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Sample records for 2-micron laser transmitter

  1. 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been recognized as one of the most important greenhouse gases. It is essential for the study of global warming to accurately measure the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and continuously record its variation. A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed in NASA Langley Research Center. This laser system is capable of making a vertical profiling of CO2 from ground and column measurement of CO2 from air and space-borne platform. The transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. A Ho:YLF laser operating in the range of 2.05 micrometers can be tuned over several characteristic lines of CO2 absorption. Experimentally, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser has been successfully used as the transmitter of coherent differential absorption lidar for the measurement of CO2 with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and pulse energy of 75 mJ. For coherent detection, high repetition rate is required for speckle averaging to obtain highly precise measurements. However, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser can not operate in high repetition rate due to the large heat loading and up-conversion. A Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF laser with low heat loading can operate in high repetition rate. A theoretical model has been established to simulate the performance of Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF lasers. For continuous wave (CW) operation, high pump intensity with small beam

  2. 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been recognized as one of the most important greenhouse gases. It is essential for the study of global warming to accurately measure the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and continuously record its variation. A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed in NASA Langley Research Center. This laser system is capable of making a vertical profiling of CO2 from ground and column measurement of CO2 from air and space-borne platform. The transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. A Ho:YLF laser operating in the range of 2.05 micrometers can be tuned over several characteristic lines of CO2 absorption. Experimentally, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser has been successfully used as the transmitter of coherent differential absorption lidar for the measurement of CO2 with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and pulse energy of 75 mJ. For coherent detection, high repetition rate is required for speckle averaging to obtain highly precise measurements. However, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser can not operate in high repetition rate due to the large heat loading and up-conversion. A Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF laser with low heat loading can operate in high repetition rate. A theoretical model has been established to simulate the performance of Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF lasers. For continuous wave (CW) operation, high pump intensity with small beam

  3. Double-Pulsed 2-micron Laser Transmitter for Multiple Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2002-01-01

    A high energy double-pulsed Ho:Tm:YLF 2-micron laser amplifier has been demonstrated. 600 mJ per pulse pair under Q-switch operation is achieved with the gain of 4.4. This solid-state laser source can be used as lidar transmitter for multiple lidar applications such as coherent wind and carbon dioxide measurements.

  4. Development of a Pulsed 2-micron Laser Transmitter for CO2 Sensing from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingxin; Petros, Mulugeta; Menzies, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), in collaboration with NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), is engaged in the development and demonstration of a highly efficient, versatile, 2-micron pulsed laser that can be used in a pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)/Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) instrument to make precise, high-resolution CO2 measurements to investigate sources, sinks, and fluxes of CO2. This laser transmitter will feature performance characteristics needed for an ASCENDS system that will be capable of delivering the CO2 measurement precision required by the Earth Science Decadal Survey (DS).

  5. 2-Micron Diode-Pumped Pulsed Laser Transmitter for SPARCLE: A Coherent Wind Lidar Shuttle Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Barnes, Norman P.; Phillips, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    To enable a tropospheric vector wind velocity profiling from space with a pulsed Doppler lidar, a diode-pumped, room temperature Ho:Tm:YLF coherent pulsed transmitter has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This pulsed laser transmitter will be a part of coherent wind lidar shuttle mission SPARCLE. The acronym stands for SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment and is primarily a technology demonstration mission and is expected to fly in 2001 as NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP) second Earth Orbiter (EO-2) mission. The laser transmitter for SPARCLE is a Ho:Tm:YLF power oscillator operating at eye-safe wavelength of 2.05 microns. The Q-switched output energy is 125 mJ at six Hz, and it has a near-transform limited beam with a pulse width of 170 ns. The high power and high beam quality of this laser makes it well suited as a coherent wind lidar transmitter on a space platform. When the output of this power oscillator is amplified by using four diode-pumped Ho:Tm:YLF amplifiers, an output energy of 600 mJ at 10 Hz is achieved. This is the highest energy ever produced at 10 Hz, and is at least an order of magnitude greater than previously achieved for a 2-micron diode-pumped laser at room temperature.

  6. 2-Micron Diode-Pumped Pulsed Laser Transmitter for SPARCLE: A Coherent Wind Lidar Shuttle Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Barnes, Norman P.; Phillips, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    To enable a tropospheric vector wind velocity profiling from space with a pulsed Doppler lidar, a diode-pumped, room temperature Ho:Tm:YLF coherent pulsed transmitter has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This pulsed laser transmitter will be a part of coherent wind lidar shuttle mission SPARCLE. The acronym stands for SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment and is primarily a technology demonstration mission and is expected to fly in 2001 as NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP) second Earth Orbiter (EO-2) mission. The laser transmitter for SPARCLE is a Ho:Tm:YLF power oscillator operating at eye-safe wavelength of 2.05 microns. The Q-switched output energy is 125 mJ at six Hz, and it has a near-transform limited beam with a pulse width of 170 ns. The high power and high beam quality of this laser makes it well suited as a coherent wind lidar transmitter on a space platform. When the output of this power oscillator is amplified by using four diode-pumped Ho:Tm:YLF amplifiers, an output energy of 600 mJ at 10 Hz is achieved. This is the highest energy ever produced at 10 Hz, and is at least an order of magnitude greater than previously achieved for a 2-micron diode-pumped laser at room temperature.

  7. High Repetition Rate Pulsed 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Uprendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo C.; Lee, Hyung

    2009-01-01

    A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. Such a laser transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of approximately 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. The measured standard deviation of the laser frequency jitter is about 3 MHz.

  8. High Energy 2-Micron Solid-State Laser Transmitter for NASA's Airborne CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin

    2012-01-01

    A 2-micron pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  9. Advances in high-energy solid-state 2-micron laser transmitter development for ground and airborne wind and CO2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Chen, Songsheng; Kavaya, Michael J.; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul; Modlin, Edward A.; Koch, Grady; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-10-01

    Sustained research efforts at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) during last fifteen years have resulted in a significant advancement in 2-micron diode-pumped, solid-state laser transmitter for wind and carbon dioxide measurement from ground, air and space-borne platform. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have developed a compact, flight capable, high energy, injection seeded, 2-micron laser transmitter for ground and airborne wind and carbon dioxide measurements. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser transmitter was integrated into a mobile trailer based coherent Doppler wind and CO2 DIAL system and was deployed during field measurement campaigns. This paper will give an overview of 2- micron solid-state laser technology development and discuss results from recent ground-based field measurements.

  10. Advances in High Energy Solid-State 2-micron Laser Transmitter Development for Ground and Airborne Wind and CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Chen, Songsheng; Kavaya, Michael J.; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul; Modlin, Edward A.; Koch, Grady; hide

    2010-01-01

    Sustained research efforts at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) during last fifteen years have resulted in a significant advancement in 2-micron diode-pumped, solid-state laser transmitter for wind and carbon dioxide measurement from ground, air and space-borne platform. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have developed a compact, flight capable, high energy, injection seeded, 2-micron laser transmitter for ground and airborne wind and carbon dioxide measurements. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser transmitter was integrated into a mobile trailer based coherent Doppler wind and CO2 DIAL system and was deployed during field measurement campaigns. This paper will give an overview of 2-micron solid-state laser technology development and discuss results from recent ground-based field measurements.

  11. High Energy 2-micron Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation shows the development of 2-micron solid state lasers. The topics covered include: 1) Overview 2-micron solid state lasers; 2) Modeling and population inversion measurement; 3) Side pump oscillator; and 4) One Joule 2-m Laser.

  12. Solid-State 2-Micron Laser Transmitter Advancement for Wind and Carbon Dioxide Measurements From Ground, Airborne, and Space-Based Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Ismail, Syed

    2008-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing 2-micron lidar technologies over a decade for wind measurements, utilizing coherent Doppler wind lidar technique and carbon dioxide measurements, utilizing Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique. Significant advancements have been made towards developing state-of-the-art technologies towards laser transmitters, detectors, and receiver systems. These efforts have led to the development of solid-state lasers with high pulse energy, tunablility, wavelength-stability, and double-pulsed operation. This paper will present a review of these technological developments along with examples of high resolution wind and high precision CO2 DIAL measurements in the atmosphere. Plans for the development of compact high power lasers for applications in airborne and future space platforms for wind and regional to global scale measurement of atmospheric CO2 will also be discussed.

  13. High Energy 2-Micron Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier, high energy Q-switched 2-micron laser system has been recently demonstrated. The laser and amplifiers are all designed in side-pumped rod configuration, pumped by back-cooled conductive packaged GaAlAs diode laser arrays. This 2-micron laser system provides nearly transform limited beam quality.

  14. 2 micron femtosecond fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jian; Wan, Peng; Yang, Lihmei

    2014-07-29

    Methods and systems for generating femtosecond fiber laser pulses are disclose, including generating a signal laser pulse from a seed laser oscillator; using a first amplifier stage comprising an input and an output, wherein the signal laser pulse is coupled into the input of the first stage amplifier and the output of the first amplifier stage emits an amplified and stretched signal laser pulse; using an amplifier chain comprising an input and an output, wherein the amplified and stretched signal laser pulse from the output of the first amplifier stage is coupled into the input of the amplifier chain and the output of the amplifier chain emits a further amplified, stretched signal laser pulse. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  15. Injection Seeded/Phase-Conjugated 2-micron Laser System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros,M.; Petzar, Paul; Trieu, Bo; Lee, Hyung; Singh, U.; Leyva, V.; Shkunov, V.; Rockwell, D.; hide

    2007-01-01

    For the first time, beam quality improvement of 2 micron laser using a fiber based phase conjugation mirror has been demonstrated. Single frequency operation is necessary to lower threshold. The reflectivity of PCM is approx. 50%.

  16. A High Energy 2-microns Laser for Multiple Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.; Barnes, James C.; Barnes, Norman P.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2000-01-01

    Solid-state 2-microns laser has been receiving considerable interest because of its eye-safe property and efficient diode pump operation, It has potential for multiple lidar applications to detect water vapor. carbon dioxide and winds. In this paper, we describe a 2-microns double pulsed Ho:Tm:YLF laser and end-pumped amplifier system. A comprehensive theoretical model has been developed to aid the design and optimization of the laser performance. In a single Q-switched pulse operation the residual energy stored in the Tm atoms will be wasted. However, in a double pulses operation mode, the residual energy stored in the Tm atoms will repopulate the Ho atoms that were depleted by the extraction of the first Q-switched pulse. Thus. the Tin sensitized Ho:YLF laser provides a unique advantage in applications that require double pulse operation, such as Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). A total output energy of 146 mJ per pulse pair under Q-switch operation is achieved with as high as 4.8% optical to optical efficiency. Compared to a single pulse laser, 70% higher laser efficiency is realized. To obtain high energy while maintaining the high beam quality, a master-oscillator-power-amplifier 2-microns system is designed. We developed an end-pumped Ho:Tm:YLF disk amplifier. This amplifier uses two diode arrays as pump source. A non-imaging lens duct is used to couple the radiation from the laser diode arrays to the laser disk. Preliminary result shows that the efficiency of this laser can be as high as 3%, a factor of three increases over side-pump configuration. This high energy, highly efficient and high beam quality laser is a promising candidate for use in an efficient, multiple lidar applications.

  17. A High Energy 2-microns Laser for Multiple Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.; Barnes, James C.; Barnes, Norman P.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2000-01-01

    Solid-state 2-microns laser has been receiving considerable interest because of its eye-safe property and efficient diode pump operation, It has potential for multiple lidar applications to detect water vapor. carbon dioxide and winds. In this paper, we describe a 2-microns double pulsed Ho:Tm:YLF laser and end-pumped amplifier system. A comprehensive theoretical model has been developed to aid the design and optimization of the laser performance. In a single Q-switched pulse operation the residual energy stored in the Tm atoms will be wasted. However, in a double pulses operation mode, the residual energy stored in the Tm atoms will repopulate the Ho atoms that were depleted by the extraction of the first Q-switched pulse. Thus. the Tin sensitized Ho:YLF laser provides a unique advantage in applications that require double pulse operation, such as Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). A total output energy of 146 mJ per pulse pair under Q-switch operation is achieved with as high as 4.8% optical to optical efficiency. Compared to a single pulse laser, 70% higher laser efficiency is realized. To obtain high energy while maintaining the high beam quality, a master-oscillator-power-amplifier 2-microns system is designed. We developed an end-pumped Ho:Tm:YLF disk amplifier. This amplifier uses two diode arrays as pump source. A non-imaging lens duct is used to couple the radiation from the laser diode arrays to the laser disk. Preliminary result shows that the efficiency of this laser can be as high as 3%, a factor of three increases over side-pump configuration. This high energy, highly efficient and high beam quality laser is a promising candidate for use in an efficient, multiple lidar applications.

  18. Coherent laser radar at 2 microns using solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Suni, Paul J. M.; Hale, Charley P.; Hannon, Stephen M.; Magee, James R.; Bruns, Dale L.; Yuen, Eric H.

    1993-01-01

    Coherent laser radar systems using 2-micron Tm- and Tm, Ho-doped solid-state lasers are useful for the remote range-resolved measurement of atmospheric winds, aerosol backscatter, and DIAL measurements of atmospheric water vapor and CO2 concentrations. Recent measurements made with a 2-micron coherent laser radar system, advances in the laser technology, and atmospheric propagation effects on 2-micron coherent lidar performance are described.

  19. Progress on High-Energy 2-micron Solid State Laser for NASA Space-Based Wind and Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2011-01-01

    Sustained research efforts at NASA Langley Research Center during last fifteen years have resulted in significant advancement of a 2-micron diode-pumped, solid-state laser transmitter for wind and carbon dioxide measurements from ground, air and space-borne platforms. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have developed a compact, flight capable, high energy, injection seeded, 2-micron laser transmitter for ground and airborne wind and carbon dioxide measurements. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser transmitter was integrated into a mobile trailer based coherent Doppler wind and CO2 DIAL system and was deployed during field measurement campaigns. This paper will give an overview of 2-micron solid-state laser technology development and discuss results from recent ground-based field measurements.

  20. High Power Laser Diode Arrays for 2-Micron Solid State Coherent Lidars Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra; Sudesh, Vikas; Baker, Nathaniel

    2003-01-01

    Laser diode arrays are critical components of any diode-pumped solid state laser systems, constraining their performance and reliability. Laser diode arrays (LDAs) are used as the pump source for energizing the solid state lasing media to generate an intense coherent laser beam with a high spatial and spectral quality. The solid state laser design and the characteristics of its lasing materials define the operating wavelength, pulse duration, and power of the laser diodes. The pump requirements for high pulse energy 2-micron solid state lasers are substantially different from those of more widely used 1-micron lasers and in many aspects more challenging [1]. Furthermore, the reliability and lifetime demanded by many coherent lidar applications, such as global wind profiling from space and long-range clear air turbulence detection from aircraft, are beyond the capability of currently available LDAs. In addition to the need for more reliable LDAs with longer lifetime, further improvement in the operational parameters of high power quasi-cw LDAs, such as electrical efficiency, brightness, and duty cycle, are also necessary for developing cost-effective 2-micron coherent lidar systems for applications that impose stringent size, heat dissipation, and power constraints. Global wind sounding from space is one of such applications, which is the main driver for this work as part of NASA s Laser Risk Reduction Program. This paper discusses the current state of the 792 nm LDA technology and the technology areas being pursued toward improving their performance. The design and development of a unique characterization facility for addressing the specific issues associated with the LDAs for pumping 2-micron coherent lidar transmitters and identifying areas of technological improvement will be described. Finally, the results of measurements to date on various standard laser diode packages, as well as custom-designed packages with potentially longer lifetime, will be reported.

  1. Qualification Testing of Laser Diode Pump Arrays for a Space-Based 2-micron Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers being considered as the transmitter source for space-based coherent Doppler lidar require high power laser diode pump arrays operating in a long pulse regime of about 1 msec. Operating laser diode arrays over such long pulses drastically impact their useful lifetime due to the excessive localized heating and substantial pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling of their active regions. This paper describes the long pulse performance of laser diode arrays and their critical thermal characteristics. A viable approach is then offered that allows for determining the optimum operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  2. Advanced 2-micron Solid-state Laser for Wind and CO2 Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Significant advancements in the 2-micron laser development have been made recently. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. The world record 2-micron laser energy is demonstrated with an oscillator and two amplifiers system. It generates more than one joule per pulse energy with excellent beam quality. Based on the successful demonstration of a fully conductive cooled oscillator by using heat pipe technology, an improved fully conductively cooled 2-micron amplifier was designed, manufactured and integrated. It virtually eliminates the running coolant to increase the overall system efficiency and reliability. In addition to technology development and demonstration, a compact and engineering hardened 2-micron laser is under development. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser is expected to be integrated to a lidar system and take field measurements. The recent achievements push forward the readiness of such a laser system for space lidar applications. This paper will review the developments of the state-of-the-art solid-state 2-micron laser.

  3. A Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier 2-micron Laser Using Fiber Phase-conjugate Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingxin; Shkunov, V.; Rockwell, D.; Betin, A.; Wang, J.; Petros, M.; Petzar, Paul; Trieu, Bo

    2007-01-01

    For the first time, a 2-micron master-oscillator-power-amplifier laser using a fiber based phase conjugation mirror has been demonstrated. The beam quality improvement and 56% of the PCM reflectivity have been achieved.

  4. Improving Lifetime of Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping 2-Micron Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data on the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  5. Improving lifetime of quasi-CW laser diode arrays for pumping 2-micron solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-04-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data on the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  6. Developing high energy dissipative soliton fiber lasers at 2 micron

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chongyuan; Wang, Cong; Shang, Wei; Yang, Nan; Tang, Yulong; Xu, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    While the recent discovered new mode-locking mechanism - dissipative soliton - has successfully improved the pulse energy of 1 μm and 1.5 μm fiber lasers to tens of nanojoules, it is still hard to scale the pulse energy at 2 μm due to the anomalous dispersion of the gain fiber. After analyzing the intracavity pulse dynamics, we propose that the gain fiber should be condensed to short lengths in order to generate high energy pulse at 2 μm. Numerical simulation predicts the existence of stable 2 μm dissipative soliton solutions with pulse energy over 10 nJ, comparable to that achieved in the 1 μm and 1.5 μm regimes. Experimental operation confirms the validity of the proposal. These results will advance our understanding of mode-locked fiber lasers at different wavelengths and lay an important step in achieving high energy ultrafast laser pulses from anomalous dispersion gain media. PMID:26348563

  7. Developing high energy dissipative soliton fiber lasers at 2 micron.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chongyuan; Wang, Cong; Shang, Wei; Yang, Nan; Tang, Yulong; Xu, Jianqiu

    2015-09-08

    While the recent discovered new mode-locking mechanism--dissipative soliton--has successfully improved the pulse energy of 1 μm and 1.5 μm fiber lasers to tens of nanojoules, it is still hard to scale the pulse energy at 2 μm due to the anomalous dispersion of the gain fiber. After analyzing the intracavity pulse dynamics, we propose that the gain fiber should be condensed to short lengths in order to generate high energy pulse at 2 μm. Numerical simulation predicts the existence of stable 2 μm dissipative soliton solutions with pulse energy over 10 nJ, comparable to that achieved in the 1 μm and 1.5 μm regimes. Experimental operation confirms the validity of the proposal. These results will advance our understanding of mode-locked fiber lasers at different wavelengths and lay an important step in achieving high energy ultrafast laser pulses from anomalous dispersion gain media.

  8. Single-Frequency Narrow Linewidth 2 Micron Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Shibin (Inventor); Spiegelberg, Christine (Inventor); Luo, Tao (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A compact single frequency, single-mode 2 .mu.m fiber laser with narrow linewidth, <100 kHz and preferably <100 kHz, is formed with a low phonon energy glass doped with triply ionized rare-earth thulium and/or holmium oxide and fiber gratings formed in sections of passive silica fiber and fused thereto. Formation of the gratings in passive silica fiber both facilitates splicing to other optical components and reduces noise thus improving linewidth. An increased doping concentration of 0.5 to 15 wt. % for thulium, holmium or mixtures thereof produces adequate gain, hence output power levels for fiber lengths less than 5 cm and preferably less than 3 cm to enable single-frequency operation.

  9. One-Joule-per-Pulse Q-Switched 2-micron Solid State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Modlin, Ed A.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Pual J.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2005-01-01

    Q-switched output of 1.1 J per pulse at 2-micron wavelength has been achieved in a diode pumped Ho:Tm:LuLF laser using a side-pumped rod configuration in a Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier (MOPA) architecture. This is the first time that a 2-micron laser has broken the Joule per pulse barrier for Q-switched operation. The total system efficiency reaches 5% and 6.2% for single and double pulse operation, respectively. The system produces excellent 1.4 times of transform limited beam quality.

  10. Research and Development of High Energy 2 - Micron Lasers Based on TM: Doped Ceramic Laser Gain Media and TM: Doped Optical Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-20

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0257 RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ENERGY 2 - MICRON LASERS BASED ON TM: DOPED CERAMIC LASER GAIN MEDIA AND TM: DOPED...2010 to 01/03/2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ENERGY 2 - MICRON LASERS BASED ON TM: DOPED CERAMIC LASER GAIN MEDIA AND...TERMS Development of high energy 2-micron lasers 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 14 19a. NAME OF

  11. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  12. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  13. Laser Transmitter Aims At Laser Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Transmitter part of developmental optical communication system. Compact, lightweight, partially-self-aiming laser transmitter built to verify some capabilities of developmental free-space optical communication system. Design capable of providing 0.5 Mbps data return over range equal to Moon-Earth distance. Breadboard of transmitting terminal constructed and tested in laboratory. Prototype transmitter includes receiving circuitry that keeps it aimed at beacon, once brought into initial alignment within about 1.7 degrees of line of sight to beacon.

  14. Laser Transmitter Aims At Laser Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Transmitter part of developmental optical communication system. Compact, lightweight, partially-self-aiming laser transmitter built to verify some capabilities of developmental free-space optical communication system. Design capable of providing 0.5 Mbps data return over range equal to Moon-Earth distance. Breadboard of transmitting terminal constructed and tested in laboratory. Prototype transmitter includes receiving circuitry that keeps it aimed at beacon, once brought into initial alignment within about 1.7 degrees of line of sight to beacon.

  15. Transmittance and reflectance of crystalline quartz and highand low-water content fused silica from 2 microns to 1 mm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaney, J. B.; Stewart, K. P.; Hass, G.

    1983-01-01

    The transmittances and reflectances of cultured crystalline quartz, Suprasil, Suprasil W, and Infrasil were compared over the wavelength region from 2 to 1000 microns. The high-water content of Suprasil and the low-water content of cultured crystalline quartz, Suprasil W, and Infrasil were determined by their transmittances measured at 2.73 microns where water content causes high absorption in optical materials. The fact that the fused silicas, both with high- and low-water content, had identical far-IR transmittances and that their transmittances were greatly inferior to that of crystalline quartz led to the conclusion that their inferior transmittance is due to their amorphous structure and not to their water content.

  16. Transmittance and reflectance of crystalline quartz and highand low-water content fused silica from 2 microns to 1 mm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaney, J. B.; Stewart, K. P.; Hass, G.

    1983-01-01

    The transmittances and reflectances of cultured crystalline quartz, Suprasil, Suprasil W, and Infrasil were compared over the wavelength region from 2 to 1000 microns. The high-water content of Suprasil and the low-water content of cultured crystalline quartz, Suprasil W, and Infrasil were determined by their transmittances measured at 2.73 microns where water content causes high absorption in optical materials. The fact that the fused silicas, both with high- and low-water content, had identical far-IR transmittances and that their transmittances were greatly inferior to that of crystalline quartz led to the conclusion that their inferior transmittance is due to their amorphous structure and not to their water content.

  17. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System Laser Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afzal, R. S.; Dallas, J. L.; Yu, A. W.; Mamakos, W. A.; Lukemire, A.; Schroeder, B.; Malak, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), scheduled to launch in 2001, is a laser altimeter and lidar for tile Earth Observing System's (EOS) ICESat mission. The laser transmitter requirements, design and qualification test results for this space- based remote sensing instrument are presented.

  18. Room-Temperature, Diode-Pumped Ho:Tm:YLF Laser Amplifiers Generating 700 mJ at 2-microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams-Byrd, Julie A.; Singh, Upendra N.; Barnes, Norman P.; Lockard, George E.; Modlin, Edward A.; Yu, Jurong

    1997-01-01

    Q-switched, 400-ns pulses with output energy of 700 mJ at 2-microns, representing an optical-to-optical efficiency of 2%, was achieved from five diode-pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser amplifiers at room-temperature.

  19. Room-Temperature, Diode-Pumped Ho:Tm:YLF Laser Amplifiers Generating 700 mJ at 2-microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams-Byrd, Julie A.; Singh, Upendra N.; Barnes, Norman P.; Lockard, George E.; Modlin, Edward A.; Yu, Jurong

    1997-01-01

    Q-switched, 400-ns pulses with output energy of 700 mJ at 2-microns, representing an optical-to-optical efficiency of 2%, was achieved from five diode-pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser amplifiers at room-temperature.

  20. InGaAs/InGaAsP/InP strained-layer quantum well lasers at about 2 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forouhar, S.; Ksendzov, A.; Larsson, A.; Temkin, H.

    1992-01-01

    The first successful operation of InGaAs strained layer quantum well (Sl-QW) injection lasers at about 2 microns is reported. The threshold current density and the external differential quantum efficiency of 5 microns wide and 800 microns long ridge waveguide lasers were 2.5 kA/sq cm and 6 percent, respectively. The devices had a reverse leakage current of less than 20 micro-A at -1 V indicating epitaxial layers with low defect density.

  1. Validar: a testbed for advanced 2-micron Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Petros, Mulugeta; Barnes, Bruce W.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Yu, Jirong; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2004-09-01

    High-energy 2-micron lasers have been incorporated in a breadboard coherent Doppler lidar to test component technologies and explore applications for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Design of the lidar is presented including aspects in the laser transmitter, receiver, photodetector, and signal processing. Sample data is presented on wind profiling and CO2 concentration measurements.

  2. Validar: A Testbed for Advanced 2-Micron Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Petros, Mulugeta; Barnes, Bruce W.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Yu, Jirong; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2004-01-01

    High-energy 2-microns lasers have been incorporated in a breadboard coherent Doppler lidar to test component technologies and explore applications for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Design of the lidar is presented including aspects in the laser transmitter, receiver, photodetector, and signal processing. Sample data is presented on wind profiling and CO2 concentration measurements.

  3. Hermetic diode laser transmitter module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollila, Jyrki; Kautio, Kari; Vahakangas, Jouko; Hannula, Tapio; Kopola, Harri K.; Oikarinen, Jorma; Sivonen, Matti

    1999-04-01

    In very demanding optoelectronic sensor applications it is necessary to encapsulate semiconductor components hermetically in metal housings to ensure reliable operation of the sensor. In this paper we report on the development work to package a laser diode transmitter module for a time- off-light distance sensor application. The module consists of a lens, laser diode, electronic circuit and optomechanics. Specifications include high acceleration, -40....+75 degree(s)C temperature range, very low gas leakage and mass-production capability. We have applied solder glasses for sealing optical lenses and electrical leads hermetically into a metal case. The lens-metal case sealing has been made by using a special soldering glass preform preserving the optical quality of the lens. The metal housings are finally sealed in an inert atmosphere by welding. The assembly concept to retain excellent optical power and tight optical axis alignment specifications is described. The reliability of the laser modules manufactured has been extensively tested using different aging and environmental test procedures. Sealed packages achieve MIL- 883 standard requirements for gas leakage.

  4. Theoretical simulation of a 2 micron airborne solid state laser anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbert, Beatrice; Cariou, Jean-Pierre

    1992-01-01

    In the near future, military aircraft will need to know precisely their true airspeed in order to optimize flight conditions. In comparison with classical anemometer probes, an airborne Doppler lidar allows measurement of the air velocity without influence from aircraft aerodynamic disturbance. While several demonstration systems of heterodyne detection using a CO2 laser have been reported, improvements in the technology of solid state lasers have recently opened up the possibility that these devices can be used as an alternative to CO2 laser systems. In particular, a diode pumped Tm:Ho:YAG laser allows a reliable compact airborne system with an eye safe wavelength (lambda = 2.09 microns) to be achieved. The theoretical study of performances of a coherent lidar using a solid state diode pumped Tm:Ho:YAG laser, caled SALSA, for measuring aircraft airspeed relative to atmospheric aerosols is described. A computer simulation was developed in order to modelize the Doppler anemometer in the function of atmospheric propagation and optical design. A clever analysis of the power budget on the detector area allows optical characteristic parameters of the system to be calculated, and then it can be used to predict performances of the Doppler system. Estimating signal to noise ratios (SNR) and heterodyne efficiency provides the available energy of speed measurement as well as a useful measurement of the alignment of the backscattered and reference fields on the detector.

  5. Theoretical simulation of a 2 micron airborne solid state laser anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbert, Beatrice; Cariou, Jean-Pierre

    1992-01-01

    In the near future, military aircraft will need to know precisely their true airspeed in order to optimize flight conditions. In comparison with classical anemometer probes, an airborne Doppler lidar allows measurement of the air velocity without influence from aircraft aerodynamic disturbance. While several demonstration systems of heterodyne detection using a CO2 laser have been reported, improvements in the technology of solid state lasers have recently opened up the possibility that these devices can be used as an alternative to CO2 laser systems. In particular, a diode pumped Tm:Ho:YAG laser allows a reliable compact airborne system with an eye safe wavelength (lambda = 2.09 microns) to be achieved. The theoretical study of performances of a coherent lidar using a solid state diode pumped Tm:Ho:YAG laser, caled SALSA, for measuring aircraft airspeed relative to atmospheric aerosols is described. A computer simulation was developed in order to modelize the Doppler anemometer in the function of atmospheric propagation and optical design. A clever analysis of the power budget on the detector area allows optical characteristic parameters of the system to be calculated, and then it can be used to predict performances of the Doppler system. Estimating signal to noise ratios (SNR) and heterodyne efficiency provides the available energy of speed measurement as well as a useful measurement of the alignment of the backscattered and reference fields on the detector.

  6. The Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Laser Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Novo-Gradac, Anne Marie; Shaw, George B.; Unger, Glenn; Lukemire, Alan

    2008-01-01

    We present the final configuration of the space flight laser transmitter as delivered to the LOLA instrument. The laser consists of two oscillators with co-aligned outputs on a single bench, each capable of providing one billion plus shots.

  7. Solid-State, High Energy 2-Micron Laser Development for Space-Based Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    Lidar (light detection and ranging) remote sensing enjoys the advantages of excellent vertical and horizontal resolution; pointing capability; a signal source independent from natural light; and control and knowledge of transmitted wavelength, pulse shape, and polarization and received polarization. Lidar in space is an emerging technology now being developing to fit applications where passive sensors cannot meet current measurement requirements. Technical requirements for space lidar are more demanding than for ground-based or airborne systems. Perhaps the most distinguishing characteristics of space lidars are the environmental requirements. Space lidar systems must be specially designed to survive the mechanical vibration loads of launch and operate in the vacuum of space where exposure to ionizing radiation limits the electronic components available. Finally, space lidars must be designed to be highly reliable because they must operate without the need for repair or adjustment. Lifetime requirements tend to be important drivers of the overall system design. The maturity of the required technologies is a key to the development of any space lidar system. NASA entered a new era in the 1990 s with the approval of several space-based remote sensing missions employing laser radar (lidar) techniques. Following the steps of passive remote sensing and then active radar remote sensing, lidar sensors were a logical next step, providing independence from natural light sources, and better spatial resolution and smaller sensor size than radar sensors. The shorter electromagnetic wavelengths of laser light also allowed signal reflectance from air molecules and aerosol particles. The smaller receiver apertures allowed the concept of scanning the sensor field of view. However, technical problems with several space-based lidar missions during that decade led to concern at NASA about the risk of lidar missions. An external panel was convened to make recommendations to NASA. Their

  8. Optoelectronic Effect in Laser Transmitter Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luc, V. V.; Mien, V. D.; Eliseev, P. G.

    2001-04-01

    Optoelectronic signals in laser transmitter modules based on the voltage saturation effect of laser diode have been experimentally studied for the GaAlAs/GaAs (λ = 830 nm) and InGaAsP/InP (λ= 1310 nm) structures. The behavior of the observed optoelectronic signals has been explained as the changing of the relative position of carrier quazi-Fermi levels. The experimental method for definition of the density inversion threshold in the active region of laser diodes has been established as well as the active region internal gain has been measured. These results give the possibility of using laser transmitter modules at the same time as an amplifier and optical switch.

  9. 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar Instrument Advancements for Tropospheric Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Kavaya, M. J.; Koch, G.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge derived from global tropospheric wind measurement is an important constituent of our overall understanding of climate behavior [1]. Accurate weather prediction saves lives and protects properties from destructions. High-energy 2-micron laser is the transmitter of choice for coherent Doppler wind detection. In addition to the eye-safety, the wavelength of the transmitter suitably matches the aerosol size in the lower troposphere. Although the technology of the 2-micron laser has been maturing steadily, lidar derived wind data is still a void in the global weather database. In the last decade, researchers at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have been engaged in this endeavor, contributing to the scientific database of 2-micron lidar transmitters. As part of this effort, an in depth analysis of the physics involved in the workings of the Ho: Tm laser systems have been published. In the last few years, we have demonstrated lidar transmitter with over1Joule output energy. In addition, a large body of work has been done in characterizing new laser materials and unique crystal configurations to enhance the efficiency and output energy of the 2-micron laser systems. At present 2-micron lidar systems are measuring wind from both ground and airborne platforms. This paper will provide an overview of the advancements made in recent years and the technology maturity levels attained.

  10. Lifetest on a high-power laser diode array transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greulich, P.; Hespeler, B.; Spatscheck, Th.

    1991-05-01

    The optical transmiter component of a free space optical communication system is critical, in that it impacts on the mechanical configuration, power requirements, mass, reliability, and transmission bit-rate of the entire system. Attention is presently given to the transmitter output power and beam quality, as well as its electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiency, in view of state-of-the-art high power transmitters for intensity modulation/direct detection and semiconductor laser transmitter systems.

  11. Development of a 2-micron Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for CO2 Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Singh, U. N.

    2013-12-01

    NASA Langley is developing a 2-micron pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar for atmospheric CO2 measurements. The high pulse energy, direct detection lidar operating at CO2 2-micron absorption band provides an alternate approach to measure CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. The objective of this development is to integrate an existing high energy double-pulsed 2-micron laser transmitter with a direct detection receiver and telescope to enable a first proof of principle demonstration of airborne direct detection CO2 measurements at 2-micron wavelength. It is expected to provide high-precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. The system is scheduled to fly on NASA UC12 or B200 research aircrafts before the end of 2013. This paper will describe the design of the airborne 2-micron pulsed IPDA lidar system; the lidar operation parameters; the wavelength pair selection; laser transmitter energy, pulse rate, beam divergence, double pulse generation and accurate frequency control; detector characterization; telescope design; lidar structure design; and lidar signal to noise ratio estimation.

  12. Space qualified laser transmitter for NASA's ICESat-2 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawruk, Nicholas W.; Stephen, Mark A.; Litvinovitch, Slava; Edelman, Joel E.; Albert, Michael M.; Edwards, Ryan E.; Culpepper, Charles F.; Rudd, William J.; Fakhoury, Elias; Hovis, Floyd E.

    2013-03-01

    Fibertek has developed an environmentally hardened Technology Readiness Level-6 laser transmitter system for the NASA Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2). The laser transmitter generates over 9 W of 532 nm output with a pulse repetition rate of 10kHz and a FWHM pulse width of < 1.5 ns with an expected lifetime of > 1 trillion shots. This paper presents the results of the Structural, Thermal and Optical analysis, details on the NASA General Environmental Verification Specification testing requirements, and the success of the laser transmitter performance through vibration and thermal vacuum testing.

  13. Recent Development of Sb-based Phototransistors in the 0.9- to 2.2-microns Wavelength Range for Applications to Laser Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. Nurul; Refaat, Tamer F.; Sulima, Oleg V.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated commercially available photodiodes and also recent developed Sb-based phototransistors in order to compare their performances for applications to laser remote sensing. A custom-designed phototransistor in the 0.9- to 2.2-microns wavelength range has been developed at AstroPower and characterized at NASA Langley's Detector Characterization Laboratory. The phototransistor's performance greatly exceeds the previously reported results at this wavelength range in the literature. The detector testing included spectral response, dark current and noise measurements. Spectral response measurements were carried out to determine the responsivity at 2-microns wavelength at different bias voltages with fixed temperature; and different temperatures with fixed bias voltage. Current versus voltage characteristics were also recorded at different temperatures. Results show high responsivity of 2650 A/W corresponding to an internal gain of three orders of magnitude, and high detectivity (D*) of 3.9x10(exp 11) cm.Hz(exp 1/2)/W that is equivalent to a noise-equivalent-power of 4.6x10(exp -14) W/Hz(exp 1/2) (-4.0 V @ -20 C) with a light collecting area diameter of 200-microns. It appears that this recently developed 2-micron phototransistor's performances such as responsivity, detectivity, and gain are improved significantly as compared to the previously published APD and SAM APD using similar materials. These detectors are considered as phototransistors based-on their structures and performance characteristics and may have great potential for high sensitivity differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor at 2.05-microns and 1.9-microns, respectively.

  14. Diode-Pumped, 2-Micron, Q-Switched Thulium: Y3Al5O12 (Tm:Yag) Microchip Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    switched, diode- pumped solid state laser operating at 2 μm. The laser cavity has a “microchip” configuration and uses a 6% thulium - doped YAG crystal...section of Tm:YAG ........................ 12 Table 4: Optical and spectroscopic properties for thulium -doped YAG. ........................ 16 Table 5...typically limit us to solid state lasers using either thulium (Tm), holmium (Ho), or both as the active ions. These rare earth ions can be doped into

  15. Novel Design of Type I High Power Mid-IR Diode Lasers for Spectral Region 3 - 4.2 Microns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-25

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Novel designs of the mid-infrared GaSb-based diode lasers were studied including those based on triple layer quantum well...avenue of the mid-infrared diode laser development with the prospect of multifold improvement of the device characteristics. Cascade pumping was achieved...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Novel Design of Type I High Power Mid-IR Diode Lasers for Spectral Region 3 - 4.2

  16. Performance of the GLAS Laser Transmitter in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Afzal, Robert S.; Dallas, Joseph L.; Melak, Anthony; Mamakos, William

    2006-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), launched in January 2003, is a laser altimeter and lidar for the Earth Observing System's (EOS) ICESat mission. The laser transmitter requirements, design and qualification test results and in-flight performance for this space-based remote sensing instrument is summarized and presented.

  17. Laterally Coupled Distributed-Feedback GaSb-Based Diode Lasers for Atmospheric Gas Detection at 2 Microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Ksendzov, Alexander; Franz, Kale J.; Bagheri, Mahmood; Forouhar, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate single-mode laterally coupled distributed-feedback diode lasers at 2.05 microns employing low-loss etched gratings. Single-facet CW output exceeds 50 mW near room temperature with linewidth below 1 MHz over 10-ms observation times

  18. Laterally Coupled Distributed-Feedback GaSb-Based Diode Lasers for Atmospheric Gas Detection at 2 Microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Ksendzov, Alexander; Franz, Kale J.; Bagheri, Mahmood; Forouhar, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate single-mode laterally coupled distributed-feedback diode lasers at 2.05 microns employing low-loss etched gratings. Single-facet CW output exceeds 50 mW near room temperature with linewidth below 1 MHz over 10-ms observation times

  19. Low-threshold 2-micron holmium laser excited by nonradiative energy transfer from Fe(3+) in YGG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, G. J.; Johnson, L. F.

    1992-12-01

    Low-threshold operation of a 2.09-micron holmium laser, excited by nonradiative energy transfer from trivalent iron, has been demonstrated. With a 1.45-mm-thick crystal of Fe,Ho:YGG at 77 K, absorbed power thresholds between 5 and 8 mW were observed as the pump wavelength was continuously tuned from 0.92 to 0.97 micron.

  20. Transmittance jump in a thin aluminium layer during laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Bykovsky, N E; Senatsky, Yu V; Pershin, S M; Samokhin, A A

    2016-02-28

    A jump in the transmittance (from ∼0.1% to ∼50% for ∼1 ns) of an optical gate on a Mylar film (a thin aluminium layer on a Lavsan substrate) irradiated by nanosecond (10{sup -7} – 10{sup -8} s) pulses of a neodymium laser with an intensity up to 0.1 GW cm{sup -2} has been recorded. The mechanism of a fast (10{sup -10} – 10{sup -11} s) increase in the transmittance of the aluminium layer upon its overheating (without boiling) to the metal – insulator phase-transition temperature is discussed. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  1. Advanced quantum cascade laser transmitter architectures and infrared photonics development

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Myers, Tanya L.

    2004-08-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security and civilian applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors. This paper reports on the current development in infrared photonics that provides a pathway for QCL transmitter miniaturization. This research has produced infrared waveguide-based optical components in chalcogenide glass using both direct-laser writing and holographic exposure techniques. We discuss here the design and fabrication concepts and capabilities required to produce integrated waveguides, waveguide couplers, and other photonic devices.

  2. Airborne Measurements of Atmospheric Methane Using Pulsed Laser Transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Riris, Haris; Wu, Stewart; Gonzalez, Brayler; Rodriguez, Michael; Hasselbrack, William; Fahey, Molly; Yu, Anthony; Stephen, Mark; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas with approximately 25 times the radiative forcing of carbon dioxide (CO2) per molecule. At NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) we have been developing a laser-based technology needed to remotely measure CH4 from orbit. We report on our development effort for the methane lidar, especially on our laser transmitters and recent airborne demonstration. Our lidar transmitter is based on an optical parametric process to generate near infrared laser radiation at 1651 nanometers, coincident with a CH4 absorption. In an airborne flight campaign in the fall of 2015, we tested two kinds of laser transmitters --- an optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and an optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The output wavelength of the lasers was rapidly tuned over the CH4 absorption by tuning the seed laser to sample the CH4 absorption line at several wavelengths. This approach uses the same Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) technique we have used for our CO2 lidar for ASCENDS. The two laser transmitters were successfully operated in the NASAs DC-8 aircraft, measuring methane from 3 to 13 kilometers with high precision.

  3. In-Flight Performance of the Mercury Laser Altimeter Laser Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Sun, Xiaoli; Li, Steven X.; Cavanaugh, John F.; Neumann, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) is one of the payload instruments on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, which was launched on August 3, 2004. MLA maps Mercury's shape and topographic landforms and other surface characteristics using a diode-pumped solid-state laser transmitter and a silicon avalanche photodiode receiver that measures the round-trip time of individual laser pulses. The laser transmitter has been operating nominally during planetary flyby measurements and in orbit about Mercury since March 2011. In this paper, we review the MLA laser transmitter telemetry data and evaluate the performance of solid-state lasers under extended operation in a space environment.

  4. Laser transmitter for space-based sodium lidar instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Janches, Diego; Konoplev, Oleg

    2016-05-01

    We are currently developing a laser transmitter to remotely measure Sodium (Na) by adapting existing lidar technology with space flight heritage. The developed instrumentation will serve as the core for the planning of a Heliophysics mission targeted to study the composition and dynamics of Earth's mesosphere based on a spaceborne lidar that will measure the mesospheric Na layer. We present performance results from our laser transmitter development effort with emphasis on wavelength tuning and power scaling of a diode-pumped Q-switched self-Raman c-cut Nd:YVO4 laser with intra-cavity frequency doubling that could produce multi-watt 589 nm wavelength output. We will review technologies that provide strong leverage for the sodium lidar laser system with strong heritage from past and current space flight missions.

  5. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  6. Design validation for ICESat-2 space-based laser transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Patrick M.; Sawruk, Nicholas W.; VanTuijl, Andre; Litvinovitch, Slava; Chuang, Ti; Edwards, Ryan E.; Rudd, William J.; Fakhoury, Elias; Wysocki, Theodore; Hovis, Floyd E.

    2014-09-01

    Fibertek is under contract from NASA Goddard to build four space qualified laser transmitters for the ICESat-2 (Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite) program, a second generation orbiting laser altimeter. Pertinent laser parameters driving the design included laser wall plug efficiency, laser reliability, a relatively narrow linewidth with wavelength tunability, high beam quality (M2<1.6), short pulsewidths (<1.5ns), and energy scalable from 250 μJ to 900μJ in predefined steps. The laser design employs fiber coupled 880nm diodes and end-pump Nd:YVO4 slabs as the gain medium in a master oscillator/power amplifier (MOPA) architecture with an LBO second harmonic generator (SHG). Following the SHG is a telescope that sets the final beam size and divergence requirements. The first laser built will be the Integration and Test Laser (ITL) used for qualification of the design. The ITL will set the baseline parameters for the flight laser builds. The ITL will also validate the design for the telescope and will be subjected to the full environmental testing required for a space hardened flight laser. Environmental testing includes vibration, thermal vacuum conditions, and electromagnetic interference (EMI). Our presentation will address the measured laser parameters from ITL as compared to the as designed laser.

  7. Laser transmitter assembly for the Optical Communication Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Copeland, David J.

    1994-08-01

    A modulated fiber-coupled diode laser assembly has been developed. This module will serve as the laser transmitter assembly for the Optical Communication Demonstrator (OCD) system. The laser is capable of greater than 20 mW of output at 100 Mbps Q-PPM modulation. It consists of a high-speed driver, a controller to maintain output amplitude under varying duty cycles, and a temperature controller to control output wavelength. The driver provides over 280 mA of peak modulation current with an optical pulse risetime of approximately 1 ns. The switching speed is limited by the inductance of the laser mount and the cable connecting the driver to the mount. The laser is coupled to a single-mode polarization preserving fiber that can feed directly into the telescope assembly of OCD.

  8. Active alignment and reliable pigtailing of laser diode transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhali, M.; Saktioto, .; Zainal, J.; Munajat, Y.; Ali, J.; Rahman, R.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we present theoretical and experimental analysis on Nd:YAG laser microwelding for pigtailing laser diode transmitter through two ball lenses that are employed for effectively matching the elliptical mode field of the laser diode with the circular on of the single mode fiber. The fiber attachment and the fixing of various coupling components have been performed in what is so called active alignment process. The system continues measuring the coupled power during the processes of alignment and attachment of various coupling components as well as the working distance and misalignment tolerances optimizations. Results of theoretical modeling of laser weld penetration depth agree with the experimentally measured results in the low laser pulse energy range. Moreover the laser pulse parameters such as, duration, energy, number of pulse shoots as well as the focusing position over the workpiece and angle of laser pulse incidence are found to have very significant effects on the weld yields and greatly affect the laser weld depth to width ratio. Optimization of all the mentioned parameters found to be necessary for achieving strong laser microwelds with more penetration and less width in the attachments of the sensitive optical components inside the packaged photonic devices modules.

  9. Alexandrite laser transmitter development for airborne water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyba, Thomas H.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Higdon, Noah S.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Browell, Edward V.

    1995-01-01

    In the DIAL technique, the water vapor concentration profile is determined by analyzing the lidar backscatter signals for laser wavelengths tuned 'on' and 'off' a water vapor absorption line. Desired characteristics of the on-line transmitted laser beam include: pulse energy greater than or equal to 100 mJ, high-resolution tuning capability (uncertainty less than 0.25 pm), good spectral stability (jitter less than 0.5 pm about the mean), and high spectral purity (greater than 99 percent). The off-line laser is generally detuned less than 100 pm away from the water vapor line. Its spectral requirements are much less stringent. In our past research, we developed and demonstrated the airborne DIAL technique for water vapor measurements in the 720-nm spectral region using a system based on an alexandrite laser as the transmitter for the on-line wavelength and a Nd:YAG laser-pumped dye laser for the off-line wavelength. This off-line laser has been replaced by a second alexandrite laser. Diode lasers are used to injection seed both lasers for frequency and linewidth control. This eliminates the need for the two intracavity etalons utilized in our previous alexandrite laser and thereby greatly reduces the risk of optical damage. Consequently, the transmitted pulse energy can be substantially increased, resulting in greater measurement range, higher data density, and increased measurement precision. In this paper, we describe the diode injection seed source, the two alexandrite lasers, and the device used to line lock the on-line seed source to the water vapor absorption feature.

  10. Alexandrite laser transmitter development for airborne water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyba, Thomas H.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Higdon, Noah S.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Browell, Edward V.

    1995-01-01

    In the DIAL technique, the water vapor concentration profile is determined by analyzing the lidar backscatter signals for laser wavelengths tuned 'on' and 'off' a water vapor absorption line. Desired characteristics of the on-line transmitted laser beam include: pulse energy greater than or equal to 100 mJ, high-resolution tuning capability (uncertainty less than 0.25 pm), good spectral stability (jitter less than 0.5 pm about the mean), and high spectral purity (greater than 99 percent). The off-line laser is generally detuned less than 100 pm away from the water vapor line. Its spectral requirements are much less stringent. In our past research, we developed and demonstrated the airborne DIAL technique for water vapor measurements in the 720-nm spectral region using a system based on an alexandrite laser as the transmitter for the on-line wavelength and a Nd:YAG laser-pumped dye laser for the off-line wavelength. This off-line laser has been replaced by a second alexandrite laser. Diode lasers are used to injection seed both lasers for frequency and linewidth control. This eliminates the need for the two intracavity etalons utilized in our previous alexandrite laser and thereby greatly reduces the risk of optical damage. Consequently, the transmitted pulse energy can be substantially increased, resulting in greater measurement range, higher data density, and increased measurement precision. In this paper, we describe the diode injection seed source, the two alexandrite lasers, and the device used to line lock the on-line seed source to the water vapor absorption feature.

  11. Remote control radioactive-waste removal system uses modulated laser transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcher, E. E.; Kopia, L. P.; Rowland, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    Laser remote control system consists of transmitter, auto tracker, and receiver. Transmitter and tracker, packaged together and bore sighted, constitute control station, receiver is slave station. Model has five command channels and optical link operating range of 110 m.

  12. Designing Light Beam Transmittance Measuring Tool Using a Laser Pointer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuroso, H.; Kurniawan, W.; Marwoto, P.

    2016-08-01

    A simple instrument used for measuring light beam transmittance percentage made of window film has been developed. The instrument uses a laser pointer of 405 nm and 650 nm ±10% as a light source. Its accuracy approaches 80%. Transmittance data was found by comparing the light beam before and after passing the window film. The light intensity measuring unit was deleted by splitting the light source into two beams through a beam splitter. The light beam was changed into resistance by a NORP12 LDR sensor designed at a circuit of voltage divider rule of Khirchoff's laws. This conversion system will produce light beam intensity received by the sensor to become an equal voltage. This voltage will, then, be presented on the computer screen in the form of a real time graph via a 2.0 USB data transfer.

  13. Prototype laser-diode-pumped solid state laser transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Thomas J.; Cheng, Emily A. P.; Wallace, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    Monolithic, diode-pumped Nd:YAG ring lasers can provide diffraction-limited, single-frequency, narrow-linewidth, tunable output which is adequate for use as a local oscillator in a coherent communication system. A laser was built which had a linewidth of about 2 kHz, a power of 5 milliwatts, and which was tunable over a range of 30 MHz in a few microseconds. This laser was phase-locked to a second, similar laser. This demonstrates that the powerful technique of heterodyne detection is possible with a diode-pumped laser used as the local oscillator. Laser diode pumping of monolithic Nd:YAG rings can lead to output powers of hundreds of milliwatts from a single laser. A laser was built with a single-mode output of 310 mW. Several lasers can be chained together to sum their power, while maintaining diffraction-limited, single frequency operation. This technique was demonstrated with two lasers, with a total output of 340 mW, and is expected to be practical for up to about ten lasers. Thus with lasers of 310 mW, output of up to 3 W is possible. The chaining technique, if properly engineered, results in redundancy. The technique of resonant external modulation and doubling is designed to efficiently convert the continuous wave, infrared output of our lasers into low duty-cycle pulsed green output. This technique was verified through both computer modeling and experimentation. Further work would be necessary to develop a deliverable system using this technique.

  14. Feasibility of a 30-meter space based laser transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berggren, R. R.; Lenertz, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of the application of large expandable mirror structures in future space missions to establish the feasibility and define the potential of high power laser systems for such applications as propulsion and power transmission. Application of these concepts requires a 30-meter diameter, diffraction limited mirror for transmission of the laser energy. Three concepts for the transmitter are presented. These concepts include consideration of continuous as well as segmented mirror surfaces and the major stow-deployment categories of inflatable, variable geometry and assembled-in-space structures. The mirror surface for each concept would be actively monitored and controlled to maintain diffraction limited performance at 10.6 microns during operation. The proposed mirror configurations are based on existing aerospace state-of-the-art technology. The assembled-in-space concept appears to be the most feasible, at this time.

  15. Reflection Effects in Multimode Fiber Systems Utilizing Laser Transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Harry E.

    1991-01-01

    A number of optical communication lines are now in use at NASA-Kennedy for the transmission of voice, computer data, and video signals. Now, all of these channels use a single carrier wavelength centered near 1300 or 1550 nm. Engineering tests in the past have given indications of the growth of systematic and random noise in the RF spectrum of a fiber network as the number of connector pairs is increased. This noise seems to occur when a laser transmitter is used instead of a LED. It has been suggested that the noise is caused by back reflections created at connector fiber interfaces. Experiments were performed to explore the effect of reflection on the transmitting laser under conditions of reflective feedback. This effort included computer integration of some of the instrumentation in the fiber optic lab using the Lab View software recently acquired by the lab group. The main goal was to interface the Anritsu Optical and RF spectrum analyzers to the MacIntosh II computer so that laser spectra and network RF spectra could be simultaneously and rapidly acquired in a form convenient for analysis. Both single and multimode fiber is installed at Kennedy. Since most are multimode, this effort concentrated on multimode systems.

  16. Wind Profiling from a New Compact, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection Doppler Lidar Transceiver during Wind Measurement Intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Demoz, B.; Veneable, D.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. This lidar system was recently deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Maryland, along with other wind lidar systems. Coherent Doppler wind lidar ground-based wind measurements and comparisons with other lidars and other sensors will be presented.

  17. 2-Micron Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has contributed in developing several 2-micron carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the DIAL technique. Currently, an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA LaRC. This paper focuses on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of wavelength control, packaging and lidar integration. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented, including telescope integration, detection systems and data acquisition electronics. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be presented.

  18. 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption lidar development for simultaneous airborne column measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-05-01

    For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has contributed in developing several 2-micron carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the DIAL technique. Currently, an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA LaRC. This paper focuses on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of wavelength control, packaging and lidar integration. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented, including telescope integration, detection systems and data acquisition electronics. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be presented.

  19. NIR transmittance puse oximetry system with laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Silva, Sonnia M.; Silveira, Juan P.; Sendra, Jose R.; Giannetti, Romano; Dotor, Maria L.; Golmayo, Dolores

    2001-05-01

    A transmittance pulse oximetry system based on near-infrared laser diodes (LD) for monitoring arterial blood hemoglobin oxygen saturation (So2) has been previously reported. In this work we present the results obtained after improvements in the sensor configuration, signal processing algorithm and calibration procedure. The pulse oximetry system also comprises the sensor electronics, and a data acquisition board installed on a handheld personal computer. The two LD chips are mounted on a single metal heat-sink and as photo- detectors are used silicon p-i-n photodiodes with the first amplifier stage situated in their back side. The real time calculation of the parameters related to So2 is carried out through a numeric separation of the pulsatile and non- pulsatile components of the photoplethysmographic signals for both wavelengths and a non-linear filtering. Patients with respiratory failure conditions were monitored as a part of the calibration procedure in order to cover a wide range of So2-values. A calibration curve have been derived through the determination of in vitro arterial So2 with a significant quantity of experimental points ranging from 60 to almost 100%. The obtained results demonstrate that it is possible to apply the proposed system to monitoring a wide range of oxygen saturation levels.

  20. Evaluation of Manganese Doped Ca5(PO4)3F as a Near Infrared (1-2 microns) Solid-State Laser Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Matthew; Hoemmerich, Uwe; Loutts, George B.

    1998-01-01

    Tunable solid-state lasers are of enormous interest for applications including fundamental spectroscopy, remote sensing of the earth atmosphere, medical surgery, and optical communications. Efficient and widely tunable lasers have been developed for the 800-1100 nm region based on transition metal doped insulators like e.g. Ti:Sapphire. The development of transition metal lasers operating at longer wavelength, however, has been limited by the luminescence efficiency of existing materials. We are currently evaluating Mn doped Ca5(PO4)3F as a new solid-state laser material for the 1-2 micro-m region. Preliminary spectroscopic studies revealed that Mn:Ca5(PO4)3F exhibits an intense near infrared luminescence which extends from 1100-1300 nm. Based on lifetime measurements we estimated the luminescence quantum efficiency to be as high as 90 deg./0 at room temperature. The near infrared luminescence properties of Mn doped Ca5(PO4)3F and its potential for solid-state laser applications will be discussed in detail.

  1. The characterization of neural tissue ablation rate and corresponding heat affected zone of a 2 micron Tm3+ doped fiber laser(Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Andrew J.; Jivraj, Jamil; Reyes, Robnier; Ramjist, Joel; Gu, Xijia J.; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2017-02-01

    Tissue removal using electrocautery is standard practice in neurosurgery since tissue can be cut and cauterized simultaneously. Thermally mediated tissue ablation using lasers can potentially possess the same benefits but with increased precision. However, given the critical nature of the spine, brain, and nerves, the effects of direct photo-thermal interaction on neural tissue needs to be known, yielding not only high precision of tissue removal but also increased control of peripheral heat damage. The proposed use of lasers as a neurosurgical tool requires that a common ground is found between ablation rates and resulting peripheral heat damage. Most surgical laser systems rely on the conversion of light energy into heat resulting in both desirable and undesirable thermal damage to the targeted tissue. Classifying the distribution of thermal energy in neural tissue, and thus characterizing the extent of undesirable thermal damage, can prove to be exceptionally challenging considering its highly inhomogenous composition when compared to other tissues such as muscle and bone. Here we present the characterization of neural tissue ablation rate and heat affected zone of a 1.94 micron thulium doped fiber laser for neural tissue ablation. In-Vivo ablation of porcine cerebral cortex is performed. Ablation volumes are studied in association with laser parameters. Histological samples are taken and examined to characterize the extent of peripheral heat damage.

  2. Evaluation of far-field pattern of laser transmitter onboard the Laser Communication Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Morio; Fukazawa, Takayuki; Toyoda, Masahiro; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Shikatani, Motokazu; Arimoto, Yoshinori; Araki, Kenichi; Aruga, Tadashi

    1997-04-01

    A far-field pattern of an onboard laser transmitter was measured using a trans-atmospheric optical link over 35,000 km range between a satellite and an optical ground station. The acquisition of the far-field pattern is made in use of a new proposed statistical analysis of downlink irradiance data obtained at the ground station. Tracking/pointing statistical characteristics of the transmitter is taken into account in order to estimate downlink irradiance when there would be no atmospheric scintillation effects. The peak directive gain of the downlink laser beam was 104.3 dB. The beam width was 28.5 X 17.5 (mu) rad. These results were consistent with the results at a laboratory test performed before launch of the satellite.

  3. On the minimization of the prime power consumption of a coupling-modulated gas laser transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The prime power requirements of a coupling-modulated gas laser transmitter are presented. The latter consists of a gas discharge tube and electro-optic modulator inside a laser resonator. In performing the calculations, the laser discharge length and the modulator voltage are simultaneously varied so that the transmitted power remains constant. In this way, tradeoffs can be made between the prime power supplied individually to the discharge tube and to the modulator driver to obtain a transmitter configuration which minimizes the total prime power consumption. An analytical expression is derived which describes the effects of information bandwidth and transmitter output power on the prime power requirements. Specific numerical results are obtained for a CO2 laser transmitter based on presently available experimental data.

  4. Minimization of the prime power consumption of a coupling-modulated gas laser transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    The present article addresses itself to the prime power requirements of a coupling-modulated gas laser transmitter. The latter consists of a gas discharge tube and electrooptic modulator inside a laser resonator. In performing the calculations, the laser discharge length and the modulator voltage are simultaneously varied so that the transmitted power remains constant. In this way, tradeoffs can be made between the prime power supplied individually to the discharge tube and to the modulator driver to obtain a transmitter configuration that minimizes the total prime power consumption. An analytical expression is derived that describes the effects of information bandwidth and transmitter output power on the prime power requirements. Specific numerical results are obtained for a CO2 laser transmitter based on presently available experimental data.

  5. Multi-wavelength transmittance photoplethysmography with near infrared laser diodes during exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Silva, S. M.; Giannetti, R.; Dotor, M. L.; Golmayo, D.; Martin, P.; Miguel-Tobal, F.; Bilbao, A.; Silveira, J. P.

    2005-08-01

    The transmittance photoplethysmographic signals recorded with multiple NIR laser diodes in athletes along a maximal exercise test by treadmill ergometer and the results after processing are presented in comparison to the established reference techniques.

  6. 50 Mb/s, 220-mW Laser-Array Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Laser transmitter based on injection locking produces single-wavelength, diffraction-limited, single-lobe beam. Output stage is array of laser diodes producing non-diffraction-limited, multi-mode beam in absence of injection locking. Suitable for both free-space and optical-fiber communication systems. Because beam from transmitter focused to spot as small as 5 micrometers, devices usable for reading and writing optical disks at increased information densities. Application also in remote sensing and ranging.

  7. Integrated quantum-well-laser transmitter compatible with ion-implanted GaAs integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, C. S.; Kasemset, D.; Kim, M. E.; Milano, R. A.

    1984-08-01

    The fabrication of an integrated optoelectronic transmitter consisting of an MOCVD-grown quantum-well laser and ion-implanted metal-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs) is described. The transmitter is characterized by a laser threshold current of 30 mA, differential quantum efficiency of 50 percent, MESFET transconductance of 60 mS/mm, and operation at frequencies up to 2 GHz.

  8. Eight-wavelength distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) laser array transmitter for WDM applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallahi, Mahmoud; McGreer, K. A.; Delage, Andre; Neophytou, A.; Templeton, Ian M.; Champion, Garth; Chatenoud, F.; Barber, Richard A.; Wang, Weijian; He, Jian Jun; Koteles, Emil S.

    1995-03-01

    We report on the design, growth, fabrication and characterization of monolithic wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) laser array transmitter and receiver chips produced by the Canadian Solid State Optoelectronics Consortium. The transmitter chip includes multiple, discrete wavelength, distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diodes monolithically integrated with waveguide combiners fabricated using an InGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. The corresponding wavelength demultiplexer unit is based on a Rowland circle grating spectrometer monolithically integrated with a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) detector array fabricated on an InGaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. The epitaxial layer wafers for both transmitter and receiver modules were grown in single molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) runs.

  9. Compact, High Energy 2-micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development for NASA's Future 3-D Winds Measurement from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Beyon, Jeffrey; Kavaya, Michael J.; Trieu, Bo; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, paul; Modlin, Edward A.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Demoz, Belay B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of 2-micron laser transmitter development at NASA Langley Research Center for coherent-detection lidar profiling of winds. The novel high-energy, 2-micron, Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser technology developed at NASA Langley was employed to study laser technology currently envisioned by NASA for future global coherent Doppler lidar winds measurement. The 250 mJ, 10 Hz laser was designed as an integral part of a compact lidar transceiver developed for future aircraft flight. Ground-based wind profiles made with this transceiver will be presented. NASA Langley is currently funded to build complete Doppler lidar systems using this transceiver for the DC-8 aircraft in autonomous operation. Recently, LaRC 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar system was selected to contribute to the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Earth Science Division (ESD) hurricane field experiment in 2010 titled Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP). The Doppler lidar system will measure vertical profiles of horizontal vector winds from the DC-8 aircraft using NASA Langley s existing 2-micron, pulsed, coherent detection, Doppler wind lidar system that is ready for DC-8 integration. The measurements will typically extend from the DC-8 to the earth s surface. They will be highly accurate in both wind magnitude and direction. Displays of the data will be provided in real time on the DC-8. The pulsed Doppler wind lidar of NASA Langley Research Center is much more powerful than past Doppler lidars. The operating range, accuracy, range resolution, and time resolution will be unprecedented. We expect the data to play a key role, combined with the other sensors, in improving understanding and predictive algorithms for hurricane strength and track. 1

  10. Airborne 2-micron double-pulsed integrated path differential absorption lidar for column CO2 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 mJ and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 µs and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-µm direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-μm IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  11. [Transurethral resection of the prostate combined with 2-micron continuous-wave laser vaporesection for benign prostatic hyperplasia with the prostate volume > 80 ml].

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-lei; Gao, Zhi-ming; Xia, Hai-bo; Bao, Guo-chang; Li, Chun-sheng; Zhang, Hao

    2015-02-01

    To sum up the clinical experience in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with the prostate weighing over 80 ml by transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) combined with 2 μm continuous-wave laser vaporesection (LVR). We retrospectively analyzed the clinical effects of TURP combined with 2 μm LVR in the treatment of 46 cases of BPH with the prostate volume > 80 ml. All the operations were successfully accomplished. The operation time and intraoperative blood loss were (112.0 ± 20.0) min (range 86-176 min) and (77.9 ± 25.9) ml (range 50-200 ml), respectively. The catheters were withdrawn at 7 days after surgery. Transient urinary incontinence occurred in 6 cases and secondary hemorrhage was found in 2 postoperatively. Six-month follow-up revealed no urethral stricture or other complications. Compared with the baseline, the international prostate symptom score (IPSS) was significantly decreased at 6 months after operation (26.3 ± 1.8 vs 11.6 ± 1.7, P <0.05), and so were the quality of life (QOL) score (5.3 ± 0.7 vs 1.3 ± 1.1, P <0.05) and post-void residual urine (PVR) ([115.5 ± 55.6] ml vs [19.9 ± 11.6] ml, P <0.05). However, the maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) was remarkably increased from (4.1 ± 2.6) ml/s to (16.2 ± 1.7) ml/s (P <0.05). TURP combined with 2 μm LVR is safe and effective for the treatment of BPH with the prostate volume >80 ml.

  12. Deep-space Optical Terminals (DOT) Ground Laser Transmitter (GLT) Trades and Conceptual Point Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, W. T.; Wright, M. W.

    2010-11-01

    A conceptual design for the Deep-space Optical Terminals (DOT) Ground Laser Transmitter (GLT) has been developed. Two trade studies were performed: one to determine the most cost-effective uplink pointing system including the use of multiple and single apertures, and the second to determine the optimal type of laser transmitter for use as a beacon reference source. The baselined design resulting from the trade studies incorporated a single 1-m aperture capable of 16-microrad pointing accuracy with multiple fiber-laser sources providing up to 5 kW average optical power at 1030 nm.

  13. Fiber-Based Laser Transmitter for Oxygen A-Band Spectroscopy and Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Abshire, James B.

    2010-01-01

    A fiber-based laser transmitter has been designed for active remote-sensing spectroscopy. The transmitter uses a master-oscillator-power-amplifier (MOPA) configuration with a distributed feedback diode-laser master oscillator and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier. The output from the MOPA is frequency-doubled with a periodically poled nonlinear crystal. The utility of this single-frequency, wavelength-tunable, power-scalable laser has been demonstrated in a spectroscopic measurement of the diatomic oxygen A-band.

  14. Influence of surface light scattering in hydrophobic acrylic intraocular lenses on laser beam transmittance.

    PubMed

    Shiraya, Tomoyasu; Kato, Satoshi; Minami, Keiichiro; Miyata, Kazunori

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to experimentally examine the changes in the transmittances of photocoagulation lasers when surface light scattering increases in AcrySof intraocular lenses (IOLs). SA60AT IOLs (Alcon) were acceleratingly aging for 0, 3, 5, and 10 years to simulate surface light scattering, and the surface light-scattering intensities of both IOL surfaces were measured using a Scheimpflug photographer. The powers of laser beams that passed from a laser photocoagulator through the aged IOLs were measured at 532, 577, and 647 nm. Changes in the laser power and transmittance with the years of aging and the intensities of surface light scattering were examined. Although the intensity of surface light scattering increased with the years of aging, the laser power did not change with the years of aging (P > 0.30, Kruskal-Wallis test). There were no significant changes in the laser transmittance with the years of aging or the laser wavelength (P > 0.30 and 0.57, respectively). The intensity of surface light scattering revealed no significant association with the laser transmittance at any wavelength (P > 0.37, liner regression). The increases in the surface light scattering of the AcrySof IOLs would not influence retinal photocoagulation treatments for up to 10 years after implantation.

  15. Single Frequency, Pulsed Laser Diode Transmitter for Dial Water Vapor Measurements at 935nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, Gregg W.; Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.; Krainak, Michael A.; Abshire, James B.; Rall, Johnathan A. R.

    1998-01-01

    We report a tunable, single frequency, narrow linewidth, pulsed laser diode transmitter at 935.68nm for remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor. The transmitter consists of a CW, tunable, external cavity diode laser whose output is amplified 2OdB using a tapered diode amplifier. The output is pulsed for range resolved DIAL lidar by pulsing the drive current to the diode amplifier at 4kHz with a .5% duty cycle. The output from the transmitter is 36OnJ/pulse and is single spatial mode. It maintains a linewidth of less than 25MHz as its wavelength is tuned across the water vapor absorption line at 935.68nm. The transmitter design and its use in a water vapor measurement will be discussed.

  16. Fiber-based laser transmitter and laser spectroscopy of the oxygen A-band for remote detection of atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, Mark Andrew

    The Author reports on the design and construction of an oxygen spectroscopy laser sounding instrument designed to measure atmospheric pressure. This instrument was conceived and designed with a satellite application in mind so we discuss the requirements this places on the instrument and specifically the laser transmitter. We have developed a novel, pulsed, frequency-doubled, fiber-based laser transmitter for use in the instrument. The instrument concept uses the collision broadening of spectroscopic lines of the diatomic oxygen A-band to deduce atmospheric pressure. We report on the spectroscopic and instrument theory. We discuss the development of a high-power, narrow-frequency, tunable, single spatial mode pulsed laser transmitter. The transmitter is a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) design. The master oscillator is a fiber coupled DFB laser with external acousto-optic modulation. The amplifier is a diode pumped, erbium-doped fiber. We discuss the non-linear optical effect of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and how it limits the transmitter performance. We review various methods for overcoming SBS in erbium fiber amplifiers and then demonstrate the performance of a high SBS threshold fiber amplifier. We demonstrate the efficacy of this transmitter by integrating it into a spectroscopic instrument and make atmospheric measurements at a test site at Goddard. We also discuss future improvements.

  17. Noise-immune laser receiver - transmitters with the quantum sensitivity limit

    SciTech Connect

    Kutaev, Yu F; Mankevich, S K; Nosach, O Yu; Orlov, E P

    2009-11-30

    We consider the operation principles of noise-immune near-IR receiver - transmitters with the quantum sensitivity limit, in which active quantum filters based on iodine photodissociation quantum amplifiers and iodine lasers are used. The possible applications of these devices in laser location, laser space communication, for the search for signals from extraterrestrial civilisations and sending signals to extraterrestrial civilisations are discussed. (invited paper)

  18. Fiber-based, trace-gas, laser transmitter technology development for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, Mark; Yu, Anthony; Chen, Jeffrey; Nicholson, Jeffrey; Engin, Doruk; Mathason, Brian; Wu, Stewart; Allan, Graham; Hasselbrack, William; Gonzales, Brayler; Han, Lawrence; Numata, Kenji; Storm, Mark; Abshire, James

    2015-09-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is working on maturing the technology readiness of a laser transmitter designed for use in atmospheric CO2 remote-sensing. GSFC has been developing an airplane-based CO2 lidar instrument over several years to demonstrate the efficacy of the instrumentation and measurement technique and to link the science models to the instrument performance. The ultimate goal is to make space-based satellite measurements with global coverage. In order to accomplish this, we must demonstrate the technology readiness and performance of the components as well as demonstrate the required power-scaling to make the link with the required signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR). To date, all the instrument components have been shown to have the required performance with the exception of the laser transmitter. In this program we are working on a fiber-based master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser transmitter architecture where we will develop a ruggedized package and perform the relevant environmental tests to demonstrate TRL-6. In this paper we will review our transmitter architecture and progress on the performance and packaging of the laser transmitter.

  19. Fiber-Based, Trace-Gas, Laser Transmitter Technology Development for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark; Yu, Anthony; Chen, Jeffrey; Nicholson, Jeffrey; Engin, Doruk; Mathason, Brian; Wu, Stewart; Allan, Graham; Hasselbrack, William; Gonzalez, Brayler; Han, Lawrence; Numata, Kenji; Storm, Mark; Abshire, James

    2015-01-01

    NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is working on maturing the technology readiness of a laser transmitter designed for use in atmospheric CO2 remote-sensing. GSFC has been developing an airplane-based CO2 lidar instrument over several years to demonstrate the efficacy of the instrumentation and measurement technique and to link the science models to the instrument performance. The ultimate goal is to make space-based satellite measurements with global coverage. In order to accomplish this, we must demonstrate the technology readiness and performance of the components as well as demonstrate the required power-scaling to make the link with the required signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR). To date, all the instrument components have been shown to have the required performance with the exception of the laser transmitter.In this program we are working on a fiber-based master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser transmitter architecture where we will develop a ruggedized package and perform the relevant environmental tests to demonstrate TRL-6. In this paper we will review our transmitter architecture and progress on the performance and packaging of the laser transmitter.

  20. High-power multi-beam diode laser transmitter for a flash imaging lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmlund, Christer; Aitta, Petteri; Kivi, Sini; Mitikka, Risto; Tyni, Lauri; Heikkinen, Veli

    2013-10-01

    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland is developing the transmitter for the "Flash Optical Sensor for TErrain Relative NAVigation" (FOSTERNAV) multi-beam flash imaging lidar. FOSTERNAV is a concept demonstrator for new guidance, navigation and control (GNC) technologies to fulfil the requirements for landing and docking of spacecraft as well as for navigation of rovers. This paper presents the design, realisation and testing of the multi-beam continuous-wave (CW) laser transmitter to be used in a 256x256 pixel flash imaging lidar. Depending on the target distance, the lidar has three operation modes using either several beams with low divergence or one single beam with a large divergence. This paper describes the transmitter part of the flash imaging lidar with focus on the electronics and especially the laser diode drivers. The transmitter contains eight fibre coupled commercial diode laser modules with a total peak optical power of 32 W at 808 nm. The main requirement for the laser diode drivers was linear modulation up to a frequency of 20 MHz allowing, for example, low distortion chirps or pseudorandom binary sequences. The laser modules contain the laser diode, a monitoring photodiode, a thermo-electric cooler, and a thermistor. The modules, designed for non-modulated and low-frequency operation, set challenging demands on the design of the drivers. Measurement results are presented on frequency response, and eye diagrams for pseudo-random binary sequences.

  1. Turnable Blue-Green LIDAR Transmitter Demonstration: Injection Laser Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-30

    and transverse operation of the pump , achieved by seeding the pump laser by injection of a lower-power, high quality beam, was used by SU/UH to get to...Comparison of the UV excimer pump and dye laser temporal pulses. The dye laser pulse duration is - 12 ns (FWHM) ......... 2-15 g 11 Illustration of the ASE...the existing UTRC laser using I the m = 1 grating reflection (Fig. 5). A 100 mJ pump pulse at 308 nm was used to pump Coumarin 102. Each wavelength m

  2. Long-duration Operation of 2-micron Coherent Doppler Lidar in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Baggot, Rene P.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2005-01-01

    The reliability and lifetime of laser remote sensing systems that can operate autonomously over a sufficiently long period are mainly constrained by the laser diode arrays (LDAs) used for pumping their laser transmitters. The lifetime of a 2-micron coherent lidar operating in space is particularly of concern in lieu of required pump pulse duration of Thulium and Holmium solid state lasers (approx. 1msec) that are considerably longer than those of more widely used 1-micron lasers (< 0.2 msec). A factor of 5 to 10 times longer pulse duration can easily translate to over an order of magnitude shorter lifetime for a typical commercially available high-power 2-D array. Therefore, it is imperative to address the lifetime and reliability of LDAs for pumping 2-micron lasers by exploring all the potential options that significantly prolong their life meeting the required operational lifetime of space-based coherent Doppler lidars. The leading causes of sudden failure and premature degradation of LDAs are intrinsic semiconductor defects, optical facet breakdown resulting from excessive localized heating, and thermo-mechanical stresses due to the extreme thermal cycling of the laser active regions1-2. Long pulse operation grossly amplifies the impact of these failure/degradation causes, particularly the thermo-mechanical stresses due to pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling. Therefore, several experimental setups have been developed to investigate each of the failure mechanisms and causes of premature degradation in order to evaluate various package designs, define the best operating parameters, and to guide the technology advancement, leading to highly reliable and very long lifetime LDAs5. Several areas of improvement in the packaging and fabrication process of laser diodes have already been identified and efforts towards implementing these improvements are well underway. These efforts include the use of advanced high thermal conductivity materials for packaging of laser diode

  3. High Spectral Purity, Narrow Linewidth Laser Transmitter for Dial Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, U. N.; Flamant, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    A laser transmission with very high degree of spectral purity was described. Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) dependence on the oscillator energy and the detuning away from the gain curve center are demonstrated. The effects of both finite laser linewidth and spectral purity on humidity measurements are experimentally demonstrated.

  4. Integration and test of high-speed transmitter electronics for free-space laser communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soni, Nitin J.; Lizanich, Paul J.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, has developed the electronics for a free-space, direct-detection laser communications system demonstration. Under the High-Speed Laser Integrated Terminal Electronics (Hi-LITE) Project, NASA Lewis has built a prototype full-duplex, dual-channel electronics transmitter and receiver operating at 325 megabit S per second (Mbps) per channel and using quaternary pulse-position modulation (QPPM). This paper describes the integration and testing of the transmitter portion for future application in free-space, direct-detection laser communications. A companion paper reviews the receiver portion of the prototype electronics. Minor modifications to the transmitter were made since the initial report on the entire system, and this paper addresses them. The digital electronics are implemented in gallium arsenide integrated circuits mounted on prototype boards. The fabrication and implementation issues related to these high-speed devices are discussed. The transmitter's test results are documented, and its functionality is verified by exercising all modes of operation. Various testing issues pertaining to high-speed circuits are addressed. A description of the transmitter electronics packaging concludes the paper.

  5. Remote sensing with a tunable alexandrite laser transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Kagann, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A high-resolution, tunable alexandrite laser system is described. Two alexandrite lasers are continuously tunable from 725-790 nm and have a bandwidth of 0.02/cm. The stability of the two lasers is evaluated. The line shape of the laser emission and spectral purity of the system were measured. The data reveal that the output consists of three axial modes with an overall width of 0.026/cm, and the spectral impurity of the alexandrite laser output is less than 0.01 percent. The ground-based lidar system is utilized for measuring atmospheric pressure profiles; the integrated absorption in the wings of lines in the O2 A band is studied to produce the profiles. An example of lidar-collected atmospheric pressure data is presented and compared with radiosonde data; only a 0.3 percent deviation between the data is observed.

  6. A Cascadable, Monolithic Laser/Modulator/Amplifier Transmitter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    on gas source molecular beam epitaxially (GSMBE) grown InGaAsP. These included low threshold, strained InGaAsP multiple quantum well (MQW) Fabry...Etched- Facet Folded-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers 14 A3. Low-threshold 1.3-^im wavelength, InGaAsP strained -layer multiple quantum well lasers... strained InGaAsP MQW Fabry Perot lasers. These devices exhibited the lowest threshold current densities ever achieved for GSMBE grown material

  7. Terahertz Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) Imaging With a Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Terahertz inverse synthetic aperture radar ( ISAR ) imaging with a quantum cascade laser transmitter Andriy A. Danylov1,*, Thomas M. Goyette1...COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Terahertz inverse synthetic aperture radar ( ISAR ) imaging with a quantum cascade laser...Coherence imaging ; (280.6730) Synthetic aperture radar . References and links 1. S. Barbieri, J. Alton, C. Baker, T. Lo, H. Beere, and D

  8. Robust Short-Pulse, High-Peak-Power Laser Transmitter for Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Malcolm W.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a pulsed fiber based master oscillator power amplifier laser at 1550 nm to support moderate data rates with high peak powers in a compact package suitable for interplanetary optical communications. To accommodate pulse position modulation, the polarization maintaining laser transmitter generates pulses from 0.1 to 1 ns with variable duty cycle over a pulse repetition frequency range of 10 to 100 MHz.

  9. 2-micron Double Pulsed IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke; Scola, Tory

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a high energy pulsed 2-micron IPDA lidar instrument to measure the atmospheric CO2 column density. The IPDA lidar is operated on the long wavelength wing of R(30) CO2 line at 2050.967 nm (4875.749 cm-1) in the side-line operation mode. The R(30) line is an excellent absorption line for the measurements of CO2 in 2µm wavelength region with regard to the strength of the absorption lines, low susceptibility to atmospheric temperature variability, and freedom from problematic interference with other absorption lines. The Ho:Tm:YLF laser transmitter is designed to be operated in a unique double pulse format that can produce two-pulse pair in 10 Hz operation. Typically, the output energies of the laser transmitter are 100mJ and 45mJ for the first pulse and the second pulse, respectively. We injection seed the first pulse with on-line frequency and the second pulse with off-line frequency. The IPDA lidar instrument size, weight and power consumption were restricted to small research aircraft payload requirements. The airborne IPDA lidar instrument measures the total integrated column content of CO2 from the instrument to the ground but with weighting that can be tuned by controlling the transmitted wavelengths. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. The 2-μm CO2 IPDA lidar airborne demonstration was conducted during March 20, 2014 through April 10, 2014. IPDA lidar airborne flights included various operating and environmental conditions. Environmental conditions included different flight altitude up to 8.3 km, different ground target conditions such as vegetation, soil, ocean, snow and sand and different cloud conditions. Besides, some flights targeted power plant incinerators for investigating the IPDA sensitivity to CO2 plums. The lidar instrument is robust during all of the flights. This paper describes

  10. Measurements of atmospheric transmittance of CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'ev, V. N.

    1991-02-01

    The field measurement of transmission of 12C1602, 12C1802 and 2 13C160 laser at 62 wavelenghts in the 9.2-11.2.~m spectral range are presented. The measurements were made on a O.2-2.0 km horizontal path using a tunable CO laser. The results were compared with the compu- 2 ted molecular absorptions. Mather a good agreement has been found. Under sufficient visibility (disregarding aerozol attenuation ) atmospheric water vapour is the main extinction component within 10-13 tm and in the range of 8-10 im other small constituents are important.

  11. An overview of DREV's activities on pulsed CO2 laser transmitters: Frequency stability and lifetime aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruickshank, James; Pace, Paul; Mathieu, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    After introducing the desired features in a transmitter for laser radar applications, the output characteristics of several configurations of frequency-stable TEA-CO2 lasers are reviewed. Based on work carried out at the Defence Research Establishment Valcartier (DREV), output pulses are examined from short cavity lasers, CW-TEA hybrid lasers, and amplifiers for low power pulses. It is concluded that the technique of injecting a low-power laser beam into a TEA laser resonator with Gaussian reflectivity mirrors should be investigated because it appears well adapted to producing high energy, single mode, low chirp pulses. Finally, a brief report on tests carried out on catalysts composed of stannic oxide and noble metals demonstrates the potential of these catalysts, operating at close to room temperature, to provide complete closed-cycle laser operation.

  12. Terahertz inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging with a quantum cascade laser transmitter.

    PubMed

    Danylov, Andriy A; Goyette, Thomas M; Waldman, Jerry; Coulombe, Michael J; Gatesman, Andrew J; Giles, Robert H; Qian, Xifeng; Chandrayan, Neelima; Vangala, Shivashankar; Termkoa, Krongtip; Goodhue, William D; Nixon, William E

    2010-07-19

    A coherent transceiver using a THz quantum cascade (TQCL) laser as the transmitter and an optically pumped molecular laser as the local oscillator has been used, with a pair of Schottky diode mixers in the receiver and reference channels, to acquire high-resolution images of fully illuminated targets, including scale models and concealed objects. Phase stability of the received signal, sufficient to allow coherent image processing of the rotating target (in azimuth and elevation), was obtained by frequency-locking the TQCL to the free-running, highly stable optically pumped molecular laser. While the range to the target was limited by the available TQCL power (several hundred microwatts) and reasonably strong indoor atmospheric attenuation at 2.408 THz, the coherence length of the TQCL transmitter will allow coherent imaging over distances up to several hundred meters. Image data obtained with the system is presented.

  13. Optical Performance Measurements of the BELA EQM and FM Transmitter Laser during AIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althaus, C.; Michaelis, H.; Lingenauber, K.; Behnke, T.; Togno, S. d.; Kallenbach, R.; Wickhusen, K.; Althaus, C.

    2014-04-01

    The BepiColombo Laser Altimeter (BELA) onboard the Mercury Planetary Orbiter is Europe's first built Laser Altimeter for a planetary mission. Its main objectives are global mapping of Mercury's topography as well as measuring its tidal deformations to learn about the internal structure of this small terrestrial planet [1]. Crucial part of the instrument for this task is the transmitter laser. It must withstand all mission phases till operation in orbit and work within tight parameter margins. To ensure this a dedicated verification program has been performed at DLR Institute for Planetary Research Berlin which is described in the present paper.

  14. Development of an Airborne Triple-Pulse 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar being developed at NASA Langley Research Center with support from NASA ESTO Instrument Incubator Program. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver and detector upgrades, laser packaging and lidar integration. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  15. Narrow linewidth UV laser transmitter for ozone DIAL remote sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ti; Hansell, Joe; Shuman, Tim; Schum, Tom; Puffenberger, Kent; Burnham, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    Fibertek has demonstrated a dual-wavelength narrow linewidth UV laser transmitter for NASA airborne ozone DIAL remote sensing application. The application requires two narrow linewidth lasers in the UV region between 300 nm and 320 nm with at least 12 nm separation between the two wavelengths. Each UV laser was based on a novel ring structure incorporating an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and a sum frequency generator (SFG). The fundamental pump source of the UV laser was a single frequency 532 nm laser, which was frequency-doubled from a diode-pumped, injection-seeded single frequency Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm and 50 Hz repetition rate. The ring frequency converters generated UV wavelengths at 304 nm and 316 nm respectively. The demonstrated output energies were 2.6 mJ for 304 nm and 2.3 mJ for 316 nm UV lines, with room to potentially achieve more energy for each laser. Linewidth narrowing was achieved using a volume Bragg grating as the output coupler of the OPO in each ring oscillator. We obtained spectral linewidths (FWHM) of 0.12 nm for the 304 nm line and 0.1 nm for the 316 nm line, and the UV energy conversion efficiencies of 12.2% and 9.1%. Fibertek built an airborne DIAL transmitter based on the reported demonstration, which was a single optical module with dual-wavelength output at the demonstrated wavelengths. NASA plans to field the UV laser transmitter as a key component of the High Spectral Resolution Lidar-II (HSRL-II) high altitude airborne instrument to perform autonomous global ozone DIAL remote sensing field campaigns.

  16. Scintillation characterization of multiple transmitters for ground-to-satellite laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Feng; Ma, Jing; Tan, Liying; Yu, SiYuan; Gao, Chong

    2005-01-01

    Using high data optical transmitters for satellite communication channels has generated an interest in laser communication systems ground-to-satellite data links. The atmospheric turbulence causes laser intensity fluctuations that can seriously degrade the reliability and performance of such laser communication links. In the ground-to-satellite link, the atmospheric turbulent's thickness is much less than the path length. Taking into account the large size of the beam at a satellite in orbit, the spatial coherence radius at the satellite is many times larger than the probable receiving aperture of the satellite's optical antenna. Thus the aperture behave of uplink essentially like a point detector without aperture averaging. An analysis of multiple beams compensation for atmospheric turbulence induced scintillation is carried out in this paper. Using multiple incoherent beams transmit synchronically optical signal from dividable apertures, separated by a distance larger than the atmospheric coherence diameter. The convolution integration to determine what happens for two independent random variable, we generalized this method to multiple independent random variables. According to probability theorem, the multiple beams distribution of the irradiance is given with different scintillation index. For this analysis we assume that the single-beam probability distribution function model of the irradiance is the gamma-gamma distribution. In our analysis of this simulation model, it shows that the adverse effect of scintillation on the communication lasers can be minimized with multiple transmitters under weak, moderate, and strong turbulence conditions. The scintillation index was reduced as the number of laser transmitters was increased. So, fluctuation on the uplink/downlink communication beams can effective reduced by multiple transmitters.

  17. Tm,Ho:YAG laser with tunable range of 2.08-2.12 microns and its applications to spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asai, Kazuhiro; Itabe, Toshikazu

    1992-01-01

    In recent advanced lasers, 2 micron solid-state lasers such as Tm:YAG and Ho:YAG lasers are very attractive for laser radar remote sensing technologies because of eye safety, realizations of all solid-state laser pumped by diode laser and smaller dimension, tunability of lasing wavelength, possibility of coherent detection, etc. Featuring these advantages, 2 micron lasers have been candidated as laser transmitters for use in water vapor Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL), laser altimeter, Doppler wind sensor, Mie lidar, etc. Characterization of a tunable Cr, Tm, Ho:YAG laser and its applications to spectroscopy concerning absorption and reflectance are reported.

  18. Electromagnetic Compatibility of Transmitter, Receiver, and Communication Port of a Space-Qualified Laser Altimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenbach, R.; Behnke, T.; Perplies, H.; Henkelmann, R.; Rech, M.; Geissbuhler, U.; Peteut, A.; Lichopoj, A.; Schroedter, R.; Michaelis, H.; Seiferlin, K.; Thomas, N.; Castro, J. M.; Herranz, M.; Lara, L.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports on EMC issues of the laser transmitter, the photodiode receiver, and the communication port of the BepiColombo Laser Altimeter BELA during integration on ESA's Mercury Planetary Orbiter MPO. Parasitic currents originating in the active Q-switch electronics of BELA's diode-laser pumped Nd:YAG laser and from the high-power laser diode driver electronics interfered with the sensitive Si avalanche photodiode sensor operating at a noise floor of about 0.3 pA/√Hz in a bandwidth of 20 MHz, and with BELA's Spacewire port, corrupting about 3% of telemetry data to the MPO memory. The problems had been eliminated by implementing multi-point grounding.

  19. Widely Tunable Negative-Chirp SG-DBR Laser/EA-Modulated Transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raring, J. W.; Skogen, E. J.; Johansson, L. A.; Sysak, M. N.; Denbaars, S. P.; Coldren, L. A.

    2005-01-01

    Ten Gb/s low power penalty (< 0.5 dB) error-free transmission was achieved through 75 km using a high-performance sampled-grating (SG) distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser/EAM transmitter. Large signal chirp measurements show negative chirp operation across the entire tuning range of the devices. An integration-oriented quantum-well-intermixing (QWI) process was employed for the realization of these devices.

  20. Eyesafe diffraction-limited single-frequency 1-ns pulsewidth Er:YAG laser transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneman, Robert C.; Hartman, Ross; Schneider, Eric A.; Garvin, Charles G.; Henderson, Sammy W.

    2007-04-01

    We report an eyesafe diffraction-limited single-frequency 1617 nm Er:YAG laser transmitter for coherent laser radar applications. The transmitter utilizes a master oscillator/power amplifier architecture, enabling the production of high peak power output. The pulsed oscillator is Q-switched and cavity-dumped, resulting in a 1.1 ns pulsewidth. The pulsed oscillator is injection-seeded by a commercial 1617 nm CW distributed feedback laser diode, resulting in single longitudinal mode output. The oscillator and amplifier are directly pumped into the Er:YAG laser upper state by commercial diode-pumped CW 1533 nm Yb,Er-doped fiber lasers. The injection-seeded pulsed oscillator produces an average output power of 2.2 W at 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF) with a pulsewidth of 1.1 ns (0.20 MW peak power) with a beam quality 1.1 times the diffraction limit. The oscillator has a slope efficiency of 47% in the CW mode, and a conversion efficiency of 85% from CW mode to injection-seeded pulsed mode. The power amplifier produces 20 W in the CW mode with an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 34% and a beam quality 1.1 times the diffraction limit, and 6.5 W in the pulsed mode at 10 kHz PRF with 1.1 ns pulsewidth (0.59 MW peak power).

  1. Improved theory for relativistic transmittance of circularly polarized laser pulses in non-ideal, realistic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Teyoun; Kim, Young-Kuk; Hur, Min Sup

    2016-10-01

    Owing to the rapid development of laser technologies, relativistically-induced transmittance (RT) of ultra-intense laser pulses in overdense plasmas is now a practically important matter. RT could give either deleterious or positive effects depending on the kinds of laser-plasma interactions. In radiation-pressure-acceleration (RPA), enhanced transmittance lowers the momentum transfer from the pulse to the ions. Meanwhile, in collisionless-electrostatic-shock, the acceleration efficiency can be increased owing to the effective heating of upstream electrons by transmitted laser fields. Previous theories mostly have handled RT in ideal plasmas, such as an infinitely long uniform plasma or a delta-function-like slab. In the actual applications, however, RT is generally combined with other dynamics, such as plasma density compression, leading to RT under a plasma in other cases. We developed one-dimensional RT theories for circularly polarized laser pulses, which would be used for such realistic plasma profiles. According to our theory, optimal thickness condition should be modified in RPA. Furthermore we developed our theory so that RT in the common two-step density plasma can be modeled. In this poster, we present the derivation and the comparison of the improved theory with PIC simulation results. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program (Grant Number NRF-2013R1A1A2006353).

  2. A Novel High Efficient Laser Transmitter Design for a Space-borne Ozone Differential Lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, W. C.; Chen, S.; Petway, L. B.; Marsh, W. D.; Storm, M. E.; Barnes, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    Development of a UV laser transmitter capable of operating from a space platform is a critical step in enabling global earth observations of aerosols and ozone at resolutions greater than current passive instrument capabilities. Tropospheric chemistry is well recognized as the next frontier for global atmospheric measurement. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) have jointly studied the requirements for a satellite based, global ozone monitoring instrument. The study, called Ozone Research using Advanced Cooperative Lidar Experiment (ORACLE) has defined the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) instrument performance, weight and power, and configuration requirements for a space based measurement. In order to achieve the measurement resolution and acceptable signal-to-noise from lidar returns, 500mJ/pulse (5 Watts average power) is required at both 305-308nm and 315-320nm wavelengths. These are consecutive pulses, in a 10 Hz, double-pulsed format. The two wavelengths are used as the on- and off-lines for the ozone DIAL measurement. NASA Langley is currently developing technology for a UV laser transmitter capable of meeting the ORACLE requirements. Experimental efforts to date have shown that the UV generation scheme is viable, and that energies greater than l00mJ/pulse are possible. In this paper, we will briefly discuss the down select process for the proposed laser design, the study effort to date and the laser system design, including both primary and alternate approaches. We will describe UV laser technology that minimizes the total number of optical components (for enhanced reliability) as well as the number of UV coated optics required to transmit the light from the laser (for enhanced optical damage resistance). While the goal is to develop a laser that will produce 500 mJ of energy, we will describe an optional design that will produce output energies between 100 - 200 mJ/unit and techniques for combining multiple laser

  3. A Novel High Efficient Laser Transmitter Design for a Space-borne Ozone Differential Lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, W. C.; Chen, S.; Petway, L. B.; Marsh, W. D.; Storm, M. E.; Barnes, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    Development of a UV laser transmitter capable of operating from a space platform is a critical step in enabling global earth observations of aerosols and ozone at resolutions greater than current passive instrument capabilities. Tropospheric chemistry is well recognized as the next frontier for global atmospheric measurement. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) have jointly studied the requirements for a satellite based, global ozone monitoring instrument. The study, called Ozone Research using Advanced Cooperative Lidar Experiment (ORACLE) has defined the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) instrument performance, weight and power, and configuration requirements for a space based measurement. In order to achieve the measurement resolution and acceptable signal-to-noise from lidar returns, 500mJ/pulse (5 Watts average power) is required at both 305-308nm and 315-320nm wavelengths. These are consecutive pulses, in a 10 Hz, double-pulsed format. The two wavelengths are used as the on- and off-lines for the ozone DIAL measurement. NASA Langley is currently developing technology for a UV laser transmitter capable of meeting the ORACLE requirements. Experimental efforts to date have shown that the UV generation scheme is viable, and that energies greater than l00mJ/pulse are possible. In this paper, we will briefly discuss the down select process for the proposed laser design, the study effort to date and the laser system design, including both primary and alternate approaches. We will describe UV laser technology that minimizes the total number of optical components (for enhanced reliability) as well as the number of UV coated optics required to transmit the light from the laser (for enhanced optical damage resistance). While the goal is to develop a laser that will produce 500 mJ of energy, we will describe an optional design that will produce output energies between 100 - 200 mJ/unit and techniques for combining multiple laser

  4. 2-Micron Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; hide

    2014-01-01

    A 2-micron high energy, pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. Development of this lidar heavily leverages the 2-micron laser technologies developed in LaRC over the last decade. The high pulse energy, direct detection lidar operating at CO2 2-micron absorption band provides an alternate approach to measure CO2 concentrations. This new 2-micron pulsed IPDA lidar has been flown in spring of this year for total ten flights with 27 flight hours. It is able to make measurements of the total amount of atmospheric CO2 from the aircraft to the ground or cloud. It is expected to provide high-precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  5. System testing and performance characterization of the LITE Laser Transmitter Module at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimolino, Marc C.; Petros, Mulugeta

    1992-07-01

    The Laser Transmitter Module (LTM) is a three-color Q-switched flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG laser. The original design concept was to package commercially available optics and flashlamp electronics for spaceflight with a power consumption goal of 2200 W and a weight goal of 600 lbs. The optical output was to exceed 200 mJ of IR, 400 mJ of green, and 150 mJ of UV per pulse at 10 Hz. The new space qualified laser exceeds the optical output requirements by 188 percent, 50 percent, and 13 percent in the UR, green, and UV respectively. This output needs only 1500 W at a weight of only 500 lbs. The LTM was delivered to the NASA Langley Research Center in December 1991. Optical characterization is now being completed.

  6. High energy, single mode, all-solid-state and tunable UV laser transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Singh, Upendra N.; Hovis, Floyd; Armstrong, Darrell J.

    2006-05-01

    NASA is developing state-of-the-art, all-solid-state, conductively cooled, diode-pumped, single longitudinal mode, tunable, short-pulsed, and high energy UV transmitters for ozone sensing measurements based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique. The goal is to demonstrate output pulse energies greater than 200 mJ at pulse repetition frequencies of 10 Hz to 50 Hz, and pulsewidths in the range of 10 ns to 25 ns at UV wavelengths of 308 nm to 320 nm. The proposed scheme is to utilize the robust Nd:YAG pump laser technology in combination with nonlinear optics arrangement comprising of a novel optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and a sum frequency generator (SFG) to generate required UV wavelengths. In this paper, recent results of the development of Nd:YAG pump laser and UV converter module are presented. At 1064 nm, an output pulse energy of 1020 mJ at 16 ns pulsewidth and 50 Hz PRF yielding greater than 7% wall plug efficiency has been demonstrated. With improved drive electronics, this pump laser has the potential to generate greater than 1.2 J/pulse. The refined OPO module to aid in the generation of >200 mJ/pulse of UV radiation is also presented. The UV transmitters are being designed for DIAL operation under strong daylight conditions from space based platforms.

  7. Low SWaP Semiconductor Laser Transmitter Modules For ASCENDS Mission Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Rosiewicz, Alex; Coleman, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The National Research Council's (NRC) Decadal Survey (DS) of Earth Science and Applications from Space has identified the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) as an important atmospheric science mission. NASA Langley Research Center, working with its partners, is developing fiber laser architecture based intensity modulated CW laser absorption spectrometer for measuring XCO2 in the 1571 nm spectral band. In support of this measurement, remote sensing of O2 in the 1260 nm spectral band for surface pressure measurements is also being developed. In this paper, we will present recent progress made in the development of advanced transmitter modules for CO2 and O2 sensing. Advanced DFB seed laser modules incorporating low-noise variable laser bias current supply and low-noise variable temperature control circuit have been developed. The 1571 nm modules operate at >80 mW and could be tuned continuously over the wavelength range of 1569-1574nm at a rate of 2 pm/mV. Fine tuning was demonstrated by adjusting the laser drive at a rate of 0.7 pm/mV. Heterodyne linewidth measurements have been performed showing linewidth 200 kHz and frequency jitter 75 MHz. In the case of 1260 nm DFB laser modules, we have shown continuous tuning over a range of 1261.4 - 1262.6 nm by changing chip operating temperature and 1261.0 - 1262.0 nm by changing the laser diode drive level. In addition, we have created a new laser package configuration which has been shown to improve the TEC coefficient of performance by a factor of 5 and improved the overall efficiency of the laser module by a factor of 2.

  8. Wind Measurements from a High Energy, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection Doppler Lidar and Intercomparison with other sensors deployed during Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra; Koch, Grady; Kavaya, Michael; Yu, Jirong; Beyon, Jeffrey; Demoz, Belay

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of 2-micron laser transmitter development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) for coherent-detection lidar profiling of winds. The novel high-energy, 2-micron, Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser technology developed at NASA Langley was employed to study laser technology currently envisioned by NASA for future global coherent Doppler lidar winds measurement. The 250 mJ, 10 Hz laser was designed as an integral part of a compact lidar transceiver developed for future aircraft flight. Ground-based wind profiles made with this transceiver will be presented. NASA Langley is currently funded to build complete Doppler lidar systems using this transceiver for the DC-8 and WB-57 aircraft. The WB-57 flights will present a more severe environment and will require autonomous operation of the lidar system. The DC-8 lidar system is a likely component of future NASA hurricane research. It will include real-time data processing and display, as well as full data archiving. The LaRC mobile lidar was deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Maryland as part of NASA HQ funded (ROSES-2007, Wind Lidar Science Proposal entitled "Intercomparison of Multiple Lidars for Wind Measurements). During the campaign, testing of the lidar was combined with a field campaign to operate a 2-micron coherent lidar alongside a 355-nm direct detection lidar to demonstrate the hybrid wind lidar concept. Besides lidar, many other meteorological sensors were located at the campaign site, including wind measuring balloon sondes, sonic and propeller anemometers mounted on a tower, and a 915-MHz radio acoustic sounding system. Comparisons among these wind measurement sensors will be presented at the conference.

  9. Multi-Wavelength, Multi-Beam, and Polarization-Sensitive Laser Transmitter for Surface Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Harding, David; Huss, Tim

    2011-01-01

    A multi-beam, multi-color, polarized laser transmitter has been developed for mapping applications. It uses commercial off-the-shelf components for a lowcost approach for a ruggedized laser suitable for field deployment. The laser transmitter design is capable of delivering dual wavelengths, multiple beams on each wavelength with equal (or variable) intensities per beam, and a welldefined state of polarization. This laser transmitter has been flown on several airborne campaigns for the Slope Imaging Multi-Polarization Photon Counting Lidar (SIMPL) instrument, and at the time of this reporting is at a technology readiness level of between 5 and 6. The laser is a 1,064-nm microchip high-repetition-rate laser emitting energy of about 8 microjoules per pulse. The beam was frequency-doubled to 532 nm using a KTP (KTiOPO4) nonlinear crystal [other nonlinear crystals such as LBO (LiB3O5) or periodically poled lithium niobiate can be used as well, depending on the conversion efficiency requirements], and the conversion efficiency was approximately 30 percent. The KTP was under temperature control using a thermoelectric cooler and a feedback monitoring thermistor. The dual-wavelength beams were then spectrally separated and each color went through its own optical path, which consisted of a beam-shaping lens, quarterwave plate (QWP), and a birefringent crystal (in this case, a calcite crystal, but others such as vanadate can be used). The QWP and calcite crystal set was used to convert the laser beams from a linearly polarized state to circularly polarized light, which when injected into a calcite crystal, will spatially separate the circularly polarized light into the two linear polarized components. The spatial separation of the two linearly polarized components is determined by the length of the crystal. A second set of QWP and calcite then further separated the two beams into four. Additional sets of QWP and calcite can be used to further split the beams into multiple

  10. The 1.2 micron CMOS technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pina, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A set of test structures was designed using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) test chip assembler and was used to evaluate the first CMOS-bulk foundry runs with feature sizes of 1.2 microns. In addition to the problems associated with the physical scaling of the structures, this geometry provided an additional set of problems, since the design files had to be generated in such a way as to be capable of being processed through p-well, n-well, and twin-well processing lines. This requirement meant that the files containing the geometric design rules as well as the structure design files had to produce process-insensitive designs, a requirement that does not apply to the more mature 3.0-micron CMOS feature size technology. Because of the photolithographic steps required with this feature size, the maximum allowable chip size was 10 x 10 mm, and this chip was divided into 24 project areas, with each area being 1.6 x 1.6 mm in size. The JPL-designed structures occupied 13 out of the 21 allowable project sizes and provided the only test information obtained from these three preliminary runs. The structures were used to successfully evaluate three different manufacturing runs through two separate foundries.

  11. Development of a Low SWaP Laser Transmitter for lidar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, N.; Rosiewicz, A.; Coleman, S.

    2009-12-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is working on novel lidar schemes to measure carbon dioxide concentrations from space based platforms for Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The National Research Council of the U.S. National Academies in its Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond, has recommended the ASCENDS mission to produce global atmospheric column CO2 measurements without seasonal, latitudinal, or diurnal bias using simultaneous laser remote sensing of CO2 and O2. The goal the ASCENDS mission is to enhance understanding of the role of CO2 in the global carbon cycle that include quantification of global spatial distributions of terrestrial and oceanic sources and sinks of CO2 on 1° x 1° grids. Accurate measurements of atmospheric parameters with high-spatial resolution from ground, airborne, and space-based platforms require advances in the state-of-the-art LIDAR technology with emphasis on compactness, efficiency, reliability, lifetime, and high performance. LaRC has selected the 1.57 micron spectral band for CO2 and 1.26 micron spectral band for oxygen sensing. In this paper, we discuss recent progress made in the development of compact, single mode transmitter technologies for CO2 and O2 lidars. One of our efforts is to demonstrate compact, efficient DFB laser modules with integrated drive and temperature control circuitry that minimizes laser linewidth, allows for wavelength tunability, and is adaptable to space qualified electronic hardware. Since ASCENDS is in essence a spectroscopic mission, precise tunability of the laser diode wavelength over transition lines is of importance. The overall goal is to reduce the overall size, weight, and power consumption (SWaP) of the laser master oscillator. In this paper, the development of advanced DFB laser diode module efficiently coupled to integrated electronics and nano-cooling scheme in a

  12. development of a medium repetition rate (10 Hz - 500 Hz) diode pumped laser transmitter for airborne scanning altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Lindauer, Steven J., II; Kay, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA has developed several small, all-solid state lasers of low repetition rates for use as transmitters in prototype LIDAR and raster scanned altimetry retrieval systems. Our early laser transmitters were developed for high resolution airborne altimetry which employed cavity dumping techniques to produce a pulse shape with a 1 ns rise time. The first such laser was the SUMR (Sub-millimeter resolution) transmitter which used a side pumped, D-shaped half-rod of Nd:YAG for the oscillator active media and produced approximately 3 ns pulses of 100 micro-J energy at a 40 Hz repetition rate. (Coyle and Blair, 1993; Coyle et al., 1995) After several upgrades to improve rep rate and pulse energy, the final version produced 1.2 mJ pulses at 120 Hz with a 3.7 ns pulse width. The laser has become known as SPLT (Sharp Pulsed Laser Transmitter), and has flown successfully on a variety of airborne altimetry missions. (Coyle and Blair, 1995; Blair et al., 1994) From building these systems, we have accrued valuable experience in delivering field-deployable lasers and have become aware of the advantages and disadvantages of employing new technologies. For example, even though the laser's main operating environment is in a "cold" aircraft during flight, the laser must still operate in very warm temperatures. This is important if the mission is based in the desert or a tropical climate since ground calibration data from stationary targets must be gathered before and after each data flight. Because conductive cooling is much more convenient than closed loop water flow, achieving the highest possible laser efficiency is becoming a high priority when designing a flight laser. This is especially true for lasers with higher pulse energies and repetition rates which are needed for high altitude scanning altimeters and LIDARs.

  13. development of a medium repetition rate (10 Hz - 500 Hz) diode pumped laser transmitter for airborne scanning altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Lindauer, Steven J., II; Kay, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA has developed several small, all-solid state lasers of low repetition rates for use as transmitters in prototype LIDAR and raster scanned altimetry retrieval systems. Our early laser transmitters were developed for high resolution airborne altimetry which employed cavity dumping techniques to produce a pulse shape with a 1 ns rise time. The first such laser was the SUMR (Sub-millimeter resolution) transmitter which used a side pumped, D-shaped half-rod of Nd:YAG for the oscillator active media and produced approximately 3 ns pulses of 100 micro-J energy at a 40 Hz repetition rate. (Coyle and Blair, 1993; Coyle et al., 1995) After several upgrades to improve rep rate and pulse energy, the final version produced 1.2 mJ pulses at 120 Hz with a 3.7 ns pulse width. The laser has become known as SPLT (Sharp Pulsed Laser Transmitter), and has flown successfully on a variety of airborne altimetry missions. (Coyle and Blair, 1995; Blair et al., 1994) From building these systems, we have accrued valuable experience in delivering field-deployable lasers and have become aware of the advantages and disadvantages of employing new technologies. For example, even though the laser's main operating environment is in a "cold" aircraft during flight, the laser must still operate in very warm temperatures. This is important if the mission is based in the desert or a tropical climate since ground calibration data from stationary targets must be gathered before and after each data flight. Because conductive cooling is much more convenient than closed loop water flow, achieving the highest possible laser efficiency is becoming a high priority when designing a flight laser. This is especially true for lasers with higher pulse energies and repetition rates which are needed for high altitude scanning altimeters and LIDARs.

  14. Analysis and design of a high power laser adaptive phased array transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mevers, G. E.; Soohoo, J. F.; Winocur, J.; Massie, N. A.; Southwell, W. H.; Brandewie, R. A.; Hayes, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of delivering substantial quantities of optical power to a satellite in low earth orbit from a ground based high energy laser (HEL) coupled to an adaptive antenna was investigated. Diffraction effects, atmospheric transmission efficiency, adaptive compensation for atmospheric turbulence effects, including the servo bandwidth requirements for this correction, and the adaptive compensation for thermal blooming were examined. To evaluate possible HEL sources, atmospheric investigations were performed for the CO2, (C-12)(O-18)2 isotope, CO and DF wavelengths using output antenna locations of both sea level and mountain top. Results indicate that both excellent atmospheric and adaption efficiency can be obtained for mountain top operation with a micron isotope laser operating at 9.1 um, or a CO laser operating single line (P10) at about 5.0 (C-12)(O-18)2um, which was a close second in the evaluation. Four adaptive power transmitter system concepts were generated and evaluated, based on overall system efficiency, reliability, size and weight, advanced technology requirements and potential cost. A multiple source phased array was selected for detailed conceptual design. The system uses a unique adaption technique of phase locking independent laser oscillators which allows it to be both relatively inexpensive and most reliable with a predicted overall power transfer efficiency of 53%.

  15. Influence of beam wander on uplink of ground-to-satellite laser communication and optimization for transmitter beam radius.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Luo, Bin; Ren, Yongxiong; Zhao, Sinan; Dang, Anhong

    2010-06-15

    We restudy the influence of beam wander on the uplink of ground-to-satellite laser communication, using the effective pointing error method, for a collimated untracked Gaussian beam under a weak atmospheric turbulence condition. It shows that the beam wander may cause significant increase in bit error rate (BER), and there exists an optimal transmitter radius for minimizing the value of BER. Further studies manifest that this optimal radius only changes with the laser wavelength and zenith angle, while independent on the satellite altitude and the fade threshold at the receiver. These results can be used in system design and optimization for the transmitter.

  16. Wind Profiling from a High Energy, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection Doppler Lidar during Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, U. N.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.; Yu, J.; Beyon, J. Y.; Demoz, B.

    2009-12-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. The transmitter portion of the transceiver employs the high-pulse-energy, Ho:Tm:LuLiF, partially conductively cooled laser technology developed at NASA Langley. The transceiver is capable of 250 mJ pulses at 10 Hz. It is very similar to the technology envisioned for coherent Doppler lidar wind measurements from Earth and Mars orbit. The transceiver is coupled to the large optics and data acquisition system in the NASA Langley VALIDAR mobile trailer. The large optics consists of a 15-cm off-axis beam expanding telescope, and a full-hemispheric scanner. Vertical and horizontal vector winds are measured, as well as relative backscatter. The data acquisition system employs frequency domain velocity estimation and pulse accumulation. It permits real-time display of the processed winds and archival of all data. The LaRC mobile lidar was deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Maryland as part of NASA HQ funded (ROSES-2007, Wind Lidar Science Proposal entitled “Intercomparison of Multiple Lidars for Wind Measurements). During the campaign, testing of the lidar was combined with a field campaign to operate a 2-μm coherent lidar alongside a 355-nm direct detection lidar to demonstrate the hybrid wind lidar concept. Besides lidar, many other meteorological sensors were located at the campaign site, including wind measuring balloon sondes, sonic and propeller anemometers mounted on a tower, and a 915-MHz radio acoustic sounding system. Comparisons among these wind measurement sensors are currently being analyzed and should be available for presentation at the Conference.

  17. Roles of the 2 microns gene products in stable maintenance of the 2 microns plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, A E; Murray, A W; Szostak, J W

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the replication and segregation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 2 microns circle. The amplification of the plasmid at low copy numbers requires site-specific recombination between the 2 microns inverted repeat sequences catalyzed by the plasmid-encoded FLP gene. No other 2 microns gene products are required. The overexpression of FLP in a strain carrying endogenous 2 microns leads to uncontrolled plasmid replication, longer cell cycles, and cell death. Two different assays show that the level of Flp activity decreases with increasing 2 microns copy number. This regulation requires the products of the REP1 and REP2 genes. These gene products also act together to ensure that 2 microns molecules are randomly segregated between mother and daughter cells at cell division. Images PMID:3316982

  18. First successful satellite laser ranging with a fibre-based transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampf, D.; Sproll, F.; Wagner, P.; Humbert, L.; Hasenohr, T.; Riede, W.

    2016-08-01

    Satellite laser ranging (SLR) is an established technology used for geodesy, fundamental science and precise orbit determination. This paper reports on the first successful SLR measurement from the German Aerospace Center research observatory in Stuttgart. While many SLR stations are in operation, the experiment described here is unique in several ways: The modular system has been assembled completely from commercial off-the-shelf components, which increases flexibility and significantly reduces hardware costs. To our knowledge it has been the first time that an SLR measurement has been conducted using an optical fibre rather than a coudé path to direct the light from the laser source onto the telescope. The transmitter operates at an output power of about 75 mW and a repetition rate of 3 kHz, and at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Due to its rather small diameter of only 80 μm, the receiver detector features a low noise rate of less than 2 kHz and can be operated without gating in many cases. With this set-up, clear return signals have been received from several orbital objects equipped with retroreflectors. In its current configuration, the system does not yet achieve the same performance as other SLR systems in terms of precision, maximum distance and the capability of daylight ranging; however, plans to overcome these limitations are outlined.

  19. Transmitter and receiver antenna gain analysis for laser radar and communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, B. J.; Degnan, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive and fairly self-contained study of centrally obscured optical transmitting and receiving antennas is presented and is intended for use by the laser radar and communication systems designer. The material is presented in a format which allows the rapid and accurate evaluation of antenna gain. The Fresnel approximation to scalar wave theory is reviewed and the antenna analysis proceeds in terms of the power gain. Conventional range equations may then be used to calculate the power budget. The transmitter calculations, resulting in near and far field antenna gain patterns, assumes the antenna is illuminated by a laser operating in the fundamental cavity mode. A simple equation is derived for matching the incident source distribution to a general antenna configuration for maximum on-axis gain. An interpretation of the resultant gain curves allows a number of auxiliary design curves to be drawn which display the losses in antenna gain due to pointing errors and the cone angle of the outgoing beam as a function of antenna size and central obscuration. The use of telescope defocusing as an approach to spreading the beam for target acquisition is compared to some alternate methods.

  20. Record Pulsed Power Demonstration of a 2 micron GaSb-Based Optically Pumped Semiconductor Laser Grown Lattice-Mismatched on an AlAs/GaAs Bragg Mirror and Substrate (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    semiconductor disk lasers OPSL or, equivalently, vertical external cavity surface emitting semi- conductor lasers VECSEL , are emerging as novel sources...wavelengths in TEM00 beams. Direct genera- tion of red light at 670 nm with powers close to 0.5 W has also been demonstrated.4 These VECSEL structures...growth of InGaSb QW stacks on AlGaSb/GaSb Bragg mirrors. The latter have been employed to demonstrate 3–5 W VECSEL lasing between 2 and 2.3 m.5 Two

  1. Photocurrent spectroscopy analysis of widely tunable negative-chirp quantum-well intermixed laser-modulator transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, G. B.; Raring, J. W.; Skogen, E. J.; Wang, C. S.; Coldren, L. A.

    2005-02-01

    High-speed laser-modulator transmitters fabricated using InGaAsP quantum-well intermixing exhibit negative chirp over a wavelength range of more than 30nm. Photocurrent spectroscopy is used to examine the multiple band edges in these devices. An exciton peak is found in the photocurrent data, and the evolution of the band edge as a function of quantum-well intermixing and applied bias voltage is revealed. The photocurrent data are then exploited to verify and explain the negative chirp characteristics of the wavelength-agile transmitters.

  2. Loss of transmittance in fluoropolymer films due to laser-induced damage at 1053 and 351-nm

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, P.; Milam, D.; Norton, M.; Sell, W.

    1997-12-01

    Thick fluoropolymer films are being evaluated as a potential `disposable` debris shield to protect high-peak-power laser optics from x-ray and target debris generated in inertial-confinement fusion-ignition experiments, Two obstacles to implementation are optical uniformity and damage threshold. To understand the damage characteristics, transmittance of single 1053- or 351-nm laser pulses has been measured for commercial fluoropolymer films in vacuum. Samples were tested at fluences up to 105 J/cm2 at 1053-nm and 13 J/cm2 at 351-nm. Both the total transmitted energy for a single shot and the temporal energy transmittance profile during the shot were measured as a function of fluence. In addition, the total focusable transmitted energy was recorded for 351 -nm pulses. Results show that transmittance decreases slowly during a single-pulse irradiation, allowing much of the energy to be transmitted at fluences which cause noticeable degradation to the film. The film transmits greater than 90% of the 351-nm energy delivered in a beam with spatial average fluence of 8 J/cm2 with modulation up to 15 J/cm2. For 1053-nm laser light, the films do not begin to exhibit noticeable transmittance loss until average fluences exceed 40 J/cm2.

  3. Miniature long-range light beam transmitter resorting to a high-power broad area laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Wenjing; Lee, Sang-Shin

    2014-08-01

    A miniature long-range light beam transmitter, which taps into a high-power broad area laser diode (BALD), was realized to exhibit a uniform detectable width. An effective model was proposed to practically emulate the multimode characteristics of the beam generated by the BALD. The model, solely based on the emitting region and far-field divergence angle pertaining to the LD, is established through an incoherent superposition of multiple normalized Hermit-Gaussian modes. The feasibility of the proposed model was successfully verified in terms of the calculated and observed irradiance distributions of the light beams. A long-range light beam transmitter was then designed and constructed taking advantage of the BALD source in conjunction with a beam shaper. The manufactured transmitter was corroborated to provide an infrared beam with a constant detectable width of ~1 m, over a distance ranging up to 400 m, for a predefined threshold level.

  4. The 10 micrometer transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, fabrication tests, and engineering model components of a 10.6 mum wideband transceiver system are reported. The effort emphasized the transmitter subsystem, including the development of the laser, the modulator driver, and included productization of both the transmitter and local oscillator lasers. The transmitter subsystem is functionally compatible with the receiver engineering model terminal, and has undergone high data rate communication system testing against that terminal.

  5. Development of collision avoidance system for useful UAV applications using image sensors with laser transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, M. K.; Bahiki, M. R.; Azrad, S.

    2016-10-01

    The main goal of this study is to demonstrate the approach of achieving collision avoidance on Quadrotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (QUAV) using image sensors with colour- based tracking method. A pair of high definition (HD) stereo cameras were chosen as the stereo vision sensor to obtain depth data from flat object surfaces. Laser transmitter was utilized to project high contrast tracking spot for depth calculation using common triangulation. Stereo vision algorithm was developed to acquire the distance from tracked point to QUAV and the control algorithm was designed to manipulate QUAV's response based on depth calculated. Attitude and position controller were designed using the non-linear model with the help of Optitrack motion tracking system. A number of collision avoidance flight tests were carried out to validate the performance of the stereo vision and control algorithm based on image sensors. In the results, the UAV was able to hover with fairly good accuracy in both static and dynamic collision avoidance for short range collision avoidance. Collision avoidance performance of the UAV was better with obstacle of dull surfaces in comparison to shiny surfaces. The minimum collision avoidance distance achievable was 0.4 m. The approach was suitable to be applied in short range collision avoidance.

  6. Fringe mode transmittance laser Doppler microscope anemometer: its adaptation for measurement in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Einav, S; Berman, H J

    1988-10-01

    Blood flow analysis in the microcirculation requires accurate measurement of velocity, volume flow and shear-rate versus shear-stress relationships. The resolution of most anemometers is too limited to obtain useful measurements, especially near the blood vessel wall and at branches and bifurcations. To make such measurements possible with a noninvasive, high resolution, accurate technique, we have developed a fringe mode, transmittance laser Doppler microscope anemometer (LDMA). This system has an intrinsically high spatial resolution (10 x 12 microns), and does not require a high concentration (10(6)/cm3) of scatters or red blood cells (RBC) as in our application. Preliminary measurements of water flow in a rectangular channel were conducted to ascertain the reliability and accuracy of velocity measurements using the LDMA. Velocity profiles were then measured by the LDMA system in arterioles 38-135 microns in diameter, in the transparent, everted cheek pouch of the anaesthetized hamster. The extremely high resolution of the optical system, and the ultra-fine traversing mechanism of the microscope stage, made velocity readings larger than 0.02 mm/s with accuracy and reproducibility better than 1%, possible near the wall to within 7-10 microns.

  7. Fiber-Based Laser Transmitter at 1.57 Micrometers for Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide from Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Abshire, James B.; Stephen, Mark A.; Chen, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Stewart; Gonzalez, Brayler; Han, Lawrence; Numata, Kenji; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William; Nicholson, Jeffrey W.; Yan, Man; Wisk, Patrick; DeSantolo, Anthony; DeSantolo, Anthony; Mangan, Brian; Puc, Gabe; Engin, Doruk; Mathason, Brian; Storm, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, NASA Goddard has successfully developed space-based lidar for remote sensing studies of the Earth and planets. The lidar in all missions to date have used diode pumped Nd:YAG laser transmitters. Recently we have been concentrating work on developing integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar to measure greenhouse gases, with the goal of measurements from space. Due to the absorption spectrum of CO2 a fiber-based master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser with a tunable seed source is an attractive laser choice. Fiber-based lasers offer a number of potential advantages for space, but since they are relatively new, challenges exist in developing them. In order to reduce risks for new missions using fiber-based lasers, we developed a 30- month plan to mature the technology of a candidate laser transmitter for space-based CO2 measurements to TRL-6. This work is also intended to reduce development time and costs and increase confidence in future mission success.

  8. Data Acquisition and Processing System for Airborne Wind Profiling with a Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, J. Y.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    A data acquisition and signal processing system is being developed for a 2-micron airborne wind profiling coherent Doppler lidar system. This lidar, called the Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN), is based on a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser transmitter and 15-cm diameter telescope. It is being packaged for flights onboard the NASA DC-8, with the first flights in the summer of 2010 in support of the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign for the study of hurricanes. The data acquisition and processing system is housed in a compact PCI chassis and consists of four components such as a digitizer, a digital signal processing (DSP) module, a video controller, and a serial port controller. The data acquisition and processing software (DAPS) is also being developed to control the system including real-time data analysis and display. The system detects an external 10 Hz trigger pulse and initiates the data acquisition and processing process, and displays selected wind profile parameters such as Doppler shift, power distribution, wind directions and velocities. Doppler shift created by aircraft motion is measured by an inertial navigation/GPS sensor and fed to the signal processing system for real-time removal of aircraft effects from wind measurements. A general overview of the system and the DAPS as well as the coherent Doppler lidar system is presented in this paper.

  9. Chirp-managed lasers as cost-efficient transmitters for 10-Gbit/s WDM-PONs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang Trung; Emsia, Ali; Briggmann, Dieter; Küppers, Franko

    2013-01-01

    Chirp-managed lasers (CML) are demonstrated as simple low-cost transmitter with high tolerance to chromatic dispersion. This manuscript proposes the use of CML as cost-effective downstream (DS) transmitters for next generation access networks. The laser chirp, which is the main drawback limiting the transmission performance of directly modulated lasers, is now used to generate differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) modulation format by direct modulation. The network architecture using CML as downstream DPSK transmitter is proposed. Bit­ error-rate measurement showed that an optical power budget of 36 dB could be obtained with direct phase-shift­ keying modulation ofCML which proves that the proposed solution is a strong candidate for future WDM-PONs. Budget-extended WDM-PON configuration is also demonstrated using Saturated Collision Amplifier, which is an amplification scheme that uses SOA saturation in order to maximize the output power and minimize the ASE noise and the polarization sensitivity. The extension scheme is demonstrated for four-wavelength 10 Gbit/s unidirectional downstream configuration with 60-dB maximum total optical budget for each wavelength.

  10. Progress of 2-micron Detectors for Application to Lidar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Ismail, Syed; Koch, Grady; Singh, Upendra N.

    2008-01-01

    AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb heterojunction phototransistors were developed at Astropower, Inc under Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) for operation in the 2-micron region. These phototransistors were optimized for 2-micron detection and have high quantum efficiency (>60%), high gain (>10(exp 3)) and low noise-equivalent- power (<5x10(exp -14) W/Hz), while operating at low bias voltage. One of these phototransistors was tested in lidar mode using the 2-micron CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system currently under development under the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) at NASA Langley. Lidar measurements included detecting atmospheric structures consisting of thin clouds in the mid-altitude and near-field boundary layer. These test results are very promising for the application of phototransistors for the two-micron lidar remote sensing. In addition, HgCdTe avalanche photodiodes (APD) acquired from Raytheon were used in atmospheric testing at 2-microns. A discussion of these measurements is also presented in this paper.

  11. Target Calibration: Retro-Reflection Mechanisms at 2 Micron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haner, David A.; Tratt, David M.

    1999-01-01

    With the growing use of 2-micrometer eye-safe solid-state laser transmitters in coherent Doppler lidar applications, there is increased interest in the reflectance properties of hard target calibration materials at this wavelength. One of the factors to be considered is the polarization characteristic of the transmitter/receiver. The two fundamental lidar systems are either based upon the backscattering of linearly polarized or circularly polarized light. Consequently, the response of calibration materials to the particular state of polarization of the incident radiation is an important consideration. Ideally the calibration materials should have a similar reflectance response to that of the remote scattering medium that is being observed. Also the material should be most efficiently adapted to the polarization characteristics of the lidar system. There are two measurement parameters that are useful in presenting the characteristics of polarization of reflecting materials. The first is the linear polarization ratio: mu (sub l) =I (sub ol)/I (sub sl), where ol denotes opposite linear and sl denotes same linear. The second is circular polarization ratio: mu (sub c) = I (sub sc)/I (sub oc) where ol denotes opposite circular and sc denotes same circular. Notice that the ratios are inverted with respect to same polarization. It is the relative values of these polarization ratios that are used to characterize the retro-reflectance mechanism. Measurement of these parameters is conveniently obtained by using the Stokes vectors corresponding to the polarized backscatter at and near the retro-angle.

  12. Wavelength Locking to CO2 Absorption Line-Center for 2-Micron Pulsed IPDA Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Antill, Charles W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    An airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). This IPDA lidar system targets both atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) column measurements. Independent wavelength control of each of the transmitted laser pulses is a key feature for the success of this instrument. The wavelength control unit provides switching, tuning and locking for each pulse in reference to a 2-micron CW (Continuous Wave) laser source locked to CO2 line-center. Targeting the CO2 R30 line center, at 2050.967 nanometers, a wavelength locking unit has been integrated using semiconductor laser diode. The CO2 center-line locking unit includes a laser diode current driver, temperature controller, center-line locking controller and CO2 absorption cell. This paper presents the CO2 center-line locking unit architecture, characterization procedure and results. Assessment of wavelength jitter on the IPDA measurement error will also be addressed by comparison to the system design.

  13. Laser transmitter design and performance for the slope imaging multi-polarization photon-counting lidar (SIMPL) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Harding, David J.; Dabney, Philip W.

    2016-03-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar (SIMPL) is a polarimetric, two-color, multi-beam push broom laser altimeter developed through the NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program. It has flown successfully on multiple airborne platforms beginning in 2008.1 It was developed to demonstrate new altimetry capabilities that combine height measurements and information about surface composition and properties. In this talk we will discuss the laser transmitter design and performance and present recent science data collected over the Greenland ice sheet and arctic sea ice in support of the second NASA Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat-2) mission to be launched in 2017.2

  14. The Ganymede Laser Altimeter - Instrument Design Overview with Radiation hard Transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althaus, C.; Hussmann, H.; Lingenauber, K.; Michaelis, H.; Kallenbach, R.; Oberst, J.

    2016-10-01

    The Ganymede Laser Altimeter (GALA) onboard of JUICE mission shall investigate Ganymede. A laser provides the measuring signal and has therefore to be robust and reliable in the environment of Jupiter, in particular with regard to radiation.

  15. 2.5 MHz Line-Width High-energy, 2 Micrometer Coherent Wind Lidar Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2007-01-01

    2 micron solid-state lasers are the primary choice for coherent Doppler wind detection. As wind lidars, they are used for wake vortex and clear air turbulence detection providing air transport safety. In addition, 2 micron lasers are one of the candidates for CO2 detection lidars. The rich CO2 absorption line around 2 micron, combined with the long upper state life of time, has made Ho based 2 micron lasers a viable candidate for CO2 sensing DIAL instrument. The design and fabrication of a compact coherent laser radar transmitter for Troposphere wind sensing is under way. This system is hardened for ground as well as airborne applications. As a transmitter for a coherent wind lidar, this laser has stringent spectral line width and beam quality requirements. Although the absolute wavelength does not have to be fixed for wind detection, to maximize return signal, the output wavelength should avoid atmospheric CO2 and H2O absorption lines. The base line laser material is Ho:Tm:LuLF which is an isomorph of Ho:Tm:YLF. LuLF produces 20% more output power than Ho:Tm:YLF. In these materials the Tm absorption cross-section, the Ho emission cross-section, the Tm to Ho energy transfer parameters and the Ho (sup 5) I (sub 7) radiative life time are all identical. However, the improved performance of the LuLF is attributed to the lower thermal population in the (sup 5) I (sub 8) manifold. It also provides higher normal mode to Q-switch conversion than YLF at high pump energy indicating a lower up-conversion. The laser architecture is composed of a seed laser, a ring oscillator, and a double pass amplifier. The seed laser is a single longitudinal mode with a line width of 13 KHz. The 100mJ class oscillator is stretched to 3 meters to accommodate the line-width requirement without compromising the range resolution of the instrument. The amplifier is double passed to produce greater than 300mJ energy.

  16. Demonstration of a free-space optical communication system using a solar-pumped laser as signal transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Z.; Zhao, C. M.; Yang, S. H.; Wang, Y.; Ke, J. Y.; Zhang, H. Y.

    2017-05-01

    A free-space optical communication system with a sun light directly pumped laser as the signal transmitter was demonstrated. A 0.6  ×  0.6 m Fresnel lens was used as the primary concentrator to collect the solar light. 6.8 W continuous wave laser power was obtained from a 4 mm diameter grooved Nd:YAG rod. The output intensity was modulated with a video signal via a LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder optoelectronic modulator. The video signal with a resolution of 1920  *  1080/frame and the frame rate of 25 Hz was transmitted over five-meter free-space in real time with high fidelity. The transmission rate was 125 Mbps and bit error rate was lower than 10-6. This research shows the feasibility of applying a solar light directly pumped laser for free-space optical communication, which is significant for telecommunications between satellites.

  17. Laser Atmospheric Transmitter Receiver-Network (LAnTeRN): A new approach for active measurement of atmospheric greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobler, J. T.; Braun, M.; Zaccheo, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Laser Atmospheric Transmitter Receiver-Network (LAnTeRN) is a new measurement concept that will enable local, regional and continental determination of key greenhouse gases, with unparalleled accuracy and precision. This new approach will offer the ability to make low bias, high precision, quasi-continuous, measurements to the accuracies required for separating anthropogenic and biogenic sources and sinks. In 2004 ITT Exelis developed an airborne demonstration unit, based on an intensity modulated continuous wave (IM-CW) lidar approach, for actively measuring atmospheric CO2 and O2. The multi-functional fiber laser lidar (MFLL) system relies on low peak power, high reliability, and efficient telecom laser components to implement this unique measurement approach. While evaluating methods for discriminating against thin clouds for the MFLL instrument, a new measurement concept was conceived. LAnTeRN has several fundamental characteristics in common with the MFLL instrument, but is a fundamentally different implementation and capability. The key difference is that LAnTeRN operates in transmission rather than in the traditional backscatter lidar configuration, which has several distinct advantages. Operating as a forward scatter, bistatic lidar system, LAnTeRN enables consideration of continuous monitoring from a geostationary orbit to multiple locations on the ground. Having the receivers on the ground significantly lowers cost and risk compared to an all space based mission, and allows the transmitter subsystem to be implemented, near term, as a hosted payload. Furthermore, the LAnTeRN measurement approach is also applicable for ground to ground measurements where high precision measurements over a long open path is required, such as facilities monitoring, or monitoring of passive volcanoes and fault lines. Using narrow linewidth laser sources allows flexibility to select the position on the absorption feature being probed. This feature allows for weighting the

  18. High Energy, Single-Mode, All-Solid-State and Tunable UV Laser Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Singh, Upendra N.; Hovis, FLoyd

    2007-01-01

    A high energy, single mode, all solid-state Nd:YAG laser primarily for pumping an UV converter is developed. Greater than 1 J/pulse at 50 HZ PRF and pulse widths around 22 ns have been demonstrated. Higher energy, greater efficiency may be possible. Refinements are known and practical to implement. Technology Demonstration of a highly efficient, high-pulse-energy, single mode UV wavelength generation using flash lamp pumped laser has been achieved. Greater than 90% pump depletion is observed. 190 mJ extra-cavity SFG; IR to UV efficiency > 21% (> 27% for 1 mJ seed). 160 mJ intra-cavity SFG; IR to UV efficiency up to 24% Fluence < 1 J/sq cm for most beams. The pump beam quality of the Nd:YAG pump laser is being refined to match or exceed the above UV converter results. Currently the Nd:YAG pump laser development is a technology demonstration. System can be engineered for compact packaging.

  19. Mars Atmospheric Characterization Using Advanced 2-Micron Orbiting Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, U.; Engelund, W.; Refaat, T.; Kavaya, M.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.

    2015-01-01

    Mars atmospheric characterization is critical for exploring the planet. Future Mars missions require landing massive payloads to the surface with high accuracy. The accuracy of entry, descent and landing (EDL) of a payload is a major technical challenge for future Mars missions. Mars EDL depends on atmospheric conditions such as density, wind and dust as well as surface topography. A Mars orbiting 2-micron lidar system is presented in this paper. This advanced lidar is capable of measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles using the most abundant atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on Mars. In addition Martian winds and surface altimetry can be mapped, independent of background radiation or geographical location. This orbiting lidar is a valuable tool for developing EDL models for future Mars missions.

  20. Infrared spectrum of Io, 2.8-5.2 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    1980-01-01

    The reflectance spectrum of Io is presented from 2.8 to 5.2 microns demonstrating the full extent of the broad and deep spectral absorption between 3.5 and 4.8 microns. Laboratory spectra of nitrates and carbonates diluted with sulfur do not satisfactorily reproduce the Io spectrum, but new information based on recently discovered volcanic activity on the satellite lead to consideration of other classes of compounds reported by Fanale et al. (1979). It is concluded that the variability of the supply of condensible SO2 gas to the surface of Io, its removal by sublimination, and the temporal variations in the strength of the SO2 band may provide an index of volcanic activity on Io that can be monitored from the earth.

  1. Photometric variability of Charon at 2.2 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosh, A. S.; Young, L. A.; Elliot, J. L.; Hammel, H. B.; Baron, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    Pluto-Charon images obtained on each of four nights at 2.2, 1.2, and 1.7 microns are presently fitted by a two-source image model in which the position of Charon and the ratio of its signal to that of Pluto are free parameters. At 2.2 microns, Charon is fainter than Pluto by magnitudes which, when combined with Pluto-Charon system photometry, yield apparent magnitudes of 15.01 + or - 0.08 for Charon at 0.06 lightcurve phase and 15.46 + or - 0.05 at lightcurve phase 0.42. In view of these results, Charon is variable in this filter bypass due to geometric albedo changes as a function of longitude.

  2. Design and Performance of the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) Laser Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Kay, Richard B.; Lindauer, Steven J., II

    2002-01-01

    The Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) laser is a Nd:YAG Q-switched, diode side-pumped, zig-zag slab design producing 10 ns, 15 mJ pulses at 1064 nm. It employs an unstable resonator as well as a graded reflectivity output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile. In order to conserve power, a conductively cooled design is employed and is designed to operate over a range of 25 C without active thermal control. The laser is an oscillator-only design and equipped with an 15X beam expander to limit the output divergence to less than 60 microrad. Thermal lensing compensation in the side-pumped slab was performed with different treatments of the x and y portions of the z-directed beam. Performance data as a function of temperature are given.

  3. Side-line tunable laser transmitter for differential absorption lidar measurements of CO2: design and application to atmospheric measurements.

    PubMed

    Koch, Grady J; Beyon, Jeffrey Y; Gibert, Fabien; Barnes, Bruce W; Ismail, Syed; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J; Yu, Jirong; Modlin, Edward A; Davis, Kenneth J; Singh, Upendra N

    2008-03-01

    A 2 microm wavelength, 90 mJ, 5 Hz pulsed Ho laser is described with wavelength control to precisely tune and lock the wavelength at a desired offset up to 2.9 GHz from the center of a CO(2) absorption line. Once detuned from the line center the laser wavelength is actively locked to keep the wavelength within 1.9 MHz standard deviation about the setpoint. This wavelength control allows optimization of the optical depth for a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measuring atmospheric CO(2) concentrations. The laser transmitter has been coupled with a coherent heterodyne receiver for measurements of CO(2) concentration using aerosol backscatter; wind and aerosols are also measured with the same lidar and provide useful additional information on atmospheric structure. Range-resolved CO(2) measurements were made with <2.4% standard deviation using 500 m range bins and 6.7 min? (1000 pulse pairs) integration time. Measurement of a horizontal column showed a precision of the CO(2) concentration to <0.7% standard deviation using a 30 min? (4500 pulse pairs) integration time, and comparison with a collocated in situ sensor showed the DIAL to measure the same trend of a diurnal variation and to detect shorter time scale CO(2) perturbations. For vertical column measurements the lidar was setup at the WLEF tall tower site in Wisconsin to provide meteorological profiles and to compare the DIAL measurements with the in situ sensors distributed on the tower up to 396 m height. Assuming the DIAL column measurement extending from 153 m altitude to 1353 m altitude should agree with the tower in situ sensor at 396 m altitude, there was a 7.9 ppm rms difference between the DIAL and the in situ sensor using a 30 min? rolling average on the DIAL measurement.

  4. Advanced topographic laser altimeter system (ATLAS) receiver telescope assembly (RTA) and transmitter alignment and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagopian, John; Bolcar, Matthew; Chambers, John; Crane, Allen; Eegholm, Bente; Evans, Tyler; Hetherington, Samuel; Mentzell, Eric; Thompson, Patrick L.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Vaughnn, David

    2016-09-01

    The sole instrument on NASA's ICESat-2 spacecraft shown in Figure 1 will be the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS)1. The ATLAS is a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) instrument; it measures the time of flight of the six transmitted laser beams to the Earth and back to determine altitude for geospatial mapping of global ice. The ATLAS laser beam is split into 6 main beams by a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) that are reflected off of the earth and imaged by an 800 mm diameter Receiver Telescope Assembly (RTA). The RTA is composed of a 2-mirror telescope and Aft Optics Assembly (AOA) that collects and focuses the light from the 6 probe beams into 6 science fibers. Each fiber optic has a field of view on the earth that subtends 83 micro Radians. The light collected by each fiber is detected by a photomultiplier and timing related to a master clock to determine time of flight and therefore distance. The collection of the light from the 6 laser spots projected to the ground allows for dense cross track sampling to provide for slope measurements of ice fields. NASA LIDAR instruments typically utilize telescopes that are not diffraction limited since they function as a light collector rather than imaging function. The more challenging requirements of the ATLAS instrument require better performance of the telescope at the ¼ wave level to provide for improved sampling and signal to noise. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) contracted the build of the telescope to General Dynamics (GD). GD fabricated and tested the flight and flight spare telescope and then integrated the government supplied AOA for testing of the RTA before and after vibration qualification. The RTA was then delivered to GSFC for independent verification and testing over expected thermal vacuum conditions. The testing at GSFC included a measurement of the RTA wavefront error and encircled energy in several orientations to determine the expected zero gravity figure, encircled

  5. Hydrogenation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as a factor affecting the cosmic 6.2 micron emission band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, L. W.; Wdowiak, T. J.; Harrison, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    While many of the characteristics of the cosmic unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands observed for interstellar and circumstellar sources within the Milky Way and other galaxies, can be best attributed to vibrational modes of the variants of the molecular family known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), there are open questions that need to be resolved. Among them is the observed strength of the 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) band relative to other strong bands, and the generally low strength for measurements in the laboratory of the 1600 cm(-1) skeletal vibration band of many specific neutral PAH molecules. Also, experiments involving laser excitation of some gas phase neutral PAH species while producing long lifetime state emission in the 3.3 micron (3000 cm(-1)) spectral region, do not result in significant 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) emission. A potentially important variant of the neutral PAH species, namely hydrogenated-PAH (H(N)-PAH) which exhibit intriguing spectral correlation with interstellar and circumstellar infrared emission and the 2175 A extinction feature, may be a factor affecting the strength of 6.2 micron emission. These species are hybrids of aromatic and cycloalkane structures. Laboratory infrared absorption spectroscopy augmented by density function theory (DFT) computations of selected partially hydrogenated-PAH molecules, demonstrates enhanced 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) region skeletal vibration mode strength for these molecules relative to the normal PAH form. This along with other factors such as ionization or the incorporation of nitrogen or oxygen atoms could be a reason for the strength of the cosmic 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) feature.

  6. Multi-Wavelength Laser Transmitter for the Two-Step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Li, Steven X.; Fahey, Molly E.; Grubisic, Andrej; Farcy, Benjamin J.; Uckert, Kyle; Li, Xiang; Getty, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Missions to diverse Outer Solar System bodies will require investigations that can detect a wide range of organics in complex mixtures, determine the structure of selected molecules, and provide powerful insights into their origin and evolution. Previous studies from remote spectroscopy of the Outer Solar System showed a diverse population of macromolecular species that are likely to include aromatic and conjugated hydrocarbons with varying degrees of methylation and nitrile incorporation. In situ exploration of Titan's upper atmosphere via mass and plasma spectrometry has revealed a complex mixture of organics. Similar material is expected on the Ice Giants, their moons, and other Outer Solar System bodies, where it may subsequently be deposited onto surface ices. It is evident that the detection of organics on other planetary surfaces provides insight into the chemical and geological evolution of a Solar System body of interest and can inform our understanding of its potential habitability. We have developed a prototype two-step laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (L2MS) instrument by exploiting the resonance-enhanced desorption of analyte. We have successfully demonstrated the ability of the L2MS to detect hydrocarbons in organically-doped analog minerals, including cryogenic Ocean World-relevant ices and mixtures. The L2MS instrument operates by generating a neutral plume of desorbed analyte with an IR desorption laser pulse, followed at a delay by a ultraviolet (UV) laser pulse, ionizing the plume. Desorption of the analyte, including trace organic species, may be enhanced by selecting the wavelength of the IR desorption laser to coincide with IR absorption features associated with vibration transitions of minerals or organic functional groups. In this effort, a preliminary laser developed for the instrument uses a breadboard mid-infrared (MIR) desorption laser operating at a discrete 3.475 µm wavelength, and a breadboard UV

  7. Approach to space-qualification of the ICESat-2 laser transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, Floyd; Sawruk, Nick; Stephen, Mark; Edelman, Joel; Litvinovitch, Slava; Edwards, Ryan; Rudd, Joe; Bautch, Jim; Fakhoury, Elias

    2013-09-01

    The design of space-flight hardware is typically required to be at a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 6 before the build of the actual flight hardware can begin. At the early design phase the "relevant environment" for TRL-6 is frequently not well defined. For the ICESat-2 laser relevant environment was defined as the qualification levels in GEVS (General Environmental Verification Standard, GSFC-STD-7000). Our approach to dealing with the high-frequency content of the 14.1 grms random vibration levels in GEVS was a flexure mounted canister design that filtered the highfrequency content. In our talk we will discuss the program and system level implications of this design approach.

  8. Optical Communications Transmitter

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-11-10

    S65-42598 (10 Nov. 1965) --- Douglas S. Idlly, Electromagnetic Systems Branch, Instrumentation and Electronic Systems Division, illustrates an Optical Communications Transmitter (LASER) during a briefing at the news center of the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas. Photo credit: NASA

  9. Silicon photonics WDM transmitter with single section semiconductor mode-locked laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Juliana; Hauck, Johannes; Shen, Bin; Romero-García, Sebastian; Islamova, Elmira; Azadeh, Saeed Sharif; Joshi, Siddharth; Chimot, Nicolas; Moscoso-Mártir, Alvaro; Merget, Florian; Lelarge, François; Witzens, Jeremy

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a wavelength domain-multiplexed (WDM) optical link relying on a single section semiconductor mode-locked laser (SS-MLL) with quantum dash (Q-Dash) gain material to generate 25 optical carriers spaced by 60.8 GHz, as well as silicon photonics (SiP) resonant ring modulators (RRMs) to modulate individual optical channels. The link requires optical reamplification provided by an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) in the system experiments reported here. Open eye diagrams with signal quality factors (Q-factors) above 7 are measured with a commercial receiver (Rx). For higher compactness and cost effectiveness, reamplification of the modulated channels with a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) operated in the linear regime is highly desirable. System and device characterization indicate compatibility with the latter. While we expect channel counts to be primarily limited by the saturation output power level of the SOA, we estimate a single SOA to support more than eight channels. Prior to describing the system experiments, component design and detailed characterization results are reported including design and characterization of RRMs, ring-based resonant optical add-drop multiplexers (RR-OADMs) and thermal tuners, S-parameters resulting from the interoperation of RRMs and RR-OADMs, and characterization of Q-Dash SS-MLLs reamplified with a commercial SOA. Particular emphasis is placed on peaking effects in the transfer functions of RRMs and RR-OADMs resulting from transient effects in the optical domain, as well as on the characterization of SS-MLLs in regard to relative intensity noise (RIN), stability of the modes of operation, and excess noise after reamplification.

  10. The 2-micron plasmid as a nonselectable, stable, high copy number yeast vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, D. L.; Bruschi, C. V.

    1991-01-01

    The endogenous 2-microns plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used extensively for the construction of yeast cloning and expression plasmids because it is a native yeast plasmid that is able to be maintained stably in cells at high copy number. Almost invariably, these plasmid constructs, containing some or all 2-microns sequences, exhibit copy number levels lower than 2-microns and are maintained stably only under selective conditions. We were interested in determining if there was a means by which 2-microns could be utilized for vector construction, without forfeiting either copy number or nonselective stability. We identified sites in the 2-microns plasmid that could be used for the insertion of genetic sequences without disrupting 2-microns coding elements and then assessed subsequent plasmid constructs for stability and copy number in vivo. We demonstrate the utility of a previously described 2-microns recombination chimera, pBH-2L, for the manipulation and transformation of 2-microns as a pure yeast plasmid vector. We show that the HpaI site near the STB element in the 2-microns plasmid can be utilized to clone yeast DNA of at least 3.9 kb with no loss of plasmid stability. Additionally, the copy number of these constructs is as high as levels reported for the endogenous 2-microns.

  11. The 2-micron plasmid as a nonselectable, stable, high copy number yeast vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, D. L.; Bruschi, C. V.

    1991-01-01

    The endogenous 2-microns plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used extensively for the construction of yeast cloning and expression plasmids because it is a native yeast plasmid that is able to be maintained stably in cells at high copy number. Almost invariably, these plasmid constructs, containing some or all 2-microns sequences, exhibit copy number levels lower than 2-microns and are maintained stably only under selective conditions. We were interested in determining if there was a means by which 2-microns could be utilized for vector construction, without forfeiting either copy number or nonselective stability. We identified sites in the 2-microns plasmid that could be used for the insertion of genetic sequences without disrupting 2-microns coding elements and then assessed subsequent plasmid constructs for stability and copy number in vivo. We demonstrate the utility of a previously described 2-microns recombination chimera, pBH-2L, for the manipulation and transformation of 2-microns as a pure yeast plasmid vector. We show that the HpaI site near the STB element in the 2-microns plasmid can be utilized to clone yeast DNA of at least 3.9 kb with no loss of plasmid stability. Additionally, the copy number of these constructs is as high as levels reported for the endogenous 2-microns.

  12. Yeast plasmid 2-micron circle promotes recombination within bacterial transposon Tn5.

    PubMed Central

    Jayaram, M; Broach, J R

    1983-01-01

    The site-specific recombination system (FLP) encoded by the yeast plasmid 2-micron circle can also act in yeast on the inverted repeats of the bacterial transposon Tn5. The efficiency of this recombination is dependent on the location of Tn5 within the 2-micron circle genome but can be as high as that observed for 2-micron circle itself. Comparison of the DNA sequences between the Tn5 repeat and the 2-micron circle recombination region reveals certain strikingly similar structural features that might be important in the recombination reaction. Images PMID:6316350

  13. Wind Measurements with High Energy 2 Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Bruce W.; Koch, Grady J.; Petros, Mulugeta; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Yu, Ji-Rong; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2004-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar based on an injection seeded Ho:Tm:YLF pulsed laser was developed for wind measurements. A transmitted pulse energy over 75 mJ at 5 Hz repetition rate has been demonstrated. Designs are presented on the laser, injection seeding, receiver, and signal processing subsystems. Sample data of atmospheric measurements are presented including a wind profile extending from the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to the free troposphere.

  14. A wavelength tunable ONU transmitter based on multi-mode Fabry-Perot laser and micro-ring resonator for bandwidth symmetric TWDM-PON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhensen; Sun, Xiao; Zhang, Kaibin

    2016-02-01

    Wavelength tunable optical transmitter is an essential component for the newly standardized time and wavelength division multiplexed passive optical network (TWDM-PON), where tunable ONU with 10Gb/s bit rate is desired to provide 40Gb/s symmetric bandwidth. In this paper, a novel wavelength tunable optical transmitter is proposed by reusing legacy low speed multi-mode Fabry-Perot laser and connecting it with an integrated photonic chip with two coupled micro-ring resonators to generate a tunable single mode signal based on Vernier effect for 10Gb/s high speed modulation, which makes it as a promising solution for colorless ONU in future symmetric TWDM-PON.

  15. Characterization of the Q-switched MOBLAS Laser Transmitter and Its Ranging Performance Relative to a PTM Q-switched System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, J. J., III; Zagwodski, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    A prototype Q-switched Nd:YAG laser transmitter intended for use in the NASA mobile laser ranging system was subjected to various tests of temporal pulse shape and stability, output energy and stability, beam divergence, and range bias errors. Peak to peak variations in the mean range were as large as 30 cm and drift rates of system bias with time as large as 6 mm per minute of operation were observed. The incorporation of a fast electro-optic cavity dump into the oscillator gave significantly improved results. Reevaluation of the ranging performance after modification showed a reduction in the peak to peak variation in the mean range to the 2 or 3 cm level and a drift rate of system time biases of less than 1 mm per minute of operation. A qualitative physical explanation for the superior performance of cavity dumped lasers is given.

  16. Comparison of direct detection 50 Mbps Q-PPM receiver performance for AlGaAs and Nd doped laser transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unger, G. L.; Krainak, M. A.; Sun, X.

    1992-01-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental performance comparison of a free space direct detection 50 Mbps quaternary pulse position modulation (Q-PPM) communications receiver for Nd:YAG and AlGaAs laser transmitters. Using silicon avalanche photodiodes (APD), we achieved a receiver sensitivity of 2.6 nW (264 incident photons/bit) at 1060 nm and 0.77 nW (59 incident photons/bit) at 810 nm (bit error rate (BER) of 10 exp -6). This is the best sensitivity ever reported for a direct detection receiver at 1060 nm. The experimental results were in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  17. Influence of outgassing organic contamination on the transmittance and laser-induced damage of SiO2 sol-gel antireflection film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liang; Xiang, Xia; Miao, Xinxiang; Li, Zhijie; Zhou, Guorui.; Yan, Zhonghua; Yuan, Xiaodong; Zheng, Wanguo; Zu, Xiaotao

    2015-12-01

    The influence of organic contamination (rubber outgassing) on the transmittance of the SiO2 sol-gel antireflection (AR) film and laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) at 355 nm for 3ω AR film and at 1064 nm for 1ω AR film is studied. The correlation between the contamination time and the transmittance loss/LIDT of 1ω/3ω AR film is also investigated both in atmospheric and vacuum environments. The results show that the transmittance loss increases with increasing contamination time, and the LIDT decreases with increasing contamination time for both in atmospheric and vacuum environments. In addition, the resistance against contamination of the 1ω film is stronger than 3ω film, and the contamination is more serious in vacuum than in an atmosphere environment for the same contamination time. Meanwhile, the damage mechanism is also discussed. It indicated that both the porous structure and photo-thermal absorption contribute to the decreasing LIDT of the sol-gel AR film.

  18. UWB transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2013-01-15

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) dual impulse transmitter is made up of a trigger edge selection circuit actuated by a single trigger input pulse; a first step recovery diode (SRD) based pulser connected to the trigger edge selection circuit to generate a first impulse output; and a second step recovery diode (SRD) based pulser connected to the trigger edge selection circuit in parallel to the first pulser to generate a second impulse output having a selected delay from the first impulse output.

  19. Compact, Engineered, 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Prototype: A New NASA Instrument Incubator Program Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Wang, Jinxue; Petros, Mulugeta

    2005-01-01

    A new project, selected in 2005 by NASA s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) under the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), will be described. The 3-year effort is intended to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a packaged, rugged, compact, space-qualifiable coherent Doppler wind lidar (DWL) transceiver capable of future validation in an aircraft and/or Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The packaged DWL will utilize the numerous advances in pulsed, solid-state, 2-micron laser technology at NASA s Langley Research Center (LaRC) in such areas as crystal composition, architecture, efficiency, cooling techniques, pulse energy, and beam quality. The extensive experience of Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (RSAS) in coherent lidar systems, in spacebased sensors, and in packaging rugged lidar systems will be applied to this project. The packaged transceiver will be as close to an envisioned space-based DWL system as the resources and technology readiness allow. We will attempt to facilitate a future upgrade to a coherent lidar system capable of simultaneous wind and CO2 concentration profile measurements. Since aerosol and dust concentration is also available from the lidar signal, the potential for a triple measurement lidar system is attractive for both Earth and Mars remote sensing. A key follow on step after the IIP will be to add a telescope, scanner, and software for aircraft validation. This IIP should also put us in a position to begin a parallel formulation study in the 2006-2007 timeframe for a space-based DWL demonstration mission early next decade.

  20. Airborne Double Pulsed 2-Micron IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Singh, Upendra

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an airborne 2-micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar for atmospheric CO2 measurements. The double pulsed, high pulse energy lidar instrument can provide high-precision CO2 column density measurements.

  1. Development, testing, and initial space qualification of 1.5-μm high-power (6W) pulse-position-modulated (PPM) fiber laser transmitter for deep-space laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shantanu; Engin, Doruk; Pachowicz, Dave; Fouron, Jean-Luc; Lander, Juan; Dang, Xung; Litvinovich, Slava; Chuang, Ti; Puffenberger, Kent; Kimpel, Frank; Utano, Rich; Wright, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    We report on the development, testing and initial space qualification of a 1.5-μm, high-power (6W), high wall-plug efficiency (~15%), pulse-position-modulated (PPM), polarization-maintaining (PM), fiber laser transmitter subsystem for deep-space laser communication links. Programmable high-order PPM modulation up to PPM-128 formats, with discrete pulse slots ranging from 0.5- to 8-nsec, satisfies variety of link requirements for deep space laser communication to Mars, asteroids, and other deep-space relay links, per NASA's space laser communication roadmap. We also present initial space qualification results from thermal-vacuum tests, vibration testing, radiation testing and overall reliability assessment.

  2. Development, testing, and initial space qualification of 1.5-μm, high-power (6 W), pulse-position-modulated fiber laser transmitter for deep-space laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shantanu; Engin, Doruk; Pachowicz, Dave; Fouron, Jean-Luc; Lander, Juan; Dang, Xung; Litvinovitch, Slava; Chuang, Ti; Puffenberger, Kent; Kimpel, Frank; Utano, Rich; Wright, Malcolm

    2016-11-01

    We report on the development, testing, and initial space qualification of a 1.5-μm, high-power (6 W), high wall-plug efficiency (˜15%), pulse-position-modulated (PPM), polarization-maintaining, fiber laser transmitter subsystem for deep-space laser communication links. Programmable high-order PPM modulation up to PPM-128 formats, with discrete pulse slots ranging from 0.5 to 8 ns, satisfies variety of link requirements for deep-space laser communication to Mars, asteroids, and other deep-space relay links, as per the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's space laser communication roadmap. We also present initial space qualification results from thermal-vacuum tests, vibration testing, radiation testing, and an overall reliability assessment.

  3. SAR transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-06-01

    In the follow-on of the ESA contract 4122/79 it was intended to demonstrate on breadboard the feasibility of a modular EPC supplied by a multibus for a KLYSTRON power transmitter. The aim of this final report is to give details on the design and on test results of the electronics required to drive a KLYSTRON for a SAR system. The concept utilized for the DC/DC conversion is a Series Resonant type (SCHWARZ Converter). An elegant Breadboard of 2 Modules (over 4 required for the complete EPC) has been realized and the tests have demonstrated the envisaged feasibility of an active redundancy with modular EPC both for output voltage generation and for output power. Also the concept of the multibus has been implemented (2 bus over 4) and verified in the EPC breadboard.

  4. Advances in High Energy Solid-State Pulsed 2-Micron Lidar Development for Ground and Airborne Wind, Water Vapor and CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Kavaya, Michael J.; Remus, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron lasers. From fundamental spectroscopy research, theoretical prediction of new materials, laser demonstration and engineering of lidar systems, it has been a very successful program spanning around two decades. Successful development of 2-micron lasers has led to development of a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement with an unprecedented laser pulse energy of 250 millijoules in a rugged package. This high pulse energy is produced by a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser with an optical amplifier. While the lidar is meant for use as an airborne instrument, ground-based tests were carried out to characterize performance of the lidar. Atmospheric measurements will be presented, showing the lidar's capability for wind measurement in the atmospheric boundary layer and free troposphere. Lidar wind measurements are compared to a balloon sonde, showing good agreement between the two sensors. Similar architecture has been used to develop a high energy, Ho:Tm:YLF double-pulsed 2-micron Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) instrument based on direct detection technique that provides atmospheric column CO2 measurements. This instrument has been successfully used to measure atmospheric CO2 column density initially from a ground mobile lidar trailer, and then it was integrated on B-200 plane and 20 hours of flight measurement were made from an altitude ranging 1500 meters to 8000 meters. These measurements were compared to in-situ measurements and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) airborne flask measurement to derive the dry mixing ratio of the column CO2 by reflecting the signal by various reflecting surfaces such as land, vegetation, ocean surface, snow and sand. The lidar measurements when compared showed a very agreement with in-situ and airborne flask measurement. NASA Langley Research Center is currently developing a

  5. Development of a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurement by Direct Detection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Singh, U. N.; Petros, M.; Bai, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center are developing a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar instrument for ground and airborne measurements via direct detection method. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capbility by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. A key component of the CO2 DIAL system, transceiver, is an existing, airborne ready, robust hardware which can provide 250mJ at 10Hz with double pulse format specifically designed for DIAL instrument. The exact wavelengths of the transceiver are controlled by well defined CW seed laser source to provide the required injection source for generating on-and-off line wavelength pulses sequentially. The compact, rugged, highly reliable transceiver is based on the unique Ho:Tm:YLF high-energy 2-micron pulsed laser technology. All the optical mounts are custom designed and have space heritage. They are designed to be adjustable and lockable and hardened to withstand vibrations that can occur in airborne operation. For the direct detection lidar application, a large primary mirror size is preferred. A 14 inch diameter telescope will be developed for this program. The CO2 DIAL/IPDA system requires many electronic functions to operate. These include diode, RF, seed laser, and PZT drivers; injection seeding detection and control; detector power supplies; and analog inputs to sample various sensors. Under NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP), a control unit Compact Laser Electronics (CLE), is developed for the controlling the coherent wind lidar transceiver. Significant modifications and additions are needed to update it for CO2 lidar controls. The data acquisition system was built for ground CO2 measurement demonstration. The software will be updated for

  6. High Energy, Narrow Linewidth 1572nm Eryb-Fiber Based MOPA for a Multi-Aperture CO2 Trace-Gas Laser Space Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engin, Doruk; Mathason, Brian; Stephen, Mark; Yu, Anthony; Cao, He; Fouron, Jean-Luc; Storm, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Accurate global measurements of tropospheric CO2 mixing ratios are needed to study CO2 emissions and CO2 exchange with the land and oceans. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing a pulsed lidar approach for an integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar to allow global measurements of atmospheric CO2 column densities from space. Our group has developed, and successfully flown, an airborne pulsed lidar instrument that uses two tunable pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a single CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, absorption of an O2 line pair in the oxygen A-band (765 nm), range, and atmospheric backscatter profiles in the same path. Both lasers are pulsed at 10 kHz, and the two absorption line regions are sampled at typically a 300 Hz rate. A space-based version of this lidar must have a much larger lidar power-area product due to the x40 longer range and faster along track velocity compared to airborne instrument. Initial link budget analysis indicated that for a 400 km orbit, a 1.5 m diameter telescope and a 10 second integration time, a 2 mJ laser energy is required to attain the precision needed for each measurement. To meet this energy requirement, we have pursued parallel power scaling efforts to enable space-based lidar measurement of CO2 concentrations. These included a multiple aperture approach consists of multi-element large mode area fiber amplifiers and a single-aperture approach consists of a multi-pass Er:Yb:Phosphate glass based planar waveguide amplifier (PWA). In this paper we will present our laser amplifier design approaches and preliminary results.

  7. Investigation on crystalline perfection, optical transmittance, birefringence, temperature-dependent refractive index, laser damage threshold and pyroelectric characteristics of inversely soluble lithium sulfate monohydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silambarasan, A.; Rajesh, P.; Bhatt, Rajeev; Bhaumik, Indranil; Karnal, A. K.; Ramasamy, P.; Gupta, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    Bulk prismatic lithium sulfate monohydrate (LSMH) single crystals were grown by seed rotation with slow heating method from aqueous solution. Small FWHM obtained from high-resolution X-ray diffraction spectrum shows that the crystals grown by this method have less defects and absence of low-angle grain boundaries. The high transmittance and low reflectance nature of the grown crystal was observed using UV-Vis-NIR spectrometer. The principal refractive indices of a LSMH crystal have been measured by a prism coupling method for the wavelengths of 0.407, 0.532, 0.828, 1.064 and 1.551 µm at room temperature, and Sellmeier equations are determined from the fitting of the data point. The refractive index data confirm that LSMH crystal is negative biaxial and the optic axis lies in YZ plane with an angle (2 V y ) of 51.74° with respect to y axis at 532 nm wavelength. The thermo-optic coefficients were determined from the temperature-dependent refractive indices measured in the range of 30-125 °C for the wavelengths of 532 and 1064 nm. The surface laser damage threshold studies reveal the higher optical radiation stability against 532-nm laser. The pyroelectric coefficients and pyroelectric figure of merit were determined from the pyroelectric current measurement by the Byer and Roundy method.

  8. Low chirp transmission at 5.0 Gbit/s using an integrated DBR laser-modulator transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raybon, G.; Koren, U.; Young, M. G.; Miller, B. I.; Chien, M.; Wood, T. H.; Presby, H. M.

    1994-08-01

    Transmission over 192 km of conventional single mode fibre is achieved using a packaged 1.56 micron dBR laser-electroabsorption modulatortransmitter operating at 5.0 Gbit/s. In an optically amplified system experiment, a dispersion penalty less than 0.5 dB at a bit error rate of 10(exp -9) is measured.

  9. Airborne 2-Micron Double Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2016-06-01

    An airborne 2-micron double-pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. This new instrument has been flown in spring of 2014 for a total of ten flights with 27 flight hours. This IPDA lidar provides high precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the results.

  10. Polymorphism within the nuclear and 2 micron genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rank, G H; Casey, G P; Xiao, W; Pringle, A T

    1991-08-01

    Seven strains of bakers' yeast were obtained as a representative sample of the Spanish baking industry. The nuclear genome was monitored for polymorphism by transverse alternating field electrophoresis (TAFE) and restriction maps of 2 micron DNA were produced. All seven strains were uniquely different when evaluated by their total chromosomal lengths whereas only two 2 micron variants were defined. There was no apparent correlation between chromosomal and plasmid polymorphism. The extensive chromosomal polymorphism within one 2 micron DNA type indicates the rapid and relatively recent evolution of the nuclear genome. The hybrid origin (S. cerevisiae-S. monacensis) of lager yeast was critically evaluated by TAFE analysis of S. cerevisiae and S. carlsbergensis chromosomes. The absence of corresponding S. cerevisiae chromosomes III and XIII in S. carlsbergensis argued against the hybrid origin of lager strains. We discuss limitations of the hybrid origin hypothesis of industrial yeasts and propose that the molecular coevolution observed in 2 micron DNA serves as a useful additional mechanism for rationalization of some of the structural polymorphism of the nuclear genome.

  11. Airborne 2-Micron Double Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2015-01-01

    An airborne 2-micron double-pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. This new 2-miron pulsed IPDA lidar has been flown in spring of 2014 for total ten flights with 27 flight hours. It provides high precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  12. Integrated Optical Transmitter and Receiver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-18

    Laser Development --Further laser development await the servicing of the GaAlAs/GaAs MOCVD reactor (see section D). During this period, work focused on continued high-speed measurements of narrow-diffused stripe laser structures grown by MOCVD, to be implemented into the integrated transmitter structure. Problems Encountered and/or Anticipated Work continued on isolating causes for growth control problems encountered last month on the GaAlAs/GaAs MOCVD system. These include inability to accurately tune the properties of the GaAlAs

  13. Two Micron Laser Technology Advancements at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    An Independent Laser Review Panel set up to examine NASA s space-based lidar missions and the technology readiness of lasers appropriate for space-based lidars indicated a critical need for an integrated research and development strategy to move laser transmitter technology from low technical readiness levels to the higher levels required for space missions. Based on the review, a multiyear Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) was initiated by NASA in 2002 to develop technologies that ensure the successful development of the broad range of lidar missions envisioned by NASA. This presentation will provide an overview of the development of pulsed 2-micron solid-state laser technologies at NASA Langley Research Center for enabling space-based measurement of wind and carbon dioxide.

  14. Interconnects, Transmitters, and Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Interconnects on-chip between transistors and between functions like processors and memories, between chips on carriers or in stacks, and the communication with the outside world have become a highly complex performance, reliability, cost, and energy challenge. Twelve layers of metal interconnects, produced by lithography, require, including the contact vias, 24 mask and process cycles on top of the process front-end. The resulting lines are associated with resistance, capacitance and inductance parasitics as well as with ageing due to high current densities. Large savings in wiring lengths are achieved with 3D integration: transistor stacking, chip stacking and TSV's, a direction, which has exploded since 2005 because of many other benefits and, at the same time, with sensitive reliability and cost issues. On top of this or as an alternative, non-contact interconnects are possible with capacitive or inductive coupling. Inductive in particular has proven to be attractive because its transmission range is large enough for communication in chip stacks and yet not too large to cause interference.Optical transmitters based on integrated III-V compound-semiconductor lasers and THz power amplifiers compete with ascending low-cost, parallel-wire transmitters based on BiCMOS technologies. Parallel mm-wave and THz transceiver arrays enable mm-wave radar for traffic safety and THz computed-tomography. In spite of all these technology advances, the power efficiency of data communication will only improve 100× in a decade. New compression and architectural techniques are in high demand.

  15. Highly reliable and efficient 1.5μm-fiber-MOPA-based, high-power laser transmitter for space communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engin, Doruk; Litvinovitch, Slava; Kimpel, Frank; Puffenberger, Kent; Dang, Xung; Fouron, Jean-Luc; Martin, Nigel; Storm, Mark; Gupta, Shantanu; Utano, Rich

    2014-06-01

    Fibertek has developed a space qualifiable, highly efficient, high power (<5W), fiber based 1.5um laser optical module (LOM). The transmitter achieves 6W average and <1kW peak power out of a 2m long single mode delivery fiber with 8nsec pulses and <6Ghz linewidth. Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) is managed by precise linewidth control and by use of LMA gain fiber in the power stage while maintaining the required diffraction limited, and highly polarized (PER<20dB) output. Size and weight of the built LOM are 8"x10"x2.375" and 3 kg, respectively. With improvements in the modulation scheme and component specification, achieved LOM electrical to optical efficiency is over 17.0%. Highly efficient operation is sustained for a wide range of pulse-position modulation (16 to 128-ary PPM) formats with pulse widths varying from 8nsec to 0.5nsec and operation temperature 10-50C. Pressure stress analysis, random vibration analysis and thermal analysis of the designed LOM predicts compliance with NASA GEVS levels for vibration and thermal cycling in a vacuum environment. System will undergo both thermal vacuum and vibration testing to validate the design.

  16. High energy, narrow linewidth 1572nm ErYb-fiber based MOPA for a multi-aperture CO2 trace-gas laser space transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engin, Doruk; Mathason, Brian; Stephen, Mark; Yu, Anthony; Cao, He; Fouron, Jean-Luc; Storm, Mark

    2016-03-01

    A cladding-pumped, LMA ErYb fiber-based, amplifier is presented for use in a LIDAR transmitter for remote sensing of atmospheric CO2 from space. The amplifier is optimized for high peak power, high efficiency, and narrow linewidth operation at 1572.3nm. Using highly reliable COTS components, the amplifier achieves 0.5kW peak power (440uJ pulse energy), 3.3W average power with transform limited (TL) linewidth and M2<1.3. The power amplifier supports a 30% increase in pulse energy when linewidth is increased to 100MHz. A preliminary conductively cooled laser optical module (LOM) concept has size 9x10x1.25 in (113 in3) and estimated weight of 7.2lb (3.2 kg). Energy scaling with pulse width up to 645uJ, 1.5usec is demonstrated. A novel doubleclad ErYb LMA fiber (30/250um) with high pump absorption (6 dB/m at 915nm) was designed, fabricated, and characterized for power scaling. The upgraded power amplifier achieves 0.8kW peak power (720uJ pulse energy) 5.4W average power with TL linewidth and M2<1.5.

  17. CO2 laser as a possible candidate for optical transmitter in free-space satellite-ground-satellite laser communication: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. A.; Naik, Govind; Shenoy, N. V.; Rao, Mandavilli M.

    1999-04-01

    Terrestrial fiber optic communication systems handle most of the inter-continental communication systems today. However recent studies indicate that these links, in spite of their huge bandwidth will be saturated in the near future. Hence attempts are being made is augment and may be even replace these by inter satellite links (ISLs). Though high power laser diodes have been found to be suitable for ISLs, they are unfortunately inadequate for satellite-ground links (SGL and GSL) as they are not powerful enough. So we have to look for more powerful lasers for SGLs & GSLs. One possible candidate is the CO2 laser. It is a gas laser. It provides a number of advantages over other sources. They include high life time, high efficiency and stability. Besides it can generate a high power continuous wave and requires only radiative cooling. CO2 can provide a high bit rate and long range transmission with low bit error rate. Also CO2 laser is in near infra-red and hence the turbulence effects due to clouds is minimum. All these make CO2 laser a very economical choice. The use of optical communication in GSLs provides many advantages over radio links. Laser being a high energy source provides the advantage of greater bandwidth, smaller beam divergence angles, smaller antennae, greater security and a new spectrum. Lesser power consumption and smaller size make it more suitable for use in a satellite. The present paper deals with a case study of a CO2 laser based free space optical communication link by making the link budget analysis.

  18. Selective in vitro transcription by purified yeast RNA polymerase II on cloned 2 micron DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ballario, P; Buongiorno-Nardelli, M; Carnevali, F; Di Mauro, E; Pedone, F

    1981-01-01

    The in vitro transcription properties of purified yeast RNA polymerase II have been analyzed on prokaryotic plasmids (pBR322 and pBR313) and chimaeric plasmids bearing yeast 2 micron sequences (BTYP 1, BTYH 2 and BTYH 3). Conditions for selective transcription of the 2 micron DNA sequences in chimaeric plasmids have been determined. pBR322 and pBR313 are not transcribed by the purified RNA polymerase II when not bearing eukaryotic inserts. We show that the agarose gel electrophoretic analysis of ternary transcription complexes allows the localization of nascent RNA chains. The RNA produced has been visualized by electron microscopy (nascent RNA hybridization loops) and by gel electrophoretic analysis. All the observed properties are shared by RNA polymerase II purified by a conventional method (1) and by a rapid alternative procedure described herein. The peculiar properties of a partially purified form of RNA polymerase II are reported. Images PMID:7029462

  19. High resolution Fourier domain Optical Coherence Tomography at 2 microns for painted objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, H.; Cheung, C. S.; Daniel, J. M. O.; Tokurakawa, M.; Clarkson, W. A.; Spring, M.

    2015-06-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography has been successfully applied to the non-invasive imaging of subsurface microstructure of a variety of materials from biological tissues to painted objects of art. One of the limitations of the technique is the low depth of penetration due to the strong scattering and absorption in the material. Previous studies found that for paint materials, the optimum window for large depth of penetration is around 2.2 microns. This is also true for many other materials with low water content. We have previously demonstrated OCT systems in this wavelength regime for imaging with improved depth of penetration. In this paper, we present an improved 2 micron high resolution Fourier domain OCT system using a broadband supercontinuum source. The system achieved a depth resolution of 9 microns in air (or 6 microns in paint or any polymer).

  20. A 2-Micron Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development For Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Reithmaier, Karl; Bai, Yingxin; Trieu, Bo C.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2012-01-01

    A 2-micron pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  1. Compact, Engineered 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Prototype for Field and Airborne Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Koch, Grady J.

    2006-01-01

    The state-of-the-art 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar breadboard at NASA/LaRC will be engineered and compactly packaged consistent with future aircraft flights. The packaged transceiver will be integrated into a coherent Doppler wind lidar system test bed at LaRC. Atmospheric wind measurements will be made to validate the packaged technology. This will greatly advance the coherent part of the hybrid Doppler wind lidar solution to the need for global tropospheric wind measurements.

  2. InGaAsSb Detectors' Characterization for 2-Micron CO2 Lidar/DIAL Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2003-01-01

    Recent interest in monitoring atmospheric CO2 focuses attention on infrared remote sensing using the 2-micron lidar/differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. Quantum detectors are critical components in this technique, and many research efforts concentrate on developing such devices for the 2-micron wavelength. Characterization results of InGaAsSb quantum detectors for the 2-micron wavelength range are presented, including experimental setup and procedure. Detectors are prototype devices manufactured by using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) structures. Characterization experiments include V-I measurements, spectral response and its variation with bias voltage and temperature, noise measurements, noise-equivalent-power (NEP) and detectivity calculations, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimation. A slight increase in the output signal occurred with increased bias voltage and was associated with a noise level increase. Cooling down the detectors reduces noise and shifts the cutoff wavelength to shorter values. Further improvement in the design and manufacturing process, by increasing the device gain and lowering its noise level, is necessary to meet the required CO2 lidar/DIAL specifications.

  3. Infrared observations of the galactic center. III - 2.2 micron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Becklin, E. E.; Matthews, K.; Wynn-Williams, C. G.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of the B-gamma line at 2.17 microns are presented for the central few parsecs of the galactic-center region. The surface-brightness distribution of the line with 3.3- and 6.6-arcsec resolution has been sampled in 25 locations. The results show that the ionized gas is concentrated within the central parsec of the galactic-center region; the fine-scale structure seen at 10 microns does not appear to be present in the ionized gas. For the central parsec (20 arcsec) the equivalent width of the B-gamma line is, within large uncertainties, independent of the 2-micron continuum flux; for radial distances of the order of 30 arcsec the line equivalent width drops significantly. A comparison of the B-gamma line strength with radio observations shows that the 2.2-micron extinction is consistent with the 2.7 mag determined from the reddening of late-type stars. Observations of the CO band at 2.3 microns in the central 30 arcsec are also presented; they strengthen the interpretation that the 2-micron flux arises from late-type giant stars.

  4. Simultaneous and Independent Measurement of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide using a Triple-Pulsed, 2-micron Airborne IPDA Lidar - A Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, U. N.; Refaat, T. F.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.

    2013-12-01

    Water vapor (H2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are dominant greenhouse gases that are critical for Earth's radiation budget and global warming through the eco-system and the carbon cycle. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has a strong heritage in atmospheric remote sensing of both gases using several instruments adopting various DIAL techniques. This communication presents a feasibility study for measuring both H2O and CO2 simultaneously and independently using a single instrument. This instrument utilizes the Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar technique to measure the weighted-average column dry-air mixing ratios of CO2 (XCO2) and H2O (XH2O) independently and simultaneously from an airborne platform. The key component of this instrument is a tunable triple-pulse 2-micron laser. The three laser pulses are transmitted sequentially within a short time interval of 200 microsec. The wavelength of each of the laser pulses can be tuned separately. The IPDA receiver design is based on low-risk, commercially available components, including 300-micron diameter InGaAs 2-micron pin detector, a low-noise, high speed trans-impedance amplifier (TIA) and 12-bit 400 MHz digitizer.

  5. Computer Simulation of Global Profiles of Carbon Dioxide Using a Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Column-Content DIAL System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Frehlich, Rod G.

    2009-01-01

    We present preliminary results of computer simulations of the error in measuring carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles from earth orbit. The simulated sensor is a pulsed, 2-micron, coherent-detection lidar alternately operating on at least two wavelengths. The simulated geometry is a nadir viewing lidar measuring the column content signal. Atmospheric absorption is modeled using FASCODE3P software with the HITRAN 2004 absorption line data base. Lidar shot accumulation is employed up to the horizontal resolution limit. Horizontal resolutions of 50, 100, and 200 km are shown. Assuming a 400 km spacecraft orbit, the horizontal resolutions correspond to measurement times of about 7, 14, and 28 s. We simulate laser pulse-pair repetition frequencies from 1 Hz to 100 kHz. The range of shot accumulation is 7 to 2.8 million pulse-pairs. The resultant error is shown as a function of horizontal resolution, laser pulse-pair repetition frequency, and laser pulse energy. The effect of different on and off pulse energies is explored. The results are compared to simulation results of others and to demonstrated 2-micron operating points at NASA Langley.

  6. Intracavity solid state Raman marine transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, James T.; Austin, William L.; Calmes, Lonnie K.; Powell, Richard C.; McLean, John W.; Bryan, Elisabeth L.

    1997-07-01

    The design and performance of a short-pulse (1.5 ns), high- energy (90 mJ/pulse) nonlinear cavity-dumped, frequency- doubled, solid-state intracavity Raman laser is presented. The laser described is utilized as the transmitter in a high- resolution surf-zone marine imaging lidar system.

  7. The Selection of Q-Switch for a 350mJ Air-borne 2-micron Wind Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.

    2008-01-01

    In the process of designing a coherent, high energy 2micron, Doppler wind Lidar, various types of Q-Switch materials and configurations have been investigated for the oscillator. Designing an oscillator with a relatively low gain laser material, presents challenges related to the management high internal circulating fluence due to high reflective output coupler. This problem is compounded by the loss of hold-off. In addition, the selection has to take into account the round trip optical loss in the resonator and the loss of hold-off. For this application, a Brewster cut 5mm aperture, fused silica AO Q-switch is selected. Once the Q-switch is selected various rf frequencies were evaluated. Since the Lidar has to perform in single longitudinal and transverse mode with transform limited line width, in this paper, various seeding configurations are presented in the context of Q-Switch diffraction efficiency. The master oscillator power amplifier has demonstrated over 350mJ output when the amplifier is operated in double pass mode and higher than 250mJ when operated in single pass configuration. The repetition rate of the system is 10Hz and the pulse length 200ns.

  8. Noise contaminated transmittance

    SciTech Connect

    Zardecki, A.; McVey, B.D.; Nelson, D.H.

    1997-09-01

    The authors compare the efficiency of a classifier based on probabilistic neural networks and the general least squares method. Both methods must accommodate noise due to uncertainty in the measured spectrum at each wavelength. The evaluation of both methods is based on a simulated transmittance spectrum, in which the received signal is supplemented by an additive admixture of noise. To obtain a realistic description of the noise model, they generate several hundred laser pulses for each wavelength under consideration. These pulses have a predetermined correlation matrix for different wavelengths; furthermore, they are composed of three components accounting for the randomness of the observed spectrum. The first component is the correlated 1/f noise; the second component is due to uncorrelated 1/f noise; the third one is the uncorrelated white noise. The probabilistic neural network fails to retrieve the species concentration correctly for large noise levels; on the other hand, its predictions being confined to a fixed number of concentration bins, the network produces relatively small variances. To a large extent, the general least square method avoids the false alarms. It reproduces the average concentrations correctly; however, the concentration variances can be large.

  9. 1.3-μm, 4 × 25-Gbit/s, EADFB laser array module with large-output-power and low-driving-voltage for energy-efficient 100GbE transmitter.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Takeshi; Kanazawa, Shigeru; Takahata, Kiyoto; Kobayashi, Wataru; Tadokoro, Takashi; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kano, Fumiyoshi

    2012-01-02

    A 1.3-μm, 4 × 25-Gbit/s, EADFB laser array module with large output power and low driving voltage is developed for 100GbE. A novel rear grating DFB laser is introduced to increase the output power of the laser while keeping the single mode lasing, which is desirable for a monolithic integration. Also, InGaAlAs-based electroabsorption modulators make very-low-driving-voltage operation possible due to their steep extinction curves. With the module, very clear 25-Gbit/s eye openings are obtained for four wavelengths with the driving voltage of only 0.5 V while securing the dynamic extinction ratio required by the system. These results indicate that the presented module is a promising candidate for energy-efficient future 100GbE transmitter.

  10. Automated alexandrite transmitter for airborne DIAL experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the performance characteristics and development status of an automated dual alexandrite laser transmitter that is to be carried aloft by NASA's ER-2 research aircraft for water vapor DIAL experiments; these efforts are part of NASA's Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE). The LASE transmitter encompasses control unit, thermal unit, and two lamp driver unit subsystems. Major reductions in system size and weight relative to commercially available alexandrite lasers were necessary; a total weight of only 330 lbs has been achieved. Attention is given to subsystem flight test results.

  11. Gas-Filled Hollow Core Fiber Lasers Based on Population Inversion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-05

    iodine (I2) and pumped at ~ 532 nm was studied. Toward improved fiber transmission measurements, novel thulium /holmium fiber laser near 2 microns...transmission, we have demonstrated a novel thulium /holmium fiber laser near 2 microns. Abstract (short): Hollow-core Optical Fiber Gas LASer...measurements, novel thulium /holmium fiber laser near 2 microns were created. H. Schlossberg Hollow-Core Optical Fiber Gas Lasers K. Corwin et al

  12. Space-Based Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier Transmitters for Coherent, Ranging, 3D-Imaging, Altimetry, Topology, and Carbon Dioxide Lidar and Earth and Planetary Optical Laser Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Mark; Engin, Doruk; Mathason, Brian; Utano, Rich; Gupta, Shantanu

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes Fibertek, Inc.'s progress in developing space-qualified Erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) transmitters for laser communications and ranging/topology, and CO2 integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. High peak power (1 kW) and 6 W of average power supporting multiple communications formats has been demonstrated with 17% efficiency in a compact 3 kg package. The unit has been tested to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6 standards. A 20 W EDFA suitable for CO2 lidar has been demonstrated with ~14% efficiency (electrical to optical [e-o]) and its performance optimized for 1571 nm operation.

  13. Direct integration transmittance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunde, V. G.; Maguire, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    A transmittance model was developed for the 200-2000/cm region for interpretation of high spectral resolution measurements of laboratory absorption and of planetary thermal emission. The high spectral resolution requires transmittances to be computed monochromatically by summing the contribution of individual molecular absorption lines. A magnetic tape atlas of H2O,O3, and CO2 molecular line parameters serves as input to the transmittance model with simple empirical representations used for continuum regions wherever suitable laboratory data exist. The theoretical formulation of the transmittance model and the computational procedures used for the evaluation of the transmittances are discussed. Application is demonstrated of the model to several homogenous path laboratory absorption examples.

  14. Broadband Integrated Transmittances (BITS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Roger E.; Berrick, Stephen W.

    1995-02-01

    Broadband Integrated Transmittances (BITS) is an EOSAEL module that calculates transmittance for systems with broad spectral response. Path-integrated concentration data from COMBIC, other EOSAEL modules, or user models are used as input for BITS. The primary function of BITS is to provide rigorous transmittance calculations for broadband systems, replacing the Beer-Lambert law used in most obscuration models. To use BITS, the system detector, filters, optics, and source spectral functions must be defined. The spectral transmittances of the atmosphere and mass extinction coefficient spectral data for the obscurant are also required. The output consists of transmittance as a function of concentration length for Beer's law and band-integrated computation methods. The theory of the model, a description of the module organization, and an operations guide that provides input and output in EOSAEL format are provided in this user's guide. Example uses for BITS are also included.

  15. Development of a Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Refaat, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to the carbon cycle and global radiation budget on Earth. Active remote sensing of CO2 is important to address several limitations that contend with passive sensors. A 2-micron double-pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This active remote sensing instrument will provide an alternate approach of measuring atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise ratio level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. Commercial, on the shelf, components are implemented for the detection system. Instrument integration will be presented in this paper as well as a background for CO2 measurement at NASA Langley research Center

  16. Development of a pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to the carbon cycle and global radiation budget on Earth. Active remote sensing of CO2 is important to address several limitations that contend with passive sensors. A 2-micron double-pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This active remote sensing instrument will provide an alternate approach of measuring atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise ratio level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. Commercial, on the shelf, components are implemented for the detection system. Instrument integration will be presented in this paper as well as a background for CO2 measurement at NASA Langley research Center.

  17. Modeling of InGaAsSb-Based Avalanche Photodetectors for 2-Micron Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Ravindra P.; Abedin, M. Nurul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The main focus of this research is to study and evaluate the potential of InGaAsSb-AlGaAsSb based 2 micron avalanche photo-detectors. The photodetector contains a separate absorption and multiplication region (SAM) structure. The analysis has mainly been done to understand the electrical response characteristics of the devices existing at NASA, and to evaluate alternate structures proposed. Calculating the current flow for the existing detector structure, on the basis of its energy band diagram, is important. This analysis also helps to find shortcomings in the existing detector structure. It is shown that, unfortunately, the existing structure cannot lead to strong multiplication or voltage dependent gain. Two alternate structures are suggested, that could overcome the inherent flaws, and help achieve improved performance. These devices are obtained through modifications of the original structure, which include varying the doping levels, and changing the thicknesses of detector sub-regions. The results of our study are presented and discussed.

  18. Optical Tunable-Based Transmitter for Multiple Radio Frequency Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung (Inventor); Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G. (Inventor); Freeman, Jon C. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An optical tunable transmitter is used to transmit multiple radio frequency bands on a single beam. More specifically, a tunable laser is configured to generate a plurality of optical wavelengths, and an optical tunable transmitter is configured to modulate each of the plurality of optical wavelengths with a corresponding radio frequency band. The optical tunable transmitter is also configured to encode each of the plurality of modulated optical wavelengths onto a single laser beam for transmission of a plurality of radio frequency bands using the single laser beam.

  19. Spacecraft transmitter reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A workshop on spacecraft transmitter reliability was held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on September 25 and 26, 1979, to discuss present knowledge and to plan future research areas. Since formal papers were not submitted, this synopsis was derived from audio tapes of the workshop. The following subjects were covered: users' experience with space transmitters; cathodes; power supplies and interfaces; and specifications and quality assurance. A panel discussion ended the workshop.

  20. Wideband S Band Transmitter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    Improvements were also made to the first transmitter to interface it with the second, to expand its versatility , to correct design flaws, and to... cap bank, drop bar Left wall, transmitter compartment: Unit 10 - Reserved for high voltage power supply Ceiling: Unit 11 - Waveguide As shown in the...Crowbar ready Ion pump current 4.2.2 CONTROL INPUTS Prime power on/off Emergency Power off High Voltage Ready (Automatic from WBA 1) Pulsing On/Off

  1. Laser Energy Monitor for Double-Pulsed 2-Micrometer IPDA Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is a remote sensing technique for monitoring different atmospheric species. The technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features normalized to the transmitted energy. 2-micron double-pulsed IPDA lidar is best suited for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements. In such case, the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by short interval (200 microseconds), with low repetition rate (10Hz). Conventional laser energy monitors, based on thermal detectors, are suitable for low repetition rate single pulse lasers. Due to the short pulse interval in double-pulsed lasers, thermal energy monitors underestimate the total transmitted energy. This leads to measurement biases and errors in double-pulsed IPDA technique. The design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on a high-speed, extended range InGaAs pin quantum detectors suitable for separating the two pulse events. Pulse integration is applied for converting the detected pulse power into energy. Results are compared to a photo-electro-magnetic (PEM) detector for impulse response verification. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in single-pulsed mode, then comparing the pin and PEM detectors in double-pulsed mode. Energy monitor linearity will be addressed.

  2. Separation of PCBs by liquid chromatography on reversed phase sub-2-micron particle columns.

    PubMed

    Olsovská, Jana; Kresinová, Zdena; Flieger, Miroslav; Cajthaml, Tomás

    2010-03-15

    A new ultra high-performance liquid chromatography method with UV detection was examined for detection and separation of polychlorinated biphenyls. This included optimization of separation conditions for two model mixtures containing seven and fifteen most relevant congeners, comparison of three types of reversed phase sub-2-micron particle sized columns and assessment of system suitability under the optimized conditions. Calibration curves determined in the range from 0.5 to 50.0 microg/mL exhibited correlation coefficients ranging from 0.997 to 0.999. Lower limits of detection ranged from 0.1 to 0.5 ppm. The most efficient Grace C18 column filled with 1.5 microm particles was then tested to separate the complex commercial mixture Delor 103, where the elution order was confirmed by GC-MS. 13 individual congeners were separated and some of the other co-eluting congeners could be resolved using another separation dimension performed with a mass spectrometry detector. The developed method could be directly applied to the separation of less complex mixtures in aqueous sample matrixes, which are used in general for enzyme degradation studies. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Advanced mid-IR Solid-State Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art 2-micron solid-state laser developments. A world record one-Joule-per-pulse energy laser system and an advanced thermal management with fully conductive cooled laser technique are discussed

  4. Design of a fiber-optic transmitter for microwave analog transmission with high phase stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, R. T., Jr.; Lutes, G. F.; Primas, L. E.; Maleki, L.

    1990-01-01

    The principal considerations in the design of fiber-optic transmitters for highly phase-stable radio frequency and microwave analog transmission are discussed. Criteria for a fiber-optic transmitter design with improved amplitude and phase-noise performance are developed through consideration of factors affecting the phase noise, including low-frequency laser-bias supply noise, the magnitude and proximity of external reflections into the laser, and temperature excursions of the laser-transmitter package.

  5. Compromised extinction and signal-to-noise ratios of weak-resonant-cavity laser diode transmitter injected by channelized and amplitude squeezed spontaneous-emission.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hung; Lin, Gong-Cheng; Wang, Hai-Lin; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2010-03-01

    By using a 200GHz AWG channelized ASE source in connection with a saturable semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) based noise blocker as the injecting source at the remote node in front of the local optical network units (ONUs), we demonstrate the spectrum-sliced ASE transmitter with greatly suppressed intensity noise performance in WDM-PON network. Such channelized SOA filtering technique effectively reduces the relative intensity noise of the ASE source by at least 4.5 dB. The low-noise WRC-FPLD transmitter improves its extinction-ratio (ER) from 8.9 to 9.6 dB and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) from 5.9 to 6.3 dB. In comparison with broad-band ASE injection-locked WRC-FPLD transmitter at same power, there is an improvement on receiving power penalty (DeltaP(Receiver)) by 2 dB at BER 10(-9) in back-to-back case, and the receiving power of BER 10(-9) can achieve -24 dBm even after 25km fiber transmission. With additional AWG filtering, the intraband crosstalk effect between the upstream transmitted data and the reflected ASE signal is significantly reduced by 6.3dB. The compromised effects of ER and SNR on BER performance are also elucidated via the modified SNR model for the WRC-FPLD under ASE injection induced gain-saturation condition. The DeltaP(Receiver)/DeltaSNR of 8.89 at same ER condition is more pronounced than the DeltaP(Receiver)/DeltaER of 3.17 obtained under same SNR condition, indicating that the SNR plays a more important role than the ER on enhancing the BER performance.

  6. Column CO2 Measurement From an Airborne Solid-State Double-Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Fay, J.; Reithmaier, K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micrometers IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  7. The 2 micron plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a miniaturized selfish genome with optimized functional competence.

    PubMed

    Chan, Keng-Ming; Liu, Yen-Ting; Ma, Chien-Hui; Jayaram, Makkuni; Sau, Soumitra

    2013-07-01

    The 2 micron plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a relatively small multi-copy selfish DNA element that resides in the yeast nucleus at a copy number of 40-60 per haploid cell. The plasmid is able to persist in host populations with almost chromosome-like stability with the help of a partitioning system and a copy number control system. The first part of this article describes the properties of the partitioning system comprising two plasmid coded proteins, Rep1 and Rep2, and a partitioning locus STB. Current evidence supports a model in which the Rep-STB system couples plasmid segregation to chromosome segregation by promoting the physical association of plasmid molecules with chromosomes. In the second part, the focus is on the Flp site-specific recombination system housed by the plasmid, which plays a critical role in maintaining steady state plasmid copy number. The Flp system corrects any decrease in plasmid population by promoting plasmid amplification via a recombination induced rolling circle replication mechanism. Appropriate plasmid amplification, without runaway increase in copy number, is ensured by positive and negative regulation of FLP gene expression by plasmid coded proteins and by the control of Flp level/activity through post-translational modification of Flp by the cellular sumoylation system. The Flp system has been successfully utilized to understand mechanisms of site-specific recombination and to bring about directed genetic alterations for addressing fundamental problems in biology and for accomplishing bio-engineering objectives. A particularly interesting, and perhaps less well known and underappreciated, application of Flp in revealing unique DNA topologies required to confer functional competence to DNA-protein machines is discussed.

  8. Borehole induction coil transmitter

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Gale; Wilt, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A borehole induction coil transmitter which is a part of a cross-borehole electromagnetic field system that is used for underground imaging applications. The transmitter consists of four major parts: 1) a wound ferrite or mu-metal core, 2) an array of tuning capacitors, 3) a current driver circuit board, and 4) a flux monitor. The core is wound with several hundred turns of wire and connected in series with the capacitor array, to produce a tuned coil. This tuned coil uses internal circuitry to generate sinusoidal signals that are transmitted through the earth to a receiver coil in another borehole. The transmitter can operate at frequencies from 1-200 kHz and supplies sufficient power to permit the field system to operate in boreholes separated by up to 400 meters.

  9. Emergency locating transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wren, Paul E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A transmitter generates three signals for sequential transmission. These signal are an unmodulated r.f. carrier, a r.f. carrier amplitude modulated by a first audio frequency waveform and a r.f. carrier amplitude modulated by a second audio frequency waveform which is distinguishable from the first and which may be employed as a means for identifying a particular transmitter. The composite, sequentially transmitted signal may be varied in terms of the individual signal transmission sequence, the duration of the individual signals, overall composite signal repetition rate and the frequency of the second audio waveform. Various combinations of signal variations may be employed to transmit different information.

  10. Micropulse water vapor differential absorption lidar: transmitter design and performance.

    PubMed

    Nehrir, Amin R; Repasky, Kevin S; Carlsten, John L

    2012-10-22

    An all diode-laser-based micropulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) laser transmitter for tropospheric water vapor and aerosol profiling is presented. The micropulse DIAL (MPD) transmitter utilizes two continuous wave (cw) external cavity diode lasers (ECDL) to seed an actively pulsed, overdriven tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA). The MPD laser produces up to 7 watts of peak power over a 1 µs pulse duration (7 µJ) and a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. Spectral switching between the online and offline seed lasers is achieved on a 1Hz basis using a fiber optic switch to allow for more accurate sampling of the atmospheric volume between the online and offline laser shots. The high laser spectral purity of greater than 0.9996 coupled with the broad tunability of the laser transmitter will allow for accurate measurements of tropospheric water vapor in a wide range of geographic locations under varying atmospheric conditions. This paper describes the design and performance characteristics of a third generation MPD laser transmitter with enhanced laser performance over the previous generation DIAL system.

  11. Strain gage barometric transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viton, P.

    1977-01-01

    A strain gage barometric transmitter for measuring the atmospheric pressure in severe environmental conditions is described. This equipment specifications are presented and its performance assessed. It is shown that this barometric sensor can measure the atmospheric pressure with a precision of 0.5 mb during a 6 month period.

  12. Multi-transmitter aperture synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rabb, David J; Jameson, Douglas F; Stafford, Jason W; Stokes, Andrew J

    2010-11-22

    Multi-transmitter aperture synthesis is a method in which multiple transmitters can be used to improve resolution and contrast of distributed aperture systems. Such a system utilizes multiple transmitter locations to interrogate a target from multiple look angles thus increasing the angular spectrum content captured by the receiver aperture array. Furthermore, such a system can improve the contrast of sparsely populated receiver arrays by capturing field data in the region between sub-apertures by utilizing multiple transmitter locations. This paper discusses the theory behind multi-transmitter aperture synthesis and provides experimental verification that imagery captured using multiple transmitters will provide increased resolution.

  13. A Compact Ti:Sapphire Laser With its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) for an Airborne Ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Storm, Mark E.; Marsh, Waverly D.; Petway, Larry B.; Edwards, William C.; Barnes, James C.

    2000-01-01

    A compact and high-pulse-energy Ti:Sapphire laser with its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) has been developed for an airborne ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to study the distributions and concentrations of the ozone throughout the troposphere. The Ti:Sapphire laser, pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and seeded by a single mode diode laser, is operated either at 867 nm or at 900 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of 20 Hz. High energy laser pulses (more than 110 mJ/pulse) at 867 nm or 900 nm with a desired beam quality have been achieved and utilized to generate its third harmonic at 289nm or 300nm, which are on-line and off-line wavelengths of an airborne ozone DIAL. After being experimentally compared with Beta-Barium Borate (beta - BaB2O4 or BBO) nonlinear crystals, two Lithium Triborate (LBO) crystals (5 x 5 x 20 cu mm) are selected for the Third Harmonic Generation (THG). In this paper, we report the Ti:Sapphire laser at 900 nm and its third harmonic at 300 nm. The desired high ultraviolet (UV) output pulse energy is more than 30 mJ at 300 nm and the energy conversion efficiency from 900 nm to 300 nm is 30%.

  14. A Compact Ti:Sapphire Laser With its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) for an Airborne Ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Storm, Mark E.; Marsh, Waverly D.; Petway, Larry B.; Edwards, William C.; Barnes, James C.

    2000-01-01

    A compact and high-pulse-energy Ti:Sapphire laser with its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) has been developed for an airborne ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to study the distributions and concentrations of the ozone throughout the troposphere. The Ti:Sapphire laser, pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and seeded by a single mode diode laser, is operated either at 867 nm or at 900 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of 20 Hz. High energy laser pulses (more than 110 mJ/pulse) at 867 nm or 900 nm with a desired beam quality have been achieved and utilized to generate its third harmonic at 289nm or 300nm, which are on-line and off-line wavelengths of an airborne ozone DIAL. After being experimentally compared with Beta-Barium Borate (beta - BaB2O4 or BBO) nonlinear crystals, two Lithium Triborate (LBO) crystals (5 x 5 x 20 cu mm) are selected for the Third Harmonic Generation (THG). In this paper, we report the Ti:Sapphire laser at 900 nm and its third harmonic at 300 nm. The desired high ultraviolet (UV) output pulse energy is more than 30 mJ at 300 nm and the energy conversion efficiency from 900 nm to 300 nm is 30%.

  15. Development of a Compact, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Doppler Wind Lidar Transceiver; and Plans for Flights on NASA's DC-8 and WB-57 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    We present results of a recently completed effort to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a compact lidar transceiver for coherent-detection lidar profiling of winds. The novel high-energy, 2-micron, Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser technology developed at NASA Langley was employed to permit study of the laser technology currently envisioned by NASA for global coherent Doppler lidar measurement of winds in the future. The 250 mJ, 10 Hz compact transceiver was also designed for future aircraft flight. Ground-based wind profiles made with this transceiver will be presented. NASA Langley is currently funded to build complete Doppler lidar systems using this transceiver for the DC-8 and WB-57 aircraft. The WB-57 flights will present a more severe environment and will require autonomous operation of the lidar system. The DC-8 lidar system is a likely component of future NASA hurricane research. It will include real-time data processing and display, as well as full data archiving. We will attempt to co-fly on both aircraft with a direct-detection Doppler wind lidar system being prepared by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  16. Atmospheric wind sensing with a 1 and 2 micron coherent lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. Milton; Henderson, Sammy W.

    1992-01-01

    The majority of coherent lidar remote sensing performed to date has utilized carbon dioxide gas laser technology at wavelengths of 9 to 11 microns. However, the use of rapidly developing solid state laser technology and the shorter wavelengths offers many potential advantages. These advantages include low mass, small size, long shelf and operating lifetimes, the absence of consumables, and in many cases, increased atmospheric transmission. The shorter wavelengths of solid state lasers allow velocity measurements having better range resolution for equivalent wind velocity resolution. Coherent Technologies, Inc. has developed a 1.06 and 2.1 micron coherent lidar system for remote wind field measurements. This system is described, and some performance data are given.

  17. Data Analysis of a Pulsed 2-micron Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar For Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Yu, J.

    2013-12-01

    The study of climate change requires precise measurement of the production, migration, and sinking of greenhouse gases. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is one of the principal greenhouse gases. NASA Langley Research Center (LARC) has developed a pulsed 2-micron coherent differential absorption lidar (DiAL) for CO2 measurement, operating on the R30 absorption line. On April 5, 2010, the lidar instrument transmitted alternating On-line and Off-line pulses from LARC into a residential area in Poquoson, Virginia; while a passive in-situ sensor measured the local CO2 concentration. This paper outlines a procedure to estimate CO2 concentration from atmospheric lidar return signal using the DiAL method; our calculation produced results in line with the in-situ measurement and matched the current state of DiAL instrument accuracy. Data from April 5 is part of a series of experiments validating the measurement accuracy and precision of this lidar. After a summative verification, a packaged lidar may be installed on research aircraft to perform CO2 studies at a great range of latitudes throughout the year, and to discover sources, sinks, and migration trends for this key greenhouse gas. The following procedure is used to estimate CO2 concentration from atmospheric lidar return using the DiAL method. First, MATLAB software developed at LARC sorts the lidar return into On-only and Off-only files containing pulses of only that type. The sorted pulses are reexamined for quality based on the center frequency, energy, and power - unsatisfactory pulses are removed. A 512-point Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) with 256-point shift is performed on each pulse to discretize the atmospheric return signal according to 63 distance 'bins'. Next, comparing decay rates of the On-line and Off-line atmospheric return intensity with distance yields the Differential Absorption Optical Slope (DAOD), which is proportional to the concentration of the desired gas. Then, in-situ meteorological data - pressure

  18. Distributed data transmitter

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kenneth Dewayne; Dunson, David

    2006-08-08

    A distributed data transmitter (DTXR) which is an adaptive data communication microwave transmitter having a distributable architecture of modular components, and which incorporates both digital and microwave technology to provide substantial improvements in physical and operational flexibility. The DTXR has application in, for example, remote data acquisition involving the transmission of telemetry data across a wireless link, wherein the DTXR is integrated into and utilizes available space within a system (e.g., a flight vehicle). In a preferred embodiment, the DTXR broadly comprises a plurality of input interfaces; a data modulator; a power amplifier; and a power converter, all of which are modularly separate and distinct so as to be substantially independently physically distributable and positionable throughout the system wherever sufficient space is available.

  19. Distributed data transmitter

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kenneth Dewayne; Dunson, David

    2008-06-03

    A distributed data transmitter (DTXR) which is an adaptive data communication microwave transmitter having a distributable architecture of modular components, and which incorporates both digital and microwave technology to provide substantial improvements in physical and operational flexibility. The DTXR has application in, for example, remote data acquisition involving the transmission of telemetry data across a wireless link, wherein the DTXR is integrated into and utilizes available space within a system (e.g., a flight vehicle). In a preferred embodiment, the DTXR broadly comprises a plurality of input interfaces; a data modulator; a power amplifier; and a power converter, all of which are modularly separate and distinct so as to be substantially independently physically distributable and positionable throughout the system wherever sufficient space is available.

  20. Temperature responsive transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A temperature responsive transmitter is provided in which frequency varies linearly with temperature. The transmitter includes two identically biased transistors connected in parallel. A capacitor, which reflects into the common bases to generate negative resistance effectively in parallel with the capacitor, is connected to the common emitters. A crystal is effectively in parallel with the capacitor and the negative resistance. Oscillations occur if the magnitude of the absolute value of the negative resistance is less than the positive resistive impedance of the capacitor and the inductance of the crystal. The crystal has a large linear temperature coefficient and a resonant frequency which is substantially less than the gain-bandwidth product of the transistors to ensure that the crystal primarily determines the frequency of oscillation. A high-Q tank circuit having an inductor and a capacitor is connected to the common collectors to increase the collector current flow which in turn enhances the radiation of the oscillator frequency by the inductor.

  1. Orbiter KU-band transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halterman, R.

    1976-01-01

    The design, build, and test of an engineering breadboard Ku band quadraphase shift keyed and wideband frequency modulated transmitter are described. This orbiter Ku band transmitter drawer is to simulate the orbiter transmitter and meet the functional requirements of the orbiter communication link.

  2. Noise Whitening in Airborne Wind Profiling With a Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Arthur, Grant E.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Two different noise whitening methods in airborne wind profiling with a pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia are presented. In order to provide accurate wind parameter estimates from the airborne lidar data acquired during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign in 2010, the adverse effects of background instrument noise must be compensated properly in the early stage of data processing. The results of the two methods are presented using selected GRIP data and compared with the dropsonde data for verification purposes.

  3. Airborne Wind Profiling With the Data Acquisition and Processing System for a Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia flew on the NASA's DC-8 aircraft during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) during the summer of 2010. The participation was part of the project Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) Air. Selected results of airborne wind profiling are presented and compared with the dropsonde data for verification purposes. Panoramic presentations of different wind parameters over a nominal observation time span are also presented for selected GRIP data sets. The realtime data acquisition and analysis software that was employed during the GRIP campaign is introduced with its unique features.

  4. Development of the Data Acquisition and Processing System for a Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    A general overview of the development of a data acquisition and processing system is presented for a pulsed, 2-micron coherent Doppler Lidar system located in NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, USA. It is a comprehensive system that performs high-speed data acquisition, analysis, and data display both in real time and offline. The first flight missions are scheduled for the summer of 2010 as part of the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign for the study of hurricanes. The system as well as the control software is reviewed and its requirements and unique features are discussed.

  5. Optimization of A 2-Micron Laser Frequency Stabilization System for a Double-Pulse CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingsin; Koch, Grady; Petros, Mulugeta; Trieu, Bo; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO2) Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for accurate CO2 concentration measurement requires a frequency locking system to achieve high frequency locking precision and stability. We describe the frequency locking system utilizing Frequency Modulation (FM), Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD), and Proportional Integration Derivative (PID) feedback servo loop, and report the optimization of the sensitivity of the system for the feed back loop based on the characteristics of a variable path-length CO2 gas cell. The CO2 gas cell is characterized with HITRAN database (2004). The method can be applied for any other frequency locking systems referring to gas absorption line.

  6. Compact, highly efficient, athermal, 25W, 2051nm Tm-fiber based MOPA for CO2 trace-gas laser space transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engin, Doruk; Chuang, Ti; Storm, Mark

    2017-02-01

    A cladding-pumped polarization maintaining (PM) Thulium (Tm) fiber-based amplifier optimized for high efficiency and high power operation at 2051 nm is presented. The two-stage amplifier has been demonstrated to achieve 25 W average power, >16 dB polarization extinction ratio (PER) out of a single-mode PM fiber using a <500 kHz linewidth Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) distributed feedback (DFB) laser1-3 and 43 dB gain. The power amplifier's optical conversion efficiency is 53%. An internal efficiency of 58% is calculated after correcting for passive losses. The two-stage amplifier sustains its highly efficient operation for a temperature range of 5-40°C. The absence of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) for the narrow linewidth amplification shows promise for further power scaling.

  7. Sensitivity Analysis and Error Budget For Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Simultaneous and Independent Measurement Using 2-Micron Triple-Pulsed IPDA Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, U. N.; Refaat, T. F.; Petros, M.; Yu, J.; Remus, R.; Antill, C.

    2015-12-01

    A new 2 μm triple-pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar for measuring weighted-average column dry-air volume-mixing ratios of water vapor (H2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) is under development at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument is a technological update to the already demonstrated 2 μm CO2 double-pulse airborne IPDA lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center. The lidar consists of a direct detection system and a 2 μm triple-pulse laser transmitter. The transmitter generates three consecutive pulses at three different locked wavelength, separated by approximately 200 microseconds, for each pump pulse at 50 Hz pulse repetition rate. Optimized wavelengths tuning and locking for each of the pulses are selected such that H2O interference is minimized from CO2 measurement, and CO2 interference is minimized from the H2O measurement. This innovative technique allows simultaneous and independent measurement of H2O and CO2 optical depths from an airborne platform. Focusing on optical depth measurements, total errors in H2O and CO2 retrievals result from both random and systematic sources. Random error is associated with the IPDA lidar detection system. Systematic errors includes both atmospheric and IPDA lidar transmitter uncertainties. Atmospheric systematic error results from a combination of sensitivities to meteorological data and molecular interference. Transmitter systematic errors result from laser spectral quality and wavelength locking control. IPDA sensitivity analysis results in CO2 differential optical depth total error of 0.45% for single shot measurement dominated by the receiver. This will reduce to 0.21% for 500 shot average dominated by atmospheric pressure uncertainty. For H2O differential single-shot optical depth measurement, the 0.58% error is dominated by atmospheric effects governed by temperature and molecular interference at lower and higher ground elevations, respectively. The error will reduce to 0.48% by

  8. Active Stand-off Detection of Gas Leaks Using a Short Range Hard-target Backscatter Differential Optical Absorption System Based on a Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Castillo, Paulo; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they can contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentration. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents gas concentration measurements using a quantum cascade laser open path system (QCLOPS). The system retrieves the pathaveraged concentration of N2O and CH4 by collecting the backscattered light from a scattering target. The gas concentration measurements have a high temporal resolution (68 ms) and are achieved at sufficient range (up to 40 m, ~ 130 feet) with a detection limit of 2.6 ppm CH4 and 0.4 ppm for N2O. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile/multidirectional remote detection and evaluation of gas leaks. The instrument is monostatic with a tunable QCL emitting at ~ 7.7 μm wavelength range. The backscattered radiation is collected by a Newtonian telescope and focused on an infrared light detector. Puffs of N2O and CH4 are released along the optical path to simulate a gas leak. The measured absorption spectrum is obtained using the thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB QCL and is analyzed to obtain path averaged gas concentrations.

  9. 47 CFR 74.461 - Transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmitter power. 74.461 Section 74.461....461 Transmitter power. (a) Transmitter power is the power at the transmitter output terminals and.... For the purpose of this Subpart, the transmitter power is the carrier power. (b) The...

  10. Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithms for the Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Ray, Taylor J.

    2013-01-01

    Two versions of airborne wind profiling algorithms for the pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia are presented. Each algorithm utilizes different number of line-of-sight (LOS) lidar returns while compensating the adverse effects of different coordinate systems between the aircraft and the Earth. One of the two algorithms APOLO (Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind Lidar) estimates wind products using two LOSs. The other algorithm utilizes five LOSs. The airborne lidar data were acquired during the NASA's Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign in 2010. The wind profile products from the two algorithms are compared with the dropsonde data to validate their results.

  11. Development of Numerical Models for Performance Predictions of Single-Photon Avalanche Photodetectors (SPAP) for the 2-Micron Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Ravindra P.; Abedin, M. Nurul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Field dependent drift velocity results are presented for electron transport in bulk Indium Arsenide (InAs) material based on a Monte Carlo model, which includes an analytical treatment of band-to-band impact ionization. Avalanche multiplication and related excess noise factor (F) are computed as a function of device length and applied voltage. A decrease in F with increases in device length is obtained. The results suggest an inherent utility for InAs-based single-photon avalanche detectors, particularly around the 2 microns region of interest for atmospheric remote sensing applications. The dark current response was also evaluated. The role of the various components has been analyzed. For shorter devices, the tunneling component is shown to dominate at low temperatures. Finally, possible structures for enhanced photodetection are proposed for future research.

  12. Cost-effective tunable 1310nm DWDM transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorchos, Łukasz; Turkiewicz, Jarosław P.

    2015-09-01

    The growing demand for higher data rate transmissions in local and metropolitan area networks is main reason of developing effective and inexpensive transmission systems. In this paper, study about the possibility to realize 1310 nm tunable DWDM transmitter using commercially available low-cost DFB lasers is presented. Extensive DFB lasers characterization has been performed which led to establish relationships between laser current, operational temperature, emitted wavelength and power. An algorithm to find the laser settings for a desired wavelength grid has been proposed and tested. Generation of the 1310nm DWDM channels with frequency spacing between 120 and 240GHz has been demonstrated.

  13. An ingestible temperature-transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, J. M.; Fryer, T. B.; Sandler, H.

    1972-01-01

    Pill-sized transmitter measures deep body temperature in studies of circadian rhythm and indicates general health. Ingestible device is a compromise between accuracy, circuit complexity, size and transmission range.

  14. Monochromatic Transmittance/Radiance Computations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-31

    Horizontal Path 100 km Long at 20 km Altitude 11. Transmittance Computed in Several Ways for a Slant Path from 20 km to Space at a 75-Deg Zenith...ATMOSPHERIC PATH AND CONTROL PROGRAM INHOM SLANT PATH VERSION I PROGRAM INHOM TARGET VERSION ATMOSPHERIC / TARGET TRANSMITTANCE ( RADIANCE...length seg- ments and into segments containing equal numbers of air molecules has been tried. For each division scheme, a slant path through a mid

  15. Universal tritium transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Cordaro, J. V.; Wood, M.

    2008-07-15

    must have sufficient time to thermally equilibrate. Amplifiers, transistors, resistors all need time to stabilize before the electrometer circuit will measure accurately in the 10{sup -15} and 10{sup -14} ampere range. Existing electrometers give the user no indication when the unit has stabilized and is acceptable for low level measurements. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) funded through the NNSA Plant Directed Research and Development (PDRD) program, has developed a truly Universal Tritium Transmitter (UTT) capable of solving many known problems with existing commercial electrometers. This UTT pushes the state-of-the-art in electrometer design and incorporates solutions to deficiencies found in commercial electrometers. (authors)

  16. New Cloud Activity on Uranus in 2004: First Detection of a Southern Feature at 2.2 microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammel, H. B.; de Pater, I.; Gibbard, S. G.; Lockwood, G. W.; Rages, K.

    2004-11-01

    On 4 July 2004 UT, we detected a southern hemispheric cloud feature on Uranus at K' (2.2 microns) using adaptive optics and the NIRC2 camera on the Keck 10-m. At H (1.6 microns), the feature had two components: a condensed core (2004-A) co-located with the K' feature at latitude -36.0 ± 0.4 deg, and an extended feature (2004-B) at roughly -33.7 ± 0.4 deg. When we observed again on 8 July UT, the core had faded at K'. By 9 July we were unable to detect a K' feature; the extended feature was still seen at H. The initial high K'-brightness of 2004-A indicates that the core's scattering particles reached altitudes above the 1-bar level, with the larger feature at H, 2004-B, residing below the 1.1-bar level (assuming the model of de Pater et al. 2002, Icarus 160, 359). The core's rapid disappearance at K' indicates dynamical processes in the local vertical aerosol structure, for example, subsidence of the feature's cloud tops. Features 2004-A and 2004-B had zonal velocities of 107 and 115 m/s, respectively (+/- 3 m/s), different from past velocities near these latitudes. These features are either new, or are long-lived but drifting in latitude (as has been seen on Neptune); see abstract by Rages et al. this volume. Regardless of their latitude, no southern features on Uranus have been detected at wavelengths of 2 microns or longward, indicating some change of activity. Continued observations of Uranus are strongly encouraged as its 2007 equinox approaches. HBH acknowledges partial support from NASA grants NAG5-11961 and NAG5-10451. IdP acknowledges partial support from NSF and the Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, managed by UCSC under cooperative agreement No. AST-9876783. SGG's work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DoE, National Nuclear Security Administration by the UC, LLNL under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  17. Evaluation of a 0.9- to 2.2-microns sensitive video camera with a mid-infrared filter (1.45- to 2.0-microns)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, J. H.; Escobar, D. E.; Nixon, P. R.; Blazquez, C. H.; Hussey, M. A.

    The application of 0.9- to 2.2-microns sensitive black and white IR video cameras to remote sensing is examined. Field and laboratory recordings of the upper and lower surface of peperomia leaves, succulent prickly pear, and buffelgrass are evaluated; the reflectance, phytomass, green weight, and water content for the samples were measured. The data reveal that 0.9- to 2.2-microns video cameras are effective tools for laboratory and field research; however, the resolution and image quality of the data is poor compared to visible and near-IR images.

  18. The 0.81 - 4.2 micron ground-based transmission spectra of the hot jupiter HD-189733b.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielski, Camilla; Waldmann, Ingo; Deroo, Pieter; Swain, Mark; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2012-07-01

    We present here ground-based transmission spectroscopy of the hot jupiter HD-189733b using the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We obtained two nights of observation of the primary transit for the z, J, H band and two nights for the K, L band. The data, acquired simultaneously over each night, cover a total spectral range from 0.81 to 4.2 micron. This includes the gap between the HST/ACS data of Pont el al. 2008 and the HST/NICMOS data of Swain et al. 2008, (1.05 to 1.48 micron) and extends the atmospheric characterisation of HD-189733b at longer wavelengths. We analysed our data using the technique explained in Swain et al. (2010) and Waldmann et. al (2011). Furthermore we compared our results with simulated atmospheric spectra and we discussed the outcome in the light of previous results published in the literature. Our observed spectra are consistent with previous data recorded from space in the bands where there is an overlap, showing that low resolution exoplanet spectroscopy is feasible with medium-sized telescopes on the ground (Danielski et al, in prep.)

  19. A 200-MHz all-digital QAM modulator and demodulator in 1.2-micron CMOS for digital radio applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Bennett C.; Samueli, Henry

    1991-12-01

    A 200-MHz universal all-digital quadrature modulator and demodulator are presented for implementing the front-end signal processing functions for high-bit-rate digital radio applications. The modulator chip accepts a pair of 8-b in-phase and quadrature data streams and generates a band-limited IF digital output. The demodulator chip accepts a digitized IF input signal and generates a pair of filtered in-phase and quadrature baseband signals. The modulator and demodulator chips each incorporate matched 40-tap finite-impulse-response (FIR) square-root Nyquist filters and can accommodate symbol rates up to Mbd. The modulator chip can generate any arbitrary signal constellation within a rectangular grid of 256 x 256 points, thus resulting in a generic chip set suitable for a wide variety of high-bit-rate digital modem designs using various advanced multilevel modulation formats such as M-ary QAM. Both chips were fabricated in a 1.2-micron CMOS process.

  20. 47 CFR 74.461 - Transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....461 Transmitter power. (a) Transmitter power is the power at the transmitter output terminals and delivered to the antenna, antenna transmission line, or any other impedance-matched, radio frequency load... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transmitter power. 74.461 Section 74.461...

  1. 47 CFR 74.461 - Transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....461 Transmitter power. (a) Transmitter power is the power at the transmitter output terminals and delivered to the antenna, antenna transmission line, or any other impedance-matched, radio frequency load... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transmitter power. 74.461 Section 74.461...

  2. 47 CFR 74.461 - Transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....461 Transmitter power. (a) Transmitter power is the power at the transmitter output terminals and delivered to the antenna, antenna transmission line, or any other impedance-matched, radio frequency load... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transmitter power. 74.461 Section 74.461...

  3. 47 CFR 74.461 - Transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....461 Transmitter power. (a) Transmitter power is the power at the transmitter output terminals and delivered to the antenna, antenna transmission line, or any other impedance-matched, radio frequency load... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transmitter power. 74.461 Section 74.461...

  4. 47 CFR 73.759 - Auxiliary transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... auxiliary transmitters, a license may be issued provided that: (a) Auxiliary transmitters may be installed... purposes: (1) The transmission of the regular programs upon the failure of the main transmitters. (2) The transmission of regular programs during maintenance or modification work on the main transmitter,...

  5. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  6. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  7. Proposal to Simultaneously Profile Wind and CO2 on Earth and Mars With 2-micron Pulsed Lidar Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Ismail, Syed; Emmitt, David

    2005-01-01

    2-micron lidar technology has been in use and under continued improvement for many years toward wind measurements. But the 2-micron wavelength region is also rich in absorption lines of CO2 (and H2O to a lesser extent) that can be exploited with the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique to make species concentration measurements. A coherent detection receiver offers the possibility of making combined wind and DIAL measurements with wind derived from frequency shift of the backscatter spectrum and species concentration derived from power of the backscatter spectrum. A combined wind and CO2 measurement capability is of interest for applications on both Earth and Mars. CO2 measurements in the Earth atmosphere are of importance to studies of the global carbon cycle. Data on vertically-resolved CO2 profiles over large geographical observations areas are of particular interest that could potentially be made by deploying a lidar on an aircraft or satellite. By combining CO2 concentration with wind measurements an even more useful data product could be obtained in the calculation of CO2 flux. A challenge to lidar in this application is that CO2 concentration measurements must be made with a high level of precision and accuracy to better than 1%. The Martian atmosphere also presents wind and CO2 measurement problems that could be met with a combined DIAL/Doppler lidar. CO2 concentration in this scenario would be used to calculate atmospheric density since the Martian atmosphere is composed of 95% CO2. The lack of measurements of Mars atmospheric density in the 30-60 km range, dust storm formation and movements, and horizontal wind patterns in the 0-20 km range pose significant risks to aerocapture, and entry, descent, and landing of future robotic and human Mars missions. Systematic measurement of the Mars atmospheric density and winds will be required over several Mars years, supplemented with day-of-entry operational measurements. To date, there have been 5

  8. Proposal to Simultaneously Profile Wind and CO2 on Earth and Mars With 2-micron Pulsed Lidar Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Ismail, Syed; Emmitt, David

    2005-01-01

    2-micron lidar technology has been in use and under continued improvement for many years toward wind measurements. But the 2-micron wavelength region is also rich in absorption lines of CO2 (and H2O to a lesser extent) that can be exploited with the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique to make species concentration measurements. A coherent detection receiver offers the possibility of making combined wind and DIAL measurements with wind derived from frequency shift of the backscatter spectrum and species concentration derived from power of the backscatter spectrum. A combined wind and CO2 measurement capability is of interest for applications on both Earth and Mars. CO2 measurements in the Earth atmosphere are of importance to studies of the global carbon cycle. Data on vertically-resolved CO2 profiles over large geographical observations areas are of particular interest that could potentially be made by deploying a lidar on an aircraft or satellite. By combining CO2 concentration with wind measurements an even more useful data product could be obtained in the calculation of CO2 flux. A challenge to lidar in this application is that CO2 concentration measurements must be made with a high level of precision and accuracy to better than 1%. The Martian atmosphere also presents wind and CO2 measurement problems that could be met with a combined DIAL/Doppler lidar. CO2 concentration in this scenario would be used to calculate atmospheric density since the Martian atmosphere is composed of 95% CO2. The lack of measurements of Mars atmospheric density in the 30-60 km range, dust storm formation and movements, and horizontal wind patterns in the 0-20 km range pose significant risks to aerocapture, and entry, descent, and landing of future robotic and human Mars missions. Systematic measurement of the Mars atmospheric density and winds will be required over several Mars years, supplemented with day-of-entry operational measurements. To date, there have been 5

  9. Modified transmitter attachment method for adult ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pietz, P.J.; Brandt, D.A.; Krapu, G.L.; Buhl, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The value of radio telemetry for waterfowl research depends on the availability of suitable methods of attaching transmitters. In previous studies, external transmitters attached to adult Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) with sutures and glue did not stay on birds reliably. In an attempt to improve transmitter retention, a method of attachment was tested in which 4-g transmitters were attached mid-dorsally with sutures and with a stainless steel anchor-shaped wire inserted subcutaneously (anchor transmitters). Field tests indicated that all of 26 female Mallards and 63 of 65 female Gadwalls (Anas strepera) retained their anchor transmitters during 4369 bird-days of monitoring during nesting and brood rearing. Survival rates of females with anchor transmitters compared favorably with those reported from other studies. In this study, females with and without anchor transmitters did not differ with respect to survival rates of their ducklings. The anchor transmitter may be suitable for a variety of field studies on numerous species.

  10. A 20-GHz IMPATT transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, J. L.; Sun, C.

    1983-01-01

    The engineering development of a solid state transmitter amplifier operating in the 20 GHz frequency band. The development effort involved a variety of disciplines including IMPATT device development, circulator design, simple and multiple diode circuits designs, and amplifier integration and test.

  11. A Low Cost TDRSS Compatible Transmitter Option

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Don

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Space-based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS) program has developed and tested a low cost Ku-Band transmitter alternative for TDRSS applications based on an existing IRIG shaped offset quaternary phase shift keying (SOQPSK) transmitter. This paper presents information related to the implementation of this low cost system, as well as performance measurements of the alternative TDRSS transmitter system compared with an existing QPSK TDRSS transmitter.

  12. Autoregressive smoothing of GOMOS transmittances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussen, D.; Gomos Team

    The nominal processing chain of the GOMOS star occultation data follows a two-stage inversion scheme: firstly, the transmittances are spectrally inverted to derive the slant path optical thicknesses of different absorbing species; secondly, the latter quantities are vertically inverted for retrieving number density profiles. Although this algorithm is cheaper than reverting the order of inversions, it neglects the use of the high correlation between successive tangent altitudes. As GOMOS may suffer from residual scintillation effects from oblique occultations, we propose to filter the transmittances along the vertical direction by using the optical segment kernel coupled to a standard regularization operator. The tuning parameter of the filtering operator is optimized by minimizing the Durbin-Watson statistics which ensures a maximal decorrelation of residuals. The results will be compared with the generic data processing model and also with a global inversion scheme.

  13. Digital transmitter - Simple, yet precise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, F.; Sumida, J.

    1986-01-01

    A transmitter developed for operation at high digital transmission speeds is described. It is a complex system that produces a clean waveform with data rates as high as 1 Mb/s; and its design makes it possible to vary all possible modulation schemes by reprogramming a chip, to vary data-transmission rates with the clock frequency, and to shape pulses without distortion. The design, furthermore, can be adapted to very-large-scale-integration (VLSI) fabrication and mass production. A prototype QPSK residual carrier modulation transmitter was fabricated and tested. The purpose was to create a deep null in the data spectrum to transmit a tone or residual carrier along with the modulation.

  14. [Pain and its main transmitters].

    PubMed

    Costentin, J

    2000-03-01

    The pain message originates peripherally from a great variety of substances either released from preformed stores or extemporaneously synthetized. They stimulate or sensitize nociceptors which are associated with the peripheral endings of sensitive protoneurones. Their central endings release many types of transmitters in the dorsal horn of medulla (substance P, NO, CGRP.). At this level their release, triggered by the firing rate, is modulated by the stimulation of various presynaptic receptors operated by transmitters produced by either interneurones (enkephalins) or medullar descending neurons (dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonine). These modulations correspond to the so-called gate control. The sensitive consecutive neurones which climb towards various brain areas are submitted to contradictory influences. Several of them enhance the pain perception (nociceptin, cholecystokinin, neuropeptide FF.) whereas several other reduce it (endorphines, neurotensin, neuromedin N, anandamide.).

  15. 47 CFR 15.212 - Modular transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Modular transmitters. 15.212 Section 15.212 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.212 Modular transmitters. (a) Single modular transmitters consist of a completely...

  16. 47 CFR 15.212 - Modular transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Modular transmitters. 15.212 Section 15.212 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.212 Modular transmitters. (a) Single modular transmitters consist of a completely...

  17. 47 CFR 15.212 - Modular transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Modular transmitters. 15.212 Section 15.212 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.212 Modular transmitters. (a) Single modular transmitters consist of a completely...

  18. 47 CFR 15.212 - Modular transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Modular transmitters. 15.212 Section 15.212 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.212 Modular transmitters. (a) Single modular transmitters consist of a completely...

  19. 47 CFR 101.513 - Transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmitter power. 101.513 Section 101.513... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.513 Transmitter power. The transmitter power will be governed by § 101.113. Further, each application must contain an analysis...

  20. 47 CFR 90.549 - Transmitter certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmitter certification. 90.549 Section 90...-775 and 793-805 MHz Bands § 90.549 Transmitter certification. Transmitters operated in the 763-775 MHz... its certification procedure as required by § 90.203....

  1. Transmitter data collection using Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, B. L.

    1988-01-01

    A data collection system installed on the 400 kilowatt X-band transmitter of the Goldstone Solar System Radar is described. The data collection system is built around the off-the-shelf IEEE 488 instrumentation, linked with fiber optics, controlled by an inexpensive computer, and uses software written in the Ada language. The speed and accuracy of the system is discussed, along with programming techniques used for both data collection and reduction.

  2. Control of optical transmittance of fat tissue slices at NIR photodynamic action mediated by indocyanine green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanina, I. Y.; Doubrovsky, V. A.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2013-02-01

    The changes in optical transmittance of human adipose cell layers sensitized by indocyanine green (ICG) as a result of photodynamic action were found and studied. It was revealed experimentally that due to the selective action of laser radiation on fat tissue sensitized by ICG the spatial distribution of its optical transmittance becomes more homogeneous. The statistical computer processing of digital images allowed one to estimate tissue optical transmittance, its spatial and temporal distributions. These quantitative estimations correlated well with the visible changes of tissue images. The measurements carried out gave an opportunity to suggest the interpretation of the phenomenon observed.

  3. Comparison of 2 micron Ho and 10 micron CO2 lidar for atmospheric backscatter and Doppler windshear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killinger, Dennis

    1991-01-01

    The development of eye-safe, solid-state Lidar systems is discussed, with an emphasis on Coherent Doppler Lidar for Atmospheric Wind Measurements. The following subject areas are covered: tunable Ho DIAL (Differential Absorption Lidar)/lidar atmospheric measurements; atmospheric turbulence measurements and detector arrays; diurnal measurements of C(sub n)(sup 2) for KSC lidar measurements; and development of single-frequency Ho laser/lidar.

  4. Characteristics of direct detection 1.6μm CO2 DIAL with OPG transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, C.; Shibata, Y.; Abo, M.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advances in a QPM nonlinear optical frequency conversion efficienfy. The QPM condition is produced to use periodically poled ferroelectric crystals. An optical parametric oscillator (OPO), amplifier (OPA), and generator (OPG) devices are widely recognized as versatile coherent tunable spectroscopic sources. Many applications of PPLN-parametric radiation sources, such as laser remote sensing and molecular spectroscopy, require broadly tunable and narrow linewidth operation in the infrared region. We developed an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) transmitter for the first 1.6 μm CO2 DIAL. In order to improve the measurement accuracy of CO2 profiles, development of high power and wavelength stabilized laser system has been conducted. We have developed a new high-power 1.6 μm laser transmitter based on a parametric master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) system pumped by a LD-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser which has the injection seed laser locked to the iodine absorption line. The master oscillator is the OPG transmitter and the amplifier is the OPA transmitter. Since the OPO transmitter has a cavity mirror, running the system without mode hopping requires complex control of cavity length. By contrast, the OPG transmitter has no cavity mirror, so there is no need to control cavity length. We report detail characteristics of the direct detection 1.6 μm CO2 DIAL with the OPG transmitter. Moreover, we report the technique of the simultaneously measurement temperature profiles with the CO2 concentration profiles using a CO2 absorption profile because of improvement of measurement accuracy of the CO2 concentration. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  5. 47 CFR 90.463 - Transmitter control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... transmitter or transmitters controlled are either radiating “RF” energy, or when the transmitter circuits have... meter may be employed to indicate the activation of both the local and the remote transmitter(s). (2) To... operator to determine when they are radiating “RF” energy or when the transmitter circuits have been placed...

  6. 47 CFR 90.463 - Transmitter control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... transmitter or transmitters controlled are either radiating “RF” energy, or when the transmitter circuits have... meter may be employed to indicate the activation of both the local and the remote transmitter(s). (2) To... operator to determine when they are radiating “RF” energy or when the transmitter circuits have been placed...

  7. 47 CFR 90.463 - Transmitter control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... transmitter or transmitters controlled are either radiating “RF” energy, or when the transmitter circuits have... meter may be employed to indicate the activation of both the local and the remote transmitter(s). (2) To... operator to determine when they are radiating “RF” energy or when the transmitter circuits have been placed...

  8. Infrared heterodyne radiometer for airborne atmospheric transmittance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolczok, J. M.; Lange, R. A.; Dinardo, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    An infrared heterodyne radiometer (IHR) was used to measure atmospheric transmittance at selected hydrogen fluoride (2.7 micrometer) and deuterium fluoride (3.8 micrometer) laser transitions. The IHR was installed aboard a KC-135 aircraft for an airborne atmospheric measurements program that used the sun as a backlighting source for the transmission measurements. The critical components are: a wideband indium antimonide (1nSb) photomixer, a CW HF/DF laser L0, a radiometric processor, and a 1900 K blackbody reference source. The measured heterodyne receiver sensitivity (NEP) is 1.3 x 10 to the -19th power W/Hz, which yields a calculated IHR temperature resolution accuracy of delta I sub S/-3 sub S = 0.005 for a source temperature of 1000 K and a total transmittance of 0.5. Measured atmospheric transmittance at several wavelengths and aircraft altitudes from 9.14 km (30,000 ft) to 13.72 km (45,000 ft) were obtained during the measurements program and have been compared with values predicted by the AFGL Atmospheric Line Parameter Compilation.

  9. Optical Parametric Oscillator on GaSe Crystal Pumped by a 3 Micron Erbium Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    based on Ho3+ and Er - doped crystals have been developed. Holmium lasers have wavelengths near 2 micron and Erbium lasers near 3 micron. Both...experience in working with GaSe OPO pumped by Q-switched pulses shows that pumping of GaSe by 2 |im laser radiation (a holmium laser) is also possible

  10. Automatic frequency control for FM transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automatic frequency control circuit for an FM television transmitter is described. The frequency of the transmitter is sampled during what is termed the back porch portion of the horizontal synchronizing pulse which occurs during the retrace interval, the frequency sample compared with the frequency of a reference oscillator, and a correction applied to the frequency of the transmitter during this portion of the retrace interval.

  11. A demonstration of CMOS VLSI circuit prototyping in support of the site facility using the 1.2 micron standard cell library developed by National Security Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Edwyn D.

    1991-01-01

    Two silicon CMOS application specific integrated circuits (ASICs), a data generation chip, and a data checker chip were designed. The conversion of the data generator circuitry into a pair of CMOS ASIC chips using the 1.2 micron standard cell library is documented. The logic design of the data checker is discussed. The functions of the control circuitry is described. An accurate estimate of timing relationships is essential to make sure that the logic design performs correctly under practical conditions. Timing and delay information are examined.

  12. High energy microlaser and compact MOPA transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brickeen, Brian K.; Bernot, Dave; Geathers, Eliot; Mosovsky, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    A compact micro-oscillator incorporating a dual-bounce, grazing incidence gain module with a folded resonator cavity is presented. The gain module, previously developed for Nd:YVO4, is embodied in highly doped ceramic Nd:YAG to generate improved Q-switch performance while maintaining localized pump absorption. The cavity design utilizes a doubly folded optics path around the gain crystal to increase the intra-cavity mode for a more optimum overlap with the pump light volume produced by standard lensed laser diode bars. A modified CS-package diode mount is developed to facilitate the reduced size of the oscillator without sacrificing the ability to use a high-energy, side-pumping arrangement. The oscillator is combined with a high gain, high energy extraction VHGM amplifier to generate a transmitter source on the order of 50 mJ. Cooling for both the oscillator and amplifier modules is provided via a conductive path through the base of the package. Both devices are mounted on opposite sides of a phase-change cooling reservoir to enable self-contained, burst-mode operation. Beam shaping of the oscillator output, in preparation for injection into the amplifier, is contained in a small cut-away path on the reservoir side.

  13. A Ground-Based 2-Micron DIAL System to Profile Tropospheric CO2 and Aerosol Distributions for Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Koch, Grady; Abedin, Nurul; Refaat, Tamer; Rubio, Manuel; Davis, Kenneth; Miller, Charles; Singh, Upendra

    2006-01-01

    System will operate at a temperature insensitive CO2 line (2050.967 nm) with side-line tuning and off-set locking. Demonstrated an order of magnitude improvement in laser line locking needed for high precision measurements, side-line operation, and simultaneously double pulsing and line locking. Detector testing of phototransistor has demonstrated sensitivity to aerosol features over long distances in the atmosphere and resolve features approx. 100m. Optical systems that collect light onto small area detectors work well. Receiver optical designs are being optimized and data acquisition systems developed. CO2 line parameter characterization in progress In situ sensor calibration in progress for validation of DIAL CO2 system.

  14. Monitoring atmospheric pollutants with a heterodyne radiometer transmitter-receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The presence of selected atmospheric pollutants can be determined by transmitting an infrared beam of proper wavelength through the atmosphere, and detecting the reflections of the transmitted beam with a heterodyne radiometer transmitter-receiver using part of the laser beam as a local oscillator. The particular pollutant and its absorption line strength to be measured are selected by the laser beam wave length. When the round-trip path for the light is known or measured, concentration can be determined. Since pressure (altitude) will affect the shape of the molecular absorption line of a pollutant, tuning the laser through a range of frequencies, which includes a part of the absorption line of the pollutant of interest, yields pollutant altitude data from which the altitude and altitude profile is determined.

  15. External Cavity Coherent Transmitter Modules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    6-15) PSK Homodyne 282 kHz FP + FDG 40 (+) (25-37) to 565 kHz FP + BDd 40 (+) (15-25) *preferred structure (+) -Minimum Practical Design ** - Figure...of 1.5 pm wavelength tunable DBR laser", OFC/IOOC 87, paper WC3. 13. X Pan, "A theoretical model of multi- electrode DFB lasers", to be published. 139

  16. Autoregressive smoothing of GOMOS transmittances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussen, D.; Vanhellemont, F.; Bingen, C.; Kyrölä, B.; Tamminen, J.; Sofieva, V.; Hassinen, S.; Seppälä, A.; Verronen, P. T.; Bertaux, J. L.; Hauchecorne, A.; Dalaudier, F.; d'Andon, O. Fanton; Barrot, G.; Mangin, A.; Theodore, B.; Guirlet, M.; Renard, J. B.; Fraisse, R.; Snoeij, P.; Koopman, R.; Saavedra, L.

    GOMOS is a stellar occultation instrument onboard ENVISAT. It has already measured several hundreds of thousands occultations since March 2002. In some circumstances, the obliqueness of the star setting causes the remote sounding of possible horizontal turbulence that cannot be adequately corrected by using the fast photometer signals, leading to the presence of residual scintillation in the atmospheric transmittance. We investigate the mechanism that produces this spurious signal that may cause the retrieval of wavy constituent profiles. A special algorithm of vertical autoregressive smoothing (VAS) is proposed that takes into account the physical correlation between adjacent measurements at different tangent altitudes. A regularization parameter of the method may be optimized on basis of the minimal correlation between the residuals as prescribed by the Durbin-Watson statistics. The improvements obtained in the retrieval of both O 3 and NO 2 number density profiles is presented and discussed with respect to the results of the official data processing model.

  17. Compact Ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Transmitter Using Solid-State Dye Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Alton L., Jr.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Elsayid-Ele, Hani

    2001-01-01

    A new potential DIAL laser transmitter is described that uses solid-state dye laser materials to make a simpler, more compact, lower mass laser system. Two solid-state dye laser materials were tested to evaluate their performance in a laser oscillator cavity end pumped by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm. The polymer host polymethyl-methacrylate was injected with a pyrromethene laser dye, PM 580, or PM 597. A narrowband laser oscillator cavity was constructed to produce visible wavelengths of 578 and 600 nm which were frequency doubled into the UV region (299 or 300 nm) by using a BBO crystal, resulting in a maximum energy of 11 mJ at a wavelength of 578 nm when pumped by the Nd:YAG laser at an energy of 100 mJ (532 nm). A maximum output energy of 378 microJ was achieved in the UV region at a wavelength of 289 nm but lasted only 2000 laser shots at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The results are promising and show that a solid-state dye laser based ozone DIAL system is possible with improvements in the design of the laser transmitter.

  18. Ho:YLF Laser Pumped by TM:Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Kohei; Ishii, Shoken; Itabe, Toshikazu; Asai, Kazuhiro; Sato, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    A 2-micron Ho:YLF laser end-pumped by 1.94-micron Tm:fiber laser is described. A ring resonator of 3m length is adopted for the oscillator. The laser is a master oscillator and an amplifier system. It is operated at high repetition rate of 200-5000 Hz in room temperature. The laser outputs were about 9W in CW and more than 6W in Q-switched operation. This laser was developed to be used for wind and CO2 measurements.

  19. Deficient Sumoylation of Yeast 2-Micron Plasmid Proteins Rep1 and Rep2 Associated with Their Loss from the Plasmid-Partitioning Locus and Impaired Plasmid Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Jordan B.; McQuaid, Mary E.; Dobson, Melanie J.

    2013-01-01

    The 2-micron plasmid of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes copy-number amplification and partitioning systems that enable the plasmid to persist despite conferring no advantage to its host. Plasmid partitioning requires interaction of the plasmid Rep1 and Rep2 proteins with each other and with the plasmid-partitioning locus STB. Here we demonstrate that Rep1 stability is reduced in the absence of Rep2, and that both Rep proteins are sumoylated. Lysine-to-arginine substitutions in Rep1 and Rep2 that inhibited their sumoylation perturbed plasmid inheritance without affecting Rep protein stability or two-hybrid interaction between Rep1 and Rep2. One-hybrid and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Rep1 was required for efficient retention of Rep2 at STB and that sumoylation-deficient mutants of Rep1 and Rep2 were impaired for association with STB. The normal co-localization of both Rep proteins with the punctate nuclear plasmid foci was also lost when Rep1 was sumoylation-deficient. The correlation of Rep protein sumoylation status with plasmid-partitioning locus association suggests a theme common to eukaryotic chromosome segregation proteins, sumoylated forms of which are found enriched at centromeres, and between the yeast 2-micron plasmid and viral episomes that depend on sumoylation of their maintenance proteins for persistence in their hosts. PMID:23555963

  20. Assessment of the calibration curve for transmittance pulse-oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronin, A.; Fine, I.; Meglinski, I.

    2011-11-01

    Optical/laser modalities provide a broad variety of practical solutions for clinical diagnostics and therapy in a range from imaging of single cells and molecules to non-invasive biopsy of specific biological tissues and organs tomography. Near-infrared transmittance pulse oximetry with laser diodes is the accepted standard in current clinical practice and widely used for noninvasive monitoring of oxygen saturation in arterial blood hemoglobin. Conceptual design of practical pulse oximetry systems requires careful selection of various technical parameters, including intensity, wavelength, beam size and profile of incident laser radiation, size, numerical aperture of the detector, as well as a clear understanding of how the spatial and temporal structural alterations in biological tissues can be linked with and can be distinguished by variations of these parameters. In current letter utilizing state-of-the-art NVIDEA CUDA technology, a new object oriented programming paradigm and on-line solutions we introduce a computational tool applied for human finger transmittance spectra simulation and assessment of calibration curve for near-infrared transmitted pulseoximetry.

  1. Variations in the Peak Position of the 6.2 micron Interstellar Emission Feature: A Tracer of N in the Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of the molecular characteristics that underlie the observed peak position and profile of the nominal 6.2 micron interstellar emission band generally attributed to the CC stretching vibrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). It begins with a summary of recent experimental and theoretical studies ofthe spectroscopic properties of large (>30 carbon atoms) PAH cations as they relate to this aspect of the astrophysical problem. It then continues with an examination of the spectroscopic properties of a number of PAH variants within the context of the interstellar 6.2 micron emission, beginning with a class of compounds known as polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles (PANHs; PAHs with one or more nitrogen atoms substituted into their carbon skeleton). In this regard, we summarize the results of recent relevant experimental studies involving a limited set of small PANHs and their cations and then report the results of a comprehensive computational study that extends that work to larger PANH cations including many nitrogen-substituted variants of coronene(+) (C24H12(+)), ovalene(+) (C32H14(+)), circumcoronene(+) (C54H18(+)), and circum-circumcoronene(+) (C96H24(+)). Finally, we report the results of more focused computational studies of selected representatives from a number of other classes of PAH variants that share one or more of the key attributes of the PANH species studied. These alternative classes of PAH variants include (1) oxygen- and silicon-substituted PAH cations; (2) PAH-metal ion complexes (metallocenes) involving the cosmically abundant elements magnesium and iron; and (3) large, asymmetric PAH cations. Overall, the studies reported here demonstrate that increasing PAH size alone is insuEcient to account for the position of the shortest wavelength interstellar 6.2 micron emission bands, as had been suggested by earlier studies. On the other hand, this work reveals that substitution of one or

  2. 77 FR 1779 - Emergency Locator Transmitters (ELTs)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... Locator Transmitter (ELT) Equipment. SUMMARY: This notice announces the FAA's intent to cancel TSO-C91a, Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) Equipment. The effect of the cancelled TSO will result in no new TSO... the 14 Code of ] Federal Regulation (14 CFR) Sec. 91.207 ELT equipage requirement. DATES: Comments...

  3. 47 CFR 101.129 - Transmitter location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmitter location. 101.129 Section 101.129 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.129 Transmitter location. (a) The applicant must determine, prior...

  4. 47 CFR 101.807 - Transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmitter power. 101.807 Section 101.807 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Television Transmission Service § 101.807 Transmitter power. Stations in this service...

  5. 47 CFR 101.807 - Transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transmitter power. 101.807 Section 101.807 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Television Transmission Service § 101.807 Transmitter power. Stations in this service will...

  6. 47 CFR 101.807 - Transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transmitter power. 101.807 Section 101.807 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Television Transmission Service § 101.807 Transmitter power. Stations in this service will...

  7. 47 CFR 101.807 - Transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transmitter power. 101.807 Section 101.807 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Television Transmission Service § 101.807 Transmitter power. Stations in this service will...

  8. 47 CFR 101.807 - Transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transmitter power. 101.807 Section 101.807 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Television Transmission Service § 101.807 Transmitter power. Stations in this service will...

  9. 47 CFR 101.513 - Transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transmitter power. 101.513 Section 101.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.513 Transmitter power. The...

  10. 47 CFR 101.513 - Transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transmitter power. 101.513 Section 101.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.513 Transmitter power. The...

  11. 47 CFR 101.513 - Transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transmitter power. 101.513 Section 101.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.513 Transmitter power. The...

  12. 47 CFR 101.513 - Transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transmitter power. 101.513 Section 101.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.513 Transmitter power. The...

  13. 48 CFR 307.7105 - Transmittal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transmittal. 307.7105 Section 307.7105 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION PLANNING Acquisition Plan 307.7105 Transmittal. The Project Officer...

  14. 47 CFR 101.129 - Transmitter location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transmitter location. 101.129 Section 101.129 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.129 Transmitter location. (a) The applicant must determine, prior...

  15. 47 CFR 101.129 - Transmitter location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transmitter location. 101.129 Section 101.129 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.129 Transmitter location. (a) The applicant must determine, prior...

  16. 47 CFR 101.129 - Transmitter location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transmitter location. 101.129 Section 101.129 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.129 Transmitter location. (a) The applicant must determine, prior...

  17. A comparison of forest canopy transmittance estimators

    Treesearch

    E.R. Smith; Kurt H. Riitters

    1994-01-01

    Multiple sensors, and alternate statistical estimators, were tested for measuring canopy transmittance in four stands under a variety of sky conditions. On a given day, stand average transmittance estimates were insensitive to degree of synchronization of the sensors used to measure under-canopy and incoming radiation. In comparisons to periodic measurement of incoming...

  18. An injectable acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Z. D.; Carlson, T. J.; Li, H.; Xiao, J.; Myjak, M. J.; Lu, J.; Martinez, J. J.; Woodley, C. M.; Weiland, M. A.; Eppard, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Salmon recovery and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish have been attracting national attention due to the environmental and economic implications. In recent years acoustic telemetry has been the primary method for studying salmon passage. However, the size of the existing transmitters limits the minimum size of fish that can be studied, introducing a bias to the study results. We developed the first acoustic fish transmitter that can be implanted by injection instead of surgery. The new injectable transmitter lasts four times longer and weighs 30% less than other transmitters. Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use and may substantially reduce adverse effects of implantation and tag burden, it will allow for study of migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before. The new technology will lead to critical information needed for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems. PMID:25630763

  19. An injectable acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z D; Carlson, T J; Li, H; Xiao, J; Myjak, M J; Lu, J; Martinez, J J; Woodley, C M; Weiland, M A; Eppard, M B

    2015-01-29

    Salmon recovery and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish have been attracting national attention due to the environmental and economic implications. In recent years acoustic telemetry has been the primary method for studying salmon passage. However, the size of the existing transmitters limits the minimum size of fish that can be studied, introducing a bias to the study results. We developed the first acoustic fish transmitter that can be implanted by injection instead of surgery. The new injectable transmitter lasts four times longer and weighs 30% less than other transmitters. Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use and may substantially reduce adverse effects of implantation and tag burden, it will allow for study of migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before. The new technology will lead to critical information needed for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems.

  20. An injectable acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z. D.; Carlson, T. J.; Li, H.; Xiao, J.; Myjak, M. J.; Lu, J.; Martinez, J. J.; Woodley, C. M.; Weiland, M. A.; Eppard, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Salmon recovery and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish have been attracting national attention due to the environmental and economic implications. In recent years acoustic telemetry has been the primary method for studying salmon passage. However, the size of the existing transmitters limits the minimum size of fish that can be studied, introducing a bias to the study results. We developed the first acoustic fish transmitter that can be implanted by injection instead of surgery. The new injectable transmitter lasts four times longer and weighs 30% less than other transmitters. Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use and may substantially reduce adverse effects of implantation and tag burden, it will allow for study of migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before. The new technology will lead to critical information needed for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems.

  1. Transmittance and scattering during wound healing after refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mar, Santiago; Martinez-Garcia, C.; Blanco, J. T.; Torres, R. M.; Gonzalez, V. R.; Najera, S.; Rodriguez, G.; Merayo, J. M.

    2004-10-01

    Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) are frequent techniques performed to correct ametropia. Both methods have been compared in their way of healing but there is not comparison about transmittance and light scattering during this process. Scattering in corneal wound healing is due to three parameters: cellular size and density, and the size of scar. Increase in the scattering angular width implies a decrease the contrast sensitivity. During wound healing keratocytes activation is induced and these cells become into fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Hens were operated using PRK and LASIK techniques. Animals used in this experiment were euthanized, and immediately their corneas were removed and placed carefully into a cornea camera support. All optical measurements have been done with a scatterometer constructed in our laboratory. Scattering measurements are correlated with the transmittance -- the smaller transmittance is the bigger scattering is. The aim of this work is to provide experimental data of the corneal transparency and scattering, in order to supply data that they allow generate a more complete model of the corneal transparency.

  2. A laser communication experiment utilizing the ACT satellite and an airborne laser transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provencher, C.; Spence, Rod

    1988-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) will carry a laser communications transmitter package in order to attempt the experimental reception of signals transmitted from earth orbit. The ACTS laser package includes both a heterodyne transmitter and a direct-detection transmitter. The laser receiver will be installed in an aircraft that is fitted with the requisite signal window. The anticipated capability of this signal detector is noted.

  3. Infrared laser damage to ciliary motion in Phragmatopoma.

    PubMed

    Rikmenspoel, R; Orris, S E; O'Day, P

    1977-04-01

    A glass neodymium laser was modified to make it possible to produce small lesions of 1-2 micron size with a quantitatively known amount of energy. The 1-06-micron radiation of this laser is sufficiently absorbed by water to work without the additions of dyes. Ciliary arrest in Phragmatopoma gills was produced by an amount of energy, sufficient to cause a rise in temperature of 150 degrees C in an area of 2 micron3. At these low doses the effect was fully reversible. With higher doses of laser energy the cilia stopped permanently, probably because of structural damage of the irradiated cells.

  4. Integrated Optical Transmitter and Receiver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    temperature is monitored by a digital infared thermometer. The AsH3 flow is started when the suceptor temperature reaches 5000 C. Calibrated electron mass...characteristics. 2. Auger electron spectroscopy in Gao. 5Alo.5As/GaAs quantum well heterostructure laser indicates that the transition width is as small as 14 A. 3

  5. Emergency Locator Transmitter Crash Testing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-29

    Drop-testing a series of three Cessna 172 aircraft, NASA simulated severe but survivable plane accidents on July 2, July 29 and August 26, 2015, to test emergency locator transmitters (ELTs). A research team equipped the vintage airplanes with five ELTs, two crash test dummies, cameras and data-collecting sensors. ELTs are installed on general aviation and commercial planes to transmit a location signal in the event of a crash. Current ELT models send that signal to orbiting satellites, which repeat it to the nearest search and rescue ground station. The signal is used to determine and transmit the ELT's identity and location to rescuers. ELTs have to work in the extreme circumstances involved in an airplane crash. Included in those extreme circumstances are the possibilities of excessive vibration, fire and impact damage. NASA research is designed to find practical ways to improve ELT system performance and robustness, giving rescue workers the best chance of saving lives. The research was funded by the Search and Rescue Mission Office at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The testing took place at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. This is a video of the July 29, 2015, test.

  6. V-band IMPATT transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D.; Ying, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    A V-band transmitter for communication application was developed that has 30 dB gain and consists of six stages of IMPATT amplifiers. The low and medium power stages are stable amplifiers while the two high power stages are triggered oscillators. Hybrid couplers in the form of Magic Tees were used for power combining two single diode IMPATT modules in the high driver stage and for a single diode IMPATT modules at the output stage. Output power of 4 watts CW across a 2.5 GHz band centered at 60 GHz was achieved with an input power of 4 mW. Dynamic range of the amplifier chain is in excess of 7 dB. A single diode one watt stable amplifier over a bandwidth greater than 2.5 GHz, a high power ( 1 watt) stable amplifier capable of operating in either the constant current or constant voltage mode and verification of the advantages of the latter mode of operation; and a 10 channel modulator with built in test equipment (specifically protective circuitry, failure monitoring, and mode of failure indicated) were also developed. The performance requirements of circulators/isolators for reflection amplifiers were also defined and verified.

  7. Modeling NDT piezoelectric ultrasonic transmitters.

    PubMed

    San Emeterio, J L; Ramos, A; Sanz, P T; Ruíz, A; Azbaid, A

    2004-04-01

    Ultrasonic NDT applications are frequently based on the spike excitation of piezoelectric transducers by means of efficient pulsers which usually include a power switching device (e.g. SCR or MOS-FET) and some rectifier components. In this paper we present an approximate frequency domain electro-acoustic model for pulsed piezoelectric ultrasonic transmitters which, by integrating partial models of the different stages (driving electronics, tuning/matching networks and broadband piezoelectric transducer), allows the computation of the emission transfer function and output force temporal waveform. An approximate frequency domain model is used for the evaluation of the electrical driving pulse from the spike generator. Tuning circuits, interconnecting cable and mechanical impedance matching layers are modeled by means of transmission lines and the classical quadripole approach. The KLM model is used for the piezoelectric transducer. In addition, a PSPICE scheme is used for an alternative simulation of the broadband driving spike, including the accurate evaluation of non-linear driving effects. Several examples illustrate the capabilities of the specifically developed software.

  8. Review of pulsed CO2 laser radar technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasson, V.

    The utility of CO2 laser radars is reviewed, and some relevant key transmitter technology issues are discussed. The utility aspect focuses on waveform and architectures and highlights the overall importance of the transmitter, from a weight/size/power consumption standpoint, in a laser radar system. The transmitter review covers major transmitter issues, namely, discharge techniques, frequency fidelity, and associated flow and acoustics control.

  9. Longwave-IR Optical Parametric Oscillator in Orientation-Patterned GaAs Pumped by a 2 micron Tm,Ho:YLF Laser (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    work.PAO Case Number 88ABW-2013-2563, Clearance Date 29 May 2013. Document contains color. 14. ABSTRACT We demonstrate longwave infrared (LWIR...with theoretical calculations. 15. SUBJECT TERMS longwave, infrared , oscillator 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...USA 2University of Dayton, 300 College Park Avenue, Dayton, OH 45469, USA *Ryan.Feaver@wpafb.af.mil Abstract: We demonstrate longwave infrared

  10. Design, Qualification, and On Orbit Performance of the CALIPSO Aerosol Lidar Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovis, Floyd E.; Witt, Greg; Sullivan, Edward T.; Le, Khoa; Weimer, Carl; Applegate, Jeff; Luck, William S., Jr.; Verhapen, Ron; Cisewski, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    The laser transmitter for the CALIPSO aerosol lidar mission has been operating on orbit as planned since June 2006. This document discusses the optical and laser system design and qualification process that led to this success. Space-qualifiable laser design guidelines included the use of mature laser technologies, the use of alignment sensitive resonator designs, the development and practice of stringent contamination control procedures, the operation of all optical components at appropriately derated levels, and the proper budgeting for the space-qualification of the electronics and software.

  11. Atlas and Catalog of Dark Clouds Based on the 2 Micron All Sky Survey. II. Correction of the Background Using the Besançon Galaxy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobashi, K.; Marshall, D. J.; Shimoikura, T.; Bernard, J.

    2013-10-01

    We have applied a correction to the background of the all-sky color excess maps of E(J-H) and E(H-KS) as well as extinction maps of AJ, AH, and AKS derived by Dobashi (2011) utilizing the 2 Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS PSC). The correction was made using a simulated star catalog produced based on the Besançon Galaxy Model (Robin et al. 2003; Marshall et al. 2006; Reylé et al. 2009; Robin et al. 2012). The method of the correction is fully described in our forthcoming paper (Dobashi et al. 2013), and the new color excess and extinction maps corrected for the background are open to the public at our website.

  12. Compact, Engineered, 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Prototype for Field and Airborne Validation: Doppler Aerosol WiNd Lidar (DAWN). Interim Review #1 (6 months)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2006-01-01

    A new project, selected in 2005 by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), under the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), will be described. The 3-year effort is intended to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a packaged, rugged, compact, space-qualifiable coherent Doppler wind lidar (DWL) transceiver capable of future validation in an aircraft and/or Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The state-of-the-art 2-micron coherent DWL breadboard at NASA/LaRC will be engineered and compactly packaged consistent with future aircraft flights. The packaged transceiver will be integrated into a coherent DWL system test bed at LaRC. Atmospheric wind measurements will be made to validate the packaged technology. This will greatly advance the coherent part of the hybrid DWL solution to the need for global tropospheric wind measurements.

  13. High-speed, large-area, p-i-n InGaAs photodiode linear array at 2-micron wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Abhay; Datta, Shubhashish

    2012-06-01

    We present 16-element and 32-element lattice-mismatched InGaAs photodiode arrays having a cut-off wavelength of ~2.2 um. Each 100 um × 200 um large pixel of the 32-element array has a capacitance of 2.5 pF at 5 V reverse bias, thereby allowing a RC-limited bandwidth of ~1.3 GHz. At room temperature, each pixel demonstrates a dark current of 25 uA at 5 V reverse bias. Corresponding results for the 16-element array having 200 um × 200 um pixels are also reported. Cooling the photodiode array to 150K is expected to reduce its dark current to < 50 nA per pixel at 5 V reverse bias. Additionally, measurement results of 2-micron single photodiodes having 16 GHz bandwidth and corresponding PIN-TIA photoreceiver having 6 GHz bandwidth are also reported.

  14. The 1.7- to 4.2-micron spectrum of asteroid 1 Ceres - Evidence for structural water in clay minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Feierberg, M. A.; Larson, H. P.; Johnson, J. R.; Tokunaga, A. T.

    1981-01-01

    A high-resolution Fourier spectrum (1.7-3.5 microns) and medium-resolution spectrophotometry (2.7-4.2 microns) were obtained for Asteroid 1 Ceres. The presence of the 3-micron absorption feature due to water of hydration was confirmed. The 3-micron feature is compared with the 3-micron bands due to water of hydration in clays and salts. It is concluded that the spectrum of Ceres shows a strong absorption at 2.7-2.8 microns due to structural OH groups in clay minerals. The dominant minerals on the surface of Ceres are therefore hydrated clay minerals structurally similar to terrestrial montmorillonites. There is also a narrow absorption feature at 3.1 microns which is attributable to a very small amount of water ice on Ceres. This is the first evidence for ice on the surface of an asteroid.

  15. Pressure Transmitter Surveillance Using Quaternion Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicharro, J. M.; García-Berrocal, A.; Balbás, M.; Blazquez, J.

    2002-11-01

    Rosemount pressure transmitters are widely used in Nuclear Power Plants. Mandatory surveillance is focused on the ramp response time, which is calculated using noise analysis techniques. But the response time only accounts for the sensing diaphragm degradation. Considering the other components, a technique for early failure detection is developed. It uses simple properties of the quaternion algebra, mainly the non-commutativity of the multiplication rule. Quaternions are built from the transmitter noise signal. The design of a specific quaternion for a given component is based on an electrical analogy of the transmitter physical model.

  16. Infrared Transmittance Of Borosilicate Based Fiber Insulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljungdahl, Gosta; Ribbing, Carl G.

    1987-11-01

    Collimated transmittance spectra for boroxide alkali-silicate glass wool with different fiber diameter distributions are reported. Three distinct maxima at 1520, 1300 and 600 cm-1 were observed. Using a normalizing procedure it is demonstrated that the peaks at 1520 and 600 cm-1 decrease with increasing average fiber diameter. The transmittance maximum at 1300 cm-1 shows a much weaker fiber size dependence which is explained by the refractive index of the fiber material n=1 at that wavenumber, causing the refraction losses to vanish. Comparison with bulk glass data and model calculations suggest that the collimated trans-mittance at this wavenumber is enhanced by rescattering in the forward direction.

  17. Helium-neon laser: thermal high-resolution recording.

    PubMed

    Carlson, C O; Stone, E; Bernstein, H L; Tomita, W K; Myers, W C

    1966-12-23

    Scan-line recording by means of a moving laser spot has been achieved on metallic and organic thin films Recording rates of the order of one million spots per second were obtained with a laser beam power of 38 milliwatts at the recording surface. Typical recorded line widths were of the order of 2 microns.

  18. Ionospheric very low frequency transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-02-15

    The theme of this paper is to establish a reliable ionospheric very low frequency (VLF) transmitter, which is also broad band. Two approaches are studied that generate VLF waves in the ionosphere. The first, classic approach employs a ground-based HF heater to directly modulate the high latitude ionospheric, or auroral electrojet. In the classic approach, the intensity-modulated HF heater induces an alternating current in the electrojet, which serves as a virtual antenna to transmit VLF waves. The spatial and temporal variations of the electrojet impact the reliability of the classic approach. The second, beat-wave approach also employs a ground-based HF heater; however, in this approach, the heater operates in a continuous wave mode at two HF frequencies separated by the desired VLF frequency. Theories for both approaches are formulated, calculations performed with numerical model simulations, and the calculations are compared to experimental results. Theory for the classic approach shows that an HF heater wave, intensity-modulated at VLF, modulates the electron temperature dependent electrical conductivity of the ionospheric electrojet, which, in turn, induces an ac electrojet current. Thus, the electrojet becomes a virtual VLF antenna. The numerical results show that the radiation intensity of the modulated electrojet decreases with an increase in VLF radiation frequency. Theory for the beat wave approach shows that the VLF radiation intensity depends upon the HF heater intensity rather than the electrojet strength, and yet this approach can also modulate the electrojet when present. HF heater experiments were conducted for both the intensity modulated and beat wave approaches. VLF radiations were generated and the experimental results confirm the numerical simulations. Theory and experimental results both show that in the absence of the electrojet, VLF radiation from the F-region is generated via the beat wave approach. Additionally, the beat wave approach

  19. Transmitters and receivers in free space optical communications for Deep Space links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, J.

    2003-01-01

    Two of the many research areas integral making a Mars-Earth optical communication link a reality are optical antenna design and laser transmitter design. This paper addresses areas of both of these by exploring a mode-matched design for a cavity-dumped communications laser, and by reporting on the initial stages of the analysis of an existing 100 inch telescope for use as an optical communications receiver.

  20. 47 CFR 80.855 - Radiotelephone transmitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the band 1605 to 3500 kHz available for ship-to-shore or ship-to-ship communication. (b) The duty cycle of the transmitter must permit transmission of the international radiotelephone alarm signal....

  1. 47 CFR 80.855 - Radiotelephone transmitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the band 1605 to 3500 kHz available for ship-to-shore or ship-to-ship communication. (b) The duty cycle of the transmitter must permit transmission of the international radiotelephone alarm signal....

  2. 47 CFR 80.855 - Radiotelephone transmitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the band 1605 to 3500 kHz available for ship-to-shore or ship-to-ship communication. (b) The duty cycle of the transmitter must permit transmission of the international radiotelephone alarm signal....

  3. 47 CFR 80.855 - Radiotelephone transmitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the band 1605 to 3500 kHz available for ship-to-shore or ship-to-ship communication. (b) The duty cycle of the transmitter must permit transmission of the international radiotelephone alarm signal....

  4. 47 CFR 80.855 - Radiotelephone transmitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the band 1605 to 3500 kHz available for ship-to-shore or ship-to-ship communication. (b) The duty cycle of the transmitter must permit transmission of the international radiotelephone alarm signal....

  5. An injectable acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Li, Huidong; Xiao, Jie; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Lu, Jun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2015-01-29

    Salmon recovery, and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish, has been attracting national attention in due to great environmental and economic implications. Acoustic Telemetry has been the primary method for studying salmon passage. However, the size of the existing transmitters limits the minimum size of fish that can be studied, introducing bias to the study results. We developed the first acoustic fish transmitter that can be implanted by injection instead of surgery. The new injectable transmitter offers improved performance and 30% weight reduction. Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use, substantially reduces adverse effects of implantation, and provides additional biological benefits for tagged fish, it will become the enabling technology for studying migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before. This will lead to critical information for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems.

  6. An injectable acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Li, Huidong; ...

    2015-01-29

    Salmon recovery, and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish, has been attracting national attention in due to great environmental and economic implications. Acoustic Telemetry has been the primary method for studying salmon passage. However, the size of the existing transmitters limits the minimum size of fish that can be studied, introducing bias to the study results. We developed the first acoustic fish transmitter that can be implanted by injection instead of surgery. The new injectable transmitter offers improved performance and 30% weight reduction. Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use, substantially reduces adverse effects of implantation,more » and provides additional biological benefits for tagged fish, it will become the enabling technology for studying migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before. This will lead to critical information for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems.« less

  7. Millimeter wave band ultra wideband transmitter MMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Jin; Rolland, Nathalie

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new millimeter-wave (MMW) ultra wideband (UWB) transmitter MMIC which has been developed in an OMMIC 0.1 μm GaAs PHEMT foundry process (ft = 100 GHz) for 22-29 GHz vehicular radar systems. The transmitter is composed of an MMW negative resistance oscillator (NRO), a power amplifier (PA), and two UWB pulse generators (PGs). In order to convert the UWB pulse signal to MMW frequency and reduce the total power consumption, the MMW NRO is driven by one of the UWB pulse generators and the power amplifier is triggered by another UWB pulse generator. The main advantages of this transmitter are: new design, simple architecture, high-precision distance measurements, infinite ON/OFF switch ratio, and low power consumption. The total power consumption of the transmitter MMIC is 218 mW with a peak output power of 5.5 dBm at 27 GHz.

  8. 48 CFR 307.7105 - Transmittal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... convey the signed AP to the CCO or designee by providing a completed Part I—Transmittal and Approval Form, with other parts of the AP attached, no later than the date agreed to in the acquisition...

  9. 48 CFR 307.7105 - Transmittal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... convey the signed AP to the CCO or designee by providing a completed Part I—Transmittal and Approval Form, with other parts of the AP attached, no later than the date agreed to in the acquisition...

  10. 48 CFR 307.7105 - Transmittal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... convey the signed AP to the CCO or designee by providing a completed Part I—Transmittal and Approval Form, with other parts of the AP attached, no later than the date agreed to in the acquisition...

  11. 48 CFR 307.7105 - Transmittal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... convey the signed AP to the CCO or designee by providing a completed Part I—Transmittal and Approval Form, with other parts of the AP attached, no later than the date agreed to in the acquisition...

  12. A radio transmitter attachment technique for soras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haramis, G.M.; Kearns, G.D.

    2000-01-01

    We modified a figure-8 leg-loop harness designed for small passerines to attach successfully 1.8-g radio transmitters over the synsacrum of migrant Soras (Porzana carolina). Because of the short caudal region of Soras, addition of a waist loop was critical to securing the transmitter while leg loops were maintained to center the package. Thin gauge (0.6-mm diameter) elastic thread proved ideal for transmitter attachment and allowed for freedom of movement and girth expansion associated with fattening during a 6-10 week stopover. Of 110 Soras radio tagged during three field seasons, only a single mortality was observed and only a single bird lost its transmitter. Migration from the study area was confirmed for 76 (69%) and suspected for another 25 birds (total 92%).

  13. Digital transmitter for data bus communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proch, G. E. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An improved digital transmitter for transmitting serial pulse code modulation (pcm) data at high bit rates over a transmission line is disclosed. When not transmitting, the transmitter features a high output impedance which prevents the transmitter from loading the transmission line. The pcm input is supplied to a logic control circuit which produces two discrete logic level signals which are supplied to an amplifier. The amplifier, which is transformer coupled to the output isolation circuitry, converts the discrete logic level signals to two high current level, ground isolated signals in the secondary windings of the coupling transformer. The latter signals are employed as inputs to the isolation circuitry which includes two series transistor pairs operating into a hybrid transformer functioning to isolate the transmitter circuitry from the transmission line.

  14. 47 CFR 90.215 - Transmitter measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the modulation of each transmitter, which is authorized to operate with an output power in excess of... modulation characteristics. (d) The determinations required by paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of this section...

  15. 47 CFR 90.215 - Transmitter measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the modulation of each transmitter, which is authorized to operate with an output power in excess of... modulation characteristics. (d) The determinations required by paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of this section...

  16. 47 CFR 90.215 - Transmitter measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the modulation of each transmitter, which is authorized to operate with an output power in excess of... modulation characteristics. (d) The determinations required by paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of this section...

  17. 47 CFR 15.212 - Modular transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... modular transmitter must have their own shielding. The physical crystal and tuning capacitors may be... shielded. The physical crystal and tuning capacitors may be located external to the shielded radio elements...

  18. Effect of ambient humidity on light transmittance through skin phantoms during cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-San-Juan, Julio C; Choi, Bernard; Franco, Walfre; Nelson, J Stuart; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2006-01-07

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is a technique employed to reduce the risk of epidermal damage during dermatologic laser surgery. However, while CSC protects the epidermis from non-specific thermal damage, it might reduce the effective fluence reaching the target chromophore due to scattering of light by the spray droplets and subsequent water condensation/freezing on the skin surface. The objective of this work was to study the effect of ambient humidity (omega) on light transmittance during CSC. An integrating sphere was employed to measure the dynamics of light transmittance through a deformable agar phantom during CSC. The study included two representative CSC spurt patterns studied using four omega: 57, 40, 20 and 12%. Results show that during CSC, as omega increased, light transmittance decreased. For the highest humidity level (57%) studied, light transmittance reached a minimum of 55% approximately 30 ms after spurt termination. In a controlled environment with omega = 12%, light transmittance reached a minimum of 87% approximately 30 ms after spurt termination. The reduced light transmittance immediately after spurt termination was most likely because of scattering of light caused by condensation of water vapour due to aggressive cooling of ambient air in the wake of the cryogen spurt.

  19. Total canopy transmittance estimated from small-footprint, full-waveform airborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenković, Milutin; Wagner, Wolfgang; Quast, Raphael; Hollaus, Markus; Ressl, Camillo; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2017-06-01

    Canopy transmittance is a directional and wavelength-specific physical parameter that quantifies the amount of radiation attenuated when passing through a vegetation layer. The parameter has been estimated from LiDAR data in many different ways over the years. While early LiDAR methods treated each returned echo equally or weighted the echoes according to their return order, recent methods have focused more on the echo energy. In this study, we suggest a new method of estimating the total canopy transmittance considering only the energy of ground echoes. Therefore, this method does not require assumptions for the reflectance or absorption behavior of vegetation. As the oblique looking geometry of LiDAR is explicitly considered, canopy transmittance can be derived for individual laser beams and can be mapped spatially. The method was applied on a contemporary full-waveform LiDAR data set collected under leaf-off conditions and over a study site that contains two sub regions: one with a mixed (coniferous and deciduous) forest and another that is predominantly a deciduous forest in an alluvial plain. The resulting canopy transmittance map was analyzed for both sub regions and compared to aerial photos and the well-known fractional cover method. A visual comparison with aerial photos showed that even single trees and small canopy openings are visible in the canopy transmittance map. In comparison with the fractional cover method, the canopy transmittance map showed no saturation, i.e., there was better separability between patches with different vegetation structure.

  20. Effect of ambient humidity on light transmittance through skin phantoms during cryogen spray cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-San-Juan, Julio C.; Choi, Bernard; Franco, Walfre; Nelson, J. Stuart; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2006-01-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is a technique employed to reduce the risk of epidermal damage during dermatologic laser surgery. However, while CSC protects the epidermis from non-specific thermal damage, it might reduce the effective fluence reaching the target chromophore due to scattering of light by the spray droplets and subsequent water condensation/freezing on the skin surface. The objective of this work was to study the effect of ambient humidity (ω) on light transmittance during CSC. An integrating sphere was employed to measure the dynamics of light transmittance through a deformable agar phantom during CSC. The study included two representative CSC spurt patterns studied using four ω: 57, 40, 20 and 12%. Results show that during CSC, as ω increased, light transmittance decreased. For the highest humidity level (57%) studied, light transmittance reached a minimum of 55% approximately 30 ms after spurt termination. In a controlled environment with ω = 12%, light transmittance reached a minimum of 87% approximately 30 ms after spurt termination. The reduced light transmittance immediately after spurt termination was most likely because of scattering of light caused by condensation of water vapour due to aggressive cooling of ambient air in the wake of the cryogen spurt.

  1. Transionospheric Propagation of VLF Transmitter Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M.; Inan, U. S.; Lehtinen, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio transmitters may play a significant role in precipitation of inner belt (L<2.5) energetic Van Allen electrons. Initial analyses of the total contribution of VLF transmitters utilized models of transionospheric propagation, but some recent studies have suggested that those models may overestimate (by 20-100 dB) the VLF energy reaching the magnetosphere. One possible cause of this discrepancy was suggested to be conversion of wave energy into electrostatic modes in the D, E, and F regions, from ionospheric density irregularities, either natural or generated by the transmitter heating itself. The DEMETER satellite built a six year history of continuous and global survey mode data which, when combined, yields detailed pictures of the radiation pattern from many transmitters into space at 680 km, with 25 km resolution, and clear features like the interference pattern on the ground mapped upwards. With both E and B survey mode data, we can also directly approximate the total power injected into the magnetosphere from each transmitter, separately for day and night, as well as the power arriving at the conjugate region. We find no detectable variation of signal intensity with geomagnetic conditions. We find evidence of transmitter heating affecting the transionospheric propagation of other transmitters. We find that the power reaching the conjugate region is a large fraction of the power injected above the transmitter. We then employ a full wave model to simulate VLF transmitter transionospheric propagation, calculating the electromagnetic fields and power flux injected into the magnetosphere. Although the model does not include ionospheric irregularities, the radiation pattern largely matches the observed one, and the total power calculated is within 6 dB of observations for every transmitter, both day and night, and across a range of low to middle latitudes and transmitter powers. We thus conclude that the effect of

  2. Compact optical transmitters for CubeSat free-space optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsbury, R. W.; Caplan, D. O.; Cahoy, K. L.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of an architectural trade study and prototype implementation of an optical transmitter suitable for resource-constrained CubeSats. Recent advances in CubeSat attitude determination and control systems have made it possible to achieve three-axis stabilization. This is essential for laser communications systems, which have challenging pointing and stability requirements. Our downlink terminal design fits in a 10 cm x 10 cm x 5 cm volume, uses < 10W of power, weighs < 1 kg, and supports data rates up to 50 Mbps. The terminal incorporates pointing, tracking and acquisition optics, an optical fine-steering mechanism, and a compact transmitter. This work focuses on the development of the transmitter for the Nanosatellite Optical Downlink Experiment (NODE). Two transmitter architectures were considered initially: direct modulation of a high-power laser diode and a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA). The MOPA-based approach was selected and a prototype "breadboard" was built from commercially available components. The prototype transmitter produces high fidelity (extinction ratio, ER < 33 dB) pulse position modulation (PPM) waveforms at 1550nm with 200mW average output power while consuming 6:5W of electrical power.

  3. Gas transmitters in female reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lu; Wu, Tian-Wen; Ni, Xin

    2016-10-25

    Nitric oxide, carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide synthesized endogenously in living organisms produce an array of disparate biological effects, so as to be considered as gas transmitters. These three gaseous molecules play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes in the bodies, such as the regulation of vascular tone and inflammatory responses as well as reproductive function. This review mainly focuses on the distribution and biological functions of these three gas transmitters in female reproductive tissues.

  4. 47 CFR 73.1665 - Main transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... follows: Authorized power Maximumrated transmitter power (kW) 0.25, 0.5, or 1 kW 1 2.5 kW 5 5 or 10 kW 10 25 or 50 kW 50 (c) A licensee may, without further authority or notification to the FCC, replace an... availability of AM broadcast transmitters that are approved or verified for use in the 1605-1705 kHz...

  5. 47 CFR 73.1665 - Main transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... follows: Authorized power Maximumrated transmitter power (kW) 0.25, 0.5, or 1 kW 1 2.5 kW 5 5 or 10 kW 10 25 or 50 kW 50 (c) A licensee may, without further authority or notification to the FCC, replace an... availability of AM broadcast transmitters that are approved or verified for use in the 1605-1705 kHz...

  6. Cancer incidence near radio and television transmitters in Great Britain. II. All high power transmitters.

    PubMed

    Dolk, H; Elliott, P; Shaddick, G; Walls, P; Thakrar, B

    1997-01-01

    A small area study of cancer incidence, 1974-1986, near 20 high power television (TV) and frequency modulation (FM) radio transmitters in Great Britain was carried out to place in context the findings of an earlier study around the Sutton Coldfield transmitter. The national database of postcoded cancer registrations was used with population and socioeconomic data from the 1981 census. Cancers examined were adult leukemias, skin melanoma, and bladder cancer, following the findings in the earlier study of significant declines in risk of these cancers with distance from the Sutton Coldfield transmitter. Childhood leukemia and brain cancer were also examined. Statistical analysis was performed for all transmitters combined, four overlapping groups of transmitters defined by their transmission characteristics, and for all transmitters separately. There were 3,305 adult leukemia cases from 0-10 km (observed/expected (O/E) ratio = 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.07). A decline in risk of adult leukemia was found for all transmitters combined (p = 0.05), two of the transmitter groups, and three of the single transmitters; for all transmitters combined, observed excess risk was no more than 15% at any distance up to 10 km, and there was no observed excess within 2 km of transmitters (O/E ratio = 0.97, 95% CI 0.78-1.21). For childhood leukemia and brain cancer, and adult skin melanoma and bladder cancer, results were not indicative of a decline in risk with distance from transmitters. The magnitude and pattern of risk found in the Sutton Coldfield study did not appear to be replicated. The authors conclude that the results at most give no more than very weak support to the Sutton Coldfield findings.

  7. Measuring Filter Transmittance Using Heterodyne Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migdall, A. L.; Roop, B.; Xia, Gu Jun

    1991-01-01

    We use heterodyne detection to measure optical transmittance over an unprecedented dynamic range, with high accuracy and high sensitivity. Our set-up uses a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with acousto-optic frequency shifting to produce a 30 MHz frequency difference between the two light beams, resulting in a beat envelope on the interferometer output beam. We determine the optical transmittance of a filter by inserting it into one of the interferometer arms and measuring the change in amplitude of the optical beat signal. This method allows direct comparison between optical and RF attenuators, ultimately tying optical transmittance measurements to 30 MHz RF attenuation standards in an absolute way. Using this method, we have measured filters that cover 12 decades of transmittance. We discuss a recently developed instrument that improves the accuracy and dynamic range over which the optical-RF connection can be made. This instrument functions as a lock-in amplifier with a dynamic range of up to 180 dB. In addition, we extend the technique into the infrared at 10,6 μm, where we demonstrate that transmittances of filters at room temperature can be measured with a dynamic range of more than 11 decades.

  8. New laser materials for laser diode pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenssen, H. P.

    1990-01-01

    The potential advantages of laser diode pumped solid state lasers are many with high overall efficiency being the most important. In order to realize these advantages, the solid state laser material needs to be optimized for diode laser pumping and for the particular application. In the case of the Nd laser, materials with a longer upper level radiative lifetime are desirable. This is because the laser diode is fundamentally a cw source, and to obtain high energy storage, a long integration time is necessary. Fluoride crystals are investigated as host materials for the Nd laser and also for IR laser transitions in other rare earths, such as the 2 micron Ho laser and the 3 micron Er laser. The approach is to investigate both known crystals, such as BaY2F8, as well as new crystals such as NaYF8. Emphasis is on the growth and spectroscopy of BaY2F8. These two efforts are parallel efforts. The growth effort is aimed at establishing conditions for obtaining large, high quality boules for laser samples. This requires numerous experimental growth runs; however, from these runs, samples suitable for spectroscopy become available.

  9. Dispersion of 0.5- to 2-micron aerosol in microG and hypergravity as a probe of convective inhomogeneity in the lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darquenne, C.; West, J. B.; Prisk, G. K.

    1999-01-01

    We used aerosol boluses to study convective gas mixing in the lung of four healthy subjects on the ground (1 G) and during short periods of microgravity (microG) and hypergravity ( approximately 1. 6 G). Boluses of 0.5-, 1-, and 2-micron-diameter particles were inhaled at different points in an inspiration from residual volume to 1 liter above functional residual capacity. The volume of air inhaled after the bolus [the penetration volume (Vp)] ranged from 150 to 1,500 ml. Aerosol concentration and flow rate were continuously measured at the mouth. The dispersion, deposition, and position of the bolus in the expired gas were calculated from these data. For each particle size, both bolus dispersion and deposition increased with Vp and were gravity dependent, with the largest dispersion and deposition occurring for the largest G level. Whereas intrinsic particle motions (diffusion, sedimentation, inertia) did not influence dispersion at shallow depths, we found that sedimentation significantly affected dispersion in the distal part of the lung (Vp >500 ml). For 0.5-micron-diameter particles for which sedimentation velocity is low, the differences between dispersion in microG and 1 G likely reflect the differences in gravitational convective inhomogeneity of ventilation between microG and 1 G.

  10. The Spacing of the Interstellar 6.2 Microns and 7.7 Microns Emission Features as an Indicator of PAH Size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Allamandola, L. J.; Mead, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A database of astrophysically relevant, infrared spectral measurements on a wide variety of neutral as well as positively and negatively charged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ranging in size from C10H8 through C48H20 is now available to extend the interstellar PAH model. Beyond simply indicating general characteristics of the carriers, this collection of data now makes it possible to conduct a more thorough interpretation of the details of the interstellar spectra and thereby derive deeper insights into the nature of the emitting material and conditions in the emission zones. This paper is the first such implementation of this spectral database. The infrared spectra of PAH cations, the main PAH form in the most energetic emission zones, are usually dominated by a few strong features in the 1650 - 1100 per centimeter (6.1 - 9.1 microns) region which tend to cluster in the vicinity of the interstellar emission bands at 1610 per centimeter and 1320 per centimeter (6.2 and 7.6 microns) but with spacings typically somewhat less than that observed in the canonical interstellar spectrum. However, the spectra in the database show that this spacing increases steadily with molecular size. Extrapolation of this trend indicates that PAHS in the 50 to 80 carbon atom size range are entirely consistent with the observed interstellar spacing. Furthermore, the profile of the 1610 per centimeter (6.2 microns) interstellar band indicates that PAHS containing as few as 20 carbon atoms contribute to this feature.

  11. Wideband transmitter for pulse NMR spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskin, E.M.; Amiton, I.P.; Batyr, A.Yu.; Lavrushenkov, V.G.

    1986-10-01

    A wideband pulse transmitter for NMR excitation in fields of up to 2.4 T (except for /sup 1/H, /sup 1/F, /sup 203/Tl, and /sup 205/Tl nuclei) is described. The transmitter provides a pulse power of 400-600 W into a 50-Omega load at frequencies of 2-40 MHz. The transmitter is equipped with a pulse programmer, which allows independent setting, in each of 16 program steps, of pulse durations or pauses of from 10/sup -7/ to 10/sup 3/ sec, output powers of from 0 to -63 dB, and a phase of radio-frequency filling of 0 or 180/sup 0/.

  12. Transmittance measurements at DIRT-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, J. A.; Haught, K. M.; Woytko, M. A.

    1980-07-01

    This is a report on the NRL experiments at the DIRT-II tests sponsored by the Atmospheric Sciences Laboratory at the White Sands Missile Range in July 1970. The NRL experiment was designed to measure spectral transmittance through smoke and dust clouds generated by detonations of various explosive charges and also by impact of artillery rounds. Spectral transmission data as a function of time for 0.55 micrometers, 1.06 micrometers, and 10.37 micrometers were obtained for 63 events comprised of static detonations and artillery rounds. Transmission data for 1.06 micrometers, in most cases were similar and equal to 0.55 micrometers. In dry soil conditions the 10.37 micrometers channel showed higher transmittance values than the visible channel. There are indications that 10.37 micrometers transmittance in wet soil events is lower than visible presumably because of strong liquid water absorption at the IR wavelength.

  13. Implanting radio transmitters in wintering canvasbacks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Dein, F.J.; Haramis, G.M.; Jorde, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    To conduct telemetry studies of wintering canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria) on Chesapeake Bay [Maryland, USA], we needed to devise a suitable method of radio transmitter attachment. We describe as aseptic, intraabdominal surgical technique, using the inhalation anesthetic isoflurane, to implant 20-g radio transmitters in free-ranging canvasbacks. We evaluated the technique over 3 winters (1987-89), when an annual average of 83 female canvasbacks received implant surgery during a 9-day period in mid-December. Of 253 ducks, 248 (98%) were implanted successfully, and 200 (80.65) completed the 70-day study until early March. No mortality or abnormal behavior from surgery was identified post-release.

  14. Athermal laser design.

    PubMed

    Bovington, Jock; Srinivasan, Sudharsanan; Bowers, John E

    2014-08-11

    This paper discusses circuit based and waveguide based athermalization schemes and provides some design examples of athermalized lasers utilizing fully integrated athermal components as an alternative to power hungry thermo-electric controllers (TECs), off-chip wavelength lockers or monitors with lookup tables for tunable lasers. This class of solutions is important for uncooled transmitters on silicon.

  15. Mid-infrared transmitter and receiver modules for free-space optical communication.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qiang; Zhu, Guoshen; Yang, Song; Yang, Kangwen; Duan, Tao; Xie, Xiaoping; Huang, Kun; Zeng, Heping

    2017-03-10

    We report on the experimental implementation of single-frequency fiber-laser pumped mid-infrared (mid-IR) transmitter and receiver modules for free-space communications. These modules enable frequency upconversion and downconversion between the 1550-nm telecom wavelength and the mid-IR, thus providing essential free-space transmission links with mid-IR single-frequency lasers in the 3.6 μm region. Specifically, based on difference frequency generation (DFG) in MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 (MgO:PPLN), the mid-IR transmitter produces 9.3-mW power at 3594 nm with 5-W pump power at 1083 nm (<10  kHz linewidth) and 3-W signal power at 1550 nm (<10  kHz linewidth), and the mid-IR receiver reproduces 12-μW power at 1550 nm with 4.7-W pump power at 1083 nm and 5-mW laser at 3594 nm. The whole modules are integrated into portable and compact devices by incorporating single-frequency fiber lasers, fiber amplifiers, DFG units, and related electronic circuits. In addition, the uses of all polarization-maintaining fiber configuration and well-controlled heat dissipation make the mid-IR transmitter and receiver exhibit a long-term stability.

  16. Compact multiwavelength transmitter module for multimode fiber optic ribbon cable

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Pocha, Michael D.; Larson, Michael C.; Garrett, Henry E.

    2002-01-01

    A compact multiwavelength transmitter module for multimode fiber optic ribbon cable, which couples light from an M.times.N array of emitters onto N fibers, where the M wavelength may be distributed across two or more vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) chips, and combining emitters and multiplexer into a compact package that is compatible with placement on a printed circuit board. A key feature is bringing together two emitter arrays fabricated on different substrates--each array designed for a different wavelength--into close physical proximity. Another key feature is to compactly and efficiently combine the light from two or more clusters of optical emitters, each in a different wavelength band, into a fiber ribbon.

  17. Automatic spectral transmittance measurement system for DWDM filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Gao-Wei; Heish, Ming-Yu

    2003-08-01

    For many years, fiber-optics communication has become an essential part of the development of our modern society. For example, its significance comes from the increasing demands on real-time image transmission, multimedia communication, distance learning, video-conferencing, video telephone, and cable TV, etc. This paper is to develop an automatic transmittance measurement system for a DWDM (dense wavelength division multiplexing) filter. In this system, a grating-based monochromators is devised to generate a collection of monochromatic light with various wavelengths, instead of using an expensive tunable laser. From this approach, the cost of the proposed system will be much lower than that of those having the same functions, by one order. In addition, we simulate the spectral filtering to investigate the resolving power of the system. It appears that our simulations give quite satisfactory results.

  18. Light transmittance of fiber posts following various surface treatments: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Ergun, Gulfem; Egilmez, Ferhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the light transmittance of fiber posts following application of various surface treatments. Materials and Methods: Fiber post specimens (Snowpost red size #14) were tested (n = 7). The fiber posts were divided into five groups according to the application of surface treatments: Group 1: No surface treatment; Group 2: Etched with hydrofluoric acid (HF) + silane application; Group 3: Airborne-particle abraded with 110 μm Al2O3; Group 4: Irradiated with erbium: Yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser; Group 5: Airborne-particle abraded with 110 μm Al2O3 + silane application. The light transmittance of the specimens was compared using a spectrophotometer. Statistical significance was determined using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (α = 0.05). Results: One-way ANOVA revealed that surface treatment had significant effects on light transmittance of posts (P < 0.001). While laser treatment had the highest percentage of light transmittance, treatment with silane following HF application had the lowest. Conclusion: Application of surface treatments might negatively affect the light transmission property of fiber posts. PMID:27095902

  19. GaAs Gigabit Monolithic Optoelectronic Transmitter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    required for laser fabrication is the major advantage of Honeywell’s laser-in-a-well concept. The most critical processing step for the laser-in-a-well is...HEAT SINK Figure 51. Detail of the Laser/Multiplexer Chip Carrier Assembly The 14 wafers that completed the initial laser fabrication steps were sent...capabilities. It is not known if all of these char- acteristics can be achieved in a single laser or if trade-offs will be required. * The laser

  20. 47 CFR 22.657 - Transmitter locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... at the Grade B contour of an adjacent channel TV station. Note: All coordinates are referenced to... contour of a co-channel TV station. (1) The protected TV station locations are as follows (all coordinates... main transmitter location of the TV station to its Grade B contour in the direction of the...

  1. 47 CFR 22.657 - Transmitter locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... at the Grade B contour of an adjacent channel TV station. Note: All coordinates are referenced to... contour of a co-channel TV station. (1) The protected TV station locations are as follows (all coordinates... main transmitter location of the TV station to its Grade B contour in the direction of the...

  2. 47 CFR 22.657 - Transmitter locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... at the Grade B contour of an adjacent channel TV station. Note: All coordinates are referenced to... contour of a co-channel TV station. (1) The protected TV station locations are as follows (all coordinates... main transmitter location of the TV station to its Grade B contour in the direction of the...

  3. 47 CFR 22.657 - Transmitter locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... at the Grade B contour of an adjacent channel TV station. Note: All coordinates are referenced to... contour of a co-channel TV station. (1) The protected TV station locations are as follows (all coordinates... main transmitter location of the TV station to its Grade B contour in the direction of the...

  4. 47 CFR 80.911 - VHF transmitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false VHF transmitter. 80.911 Section 80.911 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Small Passenger Boats § 80.911 VHF...

  5. 47 CFR 80.911 - VHF transmitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false VHF transmitter. 80.911 Section 80.911 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Small Passenger Boats § 80.911 VHF...

  6. 47 CFR 80.911 - VHF transmitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false VHF transmitter. 80.911 Section 80.911 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Small Passenger Boats § 80.911 VHF...

  7. 47 CFR 80.911 - VHF transmitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false VHF transmitter. 80.911 Section 80.911 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Small Passenger Boats § 80.911 VHF...

  8. 47 CFR 80.911 - VHF transmitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false VHF transmitter. 80.911 Section 80.911 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Small Passenger Boats § 80.911 VHF...

  9. High-Efficiency Klystron For Television Transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramins, Peter; Dayton, James; Mccune, Earl, Sr.; Kosmahl, Henry

    1990-01-01

    Improved klystron designed for use as final amplifier in ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) television transmitter. New device incorporates multistage depressed collector (MSDC) of advanced design to increase efficiency by recovering, from spent electron beam, some of residual kinetic energy otherwise dissipated as heat. Concept applied to increase efficiencies of microwave communication, equipment, radar systems, and particle-beam accelerators.

  10. Thermal measurements of microwave transmitter feedhorn window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.; Hoppe, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal measurements of microwave transmitter feedhorn windows were performed using an imaging infrared radiometer. The measurement technique is described and results are presented for windows made of 0.001-in. Kapton (trademark of Dupont Chemical Co.) and 0.1-in. HTP-6 (Space Shuttle tile material). Measured and calculated temperatures agree well.

  11. Fast transmittance model for satellite sounding.

    PubMed

    Rayer, P J

    1995-11-01

    Through the use of new line-by-line spectral calculations in both the infrared and microwave regions, coefficients have been generated for the transmittance stage of the fast radiative transfer model used by the United Kingdom Meteorological Office. These permit the fast model to calculate the transmittance for the high-resolution infrared sounder and the microwave sounding unit instruments aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration polar-orbiting satellite for a given atmospheric profile, simply by taking these coefficients in linear combination with a set of predictors. These are expressed in terms of the deviation of the profile from a reference. However, the method can be applied to any instrument within the range of the spectral calculations, thereby permitting new coefficients to be calculated as soon as the spectral response details for the instrument become available. It also permits effective consideration to be given in the longer term to new line data or improvements in line-shape theory. The process by which these coefficients have been obtained is described, along with a discussion of some of the tests carried out on their installation into the fast model; these tests show that they are suitable for operational use. The predictors employed by the fast model are discussed, and changes are proposed for those that relate to the water-vapor transmittance. In this respect it was found that the inclusion of predictors that depend primarily on the zenith angle of the radiation path leads to improvements in the transmittance calculation.

  12. High-Efficiency Klystron For Television Transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramins, Peter; Dayton, James; Mccune, Earl, Sr.; Kosmahl, Henry

    1990-01-01

    Improved klystron designed for use as final amplifier in ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) television transmitter. New device incorporates multistage depressed collector (MSDC) of advanced design to increase efficiency by recovering, from spent electron beam, some of residual kinetic energy otherwise dissipated as heat. Concept applied to increase efficiencies of microwave communication, equipment, radar systems, and particle-beam accelerators.

  13. Atlas and Catalog of Dark Clouds Based on the 2 Micron All Sky Survey. II. Correction of the Background Using the Besançon Galaxy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobashi, Kazuhito; Marshall, Douglas J.; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Bernard, Jean-Philippe

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we give a correction to the large scale color excess maps of E (J - H) and E (H - Ks) derived by Dobashi (2011, PASJ, 63, S1) based on the 2 Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS PSC). These maps were produced using a new technique named X percentile method, and they cover all of the sky at the 1" grid. The maps, however, suffer from an apparent error on a large scale arising from an ambiguity in determining the background star colors. The error is relatively large in the inner region of the Galaxy at |l| ≲ 90° , and the maps may overestimate the true extinction by a few magnitudes in AV in this region. To improve the background determination, we performed a Monte Carlo simulation to generate a star catalog equivalent to the 2MASS PSC based on the Besançon Galaxy Model described by Robin et al. (2003, A&A, 409, 523). The simulated catalog contains ˜ 7.7 × 108 stars whose apparent magnitudes in the J , H , and KS bands are calculated assuming no interstellar dust throughout the Galaxy. We applied the X percentile method to the simulated star catalog, and regarded the resulting star color maps as the background. As a result, the overestimation in the original color excess maps has been significantly improved. Extinction maps of AJ , AH , and AKS made by Dobashi (2011) were also improved utilizing the resulting color excess maps. In this paper, we further investigated possible errors arising from the X percentile method itself by setting an artificial diffuse dust disk in the simulated star catalog, and found that the diffuse dust on a large scale can be underestimated by ˜ 20% for the galactic latitude range |b| > 5° at most, which should be noted when the color excess maps are compared with other dataset including the far-infrared dust emission detected by Planck and Herschel satellites.

  14. [Lasers].

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  15. Lasers.

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  16. The characteristics of solid etalon Doppler discriminator and transmitter in designing Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dukhyeon; Cheong, Hae-Du

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a new type of Doppler discrimination system using an unseeded pulsed Q-switched laser and solid etalon. To substantiate our system, we calculate the transmitting spectral power distribution and discriminator characteristics. In our calculation, we use a 25 mm thick solid etalon with a finesse of 30, as well as a normal pulsed laser with a bandwidth of 1 cm-1. The results reveal that the change in the receiving scattered signal through the discriminator with a given LOS(Line of Sight) wind velocity is more sensitive than a normal iodine metal vapor-based Doppler lidar receiving system. We experimentally verify our suggestion using our Doppler discriminator and transmitter, and confirm that this combination is more sensitive than a metal vapor filter. Moreover, we suggest a more efficient transmitter and a more sensitive double-edge receiving system based on our calculations and experimental results.

  17. Mortality, Transmitter Retention, Growth, and Wound Healing in Juvenile Salmon Injected with Micro Acoustic Transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Liss, Stephanie A.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.; Walker, Ricardo W.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Eppard, M. Brad; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam G.

    2016-07-28

    A cylindrical acoustic transmitter (AT; 0.2 g) has been developed for injection into the peritoneum of fish. Laboratory studies can provide tagging guidelines to minimize the effect of implantation techniques and transmitter burden (relative weight of the transmitter to the weight of the fish) in fish before a transmitter is used in field studies. The goal of this study was to examine response variables (mortality, transmitter expulsion, growth, wound area) of juvenile Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha; 65–104 mm fork length [FL]) injected with an AT along a wide range of sizes that could lead to a guideline for minimizing tagging effects. The overarching goal was to determine a minimum size threshold for fish that can be injected, while minimizing adverse transmitter effects. Juveniles (n = 700) were separated into four treatments: (1) acoustic transmitter injection (AT), (2) AT and a passive integrated transponder tag injection (AT+PIT), (3) visual implant elastomer injection (Marked control), and (4) unmarked (Unmarked control). Fish were evaluated weekly for four weeks, and again at the end of the study (60 d post-tagging). Fish injected with an AT or an AT+PIT experienced greater mortality than Marked controls. By 60 d post-tagging, transmitter expulsion was 44% for AT fish and 20% for AT+PIT fish. Fish injected with an AT or an AT+PIT grew (FL and weight gain) significantly less than Marked controls, and no minimum size thresholds were detected. Finally, initial size (FL) significantly affected wound area in AT and AT+PIT fish. A size threshold was only identified on Day 7 (85.1 mm) for AT+PIT fish, indicating that wound areas in fish < 85.1 mm were larger than wound areas of fish > 85.1 mm. This research suggests that injecting juveniles with an AT or an AT+PIT had a greater effect on smaller fish than larger fish.

  18. Computation of broad spectral band electro-optical system transmittance response characteristics to military smokes and obscurants using field test data from transmissometer system measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, W. Michael; Davis, Roger; Laughman, Robert; Watkins, Wendall

    1990-03-01

    Electro-optical weapon system developers and users must know the smoke/obscurant countermeasure transmittance levels required to defeat their systems. This information is required in order to establish both operational smoke screen requirements and system scenario applicability. Transmittance data acquired in field tests such as the Smoke Week tests, Smoke/Obscurants were developed for this purpose. Narrow-band transmittance data can be analyzed using the Beer-Bouguer transmittance law to evaluate the performance of narrow-band electro-optical weapon systems such as laser rangefinders. However, broadband transmittance data for smokes such as phosphorus, fog oil, and dust in the visible, 3 to 5, or 8 to 12 micron bands cannot be evaluated directly using the Beer-Bouguer transmission law for broadband electro-optical systems such as FLIRs. A method for transforming field-measured transmittance data into equivalent electro-optical system transmittance is required. The transmissometer system analysis developed in the Project Manager, Smoke/Obscurants TRANSmissometer VALidation (TRANSVAL) program has provided the basis for developing such a method. The method developed in the TRANSVAL program for computing equivalent broadband electro-optical sensor transmittance from field test data is described. It is shown that band averages of the mass extinction coefficient used with the Beer-Bouguer transmission law do not yield correct estimates of equivalent electro-optical system transmittance. Examples are provided to illustrate the kinds of errors that can arise if sensor performance is incorrectly interpreted using field test data.

  19. Laser rocket system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. S.; Forsyth, J. B.; Skratt, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The laser rocket systems investigated in this study were for orbital transportation using space-based, ground-based and airborne laser transmitters. The propulsion unit of these systems utilizes a continuous wave (CW) laser beam focused into a thrust chamber which initiates a plasma in the hydrogen propellant, thus heating the propellant and providing thrust through a suitably designed nozzle and expansion skirt. The specific impulse is limited only by the ability to adequately cool the thruster and the amount of laser energy entering the engine. The results of the study showed that, with advanced technology, laser rocket systems with either a space- or ground-based laser transmitter could reduce the national budget allocated to space transportation by 10 to 345 billion dollars over a 10-year life cycle when compared to advanced chemical propulsion systems (LO2-LH2) of equal capability. The variation in savings depends upon the projected mission model.

  20. Method to determine and adjust the alignment of the transmitter and receiver fields of view of a LIDAR system

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, Randal L.; Henson, Tammy D.; Krumel, Leslie J.; Hargis, Jr., Philip J.

    2006-06-20

    A method to determine the alignment of the transmitter and receiver fields of view of a light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system. This method can be employed to determine the far-field intensity distribution of the transmitter beam, as well as the variations in transmitted laser beam pointing as a function of time, temperature, or other environmental variables that may affect the co-alignment of the LIDAR system components. In order to achieve proper alignment of the transmitter and receiver optical systems when a LIDAR system is being used in the field, this method employs a laser-beam-position-sensing detector as an integral part of the receiver optics of the LIDAR system.

  1. Interior, looking north at transmitter and power supply areas ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, looking north at transmitter and power supply areas - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Moscow Radar Site Transmit Sector One Transmitter Building, At the end of Steam Road, Moscow, Somerset County, ME

  2. Interior of Room T105, looking east at transmitter area ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of Room T105, looking east at transmitter area - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Moscow Radar Site Transmit Sector Three Transmitter Building, At the end of Steam Road, Moscow, Somerset County, ME

  3. Oblique view to the south of the Transmitter Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view to the south of the Transmitter Building - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Five Transmitter Building, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  4. 47 CFR 95.667 - CB transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... transmitter power. The dissipation rating of all the semiconductors or electron tubes which supply RF power to the antenna terminals of each CB transmitter must not exceed 10 W. For semiconductors, the...

  5. 47 CFR 95.667 - CB transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... transmitter power. The dissipation rating of all the semiconductors or electron tubes which supply RF power to the antenna terminals of each CB transmitter must not exceed 10 W. For semiconductors, the...

  6. Frequency agile OPO-based transmitters for multiwavelength DIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Velsko, S.P.; Ruggiero, A.; Herman, M.

    1996-09-01

    We describe a first generation mid-infrared transmitter with pulse-to- pulse frequency agility and both wide and narrow band capability. This transmitter was used to make multicomponent DIAL measurements in the field.

  7. Frequency agile OPO-based transmitters for multiwavelength DIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Velsko, S.P.; Ruggiero, A.; Herman, M.

    1996-09-01

    We describe a first generation mid-infrared transmitter with pulse to pulse frequency agility and both wide and narrow band capability. This transmitter was used to make multicomponent Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) measurements in the field.

  8. 47 CFR 22.165 - Additional transmitters for existing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... (c) Environmental. The additional transmitters must not have a significant environmental effect as... engineering, as described in § 22.953(a)(1) through (3). If the addition of transmitters involves a contract...

  9. Solid state Ku-band spacecraft transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisseman, W. R.; Tserng, H. Q.; Coleman, D. J.; Doerbeck, F. H.

    1977-01-01

    A transmitter is considered that consists of GaAs IMPATT and Read diodes operating in a microstrip circuit environment to provide amplification with a minimum of 63 db small signal gain and a minimum compressed gain at 5 W output of 57 db. Reported are Schottky-Read diode design and fabrication, microstrip and circulator optimization, preamplifier development, power amplifier development, dc-to-dc converter design, and integration of the breadboard transmitter modules. A four-stage power amplifier in cascade with a three-stage preamplifier had an overall gain of 56.5 db at 13.5 GHz with a power output of 4.5 W. A single-stage Read amplifier delivered 5.9 W with 4 db gain at 22% efficiency.

  10. 47 CFR 95.625 - CB transmitter channel frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CB transmitter channel frequencies. 95.625... SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.625 CB transmitter channel frequencies. (a) The CB transmitter channel frequencies are: Channel No. (MHz) 1 26.965 2 26.975 3 26.985 4...

  11. 47 CFR 80.209 - Transmitter frequency tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transmitter frequency tolerances. 80.209... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.209 Transmitter frequency tolerances. (a) The frequency tolerance requirements applicable to transmitters in the maritime services are...

  12. 47 CFR 95.625 - CB transmitter channel frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CB transmitter channel frequencies. 95.625... SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.625 CB transmitter channel frequencies. (a) The CB transmitter channel frequencies are: Channel No. (MHz) 1 26.965 2 26.975 3 26.985 4...

  13. 47 CFR 95.621 - GMRS transmitter channel frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false GMRS transmitter channel frequencies. 95.621... channel frequencies. (a) The GMRS transmitter channel frequencies (reference frequencies from which the..., 467.6750, 467.7000, and 467.7250. Note: Certain GMRS transmitter channel frequencies are...

  14. 47 CFR 95.621 - GMRS transmitter channel frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false GMRS transmitter channel frequencies. 95.621... channel frequencies. (a) The GMRS transmitter channel frequencies (reference frequencies from which the..., 467.6750, 467.7000, and 467.7250. Note: Certain GMRS transmitter channel frequencies are...

  15. 47 CFR 73.315 - FM transmitter location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FM transmitter location. 73.315 Section 73.315 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.315 FM transmitter location. (a) The transmitter location shall be chosen so...

  16. 47 CFR 73.315 - FM transmitter location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FM transmitter location. 73.315 Section 73.315 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.315 FM transmitter location. (a) The transmitter location shall be chosen so...

  17. Pocket-sized tone-modulated FM transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couvillon, L. A.

    1969-01-01

    Pressure of a button on a crystal-controlled transmitter causes generation of a tone. The tone modulates the FM transmitter which in turn radiates by way of the enclosed loop antenna, through the radio-frequency-transparent wall of the transmitters case to the receiver.

  18. 47 CFR 80.873 - VHF radiotelephone transmitter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false VHF radiotelephone transmitter. 80.873 Section 80.873 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... to Subpart W § 80.873 VHF radiotelephone transmitter. (a) The transmitter must be capable...

  19. 47 CFR 5.107 - Transmitter control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmitter control requirements. 5.107 Section... THAN BROADCAST) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements § 5.107 Transmitter control requirements. Each licensee shall be responsible for maintaining control of the transmitter authorized under...

  20. 47 CFR 80.63 - Maintenance of transmitter power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maintenance of transmitter power. 80.63 Section...-General § 80.63 Maintenance of transmitter power. (a) The power of each radio transmitter must not be more... manufacturer for carrier power in excess of 100 watts must contain the instruments necessary to determine...

  1. 47 CFR 74.18 - Transmitter control and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transmitter control and operation. 74.18... Applicable to All Services in Part 74 § 74.18 Transmitter control and operation. Except where unattended... part shall designate a person or persons to activate and control its transmitter. At the discretion...

  2. Advanced AN/TPQ-37 Transmitter Tube.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    TUBE ( TWT ) PPM FOCUSING OUTPUT VSWR HIGH POWER SAMARIUM COBALT RELIABILITY GRID PULSED ISOLATED ANODE OSMIUM-RUTHENIUM COATED CATHODE GAIN VARIATIONS...of the AN/TPQ- 37 transmitter tube. The task is to build and test two high power, PPM focused, grid pulsed Traveling Wave Tube ( TWT ) that meet the...requirements of Technical Guidelines MW-119B. The TWT will employ a M-type cathode for reduced temperature operation and extended life. Gain variations

  3. A solid state transmitter with adaptive beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallington, J. R.; Chrystie, P. J.

    In many transmitter applications it is desirable to provide low sidelobe streerable radiation patterns from an array fed by multiple identical solid state sources. A feed network for an experimental linear array which allows this to be accomplished by means of 'phase shift only' control of array element amplitude and phase is described. Details of the experimental equipment and measured radiation patterns, in both the transmit and receive mode, are presented.

  4. Meaningful FM transmitter modulation linearity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, H. O.

    The IM products in the demodulator output in this case are due only to the demodulator's transfer characteristics. IM product levels of the test system greater than 60 dB below the simultaneous modulation level of +300 kHz each by 400 and 450 kHz tones are obtained at Sandia Laboratories. The use of two-tone IM tests for the evaluation and specification of FM transmitter modulation linearity is strongly recommended.

  5. 5 Watt, Solid State, EHF Transmitter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    satellite-communication ground terminals. This state-of- the- art transmitter demonstrates efficient and cost-effective RF power generation at EHF for...are relatively little or no spectrum allocation problems, is that the state-of-the- art in RF power generation is far below the required levels for...accomplished using E-H hybrid magic tees of reduced height waveguide with good balance and isolation characteristics. Modulation and other signal

  6. High Efficiency mm-Wave Transmitter Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    F. Buckwalter, Peter M. Asbeck, Hayg-Taniel Dabag. Analysis and Design of Stacked-FET Millimeter-Wave Power Amplifiers, IEEE Transactions on...Digital m-ary QAM Transmitters, IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, (05 2013): 1126. doi: 10.1109/JSSC.2013.2252752 Joohwa Kim, Hayg Dabag, Peter...Asbeck, James F. Buckwalter. Q-Band and W-Band Power Amplifiers in 45-nm CMOS SOI, IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques, (06 2012

  7. Acoustic Transmitters for Underwater Neutrino Telescopes

    PubMed Central

    Ardid, Miguel; Martínez-Mora, Juan A.; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Larosa, Giuseppina; Adrián-Martínez, Silvia; Llorens, Carlos D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper acoustic transmitters that were developed for use in underwater neutrino telescopes are presented. Firstly, an acoustic transceiver has been developed as part of the acoustic positioning system of neutrino telescopes. These infrastructures are not completely rigid and require a positioning system in order to monitor the position of the optical sensors which move due to sea currents. To guarantee a reliable and versatile system, the transceiver has the requirements of reduced cost, low power consumption, high pressure withstanding (up to 500 bars), high intensity for emission, low intrinsic noise, arbitrary signals for emission and the capacity of acquiring and processing received signals. Secondly, a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed for the calibration of acoustic neutrino detection systems. The array is able to mimic the signature of ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction in emission directivity and signal shape. The technique of parametric acoustic sources has been used to achieve the proposed aim. The developed compact array has practical features such as easy manageability and operation. The prototype designs and the results of different tests are described. The techniques applied for these two acoustic systems are so powerful and versatile that may be of interest in other marine applications using acoustic transmitters. PMID:22666022

  8. Acoustic transmitters for underwater neutrino telescopes.

    PubMed

    Ardid, Miguel; Martínez-Mora, Juan A; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Larosa, Giuseppina; Adrián-Martínez, Silvia; Llorens, Carlos D

    2012-01-01

    In this paper acoustic transmitters that were developed for use in underwater neutrino telescopes are presented. Firstly, an acoustic transceiver has been developed as part of the acoustic positioning system of neutrino telescopes. These infrastructures are not completely rigid and require a positioning system in order to monitor the position of the optical sensors which move due to sea currents. To guarantee a reliable and versatile system, the transceiver has the requirements of reduced cost, low power consumption, high pressure withstanding (up to 500 bars), high intensity for emission, low intrinsic noise, arbitrary signals for emission and the capacity of acquiring and processing received signals. Secondly, a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed for the calibration of acoustic neutrino detection systems. The array is able to mimic the signature of ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction in emission directivity and signal shape. The technique of parametric acoustic sources has been used to achieve the proposed aim. The developed compact array has practical features such as easy manageability and operation. The prototype designs and the results of different tests are described. The techniques applied for these two acoustic systems are so powerful and versatile that may be of interest in other marine applications using acoustic transmitters.

  9. Structural Health Monitoring Using Transmittance Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Schulz, M. J.; Naser, A.; Ferguson, F.; Pai, P. F.

    1999-09-01

    A technique for structural health monitoring that can detect damage away from a sensor location and during operation of a structure is presented. The technique, Transmittance Function Monitoring, uses vibration measurements to detect damage, but without measuring the excitation force or using a model of the structure. Accelerometers or piezoceramic patches are attached to the structure for sensing, and piezoceramic patches or inertial actuators are used for exciting the structure. The sensor-actuator system actively interrogates the structure using broadband excitation, and transmittance functions between consecutive sensors from the healthy structure are stored as historical data. Changes in the functions are then used to detect, locate and assess damage to the structure. Transmittance functions can be computed from different types of measured structural responses. Here, structural translations and curvatures are used to detect damage on a composite beam. The sensitivity of the two different methods is compared, and the optimal frequency range to detect damage is experimentally determined. In addition, the wavelengths of the structural mode shapes are computed to estimate the highest frequency at which the structural response can be measured by a given length piezoceramic sensor.

  10. Solid state transmitters for spaceborne radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turlington, T. R.

    1983-01-01

    The SEASAT-A synthetic aperture radar, the first spaceborne SAR, utilized an all solid state RF signal synthesizer and L-band transmitter to drive a corporately fed flat plate array. The RF signal synthesizer generated a linear FM ""CHIRP'' waveform and provided stable CW reference signals used to upconvert the received signal to a unified S-band downlink channel, and to synchronize satellite control logic. The transmitter generated 1200 watts peak RF power (66 watts average) at a center frequency of 1.275 GHz from 354 watts of DC prime power. Linear FM CHIRP swept symmetrically around the center frequency with a bandwidth of 19.05 MHz and a pulse duration of 33.8 sec. Pulse repetition rate was variable from 1647 to 1944 pps. These transmitter signal parameters combined with the flat plate 34 x 7.5 ft aperture at an orbital altitude of 498 miles and a look angle 20 deg off nadir gave the SAR an 85 foot resolution over a 15.5 mile wide swath.

  11. Classical transmitters and their receptors in flatworms.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, P; El-Shehabi, F; Patocka, N

    2005-01-01

    The flatworm nervous system employs a wide repertoire of neuroactive substances, including small chemical messengers, the so called classical transmitters, and several types of neuropeptides. A large body of research accumulated over four decades has provided a wealth of information on the tissue localization and effects of these substances, their biochemistry and, recently, their molecular modes of action in all major classes of flatworms. This evidence will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on the small (classical) transmitters and the receptors that mediate their effects. One of the themes that will emerge from this discussion is that classical transmitters regulate core activities such as movement, metabolism and transport, and thus are essential for survival of the organism. In addition, the evidence shows that flatworms have multiple neurotransmitter receptors, many with unusual pharmacological features, which make them particularly attractive as drug targets. Understanding the molecular basis of these distinctive properties, and developing new, more specific receptor agonists and antagonists will undoubtedly become a major challenge in future research.

  12. A 532 nm Chaotic Fiber Laser Transmitter for Underwater Lidar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-23

    cutting, marking, and welding [72, 77, 78]. Ytterbium-doped fibers (YDFs) are particularly efficient absorbers of pump light, so very high pump powers...components at 1550 nm, but can be frustratingly high (often 30- 40%) for 1064 nm components. The mismatches between dissimilar fibers’ effective mode

  13. Feasibility of a 30-Meter Space Based Laser Transmitter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    the differential sag at the edge of the aperture is: °sag 16FpDp -1/2 / 1 \\ -3/2 1 + T^f\\ - 1 + 16Fp ) [ x 16Fp The results are...5.0 Segment Diameter (Dg). meters sag 16FpDp 10 -3/2 1 + 16Fp -r 1 + 16F1 Fig. 7 — Asphericity of off-axis mirror segments In...based on fabrication, testing , or dynamic response requirements. 3.2 MATERIAL PROPERTIES In studying the faceplate, the more conventional mirror

  14. A laser communication experiment utilizing the ACT satellite and an airborne laser transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provencher, Charles E., Jr.; Spence, Rodney L.

    1988-01-01

    The launch of a laser communication transmitter package into geosynchronous Earth orbit onboard the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) will present an excellent opportunity for the experimental reception of laser communication signals transmitted from a space orbit. The ACTS laser package includes both a heterodyne transmitter (Lincoln Labs design) and a direct detection transmitter (Goddard Space Flight Center design) with both sharing some common optical components. NASA Lewis Research Center's Space Electronics Division is planning to perform a space communication experiment utilizing the GSFC direct detection laser transceiver. The laser receiver will be installed within an aircraft provided with a glass port for the reception of the signal. This paper describes the experiment and the approach to performing such an experiment. Described are the constraints placed on the NASA Lewis experiment by the performance parameters of the laser transmitter and by the ACTS spacecraft operations. The conceptual design of the receiving terminal is given; also included is the anticipated capability of the detector.

  15. Multi-beam transmitter geometries for free-space optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez, Jason A.; Schmidt, Jason D.

    2010-02-01

    Free-space optical communications systems provide the opportunity to take advantage of higher data transfer rates and lower probability of intercept compared to radio-frequency communications. However, propagation through atmospheric turbulence, such as for airborne laser communication over long paths, results in intensity variations at the receiver and a corresponding degradation in bit error rate (BER) performance. Previous literature has shown that two transmitters, when separated sufficiently, can effectively average out the intensity varying effects of the atmospheric turbulence at the receiver. This research explores the impacts of adding more transmitters and the marginal reduction in the probability of signal fades while minimizing the overall transmitter footprint, an important design factor when considering an airborne communications system. Analytical results for the cumulative distribution function are obtained for tilt-only results, while wave-optics simulations are used to simulate the effects of scintillation. These models show that the probability of signal fade is reduced as the number of transmitters is increased.

  16. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Baggott, Renee S.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Most Lidar applications rely on moderate to high power solid state lasers to generate the required transmitted pulses. However, the reliability of solid state lasers, which can operate autonomously over long periods, is constrained by their laser diode pump arrays. Thermal cycling of the active regions is considered the primary reason for rapid degradation of the quasi-CW high power laser diode arrays, and the excessive temperature rise is the leading suspect in premature failure. The thermal issues of laser diode arrays are even more drastic for 2-micron solid state lasers which require considerably longer pump pulses compared to the more commonly used pump arrays for 1-micron lasers. This paper describes several advanced packaging techniques being employed for more efficient heat removal from the active regions of the laser diode bars. Experimental results for several high power laser diode array devices will be reported and their performance when operated at long pulsewidths of about 1msec will be described.

  17. Transmitter microdischarges in communications and broadcast Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briskman, Robert D.; Kaliski, Michael A. R.

    2016-09-01

    Most commercial communications and broadcast satellites operating at microwave radio frequencies use traveling wave tube amplifiers (TWTAs) as high power transmitters. Since TWTAs work at high voltages, it is not uncommon to experience micro-discharges, especially early in life. This observation led to the introduction of an autonomous restart function in the companion high voltage power supply (the electronic power conditioner or EPC) of the TWTA as a safety feature. A microdischarge with enough energy above a threshold would lead to a momentary removal of high voltages, followed by an automatic restart, which is usually sufficient to allow the microdischarge event to clear with minimal loss of RF transmission. In most cases the energy involved in the microdischarge is low enough that the removal of high voltages is not required and the event may go undetected. However, an unusual signature was first noted in early 1997 on a Ku-band satellite transmitter, where the characteristics of the microdischarge event were such that the control anode voltage dropped below nominal and typically recovered over a 20 min period. Such microdischarge events became known as the "20 min Effect" which has since been observed over subsequent years on other Ku-band TWTAs, as well as on Ka-band and S-band satellite TWTA transmitters in numerous satellites. This paper summarizes the in-orbit data on such microdischarges as well as the believed cause. In addition, the paper includes results from three S-band TWTAs which have operated on life test for many years. Due to ease of their monitoring instrumentation as contrast to monitoring microdischarges on orbiting operational satellites via telemetry, new data have been accumulated on this effect. The data substantiate the previous findings that microdischarges do not significantly affect satellite operation or their transmissions nor diminish the TWTAs performance, including long lifetime.

  18. Home monitoring using wearable radio frequency transmitters.

    PubMed

    Almudevar, Anthony; Leibovici, Adrian; Tentler, Aleksey

    2008-02-01

    Location tracking of a wearable radio frequency (RF) transmitter in a wireless network is a potentially useful tool for the home monitoring of patients in clinical applications. However, the problem of converting RF signals into accurate estimates of transmitter location remains a significant challenge. We wish to demonstrate that long-term home monitoring using RF transmitters is feasible. Additionally, we conjecture that human motion within familiar environments is confined to relatively small regions of high occupancy. Hence, human motion can be modelled as movement along a network of such high occupancy regions. Our methodology uses a signal processing technique developed by one of the authors (Almudevar). The technique converts longitudinal RF data into an estimated trajectory which does not depend on explicit location estimates. This approach eliminates the need for a location-signal calibration procedure. Given a long-term trajectory, Gaussian mixture models are used to identify high occupancy regions. The methodology was evaluated using data collected under a study funded by an Everyday Technologies for Alzheimer Care (ETAC) research grant from the Alzheimer's Association. A home monitoring system provided by Home Free Systems was used. The proposed methodology was able to reliably reconstruct trajectories using study data. Regions of high occupancy were identified, and the observed transitions between these regions were found to be spatially and serially coherent. In addition, the trajectory was compared to output from a parallel home sensor network, and a high degree a conformity was evident. Long-term home monitoring of human motion is feasible using readily available and easily installable technology. Furthermore, by using suitable signal processing algorithms, the often difficult location-signal calibration process can be bypassed.

  19. A solid state transmitter with adaptive beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, N.; Wallington, J. R.

    The development of solid state power amplifiers has created the opportunity for producing flexible phased array transmitters for use in radars, to complement the rapid advances in phased array receivers. The use of identical amplifiers throughout the array is required in order to achieve economies of scale; on the other hand, aperture distributions tapered in both amplitude and phase are required to give low side-lobe levels. This paper describes a solution to this problem using only phase shifters to control both tapers. An experimental array has been built, and both the construction and measured results are presented here.

  20. Omega Transmitter Outages January to December 1979.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    34.3 610 No. FAA-tI-1-113 FAACT #1.U OMEGA TRANSMITTER OUTAGES JANUARY TO DECEMBER 1919 Lorraine hzonca FEERAL AVIATION AIMNISTRATION TECINICAL CENTER...Normal During Normal Month Maint. Period Maint. Operation Maint. Operation Mar 3/6 - 3/26 (Argentina) 8156 264* 18.3 0.6* Apr 4/1 - 4/12 (Liberia) 691...0400 124 11.6 North Dakota 14 Aug 1200 to 3 Sep 2100 489 55.5 LaReunion 1 Jul 0000 to 14 Jul 2400 336 92.9 Argentina 6 Mar 0000 to 26 Mar 2400 504 59.6

  1. Visualization of glutamate as a volume transmitter.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Yohei; Iino, Masamitsu

    2011-02-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Although glutamate mediates synaptically confined point-to-point transmission, it has been suggested that under certain conditions glutamate may escape from the synaptic cleft (glutamate spillover), accumulate in the extrasynaptic space, and mediate volume transmission to regulate important brain functions. However, the inability to directly measure glutamate dynamics around active synapses has limited our understanding of glutamatergic volume transmission. The recent development of a family of fluorescent glutamate indicators has enabled the visualization of extrasynaptic glutamate dynamics in brain tissues. In this topical review, we examine glutamate as a volume transmitter based on novel results of glutamate imaging in the brain.

  2. Advances in High Energy Solid-State Pulsed 2-micron Lidar Development for Ground and Airborne Wind, Water Vapor and CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Kavaya, Michael; Remus, Ruben

    2015-04-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2 µm lasers. From fundamental spectroscopy research, theoretical prediction of new materials, laser demonstration and engineering of lidar systems, it has been a very successful program spanning around two decades. Successful development of 2 µm lasers has led to development of a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement with an unprecedented laser pulse energy of 250-mJ in a rugged package. This high pulse energy is produced by a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser with an optical amplifier. While the lidar is meant for use as an airborne instrument, ground-based tests were carried out to characterize performance of the lidar. Atmospheric measurements will be presented, showing the lidar's capability for wind measurement in the atmospheric boundary layer and free troposphere. Lidar wind measurements are compared to a balloon sonde, showing good agreement between the two sensors. Similar architecture has been used to develop a high energy, Ho:Tm:YLF double-pulsed 2 μm Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) instrument based on direct detection technique that provides atmospheric column CO2 measurements. This instrument has been successfully used to measure atmospheric CO2 column density initially from a ground mobile lidar trailer, and then it was integrated on B-200 plane and 20 hrs of flight measurement were made from an altitude ranging 1500 meter to 8000 meter. These measurements were compared to in-situ measurements and NOAA airborne flask measurement to derive the dry mixing ratio of the column CO2 by reflecting the signal by various reflecting surfaces such as land, vegetation, ocean surface, snow and sand. The lidar measurements when compared showed a very agreement with in-situ and airborne flask measurement. NASA Langley Research Center is currently developing a triple-pulsed 2 μm Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA

  3. HO:LULF and HO:LULF Laser Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Morrison, Clyde A. (Inventor); Filer, Elizabeth D. (Inventor); Jani, Mahendra G. (Inventor); Murray, Keith E. (Inventor); Lockard, George E. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A laser host material LULF (LuLiF4) is doped with holmium (Ho) and thulium (Tm) to produce a new laser material that is capable of laser light production in the vicinity of 2 microns. The material provides an advantage in efficiency over conventional Ho lasers because the LULF host material allows for decreased threshold and upconversion over such hosts as YAG and YLF. The addition of Tm allows for pumping by commonly available GaAlAs laser diodes. For use with flashlamp pumping, erbium (Er) may be added as an additional dopant. For further upconversion reduction, the Tm can be eliminated and the Ho can be directly pumped.

  4. Photothermal modeling of thulium fibre laser-tissue interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnaby, Catherine E.; Coleman, Daniel J.; King, Terence A.

    2003-10-01

    A one-dimensional finite difference model has been used to investigate the temperature distribution within thulium fibre laser-irradiated tissue. Temperature-time and temperature-depth profiles are presented for various laser stimulus parameters in the 2 micron region. These current calculations are aimed at determining theoretical temperature distributions in the application of relatively low power fibre lasers for thermal stimulation of cutaneous nerves in human pain processing. Theoretical skin surface temperatures are compared with those from thermal camera measurements during thulium fibre laser irradiation. The effectiveness of the thulium fibre laser for thermally stimulating cutaneous nerves is confirmed.

  5. Infrared Pulse-laser Long-path Absorption Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Using a Raman-shifted Dye Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minato, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    1992-01-01

    A pulsed laser source is effective in infrared laser long-path absorption measurements when the optical path length is very long or the reflection from a hard target is utilized, because higher signal-to-noise ratio is obtained in the detection of weak return signals. We have investigated the performance of a pulse-laser long-path absorption system using a hydrogen Raman shifter and a tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser, which generates second Stokes radiation in the 2-micron region.

  6. Laser-SPS systems analysis and environmental impact assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beverly, R. E., III

    1980-01-01

    The systems feasibility and environmental impact of replacing the microwave transmitters on the Satellite Power System with laser transmitters are examined. The lasers suggested are two molecular-gas electric-discharge lasers (EDL's), namely the CO and CO2 lasers. Calculations are made on system efficiency, atmospheric transmission efficiency, and laser beam spreading. It is found that the present satellite concept using lasers is far too inefficient and massive to be economically viable. However, the safety issues associated with laser power transmission appear tractable, and no effects could be identified which present a real danger of serious injury to the environment, although certain phenomena deserve closer scrutiny.

  7. Laser-SPS systems analysis and environmental impact assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beverly, R. E., III

    1980-01-01

    The systems feasibility and environmental impact of replacing the microwave transmitters on the Satellite Power System with laser transmitters are examined. The lasers suggested are two molecular-gas electric-discharge lasers (EDL's), namely the CO and CO2 lasers. Calculations are made on system efficiency, atmospheric transmission efficiency, and laser beam spreading. It is found that the present satellite concept using lasers is far too inefficient and massive to be economically viable. However, the safety issues associated with laser power transmission appear tractable, and no effects could be identified which present a real danger of serious injury to the environment, although certain phenomena deserve closer scrutiny.

  8. An efficient magnetron transmitter for superconducting accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Kazakevich, G.; Lebedev, V.; Yakovlev, V.; ...

    2016-09-22

    A concept of a highly-efficient high-power magnetron transmitter allowing wide-band phase and the mid-frequency power control at the frequency of the locking signal is proposed. The proposal is aimed for powering Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities of intensity-frontier accelerators. The transmitter is intended to operate with phase and amplitude control feedback loops allowing suppression of microphonics and beam loading in the SRF cavities. The concept utilizes injectionlocked magnetrons controlled in phase by the locking signal supplied by a feedback system. The injection-locking signal pre-excites the magnetron and allows its operation below the critical voltage. This realizes control of the magnetron powermore » in a wide range by control of the magnetron current. Pre-excitation of the magnetron by the locking signal provides an output power range up to 10 dB. Experimental studies were carried out with 2.45 GHz, 1 kW, CW magnetrons. They demonstrated stable operation of the magnetrons and power control at a low noise level. In conclusion, an analysis of the kinetics of the drifting charge in the drift approximation substantiates the concept and the experimental results.« less

  9. An efficient magnetron transmitter for superconducting accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakevich, G.; Lebedev, V.; Yakovlev, V.; Pavlov, V.

    2016-09-22

    A concept of a highly-efficient high-power magnetron transmitter allowing wide-band phase and the mid-frequency power control at the frequency of the locking signal is proposed. The proposal is aimed for powering Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities of intensity-frontier accelerators. The transmitter is intended to operate with phase and amplitude control feedback loops allowing suppression of microphonics and beam loading in the SRF cavities. The concept utilizes injectionlocked magnetrons controlled in phase by the locking signal supplied by a feedback system. The injection-locking signal pre-excites the magnetron and allows its operation below the critical voltage. This realizes control of the magnetron power in a wide range by control of the magnetron current. Pre-excitation of the magnetron by the locking signal provides an output power range up to 10 dB. Experimental studies were carried out with 2.45 GHz, 1 kW, CW magnetrons. They demonstrated stable operation of the magnetrons and power control at a low noise level. In conclusion, an analysis of the kinetics of the drifting charge in the drift approximation substantiates the concept and the experimental results.

  10. An efficient magnetron transmitter for superconducting accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakevich, G.; Lebedev, V.; Yakovlev, V.; Pavlov, V.

    2016-09-22

    A concept of a highly-efficient high-power magnetron transmitter allowing wide-band phase and the mid-frequency power control at the frequency of the locking signal is proposed. The proposal is aimed for powering Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities of intensity-frontier accelerators. The transmitter is intended to operate with phase and amplitude control feedback loops allowing suppression of microphonics and beam loading in the SRF cavities. The concept utilizes injectionlocked magnetrons controlled in phase by the locking signal supplied by a feedback system. The injection-locking signal pre-excites the magnetron and allows its operation below the critical voltage. This realizes control of the magnetron power in a wide range by control of the magnetron current. Pre-excitation of the magnetron by the locking signal provides an output power range up to 10 dB. Experimental studies were carried out with 2.45 GHz, 1 kW, CW magnetrons. They demonstrated stable operation of the magnetrons and power control at a low noise level. In conclusion, an analysis of the kinetics of the drifting charge in the drift approximation substantiates the concept and the experimental results.

  11. An efficient magnetron transmitter for superconducting accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakevich, G.; Lebedev, V.; Yakovlev, V.; Pavlov, V.

    2016-12-01

    A concept of a highly-efficient high-power magnetron transmitter allowing wide-band phase and the mid-frequency power control at the frequency of the locking signal is proposed. The proposal is aimed for powering Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities of intensity-frontier accelerators. The transmitter is intended to operate with phase and amplitude control feedback loops allowing suppression of microphonics and beam loading in the SRF cavities. The concept utilizes injection-locked magnetrons controlled in phase by the locking signal supplied by a feedback system. The injection-locking signal pre-excites the magnetron and allows its operation below the critical voltage in free run. This realizes control of the magnetron power in an extended range (up to 10 dB) by control of the magnetron current. Experimental studies were carried out with 2.45 GHz, 1 kW, CW magnetrons. They demonstrated stable operation of the magnetrons and the required range of power control at a low noise level. An analysis of the kinetics of the drifting charge within the framework of the presented model of phase focusing in magnetrons substantiates the concept and the experimental results.

  12. Surgical implantation of transmitters into fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, Daniel M.

    2003-01-01

    Although the Animal Welfare Act does not cover poikilotherms, individual institutions and policies and legal requirements other than the Animal Welfare Act (e.g., the US Public Health Service and the Interagency Research Animal Committee's Principles for the Utilization and Care of Vertebrate Animals Used in Testing, Research, and Training) require the review of projects involving fish by institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs). IACUCs may, however, lack the knowledge and experience to evaluate fish projects judiciously, especially when the projects are in field settings. Surgeries involving implantation of transmitters and other instruments into the coelom, which now comprise a very common research tool in the study of free-ranging fishes, are examples of surgeries that use a broad spectrum of surgical and anesthetic techniques, some of which would not be considered acceptable for similar work on mammals. IACUCs should apply the standards they would expect to be used for surgeries on homeotherms to surgeries on fish. Surgeons should be carefully trained and experienced. Surgical instruments and transmitters should be sterile. Regulations and laws on the use of drugs in animals should be followed, particularly those concerned with anesthetics and antibiotics used on free-ranging fish. Exceptions to surgical procedures should be made only when circumstances are extreme enough to warrant the use of less than optimal procedures.

  13. [A high transmittance material in UVc band].

    PubMed

    Lü, Wen-bo; Xu, Qiang; Du, Wei-min; Wu, Si-cheng; Ye, Xue-min; Zhao, Tai-ping; Meng, Guang-zheng; Song, Zeng-fu

    2003-04-01

    Spectral characteristics of an organic material in acid with different concentrations were investigated in the solution of a proper acid concentration. The results showed that at 252 nm the transmittance T = 56.5%, but at 290 nm the material had a strong absorption peak (epsilon > 10(4) L. (mol.cm)-1). The absorbance A280-298 nm > 8, i.e. T280-298 nm < 10(-8). The band width was about 16 nm. Therefore, this material has conspicuous characteristics such as high transmittance and deep cutoff in the background in ultraviolet-c band. The transmission peak can be shifted in the range of 251-260 nm by changing the pH value of the solution and selecting solution with a different polarity. By analyzing the spectra of the material in acid we found that the two original absorption peaks disappeared, and a new strong absorption peak appeared at 290 nm. Moreover, it seems to be some relation between the two absorption peak intensity and the new peak, which needs to be further studied. Using this result, we can produce high quality UV-filters of this material with traditional coating and colour glass technology.

  14. A method of reconstructing the spatial measurement network by mobile measurement transmitter for shipbuilding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Siyang; Lin, Jiarui; Yang, Linghui; Ren, Yongjie; Guo, Yin

    2017-07-01

    The workshop Measurement Position System (wMPS) is a distributed measurement system which is suitable for the large-scale metrology. However, there are some inevitable measurement problems in the shipbuilding industry, such as the restriction by obstacles and limited measurement range. To deal with these factors, this paper presents a method of reconstructing the spatial measurement network by mobile transmitter. A high-precision coordinate control network with more than six target points is established. The mobile measuring transmitter can be added into the measurement network using this coordinate control network with the spatial resection method. This method reconstructs the measurement network and broadens the measurement scope efficiently. To verify this method, two comparison experiments are designed with the laser tracker as the reference. The results demonstrate that the accuracy of point-to-point length is better than 0.4mm and the accuracy of coordinate measurement is better than 0.6mm.

  15. Cancer incidence near radio and television transmitters in Great Britain. I. Sutton Coldfield transmitter.

    PubMed

    Dolk, H; Shaddick, G; Walls, P; Grundy, C; Thakrar, B; Kleinschmidt, I; Elliott, P

    1997-01-01

    A small area study of cancer incidence in 1974-1986 was carried out to investigate an unconfirmed report of a "cluster" of leukemias and lymphomas near the Sutton Coldfield television (TV) and frequency modulation (FM) radio transmitter in the West Midlands, England. The study used a national database of postcoded cancer registrations, and population and socioeconomic data from the 1981 census. Selected cancers were hematopoietic and lymphatic, brain, skin, eye, male breast, female breast, lung, colorectal, stomach, prostate, and bladder. Expected numbers of cancers in small areas were calculated by indirect standardization, with stratification for a small area socioeconomic index. The study area was defined as a 10 km radius circle around the transmitter, within which 10 bands of increasing distance from the transmitter were defined as a basis for testing for a decline in risk with distance, and an inner area was arbitrarily defined for descriptive purposes as a 2 km radius circle. The risk of adult leukemia within 2 km was 1.83 (95% confidence interval 1.22-2.74), and there was a significant decline in risk with distance from the transmitter (p = 0.001). These findings appeared to be consistent over the periods 1974-1980, 1981-1986, and were probably largely independent of the initially reported cluster, which appeared to concern mainly a later period. In the context of variability of leukemia risk across census wards in the West Midlands as a whole, the Sutton Coldfield findings were unusual. A significant decline in risk with distance was also found for skin cancer, possibly related to residual socioeconomic confounding, and for bladder cancer. Study of other radio and TV transmitters in Great Britain is required to put the present results in wider context. No causal implications can be made from a single cluster investigation of this kind.

  16. Behavior of sandhill cranes harnessed with different satellite transmitters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Ellis, D.H.; Landfried, S.E.; Miller, L.H.; Klugman, S.S.; Fuller, M.R.; Vermillion, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of various attachment methods and designs of platform transmitting terminals (PTT's) was tested on captive sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland, during 1989-91. Combinations of attachment and transmitter designs included neoprene cord harness with batteries separate from the transmitter (2 harness designs), Teflon ribbon harness with batteries incorporated into the transmitter package (4 transmitter models), and a package attached directly to the bird with epoxy glue only. Physical effects seen on cranes wearing PTT's ranged from skin lacerations (caused by rubbing of harness material) to no observed effects (other than feather wear). The most successful harness material and design utilized a Teflon ribbon harness with the 4 ribbon ends from the transmitter forming a neck loop and a body loop joined at the sternum. Time spent by sandhill cranes performing most activities did not change after transmitter attachment using this harness method.

  17. Optical fiber ultrasound transmitter with electrospun carbon nanotube-polymer composite.

    PubMed

    Poduval, Radhika K; Noimark, Sacha; Colchester, Richard J; Macdonald, Thomas J; Parkin, Ivan P; Desjardins, Adrien E; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis

    2017-05-29

    All-optical ultrasound transducers are promising for imaging applications in minimally invasive surgery. In these devices, ultrasound is transmitted and received through laser modulation, and they can be readily miniaturized using optical fibers for light delivery. Here, we report optical ultrasound transmitters fabricated by electrospinning an absorbing polymer composite directly onto the end-face of optical fibers. The composite coating consisting of an aqueous dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in polyvinyl alcohol was directly electrospun onto the cleaved surface of a multimode optical fiber and subsequently dip-coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This formed a uniform nanofibrous absorbing mesh over the optical fiber end-face wherein the constituent MWCNTs were aligned preferentially along individual nanofibers. Infiltration of the PDMS through this nanofibrous mesh onto the underlying substrate was observed and the resulting composites exhibited high optical absorption (>97%). Thickness control from 2.3 μm to 41.4 μm was obtained by varying the electrospinning time. Under laser excitation with 11 μJ pulse energy, ultrasound pressures of 1.59 MPa were achieved at 1.5 mm from the coatings. On comparing the electrospun ultrasound transmitters with a dip-coated reference fabricated using the same constituent materials and possessing identical optical absorption, a five-fold increase in the generated pressure and wider bandwidth was observed. The electrospun transmitters exhibited high optical absorption, good elastomer infiltration, and ultrasound generation capability in the range of pressures used for clinical pulse-echo imaging. All-optical ultrasound probes with such transmitters fabricated by electrospinning could be well-suited for incorporation into catheters and needles for diagnostics and therapeutic applications.

  18. Optical fiber ultrasound transmitter with electrospun carbon nanotube-polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poduval, Radhika K.; Noimark, Sacha; Colchester, Richard J.; Macdonald, Thomas J.; Parkin, Ivan P.; Desjardins, Adrien E.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis

    2017-05-01

    All-optical ultrasound transducers are promising for imaging applications in minimally invasive surgery. In these devices, ultrasound is transmitted and received through laser modulation, and they can be readily miniaturized using optical fibers for light delivery. Here, we report optical ultrasound transmitters fabricated by electrospinning an absorbing polymer composite directly onto the end-face of optical fibers. The composite coating consisting of an aqueous dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in polyvinyl alcohol was directly electrospun onto the cleaved surface of a multimode optical fiber and subsequently dip-coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This formed a uniform nanofibrous absorbing mesh over the optical fiber end-face wherein the constituent MWCNTs were aligned preferentially along individual nanofibers. Infiltration of the PDMS through this nanofibrous mesh onto the underlying substrate was observed and the resulting composites exhibited high optical absorption (>97%). Thickness control from 2.3 μm to 41.4 μm was obtained by varying the electrospinning time. Under laser excitation with 11 μJ pulse energy, ultrasound pressures of 1.59 MPa were achieved at 1.5 mm from the coatings. On comparing the electrospun ultrasound transmitters with a dip-coated reference fabricated using the same constituent materials and possessing identical optical absorption, a five-fold increase in the generated pressure and wider bandwidth was observed. The electrospun transmitters exhibited high optical absorption, good elastomer infiltration, and ultrasound generation capability in the range of pressures used for clinical pulse-echo imaging. All-optical ultrasound probes with such transmitters fabricated by electrospinning could be well-suited for incorporation into catheters and needles for diagnostics and therapeutic applications.

  19. 13. View of southerly side of transmitter building no. 101 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of southerly side of transmitter building no. 101 from south, showing tracking radar (tr) on top of transmitter building no. 102 in background left and abandoned radome on top of transmitter building no. 101 in middle of photograph with utilidor passageway link to right of photograph. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  20. Contaminant Monitor Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Small Business Innovation Research contract from Langley Research Center, OPOTEK, Inc. developed a laser transmitter for remote sensing of water vapor in the upper atmosphere. As a leader in developing and using Differential Absorption Lidar, a remote sensing technique to monitor ozone and water vapor in the atmosphere, NASA was interested in upgrading the capabilities of its airborn laser systems. The laser transmitter developed for NASA was used for measuring water vapor in the infrared region. By broadening this concept to other wavelengths, OPOTEK believes a range of industrial applications can be met. In addition, the tunable laser system can be used by the Drug Enforcement Administration to discern the by-products from illegal drug manufacturing. A host of other government, university, and industrial laboratory uses for the technology are also being examined as follow-up by the company.

  1. Multichip transmitter/receiver module for fiber optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waegli, Peter; Morel, Philippe

    1997-09-01

    Amongst the various sensing principles studied for use in optical fiber sensors, color coding has proven to be successful in commercial applications. Color coded sensors are based on commercially available and easy to handle components (i.e. LED's, lasers, multimode fibers) and the same basic optoelectronics can be used for a wide variety of applications. Such applications are: the remote measurement of chemical composition (pH, hydrogen, oxygen, aromatic hydrocarbons, humidity etc.), biochemical reactions and physical parameters (e.g. temperature, pressure, etc.) in medical applications (e.g. blood gas analysis, immunosensors, etc.), environmental monitoring, process control and on the factory floor. A versatile transmitter/receiver-module, which can be easily customized, has been developed as a multi chip module (MCM). This MCM can be directly mounted onto the printed circuit board, is small in size (50 X 50 X 12 mm3) and contains all optical, optoelectronic and electronic components and circuits to interface optically with the sensors and electrically with the microprocessor and its associated circuitry used for data analysis. Up to four sensors can be connected to one module and individually interrogated under software control. The design and the characteristics of the MCM as well as its application in possible sensor arrangements will be discussed with special emphasis on its use in a four channel fiber optic temperature sensor.

  2. Wavelength-agile integrated optical transmitters for analog applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Leif A.; Chen, Chin-Hui; Akulova, Yuliya A.; Fish, Gregory A.; Coldren, Larry A.

    2003-12-01

    A summary of current work involving the development of high performance, wavelength-tunable integrated optical transmitters for analog applications is given. The performance of sampled-grating DBR lasers integrated with an SOA and an electroabsorption or Mach-Zehnder modulator is evaluated in terms of E/O conversion efficiency, noise performance and dynamic range. Optimization options to maximize either gain, noise figure or spurious-free dynamic range in analog link applications are discussed. It is shown how the combination of chip-scale integration and the use of bulk waveguide Franz-Keldysh absorption allows coupling of a large optical power level into the electroabsorption modulator, and its effects on the modulation response and analog link performance. Link results on an integrated SGDBR-SOA-EAM device includes a sub-octave SFDR in the 125 to 127 dB/Hz4/5 range and a broadband SFDR of 103-107 dB/Hz2/3 limited by third order intermodulation products or 95-98 dB/Hz1/2, limited by second order intermodulation products, over a 1528 to 1573 nm wavelength range.

  3. Naval Space Surveillance System (NAVSPASUR) solid state transmitter modernization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francoeur, A. R.

    The author describes the design of the modernized solid-state transmitter for the US Naval Space Surveillance System (NAVSPASUR) station transmitters at Jordan Lake, AL, Gila River, AZ, and Lake Kickapoo, TX. The modernized NAVSPASUR is the highest average power solid-state transmitter ever produced. With the antenna gain of the system, it produces an effective radiated average power in excess of 98 dBw. Solid-state modernization of the NAVSPASUR transmitter has produced significant cost and performance improvements, which are expected to extend the operating life of the system into the next century.

  4. Evaluation of vaginal implant transmitters in elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Bruce K; McCoy, Terrance; Kochanny, Christopher O; Cook, Rachel C

    2006-09-01

    The effects of vaginal implant transmitters for tissue damage after 11 wk in 13 captive adult elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) and subsequent reproductive performance in 38 free-ranging elk were evaluated. Vaginal implant transmitters are designed to be shed at parturition and are used to locate birth sites of wild ungulates; however, potential adverse effects of these transmitters on tissues associated with the vaginal walls or subsequent reproductive performance have not been assessed. Vaginal implant transmitters consist of a transmitter encased in inert acrylic with an antenna trailing out the distal end and wings at the proximal end to hold the transmitter in place. Using a laparoscope on sedated captive elk, necrosis or measurable differences in tissue trauma between designs with wing spans of 80 versus 150 mm over an 11-wk trial were not observed. After the captive elk trial, vaginal implant transmitters with 80-mm wings were placed into 38 pregnant wild elk, and 31 live births were documented. Fates of seven calves were not determined, because their transmitters were not shed at the birth site. We recaptured 36 of these cow elk again in fall 2003 or spring 2004, and 32 were pregnant. This study was unable to document any short- or long-term effects of vaginal implant transmitters on reproductive performance of cow elk in captive and free-range environments.

  5. Waveguide Heterodyne Mixers at THz-Frequencies - Superconducting Hot Electron Bolometers on 2-micron Si3N4 Membranes for GREAT and CONDOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Pedro Pablo

    2007-04-01

    realized in this thesis by fabricating the mixer device on a thin (i.e. 2 micron) membrane layer deposited on a bulk silicon carrier wafer. The membrane is released by backside etching of the wafer after device fabrication. A large supporting frame is needed around the device for handling and contacting. A possible approach is to fabricate the frame and the mixer simultaneously on one wafer. In the process presented here the membrane-HEB devices and the supporting frames are fabricated separately avoiding the loss of wafer "real estate" for the support frames and thus allowing for up to 690 devices to be simultaneously produced on a single 30 mm square wafer. Fabricating many identical devices for arrays is possible even if many devices are damaged during fabrication. Further it is possible to test many different parameter-variations on one single wafer. The price to pay is a slightly more involved assembly procedure, which has been realized for the first time for 1.4 and 1.9 THz in this thesis. The fabrication of the phonon-cooled HEBs was fully realized at the KOSMA clean room facilities. The sputter deposition of ultra-thin NbTiN films with critical temperatures as high as 8.5 K is one of the technological highlights, already described at [1]. This thesis focused on the optimization of the contact interfaces between the electrodes and the ultrathin superconducting layer. Etching the interface previous to deposition of the electrodes leads to a better control over the interface. The effect of the etching parameters on the HEBs has been investigated. To restore the superconducting film properties that might be affected by the cleaning process, a NbTiN layer (20 nm) is deposited on top of the contact area. The additional superconducting layer between the bolometer thin film and the heat sinks has a positive effect on the mixer performance but introduced complications in the fabrication process which have been solved in this thesis. The fabricated waveguide HEB mixers on

  6. Marine Mammal Transmitter for porpoise tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briscoe, W. G.

    The Marine Mammal Transmitter (MMT) forms part of the equipment to be used in a worldwide Porpoise Tracking System. Knowledge of porpoise migration, distribution characteristics, and population estimates are needed to aid in protection of the porpoise. A major problem is suffocation of porpoises when they are caught in tuna purse seine fishing nets. Location of the porpoise can be determined to within + or - 5 kilometers. The MMT utilizes low power CMOS integrated circuits in timing and control circuits to extend battery life. The MMT with battery pack is contained in two cylinders which are two inches in diameter and 8.5 inches long. The unit is mounted to the porpoise's dorsal fin with a vertical quarter wave monopole antenna extending from one of the cylinders. A signal from the MMT is transmitted to the Nimbus satellite. From there the information is later transmitted to a ground receiver and a data processing facility.

  7. Linear transmitter design for MSAT terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Ross; Macleod, John; Beach, Mark; Bateman, Andrew

    1990-01-01

    One of the factors that will undoubtedly influence the choice of modulation format for mobile satellites, is the availability of cheap, power-efficient, linear amplifiers for mobile terminal equipment operating in the 1.5-1.7 GHz band. Transmitter linearity is not easily achieved at these frequencies, although high power (20W) class A/AB devices are becoming available. However, these components are expensive and require careful design to achieve a modest degree of linearity. In this paper an alternative approach to radio frequency (RF) power amplifier design for mobile satellite (MSAT) terminals using readily-available, power-efficient, and cheap class C devices in a feedback amplifier architecture is presented.

  8. Facilitation of transmitter release at squid synapses

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Facilitation is shown to decay as a compound exponential with two time constants (T1, T2) at both giant and non-giant synapses in squid stellate ganglia bathed in solutions having low extracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca++]o). Maximum values of facilitation (F1) were significantly larger, and T1 was significantly smaller in giant than non-giant synapses. Decreases in [Ca++]o or increases in [Mn++]o had variable effects on T1 and F1, whereas decreases in temperature increased T1 but had insignificant effects on F1. The growth of facilitation during short trains of equal interval stimuli was adequately predicted by the linear summation model developed by Mallart and Martin (1967. J. Physiol. (Lond.). 193:676--694) for frog neuromuscular junctions. This result suggests that the underlying mechanisms of facilitation are similar in squid and other synapses which release many transmitter quanta. PMID:31411

  9. Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana; Pop, Nicolina; Calinoiu, Delia

    2013-11-13

    A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, Ångström's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

  10. Improving Loran Coverage with Low Power Transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Sherman C.; Peterson, Benjamin B.; Hardy, Tim; Enge, Per K.

    Enhanced Loran (eLoran) is currently being implemented to provide back up to global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) in many critical and essential applications. In order to accomplish this, eLoran needs to provide a high level of availability throughout its desired coverage area. While the current Loran system is generally capable of accomplishing this, worldwide, there remain a number of known areas where improved coverage is desirable or necessary. One example is in the middle of the continental United States where the transmitter density is not adequate for providing the desired availability for applications such as aviation in some parts. This paper examines the use of lower power, existing assets such as differential GPS (DGPS) and Ground Wave Emergency Network (GWEN) stations to enhance coverage and fill these gaps. Two areas covered by the paper are the feasibility and performance benefits of using the antennas at these sites.Using DGPS, GWEN or other existing low frequency (LF) broadcast towers requires the consideration of several factors. The first is the ability of the transmitting equipment to efficiently broadcast on these antennas, which are significantly shorter than those at a Loran station. Recent tests at the US Coast Guard Loran Support Unit (LSU) demonstrated the performance of a more efficient transmitter. This technology allows for the effective use of smaller antennas at lower power levels. Second is the ability to broadcast a navigation signal that is compatible with the Loran system and the potential DPGS broadcast (when using a DGPS antenna). The paper examines some possibilities for navigation signals. The goal is to develop a suitable low power signal that enhances navigation and is feasible for the transmission system.The second part of the paper examines the benefits of using these stations. The benefits depend on the location of the stations and the ability seamlessly to integrate them within the existing Loran infrastructure

  11. Measurement Of Transmittance And Veiling Glare Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Norman P.

    1981-10-01

    Transmittance and Veiling Glare Index measurements in conjunction with the Optical Transfer Function can give a set of objective measurements for specifying and providing quantitative data on the performance of components and complete optical systems. The main application of the work described, is to directly viewed telescopic systems. Transmittance, the ratio of transmitted radiance to incident irradiance, of telescopic instruments is usually measured with a small diameter collimated beam, integrating sphere and photo multiplier detector. An alternative method in which the full aperture of the objective is filled by the incident beam will reveal any adverse effects of vignetting or variability of anti reflection coatings and is of importance in subjective/objective comparisons when the eye pupil is greater than the exit pupil of the telescopic system. The MVEE 'audit' and Standard telescopes which were developed for investigation of the application of OTF measurement to visual instruments were found to have markedly different Veiling Glare Index values when measured on a wide glare field apparatus. Subsequently a series of measurements of these telescopes, using several current techniques for the measurement of stray light, indicated the importance of unwanted radiation which came from outside the field of view and the inadequacy of routine VGI measurements with a glare field equal to the field of view of the specimen being tested. For a single measurement test it was concluded that a black spot on a wide field (>±45 degrees) was desirable; this is substantially test condition C2 of British Standard 4995. The Standard telescope, as tested above, had the lowest VGI and the Audit telescope the highest VGI of all systems tested, with a modern 10 x 60 sight having a VGI value close to the former. The final section of the paper discusses possible combined instruments for measuring all three parameters, to give the most effective utilization of apparatus.

  12. A study of atmospheric optical scattering parameters at 1.5 and 2 micron region for solid state Doppler lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Eli; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Benoist, Rodney; Dubinsky, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The increasing interest in the development of an eye-safe, solid state, Doppler lidar for avionic applications has created the need for a quantitative evaluation of atmospheric effects on performance. Theoretical calculations were completed for optical scattering parameters to be compared with the field measurements. Computer codes were developed for the required calculations and designed to be interactive and user friendly in order to support comparison with experimental results and, thus, provide the basis for evaluation of eye-safe Doppler lidar over a wide range of atmospheric conditions and geographical locations. A holmium Doppler lidar operating at 2.09 microns was constructed for atmospheric backscattering, attenuation, and wind velocity measurements. Theoretical calculations and field studies were performed for backscatter coefficients. The selected wavelengths correspond to Er:glass, Tm:YAG, and Tm,Ho:YAG solid state lasers that are suitable for use in an eye-safe Doppler lidar system.

  13. Laser communication system

    SciTech Connect

    Fredriksen, H.A.; Walter, R.K.; Mentzer, R.B.

    1987-04-28

    A laser communication system is described for transmission across an atmospheric link between a radio frequency source and a load comprising: a primary transmitter including a primary laser, a primary laser modulator connected to the primary laser and to a signal source, and a laser intensity control means connected to the laser for varying the primary laser intensity; a primary receiver located in the path of a beam from the primary laser; a haze comparator circuit connected to a primary photodetector means and comparing the electrical signal from the primary photodetector means to a standard signal to produce an output signal which indicates the sense and degree of difference between the two; a secondary laser located at the primary receiver location; secondary laser modulator circuit; a secondary laser control circuit; a secondary photodetector; a first control means connected to the secondary photodetector and the primary laser intensity control means; and an interconnection between the output of the haze comparator circuit and the secondary laser intensity control circuit so that the intensity of the output of the secondary laser is varied by the haze comparator in the same manner as is the intensity of the output of the primary laser.

  14. A fiberoptic compatible midinfrared laser with CO2 laser-like effect: application to atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Oz, M C; Treat, M R; Trokel, S L; Andrew, J E; Nowygrod, R

    1989-12-01

    In theory, pulses of laser light in the 2-microns range should ablate tissue in a manner similar to that of the 10.6-microns CO2 laser with the added advantage of efficient transmission through flexible quartz fibers. Using 200-microseconds pulses of 2.15-microns thulium-holmium-chromium:YAG (THC:YAG) laser light, we were able to create 700-microns-diameter holes through calcific atherosclerosis in vitro. In vivo evaluation of thrombogenicity and healing was accomplished by exposing the luminal surface of rabbit aortas to the THC:YAG laser. Serial histologic examinations of laser-treated rabbit aortae revealed a time course of resolution of the lesions which was very similar to that observed with like-sized lesions created with the same amount of continuous wave CO2 energy. No significant differences in thrombogenicity nor healing response were noted. The excellent in vivo response observed is due in part to the pulsed nature of the THC:YAG laser output as well as to the efficient tissue absorption at the 2.15-microns wavelength. We feel that excellent ablative effects with minimal collateral thermal damage can be obtained through fiberoptic delivery systems by taking advantage of laser wavelengths corresponding to the infrared absorption peak of water in the 2-microns region and pulsed delivery of the laser energy.

  15. Multibeam Laser Altimeter for Planetary Topographic Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Bufton, J. L.; Harding, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Laser altimetry provides an active, high-resolution, high-accuracy method for measurement of planetary and asteroid surface topography. The basis of the measurement is the timing of the roundtrip propagation of short-duration pulses of laser radiation between a spacecraft and the surface. Vertical, or elevation, resolution of the altimetry measurement is determined primarily by laser pulse width, surface-induced spreading in time of the reflected pulse, and the timing precision of the altimeter electronics. With conventional gain-switched pulses from solid-state lasers and nanosecond resolution timing electronics, submeter vertical range resolution is possible anywhere from orbital altitudes of approximately 1 km to altitudes of several hundred kilometers. Horizontal resolution is a function of laser beam footprint size at the surface and the spacing between successive laser pulses. Laser divergence angle and altimeter platform height above the surface determine the laser footprint size at the surface, while laser pulse repetition rate, laser transmitter beam configuration, and altimeter platform velocity determine the spacing between successive laser pulses. Multiple laser transmitters in a single laser altimeter instrument that is orbiting above a planetary or asteroid surface could provide across-track as well as along-track coverage that can be used to construct a range image (i.e., topographic map) of the surface. We are developing a pushbroom laser altimeter instrument concept that utilizes a linear array of laser transmitters to provide contiguous across-track and along-track data. The laser technology is based on the emerging monolithic combination of individual, 1-sq cm diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser pulse emitters. Details of the multi-emitter laser transmitter technology, the instrument configuration, and performance calculations for a realistic Discovery-class mission will be presented.

  16. Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System Transmitter Downsize Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Myjak, Mitchell J.

    2010-04-30

    At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated the use of an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) to reduce the weight and volume of Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitters while retaining current functionality. Review of the design of current JSATS transmitters identified components that could be replaced by an ASIC while retaining the function of the current transmitter and offering opportunities to extend function if desired. ASIC design alternatives were identified that could meet transmitter weight and volume targets of 200 mg and 100 mm3. If alternatives to the cylindrical batteries used in current JSATS transmitters can be identified, it could be possible to implant ASIC-based JSATS transmitters by injection rather than surgery. Using criteria for the size of fish suitable for surgical implantation of current JSATS transmitters, it was concluded that fish as small as 70 mm in length could be implanted with an ASIC-based transmitter, particularly if implantation by injection became feasible.

  17. 43 CFR 4.702 - Transmittal of appeal file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmittal of appeal file. 4.702 Section... PROCEDURES Special Rules Applicable to Other Appeals and Hearings § 4.702 Transmittal of appeal file. Within... decision is being appealed shall transmit to the Office of the Director the entire official file in...

  18. 47 CFR 73.515 - NCE FM transmitter location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false NCE FM transmitter location. 73.515 Section 73.515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.515 NCE FM transmitter location....

  19. 47 CFR 73.515 - NCE FM transmitter location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false NCE FM transmitter location. 73.515 Section 73.515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.515 NCE FM transmitter location....

  20. 47 CFR 25.281 - Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25.281 Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS). All satellite uplink transmissions carrying broadband video information shall be... integrated into the uplink transmitter chain in a method that cannot easily be defeated. (c) The ATIS...

  1. Interior view to the east, note the row of transmitters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view to the east, note the row of transmitters and the cables in the foreground - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Six Transmitter Building, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  2. 47 CFR 95.628 - MedRadio transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false MedRadio transmitters. 95.628 Section 95.628 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.628 MedRadio transmitters. (a) Frequency...

  3. Evaluation of vaginal implant transmitters in elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni).

    Treesearch

    Bruce K. Johnson; Terrance McCoy; Christopher O. Kochanny; Rachel C. Cook

    2006-01-01

    The effects of vaginal implant transmitters for tissue damage after 11 wk in 13 captive adult elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) and subsequent reproductive performance in 38 free-ranging elk were evaluated. Vaginal implant transmitters are designed to be shed at parturition and are used to locate birth sites of wild ungulates; however, potential adverse...

  4. 47 CFR 74.1250 - Transmitters and associated equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transmitters and associated equipment. 74.1250... Translator Stations and FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1250 Transmitters and associated equipment. (a) FM translator and booster transmitting apparatus, and exciters employed to provide a locally generated and...

  5. 47 CFR 22.165 - Additional transmitters for existing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... contours of the additional transmitter(s) must be totally encompassed by the composite interfering contour... “service area” and “interfering contours” must be determined using the same method as for stations in the Paging and Radiotelephone Service. The service area and interfering contours so determined for...

  6. 47 CFR 22.165 - Additional transmitters for existing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... contours of the additional transmitter(s) must be totally encompassed by the composite interfering contour... “service area” and “interfering contours” must be determined using the same method as for stations in the Paging and Radiotelephone Service. The service area and interfering contours so determined for...

  7. 47 CFR 22.165 - Additional transmitters for existing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... contours of the additional transmitter(s) must be totally encompassed by the composite interfering contour... Radiotelephone Service. A “service area” and “interfering contours” must be determined using the same method as for stations in the Paging and Radiotelephone Service. The service area and interfering contours...

  8. 47 CFR 101.131 - Transmitter construction and installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmitter construction and installation. 101.131 Section 101.131 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.131 Transmitter construction and...

  9. 47 CFR 101.131 - Transmitter construction and installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transmitter construction and installation. 101.131 Section 101.131 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.131 Transmitter construction and...

  10. How does a little acronym become a big transmitter?

    PubMed

    Krnjević, Kresimir

    2004-10-15

    After an overview of the early, chequered history of the discovery of GABA and its gradual acceptance as inhibitory synaptic transmitter in the brain, the article lists and discusses some of the more unexpected later developments in studies of GABA, especially its role as excitatory transmitter in the immature brain.

  11. 47 CFR 80.203 - Authorization of transmitters for licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... station model which are essential for the compatible operation of that station in the INMARSAT space... RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.203 Authorization of transmitters for licensing. (a) Each transmitter authorized in a station in the maritime services...

  12. Efficacy of using radio transmitters to monitor least tern chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whittier, Joanna B.; Leslie, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about Least Tern (Sterna antillarum) chicks from the time they leave the nest until fledging because they are highly mobile and cryptically colored. We evaluated the efficacy of using radiotelemetry to monitor Interior Least Tern (S. a. athalassos) chicks at Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge, Oklahoma. In 1999, we attached radio transmitters to 26 Least Tern chicks and tracked them for 2-17 days. No adults abandoned their chicks after transmitters were attached. Transmitters did not appear to alter growth rates of transmittered chicks (P = 0.36) or prevent feather growth, although dermal irritation was observed on one chick. However, without frequent reattachment, transmitters generally did not remain on chicks <1 week old for more than 2 days because of feather growth and transmitter removal, presumably by adult terns. Although the presence of transmitters did not adversely affect Least Tern chicks, future assessments should investigate nonintrusive methods to improve retention of transmitters on young chicks and reduce the number of times that chicks need to be handled.

  13. An Energy Harvesting Underwater Acoustic Transmitter for Aquatic Animals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huidong; Tian, Chuan; Lu, Jun; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Brown, Richard S.; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel

    2016-09-20

    This paper presents a self-powered underwater acoustic transmitter using a piezoelectric beam to harvest the mechanical energy from fish swimming. This transmitter does not require a battery and is demonstrated in live fish. It transmits an acoustic waveform as the implanted fish swims. It enables long-term monitoring of aquatic animals.

  14. A CONTACTLESS TRANSMITTER FOR THE M TYPE DATA TRANSMISSION SYSTEM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A contactless transmitter employing electromagnetic principles for the M type data transmission system is described. It could be contained in a size 11 standard housing if the six semiconductor main switches are mounted externally. Tests showed that the transmitter will operate satisfactorily at speeds in excess of 3000 rev/min, and that it could form the basis of a brushless dc motor . (Author)

  15. 47 CFR 74.1250 - Transmitters and associated equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... section: (1) Radio frequency harmonics and spurious emissions must conform with the specifications of § 74... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transmitters and associated equipment. 74.1250... Translator Stations and FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1250 Transmitters and associated equipment. (a) FM...

  16. 47 CFR 74.1250 - Transmitters and associated equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... section: (1) Radio frequency harmonics and spurious emissions must conform with the specifications of § 74... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transmitters and associated equipment. 74.1250... Translator Stations and FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1250 Transmitters and associated equipment. (a) FM...

  17. 47 CFR 74.1250 - Transmitters and associated equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... section: (1) Radio frequency harmonics and spurious emissions must conform with the specifications of § 74... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transmitters and associated equipment. 74.1250... Translator Stations and FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1250 Transmitters and associated equipment. (a) FM...

  18. Transmitter switch for high-power microwave output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiggins, C. P.; Leu, R. K.

    1975-01-01

    Combiner system can be used for combining output powers of two transmitters or for switching from one to the other. This can be done when pair of transmitters operate on same frequency and carriers are phase coherent as by excitation from single exciter.

  19. 47 CFR 73.685 - Transmitter location and antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transmitter location and antenna system. 73.685... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Television Broadcast Stations § 73.685 Transmitter location and antenna system... and antenna height above average terrain employed, the following minimum field strength in dB...

  20. 47 CFR 73.685 - Transmitter location and antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transmitter location and antenna system. 73.685... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Television Broadcast Stations § 73.685 Transmitter location and antenna system... and antenna height above average terrain employed, the following minimum field strength in dB...