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Sample records for 2-micron laser technology

  1. Fibre laser component technology for 2-micron laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, G.; Robertson, A.

    2014-05-01

    We report on recent developments in fibre laser component technology for use in 2-micron laser systems. A range of `building block' components has been built to allow novel fibre laser architectures that exploit the advantages of fibre lasers based on Thulium and Holmium active fibres. Fibre lasers operating around 2-microns are becoming widely used in an increasing number of applications, which is driving the need for components that can operate reliably at high powers and also integrate easily with other components. To that end, we have designed and built a range of fused fibre, acousto-optic and magneto-optic devices that can be readily integrated into a range of novel fibre laser systems. Research has been carried out into improving fused fibre technology for components operating at 2um wavelengths. Side-coupled feed through combiners have been developed with signal losses as low as 0.02dB and kilowatt level end-coupled pump couplers. Alongside this a range of taps, splitters and WDMs have been developed which allows for the implementation of a variety of laser architectures. Optical isolators based on new Faraday materials have been developed, providing over 30dB isolation, low insertion loss and 30W power handling in a fibre-in, fibre-out version. New cell designs and materials for Acousto-Optic devices have been researched leading to the development of fibre-coupled Acousto-Optic Modulators (AOM) and allows for the realisation of all fibre Thulium and Holmium Q-switched and pulsed fibre lasers. Novel Acousto-Optic Tunable Filters (AOTF) designs have been realised to produce narrow resolution AOTFs and zero-shift AOTFs.

  2. High Energy 2-micron Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation shows the development of 2-micron solid state lasers. The topics covered include: 1) Overview 2-micron solid state lasers; 2) Modeling and population inversion measurement; 3) Side pump oscillator; and 4) One Joule 2-m Laser.

  3. High Energy 2-Micron Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier, high energy Q-switched 2-micron laser system has been recently demonstrated. The laser and amplifiers are all designed in side-pumped rod configuration, pumped by back-cooled conductive packaged GaAlAs diode laser arrays. This 2-micron laser system provides nearly transform limited beam quality.

  4. 2 micron femtosecond fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jian; Wan, Peng; Yang, Lihmei

    2014-07-29

    Methods and systems for generating femtosecond fiber laser pulses are disclose, including generating a signal laser pulse from a seed laser oscillator; using a first amplifier stage comprising an input and an output, wherein the signal laser pulse is coupled into the input of the first stage amplifier and the output of the first amplifier stage emits an amplified and stretched signal laser pulse; using an amplifier chain comprising an input and an output, wherein the amplified and stretched signal laser pulse from the output of the first amplifier stage is coupled into the input of the amplifier chain and the output of the amplifier chain emits a further amplified, stretched signal laser pulse. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  5. Optical isolators for 2-micron fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Gary; Legg, Thomas H.; Shardlow, Peter

    2015-02-01

    We report on the development and testing of optical isolators for use in 2-micron fiber laser systems. A variety of potential Faraday rotator materials were characterised to identify the most suitable materials for use in the 1700-2100nm wavelength range. Isolators based on the three best performing materials were then developed and packaged as fiber-in, fiber-out and fiber-in, beam-out devices. The isolators were then tested in CW, pulsed and ultrafast laser systems. The three different designs produced different performance characteristics, but all designs demonstrated isolation >25dB and insertion losses of <1.2 dB.

  6. Injection Seeded/Phase-Conjugated 2-micron Laser System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros,M.; Petzar, Paul; Trieu, Bo; Lee, Hyung; Singh, U.; Leyva, V.; Shkunov, V.; Rockwell, D.; Betin, A.; Wang, J.

    2007-01-01

    For the first time, beam quality improvement of 2 micron laser using a fiber based phase conjugation mirror has been demonstrated. Single frequency operation is necessary to lower threshold. The reflectivity of PCM is approx. 50%.

  7. Advanced 2-micron Solid-state Laser for Wind and CO2 Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Significant advancements in the 2-micron laser development have been made recently. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. The world record 2-micron laser energy is demonstrated with an oscillator and two amplifiers system. It generates more than one joule per pulse energy with excellent beam quality. Based on the successful demonstration of a fully conductive cooled oscillator by using heat pipe technology, an improved fully conductively cooled 2-micron amplifier was designed, manufactured and integrated. It virtually eliminates the running coolant to increase the overall system efficiency and reliability. In addition to technology development and demonstration, a compact and engineering hardened 2-micron laser is under development. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser is expected to be integrated to a lidar system and take field measurements. The recent achievements push forward the readiness of such a laser system for space lidar applications. This paper will review the developments of the state-of-the-art solid-state 2-micron laser.

  8. A High Energy 2-microns Laser for Multiple Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.; Barnes, James C.; Barnes, Norman P.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2000-01-01

    Solid-state 2-microns laser has been receiving considerable interest because of its eye-safe property and efficient diode pump operation, It has potential for multiple lidar applications to detect water vapor. carbon dioxide and winds. In this paper, we describe a 2-microns double pulsed Ho:Tm:YLF laser and end-pumped amplifier system. A comprehensive theoretical model has been developed to aid the design and optimization of the laser performance. In a single Q-switched pulse operation the residual energy stored in the Tm atoms will be wasted. However, in a double pulses operation mode, the residual energy stored in the Tm atoms will repopulate the Ho atoms that were depleted by the extraction of the first Q-switched pulse. Thus. the Tin sensitized Ho:YLF laser provides a unique advantage in applications that require double pulse operation, such as Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). A total output energy of 146 mJ per pulse pair under Q-switch operation is achieved with as high as 4.8% optical to optical efficiency. Compared to a single pulse laser, 70% higher laser efficiency is realized. To obtain high energy while maintaining the high beam quality, a master-oscillator-power-amplifier 2-microns system is designed. We developed an end-pumped Ho:Tm:YLF disk amplifier. This amplifier uses two diode arrays as pump source. A non-imaging lens duct is used to couple the radiation from the laser diode arrays to the laser disk. Preliminary result shows that the efficiency of this laser can be as high as 3%, a factor of three increases over side-pump configuration. This high energy, highly efficient and high beam quality laser is a promising candidate for use in an efficient, multiple lidar applications.

  9. 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been recognized as one of the most important greenhouse gases. It is essential for the study of global warming to accurately measure the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and continuously record its variation. A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed in NASA Langley Research Center. This laser system is capable of making a vertical profiling of CO2 from ground and column measurement of CO2 from air and space-borne platform. The transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. A Ho:YLF laser operating in the range of 2.05 micrometers can be tuned over several characteristic lines of CO2 absorption. Experimentally, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser has been successfully used as the transmitter of coherent differential absorption lidar for the measurement of CO2 with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and pulse energy of 75 mJ. For coherent detection, high repetition rate is required for speckle averaging to obtain highly precise measurements. However, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser can not operate in high repetition rate due to the large heat loading and up-conversion. A Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF laser with low heat loading can operate in high repetition rate. A theoretical model has been established to simulate the performance of Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF lasers. For continuous wave (CW) operation, high pump intensity with small beam

  10. High Power Laser Diode Arrays for 2-Micron Solid State Coherent Lidars Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra; Sudesh, Vikas; Baker, Nathaniel

    2003-01-01

    Laser diode arrays are critical components of any diode-pumped solid state laser systems, constraining their performance and reliability. Laser diode arrays (LDAs) are used as the pump source for energizing the solid state lasing media to generate an intense coherent laser beam with a high spatial and spectral quality. The solid state laser design and the characteristics of its lasing materials define the operating wavelength, pulse duration, and power of the laser diodes. The pump requirements for high pulse energy 2-micron solid state lasers are substantially different from those of more widely used 1-micron lasers and in many aspects more challenging [1]. Furthermore, the reliability and lifetime demanded by many coherent lidar applications, such as global wind profiling from space and long-range clear air turbulence detection from aircraft, are beyond the capability of currently available LDAs. In addition to the need for more reliable LDAs with longer lifetime, further improvement in the operational parameters of high power quasi-cw LDAs, such as electrical efficiency, brightness, and duty cycle, are also necessary for developing cost-effective 2-micron coherent lidar systems for applications that impose stringent size, heat dissipation, and power constraints. Global wind sounding from space is one of such applications, which is the main driver for this work as part of NASA s Laser Risk Reduction Program. This paper discusses the current state of the 792 nm LDA technology and the technology areas being pursued toward improving their performance. The design and development of a unique characterization facility for addressing the specific issues associated with the LDAs for pumping 2-micron coherent lidar transmitters and identifying areas of technological improvement will be described. Finally, the results of measurements to date on various standard laser diode packages, as well as custom-designed packages with potentially longer lifetime, will be reported.

  11. A Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier 2-micron Laser Using Fiber Phase-conjugate Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingxin; Shkunov, V.; Rockwell, D.; Betin, A.; Wang, J.; Petros, M.; Petzar, Paul; Trieu, Bo

    2007-01-01

    For the first time, a 2-micron master-oscillator-power-amplifier laser using a fiber based phase conjugation mirror has been demonstrated. The beam quality improvement and 56% of the PCM reflectivity have been achieved.

  12. Progress on High-Energy 2-micron Solid State Laser for NASA Space-Based Wind and Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2011-01-01

    Sustained research efforts at NASA Langley Research Center during last fifteen years have resulted in significant advancement of a 2-micron diode-pumped, solid-state laser transmitter for wind and carbon dioxide measurements from ground, air and space-borne platforms. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have developed a compact, flight capable, high energy, injection seeded, 2-micron laser transmitter for ground and airborne wind and carbon dioxide measurements. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser transmitter was integrated into a mobile trailer based coherent Doppler wind and CO2 DIAL system and was deployed during field measurement campaigns. This paper will give an overview of 2-micron solid-state laser technology development and discuss results from recent ground-based field measurements.

  13. Improving Lifetime of Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping 2-Micron Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data on the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  14. Developing high energy dissipative soliton fiber lasers at 2 micron

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chongyuan; Wang, Cong; Shang, Wei; Yang, Nan; Tang, Yulong; Xu, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    While the recent discovered new mode-locking mechanism - dissipative soliton - has successfully improved the pulse energy of 1 μm and 1.5 μm fiber lasers to tens of nanojoules, it is still hard to scale the pulse energy at 2 μm due to the anomalous dispersion of the gain fiber. After analyzing the intracavity pulse dynamics, we propose that the gain fiber should be condensed to short lengths in order to generate high energy pulse at 2 μm. Numerical simulation predicts the existence of stable 2 μm dissipative soliton solutions with pulse energy over 10 nJ, comparable to that achieved in the 1 μm and 1.5 μm regimes. Experimental operation confirms the validity of the proposal. These results will advance our understanding of mode-locked fiber lasers at different wavelengths and lay an important step in achieving high energy ultrafast laser pulses from anomalous dispersion gain media. PMID:26348563

  15. Developing high energy dissipative soliton fiber lasers at 2 micron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chongyuan; Wang, Cong; Shang, Wei; Yang, Nan; Tang, Yulong; Xu, Jianqiu

    2015-09-01

    While the recent discovered new mode-locking mechanism - dissipative soliton - has successfully improved the pulse energy of 1 μm and 1.5 μm fiber lasers to tens of nanojoules, it is still hard to scale the pulse energy at 2 μm due to the anomalous dispersion of the gain fiber. After analyzing the intracavity pulse dynamics, we propose that the gain fiber should be condensed to short lengths in order to generate high energy pulse at 2 μm. Numerical simulation predicts the existence of stable 2 μm dissipative soliton solutions with pulse energy over 10 nJ, comparable to that achieved in the 1 μm and 1.5 μm regimes. Experimental operation confirms the validity of the proposal. These results will advance our understanding of mode-locked fiber lasers at different wavelengths and lay an important step in achieving high energy ultrafast laser pulses from anomalous dispersion gain media.

  16. Developing high energy dissipative soliton fiber lasers at 2 micron.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chongyuan; Wang, Cong; Shang, Wei; Yang, Nan; Tang, Yulong; Xu, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    While the recent discovered new mode-locking mechanism--dissipative soliton--has successfully improved the pulse energy of 1 μm and 1.5 μm fiber lasers to tens of nanojoules, it is still hard to scale the pulse energy at 2 μm due to the anomalous dispersion of the gain fiber. After analyzing the intracavity pulse dynamics, we propose that the gain fiber should be condensed to short lengths in order to generate high energy pulse at 2 μm. Numerical simulation predicts the existence of stable 2 μm dissipative soliton solutions with pulse energy over 10 nJ, comparable to that achieved in the 1 μm and 1.5 μm regimes. Experimental operation confirms the validity of the proposal. These results will advance our understanding of mode-locked fiber lasers at different wavelengths and lay an important step in achieving high energy ultrafast laser pulses from anomalous dispersion gain media. PMID:26348563

  17. Double-Pulsed 2-micron Laser Transmitter for Multiple Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2002-01-01

    A high energy double-pulsed Ho:Tm:YLF 2-micron laser amplifier has been demonstrated. 600 mJ per pulse pair under Q-switch operation is achieved with the gain of 4.4. This solid-state laser source can be used as lidar transmitter for multiple lidar applications such as coherent wind and carbon dioxide measurements.

  18. Single-Frequency Narrow Linewidth 2 Micron Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Shibin (Inventor); Spiegelberg, Christine (Inventor); Luo, Tao (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A compact single frequency, single-mode 2 .mu.m fiber laser with narrow linewidth, <100 kHz and preferably <100 kHz, is formed with a low phonon energy glass doped with triply ionized rare-earth thulium and/or holmium oxide and fiber gratings formed in sections of passive silica fiber and fused thereto. Formation of the gratings in passive silica fiber both facilitates splicing to other optical components and reduces noise thus improving linewidth. An increased doping concentration of 0.5 to 15 wt. % for thulium, holmium or mixtures thereof produces adequate gain, hence output power levels for fiber lengths less than 5 cm and preferably less than 3 cm to enable single-frequency operation.

  19. One-Joule-per-Pulse Q-Switched 2-micron Solid State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Modlin, Ed A.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Pual J.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2005-01-01

    Q-switched output of 1.1 J per pulse at 2-micron wavelength has been achieved in a diode pumped Ho:Tm:LuLF laser using a side-pumped rod configuration in a Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier (MOPA) architecture. This is the first time that a 2-micron laser has broken the Joule per pulse barrier for Q-switched operation. The total system efficiency reaches 5% and 6.2% for single and double pulse operation, respectively. The system produces excellent 1.4 times of transform limited beam quality.

  20. 2-Micron Diode-Pumped Pulsed Laser Transmitter for SPARCLE: A Coherent Wind Lidar Shuttle Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Barnes, Norman P.; Phillips, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    To enable a tropospheric vector wind velocity profiling from space with a pulsed Doppler lidar, a diode-pumped, room temperature Ho:Tm:YLF coherent pulsed transmitter has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This pulsed laser transmitter will be a part of coherent wind lidar shuttle mission SPARCLE. The acronym stands for SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment and is primarily a technology demonstration mission and is expected to fly in 2001 as NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP) second Earth Orbiter (EO-2) mission. The laser transmitter for SPARCLE is a Ho:Tm:YLF power oscillator operating at eye-safe wavelength of 2.05 microns. The Q-switched output energy is 125 mJ at six Hz, and it has a near-transform limited beam with a pulse width of 170 ns. The high power and high beam quality of this laser makes it well suited as a coherent wind lidar transmitter on a space platform. When the output of this power oscillator is amplified by using four diode-pumped Ho:Tm:YLF amplifiers, an output energy of 600 mJ at 10 Hz is achieved. This is the highest energy ever produced at 10 Hz, and is at least an order of magnitude greater than previously achieved for a 2-micron diode-pumped laser at room temperature.

  1. Conductive-cooled 2-micron laser development for wind and CO2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Kohei; Ishii, Shoken; Yasui, Motoaki; Itabe, Toshikazu; Sato, Atsushi; Asai, Kazuhiro; Fukuoka, Hirotake; Ishikawa, Takayoshi

    2012-11-01

    We have developing two types of 2micron conductive-cooled lasers for wind and CO2 measurements. One type of lasers is side pumped Tm,Ho:YLF laser operated at 20-40Hz. The laser rod is cooled down to -80C and laser diodes are operated at normal temperature in a vacuum container. With this type of laser, we have built up a coherent lidar system which is used to measure wind and CO2 concentration. Ho:YLF laser end-pumped by Tm:fiber laser is another type oscillator which will be operated at high repetition rate of 200-300 Hz in normal temperature. The laser will have an amplifier. These lasers are conductive-cooled, solid-state, eye-safe and suitable for space applications.

  2. Pulsed 2-micron Laser Transmitter For Carbon Dioxide Sensing From Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Bai, Y.; Petros, M.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been recognized as one of the most important greenhouse gases. It is essential for the study of global warming to accurately measure the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and continuously record its variation. Studies of the carbon cycle are limited by the tools available to precisely measure CO2 concentrations by remote sensing. Active sensing, using the Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) approach, permits measurements day and night, at all latitudes and seasons. The development of a high pulse energy 2-μm laser transmitter for high-precision CO2 measurements from space leverages years of NASA investment in solid-state laser technology. Under NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program, funded by Earth Science Technology Office, researchers at NASA Langley Research Center developed an injection seeded, high repetition rate, Q-switched Ho:YLF laser transmitter for CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar/IPDA (profile/column) measurements from ground and airborne platforms. This master-slave laser system has high optical-to-optical efficiency and seeding success rate. NASA LaRC's 2-micron pulsed laser transmitter possesses advantages over current passive and CW active sensors. First, the pulsed format provides a built-in means for determining range to the scattering target and effectively filtering out the scattering from thin clouds and aerosols, thus eliminating a source of measurement bias. Second, by concentrating the laser energy into a pulse, sufficient backscatter signal strength can be obtained from aerosol scattering rather than relying on a hard target at a known distance. Third, the absorption line at the 2.05 μm band is ideally suited for the CO2 concentration measurement. In particular, the weighting function of 2 μm is optimum for measurement in the lower troposphere where the sources and sinks of CO2 are located. The planned laser transmitter development will lead to a Tm:Fiber pumped Ho:YLF laser transmitter capable of

  3. Development of a Pulsed 2-micron Laser Transmitter for CO2 Sensing from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingxin; Petros, Mulugeta; Menzies, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), in collaboration with NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), is engaged in the development and demonstration of a highly efficient, versatile, 2-micron pulsed laser that can be used in a pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)/Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) instrument to make precise, high-resolution CO2 measurements to investigate sources, sinks, and fluxes of CO2. This laser transmitter will feature performance characteristics needed for an ASCENDS system that will be capable of delivering the CO2 measurement precision required by the Earth Science Decadal Survey (DS).

  4. High Repetition Rate Pulsed 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Uprendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo C.; Lee, Hyung

    2009-01-01

    A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. Such a laser transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of approximately 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. The measured standard deviation of the laser frequency jitter is about 3 MHz.

  5. Advances in High Energy Solid-State 2-micron Laser Transmitter Development for Ground and Airborne Wind and CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Chen, Songsheng; Kavaya, Michael J.; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul; Modlin, Edward A.; Koch, Grady; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Sustained research efforts at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) during last fifteen years have resulted in a significant advancement in 2-micron diode-pumped, solid-state laser transmitter for wind and carbon dioxide measurement from ground, air and space-borne platform. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have developed a compact, flight capable, high energy, injection seeded, 2-micron laser transmitter for ground and airborne wind and carbon dioxide measurements. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser transmitter was integrated into a mobile trailer based coherent Doppler wind and CO2 DIAL system and was deployed during field measurement campaigns. This paper will give an overview of 2-micron solid-state laser technology development and discuss results from recent ground-based field measurements.

  6. Room-Temperature, Diode-Pumped Ho:Tm:YLF Laser Amplifiers Generating 700 mJ at 2-microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams-Byrd, Julie A.; Singh, Upendra N.; Barnes, Norman P.; Lockard, George E.; Modlin, Edward A.; Yu, Jurong

    1997-01-01

    Q-switched, 400-ns pulses with output energy of 700 mJ at 2-microns, representing an optical-to-optical efficiency of 2%, was achieved from five diode-pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser amplifiers at room-temperature.

  7. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  8. Qualification Testing of Laser Diode Pump Arrays for a Space-Based 2-micron Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers being considered as the transmitter source for space-based coherent Doppler lidar require high power laser diode pump arrays operating in a long pulse regime of about 1 msec. Operating laser diode arrays over such long pulses drastically impact their useful lifetime due to the excessive localized heating and substantial pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling of their active regions. This paper describes the long pulse performance of laser diode arrays and their critical thermal characteristics. A viable approach is then offered that allows for determining the optimum operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  9. A pulsed, high repetition rate 2-micron laser transmitter for coherent CO2 DIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Bai, Y.; Petzar, P.; Petros, M.; Chen, S.; Trieu, B.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.; Singh, U. N.

    2009-12-01

    A Holmium solid-state 2-µm pulsed laser, end-pumped by a Thulium fiber laser, is being developed for coherent CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). It combines the advantages of high efficient fiber laser technology with the mature high energy solid state laser technology to produce desired energy levels at a high repetition rate. To obtain high beam quality that is required by coherent detection technique, the effect of “spatial hole burning” in the laser gain medium must be prevented. This is achieved by the use of ring cavity configuration in which the laser light is forced to travel in one direction, so that no standing waves are formed. The pump beam and laser beam are mode-matched in the laser crystals to improve the laser efficiency. At the pumping power of 13.25W, optical-to-optical efficiency of 52% was obtained with the pulse repetition rate of 1.25 kHz, which gives the energy per pulse of ~5.5mJ. The pulse energy can be scaled by increasing the pump power or by reducing the pulse repetition rate. The pulse length of this laser is at ~50ns. The wavelengths of the Ho pulse laser are tunable over several characteristic absorption lines of CO2. The exact wavelengths of the Ho pulse laser are controlled by well-controlled continuous wave (CW) seed lasers to provide the required sequential, on-and-off line wavelength pulses for DIAL applications. Three CW lasers were used to provide the accurate on-and-off wavelengths. The first CW laser is locked to the center of a characteristic CO2 absorption line through a CO2 cell by the frequency modulation technique. The frequency of the second CW laser was shifted related to the first CW laser by a few GHz to the wing of the CO2 absorption line, and used as the on-line frequency of the CO2 DIAL. This frequency shift is necessary to obtain a better weighting function for the CO2 measurement. The standard deviation of the CW on-line frequency can be controlled within 250 KHz. The third CW laser provides the off

  10. High Energy 2-Micron Solid-State Laser Transmitter for NASA's Airborne CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin

    2012-01-01

    A 2-micron pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  11. Solid-State, High Energy 2-Micron Laser Development for Space-Based Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    Lidar (light detection and ranging) remote sensing enjoys the advantages of excellent vertical and horizontal resolution; pointing capability; a signal source independent from natural light; and control and knowledge of transmitted wavelength, pulse shape, and polarization and received polarization. Lidar in space is an emerging technology now being developing to fit applications where passive sensors cannot meet current measurement requirements. Technical requirements for space lidar are more demanding than for ground-based or airborne systems. Perhaps the most distinguishing characteristics of space lidars are the environmental requirements. Space lidar systems must be specially designed to survive the mechanical vibration loads of launch and operate in the vacuum of space where exposure to ionizing radiation limits the electronic components available. Finally, space lidars must be designed to be highly reliable because they must operate without the need for repair or adjustment. Lifetime requirements tend to be important drivers of the overall system design. The maturity of the required technologies is a key to the development of any space lidar system. NASA entered a new era in the 1990 s with the approval of several space-based remote sensing missions employing laser radar (lidar) techniques. Following the steps of passive remote sensing and then active radar remote sensing, lidar sensors were a logical next step, providing independence from natural light sources, and better spatial resolution and smaller sensor size than radar sensors. The shorter electromagnetic wavelengths of laser light also allowed signal reflectance from air molecules and aerosol particles. The smaller receiver apertures allowed the concept of scanning the sensor field of view. However, technical problems with several space-based lidar missions during that decade led to concern at NASA about the risk of lidar missions. An external panel was convened to make recommendations to NASA. Their

  12. Theoretical simulation of a 2 micron airborne solid state laser anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbert, Beatrice; Cariou, Jean-Pierre

    1992-01-01

    In the near future, military aircraft will need to know precisely their true airspeed in order to optimize flight conditions. In comparison with classical anemometer probes, an airborne Doppler lidar allows measurement of the air velocity without influence from aircraft aerodynamic disturbance. While several demonstration systems of heterodyne detection using a CO2 laser have been reported, improvements in the technology of solid state lasers have recently opened up the possibility that these devices can be used as an alternative to CO2 laser systems. In particular, a diode pumped Tm:Ho:YAG laser allows a reliable compact airborne system with an eye safe wavelength (lambda = 2.09 microns) to be achieved. The theoretical study of performances of a coherent lidar using a solid state diode pumped Tm:Ho:YAG laser, caled SALSA, for measuring aircraft airspeed relative to atmospheric aerosols is described. A computer simulation was developed in order to modelize the Doppler anemometer in the function of atmospheric propagation and optical design. A clever analysis of the power budget on the detector area allows optical characteristic parameters of the system to be calculated, and then it can be used to predict performances of the Doppler system. Estimating signal to noise ratios (SNR) and heterodyne efficiency provides the available energy of speed measurement as well as a useful measurement of the alignment of the backscattered and reference fields on the detector.

  13. Fiber laser at 2 micron region using double-clad thulium/ytterbium co-doped yttria-alumino-silicate fiber Fiber laser at 2 micron region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, S. W.; Saidin, N.; Damanhuri, S. S. A.; Ahmad, H.; Halder, A.; Paul, M. C.; Das, S.; Pal, M.; Bhadra, S. K.

    2012-01-01

    A lasing action from a newly developed double-clad Tm3+/Yb3+ co-doped yttria-alumino-silicate fiber (TYDF) is demonstrated based on cladding pumping technique. The TYDF used was drawn from D-shape preform, which was fabricated using a modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process in conjunction with a solution doping technique. The Tm3+ and Yb3+ ions concentrations in this fiber are 5.55×1019 and 15.52×1019 ions/cc, respectively. The fiber laser operates at wavelength of 1948.4 and 1947.2 nm with pump power thresholds of 0.6 and 1.0 W for 915 and 940 nm pumping, respectively. The maximum output power of 10.5 mW was achieved with the 915 nm pumping at the maximum pump power of 1.5 W. It is found that the laser is more efficient with 915 nm pumping compared to 940 nm pumping.

  14. Solid-State 2-Micron Laser Transmitter Advancement for Wind and Carbon Dioxide Measurements From Ground, Airborne, and Space-Based Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Ismail, Syed

    2008-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing 2-micron lidar technologies over a decade for wind measurements, utilizing coherent Doppler wind lidar technique and carbon dioxide measurements, utilizing Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique. Significant advancements have been made towards developing state-of-the-art technologies towards laser transmitters, detectors, and receiver systems. These efforts have led to the development of solid-state lasers with high pulse energy, tunablility, wavelength-stability, and double-pulsed operation. This paper will present a review of these technological developments along with examples of high resolution wind and high precision CO2 DIAL measurements in the atmosphere. Plans for the development of compact high power lasers for applications in airborne and future space platforms for wind and regional to global scale measurement of atmospheric CO2 will also be discussed.

  15. Validar: A Testbed for Advanced 2-Micron Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Petros, Mulugeta; Barnes, Bruce W.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Yu, Jirong; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2004-01-01

    High-energy 2-microns lasers have been incorporated in a breadboard coherent Doppler lidar to test component technologies and explore applications for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Design of the lidar is presented including aspects in the laser transmitter, receiver, photodetector, and signal processing. Sample data is presented on wind profiling and CO2 concentration measurements.

  16. Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  17. Proposal to Simultaneously Profile Wind and CO2 on Earth and Mars With 2-micron Pulsed Lidar Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Ismail, Syed; Emmitt, David

    2005-01-01

    2-micron lidar technology has been in use and under continued improvement for many years toward wind measurements. But the 2-micron wavelength region is also rich in absorption lines of CO2 (and H2O to a lesser extent) that can be exploited with the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique to make species concentration measurements. A coherent detection receiver offers the possibility of making combined wind and DIAL measurements with wind derived from frequency shift of the backscatter spectrum and species concentration derived from power of the backscatter spectrum. A combined wind and CO2 measurement capability is of interest for applications on both Earth and Mars. CO2 measurements in the Earth atmosphere are of importance to studies of the global carbon cycle. Data on vertically-resolved CO2 profiles over large geographical observations areas are of particular interest that could potentially be made by deploying a lidar on an aircraft or satellite. By combining CO2 concentration with wind measurements an even more useful data product could be obtained in the calculation of CO2 flux. A challenge to lidar in this application is that CO2 concentration measurements must be made with a high level of precision and accuracy to better than 1%. The Martian atmosphere also presents wind and CO2 measurement problems that could be met with a combined DIAL/Doppler lidar. CO2 concentration in this scenario would be used to calculate atmospheric density since the Martian atmosphere is composed of 95% CO2. The lack of measurements of Mars atmospheric density in the 30-60 km range, dust storm formation and movements, and horizontal wind patterns in the 0-20 km range pose significant risks to aerocapture, and entry, descent, and landing of future robotic and human Mars missions. Systematic measurement of the Mars atmospheric density and winds will be required over several Mars years, supplemented with day-of-entry operational measurements. To date, there have been 5

  18. Recent Development of Sb-based Phototransistors in the 0.9- to 2.2-microns Wavelength Range for Applications to Laser Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. Nurul; Refaat, Tamer F.; Sulima, Oleg V.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated commercially available photodiodes and also recent developed Sb-based phototransistors in order to compare their performances for applications to laser remote sensing. A custom-designed phototransistor in the 0.9- to 2.2-microns wavelength range has been developed at AstroPower and characterized at NASA Langley's Detector Characterization Laboratory. The phototransistor's performance greatly exceeds the previously reported results at this wavelength range in the literature. The detector testing included spectral response, dark current and noise measurements. Spectral response measurements were carried out to determine the responsivity at 2-microns wavelength at different bias voltages with fixed temperature; and different temperatures with fixed bias voltage. Current versus voltage characteristics were also recorded at different temperatures. Results show high responsivity of 2650 A/W corresponding to an internal gain of three orders of magnitude, and high detectivity (D*) of 3.9x10(exp 11) cm.Hz(exp 1/2)/W that is equivalent to a noise-equivalent-power of 4.6x10(exp -14) W/Hz(exp 1/2) (-4.0 V @ -20 C) with a light collecting area diameter of 200-microns. It appears that this recently developed 2-micron phototransistor's performances such as responsivity, detectivity, and gain are improved significantly as compared to the previously published APD and SAM APD using similar materials. These detectors are considered as phototransistors based-on their structures and performance characteristics and may have great potential for high sensitivity differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor at 2.05-microns and 1.9-microns, respectively.

  19. Development of 2-micron nonlinear frequency conversion laser system and tissue interaction monitoring using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongkyun; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang; Kim, Dae Yu

    2016-03-01

    We report on development of optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based mid-infrared laser system, which utilizes periodically poled nonlinear crystal that was pumped by near-infrared (NIR) laser. We have obtained 8 W of mid-infrared average output at the injection current of 20A from a quasi-phase-matched OPO using external cavity configuration. The laser tissue ablation efficiency was investigated which is substantially affected by several parameters such as, optical fluence rate, wavelength of the laser source and the optical properties of target tissue. Wavelength and radiant exposure dependent tissue ablation dimension were quantified by using SD-OCT (spectral domain optical coherence tomography) and the ablation efficiency was compared to that of non-converted NIR- laser system.

  20. Laterally Coupled Distributed-Feedback GaSb-Based Diode Lasers for Atmospheric Gas Detection at 2 Microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Ksendzov, Alexander; Franz, Kale J.; Bagheri, Mahmood; Forouhar, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate single-mode laterally coupled distributed-feedback diode lasers at 2.05 microns employing low-loss etched gratings. Single-facet CW output exceeds 50 mW near room temperature with linewidth below 1 MHz over 10-ms observation times

  1. Watt-level supercontinuum generation in As2Se3 fibers pumped by a 2-micron random fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yulong; Li, Feng; Xu, Jianqiu

    2016-05-01

    Chalcogenide fibers are good candidates for generating supercontinuum (SC) radiation due to their large nonlinear refractive indices and high mid-infrared transmission, but their low damage thresholds hamper the SC power scaling, thereby limiting the ultimately achieved SC brightness. Here, we report an As2Se3 fiber SC system pumped by a novel random Q-switched 2 μm Tm3+ fiber laser. The maximum SC output power is 1.09 W with slope efficiency of 24%, and the SC spans from ~1980 to ~2500 nm with a spectral width of ~500 nm at the  -20 dB points. The spectral power density is ~2 mW nm-1. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest power and spectral density SC emission ever achieved in chalcogenide fibers.

  2. 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar Instrument Advancements for Tropospheric Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Kavaya, M. J.; Koch, G.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge derived from global tropospheric wind measurement is an important constituent of our overall understanding of climate behavior [1]. Accurate weather prediction saves lives and protects properties from destructions. High-energy 2-micron laser is the transmitter of choice for coherent Doppler wind detection. In addition to the eye-safety, the wavelength of the transmitter suitably matches the aerosol size in the lower troposphere. Although the technology of the 2-micron laser has been maturing steadily, lidar derived wind data is still a void in the global weather database. In the last decade, researchers at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have been engaged in this endeavor, contributing to the scientific database of 2-micron lidar transmitters. As part of this effort, an in depth analysis of the physics involved in the workings of the Ho: Tm laser systems have been published. In the last few years, we have demonstrated lidar transmitter with over1Joule output energy. In addition, a large body of work has been done in characterizing new laser materials and unique crystal configurations to enhance the efficiency and output energy of the 2-micron laser systems. At present 2-micron lidar systems are measuring wind from both ground and airborne platforms. This paper will provide an overview of the advancements made in recent years and the technology maturity levels attained.

  3. 2-Micron Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2014-01-01

    A 2-micron high energy, pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. Development of this lidar heavily leverages the 2-micron laser technologies developed in LaRC over the last decade. The high pulse energy, direct detection lidar operating at CO2 2-micron absorption band provides an alternate approach to measure CO2 concentrations. This new 2-micron pulsed IPDA lidar has been flown in spring of this year for total ten flights with 27 flight hours. It is able to make measurements of the total amount of atmospheric CO2 from the aircraft to the ground or cloud. It is expected to provide high-precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  4. 2-micron Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Singh, U.; Petros, M.

    2012-12-01

    A 2-micron high energy, pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar is being developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. Development of this lidar heavily leverages the 2-micron laser technologies developed in LaRC over the last decade. The high pulse energy, direct detection lidar operating at CO2 2-micron absorption band provides an alternate approach to measure CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. It is expected to provide high-precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. Our objective is to integrate an existing high energy double-pulsed 2-micron laser transmitter with a direct detection receiver and telescope to enable an airborne capability to perform a first proof of principle demonstration of airborne direct detection CO2 measurements. The 2-micron transmitter provides 100mJ at 10Hz with double pulse format specifically designed for DIAL/IPDA instrument. The compact, rugged, highly reliable transceiver is based on unique Ho:Tm:YLF high-energy 2-micron pulsed laser technology. All the optical mounts are custom designed and have space heritage. A 16-inch diameter telescope has been designed and being manufactured for the direct detection lidar. The detector is an InGaAs Positive-Intrinsic-Negative (PIN) photodiode manufactured by Hamamatsu Corporation. The performance of the detector is characterized at various operating temperatures and bias voltages for spectral response, NEP, response time, dynamic range, and linearity. A collinear lidar structure is designed to be integrated to NASA UC12 or B200 research aircrafts. This paper will describe the design of the airborne 2-micron pulsed IPDA lidar system; the lidar operation parameters; the wavelength pair selection; laser transmitter energy, pulse rate, beam divergence, double pulse generation and accurate frequency control; detector characterization; telescope design; lidar structure design

  5. Evaluation of Manganese Doped Ca5(PO4)3F as a Near Infrared (1-2 microns) Solid-State Laser Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Matthew; Hoemmerich, Uwe; Loutts, George B.

    1998-01-01

    Tunable solid-state lasers are of enormous interest for applications including fundamental spectroscopy, remote sensing of the earth atmosphere, medical surgery, and optical communications. Efficient and widely tunable lasers have been developed for the 800-1100 nm region based on transition metal doped insulators like e.g. Ti:Sapphire. The development of transition metal lasers operating at longer wavelength, however, has been limited by the luminescence efficiency of existing materials. We are currently evaluating Mn doped Ca5(PO4)3F as a new solid-state laser material for the 1-2 micro-m region. Preliminary spectroscopic studies revealed that Mn:Ca5(PO4)3F exhibits an intense near infrared luminescence which extends from 1100-1300 nm. Based on lifetime measurements we estimated the luminescence quantum efficiency to be as high as 90 deg./0 at room temperature. The near infrared luminescence properties of Mn doped Ca5(PO4)3F and its potential for solid-state laser applications will be discussed in detail.

  6. Laser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Amoco Laser Company, a subsidiary of Amoco Corporation, has developed microlasers for the commercial market based on a JPL concept for optical communications over interplanetary distances. Lasers emit narrow, intense beams of light or other radiation. The beams transmit communication signals, drill, cut or melt materials or remove diseased body tissue. The microlasers cover a broad portion of the spectrum, and performance is improved significantly. Current applications include medical instrumentation, color separation equipment, telecommunications, etc.

  7. Supercontinuum generation from a multi-ring holes tellurite microstructured fiber pumped by a 2 micron high power mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dinghuan; Gao, Weiqing; Liao, Meisong; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2013-03-01

    Supercontinuum (SC) generation from a highly nonlinear tellurite microstructured fiber with multi-ring holes was demonstrated by pumping with a 2 μm high power mode-locked fiber laser. The chromatic dispersion of the fiber was measured with a homemade white-light spectral interferometer on a wide wavelength range and matched very well with the theoretical calculation. The zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of the fiber was measured to be 1358 nm and calculated to be 1390 nm. Although the pumped wavelength was far away from ZDW, with flat dispersion profile of the fiber on the anomalous dispersion, the SC could be expanded from 650 nm to 2850 nm with launched pulse energy of several hundred picojoules. Simulations of SC generation were performed and showed fair agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Two Micron Laser Technology Advancements at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    An Independent Laser Review Panel set up to examine NASA s space-based lidar missions and the technology readiness of lasers appropriate for space-based lidars indicated a critical need for an integrated research and development strategy to move laser transmitter technology from low technical readiness levels to the higher levels required for space missions. Based on the review, a multiyear Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) was initiated by NASA in 2002 to develop technologies that ensure the successful development of the broad range of lidar missions envisioned by NASA. This presentation will provide an overview of the development of pulsed 2-micron solid-state laser technologies at NASA Langley Research Center for enabling space-based measurement of wind and carbon dioxide.

  9. Compact, High Energy 2-micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development for NASA's Future 3-D Winds Measurement from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Beyon, Jeffrey; Kavaya, Michael J.; Trieu, Bo; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, paul; Modlin, Edward A.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Demoz, Belay B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of 2-micron laser transmitter development at NASA Langley Research Center for coherent-detection lidar profiling of winds. The novel high-energy, 2-micron, Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser technology developed at NASA Langley was employed to study laser technology currently envisioned by NASA for future global coherent Doppler lidar winds measurement. The 250 mJ, 10 Hz laser was designed as an integral part of a compact lidar transceiver developed for future aircraft flight. Ground-based wind profiles made with this transceiver will be presented. NASA Langley is currently funded to build complete Doppler lidar systems using this transceiver for the DC-8 aircraft in autonomous operation. Recently, LaRC 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar system was selected to contribute to the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Earth Science Division (ESD) hurricane field experiment in 2010 titled Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP). The Doppler lidar system will measure vertical profiles of horizontal vector winds from the DC-8 aircraft using NASA Langley s existing 2-micron, pulsed, coherent detection, Doppler wind lidar system that is ready for DC-8 integration. The measurements will typically extend from the DC-8 to the earth s surface. They will be highly accurate in both wind magnitude and direction. Displays of the data will be provided in real time on the DC-8. The pulsed Doppler wind lidar of NASA Langley Research Center is much more powerful than past Doppler lidars. The operating range, accuracy, range resolution, and time resolution will be unprecedented. We expect the data to play a key role, combined with the other sensors, in improving understanding and predictive algorithms for hurricane strength and track. 1

  10. Tm-doped silicate glass fibre lasers: the foundation technology for high-power mid-infrared light generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, S. D.

    2011-02-01

    The Tm-doped silicate glass fibre laser that operates in the 2 micron region of the spectrum is fast becoming a mature technology with output powers already exceeding 1 kW. In this paper, I will review a number of current and future experiments that involve lasers pumped with the output from Tm-doped silicate glass fibre lasers including linear systems e.g., the optical excitation of rare earth ions and nonlinear systems e.g., Raman fibre lasers.

  11. Long-duration Operation of 2-micron Coherent Doppler Lidar in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Baggot, Rene P.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2005-01-01

    The reliability and lifetime of laser remote sensing systems that can operate autonomously over a sufficiently long period are mainly constrained by the laser diode arrays (LDAs) used for pumping their laser transmitters. The lifetime of a 2-micron coherent lidar operating in space is particularly of concern in lieu of required pump pulse duration of Thulium and Holmium solid state lasers (approx. 1msec) that are considerably longer than those of more widely used 1-micron lasers (< 0.2 msec). A factor of 5 to 10 times longer pulse duration can easily translate to over an order of magnitude shorter lifetime for a typical commercially available high-power 2-D array. Therefore, it is imperative to address the lifetime and reliability of LDAs for pumping 2-micron lasers by exploring all the potential options that significantly prolong their life meeting the required operational lifetime of space-based coherent Doppler lidars. The leading causes of sudden failure and premature degradation of LDAs are intrinsic semiconductor defects, optical facet breakdown resulting from excessive localized heating, and thermo-mechanical stresses due to the extreme thermal cycling of the laser active regions1-2. Long pulse operation grossly amplifies the impact of these failure/degradation causes, particularly the thermo-mechanical stresses due to pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling. Therefore, several experimental setups have been developed to investigate each of the failure mechanisms and causes of premature degradation in order to evaluate various package designs, define the best operating parameters, and to guide the technology advancement, leading to highly reliable and very long lifetime LDAs5. Several areas of improvement in the packaging and fabrication process of laser diodes have already been identified and efforts towards implementing these improvements are well underway. These efforts include the use of advanced high thermal conductivity materials for packaging of laser diode

  12. Laser technologies in biophotonics

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkatov, A N; Priezzhev, A V; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2012-05-31

    This and the following issues of Quantum Electronics comprise articles reflecting the state of the art of laser technologies both currently applied and promising for application in biomedical research. Rapid development of biophotonics that we witness nowadays is due to a number of factors. These include the new results in basic studies of the interaction of laser radiation with biological tissues and cells, essential progress in the field of development of means for delivery, detection and imaging of optical radiation, and implementation of novel computer- and nanotechnologies.

  13. Roles of the 2 microns gene products in stable maintenance of the 2 microns plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, A E; Murray, A W; Szostak, J W

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the replication and segregation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 2 microns circle. The amplification of the plasmid at low copy numbers requires site-specific recombination between the 2 microns inverted repeat sequences catalyzed by the plasmid-encoded FLP gene. No other 2 microns gene products are required. The overexpression of FLP in a strain carrying endogenous 2 microns leads to uncontrolled plasmid replication, longer cell cycles, and cell death. Two different assays show that the level of Flp activity decreases with increasing 2 microns copy number. This regulation requires the products of the REP1 and REP2 genes. These gene products also act together to ensure that 2 microns molecules are randomly segregated between mother and daughter cells at cell division. Images PMID:3316982

  14. Coherent Doppler Laser Radar: Technology Development and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating, developing, and applying coherent Doppler laser radar technology for over 30 years. These efforts have included the first wind measurement in 1967, the first airborne flights in 1972, the first airborne wind field mapping in 1981, and the first measurement of hurricane eyewall winds in 1998. A parallel effort at MSFC since 1982 has been the study, modeling and technology development for a space-based global wind measurement system. These endeavors to date have resulted in compact, robust, eyesafe lidars at 2 micron wavelength based on solid-state laser technology; in a factor of 6 volume reduction in near diffraction limited, space-qualifiable telescopes; in sophisticated airborne scanners with full platform motion subtraction; in local oscillator lasers capable of rapid tuning of 25 GHz for removal of relative laser radar to target velocities over a 25 km/s range; in performance prediction theory and simulations that have been validated experimentally; and in extensive field campaign experience. We have also begun efforts to dramatically improve the fundamental photon efficiency of the laser radar, to demonstrate advanced lower mass laser radar telescopes and scanners; to develop laser and laser radar system alignment maintenance technologies; and to greatly improve the electrical efficiency, cooling technique, and robustness of the pulsed laser. This coherent Doppler laser radar technology is suitable for high resolution, high accuracy wind mapping; for aerosol and cloud measurement; for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric and trace gases; for hard target range and velocity measurement; and for hard target vibration spectra measurement. It is also suitable for a number of aircraft operations applications such as clear air turbulence (CAT) detection; dangerous wind shear (microburst) detection; airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip measurement; and fuel savings through

  15. Laser peening of metals- enabling laser technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; Daly, J.; Harrisson, J.

    1997-11-13

    Laser peening, a surface treatment for metals, employs laser induced shocks to create deep and intense residual stresses in critical components. In many applications this technology is proving to be superior to conventional treatments such as shot peening. The laser peening process has generated sufficiently impressive results to move it from a laboratory demonstration phase into a significant industrial process. However until now this evolution has been slowed because a laser system meeting the average power requirements for a high throughput process has been lacking.

  16. Compact, Engineered, 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Prototype: A New NASA Instrument Incubator Program Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Wang, Jinxue; Petros, Mulugeta

    2005-01-01

    A new project, selected in 2005 by NASA s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) under the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), will be described. The 3-year effort is intended to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a packaged, rugged, compact, space-qualifiable coherent Doppler wind lidar (DWL) transceiver capable of future validation in an aircraft and/or Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The packaged DWL will utilize the numerous advances in pulsed, solid-state, 2-micron laser technology at NASA s Langley Research Center (LaRC) in such areas as crystal composition, architecture, efficiency, cooling techniques, pulse energy, and beam quality. The extensive experience of Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (RSAS) in coherent lidar systems, in spacebased sensors, and in packaging rugged lidar systems will be applied to this project. The packaged transceiver will be as close to an envisioned space-based DWL system as the resources and technology readiness allow. We will attempt to facilitate a future upgrade to a coherent lidar system capable of simultaneous wind and CO2 concentration profile measurements. Since aerosol and dust concentration is also available from the lidar signal, the potential for a triple measurement lidar system is attractive for both Earth and Mars remote sensing. A key follow on step after the IIP will be to add a telescope, scanner, and software for aircraft validation. This IIP should also put us in a position to begin a parallel formulation study in the 2006-2007 timeframe for a space-based DWL demonstration mission early next decade.

  17. Progress of 2-micron Detectors for Application to Lidar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Ismail, Syed; Koch, Grady; Singh, Upendra N.

    2008-01-01

    AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb heterojunction phototransistors were developed at Astropower, Inc under Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) for operation in the 2-micron region. These phototransistors were optimized for 2-micron detection and have high quantum efficiency (>60%), high gain (>10(exp 3)) and low noise-equivalent- power (<5x10(exp -14) W/Hz), while operating at low bias voltage. One of these phototransistors was tested in lidar mode using the 2-micron CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system currently under development under the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) at NASA Langley. Lidar measurements included detecting atmospheric structures consisting of thin clouds in the mid-altitude and near-field boundary layer. These test results are very promising for the application of phototransistors for the two-micron lidar remote sensing. In addition, HgCdTe avalanche photodiodes (APD) acquired from Raytheon were used in atmospheric testing at 2-microns. A discussion of these measurements is also presented in this paper.

  18. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  19. Laser technologies in ophthalmic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atezhev, V. V.; Barchunov, B. V.; Vartapetov, S. K.; Zav’yalov, A. S.; Lapshin, K. E.; Movshev, V. G.; Shcherbakov, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Excimer and femtosecond lasers are widely used in ophthalmology to correct refraction. Laser systems for vision correction are based on versatile technical solutions and include multiple hard- and software components. Laser characteristics, properties of laser beam delivery system, algorithms for cornea treatment, and methods of pre-surgical diagnostics determine the surgical outcome. Here we describe the scientific and technological basis for laser systems for refractive surgery developed at the Physics Instrumentation Center (PIC) at the Prokhorov General Physics Institute (GPI), Russian Academy of Sciences.

  20. Discovery of new 2 micron sources in Rho Ophiuchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsony, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Burton, Michael G.; Russell, A. P. G.; Garden, R.

    1989-01-01

    A 144-sq-arcmin region of the Rho Oph star-forming cloud core was surveyed at 2.2 microns, complete to mK = 14. A total of 61 sources are detected, 26 of which have been previously reported, accounting for a total of 35 new sources with mK = 12-14. There is no turnover in the 2-micron luminosity function of the Rho Oph cloud core to a limiting sensitivity of mK = 14. Two of the newly discovered sources are binary companions to previously cataloged objects.

  1. Advances in femtosecond laser technology

    PubMed Central

    Callou, Thais Pinheiro; Garcia, Renato; Mukai, Adriana; Giacomin, Natalia T; de Souza, Rodrigo Guimarães; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond laser technology has become widely adopted by ophthalmic surgeons. The purpose of this study is to discuss applications and advantages of femtosecond lasers over traditional manual techniques, and related unique complications in cataract surgery and corneal refractive surgical procedures, including: LASIK flap creation, intracorneal ring segment implantation, presbyopic treatments, keratoplasty, astigmatic keratotomy, and intrastromal lenticule procedures. PMID:27143847

  2. Advances in femtosecond laser technology.

    PubMed

    Callou, Thais Pinheiro; Garcia, Renato; Mukai, Adriana; Giacomin, Natalia T; de Souza, Rodrigo Guimarães; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond laser technology has become widely adopted by ophthalmic surgeons. The purpose of this study is to discuss applications and advantages of femtosecond lasers over traditional manual techniques, and related unique complications in cataract surgery and corneal refractive surgical procedures, including: LASIK flap creation, intracorneal ring segment implantation, presbyopic treatments, keratoplasty, astigmatic keratotomy, and intrastromal lenticule procedures. PMID:27143847

  3. NASA Space Laser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Over the next two decades, the number of space based laser missions for mapping, spectroscopy, remote sensing and other scientific investigations will increase several fold. The demand for high wall-plug efficiency, low noise, narrow linewidth laser systems to meet different systems requirements that can reliably operate over the life of a mission will be high. The general trends will be for spatial quality very close to the diffraction limit, improved spectral performance, increased wall-plug efficiency and multi-beam processing. Improved spectral performance will include narrower spectral width (very near the transform limit), increased wavelength stability and or tuning (depending on application) and lasers reaching a wider range of wavelengths stretching into the mid-infrared and the near ultraviolet. We are actively developing high efficiency laser transmitter and high-sensitivity laser receiver systems that are suitable for spaceborne applications.

  4. Laser dye technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, P R

    1999-09-01

    The author has worked with laser dyes for a number of years. A first interest was in the Navy blue-green program where a flashlamp pumped dye laser was used as an underwater communication and detection device. It made use of the optical window of sea-water--blue for deep ocean, green for coastal water. A major activity however has been with the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The aim here has been enriching isotopes for the nuclear fuel cycle. The tunability of the dye laser is utilized to selectively excite one isotope in uranium vapor, and this isotope is collected electrostatically as shown in Figure 1. The interests in the AVLIS program have been in the near ultra-violet, violet, red and deep-red.

  5. Compact, Engineered 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Prototype for Field and Airborne Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Koch, Grady J.

    2006-01-01

    The state-of-the-art 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar breadboard at NASA/LaRC will be engineered and compactly packaged consistent with future aircraft flights. The packaged transceiver will be integrated into a coherent Doppler wind lidar system test bed at LaRC. Atmospheric wind measurements will be made to validate the packaged technology. This will greatly advance the coherent part of the hybrid Doppler wind lidar solution to the need for global tropospheric wind measurements.

  6. Development of a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurement by Direct Detection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Singh, U. N.; Petros, M.; Bai, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center are developing a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar instrument for ground and airborne measurements via direct detection method. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capbility by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. A key component of the CO2 DIAL system, transceiver, is an existing, airborne ready, robust hardware which can provide 250mJ at 10Hz with double pulse format specifically designed for DIAL instrument. The exact wavelengths of the transceiver are controlled by well defined CW seed laser source to provide the required injection source for generating on-and-off line wavelength pulses sequentially. The compact, rugged, highly reliable transceiver is based on the unique Ho:Tm:YLF high-energy 2-micron pulsed laser technology. All the optical mounts are custom designed and have space heritage. They are designed to be adjustable and lockable and hardened to withstand vibrations that can occur in airborne operation. For the direct detection lidar application, a large primary mirror size is preferred. A 14 inch diameter telescope will be developed for this program. The CO2 DIAL/IPDA system requires many electronic functions to operate. These include diode, RF, seed laser, and PZT drivers; injection seeding detection and control; detector power supplies; and analog inputs to sample various sensors. Under NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP), a control unit Compact Laser Electronics (CLE), is developed for the controlling the coherent wind lidar transceiver. Significant modifications and additions are needed to update it for CO2 lidar controls. The data acquisition system was built for ground CO2 measurement demonstration. The software will be updated for

  7. Tm,Ho:YAG laser with tunable range of 2.08-2.12 microns and its applications to spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asai, Kazuhiro; Itabe, Toshikazu

    1992-01-01

    In recent advanced lasers, 2 micron solid-state lasers such as Tm:YAG and Ho:YAG lasers are very attractive for laser radar remote sensing technologies because of eye safety, realizations of all solid-state laser pumped by diode laser and smaller dimension, tunability of lasing wavelength, possibility of coherent detection, etc. Featuring these advantages, 2 micron lasers have been candidated as laser transmitters for use in water vapor Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL), laser altimeter, Doppler wind sensor, Mie lidar, etc. Characterization of a tunable Cr, Tm, Ho:YAG laser and its applications to spectroscopy concerning absorption and reflectance are reported.

  8. Wavelength Locking to CO2 Absorption Line-Center for 2-Micron Pulsed IPDA Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Antill, Charles W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    An airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). This IPDA lidar system targets both atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) column measurements. Independent wavelength control of each of the transmitted laser pulses is a key feature for the success of this instrument. The wavelength control unit provides switching, tuning and locking for each pulse in reference to a 2-micron CW (Continuous Wave) laser source locked to CO2 line-center. Targeting the CO2 R30 line center, at 2050.967 nanometers, a wavelength locking unit has been integrated using semiconductor laser diode. The CO2 center-line locking unit includes a laser diode current driver, temperature controller, center-line locking controller and CO2 absorption cell. This paper presents the CO2 center-line locking unit architecture, characterization procedure and results. Assessment of wavelength jitter on the IPDA measurement error will also be addressed by comparison to the system design.

  9. Laser technology in automotive lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altingöz, Ceren

    2014-03-01

    The last few years have seen something of a revolution in automotive lighting facilitated by a range of new photonics advances. The lighting industry as a whole is moving rapidly from the incandescent and gas discharge based technologies that dominated the 20th century to solid state technology in the form of Light Emitting Diodes (LED) which are a point source light, Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLED) which are an area source light and at the edge the increasing use of lasers with different functional applications. In this paper I will focus on this edge technology of lasers as they are still trying to find their right place in automotive lighting. To better analyze their potential, the working principle of a laser will be explained, laser types used in automotive lighting, their application methods, advantages and disadvantages of their usage will be declared, application examples from the current trials of some leading automotive industry research groups will be given and finalization will be with an overall view of the possible future laser applications in the field of automotive lighting.

  10. Laser remanufacturing technology and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shiyun; Xu, Binshi; Wang, Zhijian; Ma, Yunzhe; Liu, Weihong

    2008-03-01

    Remanufacture engineering, which has become an important way to sustainable society progress, and its recent development were introduced. Laser remanufacturing technology utilizes high energy density laser beam to remanufacture the worn or failed components. As laser processing is important and advanced technology for remanufacturing, laser remanufacturing was introduced on connotation, characteristics and technical sorts. Research and application status of laser remanufacturing was reviewed, and two laser remanufacturing examples were described to show that laser remanufacturing can solve the difficult problems in equipment maintenance and remanufacturing. It pointed out that the main problems of laser remanufacturing technology for further developing lies in high power laser system, laser remanufacturing technique or processing, supports from government and enterprises. It stated out the developing trends of laser remanufacturing technology, and showed that laser remanufacturing can bring great economic and social benefits.

  11. Economic technology of laser cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedin, Alexander V.; Shilov, Igor V.; Vassiliev, Vladimir V.; Malov, Dmitri V.; Peskov, Vladimir N.

    2000-02-01

    The laser cutting of color metals and alloys by a thickness more than 2 mm has significant difficulties due to high reflective ability and large thermal conduction. We made it possible to raise energy efficiency and quality of laser cutting by using a laser processing system (LPS) consisting both of the YAG:Nd laser with passive Q-switching on base of LiF:F2- crystals and the CO2 laser. A distinctive feature of the LPS is that the radiation of different lasers incorporated in a coaxial beam has simultaneously high level of peak power (more than 400 kW in a TEM00 mode) and significant level of average power (up to 800 W in a TEM01 mode of the CO2 laser). The application of combined radiation for cutting of an aluminum alloy of D16 type made it possible to decrease the cutting energy threshold in 1.7 times, to increase depth of treatment from 2 up to 4 mm, and velocity from 0.015 up to 0.7 m/min, and also to eliminate application of absorptive coatings. At cutting of steels the velocity of treatment was doubled, and also an oxygen flow was eliminated from the technological process and replaced by the air. The obtained raise of energy efficiency and quality of cutting is explained by an essential size reducing of a formed penetration channel and by the shifting of a thermal cutting mode from melting to evaporation. The evaluation of interaction efficiency of a combined radiation was produced on the basis of non-stationary thermal-hydrodynamic model of a heating source moving as in the cutting direction, and also into the depth of material.

  12. Wind Profiling from a High Energy, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection Doppler Lidar during Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, U. N.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.; Yu, J.; Beyon, J. Y.; Demoz, B.

    2009-12-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. The transmitter portion of the transceiver employs the high-pulse-energy, Ho:Tm:LuLiF, partially conductively cooled laser technology developed at NASA Langley. The transceiver is capable of 250 mJ pulses at 10 Hz. It is very similar to the technology envisioned for coherent Doppler lidar wind measurements from Earth and Mars orbit. The transceiver is coupled to the large optics and data acquisition system in the NASA Langley VALIDAR mobile trailer. The large optics consists of a 15-cm off-axis beam expanding telescope, and a full-hemispheric scanner. Vertical and horizontal vector winds are measured, as well as relative backscatter. The data acquisition system employs frequency domain velocity estimation and pulse accumulation. It permits real-time display of the processed winds and archival of all data. The LaRC mobile lidar was deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Maryland as part of NASA HQ funded (ROSES-2007, Wind Lidar Science Proposal entitled “Intercomparison of Multiple Lidars for Wind Measurements). During the campaign, testing of the lidar was combined with a field campaign to operate a 2-μm coherent lidar alongside a 355-nm direct detection lidar to demonstrate the hybrid wind lidar concept. Besides lidar, many other meteorological sensors were located at the campaign site, including wind measuring balloon sondes, sonic and propeller anemometers mounted on a tower, and a 915-MHz radio acoustic sounding system. Comparisons among these wind measurement sensors are currently being analyzed and should be available for presentation at the Conference.

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT LASER TOUCH AND TECHNOLOGIES, LLC LASER TOUCH MODEL LT-B512

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of Laser Touch model LT-B512 targeting device manufactured by Laser Touch and Technologies, LLC, for manual spray painting operations. The relative transfer efficiency (TE) improved an avera...

  14. Mars Atmospheric Characterization Using Advanced 2-Micron Orbiting Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, U.; Engelund, W.; Refaat, T.; Kavaya, M.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.

    2015-01-01

    Mars atmospheric characterization is critical for exploring the planet. Future Mars missions require landing massive payloads to the surface with high accuracy. The accuracy of entry, descent and landing (EDL) of a payload is a major technical challenge for future Mars missions. Mars EDL depends on atmospheric conditions such as density, wind and dust as well as surface topography. A Mars orbiting 2-micron lidar system is presented in this paper. This advanced lidar is capable of measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles using the most abundant atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on Mars. In addition Martian winds and surface altimetry can be mapped, independent of background radiation or geographical location. This orbiting lidar is a valuable tool for developing EDL models for future Mars missions.

  15. Photometric variability of Charon at 2.2 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosh, A. S.; Young, L. A.; Elliot, J. L.; Hammel, H. B.; Baron, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    Pluto-Charon images obtained on each of four nights at 2.2, 1.2, and 1.7 microns are presently fitted by a two-source image model in which the position of Charon and the ratio of its signal to that of Pluto are free parameters. At 2.2 microns, Charon is fainter than Pluto by magnitudes which, when combined with Pluto-Charon system photometry, yield apparent magnitudes of 15.01 + or - 0.08 for Charon at 0.06 lightcurve phase and 15.46 + or - 0.05 at lightcurve phase 0.42. In view of these results, Charon is variable in this filter bypass due to geometric albedo changes as a function of longitude.

  16. Infrared spectrum of Io, 2.8-5.2 microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    1980-02-01

    The reflectance spectrum of Io is presented from 2.8 to 5.2 microns demonstrating the full extent of the broad and deep spectral absorption between 3.5 and 4.8 microns. Laboratory spectra of nitrates and carbonates diluted with sulfur do not satisfactorily reproduce the Io spectrum, but new information based on recently discovered volcanic activity on the satellite lead to consideration of other classes of compounds reported by Fanale et al. (1979). It is concluded that the variability of the supply of condensible SO2 gas to the surface of Io, its removal by sublimination, and the temporal variations in the strength of the SO2 band may provide an index of volcanic activity on Io that can be monitored from the earth.

  17. The 2 micron plasmid purloins the yeast cohesin complex

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Shwetal; Yang, Xian Mei; Chan, Clarence S.; Dobson, Melanie J.; Jayaram, Makkuni; Velmurugan, Soundarapandian

    2002-01-01

    The yeast 2 micron plasmid achieves high fidelity segregation by coupling its partitioning pathway to that of the chromosomes. Mutations affecting distinct steps of chromosome segregation cause the plasmid to missegregate in tandem with the chromosomes. In the absence of the plasmid stability system, consisting of the Rep1 and Rep2 proteins and the STB DNA, plasmid and chromosome segregations are uncoupled. The Rep proteins, acting in concert, recruit the yeast cohesin complex to the STB locus. The periodicity of cohesin association and dissociation is nearly identical for the plasmid and the chromosomes. The timely disassembly of cohesin is a prerequisite for plasmid segregation. Cohesin-mediated pairing and unpairing likely provides a counting mechanism for evenly partitioning plasmids either in association with or independently of the chromosomes. PMID:12177044

  18. Hydrogenation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as a factor affecting the cosmic 6.2 micron emission band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, L. W.; Wdowiak, T. J.; Harrison, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    While many of the characteristics of the cosmic unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands observed for interstellar and circumstellar sources within the Milky Way and other galaxies, can be best attributed to vibrational modes of the variants of the molecular family known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), there are open questions that need to be resolved. Among them is the observed strength of the 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) band relative to other strong bands, and the generally low strength for measurements in the laboratory of the 1600 cm(-1) skeletal vibration band of many specific neutral PAH molecules. Also, experiments involving laser excitation of some gas phase neutral PAH species while producing long lifetime state emission in the 3.3 micron (3000 cm(-1)) spectral region, do not result in significant 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) emission. A potentially important variant of the neutral PAH species, namely hydrogenated-PAH (H(N)-PAH) which exhibit intriguing spectral correlation with interstellar and circumstellar infrared emission and the 2175 A extinction feature, may be a factor affecting the strength of 6.2 micron emission. These species are hybrids of aromatic and cycloalkane structures. Laboratory infrared absorption spectroscopy augmented by density function theory (DFT) computations of selected partially hydrogenated-PAH molecules, demonstrates enhanced 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) region skeletal vibration mode strength for these molecules relative to the normal PAH form. This along with other factors such as ionization or the incorporation of nitrogen or oxygen atoms could be a reason for the strength of the cosmic 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) feature.

  19. Laser science and technology update - 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H L; Powell, H T

    1999-09-23

    The Laser Science and Technology (LS and T) Program's mission is to provide advanced solid-state laser and optics technologies for the Laboratory, government, and industry. The primary activities of LS and T in 1998 have been threefold--to complete the laser technology development and laser component testing for the ICF/NIF Program, to develop advanced solid-state laser systems and optical components for the Department of Defense (DoD) and DOE, and to address the needs of other government agencies and U.S. industry. After a four-year campaign, the LS and T Program achieved timely completion of the laser development effort for the NIF in 1998. This effort includes the special laser and component development, integrated performance testing on Beamlet, and detailed design and cost optimization using computation codes. Upon completing the Title II design review, the focus of the LS and T support effort has been shifted toward NIF laser hardware acquisition and deployment. The LS and T team also continued to develop advanced high-power solid-state laser technology for both the U.S. government and industrial partners. Progress was also made in several new areas: (a) diode-pumped solid-state laser drivers for high-energy-density physics and inertial fusion energy; (b) high-average-power femtosecond and nanosecond lasers for materials processing; and (c) femtosecond lasers for the generation of advanced light sources.

  20. Research of laser stealth performance test technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen-xing; Shi, Sheng-bing; Han, Fu-li; Wu, Yan-lin; Song, Chun-yan

    2014-09-01

    Laser stealth is an important way of photoelectric stealth weapons systems. According to operational principle of laser range finder, we actively explore and study the stealth performance approval testing technology of laser stealth materials, and bring forward and establish the stealth performance field test methods of stealth efficiency evaluation. Through contrastive test of two kinds of materials, the method is correct and effective.

  1. The 2-micron plasmid as a nonselectable, stable, high copy number yeast vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, D. L.; Bruschi, C. V.

    1991-01-01

    The endogenous 2-microns plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used extensively for the construction of yeast cloning and expression plasmids because it is a native yeast plasmid that is able to be maintained stably in cells at high copy number. Almost invariably, these plasmid constructs, containing some or all 2-microns sequences, exhibit copy number levels lower than 2-microns and are maintained stably only under selective conditions. We were interested in determining if there was a means by which 2-microns could be utilized for vector construction, without forfeiting either copy number or nonselective stability. We identified sites in the 2-microns plasmid that could be used for the insertion of genetic sequences without disrupting 2-microns coding elements and then assessed subsequent plasmid constructs for stability and copy number in vivo. We demonstrate the utility of a previously described 2-microns recombination chimera, pBH-2L, for the manipulation and transformation of 2-microns as a pure yeast plasmid vector. We show that the HpaI site near the STB element in the 2-microns plasmid can be utilized to clone yeast DNA of at least 3.9 kb with no loss of plasmid stability. Additionally, the copy number of these constructs is as high as levels reported for the endogenous 2-microns.

  2. Wind Profiling from a New Compact, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection Doppler Lidar Transceiver during Wind Measurement Intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Demoz, B.; Veneable, D.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. This lidar system was recently deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Maryland, along with other wind lidar systems. Coherent Doppler wind lidar ground-based wind measurements and comparisons with other lidars and other sensors will be presented.

  3. One Micron Laser Technology Advancements at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the advancements made in one micron laser technology at Goddard Space Flight Center. It includes information about risk factors that are being addressed by GSFC, and overviews of the various programs that GSFC is currently managing that are using 1 micron laser technology.

  4. Maintenance of the 2 microns circle plasmid in populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Futcher, A B; Cox, B S

    1983-01-01

    The 2 microns circle plasmid is maintained at high frequencies in populations of yeast cells. To find out how the plasmid is maintained, three forces were measured: the selective advantage or disadvantage conferred by 2 microns circles, the rate of generation of [Cir0] cells, and the rate of illegitimate transfer of 2 microns circles from cell to cell. It was found that under the conditions used, 2 microns circles confer a selective disadvantage of about 1%, that [Cir0] cells are generated at the rate of 7.6 x 10(-5) per [Cir+] cell per generation, and that illegitimate transfer of 2 microns circles occurs at a rate less than 10(-7) per recipient cell per generation. The most likely explanation of 2 microns circle maintenance is that the plasmid is sexually transmitted at such a rate that it spreads through populations despite selection against it. Images PMID:6341357

  5. 2.2-micron field stars at the North Galactic Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elias, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The properties of the 2.2-micron field stars seen near the North Galactic Pole by the Two Micron Sky Survey and by surveys at higher sensitivity are discussed. All the 2.2-micron sources found in these surveys can be identified with stars with known spectral types. The distribution of the 2.2-micron field stars appears to be well-understood.

  6. Laser-ultrasonic technologies for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Latyshev, Alexei S.

    1999-06-01

    This review tackles the problem of further developing laser- ultrasonic medical technologies and gives the comparison of different laser and ultrasound combinations. The features of combined influence on biotissue are explicated with due regard for mechanic, ultrasonic (US), and thermal effects. The review present the effect of self-cleaning an optical fiber tip from the laser destruction products of biotissue, the result of research on the possibility of laser-US technology applications in endoscopy, and the ways of suppressing unwanted bending oscillations. Various spheres and peculiarities of applying laser-US technologies are discussed, including microsurgery, cosmetology, transcutaneous drug delivery, and the treatment of chronic prostatitis and infected wounds. Furthermore, the analysis of transcutaneous drug delivery methods employing a portable pulsed Er:YAG laser is presented. Drug diffusion has been shown to be enhanced under acoustic and US effects. The photo-vacuum drug injection mechanism recently suggested is discussed. It turned out that laser-US technology can be suitable for both impregnating the photosensitizer in local photodynamic therapy procedures and conducting microsurgery operations involving drug injection. Treatment of infectious processes based on the bactericidal action of photosensitizers and ultrasound due to the cavitation effect in solutions is described. An additional therapeutic effect can be achieved via the US intermingling of solutions with their simulations illumination by a matrix of red lasers or light diodes. An outlook on further developing laser-US technology and the ways of its apparatus realization are considered.

  7. Wind Measurements with High Energy 2 Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Bruce W.; Koch, Grady J.; Petros, Mulugeta; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Yu, Ji-Rong; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2004-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar based on an injection seeded Ho:Tm:YLF pulsed laser was developed for wind measurements. A transmitted pulse energy over 75 mJ at 5 Hz repetition rate has been demonstrated. Designs are presented on the laser, injection seeding, receiver, and signal processing subsystems. Sample data of atmospheric measurements are presented including a wind profile extending from the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to the free troposphere.

  8. 2-Micron Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has contributed in developing several 2-micron carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the DIAL technique. Currently, an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA LaRC. This paper focuses on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of wavelength control, packaging and lidar integration. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented, including telescope integration, detection systems and data acquisition electronics. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be presented.

  9. Development of a Ground-based 2-Micron DIAL System to Profile Tropospheric CO2 and Aerosol Distributions for Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, S.; Koch, G. J.; Abedin, N.; Refaat, T.; Rubio, M.; Davis, K.; Miller, C.; Singh, U.

    2006-12-01

    NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) has funded a 3 year Instrument Incubator Program to develop a ground-based 2-micron Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) CO2 profiling system. This is a collaborative program between NASA Langley, Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Development of this field deployable instrument is an initial step towards the eventual development of a space-based DIAL system and involves the design, development, evaluation, and fielding of a ground-based CO2 profiling system. This system will be capable of providing high resolution measurements of CO2 and aerosol profiles and will be used in a number of atmospheric studies involving the atmospheric boundary layer where the sources and sinks of CO2 are located; and in the studies of dynamical, transport, pollution, and biogenic activity in the atmosphere. After a successful development of this system, it can be used as a validation tool of the OCO (Orbiting Carbon Observatory). This instrument leverages 2-micron laser technology developed under a number of NASA programs to develop new solid-state YLF laser technology that provides high pulse energy, tunable, wavelength-stabilized, and double-pulsed lasers that are operable over pre-selected temperature insensitive strong CO2 absorption lines suitable for profiling of lower tropospheric CO2. It also incorporates high quantum efficiency, high gain, and relatively low noise AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb phototransistors, and a new receiver/signal processor system to cover a large signal dynamic range with minimum signal distortions to achieve high precision DIAL measurements. High sensitivity in situ LI-COR 7000 sensors are being calibrated at PSU for the validation of DIAL measurements and high resolution spectroscopic measurements are being conducted at JPL to characterize the CO2 line parameters for DIAL application. This paper will review the need for and the advantage of a CO2 DIAL profiling system, provide

  10. Development of a Compact, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Doppler Wind Lidar Transceiver; and Plans for Flights on NASA's DC-8 and WB-57 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    We present results of a recently completed effort to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a compact lidar transceiver for coherent-detection lidar profiling of winds. The novel high-energy, 2-micron, Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser technology developed at NASA Langley was employed to permit study of the laser technology currently envisioned by NASA for global coherent Doppler lidar measurement of winds in the future. The 250 mJ, 10 Hz compact transceiver was also designed for future aircraft flight. Ground-based wind profiles made with this transceiver will be presented. NASA Langley is currently funded to build complete Doppler lidar systems using this transceiver for the DC-8 and WB-57 aircraft. The WB-57 flights will present a more severe environment and will require autonomous operation of the lidar system. The DC-8 lidar system is a likely component of future NASA hurricane research. It will include real-time data processing and display, as well as full data archiving. We will attempt to co-fly on both aircraft with a direct-detection Doppler wind lidar system being prepared by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  11. Lasers in dentistry: new possibilities with advancing laser technology?

    PubMed

    Frentzen, M; Koort, H J

    1990-12-01

    Although there are a considerable number of published papers on the role of laser treatment in dentistry, a critical review shows that laser technology is used only by specialists in a small therapeutic field. Most lasers are heat-producing devices converting electromagnetic energy into thermal energy. These lasers find uses in oral surgery for cutting or coagulating soft tissues or in the welding of dental prostheses. More recently, new types of lasers have offered non-thermal modes of tissue interaction, called photoablation, photodisruption and photochemical effects. Basic and clinical research is being carried out into the application of these devices in dentistry. However, much development will be required before lasers can replace conventional surgical methods for treating oral cancer or indeed replace the conventional bur for excavating carious lesions. PMID:2276829

  12. Laser Science & Technology Program Annual Report - 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H-L

    2001-03-20

    The Laser Science and Technology (LS&T) Program Annual Report 2001 provides documentation of the achievements of the LLNL LS&T Program during the April 2001 to March 2002 period using three formats: (1) an Overview that is a narrative summary of important results for the year; (2) brief summaries of research and development activity highlights within the four Program elements: Advanced Lasers and Components (AL&C), Laser Optics and Materials (LO&M), Short Pulse Laser Applications and Technologies (SPLAT), and High-Energy Laser System and Tests (HELST); and (3) a compilation of selected articles and technical reports published in reputable scientific or technology journals in this period. All three elements (Annual Overview, Activity Highlights, and Technical Reports) are also on the Web: http://laser.llnl.gov/lasers/pubs/icfq.html. The underlying mission for the LS&T Program is to develop advanced lasers, optics, and materials technologies and applications to solve problems and create new capabilities of importance to the Laboratory and the nation. This mission statement has been our guide for defining work appropriate for our Program. A major new focus of LS&T beginning this past year has been the development of high peak power short-pulse capability for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). LS&T is committed to this activity.

  13. 2-micron Double Pulsed IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke; Scola, Tory

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a high energy pulsed 2-micron IPDA lidar instrument to measure the atmospheric CO2 column density. The IPDA lidar is operated on the long wavelength wing of R(30) CO2 line at 2050.967 nm (4875.749 cm-1) in the side-line operation mode. The R(30) line is an excellent absorption line for the measurements of CO2 in 2µm wavelength region with regard to the strength of the absorption lines, low susceptibility to atmospheric temperature variability, and freedom from problematic interference with other absorption lines. The Ho:Tm:YLF laser transmitter is designed to be operated in a unique double pulse format that can produce two-pulse pair in 10 Hz operation. Typically, the output energies of the laser transmitter are 100mJ and 45mJ for the first pulse and the second pulse, respectively. We injection seed the first pulse with on-line frequency and the second pulse with off-line frequency. The IPDA lidar instrument size, weight and power consumption were restricted to small research aircraft payload requirements. The airborne IPDA lidar instrument measures the total integrated column content of CO2 from the instrument to the ground but with weighting that can be tuned by controlling the transmitted wavelengths. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. The 2-μm CO2 IPDA lidar airborne demonstration was conducted during March 20, 2014 through April 10, 2014. IPDA lidar airborne flights included various operating and environmental conditions. Environmental conditions included different flight altitude up to 8.3 km, different ground target conditions such as vegetation, soil, ocean, snow and sand and different cloud conditions. Besides, some flights targeted power plant incinerators for investigating the IPDA sensitivity to CO2 plums. The lidar instrument is robust during all of the flights. This paper describes

  14. Comparison of compact visible laser technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, Gary T.

    1990-04-01

    Technological advances in the field of compact visible laser sources are reviewed. Red laser diodes are considered first, and it is pointed out that they are visible to the human eye, but with a reduced brightness; these devices are expected to fall in price and play a major role in higher-density optical data-storage systems as well as bar-code scanners and laser printers. Diode-pumped solid-state lasers are then outlined, and direct diode doubling is discussed. Two major advances in this area, the availability of nonlinear materials and the availability of single longitudinal mode laser diodes with powers of 100 mW, are discussed. In the area of blue laser diodes, emphasis is placed on the material of choice ZnSe.

  15. The Mercury Laser Advances Laser Technology for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbers, C A; Caird, J; Moses, E

    2009-01-21

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is on target to demonstrate 'breakeven' - creating as much fusion-energy output as laser-energy input. NIF will compress a tiny sphere of hydrogen isotopes with 1.8 MJ of laser light in a 20-ns pulse, packing the isotopes so tightly that they fuse together, producing helium nuclei and releasing energy in the form of energetic particles. The achievement of breakeven will culminate an enormous effort by thousands of scientists and engineers, not only at Livermore but around the world, during the past several decades. But what about the day after NIF achieves breakeven? NIF is a world-class engineering research facility, but if laser fusion is ever to generate power for civilian consumption, the laser will have to deliver pulses nearly 100,000 times faster than NIF - a rate of perhaps 10 shots per second as opposed to NIF's several shots a day. The Mercury laser (named after the Roman messenger god) is intended to lead the way to a 10-shots-per-second, electrically-efficient, driver laser for commercial laser fusion. While the Mercury laser will generate only a small fraction of the peak power of NIF (1/30,000), Mercury operates at higher average power. The design of Mercury takes full advantage of the technology advances manifest in its behemoth cousin (Table 1). One significant difference is that, unlike the flashlamp-pumped NIF, Mercury is pumped by highly efficient laser diodes. Mercury is a prototype laser capable of scaling in aperture and energy to a NIF-like beamline, with greater electrical efficiency, while still running at a repetition rate 100,000 times greater.

  16. Laser Science and Technology Program Update 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H L; Hackel, L A

    2002-01-01

    The Laser Science and Technology (LS&T) Program's mission is to develop advanced solid-state lasers, optics, materials technologies, and applications to solve problems and create new capabilities of importance to the Nation and the Laboratory. A top, near-term priority is to provide technical support to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to ensure activation success. LS&T provides the NIF Programs with core competencies and supports its economic viability. The primary objectives of LS&T activities in fiscal year (FY) 2001 have been threefold: (1) to support deployment of hardware and to enhance lasers and optics performance for NIF, (2) to develop advanced solid-state laser systems and optical components for the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of Defense (DoD), and (3) to invent, develop, and deliver improved concepts and hardware for other government agencies and U.S. industry. Special efforts have also been devoted to building and maintaining our capabilities in three technology areas: high-power solid-state lasers, high-power optical materials, and applications of advanced lasers.

  17. The story of laser brazing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Peter; Dierken, Roland

    2012-03-01

    This article gives an overview on the development of laser brazing technology as a new joining technique for car body production. The story starts with fundamental research work at German institutes in 1993, continues with the first implementations in automobile production in 1998, gives examples of applications since then and ends with an outlook. Laser brazing adapted design of joints and boundary conditions for a safe processing are discussed. Besides a better understanding for the sensitivity of the process against joint irregularities and misalignment, the key to successful launch was an advanced system technology. Different working heads equipped with wire feeding device, seam tracking system or tactile sensors for an automated teaching are presented in this paper. Novel laser heads providing a two beam technology will allow improved penetration depth of the filler wire and a more ecological processing by means of energy consumption.

  18. Oceanographic applications of laser technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    1988-01-01

    Oceanographic activities with the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) for the past several years have primarily been focussed on using active (laser induced pigment fluorescence) and concurrent passive ocean color spectra to improve existing ocean color algorithms for estimating primary production in the world's oceans. The most significant results were the development of a technique for selecting optimal passive wavelengths for recovering phytoplankton photopigment concentration and the application of this technique, termed active-passive correlation spectroscopy (APCS), to various forms of passive ocean color algorithms. Included in this activity is use of airborne laser and passive ocean color for development of advanced satellite ocean color sensors. Promising on-wavelength subsurface scattering layer measurements were recently obtained. A partial summary of these results are shown.

  19. Oceanographic applications of laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    Oceanographic activities with the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) for the past several years have primarily been focussed on using active (laser induced pigment fluorescence) and concurrent passive ocean color spectra to improve existing ocean color algorithms for estimating primary production in the world's oceans. The most significant results were the development of a technique for selecting optimal passive wavelengths for recovering phytoplankton photopigment concentration and the application of this technique, termed active-passive correlation spectroscopy (APCS), to various forms of passive ocean color algorithms. Included in this activity is use of airborne laser and passive ocean color for development of advanced satellite ocean color sensors. Promising on-wavelength subsurface scattering layer measurements were recently obtained. A partial summary of these results are shown.

  20. Isotope separation by laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Wolfgang

    2002-03-01

    Isotope separation processes operate on very small differences, given either by the Quotient of masses with the same number of electrons or by their mass difference. When separating isotopes of light elements in mass quantities, thermodynamic processes accounting for the quotient, either in diffusion, chemical reactivity or distillation are used. For heavy elements those quotients are very small. Therefore they need a large number of separation steps. Large plants with high energy consumption result from that. As uranium isotope separation is the most important industrial field, alternatives, taking account for the mass difference, as e.g. gas centrifuges, have been developed. They use only a fraction of the energy input, but need a very large number of machines, as the individual throughput is small. Since it was discovered, that molecules of high symmetry like Uranium-Hexafluoride as a deep-cooled gas stream can be ionized by multiple photon excitation, this process was studied in detail and in competition to the selective ionization of metal vapors, as already demonstrated with uranium. The paper reports about the principles of the laser excitation for both processes, the different laboratory scale and prototypical plants built, the difficulties with materials, as far as the metal vapor laser separation is concerned, and the difficulties experienced in the similarity in molecular spectra. An overview of the relative economic merits of the different processes and the auspices in a saturated market for uranium isotope separation, together with other potential markets for molecular laser separation, is contained in the conclusions.

  1. Laser Science and Technology Program Update 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L A; Chen, H L

    2003-03-01

    The Laser Science and Technology (LS&T) Program's mission is to develop advanced lasers, optics, materials technologies, and applications to solve problems and create new capabilities of importance to the nation and the Laboratory. A top, near-term priority is to provide technical support in the deployment and upgrade of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our other program activities synergistically develop technologies that are of interest to the NIF Directorate but outside the scope of the NIF funding. The primary objectives of LS&T activities in 2002 have been fourfold--(a) to support deployment of hardware and to enhance laser and optics performance for NIF, (b) to develop high-energy petawatt laser science and technology for the Department of Energy (DOE), (c) to develop advanced solid-state laser systems and optical components for the Department of Defense (DoD), and to invent develop, and deliver improved concepts and hardware for other government agencies and industry. Special efforts have been devoted to building and maintaining our capabilities in three technology areas: high-power short-pulse solid-state lasers, high-power optical materials, and applications of advanced lasers. LS&T activities during 2002 focused on seven major areas: (1) NIF Project--LS&T led major advances in the deployment of NIF Final Optics Assembly (FOA) and the development of 3{omega} optics processing and treatment technologies to enhance NIF's operations and performance capabilities. (2) Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP)--LS&T personnel continued development of ultrashort-pulse lasers and high-power, large-aperture optics for applications in SSP, extreme-field science and national defense. To enhance the high-energy petawatt (HEPW) capability in NIF, LS&T continued development of advanced compressor-grating and front-end laser technologies utilizing optical-parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA). (3) High-energy-density physics and inertial fusion energy

  2. Laser light scattering instrument advanced technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this advanced technology development (ATD) project has been to provide sturdy, miniaturized laser light scattering (LLS) instrumentation for use in microgravity experiments. To do this, we assessed user requirements, explored the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware, and both coordinated and participated in the hardware and software advances needed for a flight hardware instrument. We have successfully breadboarded and evaluated an engineering version of a single-angle glove-box instrument which uses solid state detectors and lasers, along with fiber optics, for beam delivery and detection. Additionally, we have provided the specifications and written verification procedures necessary for procuring a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument which will be used by the flight hardware project which resulted from this work and from this project's interaction with the laser light scattering community.

  3. Laser-boosted lightcraft technology demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, J. C.; Morales, C.; Smith, W. L.; Myrabo, L. N.

    1990-01-01

    The detailed description and performance analysis of a 1.4 meter diameter Lightcraft Technology Demonstator (LTD) is presented. The launch system employs a 100 MW-class ground-based laser to transmit power directly to an advanced combined-cycle engine that propels the 120 kg LTD to orbit - with a mass ratio of two. The single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) LTD machine then becomes an autonomous sensor satellite that can deliver precise, high quality information typical of today's large orbital platforms. The dominant motivation behind this study is to provide an example of how laser propulsion and its low launch costs can induce a comparable order-of-magnitude reduction in sensor satellite packaging costs. The issue is simply one of production technology for future, survivable SSTO aerospace vehicles that intimately share both laser propulsion engine and satellite functional hardware.

  4. Innovative Laser Ablation Technology for Surface Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Winston C. H.

    2003-06-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a novel laser ablation in liquid for surface decontamination. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary contamination. Another aim is to make this surface decontamination technology becomes economically feasible for large scale decontamination.

  5. 3D Laser Scanning in Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Jim

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional laser scanner can be used as a tool for design and problem solving in technology education. A hands-on experience can enhance learning by captivating students' interest and empowering them with creative tools. (Author/JOW)

  6. NOVEL LASER ABLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SURFACE DECONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to develop a novel Laser Ablation Decontamination in Liquid (LADIL) technology for surface decontamination and safe removal of radioactive and/or toxic contaminants. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary conta...

  7. Advances in High Energy Solid-State Pulsed 2-Micron Lidar Development for Ground and Airborne Wind, Water Vapor and CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Kavaya, Michael J.; Remus, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron lasers. From fundamental spectroscopy research, theoretical prediction of new materials, laser demonstration and engineering of lidar systems, it has been a very successful program spanning around two decades. Successful development of 2-micron lasers has led to development of a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement with an unprecedented laser pulse energy of 250 millijoules in a rugged package. This high pulse energy is produced by a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser with an optical amplifier. While the lidar is meant for use as an airborne instrument, ground-based tests were carried out to characterize performance of the lidar. Atmospheric measurements will be presented, showing the lidar's capability for wind measurement in the atmospheric boundary layer and free troposphere. Lidar wind measurements are compared to a balloon sonde, showing good agreement between the two sensors. Similar architecture has been used to develop a high energy, Ho:Tm:YLF double-pulsed 2-micron Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) instrument based on direct detection technique that provides atmospheric column CO2 measurements. This instrument has been successfully used to measure atmospheric CO2 column density initially from a ground mobile lidar trailer, and then it was integrated on B-200 plane and 20 hours of flight measurement were made from an altitude ranging 1500 meters to 8000 meters. These measurements were compared to in-situ measurements and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) airborne flask measurement to derive the dry mixing ratio of the column CO2 by reflecting the signal by various reflecting surfaces such as land, vegetation, ocean surface, snow and sand. The lidar measurements when compared showed a very agreement with in-situ and airborne flask measurement. NASA Langley Research Center is currently developing a

  8. Airborne laser communication technology and flight test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Li-xin; Zhang, Li-zhong; Li, Xiao-ming; Li, Ying-chao; Jiang, Hui-lin

    2015-11-01

    Reconnaissance aircraft is an important node of the space-air-ground integrated information network, on which equipped with a large number of high-resolution surveillance equipment, and need high speed communications equipment to transmit detected information in real time. Currently RF communication methods cannot meet the needs of communication bandwidth. Wireless laser communication has outstanding advantages high speed, high capacity, security, etc., is an important means to solve the high-speed information transmission of airborne platforms. In this paper, detailed analysis of how the system works, the system components, work processes, link power and the key technologies of airborne laser communication were discussed. On this basis, a prototype airborne laser communications was developed, and high-speed, long-distance communications tests were carried out between the two fixed-wing aircraft, and the airborne precision aiming, atmospheric laser communication impacts on laser communication were tested. The experiments ultimately realize that, the communication distance is 144km, the communication rate is 2.5Gbps. The Airborne laser communication experiments provide technical basis for the application of the conversion equipment.

  9. Novel Laser Ablation Technology for Surface Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chung H.

    2004-06-01

    Laser ablation for surface cleaning has been pursued for the removal of paint on airplanes. It has also been pursued for the cleaning of semiconductor surfaces. However, all these approaches have been pursued by laser ablation in air. For highly contaminated surface, laser ablation in air can easily cause secondary contamination. Thus it is not suitable to apply to achieve surface decontamination for DOE facilities since many of these facilities have radioactive contaminants on the surface. Any secondary contamination will be a grave concern. The objective of this project is to develop a novel technology for laser ablation in liquid for surface decontamination. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary contamination and to evaluate the economic feasibility for large scale surface decontamination with laser ablation in liquid. When laser ablation is pursued in the solution, all the desorbed contaminants will be confined in liquid. The contaminants can be precipitated and subsequently contained in a small volume for disposal. It can reduce the risk of the decontamination workers. It can also reduce the volume of contaminants dramatically.

  10. Laser-boosted lightcraft technology demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonison, M.; Myrabo, Leik; Chen, S.; Decusatis, C.; Kusche, K.; Minucci, M.; Moder, J.; Morales, C.; Nelson, C.; Richard, J.

    1989-01-01

    The ultimate goal for this NASA/USRA-sponsored 'Apollo Lightcraft Project' is to develop a revolutionary manned launch vehicle technology that can potentially reduce payload transport costs by a factor of 1000 below the space shuttle orbiter. The Rensellaer design team proposes to utilize advanced, highly energetic, beamed-energy sources (laser, microwave) and innovative combined-cycle (airbreathing/rocket) engines to accomplish this goal. This year's effort, the detailed description and performance analysis of an unmanned 1.4-m Lightcraft Technology Demonstrator (LTD) drone, is presented. The novel launch system employs a 100-MW-class ground-based laser to transmit power directly to an advanced combined-cycle engine that propels the 120-kg LTD to orbit, with a mass ratio of two. The single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) LTD machine then becomes an autonomous sensor satellite that can deliver precise, high-quality information typical of today's large orbital platforms. The dominant motivation behind this study is to provide an example of how laser propulsion and its low launch costs can induce a comparable order-of-magnitude reduction in sensor satellite packaging costs. The issue is simply one of production technology for future, survivable SSTO aerospace vehicles that intimately share both laser propulsion engine and satellite functional hardware. A mass production cost goal of 10(exp 3)/kg for the LTD vehicle is probably realizable.

  11. Picosecond DPSS laser technology for OPCPA pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupel, Andreas; Bodnar, Nathan; Webb, Benjamin; Shah, Lawrence; Richardson, Martin

    2014-02-01

    We present the design and challenges of a diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) system to amplify picosecond pulses to high pulse energies and high average powers. We discuss our implemented solutions to mitigate thermal effects and present the obtained performance of the picosecond pulse amplification at the multi-10-MW level. Our here presented picosecond DPSS laser is well suited for pumping an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) system. Several laser technologies have been employed to pump OPCPA systems and we show how our DPSS system compares in performance to the other approaches.

  12. Advances in solid state laser technology for space and medical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in laser technology and their potential for medical applications are discussed. Gas discharge lasers, dye lasers, excimer lasers, Nd:YAG lasers, HF and DF lasers, and other commonly used lasers are briefly addressed. Emerging laser technology is examined, including diode-pumped lasers and other solid state lasers.

  13. Monitoring structure movement with laser tracking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzetti, Luigi; Giussani, Alberto; Roncoroni, Fabio; Previtali, Mattia

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the use of laser tracking technology for structure monitoring. In this field the use of this precise instrument is innovative and therefore new investigations are needed for civil structures, especially for applications carried out during unstable environmental conditions. On the other hand, as laser trackers are today very used in industrial applications aimed at collecting data at high speed with precisions superior to +/-0.05 mm, they seem quite promising for those civil engineering applications where numerous geodetic tools, often coupled with mechanical and electrical instruments, are usually used to inspect structure movements. This work illustrates three real civil engineering monitoring applications where laser tracking technology was used to detect object movements. The first one is a laboratory testing for the inspection of a beam (bending moment and shear). The second experiment is the stability inspection of a bridge. The last experiment is one of the first attempts where laser trackers tried to substitute traditional high precision geometric leveling for monitoring an important historical building: the Cathedral of Milan. The achieved results, pro and contra along with some practical issues are described.

  14. Ultrafast laser inscription: science today, technology tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, D.; Ramsay, W. T.; Willoughby, N. A.; Paterson, L.; Kar, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in the field of ultrafast laser inscription provide ample evidence underscoring the potential of this technique in fabricating novel and previously unthinkable 2D and 3D photonic and optofluidic platforms enabling current sensor, diagnostics, monitoring and biochemical research to scale new heights. In addition to meeting the demands for compact, active waveguide devices designed for diverse applications such as optical metrology, non-linear microscopy and astrophotonics, this technology facilitates the integration of microfluidics with integrated optics which creates a powerful technology for the manufacture of custom lab-on-chip devices with advanced functionality. This paper highlights the capabilities of ultrafast laser inscription in fabricating novel 3D microfluidic devices aimed for biomedical applications.

  15. Ultrashort pulsed laser technology development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manke, Gerald C.

    2014-10-01

    The Department of Navy has been pursuing a technology development program for advanced, all-fiber, Ultra Short Pulsed Laser (USPL) systems via Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) programs. Multiple topics have been published to promote and fund research that encompasses every critical component of a standard USPL system and enable the demonstration of mJ/pulse class systems with an all fiber architecture. This presentation will summarize published topics and funded programs.

  16. Solar pumped laser technology options for space power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of long-range options for in-space laser power transmission is presented. The focus is on the new technology and research status of solar-pumped lasers and their solar concentration needs. The laser options include gas photodissociation lasers, optically-pumped solid-state lasers, and blackbody-pumped transfer lasers. The paper concludes with a summary of current research thrusts.

  17. Airborne 2-Micron Double Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2016-06-01

    An airborne 2-micron double-pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. This new instrument has been flown in spring of 2014 for a total of ten flights with 27 flight hours. This IPDA lidar provides high precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the results.

  18. Airborne 2-Micron Double Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2015-01-01

    An airborne 2-micron double-pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. This new 2-miron pulsed IPDA lidar has been flown in spring of 2014 for total ten flights with 27 flight hours. It provides high precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  19. Electro-Optical Laser Technology. Curriculum Utilization. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nawn, John H.

    This report describes a program to prepare students for employment as laser technicians and laser operators and to ensure that they have the necessary skills required by the industry. The objectives are to prepare a curriculum and syllabus for an associate degree program in Electro-Optical Laser Technology. The 2-year Electro-Optical Laser program…

  20. Technology and applications of ultrafast fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Marion; Hellerer, Thomas; Stuhler, Juergen

    2011-11-01

    We briefly review the key technology of modern fiber based femtosecond laser sources summarizing advantages and disadvantages of different mode-locking solutions. A description of possible extensions of a FemtoFiber-type modelocked Er-doped fiber laser oscillator (1560 nm) reveals the flexibility with respect to wavelength coverage (488 nm .. 2200 nm) and pulse duration (10 fs .. 10 ps). The resulting FemtoFiber family and its versions for instrument integration allow one to use these state-of-the-art light sources in many important applications, e.g. THz spectroscopy and microscopy. We show that, depending on the fiber laser model and the THz emitter, THz radiation can be produced with 4-10 THz bandwidth and detected with up to 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Electronically controlled optical scanning (ECOPS) - a unique method for fast, precise and comfortable sampling of the THz pulse or other pump-probe experiments - is described and recommended for efficient data acquisition. As examples for modern microscopy with ultrafast fiber lasers we present results of two-photon fluorescence, coherent microscopy techniques (SHG/THG/CARS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM).

  1. Technology and applications of ultrafast fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Marion; Hellerer, Thomas; Stuhler, Juergen

    2012-03-01

    We briefly review the key technology of modern fiber based femtosecond laser sources summarizing advantages and disadvantages of different mode-locking solutions. A description of possible extensions of a FemtoFiber-type modelocked Er-doped fiber laser oscillator (1560 nm) reveals the flexibility with respect to wavelength coverage (488 nm .. 2200 nm) and pulse duration (10 fs .. 10 ps). The resulting FemtoFiber family and its versions for instrument integration allow one to use these state-of-the-art light sources in many important applications, e.g. THz spectroscopy and microscopy. We show that, depending on the fiber laser model and the THz emitter, THz radiation can be produced with 4-10 THz bandwidth and detected with up to 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Electronically controlled optical scanning (ECOPS) - a unique method for fast, precise and comfortable sampling of the THz pulse or other pump-probe experiments - is described and recommended for efficient data acquisition. As examples for modern microscopy with ultrafast fiber lasers we present results of two-photon fluorescence, coherent microscopy techniques (SHG/THG/CARS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM).

  2. Laser space communication experiment: Modulator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of a contractual program to develop the modulator technology necessary for a 10.6 micron laser communication system using cadmium telluride as the modulator material. The program consisted of the following tasks: (1) The growth of cadmium telluride crystals of sufficient size and purity and with the necessary optical properties for use as laser modulator rods. (2) Develop a low loss antireflection coating for the cadmium telluride rods. (3) Design and build a modulator capable of 300 MHz modulation. (4) Develop a modulator driver capable of a data rate of 300 MBits/sec, 12 W rms output power, and 40 percent efficiency. (5) Assemble and test the modulator system. All design goals were met and the system was built and tested.

  3. Laser Ignition Technology for Bi-Propellant Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Matt; Bossard, John; Early, Jim; Trinh, Huu; Dennis, Jay; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of laser ignition technology for bipropellant rocket engines applications. The objectives of this project include: (1) the selection test chambers and flows; (2) definition of the laser ignition setup; (3) pulse format optimization; (4) fiber optic coupled laser ignition system analysis; and (5) chamber integration issues definition. The testing concludes that rocket combustion chamber laser ignition is imminent. Support technologies (multiplexing, window durability/cleaning, and fiber optic durability) are feasible.

  4. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, G. K.; Cremers, D. A.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  5. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, G.K.; Cremers, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  6. Tenth Biennial Coherent Laser Radar Technology and Applications Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The tenth conference on coherent laser radar technology and applications is the latest in a series beginning in 1980 which provides a forum for exchange of information on recent events current status, and future directions of coherent laser radar (or lidar or lader) technology and applications. This conference emphasizes the latest advancement in the coherent laser radar field, including theory, modeling, components, systems, instrumentation, measurements, calibration, data processing techniques, operational uses, and comparisons with other remote sensing technologies.

  7. A 2-Micron Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development For Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Reithmaier, Karl; Bai, Yingxin; Trieu, Bo C.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2012-01-01

    A 2-micron pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  8. InGaAsSb Detectors' Characterization for 2-Micron CO2 Lidar/DIAL Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2003-01-01

    Recent interest in monitoring atmospheric CO2 focuses attention on infrared remote sensing using the 2-micron lidar/differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. Quantum detectors are critical components in this technique, and many research efforts concentrate on developing such devices for the 2-micron wavelength. Characterization results of InGaAsSb quantum detectors for the 2-micron wavelength range are presented, including experimental setup and procedure. Detectors are prototype devices manufactured by using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) structures. Characterization experiments include V-I measurements, spectral response and its variation with bias voltage and temperature, noise measurements, noise-equivalent-power (NEP) and detectivity calculations, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimation. A slight increase in the output signal occurred with increased bias voltage and was associated with a noise level increase. Cooling down the detectors reduces noise and shifts the cutoff wavelength to shorter values. Further improvement in the design and manufacturing process, by increasing the device gain and lowering its noise level, is necessary to meet the required CO2 lidar/DIAL specifications.

  9. High power semiconductor laser beam combining technology and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Tong, Cunzhu; Peng, Hangyu; Zhang, Jun

    2013-05-01

    With the rapid development of laser applications, single elements of diode lasers are not able to meet the increasing requirements on power and beam quality in the material processing and defense filed, whether are used as pumping sources or directly laser sources. The coupling source with high power and high beam quality, multiplexed by many single elements, has been proven to be a promising technical solution. In this paper, the authors review the development tendency of efficiency, power, and lifetime of laser elements firstly, and then introduce the progress of laser beam combining technology. The authors also present their recent progress on the high power diode laser sources developed by beam combining technology, including the 2600W beam combining direct laser source, 1000W fiber coupled semiconductor lasers and the 1000W continuous wave (CW) semiconductor laser sources with beam quality of 12.5×14[mm. mrad]2.

  10. Computer Simulation of Global Profiles of Carbon Dioxide Using a Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Column-Content DIAL System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Frehlich, Rod G.

    2009-01-01

    We present preliminary results of computer simulations of the error in measuring carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles from earth orbit. The simulated sensor is a pulsed, 2-micron, coherent-detection lidar alternately operating on at least two wavelengths. The simulated geometry is a nadir viewing lidar measuring the column content signal. Atmospheric absorption is modeled using FASCODE3P software with the HITRAN 2004 absorption line data base. Lidar shot accumulation is employed up to the horizontal resolution limit. Horizontal resolutions of 50, 100, and 200 km are shown. Assuming a 400 km spacecraft orbit, the horizontal resolutions correspond to measurement times of about 7, 14, and 28 s. We simulate laser pulse-pair repetition frequencies from 1 Hz to 100 kHz. The range of shot accumulation is 7 to 2.8 million pulse-pairs. The resultant error is shown as a function of horizontal resolution, laser pulse-pair repetition frequency, and laser pulse energy. The effect of different on and off pulse energies is explored. The results are compared to simulation results of others and to demonstrated 2-micron operating points at NASA Langley.

  11. The research of laser marking control technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiue; Zhang, Rong

    2009-08-01

    In the area of Laser marking, the general control method is insert control card to computer's mother board, it can not support hot swap, it is difficult to assemble or it. Moreover, the one marking system must to equip one computer. In the system marking, the computer can not to do the other things except to transmit marking digital information. Otherwise it can affect marking precision. Based on traditional control methods existed some problems, introduced marking graphic editing and digital processing by the computer finish, high-speed digital signal processor (DSP) control marking the whole process. The laser marking controller is mainly contain DSP2812, digital memorizer, DAC (digital analog converting) transform unit circuit, USB interface control circuit, man-machine interface circuit, and other logic control circuit. Download the marking information which is processed by computer to U disk, DSP read the information by USB interface on time, then processing it, adopt the DSP inter timer control the marking time sequence, output the scanner control signal by D/A parts. Apply the technology can realize marking offline, thereby reduce the product cost, increase the product efficiency. The system have good effect in actual unit markings, the marking speed is more quickly than PCI control card to 20 percent. It has application value in practicality.

  12. Laser Technology Is Primed for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Explains the three characteristics of laser light (monochromatic light, divergence, and coherence), the components of a laser, applications of the laser (alignment, distance measurement, welding/cutting, marking, medical applications), and a complete laser training system appropriate for classroom use. (CT)

  13. Technical design of laser re-manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-jian; Xing, Fei; Liu, Yu; Zhai, Hai-bo

    2010-10-01

    The cladding technical types and choosing principle during laser re-manufacturing such as beam pattern, surface pretreatment, cladding process, post-processing technology etc., were introduced. The powder feeding method and preheat treatment were researched. The above works provide the bases for technical design of the laser remanufacturing technology.

  14. Laser propulsion for orbit transfer - Laser technology issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, J. C.; Frisbee, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Using reasonable near-term mission traffic models (1991-2000 being the assumed operational time of the system) and the most current unclassified laser and laser thruster information available, it was found that space-based laser propulsion orbit transfer vehicles (OTVs) can outperform the aerobraked chemical OTV over a 10-year life-cycle. The conservative traffic models used resulted in an optimum laser power of about 1 MW per laser. This is significantly lower than the power levels considered in other studies. Trip time was taken into account only to the extent that the system was sized to accomplish the mission schedule.

  15. Development of an Airborne Triple-Pulse 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar being developed at NASA Langley Research Center with support from NASA ESTO Instrument Incubator Program. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver and detector upgrades, laser packaging and lidar integration. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  16. The Selection of Q-Switch for a 350mJ Air-borne 2-micron Wind Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.

    2008-01-01

    In the process of designing a coherent, high energy 2micron, Doppler wind Lidar, various types of Q-Switch materials and configurations have been investigated for the oscillator. Designing an oscillator with a relatively low gain laser material, presents challenges related to the management high internal circulating fluence due to high reflective output coupler. This problem is compounded by the loss of hold-off. In addition, the selection has to take into account the round trip optical loss in the resonator and the loss of hold-off. For this application, a Brewster cut 5mm aperture, fused silica AO Q-switch is selected. Once the Q-switch is selected various rf frequencies were evaluated. Since the Lidar has to perform in single longitudinal and transverse mode with transform limited line width, in this paper, various seeding configurations are presented in the context of Q-Switch diffraction efficiency. The master oscillator power amplifier has demonstrated over 350mJ output when the amplifier is operated in double pass mode and higher than 250mJ when operated in single pass configuration. The repetition rate of the system is 10Hz and the pulse length 200ns.

  17. Data Acquisition and Processing System for Airborne Wind Profiling with a Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, J. Y.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    A data acquisition and signal processing system is being developed for a 2-micron airborne wind profiling coherent Doppler lidar system. This lidar, called the Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN), is based on a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser transmitter and 15-cm diameter telescope. It is being packaged for flights onboard the NASA DC-8, with the first flights in the summer of 2010 in support of the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign for the study of hurricanes. The data acquisition and processing system is housed in a compact PCI chassis and consists of four components such as a digitizer, a digital signal processing (DSP) module, a video controller, and a serial port controller. The data acquisition and processing software (DAPS) is also being developed to control the system including real-time data analysis and display. The system detects an external 10 Hz trigger pulse and initiates the data acquisition and processing process, and displays selected wind profile parameters such as Doppler shift, power distribution, wind directions and velocities. Doppler shift created by aircraft motion is measured by an inertial navigation/GPS sensor and fed to the signal processing system for real-time removal of aircraft effects from wind measurements. A general overview of the system and the DAPS as well as the coherent Doppler lidar system is presented in this paper.

  18. Current and long-term technologies of laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulashcyk, Vladimir S.; Volotovskaya, Anna V.

    2007-06-01

    Laser therapy, using low-energy laser radiation, is being more and more applied. The most applied technology is transcutaneous radiation of tissues by laser radiation. Originally, a direct action on a pathological site was mostly used, but recently more attention is given to reflexogenic areas, acupuncture points, and endocrine organ projection sites. The development of light-conductive engineering made it possible to practically apply intraorgan laser therapy. This technology is widely spread in gynecology, otorhinolaryngology, urology, gastroenterology, etc. Close to it are different versions of intratissue laser therapy (intraosteal, periosteal, myofascial). A special kind of laser therapy is laser hemotherapy. Depending on the techniques and protocol of its application, there are extracorporeal, intravascular, and supravenous ways of action. According to our comparative investigations, supravenous hemotherapy by its therapeutic efficacy and major medicinal effects can be well compared with intravascular laser hemotherapy. With good prospects and efficiency is laser therapy as a combination of laser and other physical factors. Magnetolaser therapy has been scientifically substantiated and practically applied so far. Theoretically and experimentally substantiated is a combined application of laser radiation and physical factors such as ultrasound, direct current field, vacuum, cryotherapy, etc. Experimental research and few so far clinical observations are indicative of prospects of a complex application of laser radiation and drugs. To improve light absorption, laser radiation is combined with different dyes. Photodynamic therapy, originally used in oncology, is applied today in treating different diseases. We showed a possibility of using a number of drugs possessing simultaneously photosensitizing properties to this end. Laser radiation significantly influences pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, which gives reason to practically implement laser

  19. A Laser Technology Test Facility for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A J; Campbell, R W; Ebbers, C A; Freitas, B L; Latkowski, J; Molander, W A; Sutton, S B; Telford, S; Caird, J A

    2009-10-06

    A LIFE laser driver needs to be designed and operated which meets the rigorous requirements of the NIF laser system while operating at high average power, and operate for a lifetime of >30 years. Ignition on NIF will serve to demonstrate laser driver functionality, operation of the Mercury laser system at LLNL demonstrates the ability of a diode-pumped solid-state laser to run at high average power, but the operational lifetime >30 yrs remains to be proven. A Laser Technology test Facility (LTF) has been designed to specifically address this issue. The LTF is a 100-Hz diode-pumped solid-state laser system intended for accelerated testing of the diodes, gain media, optics, frequency converters and final optics, providing system statistics for billion shot class tests. These statistics will be utilized for material and technology development as well as economic and reliability models for LIFE laser drivers.

  20. Second-generation dental laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Michael

    1993-07-01

    The first generation of dental lasers proved limited to soft tissue applications. Due to the thermal properties of these lasers, drilling of enamel and dentin is harmful to the underlying nerve tissue. As a solution to this problem, more sophisticated solidstate lasers are under commercial development for hard tissue applications. The first of these second generation lasers to emerge is the erbium:YAG now marketed in Europe by KaVo. This system relies on a cumbersome articulated arm delivery device. Other manufacturers have overcome this delivery problem with the introduction of flexible delivery methods. Another hard tissue laser that has been introduced is the short-pulsed Nd:YAG. This laser uses shaped pulses to drill teeth without thermal damage. An overview of these and other second generation dental lasers is presented.

  1. The Outlook For Medical Lasers: The New Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arons, Irving J.

    1989-06-01

    The medical laser industry continues to be a complex industry to follow. In this presentation, the author provides an overview of the growing markets, the new laser technologies and the new applications that will shape the medical laser industry in the years ahead. The presentation covers both a conservative view of market growth as well as application breakthroughs that could greatly impact the sale of both conventional and new laser systems. These new applications include laser angioplasty, laser lithotripsy, corneal sculpting, and other new significant surgical and therapeutic uses for lasers. The new laser systems include excimer lasers, pulsed dye systems, new solid state lasers operating at fiber transmittable water absorption peaks, diode and diode pumped solid state lasers and tunable solid state lasers of the future. The presentation, based on a recently completed study of the industry (published by Arthur D. Little's Decision Resources, November, 1988), is a valuable overview for both established participants and those newly interested in the medical laser field.

  2. Research on laser fuze technology based on MEMS/MOEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huimin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Yingwen; Li, Kun; Sun, Jianqiang

    2007-12-01

    With the development of semiconductor laser technology, laser proximity fuzes have been widely used in various kinds of guided missiles and conventional ammunitions. Conventional laser proximity fuzes consisting of separated components, have the disadvantages such as large volumes and poor anti-jamming abilities, so are not satisfied with the modern warfare circumstances. Combined with the separated components, the system has been divided into transmitting module, receiving module and information processing module, the different modules have been analyzed in detail,. Meanwhile, the transmitting driven circuit has been developed and laser pulse with 20ns narrow width was obtained. In order to meet the multifunction and miniaturization, laser fuzes based on MEMS/MOEMS have been introduced in this paper. Technologies include vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser, integrated resonant-cavity photodetector and refractive micro-optics. The entire structure was roughly 1~2mm thick and 1mm on a side.

  3. New Cloud Activity on Uranus in 2004: First Detection of a Southern Feature at 2.2 microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammel, H. B.; de Pater, I.; Gibbard, S. G.; Lockwood, G. W.; Rages, K.

    2004-11-01

    On 4 July 2004 UT, we detected a southern hemispheric cloud feature on Uranus at K' (2.2 microns) using adaptive optics and the NIRC2 camera on the Keck 10-m. At H (1.6 microns), the feature had two components: a condensed core (2004-A) co-located with the K' feature at latitude -36.0 ± 0.4 deg, and an extended feature (2004-B) at roughly -33.7 ± 0.4 deg. When we observed again on 8 July UT, the core had faded at K'. By 9 July we were unable to detect a K' feature; the extended feature was still seen at H. The initial high K'-brightness of 2004-A indicates that the core's scattering particles reached altitudes above the 1-bar level, with the larger feature at H, 2004-B, residing below the 1.1-bar level (assuming the model of de Pater et al. 2002, Icarus 160, 359). The core's rapid disappearance at K' indicates dynamical processes in the local vertical aerosol structure, for example, subsidence of the feature's cloud tops. Features 2004-A and 2004-B had zonal velocities of 107 and 115 m/s, respectively (+/- 3 m/s), different from past velocities near these latitudes. These features are either new, or are long-lived but drifting in latitude (as has been seen on Neptune); see abstract by Rages et al. this volume. Regardless of their latitude, no southern features on Uranus have been detected at wavelengths of 2 microns or longward, indicating some change of activity. Continued observations of Uranus are strongly encouraged as its 2007 equinox approaches. HBH acknowledges partial support from NASA grants NAG5-11961 and NAG5-10451. IdP acknowledges partial support from NSF and the Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, managed by UCSC under cooperative agreement No. AST-9876783. SGG's work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DoE, National Nuclear Security Administration by the UC, LLNL under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  4. Ultrasonic Technology for Characterizing Laser Damage in Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G; Martin, L P; Chambers, D

    2002-04-30

    An ultrasonic technique was developed to detect and characterize laser damage in critical optics. During normal usage, sub critical flaws induced by high laser fluence can grow to critical size and potentially can cause unanticipated failure of the optics. This ultrasonic technique monitors the optic in situ and provides a quick, reliable way to quantify the location, number and, ultimately, the size of defects that may initiate and grow during firing of the laser. The feasibility of detecting and sizing laser-induced damage with an ultrasonic technology was theoretically and experimentally demonstrated. An experiment was conducted whereby ultrasonic data was acquired in situ on an optic as it was damaged by a laser. This monitoring of laser induced damage clearly demonstrated the potential for ultrasonic monitoring of critical optics for laser-induced damage.

  5. National funding initiatives for laser technology in Germany: projects on brilliant laser sources and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Friedrich

    2010-09-01

    Germany's leading role in laser technology is not least a consequence of successful national precompetitive joint development projects between industry and science: Funding of laser technology in Germany is strongly performed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and has already been started in the second half of the eighties of last century. Since then several programs matched to the actual technological status and the future requirements of the market have been run: whilst activities have been focused on gas lasers in the beginning, today - in the actual research funding program "optical technologies" - semiconductor lasers and diode pumped lasers are in the center of interest. More than ever before relevance of the development to applications must be integrated into the projects. Consequently, in most projects lasers source development and application of novel brilliant laser sources are combined. This has been successfully performed in the BRIOLAS (Brilliant Diode Lasers) initiative, which has been launched in 2004 and will come to an end in 2010. Based on the knowledge and experience gained in the 13 projects of the BRIOLAS initiative, two new initiatives have been launched in 2008, namely INLAS (Integrated Optical Components for High Power Laser Beam Sources) and MABRILAS (Material Processing with Brilliant Laser Beam Sources).

  6. National funding initiatives for laser technology in Germany: projects on brilliant laser sources and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Friedrich

    2011-02-01

    Germany's leading role in laser technology is not least a consequence of successful national precompetitive joint development projects between industry and science: Funding of laser technology in Germany is strongly performed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and has already been started in the second half of the eighties of last century. Since then several programs matched to the actual technological status and the future requirements of the market have been run: whilst activities have been focused on gas lasers in the beginning, today - in the actual research funding program "optical technologies" - semiconductor lasers and diode pumped lasers are in the center of interest. More than ever before relevance of the development to applications must be integrated into the projects. Consequently, in most projects lasers source development and application of novel brilliant laser sources are combined. This has been successfully performed in the BRIOLAS (Brilliant Diode Lasers) initiative, which has been launched in 2004 and will come to an end in 2010. Based on the knowledge and experience gained in the 13 projects of the BRIOLAS initiative, two new initiatives have been launched in 2008, namely INLAS (Integrated Optical Components for High Power Laser Beam Sources) and MABRILAS (Material Processing with Brilliant Laser Beam Sources).

  7. Information Technologies for the 1980's: Lasers and Microprocessors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, William D.

    This discussion of the development and application of lasers and microprocessors to information processing stresses laser communication in relation to capacity, reliability, and cost and the advantages of this technology to real-time information access and information storage. The increased capabilities of microprocessors are reviewed, and a…

  8. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Labeling of the produce has gained marked attention in recent years. Laser labeling technology involves the etching of required information on the surface using a low energy CO2 laser beam. The etching forms alphanumerical characters by pinhole dot matrix depressions. These openings can lead to wat...

  9. Modeling of InGaAsSb-Based Avalanche Photodetectors for 2-Micron Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Ravindra P.; Abedin, M. Nurul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The main focus of this research is to study and evaluate the potential of InGaAsSb-AlGaAsSb based 2 micron avalanche photo-detectors. The photodetector contains a separate absorption and multiplication region (SAM) structure. The analysis has mainly been done to understand the electrical response characteristics of the devices existing at NASA, and to evaluate alternate structures proposed. Calculating the current flow for the existing detector structure, on the basis of its energy band diagram, is important. This analysis also helps to find shortcomings in the existing detector structure. It is shown that, unfortunately, the existing structure cannot lead to strong multiplication or voltage dependent gain. Two alternate structures are suggested, that could overcome the inherent flaws, and help achieve improved performance. These devices are obtained through modifications of the original structure, which include varying the doping levels, and changing the thicknesses of detector sub-regions. The results of our study are presented and discussed.

  10. Measurements of absolute line intensities in carbon dioxide bands near 5.2 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Benner, D. C.; Devi, V. M.

    1985-01-01

    A nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting procedure has been used to derive experimental absolute intensities for over 300 unblended lines belonging to twelve CO2 bands in the 5.2-micron region. The spectral data were recorded at 0.01/cm resolution and room temperature with the Fourier transform spectrometer in the McMath solar telescope complex at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak and have a signal-to-rms noise ratio of 2000-4000. A natural sample of carbon dioxide was used as the sample gas. For each band, the measured line intensities have been analyzed to derive the vibrational band intensity and coefficients of the F factor. The results are compared to the values used to calculate the intensities in the 1982 Air Force Geophysics Laboratory line parameters compilation.

  11. Development of a Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Refaat, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to the carbon cycle and global radiation budget on Earth. Active remote sensing of CO2 is important to address several limitations that contend with passive sensors. A 2-micron double-pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This active remote sensing instrument will provide an alternate approach of measuring atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise ratio level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. Commercial, on the shelf, components are implemented for the detection system. Instrument integration will be presented in this paper as well as a background for CO2 measurement at NASA Langley research Center

  12. Temperatures of the Jovian auroral zone inferred from 2-micron H2 quadrupole line observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Drossart, P.; Caldwell, J.; Maillard, J. Paris Observatoire, Meudon York Univ., North York CNRS, Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris )

    1990-03-01

    On the basis of the observed intensities of the S1(0), S1(1), and S1(2) 2-micron H2 quadrupole lines in the southern auroral zone of Jupiter, a rotational temperature of 730 (+ 490/-200) K in the 0.01-1.0 microbar range is derived which is judged to represent the local neutral kinetic temperature. Although the dominance of nonthermal emission is indicated for these lines by the factor-of-500 predominance of the H2(nu = 1) auroral zone population over the normal Boltzmann population, a calculation of both thermal and nonthermal intensities of the pure H2 rotational quadrupole lines yields the opposite results in the greater-than-5 micron wavelength region. 21 refs.

  13. Investigations into a potential laser-NASP transport technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Laser propelled flight/transport technology is surveyed. A detailed conceptual design is presented for an on-place Mercury-Lightcraft: other designs are briefly explored for larger, 15-place Executive Lightcraft, and 150 to 350 passenger Jumbo Lightcraft.

  14. Laser furnace technology for zone refining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser experiment facility is constructed to investigate the problems in using a laser beam to zone refine semiconductor and metal crystals. The hardware includes a computer to control scan mirrors and stepper motors to provide a variety of melt zone patterns. The equipment and its operating procedures are described.

  15. ICESat-2 laser technology readiness level evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawruk, Nicholas W.; Burns, Patrick M.; Edwards, Ryan E.; Wysocki, Theodore; VanTuijl, Andre; Litvinovitch, Viatcheslav; Sullivan, Edward; Hovis, Floyd E.

    2015-02-01

    We report on the completion of the space qualification testing program for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite 2 (ICESat-2) program. This paper describes the final performance results of the fully integrated (laser and electronics) flight laser system with an emphasis on the system design evolution from a breadboard demonstration to a fully space-qualified laser system. The 532 nm ICESat-2 laser transmitter generates diffraction limited pulse energies of 1 mJ, pulsewidths of < 1.5 ns, and 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency and has minimum lifetime of 1 trillion pulses on-orbit. A combination of engineering design units and correlated structural thermal optical analysis was used to systematically improve reliability and performance over the operating environment. The laser system qualification and acceptance test programs included electromagnetic interference (EMI), vibration, and thermal vacuum (TVAC) testing. This paper presents key laser performance results and lessons learned on the multi-year laser development to facilitate future space-qualified laser developments, improve reliability, and increase performance.

  16. Semiconductor laser technology for remote sensing experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    Semiconductor injection lasers are required for implementing virtually all spaceborne remote sensing systems. Their main advantages are high reliability and efficiency, and their main roles are envisioned in pumping and injection locking of solid state lasers. In some shorter range applications they may even be utilized directly as the sources.

  17. The solid state detector technology for picosecond laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochazka, Ivan

    1993-01-01

    We developed an all solid state laser ranging detector technology, which makes the goal of millimeter accuracy achievable. Our design and construction philosophy is to combine the techniques of single photon ranging, ultrashort laser pulses, and fast fixed threshold discrimination while avoiding any analog signal processing within the laser ranging chain. The all solid state laser ranging detector package consists of the START detector and the STOP solid state photon counting module. Both the detectors are working in an optically triggered avalanche switching regime. The optical signal is triggering an avalanche current buildup which results in the generation of a uniform, fast risetime output pulse.

  18. Femtosecond laser cataract surgery: technology and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Timothy V; Lawless, Michael; Chan, Colin Ck; Jacobs, Mark; Ng, David; Bali, Shveta J; Hodge, Chris; Sutton, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    The recent introduction of femtosecond lasers to cataract surgery has generated much interest among ophthalmologists around the world. Laser cataract surgery integrates high-resolution anterior segment imaging systems with a femtosecond laser, allowing key steps of the procedure, including the primary and side-port corneal incisions, the anterior capsulotomy and fragmentation of the lens nucleus, to be performed with computer-guided laser precision. There is emerging evidence of reduced phacoemulsification time, better wound architecture and a more stable refractive result with femtosecond cataract surgery, as well as reports documenting an initial learning curve. This article will review the current state of technology and discuss our clinical experience. PMID:22788831

  19. Research on the laser angle deception jamming technology of laser countermeasure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shi-wei; Chen, Wen-jian; Gao, Wei; Duan, Yuan-yuan

    2015-10-01

    In recent years , laser guided weapons behave very well at destroying the military goals in the local wars, the single-shot probability, effective range and hitting precision getting better. And the semi-active laser guided weapons are the most widely used laser guided weapons. In order to improve the viability and protect important military goals, it's necessary to study the technology to against the semi-active guided weapons. This paper studies the working principle, the advantages and disadvantages of the semi-active guided weapons at first, and analyze the possibility of laser angle deception jamming system working. Then it analyzes the working principle and process of laser angle deception jamming technology. Finally it designs a half-real simulation system of laser angle deception jamming, which consists of semi-active laser guided weapons simulation system and laser angle deception jamming system. The simulation system demonstrates the working process of the laser angle deception jamming system. This paper provides fundamental base for the research on the countermeasure technology of semi-active laser guided weapons.

  20. CO2 laser drives extreme ultraviolet nano-lithography — second life of mature laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, K. M.; Ohta, T.; Suganuma, T.; Fujimoto, J.; Mizoguchi, H.; Sumitani, A.; Endo, A.

    2013-12-01

    It was shown both theoretically and experimentally that nanosecond order laser pulses at 10.6 micron wavelength were superior for driving the Sn plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source for nano-lithography for the reasons of higher conversion efficiency, lower production of debris and higher average power levels obtainable in CO2 media without serious problems of beam distortions and nonlinear effects occurring in competing solid-state lasers at high intensities. The renewed interest in such pulse format, wavelength, repetition rates in excess of 50 kHz and average power levels in excess of 18 kiloWatt has sparked new opportunities for a matured multi-kiloWatt CO2 laser technology. The power demand of EUV source could be only satisfied by a Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier system configuration, leading to a development of a new type of hybrid pulsed CO2 laser employing a whole spectrum of CO2 technology, such as fast flow systems and diffusion-cooled planar waveguide lasers, and relatively recent quantum cascade lasers. In this paper we review briefly the history of relevant pulsed CO2 laser technology and the requirements for multi-kiloWatt CO2 laser, intended for the laser-produced plasma EUV source, and present our recent advances, such as novel solid-state seeded master oscillator and efficient multi-pass amplifiers built on planar waveguide CO2 lasers.

  1. Research on intelligent detection and processing technology of laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haili; Jiang, Huilin

    2005-01-01

    Aimed at the influence of turbulent atmosphere effect on laser pulse detection, it discusses the key factors that affect the signal test in this paper. Based on it, the article also discusses two key techniques, namely, floating threshold value and AGC (Automatic Gain Control) technology in detail, especially about the technique of floating threshold value. According to discussion about intelligent detection technology of laser pulse, the system designs a low noise detecting unit of laser pulse, tests its performance by the experiment, and validates correctness of the results.

  2. U.S. Army High Energy Laser (HEL) technology program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavan, Michael J.; Wachs, John J.

    2011-11-01

    The US Army is investing in Solid State Laser (SSL) technology to assess counter rocket, artillery, and mortar (C-RAM) and counter unmanned aerial vehicle (C-UAV) capabilities of solid state based HEL systems, as well as other potential applications for HELs of interest to the Army. The Army HEL program thrust areas are systematically moving the technology forward toward weaponization, including solid state laser technologies, advances in beam control technology, and conducting major demonstrations. The High Energy Laser Mobile Demonstrator (HELMD) will be a major step toward demonstrating HEL weapon capability to the soldier. The US Army will continue to pursue technologies that enable more compact systems compatible with, for example, a Stryker tactical vehicle as a crucial part of our strategy to provide a capability to the warfighter that can maneuver with the force.

  3. Scientific applications of frequency-stabilized laser technology in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumaker, Bonny L.

    1990-01-01

    A synoptic investigation of the uses of frequency-stabilized lasers for scientific applications in space is presented. It begins by summarizing properties of lasers, characterizing their frequency stability, and describing limitations and techniques to achieve certain levels of frequency stability. Limits to precision set by laser frequency stability for various kinds of measurements are investigated and compared with other sources of error. These other sources include photon-counting statistics, scattered laser light, fluctuations in laser power, and intensity distribution across the beam, propagation effects, mechanical and thermal noise, and radiation pressure. Methods are explored to improve the sensitivity of laser-based interferometric and range-rate measurements. Several specific types of science experiments that rely on highly precise measurements made with lasers are analyzed, and anticipated errors and overall performance are discussed. Qualitative descriptions are given of a number of other possible science applications involving frequency-stabilized lasers and related laser technology in space. These applications will warrant more careful analysis as technology develops.

  4. Expert systems for optimization of laser technology processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorov, Vladimir S.; Sternin, M. Y.

    2002-04-01

    Many users of laser technological processes are trying to create data bases accumulating their experience in laser processing of materials. The data bases are useful tools to render help to technicians working with laser machines. But it is only the first step in utilization of intelligent computer programs. In this paper we present the results of the development of expert system (ES) to help technicians in the choice of best conditions for laser processing of materials. The ES has been created on the basis of practical knowledge of experts and experimental results collected to the data base. The set of parameters was developed for the description of laser technological processes. Each of the processes was characterized by the values of such parameters changing in some reasonable diapasons. Those parameters were divided into input and output groups. The input group of parameters included the main technical characteristics of the laser, the type of the material and the demands on the quality of laser processing products. The output group of parameters consisted of the set of laser processing conditions recommended by the expert system. Generally, the ES presents a computer model of the expert's decision making process. The steps of such a process are a new task analysis, search of closest past cases, evaluation of tasks similarity and so on. The expert system called MALS (Machine Learning Shell) is presented in this paper as an example of ES which could give consultations on the best choice of the laser cutting process.

  5. Application and the key technology on high power fiber-optic laser in laser weapon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhou; Li, Qiushi; Meng, Haihong; Sui, Xin; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhai, Xuhua

    2014-12-01

    The soft-killing laser weapon plays an important role in photoelectric defense technology. It can be used for photoelectric detection, search, blinding of photoelectric sensor and other devices on fire control and guidance devices, therefore it draws more and more attentions by many scholars. High power fiber-optic laser has many virtues such as small volume, simple structure, nimble handling, high efficiency, qualified light beam, easy thermal management, leading to blinding. Consequently, it may be used as the key device of soft-killing laser weapon. The present study introduced the development of high power fiber-optic laser and its main features. Meanwhile the key technology of large mode area (LMA) optical fiber design, the beam combination technology, double-clad fiber technology and pumping optical coupling technology was stated. The present study is aimed to design high doping LMA fiber, ensure single mode output by increasing core diameter and decrease NA. By means of reducing the spontaneous emission particle absorbed by fiber core and Increasing the power density in the optical fiber, the threshold power of nonlinear effect can increase, and the power of single fiber will be improved. Meantime, high power will be obtained by the beam combination technology. Application prospect of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology was also set forth. Lastly, the present study explored the advantages of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology.

  6. Research of laser cleaning technology for steam generator tubing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Suixa; Luo, Jijun; Xu, Jun; Yuan, Bo

    2010-10-01

    Surface cleaning based on the laser-induced breakdown of gas and subsequent shock wave generation can remove small particles from solid surfaces. Accordingly, several studies in steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants were performed to expand the cleaning capability of the process. In this work, experimental apparatus of laser cleaning was designed in order to clean heat tubes in steam generator. The laser cleaning process is monitored by analyzing acoustic emission signal experimentally. Experiments demonstrate that laser cleaning can remove smaller particles from the surface of steam generator tubes better than other cleaning process. It has advantages in saving on much manpower and material resource, and it is a good cleaning method for heat tubes, which can be real-time monitoring in laser cleaning process of heat tubes by AE signal. As a green cleaning process, laser cleaning technology in equipment maintenance will be a good prospect.

  7. New laser technologies in the clinic of neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupak, V. V.; Fomichev, N. G.; Tsvetovsky, S. B.; Dmitriev, A. B.; Kobosev, V. V.; Bagaev, S. N.; Mayorov, A. P.; Struts, S. G.

    2005-08-01

    In report summarized more then 10 experience of authors in Novosibirsk Traumatology and orthopedics research institute Neurosurgery clinic on usage of laser technologies in treatment of central nervous system tumors. On the basis of ND-YAG laser application original technologies have been developed and used in surgical treatment of patients with various neurosurgical pathology and protected by 8 Patents of the Russian Federation. 427 patients were operated on with the use of YAG:Nd3+ laser. Out of them 152 patients had extracerebral tumors of various volume and localization, 135 patients - spinal cord tumors, 74 patients - a pathology of cerebrospinal transition (Amold-Chiari syndrome of 1-2 types), and 66 patients - intramedullary tumors of deep localization. Results showed good results of laser technologies usage for central nervous system tumors removal.

  8. Development of a Curriculum in Laser Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, William J.

    A Seattle Central Community College project visited existing programs, surveyed need, and developed a curriculum for a future program in Laser-Electro-Optics (LEO) Technology. To establish contacts and view successful programs, project staff made visits to LEO technology programs at San Jose City College and Texas State Technical Institute, Center…

  9. A contribution to laser range imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defigueiredo, Rui J. P.; Denney, Bradley S.

    1991-02-01

    The goal of the project was to develop a methodology for fusion of a Laser Range Imaging Device (LRID) and camera data. Our initial work in the project led to the conclusion that none of the LRID's that were available were sufficiently adequate for this purpose. Thus we spent the time and effort on the development of the new LRID with several novel features which elicit the desired fusion objectives. In what follows, we describe the device developed and built under contract. The Laser Range Imaging Device (LRID) is an instrument which scans a scene using a laser and returns range and reflection intensity data. Such a system would be extremely useful in scene analysis in industry and space applications. The LRID will be eventually implemented on board a mobile robot. The current system has several advantages over some commercially available systems. One improvement is the use of X-Y galvonometer scanning mirrors instead of polygonal mirrors present in some systems. The advantage of the X-Y scanning mirrors is that the mirror system can be programmed to provide adjustable scanning regions. For each mirror there are two controls accessible by the computer. The first is the mirror position and the second is a zoom factor which modifies the amplitude of the position of the parameter. Another advantage of the LRID is the use of a visible low power laser. Some of the commercial systems use a higher intensity invisible laser which causes safety concerns. By using a low power visible laser, not only can one see the beam and avoid direct eye contact, but also the lower intensity reduces the risk of damage to the eye, and no protective eyeware is required.

  10. Overview on the high power excimer laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingru

    2013-05-01

    High power excimer laser has essential applications in the fields of high energy density physics, inertial fusion energy and industry owing to its advantages such as short wavelength, high gain, wide bandwidth, energy scalable and repetition operating ability. This overview is aimed at an introduction and evaluation of enormous endeavor of the international high power excimer laser community in the last 30 years. The main technologies of high power excimer laser are reviewed, which include the pumping source technology, angular multiplexing and pulse compressing, beam-smoothing and homogenous irradiation, high efficiency and repetitive operation et al. A high power XeCl laser system developed in NINT of China is described in detail.

  11. Laser transmitter for Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, John; Cimolino, Marc; Petros, Mulugeta

    1991-01-01

    The Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) Laser Transmitter Module (LTM) flight laser optical architecture has been space qualified by extensive testing at the system, subsystem and component level. The projected system output performance has been verified using an optically and electrically similar breadboard version of the laser. Parasitic lasing was closely examined and completely suppressed after design changes were implemented and tested. Oscillator and amplifier type heads were separately tested to 150 million shots. Critical subassemblies have undergone environmental testing to Shuttle qualification levels. A superior three color anti-reflection coating was developed and tested for use on 14 surfaces after the final amplifier.

  12. Technology Assessment of Laser-Assisted Materials Processing in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagarathnam, Karthik; Taminger, Karen M. B.

    2001-01-01

    Lasers are useful for performing operations such as joining, machining, built-up freeform fabrication, shock processing, and surface treatments. These attributes are attractive for the supportability of longer-term missions in space due to the multi-functionality of a single tool and the variety of materials that can be processed. However, current laser technology also has drawbacks for space-based applications, specifically size, power efficiency, lack of robustness, and problems processing highly reflective materials. A review of recent laser developments will be used to show how these issues may be reduced and indicate where further improvement is necessary to realize a laser-based materials processing capability in space. The broad utility of laser beams in synthesizing various classes of engineering materials will be illustrated using state-of-the art processing maps for select lightweight alloys typically found on spacecraft. With the advent of recent breakthroughs in diode-pumped solid-state lasers and fiber optic technologies, the potential to perform multiple processing techniques is increasing significantly. Lasers with suitable wavelengths and beam properties have tremendous potential for supporting future space missions to the moon, Mars and beyond.

  13. Multichip packaging technology with laser-patterned interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfknecht, Andrew T.; Tuckerman, David B.; Kaschmitter, James L.; McWilliams, Bruce M.

    1989-04-01

    A multichip silicon-on-silicon packaging technology was developed which incorporates laser-patterned thin-film interconnects. This technology is particularly suited for application in high speed, high power, and high I/O systems where its unique characteristics provide many advantages over more traditional methods. The laser-patterned thin-film interconnects allow higher I/O densities and better electrical performance than wire bonds or TAB. The face-up, thin-film eutectic die attach technique used provides much lower thermal resistance between the substrate and the chips than solder bump die attach can achieve. In addition, laser-patterned interconnects demonstrate superior ruggedness and fatigue resistance under thermomechanical cycling and shock. This technology was used to produce a 10-chip memory module, samples of which were tested to relevant methods of MIL-STD 883C.

  14. Column CO2 Measurement From an Airborne Solid-State Double-Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Fay, J.; Reithmaier, K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micrometers IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  15. Tunable solid-state laser technology for applications to scientific and technological experiments from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allario, F.; Taylor, L. V.

    1986-01-01

    Current plans for the Earth Observing System (EOS) include development of a lidar facility to conduct scientific experiments from a polar orbiting platforms. A recommended set of experiments were scoped, which includes techniques of atmospheric backscatter (Lidar), Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL), altimetry, and retroranging. Preliminary assessments of the resources (power, weight, volume) required by the Eos Lidar Facility were conducted. A research program in tunable solid state laser technology was developed, which includes laser materials development, modeling and experiments on the physics of solid state laser materials, and development of solid state laser transmitters with a strong focus on Eos scientific investigations. Some of the system studies that were conducted which highlight the payoff of solid state laser technology for the Eos scientific investigations will be discussed. Additionally, a summary of some promising research results which have recently emerged from the research program will be presented.

  16. CCD technology applied to laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Renier, Eric; Truchetet, Frederic

    1996-03-01

    Power lasers are more and more used in aerospace industry or automobile industry; their widespread use through different processes such as: welding, drilling or coating, in order to perform some surface treatments of material, requires a better understanding. In order to control the quality of the process, many technics have been developed, but most of them are based on a post-mortem analysis of the samples, and/or require an important financial investment. Welding, coating or other material treatments involving material transformations are often controlled with a metallurgical analysis. We here propose a new method, a new approach of the phenomena, we control the industrial process during the application. For this, we use information provided by two CCD cameras. One supplies information related to the intensity, and geometry of the melted surface, the second about the shape of the powder distribution within the laser beam. We use data provided by post-mortem metallurgical analysis and correlate those informations with parameters measured by both CCD, we create a datas bank which represents the relation between the measured parameters and the quality of the coating. Both informations, provided by the 2 CCD cameras allows us to optimize the industrial process. We are actually working on the real time aspect of the application and expect an implementation of the system.

  17. Selectively oxidized vertical-cavity laser performance and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-02-01

    The authors discuss revolutionary performance advances in selectively oxidized vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), which have enabled low operating power laser diodes appropriate for aerospace applications. Incorporating buried oxide layers converted from AIGaAs layers within the laser cavity produces enhanced optical and electrical confinement enabling superior laser performance, such as high efficiency and modulation bandwidth. VCSELs also shown to be viable over varied environmental conditions such as ambient temperature and ionized radiation. The development of novel VCSEL technologies for advanced system applications is also described. Two dimensional individually addressable VCSEL arrays exhibit uniform threshold and operating characteristics. Bottom emitting 850 nm VCSEL arrays fabricated using wafer fusion are also reported.

  18. Advanced mid-IR Solid-State Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art 2-micron solid-state laser developments. A world record one-Joule-per-pulse energy laser system and an advanced thermal management with fully conductive cooled laser technique are discussed

  19. Advanced laser sensing receiver concepts based on FPA technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, P. L.; Petrin, R. R.; Jolin, J. L.; Foy, B. R.; Lowrance, J. L.; Renda, G.

    2002-01-01

    The ultimate performance of any remote sensor is ideally governed by the hardware signal-to-noise capability and allowed signal-averaging time. In real-world scenarios, this may not be realizable and the limiting factors may suggest the need for more advanced capabilities. Moving from passive to active remote sensors offers the advantage of control over the illumination source, the laser. Added capabilities may include polarization discrimination, instantaneous imaging, range resolution, simultaneous multi-spectral measurement, or coherent detection. However, most advanced detection technology has been engineered heavily towards the straightforward passive sensor requirements, measuring an integrated photon flux. The need for focal plane array technology designed specifically for laser sensing has been recognized for some time, but advances have only recently made the engineering possible. This paper will present a few concepts for laser sensing receiver architectures, the driving specifications behind those concepts, and test/modeling results of such designs.

  20. Repeat scanning technology for laser ultrasonic propagation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Yenn Chong, See; Sunuwar, Nitam; Park, Chan Yik

    2013-08-01

    Laser ultrasonic scanning in combination with contact or non-contact sensors provides new paradigms in structural health management (SHM) and non-destructive in-process quality control (IPQC) for large composite structures. Wave propagation imaging technology based on laser ultrasonic scanning and fixed-point sensing shows remarkable advantages, such as minimal need for embedded sensors in SHM, minimum invasive defect visualization in IPQC and general capabilities of curved and complex target inspection, and temporal reference-free inspection. However, as with other SHM methods and non-destructive evaluation based on ultrasound, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a prevalent issue in real structural applications, especially with non-contact thin-composite sensing or with thick and heterogeneous composites. This study proposes a high-speed repeat scanning technique for laser ultrasonic propagation imaging (UPI) technology, which is realized with the scanning speed of 1 kHz of a Q-switched continuous wave laser, and precise control of the laser beam pulses for identical point scanning. As a result, the technique enables the achievement of significant improvement in the SNR to inspect real-world composite structures. The proposed technique provides enhanced results for impact damage detection in a 2 mm thick wing box made of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic, despite the low sensitivity of non-contact laser ultrasonic sensing. A field-applicable pure laser UPI system has been developed using a laser Doppler vibrometer as the non-contact ultrasonic sensor. The proposed technique enables the visualization of the disbond defect in a 15 mm thick wind blade specimen made of glass-fiber-reinforced plastic, despite the high dissipation of ultrasound in the thick composite.

  1. DBM technologies for free-space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ih, C. S.; Hunsperger, R. G.; Wang, X. L.; Kramer, J. J.; Kissa, K.

    1990-07-01

    The concept of double-beam modulation (DBM) has been demonstrate using SWAOM, SWSAWM, and DMB frequency-locked lasers (DBM-FLL). The concept and characteristics of DBM are reviewed, and some initial experiments to demonstrate the concept of DMB-FLL are described. DBM technologies for space communications are briefly addressed.

  2. Laser Electro-Optic Technology. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This program guide identifies primary considerations in the organization, operation, and evaluation of a laser electro-optic technology program. An occupational description and program content are presented. A curriculum framework specifies the exact course title, course number, levels of instruction, major course content, laboratory activities,…

  3. Laser Electro-Optic Engineering Technology. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This program guide identifies particular considerations in the organization, operation, and evaluation of laser electro-optic engineering technology programs. Contents include an occupational description and information on the following: program content, including a curriculum framework that details major concepts and intended outcomes and a list…

  4. Compact, Engineered, 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Prototype for Field and Airborne Validation: Doppler Aerosol WiNd Lidar (DAWN). Interim Review #1 (6 months)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2006-01-01

    A new project, selected in 2005 by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), under the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), will be described. The 3-year effort is intended to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a packaged, rugged, compact, space-qualifiable coherent Doppler wind lidar (DWL) transceiver capable of future validation in an aircraft and/or Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The state-of-the-art 2-micron coherent DWL breadboard at NASA/LaRC will be engineered and compactly packaged consistent with future aircraft flights. The packaged transceiver will be integrated into a coherent DWL system test bed at LaRC. Atmospheric wind measurements will be made to validate the packaged technology. This will greatly advance the coherent part of the hybrid DWL solution to the need for global tropospheric wind measurements.

  5. Write-Once Laser Disc Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slonim, Jacob; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This article presents a brief history of the videodisc and describes three major current manifestations of this storage medium--read-only, write-once, erasable. The current status of write-once technology, major corporations involved in the field, potential uses for various types of storage media, and software and market trends are highlighted.…

  6. Laser-light delivery microtools based on laser technology: design, fabrication, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, Vadim P.; Voznesensky, Nikolay B.

    2001-06-01

    A set of new laser-light delivery microtools (LDM) based on laser technology is investigated and discussed. Wide application of LDM in different fields of science, medicine, biology, industry and information processing is considered. Fiber optical networks in medical diagnostics and technical, civil engineering and other technological areas are discussed. The general approach based on electromagnetic field equations-transformation for all range of dimensions (mini-, micro and nanodomain) is given. Laser-assisted technology for drawing-out and for microstructuring optical tools is investigated, high-speed movie has been applied to study the process and compared with theoretical description. Finally a number of fibers and micropipettes-based medical tools and SNOM-tips has been fabricated and tested. Applications of some tools for medical operations (thermocoagulation), protein rasters preparing, SNOM-microscopy investigation have been demonstrated.

  7. [Technological characteristics of endoscopic high frequency current and laser interventions].

    PubMed

    Reidenbach, H D

    1993-01-01

    High frequency current and laser radiation perform two possibilities to generate therapeutic and surgical heat. The integration of these two technologies into endoscopy resulted in important ancillary techniques in the hands of a surgeon. Starting from the principal methods for coagulation and dissection of tissue the respective technological aspects at the interaction of high frequency currents and intensive laser radiation with different wavelengths on biological tissue are illustrated. Mono- and bipolar HF-techniques as well as the light-guide assisted laser method in the contact and non-contact mode are explained. The special problems in endoscopy arising from the reduction in visibility by haemorrhages and the development of smoke at the thermally induced coagulation may be overcome successfully by the simultaneous instillation of a nearly isolating liquid during the HF-treatment. The so-called electrohydrothermosation (EHT) method is presented and several probes and instruments for endoscopic hemostasis and microsurgery are explained. For an increase in safety at the endoscopic application of HF-current the use of the bipolar technique is recommended and several technological developments used in this mode are pointed out. It is shown that the absorption of radiation through the water-content of the tissue is mainly responsible for the reactions which may be produced with laser-light. Furthermore it is mentioned that the range of lasers which might be used has a large spectrum of medical applications which had been even increased especially by the new erbium and holmium solid state lasers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8147152

  8. Component Technology for Laser Plasma Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W J; Smith, S G; Dahlgren, T; Epperley, T; Kohn, S; Kumfert, G

    2002-06-17

    This paper will discuss the application of high performance component software technology developed for a complex physics simulation development effort. The primary tool used to build software components is called Babel and is used to create language-independent libraries for high performance computers. Components were constructed from legacy code and wrapped with a thin Python layer to enable run-time scripting. Low-level components in Fortran, C++, and Python were composed directly as Babel components and invoked interactively from a parallel Python script.

  9. The laser measurement technology of combustion flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingdong; Wang, Guangyu; Qu, Dongsheng

    2014-07-01

    The parameters of combustion flow field such as temperature, velocity, pressure and mole-fraction are of significant value in engineering application. The laser spectroscopy technology which has the non-contact and non- interference properties has become the most important method and it has more advantages than conventionally contacting measurement. Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF/LIF) is provided with high sensibility and resolution. Filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) is a good measurement method for complex flow field .Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is prosperity on development and application. This article introduced the theoretical foundation, technical principle, system structure, merits and shortages. It is helpful for researchers to know about the latest development tendency and do the related research.

  10. Application of laser bar code technology in power fitting evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaohong; Liu, Shuhuab

    2007-12-01

    In this work, an automatic encoding and management system on power fittings (PFEMS) is developed based on laser bar coding technology. The system can encode power fittings according to their types, structure, dimensions, materials, and technical characteristics. Both the character codes and the laser bar codes of power fittings can be produced from the system. The system can evaluate power fittings and search process-paper automatically. The system analyzes the historical values and technical information of congeneric fittings, and forms formulae of evaluation with recursive analytical method. And then stores the formulae and technical documents into the database for index. Scanning the bar code with a laser bar code reader, accurate evaluation and corresponding process-paper of the fittings can be produced. The software has already been applied in some power stations and worked very well.

  11. Science, technology, and the industrialization of laser-driven processes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.I.; Paisner, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Members of the laser program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) reviewed potential applications of lasers in industry, some of which are: isotope separation; cleanup of radioactive waste; trace impurity removal; selective chemical reactions; photochemical activation or dissociation of gases; control of combustion particulates; crystal and powder chemistry; and laser induced biochemistry. Many of these areas are currently under active study in the community. The investigation at LLNL focused on laser isotope separation of atomic uranium because of the large demand (> 1000 tonnes/year) and high product enrichment price (> $600/kg of product) for material used as fuel in commercial light-water nuclear power reactors. They also believed that once the technology was fully developed and deployed, it could be applied directly to separating many elements economically on an industrial scale. The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program at LLNL has an extensive uranium and plutonium program of >$100 M in FY85 and a minor research program for other elements. This report describes the AVLIS program conducted covering the following topics; candidate elements; separative work units; spectroscopic selectivety; major systems; facilities; integrated process model;multivariable sensitivety studies; world market; and US enrichment enterprise. 23 figs. (AT)

  12. Laser technology in manufacture of printed-circuit boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machulka, G. A.; Stelmakh, M. F.; Uladinov, A. B.

    1985-09-01

    The complexity of the printed-circuit board manufacturing process, additionally encumbered by the intricacy of topology and layout, especially in multilayer boards, makes application of laser technology a very attractive possibility. Extensive studies have established the feasibility of using laser radiation in polygraphic dry offset printing, despite difficulties created by the high thermal conductivity of metallized surfaces, also in etching of patterns, drilling of holes, and soldering of joints. A gaseous (CO2) laser and a solid-state (garnet) laser have been found to be most suitable, each for specific operations. One of the most critical factors here is selection of oxidation-resistant materials for masks and insulation. The next step is incorporating the laser operations in the production line. The feasibility of this has been established in three versions. The first and simplest version, without computer, is proposed for experimental or pilot production of bilateral boards. The second version is proposed or commercial production, with an automatic work station and a control computer. In the third and most advanced version, for large-scale production, the automatic work station has been replaced by a computer-aided design system.

  13. Advanced excimer laser technologies enable green semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Hitomi; Yoo, Youngsun; Minegishi, Yuji; Hisanaga, Naoto; Enami, Tatsuo

    2014-03-01

    "Green" has fast become an important and pervasive topic throughout many industries worldwide. Many companies, especially in the manufacturing industries, have taken steps to integrate green initiatives into their high-level corporate strategies. Governments have also been active in implementing various initiatives designed to increase corporate responsibility and accountability towards environmental issues. In the semiconductor manufacturing industry, there are growing concerns over future environmental impact as enormous fabs expand and new generation of equipments become larger and more powerful. To address these concerns, Gigaphoton has implemented various green initiatives for many years under the EcoPhoton™ program. The objective of this program is to drive innovations in technology and services that enable manufacturers to significantly reduce both the financial and environmental "green cost" of laser operations in high-volume manufacturing environment (HVM) - primarily focusing on electricity, gas and heat management costs. One example of such innovation is Gigaphoton's Injection-Lock system, which reduces electricity and gas utilization costs of the laser by up to 50%. Furthermore, to support the industry's transition from 300mm to the next generation 450mm wafers, technologies are being developed to create lasers that offer double the output power from 60W to 120W, but reducing electricity and gas consumption by another 50%. This means that the efficiency of lasers can be improve by up to 4 times in 450mm wafer production environments. Other future innovations include the introduction of totally Heliumfree Excimer lasers that utilize Nitrogen gas as its replacement for optical module purging. This paper discusses these and other innovations by Gigaphoton to enable green manufacturing.

  14. Laser radar technology and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Quebec, Canada, June 3-5, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruickshank, James M.; Harney, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on laser radar technology and applications are presented. The topics considered include: eye-safe solid lasers for lidar applications, practical DF laser for ranging applications, ultrafast surface barrier photodetectors, performance analyses for peak-detecting laser radars, multiple scattering for laser beams propagating in a layered atmosphere, laser radar cross section of objects immersed in the earth's atmosphere, measurements of pulse coherence in mode-locked TEA-CO2 lasers, and single longitudinal mode operation of a continuously tunable high pressure TE-CO2. Also discussed are: amplitude-modulated laser system for distance and displacement measurement, minilaser rangefinder, laser docking system radar flight experiment, improved optical resonator for laser radars, design of frequency-stable TEA-CO2 lasers, HgCdTe photodiodes for heterodyne applications, acoustooptic spectrum analyzer for laser radar applications, laser cloud mapper and its applications, scanning lidar bathymeter for water depth measurement, and fluorescence lidar for land and sea remote sensing.

  15. Science, technology and the industrialization of laser-driven processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. I.; Paisner, J. A.

    1985-05-01

    Members of the laser program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) potential applications of lasers in industry, some of which are: isotope separation, cleanup of radioactive waste, trace impurity removal, selective chemical reactions, photochemical activation or dissociation of gases, control of combustion particulates, crystal and powder chemistry, and laser induced biochemistry are reviewed. Many of these areas are currently under active study in the community. The investigation at LLNL focused on laser isotope separation of atomic uranium because of the large demand and high product enrichment price for material used as fuel in commercial light-water nuclear power reactors. They also believed that once the technology was fully developed and deployed, it could be applied directly to separating many elements economicprogram at LLNL has an extensive uranium and plutonium program of $100 M in Fy85 and a minor research program for other elements. This report describes the AVLIS program conducted covering the following topics: candidate elements, separative work units, sepctroscopic selectivety, major systems, facilities, integrated process model, multivariable sensitivity studies, world market, and US enrichment enterprise.

  16. Application of conventional laser technology to gamma-gamma colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, C.E.; Kurnit, N.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.

    1995-02-01

    A future e{sup {minus}}e{sup +} (electron-positron) linear collider can be configured with perhaps minimal modification to serve as an {gamma}-{gamma} (gamma-gamma) or a e{sup {minus}}-{gamma} collider. This is accomplished by Compton-backscattering low energy photons (from a laser source) off of the high-energy electron beams prior to the crossing of the electron beams. However, to be competitive with the e{sup {minus}}e{sup +} configuration, the luminosity cannot be compromised in the process. This requires that the laser source deliver a sufficient number of photons per pulse with a pulse format and rate matching that of the electron beams. As it turns out, this requires an average optical power of 5 to 15 kW from the laser which is beyond the current state of the art. In this paper, the authors address how to generate the required pulse format and how the high average power requirement can be met with conventional laser technology. They also address concerns about the survivability of mirrors located near the interaction point. Finally, they list a program of research and development which addresses some of the unknowns in such a system.

  17. Noise Whitening in Airborne Wind Profiling With a Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Arthur, Grant E.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Two different noise whitening methods in airborne wind profiling with a pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia are presented. In order to provide accurate wind parameter estimates from the airborne lidar data acquired during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign in 2010, the adverse effects of background instrument noise must be compensated properly in the early stage of data processing. The results of the two methods are presented using selected GRIP data and compared with the dropsonde data for verification purposes.

  18. Airborne Wind Profiling With the Data Acquisition and Processing System for a Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia flew on the NASA's DC-8 aircraft during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) during the summer of 2010. The participation was part of the project Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) Air. Selected results of airborne wind profiling are presented and compared with the dropsonde data for verification purposes. Panoramic presentations of different wind parameters over a nominal observation time span are also presented for selected GRIP data sets. The realtime data acquisition and analysis software that was employed during the GRIP campaign is introduced with its unique features.

  19. Absolute integrated intensity and individual line parameters for the 6.2-micron band of NO2. [in solar spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Bonomo, F. S.; Williams, W. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Snider, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    The absolute integrated intensity of the 6.2-micron band of NO2 at 40 C was determined from quantitative spectra at about 10 per cm resolution by the spectral band model technique. A value of 1430 plus or minus 300 per sq cm per atm was obtained. Individual line parameters, positions, intensities, and ground-state energies were derived, and line-by-line calculations were compared with the band model results and with the quantitative spectra obtained at about 0.5 per cm resolution.

  20. Development of the Data Acquisition and Processing System for a Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    A general overview of the development of a data acquisition and processing system is presented for a pulsed, 2-micron coherent Doppler Lidar system located in NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, USA. It is a comprehensive system that performs high-speed data acquisition, analysis, and data display both in real time and offline. The first flight missions are scheduled for the summer of 2010 as part of the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign for the study of hurricanes. The system as well as the control software is reviewed and its requirements and unique features are discussed.

  1. Broadband 7 microns OPCPA pumped by a 2 microns picosecond Ho:YLF CPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Daniel; Hemmer, Michael; Baudisch, Matthias; Biegert, Jens; Chalus, Olivier; Simon-Boisson, Christophe; Zawilski, Kevin; Schunemann, Peter G.; Smirnov, Vadim; Hoogland, Heinar

    2016-03-01

    The development of coherent light sources with emission in the mid-IR is currently undergoing a remarkable revolution. The mid-IR spectral range has always been of tremendous interest, mainly to spectroscopists, due to the ability of mid-IR light to access rotational and vibrational resonances of molecules which give rise to superb sensitivity upon optical probing [1-3]. Previously, high energy resolution was achieved with narrowband lasers or parametric sources, but the advent of frequency comb sources has revolutionized spectroscopy by providing high energy resolution within the frequency comb structure of the spectrum and at the same time broadband coverage and short pulse duration [4-6]. Such carrier to envelope phase (CEP) controlled light waveforms, when achieved at ultrahigh intensity, give rise to extreme effects such as the generation of isolated attosecond pulses in the vacuum to extreme ultraviolet range (XUV) [7]. Motivated largely by the vast potential of attosecond science, the development of ultraintense few-cycle and CEP stable sources has intensified [8], and it was recognized that coherent soft X-ray radiation could be generated when driving high harmonic generation (HHG) with long wavelength sources [9-11]. Recently, based on this concept, the highest waveform controlled soft X-ray flux [12] and isolated attosecond pulse emission at 300 eV [13] was demonstrated via HHG from a 1850 nm, sub-2-cycle source [14]. Within strong field physics, long wavelength scaling may lead to further interesting physics such as the direct reshaping of the carrier field [15], scaling of quantum path dynamics [16], the breakdown of the dipole approximation [17] or direct laser acceleration [18]. The experimental development of long wavelength light sources therefore holds great promise in many fields of science and will lead to numerous applications beyond strong field physics and attosecond science. In this paper, we present the first mid-IR optical parametric

  2. SITE - EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES: LASER INDUCED PHOTO- CHEMICAL OXIDATIVE DESTRUCTION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN LEACHATES AND GROUNDWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The technology described in this report has been developed under the Emerging Technology Program of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program to photochemically oxidize organic compounds in wastewater by applying ultraviolet radiation using an excimer laser. T...

  3. Solid state laser technology for inertial confinement fusion: A collection of articles from ''Energy and Technology Review''

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    This paper contains reprinted articles that record several milestones in laser research at LLNL. ''Neodymium-Glass Laser Research and Development at LLNL'' recounts the history of the Laser Program and our work on neodymium-glass lasers. ''Nova Laser Technology'' describes the capabilities of the Nova laser and some of its uses. ''Building Nova: Industry Relations and Technology Transfer'' illustrates the Laboratory's commitment to work with US industry in technology development. ''Managing the Nova Laser Project'' details the organization and close monitoring of costs and schedules during the construction of the Nova laser facility. The article ''Optical Coatings by the Sol-Gel Process,'' describes our chemical process for making the damage-resistant, antireflective silica coatings used on the Nova laser glass. The technical challenges in designing and fabricating the KDP crystal arrays used to convert the light wave frequency of the Nova lasers are reported in ''Frequency Conversion of the Nova Laser.'' Two articles, ''Eliminating Platinum Inclusions in Laser Glass'' and ''Detecting Microscopic Inclusions in Optical Glass,'' describe how we dealt with the problem of damaging metal inclusions in the Nova laser glass. The last article reprinted here, ''Auxilliary Target Chamber for Nova,'' discusses the diversion of two of Nova's ten beamlines into a secondary chamber for the purpose of increasing our capacity for experimentation.

  4. CLEANSPACE 'Small Debris Removal By Laser Illumination And Complementary Technologies'

    SciTech Connect

    Esmiller, Bruno; Jacquelard, Christophe

    2011-11-10

    Studies show that the number of debris in Low Earth Orbit is exponentially growing despite future debris release mitigation measures considered. Especially, the already existing population of small and medium debris (between 1 cm and several dozens of cm) is today a concrete threat to operational satellites. A ground based laser solution which can remove at low expense and in a non-destructive way hazardous debris of decimetric size around selected space assets appears as one highly promising answer. This solution will be studied in the frame of CLEANSPACE project which is a part of the FP7 space theme. The overall CLEANSPACE objective is threefold: to propose an efficient and affordable global system architecture, to tackle safety regulation aspects, political implications and future collaborations, to develop affordable technological bricks and to establish roadmap for the development and the future implantation of a fully functional laser protection system. This paper will present the CLEANSPACE project.

  5. Closed-Cycle, Frequency-Stable CO2 Laser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batten, Carmen E. (Editor); Miller, Irvin M. (Editor); Wood, George M., Jr. (Editor); Willetts, David V. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings contain a collection of papers and comments presented at a workshop on technology associated with long-duration closed-cycle operation of frequency-stable, pulsed carbon dioxide lasers. This workshop was held at the NASA Langley Research Center June 10 to 12, 1986. The workshop, jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE), was attended by 63 engineers and scientists from the United States and the United Kingdom. During the 2 1/2 days of the workshop, a number of issues relating to obtaining frequency-stable operation and to the catalytic control of laser gas chemistry were discussed, and specific recommendations concerning future activities were drafted.

  6. Ta Keo Temple Reconstruction Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, X.; Wang, C.; Wan, Y. P.; Khuon, K. N.

    2015-08-01

    Ta Keo temple is one of the very famous temple complex of Angkor Wat in northwestern Cambodia. It has been suffering massive collapse and other serious damages in recent years. Nowadays, Terrestrial Laser Scanning(TLS) technology is considered as a wellestablished resource for heritage documentation and protection (Lerma et al, 2008; Reshetyuk, 2009). This paper used TLS to reconstruct Ta Keo Temple. Firstly, we acquired 71 scanning stations of points cloud data with high density and high accuracy, and over one thousand images with high spatial resolution about the temple. Secondly, the raw points cloud data were denoised, reduced and managed efficiently, and registrated using an adjusted ICP algorithm. Thirdly, a triangulation method was used to model most objects. At last, we mapped the texture data into the digital model and a 3-D model of Ta Keo with high accuracy was achieved. The authors focus on large object reconstruction by TLS technology, and pay much attention to the scanning design, multi-station data and the whole project's data registration, and texture mapping and so on. The research result will be useful for Ta Keo restoration, reconstruction and protection. Also, it is a good reference source for large complex buildings reconstruction when using terrestrial laser scanning technology.

  7. Combined 2-micron Dial and Doppler Lidar: Application to the Atmosphere of Earth or Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Ismail, Syed; Kavaya, Michael; Yu, Jirong; Wood, Sidney A.; Emmitt, G. David

    2006-01-01

    A concept is explored for combining the Doppler and DIAL techniques into a single, multifunctional instrument. Wind, CO2 concentration, and aerosol density can all be measured. Technology to build this instrument is described, including the demonstration of a prototype lidar. Applications are described for use in the Earth science. The atmosphere of Mars can also be studied, and results from a recently-developed simulation model of performance in the Martian atmosphere are presented.

  8. Analysis and research on technology system of space broadband network based on laser link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chengwu; Fei, Ligang; Chen, Erhu; Kou, Baohua; Cheng, Liyu

    2015-10-01

    Space broadband network based on laser link represents the future development direction, Europe, the United States, Japan and other space powers have been researching the theory of space laser communication and the key technology constantly, and have carried out the key technology test of inter-satellite laser communication and satellite-ground laser communication on orbit. However, what is the technology system of space broadband network based on laser link? up to now, it is still controversial, such as wavelength, coding, and modulation mode, exchange mode and so on. Here, by analyzing all kinds of space laser communication test and its technology parameters, combined with the application requirement of space broadband network, a set of technology system for space broadband network based on laser link is put forward, although just a preliminary research result. At first, this paper introduces the basic conception of space broadband network based on laser link, defines the space laser broadband network technology system and its research scope. Then analyze the main contents of space laser broadband network technology system, especially the technical route choice involved, and by studying, the related suggestions are given. Finally, with the development of space broadband network, the issue of standardization in space laser communication technology system is put forward, in order to cause attaches great importance to scientific research institutes and relevant experts.

  9. Optimization of A 2-Micron Laser Frequency Stabilization System for a Double-Pulse CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingsin; Koch, Grady; Petros, Mulugeta; Trieu, Bo; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO2) Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for accurate CO2 concentration measurement requires a frequency locking system to achieve high frequency locking precision and stability. We describe the frequency locking system utilizing Frequency Modulation (FM), Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD), and Proportional Integration Derivative (PID) feedback servo loop, and report the optimization of the sensitivity of the system for the feed back loop based on the characteristics of a variable path-length CO2 gas cell. The CO2 gas cell is characterized with HITRAN database (2004). The method can be applied for any other frequency locking systems referring to gas absorption line.

  10. Airborne laser induced fluorescence imaging. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) was demonstration as part of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) Plant 1 Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area located at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The demonstration took place on November 19, 1996. In order to allow the contaminated buildings undergoing deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) to be opened to the atmosphere, radiological surveys of floors, walls and ceilings must take place. After successful completion of the radiological clearance survey, demolition of the building can continue. Currently, this process is performed by collecting and analyzing swipe samples for radiological analysis. Two methods are used to analyze the swipe samples: hand-held frisker and laboratory analysis. For the purpose of this demonstration, the least expensive method, swipe samples analyzed by hand-held frisker, is the baseline technology. The objective of the technology demonstration was to determine if the baseline technology could be replaced using LIF.

  11. New laser technology to determine present weather parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, R. A.; Sandford, A. P.; Jones, G. E.; Richards, J.; Petzing, J.; Coupland, J. M.

    2006-07-01

    Present weather sensors are becoming increasingly important as a means to augment networks of automated weather stations and extend the capability of manned observations. The classification of hydrometeors is one of the principal tasks that is addressed by present weather sensors. In this paper, we discuss a new laser-based technology for this purpose. The system improves upon current precipitation monitors by using a derivative of phase Doppler anemometry techniques to accurately determine particle speed and size. The instrument is also capable of distinguishing between liquid droplets and solid polycrystalline hydrometeors and can be used to estimate visibility. The incorporation of this technology into a meteorological station with other sensors, such as temperature and relative humidity probes, leads to the accurate classification of particle type. The example data shown are taken from tests in Leicestershire, England and Utah, USA and show the differences between solid and liquid precipitation events.

  12. Ultrafast disk technology enables next generation micromachining laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckl, Oliver H.; Weiler, Sascha; Luzius, Severin; Zawischa, Ivo; Sutter, Dirk

    2013-02-01

    Ultrashort pulsed lasers based on thin disk technology have entered the 100 W regime and deliver several tens of MW peak power without chirped pulse amplification. Highest uptime and insensitivity to back reflections make them ideal tools for efficient and cost effective industrial micromachining. Frequency converted versions allow the processing of a large variety of materials. On one hand, thin disk oscillators deliver more than 30 MW peak power directly out of the resonator in laboratory setups. These peak power levels are made possible by recent progress in the scaling of the pulse energy in excess of 40 μJ. At the corresponding high peak intensity, thin disk technology profits from the limited amount of material and hence the manageable nonlinearity within the resonator. Using new broadband host materials like for example the sesquioxides will eventually reduce the pulse duration during high power operation and further increase the peak power. On the other hand industry grade amplifier systems deliver even higher peak power levels. At closed-loop controlled 100W, the TruMicro Series 5000 currently offers the highest average ultrafast power in an industry proven product, and enables efficient micromachining of almost any material, in particular of glasses, ceramics or sapphire. Conventional laser cutting of these materials often requires UV laser sources with pulse durations of several nanoseconds and an average power in the 10 W range. Material processing based on high peak power laser sources makes use of multi-photon absorption processes. This highly nonlinear absorption enables micromachining driven by the fundamental (1030 nm) or frequency doubled (515 nm) wavelength of Yb:YAG. Operation in the IR or green spectral range reduces the complexity and running costs of industrial systems initially based on UV light sources. Where UV wavelength is required, the TruMicro 5360 with a specified UV crystal life-time of more than 10 thousand hours of continues

  13. Dental scanning in CAD/CAM technologies: laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Faur, Nicolae; Negru, Radu; Romînu, Mihai; Cozarov, Dalibor

    2008-02-01

    Scanning, also called digitizing, is the process of gathering the requisite data from an object. Many different technologies are used to collect three dimensional data. They range from mechanical and very slow, to radiation-based and highly-automated. Each technology has its advantages and disadvantages, and their applications and specifications overlap. The aims of this study are represented by establishing a viable method of digitally representing artifacts of dental casts, proposing a suitable scanner and post-processing software and obtaining 3D Models for the dental applications. The method is represented by the scanning procedure made by different scanners as the implicated materials. Scanners are the medium of data capture. 3D scanners aim to measure and record the relative distance between the object's surface and a known point in space. This geometric data is represented in the form of point cloud data. The contact and no contact scanners were presented. The results show that contact scanning procedures uses a touch probe to record the relative position of points on the objects' surface. This procedure is commonly used in Reverse engineering applications. Its merits are represented by efficiency for objects with low geometric surface detail. Disadvantages are represented by time consuming, this procedure being impractical for artifacts digitization. The non contact scanning procedure implies laser scanning (laser triangulation technology) and photogrammetry. As a conclusion it can be drawn that different types of dental structure needs different types of scanning procedures in order to obtain a competitive complex 3D virtual model that can be used in CAD/CAM technologies.

  14. Development of Double and Triple-Pulsed 2-micron IPDA Lidars for Column CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to the carbon cycle and globalradiation budget on Earth. CO2 role on Earth’s climate is complicated due to different interactions with various climatecomponents that include the atmosphere, the biosphere and the hydrosphere. Although extensive worldwide efforts formonitoring atmospheric CO2 through various techniques, including in-situ and passive sensors, are taking place highuncertainties exist in quantifying CO2 sources and sinks. These uncertainties are mainly due to insufficient spatial andtemporal mapping of the gas. Therefore it is required to have more rapid and accurate CO2 monitoring with higheruniform coverage and higher resolution. CO2 DIAL operating in the 2-µm band offer better near-surface CO2measurement sensitivity due to the intrinsically stronger absorption lines. For more than 15 years, NASA LangleyResearch Center (LaRC) contributed in developing several 2-?m CO2 DIAL systems and technologies. This paperfocuses on the current development of the airborne double-pulsed and triple-pulsed 2-?m CO2 integrated pathdifferential absorption (IPDA) lidar system at NASA LaRC. This includes the IPDA system development andintegration. Results from ground and airborne CO2 IPDA testing will be presented. The potential of scaling suchtechnology to a space mission will be addressed.

  15. Fusion technologies for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, K. J.; Latkowski, J. F.; Abbott, R. P.; Anklam, T. P.; Dunne, A. M.; El-Dasher, B. S.; Flowers, D. L.; Fluss, M. J.; Lafuente, A.; Loosmore, G. A.; Morris, K. R.; Moses, E.; Reyes, S.

    2013-11-01

    The Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy (LIFE) engine design builds upon on going progress at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and offers a near-term pathway to commercial fusion. Fusion technologies that are critical to success are reflected in the design of the first wall, blanket and tritium separation subsystems. The present work describes the LIFE engine-related components and technologies. LIFE utilizes a thermally robust indirect-drive target and a chamber fill gas. Coolant selection and a large chamber solid-angle coverage provide ample tritium breeding margin and high blanket gain. Target material selection eliminates the need for aggressive chamber clearing, while enabling recycling. Demonstrated tritium separation and storage technologies limit the site tritium inventory to attractive levels. These key technologies, along with the maintenance and advanced materials qualification program have been integrated into the LIFE delivery plan. This describes the development of components and subsystems, through prototyping and integration into a First Of A Kind power plant. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Space Solar Power Technology Demonstration for Lunar Polar Applications: Laser-Photovoltaic Wireless Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henley, M. W.; Fikes, J. C.; Howell, J.; Mankins, J. C.; Howell, Joe T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Space Solar Power technology offers unique benefits for near-term NASA space science missions, which can mature this technology for other future applications. "Laser-Photo-Voltaic Wireless Power Transmission" (Laser-PV WPT) is a technology that uses a laser to beam power to a photovoltaic receiver, which converts the laser's light into electricity. Future Laser-PV WPT systems may beam power from Earth to satellites or large Space Solar Power satellites may beam power to Earth, perhaps supplementing terrestrial solar photo-voltaic receivers. In a near-term scientific mission to the moon, Laser-PV WPT can enable robotic operations in permanently shadowed lunar polar craters, which may contain ice. Ground-based technology demonstrations are proceeding, to mature the technology for this initial application, in the moon's polar regions.

  17. Development of Numerical Models for Performance Predictions of Single-Photon Avalanche Photodetectors (SPAP) for the 2-Micron Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Ravindra P.; Abedin, M. Nurul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Field dependent drift velocity results are presented for electron transport in bulk Indium Arsenide (InAs) material based on a Monte Carlo model, which includes an analytical treatment of band-to-band impact ionization. Avalanche multiplication and related excess noise factor (F) are computed as a function of device length and applied voltage. A decrease in F with increases in device length is obtained. The results suggest an inherent utility for InAs-based single-photon avalanche detectors, particularly around the 2 microns region of interest for atmospheric remote sensing applications. The dark current response was also evaluated. The role of the various components has been analyzed. For shorter devices, the tunneling component is shown to dominate at low temperatures. Finally, possible structures for enhanced photodetection are proposed for future research.

  18. Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithms for the Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Ray, Taylor J.

    2013-01-01

    Two versions of airborne wind profiling algorithms for the pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia are presented. Each algorithm utilizes different number of line-of-sight (LOS) lidar returns while compensating the adverse effects of different coordinate systems between the aircraft and the Earth. One of the two algorithms APOLO (Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind Lidar) estimates wind products using two LOSs. The other algorithm utilizes five LOSs. The airborne lidar data were acquired during the NASA's Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign in 2010. The wind profile products from the two algorithms are compared with the dropsonde data to validate their results.

  19. Emerging ps-TW CO{sub 2} laser technology for high energy physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1998-02-01

    A brief overview of laser acceleration techniques and a comparative analysis of the picosecond terawatt (ps-TW) CO{sub 2} laser technology versus T{sup 3} solid state lasers for prospective HEP applications. Special attention is given to two laser accelerator schemes. The first one is the far-field staged laser accelerator, STELLA, which is under exploration at the ATF using a CO{sub 2} laser. The second is a laser wakefield accelerator where ps-TW CO{sub 2} lasers have a great potential. Inverse to the laser accelerator, a prospective monochromatic x-ray source feasible at the ATF will also utilize a 50 MeV subpicosecond electron beam and the first ps-TW CO{sub 2} laser, PITER I.

  20. LLNL medical and industrial laser isotope separation: large volume, low cost production through advanced laser technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Scheibner, K. F.; Shaw, M.; Wilder, J.

    1998-09-02

    The goal of this LDRD project was to demonstrate the technical and economical feasibility of applying laser isotope separation technology to the commercial enrichment (>lkg/y) of stable isotopes. A successful demonstration would well position the laboratory to make a credible case for the creation of an ongoing medical and industrial isotope production and development program at LLNL. Such a program would establish LLNL as a center for advanced medical isotope production, successfully leveraging previous LLNL Research and Development hardware, facilities, and knowledge.

  1. Development of Laser Surface Technologies for Anti-Corrosion on Magnesium Alloys: a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rujian; Guan, Yingchun; Zhu, Ying

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys have been increasingly used in industries and biomaterial fields due to low density, high specific strength and biodegradability. However, poor surface-related properties are major factors that limit their practical applications. This paper mainly focuses on laser-based anti-corrosion technologies for Mg alloys, beginning with a brief review of conventional methods, and then demonstrates the feasibility of laser surface technologies including laser surface melting (LSM), laser surface alloying (LSA), laser surface cladding (LSC) and laser shock peening (LSP) in achieving enhancement of corrosion resistance. The mechanism and capability of each technique in corrosion resistance is carefully discussed. Finally, an outlook of the development of laser surface technology for Mg alloy is further concluded, aiming to serve as a guide for further research both in industry applications and biomedical devices.

  2. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. PMID:27175057

  3. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update.

    PubMed

    Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. PMID:27175057

  4. The evolution of the laser: A systems perspective on science, technology and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deruiter, Willem

    The evolution of laser technology is addressed, and an attempt is made to correlate this evolution to the macrosociological theory of Juergen Habermas. The economic and social consequences of innovations are evaluated. Different laser applications are described. The evolution of the semiconductor laser is discussed. The evolution of optical telecommunication systems is outlined. The Habermas theory of communicative action, focussing on the theoretical distinction between 'system' and 'lifeworld,' is treated. The modified theory of Habermas is applied to the evolution of the laser. The embedding of a number of laser applications in the social context is discussed: laser isotope separation, compact disc players, and the Strategic Defense Initiative.

  5. Study of application and key technology of the high-energy laser weapon in optoelectronic countermeasure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhou; Xing, Hao; Wang, Dawei; Wang, Qiugui

    2015-10-01

    High-energy Laser weapon is a new-style which is developing rapidly nowadays. It is a one kind of direction energy weapon which can destroy the targets or make them invalid. High-energy Laser weapon has many merits such as concentrated energy, fast transmission, long operating range, satisfied precision, fast shift fire, anti-electromagnetic interference, reusability, cost-effectiveness. High-energy Laser weapon has huge potential for modern warfare since its laser beam launch attack to the target by the speed of light. High-energy Laser weapon can be deployed by multiple methods such as skyborne, carrier borne, vehicle-mounted, foundation, space platform. Besides the connection with command and control system, High-energy Laser weapon is consist of high-energy laser and beam steering. Beam steering is comprised of Large diameter launch system and Precision targeting systems. Meanwhile, beam steering includes the distance measurement of target location, detection system of television and infrared sensor, adaptive optical system of Laser atmospheric distortion correction. The development of laser technology is very fast in recent years. A variety of laser sources have been regarded as the key component in many optoelectronic devices. For directed energy weapon, the progress of laser technology has greatly improved the tactical effectiveness, such as increasing the range and strike precision. At the same time, the modern solid-state laser has become the ideal optical source for optical countermeasure, because it has high photoelectric conversion efficiency and small volume or weight. However, the total performance is limited by the mutual cooperation between different subsystems. The optical countermeasure is a complex technique after many years development. The key factor to evaluate the laser weapon can be formulated as laser energy density to target. This article elaborated the laser device technology of optoelectronic countermeasure and Photoelectric tracking

  6. Laser-Hybrid welding, an innovative technology to join automotive body parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieben, Manuel; Brunnecker, Frank

    The design of Tail lamps has been changed dramatically since cars built. At modern lamps, the lenses are absolutely transparent and allow a direct view onto the weld seam. Conventional welding technologies, such as vibration and hot plate welding cannot compete with this demand. Focused on this targeted application, LPKF Laser & Electronics AG has developed in cooperation with the Bavarian Laser Centre a unique Laser welding technology called hybrid welding.

  7. New technology update: femtosecond laser in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Zoltan Z

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers represent a new frontier in cataract surgery. Since their introduction and first human treatment in 2008, a lot of new developments have been achieved. In this review article, the physical principle of femtolasers is discussed, together with the indications and side effects of the method in cataract surgery. The most important clinical results are also presented regarding capsulotomy, fragmentation of the crystalline lens, corneal wound creation, and refractive results. Safety issues such as endothelial and macular changes are also discussed. The most important advantage of femtolaser cataract technology at present is that all the important surgical steps of cataract surgery can be planned and customized, delivering unparalleled accuracy, repeatability, and consistency in surgical results. The advantages of premium lenses can be maximally used in visual and presbyopia restoration as well. The advantages of premium lenses can be maximally used, not only in visual, but in presbyopia restoration as well. Quality of vision can be improved with less posterior chamber lens (PCL) tilt, more centralized position of the PCL, possibly less endothelial damage, less macular edema, and less posterior capsule opacification (PCO) formation. This technological achievement should be followed by other technical developments in the lens industry. Hopefully this review article will help us to understand the technology and the results to demonstrate the differences between the use of femtolasers and phacoemulsification-based cataract surgery. The most important data of the literature are summarized to show ophthalmologists the benefits of the technology in order to provide the best refractive results to the patient. PMID:24970994

  8. New technology update: femtosecond laser in cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zoltan Z

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers represent a new frontier in cataract surgery. Since their introduction and first human treatment in 2008, a lot of new developments have been achieved. In this review article, the physical principle of femtolasers is discussed, together with the indications and side effects of the method in cataract surgery. The most important clinical results are also presented regarding capsulotomy, fragmentation of the crystalline lens, corneal wound creation, and refractive results. Safety issues such as endothelial and macular changes are also discussed. The most important advantage of femtolaser cataract technology at present is that all the important surgical steps of cataract surgery can be planned and customized, delivering unparalleled accuracy, repeatability, and consistency in surgical results. The advantages of premium lenses can be maximally used in visual and presbyopia restoration as well. The advantages of premium lenses can be maximally used, not only in visual, but in presbyopia restoration as well. Quality of vision can be improved with less posterior chamber lens (PCL) tilt, more centralized position of the PCL, possibly less endothelial damage, less macular edema, and less posterior capsule opacification (PCO) formation. This technological achievement should be followed by other technical developments in the lens industry. Hopefully this review article will help us to understand the technology and the results to demonstrate the differences between the use of femtolasers and phacoemulsification-based cataract surgery. The most important data of the literature are summarized to show ophthalmologists the benefits of the technology in order to provide the best refractive results to the patient. PMID:24970994

  9. Current Laser Resurfacing Technologies: A Review that Delves Beneath the Surface

    PubMed Central

    Preissig, Jason; Hamilton, Kristy; Markus, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Numerous laser platforms exist that rejuvenate the skin by resurfacing its upper layers. In varying degrees, these lasers improve the appearance of lentigines and rhytides, eliminate photoaging, soften scarring due to acne and other causes, and treat dyspigmentation. Five major classes of dermatologic lasers are currently in common use: ablative and nonablative lasers in both fractionated and unfractionated forms as well as radiofrequency technologies. The gentler nonablative lasers allow for quicker healing, whereas harsher ablative lasers tend to be more effective. Fractionating either laser distributes the effect, increasing the number of treatments but minimizing downtime and complications. In this review article, the authors seek to inform surgeons about the current laser platforms available, clarify the differences between them, and thereby facilitate the identification of the most appropriate laser for their practice. PMID:23904818

  10. Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch Technology for Short Pulse Electromagnetics and Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Denison, Gary J.; Helgeson, Wesley D.; Hjalmarson, Harold P.; Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Mar, Alan; O'Malley, Martin W.; Zutavern, Fred J.

    1999-08-05

    High gain photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) are being used to produce high power electromagnetic pulses foc (1) compact, repetitive accelerators, (2) ultra-wide band impulse sources, (3) precision gas switch triggers, (4) optically-activated firesets, and (5) high power optical pulse generation and control. High power, sub-nanosecond optical pulses are used for active optical sensors such as compact optical radars and range-gated hallistic imaging systems. Following a brief introduction to high gain PCSS and its general applications, this paper will focus on PCSS for optical pulse generation and control. PCSS technology can be employed in three distinct approaches to optical pulse generation and control: (1) short pulse carrier injection to induce gain-switching in semiconductor lasers, (2) electro-optical Q-switching, and (3) optically activated Q-switching. The most significant PCSS issues for these applications are switch rise time, jitter, and longevity. This paper will describe both the requirements of these applications and the most recent results from PCSS technology. Experiments to understand and expand the limitations of high gain PCSS will also be described.

  11. Progresses on the Theoretical and Experimental Studies in Laser Technologies Research and Application Center In Kocaeli

    SciTech Connect

    Akman, E.; Atalay, B.; Candan, L.; Canel, T.; Demir, A.; Demir, P.; Erturk, S.; Genc, B.; Kacar, E.; Kenar, N.; Koymen, E.; Mutlu, M.; Sinmazcelik, T.; Urhan, O.

    2007-04-23

    Laser Technologies Research and Application Center (LATARUM) was established in 2005 with interdisciplinary cooperation to obtain product based on projects, to train personnel with at highest academic level with knowledge to use latest technology. There are electro-optics, laser material processing and modelling and simulation groups working on projects. Theoretical modeling studies are performed for x-ray laser media. Ne-like nickel and iron and Ni-like tin and molybdenum x-ray laser media for different pumping laser configurations have been modeled using EHYBRID. Theoretical and experimental studies on spectrometer design for wavelength range between X-ray and IR are carried out by electro-optic group. Material processing studies using Nd-YAG laser are performed. Materials of titanium, aluminum and stainless steel have been welded in different laser pulse, power, and repetition rate conditions. Optimum parameters for these welding processes have been obtained.

  12. Advanced metaheuristic algorithms for laser optimization in optical accelerator technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomizawa, Hiromitsu

    2011-10-01

    Lasers are among the most important experimental tools for user facilities, including synchrotron radiation and free electron lasers (FEL). In the synchrotron radiation field, lasers are widely used for experiments with Pump-Probe techniques. Especially for X-ray-FELs, lasers play important roles as seed light sources or photocathode-illuminating light sources to generate a high-brightness electron bunch. For future accelerators, laser-based techonologies such as electro-optic (EO) sampling to measure ultra-short electron bunches and optical-fiber-based femtosecond timing systems have been intensively developed in the last decade. Therefore, controls and optimizations of laser pulse characteristics are strongly required for many kinds of experiments and improvement of accelerator systems. However, people believe that lasers should be tuned and customized for each requirement manually by experts. This makes it difficult for laser systems to be part of the common accelerator infrastructure. Automatic laser tuning requires sophisticated algorithms, and the metaheuristic algorithm is one of the best solutions. The metaheuristic laser tuning system is expected to reduce the human effort and time required for laser preparations. I have shown some successful results on a metaheuristic algorithm based on a genetic algorithm to optimize spatial (transverse) laser profiles, and a hill-climbing method extended with a fuzzy set theory to choose one of the best laser alignments automatically for each machine requirement.

  13. Laser etching: A new technology to identify Florida grapefruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser labeling of fruits and vegetables is an alternative means to label produce. Low energy CO2 laser beam etches the surface showing the contrasting underlying layer. These etched surfaces can promote water loss and potentially allowing for pathogen entry. The long term effects of laser labeling o...

  14. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser labeling of fruits and vegetables is an alternative means to label produce. Low energy CO2 laser beams etch the surface showing the contrasting underlying layer. These etched surfaces can promote water loss and potentially allow for entry of decay organisms. The long-term effects of laser labe...

  15. AlGaInN laser diode technology and systems for defence and security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najda, Stephen P.; Perlin, Piotr; Suski, Tadek; Marona, Lucja; Boćkowski, Mike; Leszczyński, Mike; Wisniewski, Przemek; Czernecki, Robert; Kucharski, Robert; Targowski, Grzegorz; Watson, Scott; Kelly, Antony E.

    2015-05-01

    The latest developments in AlGaInN laser diode technology are reviewed for defence and security applications such as underwater communications. The AlGaInN material system allows for laser diodes to be fabricated over a very wide range of wavelengths from u.v., ~380nm, to the visible ~530nm, by tuning the indium content of the laser GaInN quantum well. Thus AlGaInN laser diode technology is a key enabler for the development of new disruptive system level applications in displays, telecom, defence and other industries.

  16. Use of the 810 nm diode laser: soft tissue management and orthodontic applications of innovative technology.

    PubMed

    Sarver, David M

    2006-10-01

    Innovative technologies such as the diode laser have provided considerable benefit to dental patients and professionals. Facilitating efficient cutting of tissue and subsequent coagulation, the soft tissue laser enhances tissue healing and can reduce postsurgical complications. Due to the conservative nature of treatment accomplished with the laser this technology is very useful in orthodontic procedures. The diode laser is utilized in both esthetic enhancement of the smile, and treatment management of soft tissue issues that impede efficient orthodontic treatment. Its clinical application will be illustrated in a series of orthodontic cases. PMID:17139948

  17. Multifunctional universal SPM nanoprobe fabrication with laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Golubok, A. O.; Levichev, V. V.; Zuong, Z.; Yakovlev, E. B.

    2009-05-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a high spatial resolution method of surface topography visualization and measurement of its local properties. The detecting of interaction arising between the sharp solid-state probe and the sample surface is the foundation of SPM. In dependence from nature of this interaction the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning force microscopy (SFM), scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM), etc. are distinguished. The spatial resolution of all types of probe microscopy determines both sharpness of increasing of interaction between a probe and a sample at their approach, and shape and size of a top of a solid-state probe. So, the progress in SPM information capabilities is highly depends on probe properties and first of all on properly fabricated aperture size. Fabrication procedures are rather complicated because of nanometric scale size of aperture and hard requirements to reproducibility and need to be improved. The way how to do it by laser-assisted drawing-out is involving of feed-back in a processing procedure-results in two types of feedback for the process of drawing-out has been suggested, tested and installed into the technological set-up. Different probes have been fabricated by above mentioned laser-assisted stretching during this work: SNOM types from optical fibers, micropipettes from quartz glass capillaries, micropipettes with microwires inside and with metallic covers outside. Some examples of application of above mentioned combined probes for cell membrane technology are described. Most important from them are topographical studying of cells and bacteria in living condition (in liquid) and studying of the mechanical properties of cell (rigidity of cell membrane) using the nanopipette as a tip of a force sensor. Except for that using the model sample the measurement of ion current that runs through nanopipette which also carries out a role of a tip of a force sensor have been done. Thus it is shown, that using

  18. Repairing an implant titanium milled framework using laser welding technology: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Soni; Monaco, Edward A

    2009-04-01

    The application of laser welding technology allows titanium to be welded predictably and precisely to achieve accurate fit of a milled framework. Laser energy results in localized heat production, thereby reducing thermal expansion. Unlike soldering, laser energy can be directed to a small area, making it possible to laser weld close to acrylic resin or ceramic. This article describes the use of laser welding to repair an implant titanium milled fixed denture. A quick, cost-effective, accurate repair was accomplished, and the repaired framework possessed adequate strength and the same precise fit as the original framework. PMID:19328274

  19. Current status of the laser diode array projector technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, D. Brett; Saylor, Daniel A.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes recent developments and the current status of the Laser Diode Array Projector (LDAP) Technology. The LDAP is a state-of-the-art dynamic infrared scene projector system capable of generating high resolution in-band infrared imagery at high frame rates. Three LDAPs are now operational at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command's (AMCOM) Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (MRDEC). These projectors have been used to support multiple Hardware-in-the-Loop test entries of various seeker configurations. Seeker configurations tested include an InSb 256 X $256 focal-plane array (FPA), an InSb 512 X 512 FPA, a PtSi 640 X 480 FPA, a PtSi 256 X 256 FPA, an uncooled 320 X 240 microbolometer FPA, and two dual field- of-view (FOV) seekers. Several improvements in the projector technology have been made since we last reported in 1997. The format size has been increased to 544 X 544, and 672 X 512, and it has been proven that the LDAP can be synchronized without a signal from the unit-under test (UUT). The control software has been enhanced to provide 'point and click' control for setup, calibration, image display, image capture, and data analysis. In addition, the first long-wave infrared (LWIR) LDAP is now operational, as well as a dual field of view LDAP which can change its FOV within 0.25 seconds. The projector is interfaced to a Silicon Graphics scene generation computer which is capable of real-time 3-D scene generation. Sample images generated with the projector and captured by an InSb FPA sensor are included in the text.

  20. Experimental demonstration of distributed feedback semiconductor lasers based on reconstruction-equivalent-chirp technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingsi; Wang, Huan; Chen, Xiangfei; Yin, Zuowei; Shi, Yuechun; Lu, Yanqing; Dai, Yitang; Zhu, Hongliang

    2009-03-30

    In this paper we report, to the best of our knowledge, the first experimental realization of distributed feedback (DFB) semiconductor lasers based on reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technology. Lasers with different lasing wavelengths are achieved simultaneously on one chip, which shows a potential for the REC technology in combination with the photonic integrated circuits (PIC) technology to be a possible method for monolithic integration, in that its fabrication is as powerful as electron beam technology and the cost and time-consuming are almost the same as standard holographic technology. PMID:19333287

  1. High power diode laser stack development using gold-tin bonding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dong; Wang, Jingwei; Zhang, Pu; Cai, Lei; Dai, Ye; Li, Yingjie; Liu, Xingsheng

    2015-02-01

    High power diode lasers have increased application in many fields. In this work, a sophisticated high power and high performance conduction cooled diode laser stack has been developed for long pulse duration and high duty cycle using gold-tin (AuSn) bonding technology. The transient thermal behavior and optical simulation of the laser diode stack module are investigated to optimize the laser device structure. CTE-matched submount and AuSn hard solder are used for bonding the laser diode bar to achieve higher reliability and longer lifetime. Guided by the numerical simulation and analytical results, conduction cooled diode laser stack with high power, long pulse duration and high duty cycle is fabricated and characterized. Compared with the conventional indium bonding technology, the new design is a promising approach to obtain improved performance with high reliability and long lifetime.

  2. Laser Spectroscopy Based Multi-Gas Monitor Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgett, Paul D.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    The timing was right in the “evolution” of low power tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) to design a spacecraft cabin air monitor around technology being developed at a small company funded by SBIR grants. NASA Centers had been monitoring their progress hoping that certain key gaps in the long term gas monitoring development roadmap could be filled by TDLS. The first iteration of a monitor for multiple gases called the Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM) which measures oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapor, as well as temperature and pressure. In January 2013, the ISS Program being particularly interested in ammonia funded a technology demonstration of MGM. The project was a joint effort between Vista Photonics for the sensor, NASA-JSC for project management and laboratory calibration, and Nanoracks for the enclosure and payload certification/integration. Nanoracks was selected in order to use their new experimental infrastructure located in an EXPRESS rack in the JEM. The MGM enclosure has multiple power supply options including 5VDC USB interface to the Nanoracks Frame, 28VDC Express Rack power and internal rechargeable batteries. MGM was calibrated at NASA-JSC in July 2013, delivered to ISS on 37 Soyuz in November 2013 and was installed and activated in February 2014. MGM resided in the Nanoracks Frame making continuous measurements the majority of the time, but also spent a day in Node 3 on battery power, and a month in the US Lab Module on 28VDC power, as part of the demonstration. Data was downloaded via Nanoracks on roughly a weekly basis. Comparisons were made with data from the Major Constituents Analyzer (MCA) which draws and analyzes air from JEM and other modules several times per hour. A crewmember challenged the carbon dioxide channel by breathing into the intake upon startup, and challenged the ammonia channel later using a commercial ammonia inhalant. Many interesting phenomena in the cabin atmosphere were detected during the tech demo

  3. An update on the use of laser technology in skin vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinyuan; Wang, Ji; Shah, Dilip; Wu, Mei X

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination via skin often induces stronger immune responses than via muscle. This, in line with potential needle-free, painless delivery, makes skin a very attractive site for immunization. Yet, despite decades of effort, effective skin delivery is still in its infant stage and safe and potent adjuvants for skin vaccination remain largely undefined. We have shown that laser technologies including both fractional and non-fractional lasers can greatly augment vaccine-induced immune response without incurring any significant local and systemic side effects. Laser illumination at specific settings can accelerate the motility of antigen-presenting cells or trigger release of ‘danger’ signals stimulating the immune system. Moreover, several other groups including the authors explore laser technologies for needle-free transcutaneous vaccine delivery. As these laser-mediated resurfacing technologies are convenient, safe and cost-effective, their new applications in vaccination warrant clinical studies in the very near future. PMID:24127871

  4. CO{sub 2} laser technology for advanced particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1996-06-01

    Short-pulse, high-power CO{sub 2} lasers open new prospects for development of ultra-high gradient laser-driven electron accelerators. The advantages of {lambda}=10 {mu}m CO{sub 2} laser radiation over the more widely exploited solid state lasers with {lambda}{approximately}1 {mu}m are based on a {lambda}{sup 2}-proportional ponderomotive potential, {lambda}-proportional phase slippage, and {lambda}-proportional scaling of the laser accelerator structures. We show how a picosecond terawatt CO{sub 2} laser that is under construction at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility may benefit the ATF`s experimental program of testing far-field, near-field, and plasma accelerator schemes.

  5. Clock Technology Development for the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W. M.; Thompson, R. J.; Seidel, D. J.; Kohel, J.; Maleki, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Time and Frequency Sciences and Technology Group at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has developed a laser cooling capability for flight and has been selected by NASA to support the Laser-Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program. Current work in the group includes design and development for tee two laser-cooled atomic clock experiments which have been selected for flight on the International Space Station.

  6. System approach to development of CAD and CAM laser technological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopota, Vitaliy A.

    1997-04-01

    Laser technology is one of the technologies the most highly developed at present; however, its wide introduction is constrained, on the one hand, by complexity and the high cost of the equipment, and, on the other hand, by complexity and insufficient knowledge about processes of laser welding, cutting and surface processing, as well as shortages of qualified staff. In spite of these reasons the technologies of laser processing of materials have reached such a level of development that their further perfection on the basis of accumulation of the empirical information has become impossible, whereas technological opportunities of such ways of laser processing, such as welding, cutting, melting and marking, are not completely used. For their successful realization it is necessary to choose the optimum mode of processing, but it is impossible because of the shortage of knowledge about the physical nature of given technological processes, as practically all existing information on these processes has qualitative character. On the other side, to provide the high quality and stability of treatment results it is necessary to have realization of the current monitoring and control during the most technological processes. For this purpose CAD and CAM systems are necessary, the absence of which is explained by the fact that for the present the physically adequate theoretical descriptions of laser technological processes are missing, and the experimental data, by virtue of non-systematic use of experimental work, does not give a complete experimental picture of the physical phenomena, proceeding at laser processing of materials.

  7. A survey of beam-combining technologies for laser space power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, J. H.; Williams, M. D.; Lee, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The combination of laser beams holds much promise for obtaining powerful beams. Methods are surveyed for beam combination (coherent and incoherent) and two of them are identified as the most effective means for achieving high power transmission in space. The two methods as applied to laser diode arrays are analyzed, and potentially productive work areas for the advancement of technology are delineated.

  8. Competency-Based Curriculum Guide for Laser Technology. September 1980-June 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fioroni, John J.

    This document contains materials developed by a project to provide a competency-based curriculum guide for laser technology at the community college level. An abstract of the final report is included. Next, the 17 job competencies determined as necessary to meet the job description of laser technician are listed. A career ladder and qualifications…

  9. Laser Light Scattering, from an Advanced Technology Development Program to Experiments in a Reduced Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Tscharnuter, Walther W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Dautet, Henri; Deschamps, Pierre; Boucher, Francois; Zuh, Jixiang; Tin, Padetha; Rogers, Richard B.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advancements in laser light scattering hardware are described. These include intelligent single card correlators; active quench/active reset avalanche photodiodes; laser diodes; and fiber optics which were used by or developed for a NASA advanced technology development program. A space shuttle experiment which will employ aspects of these hardware developments is previewed.

  10. Laser Communications and Fiber Optics Lab Manual. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddick, Robert

    This laboratory training manual on laser communications and fiber optics may be used in a general technology-communications course for ninth graders. Upon completion of this exercise, students achieve the following goals: match concepts with laser communication system parts; explain advantages of fiber optic cable over conventional copper wire;…

  11. Generation of doughnut spot for high-power laser technologies using refractive beam shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2015-03-01

    Doughnut and inverse-Gauss intensity distributions of laser spot are required in laser technologies like welding, cladding where high power fiber coupled diode or solid-state lasers as well as fiber lasers are used. In comparison to Gaussian and flat-top distributions the doughnut and inverse-Gauss profiles provide more uniform temperature distribution on a work piece - this improves the technology, increase stability of processes and efficiency of using the laser energy, reduce the heat affected zone (HAZ). This type of beam shaping has become frequently asked by users of multimode lasers, especially multimode fiber coupled diode lasers. Refractive field mapping beam shapers are applied as one of solutions for the task to manipulate intensity distribution of multimode lasers. The operation principle of these devices presumes almost lossless transformation of laser beam irradiance from Gaussian to flat-top, doughnut or inverse-Gauss through controlled wavefront manipulation inside a beam shaper using lenses with smooth optical surfaces. This paper will describe some design basics of refractive beam shapers of the field mapping type and optical layouts of their applying with high-power multimode lasers. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  12. Pulsed Single Frequency Fiber Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shibin

    2016-06-01

    Pulsed single frequency fiber lasers with mJ level near 1 micron, 1.55 micron and 2 micron wavelengths were demonstrated by using our proprietary highly doped fibers. These fiber lasers exhibit excellent long term stable operation with M2<1.2.

  13. Emerging terawatt picosecond CO{sub 2} laser technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1997-09-01

    The first terawatt picosecond (TWps) CO{sub 2} laser is under construction at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). TWps-CO{sub 2} lasers, having an order of magnitude longer wavelength than the well-known table-top terawatt solid state lasers, offer new opportunities for strong-field physics research. For laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) the advantage of the new class of lasers is due to a gain of two orders of magnitude in the ponderomotive potential. The large average power of CO{sub 2} lasers is important for the generation of hard radiation through Compton back-scattering of the laser off energetic electron beams. The authors discuss applications of TWps-CO{sub 2} lasers for LWFA modules of a tentative electron-positron collider, for {gamma}-{gamma} (or {gamma}-lepton) colliders, for a possible table-top source of high-intensity x-rays and gamma rays, and the generation of polarized positron beams.

  14. NASA Laser Light Scattering Advanced Technology Development Workshop, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The major objective of the workshop was to explore the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware and to assess user requirements and needs for a laser light scattering instrument in a reduced gravity environment. The workshop addressed experimental needs and stressed hardware development.

  15. High pressure gas laser technology for atmospheric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a fixed frequency chirp-free and highly stable intense pulsed laser made for Doppler wind velocity measurements with accurate ranging is described. Energy extraction from a high pressure CO2 laser at a tunable single mode frequency is also examined.

  16. Application to monitoring of tailings dam based on 3D laser scanning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Fang; Zhang, Aiwu

    2011-06-01

    This paper presented a new method of monitoring of tailing dam based on 3D laser scanning technology and gave the method flow of acquiring and processing the tailing dam data. Taking the measured data for example, the author analyzed the dam deformation by generating the TIN, DEM and the curvature graph, and proved that it's feasible to global monitor the tailing dam using 3D laser scanning technology from the theory and method.

  17. Laser versus intense pulsed light: Competing technologies in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ross, E Victor

    2006-04-01

    Lasers have been competing with non-laser intense pulsed light (IPL) sources in the cosmetic arena over the past 10 years. Initially IPLs were somewhat cumbersome and accepted by a minority of "serious" practitioners. Recently, however, the popularity of full-face visible light skin rejuvenation, enhanced engineering of IPLs, and favorable cost versus many lasers, have lead to a proliferation of IPL devices. No longer a stepchild in the rejuvenation market, IPLs may overtake lasers as the devices of choice among most physicians. We review the pros and cons of lasers and IPLs within the context of design, cost, and other practical concerns for a typical office-based practice. PMID:16596659

  18. The role of laser technologies in medicine and surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabay, Shimon

    2004-09-01

    The paper presents the three most important subjects in medical applications of lasers; the laser-tissue interaction mechanism, the laser parameters, and the beam delivery system. For the first one, the thermal and non-thermal interactions and their role will be presented. The laser parameters, such as; wavelength, mode of operation (CW or pulsed), pulse duration and other relevant techniques will be highlighted and their matching to the specific application will be discussed. Finally, the transport of the laser beam to the targeted tissue through articulated arms and fiber optic cables will be compared and discussed. The optical processing of the beam, at the hand piece end, to focusing, collimating, defocusing and scanning will also be presented.

  19. New technology developments make passive laser/fiber alignment a reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, John V.; MacDonald, Brian M.; Lealman, I. F.; Jones, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we report on the combination of a precision cleaved large spot laser and a silicon micromachined optical bench to achieve high coupling efficiencies by purely passive alignment. Coupling efficiencies of over 50% have been obtained by passively aligning precision cleaved large spot sized lasers to singlemode fiber on a silicon micromachined substrate. This is the highest known coupling figure reported for passive alignment. The packaging of semiconductor laser chips has always presented a range of technical problems due to the sub-micron tolerances required to obtain optimum coupling of the small laser spot size to the larger spot size of a singlemode fiber. Lasers have been developed that can ease these tolerances by matching the laser spot size to that of cleaved fiber. This is achieved by tapering the active layer to adiabatically expand the laser mode size. A method of controlling the physical size of laser diode chips to sub-micron accuracy has enabled these lasers to be bonded against substantial alignment features on a silicon micro-engineered optical bench which also includes a V-groove into which a cleaved single-mode optical fiber can be fixed. Results are also discussed for an alternative ferrule-based, non-hermetic laser packaging design which utilizes the relaxed alignment tolerances of the large spot lasers to give simple package assembly suitable for automation. Both of the packaging technologies discussed offer a viable route to obtaining the very low cost optoelectronic components required for fiber to the home networks.

  20. Preliminary design and estimate of capital and operating costs for a production scale application of laser decontamination technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Ho-ming; Edelson, M.C.

    1994-08-06

    The application of laser ablation technology to the decontamination of radioactive metals, particularly the surfaces of equipment, is discussed. Included is information related to the design, capital and operating costs, and effectiveness of laser ablation technology, based on commercial excimer and Nd:YAG lasers, for the decontamination of production scale equipment.

  1. Precision micro drilling with copper vapor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.J.; Martinez, M.W.; Warner, B.E.; Dragon, E.P.; Huete, G.; Solarski, M.E.

    1994-09-02

    The authors have developed a copper vapor laser based micro machining system using advanced beam quality control and precision wavefront tilting technologies. Micro drilling has been demonstrated through percussion drilling and trepanning using this system. With a 30 W copper vapor laser running at multi-kHz pulse repetition frequency, straight parallel holes with size varying from 500 microns to less than 25 microns and with aspect ratio up to 1:40 have been consistently drilled on a variety of metals with good quality. For precision trepanned holes, the hole-to-hole size variation is typically within 1% of its diameter. Hole entrance and exit are both well defined with dimension error less than a few microns. Materialography of sectioned holes shows little (sub-micron scale) recast layer and heat affected zone with surface roughness within 1--2 microns.

  2. Aura of technology and the cutting edge: a history of lasers in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Robert W; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2009-09-01

    In this historical review the authors examine the important developments that have led to the availability of laser energy to neurosurgeons as a unique and sometimes invaluable tool. They review the physical science behind the function of lasers, as well as how and when various lasers based on different lasing mediums were discovered. They also follow the close association between advances in laser technology and their application in biomedicine, from early laboratory experiments to the first clinical experiences. Because opinions on the appropriate role of lasers in neurosurgery vary widely, the historical basis for some of these views is explored. Initial enthusiasm for a technology that appears to have innate advantages for safe resections has often given way to the strict limitations and demands of the neurosurgical operating theater. However, numerous creative solutions to improve laser delivery, power, safety, and ergonomics demonstrate the important role that technological advances in related scientific fields continue to offer neurosurgery. Benefiting from the most recent developments in materials science, current CO(2) laser delivery systems provide a useful addition to the neurosurgical armamentarium when applied in the correct circumstances and reflect the important historical advances that come about from the interplay between neurosurgery and technology. PMID:19722821

  3. AlGaInN laser diode technology and systems for defence and security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najda, Stephen P.; Perlin, Piotr; Suski, Tadek; Marona, Lujca; Boćkowski, Mike; Leszczyński, Mike; Wisniewski, Przemek; Czernecki, Robert; Kucharski, Robert; Targowski, Grzegorz; Watson, Scott; Kelly, Antony E.

    2015-10-01

    AlGaInN laser diodes is an emerging technology for defence and security applications such as underwater communications and sensing, atomic clocks and quantum information. The AlGaInN material system allows for laser diodes to be fabricated over a very wide range of wavelengths from u.v., ~380nm, to the visible ~530nm, by tuning the indium content of the laser GaInN quantum well. Thus AlGaInN laser diode technology is a key enabler for the development of new disruptive system level applications in displays, telecom, defence and other industries. Ridge waveguide laser diodes are fabricated to achieve single mode operation with optical powers up to 100mW with the 400-440nm wavelength range with high reliability. Visible free-space and underwater communication at frequencies up to 2.5GHz is reported using a directly modulated 422nm GaN laser diode. Low defectivity and highly uniform GaN substrates allow arrays and bars to be fabricated. High power operation operation of AlGaInN laser bars with up to 20 emitters have been demonstrated at optical powers up to 4W in a CS package with common contact configuration. An alternative package configuration for AlGaInN laser arrays allows for each individual laser to be individually addressable allowing complex free-space or optical fibre system integration with a very small form-factor.

  4. High performance FBG interrogation technology with scan fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanhong; Ma, Youchun; Yang, Minwei

    2010-11-01

    A Fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) Interrogation scheme with scan fiber laser was demonstrated. The ring cavity scan fiber laser was investigated and the scan fiber laser module was made and test, the 200Hz scan frequency, ~0.02nm line width, more than 40nm scan range and more than 1 mW output power were obtained. A 12 channels, 20 FBGs per channel FBG interrogator was made with this laser module and the high speed signal process circuit base on FPGA. The centroid finding method which has advantage on interrogation speed and accurate was taken for finding the peak of the return FBG spectrum. The FBG interrogator was test and less than 3pm standard deviation with 200Hz scan frequency were obtained.

  5. Reconfigurable Computing As an Enabling Technology for Single-Photon-Counting Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Wesley; Hicks, Edward; Pinchinat, Maxime; Dabney, Philip; McGarry, Jan; Murray, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Single-photon-counting laser altimetry is a new measurement technique offering significant advantages in vertical resolution, reducing instrument size, mass, and power, and reducing laser complexity as compared to analog or threshold detection laser altimetry techniques. However, these improvements come at the cost of a dramatically increased requirement for onboard real-time data processing. Reconfigurable computing has been shown to offer considerable performance advantages in performing this processing. These advantages have been demonstrated on the Multi-KiloHertz Micro-Laser Altimeter (MMLA), an aircraft based single-photon-counting laser altimeter developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center with several potential spaceflight applications. This paper describes how reconfigurable computing technology was employed to perform MMLA data processing in real-time under realistic operating constraints, along with the results observed. This paper also expands on these prior results to identify concepts for using reconfigurable computing to enable spaceflight single-photon-counting laser altimeter instruments.

  6. The state-of-the-art laser bio-cladding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jichang; Fuh, J. Y. H.; Lü, L.

    2010-11-01

    The current state and future trend of laser bio-cladding technology are discussed. Laser bio-cladding is used in implants including fabrication of metal scaffolds and bio-coating on the scaffolds. Scaffolds have been fabricated from stainless steel, Co-based alloy or Ti alloy using laser cladding, and new laser-deposited Ti alloys have been developed. Calcium phosphate bioceramic coatings have been deposited on scaffolds with laser to improve the wear resistence and corrosion resistence of implants and to induce bone regeneration. The types of biomaterial devices currently available in the market include replacement heart valve prosthesis, dental implants, hip/knee implants, catheters, pacemakers, oxygenators and vascular grafts. Laser bio-cladding process is attracting more and more attentions of people.

  7. Terawatt Picosecond CO(sub 2) Laser Technology for High Energy Physics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I. V.

    1998-07-05

    Demonstration of ultra-high acceleration gradients in the SM LWFA experiments put a next objective for the laser accelerator development to achieve a low-emittance monochromatic acceleration over extended interaction distances. The emerging picosecond terawatt (ps-TW) CO{sub 2} laser technology helps to meet this strategic goal. Among the considered examples are: the staged electron laser accelerator (STELLA) experiment, which is being conducted at the Brookhaven ATF, and the plasma-channeled LWFA. The long-wavelength and high average power capabilities of CO{sub 2} lasers maybe utilized also for generation of intense x-ray and gamma radiation through Compton back-scattering of the laser beams off relativistic electrons. We discuss applications of ps-TW CO{sub 2} lasers for a tentative {gamma}-{gamma} (or {gamma}-lepton) collider and generation of polarized positron beams.

  8. Laser Energy Monitor for Double-Pulsed 2-Micrometer IPDA Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is a remote sensing technique for monitoring different atmospheric species. The technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features normalized to the transmitted energy. 2-micron double-pulsed IPDA lidar is best suited for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements. In such case, the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by short interval (200 microseconds), with low repetition rate (10Hz). Conventional laser energy monitors, based on thermal detectors, are suitable for low repetition rate single pulse lasers. Due to the short pulse interval in double-pulsed lasers, thermal energy monitors underestimate the total transmitted energy. This leads to measurement biases and errors in double-pulsed IPDA technique. The design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on a high-speed, extended range InGaAs pin quantum detectors suitable for separating the two pulse events. Pulse integration is applied for converting the detected pulse power into energy. Results are compared to a photo-electro-magnetic (PEM) detector for impulse response verification. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in single-pulsed mode, then comparing the pin and PEM detectors in double-pulsed mode. Energy monitor linearity will be addressed.

  9. Laser Ignition Technology for Bi-Propellant Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Matthew E.; Bossard, John A.; Early, Jim; Trinh, Huu; Dennis, Jay; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The fiber optically coupled laser ignition approach summarized is under consideration for use in igniting bi-propellant rocket thrust chambers. This laser ignition approach is based on a novel dual pulse format capable of effectively increasing laser generated plasma life times up to 1000 % over conventional laser ignition methods. In the dual-pulse format tinder consideration here an initial laser pulse is used to generate a small plasma kernel. A second laser pulse that effectively irradiates the plasma kernel follows this pulse. Energy transfer into the kernel is much more efficient because of its absorption characteristics thereby allowing the kernel to develop into a much more effective ignition source for subsequent combustion processes. In this research effort both single and dual-pulse formats were evaluated in a small testbed rocket thrust chamber. The rocket chamber was designed to evaluate several bipropellant combinations. Optical access to the chamber was provided through small sapphire windows. Test results from gaseous oxygen (GOx) and RP-1 propellants are presented here. Several variables were evaluated during the test program, including spark location, pulse timing, and relative pulse energy. These variables were evaluated in an effort to identify the conditions in which laser ignition of bi-propellants is feasible. Preliminary results and analysis indicate that this laser ignition approach may provide superior ignition performance relative to squib and torch igniters, while simultaneously eliminating some of the logistical issues associated with these systems. Further research focused on enhancing the system robustness, multiplexing, and window durability/cleaning and fiber optic enhancements is in progress.

  10. Laser Cutting and Size Reduction. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    The project utilizes a Neodymium Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser to cut and size reduce equipment in the 324 Laboratory B Hot Cell located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This project will demonstrate the ability of the Nd:Yag laser to remotely and safely dismantle equipment faster, cheaper, and more efficiently than baseline cutting methods, such as the plasma torch and the water knife, in a highly radioactive area using fiber optics.

  11. Excimer laser ophthalmic surgery: evaluation of a new technology.

    PubMed Central

    Infeld, D. A.; O'Shea, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide information and an overview of the potential risks and benefits of excimer laser surgery, a new and promising technique in ophthalmic surgery. Although this review concentrates on the use of the laser for refractive purposes, novel therapeutic techniques are also discussed. It is hoped that this will enable general practitioners, optometrists and physicians to provide appropriate advice and counselling for patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10211324

  12. Laser Science and Technology Program Annual Report-2002 NIF Programs Directorate

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L; Chen, H L

    2003-03-01

    The Laser Science and Technology (LS&T) Program's mission is to develop advanced lasers, optics, materials technologies, and applications to solve problems and create new capabilities of importance to the nation and the Laboratory. A top, near-term priority is to provide technical support in the deployment and upgrade of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our other program activities synergistically develop technologies that are consistent with the goals of the NIF Directorate and develop state-of-the-art capabilities. The primary objectives of LS&T activities in 2002 have been fourfold--(a) to support deployment of hardware and to enhance laser and optics performance for NIF, (b) to develop high-energy petawatt laser science and technology for the Department of Energy (DOE), (c) to develop advanced solid-state laser systems and optical components for the Department of Defense (DoD), and (d) to invent, develop, and deliver improved concepts and hardware for other government agencies and industry. LS&T activities during 2002 focused on seven major areas: (1) NIF Project-LS&T led major advances in the deployment of NIF Final Optics Assembly (FOA) and the development of 30.1 optics processing and treatment technologies to enhance NIF's operations and performance capabilities. (2) Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP)-LS&T personnel continued development of ultrashort-pulse lasers and high-power, large-aperture optics for applications in SSP, extreme-field science and national defense. To enhance the high-energy petawatt (HEPW) capability in NIF, LS&T continued development of advanced compressor-grating and front-end laser technologies utilizing optical-parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA). (3) High-energy-density physics and inertial fusion energy-LS&T continued development of kW- to MW-class, diode-pumped, solid-state laser (DPSSL). (4) Department of Defense (DoD)-LS&T continued development of a 100 kw-class solid-state heat-capacity laser (SSHCL) for

  13. Enabling Laser and Lidar Technologies for NASA's Science and Exploration Mission's Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s Laser Risk Reduction Program, begun in 2002, has achieved many technology advances in only 3.5 years. The recent selection of several lidar proposals for Science and Exploration applications indicates that the LRRP goal of enabling future space-based missions by lowering the technology risk has already begun to be met.

  14. Advances in Laser/Lidar Technologies for NASA's Science and Exploration Mission's Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Laser Risk Reduction Program, begun in 2002, has achieved many technology advances in only 3.5 years. The recent selection of several lidar proposals for Science and Exploration applications indicates that the LRRP goal of enabling future space-based missions by lowering the technology risk has already begun to be met.

  15. High power diode lasers: technology and application in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Martin; Eberhard, Franz; Herrmann, Gerhard; Luft, Johann; Maric, J.; Morgott, Stefan; Philippens, Marc; Teich, W.

    2003-03-01

    The application field of high power semiconductor lasers is growing rapidly and covers e.g. solid state laser pumping, metal and plastic welding, hard and soft soldering, suface treatment and others. Preferably those applications are attractive, which do not require extremely high beam quality. We have investigated high power diode-laser bars from 808 nm to 980 nm. The scope of this presentation is on focusability and beam quality. For better beam shaping structures with reduced fill factor of 25% to 30% were developed. They were operated in continuous wave operation at power levels of up to 55 W. Tests indicate extrapolated lifetimes of more than 100,000 hours at 40 W at 980 nm cw and about 10,000 hours at 45 W - 50 W at 940 nm and 808 nm. Monolithically stacked NonostacksR were investigated. Operation up to 100°C with excellent lifetimes could be demonstrated. New concepts and applications for low mode number high power diode lasers like tapered laser bars are presented. Examples for various current areas of interest in European research facilities will be given.

  16. New Technology In Laser Welding Of Thin Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongzeng; Zhang, Qiu'e.; Ma, Shulin; Li, Yongda; Tian, Fenggui

    1987-01-01

    It is difficult to get a good welding spot and nearly impossible to weld a 10 micron diameter filament (e.g. NiCr) onto a foreign workpiece over 1000 times larger in size. In this paper we introduce the laser powder-covered welding technique. The first step is to laser- weld a metal powder onto a small area of interest of a larger-sized workpiece. This changes the nature of the larger-sized material. The second step is to position the thin filament in contact with the larger workpiece and to apply the pulsed laser so a round and smooth welding spot forms. This should form a good alloy combination. This welding technique has a high success rate for welding minute electrical heat source, independent of the material of the larger workpiece. This technique also solves the problems of unstable quality in tin welding, burrs in pressure welding, and eliminates the problem of welding flux corrosion. This same technique is applied to the laser-welding of a super-thin piece to a foreign workpiece, where the welding spot forms a "micro-rivet': In the paper we present specific conditions required, the analysis data of the welding quality and the specific structure of the laser-welding workstation.

  17. Laser Doppler technology applied to atmospheric environmental operating problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, E. A.; Bilbro, J. W.; Dunkin, J. A.; Jeffreys, H. B.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon dioxide laser Doppler ground wind data were very favorably compared with data from standard anemometers. As a result of these measurements, two breadboard systems were developed for taking research data: a continuous wave velocimeter and a pulsed Doppler system. The scanning continuous wave laser Doppler velocimeter developed for detecting, tracking and measuring aircraft wake vortices was successfully tested at an airport where it located vortices to an accuracy of 3 meters at a range of 150 meters. The airborne pulsed laser Doppler system was developed to detect and measure clear air turbulence (CAT). This system was tested aboard an aircraft, but jet stream CAT was not encountered. However, low altitude turbulence in cumulus clouds near a mountain range was detected by the system and encountered by the aircraft at the predicted time.

  18. Calibration technology in application of robot-laser scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, YongJie; Yin, ShiBin; Zhu, JiGui

    2012-11-01

    A system composed of laser sensor and 6-DOF industrial robot is proposed to obtain complete three-dimensional (3-D) information of the object surface. Suitable for the different combining ways of laser sensor and robot, a new method to calibrate the position and pose between sensor and robot is presented. By using a standard sphere with known radius as a reference tool, the rotation and translation matrices between the laser sensor and robot are computed, respectively in two steps, so that many unstable factors introduced in conventional optimization methods can be avoided. The experimental results show that the accuracy of the proposed calibration method can be achieved up to 0.062 mm. The calibration method is also implemented into the automated robot scanning system to reconstruct a car door panel.

  19. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  20. Development of laser-aided plasma diagnostics and related technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahata, K.; Akiyama, T.; Pavlichenko, R.; Tanaka, K.; Nakayama, K.; Okajima, S.

    2008-03-12

    Laser-aided plasma diagnostics, aiming for establishment of reliable density measurement in next step magnetically confined fusion devices, are under development at the National Institute for Fusion Science. A new type of two color laser (57.2/47.6-{mu}m CH{sub 3}OD) interferometer has been developed and its original function, vibration subtraction, was confirmed in a test stand. The line integrated density measurements by the polarimeter were demonstrated at Compact Helical System by the Cotton-Mouton polarimeter and at the LHD by the Faraday rotation polarimeter.

  1. NASA Laser Remote Sensing Technology Needs for Earth Science in the Next Decade and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trait, David M.; Neff, Jon M.; Valinia, Azita

    2007-01-01

    In late 2005 the NASA Earth Science Technology Office convened a working group to review decadal-term technology needs for Earth science active optical remote sensing objectives. The outcome from this effort is intended to guide future NASA investments in laser remote sensing technologies. This paper summarizes the working group findings and places them in context with the conclusions of the National Research Council assessment of Earth science needs, completed in 2007.

  2. Compact and efficient DPSS laser using diamond-cooled technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Hsian P.; Wang, Yu-Lin; Hasson, Victor H.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, we summarize the performance of a diamond cooled diode pumped solid state (DPSS) Nd:YAG laser developed by Textron Systems Corporation (TCS). Over 50% intrinsic extraction efficiency at 50-Watts average power, equivalent to volumetric power extraction of 2000 W/cc, has been experimentally demonstrated. Beam quality (BQ) of less than 1.1 XDL has been measured in an oscillator configuration with the laser operating in TEM00 mode. With a simple passive thermal lens correction, BQ of less than 1.5 XDL was obtained from an oscillator amplifier arrangement at specific pump rates up to 1600 W/cc and 600 W/cc, respectively. By using an intra-cavity acousto-optic modulator, Q-switched laser pulses as short as 6 ns were obtained from the oscillator. This concept is amenable to scaling up to very high power levels. A conceptual design, using our validated database, for a 100-kW class laser is also presented.

  3. AlGaInN laser diode technology for defence, security and sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najda, Stephen P.; Perlin, Piotr; Suski, Tadek; Marona, Lucja; Boćkowski, Mike; Leszczyński, Mike; Wisniewski, Przemek; Czernecki, Robert; Kucharski, Robert; Targowski, Grzegorz; Watson, Scott; Kelly, Antony E.

    2014-10-01

    The latest developments in AlGaInN laser diode technology are reviewed for defence, security and sensing applications. The AlGaInN material system allows for laser diodes to be fabricated over a very wide range of wavelengths from u.v., i.e, 380nm, to the visible, i.e., 530nm, by tuning the indium content of the laser GaInN quantum well. Advantages of using Plasma assisted MBE (PAMBE) compared to more conventional MOCVD epitaxy to grow AlGaInN laser structures are highlighted. Ridge waveguide laser diode structures are fabricated to achieve single mode operation with optical powers of <100mW in the 400-420nm wavelength range that are suitable for telecom applications. Visible light communications at high frequency (up to 2.5 Gbit/s) using a directly modulated 422nm Gallium-nitride (GaN) blue laser diode is reported. High power operation of AlGaInN laser diodes is demonstrated with a single chip, AlGaInN laser diode `mini-array' with a common p-contact configuration at powers up to 2.5W cw at 410nm. Low defectivity and highly uniform GaN substrates allow arrays and bars of nitride lasers to be fabricated. GaN laser bars of up to 5mm with 20 emitters, mounted in a CS mount package, give optical powers up to 4W cw at ~410nm with a common contact configuration. An alternative package configuration for AlGaInN laser arrays allows for each individual laser to be individually addressable allowing complex free-space and/or fibre optic system integration within a very small form-factor.or.

  4. The GRACE Follow-On Laser Ranging Interferometer; A inter-spacecraft laser interferometry technology demonstrator with similarities to LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipstein, William; McKenzie, Kirk; Grace Follow-On LASER Ranging Interferometer Team

    2016-03-01

    GRACE Follow-On will replace the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission, which has been measuring Earth's gravity field since 2002. Like GRACE, GRACE Follow-On will use a microwave link as its primary instrument to measure micron-level changes in the 200km separation of a pair of satellites in a following polar orbit. GRACE Follow-On will also include a 2-way laser-link, the Laser Ranging Interferometer (LRI), as a technology demonstrator package. The LRI is an NASA/German partnership and will demonstrate inter-spacecraft laser interferometry with a goal of 10 times better precision than the microwave instrument, or about 90 nm/ √(Hz) between 10 and 100 mHz. The similarities between the LRI and a single arm of Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mean many of the required technologies will be the same. This talk will give an overview of the LRI and the status of the LRI instruments, and implications for LISA.

  5. Precision laser range finder system design for Advanced Technology Laboratory applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, K. E.; Kohn, R. L.; Seib, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    Preliminary system design of a pulsed precision ruby laser rangefinder system is presented which has a potential range resolution of 0.4 cm when atmospheric effects are negligible. The system being proposed for flight testing on the advanced technology laboratory (ATL) consists of a modelocked ruby laser transmitter, course and vernier rangefinder receivers, optical beacon retroreflector tracking system, and a network of ATL tracking retroreflectors. Performance calculations indicate that spacecraft to ground ranging accuracies of 1 to 2 cm are possible.

  6. Lightweight solar array blanket tooling, laser welding and cover process technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    A two phase technology investigation was performed to demonstrate effective methods for integrating 50 micrometer thin solar cells into ultralightweight module designs. During the first phase, innovative tooling was developed which allows lightweight blankets to be fabricated in a manufacturing environment with acceptable yields. During the second phase, the tooling was improved and the feasibility of laser processing of lightweight arrays was confirmed. The development of the cell/interconnect registration tool and interconnect bonding by laser welding is described.

  7. Clock Technology Development in the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Dave; Thompson, R. J.; Klipstein, W. M.; Kohel, J.; Maleki, L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program. It focuses on clock technology development. The topics include: 1) Overview of LCAP Flight Projects; 2) Space Clock 101; 3) Physics with Clocks in microgravity; 4) Space Clock Challenges; 5) LCAP Timeline; 6) International Space Station (ISS) Science Platforms; 7) ISS Express Rack; 8) Space Qualification of Components; 9) Laser Configuration; 10) Clock Rate Comparisons: GPS Carrier Phase Frequency Transfer; and 11) ISS Model Views. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  8. Closed-flap laser-assisted esthetic dentistry using Er:YSGG technology.

    PubMed

    Flax, Hugh D; Radz, Gary M

    2004-08-01

    Use of a hard-/soft-tissue laser is a wonderful adjunctive tool for esthetic and restorative dentistry. The cases described here demonstrate some of the many ways in which this laser technology allows clinicians to make significant soft- and hard-tissue changes. These changes not only improve the final esthetic outcome of the case but also provide the biologic functional parameters required for successful dentistry. PMID:15456127

  9. Comparison of 2 micron Ho and 10 micron CO2 lidar for atmospheric backscatter and Doppler windshear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killinger, Dennis

    1991-01-01

    The development of eye-safe, solid-state Lidar systems is discussed, with an emphasis on Coherent Doppler Lidar for Atmospheric Wind Measurements. The following subject areas are covered: tunable Ho DIAL (Differential Absorption Lidar)/lidar atmospheric measurements; atmospheric turbulence measurements and detector arrays; diurnal measurements of C(sub n)(sup 2) for KSC lidar measurements; and development of single-frequency Ho laser/lidar.

  10. Technology and engineering aspects of high power pulsed single longitudinal mode dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, V. S.; Mukherjee, Jaya; Gantayet, L. M.

    2015-09-01

    Tunable single mode pulsed dye lasers are capable of generating optical radiations in the visible range having very small bandwidths (transform limited), high average power (a few kW) at a high pulse repetition rate (a few tens of kHz), small beam divergence and relatively higher efficiencies. These dye lasers are generally utilized laser dyes dissolved in solvents such as water, heavy water, ethanol, methanol, etc. to provide a rapidly flowing gain medium. The dye laser is a versatile tool, which can lase either in the continuous wave (CW) or in the pulsed mode with pulse duration as small as a few tens of femtoseconds. In this review, we have examined the several cavity designs, various types of gain mediums and numerous types of dye cell geometries for obtaining the single longitudinal mode pulsed dye laser. Different types of cavity configuration, such as very short cavity, short cavity with frequency selective element and relatively longer cavity with multiple frequency selective elements were reviewed. These single mode lasers have been pumped by all kinds of pumping sources such as flash lamps, Excimer, Nitrogen, Ruby, Nd:YAG, Copper Bromide and Copper Vapor Lasers. The single mode dye lasers are either pumped transversely or longitudinally to the resonator axis. The pulse repletion rate of these pump lasers were ranging from a few Hz to a few tens of kHz. Physics technology and engineering aspects of tuning mechanism, mode hop free scanning and dye cell designs are also presented in this review. Tuning of a single mode dye laser with a resolution of a few MHz per step is a technologically challenging task, which is discussed here.

  11. Gas laser for efficient sustaining a continuous optical discharge plasma in scientific and technological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zimakov, V P; Kuznetsov, V A; Kedrov, A Yu; Solov'ev, N G; Shemyakin, A N; Yakimov, M Yu

    2009-09-30

    A stable high-power laser is developed for the study and technical applications of a continuous optical discharge (COD). The laser based on the technology of a combined discharge in a scheme with a fast axial gas flow emits 2.2 kW at 10.6 {mu}m per meter of the active medium in continuous and repetitively pulsed regimes with the electrooptical efficiency 20%. The sustaining of the COD plasma in argon and air is demonstrated at the atmospheric pressure. The emission properties of the COD plasma are studied and its possible applications are discussed. (lasers)

  12. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Husain, Zain; Alster, Tina S

    2016-01-01

    The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice. PMID:26893574

  13. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Zain; Alster, Tina S

    2016-01-01

    The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice. PMID:26893574

  14. A technology platform for translational research on laser driven particle accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghardt, W.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kaluza, M.; Pawelke, J.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Baumann, M.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely accepted that proton or light ion beams may have a high potential for improving cancer cure by means of radiation therapy. However, at present the large dimensions of electromagnetic accelerators prevent particle therapy from being clinically introduced on a broad scale. Therefore, several technological approaches among them laser driven particle acceleration are under investigation. Parallel to the development of suitable high intensity lasers, research is necessary to transfer laser accelerated particle beams to radiotherapy, since the relevant parameters of laser driven particle beams dramatically differ from those of beams delivered by conventional accelerators: The duty cycle is low, whereas the number of particles and thus the dose rate per pulse are high. Laser accelerated particle beams show a broad energy spectrum and substantial intensity fluctuations from pulse to pulse. These properties may influence the biological efficiency and they require completely new techniques of beam delivery and quality assurance. For this translational research a new facility is currently constructed on the campus of the university hospital Dresden. It will be connected to the department of radiooncology and host a petawatt laser system delivering an experimental proton beam and a conventional therapeutic proton cyclotron. The cyclotron beam will be delivered on the one hand to an isocentric gantry for patient treatments and on the other hand to an experimental irradiation site. This way the conventional accelerator will deliver a reference beam for all steps of developing the laser based technology towards clinical applicability.

  15. The technology and welding joint properties of hybrid laser-tig welding on thick plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenghai, Zhang; Yifu, Shen; Huijuan, Qiu

    2013-06-01

    The technologies of autogenous laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding are used on thick plate of high strength lower alloy structural steel 10CrNiMnMoV in this article. The unique advantages of hybrid laser-TIG welding is summarized by comparing and analyzing the process parameters and welding joints of autogenous laser welding laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding. With the optimal process parameters of hybrid welding, the good welding joint without visible flaws can be obtained and its mechanical properties are tested according to industry standards. The results show that the hybrid welding technology has certain advantages and possibility in welding thick plates. It can reduce the demands of laser power, and it is significant for lowering the aspect ratio of weld during hybrid welding, so the gas in the molten pool can rise and escape easily while welding thick plates. Therefore, the pores forming tendency decreases. At the same time, hybrid welding enhances welding speed, and optimizes the energy input. The transition and grain size of the microstructure of hybrid welding joint is better and its hardness is higher than base material. Furthermore, its tensile strength and impact toughness is as good as base material. Consequently, the hybrid welding joint can meet the industry needs completely.

  16. Laser Ranging to the Moon: How Evolving Technology Enables New Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faller, James

    2010-03-01

    Technological advances have long been the enabler of scientific progress. The invention of the laser is a prime example of this symbiotic relationship between technical progress and scientific advances. The laser, which today is omnipresent in each of our lives, made its first appearance during the time that I was a graduate student in Professor Dicke's group at Princeton. A major change occurring during that time period was that technology was transforming the study of gravitational physics from just a theoretical subject into also an experimental subject where one could hope to measure things using by-then-available laboratory technologies and techniques. During this same time, the idea for the lunar laser ranging experiment was born. The history and accomplishments of this experiment--a still ongoing experiment which is one of the real scientific triumphs of NASA's Apollo program--will be given.

  17. The role and future of the Laser Technology in the Additive Manufacturing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Gideon N.

    The Additive Manufacturing (AM) was, in the early days, strongly inspired by upcoming laser technologies. The trend to apply lasers in manufacturing in the 1970's might be also be seen as the ignition point, as is evident in early precedent patents. During the evolvement of AM processes, many new systems based on various physical principals were evident; alternative energy sources for AM are in use today. Starting with the 'historical' background followed by a detailed classification analyzing the enablers in use, relevant laser technologies have been identified. This paper focuses on powder bed technologies for plastics and metals as the relevant Laser technology. It concentrates on laser influences and state-of-the-art knowledge. The paper will present a generalized, 'big picture' overview indicating 'lessons learned' and where future emphasis should be focused. Opportunities and challenges, including actual development status, will be described in view of the desired outcomes. Finally, future research challenges and conclusions will be stated and several relevant references for further readings will be given.

  18. Three-year program to improve critical 1-micron Qsw laser technology for Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaizawa, Daisuke; Chishiki, Yoshikazu; Satoh, Yohei; Hanada, Tatsuyuki; Yamakawa, Shiro; Ogawa, Takayo; Wada, Satoshi; Ishii, Shoken; Mizutani, Kohei; Yasui, Motoaki

    2012-11-01

    Laser remote sensing technologies are valuable for a variety of scientific requirements. These measurement techniques are involved in several earth science areas, including atmospheric chemistry, aerosols and clouds, wind speed and directions, prediction of pollution, oceanic mixed layer depth, vegetation canopy height (biomass), ice sheet, surface topography, and others. Much of these measurements have been performed from the ground to aircraft over the past decades. To improve knowledge of these science areas with transport models (e.g. AGCM), further advances of vertical profile are required. JAXA collaborated with NICT and RIKEN started a new cross-sectional 3-year program to improve a technology readiness of the critical 1-micron wavelengths from 2011. The efficient frequency conversions such as second and third harmonic generation and optical parametric oscillation/generation are applied. A variety of elements are common issues to lidar instruments, which includes heat rejection using high thermal conductivity materials, laser diode life time and reliability, wavelength control, and suppression of contamination control. And the program has invested in several critical areas including advanced laser transmitter technologies to enable science measurements and improvement of knowledge for space-based laser diode arrays, Pockels cells, advanced nonlinear wavelength conversion technology for space-based LIDIRs. Final goal is aim to realize 15 watt class Q-switched pulse laser over 3-year lifetime.

  19. Infrared Pulsed Laser Deposition: Applications in Photonics and Biomedical Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, Richard

    2006-04-01

    Resonant infrared pulsed-laser deposition (RIR-PLD) shows significant promise for synthesizing thin films of small organic molecules, thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers and biopolymers, without compromising structure or functionality. This contrasts with most attempts at UV-PLD of organic materials, which have often been accompanied by severe photochemical or photothermal degradation of the ablated material. Representative recent successes in RIR-PLD include deposition of: polymers for light emission and hole transport; functionalized polymers and nanoparticles for chemical and biological sensing; and biocompatible polymers suitable for coating medical devices or drug-delivery vehicles. Plume imaging and various other optical- and mass-spectroscopy experiments appear to confirm that polymers or organic molecules ablated by resonant infrared laser irradiation experience a high spatial and temporal density of vibrational excitation, but tend to remain in the electronic ground state. The mechanism of RIR-PLD is observed to depend on the anharmonicity of the mid-infrared absorption modes, their finite relaxation time, mode-specific nonlinear absorption, and rapid changes in polymer viscosity as a function of temperature. Many of the RIR-PLD experiments to date were carried out using a tunable, mid-infrared, picosecond free-electron laser. However, if RIR-PLD is to become a practical tool for making organic thin films, it will be necessary to develop more conventional lasers that can achieve a similar combination of high pulse intensity, low pulse energy, high pulse-repetition frequency and moderate average power. In conclusion, the prospects for developing precisely such table-top RIR-PLD systems will be discussed.

  20. New laser technology helps reduce coal-slagging headaches

    SciTech Connect

    Neville, A.

    2009-02-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is starting to light the way for power plant operators who want to reduce coal ash deposition in their boilers. The method was developed by Lehigh University's Energy Research Centre and the Energy Research Co. The LIBS system analyzes the chemical properties of coal using a pulsating laser with two frequencies, one infrared and one visible light. The laser vaporizes a sample, resulting in a distinct elemental signature. From these data, a newly developed software package containing artificial neural network (ANN) models estimates ash fusion temperature and predicts coal slagging potential. LIBS is the size of a table top, safe to use and provides instantaneous data without interrupting the process. The performance of the LIBS system was verified in lab experiments and then the system was set up at Dominion's Brayton Point Power Station, a 1,150-MW coal-fired power plant in Somerset, MA. The project demonstrated the merit of the LIBS system that produces coal elemental analysis and estimated fusion temperatures. Further development is needed to equip a LIBS system with an automatic online coal-sampling attachment and to achieve higher accuracy and repeatability. The researchers have been awarded a second DOE grant to fund development of a commercial prototype of the LIBS system. 2 figs., 2 photos.

  1. [INVITED] Laser-induced forward transfer: A high resolution additive manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaporte, Philippe; Alloncle, Anne-Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Among the additive manufacturing techniques, laser-induced forward transfer addresses the challenges of printing thin films in solid phase or small volume droplets in liquid phase with very high resolution. This paper reviews the physics of this process and explores the pros and cons of this technology versus other digital printing technologies. The main field of applications are printed electronics, organic electronics and tissue engineering, and the most promising short terms ones concern digital laser printing of sensors and conductive tracks. Future directions and emerging areas of interest are discussed such as printing solid from a liquid phase and 3D digital nanomanufacturing.

  2. Advanced photoinjector laser and microwave technologies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F.V.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Talley, W.K.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of the design parameters of the compact, high gradient, high luminosity X-band (8.568 GHz) photoinjector facility currently being developed as a collaborative effort between LLNL and UC Davis, is followed by a more detailed description of each of its major subsystems : X-band rf gun, GHz repetition rate synchronously modelocked AlGaAs quantum well laser oscillator, and 8-pass Ti: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} chirped pulse laser amplifier. The photoinjector uses a high quantum efficiency ({approx}5%) Cs{sub 2}Te photocathode, and will be capable of producing high charge (> 1 nC), relativistic (5 MeV), ultrashort (< 1 ps) electron bunches at 2.142 GHz repetition rate in burst mode (100 photoelectron bunches). Design studies indicate that a normalized rms transverse emittance {epsilon}{sub n} = 0.75 {pi} mm-mrad is possible at 0.1 nC charge, while 2.5 {pi} mm-mrad can be obtained at 1 nC. A complete status report of our progress in the development and implementation of the design discussed herein is then given, together with initial experimental data concerning the performance of the 15 MW SLAC X-band klystron amplifier. Finally, the phase noise and jitter characteristics of the laser and rf systems of the high gradient X-band photoinjector have been measured experimentally. In this case, the laser oscillator is a self-modelocked Titanium:Sapphire system operating at the 108th subharmonic of the rf gun. The X-band signal is produced from the laser by a phase-locked dielectric resonance oscillator, and amplified by a pulsed TWT. A comparison between the TWT phase noise and the fields excited in the rf gun demonstrates the filtering effect of the high Q cavity resonant structure, thus indicating that the rf gun can be used as a master oscillator, and could be energized by either a magnetron or a cross-field amplifier.

  3. Novel optical measuring systems and laser technologies for science and industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugui, Yuri; Plotnikov, Sergei; Potashnikov, Anatoly; Verkhogliad, Alexander

    2006-11-01

    The novel results of the R & D activity of TDI SIE SB RAS in the field of the optical measuring technologies, as well as laser technologies for solving safety problems are presented. To measure the rocks stress and to prevent the mountain impact, as well as for basic investigations, a set of optical-electronic deformers and systems was developed and produced. For permanent noncontact bearing position inspection of oil-drilling platforms on Sakhalin coast, Russia) we have developed optical-electronic method and system SAKHALIN with cumulative traveled distance (3 km) measurement error less than 0.03 %. Multifunctional laser technological system LSP-2000 equipped by two Nd-YAG lasers was developed for cutting, welding and surface micro profiling with ablation process (working range of 3 × 2 × 0.6 m 3, positioning error less than 10 mkm). Safety of Russian nuclear reactors takes 100 % noncontact 3D dimensional inspection of all parts of fuel assemblies, including grid spacers. Results of development and testing the specialized high productive laser measuring machine, based on structured illumination, for 3D inspection of grid spacers with micron resolution are presented. Ensuring the safety of running trains is the actual task for railways. Using high-speed laser noncontact method on the base of triangulation position sensors, TDI SIE has developed and produced automatic laser diagnostic system COMPLEX for inspection of geometric parameters of wheel pairs (train speed up to 60 km/hr.), which is used successfully on Russian railways. Experimental results on measuring and laser technological systems testing are presented.

  4. Laser technologies in treatment of degenerative-dystrophic bone diseases in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abushkin, Ivan A.; Privalov, Valery A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Noskov, Nikolay V.; Neizvestnykh, Elena A.; Kotlyarov, Alexander N.; Shekunova, Yulia G.

    2014-03-01

    Two low invasive laser technologies for treatment of degenerative-dystrophic bone diseases in children are presented. The first is the transcutaneous laser osteoperforation developed by us and initially applied for treatment of different inflammatory and traumatic diseases (osteomyelitides, osteal and osteoarticular panaritiums, delayed unions, false joints, and others). Now the technology was applied to treatment of aseptic osteonecrosis of different localizations in 134 children aged from 1 to 16 years, including 56 cases with necrosis of femoral head (Legg-Calve-Perthes disease), 42 with necrosis of 2nd metatarsal bone head (Kohler II disease), and 36 with necrosis of tibial tuberosity (Osgood-Schlatter disease). The second technology is the laser intracystic thermotherapy for treatment of bone cysts. The method was applied to 108 children aged from 3 to 16 years with aneurismal and solitary cysts of different localizations. In both technologies a 970 nm diode laser was used. The suggested technologies increase the efficiency of treatment, reduce its duration, can be performed on outpatient basis, which resulted in great economical effect.

  5. Review of development of laser active imaging technology in China and foreign countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Youchen; Zhao, Hongli; Li, Yingcun

    2014-11-01

    Range-gated laser active imaging technology is an effective way to image detection and precise tracking of remote, dark, and small targets that overcomes the shortcomings of passive visible or infrared imaging technology, thus has important practical value and broad application prospects in the military. The paper based on the analysis of its principle, technical advantages and key technologies focus on the typical systems under atmospheric conditions at home and abroad and the latest research results, and discusses the development trends of this technology.

  6. Key Laser Technologies for X-Ray FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Kaertner, Franz

    2013-08-31

    In the final project period, we demonstrated sub femtosecond timing distribution over a 1.2 km polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber-optic link using balanced optical cross-correlators (BOCs) for link stabilization. By eliminating polarization mode dispersion, link operation for 16 days maintained 0.6 fs RMS timing drift and during a 3-day interval only 0.13 fs drift, which corresponds to a stability level of 10-21. To improve the overall system efficiency and robustness, we developed fiber-coupled, hybrid-integrated BOCs using waveguides in periodically-poled KTiOPO4 (PPKTP). The measured second-harmonic conversion efficiency in the waveguides is a factor of 50 higher than that of bulk-optic crystals. Characterization of 1st-generation devices shows performance comparable to free-space BOCs, with the potential for significant improvement in future devices. For optical-to-RF conversion, we developed two balanced optical-microwave phase detectors (BOM-PD) based on the Sagnac and Mach-Zehnder interferometers. RF extraction using BOM-PDs in phase-locked loops yielded sub-10-fs residual timing jitter for locking bandwidths on the order of several hundred kHz. Finally, we characterized the timing jitter of ultralow-noise Ti:Sapphire oscillators, demonstrating an unprecedented 13 as of jitter integrated over the entire Nyquist band. Our measurements agreed well with theory, confirming our models for quantum-limited laser noise. Measurements of commercially available solid-state lasers at 1550 nm showed that there are laser sources already available with sufficiently low noise to achieve sub-femtosecond performance as master oscillators within a timing distribution system.

  7. A demonstration of CMOS VLSI circuit prototyping in support of the site facility using the 1.2 micron standard cell library developed by National Security Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Edwyn D.

    1991-01-01

    Two silicon CMOS application specific integrated circuits (ASICs), a data generation chip, and a data checker chip were designed. The conversion of the data generator circuitry into a pair of CMOS ASIC chips using the 1.2 micron standard cell library is documented. The logic design of the data checker is discussed. The functions of the control circuitry is described. An accurate estimate of timing relationships is essential to make sure that the logic design performs correctly under practical conditions. Timing and delay information are examined.

  8. SLEDs and Swept Source Laser Technology for OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duelk, Marcus; Hsu, Kevin

    EXALOS offers broadband and high-power superluminescent light-emitting diodes (SLEDs) and high-speed wavelength-swept lasers, covering various visible and near-infrared wavelength regions (390-1,700 nm). These diverse wavelengths are realized in different semiconductor material systems such as GaN, GaAs, or InP. Those light sources are used in various fields such as navigation, optical coherence tomography (OCT), metrology, sensing, and microscopy. Detailed discussions on SLED characteristics and key swept-source OCT system design parameters are presented.

  9. Laser ultrasound technology for fault detection on carbon fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyrkammer, Robert; Reitinger, Bernhard; Grün, Hubert; Sekelja, Jakov; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The marching in of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) to mass production in the aeronautic and automotive industry requires reliable quality assurance methods. Laser ultrasound (LUS) is a promising nondestructive testing technique for sample inspection. The benefits compared to conventional ultrasound (US) testing are couplant free measurements and an easy access to complex shapes due to remote optical excitation and detection. Here the potential of LUS is present on composite test panels with relevant testing scenarios for industry. The results are evaluated in comparison to conventional ultrasound used in the aeronautic industry.

  10. Lasers in InP generic photonic integration technology platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latkowski, Sylwester; Lenstra, Daan

    2015-04-01

    A review is given of a number of lasers in a form of photonic integrated circuits realized on InP substrate using a generic integration approach. The potential of these photonic circuits lies in their compactness, low power consumption, and significant reduction of fabrication cost by realization in generic foundry runs. Generic integration platforms offer the possibility of realizing functionally advanced photonic circuits using combinations of just a few standardized and parameterized building blocks. This vibrant field opens new doors to innovative product development for SMEs as well as curiosity-driven research.

  11. Silicon PV module customization using laser technology for new BIPV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ballesteros, Juan José; Lauzurica, Sara; Morales, Miguel; del Caño, Teodosio; Valencia, Daniel; Casado, Leonardo; Balenzategui, José Lorenzo; Molpeceres, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that lasers have helped to increase efficiency and to reduce production costs in the photovoltaic (PV) sector in the last two decades, appearing in most cases as the ideal tool to solve some of the critical bottlenecks of production both in thin film (TF) and crystalline silicon (c-Si) technologies. The accumulated experience in these fields has brought as a consequence the possibility of using laser technology to produce new Building Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV) products with a high degree of customization. However, to produce efficiently these personalized products it is necessary the development of optimized laser processes able to transform standard products in customized items oriented to the BIPV market. In particular, the production of semitransparencies and/or freeform geometries in TF a-Si modules and standard c-Si modules is an application of great interest in this market. In this work we present results of customization of both TF a-Si modules and standard monocrystalline (m-Si) and policrystalline silicon (pc-Si) modules using laser ablation and laser cutting processes. A discussion about the laser processes parameterization to guarantee the functionality of the device is included. Finally some examples of final devices are presented with a full discussion of the process approach used in their fabrication.

  12. The applications of laser tracking and ranging technology in space rendezvous and docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Wenji; Gao, Limin; Zhou, Liang; Li, Dawei; Wang, Rong

    2013-09-01

    With the development of space technology, more and more Rendezvous and Docking (RVD) mission require more precise measurement of relative position and attitude between tracking spacecraft and target spacecraft. In the procedure of docking between near spacecraft , the optical retroreflector on the target Spacecraft were tracked by the laser tracking and ranging device on the tracking spacecraft , the distance data were provided by laser ranging system, and the azimuth data were provided by tracking gimbal, Synthesized the distance data and azimuth data, the relative position information between two spacecraft were provided to the target spacecraft. Furthermore, through tracking more than three point on the target spacecraft ,the complete information of relative position and attitude between two spacecraft were calculated rapidly by the measurement system,which were presented to the control system during the whole RVD operating stage. The laser tracking technology guaranteed continuous measurement and supplied accurate azimuth information, and the laser ranging technology ensured high accuracy of distance information. In addition, the untouched measure mode give no disturbance to the docking operation, moreover, the monochromaticity of laser make the tracking and ranging procedure avoiding to be disturbed by parasitic light of space, thus there will be a effective measurement accompanying the whole docking operating procedure and affording valid data to the control system of docking.

  13. A Ground-Based 2-Micron DIAL System to Profile Tropospheric CO2 and Aerosol Distributions for Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Koch, Grady; Abedin, Nurul; Refaat, Tamer; Rubio, Manuel; Davis, Kenneth; Miller, Charles; Singh, Upendra

    2006-01-01

    System will operate at a temperature insensitive CO2 line (2050.967 nm) with side-line tuning and off-set locking. Demonstrated an order of magnitude improvement in laser line locking needed for high precision measurements, side-line operation, and simultaneously double pulsing and line locking. Detector testing of phototransistor has demonstrated sensitivity to aerosol features over long distances in the atmosphere and resolve features approx. 100m. Optical systems that collect light onto small area detectors work well. Receiver optical designs are being optimized and data acquisition systems developed. CO2 line parameter characterization in progress In situ sensor calibration in progress for validation of DIAL CO2 system.

  14. Innovative fiber systems for laser medicine and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artiouchenko, Viatcheslav G.; Wojciechowski, Cezar

    2003-10-01

    Development of Polycrystalline Infrared (PIR-) fibers extruded from solid solutions of AgCl/AgBr has opened a new horizon of molecular spectroscopy applications in 4-18 micron range of spectra. PIR-fiber cables and probes could be coupled with a variety of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer and Tunable Diode Lasers (TDL), including pig tailing of Mercury Cadmium Tellurium (MCT) detectors. Using these techniques no sample preparation is necessary for PIR-fiber probes have been used to measure reflection and absorption spectra, in situ, in vivo, in real time and even multiplexed. Such PIR-fiber probes have been used for evanescent absorption spectroscopy of malignant tissue and skin surface diagnostics in-vivo, glucose detection in blood as well as crude oil composition analysis, for organic pollution and nuclear waste monitoring. A review of various PIR-fiber applications in medicine, industry and environment control is presented. The synergy of PIR-fibers flexibility with a super high spectral resolution of TDL spectrometers with Δv=10-4cm-1, provides the unique tool for gas analysis, specifically wiht PIR-fibers are coupled as pigtails with MCT-detectors and Pb-salt lasers. Design of multichannel PIR-fiber tailed TDL spectrometer could be used as a portable device for multispectral gas analysis as 1 ppb level of detectivity for various applications in medicine and biotechnology.

  15. Innovative fiber systems for laser medicine and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artiouchenko, Viatcheslav G.; Wojciechowski, Cezar

    2004-09-01

    Development of Polycrystalline Infrared (PIR-) fibers extruded from solid solutions of AgCl/AgBr has opened a new horizon of molecular spectroscopy applications in 4 - 18 micron range of spectra. PIR-fiber cables and probes could be coupled with a variety of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer and Tunable Diode Lasers (TDL), including pig tailing of Mercury Cadmium Tellurium (MCT) detectors. Using these techniques no sample preparation is necessary for PIR-fiber probes to measure reflection and absorption spectra, in situ, in vivo, in real time and even multiplexed. Such PIR-fiber probes have been used for evanescent absorption spectroscopy of malignant tissue and skin surface diagnostics in-vivo, glucose detection in blood as well as crude oil composition analysis, for organic pollution and nuclear waste monitoring. A review of various PIR-fiber applications in medicine, industry and environment control is presented. The synergy of PIR-fibers flexibility with a super high spectral resolution of TDL spectrometers with Δν=10-4cm-1, provides the unique tool for gas analysis, specifically when PIR-fibers are coupled as pigtails with MCT-detectors and Pb-salt lasers. Design of multichannel PIR-fiber tailed TDL spectrometer could be used as a portable device for multispectral gas analysis at 1 ppb level of detectivity for various applications in medicine and biotechnology.

  16. High power diode laser array development using completely indium free packaging technology with narrow spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dong; Wang, Jingwei; Gao, Lijun; Liang, Xuejie; Li, Xiaoning; Liu, Xingsheng

    2016-03-01

    The high power diode lasers have been widely used in many fields. In this work, a sophisticated high power and high performance horizontal array of diode laser stacks have been developed and fabricated with high duty cycle using hard solder bonding technology. CTE-matched submount and Gold Tin (AuSn) hard solder are used for bonding the diode laser bar to achieve the performances of anti-thermal fatigue, higher reliability and longer lifetime. This array consists of 30 bars with the expected optical output peak power of 6000W. By means of numerical simulation and analytical results, the diode laser bars are aligned on suitable positions along the water cooled cooler in order to achieve the uniform wavelength with narrow spectrum and accurate central wavelength. The performance of the horizontal array, such as output power, spectrum, thermal resistance, life time, etc., is characterized and analyzed.

  17. Simulation and Technology of Hybrid Welding of Thick Steel Parts with High Power Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, Gleb; Valdaytseva, Ekaterina; Tzibulsky, Igor; Lopota, Alexander; Velichko, Olga

    The article devoted to steady state and dynamic simulation of melt pool behavior during hybrid laser-arc welding of pipes and shipbuilding sections. The quasi-stationary process-model was used to determine an appropriate welding mode. The dynamical model of laser welding was used for investigation of keyhole depth and width oscillations. The experiments of pipe steel and stainless steel hybrid laser-MAG welding have been made with 15-kW fiber laser in wide range of welding mode parameters. Comparison of experimentally measured and simulated behavior of penetration depth as well as their oscillation spectra approved the self-oscillation nature of melt pool behavior. The welding mode influence of melt pool stability has also been observed. The technological peculiarities, which allow provide high quality weld seam, has been discussed also.

  18. Development of compact blue-green lasers for projection display based on Novalux extended-cavity surface-emitting laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchegrov, Andrei V.; Watson, Jason P.; Lee, Dicky; Umbrasas, Arvydas; Hallstein, Sascha; Carey, Glen P.; Hitchens, William R.; Scholz, Ken; Cantos, Brad D.; Niven, Greg; Jansen, Michael; Pelaprat, Jean-Michel; Mooradian, Aram

    2005-03-01

    Compact and efficient blue-green lasers have been receiving increasing interest in the last few years due to their applications in various industries: bio-instrumentation, reprographics, microscopy, etc. We report on the latest developments in frequency-doubled, compact blue-green lasers, based on Novalux extended-cavity surface emitting laser (NECSEL) technology. This discussion will touch upon using NECSEL technology to go beyond a 5-20 milliwatt cw laser design for instrumentation applications and obtain a compact design that is scalable to higher power levels in an array-based architecture. Such a blue-green laser array platform can address the needs of laser light sources in the projection display consumer electronics markets, particularly in rear-projection televisions.

  19. MIMO based optical phased array technology with electronic beam steering for laser radar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Neha; Zmuda, Henry

    2010-04-01

    This paper will address the analysis and design of an electronically scanned phased array laser radar (ladar) system utilizing the techniques of multi-input multi-output (MIMO) array design. MIMO radar is has attracted much attention recently from both researchers and practitioners alike due to its significant potential for advancing the state-of-the-art RF radar technology. The laser radar architecture presented stands to gain significant inroads on the ability to apply RF array processing methods to laser radar systems in several ways. Specifically, using MIMO array design concepts, it is shown that the resolution of the ladar array can substantially exceed the diffraction limited resolution of a conventional array. Additionally, the use of array methods provides the capability to electronically steer the aperture, thus avoiding the mechanical beam scanning methods generally encountered in laser radar systems. Finally, by using an array of radiators, an increase in total radiated power is achieved, relieving the power burden on a single laser. The problems traditionally encountered in applying conventional array techniques to laser/detector arrays, for example, the inability to achieve half-wavelength spacing or the surfacing of source coherence issues, actually work to one's advantage when viewed in the MIMO paradigm. It is anticipated that the successful implementation of this system will significantly advance the state-of-the-art of laser radar capabilities for high speed imaging, target detection, tracking, and signature analysis.

  20. Fiber Sensor Systems Based on Fiber Laser and Microwave Photonic Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hongyan; Chen, Daru; Cai, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensors, especially fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are very attractive due to their numerous advantages over traditional sensors, such as light weight, high sensitivity, cost-effectiveness, immunity to electromagnetic interference, ease of multiplexing and so on. Therefore, fiber-optic sensors have been intensively studied during the last several decades. Nowadays, with the development of novel fiber technology, more and more newly invented fiber technologies bring better and superior performance to fiber-optic sensing networks. In this paper, the applications of some advanced photonic technologies including fiber lasers and microwave photonic technologies for fiber sensing applications are reviewed. FBG interrogations based on several kinds of fiber lasers, especially the novel Fourier domain mode locking fiber laser, have been introduced; for the application of microwave photonic technology, examples of microwave photonic filtering utilized as a FBG sensing interrogator and microwave signal generation acting as a transversal loading sensor have been given. Both theoretical analysis and experimental demonstrations have been carried out. The comparison of these advanced photonic technologies for the applications of fiber sensing is carried out and important issues related to the applications have been addressed and the suitable and potential application examples have also been discussed in this paper. PMID:22778591

  1. Fiber sensor systems based on fiber laser and microwave photonic technologies.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongyan; Chen, Daru; Cai, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensors, especially fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are very attractive due to their numerous advantages over traditional sensors, such as light weight, high sensitivity, cost-effectiveness, immunity to electromagnetic interference, ease of multiplexing and so on. Therefore, fiber-optic sensors have been intensively studied during the last several decades. Nowadays, with the development of novel fiber technology, more and more newly invented fiber technologies bring better and superior performance to fiber-optic sensing networks. In this paper, the applications of some advanced photonic technologies including fiber lasers and microwave photonic technologies for fiber sensing applications are reviewed. FBG interrogations based on several kinds of fiber lasers, especially the novel Fourier domain mode locking fiber laser, have been introduced; for the application of microwave photonic technology, examples of microwave photonic filtering utilized as a FBG sensing interrogator and microwave signal generation acting as a transversal loading sensor have been given. Both theoretical analysis and experimental demonstrations have been carried out. The comparison of these advanced photonic technologies for the applications of fiber sensing is carried out and important issues related to the applications have been addressed and the suitable and potential application examples have also been discussed in this paper. PMID:22778591

  2. FY07 LDRD Final Report Precision, Split Beam, Chirped-Pulse, Seed Laser Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-11-12

    The goal of this LDRD ER was to develop a robust and reliable technology to seed high-energy laser systems with chirped pulses that can be amplified to kilo-Joule energies and recompressed to sub-picosecond pulse widths creating extremely high peak powers suitable for petawatt class physics experiments. This LDRD project focused on the development of optical fiber laser technologies compatible with the current long pulse National Ignition Facility (NIF) seed laser. New technologies developed under this project include, high stability mode-locked fiber lasers, fiber based techniques for reduction of compressed pulse pedestals and prepulses, new compact stretchers based on chirped fiber Bragg gratings (CFBGs), new techniques for manipulation of chirped pulses prior to amplification and new high-energy fiber amplifiers. This project was highly successful and met virtually all of its goals. The National Ignition Campaign has found the results of this work to be very helpful. The LDRD developed system is being employed in experiments to engineer the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) front end and the fully engineered version of the ARC Front End will employ much of the technology and techniques developed here.

  3. Development of Articulated Competency-Based Curriculum in Laser/Electro-Optics Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luzerne County Community Coll., Nanticoke, PA.

    A project was conducted at the Community College of Luzerne County (Pennsylvania) to develop, in cooperation with area vocational-technical schools, the first year of a competency-based curriculum in laser/electro-optics technology. Existing programs were reviewed and private sector input was sought in developing the curriculum and identifying…

  4. Development of Articulated Competency-Based Curriculum in Laser/Electro-Optics Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luzerne County Community Coll., Nanticoke, PA.

    The project described in this report was conducted at the Community College of Luzerne County (Pennsylvania) to develop, in conjunction with area vocational-technical schools, the second year of a competency-based curriculum in laser/electro-optics technology. During the project, a task force of teachers from the area schools and the college…

  5. Development of Generalizable Educational Programs in Laser/Electro-Optics Technology: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Daniel M.

    The purpose of the Laser/Electro-Optics Technology (LEOT) Project was to establish a pilot educational program, develop a flexible curriculum, prepare and test instructional materials, transport the curriculum and instructional materials into other educational institutions by establishing relevant LEOT programs wherever they are needed, and to…

  6. Technology development for laser-cooled clocks on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W. M.

    2003-01-01

    The PARCS experiment will use a laser-cooled cesium atomic clock operating in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station to provide both advanced tests of gravitational theory to demonstrate a new cold-atom clock technology for space.

  7. Advantages of Picosecond Laser Machining for Cutting-Edge Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhouse, C.

    The demand to reduce the size, weight and material cost of modern electronic devices results in a requirement for precision micromachining to aid product development. Examples include making smaller and more powerful smartphones with brighter displays, eliminating the requirement for post-process cleaning and machining the latest bio- absorbable medical stents. The pace of innovation in high-tech industries has led to ultrafast (picosecond) industrial lasers becoming an important tool for many applications and the high repetition rates now available help to meet industrial throughput levels. This is due to the unique operating regime (megawatts of peak power) enabling clean cutting and patterning of sensitive materials and thin films used in a number of novel devices and allows micromachining of wide bandgap, "difficult" materials such as glass.

  8. Solid State Laser Technology Development for Atmospheric Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, James C.

    1998-01-01

    NASA atmospheric scientists are currently planning active remote sensing missions that will enable global monitoring of atmospheric ozone, water vapor, aerosols and clouds as well as global wind velocity. The measurements of these elements and parameters are important because of the effects they have on climate change, atmospheric chemistry and dynamics, atmospheric transport and, in general, the health of the planet. NASA will make use of Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) and backscatter lidar techniques for active remote sensing of molecular constituents and atmospheric phenomena from advanced high-altitude aircraft and space platforms. This paper provides an overview of NASA Langley Research Center's (LaRC's) development of advanced solid state lasers, harmonic generators, and wave mixing techniques aimed at providing the broad range of wavelengths necessary to meet measurement goals of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise.

  9. Simultaneous determination of twelve benzodiazepines in human serum using a new reversed-phase chromatographic column on a 2-microns porous microspherical silica gel.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E; Terada, M; Misawa, S; Wakasugi, C

    1996-06-28

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method has been developed for the simultaneous analysis of twelve frequently used benzodiazepines (BZPs) (bromazepam, clonazepam, chlordiazepoxide, estazolam, etizolam, flutazoram, haloxazolam, lorazepam, nitrazepam, oxazolam, triazolam and diazepam, internal standard) by using commercially available 2 or 5 microns particle size reversed-phase columns and a microflow cell-equipped ultraviolet detector. The separation was achieved using a C18 reversed-phase column (condition 1: 100 x 4.6 mm I.D., particle size 2 microns, TSK gel Super-ODS: conditon 2: 100 x 4.6 mm I.D., particle size 5 microns, Hypersil ODS-C18). The mobile phase was composed of methanol-5 mM NaH2PO4 (pH 6) (45:55, v/v), and the flow-rate was 0.65 ml/min (condition 1 and 2). The absorbance of the eluent was monitored at 254 nm. Retention times under condition 1 were shorter than those of condition 2. When the twelve benzodiazepines were determined, sensitivity and limits of quantification were about four to ten times better under condition 1 than under condition 2. The rate of recovery and linearity in condition 1 were approximately the same as those in condition 2. These results show that a new ODS filler with a particle size of 2 microns was more sensitive, provided better separation and was more rapid than that with conventional ODS filler. PMID:8832439

  10. Solid-state coherent LIDAR technology for space-based wind measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Mark W.; Hannon, Stephen M.; Henderson, Sammy W.; Gatt, Philip; Huffaker, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    Pulsed coherent solid-state 2 micron laser radar systems have been developed at Coherent Technologies, Inc. for ground- and airborne-based applications. Ground-based measurements of wind profiles and aerosol backscatter have been performed for several years. Examples of wind and aerosol backscatter coefficient measurements will be presented which cover a variety of weather conditions. Airborne measurements of wind profiles below the aircraft have been performed by Wright Laboratories, operating in a VAD measurement mode and will be reviewed. An engineered flight-worthy coherent lidar system is under development at CTI for flight on the SR-71 aircraft, in support of the High Speed Civil Transport program. Flights will be conducted by NASA-Dryden Flight Research Center at altitudes above 60,000 feet for the measurement of atmospheric turbulence ahead of the aircraft. Efforts are also underway at CTI for the development of high power coherent laser radar systems. Extensive detailed physical optics models of diode-pumped solid-state laser performance have been developed to characterize transient thermo-optic aberrations and the overall efficiency of lasers intended for space-based applications. We are currently developing a 2 micron 0.5 J/pulse transmitter with a 10 Hz PRF and a pulse duration of 400 - 500 ns. The status and expected space-based wind measuring performance for this system will be presented.

  11. Variations in the Peak Position of the 6.2 micron Interstellar Emission Feature: A Tracer of N in the Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of the molecular characteristics that underlie the observed peak position and profile of the nominal 6.2 micron interstellar emission band generally attributed to the CC stretching vibrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). It begins with a summary of recent experimental and theoretical studies ofthe spectroscopic properties of large (>30 carbon atoms) PAH cations as they relate to this aspect of the astrophysical problem. It then continues with an examination of the spectroscopic properties of a number of PAH variants within the context of the interstellar 6.2 micron emission, beginning with a class of compounds known as polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles (PANHs; PAHs with one or more nitrogen atoms substituted into their carbon skeleton). In this regard, we summarize the results of recent relevant experimental studies involving a limited set of small PANHs and their cations and then report the results of a comprehensive computational study that extends that work to larger PANH cations including many nitrogen-substituted variants of coronene(+) (C24H12(+)), ovalene(+) (C32H14(+)), circumcoronene(+) (C54H18(+)), and circum-circumcoronene(+) (C96H24(+)). Finally, we report the results of more focused computational studies of selected representatives from a number of other classes of PAH variants that share one or more of the key attributes of the PANH species studied. These alternative classes of PAH variants include (1) oxygen- and silicon-substituted PAH cations; (2) PAH-metal ion complexes (metallocenes) involving the cosmically abundant elements magnesium and iron; and (3) large, asymmetric PAH cations. Overall, the studies reported here demonstrate that increasing PAH size alone is insuEcient to account for the position of the shortest wavelength interstellar 6.2 micron emission bands, as had been suggested by earlier studies. On the other hand, this work reveals that substitution of one or

  12. Technical advantages of disk laser technology in short and ultrashort pulse processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, P.; Stollhof, J.; Weiler, S.; Massa, S.; Faisst, B.; Denney, P.; Gounaris, E.

    2011-03-01

    This paper demonstrates that disk-laser technology introduces advantages that increase efficiency and allows for high productivity in micro-processing in both the nanosecond (ns) and picosecond (ps) regimes. Some technical advantages of disk technology include not requiring good pump beam quality or special wavelengths for pumping of the disk, high optical efficiencies, no thermal lensing effects and a possible scaling of output power without an increase of pump beam quality. With cavity-dumping, the pulse duration of the disk laser can be specified between 30 and hundreds of nanoseconds, but is independent of frequency, thus maintaining process stability. TRUMPF uses this technology in the 750 watts average power laser TruMicro 7050. High intensity, along with fluency, is important for high ablation rates in thinfilm removal. Thus, these ns lasers show high removal rates, above 60 cm2/s, in thin-film solar cell production. In addition, recent results in paint-stripping of aerospace material prove the green credentials and high processing rates inherent with this technology as it can potentially replace toxic chemical processes. The ps disk technology meanwhile is used in, for example, scribing of solar cells, wafer dicing and drilling injector nozzles, as the pulse duration is short enough to minimize heat input in the laser-matter interaction. In the TruMicro Series 5000, the multi-pass regenerative amplifier stage combines high optical-optical efficiencies together with excellent output beam quality for pulse durations of only 6 ps and high pulse energies of up to 0.25 mJ.

  13. Technological Aspects of High Speed Direct Laser Deposition Based on Heterophase Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, G. A.; Klimova, O. G.; Zemlyakov, E. V.; Babkin, K. D.; Kolodyazhnyy, D. Yu.; Shamray, F. A.; Travyanov, A. Ya.; Petrovskiy, P. V.

    The article deals with physical peculiarities and technology of high speed processes of direct laser deposition. On the base of theoretic research and computer modeling the powder transfer has been optimized, increasing process stability and productivity. Principles of nozzles design also have been developed in accordance with technological needs. An influence of process mode on product properties and material structure was defined for heat resisted Ni-based superalloys. Developed technology provided the mechanic properties of products on the level of rolled material and allows avoid heat treatment and HIP in production process. Possible ways for increasing process performance and economic efficiency also have been discussed.

  14. Explosive component acceptance tester using laser interferometer technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickstrom, Richard D.; Tarbell, William W.

    1993-01-01

    Acceptance testing of explosive components requires a reliable and simple to use testing method that can discern less than optimal performance. For hot-wire detonators, traditional techniques use dent blocks or photographic diagnostic methods. More complicated approaches are avoided because of their inherent problems with setup and maintenance. A recently developed tester is based on using a laser interferometer to measure the velocity of flying plates accelerated by explosively actuated detonators. Unlike ordinary interferometers that monitor displacement of the test article, this device measures velocity directly and is commonly used with non-spectral surfaces. Most often referred to as the VISAR technique (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflecting Surface), it has become the most widely-accepted choice for accurate measurement of velocity in the range greater than 1 mm/micro-s. Traditional VISAR devices require extensive setup and adjustment and therefore are unacceptable in a production-testing environment. This paper describes a new VISAR approach which requires virtually no adjustments, yet provides data with accuracy comparable to the more complicated systems. The device, termed the Fixed-Cavity VISAR, is currently being developed to serve as a product verification tool for hot-wire detonators and slappers. An extensive data acquisition and analysis computer code was also created to automate the manipulation of raw data into final results.

  15. Laser beam soldering of fine-pitch technology packages with solid solder deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucher, Hans-Joerg; Glasmacher, Mathias; Geiger, Manfred

    1996-04-01

    Micro electronics is a key technology attracting the attention of information, communication, automation and data processing technologies. Ongoing miniaturization combined with an increasing number of I/Os has inevitably lead to ever finer lead geometries. Therefore the demands put upon the surface mount technology are increasing continuously. Processing of high lead count fine pitch packages, for example those which are applied in high-capacity computers, has not increased the demands put upon the assembly process only, but also on the connecting techniques. By reflow soldering with laser beam radiation the benefits from the tool `laser beam' are used extensively, for example contact and force free processing, strictly localized heating and the good controllability thereof, formation of fine crystalline and homogeneous structures, etc. Within the scope of this paper the fundamentals of laser beam soldering are discussed for fine pitch lead frames (pitch 300 micrometers ) for plastic packages, made by a modified CuFe2P alloy with a 5 micrometers Sn90Pb plating, on solid solder depths (Sn63Pb) performed by the so called High-Pad process. These investigations are unique in the field of laser beam soldering and are carried out by means of a Nd:YAG-laser. A pyrometer is used for detection of the emission of the temperature radiation of the joining area for process control. The additional use of a high-speed camera gives a detailed description of the melting and wetting process. The influence of laser beam parameters and the volume of the solid solder deposits on the joining result are presented.

  16. Development and applications of laser peening without coating as a surface enhancement technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yuji; Mukai, Naruhiko; Yoda, Masaki; Uehara, Takuya; Chida, Itaru; Obata, Minoru

    2006-09-01

    Laser peening without coating (LPwC) is an innovative surface enhancement technology to mitigate fatigue and stress corrosion of metallic materials by imparting a compressive residual stress. Toshiba has established a process without coating, whereas the coating is inevitably required in conventional process of laser peening to protect the surface from melting. Since the energy of laser pulses in LPwC is significantly small compared to that in the conventional process, a commercially available Nd:YAG laser can be used, and moreover, an optical fiber can be utilized to deliver the laser pulses. Compressive residual stress nearly equal to the yield strength of the materials was introduced on the surface after LPwC. The depth of the compressive residual stress reaches 1 mm or more from the surface. High-cycle fatigue tests proved that LPwC significantly prolonged the fatigue lives despite the increase in surface roughness due to ablative interaction of laser pulses with material surface. Accelerating stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests showed that LPwC completely prevents SCC of sensitized austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base alloys and their weld metals. LPwC has been used since 1999 to prevent SCC of core shrouds or nozzle welds of ten nuclear power reactors of both boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) types, already covering nearly one fifth of the existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Japan.

  17. Laser ultrasonic technology and its applications in nondestructive testing in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Guoping

    2005-02-01

    As a new branch of ultrasonics, laser-induced ultrasonics is developed quickly, and has wide applications in many areas recently, for its advantages such as non-contract operation, non-destructive testing, broad bandwidth, high time resolution, high space resolution, no shape limits on samples, etc. Firstly, the principles of the laser-induced ultrasonic generation, e.g., the thermoelastic excitation theory and the ablation excitation theory, were introduced. This paper also described the laser-induced ultrasonic detection by means of the confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer (CFPI). And then its applications in non-destructive testing in solids were introduced in detail. Based on the principles of the laser-induced ultrasonic generation and detection, the structure of the laser ultrasonic detection system was presented. From the velocities of compress wave and surface wave measured by the detection system, elastic constants of aluminium were worked out. The experimental results were in good accordance with the theoretical predictions, which demonstrated that laser ultrasonic technique is practical, reliable and effective. Future prospects for such technology were pointed out finally.

  18. Laser rapid forming technology of high-performance dense metal components with complex structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weidong; Chen, Jing; Li, Yanming; Lin, Xin

    2005-01-01

    Laser rapid forming (LRF) is a new and advanced manufacturing technology that has been developed on the basis of combining high power laser cladding technology with rapid prototyping (RP) to realize net shape forming of high performance dense metal components without dies. Recently we have developed a set of LRF equipment. LRF experiments were carried out on the equipment to investigate the influences of processing parameters on forming characterizations systematically with the cladding powder materials as titanium alloys, superalloys, stainless steel, and copper alloys. The microstructure of laser formed components is made up of columnar grains or columnar dendrites which grow epitaxially from the substrate since the solid components were prepared layer by layer additionally. The result of mechanical testing proved that the mechanical properties of laser formed samples are similar to or even over that of forging and much better than that of casting. It is shown in this paper that LRF technology is providing a new solution for some difficult processing problems in the high tech field of aviation, spaceflight and automobile industries.

  19. Yb-doped silica glass and photonic crystal fiber based on laser sintering technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Jiale; Zhou, Guiyao; Xia, Changming; Liu, Jiantao; Tian, Hongchun; Liang, Wanting; Hou, Zhiyun

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the fabricating method for Yb3+-doped silica glass and double-cladding large mode area photonic crystal fiber (LMA PCF) based on laser sintering technology combined with a liquid phase doping method. The doped material prepared shows the amorphous property and the hydroxyl content is approximately 40 ppm. The attenuation of the fabricated LMA PCF is 14.2 dB m-1 at 976 nm, and the lowest value is 0.25 dB m-1 at 1200 nm. The laser slope efficiency is up to 70.2%.

  20. Advanced technologies in chemical oxygen-iodine lasers for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Nagatomo, Syoji; Takeda, Shuzaburo; Wani, Fumio; Nanri, Kenzo; Fujioka, Tomoo

    1998-05-01

    A new concept of energy network system, `optical power system', was proposed. In this system, optical power is generated at a laser facility and it is distributed to users through optical fiber such as electric power system. The authors have started a feasibility study of this concept based on the latest chemical oxygen-iodine laser technology. 23.4% of chemical efficiency was obtained using nitrogen as buffer gas. Buffer gas cooling remarkably increased chemical efficiency. Liquid-jet type singlet oxygen generator (SOG) and twisted aerosol SOG (TA-SOG) were compared with the same setup. TA-SOG showed good performance especially in the high gas flow velocity range.

  1. Shuttle Laser Technology Experiment Facility (LTEF)-to-airplane lasercom experiment: Airplane considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalil, Ford

    1990-01-01

    NASA is considering the use of various airplanes for a Shuttle Laser Technology Experiment Facility (LTEF)-to-Airplane laser communications experiment. As supporting documentation, pertinent technical details are included about the potential use of airplanes located at Ames Research Center and Wallops Flight Facility. The effects and application of orbital mechanics considerations are also presented, including slant range, azimuth, elevation, and time. The pros and cons of an airplane equipped with a side port with a bubble window versus a top port with a dome are discussed.

  2. Laser formed intentional firearm microstamping technology: counterinsurgency intelligence gathering tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.; Ohar, Orest P.

    2009-09-01

    Warfare relies on effective, accurate and timely intelligence an especially critical task when conducting a counterinsurgency operation [1]. Simply stated counterinsurgency is an intelligence war. Both insurgents and counterinsurgents need effective intelligence capabilities to be successful. Insurgents and counterinsurgents therefore attempt to create and maintain intelligence networks and fight continuously to neutralize each other's intelligence capabilities [1][2]. In such an environment it is obviously an advantage to target or proactively create opportunities to track and map an insurgent movement. Quickly identifying insurgency intelligence assets (Infiltrators) within a host government's infrastructure is the goal. Infiltrators can occupy various areas of government such as security personnel, national police force, government offices or military units. Intentional Firearm Microstamping offers such opportunities when implemented into firearms. Outfitted within firearms purchased and distributed to the host nation's security forces (civilian and military), Intentional Firearm Microstamping (IFM) marks bullet cartridge casings with codes as they are fired from the firearm. IFM is incorporated onto optimum surfaces with the firearm mechanism. The intentional microstamp tooling marks can take the form of alphanumeric codes or encoded geometric codes that identify the firearm. As the firearm is discharged the intentional tooling marks transfer a code to the cartridge casing which is ejected out of the firearm. When recovered at the scene of a firefight or engagement, the technology will provide forensic intelligence allowing the mapping and tracking of small arms traffic patterns within the host nation or identify insurgency force strength and pinpoint firearm sources, such as corrupt/rogue military units or police force. Intentional Firearm Microstamping is a passive mechanical trace technology that can be outfitted or retrofitted to semiautomatic handguns and

  3. Multimedia Superabrasive, Laser Cladding, and Waterjet Technology Performance Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Bohley, M.C.; Ciccateri, T.J.

    1998-04-03

    into the electronic information retrieval portion of the PSS. On-line reference manuals covering Operations, Maintenance, Mechanical, Electrical, and Peripherals provide text and illustrations to the machine operator in a traditional structure, but additionally offer the capability to search voluminous amounts of technical data and retrieve specific information on request. This project provided the project team with a detailed understanding of the knowledge and information required to produce and support advanced machine tools. In addition it resulted in the design and construction of a prototype Grinders PSS that contains all the logic and interfaces necessary to integrate product information from the Huffman Waterjets and Lasers product lines.

  4. Development of Ho:YLF laser pumped by Tm:fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Kohei; Ishii, Shoken; Itabe, Toshikazu; Asai, Kazuhiro; Sato, Atsushi

    2014-11-01

    We are developing a 2-micron Ho:YLF laser end-pumped by Tm:fiber laser. The oscillator has ring resonator of 3m length. The laser is operated at high repetition rate of 200-5000 Hz in room temperature. The oscillator and amplifier system showed outputs of about 9W in CW and more than 6W in Q-switched operation. This laser will be used for wind and CO2 concentration measurements.

  5. The application and research of the multi-receiving telescopes technology in laser ranging to space targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhibo; Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Zhongping; Deng, Huarong; Li, Pu; Meng, Wendong; Cheng, Zhien; Shen, Lurun; Tang, Zhenhong

    2014-11-01

    Laser ranging technology can directly measure the distance between space targets and ground stations with the highest measurement precision and will play an irreplaceable role in orbit check and calibrating microwave measurement system. The precise orbit determination and accurate catalogue of space targets can also be realized by laser ranging with multi-stations. Among space targets, most of ones are inactive targets and space debris, which should be paid the great attentions for the safety of active spacecrafts. Because of laser diffuse reflection from the surface of targets, laser ranging to space debris has the characteristics of wide coverage and weak strength of laser echoes, even though the powerful laser system is applied. In order to increase the receiving ability of laser echoes, the large aperture telescope should be adopted. As well known, some disadvantages for one set of large aperture telescope, technical development difficulty and system running and maintenance complexity, will limit its flexible applications. The multi-receiving telescopes technology in laser ranging to space targets is put forward to realize the equivalent receiving ability produced by one larger aperture telescope by way of using multi-receiving telescopes, with the advantages of flexibility and maintenance. The theoretical analysis of the feasibility and key technologies of multi-receiving telescopes technology in laser ranging to space targets are presented in this paper. The experimental measurement system based on the 60cm SLR system and 1.56m astronomical telescopes with a distance of about 50m is established to provide the platform for researching on the multi-receiving telescopes technology. The laser ranging experiments to satellites equipped with retro-reflectors are successfully performed by using the above experimental system and verify the technical feasibility to increase the ability of echo detection. And the multi-receiving telescopes technology will become a

  6. Ho:YLF Laser Pumped by TM:Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Kohei; Ishii, Shoken; Itabe, Toshikazu; Asai, Kazuhiro; Sato, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    A 2-micron Ho:YLF laser end-pumped by 1.94-micron Tm:fiber laser is described. A ring resonator of 3m length is adopted for the oscillator. The laser is a master oscillator and an amplifier system. It is operated at high repetition rate of 200-5000 Hz in room temperature. The laser outputs were about 9W in CW and more than 6W in Q-switched operation. This laser was developed to be used for wind and CO2 measurements.

  7. The 1.7- to 4.2-micron spectrum of asteroid 1 Ceres - Evidence for structural water in clay minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Feierberg, M. A.; Larson, H. P.; Johnson, J. R.; Tokunaga, A. T.

    1981-01-01

    A high-resolution Fourier spectrum (1.7-3.5 microns) and medium-resolution spectrophotometry (2.7-4.2 microns) were obtained for Asteroid 1 Ceres. The presence of the 3-micron absorption feature due to water of hydration was confirmed. The 3-micron feature is compared with the 3-micron bands due to water of hydration in clays and salts. It is concluded that the spectrum of Ceres shows a strong absorption at 2.7-2.8 microns due to structural OH groups in clay minerals. The dominant minerals on the surface of Ceres are therefore hydrated clay minerals structurally similar to terrestrial montmorillonites. There is also a narrow absorption feature at 3.1 microns which is attributable to a very small amount of water ice on Ceres. This is the first evidence for ice on the surface of an asteroid.

  8. Optical electronic measuring systems and laser technologies for scientific and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugui, Yuri V.; Bazin, Vladimir S.; Finogenov, Leonid V.; Makarov, Sergei N.; Verkhogliad, Alexander G.

    2006-11-01

    The novel results of the R and D activity of TDI SIE SB RAS in the field of the optical measuring technologies, as well as laser technologies for solving actual problems are presented. The metrological characterization of a perspective Fresnel method for high precision measuring the dimensions of objects is investigated. An optoelectronic noncontact method using diffractive optical element (DOE) for the 3D inspection of article holes is presented. A structured light method and system testing results for noncontact inspection of wire wear and its defects for train electro-supply network are discussed. For permanent noncontact bearing position inspection of oil-drilling platforms on Sakhalin coast, Russia) under extreme temperatures (+/- 40°C) we have developed optical-electronic method and system SAKHALIN. Multifunctional laser technological system LSP-2000 equipped by two Nd-YAG lasers was developed for cutting, welding and surface micro profiling with ablation process (working range of 3 x 3 x 0.6 m 3, positioning error less than 10 μm). Safety of Russian nuclear reactors takes 100 % noncontact 3D dimensional inspection of all parts of fuel assemblies, including grid spacers. Results of development and testing the specialized high productive laser measuring machine, based on structured illumination, for 3D inspection of grid spacers with micron resolution are presented. For safety increasing of Russian railways TDI SIE has developed and produced automatic laser diagnostic system COMPLEX for inspection of geometric parameters of wagon wheel pairs for running train (speed up to 60 km/hr.), which is used successfully on Russian railways.

  9. Fiber-Based, Trace-Gas, Laser Transmitter Technology Development for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark; Yu, Anthony; Chen, Jeffrey; Nicholson, Jeffrey; Engin, Doruk; Mathason, Brian; Wu, Stewart; Allan, Graham; Hasselbrack, William; Gonzalez, Brayler; Han, Lawrence; Numata, Kenji; Storm, Mark; Abshire, James

    2015-01-01

    NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is working on maturing the technology readiness of a laser transmitter designed for use in atmospheric CO2 remote-sensing. GSFC has been developing an airplane-based CO2 lidar instrument over several years to demonstrate the efficacy of the instrumentation and measurement technique and to link the science models to the instrument performance. The ultimate goal is to make space-based satellite measurements with global coverage. In order to accomplish this, we must demonstrate the technology readiness and performance of the components as well as demonstrate the required power-scaling to make the link with the required signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR). To date, all the instrument components have been shown to have the required performance with the exception of the laser transmitter.In this program we are working on a fiber-based master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser transmitter architecture where we will develop a ruggedized package and perform the relevant environmental tests to demonstrate TRL-6. In this paper we will review our transmitter architecture and progress on the performance and packaging of the laser transmitter.

  10. Fiber-based, trace-gas, laser transmitter technology development for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, Mark; Yu, Anthony; Chen, Jeffrey; Nicholson, Jeffrey; Engin, Doruk; Mathason, Brian; Wu, Stewart; Allan, Graham; Hasselbrack, William; Gonzales, Brayler; Han, Lawrence; Numata, Kenji; Storm, Mark; Abshire, James

    2015-09-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is working on maturing the technology readiness of a laser transmitter designed for use in atmospheric CO2 remote-sensing. GSFC has been developing an airplane-based CO2 lidar instrument over several years to demonstrate the efficacy of the instrumentation and measurement technique and to link the science models to the instrument performance. The ultimate goal is to make space-based satellite measurements with global coverage. In order to accomplish this, we must demonstrate the technology readiness and performance of the components as well as demonstrate the required power-scaling to make the link with the required signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR). To date, all the instrument components have been shown to have the required performance with the exception of the laser transmitter. In this program we are working on a fiber-based master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser transmitter architecture where we will develop a ruggedized package and perform the relevant environmental tests to demonstrate TRL-6. In this paper we will review our transmitter architecture and progress on the performance and packaging of the laser transmitter.

  11. Quality control of laser- and powder bed-based Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berumen, Sebastian; Bechmann, Florian; Lindner, Stefan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Craeghs, Tom

    The quality of metal components manufactured by laser- and powder bed-based additive manufacturing technologies has continuously been improved over the last years. However, to establish this production technology in industries with very high quality standards the accessibility of prevalent quality management methods to all steps of the process chain needs still to be enhanced. This publication describes which tools are and will be available to fulfil those requirements from the perspective of a laser machine manufacturer. Generally five aspects of the part building process are covered by separate Quality Management (QM) modules: the powder quality, the temperature management, the process gas atmosphere, the melt pool behaviour and the documentation module. This paper sets the focus on melt pool analysis and control.

  12. Earth-to-Orbit Laser Launch Simulation for a Lightcraft Technology Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, J. C.; Morales, C.; Smith, W. L.; Myrabo, L. N.

    2006-05-01

    Optimized laser launch trajectories have been developed for a 1.4 m diameter, 120 kg (empty mass) Lightcraft Technology Demonstrator (LTD). The lightcraft's combined-cycle airbreathing/rocket engine is designed for single-stage-to-orbit flights with a mass ratio of 2 propelled by a 100 MW class ground-based laser built on a 3 km mountain peak. Once in orbit, the vehicle becomes an autonomous micro-satellite. Two types of trajectories were simulated with the SORT (Simulation and Optimization of Rocket Trajectories) software package: a) direct GBL boost to orbit, and b) GBL boost aided by laser relay satellite. Several new subroutines were constructed for SORT to input engine performance (as a function of Mach number and altitude), vehicle aerodynamics, guidance algorithms, and mass history. A new guidance/steering option required the lightcraft to always point at the GBL or laser relay satellite. SORT iterates on trajectory parameters to optimize vehicle performance, achieve a desired criteria, or constrain the solution to avoid some specific limit. The predicted laser-boost performance for the LTD is undoubtedly revolutionary, and SORT simulations have helped to define this new frontier.

  13. A Technology Demonstration Experiment for Laser Cooled Atomic Clocks in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W. M.; Kohel, J.; Seidel, D. J.; Thompson, R. J.; Maleki, L.; Gibble, K.

    2000-01-01

    We have been developing a laser-cooling apparatus for flight on the International Space Station (ISS), with the intention of demonstrating linewidths on the cesium clock transition narrower than can be realized on the ground. GLACE (the Glovebox Laser- cooled Atomic Clock Experiment) is scheduled for launch on Utilization Flight 3 (UF3) in 2002, and will be mounted in one of the ISS Glovebox platforms for an anticipated 2-3 week run. Separate flight definition projects funded at NIST and Yale by the Micro- gravity Research Division of NASA as a part of its Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program will follow GLACE. Core technologies for these and other LCAP missions are being developed at JPL, with the current emphasis on developing components such as the laser and optics subsystem, and non-magnetic vacuum-compatible mechanical shutters. Significant technical challenges in developing a space qualifiable laser cooling apparatus include reducing the volume, mass, and power requirements, while increasing the ruggedness and reliability in order to both withstand typical launch conditions and achieve several months of unattended operation. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. Research of high power and stable laser in portable Raman spectrometer based on SHINERS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yongsheng; Yin, Yu; Wu, Yulin; Ni, Xuxiang; Zhang, Xiuda; Yan, Huimin

    2013-08-01

    integral incremental digital PID algorithm is used in the TEC temperature control system. The experimental results show that comparing with other schemes, the output power of laser in our scheme is more stable and reliable, moreover the peak value is bigger, and the temperature can be precisely controlled in +/-0.1°C, then the volume of the device is smaller. Using this laser equipment, the ideal Raman spectra of materials can be obtained combined with SHINERS technology and spectrometer equipment.

  15. Investigation of the technology of laser welding of aluminum alloy 1424

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annin, B. D.; Fomin, V. M.; Antipov, V. V.; Ioda, E. N.; Karpov, E. V.; Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.; Cherepanov, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, certain technological variants of the laser welding of alloy 1424 of the Al-Mg-Li-Zr system are considered with the purpose of obtaining the durability level of the welded joint, which is close to that of the basic metal. It is shown that, in the case of using various types of plastic deformation of the welded joint, its durability can be increased considerably to 0.85-0.95 from that of the basic metal.

  16. Advances in single mode and high power AlGaInN laser diode technology for systems applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najda, Stephen P.; Perlin, Piotr; Suski, Tadek; Marona, Lujca; Boćkowski, Michal; Leszczyński, Mike; Wisniewski, Przemek; Czernecki, Robert; Kucharski, Robert; Targowski, Grzegorz; Smalc-Koziorowska, Julita; Stanczyk, Szymon; Watson, Scott; Kelly, Antony E.

    2015-03-01

    The AlGaInN material system allows for laser diodes to be fabricated over a very wide range of wavelengths from u.v., ~380nm, to the visible ~530nm, by tuning the indium content of the laser GaInN quantum well. Thus AlGaInN laser diode technology is a key enabler for the development of new disruptive system level applications in displays, telecom, defence and other industries.

  17. Some features of the technology of passive laser shutters based on GSGG crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, A. N.; Krutova, L. I.; Ignatenkov, B. A.; Vetrov, V. N.

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents the results of work on improving the technology of passive laser shutters based on gallium scandium gadolinium garnet crystals doped with tetravalent chromium cations. It is shown that the behavior of the Cr4+ cations in a melt of a mix of oxides can be described by the Pfann equation, and the distribution factor of Cr4+ can be determined. It was possible to increase the utilization factor of the mix by a factor of 3.5 and to reduce the number of process operations by optimizing the technology.

  18. Laser microprocessing technologies for automotive, flexible electronics, and solar energy sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikumb, Suwas; Bathe, Ravi; Knopf, George K.

    2014-10-01

    Laser microprocessing technologies offer an important tool to fulfill the needs of many industrial sectors. In particular, there is growing interest in applications of these processes in the manufacturing areas such as automotive parts fabrication, printable electronics and solar energy panels. The technology is primarily driven by our understanding of the fundamental laser-material interaction, process control strategies and the advancement of significant fabrication experience over the past few years. The wide-ranging operating parameters available with respect to power, pulse width variation, beam quality, higher repetition rates as well as precise control of the energy deposition through programmable pulse shaping technologies, enables pre-defined material removal, selective scribing of individual layer within a stacked multi-layer thin film structure, texturing of material surfaces as well as precise introduction of heat into the material to monitor its characteristic properties are a few examples. In this research, results in the area of laser surface texturing of metals for added hydrodynamic lubricity to reduce friction, processing of ink-jet printed graphene oxide for flexible printed electronic circuit fabrication and scribing of multi-layer thin films for the development of photovoltaic CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) interconnects for solar panel devices will be discussed.

  19. Development of Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing technology for laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the aim of enabling it as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation, perfusion, and gas-exchange. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 1BXe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive NMR detection, opening the door to practical MRI with novel, open-access magnet designs at very low magnetic fields (and hence in confined spaces). We are pursuing two specific aims in this technology development program. The first aim is to develop an open-access, low-field (less than 0.01 T) instrument for MRI studies of human gas inhalation as a function of subject orientation, and the second aim is to develop functional imaging of the lung using laser-polarized He-3 and Xe-129.

  20. How to manage continuing education and retraining programs on optical physics and laser technology at a university: Moscow State experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadkov, Victor N.; Koroteev, Nikolai I.

    1995-10-01

    An experience of managing the continuing education and retraining programs at the International Laser Center (ILC) of Moscow State University is discussed. The offered programs are in a wide range of areas, namely laser physics and technology, laser biophysics and biomedicine, laser chemistry, and computers in laser physics. The attendees who are presumably scientists, engineers, technical managers, and graduate students can join these programs through the annual ILC term (6 months), individual training and research programs (up to a year), annual ILC Laser Graduate School, graduate study, and post-docs program, which are reviewed in the paper. A curriculum that includes basic and specialized courses is described in detail. A brief description of the ILC Laser Teaching and Computer Labs that support all the educational courses is given as well.

  1. High-power free-electron lasers-technology and future applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socol, Yehoshua

    2013-03-01

    Free-electron laser (FEL) is an all-electric, high-power, high beam-quality source of coherent radiation, tunable - unlike other laser sources - at any wavelength within wide spectral region from hard X-rays to far-IR and beyond. After the initial push in the framework of the “Star Wars” program, the FEL technology benefited from decades of R&D and scientific applications. Currently, there are clear signs that the FEL technology reached maturity, enabling real-world applications. E.g., successful and unexpectedly smooth commissioning of the world-first X-ray FEL in 2010 increased in one blow by more than an order of magnitude (40×) wavelength region available by FEL technology and thus demonstrated that the theoretical predictions just keep true in real machines. Experience of ordering turn-key electron beamlines from commercial companies is a further demonstration of the FEL technology maturity. Moreover, successful commissioning of the world-first multi-turn energy-recovery linac demonstrated feasibility of reducing FEL size, cost and power consumption by probably an order of magnitude in respect to previous configurations, opening way to applications, previously considered as non-feasible. This review takes engineer-oriented approach to discuss the FEL technology issues, keeping in mind applications in the fields of military and aerospace, next generation semiconductor lithography, photo-chemistry and isotope separation.

  2. Technology Development of a Fiber Optic-Coupled Laser Ignition System for Multi-Combustor Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Early, Jim; Osborne, Robin; Thomas, Matthew E.; Bossard, John A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the progress of technology development of a laser ignition system at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The first two years of the project focus on comprehensive assessments and evaluations of a novel dual-pulse laser concept, flight- qualified laser system, and the technology required to integrate the laser ignition system to a rocket chamber. With collaborations of the Department of Energy/Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC), MSFC has conducted 26 hot fire ignition tests with lab-scale laser systems. These tests demonstrate the concept feasibility of dual-pulse laser ignition to initiate gaseous oxygen (GOX)/liquid kerosene (RP-1) combustion in a rocket chamber. Presently, a fiber optic- coupled miniaturized laser ignition prototype is being implemented at the rocket chamber test rig for future testing. Future work is guided by a technology road map that outlines the work required for maturing a laser ignition system. This road map defines activities for the next six years, with the goal of developing a flight-ready laser ignition system.

  3. Advanced technologies in the ASI MLRO towards a new generation laser ranging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Thomas; Bianco, Giuseppe

    1994-11-01

    Matera Laser Ranging Observatory (MLRO) is a high performance, highly automated optical and astronomical observatory currently under design and development by AlliedSignal for the Italian Space Agency (ASI). It is projected to become operational at the Centro Geodesia Spaziale in Matera, Italy, in 1997. MLRO, based on a 1.5-meter astronomical quality telescope, will perform ranging to spacecraft in earthbound orbits, lunar reflectors, and specially equipped deep space missions. The primary emphasis during design is to incorporate state-of-the-art technologies to produce an intelligent, automated, high accuracy ranging system that will mimic the characteristic features of a fifth generation laser ranging system. The telescope has multiple ports and foci to support future experiments in the areas of laser communications, lidar, astrometry, etc. The key features providing state-of-the-art ranging performance include: a diode-pumped picosecond (50 ps) laser, high speed (3-5 GHz) optoelectronic detection and signal processing, and a high accuracy (6 ps) high resolution (less than 2 ps) time measurement capability. The above combination of technologies is expected to yield millimeter laser ranging precision and accuracy on targets up to 300,000 km, surpassing the best operational instrument performance to date by a factor of five or more. Distributed processing and control using a state-of-the-art computing environment provides the framework for efficient operation, system optimization, and diagnostics. A computationally intelligent environment permits optimal planning, scheduling, tracking, and data processing. It also supports remote access, monitor, and control for joint experiments with other observatories.

  4. Advanced technologies in the ASI MLRO towards a new generation laser ranging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Thomas; Bianco, Giuseppe

    1994-01-01

    Matera Laser Ranging Observatory (MLRO) is a high performance, highly automated optical and astronomical observatory currently under design and development by AlliedSignal for the Italian Space Agency (ASI). It is projected to become operational at the Centro Geodesia Spaziale in Matera, Italy, in 1997. MLRO, based on a 1.5-meter astronomical quality telescope, will perform ranging to spacecraft in earthbound orbits, lunar reflectors, and specially equipped deep space missions. The primary emphasis during design is to incorporate state-of-the-art technologies to produce an intelligent, automated, high accuracy ranging system that will mimic the characteristic features of a fifth generation laser ranging system. The telescope has multiple ports and foci to support future experiments in the areas of laser communications, lidar, astrometry, etc. The key features providing state-of-the-art ranging performance include: a diode-pumped picosecond (50 ps) laser, high speed (3-5 GHz) optoelectronic detection and signal processing, and a high accuracy (6 ps) high resolution (less than 2 ps) time measurement capability. The above combination of technologies is expected to yield millimeter laser ranging precision and accuracy on targets up to 300,000 km, surpassing the best operational instrument performance to date by a factor of five or more. Distributed processing and control using a state-of-the-art computing environment provides the framework for efficient operation, system optimization, and diagnostics. A computationally intelligent environment permits optimal planning, scheduling, tracking, and data processing. It also supports remote access, monitor, and control for joint experiments with other observatories.

  5. Aerospace laser communications technology as enabler for worldwide quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Florian; Weinfurter, Harald; Rau, Markus; Schmidt, Christopher; Melén, Gwen; Vogl, Tobias; Nauerth, Sebastian; Fuchs, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A worldwide growing interest in fast and secure data communications pushes technology development along two lines. While fast communications can be realized using laser communications in fiber and free-space, inherently secure communications can be achieved using quantum key distribution (QKD). By combining both technologies in a single device, many synergies can be exploited, therefore reducing size, weight and power of future systems. In recent experiments we demonstrated quantum communications over large distances as well as between an aircraft and a ground station which proved the feasibility of QKD between moving partners. Satellites thus may be used as trusted nodes in combination with QKD receiver stations on ground, thereby enabling fast and secure communications on a global scale. We discuss the previous experiment with emphasis on necessary developments to be done and corresponding ongoing research work of German Aerospace Center (DLR) and Ludwig Maximilians University Munich (LMU). DLR is performing research on satellite and ground terminals for the high-rate laser communication component, which are enabling technologies for the QKD link. We describe the concept and hardware of three generations of OSIRIS (Optical High Speed Infrared Link System) laser communication terminals for low Earth orbiting satellites. The first type applies laser beam pointing solely based on classical satellite control, the second uses an optical feedback to the satellite bus and the third, currently being in design phase, comprises of a special coarse pointing assembly to control beam direction independent of satellite orientation. Ongoing work also targets optical terminals for CubeSats. A further increase of beam pointing accuracy can be achieved with a fine pointing assembly. Two ground stations will be available for future testing, an advanced stationary ground station and a transportable ground station. In parallel the LMU QKD source size will be reduced by more than an

  6. Lidar Technology at the Goddard Laser and Electro-Optics Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Laser and Electro-Optics Branch at Goddard Space flight Center was established about three years ago to provide a focused center of engineering support and technology development in these disciplines with an emphasis on spaced based instruments for Earth and Space Science. The Branch has approximately 15 engineers and technicians with backgrounds in physics, optics, and electrical engineering. Members of the Branch are currently supporting a number of space based lidar efforts as well as several technology efforts aimed at enabling future missions. The largest effort within the Branch is support of the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESAT) carrying the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) instrument. The ICESAT/GLAS primary science objectives are: 1) To determine the mass balance of the polar ice sheets and their contributions to global sea level change; and 2) To obtain essential data for prediction of future changes in ice volume and sea-level. The secondary science objectives are: 1) To measure cloud heights and the vertical structure of clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere; 2) To map the topography of land surfaces; and 3) To measure roughness, reflectivity, vegetation heights, snow-cover, and sea-ice surface characteristics. Our efforts have concentrated on the GLAS receiver component development, the Laser Reference Sensor for the Stellar Reference System, the GLAS fiber optics subsystems, and the prelaunch calibration facilities. We will report on our efforts in the development of the space qualified interference filter [Allan], etalon filter, photon counting detectors, etalor/laser tracking system, and instrument fiber optics, as well as specification and selection of the star tracker and development of the calibration test bed. We are also engaged in development work on lidar sounders for chemical species. We are developing new lidar technology to enable a new class of miniature lidar instruments that are compatible with small

  7. Review of laser technology at M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, S.

    The research discussed is that done on low-power CO2 lasers and their application, in particular in infrared radars and communications. Attention is also given to recent advances in laser technology that have a bearing on these systems. The compact infrared radar being developed for tactical airborne applications is described, noting that the system can operate in either of two modes. These are a search mode, which employs a wide-field-of-view line scan and CW Doppler detection, and a pulsed imaging mode, in which the x, y image plane scanners are activated to produce a narrow-field-of-view image at 15 frames per second. In discussing infrared communications, a laser is described in which the CdTe crystal is mounted directly in the waveguide structure. This makes possible much lower switching voltages than would be the case if the crystal were positioned outside the waveguide in the expanding portion of the beam. Also described is the high-repetition-rate mini-TEA laser designed for use in pollution-monitoring radar.

  8. Application of SFM and laser scanning technology to the description of mosaics piece by piece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajioka, O.; Hori, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Mosaic floors of surviving buildings in Ostia have been mainly recorded in photographs. From 2008, Japanese research group carries out a project of 3d measuring of the whole structure of ancient Roman city Ostia using laser scanners, including its landscape, city blocks, streets, buildings, wall paintings and mosaics. The laser scanner allows for a more detailed analysis and a greater potential for recording mosaics. We can record the data of mosaics, which are described piece by piece. However it is hard to acquire enough high dense point cloud and the internal camera of the laser scanner produce low quality images. We introduce a possible technology of 3D recording of mosaics with high-quality colour information; SFM. The use of this technique permits us to create 3D models from images provided from a CCD camera without heavy and large laser scanners. We applied SFM system to different three types of the mosaics laid down on the floors of "the House of the Dioscuroi", "the Insula of the Muse" and "the House of Jove and Ganymede", and created high resolution orthographic images. Then we examined to compare these orthographic images with that are created from the point cloud data. As a result, we confirmed that SFM system has sufficient practical utility for the mosaic research. And we present how much of density of point cloud or ground resolution are required for the documentation of mosaics accurately.

  9. Design of 60-kJ SG-III laser facility and related technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hansheng; Zhang, Xiaomin; Wei, X. F.; Zheng, Wanguo; Jing, F.; Sui, Z.; Zhao, Q.; Fan, Dianyuan; Ling, Z. Q.; Zhou, Jun

    2001-04-01

    The SG-III laser facility has been proposed to produce 1-ns, 60-kJ blue light pulses for IC Application at China Academy of Engineering Physics. The baseline design suggests that the SG-III be a 64-beam laser facility grouped into eight bundles with clear optical apertures of 30cm by 30cm. The facility consists of multiple subsystems, including the front end, preamplification and injection section, main amplifiers, beam transport and alignment system, switchyard, target area, integrated computer control, and beam diagnostics. The amplifier column in each bundle contains eight beamlets stacked 4 high by 2 wide. Great progress has been made in developing key laser technologies, such as integrated fiber optics, binary optics, adaptive optics, four-pass amplification, large aperture plasma electrode switches, rapid growth of KDP, brand-new laser glass, long flashlamps, precision manufacturing of large optics and metallized self-heating capacitors. Codes have been developed and numerical simulations have been conducted for the optical design of the facility. The design of the Technical Integration Line of 2 by 2 segmented array as a prototype module of SG-II has been optimized and the construction will soon get started.

  10. Free-space and underwater GHz data transmission using AlGaInN laser diode technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najda, S. P.; Perlin, P.; Suski, T.; Marona, L.; Boćkowski, M.; Leszczyński, M.; Wisniewski, P.; Czernecki, R.; Kucharski, R.; Targowski, G.; Watson, S.; Kelly, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    Laser diodes fabricated from the AlGaInN material system is an emerging technology for defence and security applications; in particular for free space laser communication. Conventional underwater communication is done acoustically with very slow data rates, short reach, and vulnurable for interception. AlGaInN blue-green laser diode technology allows the possibility of both airbourne links and underwater telecom that operate at very fast data rates (GHz), long reach (100's of metres underwater) and can also be quantum encrypted. The latest developments in AlGaInN laser diode technology are reviewed for defence and security applications. The AlGaInN material system allows for laser diodes to be fabricated over a very wide range of wavelengths from u.v., ~380nm, to the visible ~530nm, by tuning the indium content of the laser GaInN quantum well. Ridge waveguide laser diode structures are fabricated to achieve single mode operation with optical powers of <100mW. Visible light communications at high frequency (up to 2.5 Gbit/s) using a directly modulated 422nm Galliumnitride (GaN) blue laser diode is reported in free-space and underwater.

  11. Self-Raman Nd:YVO4 laser and electro-optic technology for space-based sodium lidar instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yu, Anthony W.; Janches, Diego; Jones, Sarah L.; Blagojevic, Branimir; Chen, Jeffrey

    2014-02-01

    We are developing a laser and electro-optic technology to remotely measure Sodium (Na) by adapting existing lidar technology with space flight heritage. The developed instrumentation will serve as the core for the planning of an Heliophysics mission targeted to study the composition and dynamics of Earth's mesosphere based on a spaceborne lidar that will measure the mesospheric Na layer. We present performance results from our diode-pumped tunable Q-switched self-Raman c-cut Nd:YVO4 laser with intra-cavity frequency doubling that produces multi-watt 589 nm wavelength output. The c-cut Nd:YVO4 laser has a fundamental wavelength that is tunable from 1063-1067 nm. A CW External Cavity diode laser is used as a injection seeder to provide single-frequency grating tunable output around 1066 nm. The injection-seeded self-Raman shifted Nd:VO4 laser is tuned across the sodium vapor D2 line at 589 nm. We will review technologies that provide strong leverage for the sodium lidar laser system with strong heritage from the Ice Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS). These include a space-qualified frequency-doubled 9W @ 532 nm wavelength Nd:YVO4 laser, a tandem interference filter temperature-stabilized fused-silica-etalon receiver and high-bandwidth photon-counting detectors.

  12. OPTICAL correlation identification technology applied in underwater laser imaging target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Guang-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Ge, Wei-Long

    2011-11-01

    The underwater laser imaging detection is an effective method of detecting short distance target underwater as an important complement of sonar detection. With the development of underwater laser imaging technology and underwater vehicle technology, the underwater automatic target identification has gotten more and more attention, and is a research difficulty in the area of underwater optical imaging information processing. Today, underwater automatic target identification based on optical imaging is usually realized with the method of digital circuit software programming. The algorithm realization and control of this method is very flexible. However, the optical imaging information is 2D image even 3D image, the amount of imaging processing information is abundant, so the electronic hardware with pure digital algorithm will need long identification time and is hard to meet the demands of real-time identification. If adopt computer parallel processing, the identification speed can be improved, but it will increase complexity, size and power consumption. This paper attempts to apply optical correlation identification technology to realize underwater automatic target identification. The optics correlation identification technology utilizes the Fourier transform characteristic of Fourier lens which can accomplish Fourier transform of image information in the level of nanosecond, and optical space interconnection calculation has the features of parallel, high speed, large capacity and high resolution, combines the flexibility of calculation and control of digital circuit method to realize optoelectronic hybrid identification mode. We reduce theoretical formulation of correlation identification and analyze the principle of optical correlation identification, and write MATLAB simulation program. We adopt single frame image obtained in underwater range gating laser imaging to identify, and through identifying and locating the different positions of target, we can improve

  13. OPTICAL correlation identification technology applied in underwater laser imaging target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Guang-tao; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Ge, Wei-long

    2012-01-01

    The underwater laser imaging detection is an effective method of detecting short distance target underwater as an important complement of sonar detection. With the development of underwater laser imaging technology and underwater vehicle technology, the underwater automatic target identification has gotten more and more attention, and is a research difficulty in the area of underwater optical imaging information processing. Today, underwater automatic target identification based on optical imaging is usually realized with the method of digital circuit software programming. The algorithm realization and control of this method is very flexible. However, the optical imaging information is 2D image even 3D image, the amount of imaging processing information is abundant, so the electronic hardware with pure digital algorithm will need long identification time and is hard to meet the demands of real-time identification. If adopt computer parallel processing, the identification speed can be improved, but it will increase complexity, size and power consumption. This paper attempts to apply optical correlation identification technology to realize underwater automatic target identification. The optics correlation identification technology utilizes the Fourier transform characteristic of Fourier lens which can accomplish Fourier transform of image information in the level of nanosecond, and optical space interconnection calculation has the features of parallel, high speed, large capacity and high resolution, combines the flexibility of calculation and control of digital circuit method to realize optoelectronic hybrid identification mode. We reduce theoretical formulation of correlation identification and analyze the principle of optical correlation identification, and write MATLAB simulation program. We adopt single frame image obtained in underwater range gating laser imaging to identify, and through identifying and locating the different positions of target, we can improve

  14. Closed-cycle, frequency-stable CO/sub 2/ laser technology

    SciTech Connect

    Batten, C.E.; Miller, I.M.; Wood, G.M. Jr.; Willetts, D.V.

    1987-04-01

    These proceedings contain a collection of papers and comments presented at a workshop on technology associated with long-duration closed-cycle operation of frequency-stable, pulsed carbon dioxide lasers. This workshop was held at the NASA Langley Research Center June 10 to 12, 1986. The workshop, jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE), was attended by 63 engineers and scientists from the United States and the United Kingdom. During the 2 1/2 days of the workshop, a number of issues relating to obtaining frequency-stable operation and to the catalytic control of laser gas chemistry were discussed, and specific recommendations concerning future activities were drafted.

  15. Passivity of the bars manufactured using current technologies: laser-sintering, casting, and milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Diana; Popescu, Sabin; Pop, Daniel; Jivanescu, Anca; Todea, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Implant overdentures are often selected as therapeutic options for the treatment of edentulous mandibles. "Passive-fit" between the mesostructures and the implants plays an important role in the longevity of the implant-prosthetic assembly in the oral cavity. "Mis-fit" can cause mechanical or biological complications. The purpose of this test was to investigate the passive adaptation of the bars manufactured through different technologies, and in this respect two bars (short and long) were fabricated by each process: laser-sintering, milling, casting. The tensions induced by tightening the connection screw between the bars and the underlying implants were recorded using strain gauges and used as measuring and comparing tool in testing the bars' "passivity". The results of the test showed that the milled bars had the best "passive-fit", followed by laser-sintered bars, while cast bars had the lowest adaptation level.

  16. Bridge Displacement Monitoring Method Based on Laser Projection-Sensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Liu, Hao; Yu, Yan; Xu, Xiaodong; Hu, Weitong; Li, Mingchu; Ou, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Bridge displacement is the most basic evaluation index of the health status of a bridge structure. The existing measurement methods for bridge displacement basically fail to realize long-term and real-time dynamic monitoring of bridge structures, because of the low degree of automation and the insufficient precision, causing bottlenecks and restriction. To solve this problem, we proposed a bridge displacement monitoring system based on laser projection-sensing technology. First, the laser spot recognition method was studied. Second, the software for the displacement monitoring system was developed. Finally, a series of experiments using this system were conducted, and the results show that such a system has high measurement accuracy and speed. We aim to develop a low-cost, high-accuracy and long-term monitoring method for bridge displacement based on these preliminary efforts. PMID:25871716

  17. Cost-effective, transfer-free, flexible resistive random access memory using laser-scribed reduced graphene oxide patterning technology.

    PubMed

    Tian, He; Chen, Hong-Yu; Ren, Tian-Ling; Li, Cheng; Xue, Qing-Tang; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Wu, Can; Yang, Yi; Wong, H-S Philip

    2014-06-11

    Laser scribing is an attractive reduced graphene oxide (rGO) growth and patterning technology because the process is low-cost, time-efficient, transfer-free, and flexible. Various laser-scribed rGO (LSG) components such as capacitors, gas sensors, and strain sensors have been demonstrated. However, obstacles remain toward practical application of the technology where all the components of a system are fabricated using laser scribing. Memory components, if developed, will substantially broaden the application space of low-cost, flexible electronic systems. For the first time, a low-cost approach to fabricate resistive random access memory (ReRAM) using laser-scribed rGO as the bottom electrode is experimentally demonstrated. The one-step laser scribing technology allows transfer-free rGO synthesis directly on flexible substrates or non-flat substrates. Using this time-efficient laser-scribing technology, the patterning of a memory-array area up to 100 cm(2) can be completed in 25 min. Without requiring the photoresist coating for lithography, the surface of patterned rGO remains as clean as its pristine state. Ag/HfOx/LSG ReRAM using laser-scribing technology is fabricated in this work. Comprehensive electrical characteristics are presented including forming-free behavior, stable switching, reasonable reliability performance and potential for 2-bit storage per memory cell. The results suggest that laser-scribing technology can potentially produce more cost-effective and time-effective rGO-based circuits and systems for practical applications. PMID:24801736

  18. Multiwavelength lasers fabricated by a novel impurity-free quantum-well intermixing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, JingHua; Chua, Soo-Jin; Huang, Y. H.; Zhang, Zhenhua; Li, G.; Saher Helmy, A.; Marsh, John H.

    1999-11-01

    Using impurity free vacancy enhanced disordering (IFVD), the shift in the band gap of Al0.3Ga0.7As/GaAs QW structures can be precisely controlled by an Al layer buried between a spin-on silica film and wet-oxidized GaAs surface. The blue shift in wavelength of Al0.3Ga0.7As/GaAs QW photoluminescence (PL) depends linearly on the thickness of the buried Al layer. By changing the Al layer thickness, the PL peak wavelength can be tuned from 7870 angstrom for the as-grown sample to 7300 angstrom and 7050 angstrom after 20s and 45s rapid thermal annealing at 850°C respectively. Applying this technology, three wavelength lasers were successfully fabricated in a single chip. The laser is a GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As three quantum well GRIN-SCH structure. Al layers with different thickness, i.e., no Al, 200 angstrom and 300 angstrom thick respectively, were buried between the oxidized GaAs surface and the silica film by two step photo-lithography and lift- off in three adjacent regions with 200 μm spacing. After one step rapid thermal annealing, the wafer was processed into 6 μm oxide-strip lasers. At room temperature the intermixed lasers covered with different thickness of Al layer show different lasing wavelengths. All the lasers have similar threshold current and slope efficiency.

  19. Laser assisted and hermetic room temperature bonding based on direct bonding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haneveld, Jeroen; Tijssen, Peter; Oonk, Johannes; Olde Riekerink, Mark; Tigelaar, Hildebrand; van't Oever, Ronny; Blom, Marko

    2014-03-01

    A novel method for laser assisted room temperature bonding of two substrates is presented. The method enables the packaging of delicate (bio)structures and/or finished (MEMS) devices, as there is no need for a high temperature annealing process. This also allows the bonding of two substrates with non-matching thermal expansion coefficients. The basis of the presented technology is the ability to create a direct pre-bond between two substrates. These can be two glass substrates, of which one has a thin film metal coating (e.g. Cr. Ti, Ta, Au…), or a silicon-glass combination. After (aligned) pre-bonding of the two wafers, a laser (e.g. a Nd:YAG laser) is used to form a permanent bond line on the bond interface, using the metal layer as a light absorber (or the silicon, in the case of a glass-silicon combination). The permanent bond line width is in the order of 10-50μm. The use of a laser to form the permanent bond ensures a hermetic sealing of the total package; a distinctive advantage over other, more conventional methods of room temperature bonding (e.g. adhesive bonding). He-leak testing showed leak rates in the order of 10-9 mbar l/s. This meets the failure criteria of the MIL-STD-883H standard of 5x10-8 mbar l/s. An added functionality of the proposed method is the possibility to create electrical circuitry on the bond interface, using the laser to modify the metal interlayer, rendering it electrically non-conductive. Biocompatible packages are also possible, by choosing the appropriate interlayer material. This would allow for the fabrication of implantable packages.

  20. Dispersion of 0.5- to 2-micron aerosol in microG and hypergravity as a probe of convective inhomogeneity in the lung.

    PubMed

    Darquenne, C; West, J B; Prisk, G K

    1999-04-01

    We used aerosol boluses to study convective gas mixing in the lung of four healthy subjects on the ground (1 G) and during short periods of microgravity (microG) and hypergravity ( approximately 1. 6 G). Boluses of 0.5-, 1-, and 2-micron-diameter particles were inhaled at different points in an inspiration from residual volume to 1 liter above functional residual capacity. The volume of air inhaled after the bolus [the penetration volume (Vp)] ranged from 150 to 1,500 ml. Aerosol concentration and flow rate were continuously measured at the mouth. The dispersion, deposition, and position of the bolus in the expired gas were calculated from these data. For each particle size, both bolus dispersion and deposition increased with Vp and were gravity dependent, with the largest dispersion and deposition occurring for the largest G level. Whereas intrinsic particle motions (diffusion, sedimentation, inertia) did not influence dispersion at shallow depths, we found that sedimentation significantly affected dispersion in the distal part of the lung (Vp >500 ml). For 0.5-micron-diameter particles for which sedimentation velocity is low, the differences between dispersion in microG and 1 G likely reflect the differences in gravitational convective inhomogeneity of ventilation between microG and 1 G. PMID:10194229

  1. Dispersion of 0.5- to 2-micron aerosol in microG and hypergravity as a probe of convective inhomogeneity in the lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darquenne, C.; West, J. B.; Prisk, G. K.

    1999-01-01

    We used aerosol boluses to study convective gas mixing in the lung of four healthy subjects on the ground (1 G) and during short periods of microgravity (microG) and hypergravity ( approximately 1. 6 G). Boluses of 0.5-, 1-, and 2-micron-diameter particles were inhaled at different points in an inspiration from residual volume to 1 liter above functional residual capacity. The volume of air inhaled after the bolus [the penetration volume (Vp)] ranged from 150 to 1,500 ml. Aerosol concentration and flow rate were continuously measured at the mouth. The dispersion, deposition, and position of the bolus in the expired gas were calculated from these data. For each particle size, both bolus dispersion and deposition increased with Vp and were gravity dependent, with the largest dispersion and deposition occurring for the largest G level. Whereas intrinsic particle motions (diffusion, sedimentation, inertia) did not influence dispersion at shallow depths, we found that sedimentation significantly affected dispersion in the distal part of the lung (Vp >500 ml). For 0.5-micron-diameter particles for which sedimentation velocity is low, the differences between dispersion in microG and 1 G likely reflect the differences in gravitational convective inhomogeneity of ventilation between microG and 1 G.

  2. The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar: an Advanced Technology Airborne Laser Altimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabney, P.; Harding, D. J.; Huss, T.; Valett, S.; Yu, A. W.; Zheng, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar (SIMPL) is an airborne laser altimeter developed through the NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program with a focus on cryopshere remote sensing. The SIMPL instrument incorporates a variety of advanced technologies in order to demonstrate measurement approaches of potential benefit for improved airborne laser swath mapping and spaceflight laser altimeter missions. SIMPL incorporates beam splitting, single-photon ranging and polarimetry technologies at green and near-infrared wavelengths in order to achieve simultaneous sampling of surface elevation, slope, roughness and scattering properties, the latter used to differentiate surface types. The transmitter is a 1 nsec pulse width, 11 kHz, 1064 nm microchip laser, frequency doubled to 532 nm and split into four plane-polarized beams using birefringent calcite crystal in order to maintain co-alignment of the two colors. The 16 channel receiver splits the received energy for each beam into the two colors and each color is split into energy parallel and perpendicular to the transmit polarization plane thereby proving a measure of backscatter depolarization. The depolarization ratio is sensitive to the proportions of specular reflection and surface and volume scattering, and is a function of wavelength. The ratio can differentiate, for example, water, young translucent ice, older granular ice and snow. The solar background count rate is controlled by spatial filtering using a pinhole array and by spectral filtering using temperature-controlled narrow bandwidth filters. The receiver is fiber coupled to 16 Single Photon Counting Modules (SPCMs). To avoid range biases due to the long dead time of these detectors the probability of detection per laser fire on each channel is controlled to be below 30%, using mechanical irises and flight altitude. Event timers with 0.1 nsec resolution in combination the narrow transmit pulse yields single

  3. Use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technology for Long Term High Precision Deformation Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Vezočnik, Rok; Ambrožič, Tomaž; Sterle, Oskar; Bilban, Gregor; Pfeifer, Norbert; Stopar, Bojan

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a new methodology for high precision monitoring of deformations with a long term perspective using terrestrial laser scanning technology. In order to solve the problem of a stable reference system and to assure the high quality of possible position changes of point clouds, scanning is integrated with two complementary surveying techniques, i.e., high quality static GNSS positioning and precise tacheometry. The case study object where the proposed methodology was tested is a high pressure underground pipeline situated in an area which is geologically unstable. PMID:22303152

  4. Noncontact laser sensing technology for structural health monitoring and nondestructive testing (presentation video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Hoon

    2014-03-01

    Noncontact sensing techniques is gaining prominence for structural health monitoring (SHM) and nondestructive testing (NDT) due to (1) their noncontact and nonintrusive natures, (2) their spatial resolution much higher than conventional discrete sensors can achieve, (3) their less dependency on baseline data obtained from the pristine condition of a target structure (reference-free diagnosis), (4) cost and labor reduction in sensor installation and maintenance. In this talk, a suite of noncontact sensing techniques particularly based on laser technology will be presented for SHM and NDT of aircraft, wind turbine blades, high-speed trains, nuclear power plants, bridges, automobile manufacturing facilities and semiconductors.

  5. Extremely long life and low-cost 193nm excimer laser chamber technology for 450mm wafer multipatterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsushima, Hiroaki; Katsuumi, Hisakazu; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Asayama, Takeshi; Kumazaki, Takahito; Kurosu, Akihiko; Ohta, Takeshi; Kakizaki, Kouji; Matsunaga, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2014-04-01

    193nm ArF excimer lasers are widely used as light sources for the lithography process of semiconductor production. 193nm ArF exicmer lasers are expected to continue to be the main solution in photolithography, since advanced lithography technologies such as multiple patterning and Self-Aligned Double Patterning (SADP) are being developed. In order to apply these technologies to high-volume semiconductor manufacturing, the key is to reduce the total operating cost. To reduce the total operating cost, life extension of consumable part and reduction of power consumption are an important factor. The chamber life time and power consumption are a main factor to decide the total operating cost. Therefore, we have developed the new technology for extension of the chamber life time and low electricity consumption. In this paper, we will report the new technology to extend the life time of the laser chamber and to reduce the electricity consumption.

  6. Free-space laser communication technologies II; Proceedings of the Meeting, LOS Angeles, CA, Jan. 15-17, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begley, David L.; Seery, Bernard D.

    Various papers on free-space laser communication technologies are presented. Individual topics addressed include: optical intersatellite link experiment between the earth station and ETS-VI, the Goddard optical communications program, technologies and techniques for lasercom terminal size, weight, and cost reduction, laser beam acquisition and tracking system for ETS-VI laser communication equipment, analog dividers for acquisition and tracking signal normalization, fine pointing mechanism using multilayered piezoelectric actuator for optical ISL system, analysis of SILEX tracking sensor performance, new telescope concept for space communication, telescope considered as a very high gain antenna, design of compact transceiver optical systems for optical intersatellite links, ultralightweight optics for laser communications, highly sensitive measurement method for stray light and retroreflected light, depolarization effects on free space laser transceiver communication systems, in-orbit measurements of microaccelerations of ESA's communication satellite Olympus, high-performance laser diode transmitter for optical free space communication, diode-pumped Nd:host laser transmitter for intersatellite optical communications, single-frequency diode-pumped laser for free-space communication.

  7. Understanding lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gibilisco, S.

    1989-01-01

    Covering all different types of laser applications-Gibilisco offers an overview of this fascinating phenomenon of light. Here he describes what lasers are and how they work and examines in detail the different kinds of lasers in use today. Topics of particular interest include: the way lasers work; the different kinds of lasers; infrared, ultraviolet and x-ray lasers; use of lasers in industry and manufacturing; use of lasers for long-distance communications; fiberoptic communications; the way laser shows work; the reality of Star Wars; lasers in surgical and medical applications; and holography and the future of laser technology.

  8. Self-calibration method for rotating laser positioning system using interscanning technology and ultrasonic ranging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Yu, Zhijing; Zhuge, Jingchang

    2016-04-01

    A rotating laser positioning system (RLPS) is an efficient measurement method for large-scale metrology. Due to multiple transmitter stations, which consist of a measurement network, the position relationship of these stations must be first calibrated. However, with such auxiliary devices such as a laser tracker, scale bar, and complex calibration process, the traditional calibration methods greatly reduce the measurement efficiency. This paper proposes a self-calibration method for RLPS, which can automatically obtain the position relationship. The method is implemented through interscanning technology by using a calibration bar mounted on the transmitter station. Each bar is composed of three RLPS receivers and one ultrasonic sensor whose coordinates are known in advance. The calibration algorithm is mainly based on multiplane and distance constraints and is introduced in detail through a two-station mathematical model. The repeated experiments demonstrate that the coordinate measurement uncertainty of spatial points by using this method is about 0.1 mm, and the accuracy experiments show that the average coordinate measurement deviation is about 0.3 mm compared with a laser tracker. The accuracy can meet the requirements of most applications, while the calibration efficiency is significantly improved. PMID:27140762

  9. Structural properties of H13 tool steel parts produced with use of selective laser melting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šafka, J.; Ackermann, M.; Voleský, L.

    2016-04-01

    This paper deals with establishing of building parameters for 1.2344 (H13) tool steel processed using Selective Laser Melting (SLM) technology with layer thickness of 50 µm. In the first part of the work, testing matrix of models in the form of a cube with chamfered edge were built under various building parameters such as laser scanning speed and laser power. Resulting models were subjected to set of tests including measurement of surface roughness, inspection of inner structure with aid of Light Optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy and evaluation of micro-hardness. These tests helped us to evaluate an influence of changes in building strategy to the properties of the resulting model. In the second part of the work, mechanical properties of the H13 steel were examined. For this purpose, the set of samples in the form of “dog bone” were printed under three different alignments towards the building plate and tested on universal testing machine. Mechanical testing of the samples should then reveal if the different orientation and thus different layering of the material somehow influence its mechanical properties. For this type of material, the producer provides the parameters for layer thickness of 30 µm only. Thus, our 50 µm building strategy brings shortening of the building time which is valuable especially for large models. Results of mechanical tests show slight variation in mechanical properties for various alignment of the sample.

  10. Beyond laser microdissection technology: follow the yellow brick road for cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Legres, Luc G; Janin, Anne; Masselon, Christophe; Bertheau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Normal biological tissues harbour different populations of cells with intricate spacial distribution patterns resulting in heterogeneity of their overall cellular composition. Laser microdissection involving direct viewing and expertise by a pathologist, enables access to defined cell populations or specific region on any type of tissue sample, thus selecting near-pure populations of targeted cells. It opens the way for molecular methods directed towards well-defined populations, and provides also a powerful tool in studies focused on a limited number of cells. Laser microdissection has wide applications in oncology (diagnosis and research), cellular and molecular biology, biochemistry and forensics for tissue selection, but other areas have been gradually opened up to these new methodological approaches, such as cell cultures and cytogenetics. In clinical oncology trials, molecular profiling of microdissected samples can yield global “omics” information which, together, with the morphological analysis of cells, can provide the basis for diagnosis, prognosis and patient-tailored treatments. This remarkable technology has brought new insights in the understanding of DNA, RNA, and the biological functions and regulation of proteins to identify molecular disease signatures. We review herein the different applications of laser microdissection in a variety of fields, and we particularly focus attention on the pre-analytical steps that are crucial to successfully perform molecular-level investigations. PMID:24482735

  11. Chemical Laser Phase Conjugation Technology (CLPCT). Final report, 10 July 1985-9 November 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Schnurr, A.D.; Meisenholder, S.; Quon, S.; Betts, J.; Doyle, J.

    1986-11-30

    The final report for the Chemical Laser Phase Conjugation Technology (CLPCT) project presents the detailed design for an experimental facility for use in future phase-conjugation experiments, which will be conducted under a separate project. The objective of the CLPCT program was to design a facility that (1) is compatible with the use of an existing 50-liter repetitively HF pulsed chemical laser (RPCL) device and (2) would allow design flexibility/growth potential for other more-complex experiments. The detailed design of the facility for the HF Conjugation experiment is described. Phase conjugation is developed by the nonlinear optical process wherein the high energy HF chemical laser beam is focused within a stimulated Brillioun scattering (SBS) cell which is filled with xenon at 40 atmospheres. The experimental facility consists of the oscillator subsystem, RPCL subsystem, diagnostics subsystem and phase-conjugation subsystem. The detailed design of each subsystem is described. In addition, the conceptual is described. A flowing SBS cell was developed for this experiment.

  12. Multi-wavelength lasers fabricated by an Al layer controlled quantum well intermixing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, J. H.; Chua, S. J.; Huang, Y. H.; Li, G.; Zhang, Z. H.; Helmy, A. Saher; Marsh, J. H.

    2000-09-01

    We report that the shift in the band gap of Al0.3Ga0.7As/GaAs quantum well structures can be precisely controlled by an Al layer buried between a spin-on silica film and a wet-oxidized GaAs surface. The blueshift in wavelength of the Al0.3Ga0.7As/GaAs quantum well photoluminescence (PL) depends linearly on the thickness of the buried Al layer. By changing the Al layer thickness, the PL peak wavelength can be tuned from 7870 Å for the as-grown sample to 7300 and 7050 Å after 20 and 45 s rapid thermal annealing at 850 °C, respectively. Applying this technology, Al layers with different thickness, i.e., no Al, 200 and 300 Å thick, were applied to the oxidized GaAs surface in three adjacent regions with 200 μm spacing on a quantum well laser structure sample. Three wavelength lasers were successfully fabricated in a single chip by a one step rapid thermal annealing. All the lasers have similar threshold current and slope efficiency.

  13. Manufacturing three-dimensional nickel titanium articles using layer-by-layer laser-melting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkovsky, I. V.; Yadroitsev, I. A.; Smurov, I. Yu.

    2013-12-01

    Specific features of layer-by-layer synthesis of three-dimensional (3D) nickel titanium (NiTi, nitinol) articles by selective laser melting (SLM) technology have been studied. Nonporous 3D nitinol articles have been obtained for the first time in a single technological cycle. A necessary condition was that the NiTi powder medium was heated to 500°C during sintering. The structure and composition of intermetallic phases in SLM-synthesized samples have been studied by optical metallography, microhardness measurements, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis techniques. Optimum SLM regimes for manufacturing NiTi articles and promising medical applications of this material are considered.

  14. Study of millisecond laser annealing on ion implanted soi and application to scaled finfet technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalak, Tyler J.

    The fabrication of metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET) requires the engineering of low resistance, low leakage, and extremely precise p-n junctions. The introduction of finFET technology has introduced new challenges for traditional ion implantation and annealing techniques in junction design as the fin widths continue to decrease for improved short channel control. This work investigates the use of millisecond scanning laser annealing in the formation of n-type source/drain junctions in next generation MOSFET. We present a model to approximate the true thermal profile for a commercial laser annealing process which allows us to represent more precisely specific thermal steps using Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD). Sheet resistance and Hall Effect measurements for blanket films are used to correlate dopant activation and mobility with the regrowth process during laser anneal. We show the onset of high conductivity associated with completion of solid phase epitaxial regrowth (SPER) in the films. The Lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (LKMC) model shows excellent agreement with cross section transmission electron microscopy (TEM), correlating the increase of conductivity with completion of crystal regrowth, increased activation, and crystal quality at various temperatures. As scaled devices move into the non-planar geometries and possibly adopt silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates, the crystal regrowth and dopant activation of amorphizing implants becomes more complicated and doping methods must adapt accordingly. Following the concept of the more recently proposed hot ion implantation and the benefits of laser anneal, we investigate a possible process flow for a 10/14 nm node SOI finFET by utilizing process and device TCAD. Device simulation parameters for the 10/14 nm node device are taken from a calibrated model based on fabricated non-planar 40 nm gate length device finFET. The implications on device performance are considered for the

  15. A high resolution laser ranging system based on time-correlated single-photon counting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yixin; Wang, Huanqin; Huang, Zhe; Cao, Yangyang; Gui, Huaqiao

    2014-12-01

    Laser ranging has become an important method for both distance measurements and acquisition of threedimensional (3D) images. In this paper, a laser ranging system based on Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting technology (TCSPC) is developed. A Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (G-APD), which has the ability of detecting single-photon events, is used to capture the weak light scattered from the long-range target. In order to improve the ranging resolution of TCSPC based measurement system, a high repetition frequency of subnanosecond narrow pulse generator circuit based on the avalanche effect of RF-BJT is designed and applied as the light source. Moreover, some optimized optical light designs have been done to improve the system signal to noise rate (SNR), including using a special aspherical lens as projecting lens, adopting a telephoto camera lens with small view angle and short depth of field before detector. Experimental tests for evaluation of the laser raging system performance are described. As a means of echo signal analysis, three different algorithms have been introduced, in which the cross-correlation algorithm was demonstrated to be the most effective algorithm to determining the round trip time to a target, even based on histograms with a significant amount of background noise photons. It was found that centimeter ranging resolution can be achieved thanks to the use of Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) with picosecond resolution and the Cross-Correlation algorithm. The proposed laser ranging system has advantages of high range resolution, short response time and simple structure, which was potential applications for 3D object recognition, computer vision, reverse engineering and virtual reality.

  16. Laser ablation and competitive technologies in paint stripping of heavy anticorrosion coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuöcker, Georg D.; Bielak, Robert

    2007-05-01

    During the last years surface preparation prior to coating operations became an important research and development task, since tightened environmental regulations have to be faced in view of the deliberation of hazardous compounds of coatings. Especially, ship-yards get more and more under pressure, because the environmental commitment of their Asian competitors is fairly limited. Therefore, in the US and in Europe several technology evaluation projects have been launched to face this challenge. The majority of coating service providers and ship yards use grit blasting; this process causes heavy emissions as of dust and enormous amounts of waste as polluted sand. Coating removal without any blasting material would reduce the environmental impact. Laser processing offers ecological advantages. Therefore thermal processes like laser ablation have been studied thoroughly in several published projects and also in this study. Many of these studies have been focused on the maintenance of airplanes, but not on de-coating of heavy protective coatings. In this case the required laser power is extra-high. This study is focused on the maintenance of heavy anti-corrosion coatings and compares the industrial requirements and the opportunities of the innovative laser processes. Based on the results of this analysis similar approaches as e.g. plasma jet coating ablation have been studied. It was concluded that none of these methods can compete economically with the conventional processes as grit blasting and water jetting since the required ablation rate is very high (>60m2/h). A new process is required that is not based on any blasting operation and which does not depend strongly on the coating's characteristic. The delamination of the coating where the coatings is not removed by evaporation, but in little pieces of the complete coating system meets these requirements. The delamination can be accomplished by the thermal destruction of the primer coating by an intense heat pulse

  17. Predicting residual and flow stresses from surface topography created by laser cutting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harničárová, Marta; Valíček, Jan; Öchsner, Andreas; Grznárik, Radovan; Kušnerová, Milena; Neugebauer, Josef; Kozak, Dražan

    2013-11-01

    The paper deals with the engineering method for laser cutting technology that utilizes stress equations derived from surface topography for determining residual stresses. It presents an original method for residual stress assessment in a non-contact and non-destructive manner. The high temperature around cut edges results in the development of residual stresses during the cutting process, which decreases the quality of the end product. Surface topographical parameters themselves carry information on a concrete state of technological process in the concrete moment of its usage. This method for the assessment of residual stress in materials being cut by a laser beam provides sufficient information on the residual stress state evaluation with sufficient accuracy by applying an analytical and experimental approach. Experiments were conducted on three different materials, namely steel, aluminium alloy and titanium. It was necessary to check calculation by measuring the residual stress distribution in the vicinity of cut edge using the ultrasonic method. The novelty of the method for the determination of residual stresses in a workpiece lies in the physics-based approach focusing on the mechanical and stress-deformation parameters of the material being cut and on the mechanical equilibrium of the system: material properties-tool properties-deformation properties.

  18. All Fiber Technology for High-Energy Petawatt Front End Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Liao, Z M; Jovanovic, I; Wattellier, B; Beach, R; Payne, S A; Barty, C P J

    2003-09-05

    We are developing an all fiber front end for the next generation high-energy petawatt (HEPW) laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The ultimate goal of the LLNL HEPW effort is to generate 5-kJ pulses capable of compression to 5ps at 1053nm, enabling advanced x-ray backlighters and possible demonstration of fast ignition. We discuss the front-end of the laser design from the fiber master oscillator, which generates the mode-locked 20nm bandwidth initial pulses through the 10mJ output of the large flattened mode (LFM) fiber amplifier. Development of an all fiber front end requires technological breakthroughs in the key areas of the master oscillator and fiber amplification. Chirped pulse amplification in optical fibers has been demonstrated to 1mJ. Further increase is limited by the onset of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). We have recently demonstrated a new flattened mode fiber technology, which reduces peak power for a given energy and thus the onset of SRS. Controlled experiments with 1st generation fibers yielded 0.5mJ of energy while significantly increasing the point at which nonlinear optical effects degrade the amplified pulse. In this paper we will discuss our efforts to extend this work to greater than 20mJ using our large flattened mode fiber amplifier.

  19. Advances in laser technology for the atmospheric sciences; Proceedings of the Seminar, San Diego, Calif., August 25, 26, 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, J. D. (Editor); Moore, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    These papers deal with recent research, developments, and applications in laser and electrooptics technology, particularly with regard to atmospheric effects in imaging and propagation, laser instrumentation and measurements, and particle measurement. Specific topics include advanced imaging techniques, image resolution through atmospheric turbulence over the ocean, an efficient method for calculating transmittance profiles, a comparison of a corner-cube reflector and a plane mirror in folded-path and direct transmission through atmospheric turbulence, line-spread instrumentation for propagation measurements, scaling laws for thermal fluctuations in the layer adjacent to ocean waves, particle sizing by laser photography, and an optical Fourier transform analysis of satellite cloud imagery. Other papers discuss a subnanosecond photomultiplier tube for laser application, holography of solid propellant combustion, diagnostics of turbulence by holography, a camera for in situ photography of cloud particles from a hail research aircraft, and field testing of a long-path laser transmissometer designed for atmospheric visibility measurements.

  20. Laser & Fiber Optics: Instructional Manual. The North Dakota High Technology Mobile Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eickhoff, Luvern R.

    This instructional manual contains 20 learning activity packets for use in a workshop on lasers and fiber optics. The lessons cover the following topics: what a laser; coherent light; setting up the laser; characteristics of the laser beam; scattering of light; laser beam divergence, intensity, color, ophthalmology, and reflections; directivity of…

  1. AlGaInN laser diode technology for free-space and plastic optical fibre telecom applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najda, S. P.; Perlin, P.; Suski, T.; Marona, L.; Bóckowski, M.; Leszczyński, M.; Wisniewski, P.; Czernecki, R.; Kucharski, R.; Targowski, G.; Watson, S.; Kelly, A. E.; Watson, M. A.; Blanchard, P.; White, H.

    2016-03-01

    Gallium Nitride laser diodes fabricated from the AlGaInN material system is an emerging technology for laser sources from the UV to visible and is a potential key enabler for new system applications such as free-space (underwater & air bourne links) and plastic optical fibre telecommunications. We measure visible light (free-space and underwater) communications at high frequency (up to 2.5 Gbit/s) and in plastic optical fibre (POF) using a directly modulated GaN laser diode.

  2. Indoor radiation mapping using the Laser Assisted Ranging and Data System (LARADS). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) nuclear facilities require characterization and documentation of the results as part of planning and decision-making for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) projects and to release areas that have been cleaned up. Conducting radiation surveys of indoor and outdoor surfaces and generating accurate survey reports is an important component of the D and D program. The Laser Assisted Ranging and Data System (LARADS) is a characterization technology that provides real-time data on the location and concentration levels of radiological contamination. The system can be utilized with a number of available detection instruments and can be integrated with existing data analysis and mapping software technologies to generate superior quality survey data reports. This innovative technology is competitive with baseline technologies in terms of cost and survey times, but is much more flexible and provides more useful reports. The system also has the capability of electronically logging survey data, making it easy to store and retrieve. Such data are scientifically derived and not subject to interpretation. The LARADS is an extremely attractive alternative to manually generated survey data reports.

  3. A study of transverse laser modes using a novel multi-scale simulation architecture for laser-based manufacturing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Nachiket; Pal, Deepankar; Teng, Chong; Zeng, Kai; Sublette, Tim; Stucker, Brent

    2015-03-01

    The present work presents an investigation of transverse laser modes in Selective Laser Melting (SLM). It includes detailed descriptions of process physics and various simulation tools that were developed at 3DSIM for SLM simulation. The SLM process depends on a focused laser directed towards a powder bed to selectively melt and solidify layers of powder to create a complex three dimensional geometry. The thermo-mechanical interaction of laser, powder bed and partially solidified part involves various nonlinear phenomena leading to final part microstructure, mechanical properties and geometrical accuracy. One important aspect of these interactions is the laser beam profile. Traditionally, Gaussian laser profiles with 00 transverse modes are used for SLM, since these are the only modes readily available for commercial purposes. The present work utilizes the SLM simulation tools at 3DSIM to study the potential for the use of transverse mode lasers for SLM. The interaction of transverse laser modes with characteristic thermal Eigenmodes of a typical powder bed has been modeled to further understand the effects of higher order laser modes on SLM performance.

  4. New laser materials for laser diode pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenssen, H. P.

    1990-01-01

    The potential advantages of laser diode pumped solid state lasers are many with high overall efficiency being the most important. In order to realize these advantages, the solid state laser material needs to be optimized for diode laser pumping and for the particular application. In the case of the Nd laser, materials with a longer upper level radiative lifetime are desirable. This is because the laser diode is fundamentally a cw source, and to obtain high energy storage, a long integration time is necessary. Fluoride crystals are investigated as host materials for the Nd laser and also for IR laser transitions in other rare earths, such as the 2 micron Ho laser and the 3 micron Er laser. The approach is to investigate both known crystals, such as BaY2F8, as well as new crystals such as NaYF8. Emphasis is on the growth and spectroscopy of BaY2F8. These two efforts are parallel efforts. The growth effort is aimed at establishing conditions for obtaining large, high quality boules for laser samples. This requires numerous experimental growth runs; however, from these runs, samples suitable for spectroscopy become available.

  5. DE-STAR: Phased-array laser technology for planetary defense and other scientific purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip; Bible, Johanna; Bublitz, Jesse; Arriola, Josh; Motta, Caio; Suen, Jon; Johansson, Isabella; Riley, Jordan; Sarvian, Nilou; Wu, Jane; Milich, Andrew; Oleson, Mitch; Pryor, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Current strategies for diverting threatening asteroids require dedicated operations for every individual object. We propose a stand-off, Earth-orbiting system capable of vaporizing the surface of asteroids as a futuristic but feasible approach to impact risk mitigation. We call the system DE-STAR (Directed Energy System for Targeting of Asteroids and exploRation). DE-STAR is a modular phased array of laser amplifiers, powered by solar photovoltaic panels. Lowcost development of test systems is possible with existing technology. Larger arrays could be tested in sub-orbital demonstrations, leading eventually to an orbiting system. Design requirements are established by seeking to vaporize the surface of an asteroid, with ejected material creating a reaction force to alter the asteroid's orbit. A proposed system goal would be to raise the surface spot temperature to <3,000K, evaporating all known substances. Engagement distance required for successful diversion depends on the asteroid's mass, composition and approach velocity. Distance to focus and desired surface spot temperature then determine laser array size. Volatile-laden objects (such as comets) ~100m wide and approaching at 5km/s could be diverted by initiating engagement at ~0.05AU, requiring a laser array of ~100m side length. Phased array configuration allows multiple beams, so a single DE-STAR of sufficient size would be capable of targeting several threats simultaneously. An orbiting DE-STAR could serve diverse scientific objectives, such as propulsion of kinetic asteroid interceptors or other interplanetary spacecraft. Vaporization of debris in Earth orbit could be accomplished with a ~10m array. Beyond the primary task of Earth defense, numerous functions are envisioned.

  6. Surface emitting laser technology and its application to the space radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, R.F.; Choquette, K.D.; Hou, Hong, Q.

    1997-09-01

    Present and future space-based applications such as sensors, low-weight and low-power data links for satellites, communication between electromagnetically-shielded modules, and short-distance cross-links within satellite constellations may benefit from the inclusion of small, low-power, and high-efficiency lasers such as the recently-developed Vertical Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL). Many factors influence the application of these devices to space. Temperature response, operational lifetime and reliability, and power consumption are all important considerations for space applications. In addition, the space radiation environments must be considered. In this work, the effects of ionizing radiation on VCSELs are studied with an emphasis on proton damage, and with comparisons to related neutron and gamma-induced phenomena. The influence of proton irradiation is studied in-depth for selected VCSEL structures by the use of an ion microbeam. The experiments indicate that VCSELs exhibit much less threshold current shift for a given radiation dose, compared to the more traditional edge-emitting semiconductor lasers, but that self-heating is a more important consideration for VCSELs. The high current densities associated with VCSELs also lead to a strong influence from forward-bias annealing. These effects are common to various VCSEL types (780 nm and 850 nm) and their magnitude at a given dose is strongly dependent on device size. This indicates that, while VCSELs appear to be very insensitive to ionizing radiation when compared with alternative technologies, there are a number of factors that must be taken into account when optimizing for the space environment.

  7. Treatment of Parapelvic Cyst by Internal Drainage Technology Using Ureteroscope and Holmium Laser

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Q; Huang, S; Li, Q; Xu, L; Wei, X; Huang, S; Li, S; Liu, Z

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The aim of parapelvic cyst treatment is to have complete drainage of cyst fluid and prevent its further compression of the kidney and collective system. This study explores the efficacy and safety of surgical approaches with holmium laser ureteroscopic internal drainage in the treatment of parapelvic cyst. Methods: The compression effect of parapelvic cyst on the renal collective system was observed by rigid ureteroscope using retrograde ureteroscopic technology. With direct vision, the cyst wall on the obvious parapelvic compression site was cut. The diameter of the cyst wall cut was about 1 cm. The internal drainage was obtained by double-J tubes. When the cyst was in the inferior pole of kidney or where the rigid ureteroscope could not reach, a flexible ureteroscope was used. Results: In 28 cases of operation, 27 cases were successful. The cyst treatment time was eight to 40 minutes (average 26 minutes). During the operation, no massive haemorrhage, damage of nearby organ and ureter, or other complications happened. Time of follow-up was 10–72 months (average 39 months). The results of follow-up showed that in 22 cases, the cyst disappeared; the diameter of the cyst in four cases was reduced by more than half, and one case recurred. Conclusion: The treatment of parapelvic cyst by internal drainage operation using holmium laser and ureteroscopy was effective. The operation was safe with few complications. PMID:26426175

  8. Performance capabilities and utilization of MICOM's diode-laser-based infrared scene projector technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, D. Brett; Cooper, John B.

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the current design characteristics and performance capabilities of the US Army Missile Command's diode laser based infrared scene projector technology. The projector is now operational at the US Army Missile Command's Research, Development, and Engineering Center and is being integrated into several HWIL simulation facilities. The projector is based upon a linear array of Pb-salt diode lasers coupled with a high-speed optical scanning system, drive electronics and synchronization electronics. The projector design has been upgraded to generate 256 X 256 resolution scenes at 4 KHz frame rates, and the fabrication of a 544 X 544 projector is in progress. The projector system now includes real-time non-uniformity correction electronics and is interfaced with a real-time scene generation computer. In addition, a closed-cycle cryogenic cooling system has been added for increased dynamic range and maintenance-free operation. The system's modularity provides upgradability to meet specific performance requirements such as increased spatial resolution, different emission wavelengths, or dual-band scene projections. The projector's upgraded design and performance characteristics are presented in this paper, as well as sample images generated with the projector and captured by an InSb FPA sensor.

  9. Bioactive treatment promotes osteoblast differentiation on titanium materials fabricated by selective laser melting technology.

    PubMed

    Tsukanaka, Masako; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Sasaki, Kiyoyuki; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) technology is useful for the fabrication of porous titanium implants with complex shapes and structures. The materials fabricated by SLM characteristically have a very rough surface (average surface roughness, Ra=24.58 µm). In this study, we evaluated morphologically and biochemically the specific effects of this very rough surface and the additional effects of a bioactive treatment on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Flat-rolled titanium materials (Ra=1.02 µm) were used as the controls. On the treated materials fabricated by SLM, we observed enhanced osteoblast differentiation compared with the flat-rolled materials and the untreated materials fabricated by SLM. No significant differences were observed between the flat-rolled materials and the untreated materials fabricated by SLM in their effects on osteoblast differentiation. We concluded that the very rough surface fabricated by SLM had to undergo a bioactive treatment to obtain a positive effect on osteoblast differentiation. PMID:26830832

  10. Application of FPGA technology for control of superconducting TESLA cavities in free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2006-10-01

    Contemporary fundamental research in physics, biology, chemistry, pharmacology, material technology and other uses frequently methods basing on collision of high energy particles or penetration of matter with ultra-short electromagnetic waves. Kinetic energy of involved particles, considerably greater than GeV, is generated in accelerators of unique construction. The paper presents a digest of working principles of accelerators. There are characterized research methods which use accelerators. A method to stabilize the accelerating EM field in superconducting (SC) resonant cavity was presented. An example was given of usage of TESLA cavities in linear accelerator propelling the FLASH free electron laser (FEL) in DESY, Hamburg. Electronic and photonic control system was debated. The system bases on advanced FPGA circuits and cooperating fast DSP microprocessor chips. Examples of practical solutions were described. Test results of the debated systems in the real-time conditions were given.

  11. National Ignition Facility quality assurance plan for laser materials and optical technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, C.R.

    1996-05-01

    Quality achievement is the responsibility of the line organizations of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. This subtier Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) applies to activities of the Laser Materials & Optical Technology (LM&OT) organization and its subcontractors. It responds to the NIF Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP, L-15958-2, NIF-95-499) and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C. This Plan is organized according to 10 Quality Assurance (QA) criteria and subelements of a management system as outlined in the NIF QAPP. This Plan describes how those QA requirements are met. This Plan is authorized by the Associate Project Leader for the LM&OT organization, who has assigned responsibility to the Optics QA engineer to maintain this plan, with the assistance of the NIF QA organization. This Plan governs quality-affecting activities associated with: design; procurement; fabrication; testing and acceptance; handling and storage; and installation of NIF Project optical components into mounts and subassemblies.

  12. A laser-based technology for fabricating a soda-lime glass based microfluidic device for circulating tumour cell capture.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Daniel; Couceiro, Ramiro; Aymerich, Maria; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Abal, Miguel; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2015-10-01

    We developed a laser-based technique for fabricating microfluidic microchips on soda-lime glass substrates. The proposed methodology combines a laser direct writing, as a manufacturing tool for the fabrication of the microfluidics structures, followed by a post-thermal treatment with a CO2 laser. This treatment will allow reshaping and improving the morphological (roughness) and optical qualities (transparency) of the generated microfluidics structures. The use of lasers commonly implemented for material processing makes this technique highly competitive when compared with other glass microstructuring approaches. The manufactured chips were tested with tumour cells (Hec 1A) after being functionalized with an epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibody coating. Cells were successfully arrested on the pillars after being flown through the device giving our technology a translational application in the field of cancer research. PMID:26218523

  13. Laser-Mechanical Drilling for Geothermal Energy: Low-Contact Drilling Technology to Enable Economical EGS Wells

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Foro Energy is developing a unique capability and hardware system to transmit high power lasers over long distances via fiber optic cables. This laser power is integrated with a mechanical drilling bit to enable rapid and sustained penetration of hard rock formations too costly to drill with mechanical drilling bits alone. The laser energy that is directed at the rock basically softens the rock, allowing the mechanical bit to more easily remove it. Foro Energy’s laser-assisted drill bits have the potential to be up to 10 times more economical than conventional hard-rock drilling technologies, making them an effective way to access the U.S. energy resources currently locked under hard rock formations.

  14. Compact, robust technology for next-generation ultrafast high-power fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rever, Matthew A.

    Fiber lasers are an attractive alternative to bulk solid-state systems due to their potential for compactness and robustness, as well as their having diffraction-limited output even at high average powers. Combined with the technique of chirped-pulse-amplification (CPA), a new generation of ultrafast lasers can be engineered providing reliable high average power and ultrahigh peak power for applications in high-field research, novel radiation sources, spectroscopy, and materials processing. However, current fiber CPA systems still rely on large stretchers and compressors with free-space bulk diffraction gratings, which are incompatible with fiber laser benefits. Clearly, the bulk diffraction grating stretchers and compressors need to be replaced by much smaller and simpler devices. Chirped volume Bragg gratings (CVBGs) are simple slabs of glass with quasi-periodic indices of refraction that can chirp ultrafast pulses to hundreds of picoseconds and back down to the sub-picosecond level in only a few centimeters of material and with easy alignment. Proof-of-principle experiments using CVBGs for stretchers and compressors in fiber CPA systems have previously been performed, but several issues need to be resolved before they are deployed for mainstream use. This thesis presents a quantitative analysis of the performance of CVBGs at high average powers, which is backed by experimental data wherein the gratings are exposed to a record high 200 W of input power. Due to the gratings bandwidth and thermal properties, the pulses are recompressible to 350 fs, indicating high fidelity operation. Extrapolation from the model predicts that kW operation, a major goal for all fiber CPA lasers, will be feasible with this technology. Moreover, the fundamental performance of the CVBGs, both spatial and temporal, is characterized. A new fabrication technique has allowed for the elimination of spatial chirp, a previous limitation on the beam quality. Measurements clearly show the new

  15. Laser optoacoustic tomography for medical diagnostics: principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Jacques, Steven L.; Tittel, Frank K.

    1996-04-01

    tomography. The technology allows us to determine directly temperature distributions in tissues and locate tissues volumes with different absorption. To demonstrate principles of TRSDTLA, experiments were conducted in vivo with mice-model for breast cancer using specially designed front-surface transducers- reflectometers. To present advantages and limitation of LOATT, experiments were performed in phantoms made of gel with polystyrene spheres colored with copper sulfate. Our experimental results and theoretical calculations show that TRSDTLA can be applied for non- invasive histology of layered tissues with in-depth resolution of up to 2 microns. TRSDTLA in acoustic reflection mode is promising for diagnostics of skin and ocular diseases. LOATT in acoustic transmission mode can be applied for detection of small tissue volumes with enhanced absorption located inside organs at the depth of up to 10 cm.

  16. Maximizing coupling-efficiency of high-power diode lasers utilizing hybrid assembly technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zontar, D.; Dogan, M.; Fulghum, S.; Müller, T.; Haag, S.; Brecher, C.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present hybrid assembly technology to maximize coupling efficiency for spatially combined laser systems. High quality components, such as center-turned focusing units, as well as suitable assembly strategies are necessary to obtain highest possible output ratios. Alignment strategies are challenging tasks due to their complexity and sensitivity. Especially in low-volume production fully automated systems are economically at a disadvantage, as operator experience is often expensive. However reproducibility and quality of automatically assembled systems can be superior. Therefore automated and manual assembly techniques are combined to obtain high coupling efficiency while preserving maximum flexibility. The paper will describe necessary equipment and software to enable hybrid assembly processes. Micromanipulator technology with high step-resolution and six degrees of freedom provide a large number of possible evaluation points. Automated algorithms are necess ary to speed-up data gathering and alignment to efficiently utilize available granularity for manual assembly processes. Furthermore, an engineering environment is presented to enable rapid prototyping of automation tasks with simultaneous data ev aluation. Integration with simulation environments, e.g. Zemax, allows the verification of assembly strategies in advance. Data driven decision making ensures constant high quality, documents the assembly process and is a basis for further improvement. The hybrid assembly technology has been applied on several applications for efficiencies above 80% and will be discussed in this paper. High level coupling efficiency has been achieved with minimized assembly as a result of semi-automated alignment. This paper will focus on hybrid automation for optimizing and attaching turning mirrors and collimation lenses.

  17. Laser plasma sources of soft x-rays and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) for application in science and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartnik, Andrzej; Wachulak, Przemysław; Jarocki, Roman; Kostecki, Jerzy; Szczurek, Mirosław; Adjei, Daniel; Ahad, Inam Ul; Ayele, Mesfin G.; Fok, Tomasz; Szczurek, Anna; Torrisi, Alfio; Wegrzyński, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2015-05-01

    Laser plasma sources of soft x-rays and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) developed in our laboratory for application in various areas of technology and science are presented. The sources are based on a laser-irradiated gas puff target approach. The targets formed by pulsed injection of gas under high-pressure are irradiated with nanosecond laser pulses from Nd:YAG lasers. We use commercial lasers generating pulses with time duration from 1ns to 10ns and energies from 0.5J to 10J at 10Hz repetition rate. The gas puff targets are produced using a double valve system equipped with a special nozzle to form a double-stream gas puff target which secures high conversion efficiency without degradation of the nozzle. The use of a gas puff target instead of a solid target makes generation of laser plasmas emitting soft x-rays and EUV possible without target debris production. The sources are equipped with various optical systems, including grazing incidence axisymmetric ellipsoidal mirrors, a "lobster eye" type grazing incidence multi-foil mirror, and an ellipsoidal mirror with Mo/Si multilayer coating, to collect soft x-ray and EUV radiation and form the radiation beams. In this paper new applications of these sources in various fields, including soft x-ray and EUV imaging in nanoscale, EUV radiography and tomography, EUV materials processing and modification of polymer surfaces, EUV photoionization of gases, radiobiology and soft x-ray contact microscopy are reviewed.

  18. Analysis of the restricting factors of laser countermeasure active detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufa; Sun, Xiaoquan

    2016-07-01

    The detection effect of laser active detection system is affected by various kinds of factors. In view of the application requirement of laser active detection, the influence factors for laser active detection are analyzed. The mathematical model of cat eye target detection distance has been built, influence of the parameters of laser detection system and the environment on detection range and the detection efficiency are analyzed. Various parameters constraint detection performance is simulated. The results show that the discovery distance of laser active detection is affected by the laser divergence angle, the incident angle and the visibility of the atmosphere. For a given detection range, the laser divergence angle and the detection efficiency are mutually restricted. Therefore, in view of specific application environment, it is necessary to select appropriate laser detection parameters to achieve optimal detection effect.

  19. Characterizing the geomorphic setting of precariously balanced rocks using terrestrial laser scanning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, D. E.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2009-12-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) technology is rapidly becoming an effective three-dimensional imaging tool. Precariously balanced rocks are a subset of spheroidally weathered boulders. They are balanced on bedrock pedestals and are formed in upland drainage basins and pediments of exhumed plutons. Precarious rocks are used as negative evidence of earthquake-driven extreme ground motions. Field surveys of PBRs are coupled with cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) surface exposure dating techniques to determine their exhumation rates. These rates are used in statistical simulations to estimate the magnitudes and recurrences of earthquake-generated extreme ground shaking as a means to physically validate seismic hazard analyses. However, the geomorphic setting of PBRs in the landscape is poorly constrained when interpreting their exhumation rates from CRN surface exposure dates. Are PBRs located on steep or gentle hillslopes? Are they located near drainages or hillslope crests? What geomorphic processes control the spatial distribution of PBRs in a landscape, and where do these processes dominate? Because the fundamental hillslope transport laws are largely controlled by local hillslope gradient and contributing area, the location of a PBR is controlled by the geomorphic agents and their rates acting on it. Our latest efforts involve using a combination of TLS and airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) to characterize the geomorphic situation of PBRs. We used a Riegl LPM 800i (LPM 321) terrestrial laser scanner to scan a ~1.5 m tall by ~1 m wide precariously balanced rock in the Granite Dells, central Arizona. The PBR was scanned from six positions, and the scans were aligned to a point cloud totaling 3.4M points. We also scanned a ~50 m by ~150 m area covering PBR hillslopes from five scan positions. The resulting 5.5M points were used to create a digital terrain model of precarious rocks and their hillslopes. Our TLS- and ALSM-generated surface models and DEMs provide a

  20. Requirements and Technology Advances for Global Wind Measurement with a Coherent Lidar: A Shrinking Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Koch, Grady J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Singh, Upendra N.; Emmitt, G. David

    2007-01-01

    Early concepts to globally measure vertical profiles of vector horizontal wind from space planned on an orbit height of 525 km, a single pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system to cover the full troposphere, and a continuously rotating telescope/scanner that mandated a vertical line of sight wind profile from each laser shot. Under these conditions system studies found that laser pulse energies of approximately 20 J at 10 Hz pulse repetition rate with a rotating telescope diameter of approximately 1.5 m was required. Further requirements to use solid state laser technology and an eyesafe wavelength led to the relatively new 2-micron solid state laser. With demonstrated pulse energies near 20 mJ at 5 Hz, and no demonstration of a rotating telescope maintaining diffraction limited performance in space, the technology gap between requirements and demonstration was formidable. Fortunately the involved scientists and engineers set out to reduce the gap, and through a combination of clever ideas and technology advances over the last 15 years, they have succeeded. This paper will detail the gap reducing factors and will present the current status.

  1. Analysis of measurements for solid state laser remote lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin

    1995-01-01

    The merits of using lidar systems for remote measurements of various atmospheric processes such as wind, turbulence, moisture, and aerosol concentration are widely recognized. Although the lidar technology has progressed considerably over the past two decades, significant research particularly in the area of solid state lidars remains to be conducted in order to fully exploit this technology. The work performed by the UAH (University of Alabama in Huntsville) personnel under this Delivery Order concentrated on analyses of measurements required in support of solid state laser remote sensing lidar systems which are to be designed, deployed, and used to measure atmospheric processes and constituents. UAH personnel has studied and recommended to NASA/MSFC the requirements of the optical systems needed to characterize the detection devices suitable for solid state wavelengths and to evaluate various heterodyne detection schemes. The 2-micron solid state laser technology was investigated and several preliminary laser designs were developed and their performance for remote sensing of atmospheric winds and clouds from a spaceborne platform were specified. In addition to the laser source and the detector, the other critical technologies necessary for global wind measurements by a spaceborne solid state coherent lidar systems were identified to be developed and demonstrated. As part of this work, an analysis was performed to determine the atmospheric wind velocity estimation accuracy using the line-of-sight measurements of a scanning coherent lidar. Under this delivery order, a computer database of materials related to the theory, development, testing, and operation of lidar systems was developed to serve as a source of information for lidar research and development.

  2. Advances in High Energy Solid-State Pulsed 2-micron Lidar Development for Ground and Airborne Wind, Water Vapor and CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Kavaya, Michael; Remus, Ruben

    2015-04-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2 µm lasers. From fundamental spectroscopy research, theoretical prediction of new materials, laser demonstration and engineering of lidar systems, it has been a very successful program spanning around two decades. Successful development of 2 µm lasers has led to development of a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement with an unprecedented laser pulse energy of 250-mJ in a rugged package. This high pulse energy is produced by a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser with an optical amplifier. While the lidar is meant for use as an airborne instrument, ground-based tests were carried out to characterize performance of the lidar. Atmospheric measurements will be presented, showing the lidar's capability for wind measurement in the atmospheric boundary layer and free troposphere. Lidar wind measurements are compared to a balloon sonde, showing good agreement between the two sensors. Similar architecture has been used to develop a high energy, Ho:Tm:YLF double-pulsed 2 μm Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) instrument based on direct detection technique that provides atmospheric column CO2 measurements. This instrument has been successfully used to measure atmospheric CO2 column density initially from a ground mobile lidar trailer, and then it was integrated on B-200 plane and 20 hrs of flight measurement were made from an altitude ranging 1500 meter to 8000 meter. These measurements were compared to in-situ measurements and NOAA airborne flask measurement to derive the dry mixing ratio of the column CO2 by reflecting the signal by various reflecting surfaces such as land, vegetation, ocean surface, snow and sand. The lidar measurements when compared showed a very agreement with in-situ and airborne flask measurement. NASA Langley Research Center is currently developing a triple-pulsed 2 μm Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA

  3. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY: Switching of a pulsed ionic diode through the bulk of an ion source with laser plasma initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleshakova, R. P.; Shikanov, A. E.

    1987-10-01

    An analysis was made of the results of an investigation of switching of a pulsed ionic diode through the bulk of an ion source with a laser plasma and a vacuum arc. The dependences of the neutron yield on the electrical energy of the diode were recorded and analyzed. The results indicated a possible way of simple construction of an acceleration tube with switching via a laser-plasma source.

  4. Laser Spectroscopy Multi-Gas Monitor: Results of Technology Demonstration on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgett, Paul D.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) is an up and coming trace and major gas monitoring technology with unmatched selectivity, range and stability. The technology demonstration of the 4 gas Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM), reported at the 2014 ICES conference, operated continuously on the International Space Station (ISS) for nearly a year. The MGM is designed to measure oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapor in ambient cabin air in a low power, relatively compact device. While on board, the MGM experienced a number of challenges, unplanned and planned, including a test of the ammonia channel using a commercial medical ammonia inhalant. Data from the unit was downlinked once per week and compared with other analytical resources on board, notably the Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA), a magnetic sector mass spectrometer. MGM spent the majority of the time installed in the Nanoracks Frame 2 payload facility in front breathing mode (sampling the ambient environment of the Japanese Experiment Module), but was also used to analyze recirculated rack air. The capability of the MGM to be operated in portable mode (via internal rechargeable lithium ion polymer batteries or by plugging into any Express Rack 28VDC connector) was a part of the usability demonstration. Results to date show unprecedented stability and accuracy of the MGM vs. the MCA for oxygen and carbon dioxide. The ammonia challenge (approx. 75 ppm) was successful as well, showing very rapid response time in both directions. Work on an expansion of capability in a next generation MGM has just begun. Combustion products and hydrazine are being added to the measurable target analytes. An 8 to 10 gas monitor (aka Gas Tricorder 1.0) is envisioned for use on ISS, Orion and Exploration missions.

  5. Advancing adaptive optics technology: Laboratory turbulence simulation and optimization of laser guide stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampy, Rachel A.

    Since Galileo's first telescope some 400 years ago, astronomers have been building ever-larger instruments. Yet only within the last two decades has it become possible to realize the potential angular resolutions of large ground-based telescopes, by using adaptive optics (AO) technology to counter the blurring effects of Earth's atmosphere. And only within the past decade have the development of laser guide stars (LGS) extended AO capabilities to observe science targets nearly anywhere in the sky. Improving turbulence simulation strategies and LGS are the two main topics of my research. In the first part of this thesis, I report on the development of a technique for manufacturing phase plates for simulating atmospheric turbulence in the laboratory. The process involves strategic application of clear acrylic paint onto a transparent substrate. Results of interferometric characterization of the plates are described and compared to Kolmogorov statistics. The range of r0 (Fried's parameter) achieved thus far is 0.2--1.2 mm at 650 nm measurement wavelength, with a Kolmogorov power law. These plates proved valuable at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at University of California, Santa Cruz, where they have been used in the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics testbed, during integration and testing of the Gemini Planet Imager, and as part of the calibration system of the on-sky AO testbed named ViLLaGEs (Visible Light Laser Guidestar Experiments). I present a comparison of measurements taken by ViLLaGEs of the power spectrum of a plate and the real sky turbulence. The plate is demonstrated to follow Kolmogorov theory well, while the sky power spectrum does so in a third of the data. This method of fabricating phase plates has been established as an effective and low-cost means of creating simulated turbulence. Due to the demand for such devices, they are now being distributed to other members of the AO community. The second topic of this thesis pertains to understanding and

  6. Developing Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) Technology for the Manufacture of Large-Aperture Optics in Megajoule Class Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A

    2010-10-27

    Over the last eight years we have been developing advanced MRF tools and techniques to manufacture meter-scale optics for use in Megajoule class laser systems. These systems call for optics having unique characteristics that can complicate their fabrication using conventional polishing methods. First, exposure to the high-power nanosecond and sub-nanosecond pulsed laser environment in the infrared (>27 J/cm{sup 2} at 1053 nm), visible (>18 J/cm{sup 2} at 527 nm), and ultraviolet (>10 J/cm{sup 2} at 351 nm) demands ultra-precise control of optical figure and finish to avoid intensity modulation and scatter that can result in damage to the optics chain or system hardware. Second, the optics must be super-polished and virtually free of surface and subsurface flaws that can limit optic lifetime through laser-induced damage initiation and growth at the flaw sites, particularly at 351 nm. Lastly, ultra-precise optics for beam conditioning are required to control laser beam quality. These optics contain customized surface topographical structures that cannot be made using traditional fabrication processes. In this review, we will present the development and implementation of large-aperture MRF tools and techniques specifically designed to meet the demanding optical performance challenges required in large-aperture high-power laser systems. In particular, we will discuss the advances made by using MRF technology to expose and remove surface and subsurface flaws in optics during final polishing to yield optics with improve laser damage resistance, the novel application of MRF deterministic polishing to imprint complex topographical information and wavefront correction patterns onto optical surfaces, and our efforts to advance the technology to manufacture large-aperture damage resistant optics.

  7. Master on Photonics and Laser Technologies: on-line teaching experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Ángel; Michinel, Humberto; Salgueiro, José R.; Vázquez-Dorrío, Benito; Yáñez, Armando; Arines, Justo; Flores-Arias, M. Teresa

    2014-07-01

    The Galician Universitary System (SUG) in the framework of the European studies under the Bologna process presents a huge number of Masters courses. In this work we present the teaching framework of the Science Masters on "Photonics and Laser Technologies", coordinated by the University of Vigo (UVigo) and involving the three Universities of Galicia: University of Vigo (UVigo), University of Santiago de Compostela (USC) and University of Coruña (UdC). The aim of this work is to show how teaching at this Masters is carried out using an online platform so that the whole expertise of all the three Universities can be properly exploited and the geographic dispersion of lecturers and students overcame. The used platform permits the students to attend the lessons from their own Universities without wasting time and money on traveling. Besides, each lecturer can teach from his/her own University, allowing the combination of this activity with other professional and scientific duties. Thanks to this tool, the Masters could host students that followed the lessons from other different countries. The platform has been used for lectures, seminar classes, examinations, conferences and coordination activities between teachers and students.

  8. Accurate time delay technology in simulated test for high precision laser range finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhibin; Xiao, Wenjian; Wang, Weiming; Xue, Mingxi

    2015-10-01

    With the continuous development of technology, the ranging accuracy of pulsed laser range finder (LRF) is higher and higher, so the maintenance demand of LRF is also rising. According to the dominant ideology of "time analog spatial distance" in simulated test for pulsed range finder, the key of distance simulation precision lies in the adjustable time delay. By analyzing and comparing the advantages and disadvantages of fiber and circuit delay, a method was proposed to improve the accuracy of the circuit delay without increasing the count frequency of the circuit. A high precision controllable delay circuit was designed by combining the internal delay circuit and external delay circuit which could compensate the delay error in real time. And then the circuit delay accuracy could be increased. The accuracy of the novel circuit delay methods proposed in this paper was actually measured by a high sampling rate oscilloscope actual measurement. The measurement result shows that the accuracy of the distance simulated by the circuit delay is increased from +/- 0.75m up to +/- 0.15m. The accuracy of the simulated distance is greatly improved in simulated test for high precision pulsed range finder.

  9. Genomic DNA detection using cycling probe technology and capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Dickinson Laing, Terrina; Mah, David C W; Poirier, Robert T; Bekkaoui, Faouzi; Lee, William E; Bader, Douglas E

    2004-10-01

    Cycling probe technology (CPT) is an isothermal DNA analysis method that has been shown to be useful for identifying genetic markers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in clinical settings. CPT assays have previously employed several assay methods that include polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and magnetic beads for separations and radioisotopic and colorimetric detection for detection. Capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (CGE-LIF) is an alternative separation and detection method that offers attributes such as low sample consumption, short analysis times, no radiation hazards and potential for high throughput. We report on the development of a CGE-LIF CPT assay for genomic DNA from Erwinia herbicola and the comparison of this assay with a conventional 32p radioisotopic PAGE CPT assay. Separation and detection of intact and cleaved fluorescein-labeled CPT probe molecules by CGE-LIF was achieved in under 4 min through a gel-filled capillary (7 cm separation length to detector). Total time, from setup to detection, was about 1 h for the complete assay versus several hours (3-12 h) for the radioisotopic PAGE CPT assay. Similar detection limits of 10(5)-10(6) copies of genomic target DNA were observed with each assay method. This study demonstrated that CGE-LIF CPT is a suitable analysis method for the detection of genomic DNA sequences. PMID:15356906

  10. Laser diagnostic technology for early detection of pathogen infestation in orange fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giubileo, Gianfranco; Lai, Antonella; Piccinelli, Delinda; Puiu, Adriana

    2010-11-01

    Due to an increased expectation of food products that respect high quality and safety standards, there is a need for the growth of accurate, fast, objective and non-destructive technologies for quality determination of food and agricultural products. For this purpose, a diagnostic system based on laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) was developed at ENEA Frascati Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory (Italy). In the design of the photoacoustic detector, particular emphasis was placed in attaining a high sensitivity in detecting ethylene (ET) down to sub-parts per billion level (minimum detectable concentration 0.2 ppb). This was required due to the necessity to monitor and follow up ET production at a single fruit scale. ET is normally synthesised in very low amounts by healthy citrus fruits; however stress conditions such as pathogen attack may induce a substantial increase in the synthesised ET. In the present paper, the comparison between the ET emitted by healthy oranges ( Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) cv Navel and by Phytophthora citrophthora infested Navel orange fruits are reported. The obtained results show a well evident increase in ET emission from the infested fruit with respect to the healthy one, even 24 h after the inoculation with the pathogen; at that time the tissue necrosis was not yet visible, and the fruit was also not yet damaged. The possibility to perform a real time non-destructive detection of ET traces makes the LPAS a powerful tool for monitoring the healthy state of the citrus fruits.

  11. System technology for laser-assisted milling with tool integrated optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermani, Jan-Patrick; Emonts, Michael; Brecher, Christian

    2013-02-01

    High strength metal alloys and ceramics offer a huge potential for increased efficiency (e. g. in engine components for aerospace or components for gas turbines). However, mass application is still hampered by cost- and time-consuming end-machining due to long processing times and high tool wear. Laser-induced heating shortly before machining can reduce the material strength and improve machinability significantly. The Fraunhofer IPT has developed and successfully realized a new approach for laser-assisted milling with spindle and tool integrated, co-rotating optics. The novel optical system inside the tool consists of one deflection prism to position the laser spot in front of the cutting insert and one focusing lens. Using a fiber laser with high beam quality the laser spot diameter can be precisely adjusted to the chip size. A high dynamic adaption of the laser power signal according to the engagement condition of the cutting tool was realized in order not to irradiate already machined work piece material. During the tool engagement the laser power is controlled in proportion to the current material removal rate, which has to be calculated continuously. The needed geometric values are generated by a CAD/CAM program and converted into a laser power signal by a real-time controller. The developed milling tool with integrated optics and the algorithm for laser power control enable a multi-axis laser-assisted machining of complex parts.

  12. Surface modification of bisphenol A polycarbonate material by ultraviolet Nd:YVO4 laser high-speed microprocessing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Suhuan; Lv, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a low-cost and high-efficiency microprocessing modification technology for the surface of bisphenol A polycarbonate (BAPC) material was achieved (in particular, from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity) at high laser scanning speeds (600-1000 mm s - 1) and using an all-solid state, Q-switched, high-average power and nanosecond pulse Nd:YVO4 laser (355 nm wavelength). During the modification, it was found that the laser fluence and pulse width were the two main parameters affecting the modification effect. Moreover, the modification had a significant effect on the water contact angle, wetting behavior, microstructure, average roughness and chemical composition of the surface. When the laser fluences applied were low (i.e., less than the so-called critical fluence of the UV laser modification of the BAPC material), the water contact angle was found to be a little less than the original, the hydrophilicity was slightly improved, the relative content of the oxygen-containing groups (e.g. O-C and COO - ) increased, the microstructure and average roughness only had a very slight change, and the wetting behavior complied with the Wenzel regime. On the other hand, when the laser fluences applied were high, the water contact angle significantly increased, the hydrophilicity markedly decreased and the relative content of the oxygen-containing groups also increased. Here, a porous microstructure with periodical v-type grooves was generated and the average roughness had an obvious increase. In this case, the wetting behavior could be explained by the Cassie-Baxter regime, i.e., the microstructure and average roughness change played a deciding role. The reason for this might be that different laser parameters result in different material deformation and removal processes, thereby resulting in different surface chemical compositions, microstructures, roughnesses and wetting properties.

  13. Laser-generated ultrasound with liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) technology in the thermoelastic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalms, Michael; Hellmers, Sandra; Bergmann, Ralf B.

    2012-04-01

    Composite materials like carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are used more and more in commercial applications and offer several attractive ways for tailored solutions. However, for many safety issues these materials require adequate nondestructive testing. The extension of the ultrasound technique for nondestructive purpose with laser technology brings new possibilities into the production processes for example manufacturing of small complex components with the capability of an inline observation. One problem with laser based ultrasound is the conventional Gaussian beam shape and an inappropriate thermal penetration when using for example a YAG-laser, which is usually destructive for the properties of the material under test. We describe the successful implementation of laser-based ultrasound using a Liquid Crystal on Silicon (LCoS) spatial light modulator for beam shaping. A LCoS display optimized as phase-only modulator with 8-bit phase level addressing is used to adapt the intensity dispersal of the laser to a predetermined spatial light distribution for nondestructive optoacoustic interaction with CFRP materials in the thermoelastic regime.

  14. CO{sub 2} laser technology for advanced particle accelerators. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1996-06-01

    Short-pulse, high-power CO{sub 2} lasers open new prospects for development of ultra-high gradient laser-driven electron accelerators. The advantages of {lambda}=10 {mu}m CO{sub 2} laser radiation over the more widely exploited solid state lasers with {lambda}{approximately}1 {mu}m are based on a {lambda}{sup 2}-proportional ponderomotive potential, {lambda}-proportional phase slippage distance, and {lambda}-proportional scaling of the laser accelerator structures. We show how a picosecond terawatt CO{sub 2} laser that is under construction at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility may benefit the ATF`s experimental program of testing far-field, near-field, and plasma accelerator schemes.

  15. Advancing adaptive optics technology: Laboratory turbulence simulation and optimization of laser guide stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampy, Rachel A.

    Since Galileo's first telescope some 400 years ago, astronomers have been building ever-larger instruments. Yet only within the last two decades has it become possible to realize the potential angular resolutions of large ground-based telescopes, by using adaptive optics (AO) technology to counter the blurring effects of Earth's atmosphere. And only within the past decade have the development of laser guide stars (LGS) extended AO capabilities to observe science targets nearly anywhere in the sky. Improving turbulence simulation strategies and LGS are the two main topics of my research. In the first part of this thesis, I report on the development of a technique for manufacturing phase plates for simulating atmospheric turbulence in the laboratory. The process involves strategic application of clear acrylic paint onto a transparent substrate. Results of interferometric characterization of the plates are described and compared to Kolmogorov statistics. The range of r0 (Fried's parameter) achieved thus far is 0.2--1.2 mm at 650 nm measurement wavelength, with a Kolmogorov power law. These plates proved valuable at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at University of California, Santa Cruz, where they have been used in the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics testbed, during integration and testing of the Gemini Planet Imager, and as part of the calibration system of the on-sky AO testbed named ViLLaGEs (Visible Light Laser Guidestar Experiments). I present a comparison of measurements taken by ViLLaGEs of the power spectrum of a plate and the real sky turbulence. The plate is demonstrated to follow Kolmogorov theory well, while the sky power spectrum does so in a third of the data. This method of fabricating phase plates has been established as an effective and low-cost means of creating simulated turbulence. Due to the demand for such devices, they are now being distributed to other members of the AO community. The second topic of this thesis pertains to understanding and

  16. Second generation high data-rate inter-orbit link based on diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sontag, H.; Johann, U.; Pribil, K.

    1991-05-01

    The SILEX experimental program is concerned with demonstrating the technologies of an optical communications link between two satellites; in order to expand system capabilities to the high data rates required for future LEO-GEO interorbit links, a detailed design study has been conducted for a system predicated on diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser technology. Even with telescopes whose apertures are less than 10 cm on the LEO satellite, and transmitter powers of less than 1 W, system transmission performance is greater than 1 Gbit/sec.

  17. Laser-Assisted Sheet Metal Working by the Integration of Scanner System Technology into a Progressive Die

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Eckert, Markus

    Within the sheet metal working industry the demand for thinner sheet materials with very high strength is growing due to the increasing importance for saving energy and responsible usage of natural resources. High strength and low ductility restrict application of state-of-the-art technology to shear, bend or deep draw parts with the needed complexity and quality. The Fraunhofer IPT has developed a "hy-PRESS" system to combine laser-assisted preheating and conventional punching to a hybrid technology in a progressive die, which allows to shear, bend and deep draw high strength materials with a high quality and complexity in progressive dies.

  18. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Baggott, Renee S.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Most Lidar applications rely on moderate to high power solid state lasers to generate the required transmitted pulses. However, the reliability of solid state lasers, which can operate autonomously over long periods, is constrained by their laser diode pump arrays. Thermal cycling of the active regions is considered the primary reason for rapid degradation of the quasi-CW high power laser diode arrays, and the excessive temperature rise is the leading suspect in premature failure. The thermal issues of laser diode arrays are even more drastic for 2-micron solid state lasers which require considerably longer pump pulses compared to the more commonly used pump arrays for 1-micron lasers. This paper describes several advanced packaging techniques being employed for more efficient heat removal from the active regions of the laser diode bars. Experimental results for several high power laser diode array devices will be reported and their performance when operated at long pulsewidths of about 1msec will be described.

  19. The fast and accurate 3D-face scanning technology based on laser triangle sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinjiang; Chang, Tianyu; Ge, Baozhen; Tian, Qingguo; Chen, Yang; Kong, Bin

    2013-08-01

    A laser triangle scanning method and the structure of 3D-face measurement system were introduced. In presented system, a liner laser source was selected as an optical indicated signal in order to scanning a line one times. The CCD image sensor was used to capture image of the laser line modulated by human face. The system parameters were obtained by system calibrated calculated. The lens parameters of image part of were calibrated with machine visual image method and the triangle structure parameters were calibrated with fine wire paralleled arranged. The CCD image part and line laser indicator were set with a linear motor carry which can achieve the line laser scanning form top of the head to neck. For the nose is ledge part and the eyes are sunk part, one CCD image sensor can not obtain the completed image of laser line. In this system, two CCD image sensors were set symmetric at two sides of the laser indicator. In fact, this structure includes two laser triangle measure units. Another novel design is there laser indicators were arranged in order to reduce the scanning time for it is difficult for human to keep static for longer time. The 3D data were calculated after scanning. And further data processing include 3D coordinate refine, mesh calculate and surface show. Experiments show that this system has simply structure, high scanning speed and accurate. The scanning range covers the whole head of adult, the typical resolution is 0.5mm.

  20. Capabilities of laser technology for manufacturing diagnostic peptide matrices with maximal density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, O. I.; Shcherbakov, E. M.; Nesterov-Müller, A.; Sobol', E. N.

    2016-02-01

    The process of manufacturing a matrix-gel biochip is modelled by means of laser fused deposition of a layer of polymer microparticles, containing a sensitive peptide element, onto a glass substrate. The limits of acceptable ranges and the optimal values of laser parameters, at which the melting of the polymer coating occurs without damaging the sensitive elements of the biochip, are theoretically determined. The results of the experiments on laser fused deposition of a layer of microparticles having the size 3 - 4 μm confirm the conservation of the functions of the biological complexes at optimal irradiation regimes. The parameters of the laser impact affecting the possible minimal separation between the zones of laser fused deposition are investigated. The essential role of heat conductivity and thermoplasticity of the polymer in increasing the size of the melted droplet is demonstrated. Using the laser radiation with the wavelength 532 nm focused into a spot with the diameter 6 μm (the laser pulse duration being 10 ms) the laser fused deposition density of 110000 spots per 1 cm2 is achieved. The maximal estimated density of laser fused deposition for the studied system amounts to 250000 spots per 1 cm2.

  1. HO:LULF and HO:LULF Laser Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Morrison, Clyde A. (Inventor); Filer, Elizabeth D. (Inventor); Jani, Mahendra G. (Inventor); Murray, Keith E. (Inventor); Lockard, George E. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A laser host material LULF (LuLiF4) is doped with holmium (Ho) and thulium (Tm) to produce a new laser material that is capable of laser light production in the vicinity of 2 microns. The material provides an advantage in efficiency over conventional Ho lasers because the LULF host material allows for decreased threshold and upconversion over such hosts as YAG and YLF. The addition of Tm allows for pumping by commonly available GaAlAs laser diodes. For use with flashlamp pumping, erbium (Er) may be added as an additional dopant. For further upconversion reduction, the Tm can be eliminated and the Ho can be directly pumped.

  2. Infrared Pulse-laser Long-path Absorption Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Using a Raman-shifted Dye Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minato, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    1992-01-01

    A pulsed laser source is effective in infrared laser long-path absorption measurements when the optical path length is very long or the reflection from a hard target is utilized, because higher signal-to-noise ratio is obtained in the detection of weak return signals. We have investigated the performance of a pulse-laser long-path absorption system using a hydrogen Raman shifter and a tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser, which generates second Stokes radiation in the 2-micron region.

  3. Lasers: invention to application. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ausubel, J.H.; Langford, H.D.

    1987-08-01

    Contents include: The laser--still young at 25; Lasers in modern industries; Lasers in communications and information processing; Lasers in medicine; Lasers in science; Interactions between the science and technology of lasers; Glossary.

  4. A study of atmospheric optical scattering parameters at 1.5 and 2 micron region for solid state Doppler lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Eli; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Benoist, Rodney; Dubinsky, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The increasing interest in the development of an eye-safe, solid state, Doppler lidar for avionic applications has created the need for a quantitative evaluation of atmospheric effects on performance. Theoretical calculations were completed for optical scattering parameters to be compared with the field measurements. Computer codes were developed for the required calculations and designed to be interactive and user friendly in order to support comparison with experimental results and, thus, provide the basis for evaluation of eye-safe Doppler lidar over a wide range of atmospheric conditions and geographical locations. A holmium Doppler lidar operating at 2.09 microns was constructed for atmospheric backscattering, attenuation, and wind velocity measurements. Theoretical calculations and field studies were performed for backscatter coefficients. The selected wavelengths correspond to Er:glass, Tm:YAG, and Tm,Ho:YAG solid state lasers that are suitable for use in an eye-safe Doppler lidar system.

  5. LASER TECHNOLOGY FOR PRECISION MONOENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCE R&D AT LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Bayramian, A; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Gibson, D J; Marsh, R; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Prantil, M; Wu, S; Ebbers, C; Scarpetti, R D; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Bonanno, R E; Barty, C P

    2010-04-20

    Generation of mono-energetic, high brightness gamma-rays requires state of the art lasers to both produce a low emittance electron beam in the linac and high intensity, narrow linewidth laser photons for scattering with the relativistic electrons. Here, we overview the laser systems for the 3rd generation Monoenergetic Gamma-ray Source (MEGa-ray) currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL). We also describe a method for increasing the efficiency of laser Compton scattering through laser pulse recirculation. The fiber-based photoinjector laser will produce 50 {micro}J temporally and spatially shaped UV pulses at 120 Hz to generate a low emittance electron beam in the X-band RF photoinjector. The interaction laser generates high intensity photons that focus into the interaction region and scatter off the accelerated electrons. This system utilizes chirped pulse amplification and commercial diode pumped solid state Nd:YAG amplifiers to produce 0.5 J, 10 ps, 120 Hz pulses at 1064 nm and up to 0.2 J after frequency doubling. A single passively mode-locked Ytterbium fiber oscillator seeds both laser systems and provides a timing synch with the linac.

  6. Advanced-technology laser-aided air pollution monitoring in Athens: the Greek differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambezidis, H. D.; Efthimiopoulos, Tom; Ehret, Gerhard; Kotsopoulos, Stavros A.; Zevgolis, Dimitrios; Economou, G.; Kosmidis, Constantine E.; Adamopoulos, A. D.; Doukas, A.; Gogou, P.-M.; Karaboulas, D.; Katsenos, J.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes the needs for establishing a mobile laser laboratory (LIDAR) for air pollution monitoring in the Athens area. It also gives the specifications of the laser unit of the LIDAR system and the various studies to be performed in Athens area.

  7. Laser-based display technology development at the Naval Ocean Systems Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Thomas E.; Trias, John A.; Lasher, Mark E.; Poirier, Peter M.; Dahlke, Weldon J.; Robinson, Waldo R.

    1991-02-01

    For several years, the Naval Ocean Systems Center (NOSC) has been working on the development of laser-based display systems with the goal of upgrading the image quality and ruggedness of shipboard displays. In this paper the authors report work on the major task of developing a full-color laser-addressed liquid crystal light valve (LCLV) projection system.

  8. Laser-based display technology development at the Naval Ocean Systems Center (NOSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Thomas; Trias, John; Lasher, Mark; Poirier, Peter; Dahlke, Weldon

    1991-05-01

    For several years, the Naval Ocean Systems Center (NOSC) has been working on the development of laser-based display systems with the goal of upgrading the image quality and ruggedness of shipboard displays. In this paper we report work on our major task of developing a full-color laser-addressed liquid crystal light value (LCLV) projection system.

  9. Laser Ranging in Solar System: Technology Developments and New Science Measurement Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Mcgarry, J.; Neumann, G. A.; Mazarico, E.

    2015-12-01

    Laser Ranging has played a major role in geodetic studies of the Earth over the past 40 years. The technique can potentially be used in between planets and spacecrafts within the solar system to advance planetary science. For example, a direct measurement of distances between planets, such as Mars and Venus would make significant improvements in understanding the dynamics of the whole solar system, including the masses of the planets and moons, asteroids and their perturbing interactions, and the gravity field of the Sun. Compared to the conventional radio frequency (RF) tracking systems, laser ranging is potentially more accurate because it is much less sensitive to the transmission media. It is also more efficient because the laser beams are much better focused onto the targets than RF beams. However, existing laser ranging systems are all Earth centric, that is, from ground stations on Earth to orbiting satellites in near Earth orbits or lunar orbit, and to the lunar retro-reflector arrays deployed by the astronauts in the early days of lunar explorations. Several long distance laser ranging experiments have been conducted with the lidar in space, including a two-way laser ranging demonstration between Earth and the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) on the MESSENGER spacecraft over 24 million km, and a one way laser transmission and detection experiment over 80 million km between Earth and the Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA) on the MGS spacecraft in Mars orbit. A one-way laser ranging operation has been carried out continuously from 2009 to 2014 between multiple ground stations to LRO spacecraft in lunar orbit. The Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) on the LADEE mission has demonstrated that a two way laser ranging measurements, including both the Doppler frequency and the phase shift, can be obtained from the subcarrier or the data clocks of a high speed duplex laser communication system. Plans and concepts presently being studied suggest we may be

  10. Technology assessment of high pulse energy CO(2) lasers for remote sensing from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.; Brockman, P.; Schryer, D. R.; Miller, I. M.; Bair, C. H.; Sidney, B. D.; Wood, G. M.; Upchurch, B. T.; Brown, K. G.

    1985-01-01

    Developments and needs for research to extend the lifetime and optimize the configuration of CO2 laser systems for satellite based on remote sensing of atmospheric wind velocities and trace gases are reviewed. The CO2 laser systems for operational satellite application will require lifetimes which exceed 1 year. Progress in the development of efficient low temperature catalysts and gas mixture modifications for extending the lifetime of high pulse energy closed cycle common and rare isotope CO2 lasers and of sealed CW CO2 lasers is reviewed. Several CO2 laser configurations are under development to meet the requirements including: unstable resonators, master oscillator power amplifiers and telescopic stable resonators, using UV or E-beam preionization. Progress in the systems is reviewed and tradeoffs in the system parameters are discussed.

  11. [The Early Years of Military Laser Research and Technology in the Federal Republic of Germany During the Cold War].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Helmuth

    2014-01-01

    The invention of the laser in 1960 and the innovation process of laser technology during the following years coincided with the dramatic increase of the East-West-conflict during the 1960s - the peak of the so-called Cold War after the erection of the Berlin Wall in 1961. The predictable features of the new device, not only for experimental sciences, but also for technical and military applications, led instantly to a laser hype all over the world. Military funding and research played a major part in this development. Especially in the United States military laser research and development played an important role in the formation of Cold War sciences. The European allies followed this example to a certain degree, but their specific national environments led to quite different solutions and results. This article describes and analyzes the special features and background of this development for the Federal Republic of Germany in the area of conflict between science, politics and industry from 1960 to the early 1970s. PMID:26070381

  12. Emerging terawatt picosecond CO{sub 2} laser technology and possible applications in accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1997-07-01

    The first terawatt picosecond (TWps) CO{sub 2} laser is under construction at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). TWps-CO{sub 2} lasers, having the order of magnitude longer wavelength than the well-known table-top terawatt solid state lasers, offer new opportunities for the strong-field physics research. For processes based on electro quiver motion, such as laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA), the advantage of the new class of lasers is due to a gain of two orders of magnitude in the ponderomotive potential for the same peak power. The large average power capability of CO{sub 2} lasers is important for the generation of hard radiation through Compton back-scattering of the laser off energetic electron beams, as well as for other applications. Among them are: LWFA modules of a tentative electron-positron collider, {gamma}-{gamma} (or {gamma}-lepton) collider, a possible table-top source of high-intensity x-rays and gamma rays and the generation of polarized positron beams.

  13. Damage Resistant Optical Glasses for High Power Lasers: A Continuing Glass Science and Technology Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J H

    2002-08-28

    A major challenge in the development of optical glasses for high-power lasers is reducing or eliminating laser-induced damage to the interior (bulk) and the polished surface of the glass. Bulk laser damage in glass generally originates from inclusions. With the development of novel glass melting and forming processes it is now possible to make both fused silica and a suit of meta-phosphate laser glasses in large sizes ({approx}>0.5-lm diameter), free of inclusions and with high optical homogeneity ({approx} 10{sup -6}). Considerable attention also has been focused on improving the laser damage resistance to polished optical glass surfaces. Studies have shown that laser-induced damage to surfaces grows exponentially with the number of shots when illuminated with nano-second pulses at 351-nm above a given fluence threshold. A new approach for reducing and eliminating laser-induced surface damage relies on a series of post-polishing treatment steps. This damage improvement method is briefly reviewed.

  14. Laser processes and system technology for the production of high-efficient crystalline solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayerhofer, R.; Hendel, R.; Zhu, Wenjie; Geiger, S.

    2012-10-01

    The laser as an industrial tool is an essential part of today's solar cell production. Due to the on-going efforts in the solar industry, to increase the cell efficiency, more and more laser-based processes, which have been discussed and tested at lab-scale for many years, are now being implemented in mass production lines. In order to cope with throughput requirements, standard laser concepts have to be improved continuously with respect to available average power levels, repetition rates or beam profile. Some of the laser concepts, that showed high potential in the past couple of years, will be substituted by other, more economic laser types. Furthermore, requirements for processing with less-heat affected zones fuel the development of industry-ready ultra short pulsed lasers with pulse widths even below the picosecond range. In 2011, the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) had launched the program "PV-Innovation Alliance", with the aim to support the rapid transfer of high-efficiency processes out of development departments and research institutes into solar cell production lines. Here, lasers play an important role as production tools, allowing the fast implementation of high-performance solar cell concepts. We will report on the results achieved within the joint project FUTUREFAB, where efficiency optimization, throughput enhancement and cost reduction are the main goals. Here, the presentation will focus on laser processes like selective emitter doping and ablation of dielectric layers. An indispensable part of the efforts towards cost reduction in solar cell production is the improvement of wafer handling and throughput capabilities of the laser processing system. Therefore, the presentation will also elaborate on new developments in the design of complete production machines.

  15. Laser tabbed die: A repairable, high-speed die-interconnection technology. 1994 LDRD final report 93-SR-089

    SciTech Connect

    Malba, V.; Bernhardt, A.F.

    1995-09-01

    A unique technology for multichip module production is presented. The technology, called Laser Tabbed Die (L-TAB), consists of a method for forming surface-mount-type {open_quotes}gull wing{close_quotes} interconnects on bare dice. The dice are temporarily bonded to a sacrificial substrate which has a polymer thin film coated onto it. The gull wings are formed on the side of the die with a direct-write laser patterning process which allows vertical as well as horizontal image formation. Using the laser patterning system, trenches are formed in a positive electrodeposited photoresist (EDPR) which is plated onto a metal seed layer, allowing copper to be electroplated through the resultant mask. After stripping the resist and the metal seed layer, the polymer film on the substrate is dissolved, releasing the chip with the {open_quotes}gull wings{close_quotes} intact. The chips are then bonded onto a circuit board or permanent substrate with solder or conductive adhesive.

  16. Experimental demonstration of a multi-wavelength distributed feedback semiconductor laser array with an equivalent chirped grating profile based on the equivalent chirp technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Wangzhe; Zhang, Xia; Yao, Jianping

    2013-08-26

    We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first realization of a multi-wavelength distributed feedback (DFB) semiconductor laser array with an equivalent chirped grating profile based on equivalent chirp technology. All the lasers in the laser array have an identical grating period with an equivalent chirped grating structure, which are realized by nonuniform sampling of the gratings. Different wavelengths are achieved by changing the sampling functions. A multi-wavelength DFB semiconductor laser array is fabricated and the lasing performance is evaluated. The results show that the equivalent chirp technology is an effective solution for monolithic integration of a multi-wavelength laser array with potential for large volume fabrication. PMID:24105542

  17. A New Technology for Applanation Free Corneal Trephination: The Picosecond Infrared Laser (PIRL)

    PubMed Central

    Linke, Stephan J.; Frings, Andreas; Ren, Ling; Gomolka, Amadeus; Schumacher, Udo; Reimer, Rudolph; Hansen, Nils-Owe; Jowett, Nathan; Richard, Gisbert; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    The impact of using a Femtosecond laser on final functional results of penetrating keratoplasty is low. The corneal incisions presented here result from laser ablations with ultrafast desorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE). The results of the current study are based on the first proof-of-principle experiments using a mobile, newly introduced picosecond infrared laser system, and indicate that wavelengths in the mid-infrared range centered at 3 μm are efficient for obtaining applanation-free deep cuts on porcine corneas. PMID:25781907

  18. NASA's flight-technological development program - A 650 Mbps laser communications testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, W. L.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.; Nace, D. A.; Lokerson, D. C.; Minott, P. O.; Chapman, W. W.

    1991-01-01

    A 650 Mbps laser communications testbed under construction for the development of flight qualifiable hardware suitable for near-term operation on geosynchronous-to-geosynchronous crosslink missions is presented. The program's primary purpose is to develop and optimize laser communications unique subsystems. Requirements for the testbed experiments are to optimize the acquisition processes, to fully simulate the long range (up to 21,000 km) and the fine tracking characteristics of two narrow-beam laser communications terminals, and to fully test communications performance which will include average and burst bit error rates, effects of laser diode coalignment, degradation due to internal and external stray light, and the impact of drifts in the optical components.

  19. An Overview of High Energy Short Pulse Technology for Advanced Radiography of Laser Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J; Key, M; Britten, J; Beach, R; Beer, G; Brown, C; Bryan, S; Caird, J; Carlson, T; Crane, J; Dawson, J; Erlandson, A C; Fittinghoff, D; Hermann, M; Hoaglan, C; Iyer, A; Jones, L; Jovanovic, I; Komashko, A; Landen, O; Liao, Z; Molander, W; Mitchell, A; Moses, E; Nielsen, N; Nguyen, H; Nissen, J; Payne, S; Pennington, D; Risinger, L; Rushford, M; Skulina, K; Spaeth, M; Stuart, B; Tietbohl, G; Wattellier, B

    2004-06-18

    The technical challenges and motivations for high-energy, short-pulse generation with NIF-class, Nd:glass laser systems are reviewed. High energy short pulse generation (multi-kilojoule, picosecond pulses) will be possible via the adaptation of chirped pulse amplification laser techniques on the NIF. Development of meter-scale, high efficiency, high-damage-threshold final optics is a key technical challenge. In addition, deployment of HEPW pulses on NIF is constrained by existing laser infrastructure and requires new, compact compressor designs and short-pulse, fiber-based, seed-laser systems. The key motivations for high energy petawatt pulses on NIF is briefly outlined and includes high-energy, x-ray radiography, proton beam radiography, proton isochoric heating and tests of the fast ignitor concept for inertial confinement fusion.

  20. The science, technology and mission design for the Laser Astrometric test of relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.

    2006-01-01

    The Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity (LATOR) is a Michelson-Morley-type experiment designed to test the Einstein's general theory of relativity in the most intense gravitational environment available in the solar system - the close proximity to the Sun.

  1. Injection seeded, diode pumped regenerative ring Nd:YAG amplifier for spaceborne laser ranging technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Kay, Richard B.; Degnan, John J.; Krebs, Danny J.; Seery, Bernard D.

    1992-01-01

    A small, all solid state, regenerative ring amplifier designed as a prototype for space application is discussed. Novel features include dual side pumping of the Nd:YAG crystal and a triangular ring cavity design which minimizes the number of optical components and losses. The amplifier is relatively small (3 ns round trip time) even though standard optical elements are employed. The ring regeneratively amplifies a 100 ps single pulse by approximately 10(exp 5) at a repetition rate of 10 to 100 Hz. The amplifier is designed to be injection seeded with a pulsed, 100 ps laser diode at 1.06 microns, but another Nd:YAG laser system supplying higher pulse energies was employed for laboratory experiment. This system is a prototype laser oscillator for the Geoscience Laser Ranging System (GLRS) platform. Results on measurements of beam quality, astigmatism, and gain are given.

  2. Science Investigations with Laser Ranging to the Moon and Mars/Phobos: Recent Advances, Technology Demonstrations, and New Ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Williams, James G.; Folkner, William M.

    2010-05-01

    transponder on Mars/Phobos could lead to major advances in science investigations of Mars/Phobos. Technology is available to conduct such measurements with a picosecond timing precision which could translate into mm-level accuracies achieved in ranging between the Earth and Mars/Phobos. The resulting Mars Laser Ranging (MLR) would provide new opportunities for robust advances in the tests of relativistic gravity and the properties of Martian interior, including liquid core, could be determined from Martian rotation, orientation, tidal response. Alternatively, Phobos laser Ranging (PLR) would benefit the study of Phobos and the Martian system. Given the current technology readiness level, PLR could be started in 2011 for launch in 2016 for 3 years of science operations. We discuss the PLR's science objectives, instrument, and mission design. We also present the details of science simulations performed to support the mission's primary objectives. The work described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  3. Long pulse generation technology of solid-state laser adopting a new real time multi-discharge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jung-Hwan; Song, Kum-Young; Chung, Hyun-Ju; Jung, Jong-Han; Kim, Whi-Young; Kang, Uk; Kim, Hee-Je

    2002-04-01

    In this study, a solid-state laser system adopting a new real time multi-discharge method in which three flashlamps are turned on consecutively was designed and fabricated to examine the pulse width and the pulse shape of the laser beams depending upon the changes in the lamp turn-on time. That is, this study shows a technology that makes it possible to make various pulse shapes by turning on three flashlamps consecutively on a real-time basis with the aid of a program integrated circuit one-chip microprocessor. With this technique, the lamp turn-on delay time can be varied more diversely from 0 to 10 ms and the real-time control is possible with an external keyboard, enabling various pulse shapes. In addition, longer pulses can be more widely used for industrial processing and many medical purposes.

  4. Application of 3D laser scanning technology in historical building preservation: a case study of a Chinese temple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu Min; Lu, Nien Hua; Wu, Tsung Chiang

    2005-06-01

    This study applies 3D Laser scanning technology to develop a high-precision measuring system for digital survey of historical building. It outperformed other methods in obtaining abundant high-precision measuring points and computing data instantly. In this study, the Pei-tien Temple, a Chinese Taoism temple in southern Taiwan famous for its highly intricate architecture and more than 300-year history, was adopted as the target to proof the high accuracy and efficiency of this system. By using French made MENSI GS-100 Laser Scanner, numerous measuring points were precisely plotted to present the plane map, vertical map and 3D map of the property. Accuracies of 0.1-1 mm in the digital data have consistently been achieved for the historical heritage measurement.

  5. Laser microfabrication technology and its application to high speed interconnect of gate arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, A.F.; McWilliams, B.M.; Mitlitsky, F.; Whitehead, J.C.

    1986-12-01

    A goal of the LLNL Laser Pantography (LP) program has been demonstrating processes in which a computer-steered and computer-modulated laser beam directly deposits or removes material onto or from a substrate such as a silicon wafer. Substantial advantages could accrue from a fully developed set of such processes, including: lower cost for prototyping and low volume manufacturing, faster fabrication, on-line repair, and customized computers. 7 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Laser Engineered Net Shape (LENS) Technology for the Repair of Ni-Base Superalloy Turbine Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dejian; Lippold, John C.; Li, Jia; Rohklin, Stan R.; Vollbrecht, Justin; Grylls, Richard

    2014-09-01

    The capability of the laser engineered net shape (LENS) process was evaluated for the repair of casting defects and improperly machined holes in gas turbine engine components. Various repair geometries, including indentations, grooves, and through-holes, were used to simulate the actual repair of casting defects and holes in two materials: Alloy 718 and Waspaloy. The influence of LENS parameters, including laser energy density, laser scanning speed, and deposition pattern, on the repair of these defects and holes was studied. Laser surface remelting of the substrate prior to repair was used to remove machining defects and prevent heat-affected zone (HAZ) liquation cracking. Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques were used as a possible approach for detecting lack-of-fusion in repairs. Overall, Alloy 718 exhibited excellent repair weldability, with essentially no defects except for some minor porosity in repairs representative of deep through-holes and simulated large area casting defects. In contrast, cracking was initially observed during simulated repair of Waspaloy. Both solidification cracking and HAZ liquation cracking were observed in the repairs, especially under conditions of high heat input (high laser power and/or low scanning speed). For Waspaloy, the degree of cracking was significantly reduced and, in most cases, completely eliminated by the combination of low laser energy density and relatively high laser scanning speeds. It was found that through-hole repairs of Waspaloy made using a fine powder size exhibited excellent repair weldability and were crack-free relative to repairs using coarser powder. Simulated deep (7.4 mm) blind-hole repairs, representative of an actual Waspaloy combustor case, were successfully produced by the combination use of fine powder and relatively high laser scanning speeds.

  7. Can solid-state laser technology serve usefully beyond fusion ignition facilities?

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S.A.; Powell, H.T.; Krupke, W.F.

    1995-07-28

    We have explored the major technical and conceptual issues relating to the suitability of a diode-pumped solid state laser as a driver for an inertial fusion energy power plant. While solid state lasers have long served as the workhorse of inertial confinement fusion physics studies, the deployment of a driver possessing adequate efficiency, reliability, and repetition rate for inertial fusion energy requires the implementation of several technical innovations discussed in this article.

  8. Multispectral airborne laser scanning - a new trend in the development of LiDAR technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakuła, K.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is the one of the most accurate remote sensing techniques for data acquisition where the terrain and its coverage is concerned. Modern scanners have been able to scan in two or more channels (frequencies of the laser) recently. This gives the rise to the possibility of obtaining diverse information about an area with the different spectral properties of objects. The paper presents an example of a multispectral ALS system - Titan by Optech - with the possibility of data including the analysis of digital elevation models accuracy and data density. As a result of the study, the high relative accuracy of LiDAR acquisition in three spectral bands was proven. The mean differences between digital terrain models (DTMs) were less than 0.03 m. The data density analysis showed the influence of the laser wavelength. The points clouds that were tested had average densities of 25, 23 and 20 points per square metre respectively for green (G), near-infrared (NIR) and shortwave-infrared (SWIR) lasers. In this paper, the possibility of the generation of colour composites using orthoimages of laser intensity reflectance and its classification capabilities using data from airborne multispectral laser scanning for land cover mapping are also discussed and compared with conventional photogrammetric techniques.

  9. Possibilities of using pulsed lasers and copper-vapour laser system (CVL and CVLS) in modern technological equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labin, N. A.; Bulychev, N. A.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Grigoryants, A. G.; Shiganov, I. N.; Krasovskii, V. I.; Sachkov, V. I.; Plyaka, P. S.; Feofanov, I. N.

    2015-12-01

    Research on CVL installations with an average power of 20-25 W of cutting and drilling has shown wide range of applications of these lasers for micromachining of metals and a wide range of non-metallic materials up to 1-2 mm. From the analysis indicated that peak power density in the focused light spot of 10-30 μm diameter must be 109 -1012 W/cm2 the productivity and quality micromachining, when the treatment material is preferably in the evaporative mode micro explosions, followed by the expansion of the superheated vapor and the liquid. To achieve such levels of power density, a minimum heat affected zone (5- 10 μm) and a minimum surface roughness of the cut (1-2 μm), the quality of the output beam of radiation should be as high. Ideally, to ensure the quality of the radiation, the structure of CVL output beam must be single-beam, diffraction divergence and have at duration pulses τi = 20-40 ns. The pulse energy should have low values of 0.1-1 mJ at pulse repetition rates of 10-20 kHz. Axis of the radiation beam instability of the pattern to be three orders of magnitude smaller than the diffraction limit of the divergence. The spot of the focused radiation beam must have a circular shape with clear boundary, and a Gaussian intensity distribution.

  10. Silicon Based Photovoltaic Cells For Concentration-Research And Development Progress In Laser Grooved Buried Contact Cell Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, A.; Baistow, I.; Brown, L.; Devenport, S.; Drew, K.; Heasman, K. C.; Morrison, D.; Bruton, T. M.; Serenelli, L.; De Iuliis, S.; Izzi, M.; Tucci, M.; Salza, E.; Pirozzi, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Laser grooved buried contact silicon solar cell (LGBC) process employed by Narec currently produces LGBC cells designed to operate at concentrations ranging from 1-100 suns and has demonstrated efficiencies at 50X of over 19% and at 100X of over 18.2% using 300 μm CZ silicon[1] wafers. As part of the LAB2LINE[1], APOLLON[2] and ASPIS[3] projects funded under the European Commission Framework Programs (FP6 and FP7) we have made improvements to the LGBC process to improve efficiency or make the cell technology more suitable for industrial CPV receiver manufacturing processes. We describe a process which hybridizes LGBC and more standard screen printing technologies which yields at least a 6% relative improvement at concentration when using more readily available 200 μm thick CZ wafers. We describe a pioneering front dicing technique (FDT). The FDT process is important in small cells where edge recombination effects are detrimental to the performance. We show that by using this new technique we can produce cells that perform better at concentration and improve the positioning of the front contact of the cell. We also describe a busbar technology that uses laser processing and electroless chemical plating to allow not only soldering to the front contact of the cell but also wire bonding. The advances in research and development of LGBC cells leading to improved cell performance may provide significant reductions in levilised cost of energy (LCOE) for low to medium CPV systems.

  11. Preliminary results of tracked laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (T-LASIK) for myopia and hyperopia using the autonomous technologies excimer laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguen, Ezra I.; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Salz, James J.

    2000-06-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the safety and efficacy of LASIK with the LADARVision laser by Autonomous Technologies, (Orlando, FL). The study included four subsets: Spherical myopia -- up to -11.00D, spherical hyperopia -- up to +6.00D. Both myopic and hyperopic astigmatism could be corrected, up to 6.00D of astigmatism. A total of 105 patients participated. Sixty-six patients were myopic and 39 were hyperopic. The mean (+/- SD) age was 42.8 +/- 9.3 years for myopia and 53.2 +/- 9.9 years for hyperopia. At 3 months postop. Sixty-one myopic eyes were available for evaluation. Uncorrected visual acuity was 20/20 in 70% of eyes and 20/40 in 92.9% of all eyes. The refractive outcome was within +/- 0.50D in 73.8% of eyes and within +/- 1.00D in 96.7 of eyes. Thirty-eight hyperopic eyes were available. Uncorrected visual acuity was 20/20 in 42.1% of eyes and 20/40 in 88% of all eyes. The refractive outcome was within +/- 0.50D in 57.9% of eyes and within +/- 1.00D in 86.8% of eyes. Complications were not sight threatening and were discussed in detail. Lasik with the LADARVision laser appears to be safe and effective.

  12. A fiberoptic compatible midinfrared laser with CO2 laser-like effect: application to atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Oz, M C; Treat, M R; Trokel, S L; Andrew, J E; Nowygrod, R

    1989-12-01

    In theory, pulses of laser light in the 2-microns range should ablate tissue in a manner similar to that of the 10.6-microns CO2 laser with the added advantage of efficient transmission through flexible quartz fibers. Using 200-microseconds pulses of 2.15-microns thulium-holmium-chromium:YAG (THC:YAG) laser light, we were able to create 700-microns-diameter holes through calcific atherosclerosis in vitro. In vivo evaluation of thrombogenicity and healing was accomplished by exposing the luminal surface of rabbit aortas to the THC:YAG laser. Serial histologic examinations of laser-treated rabbit aortae revealed a time course of resolution of the lesions which was very similar to that observed with like-sized lesions created with the same amount of continuous wave CO2 energy. No significant differences in thrombogenicity nor healing response were noted. The excellent in vivo response observed is due in part to the pulsed nature of the THC:YAG laser output as well as to the efficient tissue absorption at the 2.15-microns wavelength. We feel that excellent ablative effects with minimal collateral thermal damage can be obtained through fiberoptic delivery systems by taking advantage of laser wavelengths corresponding to the infrared absorption peak of water in the 2-microns region and pulsed delivery of the laser energy. PMID:2511380

  13. The research on measurement technology of high dynamic range laser focal spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengzhou; Hu, Bingliang; Yin, Qinye; Cao, Shikang; Wang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    In order to obtain the far-field distribution of high dynamic range laser focal spot, the mathematical model of schlieren method to measure the far-field focal spot was proposed, and the traditional schlieren reconstructed algorithm was optimized in many aspects in this paper. First of all, the mathematical model which used to measure the far-field focal spot was created, the amplificatory coefficient K of the main lobe intensity and amplificatory coefficient b of the laser spot area were selected ; Secondly, the two important parameters were calibrated and the accurate main lobe spot and side lobe spot were captured by the integrated diagnostic beam fast automatic alignment system; Finally, the schlieren reconstructed algorithm was optimized by circle fitting method to calculate side lobe image center and weighted average method to fuse the joint image edge, and the error of traditional schlieren reconstruction method for side lobe center was reduced and the obvious joint mark of reconstructed image was eliminated completely. The method had been applied in a certain laser driver parameter measurement integrated diagnostic system to measure far-field laser focal spot. The experimental results show that the method can measure the far-field distribution of high dynamic range laser focal spot exactly on the condition that the parameter of mathematical model is calibrated accurately and the reconstructed algorithm of schlieren measure is optimized excellently.

  14. Financial analysis of technology acquisition using fractionated lasers as a model.

    PubMed

    Jutkowitz, Eric; Carniol, Paul J; Carniol, Alan R

    2010-08-01

    Ablative fractional lasers are among the most advanced and costly devices on the market. Yet, there is a dearth of published literature on the cost and potential return on investment (ROI) of such devices. The objective of this study was to provide a methodological framework for physicians to evaluate ROI. To facilitate this analysis, we conducted a case study on the potential ROI of eight ablative fractional lasers. In the base case analysis, a 5-year lease and a 3-year lease were assumed as the purchase option with a $0 down payment and 3-month payment deferral. In addition to lease payments, service contracts, labor cost, and disposables were included in the total cost estimate. Revenue was estimated as price per procedure multiplied by total number of procedures in a year. Sensitivity analyses were performed to account for variability in model assumptions. Based on the assumptions of the model, all lasers had higher ROI under the 5-year lease agreement compared with that for the 3-year lease agreement. When comparing results between lasers, those with lower operating and purchase cost delivered a higher ROI. Sensitivity analysis indicates the model is most sensitive to purchase method. If physicians opt to purchase the device rather than lease, they can significantly enhance ROI. ROI analysis is an important tool for physicians who are considering making an expensive device acquisition. However, physicians should not rely solely on ROI and must also consider the clinical benefits of a laser. PMID:20665406

  15. [Research on the neas infrared focal plane array detector imaging technology used in the laser warning].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Bin; Huang, Yan-Fei; Wang, Yao-Li; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yan-Chao

    2014-04-01

    In order to achieve the incoming laser's accurate position, it is necessary to improve the detected laser's direction resolution. The InGaAs focal plane array detector with the type of FPA-320 x 256-C was selected as the core component of the diffraction grating laser warning device. The detection theory of laser wavelength and direction based on diffraction grating was introduced. The drive circuit was designed through the analysis of the detector's performance and parameters. Under the FPGA' s timing control, the detector's analog output was sampled by the high-speed AD. The data was cached to FPGA's extended SRAM, and then transferred to a PC through USB. Labview on a PC collects the raw data for processing and displaying. The imaging experiments were completed with the above method. With the wavelength of 1550 nm and 980 nm laser from different directions the diffraction images were detected. Through analysis the location of the zero order and one order can be determined. According to the grating diffraction theory, the wavelength and the direction of the two-dimensional angle can be calculated. It indicates that the wavelength error is less than 10 nm, and the angle error is less than 1 degrees. PMID:25007645

  16. Enabling coherent control of trapped ions with economical multi-laser frequency stabilization technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lybarger, Warren Emanuel, Jr.

    A phase-locked scanning stability transfer cavity (SSTC) for transferring the absolute frequency stability of an iodine referenced He-Ne (master) laser to three otherwise uncalibrated (slave) lasers (at 844, 1033, & 1092 nm) of a trapped-Sr+ quantum information processing (QIP) apparatus is described. When locked, the 422 nm frequency-doubled Doppler-cooling laser exhibits an error of <1 MHz RMS for several hours, and similar stability is achieved with the other slave lasers. When unlocked, each slave laser drifts by a large fraction (or more) of the corresponding transition linewidth in minutes, thus making reliable laser cooling, ion state readout, and execution of QIP algorithms practically infeasible. The SSTC makes coherent control of Sr+ possible by addressing this problem, and the QIP apparatus is now sufficiently stable for single user operation. New single-ion experimental capabilities include ground state cooling, high-fidelity Rabi flopping, Ramsey interferometry, and sympathetic cooling of 88Sr+( 86Sr+) with 86Sr+( 88Sr+). A 2.5 msec coherence time has been achieved with the optical quoit encoded in a |5 2S 1/2> ↔ |4 2D5/2> quadrupole transition, a precision measurement of the isotope shift of the qubit transition in 86Sr+ relative to 88Sr+ is reported, and a single-ion heating rate consistent with results throughout the trapped-ion community is reported. The SSTC is simple to implement, uses no custom optics, and it has a higher scanning rate than previously demonstrated SSTC's. Phase-locked SSTC's are shown to have an advantage over the more common displacement-locked SSTC in the low finesse regime, and they are an attractive alternative to passively stable but complex optical references and diode lasers designed to address the same problem. The SSTC is useful in spectroscopic applications with other ion species, atoms, and molecules, in general. An appendix is dedicated to describing in detail an advanced trapped-ion quantum processor concept

  17. Welding technology transfer task/laser based weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looney, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Sensors to control and monitor welding operations are currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The laser based weld bead profiler/torch rotation sensor was modified to provide a weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds. The tracking system features a precision laser based vision sensor, automated two-axis machine motion, and an industrial PC controller. The system benefits are elimination of weld repairs caused by joint tracking errors which reduces manufacturing costs and increases production output, simplification of tooling, and free costly manufacturing floor space.

  18. Fiber laser pumped high energy cryogenically cooled Ho:YLF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippert, Espen; Fonnum, Helge; Stenersen, Knut

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we report on a high energy, low repetition rate 2-micron-laser, with high conversion efficiency in terms of output energy per pump power. The laser consists of a Ho3+-doped LiYF4 (YLF) crystal cooled to cryogenic temperatures in an unstable resonator, pumped by a thulium fiber laser. The cooling to 77 K makes Ho:YLF a quasi four level laser system, which greatly enhances the extraction efficiency. We achieved 356 mJ in Q-switched operation at 1 Hz PRF when pumping the laser with 58 W for 36 ms. The high beam quality from the fiber laser and the use of an unstable resonator with a graded reflectivity mirror (GRM) resulted in a high quality laser beam with a M2-value of 1.3.

  19. Application of laser technology in treatment of diseases of the external genitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczak, Maciej; Wozniak, Jakub; Sajdak, Stefan; Opala, Tomasz; Rabiega, Dorota

    2000-11-01

    Lasersurgery is the very profitable method of treatment of diseases of external sexual organs, with regard to high efficiency and little relapses. Lasersurgery is recommended especially for pregnant women considering possibility of physiological childbirth. We prefer laser CO2 in connexion with colposcope in treatment of diseases of external sexual organs. The application of this method is limited by the high cost of equipment.

  20. The e-Beam Sustained Laser Technology for Space-based Doppler Wind Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, M. J.; Holman, W.; Robinson, R. J.; Schwarzenberger, P. M.; Smith, I. M.; Wallace, S.; Harris, M. R.; Willetts, D. V.; Kurzius, S. C.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of GEC Avionics activities relating to the Spaceborne Doppler Wind Lidar. In particular, the results of design studies into the use of an e-beam sustained CO2 laser for spaceborne applications, and experimental work on a test bed system are discussed.

  1. Microsystem technology based diode lasers and Raman sensors for in situ food quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumpf, B.; Schmidt, H.; Maiwald, M.; Müller, A.; Erbert, G.; Kronfeldt, H.-D.; Tränkle, G.

    2009-05-01

    A microsystem based Raman sensor system for the in situ control of meat was realized. As excitation laser source a compact external cavity diode laser (ECDL) emitting at 671.0 nm mounted on a micro optical bench with a total dimension of (13 x 4 x 1) mm3 is implemented. An output power of 200 mW, a stable emission at 671.0 nm, and a narrow spectral width of about 80 pm, i.e. 2 cm-1, were measured. The device is well suited for Raman measurements of liquid and solid samples. The devices parameters and the stability will be reviewed. The micro-system laser device is implemented into a specifically laboratory prototype, including an optical bench with a diameter of 25 mm and a length of 170 mm. The probe is coupled fiber-optically to a polychromator with CCD detector for rapid spectral analysis. The Raman probe is characterized and first Raman measurements of porcine musculus longissimus dorsi through the package will be presented. The usefulness of Raman spectroscopy will be discussed with a view of integrating the sensor in a handheld laser scanner for food control.

  2. Technical Note: Measuring Grain and Insect Characteristics using NIR Laser Array Technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential of using an eight-wavelength near-infrared (NIR) laser cluster spectrometer for measuring wheat quality (hardness index, protein content, moisture content, and waxy character) and determining tsetse fly pupae sex was investigated and compared to a commercial single kernel near infrared...

  3. THE STUDY OF WHEAT STARCH SIZE DISTRIBUTION USING IMAGE ANALYSIS AND LASER DIFFRACTION TECHNOLOGY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch is the most abundant storage reserve in the wheat caryopsis yet little is known about its influence on end-use properties. Starch was isolated from wheats of four different classes and analyzed using digital image analysis (IA) coupled to a light microscope and several laser diffraction sizi...

  4. Key technologies and applications of laser cooling and trapping 87Rb atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Ning; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yu; Fan, Shangchun

    2016-06-01

    Atom Interferometry is proved to be a potential method for measuring the acceleration of atoms due to Gravity, we are now building a feasible system of cold atom gravimeter. In this paper development and the important applications of laser cooling and trapping atoms are introduced, some key techniques which are used to obtain 87Rb cold atoms in our experiments are also discussed.

  5. FEASIBILITY STUDY TO DEMONSTRATE APPLICABILITY OF TUNABLE INFRARED LASER EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY TECHNOLOGY TO MEASURE AIR POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project involves the real-time measurement of air quality using open-path IR spectroscopy. A prototype open-path tunable laser absorption spectroscopy instrument was designed, built, and successfully operated for several hundred hours between October and December 2000. The...

  6. The Use of Natural Language Entry and Laser Videodisk Technology in CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdulla, Abdulla M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The use of an authoring system is described that incorporates student interaction with the computer by natural language entry at the keyboard and the use of the microcomputer to direct a random-access laser video-disk player. (Author/MLW)

  7. Fabrication of electrodes on the aluminum doped zinc oxide thin films using an ultraviolet laser direct-patterning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Tseng, Shih-Feng; Kuo, Chao-Hui; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Chiang, Donyau; Yao, Pin-Chiun; Chen, Ming-Fei

    Because transparent conductive oxide (TCO) thin films have more than 80% transmittance in visible spectrum, and high electrical conductivity, the TCO films are widely applied to flat panel displays and solar cells as transparent electrode materials. This study aims to develop a direct patterning technology on ZnO:Al (AZO) thin films by a diode-pumped solid state ultraviolet laser. The electrode patterns with array structures on AZO thin films were generated by a high-speed galvanometric scanning system. The optoelectronic properties of a patterned electrode have strong relation with the laser pulse frequency, the scan speed, and the patterning time. The surface morphology and roughness of patterned electrode were measured by three dimension confocal microscope and field emission scanning electron microscope, respectively. The resistivity of AZO thin films before and after laser patterning was measured by a four point probe instrument. The optical transmittance was recorded by a UV/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer. The experimental results indicated that the edge line width and depth decreased with increasing the scan speed. After the array patterns structure were formed by laser dry etching, the roughness Ra values of patterned area increased from 0.06 μm to 0.16 μm. These transmittances of patterned structure from 400 nm to 800 nm wavelengths averagely reached to 82%. The measured results of electrical conductively revealed that the resistivity gradually increased with increasing the pulse repetition frequency. In addition, surface morphologic examination on the straight lines, corners, and etched regions of patterned films revealed no micro-cracks observed which meant the patterned surface had a better surface quality.

  8. High-Power Single-Mode 2.65-micron InGaAsSb/AlInGaAsSb Diode Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frez, Clifford F.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Forouhar, Siamak; Borgentun, Carl E.; Gupta, James

    2013-01-01

    Central to the advancement of both satellite and in-situ science are improvements in continuous-wave and pulsed infrared laser systems coupled with integrated miniaturized optics and electronics, allowing for the use of powerful, single-mode light sources aboard both satellite and unmanned aerial vehicle platforms. There is a technological gap in supplying adequate laser sources to address the mid-infrared spectral window for spectroscopic characterization of important atmospheric gases. For high-power applications between 2 to 3 micron, commercial laser technologies are unsuitable because of limitations in output power. For instance, existing InP-based laser systems developed for fiber-based telecommunications cannot be extended to wavelengths longer than 2 micron. For emission wavelengths shorter than 3 micron, intersubband devices, such as infrared quantum cascade lasers, become inefficient due to band-offset limitations. To date, successfully demonstrated singlemode GaSb-based laser diodes emitting between 2 and 3 micron have employed lossy metal Bragg gratings for distributed- feedback coupling, which limits output power due to optical absorption. By optimizing both the quantum well design and the grating fabrication process, index-coupled distributed-feedback 2.65-micron lasers capable of emitting in excess of 25 mW at room temperature have been demonstrated. Specifically, lasers at 3,777/cm (2.65 micron) have been realized to interact with strong absorption lines of HDO and other isotopologues of H2O. With minor modifications of the optical cavity and quantum well designs, lasers can be fabricated at any wavelength within the 2-to-3-micron spectral window with similar performance. At the time of this reporting, lasers with this output power and wavelength accuracy are not commercially available. Monolithic ridge-waveguide GaSb lasers were fabricated that utilize secondorder lateral Bragg gratings to generate single-mode emission from InGaAsSb/ Al

  9. Rapid Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Burkholderia pseudomallei by Use of Laser Light Scattering Technology.

    PubMed

    Bugrysheva, Julia V; Lascols, Christine; Sue, David; Weigel, Linda M

    2016-06-01

    Rapid methods to determine antimicrobial susceptibility would assist in the timely distribution of effective treatment or postexposure prophylaxis in the aftermath of the release of bacterial biothreat agents such as Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, or Burkholderia pseudomallei Conventional susceptibility tests require 16 to 48 h of incubation, depending on the bacterial species. We evaluated a method that is based on laser light scattering technology that measures cell density in real time. We determined that it has the ability to rapidly differentiate between growth (resistant) and no growth (susceptible) of several bacterial threat agents in the presence of clinically relevant antimicrobials. Results were available in <4 h for B. anthracis and <6 h for Y. pestis and B. pseudomallei One exception was B. pseudomallei in the presence of ceftazidime, which required >10 h of incubation. Use of laser scattering technology decreased the time required to determine antimicrobial susceptibility by 50% to 75% for B. anthracis, Y. pestis, and B. pseudomallei compared to conventional methods. PMID:26984973

  10. Derivation of Ground Surface and Vegetation in a Coastal Florida Wetland with Airborne Laser Technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raabe, Ellen A.; Harris, Melanie S.; Shrestha, Ramesh L.; Carter, William E.

    2008-01-01

    The geomorphology and vegetation of marsh-dominated coastal lowlands were mapped from airborne laser data points collected on the Gulf Coast of Florida near Cedar Key. Surface models were developed using low- and high-point filters to separate ground-surface and vegetation-canopy intercepts. In a non-automated process, the landscape was partitioned into functional landscape units to manage the modeling of key landscape features in discrete processing steps. The final digital ground surface-elevation model offers a faithful representation of topographic relief beneath canopies of tidal marsh and coastal forest. Bare-earth models approximate field-surveyed heights by + 0.17 m in the open marsh and + 0.22 m under thick marsh or forest canopy. The laser-derived digital surface models effectively delineate surface features of relatively inaccessible coastal habitats with a geographic coverage and vertical detail previously unavailable. Coastal topographic details include tidal-creek tributaries, levees, modest topographic undulations in the intertidal zone, karst features, silviculture, and relict sand dunes under coastal-forest canopy. A combination of laser-derived ground-surface and canopy-height models and intensity values provided additional mapping capabilities to differentiate between tidal-marsh zones and forest types such as mesic flatwood, hydric hammock, and oak scrub. Additional derived products include fine-scale shoreline and topographic profiles. The derived products demonstrate the capability to identify areas of concern to resource managers and unique components of the coastal system from laser altimetry. Because the very nature of a wetland system presents difficulties for access and data collection, airborne coverage from remote sensors has become an accepted alternative for monitoring wetland regions. Data acquisition with airborne laser represents a viable option for mapping coastal topography and for evaluating habitats and coastal change on marsh

  11. Research of beam conditioning technologies on SG-III laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Su, Jingqin; Yuan, Haoyu; Li, Ping; Tian, Xiaocheng; Wang, Jianjun; Dong, Jun; Zhang, Ying; Yuan, Qiang; Wang, Yuancheng; Zhou, Wei; Peng, Zhitao; Wang, Fang; Hu, Dongxia; Zhu, Qihua; Zheng, Wanguo; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2014-12-01

    Multi-FM SSD and CPP was experimentally studied in high fluence and will be equipped on all the beams of SG-III laser facility. The output spectrum of the cascade phase modulators are stable and the residual amplitude modulation is small. FM-to-AM effect caused by free-space propagation after using smoothing by spectral dispersion is theoretically analyzed. Results indicate inserting a dispersion grating in places with larger beam aperture could alleviate the FM-to- AM effect, suggesting minimizing free-space propagation and adopting image relay. Experiments taken on SG-III laser facility indicate when the number of color cycles (Nc) adopts 1, imposing of SSD with 3.3 times diffraction limit (TDL) did not lead to pinhole closure in the spatial filters of the preamplifier and main amplifier with 30-TDL pinhole size. The nonuniformity of the focal spot using Multi-FM SSD and CPP drops to 0.26, comparing to 0.84 only using CPP. The experiments solve some key technical problems using SSD and CPP on SG-III laser facility, and provide a flexible platform for laser-plasma interaction experiments. Combined beam smoothing and polarization smoothing are also analyzed. Simulation results indicate through adjusting dispersion directions of one-dimensional SSD beams in a quad, two-dimensional SSD could be obtained. The near field and far field properties of beams using polarization smoothing were also studied, including birefringent wedge and polarization control plate (PCP). By using PCP, cylindrical vector beams could be obtained. New solutions will be provided to solve the LPI problem encountered in indirect drive laser fusion.

  12. Optical materials for space based laser systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.; Armagan, G.; Byvik, C. E.; Albin, S.

    1989-01-01

    The design features and performance characteristics of a sensitized holmium laser applicable to differential lidar and Doppler windshear measurements are presented, giving attention to the optimal choice of sensitizing/activating dopant ions. This development of a 2-micron region eye-safe laser, where holmium is sensitized by either hulium or erbium, has called for interionic energy transfer processes whose rate will not result in gain-switched pulses that are excessively long for atmospheric lidar and Doppler windshear detection. The application of diamond films for optical component hardening is noted.

  13. International Seminar on Laser and Opto-Electronic Technology in Industry: State-of-the-Art Review, Xiamen, People's Republic of China, June 25-28, 1986, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jingtang; Pryputniewicz, Ryszard J.

    Various papers on the state of the art in laser and optoelectronic technology in industry are presented. Individual topics addressed include: wavelength compensation for holographic optical element, optoelectronic techniques for measurement and inspection, new optical measurement methods in Western Europe, applications of coherent optics at ISL, imaging techniques for gas turbine development, the Rolls-Royce experience with industrial holography, panoramic holocamera for tube and borehole inspection, optical characterization of electronic materials, optical strain measurement of rotating components, quantitative interpretation of holograms and specklegrams, laser speckle technique for hydraulic structural model test, study of holospeckle interferometry, common path shearing fringe scanning interferometer, and laser interferometry applied to nondestructive testing of tires.

  14. Improving the appearance of all textile products from clothing to home textile using laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondogan, Ziynet; Pamuk, Oktay; Ondogan, Ece Nuket; Ozguney, Arif

    2005-11-01

    Denim trousers, commonly known as "blue jeans", have maintained their popularity for many years. For the purpose of supporting customers' purchasing behaviour and to address their aesthetic taste, companies have been trying in recent years to develop various techniques to improve the visual aspects of denim fabrics. These techniques mainly include printing on fabrics, embroidery and washing the final product. Especially, fraying certain areas of the fabric by sanding and stone washing to create designs is a popular technique. However, due to certain inconveniences caused by these procedures and in response to growing demands, research is underway to obtain a similar appearance by creating better quality and more advantageous manufacturing conditions. As is known, the laser is a source of energy which can be directed on desired objects and whose power and intensity can be easily controlled. Use of the laser enables us to cut a great variety of material from metal to fabric. Starting off from this point, we thought it would be possible to transfer certain designs onto the surface of textile material by changing the dye molecules in the fabric and creating alterations in its colour quality values by directing the laser to the material at reduced intensity. This study mainly deals with a machine specially designed for making use of laser beams to transfer pictures, figures as well as graphics of desired variety, size and intensity on all kinds of surfaces in textile manufacturing such as knitted—woven fabrics, leather, etc. at desired precision and without damaging the texture of the material. In the designed system, computer-controlled laser beams are used to change the colour of the dye material on the textile surface by directing the laser beams at a desired wavelength and intensity onto various textile surfaces selected for application. For this purpose, a laser beam source that can reach the initial level of power and that can be controlled by means of a

  15. Enhancement of biocompatibility of nickel-titanium by laser surface modification technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Ka Wai

    Nickel Titanium is a relatively new biomaterial that has attracted research interest for biomedical application. The good biocompatibility with specific functional properties of shape memory effect and superelasticity creates a smart material for medical applications. However, there are still concerns on nickel ion release of this alloy if it is going to be implanted for a long time. Nickel ion is carcinogenic and also causes allergic response and degeneration of muscle tissue. The subsequent release of Ni+ ions into the body system is fatal for the long term application of this alloy in the human body. To improve the long term biocompatibility and corrosion properties of NiTi, different surface treatment techniques have been investigated but no optimum technique has been established yet. This project will investigate the feasibility of applying laser surface alloying technique to improve the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of NiTi in simulated body fluid condition. This thesis summarizes the result of laser surface modification of NiTi with Mo, Nb and Co using CO2 laser. The modified layer, which is free of microcracks and pores, acts as physical barrier to reduce nickel release and enhance the surface properties. The hardness values of the Mo-alloyed NiTi, Nb-alloyed NiTi and Co-alloyed NiTi surface were found to be three to four times harder than the NiTi substrate. Corrosion polarization tests also showed that the alloyed NiTi are significantly more resistant than the NiTi alloy. The release of Ni ions can be greatly reduced after laser surface alloying NiTi with Mo, Nb and Co. The improvement in wettability characteristics, the growth of the apatite on the specimen's surface and the adhesion of cell confirm the good biocompatibility after laser surface alloying. It is concluded that laser surface alloying is one of the potential technique not only to improve the corrosion resistance with low nickel release rate, but also retain the good

  16. Semiconductor laser self-mixing micro-vibration measuring technology based on Hilbert transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yufeng; Wang, Ming; Xia, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A signal-processing synthesizing Wavelet transform and Hilbert transform is employed to measurement of uniform or non-uniform vibrations in self-mixing interferometer on semiconductor laser diode with quantum well. Background noise and fringe inclination are solved by decomposing effect, fringe counting is adopted to automatic determine decomposing level, a couple of exact quadrature signals are produced by Hilbert transform to extract vibration. The tempting potential of real-time measuring micro vibration with high accuracy and wide dynamic response bandwidth using proposed method is proven by both simulation and experiment. Advantages and error sources are presented as well. Main features of proposed semiconductor laser self-mixing interferometer are constant current supply, high resolution, simplest optical path and much higher tolerance to feedback level than existing self-mixing interferometers, which is competitive for non-contact vibration measurement.

  17. Electro-optical equivalent calibration technology for high-energy laser energy meters.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ji Feng; Chang, Yan; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Xiao Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Electro-optical equivalent calibration with high calibration power and high equivalence is particularly well-suited to the calibration of high-energy laser energy meters. A large amount of energy is reserved during this process, however, which continues to radiate after power-off. This study measured the radiation efficiency of a halogen tungsten lamp during power-on and after power-off in order to calculate the total energy irradiated by a lamp until the high-energy laser energy meter reaches thermal equilibrium. A calibration system was designed based on the measurement results, and the calibration equivalence of the system was analyzed in detail. Results show that measurement precision is significantly affected by the absorption factor of the absorption chamber and by heat loss in the energy meter. Calibration precision is successfully improved by enhancing the equivalent power and reducing power-on time. The electro-optical equivalent calibration system, measurement uncertainty of which was evaluated as 2.4% (k = 2), was used to calibrate a graphite-cone-absorption-cavity absolute energy meter, yielding a calibration coefficient of 1.009 and measurement uncertainty of 3.5% (k = 2). A water-absorption-type high-energy laser energy meter with measurement uncertainty of 4.8% (k = 2) was considered the reference standard, and compared to the energy meter calibrated in this study, yielded a correction factor of 0.995 (standard deviation of 1.4%). PMID:27131714

  18. New progress of ranging technology at Wuhan Satellite Laser Ranging Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xia, Zhiz-Hong; Ye, Wen-Wei; Cai, Qing-Fu

    1993-01-01

    A satellite laser ranging system with an accuracy of the level of centimeter has been successfully developed at the Institute of Seismology, State Seismological Bureau with the cooperation of the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Science. With significant improvements on the base of the second generation SLR system developed in 1985, ranging accuracy of the new system has been upgraded from 15 cm to 3-4 cm. Measuring range has also been expanded, so that the ETALON satellite with an orbit height of 20,000 km launched by the former U.S.S.R. can now be tracked. Compared with the 2nd generation SLR system, the newly developed system has the following improvements. A Q modulated laser is replaced by a mode-locked YAG laser. The new device has a pulse width of 150 ps and a repetition rate of 1-4 pps. A quick response photomultiplier has been adopted as the receiver for echo; for example, the adoption of the MCP tube has obviously reduced the jitter error of the transit time and has improved the ranging accuracy. The whole system is controlled by an IBM PC/XT Computer to guide automatic tracking and measurement. It can carry out these functions for satellite orbit calculation, real-time tracking and adjusting, data acquisition and the preprocessed of observing data, etc. The automatization level and reliability of the observation have obviously improved.

  19. Electro-optical equivalent calibration technology for high-energy laser energy meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ji Feng; Chang, Yan; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Xiao Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Electro-optical equivalent calibration with high calibration power and high equivalence is particularly well-suited to the calibration of high-energy laser energy meters. A large amount of energy is reserved during this process, however, which continues to radiate after power-off. This study measured the radiation efficiency of a halogen tungsten lamp during power-on and after power-off in order to calculate the total energy irradiated by a lamp until the high-energy laser energy meter reaches thermal equilibrium. A calibration system was designed based on the measurement results, and the calibration equivalence of the system was analyzed in detail. Results show that measurement precision is significantly affected by the absorption factor of the absorption chamber and by heat loss in the energy meter. Calibration precision is successfully improved by enhancing the equivalent power and reducing power-on time. The electro-optical equivalent calibration system, measurement uncertainty of which was evaluated as 2.4% (k = 2), was used to calibrate a graphite-cone-absorption-cavity absolute energy meter, yielding a calibration coefficient of 1.009 and measurement uncertainty of 3.5% (k = 2). A water-absorption-type high-energy laser energy meter with measurement uncertainty of 4.8% (k = 2) was considered the reference standard, and compared to the energy meter calibrated in this study, yielded a correction factor of 0.995 (standard deviation of 1.4%).

  20. Laser power beaming: an emerging technology for power transmission and propulsion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Harold E.

    1997-05-01

    A ground based laser beam transmitted to space can be used as an electric utility for satellites. It can significantly increase the electric power available to operate a satellite or to transport it from low earth orbit (LEO) to mid earth or geosynchronous orbits. The increase in electrical power compared to that obtainable from the sun is as much as 1000% for the same size solar panels. An increase in satellite electric power is needed to meet the increasing demands for power caused by the advent of 'direct to home TV,' for increased telecommunications, or for other demands made by the burgeoning 'space highway.' Monetary savings as compared to putting up multiple satellites in the same 'slot' can be over half a billion dollars. To obtain propulsion, the laser power can be beamed through the atmosphere to an 'orbit transfer vehicle' (OTV) satellite which travels back and forth between LEO and higher earth orbits. The OTV will transport the satellite into orbit as does a rocket but does not require the heavy fuel load needed if rocket propulsion is used. Monetary savings of 300% or more in launch costs are predicted. Key elements in the proposed concept are a 100 to 200 kW free- electron laser operating at 0.84 m in the photographic infrared region of the spectrum and a novel adaptive optic telescope.