Science.gov

Sample records for 2-nitroimidazole hypoxic cell

  1. NLP-1: a DNA intercalating hypoxic cell radiosensitizer and cytotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Panicucci, R.; Heal, R.; Laderoute, K.; Cowan, D.; McClelland, R.A.; Rauth, A.M.

    1989-04-01

    The 2-nitroimidazole linked phenanthridine, NLP-1 (5-(3-(2-nitro-1-imidazoyl)-propyl)-phenanthridinium bromide), was synthesized with the rationale of targeting the nitroimidazole to DNA via the phenanthridine ring. The drug is soluble in aqueous solution (greater than 25 mM) and stable at room temperature. It binds to DNA with a binding constant 1/30 that of ethidium bromide. At a concentration of 0.5 mM, NLP-1 is 8 times more toxic to hypoxic than aerobic cells at 37 degrees C. This concentration is 40 times less than the concentration of misonidazole, a non-intercalating 2-nitroimidazole, required for the same degree of hypoxic cell toxicity. The toxicity of NLP-1 is reduced at least 10-fold at 0 degrees C. Its ability to radiosensitize hypoxic cells is similar to misonidazole at 0 degrees C. Thus the putative targeting of the 2-nitroimidazole, NLP-1, to DNA, via its phenanthridine group, enhances its hypoxic toxicity, but not its radiosensitizing ability under the present test conditions. NLP-1 represents a lead compound for intercalating 2-nitroimidazoles with selective toxicity for hypoxic cells.

  2. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent “Pimonidazole” in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH. PMID:27580239

  3. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent "Pimonidazole" in Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Yukiko; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH. PMID:27580239

  4. Clinical perspectives for the use of new hypoxic cell sensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    Experience with high pressure oxygen in combination with radiotherapy has shown that, for some tumors at least, the presence of hypoxic cells is a limiting factor in the ability to cure these tumors even with conventional daily fractionation. This suggests that hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, of which misonidazole (MISO) is the prototype drug, may play a role in improving the cure-rate of some tumors when combined with daily fractionation. Even for those tumors for which no improvement is seen when combined with daily fractionation, it is likely that there will be an important role for these sensitizers by using them in combination with regimens of only a few dose fractions. Because of the limiting side effects of neuropathy, a less toxic radiosensitizer than MISO is required to gain the full clinical benefit of these drugs. A possible way of achieving this is to reduce the lipid solubility (lipophilicity) of the compounds while still retaining their electron-affinity. This reduces the concentration of drug in the neural tissues (brain, peripheral nerves) without affecting the tumor concentration. However, if the lipophilicity is too low, the drugs are unable to enter the hypoxic cells and hence lose their radiosensitivity efficiency. It would appear that a lipophilicity given by an octanol:water partition coefficient of approximately 0.04 is optimum (cf. MISO = 0.43) with the 2-nitroimidazole amide SR-2508 the best in this series. Tumor levels of this drug of at least 7-8 times those obtained with MISO should be attainable clinically for no increase in neurotoxicity. Another property of electron-affinic sensitizers shows clinical promise. This is their ability to preferentially sensitize tumors compared to normal tissues to the cytotoxic action of several chemotherapeutic agents.

  5. S-2-amino-5-(2-nitroimidazol-1-yl)pentanoic acid: a model for potential bioreductively activated prodrugs for inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity.

    PubMed

    Ulhaq, S; Naylor, M A; Chinje, E C; Threadgill, M D; Stratford, I J

    1997-01-01

    Treatment of 1,1-dimethylethyl S-(2-1,1-dimethylethoxycarbonylamino)-5-bromopentanoate with 1-potassio-2-nitroimidazole, followed by deprotection, afforded S-2-amino-5-(2-nitroimidazol-1-yl)pentanoic acid, which was reduced to S-2-amino-5-(2-aminoimidazol-1-yl)pentanoic acid. This aminoimadazole inhibited rat brain nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity 3.2 times more potently than did the nitro analogue. Thus S-2-amino-5-(2-nitroimidazol-1-yl)pentanoic acid is a potent prodrug which may be bioreductively activated to a NOS inhibitor in hypoxic solid tumours.

  6. Photoreceptor cell apoptosis induced by the 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer, CI-1010, is mediated by p53-linked activation of caspase-3.

    PubMed

    Miller, Terry J; Schneider, Randal J; Miller, James A; Martin, Brad P; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R; Agarwal, Neeraj; Dethloff, Lloyd A; Philbert, Martin A

    2006-01-01

    The nitroimidazole radiosensitizer CI-1010 ((R)-alpha-[[(2-bromoethyl)-amino]methyl]-2-nitro-1H-imidazole-1-ethanol monohydrobromide) causes selective, irreversible, retinal photoreceptor apoptosis in vivo. The mouse 661 W photoreceptor cell line was used as a neuronotypic model of CI-1010-mediated retinal degeneration. Exposure to CI-1010 for 24 h induced apoptosis in 661 W cells, as determined by ultrastructural analysis, agarose electrophoresis and analysis of TUNEL-positive nuclei. CI-1010 caused a loss of viability in 661 W cells, as measured by the reduction of MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide). A clear link was established between the onset of apoptosis and activity of caspase-3 and caspase-8, prior to poly[ADP-ribose]polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Pretreatment with caspase inhibitors, ZVAD.fmk or DEVD-CHO, prevented morphological changes in most CI-1010-treated cells. Evaluation of mitochondrial inner membrane potential (Deltapsi(m)) in live 661 W cells using the fluorescent dye, tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester revealed retention of (Deltapsi(m)) until after caspase activation. Absence of cytochrome c in the cytoplasm in treated cells further supports the hypothesis of a mitochondrial-independent mechanism of cell death. Significant increase in DNA crosslinks observed in 661 W cells correlates with induction and phosphorylation of p53 at multiple serine sites. Cell cycle analysis of 661 W cells reveals a G(2) arrest in response to CI-1010-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death. Increased protein expression of Bax, Fas, and FasL, concomitant to the loss of Bcl-xL in treated 661 W cells may be modulated by p53. This study evaluates in vitro mechanisms of CI-1010-induced cell death in photoreceptors and provides evidence in support of a p53-linked activation of caspase-3 in response to DNA damage caused by CI-1010.

  7. DNA-targeted 2-nitroimidazoles: studies of the influence of the phenanthridine-linked nitroimidazoles, 2-NLP-3 and 2-NLP-4, on DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Weinfeld, Michael

    2002-09-01

    The nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridines 2-NLP-3 (5-[3-(2-nitro-1-imidazoyl)-propyl]-phenanthridinium bromide) and 2-NLP-4 (5-[3-(2-nitro-1-imidazoyl)-butyl]-phenanthridinium bromide) are composed of the radiosensitizer, 2-nitroimidazole, attached to the DNA intercalator phenanthridine by a 3- and 4-carbon linker, respectively. Previous in vitro assays showed both compounds to be 10-100 times more efficient as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers (based on external drug concentrations) than the untargeted 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer, misonidazole (Cowan et al., Radiat. Res. 127, 81-89, 1991). Here we have used a (32)P postlabeling assay and 5'-end-labeled oligonucleotide assay to compare the radiation-induced DNA damage generated in the presence of 2-NLP-3, 2-NLP-4, phenanthridine and misonidazole. After irradiation of the DNA under anoxic conditions, we observed a significantly greater level of 3'-phosphoglycolate DNA damage in the presence of 2-NLP-3 or 2-NLP-4 compared to irradiation of the DNA in the presence of misonidazole. This may account at least in part for the greater cellular radiosensitization shown by the nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridines over misonidazole. Of the two nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridines, the better in vitro radiosensitizer, 2-NLP-4, generated more 3'-phosphoglycolate in DNA than did 2-NLP-3. At all concentrations, phenanthridine had little effect on the levels of DNA damage, suggesting that the enhanced radiosensitization displayed by 2-NLP-3 and 2-NLP-4 is due to the localization of the 2-nitroimidazole to the DNA by the phenanthridine substituent and not to radiosensitization by the phenanthridine moiety itself.

  8. Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuri; Lin, Qun; Glazer, Peter M.; Yun, Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia or oxygen deficiency is a salient feature of solid tumors. Hypoxic tumors are often resistant to conventional cancer therapies, and tumor hypoxia correlates with advanced stages of malignancy. Hypoxic tumors appear to be poorly differentiated. Increasing evidence suggests that hypoxia has the potential to inhibit tumor cell differentiation and thus plays a direct role in the maintenance of cancer stem cells. Studies have also shown that hypoxia blocks differentiation of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells, a potential source of tumor-associated stromal cells. It is therefore likely that hypoxia may have a profound impact on the evolution of the tumor stromal microenvironment. These observations have led to the emergence of a novel paradigm for a role of hypoxia in facilitating tumor progression. Hypoxia may help create a microenvironment enriched in poorly differentiated tumor cells and undifferentiated stromal cells. Such an undifferentiated hypoxic microenvironment may provide essential cellular interactions and environmental signals for the preferential maintenance of cancer stem cells. This hypothesis suggests that effectively targeting hypoxic cancer stem cells is a key to successful tumor control. PMID:19519400

  9. DNA-Targeted 2-Nitroimidazoles: Studies of the Influence of the Phenanthridine-Linked Nitroimidazoles, 2-NLP-3 and 2-NLP-4, on DNA Damage Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W. ); Weinfeld, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridines 2-NLP-3 (5-[3-(2-nitro-1-imidazoyl)-propyl]-phenanthridinium bromide) and 2-NLP-4 (5-[3-(2-nitro-1-imidazoyl)-butyl1]-phenanthridinium bromide) are composed of the radiosensitizer, 2-nitroimidazole, attached to the DNA intercalator phenanthridine via a 3- and 4-carbon linker, respectively. Previous in vitro assays show both compounds to be 10 - 100 times more efficient as hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, misonidazole[Cowan et al., Radiat. Res. 127, 81-89, 1991]. Here we have used a 32P postlabeling assay and 5'-end labeled oligonucleotide assay to compare the radiogenic DNA damage generated in the presence of 2-NLP-3, 2-NLP-4 compared to irradiation in the presence of misonidazole. This may account, at least in part, for the greater cellular radiosensitization shown by the nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridines over misonidazole.

  10. Hypoxic cell turnover in different solid tumor lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ljungkvist, Anna S.E. . E-mail: a.ljungkvist@rther.umcn.nl; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Rijken, Paulus F.J.W.; Begg, Adrian C.; Raleigh, James A.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: Most solid tumors contain hypoxic cells, and the amount of tumor hypoxia has been shown to have a negative impact on the outcome of radiotherapy. The efficacy of combined modality treatments depends both on the sequence and timing of the treatments. Hypoxic cell turnover in tumors may be important for optimal scheduling of combined modality treatments, especially when hypoxic cell targeting is involved. Methods and Materials: Previously we have shown that a double bioreductive hypoxic marker assay could be used to detect changes of tumor hypoxia in relation to the tumor vasculature after carbogen and hydralazine treatments. This assay was used in the current study to establish the turnover rate of hypoxic cells in three different tumor models. The first hypoxic marker, pimonidazole, was administered at variable times before tumor harvest, and the second hypoxic marker, CCI-103F, was injected at a fixed time before harvest. Hypoxic cell turnover was defined as loss of pimonidazole (first marker) relative to CCI-103F (second marker). Results: The half-life of hypoxic cell turnover was 17 h in the murine C38 colon carcinoma line, 23 h and 49 h in the human xenograft lines MEC82 and SCCNij3, respectively. Within 24 h, loss of pimonidazole-stained areas in C38 and MEC82 occurred concurrent with the appearance of pimonidazole positive cell debris in necrotic regions. In C38 and MEC82, most of the hypoxic cells had disappeared after 48 h, whereas in SCCNij3, viable cells that had been labeled with pimonidazole were still observed after 5 days. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that the double hypoxia marker assay can be used to study changes in both the proportion of hypoxic tumor cells and their lifespan at the same time. The present study shows that large differences in hypoxic cell turnover rates may exist among tumor lines, with half-lives ranging from 17-49 h.

  11. Evaluation of nitrobenzimidazoles as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Frank, L.R.; Bush, D.; Harrison, G.H.

    1983-07-01

    Radiobiological and pharmacokinetic assays were performed to determine the potential of 2-nitrobenzimidazole (NBI) as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizing agent. As judged by comparing survival curve slopes of Serratia marcescens irradiated under aerated and hypoxic conditions, the NBI enhancement ratio (ER) at 2 mM concentration was 2.4 +/- 0.2, compared with an oxygen enhancement ratio of 3.3 +/- 0.3. 2,5-Dinitrobenzimidazole (DNBI) was investigated in vitro; its ER was 3.0 +/- 0.3 at 4 mM concentration. Very poor tissue penetration of DNBI precluded further testing in vivo. Acute toxic signs appeared in C3H/HeJ mice following ip injection of NBI at 100 mg/kg. These would be partly attributable to the stress caused by the high pH of the injection vehicle. The LD50 was estimated to be 125-150 mg/kg. Mammary adenocarcinoma tumors grown in the flanks of these mice exhibited maximum NBI levels at 5 min postinjection (ip). Peak tumor radiosensitization occurred in the interval between 5 and 10 min postinjection. The ER for tumor regrowth delay was 2.1 +/- 0.3 following 50 mg/kg injected into mice 5 min before irradiation. Functional evaluation up to 40 days after treatment revealed no evidence of neurological deficit.

  12. Evaluation of nitrobenzimidazoles as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Frank, L.R.; Bush, D.; Harrison, G.H.

    1983-07-01

    Radiobiological and pharmacokinetic assays were performed to determine the potential of 2-nitrobenzimidazole (NBI) as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizing agent. As judged by comparing survival curve slopes of Serratia marcescens irradiated under aerated and hypoxic conditions, the NBI enhancement ratio (ER) at 2 mM concentration was 2.4 +- 0.2, compared with an oxygen enhancement ratio of 3.3 +- 0.3. 2,5-Dinitrobenzimidazole (DNBI) was investigated in vitro; its ER was 3.0 +- 0.3 at 4 mM concentration. Very poor tissue penetration of DNBI precluded further testing in vivo. Acute toxic signs appeared in C3H/HeJ mice following ip injection of NBI at 100 mg/kg. These would be partly attributable to the stress caused by the high pH of the injection vehicle. The LD/sub 50/ was estimated to be 125 to 150 mg/kg. Mammary adenocarcinoma tumors grown in the flanks of these mice exhibited maximum NBI levels at 5 min postinjection (ip). Peak tumor radiosensitization occurred in the interval between 5 and 10 min postinjection. The ER for tumor regrowth delay was 2.1 +- 0.3 following 50 mg/kg injected into mice 5 min before irradiation. Functional evaluation up to 40 days after treatment revealed no evidence of neurological deficit.

  13. Radiosensitization by a new potent nucleoside analog: 1-(1[prime],3[prime],4[prime]-trihydroxy-2[prime]-Butoxy)methyl-2-nitroimidazole(RP-343)

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Chieko; Shoji, Takahiro; Mori, Tomoyuki ); Suzuki, Akira; Sato, Chihiro; Tanabe, Yoshitaka; Miyata, Yoshiyuki; Nishio, Azuma; Suzuki, Toshimitsu; Sakaguchi, Masakazu )

    1993-06-15

    A new hypoxic cell sensitizer has been synthesized; this is a 2-nitroimidazole nucleoside analog having erythritol as sugar moiety at the N-1 position of the imidazole ring (RP-343). Its potential as a potent hypoxic cell sensitizer was compared with that of RP-170 and etanidazole. Radiosensitization was tested in two murine tumors, EMT6 using in vitro and in vivo-in vitro assays and SCCVII using growth delay and TCD[sub 50] assays. Pharmacokinetic study was performed in Balb/c mice bearing EMT6 tumors and in Beagle dogs. The LD[sub 50] of each sensitizer was obtained with ICR mice. As might be expected from the almost identical electron affinities of the three sensitizers, they were equally effective against hypoxic EMT6 cells in vitro. While having the lowest partition coefficient (0.035), RP-343 exhibited almost equally effective distribution to tumors and sensitizing radiation activity. An intravenous (i.v.) injection of 100 mg/kg of RP-343, RP-170 and etanidazole showed an almost equal sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) of about 1.4 to solid EMT6 tumor under in vivo-in vitro assay and a virtually equal SER of 1.33-1.44 to solid SCCVII tumor under both tumor growth delay assay and TCD[sub 50] assay. A great advantage of RP-343 over RP-170 and etanidazole is its very much lower toxicity; their LD[sub 50]s in mice were > 6.0, 4.3 and 4.8 g/kg, respectively, on i.v. injection. The lower toxicity of RP-343 was supported by its lower concentrations in the brain; the RP-343 AUC for brain was 0.43 times that of RP-170. Three indices were selected to compare the three nitroimidazoles. SER at 5% LD[sub 50] doses of RP-343, RP-170 and etanidazole was 1.66, 1.59 and 1.56. At the same toxicity levels, RP-343 was found to have better sensitization of solid tumors over both etanidazole and RP-170. The maximum tumor concentration/AUC for brain (C[sub max/tumor]/AUC[sub brain]) ratios for RP-343 and RP-170 were 9.62 and 3.98. 37 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Tracking hypoxic signaling within encapsulated cell aggregates.

    PubMed

    Skiles, Matthew L; Sahai, Suchit; Blanchette, James O

    2011-01-01

    , is therefore reduced and limited by diffusion. This reduced oxygen availability may especially impact β-cells whose insulin secretory function is highly dependent on oxygen. Capsule composition and geometry will also impact diffusion rates and lengths for oxygen. Therefore, we also describe a technique for identifying hypoxic cells within our PEG capsules. Infection of the cells with a recombinant adenovirus allows for a fluorescent signal to be produced when intracellular hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathways are activated. As HIFs are the primary regulators of the transcriptional response to hypoxia, they represent an ideal target marker for detection of hypoxic signaling. This approach allows for easy and rapid detection of hypoxic cells. Briefly, the adenovirus has the sequence for a red fluorescent protein (Ds Red DR from Clontech) under the control of a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) trimer. Stabilization of HIF-1 by low oxygen conditions will drive transcription of the fluorescent protein (Figure 1). Additional details on the construction of this virus have been published previously. The virus is stored in 10% glycerol at -80° C as many 150 μL aliquots in 1.5 mL centrifuge tubes at a concentration of 3.4 x 10(10) pfu/mL. Previous studies in our lab have shown that MIN6 cells encapsulated as aggregates maintain their viability throughout 4 weeks of culture in 20% oxygen. MIN6 aggregates cultured at 2 or 1% oxygen showed both signs of necrotic cells (still about 85-90% viable) by staining with ethidium bromide as well as morphological changes relative to cells in 20% oxygen. The smooth spherical shape of the aggregates displayed at 20% was lost and aggregates appeared more like disorganized groups of cells. While the low oxygen stress does not cause a pronounced drop in viability, it is clearly impacting MIN6 aggregation and function as measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Western blot analysis of encapsulated cells in 20% and 1% oxygen also

  15. Tracking Hypoxic Signaling within Encapsulated Cell Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Skiles, Matthew L.; Sahai, Suchit; Blanchette, James O.

    2011-01-01

    nutrients, notably oxygen, is therefore reduced and limited by diffusion. This reduced oxygen availability may especially impact β-cells whose insulin secretory function is highly dependent on oxygen11-13. Capsule composition and geometry will also impact diffusion rates and lengths for oxygen. Therefore, we also describe a technique for identifying hypoxic cells within our PEG capsules. Infection of the cells with a recombinant adenovirus allows for a fluorescent signal to be produced when intracellular hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathways are activated14. As HIFs are the primary regulators of the transcriptional response to hypoxia, they represent an ideal target marker for detection of hypoxic signaling15. This approach allows for easy and rapid detection of hypoxic cells. Briefly, the adenovirus has the sequence for a red fluorescent protein (Ds Red DR from Clontech) under the control of a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) trimer. Stabilization of HIF-1 by low oxygen conditions will drive transcription of the fluorescent protein (Figure 1). Additional details on the construction of this virus have been published previously15. The virus is stored in 10% glycerol at -80° C as many 150 μL aliquots in 1.5 mL centrifuge tubes at a concentration of 3.4 x 1010 pfu/mL. Previous studies in our lab have shown that MIN6 cells encapsulated as aggregates maintain their viability throughout 4 weeks of culture in 20% oxygen. MIN6 aggregates cultured at 2 or 1% oxygen showed both signs of necrotic cells (still about 85-90% viable) by staining with ethidium bromide as well as morphological changes relative to cells in 20% oxygen. The smooth spherical shape of the aggregates displayed at 20% was lost and aggregates appeared more like disorganized groups of cells. While the low oxygen stress does not cause a pronounced drop in viability, it is clearly impacting MIN6 aggregation and function as measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion15. Western blot analysis of encapsulated

  16. Targeting tumor hypoxia with 2-nitroimidazole-indocyanine green dye conjugates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Zanganeh, Saeid; Mohammad, Innus; Aguirre, Andres; Wang, Tianheng; Yang, Yi; Kuhn, Liisa; Smith, Michael B; Zhu, Quing

    2013-06-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a major indicator of treatment resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, and fluorescence optical tomography has tremendous potential to provide clinically useful, functional information by identifying tumor hypoxia. The synthesis of a 2-nitroimidazole-indocyanine green conjugate using a piperazine linker (piperazine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG) capable of robust fluorescent imaging of tumor hypoxia is described. In vivo mouse tumor imaging studies were completed and demonstrate an improved imaging capability of the new dye relative to an earlier version of the dye that was synthesized with an ethanolamine linker (ethanolamine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG). Mouse tumors located at imaging depths of 1.5 and 2.0 cm in a turbid medium were imaged at various time points after intravenous injection of the dyes. On average, the reconstructed maximum fluorescence concentration of the tumors injected with piperazine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG was twofold higher than that injected with ethanolamine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG within 3 h postinjection period and 1.6 to 1.7 times higher beyond 3 h postinjection. The untargeted bis-carboxylic acid ICG completely washed out after 3 h postinjection. Thus, the optimal window to assess tumor hypoxia is beyond 3 h postinjection. These findings were supported with fluorescence images of histological sections of tumor samples and an immunohistochemistry technique for identifying tumor hypoxia.

  17. Targeting tumor hypoxia with 2-nitroimidazole-indocyanine green dye conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Zanganeh, Saeid; Mohammad, Innus; Aguirre, Andres; Wang, Tianheng; Yang, Yi; Kuhn, Liisa; Smith, Michael B.; Zhu, Quing

    2013-06-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a major indicator of treatment resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, and fluorescence optical tomography has tremendous potential to provide clinically useful, functional information by identifying tumor hypoxia. The synthesis of a 2-nitroimidazole-indocyanine green conjugate using a piperazine linker (piperazine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG) capable of robust fluorescent imaging of tumor hypoxia is described. In vivo mouse tumor imaging studies were completed and demonstrate an improved imaging capability of the new dye relative to an earlier version of the dye that was synthesized with an ethanolamine linker (ethanolamine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG). Mouse tumors located at imaging depths of 1.5 and 2.0 cm in a turbid medium were imaged at various time points after intravenous injection of the dyes. On average, the reconstructed maximum fluorescence concentration of the tumors injected with piperazine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG was twofold higher than that injected with ethanolamine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG within 3 h postinjection period and 1.6 to 1.7 times higher beyond 3 h postinjection. The untargeted bis-carboxylic acid ICG completely washed out after 3 h postinjection. Thus, the optimal window to assess tumor hypoxia is beyond 3 h postinjection. These findings were supported with fluorescence images of histological sections of tumor samples and an immunohistochemistry technique for identifying tumor hypoxia.

  18. Selective toxicity of nitracrine to hypoxic mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W. R.; Denny, W. A.; Twigden, S. J.; Baguley, B. C.; Probert, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Hypoxic cells in solid tumours are resistant to ionizing radiation and may be refractory to treatment by many chemotherapeutic agents. For these reasons the identification of drugs with selective toxicity towards hypoxic cells is an important objective in cancer chemotherapy. Nitroimidazoles such as misonidazole demonstrate such hypoxia-selective toxicity but have very low dose potency. The 1-nitroacridine derivative 1-nitro-9-(dimethylaminopropylamino)acridine (nitracrine) binds reversibly to DNA but also forms covalent adducts with DNA in vivo. We have found nitracrine to be selectively toxic to the Chinese hamster ovary cell line AA8 under hypoxic conditions in culture, with a potency approximately 100,000 times higher than that of misonidazole. The effect of oxygen is not a simple dose-modifying one in this system, probably in part because of rapid metabolic inactivation of nitracrine under hypoxic conditions. Viscometric studies with the mini col E1 plasmid PML-21 confirmed that nitracrine binds to DNA by intercalation, and provided an unwinding angle of 16 degrees (relative to 26 degrees for ethidium). It is proposed that the cytotoxicity of nitracrine under hypoxia is due to reductive metabolism to form an alkylating species, but that intercalation of the chromophore may enhance reactivity towards DNA and hence contribute to the marked enhancement of potency with respect to simple nitroheteroaromatic drugs. PMID:6696822

  19. A limited overlap between intratumoral distribution of 1-(5-fluoro-5-deoxy-α-D-arabinofuranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole and copper-diacetyl-bis[N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takako; Yuan, Qinghua; Jin, Zhao-Hui; Aung, Winn; Yoshii, Yukie; Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Endo, Hiroko; Inoue, Masahiro; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Saga, Tsuneo

    2015-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor hypoxia provides valuable information for cancer treatment planning. Two types of PET tracers, nitroimidazole compounds and [62,64Cu] copper-diacetyl-bis[N(4)-methylthio- semicarbazone] (Cu-ATSM), have been used for imaging hypoxic tumors. High accumulation of these tracers in tumors was shown to predict poor prognosis. Both similar and different intratumoral distributions of these PET tracers have been reported with some studies questioning the dependence of the Cu-ATSM accumulation on hypoxia. In the present study, we compared the intratumoral distribution and cellular uptake of 1-(5-fluoro-5-deoxy-α-D-arabinofuranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole (FAZA) and Cu-ATSM. Intratumoral distributions of FAZA and Cu-ATSM compared by double tracer autoradiography in xenografts of 8 cancer cell lines and 3 cancer tissue originated spheroids (CTOSs) showed that only a limited overlap was observed between the regions with high levels of FAZA and Cu-ATSM accumulation in all the xenografts. Immunohistochemistry in the regions enriched with FAZA and Cu-ATSM in xenografts demonstrated that pimonidazole adducts were in regions that accumulated high levels of FAZA, while HIF-1α was in areas enriched with either tracer. In addition, we examined the cellular uptake of FAZA and Cu-ATSM at different levels of oxygen concentration in 4 cell lines and revealed that cellular uptake of FAZA was increased with the decrease of oxygen concentration from 20 to 2 and from 2 to 1%, while the Cu-ATSM uptake increased with the decrease of oxygen concentration from 20 to 2%, but did not increase with the decrease from 2 to 1%. Our findings indicate that intratumoral distributions of FAZA and Cu-ATSM were essentially non-overlapping and although hypoxia affects the buildup of both tracers, the accumulation of Cu-ATSM occurred at milder hypoxia compared to the conditions required for the accumulation of FAZA. Therefore, accumulation levels of FAZA and

  20. Cell therapy for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro M; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia

    2010-03-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a common cause of long-term neurological disability in children. Despite advances in supportive care, no treatments for HIE are available at present. The potential use of stem/progenitor cell therapies for neuroprotection or regeneration of the damaged adult brain has been evaluated in several preclinical studies, and the most promising results are now being tested in clinical trials. In recent years, the use of stem/progenitor cell transplantation in animal models of HIE has also been evaluated in several laboratories. It was shown that human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells may have a therapeutic potential through multiple mechanisms acting locally in the central nervous system and possibly in peripheral organs of hypoxic-ischemic animals. Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs) have also been transplanted in animal models of HIE, migrating long distances to ischemic brain areas and differentiating into neurons. The results of these studies have raised important questions that must be addressed before these findings can be translated to the bedside. In this review, we give a critical overview of the different studies published up to now, and we discuss the endogenous regenerative potential of NSCs of the newborn brain when challenged by an HIE insult. We also discuss the use of cell therapies for the encephalopathy of prematurity.

  1. Tumorigenicity of hypoxic respiring cancer cells revealed by a hypoxia–cell cycle dual reporter

    PubMed Central

    Le, Anne; Stine, Zachary E.; Nguyen, Christopher; Afzal, Junaid; Sun, Peng; Hamaker, Max; Siegel, Nicholas M.; Gouw, Arvin M.; Kang, Byung-hak; Yu, Shu-Han; Cochran, Rory L.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Song, Hongjun; Dang, Chi V.

    2014-01-01

    Although aerobic glycolysis provides an advantage in the hypoxic tumor microenvironment, some cancer cells can also respire via oxidative phosphorylation. These respiring (“non-Warburg”) cells were previously thought not to play a key role in tumorigenesis and thus fell from favor in the literature. We sought to determine whether subpopulations of hypoxic cancer cells have different metabolic phenotypes and gene-expression profiles that could influence tumorigenicity and therapeutic response, and we therefore developed a dual fluorescent protein reporter, HypoxCR, that detects hypoxic [hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) active] and/or cycling cells. Using HEK293T cells as a model, we identified four distinct hypoxic cell populations by flow cytometry. The non-HIF/noncycling cell population expressed a unique set of genes involved in mitochondrial function. Relative to the other subpopulations, these hypoxic “non-Warburg” cells had highest oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial capacity consistent with increased mitochondrial respiration. We found that these respiring cells were unexpectedly tumorigenic, suggesting that continued respiration under limiting oxygen conditions may be required for tumorigenicity. PMID:25114222

  2. Development of a real-time imaging system for hypoxic cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kagiya, Go; Ogawa, Ryohei; Hyodo, Fuminori; Yamashita, Kei; Nakamura, Mizuki; Ishii, Ayumi; Sejimo, Yukihiko; Tominaga, Shintaro; Murata, Masaharu; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Hatashita, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic regions within the tumor form due to imbalances between cell proliferation and angiogenesis; specifically, temporary closure or a reduced flow due to abnormal vasculature. They create environments where cancer cells acquire resistance to therapies. Therefore, the development of therapeutic approaches targeting the hypoxic cells is one of the most crucial challenges for cancer regression. Screening potential candidates for effective diagnostic modalities even under a hypoxic environment would be an important first step. In this study, we describe the development of a real-time imaging system to monitor hypoxic cell apoptosis for such screening. The imaging system is composed of a cyclic luciferase (luc) gene under the control of an improved hypoxic-responsive promoter. The cyclic luc gene product works as a caspase-3 (cas-3) monitor as it gains luc activity in response to cas-3 activation. The promoter composed of six hypoxic responsible elements and the CMV IE1 core promoter drives the effective expression of the cyclic luc gene in hypoxic conditions, enhancing hypoxic cell apoptosis visualization. We also confirmed real-time imaging of hypoxic cell apoptosis in the spheroid, which shares properties with the tumor. Thus, this constructed system could be a powerful tool for the development of effective anticancer diagnostic modalities. PMID:26966700

  3. Development of a real-time imaging system for hypoxic cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kagiya, Go; Ogawa, Ryohei; Hyodo, Fuminori; Yamashita, Kei; Nakamura, Mizuki; Ishii, Ayumi; Sejimo, Yukihiko; Tominaga, Shintaro; Murata, Masaharu; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Hatashita, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic regions within the tumor form due to imbalances between cell proliferation and angiogenesis; specifically, temporary closure or a reduced flow due to abnormal vasculature. They create environments where cancer cells acquire resistance to therapies. Therefore, the development of therapeutic approaches targeting the hypoxic cells is one of the most crucial challenges for cancer regression. Screening potential candidates for effective diagnostic modalities even under a hypoxic environment would be an important first step. In this study, we describe the development of a real-time imaging system to monitor hypoxic cell apoptosis for such screening. The imaging system is composed of a cyclic luciferase (luc) gene under the control of an improved hypoxic-responsive promoter. The cyclic luc gene product works as a caspase-3 (cas-3) monitor as it gains luc activity in response to cas-3 activation. The promoter composed of six hypoxic responsible elements and the CMV IE1 core promoter drives the effective expression of the cyclic luc gene in hypoxic conditions, enhancing hypoxic cell apoptosis visualization. We also confirmed real-time imaging of hypoxic cell apoptosis in the spheroid, which shares properties with the tumor. Thus, this constructed system could be a powerful tool for the development of effective anticancer diagnostic modalities. PMID:26966700

  4. Molecular enzymology of the reductive bioactivation of hypoxic cell cytotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, M.I.; Wolf, C.R.; Workman, P.

    1989-04-01

    The hypoxic cell cytotoxins SR 4233, benznidazole (Benzo), and CB 1954 were readily reduced by anaerobic mouse liver microsomes in vitro to their respective amino or single N-oxide derivatives. The reactions were inhibited in air and required reduced cofactors, particularly NADPH. The rates of reductive bioactivation were markedly different for each drug, with SR 4233 much greater than CB 1954 greater than Benzo. Using purified cytochrome P-450 reductase (P-450 reductase) and an inhibitory antibody to this enzyme, we demonstrated that P-450 reductase was involved in the reductive bioactivation of all 3 compounds. It had a minor role in SR 4233 reduction, but a more important involvement in CB 1954 metabolism to its 4-amino metabolite. Using carbon monoxide, a specific inhibitor of cytochrome P-450 (P-450), we demonstrated that P-450 was involved in both SR 4233 and Benzo reduction. P-450 had a major role both in SR 4233 conversion to SR 4317 and in the latter steps of Benzo amine formation. Purified xanthine oxidase was shown to reduce SR 4233 and Benzo in vitro, but cytosolic aldehyde oxidase activity was only detectable with Benzo as substrate. Characterizing the relative participation of the various reductases in tumor versus normal tissues may allow a more rational selection and application of hypoxic cell cytotoxins in cancer therapy.

  5. Microfluidic cell culture system with on-chip hypoxic conditioning.

    PubMed

    Takano, Atsushi; Tanaka, Masato; Futai, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated a portable microfluidic cell culture system with multi-gas (CO2 and O2) incubation which we can cultivate under hypoxia without bulky peripheral apparatus such as gas tanks, regulators, and flow controllers. The system contains a chip of 26 mm × 48 mm which is capable to diffuse CO2 and absorb O2 through a gas-permeable wall of nested media reservoir. The media was water-jacketed with aqueous solution containing 0.8 M sodium bicarbonate as CO2 supply and 1 M sodium ascorbate as oxygen scavenger. The partial CO2 pressure (pCO2) in media reservoir stabilized at least 10.2% ± 0.11% for at least 72 hours. The partial O2 pressure (pO2) in the media reservoir decreased to 4.2%. Portable on-chip hypoxic culture of SV40-T2 cells for 72 h was also demonstrated. PMID:24110727

  6. Reconstitution activity of hypoxic cultured human cord blood CD34-positive cells in NOG mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, Haruko; Takubo, Keiyo; Iwasaki, Hiroko; Yoshihara, Hiroki; Gomei, Yumiko; Hosokawa, Kentaro; Arai, Fumio; Takahashi, Takao; Suda, Toshio

    2009-01-16

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in hypoxic areas of the bone marrow. However, the role of hypoxia in the maintenance of HSCs has not been fully characterized. We performed xenotransplantation of human cord blood cells cultured in hypoxic or normoxic conditions into adult NOD/SCID/IL-2R{gamma}{sup null} (NOG) mice. Hypoxic culture (1% O{sub 2}) for 6 days efficiently supported the maintenance of HSCs, although cell proliferation was suppressed compared to the normoxic culture. In contrast, hypoxia did not affect in vitro colony-forming ability. Upregulation of a cell cycle inhibitor, p21, was observed in hypoxic culture. Immunohistochemical analysis of recipient bone marrow revealed that engrafted CD34{sup +}CD38{sup -} cord blood HSCs were hypoxic. Taken together, these results demonstrate the significance of hypoxia in the maintenance of quiescent human cord blood HSCs.

  7. Overcoming Hypoxic-Resistance of Tumor Cells to TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis through Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Lee, You-Jin; Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Park, Sang-Youel

    2014-01-01

    A solid tumor is often exposed to hypoxic or anoxic conditions; thus, tumor cell responses to hypoxia are important for tumor progression as well as tumor therapy. Our previous studies indicated that tumor cells are resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced cell apoptosis under hypoxic conditions. Melatonin inhibits cell proliferation in many cancer types and induces apoptosis in some particular cancer types. Here, we examined the effects of melatonin on hypoxic resistant cells against TRAIL-induced apoptosis and the possible mechanisms of melatonin in the hypoxic response. Melatonin treatment increased TRAIL-induced A549 cell death under hypoxic conditions, although hypoxia inhibited TRAIL-mediated cell apoptosis. In a mechanistic study, hypoxia inducible factor-1α and prolyl-hydroxylase 2 proteins, which increase following exposure to hypoxia, were dose-dependently down-regulated by melatonin treatment. Melatonin also blocked the hypoxic responses that reduced pro-apoptotic proteins and increased anti-apoptotic proteins including Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Furthermore, melatonin treatment reduced TRAIL resistance by regulating the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and Bax translocation. Our results first demonstrated that melatonin treatment induces apoptosis in TRAIL-resistant hypoxic tumor cells by diminishing the anti-apoptotic signals mediated by hypoxia and also suggest that melatonin could be a tumor therapeutic tool by combining with other apoptotic ligands including TRAIL, particularly in solid tumor cells exposed to hypoxia. PMID:25000265

  8. Overcoming hypoxic-resistance of tumor cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through melatonin.

    PubMed

    Lee, You-Jin; Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Park, Sang-Youel

    2014-07-04

    A solid tumor is often exposed to hypoxic or anoxic conditions; thus, tumor cell responses to hypoxia are important for tumor progression as well as tumor therapy. Our previous studies indicated that tumor cells are resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced cell apoptosis under hypoxic conditions. Melatonin inhibits cell proliferation in many cancer types and induces apoptosis in some particular cancer types. Here, we examined the effects of melatonin on hypoxic resistant cells against TRAIL-induced apoptosis and the possible mechanisms of melatonin in the hypoxic response. Melatonin treatment increased TRAIL-induced A549 cell death under hypoxic conditions, although hypoxia inhibited TRAIL-mediated cell apoptosis. In a mechanistic study, hypoxia inducible factor-1α and prolyl-hydroxylase 2 proteins, which increase following exposure to hypoxia, were dose-dependently down-regulated by melatonin treatment. Melatonin also blocked the hypoxic responses that reduced pro-apoptotic proteins and increased anti-apoptotic proteins including Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Furthermore, melatonin treatment reduced TRAIL resistance by regulating the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and Bax translocation. Our results first demonstrated that melatonin treatment induces apoptosis in TRAIL-resistant hypoxic tumor cells by diminishing the anti-apoptotic signals mediated by hypoxia and also suggest that melatonin could be a tumor therapeutic tool by combining with other apoptotic ligands including TRAIL, particularly in solid tumor cells exposed to hypoxia.

  9. Stem Cell Therapy for Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales-Portillo, Gabriel S.; Reyes, Stephanny; Aguirre, Daniela; Pabon, Mibel M.; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2014-01-01

    Treatments for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) have been limited. The aim of this paper is to offer translational research guidance on stem cell therapy for neonatal HIE by examining clinically relevant animal models, practical stem cell sources, safety and efficacy of endpoint assays, as well as a general understanding of modes of action of this cellular therapy. In order to do so, we discuss the clinical manifestations of HIE, highlighting its overlapping pathologies with stroke and providing insights on the potential of cell therapy currently investigated in stroke, for HIE. To this end, we draw guidance from recommendations outlined in stem cell therapeutics as an emerging paradigm for stroke or STEPS, which have been recently modified to Baby STEPS to cater for the “neonatal” symptoms of HIE. These guidelines recognized that neonatal HIE exhibit distinct disease symptoms from adult stroke in need of an innovative translational approach that facilitates the entry of cell therapy in the clinic. Finally, new information about recent clinical trials and insights into combination therapy are provided with the vision that stem cell therapy may benefit from available treatments, such as hypothermia, already being tested in children diagnosed with HIE. PMID:25161645

  10. Screening and identification of a specific peptide for targeting hypoxic hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiming; Xia, Xiangwen; Wang, Yong; Li, Xin; Zhou, Guofeng; Liang, Huiming; Feng, Gansheng; Zheng, Chuansheng

    2016-08-01

    The biological behaviors of residual hepatoma cells after transarterial embolization therapy, which exist in a hypoxic or even anaerobic tumor microenvironment, differ from the tumor cells under normoxic conditions. This study aimed to use a phage display peptide library for in vivo and in vitro screening to obtain a peptide which could specifically bind to hypoxic hepatoma cells, allowing further targeted diagnosis and treatment for liver cancer. In this study, hypoxic hepatoma cells HepG2 (targeted cells), and normal liver cells HL-7702 (control cells), were utilized to perform three rounds of in vitro screening using a phage-displayed 7-mer peptide library. In addition, hypoxic HepG2 were subcutaneously injected into nude mice to establish a hepatocarcinoma model, followed by performing three rounds of in vivo screening on the phages identified from the in vitro screening. The products from the screening were further identified using ELISA and immunofluorescence staining on cells and tissues. The results indicated that the P11 positive clone had the highest binding effect with hypoxic hepatoma cells. The sequence of the exogenous insert fragment of P11 positive clone was obtained by sequencing: GSTSFSK. The binding assay indicated that GSTSFSK could specifically bind to hypoxic hepatoma cells and hepatocarcinoma tissues. This 7-mer peptide has the potential to be developed as an useful molecular to the targeting diagnosis and treatment of residual hepatoma cells after transarterial chemoembolization. PMID:27381416

  11. Targeting tumor hypoxia: a third generation 2-nitroimidazole-indocyanine dye-conjugate with improved fluorescent yield.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feifei; Zanganeh, Saeid; Mohammad, Innus; Dietz, Christopher; Abuteen, Akram; Smith, Michael B; Zhu, Quing

    2015-12-14

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with the rapid proliferation and growth of malignant tumors, and the ability to detect tumor hypoxia is important for predicting tumor response to anti-cancer treatments. We have developed a class of dye-conjugates that are related to indocyanine green (ICG, ) to target tumor hypoxia, based on in vivo infrared fluorescence imaging using nitroimidazole moieties linked to indocyanine fluorescent dyes. We previously reported that linking 2-nitroimidazole to an indocyanine dicarboxylic acid dye derivative () using an ethanolamine linker (ethanolamine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG, ), led to a dye-conjugate that gave promising results for targeting cancer hypoxia in vivo. Structural modification of the dye conjugate replaced the ethanolamine unit with a piperazineacetyl unit and led a second generation dye conjugate, piperzine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG (). This second generation dye-conjugate showed improved targeting of tumor hypoxia when compared with . Based on the hypothesis that molecules with more planar and rigid structures have a higher fluorescence yield, as they could release less absorbed energy through molecular vibration or collision, we have developed a new 2-nitroimidazole ICG conjugate, , with two carbon atoms less in the polyene linker. Dye-conjugate was prepared from our new dye (), and coupled to 2-nitroimidazole using a piperazine linker to produce this third-generation dye-conjugate. Spectral measurements showed that the absorption/emission wavelengths of 657/670 were shifted ∼100 nm from the second-generation hypoxia dye of 755/780 nm. Its fluorescence quantum yield was measured to be 0.467, which is about 5 times higher than that of (0.083). In vivo experiments were conducted with balb/c mice and showed more than twice the average in vivo fluorescence intensity in the tumor beyond two hours post retro-orbital injection as compared with . These initial results suggest that may significantly improve in vivo tumor hypoxia targeting.

  12. Tolbutamide attenuates diazoxide-induced aggravation of hypoxic cell injury.

    PubMed

    Pissarek, M; Reichelt, C; Krauss, G J; Illes, P

    1998-11-23

    /ADP, GTP/GDP and UTP/UDP ratios uniformly declined at a low pO2. However, only the ATP/ADP ratio was decreased further by diazoxide (300 microM). The observed alterations in nucleotide contents may be of importance for long- and short-term processes related to acute cerebral hypoxia. Thus, hypoxia-induced alterations of purine and pyrimidine nucleotide levels may influence the open state of KATP-channels during the period of reversible hypoxic cerebral injury. Furthermore, alterations during the irreversible period of cerebral injury may also arise, as a consequence of decreased pyrimidine nucleotide contents affecting cell survival viaprotein and DNA synthesis.

  13. Selective enhancement of hypoxic cell killing by tempol-regulated suicide gene expression

    PubMed Central

    KAGIYA, GO; OGAWA, RYOHEI; CHOUDHURI, RAJANI; COOK, JOHN A; HATASHITA, MASANORI; TANAKA, YOSHIKAZU; KODA, KANA; YAMASHITA, KEI; KUBO, MAKOTO; KAWAKAMI, FUMITAKA; MITCHELL, JAMES B

    2015-01-01

    The presence of hypoxic regions within solid tumors is caused by an imbalance between cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Such regions may facilitate the onset of recurrence after radiation therapy and chemotherapy, as hypoxic cells show resistance to these treatments. We found that tempol, a nitroxide, strongly induces the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, particularly under conditions of hypoxia. We, therefore, evaluated whether tempol enhances the gene expression via HIF-1α, potentially leading to various applications for cancer gene therapy targeting hypoxic cells. Consequently, following treatment with tempol under hypoxia, the luciferase (Luc) activity in the cells transfected with the plasmid containing the luc gene with the oxygen-dependent degradation domain and a promoter composed of hypoxia-responsive elements increased up to approximately 10-fold compared to that observed in cells treated identically with the exception of tempol. The plasmid constructed by replacing the luc gene with the fcy::fur fusion gene as a suicide gene, strongly induced the accumulation of the Fcy::Fur fusion protein, only when incubated in the presence of the hypoxic mimic CoCl2 and tempol. The transfected cells were successfully killed with the addition of 5-fluorocytosine to the cell culture according to the fcy::fur fusion gene expression. As similar but lesser enhancement of the Luc activity was also observed in solid tumor tissues in nude mice, this strategy may be applied for hypoxic cancer eradication. PMID:26034980

  14. Selective enhancement of hypoxic cell killing by tempol-regulated suicide gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kagiya, Go; Ogawa, Ryohei; Choudhuri, Rajani; Cook, John A; Hatashita, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Koda, Kana; Yamashita, Kei; Kubo, Makoto; Kawakami, Fumitaka; Mitchell, James B

    2015-08-01

    The presence of hypoxic regions within solid tumors is caused by an imbalance between cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Such regions may facilitate the onset of recurrence after radiation therapy and chemotherapy, as hypoxic cells show resistance to these treatments. We found that tempol, a nitroxide, strongly induces the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, particularly under conditions of hypoxia. We, therefore, evaluated whether tempol enhances the gene expression via HIF-1α, potentially leading to various applications for cancer gene therapy targeting hypoxic cells. Consequently, following treatment with tempol under hypoxia, the luciferase (Luc) activity in the cells transfected with the plasmid containing the luc gene with the oxygen-dependent degradation domain and a promoter composed of hypoxia-responsive elements increased up to approximately 10-fold compared to that observed in cells treated identically with the exception of tempol. The plasmid constructed by replacing the luc gene with the fcy::fur fusion gene as a suicide gene, strongly induced the accumulation of the Fcy::Fur fusion protein, only when incubated in the presence of the hypoxic mimic CoCl2 and tempol. The transfected cells were successfully killed with the addition of 5-fluorocytosine to the cell culture according to the fcy::fur fusion gene expression. As similar but lesser enhancement of the Luc activity was also observed in solid tumor tissues in nude mice, this strategy may be applied for hypoxic cancer eradication. PMID:26034980

  15. Differential roles of hypoxia inducible factor subunits in multipotential stromal cells under hypoxic condition

    PubMed Central

    Tamama, Kenichi; Kawasaki, Haruhisa; Kerpedjieva, Svetoslava S.; Guan, Jianjun; Ganju, Ramesh K.; Sen, Chandan K.

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy with bone marrow multipotential stromal cells (MSCs) represents a promising approach to promote wound healing and tissue regeneration. MSCs expanded in vitro lose early progenitors with differentiation and therapeutic potentials under normoxic condition, whereas hypoxic condition promotes MSC self-renewal through preserving colony forming early progenitors and maintaining undifferentiated phenotypes. Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway is a crucial signaling pathway activated in hypoxic condition. We evaluated the roles of HIFs in MSC differentiation, colony formation, and paracrine activity under hypoxic condition. Hypoxic condition reversibly decreased osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Decrease of osteogenic differentiation depended on HIF pathway; whereas decrease of adipogenic differentiation depended on the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR), but not HIFs. Hypoxia-mediated increase of MSC colony formation was not HIF-dependent also. Hypoxic exposure increased secretion of VEGF, HGF and basic FGF in a HIF-dependent manner. These findings suggest that HIF has a limited, but pivotal role in enhancing MSC self-renewal and growth factor secretions under hypoxic condition. PMID:21328454

  16. Hypoxic preconditioning involves system Xc- regulation in mouse neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sims, Brian; Clarke, Melinda; Francillion, Ludwig; Kindred, Elijah; Hopkins, Elana Shuford; Sontheimer, Harald

    2012-03-01

    In animals, hypoxic preconditioning has been used as a form of neuroprotection. The exact mechanism involved in neuroprotective hypoxic preconditioning has not been described, yet could be valuable for possible neuroprotective strategies. The overexpression of the cystine-glutamate exchanger, system Xc-, has been demonstrated as being neuroprotective (Shih, Erb et al. 2006). Here, using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrate that C57BL/6 mice exposed to hypoxia showed an increase in system Xc- expression, with the highest level of intensity in the hippocampus. Western Blot analysis also showed an almost 2-fold increase in system Xc- protein in hypoxia-exposed versus control mice. The mRNA for the regulatory subunit of system Xc-, xCT, and the xCT/actin ratio were also increased under hypoxic conditions. Experiments using hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α) siRNA showed a statistically significant decrease in HIF-1α and system Xc- expression. Under hypoxic conditions, system Xc- activity, as determined by cystine uptake, increased 2-fold. Importantly, hypoxic preconditioning was attenuated in neural stem cells by pharmacological inhibition of system Xc- activity with S4-carboxyphenylglycine. These data provide the first evidence of hypoxic regulation of the cystine glutamate exchanger system Xc-.

  17. Misonidazole and MTDQ in combination: cytotoxic and radiosensitizing properties in hypoxic mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Astor, M.; Hall, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    A combination of misonidazole and MTDQ (6,6'-methylene-bis-2,2,4 trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline) has been tested for its radiation-sensitizing properties and cytotoxicity, using Chinese hamster V79 cells cultured in vitro. Both compounds sensitize hypoxic cells to the effects of X-rays, and when used in combination their sensitizing properties are additive. By contrast, the presence of MTDQ completely inhibits the cytotoxicity that misonidazole exhibits towards hypoxic cells. These experiments shed some light on the mechanism of action of electron-affinic hypoxic cell sensitizers, and the combination of radiosensitizers suggested may have an application in human cancer radiotherapy by eliminating the neurotoxicity experienced by patients receiving misonidazole during radiotherapy. PMID:486306

  18. Keynote address: cellular reduction of nitroimidazole drugs: potential for selective chemotherapy and diagnosis of hypoxic cells.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J D; Lee, J; Meeker, B E

    1989-04-01

    Nitroimidazole drugs were initially developed as selective radiosensitizers of hypoxic cells and, consequently, as adjuvants to improve the local control probabilities of current radiotherapies. Misonidazole (MISO), the prototype radiosensitizing drug, was found in Phase I clinical studies to cause dose-limiting neurotoxicities (mainly peripheral neuropathies). MISO was also found to be cytotoxic in the absence of radiation and to covalently bind to cellular molecules, both processes demonstrating rates much higher in hypoxic compared with oxygenated cells. It is likely that neurotoxicity, cellular cytotoxicity and adduct formation results from reactions between reduction intermediates of MISO and cellular target molecules. Spin-offs from radiosensitizer research include the synthesis and characterization of more potent hypoxic cytotoxins and the exploitation of sensitizer-adducts as probes for measuring cellular and tissue oxygen levels. Current developments in hypoxic cell cytotoxin and hypoxic cell marker research are reviewed with specific examples from studies which characterize the cellular reduction of TF-MISO, (1-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)-3[2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy]-2-propanol).

  19. Hypoxic stress up-regulates Kir2.1 expression and facilitates cell proliferation in brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Hideto; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hisao; Asai, Kiyofumi; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is mainly composed of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs), astrocytes and pericytes. Brain ischemia causes hypoxic encephalopathy and damages BBB. However, it remains still unclear how hypoxia affects BCECs. In the present study, t-BBEC117 cells, an immortalized bovine brain endothelial cell line, were cultured under hypoxic conditions at 4-5% oxygen for 72 h. This hypoxic stress caused hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential. Patch-clamp recordings revealed a marked increase in Ba(2+)-sensitive inward rectifier K(+) current in t-BBEC117 cells after hypoxic culture. Western blot and real-time PCR analyses showed that Kir2.1 expression was significantly up-regulated at protein level but not at mRNA level after the hypoxic culture. Ca(2+) imaging study revealed that the hypoxic stress enhanced store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) entry, which was significantly reduced in the presence of 100 μM Ba(2+). On the other hand, the expression of SOC channels such as Orai1, Orai2, and transient receptor potential channels was not affected by hypoxic stress. MTT assay showed that the hypoxic stress significantly enhanced t-BBEC117 cell proliferation, which was inhibited by approximately 60% in the presence of 100 μM Ba(2+). We first show here that moderate cellular stress by cultivation under hypoxic conditions hyperpolarizes membrane potential via the up-regulation of functional Kir2.1 expression and presumably enhances Ca(2+) entry, resulting in the facilitation of BCEC proliferation. These findings suggest potential roles of Kir2.1 expression in functional changes of BCECs in BBB following ischemia. PMID:27235552

  20. Cytosine Deaminase/5-Fluorocytosine Exposure Induces Bystander and Radiosensitization Effects in Hypoxic Glioblastoma Cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jennifer K.; Hu, Lily J.; Wang Dongfang; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Deen, Dennis F. . E-mail: dennisdeen@juno.com

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) is limited by therapeutic ratio; therefore, successful therapy must be specifically cytotoxic to cancer cells. Hypoxic cells are ubiquitous in GBM, and resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and, thus, are logical targets for gene therapy. In this study, we investigated whether cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) enzyme/prodrug treatment induced a bystander effect (BE) and/or radiosensitization in hypoxic GBM cells. Methods and Materials: We stably transfected cells with a gene construct consisting of the SV40 minimal promoter, nine copies of a hypoxia-responsive element, and the yeast CD gene. During hypoxia, a hypoxia-responsive element regulates expression of the CD gene and facilitates the conversion of 5-FC to 5-fluorouracil, a highly toxic antimetabolite. We used colony-forming efficiency (CFE) and immunofluorescence assays to assess for BE in co-cultures of CD-expressing clone cells and parent, pNeo- or green fluorescent protein-stably transfected GBM cells. We also investigated the radiosensitivity of CD clone cells treated with 5-FC under hypoxic conditions, and we used flow cytometry to investigate treatment-induced cell cycle changes. Results: Both a large BE and radiosensitization occurred in GBM cells under hypoxic conditions. The magnitude of the BE depended on the number of transfected cells producing CD, the functionality of the CD, the administered concentration of 5-FC, and the sensitivity of cell type to 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: Hypoxia-inducible CD/5-FC therapy in combination with radiation therapy shows both a pronounced BE and a radiosensitizing effect under hypoxic conditions.

  1. Resistance of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation is influenced by homologous recombination status

    SciTech Connect

    Sprong, Debbie; Janssen, Hilde L.; Vens, Conchita; Begg, Adrian C. . E-mail: a.begg@nki.nl

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of DNA repair in hypoxic radioresistance. Methods and Materials: Chinese hamster cell lines with mutations in homologous recombination (XRCC2, XRCC3, BRAC2, RAD51C) or nonhomologous end-joining (DNA-PKcs) genes were irradiated under normoxic (20% oxygen) and hypoxic (<0.1% oxygen) conditions, and the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was calculated. In addition, Fanconi anemia fibroblasts (complementation groups C and G) were compared with fibroblasts from nonsyndrome patients. RAD51 foci were studied using immunofluorescence. Results: All hamster cell lines deficient in homologous recombination showed a decrease in OER (1.5-2.0 vs. 2.6-3.0 for wild-types). In contrast, the OER for the DNA-PKcs-deficient line was comparable to wild-type controls. The two Fanconi anemia cell strains also showed a significant reduction in OER. The OER for RAD51 foci formation at late times after irradiation was considerably lower than that for survival in wild-type cells. Conclusion: Homologous recombination plays an important role in determining hypoxic cell radiosensitivity. Lower OERs have also been reported in cells deficient in XPF and ERCC1, which, similar to homologous recombination genes, are known to play a role in cross-link repair. Because Fanconi anemia cells are also sensitive to cross-linking agents, this strengthens the notion that the capacity to repair cross-links determines hypoxic radiosensitivity.

  2. ADVANCES IN THE CELL-BASED TREATMENT OF NEONATAL HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC BRAIN INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Pabon, Mibel M.; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapy for adult stroke has reached limited clinical trials. Here, we provide translational research guidance on stem cell therapy for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury requiring a careful consideration of clinically relevant animal models, feasible stem cell sources, and validated safety and efficacy endpoint assays, as well as a general understanding of modes of action of this cellular therapy. To this end, we refer to existing translational guidelines, in particular the recommendations outlined in the consortium of academicians, industry partners and regulators called Stem cell Therapeutics as an Emerging Paradigm for Stroke or STEPS. Although the STEPS guidelines are directed at enhancing the successful outcome of cell therapy in adult stroke, we highlight overlapping pathologies between adult stroke and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. We are, however, cognizant that the neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury displays disease symptoms distinct from adult stroke in need of an innovative translational approach that facilitates the entry of cell therapy in the clinic. Finally, insights into combination therapy are provided with the vision that stem cell therapy may benefit from available treatments, such as hypothermia, already being tested in children diagnosed with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. PMID:23565051

  3. Global Profiling of Metabolic Adaptation to Hypoxic Stress in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kucharzewska, Paulina; Christianson, Helena C.; Belting, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenetic events and unique phenomena of the tumor microenvironment together induce adaptive metabolic responses that may offer new diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets of cancer. Hypoxia, or low oxygen tension, represents a well-established and universal feature of the tumor microenvironment and has been linked to increased tumor aggressiveness as well as resistance to conventional oncological treatments. Previous studies have provided important insights into hypoxia induced changes of the transcriptome and proteome; however, how this translates into changes at the metabolite level remains to be defined. Here, we have investigated dynamic, time-dependent effects of hypoxia on the cancer cell metabolome across all families of macromolecules, i.e., carbohydrate, protein, lipid and nucleic acid, in human glioblastoma cells. Using GC/MS and LC/MS/MS, 345 and 126 metabolites were identified and quantified in cells and corresponding media, respectively, at short (6 h), intermediate (24 h), and prolonged (48 h) incubation at normoxic or hypoxic (1% O2) conditions. In conjunction, we performed gene array studies with hypoxic and normoxic cells following short and prolonged incubation. We found that levels of several key metabolites varied with the duration of hypoxic stress. In some cases, metabolic changes corresponded with hypoxic regulation of key pathways at the transcriptional level. Our results provide new insights into the metabolic response of glioblastoma cells to hypoxia, which should stimulate further work aimed at targeting cancer cell adaptive mechanisms to microenvironmental stress. PMID:25633823

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition attenuates hypoxic cancer cells induced m2-polarization of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dubey, P; Shrivastava, R; Tripathi, C; Jain, N K; Tewari, B N; Lone, M-U-D; Baghel, K S; Kumar, V; Misra, S; Bhadauria, S; Bhatt, M L B

    2014-09-12

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), represent a major subpopulation of tumor infiltrating immune cells. These alternatively activated M2-polarized macrophages are well known for their pro-tumor functions. Owing to their established role in potentiating tumor-neovasculogenesis and metastasis, TAMs have emerged as promising target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. One of the key TAMs related phenomenon that is amenable to therapeutic intervention is their phenotype switching into alternatively activated M2-polarized macrophages. Hindering macrophage polarization towards a pro-tumor M2 phenotype, or better still reprogramming the M2 like TAMs towards M1 subtype is being considered a beneficial anti-cancer strategy. Hypoxic tumor milieu has been proposed as one of the most plausible factor governing M2-polarization of macrophages. We recently demonstrated that hypoxic tumor cells imparted a pro—angiogenic M2 skewed phenotype to macrophages. Furthermore, sizeable body of data indicates for participation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in macrophage polarization. Concordantly, inhibition of COX-2 is associated with impaired macrophage polarization. Prompted by this in the current study we decided to explore if inhibition of COX-2 activity via chemical inhibitors may prevent hypoxic cancer cell induced M2-polarization of macrophages. We observed that treatment with Flunixin meglumine, an established preferential inhibitor of COX-2 activity markedly inhibited hypoxic cancer cell induced of M2-polarization of macrophages thereby indicating for usage of COX-2 inhibition as possible anti-cancer treatment modality.

  5. Quantitative measurement of redox potential in hypoxic cells using SERS nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jing; Auchinvole, Craig; Fisher, Kate; Campbell, Colin J.

    2014-09-01

    Hypoxia is considered to be a reductive disorder of cells that is caused either by a lack of oxygen or by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways and is thought to play a role in the pathology of diseases including stroke and cancer. One aspect of hypoxia that remains poorly investigated is the dysregulation of cellular redox potential and its role in controlling biological pathway activation. Since there is currently no way of quantitatively measuring the intracellular redox potential of hypoxic cells, this provided us with the motivation to develop optical nanosensors whose Surface-Enhanced Raman (SER) spectrum provides a quantitative measure of redox potential in hypoxic cells. Our nanosensors are made from organic reporter molecules that show oxidation-state-dependent changes in the Raman spectrum and are chemically adsorbed onto gold nanoshells. These nanosensors can be taken up by cells, and by collecting the SER spectrum we can calculate the localised intracellular redox potential from single hypoxic cells in a non-invasive, reversible way.Hypoxia is considered to be a reductive disorder of cells that is caused either by a lack of oxygen or by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways and is thought to play a role in the pathology of diseases including stroke and cancer. One aspect of hypoxia that remains poorly investigated is the dysregulation of cellular redox potential and its role in controlling biological pathway activation. Since there is currently no way of quantitatively measuring the intracellular redox potential of hypoxic cells, this provided us with the motivation to develop optical nanosensors whose Surface-Enhanced Raman (SER) spectrum provides a quantitative measure of redox potential in hypoxic cells. Our nanosensors are made from organic reporter molecules that show oxidation-state-dependent changes in the Raman spectrum and are chemically adsorbed onto gold nanoshells. These nanosensors can be taken up by cells, and by collecting the SER

  6. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Should Be Combined With a Hypoxic Cell Radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. Martin; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of tumor hypoxia on the expected level of cell killing by regimens of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and to determine the extent to which the negative effect of hypoxia could be prevented using a clinically available hypoxic cell radiosensitizer. Results and Discussion: We have calculated the expected level of tumor cell killing from regimens of SABR, both with and without the assumption that 20% of the tumor cells are hypoxic, using the standard linear quadratic model and the universal survival curve modification. We compare the results obtained with our own clinical data for lung tumors of different sizes and with published data from other studies. We also have calculated the expected effect on cell survival of adding the hypoxic cell sensitizer etanidazole at clinically achievable drug concentrations. Modeling tumor cell killing with any of the currently used regimens of SABR produces results that are inconsistent with the majority of clinical findings if tumor hypoxia is not considered. However, with the assumption of tumor hypoxia, the expected level of cell killing is consistent with clinical data. For only some of the smallest tumors are the clinical data consistent with no tumor hypoxia, but there could be other reasons for the sensitivity of these tumors. The addition of etanidazole at clinically achievable tumor concentrations produces a large increase in the expected level of tumor cell killing from the large radiation doses used in SABR. Conclusions: The presence of tumor hypoxia is a major negative factor in limiting the curability of tumors by SABR at radiation doses that are tolerable to surrounding normal tissues. However, this negative effect of hypoxia could be overcome by the addition of clinically tolerable doses of the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer etanidazole.

  7. Bone marrow long label-retaining cells reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic niche

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Yoshiaki; Takubo, Keiyo; Suda, Toshio

    2008-02-08

    In response to changing signals, quiescent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be induced to an activated cycling state and provide multi-lineage hematopoietic cells to the whole body via blood vessels. However, the precise localization of quiescent HSCs in bone marrow microenvironment is not fully characterized. Here, we performed whole-mount immunostaining of bone marrow and found that BrdU label-retaining cells (LRCs) definitively reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic zone distant from the 'vascular niche'. Although LRCs expressed very low level of a well-known HSC marker, c-kit in normal circumstances, myeloablation by 5-FU treatment caused LRCs to abundantly express c-kit and proliferate actively. These results demonstrate that bone marrow LRCs reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic niche, and function as a regenerative cell pool of HSCs.

  8. Downregulation of metabolic activity increases cell survival under hypoxic conditions: potential applications for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehyun; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Jackson, John D; Lee, Sang Jin; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2014-08-01

    A major challenge to the success of cell-based implants for tissue regeneration is an insufficient supply of oxygen before host vasculature is integrated into the implants, resulting in premature cell death and dysfunction. Whereas increasing oxygenation to the implants has been a major focus in the field, our strategy is aimed at lowering oxygen consumption by downregulating cellular metabolism of cell-based implants. Adenosine, which is a purine nucleoside that functions as an energy transferring molecule, has been reported to increase under hypoxia, resulting in reducing the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) demands of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase. In the present study, we investigated whether adenosine could be used to downregulate cellular metabolism to achieve prolonged survival under hypoxic conditions. Murine myoblasts (C2C12) lacking a self-survival mechanism were treated with adenosine under 0.1% hypoxic stress. The cells, cultured in the presence of 5 mM adenosine, maintained their viability under hypoxia, and regained their normal growth and function of forming myotubes when transferred to normoxic conditions at day 11 without further supply of adenosine, whereas nontreated cells failed to survive. An increase in adenosine concentrations shortened the onset of reproliferation after transfer to normoxic conditions. This increase correlated with an increase in metabolic downregulation during the early phase of hypoxia. A higher intracellular ATP level was observed in adenosine-treated cells throughout the duration of hypoxia. This strategy of increasing cell survival under hypoxic conditions through downregulating cellular metabolism may be utilized for cell-based tissue regeneration applications as well as protecting tissues against hypoxic injuries.

  9. Synthesis of a fluorine-18 labeled hypoxic cell sensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Jerabek, P.A.; Dischino, D.D.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Welch, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this work was to synthesize a positron emitting radiosensitizing agent as a potential in vivo marker of hypoxic regions within tumors, and ischemic areas of the heart and brain. The method involved radiochemical synthesis of fluorine-18 labeled 1-(2-nitro-imidazolyl)-3-fluoro-2-propanol via nucleophilic ring opening of 1-(2,3-epoxypropyl)2-nitro-imidzole by fluorine-18 labeled tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF). Fluroine-18 TBAF was prepared by the exchange reaction of TBAF with aqueous flourine-18 produced by proton bombardment of enriched oxygen-18 water. The aqueous solution was evaporated carefully by azeotropic distillation with acetonitrile. The fluorine-18 labeled TBAF was taken up in N,N-dimethylacetamide or dimethysulfoxide, then reacted with the episode at 60C for 30 minutes. Separation and identification of the fluorine-18 labeled products by high performance liquid chromatography showed a radioactive peak with a retention time identical to that of 1-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)-3-fluoro-2-propanol and a second radioactive peak with a retention time three minutes longer in addition to unreacted fluorine-18 labeled TBAF. The second radioactive peak may represent fluorine-18 labeled 1-2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)-2-fluoro-3-propanol. The average radiochemical yield from reactions run in N,N-dimethylacetamide using 20 micromoles of TBAF and 1-2 mg of the epoxide was l7% in a synthesis time of about 40 minutes. The synthesis of fluorohydrins by the reaction of fluorine-18 labeled TBAF on epoxides represents a new method for the preparation of fluorine-18 labeled fluorohydrins.

  10. DT-diaphorase protects cells from the hypoxic cytotoxicity of indoloquinone EO9.

    PubMed Central

    Plumb, J. A.; Gerritsen, M.; Workman, P.

    1994-01-01

    Aerobic sensitivity to indoloquinone EO9 has been shown to correlate with cellular levels of the two-electron reducing enzyme DT-diaphorase. However, little is known about the relative roles of one- and two-electron reducing enzymes in the hypoxic cytotoxicity of EO9. We have characterised a panel of 23 human tumour cell lines for both bioreductive enzyme activities and aerobic sensitivity to EO9. Eight cell lines were then selected for a comparison of aerobic and hypoxic sensitivities. Activities of DT-diaphorase showed a wide range (> 10,000-fold), while activities of the one-electron reducing cytochrome b5 and cytochrome P450 reductases were generally lower and showed only a 15- and 25-fold range respectively. The aerobic cytotoxicity of EO9 was clearly related to the cellular levels of DT-diaphorase (r = 0.87), with higher levels giving increased sensitivity, but not to the levels of one-electron reducing enzymes. In contrast, there was no relationship between sensitivity to BCNU, cisplatin or the bioreductive agent SR 4233 (tirapazamine) and activities of any of these reducing enzymes. Under hypoxic conditions sensitivity to EO9 was markedly increased in cell lines with low levels of DT-diaphorase activity, while cell lines with high levels show only a small increase in sensitivity. This is reflected by a clear correlation (r = 0.98) between cellular DT-diaphorase activity and the ratio of aerobic to hypoxic sensitivity to EO9. However, we have now for the first time demonstrated an inverse correlation (r = 0.93) between the cellular activity of DT-diaphorase and hypoxic sensitivity to EO9, that is sensitivity decreases with increasing DT-diaphorase activity. Moreover, this correlation was lost when cells were exposed to drug in the presence of dicoumarol, supporting an involvement of DT-diaphorase in this relationship. These observations question the previously straightforward role for DT-diaphorase in the metabolic activation of EO9. Whereas DT-diaphorase is

  11. Transcriptomic changes in human renal proximal tubular cells revealed under hypoxic conditions by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenmin; Li, Yiping; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Lei; Liu, Jing; Ding, Fengan; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Cheng, Zhengyuan; Chen, Pingsheng; Dou, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Chronic hypoxia often occurs among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Renal proximal tubular cells may be the primary target of a hypoxic insult. However, the underlying transcriptional mechanisms remain undefined. In this study, we revealed the global changes in gene expression in HK‑2 human renal proximal tubular cells under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. We analyzed the transcriptome of HK‑2 cells exposed to hypoxia for 24 h using RNA sequencing. A total of 279 differentially expressed genes was examined, as these genes could potentially explain the differences in HK‑2 cells between hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Moreover, 17 genes were validated by qPCR, and the results were highly concordant with the RNA seqencing results. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analyses were performed to better understand the functions of these differentially expressed genes. The upregulated genes appeared to be significantly enriched in the pathyway of extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction, and in paticular, the pathway of renal cell carcinoma was upregulated under hypoxic conditions. The downregulated genes were enriched in the signaling pathway related to antigen processing and presentation; however, the pathway of glutathione metabolism was downregulated. Our analysis revealed numerous novel transcripts and alternative splicing events. Simultaneously, we also identified a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms, which will be a rich resource for future marker development. On the whole, our data indicate that transcriptome analysis provides valuable information for a more in depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms in CKD and renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27432315

  12. An Argonaute 2 Switch Regulates Circulating miR-210 to Coordinate Hypoxic Adaptation across Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Andrew; Lee, Changjin; Annis, Sofia; Min, Pil-Ki; Pande, Reena; Creager, Mark A.; Julian, Colleen G.; Moore, Lorna G.; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Hwang, Sarah J.; Kourembanas, Stella; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2014-01-01

    Complex organisms may coordinate molecular responses to hypoxia by specialized avenues of communication across multiple tissues, but these mechanisms are poorly understood. Plasma-based, extracellular microRNAs have been described, yet, their regulation and biological functions in hypoxia remain enigmatic. We found a unique pattern of release of the hypoxia-inducible microRNA-210 (miR-210) from hypoxic and reoxygenated cells. This microRNA is also elevated in human plasma in physiologic and pathologic conditions of altered oxygen demand and delivery. Released miR-210 can be delivered to recipient cells, and its direct suppression of its direct target ISCU and mitochondrial metabolism is primarily evident in hypoxia. To regulate these hypoxia-specific actions, prolyl-hydroxylation of Argonaute 2 acts as a molecular switch that reciprocally modulates miR-210 release and intracellular activity in source cells as well as regulates intracellular activity in recipient cells after miR-210 delivery. Therefore, Argonaute 2-dependent control of released miR-210 represents a unique communication system that integrates the hypoxic response across anatomically distinct cells, preventing unnecessary activity of delivered miR-210 in normoxia while still preparing recipient tissues for incipient hypoxic stress and accelerating adaptation. PMID:24983771

  13. Clinical results of hypoxic cell radiosensitisation from hyperbaric oxygen to accelerated radiotherapy, carbogen and nicotinamide.

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, M.; Dische, S.

    1996-01-01

    The 40-year history of hypoxic cell sensitisation can be traced from hyperbaric oxygen to the present clinical studies with carbogen, nicotinamide and accelerated radiotherapy. A meta-analysis by Overgaard (1995) included 10703 cases entered into 83 randomised controlled trials and showed an overall improvement in local tumour control of 4.6% (P = 0.00001) and in survival of 2.8% (P = 0.005). Hyperbaric oxygen gave a 6.6% (P = 0.003) improvement in local control and hypoxic cell sensitisers 3.9% (P = 0.04). Despite this, the only hypoxic cell-sensitising method in routine clinical use is the giving of nimorazole in supraglottic and pharyngeal carcinomas. Acute, as well as chronic hypoxia has been recognised and nicotinamide, the amide derivative of B3 is believed to prevent the former. Thus ARCON (accelerated radiotherapy, carbogen and nicotinamide) has been introduced in the clinic in an effort to overcome tumour proliferation, chronic and acute hypoxia, respectively. The success of future randomised controlled trials would be improved greatly if methods were available to measure the concentration of hypoxic cells in tumours before treatment and thus select those where benefit may be gained. The use of ARCON recognises that tumour cell proliferation is an important cause of failure in addition to hypoxia. However, intrinsic radiosensitivity may also need to be taken into account in the future. Clinical trials aim to improve the therapeutic ratio and thus the study of morbidity is as important as local tumour control. International collaboration is essential if randomised controlled trials are to be carried out within reasonable periods of time. PMID:8763896

  14. Opiorphin is a master regulator of the hypoxic response in corporal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shibo; Tar, Moses Tarndie; Melman, Arnold; Davies, Kelvin Paul

    2014-01-01

    Men with sickle cell disease (SCD) risk developing priapism. Recognizing that SCD is a disease of hypoxia, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on gene expression in corporal smooth muscle (CSM) cells. Rat CSM cells in vitro were treated with CoCl2 or low oxygen tension to mimic hypoxia. Hypoxic conditions increased expression of genes previously associated with priapism in animal models. Variable coding sequence a1 (Vcsa1; the rat opiorphin homologue, sialorphin), hypoxia-inducible factor 1a (Hif-1a), and A2B adenosine receptor (a2br) were increased by 10-, 4-, and 6-fold, respectively, by treatment with CoCl2, whereas low oxygen tension caused increases in expression of 3-, 4-, and 1.5-fold, respectively. Sialorphin-treated CSM cells increased expression of Hif-1a and a2br by 4-fold, and vcsa1-siRNA treatment reduced expression by ∼50%. Using a Hif-1a inhibitor, we demonstrated up-regulation of a2br by sialorphin is dependent on Hif-1a, and knockdown of vcsa1 expression with vcsa1-siRNA demonstrated that hypoxic-up-regulation of Hif-1a is dependent on vcsa1. In CSM from a SCD mouse, there was 15-fold up-regulation of opiorphin at a life stage prior to priapism. We conclude that in CSM, opiorphins are master regulators of the hypoxic response. Opiorphin up-regulation in response to SCD-associated hypoxia activates CSM “relaxant” pathways; excessive activation of these pathways results in priapism.—Fu, S., Tar, M. T., Melman, A., Davies, K. P. Opiorphin is a master regulator of the hypoxic response in corporal smooth muscle cells. PMID:24803544

  15. Interaction of caveolin-1, nitric oxide, and nitric oxide synthases in hypoxic human SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiangang; Lee, Waisin; Li, Yue; Lau, Chi Fai; Ng, Kwong Man; Fung, Man Lung; Liu, Ke Jian

    2008-10-01

    Neuroblastoma cells are capable of hypoxic adaptation, but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 (cav-1), a plasma membrane signal molecule, might play a role in protecting neuroblastoma cells from oxidative injury by modulating nitric oxide (NO) production. We investigated the alterations of cav-1, cav-2, nitric oxide synthases (NOS), and NO levels in human SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells exposed to hypoxia with 2% [O2]. The major discoveries include: (i) cav-1 but not cav-2 was up-regulated in the cells exposed to 15 h of hypoxia; (ii) NO donor 1-[N, N-di-(2-aminoethyl) amino] diazen-1-ium-1, 2-diolate up-regulated the expression of cav-1, whereas the non-selective NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitor 1400W each abolished the increase in cav-1 expression in the hypoxic SK-N-MC cells. These results suggest that iNOS-induced NO production contributes to the up-regulation of cav-1 in the hypoxic SK-N-MC cells. Furthermore, we studied the roles played by cav-1 in regulating NO, NOS, and apoptotic cell death in the SK-N-MC cells subjected to 15 h of hypoxic treatment. Both cav-1 transfection and cav-1 scaffolding domain peptide abolished the induction of iNOS, reduced the production of NO, and reduced the rates of apoptotic cell death in the hypoxic SK-N-MC cells. These results suggest that increased expression of cav-1 in response to hypoxic stimulation could prevent oxidative injury induced by reactive oxygen species. The interactions of cav-1, NO, and NOS could be an important signal pathway in protecting the neuroblastoma cells from oxidative injury, contributing to the hypoxic tolerance of neuroblastoma cells. PMID:18717816

  16. G-CSF and hypoxic conditioning improve the proliferation, neural differentiation and migration of canine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Liu, Xing-Long; Cheng, Qi-Guang; Lu, Shan-Shan; Xu, Xiao-Quan; Zu, Qing-Quan; Liu, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) is emerging as a potential regenerative therapy after ischemic attacks in the brain. However, it has been questioned because very few transplanted BMSCs are detected homing to and survived in the ischemic region. Improving the cell viability and migration ability under the complex ischemic condition seems very important. The aim of our study is to identify whether hypoxic condition and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) could improve the cell survival and migration ability of transplanted cells or hypoxic condition could promote BMSC's neural differentiation. BMSCs were treated under either normoxic (21% O2) or hypoxic (1% O2) (HP-BMSCs) conditions, no significant apoptosis was observed in hypoxic precondition (HP) group, our study confirmed that HP improves BMSCs proliferation and migration. Meanwhile, neural induction of BMSCs under hypoxic condition exhibited significant superior results than normoxic condition. Additionally, the addition of G-CSF in HP-BMSCs culture media promoted HP efficiency on BMSCs. These findings shed light on novel efficient strategy on the prosperity of BMSCs. Hypoxic preconditioning and cultured with G-CSF may become a promising therapeutics for cell-based therapy in the treatments of ischemia stroke. PMID:27588100

  17. Hypoxic stellate cells of pancreatic cancer stroma regulate extracellular matrix fiber organization and cancer cell motility.

    PubMed

    Sada, Masafumi; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Horioka, Kohei; Okumura, Takashi; Moriyama, Taiki; Miyasaka, Yoshihiro; Ohtsuka, Takao; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Oda, Yoshinao; Nakamura, Masafumi

    2016-03-28

    Desmoplasia and hypoxia in pancreatic cancer mutually affect each other and create a tumor-supportive microenvironment. Here, we show that microenvironment remodeling by hypoxic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promotes cancer cell motility through alteration of extracellular matrix (ECM) fiber architecture. Three-dimensional (3-D) matrices derived from PSCs under hypoxia exhibited highly organized parallel-patterned matrix fibers compared with 3-D matrices derived from PSCs under normoxia, and promoted cancer cell motility by inducing directional migration of cancer cells due to the parallel fiber architecture. Microarray analysis revealed that procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase 2 (PLOD2) in PSCs was the gene that potentially regulates ECM fiber architecture under hypoxia. Stromal PLOD2 expression in surgical specimens of pancreatic cancer was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of PLOD2 in PSCs blocked parallel fiber architecture of 3-D matrices, leading to decreased directional migration of cancer cells within the matrices. In conclusion, these findings indicate that hypoxia-induced PLOD2 expression in PSCs creates a permissive microenvironment for migration of cancer cells through architectural regulation of stromal ECM in pancreatic cancer.

  18. The inhibitory effect of hypoxic cytotoxin on the expansion of cancer stem cells in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Suzuki, Noriko; Nagasawa, Hideko; Ohnishi, Ken; Morishige, Ken-Ichirou

    2015-02-20

    While an increase in progression free survival time is seen when an angiogenesis inhibitor is used in the treatment of high-relapse rate ovarian cancer, it has little effect on overall survival. A possible cause of treatment-resistance to angiogenesis inhibitors is the growth of stem cells in a hypoxic microenvironment built inside the tumor tissue by angiogenesis inhibition. In this study, we examined the possible suppression of stem cell and cancer stem cell (CSC) expansion by hypoxic cytotoxin, TX-402. TX-402, an analogue of tirapazamine, has been developed as a hypoxia selective prodrug with inhibitory effects of HIF-1 and angiogenesis. We considered TX-402 as a possible molecular-target drug candidate for ovarian cancer due to its inhibition of CSC expansion. In this study, we found that the expressions of HIF-1α and HIF-2α were increased under hypoxia in serous ovarian cancer cell lines. The expressions of HIF-1α and HIF-2α induced under hypoxia were repressed by TX-402 in a dose-dependent manner. Next, we investigated the effects of hypoxia on the expression levels of stem cell factors, Oct4, Nanog, Sox2 and Lin28, and showed that their expressions were induced by hypoxia. It was also observed that the expressions of putative ovarian cancer stem cell markers, CD133 and CD44 were induced under hypoxia. Furthermore, TX-402 was found to dose-dependently inhibit the expressions of CSC markers and stem cell factors. Oct4 expression was repressed by HIF-2α silencing, but not by HIF-1α silencing, indicating that TX-402 may repress the expression of Oct4 by inhibiting HIF-2α. We constructed CaOV3 spheroids as a 3-dimensional hypoxia model, in which the internal hypoxic region contained CSC-like cells expressing Oct4. The internal hypoxic region, which contained Oct4 expressing cells, disappeared following TX-402 treatment. In conclusion, hypoxia promoted the expansion of CSCs expressing CD133 and CD44 accompanied by an increase of stem cell factors. Its

  19. Role of Notch Signaling in the Maintenance of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Under Hypoxic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Mariko; Isshi, Haruki; Ishihara, Shin; Okura, Hanayuki; Ichinose, Akihiro; Ozawa, Toshiyuki; Matsuyama, Akifumi; Hayakawa, Takao

    2014-01-01

    Human adipose tissue-derived multilineage progenitor cells (hADMPCs) are attractive for cell therapy and tissue engineering because of their multipotency and ease of isolation without serial ethical issues. However, their limited in vitro lifespan in culture systems hinders their therapeutic application. Some somatic stem cells, including hADMPCs, are known to be localized in hypoxic regions; thus, hypoxia may be beneficial for ex vivo culture of these stem cells. These cells exhibit a high level of glycolytic metabolism in the presence of high oxygen levels and further increase their glycolysis rate under hypoxia. However, the physiological role of glycolytic activation and its regulatory mechanisms are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that Notch signaling is required for glycolysis regulation under hypoxic conditions. Our results demonstrate that 5% O2 dramatically increased the glycolysis rate, improved the proliferation efficiency, prevented senescence, and maintained the multipotency of hADMPCs. Intriguingly, these effects were not mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), but rather by the Notch signaling pathway. Five percent O2 significantly increased the level of activated Notch1 and expression of its downstream gene, HES1. Furthermore, 5% O2 markedly increased glucose consumption and lactate production of hADMPCs, which decreased back to normoxic levels on treatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor. We also found that HES1 was involved in induction of GLUT3, TPI, and PGK1 in addition to reduction of TIGAR and SCO2 expression. These results clearly suggest that Notch signaling regulates glycolysis under hypoxic conditions and, thus, likely affects the cell lifespan via glycolysis. PMID:24878247

  20. Radiosensitization of paclitaxel, etanidazole and paclitaxel+etanidazole nanoparticles on hypoxic human tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng; Bai, Ling; Wu, Hong; Tian, Furong; Guo, Guozhen

    2007-09-01

    Paclitaxel and etanidazole are hypoxic radiosensitizers that exhibit cytotoxic action at different mechanisms. The poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing paclitaxel, etanidazole and paclitaxel+etanidazole were prepared by o/w and w/o/w emulsification-solvent evaporation method. The morphology of the nanoparticles was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The drug encapsulation efficiency (EE) and release profile in vitro were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The cellular uptake of nanoparticles for the human breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7) and the human carcinoma cervicis cells (HeLa) was evaluated by transmission electronic microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Cell viability was determined by the ability of single cell to form colonies in vitro. The prepared nanoparticles were spherical shape with size between 80 and 150 nm. The EE was higher for paclitaxel and lower for etanidazole. The drug release was controlled over time. The cellular uptake of nanoparticles was observed. Co-culture of the two tumor cell lines with drug-loaded nanoparticles demonstrated that released drug effectively sensitized hypoxic tumor cells to radiation. The radiosensitization of paclitaxel+etanidazole nanoparticles was more significant than that of single drug-loaded nanoparticles. PMID:17509678

  1. Hypoxic Preconditioning Increases Survival and Pro-Angiogenic Capacity of Human Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stromal Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Andreas Matthäus; Klose, Kristin; Bieback, Karen; Korinth, Dirk; Schneider, Maria; Seifert, Martina; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Kurtz, Andreas; Falk, Volkmar; Stamm, Christof

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning was shown to improve the therapeutic efficacy of bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) upon transplantation in ischemic tissue. Given the interest in clinical applications of umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs, we developed a specific hypoxic preconditioning protocol and investigated its anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenic effects on cord blood MSCs undergoing simulated ischemia in vitro by subjecting them to hypoxia and nutrient deprivation with or without preceding hypoxic preconditioning. Cell number, metabolic activity, surface marker expression, chromosomal stability, apoptosis (caspases-3/7 activity) and necrosis were determined, and phosphorylation, mRNA expression and protein secretion of selected apoptosis and angiogenesis-regulating factors were quantified. Then, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were subjected to simulated ischemia in co-culture with hypoxically preconditioned or naïve cord blood MSCs, and HUVEC proliferation was measured. Migration, proliferation and nitric oxide production of HUVECs were determined in presence of cord blood MSC-conditioned medium. Cord blood MSCs proved least sensitive to simulated ischemia when they were preconditioned for 24 h, while their basic behavior, immunophenotype and karyotype in culture remained unchanged. Here, “post-ischemic” cell number and metabolic activity were enhanced and caspase-3/7 activity and lactate dehydrogenase release were reduced as compared to non-preconditioned cells. Phosphorylation of AKT and BAD, mRNA expression of BCL-XL, BAG1 and VEGF, and VEGF protein secretion were higher in preconditioned cells. Hypoxically preconditioned cord blood MSCs enhanced HUVEC proliferation and migration, while nitric oxide production remained unchanged. We conclude that hypoxic preconditioning protects cord blood MSCs by activation of anti-apoptotic signaling mechanisms and enhances their angiogenic potential. Hence, hypoxic preconditioning

  2. Fractionated dose of 35-MEV fast neutrons and hypoxic tumor cell survival curve.

    PubMed

    U, R; Evans, J C; Cavanaugh, P J; Abramson, N; Thompson, T T; Wheless, D M

    1975-06-01

    The determination of the RBE for the MANTA fast neutrons produced by NRL is inprogress, with the model system using tumor cell population kinetic response patterns assayed in vitro after irradiation in vivo. Ascites tumor cells BW-5147 were irradiated with a clinically usable fast neutron beam from the NRL cyclotron, which is produced by accelrating deuterons to 35 MeV and using htem to bombard a thick berylliumtarget. The comparison of dose-effect relationships was made for doses ranging from30 to 1000 rads. The doses required for an isoeffect on BW-5147 hypoxic tumor cell survival and impairment of its reproductive capacity from fast neutron exposure were not different wheither it was given a single dose or the same dose given in three fractions separated by long recovery periods in situ. No intracellular repair of sublethal injury when the dose was given in three fractions, although the hypoxic BWp5147 tumor cells haveno effective reoxygenation or repopulation in this time interval. The RBE for the fast neutron beam is 4 relative to x rays for fractionated doses at the surviving fractionlevel of 0.6-0.7, while the RBE IS 2.5 FOR SINGLE DOSES. However, at a surviving fraction of 0.1, the RBE is 1.9 for single and 2.8 for fractionated doses. Analysis of thedaily cell population rate or mitotic delay between the two types of radiations at a similiar level of survival.

  3. System for measuring oxygen consumption rates of mammalian cells in static culture under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Yuki; Miyahara, Hirotaka; Ota, Yuri; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) of mammalian cells in hypoxic environments is essential for designing and developing a three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture system. However, OCR measurements under hypoxic conditions are infrequently reported in the literature. Here, we developed a system for measuring OCRs at low oxygen levels. The system injects nitrogen gas into the environment and measures the oxygen concentration by an optical oxygen microsensor that consumes no oxygen. The developed system was applied to HepG2 cells in static culture. Specifically, we measured the spatial profiles of the local dissolved oxygen concentration in the medium, then estimated the OCRs of the cells. The OCRs, and also the pericellular oxygen concentrations, decreased nonlinearly as the oxygen partial pressure in the environment decreased from 19% to 1%. The OCRs also depended on the culture period and the matrix used for coating the dish surface. Using this system, we can precisely estimate the OCRs of various cell types under environments that mimic 3-D culture conditions, contributing crucial data for an efficient 3-D culture system design. PMID:26558344

  4. The Induction of Metformin Inhibitory Effects on Tumor Cell Growth in Hypoxic Condition.

    PubMed

    Safari, Zohreh; Safaralizadeh, Reza; Seyedzadeh, Mir Hadi; Valinezad Orang, Ayla; Zare, Ahad; Hosseinpour Feizi, Mohammad Ali; Kardar, Gholam Ali

    2015-12-01

    It is aimed to evaluate the actual anti-cancerous effects of metformin on cancer cells in hypoxic condition. Non-cancerous cells (HEK293) and cancer cells (MCF-7) were cultured in both hypoxia and normoxia conditions and treated with different concentrations of metformin. The proliferation, apoptosis, and necrosis rate were assessed using MTT test and Annexin V assay. The S6K1 phosphorylation was assessed using western blotting. Zymography was used to measure the activity of metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Metformin treatment inhibited proliferation of cancer cells in the optimal concentration of 10 mM under hypoxia condition, while it showed no effects on non-cancerous cell viability. The statistical analysis of MTT assay indicated that the pro-apoptotic function of metformin for cancer cells under hypoxia condition compared to normoxia was significant with different metformin concentrations (p<0.01). However, the effect of metformin treatments for non-cancerous cells under hypoxia condition compared to normoxia was not significant. Western-blot analysis indicated a significant decrease in S6K1 phosphorylation in cancer cells under hypoxia condition (p<0.05). Nevertheless, there was no considerable difference between normoxia and hypoxia conditions in non-cancerous cells. MMP-9 zymography analysis revealed that the highest inhibition of MMP-9 activity was observed in hypoxia condition by 20mM of metformin concentration only in cancer cell. The results indicate that in hypoxia condition metformin exerts its anti-cancerous function by inhibiting proliferation and tumor progression and inducing cell apoptosis more effectively than normoxia condition. In line with cancer cell conditions, most importantly hypoxic condition, metformin can be considered as a potential anti-cancerous drug. PMID:26725558

  5. The Induction of Metformin Inhibitory Effects on Tumor Cell Growth in Hypoxic Condition.

    PubMed

    Safari, Zohreh; Safaralizadeh, Reza; Seyedzadeh, Mir Hadi; Valinezad Orang, Ayla; Zare, Ahad; Hosseinpour Feizi, Mohammad Ali; Kardar, Gholam Ali

    2015-12-01

    It is aimed to evaluate the actual anti-cancerous effects of metformin on cancer cells in hypoxic condition. Non-cancerous cells (HEK293) and cancer cells (MCF-7) were cultured in both hypoxia and normoxia conditions and treated with different concentrations of metformin. The proliferation, apoptosis, and necrosis rate were assessed using MTT test and Annexin V assay. The S6K1 phosphorylation was assessed using western blotting. Zymography was used to measure the activity of metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Metformin treatment inhibited proliferation of cancer cells in the optimal concentration of 10 mM under hypoxia condition, while it showed no effects on non-cancerous cell viability. The statistical analysis of MTT assay indicated that the pro-apoptotic function of metformin for cancer cells under hypoxia condition compared to normoxia was significant with different metformin concentrations (p<0.01). However, the effect of metformin treatments for non-cancerous cells under hypoxia condition compared to normoxia was not significant. Western-blot analysis indicated a significant decrease in S6K1 phosphorylation in cancer cells under hypoxia condition (p<0.05). Nevertheless, there was no considerable difference between normoxia and hypoxia conditions in non-cancerous cells. MMP-9 zymography analysis revealed that the highest inhibition of MMP-9 activity was observed in hypoxia condition by 20mM of metformin concentration only in cancer cell. The results indicate that in hypoxia condition metformin exerts its anti-cancerous function by inhibiting proliferation and tumor progression and inducing cell apoptosis more effectively than normoxia condition. In line with cancer cell conditions, most importantly hypoxic condition, metformin can be considered as a potential anti-cancerous drug.

  6. Proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells under hypoxic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Hongying; Cai Huiguo; Han Zhongchao; Yang Renchi; Zhao, Qinjun; Cao Ying; Li Jing; Zhou Cixiang; Liao Lianming; Jia Mingyue; Zhao Qian; Chen Guoqiang . E-mail: chengq@shsmu.edu.cn; Zhao, R.C. |. E-mail: chunhuaz@public.tpt.tj.cn

    2006-08-18

    Low oxygen tension is a potent differentiation inducer of numerous cell types and an effective stimulus of many gene expressions. Here, we described that under 8% O{sub 2}, bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) exhibited proliferative and morphologic changes. The level of differentiated antigen H-2Dd and the number of G{sub 2}/S/M phase cells increased evidently under 8% O{sub 2} condition. Also, the proportion of wide, flattened, and epithelial-like cells (which were alkaline phosphatase staining positive) in MSCs increased significantly. When cultured in adipogenic medium, there was a 5- to 6-fold increase in the number of lipid droplets under hypoxic conditions compared with that in normoxic culture. We also demonstrated the existence of MSC differentiation under hypoxic conditions by electron microscopy. Expression of Oct4 was inhibited under 8% O{sub 2} condition, but after adipocyte differentiation in normoxic culture and hypoxia-mimicking agents cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) and deferoxamine mesylate (DFX) treatments, Oct4 was still expressed in MSCs. These results indicate hypoxia accelerates MSC differentiation and hypoxia and hypoxia-mimicking agents exert different effects on MSC differentiation.

  7. Radiosensitizing and toxic effects of RSU-1069 on hypoxic cells in a murine tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Chaplin, D.J.; Durand, R.E.; Stratford, I.J.; Jenkins, T.C.

    1986-07-01

    RSU-1069 is one of a group of compounds of particular interest in radiobiology, since it combines the nitroimidazole ring with a side chain bearing a monofunctional alkylating agent. This compound has been shown to be a potent radiosensitizer both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, it has recently been shown to be an effective hypoxic cell cytotoxin in vitro. Our studies have been carried out using the SCCVII squamous carcinoma implanted subcutaneously in C/sub 3/H mice, using a technique we recently developed which facilitates isolation of tumor cell subpopulations from known locations relative to the tumor blood supply. The response of the separated tumor subpopulations was assessed using a soft agar clonogenic assay. For radiosensitization studies, RSU-1069 was administered i.p. at 0.5 mumol/g 20 min before irradiation and the tumors excised 20 min after irradiation. For toxicity studies, tumors were excised 16-18 hr after RSU-1069 administration. The results obtained to date clearly demonstrate that RSU-1069 is an efficient hypoxic cell radiosensitizer and cytotoxin in this murine tumor and has little effect on well perfused (i.e., oxic) cells.

  8. 660 nm red light-enhanced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianchao; Hou, Wensheng; Wu, Xiaoying; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Nong; Zhou, Ping

    2014-02-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. However, the in vivo transplantation effects are poor and their survival, colonization and differentiation efficiencies are relatively low. Red or near-infrared light from 600-1,000 nm promotes cellular migration and prevents apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the combination of red light with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be effective for the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. In this study, the migration and colonization of cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on primary neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation were detected using Transwell assay. The results showed that, after a 40-hour irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm(2), an increasing number of green fluorescence-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells migrated towards hypoxic-ischemic damaged primary neurons. Meanwhile, neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage were given an intraperitoneal injection of 1 × 10(6) bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, followed by irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm(2) for 7 successive days. Shuttle box test results showed that, after phototherapy and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, the active avoidance response rate of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage rats was significantly increased, which was higher than that after bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation alone. Experimental findings indicate that 660 nm red light emitting diode irradiation promotes the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, thereby enhancing the contribution of cell transplantation in the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  9. 660 nm red light-enhanced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianchao; Hou, Wensheng; Wu, Xiaoying; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Nong; Zhou, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. However, the in vivo transplantation effects are poor and their survival, colonization and differentiation efficiencies are relatively low. Red or near-infrared light from 600–1,000 nm promotes cellular migration and prevents apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the combination of red light with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be effective for the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. In this study, the migration and colonization of cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on primary neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation were detected using Transwell assay. The results showed that, after a 40-hour irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm2, an increasing number of green fluorescence-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells migrated towards hypoxic-ischemic damaged primary neurons. Meanwhile, neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage were given an intraperitoneal injection of 1 × 106 bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, followed by irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm2 for 7 successive days. Shuttle box test results showed that, after phototherapy and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, the active avoidance response rate of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage rats was significantly increased, which was higher than that after bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation alone. Experimental findings indicate that 660 nm red light emitting diode irradiation promotes the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, thereby enhancing the contribution of cell transplantation in the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. PMID:25206807

  10. Mineralization of bone-related SaOS-2 cells under physiological hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Tolba, Emad; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a physiological energy-rich polymer with multiple phosphoric anhydride bonds. In cells such as bone-forming osteoblasts, glycolysis is the main pathway generating metabolic energy in the form of ATP. In the present study, we show that, under hypoxic culture conditions, the growth/viability of osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells is not impaired. The addition of polyP to those cells, administered as amorphous calcium polyP nanoparticles (aCa-polyP-NP; approximate size 100 nm), significantly increased the proliferation of the cells. In the presence of polyP, the cells produce significant levels of lactate, the end product of anaerobic glycolysis. Under those conditions, an eight-fold increase in the steady-state level of the membrane-associated carbonic anhydrase IX is found, as well as a six-fold induction of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1. Consequently, biomineral formation onto the SaOS-2 cells decreases under low oxygen tension. If the polyP nanoparticles are added to the cells, the degree of mineralization is enhanced. These changes had been measured also in human mesenchymal stem cells. The assumption that the bicarbonate, generated by the carbonic anhydrase in the presence of polyP under low oxygen, is deposited as a constituent of the bioseeds formed during initial hydroxyapatite formation is corroborated by the identification of carbon besides of calcium, oxygen and phosphorus in the initial biomineral deposit onto the cells using the sensitive technology of high-resolution energy dispersive spectrometry mapping. Based on these data, we conclude that polyP is required for the supply of metabolic energy during bone mineral formation under physiological, hypoxic conditions, acting as a 'metabolic fuel' for the cells to grow.

  11. Selective toxicity of 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide toward hypoxic mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rauth, A.M.; Mohindra, J.K.

    1981-12-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)-imidazole-4-carboxamide (DTIC) is used in the treatment of malignant melanoma where response rates of 15 to 30% have been reported. Some current interest exists in combining DTIC chemotherapy with localized high-dose (800 rads)-per-fraction radiotherapy in the treatment of unresectable metastatic melanoma. The present work investigates the radiosensitizing and chemotherapeutic properties of DTIC in an in vitro system using Chinese hamster ovary or HeLa cells and in vivo, using the KHT transplantable murine tumor. No evidence of a radiosensitizing effect of DTIC was found towards hypoxic or aerobic cells either in vitro or in vivo. In vitro, high drug concentrations (1 mg/ml) were approximately 5 times more effective in killing hypoxic Chinese hamster ovary or HeLa cells than in killing aerobic cells over exposure times of 0 to 12 hr. The degree of toxicity was drug dose and temperature dependent but was not highly dependent on cell number or cell type. In vivo plasma levels of DTIC were measured with high-pressure liquid chromatography after i.p. injection of drug into C3H mice. At the highest drug doses tested, near the 50% lethal dose in mice for DTIC (0.5 mg/g), the drug was toxic to both aerobic and hypoxic tumor cells with some evidence of increased toxicity towards hypoxic cells. The present work suggests that DTIC may be more efficiently activated under hypoxic conditions as compared to aerobic conditions. The increased toxicity of DTIC under hypoxic versus aerobic conditions may prove to be a feature of this drug that can be exploited in its clinical use and in the design of new analogs of DTIC.

  12. Hypoxia-Responsive Polymersomes for Drug Delivery to Hypoxic Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Prajakta; Haldar, Manas K; You, Seungyong; Choi, Yongki; Mallik, Sanku

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia in tumors contributes to overall tumor progression by assisting in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, angiogenesis, and metastasis of cancer. In this study, we have synthesized a hypoxia-responsive, diblock copolymer poly(lactic acid)-azobenzene-poly(ethylene glycol), which self-assembles to form polymersomes in an aqueous medium. The polymersomes did not release any encapsulated contents for 50 min under normoxic conditions. However, under hypoxia, 90% of the encapsulated dye was released in 50 min. The polymersomes encapsulated the combination of anticancer drugs gemcitabine and erlotinib with entrapment efficiency of 40% and 28%, respectively. We used three-dimensional spheroid cultures of pancreatic cancer cells BxPC-3 to demonstrate hypoxia-mediated release of the drugs from the polymersomes. The vesicles were nontoxic. However, a significant decrease in cell viability was observed in hypoxic spheroidal cultures of BxPC-3 cells in the presence of drug encapsulated polymersomes. These polymersomes have potential for future applications in imaging and treatment of hypoxic tumors.

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of two novel 2-nitroimidazole derivatives as potential PET radioligands for tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Zhihao; Zhu, Lin; Liu, Yajing; Du, Fenghua; Gan, Hongmei; Qiao, Jinpin; Kung, Hank F.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Nitroimidazole (azomycin) derivatives labeled with radioisotopes have been developed as cancer imaging and radiotherapeutic agents based on the oncological hypoxic mechanism. By attaching nitroimidazole core with different functional groups, we synthesized new nitroimidazole derivatives, and evaluated their potentiality as tumor imaging agents. Methods Starting with commercially available 2-nitroimdazole, 2-fluoro-N-(2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl)acetamide (NEFA, [19F]7) and 2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl 2-fluoroacetate (NEFT, [19F]8), as well as radiolabeling precursors - the bromo substituted analogs were quickly synthesized through a three-step synthetic pathway. The precursors were radiolabeled with [18F]F-/18-crown-6/KHCO3 in DMSO at 90 °C for 10 min followed by purification with an Oasis HLB cartridge. Biodistribution studies were carried out in EMT-6 tumor-bearing mice. The uptake (%ID/g) in tumors and normal tissues were measured at 30 min post injection. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was used to distinguish metabolites from parent drugs in urine and plasma of rat injected with “cold” NEFA ([19F]7) and NEFT ([19F]8). Results Two radiotracers, [18F]NEFA ([18F]7) and [18F]NEFT ([18F]8), were prepared with average yields of 6-7% and 9-10% (no decay corrected). Radiochemical purity for both tracers was >95% as determined by HPLC. Biodistribution studies in EMT-6 tumor-bearing mice indicated that the tumor to blood and tumor to liver ratios of both [18F]7 (0.96, 0.98) and [18F]8 (0.61,1.10) at 30 min were higher than those observed for [18F]FMISO (1) (0.91, 0.59), a well-investigated azomycin type hypoxia radiotacer. LC/MS analysis demonstrated that fluoroacetate was the main in vivo metabolite for both NEFA ([19F]7) and NEFT ([19F]8). Conclusions In this research, two new fluorine-18 labeled 2-nitroimdazole derivatives, [18F]7 and [18F]8, both of which containing in vivo hydrolyzable

  14. Onset and early development of hypoxic ventilatory responses and branchial neuroepithelial cells in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tien-Chien F; Burggren, Warren W

    2010-12-01

    Onset and ontogeny of the O₂ chemoreceptive control of ventilation was investigated in Xenopus laevis. The density and size of branchial serotonin-immunoreactive neuroepithelial cells (5-HT-IR NECs) were also determined using confocal immunofluorescent microscopy. Larvae started gill ventilation at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf), and, at this early stage, acute hypoxic exposure produced an increase in frequency from 28 ± 4 to 60 ± 2 beats x min⁻¹. Concurrent with the onset of ventilatory responses, 5-HT-IR NECs appeared in the gill filament bud. Lung ventilation began at 5 dpf and exhibited a 3-fold increase in frequency during acute hypoxia. At 10 dpf, gill ventilatory sensitivity to hypoxia increased, as did NEC density, from 15 ± 1 (5 dpf) to 29 ± 2 (10 dpf) cells x mm of filament⁻¹. Unlike ventilation frequency, gill ventilation amplitude and lung expired volume were unaltered by acute hypoxia. Chronic exposure to moderate hypoxia, at a P(O₂) of 110 mmHg, attenuated acute responses to moderate hypoxia at 10 and 14 dpf but had no effect at more severe hypoxia or at other stages. Chronic hypoxia also stimulated 5-HT-IR NECs growth at 21 dpf. Collectively, larvae at 5 dpf exhibited strong O₂-driven gill and lung ventilatory responses, and between 10 and 21 dpf, the early hypoxic responses can be shaped by the ambient P(O₂).

  15. Isolation and characterization of 2-nitroimidazole produced by Streptomyces species as an inhibitor of both carbonic anhydrase and shell formation in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Mari; Ozaki, Noriaki; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Furihata, Keiko; Hayakawa, Yoichi; Sakuda, Shohei; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2002-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase is thought to be involved in the process of calcium carbonate deposition in calcified tissues of many organisms. Barnacles form hard calcified shells for protection against predation, and represent a class of marine-fouling animals. In order to inhibit barnacle growth by inhibiting shell formation, we searched for carbonic anhydrase inhibitors from microbial secondary metabolites. A simple assay for assessing carbonic-anhydrase-inhibiting activity was developed. Screening of many microorganisms isolated from soil with this assay resulted in a microbial strain that produced a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. This strain was identified as Streptomyces eurocidicus mf294. The inhibitor was isolated through 4 purification steps and identified as 2-nitroimidazole on the basis of spectroscopic data. 2-Nitroimidazole inhibited barnacle carbonic anhydrase dose-dependently and complete inhibition was reached at the concentration of 1 x 10(-5) M. 2-Nitroimidazole did not affect settlement or metamorphosis of barnacle larvae, but inhibited shell formation at concentrations higher than 1 x 10(-4) M. These findings strongly support the idea that carbonic anhydrase is involved in calcification.

  16. Polysialic acid sustains cancer cell survival and migratory capacity in a hypoxic environment.

    PubMed

    Elkashef, Sara M; Allison, Simon J; Sadiq, Maria; Basheer, Haneen A; Ribeiro Morais, Goreti; Loadman, Paul M; Pors, Klaus; Falconer, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia) is a unique carbohydrate polymer expressed on the surface of NCAM (neuronal cell adhesion molecule) in a number of cancers where it modulates cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion, migration, invasion and metastasis and is strongly associated with poor clinical prognosis. We have carried out the first investigation into the effect of polySia expression on the behaviour of cancer cells in hypoxia, a key source of chemoresistance in tumours. The role of polysialylation and associated tumour cell migration and cell adhesion were studied in hypoxia, along with effects on cell survival and the potential role of HIF-1. Our findings provide the first evidence that polySia expression sustains migratory capacity and is associated with tumour cell survival in hypoxia. Initial mechanistic studies indicate a potential role for HIF-1 in sustaining polySia-mediated migratory capacity, but not cell survival. These data add to the growing body of evidence pointing to a crucial role for the polysialyltransferases (polySTs) in neuroendocrine tumour progression and provide the first evidence to suggest that polySia is associated with an aggressive phenotype in tumour hypoxia. These results have significant potential implications for polyST inhibition as an anti-metastatic therapeutic strategy and for targeting hypoxic cancer cells. PMID:27611649

  17. Polysialic acid sustains cancer cell survival and migratory capacity in a hypoxic environment

    PubMed Central

    Elkashef, Sara M.; Allison, Simon J.; Sadiq, Maria; Basheer, Haneen A.; Ribeiro Morais, Goreti; Loadman, Paul M.; Pors, Klaus; Falconer, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia) is a unique carbohydrate polymer expressed on the surface of NCAM (neuronal cell adhesion molecule) in a number of cancers where it modulates cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion, migration, invasion and metastasis and is strongly associated with poor clinical prognosis. We have carried out the first investigation into the effect of polySia expression on the behaviour of cancer cells in hypoxia, a key source of chemoresistance in tumours. The role of polysialylation and associated tumour cell migration and cell adhesion were studied in hypoxia, along with effects on cell survival and the potential role of HIF-1. Our findings provide the first evidence that polySia expression sustains migratory capacity and is associated with tumour cell survival in hypoxia. Initial mechanistic studies indicate a potential role for HIF-1 in sustaining polySia-mediated migratory capacity, but not cell survival. These data add to the growing body of evidence pointing to a crucial role for the polysialyltransferases (polySTs) in neuroendocrine tumour progression and provide the first evidence to suggest that polySia is associated with an aggressive phenotype in tumour hypoxia. These results have significant potential implications for polyST inhibition as an anti-metastatic therapeutic strategy and for targeting hypoxic cancer cells. PMID:27611649

  18. Important role of PLC-γ1 in hypoxic increase in intracellular calcium in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vishal R; Song, Tengyao; Joseph, Leroy; Mei, Lin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao

    2013-02-01

    An increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) induces hypoxic cellular responses in the lungs; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We report, for the first time, that acute hypoxia significantly enhances phospholipase C (PLC) activity in mouse resistance pulmonary arteries (PAs), but not in mesenteric arteries. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining reveal the expression of PLC-γ1 protein in PAs and PASMCs, respectively. The activity of PLC-γ1 is also augmented in PASMCs following hypoxia. Lentiviral shRNA-mediated gene knockdown of mitochondrial complex III Rieske iron-sulfur protein (RISP) to inhibit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production prevents hypoxia from increasing PLC-γ1 activity in PASMCs. Myxothiazol, a mitochondrial complex III inhibitor, reduces the hypoxic response as well. The PLC inhibitor U73122, but not its inactive analog U73433, attenuates the hypoxic vasoconstriction in PAs and hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in PASMCs. PLC-γ1 knockdown suppresses its protein expression and the hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Hypoxia remarkably increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) production, which is blocked by U73122. The IP(3) receptor (IP(3)R) antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) or xestospongin-C inhibits the hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i). PLC-γ1 knockdown or U73122 reduces H(2)O(2)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in PASMCs and contraction in PAs. 2-APB and xestospongin-C produce similar inhibitory effects. In conclusion, our findings provide novel evidence that hypoxia activates PLC-γ1 by increasing RISP-dependent mitochondrial ROS production in the complex III, which causes IP(3) production, IP(3)R opening, and Ca(2+) release, playing an important role in hypoxic Ca(2+) and contractile responses in PASMCs.

  19. Hypoxic preconditioning increases the protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhilin; Fang, Bo; Tan, Zhibin; Zhang, Dong; Ma, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) protect against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury (SCIRI). However, a large number of transplanted BMSCs often undergo apoptosis, which severely affects the treatment outcome. Previous studies have demonstrated that hypoxic preconditioning effectively increases the survival rate of BMSCs following transplantation, and increases their protective effect on injured tissues. However, there have been few reports regarding roles of hypoxic preconditioning in SCIRI. The present study isolated rat BMSCs and separately transplanted hypoxia‑ and non‑hypoxia‑preconditioned BMSCs into the spinal cord tissues of rats with SCIRI. The role of hypoxic preconditioning in the promotion of the protective effect of BMSCs on SCIRI was investigated using neurological function scores, Evans blue staining, hematoxylin and eosin staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. In addition, reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the expression levels of hypoxia‑inducible factor 1α (HIF‑1α), and to investigate its possible underlying mechanism of action. The results indicated that hypoxic preconditioning effectively increased the protective effects of BMSCs on neurological function, blood spinal cord barrier and tissue damage following SCIRI, and inhibited apoptosis. Furthermore, hypoxic preconditioned BMSCs upregulated the expression of HIF‑1α in spinal cord tissues. Therefore, hypoxic preconditioning effectively increased the protective effect of BMSCs on SCIRI and may be associated with upregulation of the expression of HIF‑1α. Hypoxic preconditioning may serve as an effective means of increasing the protective effect of BMSCs on SCIRI.

  20. Molecular analysis of selected cell cycle regulatory proteins during aerobic and hypoxic maintenance of human ovarian carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Krtolica, A; Krucher, N A; Ludlow, J W

    1999-01-01

    We have previously reported on the development of an in vitro model system for studying the effect of hypoxia on ovarian carcinoma cell proliferation and invasion (Krtolica and Ludlow, 1996). These data indicate that the cell division cycle is reversibly arrested during the G1 phase. Here, we have continued this study to include the proliferation properties of both aerobic and hypoxic human ovarian carcinoma cells at the molecular level. The growth suppressor product of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene, pRB, appears to be functional in these cells as determined by SV40 T-antigen binding studies. Additional G1-to-S cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclins D and E, cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) 4 and 2, and cdk inhibitors p27 and p18, also appear to be intact based on their apparent molecular weights and cell cycle stage-specific abundance. During hypoxia, there is a decrease in abundance of cyclins D and E, with an increase in p27 abundance. cdk4 activity towards pRB and cdk2 activity towards histone H1 are also decreased. Co-precipitation studies revealed an increased amount of p27 complexing with cyclin E-cdk2 during hypoxia than during aerobic cell growth. In addition, pRB-directed phosphatase activity was found to be greater in hypoxic than aerobic cells. Taken together, a model is suggested to explain hypoxia-induced cell cycle arrest in SKA human ovarian carcinoma cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10471034

  1. Molecular analysis of selected cell cycle regulatory proteins during aerobic and hypoxic maintenance of human ovarian carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Krtolica, A; Krucher, N A; Ludlow, J W

    1999-08-01

    We have previously reported on the development of an in vitro model system for studying the effect of hypoxia on ovarian carcinoma cell proliferation and invasion (Krtolica and Ludlow, 1996). These data indicate that the cell division cycle is reversibly arrested during the G1 phase. Here, we have continued this study to include the proliferation properties of both aerobic and hypoxic human ovarian carcinoma cells at the molecular level. The growth suppressor product of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene, pRB, appears to be functional in these cells as determined by SV40 T-antigen binding studies. Additional G1-to-S cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclins D and E, cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) 4 and 2, and cdk inhibitors p27 and p18, also appear to be intact based on their apparent molecular weights and cell cycle stage-specific abundance. During hypoxia, there is a decrease in abundance of cyclins D and E, with an increase in p27 abundance. cdk4 activity towards pRB and cdk2 activity towards histone H1 are also decreased. Co-precipitation studies revealed an increased amount of p27 complexing with cyclin E-cdk2 during hypoxia than during aerobic cell growth. In addition, pRB-directed phosphatase activity was found to be greater in hypoxic than aerobic cells. Taken together, a model is suggested to explain hypoxia-induced cell cycle arrest in SKA human ovarian carcinoma cells. PMID:10471034

  2. Pluripotent and Multipotent Stem Cells Display Distinct Hypoxic miRNA Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rahul; Dale, Tina P.; Al-Zubaidi, Mohammed A.; Benny Malgulwar, Prit; Forsyth, Nicholas R.; Kulshreshtha, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are reported to have a crucial role in the regulation of self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. Hypoxia has been identified as a key biophysical element of the stem cell culture milieu however, the link between hypoxia and miRNA expression in stem cells remains poorly understood. We therefore explored miRNA expression in hypoxic human embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells (hESCs and hMSCs). A total of 50 and 76 miRNAs were differentially regulated by hypoxia (2% O2) in hESCs and hMSCs, respectively, with a negligible overlap of only three miRNAs. We found coordinate regulation of precursor and mature miRNAs under hypoxia suggesting their regulation mainly at transcriptional level. Hypoxia response elements were located upstream of 97% of upregulated hypoxia regulated miRNAs (HRMs) suggesting hypoxia-inducible-factor (HIF) driven transcription. HIF binding to the candidate cis-elements of specific miRNAs under hypoxia was confirmed by Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with qPCR. Role analysis of a subset of upregulated HRMs identified linkage to reported inhibition of differentiation while a downregulated subset of HRMs had a putative role in the promotion of differentiation. MiRNA-target prediction correlation with published hypoxic hESC and hMSC gene expression profiles revealed HRM target genes enriched in the cytokine:cytokine receptor, HIF signalling and pathways in cancer. Overall, our study reveals, novel and distinct hypoxia-driven miRNA signatures in hESCs and hMSCs with the potential for application in optimised culture and differentiation models for both therapeutic application and improved understanding of stem cell biology. PMID:27783707

  3. Type I Epithelial Cells Are the Main Target of Whole-Body Hypoxic Preconditioning in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shelley X. L.; Miller, James J.; Stolz, Donna Beer; Serpero, Laura D.; Zhao, Wei; Gozal, David; Wang, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Whole-body hypoxic preconditioning (WHPC) prolongs survival of mice exposed to severe hypoxia by attenuating pulmonary edema and preserving gas exchange. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) of this protection remains unclear. The objective of this study was to identify the cellular target(s) of WHPC in the lung. Conscious mice were exposed to hypoxia (7% O2) for 6 hours with or without pretreatment of WHPC ([8% O2] × 10 min/[21% O2] × 10 min; 6 cycles). Hypoxia caused severe lung injury, as shown by the development of high-permeability–type pulmonary edema and the release of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase into the airspace and the circulation. All these signs of hypoxic lung injury were significantly attenuated by WHPC. Hypoxia also caused a remarkable release of type I cell markers (caveolin-2 and receptor for advanced glycation end products) in lung lavage that was almost completely abolished by WHPC. Conversely, hypoxia-induced release of type II cell markers (surfactant-associated proteins A and D) was only marginal, and was unaffected by WHPC. Electron microscopic analysis demonstrated considerable hypoxic damage in alveolar type I cells and vascular endothelial cells. Notably, WHPC completely eliminated hypoxic damage in the former and alleviated it in the latter. Type II cells appeared normal. Furthermore, WHPC up-regulated protein expression of cytoprotective genes in the lung, such as heat shock proteins and manganese superoxide dismutase. Thus, WHPC attenuates hypoxic lung injury through protection of cells constituting the respiratory membrane, especially hypoxia-vulnerable type I epithelial cells. This beneficial effect may involve up-regulation of cytoprotective genes. PMID:18776132

  4. Hepatocytes Determine the Hypoxic Microenvironment and Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Production of Nitric Oxide That Targets Mitochondrial Respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Heng; Verovski, Valeri N.; Leonard, Wim; Law, Ka Lun; Vermeersch, Marieke; Storme, Guy; Van den Berge, Dirk; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra; De Ridder, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether host hepatocytes may reverse hypoxic radioresistance through nitric oxide (NO)-induced oxygen sparing, in a model relevant to colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Hepatocytes and a panel of CRC cells were incubated in a tissue-mimetic coculture system with diffusion-limited oxygenation, and oxygen levels were monitored by an oxygen-sensing fluorescence probe. To activate endogenous NO production, cocultures were exposed to a cytokine mixture, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and NO/nitrite production. The mitochondrial targets of NO were examined by enzymatic activity. To assess hypoxic radioresponse, cocultures were irradiated and reseeded for colonies. Results: Resting hepatocytes consumed 10-40 times more oxygen than mouse CT26 and human DLD-1, HT29, HCT116, and SW480 CRC cells, and thus seemed to be the major effectors of hypoxic conditioning. As a result, hepatocytes caused uniform radioprotection of tumor cells at a 1:1 ratio. Conversely, NO-producing hepatocytes radiosensitized all CRC cell lines more than 1.5-fold, similar to the effect of selective mitochondrial inhibitors. The radiosensitizing effect was associated with a respiratory self-arrest of hepatocytes at the level of aconitase and complex II, which resulted in profound reoxygenation of tumor cells through oxygen sparing. Nitric oxide–producing hepatocytes were at least 10 times more active than NO-producing macrophages to reverse hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Conclusions: Hepatocytes were the major determinants of the hypoxic microenvironment and radioresponse of CRC cells in our model of metabolic hypoxia. We provide evidence that reoxygenation and radiosensitization of hypoxic CRC cells can be achieved through oxygen sparing induced by endogenous NO production in host hepatocytes.

  5. Observation of reversible, rapid changes in drug susceptibility of hypoxic tumor cells in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Germain, Todd; Ansari, Megan; Pappas, Dimitri

    2016-09-14

    Hypoxia is a major stimulus for increased drug resistance and for survival of tumor cells. Work from our group and others has shown that hypoxia increases resistance to anti-cancer compounds, radiation, and other damage-pathway cytotoxic agents. In this work we utilize a microfluidic culture system capable of rapid switching of local oxygen concentrations to determine changes in drug resistance in prostate cancer cells. We observed rapid adaptation to hypoxia, with drug resistance to 2 μM staurosporine established within 30 min of hypoxia. Annexin-V/Sytox Green apoptosis assays over 9 h showed 78.0% viability, compared to 84.5% viability in control cells (normoxic cells with no staurosporine). Normoxic cells exposed to the same staurosporine concentration had a viability of 48.6% after 9 h. Hypoxia adaptation was rapid and reversible, with Hypoxic cells treated with 20% oxygen for 30 min responding to staurosporine with 51.6% viability after drug treatment for 9 h. Induction of apoptosis through the receptor-mediated pathway, which bypasses anti-apoptosis mechanisms induced by hypoxia, resulted in 39.4 ± 7% cell viability. The rapid reversibility indicates co-treatment of oxygen with anti-cancer compounds may be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27566353

  6. Efficient Monte Carlo modelling of individual tumour cell propagation for hypoxic head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuckwell, W.; Bezak, E.; Yeoh, E.; Marcu, L.

    2008-09-01

    A Monte Carlo tumour model has been developed to simulate tumour cell propagation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The model aims to eventually provide a radiobiological tool for radiation oncology clinicians to plan patient treatment schedules based on properties of the individual tumour. The inclusion of an oxygen distribution amongst the tumour cells enables the model to incorporate hypoxia and other associated parameters, which affect tumour growth. The object oriented program FORTRAN 95 has been used to create the model algorithm, with Monte Carlo methods being employed to randomly assign many of the cell parameters from probability distributions. Hypoxia has been implemented through random assignment of partial oxygen pressure values to individual cells during tumour growth, based on in vivo Eppendorf probe experimental data. The accumulation of up to 10 million virtual tumour cells in 15 min of computer running time has been achieved. The stem cell percentage and the degree of hypoxia are the parameters which most influence the final tumour growth rate. For a tumour with a doubling time of 40 days, the final stem cell percentage is approximately 1% of the total cell population. The effect of hypoxia on the tumour growth rate is significant. Using a hypoxia induced cell quiescence limit which affects 50% of cells with and oxygen levels less than 1 mm Hg, the tumour doubling time increases to over 200 days and the time of tumour growth for a clinically detectable tumour (109 cells) increases from 3 to 8 years. A biologically plausible Monte Carlo model of hypoxic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumour growth has been developed for real time assessment of the effects of multiple biological parameters which impact upon the response of the individual patient to fractionated radiotherapy.

  7. Efficient Monte Carlo modelling of individual tumour cell propagation for hypoxic head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Tuckwell, W; Bezak, E; Yeoh, E; Marcu, L

    2008-09-01

    A Monte Carlo tumour model has been developed to simulate tumour cell propagation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The model aims to eventually provide a radiobiological tool for radiation oncology clinicians to plan patient treatment schedules based on properties of the individual tumour. The inclusion of an oxygen distribution amongst the tumour cells enables the model to incorporate hypoxia and other associated parameters, which affect tumour growth. The object oriented program FORTRAN 95 has been used to create the model algorithm, with Monte Carlo methods being employed to randomly assign many of the cell parameters from probability distributions. Hypoxia has been implemented through random assignment of partial oxygen pressure values to individual cells during tumour growth, based on in vivo Eppendorf probe experimental data. The accumulation of up to 10 million virtual tumour cells in 15 min of computer running time has been achieved. The stem cell percentage and the degree of hypoxia are the parameters which most influence the final tumour growth rate. For a tumour with a doubling time of 40 days, the final stem cell percentage is approximately 1% of the total cell population. The effect of hypoxia on the tumour growth rate is significant. Using a hypoxia induced cell quiescence limit which affects 50% of cells with and oxygen levels less than 1 mm Hg, the tumour doubling time increases to over 200 days and the time of tumour growth for a clinically detectable tumour (10(9) cells) increases from 3 to 8 years. A biologically plausible Monte Carlo model of hypoxic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumour growth has been developed for real time assessment of the effects of multiple biological parameters which impact upon the response of the individual patient to fractionated radiotherapy. PMID:18677039

  8. Erythropoietin and a nonerythropoietic peptide analog promote aortic endothelial cell repair under hypoxic conditions: role of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Heikal, Lamia; Ghezzi, Pietro; Mengozzi, Manuela; Stelmaszczuk, Blanka; Feelisch, Martin; Ferns, Gordon AA

    2016-01-01

    The cytoprotective effects of erythropoietin (EPO) and an EPO-related nonerythropoietic analog, pyroglutamate helix B surface peptide (pHBSP), were investigated in an in vitro model of bovine aortic endothelial cell injury under normoxic (21% O2) and hypoxic (1% O2) conditions. The potential molecular mechanisms of these effects were also explored. Using a model of endothelial injury (the scratch assay), we found that, under hypoxic conditions, EPO and pHBSP enhanced scratch closure by promoting cell migration and proliferation, but did not show any effect under normoxic conditions. Furthermore, EPO protected bovine aortic endothelial cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis under hypoxic conditions. The priming effect of hypoxia was associated with stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor-1α, EPO receptor upregulation, and decreased Ser-1177 phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS); the effect of hypoxia on the latter was rescued by EPO. Hypoxia was associated with a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) production as assessed by its oxidation products, nitrite and nitrate, consistent with the oxygen requirement for endogenous production of NO by endothelial NOS. However, while EPO did not affect NO formation in normoxia, it markedly increased NO production, in a manner sensitive to NOS inhibition, under hypoxic conditions. These data are consistent with the notion that the tissue-protective actions of EPO-related cytokines in pathophysiological settings associated with poor oxygenation are mediated by NO. These findings may be particularly relevant to atherogenesis and postangioplasty restenosis. PMID:27800514

  9. Kalkitoxin Inhibits Angiogenesis, Disrupts Cellular Hypoxic Signaling, and Blocks Mitochondrial Electron Transport in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J. Brian; Liu, Yang; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Mahdi, Fakhri; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Gerwick, William H.; Valeriote, Frederick A.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2015-01-01

    The biologically active lipopeptide kalkitoxin was previously isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens (Lyngbya majuscula). Kalkitoxin exhibited N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated neurotoxicity and acted as an inhibitory ligand for voltage-sensitive sodium channels in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Subsequent studies revealed that kalkitoxin generated a delayed form of colon tumor cell cytotoxicity in 7-day clonogenic cell survival assays. Cell line- and exposure time-dependent cytostatic/cytotoxic effects were previously observed with mitochondria-targeted inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). The transcription factor HIF-1 functions as a key regulator of oxygen homeostasis. Therefore, we investigated the ability of kalkitoxin to inhibit hypoxic signaling in human tumor cell lines. Kalkitoxin potently and selectively inhibited hypoxia-induced activation of HIF-1 in T47D breast tumor cells (IC50 5.6 nM). Mechanistic studies revealed that kalkitoxin inhibits HIF-1 activation by suppressing mitochondrial oxygen consumption at electron transport chain (ETC) complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Further studies indicate that kalkitoxin targets tumor angiogenesis by blocking the induction of angiogenic factors (i.e., VEGF) in tumor cells. PMID:25803180

  10. Metabolic studies and neurotoxicity in tumors and brain of mice after hypoxic cell sensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Streffer, C.; Tamulevicius, P. )

    1994-06-15

    The effects of the radiosensitizers RK-28 and RP-170, both 2-nitroimidazole nucleoside analogues, and KU-2285, a fluorinated 2-nitroimidazole, as well as etanidazole (ETA) on glucose metabolism in mouse tumors and brain were studied to assess their degree of neurotoxicity. Adult male C57B1 mice received differing doses of the above sensitizers IP. Blood, brain, and tumor samples were removed at various times and the levels of glycolytic metabolites determined. Glucose uptake and phosphorylation in brain were measured by the 2-deoxyglucose method of Sokoloff et al. RP-170 showed neither signs of toxicity nor significant alterations in glucose metabolism in brain or tumor at doses up to 4 g/kg b.w. up to 4 h. By contrast, RK-28 was extremely neurotoxic at a dose of 1 g/kg b.w. with a high degree of lethality, resulting in a highly significant increase in the brain glucose level from 0.38 [mu]mol/g to 2.20 [mu]mol/g 2 h after administration, whereas that in the tumor was decreased. KU-2285 and ETA were significantly less toxic than RK-28 at this dose, as reflected in a lower increase in the brain glucose level (0.60 [mu]mol/g), although KU-2285 approaches that of RK-28 (1.43 [mu]mol/g) after 2 h following a dose of 2 g/kg b.w. However, in contrast to the other sensitizers, KU-2285 concomitantly also resulted in a highly significant continuous increase in tumor glucose levels. Labeled [sup 3]H-2deoxyglucose studies showed that RP-170 neither markedly affected the uptake of total radioactivity into the brain nor its degree of phosphorylation whereas, KU-2285 (2 g/kg) and RK-28 (1 g/kg) decreased uptake by [approximately]50% and phosphorylation approximately 3 and 4-fold, respectively. At doses of 1 g/kg, ETA and KU-2285 showed no significant changes in these parameters. This indicates a decreased level of neurotoxicity. 9 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  11. DNA damage in wounded, hypoxic and acidotic human skin fibroblast cell cultures after low laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins Evans, D.; Mbene, A.; Zungu, I.; Houreld, N.; Abrahamse, H.

    2009-02-01

    Phototherapy has become more popular and widely used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. To ensure sound results as evidence of its effectiveness, well designed experiments must be conducted when determining the effect of phototherapy. Cell culture models such as hypoxic, acidotic and wounded cell cultures simulating different disease conditions including ischemic heart disease, diabetes and wound healing were used to determine the effect of laser irradiation on the genetic integrity of the cell. Even though phototherapy has been found to be beneficial in a wide spectrum of conditions, it has been shown to induce DNA damage. However, this damage appears to be repairable. The risk lies in the fact that phototherapy may help the medical condition initially but damage DNA at the same time leaving undetected damage that may result in late onset, more severe, induced medical conditions including cancer. Human skin fibroblasts were cultured and used to induce a wound (by the central scratch model), hypoxic (by incubation in an anaerobic jar, 95% N2 and 5% O2) and acidotic (reducing the pH of the media to 6.7) conditions. Different models were irradiated using a Helium-Neon (632.8 nm) laser with a power density of 2.07 mW/cm2 and a fluence of 5 J/cm2 or 16 J/cm2. The effect of the irradiation was determined using the Comet assay 1 and 24 h after irradiation. In addition, the Comet assay was performed with the addition of formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) obviating strand brakes in oxidized bases at a high fluence of 16 J/cm2. A significant increase in DNA damage was seen in all three injured models at both 1 and 24 h post-irradiation when compared to the normal un-injured cells. However, when compared to non-irradiated controls the acidotic model showed a significant decrease in DNA damage 24 h after irradiation indicating the possible induction of cellular DNA repair mechanisms. When wounded cells were irradiated with higher fluences of 16 J/cm2

  12. Transcriptional Profiling of Hypoxic Neural Stem Cells Identifies Calcineurin-NFATc4 Signaling as a Major Regulator of Neural Stem Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Marta; Fernández, Virginia; Monllau, Josep M; Borrell, Víctor; Lerin, Carles; de la Iglesia, Núria

    2015-08-11

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in a hypoxic microenvironment within the brain. However, the crucial transcription factors (TFs) that regulate NSC biology under physiologic hypoxia are poorly understood. Here we have performed gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of microarray datasets from hypoxic versus normoxic NSCs with the aim of identifying pathways and TFs that are activated under oxygen concentrations mimicking normal brain tissue microenvironment. Integration of TF target (TFT) and pathway enrichment analysis identified the calcium-regulated TF NFATc4 as a major candidate to regulate hypoxic NSC functions. Nfatc4 expression was coordinately upregulated by top hypoxia-activated TFs, while NFATc4 target genes were enriched in hypoxic NSCs. Loss-of-function analyses further revealed that the calcineurin-NFATc4 signaling axis acts as a major regulator of NSC self-renewal and proliferation in vitro and in vivo by promoting the expression of TFs, including Id2, that contribute to the maintenance of the NSC state.

  13. Radiation enhances the therapeutic effect of Banoxantrone in hypoxic tumour cells with elevated levels of nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    MEHIBEL, MANAL; SINGH, SIMENDRA; COWEN, RACHEL L.; WILLIAMS, KAYE J.; STRATFORD, IAN J.

    2016-01-01

    Banoxantrone (AQ4N) is a prototype hypoxia selective cytotoxin that is activated by haem containing reductases such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In the present study, we evaluate whether elevated levels of iNOS in human tumour cells will improve their sensitivity to AQ4N. Further, we examine the potential of radiation to increase cellular toxicity of AQ4N under normoxic (aerobic) and hypoxic conditions. We employed an expression vector containing the cDNA for human iNOS to transfect human fibrosarcoma HT1080 tumour cells. Alternatively, parental cells were exposed to a cytokine cocktail to induce iNOS gene expression and enzymatic activity. The cells were then treated with AQ4N alone and in combination with radiation in the presence or absence of the iNOS inhibitor N-methyl-L-arginine. In parental cells, AQ4N showed little difference in toxicity under hypoxic verses normoxic conditions. Notably, cells with upregulated iNOS activity showed a significant increase in sensitivity to AQ4N, but only under conditions of reduced oxygenation. When these cells were exposed to the combination of AQ4N and radiation, there was much greater cell killing than that observed with either modality alone. In the clinical development of hypoxia selective cytotoxins it is likely they will be used in combination with radiotherapy. In the present study, we demonstrated that AQ4N can selectively kill hypoxic cells via an iNOS-dependent mechanism. This hypoxia-selective effect can be augmented by combining AQ4N with radiation without increasing cytotoxicity to well-oxygenated tissues. Collectively, these results suggest that targeting hypoxic tumours with high levels of iNOS with a combination of AQ4N and radiotherapy could be a useful clinical therapeutic strategy. PMID:26782976

  14. Quantitative imaging of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell localization and hypoxic status in the bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Nombela-Arrieta, César; Pivarnik, Gregory; Winkel, Beatrice; Canty, Kimberly J; Harley, Brendan; Mahoney, John E; Park, Shin-Young; Lu, Jiayun; Protopopov, Alexei; Silberstein, Leslie E

    2013-05-01

    The existence of a haematopoietic stem cell niche as a spatially confined regulatory entity relies on the notion that haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are strategically positioned in unique bone marrow microenvironments with defined anatomical and functional features. Here, we employ a powerful imaging cytometry platform to perform a comprehensive quantitative analysis of HSPC distribution in bone marrow cavities of femoral bones. We find that HSPCs preferentially localize in endosteal zones, where most closely interact with sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal bone marrow microvessels, which form a distinctive circulatory system. In situ tissue analysis reveals that HSPCs exhibit a hypoxic profile, defined by strong retention of pimonidazole and expression of HIF-1α, regardless of localization throughout the bone marrow, adjacency to vascular structures or cell-cycle status. These studies argue that the characteristic hypoxic state of HSPCs is not solely the result of a minimally oxygenated niche but may be partially regulated by cell-specific mechanisms.

  15. Mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: neuroprotective effects of combined therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Jiang, Feng; Li, Qifeng; He, Xiaoguang; Ma, Jie

    2014-10-01

    Neural stem cell transplantation is a useful treatment for ischemic stroke, but apoptosis often occurs in the hypoxic-ischemic environment of the brain after cell transplantation. In this study, we determined if mild hypothermia (27-28°C) can increase the survival rate of neural stem cells (1.0 × 10(5)/μL) transplanted into neonatal mice with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Long-term effects on neurological functioning of the mice were also examined. After mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation, we observed decreased expression levels of inflammatory factor nuclear factor-kappa B and apoptotic factor caspase-3, reduced cerebral infarct volumes, increased survival rate of transplanted cells, and marked improvements in neurological function. Thus, the neuroprotective effects of mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation are superior to those of monotherapy. Moreover, our findings suggest that the neuroprotective effects of mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy are achieved by anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:25422635

  16. Mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: neuroprotective effects of combined therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Jiang, Feng; Li, Qifeng; He, Xiaoguang; Ma, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cell transplantation is a useful treatment for ischemic stroke, but apoptosis often occurs in the hypoxic-ischemic environment of the brain after cell transplantation. In this study, we determined if mild hypothermia (27–28°C) can increase the survival rate of neural stem cells (1.0 × 105/μL) transplanted into neonatal mice with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Long-term effects on neurological functioning of the mice were also examined. After mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation, we observed decreased expression levels of inflammatory factor nuclear factor-kappa B and apoptotic factor caspase-3, reduced cerebral infarct volumes, increased survival rate of transplanted cells, and marked improvements in neurological function. Thus, the neuroprotective effects of mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation are superior to those of monotherapy. Moreover, our findings suggest that the neuroprotective effects of mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy are achieved by anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:25422635

  17. The radiomimetic enediyne, 20′-deschloro-C-1027 induces inter-strand DNA crosslinks in hypoxic cells and overcomes cytotoxic radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Beerman, Terry A.; Gawron, Loretta S.; Shen, Ben; Kennedy, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of the radiomimetic anti-tumor enediyne C-1027 to induce DNA inter-strand crosslinks (ICLs), in addition to the expected DNA strand breaks, is unique among traditional DNA targeted cancer therapies. Importantly, radiation therapy and most radiomimetic drugs have diminished effect in hypoxic environments due to decreased induction of DNA strand breaks, which is an oxygen requiring process. However, C-1027’s induction of ICLs is enhanced under hypoxia and it is actually more potent against hypoxic cells, overcoming this common tumor resistance mechanism. In this study, an analog of C-1027, 20′deschloro-C-1027 was examined for its ability to induce DNA ICLs under hypoxic conditions. Deschloro-induced ICLs were detected under hypoxic cell-free conditions, with a concomitant reduction in the induction of DNA strand breaks. In cells deschloro behaved similarly, inducing cellular ICLs under hypoxic conditions with a reduction in DNA breaks. The cytotoxicity of deschloro treatment was similar in normoxic and hypoxic cells, suggesting that the ICL induction allows deschloro to retain its cytotoxic activity under hypoxia. It appears that rational engineering of the C-1027 family of radiomimetics holds promise toward overcoming the radioresistance associated with the hypoxic environment associated with solid tumors. PMID:24986640

  18. PIM Kinase Inhibitors Kill Hypoxic Tumor Cells by Reducing Nrf2 Signaling and Increasing Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Warfel, Noel A; Sainz, Alva G; Song, Jin H; Kraft, Andrew S

    2016-07-01

    Intratumoral hypoxia is a significant obstacle to the successful treatment of solid tumors, and it is highly correlated with metastasis, therapeutic resistance, and disease recurrence in cancer patients. As a result, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapies that target hypoxic cells within the tumor microenvironment. The Proviral Integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus (PIM) kinases represent a prosurvival pathway that is upregulated in response to hypoxia, in a HIF-1-independent manner. We demonstrate that pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of PIM kinases is significantly more toxic toward cancer cells in hypoxia as compared with normoxia. Xenograft studies confirm that PIM kinase inhibitors impede tumor growth and selectively kill hypoxic tumor cells in vivo Experiments show that PIM kinases enhance the ability of tumor cells to adapt to hypoxia-induced oxidative stress by increasing the nuclear localization and activity of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which functions to increase the expression of antioxidant genes. Small molecule PIM kinase inhibitors prevent Nrf2 from accumulating in the nucleus, reducing the transcription of cytoprotective genes and leading to the build-up of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) to toxic levels in hypoxic tumor cells. This toxic effect of PIM inhibitors can be successfully blocked by ROS scavengers, including N-acetyl cystine and superoxide dismutase. Thus, inhibition of PIM kinases has the potential to oppose hypoxia-mediated therapeutic resistance and induce cell death in the hypoxic tumor microenvironment. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1637-47. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196781

  19. Transcriptional signature of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) preconditioned for chondrogenesis in hypoxic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pilgaard, L.; Lund, P.; Duroux, M.; Lockstone, H.; Taylor, J.; Emmersen, J.; Fink, T.; Ragoussis, J.; Zachar, V.

    2009-07-01

    Hypoxia is an important factor involved in the control of stem cells. To obtain a better insight into the phenotypical changes brought about by hypoxic preconditioning prior to chondrogenic differentiation; we have investigated growth, colony-forming and chondrogenic capacity, and global transcriptional responses of six adipose tissue-derived stem cell lines expanded at oxygen concentrations ranging from ambient to 1%. The assessment of cell proliferation and colony-forming potential revealed that the hypoxic conditions corresponding to 1% oxygen played a major role. The chondrogenic inducibility, examined by high-density pellet model, however, did not improve on hypoxic preconditioning. While the microarray analysis revealed a distinctive inter-donor variability, the exposure to 1% hypoxia superseded the biological variability and produced a specific expression profile with 2581 significantly regulated genes and substantial functional enrichment in the pathways of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, exposure to 1% oxygen resulted in upregulation of factors related to angiogenesis and cell growth. In particular, leptin (LEP), the key regulator of body weight and food intake was found to be highly upregulated. In conclusion, the results of this investigation demonstrate the significance of donor demographics and the importance of further studies into the use of regulated oxygen tension as a tool for preparation of ASCs in order to exploit their full potential.

  20. Respiration of mammalian cells at low concentrations of oxygen: I. Effect of hypoxic-cell radiosensitizing drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, C. J.; Biaglow, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Drugs which sensitize hypoxic mammalian cells to radiation damage in vitro can also affect the cellular respiration rate. This phenomenon was studied in detail to determine whether the changes in oxygen consumption occur at low oxygen concentrations and under optimal nutritional conditions. We have found that cells in tissue culture can undergo adaptive changes in respiration (electron flow) which make them insensitive to the effects of radiosensitizing drugs and even respiration uncouplers such as dinitrophenol, and the inhibitors rotenone and cyanide. At low cell densities, where nutrient depletion in the medium would be negligible, the drugs have reduced effects, particularly at low oxygen concentrations (below 40 mmHg oxygen partial pressure). Parallel cytotoxicity and growht inhibition studies indicate that most drugs are unlikely to have substantial effect on respiration at non-cytotoxic levels. PMID:277219

  1. Ultrasound-mediated destruction of oxygen and paclitaxel loaded lipid microbubbles for combination therapy in hypoxic ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiangchuan; Yin, Mingyue; Zhu, Shenyin; Liu, Li; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X; Chang, Shufang

    2016-01-01

    We synthesized oxygen and paclitaxel (PTX) loaded lipid microbubbles (OPLMBs) for ultrasound mediated combination therapy in hypoxic ovarian cancer cells. Our experiments successfully demonstrated that ultrasound induced OPLMBs destruction significantly enhanced the local oxygen release. We also demonstrated that OPLMBs in combination with ultrasound (300 kHz, 0.5 W/cm(2), 15s) yielded anti-proliferative activities of 52.8 ± 2.75% and cell apoptosis ratio of 35.25 ± 0.17% in hypoxic cells at 24h after the treatment, superior to other treatment groups such as PTX only and PTX-loaded MBs (PLMBs) with or without ultrasound mediation. RT-PCR and Western blot tests further confirmed the reduced expression of HIF-1α and MDR-1/P-gp after ultrasound mediation of OPLMBs. Our experiment suggests that ultrasound mediation of oxygen and drug-loaded MBs may be a useful method to overcome chemoresistance in the hypoxic ovarian cancer cells.

  2. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Iodoglucoazomycin (I-GAZ), an Azomycin-Glucose Adduct with Putative Applications in Diagnostic Imaging and Radiotherapy of Hypoxic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Piyush; Elsaidi, Hassan R H; Zorniak, Bohdarianna; Laurens, Evelyn; Yang, Jennifer; Bacchu, Veena; Wang, Monica; Wiebe, Leonard I

    2016-08-01

    Iodoglucoazomycin (I-GAZ; N-(2-iodo-3-(6-O-glucosyl)propyl)-2-nitroimidazole), a non-glycosidic nitroimidazole-6-O-glucose adduct, was synthesized, radioiodinated, and evaluated as a substrate of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) for radiotheranostic (therapy+diagnostic) management of hypoxic tumors. Nucleophilic iodination of the nosylate synthon of I-GAZ followed by deprotection afforded I-GAZ in 74 % overall yield. I-GAZ was radioiodinated via 'exchange' labeling using [(123/131) I]iodide (50-70 % RCY) and then purified by Sep-Pak™ (>96 % RCP). [(131) I]I-GAZ was stable in 2 % ethanolic solution in sterile water for 14 days when stored at 5 °C. In cell culture, I-GAZ was found to be nontoxic to EMT-6 cells at concentrations <0.5 mm, and weakly radiosensitizing (SER 1.1 at 10 % survival of EMT-6 cells; 1.2 at 0.1 % survival in MCF-7 cells). The hypoxic/normoxic uptake ratio of [(123) I]I-GAZ in EMT-6 cells was 1.46 at 2 h, and under normoxic conditions the uptake of [(123) I]I-GAZ by EMT-6 cells was unaltered in the presence of 5 mm glucose. The biodistribution of [(131) I]I-GAZ in EMT-6 tumor-bearing Balb/c mice demonstrated rapid clearance from blood and extensive renal and hepatic excretion. Tumor/blood and tumor/muscle ratios reached ∼3 and 8, respectively, at 4 h post-injection. Regression analysis of the first order polynomial plots of the blood and tumor radioactivity concentrations supported a perfusion-excretion model with low hypoxia-dependent binding. [(131) I]I-GAZ was found to be stable in vivo, and did not deiodinate. PMID:27377671

  3. Continuous Hypoxic Culturing of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Enhances SSEA-3 and MYC Levels

    PubMed Central

    Laiho, Asta; Rahkonen, Nelly; Emani, Maheswara Reddy; Viitala, Miro; Laurila, Kirsti; Sahla, Roosa; Lund, Riikka; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Jaakkola, Panu; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2013-01-01

    Low oxygen tension (hypoxia) contributes critically to pluripotency of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) by preventing spontaneous differentiation and supporting self-renewal. However, it is not well understood how hESCs respond to reduced oxygen availability and what are the molecular mechanisms maintaining pluripotency in these conditions. In this study we characterized the transcriptional and molecular responses of three hESC lines (H9, HS401 and HS360) on short (2 hours), intermediate (24 hours) and prolonged (7 days) exposure to low oxygen conditions (4% O2). In response to prolonged hypoxia the expression of pluripotency surface marker SSEA-3 was increased. Furthermore, the genome wide gene-expression analysis revealed that a substantial proportion (12%) of all hypoxia-regulated genes in hESCs, were directly linked to the mechanisms controlling pluripotency or differentiation. Moreover, transcription of MYC oncogene was induced in response to continuous hypoxia. At the protein level MYC was stabilized through phosphorylation already in response to a short hypoxic exposure. Total MYC protein levels remained elevated throughout all the time points studied. Further, MYC protein expression in hypoxia was affected by silencing HIF2α, but not HIF1α. Since MYC has a crucial role in regulating pluripotency we propose that induction of sustained MYC expression in hypoxia contributes to activation of transcriptional programs critical for hESC self-renewal and maintenance of enhanced pluripotent state. PMID:24236059

  4. Therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells transplantation on hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bingchuan; Gu, Ping; Wang, Wenting; Dong, Ci; Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Huimiao; Qiu, Fucheng; Han, Rui; Zhang, Zhenqing; Yan, Baoyong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) hold substantial promise for the treatment of ischemic neurological disease, but few clinical data are currently available about its therapeutic effects in hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). This study is to evaluate the effects of hUC-MSCs transplantation on patients with HIE. Methods A total 22 patients with HIEwere randomly divided into hUC-MSCs transplantation group (n = 12) and control group (n = 10). After isolation, hUC-MSCs were cultured for 3 to 5 passages in vitro and then intravenously administered to HIE patients in the transplantation group, while the control group received routine treatment only. The outcomes of HIE patients were evaluated at designated time points by clinical assessment scales, including NIHSS, Barthel Index, MMSE, HAMA24, HAMD14 and UPDRS. Results: hUC-MSCs were identified by morphological analysis and flow cytometry assays before clinic transplantation. No significant differences of demographic characteristics were observed between the two groups of subjects. Compared to the control group, hUC-MSCs transplantation markedly improved the outcomes of HIE patients leading to better recovery of neurological function, cognition ability, emotional reaction and extrapyramidal function. No significant adverse effects were found in subjects with hUC-MSCs transplantation during a 180-day follow-up period. Conclusion: These data suggest that hUC-MSCs therapy markedly improves the outcomes of patients with HIE, which is potential for the routine treatment of ischemic neurological disease. PMID:27508046

  5. Melatonin promotes osteoblast differentiation and mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells under hypoxic conditions through activation of PKD/p38 pathways.

    PubMed

    Son, Jang-Ho; Cho, Yeong-Cheol; Sung, Iel-Yong; Kim, In-Ryoung; Park, Bong-Soo; Kim, Yong-Deok

    2014-11-01

    Osteoblastic differentiation and bone-forming capacity are known to be suppressed under hypoxic conditions. Melatonin has been shown to influence cell differentiation. A number of in vitro and in vivo studies have suggested that melatonin also has an anabolic effect on bone, by promoting osteoblastic differentiation. However, the precise mechanisms and the signaling pathways involved in this process, particularly under hypoxic conditions, are unknown. This study investigated whether melatonin could promote osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization of preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells under hypoxic conditions. Additionally, we examined the molecular signaling pathways by which melatonin mediates this process. We found that melatonin is capable of promoting differentiation and mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured under hypoxic conditions. Melatonin upregulated ALP activity and mRNA levels of Alp, Osx, Col1, and Ocn in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Alizarin red S staining showed that the mineralized matrix in hypoxic MC3T3-E1 cells formed in a manner that was dependent on melatonin concentration. Moreover, melatonin stimulated phosphorylation of p38 Mapk and Prkd1 in these MC3T3-E1 cells. We concluded that melatonin promotes osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells under hypoxic conditions via the p38 Mapk and Prkd1 signaling pathways. PMID:25250639

  6. Inhibitory effects of B-cell lymphoma 2 on the vasculogenic mimicry of hypoxic human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIANWEN; KE, YIQUAN; HUANG, MIN; HUANG, SHUYUN; LIANG, YIMING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms and effects of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) on the vasculogenic mimicry (VM) of human glioma cells. U87 cells were cultured under hypoxic conditions and then divided into four groups: Control, 3-(5-hydroxymethyl-2-furyl)-1-benzylindazole (YC-1), ABT-737 and YC-1 + ABT-737. These groups were treated with the corresponding simulators. The expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-14 and Bcl-2 in each group was determined using a reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Compared with that in the control group, the mRNA and protein expression of MMP-2, MMP-14 and Bcl-2 in the YC-1 and ABT-737 groups was significantly reduced. The expression of HIF-1α, however, was only significantly reduced in the YC-1 group (P<0.05). Compared with those in the YC-1 + ABT-737 group, the expression levels of the four proteins in the YC-1 and ABT-737 groups were not significantly different, with the exception of the expression of HIF-1α in the ABT-737 group, which was significantly enhanced (P<0.05). The mRNA expression levels of HIF-1α, MMP-2 and MMP-14 in the YC-1 group were significantly different from those in the ABT-737 group (P<0.01); however, no significant difference was observed in the expression of Bcl-2. In conclusion, Bcl-2 may be an important factor in the VM formation of human malignant glioma U87 cells under hypoxic conditions. Certain functions of Bcl-2 may be attributed to the HIF-1α-MMP-2-MMP-14-VM channel, whereas other functions may be independent of the channel. PMID:25667663

  7. Hypoxic stress induces, but cannot sustain trophoblast stem cell differentiation to labyrinthine placenta due to mitochondrial insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yufen; Zhou, Sichang; Jiang, Zhongliang; Dai, Jing; Puscheck, Elizabeth E; Lee, Icksoo; Parker, Graham; Hüttemann, Maik; Rappolee, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunctional stem cell differentiation into placental lineages is associated with gestational diseases. Of the differentiated lineages available to trophoblast stem cells (TSC), elevated O2 and mitochondrial function are necessary to placental lineages at the maternal-placental surface and important in the etiology of preeclampsia. TSC lineage imbalance leads to embryonic failure during uterine implantation. Stress at implantation exacerbates stem cell depletion by decreasing proliferation and increasing differentiation. Implantation site O2 is normally ~2%. In culture, exposure to 2% O2 and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)4 enabled highest mouse TSC multipotency and proliferation. In contrast, hypoxic stress (0.5% O2) initiated the most TSC differentiation after 24 hr despite FGF4. However, hypoxic stress supported differentiation poorly after 4–7 days, despite FGF4 removal. At all tested O2 levels, FGF4 maintained Warburg metabolism; mitochondrial inactivity and aerobic glycolysis. However, hypoxic stress suppressed mitochondrial membrane potential, maintained low mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (oxidative phosphorylation/OxPhos), and high pyruvate kinase M2 (glycolysis) despite FGF4 removal. Inhibiting OxPhos inhibited differentiation at the differentiation optimum at 20% O2. Moreover, adding differentiation-inducing hyperosmolar stress failed to induce differentiation during hypoxia. Thus, differentiation depended on OxPhos at 20% O2; hypoxic and hyperosmolar stresses did not induce differentiation at 0.5% O2. Hypoxia-limited differentiation and mitochondrial inhibition and activation suggest that differentiation into two lineages of the labyrinthine placenta requires O2>0.5–2% and mitochondrial function. Stress-activated protein kinase increases an early lineage and suppresses later lineages in proportion to the deviation from optimal O2 for multipotency, thus it is the first enzyme reported to prioritize differentiation. PMID:25239494

  8. Hypothermia augments neuroprotective activity of mesenchymal stem cells for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Park, Won Soon; Sung, Se In; Ahn, So Yoon; Yoo, Hye Soo; Sung, Dong Kyung; Im, Geun Ho; Choi, Soo Jin; Chang, Yun Sil

    2015-01-01

    Though hypothermia is the only clinically available treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), it is not completely effective in severe cases. We hypothesized that combined treatment with hypothermia and transplantation of human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) would synergistically attenuate severe HIE compared to stand-alone therapy. To induce hypoxia-ischemia (HI), male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 8% oxygen for 120 min after unilateral carotid artery ligation on postnatal day (P) 7. After confirmation of severe HIE involving >50% of the ipsilateral hemisphere volume as determined by diffusion-weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 2 h after HI, intraventricular MSC transplantation (1 × 105 cells) and/or hypothermia with target temperature at 32°C for 24 h were administered 6 h after induction of HI. Follow-up brain MRI at P12 and P42, sensorimotor function tests at P40-42, evaluation of cytokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at P42, and histologic analysis of peri-infarct tissues at P42 were performed. Severe HI resulted in progressively increased brain infarction over time as assessed by serial MRI, increased number of cells positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick-end labeling, microgliosis and astrocytosis, increased CSF cytokine levels, and impaired function in behavioral tests such as rotarod and cylinder tests. All of the abnormalities observed in severe HIE showed greater improvement after combined treatment with hypothermia and MSC transplantation than with either therapy alone. Overall, these findings suggest that combined treatment with hypothermia and human UCB-derived MSC transplantation might be a novel therapeutic modality to improve the prognosis of severe HIE, an intractable disease that currently has no effective treatment.

  9. Hypothermia augments neuroprotective activity of mesenchymal stem cells for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Park, Won Soon; Sung, Se In; Ahn, So Yoon; Yoo, Hye Soo; Sung, Dong Kyung; Im, Geun Ho; Choi, Soo Jin; Chang, Yun Sil

    2015-01-01

    Though hypothermia is the only clinically available treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), it is not completely effective in severe cases. We hypothesized that combined treatment with hypothermia and transplantation of human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) would synergistically attenuate severe HIE compared to stand-alone therapy. To induce hypoxia-ischemia (HI), male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 8% oxygen for 120 min after unilateral carotid artery ligation on postnatal day (P) 7. After confirmation of severe HIE involving >50% of the ipsilateral hemisphere volume as determined by diffusion-weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 2 h after HI, intraventricular MSC transplantation (1 × 105 cells) and/or hypothermia with target temperature at 32°C for 24 h were administered 6 h after induction of HI. Follow-up brain MRI at P12 and P42, sensorimotor function tests at P40-42, evaluation of cytokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at P42, and histologic analysis of peri-infarct tissues at P42 were performed. Severe HI resulted in progressively increased brain infarction over time as assessed by serial MRI, increased number of cells positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick-end labeling, microgliosis and astrocytosis, increased CSF cytokine levels, and impaired function in behavioral tests such as rotarod and cylinder tests. All of the abnormalities observed in severe HIE showed greater improvement after combined treatment with hypothermia and MSC transplantation than with either therapy alone. Overall, these findings suggest that combined treatment with hypothermia and human UCB-derived MSC transplantation might be a novel therapeutic modality to improve the prognosis of severe HIE, an intractable disease that currently has no effective treatment. PMID:25816095

  10. Loss of cell adhesion molecule CHL1 improves homeostatic adaptation and survival in hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Huang, X; Sun, J; Rong, W; Zhao, T; Li, D H; Ding, X; Wu, L Y; Wu, K; Schachner, M; Xiao, Z C; Zhu, L L; Fan, M

    2013-01-01

    Close homologue of L1 (CHL1) is a transmembrane cell adhesion molecule that is critical for brain development and for the maintenance of neural circuits in adults. Recent studies revealed that CHL1 has diverse roles and is involved in the regulation of recovery after spinal cord injury. CHL1 expression was downregulated in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and brain stem after the induction of acute hypoxia (AH). In the current study, we sought to address the role of CHL1 in regulating homeostasis responses to hypoxia using CHL1-knockout (CHL1(-/-)) mice. We found that, compared with wild-type littermates, CHL1(-/-) mice showed a dramatically lower mortality rate and an augmented ventilatory response after they were subjected to AH. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that CHL1 was expressed in the carotid body (CB), the key oxygen sensor in rodents, and CHL1 expression level in the CB as assayed by western blot was decreased after hypoxic exposure. The number of glomus cells and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (a marker for glomus cells) in the CB of CHL1(-/-) mice appeared to be increased compared with CHL1(+/+) mice. In addition, in the ex vivo CB preparation, hypoxia induced a significantly greater afferent nerve discharge in CHL1(-/-) mice compared with CHL1(+/+) mice. Furthermore, the arterial blood pressure and plasma catecholamine levels of CHL1(-/-) mice were also significantly higher than those of CHL1(+/+) mice. Our findings first demonstrate that CHL1 is a novel intrinsic factor that is involved in CB function and in the ventilatory response to AH. PMID:23949217

  11. The Transcription Factor ZNF395 Is Required for the Maximal Hypoxic Induction of Proinflammatory Cytokines in U87-MG Cells

    PubMed Central

    Herwartz, Christine; Castillo-Juárez, Paola; Schröder, Linda; Barron, Blanca L.; Steger, Gertrud

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia activates the expression of proangiogenic and survival promoting factors as well as proinflammatory cytokines that support tissue inflammation. Hypoxia and inflammation are associated with tumor progression. The identification of the factors participating in the hypoxia associated inflammation is essential to develop strategies to control tumor hypoxia. The transcription factor ZNF395 was found to be overexpressed in various tumors including glioblastomas particularly in the network of a hypoxic response pointing to a functional role of ZNF395. On the other hand, ZNF395 was suggested to have tumor suppressor activities which may rely on its repression of proinflammatory factors. To address these conflictive observations, we investigated the role of ZNF395 in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the astrocytoma cell line U87-MG under hypoxia. We show that ZNF395 is a target gene of the hypoxia inducible factor HIF-1α. By gene expression analysis, RT-PCR and ELISA, we demonstrated that the siRNA-mediated suppression of ZNF395 impairs the hypoxic induction of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and LIF in U87-MG cells. At ambient oxygen concentrations, ZNF395 had no enhancing effect, indicating that this transcriptional activation by ZNF395 is restricted to hypoxic conditions. Our results suggest that ZNF395 contributes to hypoxia associated inflammation by superactivating proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:26229239

  12. Preclinical and Clinical Evidence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Persistence in the Hypoxic Niche of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells after Therapy.

    PubMed

    Garhyan, Jaishree; Bhuyan, Seema; Pulu, Ista; Kalita, Deepjyoti; Das, Bikul; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), the causative agent of pulmonary tuberculosis, is difficult to eliminate by antibiotic therapy. We recently identified CD271(+) bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) as a potential site of MTB persistence after therapy. Herein, we have characterized the potential hypoxic localization of the post-therapy MTB-infected CD271(+) BM-MSCs in both mice and human subjects. We first demonstrate that in a Cornell model of MTB persistence in mice, green fluorescent protein-labeled virulent MTB-strain H37Rv was localized to pimonidazole (an in vivo hypoxia marker) positive CD271(+) BM-MSCs after 90 days of isoniazid and pyrazinamide therapy that rendered animal's lung noninfectious. The recovered CD271(+) BM-MSCs from post-therapy mice, when injected into healthy mice, caused active tuberculosis infection in the animal's lung. Moreover, MTB infection significantly increased the hypoxic phenotype of CD271(+) BM-MSCs. Next, in human subjects, previously treated for pulmonary tuberculosis, the MTB-containing CD271(+) BM-MSCs exhibited high expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and low expression of CD146, a hypoxia down-regulated cell surface marker of human BM-MSCs. These data collectively demonstrate the potential localization of MTB harboring CD271(+) BM-MSCs in the hypoxic niche, a critical microenvironmental factor that is well known to induce the MTB dormancy phenotype. PMID:26066709

  13. The dietary flavonoid kaempferol effectively inhibits HIF-1 activity and hepatoma cancer cell viability under hypoxic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mylonis, Ilias; Lakka, Achillia; Tsakalof, Andreas; Simos, George

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Kaempferol inhibits HIF-1 activity in hepatocarcinoma cells; {yields} Kaempferol causes cytoplasmic mislocalization of HIF-1{alpha} by impairing the MAPK pathway. {yields} Viability of hepatocarcinoma cells under hypoxia is reduced by kaempferol. -- Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is characterized by high mortality rates and resistance to conventional treatment. HCC tumors usually develop local hypoxia, which stimulates proliferation of cancer cells and renders them resilient to chemotherapy. Adaptation of tumor cells to the hypoxic conditions depends on the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). Over-expression of its regulated HIF-1{alpha} subunit, an important target of anti-cancer therapy, is observed in many cancers including HCC and is associated with severity of tumor growth and poor patient prognosis. In this report we investigate the effect of the dietary flavonoid kaempferol on activity, expression levels and localization of HIF-1{alpha} as well as viability of human hepatoma (Huh7) cancer cells. Treatment of Huh7 cells with kaempferol under hypoxic conditions (1% oxygen) effectively inhibited HIF-1 activity in a dose-dependent manner (IC{sub 50} = 5.16 {mu}M). The mechanism of this inhibition did not involve suppression of HIF-1{alpha} protein levels but rather its mislocalization into the cytoplasm due to inactivation of p44/42 MAPK by kaempferol (IC{sub 50} = 4.75 {mu}M). Exposure of Huh7 cells to 10 {mu}{Mu} kaempferol caused significant reduction of their viability, which was remarkably more evident under hypoxic conditions. In conclusion, kaempferol, a non-toxic natural food component, inhibits both MAPK and HIF-1 activity at physiologically relevant concentrations (5-10 {mu}M) and suppresses hepatocarcinoma cell survival more efficiently under hypoxia. It has, therefore, potential as a therapeutic or chemopreventive anti-HCC agent.

  14. Exosomes from hypoxic endothelial cells have increased collagen crosslinking activity through up-regulation of lysyl oxidase-like 2.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Olivier G; van Balkom, Bas W M; Gremmels, Hendrik; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2016-02-01

    Exosomes are important mediators of intercellular communication. Additionally, they contain a variety of components capable of interacting with the extracellular matrix (ECM), including integrins, matrix metalloproteinases and members of the immunoglobin superfamily. Despite these observations, research on exosome-ECM interactions is limited. Here, we investigate whether the exosome-associated lysyl oxidase family member lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) is involved in ECM remodelling. We found that LOXL2 is present on the exterior of endothelial cell (EC)-derived exosomes, placing it in direct vicinity of the ECM. It is up-regulated twofold in EC-derived exosomes cultured under hypoxic conditions. Intact exosomes from hypoxic EC and LOXL2 overexpressing EC show increased activity in a fluorometric lysyl oxidase enzymatic activity assay as well as in a collagen gel contraction assay. Concordantly, knockdown of LOXL2 in exosome-producing EC in both normal and hypoxic conditions reduces activity of exosomes in both assays. Our findings show for the first time that ECM crosslinking by EC-derived exosomes is mediated by LOXL2 under the regulation of hypoxia, and implicate a role for exosomes in hypoxia-regulated focal ECM remodelling, a key process in both fibrosis and wound healing.

  15. Role of ROS signaling in differential hypoxic Ca2+ and contractile responses in pulmonary and systemic vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Xiao; Zheng, Yun-Min

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia causes a large increase in [Ca2+]i and attendant contraction in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), but not in systemic artery SMCs. The different responses meet the respective functional needs in these two distinct vascular myocytes; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well known. We and other investigators have provided extensive evidence to reveal that voltage-dependent K+ (KV) channels, canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels, ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channels (RyRs), cyclic adenosine diphosphate-ribose, FK506 binding protein 12.6, protein kinase C, NADPH oxidase and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the essential effectors and signaling intermediates in the hypoxic increase in [Ca2+]i in PASMCs and HPV, but they may not primarily underlie the diverse cellular responses in pulmonary and systemic vascular myocytes. Hypoxia significantly increases mitochondrial ROS generation in PASMCs, which can induce intracellular Ca2+ release by opening RyRs, and may also cause extracellular Ca2+ influx by inhibiting KV channels and activating TRPC channels, leading to a large increase in [Ca2+]i in PASMCs and HPV. In contrast, hypoxia has no or a minor effect on mitochondrial ROS generation in systemic SMCs, thereby causing no change or a negligible increase in [Ca2+]i and contraction. Further preliminary work indicates that Rieske iron–sulfur protein in the mitochondrial complex III may perhaps serve as a key initial molecular determinant for the hypoxic increase in [Ca2+]i in PASMCs and HPV, suggesting its potential important role in different cellular changes to respond to hypoxic stimulation in pulmonary and systemic artery myocytes. All these findings have greatly improved our understanding of the molecular processes for the differential hypoxic Ca2+ and contractile responses in vascular SMCs from distinct pulmonary and systemic circulation systems. PMID:20713188

  16. Factors associated with the preincubation effect of hypoxic cell sensitizers in vitro and their possible implications in chemosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Roizin-Towle, L.; Biaglow, J.E.; Meltzer, H.L.; Varnes, M.E.

    1984-06-01

    The enhancement of melphalan toxicity was observed by preincubation of V-79-379A cells in spinner culture with multiple doses of misonidazole (miso) or SR-2508 under hypoxic conditions. Chemosensitization was shown to be a function of sensitizer concentration and duration of exposure to the alkylating agent. Cells preincubated with miso not only had lower levels of nonprotein thiols, but also were shown to have altered levels of intracellular calcium and a lower threshold to oxidative stress as measured by toxicity to cysteamine or H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. Preincubated cells, hypoxic cells, and cells receiving moderate hyperthermia (42.5/sup 0/C for 3 hr) all showed increased sensitivity to either cysteamine or H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. The increased killing of preincubated cells by cysteamine was shown to be similar to that of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, and the dramatic reduction of cysteamine toxicity by catalase indicated H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was the major reaction associated with this effect. These results indicate that preincubated cells exhibit a variety of biological effects that may significantly influence their response to further treatment with drugs or radiation, especially where peroxidative and free radical mechanisms are involved.

  17. Patient-specific modeling and analysis of dynamic behavior of individual sickle red blood cells under hypoxic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E.; Li, Zhen; Tang, Yu-Hang; Lu, Lu; Dao, Ming; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disorder exhibiting heterogeneous morphology and abnormal dynamics under hypoxic conditions. We developed a time-dependent cell model that is able to simulate the dynamic processes of repeated sickling and unsickling of red blood cells (RBCs) under physiological conditions. By using the kinetic cell model with parameters derived from patient-specific data, we present a mesoscopic computational study of the dynamic behavior of individual sickle RBCs flowing in a microfluidic channel with multiple microgates. We investigate how individual sickle RBCs behave differently from healthy ones in channel flow, and analyze the alteration of cellular behavior and response to single-cell capillary obstruction induced by cell rheologic rigidification and morphological change due to cell sickling under hypoxic conditions. We also simulate the flow dynamics of sickle RBCs treated with hydroxyurea (HU) and quantify the relative enhancement of hemodynamic performance of HU. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Grant U01HL114476.

  18. Combination of nicotinamide and hyperthermia to eliminate radioresistant chronically and acutely hypoxic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horsman, M.R.; Chaplin, D.J.; Overgaard, J. )

    1990-12-01

    The interaction among nicotinamide, radiation, and heat was studied in vivo using a C3H mouse mammary carcinoma grown in the feet of CDF1 mice. Response following local tumor treatment was assessed by tumor control and regrowth delay. Nicotinamide (1000 mg/kg i.p.) produced maximal radiosensitization when injected 30 min to 2 h before irradiation (enhancement ratios (ERs), 1.2-1.5). Radiation damage was also increased by heating tumors (43.5 degrees C for 60 min) 4 h after irradiation (ERs = 1.6-2.6). This combined radiation and heat treatment was enhanced by nicotinamide but the effect depended on the assay procedure, such that although a significant increase was observed with the tumor control assay, only a slight increase was seen using regrowth delay as the end point. The development of moist desquamation in normal feet was used to estimate skin damage after irradiation. Nicotinamide and heat both resulted in a small yet significant increase in skin damage (ERs less than 1.2 and 1.1, respectively). A combined treatment resulted in a greater ER of 1.7, but when compared to the tumor response it still gave a therapeutic gain. A histological fluorescent staining technique was used to assess functional tumor vasculature at two periods in time separated by 20 min. Under normal conditions 7.7% of the vessels in this tumor were functional at one time but not the other. This value was reduced to 2.8% after nicotinamide administration. Since these fluctuations in blood flow can result in acute hypoxia we conclude that while heat eliminates chronically hypoxic tumor cells, nicotinamide probably removes the presence of acute hypoxia.

  19. Synthesis and radiolabeling of (64)Cu-labeled 2-nitroimidazole derivative (64)Cu-BMS2P2 for hypoxia imaging.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zheng; Zhu, Hua; Lin, Xinfeng; Chu, Taiwei; Luo, Ruyi; Wang, Yunhua; Yang, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) probe with hypoxia targeting specificity and a relatively long half-life. The synthesis, (64)Cu-labeling in vitro and in vivo study of the novel 2-nitroimidazole complex (64)Cu-BMS2P2 is presented in this study. The hypoxia targeting capacity of (64)Cu-BMS2P2 in vitro was evaluated and compared with the (64)Cu-BMS181321, and confirmed by PET imaging in vivo and immunohistochemistry for carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) in a tumor mouse model. These results suggest that (64)Cu-BMS2P2 is a promising candidate for PET hypoxia imaging and worthy of further investigations in dynamic hypoxia imaging.

  20. Correlation between radiosensitivity, percentage hypoxic cells and pO2 measurements in one rodent and two human tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C D; Chavaudra, N; Martin, L; Guichard, M

    1994-07-01

    Computerized pO2 histography has been used to measure the intratumor pO2 in patients for the past few years, and there is now evidence that these tumors contain hypoxic cells. One of the major questions that remains to be answered is the relevance of such data to radiosensitivity. The present study looks for a correlation between intratumor pO2, the percentage of hypoxic cells in the tumor and the radiosensitization induced by carbogen and/or the oxygen carrier, perflubron emulsion. Two human tumor xenografts (HRT18, Na11+) and one rodent tumor (EMT6) were used. The radiosensitivity (clonogenic assay) and the oxygen tension (computerized pO2 histography) were measured. All experiments were performed under similar conditions. Carbogen increased tumor radiosensitivity; sensitization was greatest when 4 ml/kg perflubron emulsion was used in conjunction with carbogen. The pO2 distribution was shifted to higher pO2 values in the tumors whatever the treatment; the shift was greater for perflubron emulsion plus carbogen. The low pO2 values (< 0.4 kPa) were lost for the HRT18 cells. A correlation (EMT6, HRT18) or a link (Na11+) between the radiosensitization and the oxygen tension measurements was found for values below 1.07 or 1.33 kPa. A trend between the percentage of hypoxic cells and pO2 measurements was found taking into account pO2 measurements comprised between 0.27 and 0.67 kPa. PMID:8016297

  1. In vivo click reaction between Tc-99m-labeled azadibenzocyclooctyne-MAMA and 2-nitroimidazole-azide for tumor hypoxia targeting.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjing; Chu, Taiwei

    2015-10-15

    The bioactivity of nitroimidazole in Tc-99m-labeled 2-nitroimidazole, a traditional solid tumor hypoxia-imaging agent for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), is reduced by the presence of large ligand and metallic radionuclide, exhibiting lower tumor-to-nontumor ratios. In an effort to solve this general problem, a pretargeting strategy based on click chemistry (strain-promoted cyclooctyne-azide cycloaddition) was applied. The functional click synthons were synthesized as pretargeting components: an azide group linked to 2-nitroimidazole (2NIM-Az) serves for tumor hypoxia-targeting and azadibenzocyclooctyne conjugated with monoamine monoamide dithiol ligand (AM) functions as radiolabeling and binding group to azides in vivo. 2NIM-triazole-MAMA was obtained from in vitro click reaction with a reaction rate constant of 0.98M(-1)s(-1). AM and 2NIM-triazole-MAMA were radiolabeled with Tc-99m. The hypoxia-pretargeting biodistribution was studied in Kunming mice bearing S180 tumor; (99m)Tc-AM and (99m)Tc-triazole-2NIM were used as blank control and conventional control. Compared to the control groups, the pretargeting experiment exhibits the best radio-uptake and retention in tumor, with higher tumor-to-muscle and tumor-to-blood ratios (up to 8.55 and 1.44 at 8h post-(99m)Tc-complex-injection, respectively). To some extent, the pretargeting strategy protects the bioactivity of nitroimidazole and therefore provides an innovative approach for the development of tumor hypoxia-SPECT imaging agents. PMID:26358160

  2. In vivo click reaction between Tc-99m-labeled azadibenzocyclooctyne-MAMA and 2-nitroimidazole-azide for tumor hypoxia targeting.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjing; Chu, Taiwei

    2015-10-15

    The bioactivity of nitroimidazole in Tc-99m-labeled 2-nitroimidazole, a traditional solid tumor hypoxia-imaging agent for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), is reduced by the presence of large ligand and metallic radionuclide, exhibiting lower tumor-to-nontumor ratios. In an effort to solve this general problem, a pretargeting strategy based on click chemistry (strain-promoted cyclooctyne-azide cycloaddition) was applied. The functional click synthons were synthesized as pretargeting components: an azide group linked to 2-nitroimidazole (2NIM-Az) serves for tumor hypoxia-targeting and azadibenzocyclooctyne conjugated with monoamine monoamide dithiol ligand (AM) functions as radiolabeling and binding group to azides in vivo. 2NIM-triazole-MAMA was obtained from in vitro click reaction with a reaction rate constant of 0.98M(-1)s(-1). AM and 2NIM-triazole-MAMA were radiolabeled with Tc-99m. The hypoxia-pretargeting biodistribution was studied in Kunming mice bearing S180 tumor; (99m)Tc-AM and (99m)Tc-triazole-2NIM were used as blank control and conventional control. Compared to the control groups, the pretargeting experiment exhibits the best radio-uptake and retention in tumor, with higher tumor-to-muscle and tumor-to-blood ratios (up to 8.55 and 1.44 at 8h post-(99m)Tc-complex-injection, respectively). To some extent, the pretargeting strategy protects the bioactivity of nitroimidazole and therefore provides an innovative approach for the development of tumor hypoxia-SPECT imaging agents.

  3. Role of the ERK1/2 Signaling Pathway in Osteogenesis of Rat Tendon-Derived Stem Cells in Normoxic and Hypoxic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei; Xu, Yuan; Gan, Yibo; Song, Lei; Zhang, Chengmin; Wang, Liyuan; Zhou, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ectopic ossification and increased vascularization are two common phenomena in the chronic tendinopathic tendon. The increased vascularization usually leads to an elevated local oxygen tension which is one of micro-environments that can influence differentiate status of stem cells. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the osteogenesis capacity of rat tendon-derived stem cells TDSCs (rTDSCs) in normoxic and hypoxic cultures, and to study the role of ERK1/2 signaling pathway in this process. Methods: rTDSCs were subjected to osteogenesis inductive culture in hypoxic (3% O2) and normoxic (20% O2) conditions. The inhibitor U0126 was added along with culture medium to determine the role of ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Cell viability, cell proliferation, alizarin red staining, alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity, gene expression (ALP, osteocalcin, collagen I and RUNX2) and protein expression (p-ERK1/2 and RUNX2) of osteogenic-cultured rTSDCs were analyzed in this study. Results: Hypoxic and normoxic culture had no effects on cell viability of rTDSCs, whereas the proliferation potential of rTDSCs was significantly increased in hypoxic culture. The osteogenesis capacity of rTDSCs in normoxic culture was significantly promoted compared with hypoxic culture, which was reflected by an increased alizarin red staining intensity, an elevated ALP activity, and the up-regulated gene (ALP, osteocalcin, collagen I and RUNX2) or protein (RUNX2) expression of osteogenic makers. However, the osteogenesis capacity of rTDSCs in both hypoxic and normoxic cultures was attenuated by the inhibitor U0126. Conclusion: Normoxic culture promotes osteogenic differentiation of rTDSCs compared with the hypoxic culture, and the ERK1/2 signaling pathway is involved in this process. PMID:27499695

  4. 1,2-Benzisothiazole Derivatives Bearing 4-, 5-, or 6-Alkyl/arylcarboxamide Moieties Inhibit Carbonic Anhydrase Isoform IX (CAIX) and Cell Proliferation under Hypoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Coviello, Vito; Marchi, Beatrice; Sartini, Stefania; Quattrini, Luca; Marini, Anna Maria; Simorini, Francesca; Taliani, Sabrina; Salerno, Silvia; Orlandi, Paola; Fioravanti, Anna; Desidero, Teresa Di; Vullo, Daniela; Da Settimo, Federico; Supuran, Claudiu T; Bocci, Guido; La Motta, Concettina

    2016-07-14

    Three novel series of 1,2-benzisothiazole derivatives have been developed as inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase isoform IX. Compounds 5c and 5j, tested in vitro on the human colon cell line HT-29, blocked the growth of cells cultured under chemically induced hypoxic conditions, displaying a specific activity against cancer cells characterized by CAIX up-regulation. Moreover, a synergistic activity of 5c with SN-38 (the active metabolite of irinotecan) and 5-fluorouracil on cell proliferation under hypoxic conditions was demonstrated. PMID:27305384

  5. Downregulation of miR-210 expression inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis and enhances radiosensitivity in hypoxic human hepatoma cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wei; Sun, Ting; Cao, Jianping; Liu, Fenju; Tian, Ye; Zhu, Wei

    2012-05-01

    Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and an important contributor to tumor radioresistance. miR-210 is the most consistently and robustly induced microRNA under hypoxia in different types of tumor cells and normal cells. In the present study, to explore the feasibility of miR-210 as an effective therapeutic target, lentiviral-mediated anti-sense miR-210 gene transfer technique was employed to downregulate miR-210 expression in hypoxic human hepatoma SMMC-7721, HepG2 and HuH7 cells, and phenotypic changes of which were analyzed. Hypoxia led to an increased hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) and miR-210 expression and cell arrest in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase in all cell lines. miR-210 downregulation significantly suppressed cell viability, induced cell arrest in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase, increased apoptotic rate and enhanced radiosensitivity in hypoxic human hepatoma cells. Moreover, apoptosis-inducing factor, mitochondrion-associated, 3 (AIFM3) was identified as a direct target gene of miR-210. AIFM3 downregulation by siRNA attenuated radiation induced apoptosis in miR-210 downregulated hypoxic human hepatoma cells. Taken together, these data suggest that miR-210 might be a potential therapeutic target and specific inhibition of miR-210 expression in combination with radiotherapy might be expected to exert strong anti-tumor effect on hypoxic human hepatoma cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-210 downregulation radiosensitized hypoxic hepatoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIFM3 was identified as a direct target gene of miR-210. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-210 might be a therapeutic target to hypoxic hepatoma.

  6. Design of hypoxia-targeting radiopharmaceuticals: selective uptake of copper-64 complexes in hypoxic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dearling, J L; Lewis, J S; Mullen, G E; Rae, M T; Zweit, J; Blower, P J

    1998-07-01

    The well-known perfusion tracer CuPTSM, labelled with 62Cu or 64Cu, is believed to be trapped in cells non-selectively by a bioreductive mechanism. It is proposed that by modifying the ligand to increase its electron donor strength (for example by adding alkyl functionality or replacing sulphur ligands with oxygen ligands), the copper complexes will become less easily reduced and tracers with selectivity for hypoxic tissues could thus be developed. The aim of this work was to prepare 64Cu-labelled complexes of two series of ligands, based on the bis(thiosemicarbazone) (13 ligands) and bis(salicylaldimine) (3 ligands) skeletons, and to evaluate the hypoxia dependence of their uptake in cells. The complexes were incubated with Chinese hamster ovary cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and the cells isolated by centrifugation to determine radioactivity uptake at various time points up to 90 min. Several members of both series demonstrated significant (P<0.05) or highly significant (P<0.01) hypoxia selectivity, indicating that both series of complexes offer a basis for development of hypoxia-targeting radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (60Cu, 61Cu, 62Cu, 64Cu) and targeted radiotherapy (64Cu, 67Cu).

  7. Investigating the effect of hypoxic culture on the endothelial differentiation of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Griffith, Cai; Duffy, Garry P; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-12-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) are a unique stem cell source that may have great potential for use in tissue engineering (TE) due to their pluripotentiality. AFSCs have previously shown angiogenic potential and may present an alternative cell source for endothelial-like cells that could be used in range of applications, including the pre-vascularisation of TE constructs and the treatment of ischaemic diseases. This study investigated the ability of these cells to differentiate down an endothelial lineage with the aim of producing an endothelial-like cell suitable for use in pre-vascularisation. As hypoxia and the associated HIF-1 pathway have been implicated in the induction of angiogenesis in a number of biological processes, it was hypothesised that culture in hypoxic conditions could enhance the endothelial differentiation of AFSCs. The cells were cultured in endothelial cell media supplemented with 50 ng mL(-1) of VEGF, maintained in normoxia, intermittent hypoxia or continuous hypoxia and assessed for markers of endothelial differentiation at day 7 and 14. The results demonstrated that AFSCs subjected to these culture conditions display an endothelial gene expression profile and adopted functional endothelial cell characteristics indicative of early endothelial differentiation. Culture in continuous hypoxia enhanced endothelial gene expression but did not enhance functional endothelial cell characteristics. Overall, AFSCs subjected to endothelial stimuli demonstrated a less mature endothelial gene expression profile and phenotype when compared with HUVECs, the endothelial cell control. However, this study is the first time that the positive effect of an extended period of continuous hypoxic culture on endothelial differentiation in AFSCs has been demonstrated.

  8. Vitamin D Prevents Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction Induced by Sera from Women with Preeclampsia or Conditioned Media from Hypoxic Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Myerski, Ashley C.; von Kaisenberg, Constantin S.; Grundmann, Magdalena; Hubel, Carl A.; von Versen-Höynck, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Context Placenta-derived circulating factors contribute to the maternal endothelial dysfunction underlying preeclampsia. Endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC), a sub-population of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), are thought to be involved in vasculogenesis and endothelial repair. Low vitamin D concentrations are associated with an increased risk for preeclampsia. Objective We hypothesized that the function of human fetal ECFCs in culture would be suppressed by exposure to preeclampsia-related factors–preeclampsia serum or hypoxic placental conditioned medium– in a fashion reversed by vitamin D. Design, Setting, Patients ECFCs were isolated from cord blood of uncomplicated pregnancies and expanded in culture. Uncomplicated pregnancy villous placenta in explant culture were exposed to either 2% (hypoxic), 8% (normoxic) or 21% (hyperoxic) O2 for 48 h, after which the conditioned media (CM) was collected. Outcome Measures ECFC tubule formation (Matrigel assay) and migration were examined in the presence of either maternal serum from preeclampsia cases or uncomplicated pregnancy controls, or pooled CM, in the presence or absence of 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3. Results 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3 reversed the adverse effects of preeclampsia serum or CM from hypoxic placenta on ECFCs capillary-tube formation and migration. Silencing of VDR expression by VDR siRNA, VDR blockade, or VEGF pathway blockade reduced ECFC functional abilities. Effects of VDR or VEGF blockade were partially prevented by vitamin D. Conclusion Vitamin D promotes the capillary-like tubule formation and migration of ECFCs in culture, minimizing the negative effects of exposure to preeclampsia-related factors. Further evaluation of the role of vitamin D in ECFC regulation and preeclampsia is warranted. PMID:24887145

  9. Low glucose under hypoxic conditions induces unfolded protein response and produces reactive oxygen species in lens epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Elanchezhian, R; Palsamy, P; Madson, C J; Mulhern, M L; Lynch, D W; Troia, A M; Usukura, J; Shinohara, T

    2012-01-01

    Aging is enhanced by hypoxia and oxidative stress. As the lens is located in the hypoglycemic environment under hypoxia, aging lens with diabetes might aggravate these stresses. This study was designed to examine whether low glucose under hypoxic conditions induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), and also if the UPR then generates the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in lens epithelial cells (LECs). The UPR was activated within 1 h by culturing the human LECs (HLECs) and rat LECs in <1.5 mM glucose under hypoxic conditions. These conditions also induced the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant-protective UPR, production of ROS, and apoptosis. The rat LECs located in the anterior center region were the least susceptible to the UPR, whereas the proliferating LECs in the germinative zone were the most susceptible. Because the cortical lens fiber cells are differentiated from the LECs after the onset of diabetes, we suggest that these newly formed cortical fibers have lower levels of Nrf2, and are then oxidized resulting in cortical cataracts. Thus, low glucose and oxygen conditions induce the UPR, generation of ROS, and expressed the Nrf2 and Nrf2-dependent antioxidant enzymes at normal levels. But these cells eventually lose reduced glutathione (GSH) and induce apoptosis. The results indicate a new link between hypoglycemia under hypoxia and impairment of HLEC functions. PMID:22513875

  10. Transcriptional Profiling of Hypoxic Neural Stem Cells Identifies Calcineurin-NFATc4 Signaling as a Major Regulator of Neural Stem Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Marta; Fernández, Virginia; Monllau, Josep M.; Borrell, Víctor; Lerin, Carles; de la Iglesia, Núria

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in a hypoxic microenvironment within the brain. However, the crucial transcription factors (TFs) that regulate NSC biology under physiologic hypoxia are poorly understood. Here we have performed gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of microarray datasets from hypoxic versus normoxic NSCs with the aim of identifying pathways and TFs that are activated under oxygen concentrations mimicking normal brain tissue microenvironment. Integration of TF target (TFT) and pathway enrichment analysis identified the calcium-regulated TF NFATc4 as a major candidate to regulate hypoxic NSC functions. Nfatc4 expression was coordinately upregulated by top hypoxia-activated TFs, while NFATc4 target genes were enriched in hypoxic NSCs. Loss-of-function analyses further revealed that the calcineurin-NFATc4 signaling axis acts as a major regulator of NSC self-renewal and proliferation in vitro and in vivo by promoting the expression of TFs, including Id2, that contribute to the maintenance of the NSC state. PMID:26235896

  11. Modulation of p75 neurotrophin receptor under hypoxic conditions induces migration and invasion of C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-Chung; Luo, Sheng-Jie; Lin, Chun-Liang; Chang, Pey-Jium; Chen, Miao-Fen

    2015-01-01

    p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) has been reported to play important roles in various cancer types. However, the exact mechanism of tumorigenesis involving p75NTR is unknown. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the expression of p75NTR in malignant glioma and the impact on tumor cell migration and invasion. p75NTR and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression was down-regulated by short-hairpin RNA and up-regulated with expression vectors. By immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis, we found that p75NTR was expressed in both human and rat malignant gliomas. Knockdown of p75NTR increased the expression of vimentin, vascular endothelial growth factor, Matrix metalloproteinase 9, and TWIST, and enhanced the invasion and migration abilities assessed by transwell assay in the C6 tumor cells. Inverse expressions of p75NTR and HIF-1α were detected in glioma cell lines under hypoxic conditions, while increased HIF-1α significantly downregulated the expression of p75NTR, suggesting a HIF-1α-p75NTR-EMT pathway that may regulate glioma cells invasion and migration. Downregulation of p75NTR increased phosphorylation of Src, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin. Knockdown of p75NTR also dysregulated β-catenin-mediated cell junctions, and up-regulated the expressions of fibronectin and L1CAM in the cell-cell junctions, thus suggesting that p75NTR knockdown contributed to a more aggressive migration phenotype via FAK signaling pathway. Our studies suggested that modulation of p75NTR under hypoxic condition could enhance C6 cells migration and invasion by induction of EMT, and activation of the FAK pathway. The HIF-1α-p75NTR-EMT axis may play a central role in glioma tumorigenesis. PMID:25527128

  12. Azobenzene-caged sulforhodamine dyes: a novel class of ‘turn-on’ reactive probes for hypoxic tumor cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Piao, Wen; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Nagano, Tetsuo; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Romieu, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    New sulforhodamine-based fluorescent ‘turn-on’ probes have been developed for the direct imaging of cellular hypoxia. Rapid access to this novel class of water-soluble ‘azobenzene-caged’ fluorophores was made possible through an easily-implementable azo-coupling reaction between a fluorescent primary arylamine derived from a sulforhodamine 101 scaffold (named SR101-NaphtNH 2 ) and a tertiary aniline whose N-substituents are neutral, cationic, or zwitterionic. The detection mechanism is based on the bioreductive cleavage of the azo bond that restores strong far-red fluorescence (emission maximum at 625 nm) by regenerating the original sulforhodamine SR101-NaphtNH 2 . This valuable fluorogenic response was obtained for the three ‘smart’ probes studied in this work, as shown by an in vitro assay using rat liver microsomes placed under aerobic and then under hypoxic conditions. Most importantly, the probe namely SR101-NaphtNH 2 -Hyp-diMe was successfully applied for imaging the hypoxic status of tumor cells (A549 cells).

  13. Effects of 4E-BP1 expression on hypoxic cell cycle inhibition and tumor cell proliferation and survival

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Bryan C.; Lam, Jennifer C.; Young, Regina M.; Houghton, Peter J.; Keith, Brian; Simon, M. Celeste

    2008-01-01

    Elevated activity of the eIF4F complex, which controls initiation of cap-dependent mRNA translation, has been linked to cancer progression. eIF4E recruitment to eIF4F is the rate limiting step of complex assembly and is regulated by eIF4E-Binding Proteins (4E-BPs). When stimulated, the mammalian Target of Rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) phosphorylates 4E-BP1, which then releases eIF4E. Hypoxia inhibits mTORC1 activity and therefore cap-dependent protein synthesis. To establish a novel genetic test of the role of eIF4F activity in regulating cell division and viability within hypoxic tumor microenvironments, we generated shRNA mediated 4E-BP1 knock-down in Rh30 rhabdomyosarcoma cells. 4E-BP1 knock-down relieved hypoxia-mediated inhibition of cycle progression in vitro and was correlated with increased expression of cyclin D1 and c-Myc. Xenograft tumors derived from these cells also displayed enhanced expression of cyclin D1 and c-Myc along with antiapoptotic genes encoding Bcl-xL, and XIAP, and failed to develop the extensive necrotic zones and edema observed in control tumors. Surprisingly, 4E-BP1 knock-down also leads to a dramatic increase in aberrant mitoses in vivo and enhanced expression of Mad2 and securin. Thus, reduced expression of the negative regulator of eIF4E has significant effects on tumor development, and is associated with enhanced cell proliferation and survival. PMID:18708753

  14. MiR-210 promotes a hypoxic phenotype and increases radioresistance in human lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Grosso, S; Doyen, J; Parks, S K; Bertero, T; Paye, A; Cardinaud, B; Gounon, P; Lacas-Gervais, S; Noël, A; Pouysségur, J; Barbry, P; Mazure, N M; Mari, B

    2013-01-01

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to radiotherapy and chemotherapy is a major problem in the treatment of cancer. Recently, an additional mode of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-dependent transcriptional regulation, involving modulation of a specific set of micro RNAs (miRNAs), including miR-210, has emerged. We have recently shown that HIF-1 induction of miR-210 also stabilizes HIF-1 through a positive regulatory loop. Therefore, we hypothesized that by stabilizing HIF-1 in normoxia, miR-210 may protect cancer cells from radiation. We developed a non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC)-derived cell line (A549) stably expressing miR-210 (pmiR-210) or a control miRNA (pmiR-Ctl). The miR-210-expressing cells showed a significant stabilization of HIF-1 associated with mitochondrial defects and a glycolytic phenotype. Cells were subjected to radiation levels ranging from 0 to 10 Gy in normoxia and hypoxia. Cells expressing miR-210 in normoxia had the same level of radioresistance as control cells in hypoxia. Under hypoxia, pmiR-210 cells showed a low mortality rate owing to a decrease in apoptosis, with an ability to grow even at 10 Gy. This miR-210 phenotype was reproduced in another NSCLC cell line (H1975) and in HeLa cells. We have established that radioresistance was independent of p53 and cell cycle status. In addition, we have shown that genomic double-strand breaks (DSBs) foci disappear faster in pmiR-210 than in pmiR-Ctl cells, suggesting that miR-210 expression promotes a more efficient DSB repair. Finally, HIF-1 invalidation in pmiR-210 cells removed the radioresistant phenotype, showing that this mechanism is dependent on HIF-1. In conclusion, miR-210 appears to be a component of the radioresistance of hypoxic cancer cells. Given the high stability of most miRNAs, this advantage could be used by tumor cells in conditions where reoxygenation has occurred and suggests that strategies targeting miR-210 could enhance tumor radiosensitization.

  15. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase α and Extracelluar Signal-Regulated Kinase Mediates CB-PIC-Induced Apoptosis in Hypoxic SW620 Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Yun; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Jung, Deok-Beom; Kim, Hyunseok; Sohn, Eun Jung; Kim, Bonglee; Jung, Ji Hoon; Kwon, Byoung-Mog; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Here, antitumor mechanism of cinnamaldehyde derivative CB-PIC was elucidated in human SW620 colon cancer cells. CB-PIC significantly exerted cytotoxicity, increased sub-G1 accumulation, and cleaved PARP with apoptotic features, while it enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK alpha and ACC as well as activated the ERK in hypoxic SW620 cells. Furthermore, CB-PIC suppressed the expression of HIF1 alpha, Akt, and mTOR and activated the AMPK phosphorylation in hypoxic SW620 cells. Conversely, silencing of AMPK α blocked PARP cleavage and ERK activation induced by CB-PIC, while ERK inhibitor PD 98059 attenuated the phosphorylation of AMPK α in hypoxic SW620 cells, implying cross-talk between ERK and AMPK α . Furthermore, cotreatment of CB-PIC and metformin enhanced the inhibition of HIF1 α and Akt/mTOR and the activation of AMPK α and pACC in hypoxic SW620 cells. In addition, CB-PIC suppressed the growth of SW620 cells inoculated in BALB/c athymic nude mice, and immunohistochemistry revealed that CB-PIC treatment attenuated the expression of Ki-67, CD34, and CAIX and increased the expression of pAMPK α in CB-PIC-treated group. Interestingly, CP-PIC showed better antitumor activity in SW620 colon cancer cells under hypoxia than under normoxia, since it may be applied to chemoresistance. Overall, our findings suggest that activation of AMPK α and ERK mediates CB-PIC-induced apoptosis in hypoxic SW620 colon cancer cells.

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment promotes neural stem cell proliferation in the subventricular zone of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhichun; Liu, Jing; Ju, Rong

    2013-05-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage has been used clinically for many years, but its effectiveness remains controversial. In addition, the mechanism of this potential neuroprotective effect remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the influence of hyperbaric oxygen on the proliferation of neural stem cells in the subventricular zone of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats (7 days old) subjected to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. Six hours after modeling, rats were treated with hyperbaric oxygen once daily for 7 days. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine positive and nestin positive cells in the subventricular zone of neonatal rats increased at day 3 after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and peaked at day 5. After hyperbaric oxygen treatment, the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine positive and nestin positive cells began to increase at day 1, and was significantly higher than that in normal rats and model rats until day 21. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that hyperbaric oxygen treatment could attenuate pathological changes to brain tissue in neonatal rats, and reduce the number of degenerating and necrotic nerve cells. Our experimental findings indicate that hyperbaric oxygen treatment enhances the proliferation of neural stem cells in the subventricular zone of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage, and has therapeutic potential for promoting neurological recovery following brain injury.

  17. A three-dimensional engineered tumour for spatial snapshot analysis of cell metabolism and phenotype in hypoxic gradients.

    PubMed

    Rodenhizer, Darren; Gaude, Edoardo; Cojocari, Dan; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Frezza, Christian; Wouters, Bradly G; McGuigan, Alison P

    2016-02-01

    The profound metabolic reprogramming that occurs in cancer cells has been investigated primarily in two-dimensional cell cultures, which fail to recapitulate spatial aspects of cell-to-cell interactions as well as tissue gradients present in three-dimensional tumours. Here, we describe an engineered model to assemble three-dimensional tumours by rolling a scaffold-tumour composite strip. By unrolling the strip, the model can be rapidly disassembled for snapshot analysis, allowing spatial mapping of cell metabolism in concert with cell phenotype. We also show that the establishment of oxygen gradients within samples that are shaped by oxygen-dependent signalling pathways, as well as the consequential variations in cell growth, response to hypoxic gradients extending from normoxia to severe hypoxia, and therapy responsiveness, are consistent with those of tumours in vivo. Moreover, by using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we mapped cellular metabolism and identified spatially defined metabolic signatures of cancer cells to reveal both known and novel metabolic responses to hypoxia. PMID:26595121

  18. A three-dimensional engineered tumour for spatial snapshot analysis of cell metabolism and phenotype in hypoxic gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenhizer, Darren; Gaude, Edoardo; Cojocari, Dan; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Frezza, Christian; Wouters, Bradly G.; McGuigan, Alison P.

    2016-02-01

    The profound metabolic reprogramming that occurs in cancer cells has been investigated primarily in two-dimensional cell cultures, which fail to recapitulate spatial aspects of cell-to-cell interactions as well as tissue gradients present in three-dimensional tumours. Here, we describe an engineered model to assemble three-dimensional tumours by rolling a scaffold-tumour composite strip. By unrolling the strip, the model can be rapidly disassembled for snapshot analysis, allowing spatial mapping of cell metabolism in concert with cell phenotype. We also show that the establishment of oxygen gradients within samples that are shaped by oxygen-dependent signalling pathways, as well as the consequential variations in cell growth, response to hypoxic gradients extending from normoxia to severe hypoxia, and therapy responsiveness, are consistent with those of tumours in vivo. Moreover, by using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we mapped cellular metabolism and identified spatially defined metabolic signatures of cancer cells to reveal both known and novel metabolic responses to hypoxia.

  19. Dose escalation of the hypoxic cell sensitizer etanidazole combined with ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide, and autologous hematopoietic stem cell support.

    PubMed

    Elias, A D; Wheeler, C; Ayash, L J; Schwartz, G; Ibrahim, J; Mills, L; McCauley, M; Coleman, N; Warren, D; Schnipper, L; Antman, K H; Teicher, B A; Frei, E

    1998-06-01

    Multiple mechanisms of drug resistance contribute to treatment failure. Although high-dose therapy attempts to overwhelm these defenses pharmacologically, this approach is only successful in a fraction of treated patients. Many drug resistance mechanisms are shared between malignant and normal cells, but the expression of various drug resistance mechanisms associated with hypoxia is largely confined to tumor tissue. Thus, reversal of this mechanism is likely to provide a therapeutic advantage to the host. This study was designed to define the dose-limiting toxicities and maximum tolerated dose of etanidazole when it is given concurrently with high-dose ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE), with hematopoietic stem cell support. The maximum tolerated doses of high-dose ICE were administered concurrently with dose escalations of etanidazole, a hypoxic cell sensitizer. All agents were given by 96-h continuous i.v. infusion beginning on day -7. Mesna uroprotection was provided. Autologous marrow and cytokine mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells were reinfused on day 0. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was administered following reinfusion until the granulocytes recovered to > 1000/microliter. Fifty-five adults with advanced malignancies were enrolled in cohorts of five to nine patients. Four dose levels of etanidazole between 3 and 5.5 g/m2/day (12, 16, 20, and 22 g/m2 total doses) and two doses of carboplatin (1600 and 1800 mg/m2 total doses) were evaluated. Seven patients died of organ toxicity (13%); two each from veno-occlusive disease of liver and sepsis; and one each from sudden death, renal failure, and refractory thrombocytopenic hemorrhage. Five deaths occurred at the top dose level. One additional patient suffered a witnessed cardiorespiratory arrest from ventricular fibrillation and was resuscitated. Dose-dependent and largely reversible peripheral neuropathy was observed consisting of two syndromes: severe cramping myalgic/neuralgic pain

  20. Metabolic profiling reveals potential metabolic markers associated with Hypoxia Inducible Factor-mediated signalling in hypoxic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Emily G.; Kotze, Helen L.; Allwood, J. William; Dunn, Warwick B.; Goodacre, Royston; Williams, Kaye J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) plays an important role in oxygen compromised environments and therefore in tumour survival. In this research, metabolomics has been applied to study HIFs metabolic function in two cell models: mouse hepatocellular carcinoma and human colon carcinoma, whereby the metabolism has been profiled for a range of oxygen potentials. Wild type cells have been compared to cells deficient in HIF signalling to reveal its effect on cellular metabolism under normal oxygen conditions as well as low oxygen, hypoxic and anoxic environments. Characteristic responses to hypoxia that were conserved across both cell models involved the anti-correlation between 2-hydroxyglutarate, 2-oxoglutarate, fructose, hexadecanoic acid, hypotaurine, pyruvate and octadecenoic acid with 4-hydroxyproline, aspartate, cysteine, glutamine, lysine, malate and pyroglutamate. Further to this, network-based correlation analysis revealed HIF specific pathway responses to each oxygen condition that were also conserved between cell models. From this, 4-hydroxyproline was revealed as a regulating hub in low oxygen survival of WT cells while fructose appeared to be in HIF deficient cells. Pathways surrounding these hubs were built from the direct connections of correlated metabolites that look beyond traditional pathways in order to understand the mechanism of HIF response to low oxygen environments. PMID:26508589

  1. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid radiosensitizes tumor hypoxic cells in vitro through the oxidation of nitroxyl to nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Samuni, Yuval; Wink, David A; Krishna, Murali C; Mitchell, James B; Goldstein, Sara

    2014-08-01

    The pharmacological effects of hydroxamic acids are partially attributed to their ability to serve as HNO and/or NO donors under oxidative stress. Previously, it was concluded that oxidation of the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) by the metmyoglobin/H2O2 reaction system releases NO, which was based on spin trapping of NO and accumulation of nitrite. Reinvestigation of this system demonstrates the accumulation of N2O, which is a marker of HNO formation, at similar rates under normoxia and anoxia. In addition, the yields of nitrite that accumulated in the absence and the presence of O2 did not differ, implying that the source of nitrite is other than autoxidation of NO. In this system metmyoglobin is instantaneously and continuously converted into compound II, leading to one-electron oxidation of SAHA to its respective transient nitroxide radical. Studies using pulse radiolysis show that one-electron oxidation of SAHA (pKa=9.56 ± 0.04) yields the respective nitroxide radical (pKa=9.1 ± 0.2), which under all experimental conditions decomposes bimolecularly to yield HNO. The proposed mechanism suggests that compound I oxidizes SAHA to the respective nitroxide radical, which decomposes bimolecularly in competition with its oxidation by compound II to form HNO. Compound II also oxidizes HNO to NO and NO to nitrite. Given that NO, but not HNO, is an efficient hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, we hypothesized that under an oxidizing environment SAHA might act as a NO donor and radiosensitize hypoxic cells. Preincubation of A549 and HT29 cells with 2.5 μM SAHA for 24h resulted in a sensitizer enhancement ratio at 0.01 survival levels (SER0.01) of 1.33 and 1.59, respectively. Preincubation of A549 cells with oxidized SAHA had hardly any effect and, with 2mM valproic acid, which lacks the hydroxamate group, resulted in SER0.01=1.17. Preincubation of HT29 cells with SAHA and Tempol, which readily oxidizes HNO to NO, enhanced the

  2. Hypoxia-mediated induction of acidic/basic fibroblast growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor in mononuclear phagocytes stimulates growth of hypoxic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, K; Ogawa, S; Matsumoto, M; Koga, S; Clauss, M; Pinsky, D J; Lyn, P; Leavy, J; Witte, L; Joseph-Silverstein, J

    1995-01-01

    Wound repair and tumor vascularization depend upon blood vessel growth into hypoxic tissue. Although hypoxia slows endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and suppresses EC basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) expression, we report that macrophages (MPs) exposed to PO2 approximately 12-14 torr (1 torr = 133.3 Pa) synthesize and release in a time-dependent manner platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and acidic/basic FGFs (a/bFGFs), which stimulate the growth of hypoxic ECs. Chromatography of hypoxic MP-conditioned medium on immobilized heparin with an ascending NaCl gradient resolved three peaks of mitogenic activity: activity of the first peak was neutralized by antibody to PDGF; activity of the second peak was neutralized by antibody to aFGF; and activity of the third peak was neutralized by antibody to bFGF. Metabolically labeled lysates and supernatants from MPs exposed to hypoxia showed increased synthesis and release of immunoprecipitable PDGF and a/bFGF in the absence of changes in cell viability. Possible involvement of a heme-containing oxygen sensor in MP elaboration of growth factors was suggested by the induction of bFGF and PDGF by normoxic MPs exposed to nickel or cobalt, although metabolic inhibitors such as sodium azide were without effect. These results suggest a paracrine model in which hypoxia stimulates MP release of PDGF and a/bFGF, inducing EC proliferation and potentially promoting angiogenesis in hypoxic environments. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7538678

  3. Distinct breast cancer stem/progenitor cell populations require either HIF1α or loss of PHD3 to expand under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Iriondo, Oihana; Rábano, Miriam; Domenici, Giacomo; Carlevaris, Onintza; López-Ruiz, José Antonio; Zabalza, Ignacio; Berra, Edurne; Vivanco, Maria dM

    2015-10-13

    The heterogeneous nature of breast cancer is a result of intrinsic tumor complexity and also of the tumor microenvironment, which is known to be hypoxic. We found that hypoxia expands different breast stem/progenitor cell populations (cells with increased aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (Aldefluor+), high mammosphere formation capacity and CD44+CD24-/low cells) both in primary normal epithelial and tumor cells. The presence of the estrogen receptor (ER) limits hypoxia-dependent CD44+CD24-/low cell expansion.We further show that the hypoxia-driven cancer stem-like cell enrichment results from a dedifferentiation process. The enhanced mammosphere formation and Aldefluor+ cell content observed in breast cancer cells relies on hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). In contrast, the CD44+CD24-/low population expansion is HIF1α independent and requires prolyl hydroxylase 3 (PHD3) downregulation, which mimics hypoxic conditions, leading to reduced CD24 expression through activation of NFkB signaling. These studies show that hypoxic conditions expand CSC populations through distinct molecular mechanisms. Thus, potential therapies that combine current treatments for breast cancer with drugs that target CSC should take into account the heterogeneity of the CSC subpopulations.

  4. Synergy of endothelial and neural progenitor cells from adipose-derived stem cells to preserve neurovascular structures in rat hypoxic-ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Yuan-Yu; Chang, Ya-Ju; Huang, Chia-Wei; Handayani, Fitri; Chiang, Yi-Lun; Fan, Shih-Chen; Ho, Chien-Jung; Kuo, Yu-Min; Yang, Shang-Hsun; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Lin, Sheng-Che; Huang, Chao-Ching; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal cerebral hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury damages the architecture of neurovascular units (NVUs) and results in neurological disorders. Here, we differentiated adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) toward the progenitor of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and neural precursor cells (NPCs) via microenvironmental induction and investigated the protective effect by transplanting ASCs, EPCs, NPCs, or a combination of EPCs and NPCs (E+N) into neonatal HI injured rat pups. The E+N combination produced significant reduction in brain damage and cell apoptosis and the most comprehensive restoration in NVUs regarding neuron number, normal astrocytes, and vessel density. Improvements in cognitive and motor functions were also achieved in injured rats with E+N therapy. Synergistic interactions to facilitate transmigration under in vitro hypoxic microenvironment were discovered with involvement of the neuropilin-1 (NRP1) signal in EPCs and the C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) signals in NPCs. Therefore, ASCs exhibit great potential for cell sources in endothelial and neural lineages to prevent brain from HI damage. PMID:26447335

  5. TFPI1 Mediates Resistance to Doxorubicin in Breast Cancer Cells by Inducing a Hypoxic-Like Response

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Gerald F.; Berg, Arnie; Postnikoff, Spike D. L.; Wilson, Heather L.; Arnason, Terra G.; Kusalik, Anthony; Harkness, Troy A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Thrombin and hypoxia are important players in breast cancer progression. Breast cancers often develop drug resistance, but mechanisms linking thrombin and hypoxia to drug resistance remain unresolved. Our studies using Doxorubicin (DOX) resistant MCF7 breast cancer cells reveals a mechanism linking DOX exposure with hypoxic induction of DOX resistance. Global expression changes between parental and DOX resistant MCF7 cells were examined. Westerns, Northerns and immunocytochemistry were used to validate drug resistance and differentially expressed genes. A cluster of genes involved in the anticoagulation pathway, with Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor 1 (TFPI1) the top hit, was identified. Plasmids overexpressing TFPI1 were utilized, and 1% O2 was used to test the effects of hypoxia on drug resistance. Lastly, microarray datasets from patients with drug resistant breast tumors were interrogated for TFPI1 expression levels. TFPI1 protein levels were found elevated in 3 additional DOX resistant cells lines, from humans and rats, indicating evolutionarily conservation of the effect. Elevated TFPI1 in DOX resistant cells was active, as thrombin protein levels were coincidentally low. We observed elevated HIF1α protein in DOX resistant cells, and in cells with forced expression of TFPI1, suggesting TFPI1 induces HIF1α. TFPI1 also induced c-MYC, c-SRC, and HDAC2 protein, as well as DOX resistance in parental cells. Growth of cells in 1% O2 induced elevated HIF1α, BCRP and MDR-1 protein, and these cells were resistant to DOX. Our in vitro results were consistent with in vivo patient datasets, as tumors harboring increased BCRP and MDR-1 expression also had increased TFPI1 expression. Our observations are clinically relevant indicating that DOX treatment induces an anticoagulation cascade, leading to inhibition of thrombin and the expression of HIF1α. This in turn activates a pathway leading to drug resistance. PMID:24489651

  6. Inhibition of Hypoxia Inducible Factor Alpha and Astrocyte-Elevated Gene-1 Mediates Cryptotanshinone Exerted Antitumor Activity in Hypoxic PC-3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Jung, Deok-Beom; Sohn, Eun Jung; Kim, Hanna Hyun; Park, Moon Nyeo; Lew, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Seok Geun; Kim, Bonglee; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Although cryptotanshinone (CT) was known to exert antitumor activity in several cancers, its molecular mechanism under hypoxia still remains unclear. Here, the roles of AEG-1 and HIF-1α in CT-induced antitumor activity were investigated in hypoxic PC-3 cells. CT exerted cytotoxicity against prostate cancer cells and suppressed HIF-1α accumulation and AEG-1 expression in hypoxic PC-3 cells. Also, AEG-1 was overexpressed in prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, HIF-1α siRNA transfection enhanced the cleavages of caspase-9,3, and PAPR and decreased expression of Bcl-2 and AEG1 induced by CT in hypoxic PC-3 cells. Of note, DMOG enhanced the stability of AEG-1 and HIF-1α during hypoxia. Additionally, CT significantly reduced cellular level of VEGF in PC-3 cells and disturbed tube formation of HUVECs. Consistently, ChIP assay revealed that CT inhibited the binding of HIF-1α to VEGF promoter. Furthermore, CT at 10 mg/kg suppressed the growth of PC-3 cells in BALB/c athymic nude mice by 46.4% compared to untreated control. Consistently, immunohistochemistry revealed decreased expression of Ki-67, CD34, VEGF, carbonic anhydrase IX, and AEG-1 indices in CT-treated group compared to untreated control. Overall, our findings suggest that CT exerts antitumor activity via inhibition of HIF-1α, AEG1, and VEGF as a potent chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:23243443

  7. Strategies To Assess Hypoxic/HIF-1-Active Cancer Cells for the Development of Innovative Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Chan Joo; Zeng, Lihua; Zhu, Yuxi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Harada, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Local tumor recurrence and distant tumor metastasis frequently occur after radiation therapy and result in the death of cancer patients. These problems are caused, at least in part, by a tumor-specific oxygen-poor microenvironment, hypoxia. Oxygen-deprivation is known to inhibit the chemical ionization of both intracellular macro-molecules and water, etc., and thus reduce the cytotoxic effects of radiation. Moreover, DNA damage produced by free radicals is known to be more repairable under hypoxia than normoxia. Hypoxia is also known to induce biological tumor radioresistance through the activation of a transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). Several potential strategies have been devised in radiation therapy to overcome these problems; however, they have not yet achieved a complete remission. It is essential to reveal the intratumoral localization and dynamics of hypoxic/HIF-1-active tumor cells during tumor growth and after radiation therapy, then exploit the information to develop innovative therapeutic strategies, and finally damage radioresistant cells. In this review, we overview problems caused by hypoxia/HIF-1-active cells in radiation therapy for cancer and introduce strategies to assess intratumoral hypoxia/HIF-1 activity. PMID:24212970

  8. Effects of Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury and Hypothermic Neuroprotection on Neural Progenitor Cells in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Minhye; Lim, Sanghee; Kang, Eunchai; Furmanski, Orion; Song, Hongjun; Ryu, Yun Kyoung; Mintz, C David

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury (HI) results in widespread cerebral encephalopathy and affects structures that are essential for neurocognitive function, such as the hippocampus. The dentate gyrus contains a reservoir of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs) that are critical for postnatal development and normal adult function of the hippocampus, and may also facilitate the recovery of function after injury. Using a neonatal mouse model of mild-to-moderate HI and immunohistochemical analysis of NSPC development markers, we asked whether these cells are vulnerable to HI and how they respond to both injury and hypothermic therapy. We found that cleaved caspase-3 labeling in the subgranular zone, where NSPCs are located, is increased by more than 30-fold after HI. The population of cells positive for both proliferating cell nuclear antigen and nestin (PCNA+Nes+), which represent primarily actively proliferating NSPCs, are acutely decreased by 68% after HI. The NSPC population expressing NeuroD1, a marker for NSPCs transitioning to become fate-committed neural progenitors, was decreased by 47%. One week after HI, there was a decrease in neuroblasts and immature neurons in the dentate gyrus, as measured by doublecortin (DCX) immunolabeling, and at the same time PCNA+Nes+ cell density was increased by 71%. NSPCs expressing Tbr2, which identifies a highly proliferative intermediate neural progenitor population, increased by 107%. Hypothermia treatment after HI partially rescues both the acute decrease in PCNA+Nes+ cell density at 1 day after injury and the chronic loss of DCX immunoreactivity and reduction in NeuroD1 cell density measured at 1 week after injury. Thus, we conclude that HI causes an acute loss of dentate gyrus NSPCs, and that hypothermia partially protects NSPCs from HI. PMID:26087836

  9. Hypoxic stress triggers a programmed cell death pathway to induce vascular cavity formation in Pisum sativum roots.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Gladish, Daniel K

    2012-12-01

    Flooding at warm temperatures induces hypoxic stress in Pisum sativum seedling roots. In response, some undifferentiated cells in the primary root vascular cylinder start degenerating and form a longitudinal vascular cavity. Changes in cellular morphology and cell wall ultrastructure detected previously in the late stages of cavity formation suggest possible involvement of programmed cell death (PCD). In this study, cytological events occurring in the early stages of cavity formation were investigated. Systematic DNA fragmentation, a feature of many PCD pathways, was detected in the cavity-forming roots after 3 h of flooding in situ by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay and in isolated total DNA by gel electrophoresis. High molecular weight DNA fragments of about 20-30 kb were detected by pulse-field gel electrophoresis, but no low-molecular weight internucleosomal DNA fragments were detected by conventional gel electrophoresis. Release of mitochondrial cytochrome c protein into the cytosol, an integral part of mitochondria-dependent PCD pathways, was detected in the cavity-forming roots within 2 h of flooding by fluorescence microscopy of immunolabeled cytochrome c in situ and in isolated mitochondrial and cytosolic protein fractions by western blotting. DNA fragmentation and cytochrome c release remained confined to the undifferentiated cells in center of the root vascular cylinders, even after 24 h of flooding, while outer vascular cylinder cells and cortical cells maintained cellular integrity and normal activity. These findings confirm that hypoxia-induced vascular cavity formation in P. sativum roots involves PCD, and provides a chronological model of cytological events involved in this rare and understudied PCD system.

  10. Astroglial Activation by an Enriched Environment after Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhances Angiogenesis after Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Rae; Suh, Hwal; Yu, Ji Hea; Kim, Hyongbum (Henry); Seo, Jung Hwa; Seo, Cheong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has paracrine effects; however, the effects are known to be largely limited. Here we investigated the combination effects of cell transplantation and enriched environment (EE) in a model of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Brain damage was induced in seven-day-old mice by unilateral carotid artery ligation and exposure to hypoxia (8% O2 for 90 min). At six weeks of age, the mice were randomly assigned to four groups: phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-control (CON), PBS-EE, MSC-CON, and MSC-EE. Rotarod and grip strength tests were performed to evaluate neurobehavioral functions. Histologic evaluations were also performed to confirm the extent of astrocyte activation and endogenous angiogenesis. An array-based multiplex ELISA and Western blot were used to identify growth factors in vivo and in vitro. Two weeks after treatment, levels of astrocyte density and angiogenic factors were increased in MSC-EE mice, but glial scarring was not increased. Eight weeks after treatment, angiogenesis was increased, and behavioral outcomes were synergistically improved in the MSC-EE group. Astrocytes co-cultured with MSCs expressed higher levels of angiogenic factors than astrocytes cultured alone. The mechanisms of this synergistic effect included enhanced repair processes, such as increased endogenous angiogenesis and upregulation of angiogenic factors released from activated astrocytes. PMID:27649153

  11. Astroglial Activation by an Enriched Environment after Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhances Angiogenesis after Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Rae; Suh, Hwal; Yu, Ji Hea; Kim, Hyongbum Henry; Seo, Jung Hwa; Seo, Cheong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has paracrine effects; however, the effects are known to be largely limited. Here we investigated the combination effects of cell transplantation and enriched environment (EE) in a model of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Brain damage was induced in seven-day-old mice by unilateral carotid artery ligation and exposure to hypoxia (8% O₂ for 90 min). At six weeks of age, the mice were randomly assigned to four groups: phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-control (CON), PBS-EE, MSC-CON, and MSC-EE. Rotarod and grip strength tests were performed to evaluate neurobehavioral functions. Histologic evaluations were also performed to confirm the extent of astrocyte activation and endogenous angiogenesis. An array-based multiplex ELISA and Western blot were used to identify growth factors in vivo and in vitro. Two weeks after treatment, levels of astrocyte density and angiogenic factors were increased in MSC-EE mice, but glial scarring was not increased. Eight weeks after treatment, angiogenesis was increased, and behavioral outcomes were synergistically improved in the MSC-EE group. Astrocytes co-cultured with MSCs expressed higher levels of angiogenic factors than astrocytes cultured alone. The mechanisms of this synergistic effect included enhanced repair processes, such as increased endogenous angiogenesis and upregulation of angiogenic factors released from activated astrocytes. PMID:27649153

  12. GLUT3 and PKM2 regulate OCT4 expression and support the hypoxic culture of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Christensen, David R; Calder, Philip C; Houghton, Franchesca D

    2015-12-07

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the capacity to differentiate into all cell types and thus have great potential for regenerative medicine. hESCs cultured at low oxygen tensions are more pluripotent and display an increased glycolytic rate but how this is regulated is unknown. This study therefore aimed to investigate the regulation of glucose metabolism in hESCs and whether this might impact OCT4 expression. In contrast to the glucose transporter GLUT1, GLUT3 was regulated by environmental oxygen and localised to hESC membranes. Silencing GLUT3 caused a reduction in glucose uptake and lactate production as well as OCT4 expression. GLUT3 and OCT4 expression were correlated suggesting that hESC self-renewal is regulated by the rate of glucose uptake. Surprisingly, PKM2, a rate limiting enzyme of glycolysis displayed a nuclear localisation in hESCs and silencing PKM2 did not alter glucose metabolism suggesting a role other than as a glycolytic enzyme. PKM2 expression was increased in hESCs cultured at 5% oxygen compared to 20% oxygen and silencing PKM2 reduced OCT4 expression highlighting a transcriptional role for PKM2 in hESCs. Together, these data demonstrate two separate mechanisms by which genes regulating glucose uptake and metabolism are involved in the hypoxic support of pluripotency in hESCs.

  13. Amperometric sensing of HIF1α expressed in cancer cells and the effect of hypoxic mimicking agents.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Khalil K; Gurudatt, N G; Mir, Tanveer Ahmad; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2016-09-15

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1α) overexpression was detected in cancerous cells using an amperometric immunosensor with a nano-bioconjugate. The sensor probe was fabricated by covalently immobilizing the antibody (anti-HIF1α) onto a composite layer of functionalized conducting polymer [2,2:5,2-terthiophene-3-(p-benzoic acid)] (pTTBA) formed on a layer of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). A nano-bioconjugate with hydrazine and a secondary antibody of HIF1α (sec-Ab2) attached on AuNPs reveals the immunoreaction at the sensor probe through the catalytic reduction of H2O2 by hydrazine at -0.35V vs. Ag/AgCl. Morphology and performance of the sensor probe were characterized using FE-SEM, XPS, EIS, and cyclic voltammetry. The calibration plot at optimized experimental conditions shows a dynamic range of 25-350pM/mL with a detection limit of 5.35±0.02pM/mL. The reliability of the sensor was evaluated using non-cancerous Vero and cancerous MCF-7 cell lysates, where the HIF1α expression was compared with three cancerous cell lines MCF-7, PC-3, and A549. Furthermore, the sensor probe confirms the stable expression of HIF1α in the A549 lung cancer cells when exposing them to hypoxic mimicking agents Co, Ni, and Mn ions. Of these, Co ions show the highest stabilization effect on HIF1α followed by Ni and Mn ions, respectively. PMID:27132006

  14. Glaucoma-induced degeneration of retinal ganglion cells prevented by hypoxic preconditioning: a model of glaucoma tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanli; Zhang, Lihong; Schmidt, Jimena F; Gidday, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Like all cells, neurons adapt to stress by transient alterations in phenotype, an epigenetic response that forms the basis for preconditioning against acute ischemic injury in the central nervous system. We recently showed that a modified repetitive hypoxic preconditioning (RHP) regimen significantly extends the window of ischemic tolerance to acute retinal ischemic injury from days to months. The present study was undertaken to determine if this uniquely protracted neuroprotective phenotype would also confer resistance to glaucomatous neurodegeneration. Retinal ganglion cell death at somatic and axonal levels was assessed after both 3 and 10 wks of sustained intraocular hypertension in an adult mouse model of inducible, open-angle glaucoma, with or without RHP before intraocular pressure elevation. Loss of brn3-positive ganglion cell soma after 3 wks of experimental glaucoma, along with increases in several apoptotic endpoints, were all significantly and robustly attenuated in mice subjected to RHP. Soma protection by RHP was also confirmed after 10 wks of intraocular hypertension by brn3 and SMI32 immunostaining. In addition, quantification of axon density in the postlaminar optic nerve documented robust preservation in RHP-treated mice, and neurofilament immunostaining also revealed preconditioning-induced improvements in axon integrity/survival in both retina and optic nerve after 10 wks of experimental glaucoma. This uniquely protracted period of phenotypic change, established in retinal ganglion cells by the activation of latent antiapoptotic, prosurvival mechanisms at both somatic and axonal levels, reflects a novel form of inducible neuronal plasticity that may provide innovative therapeutic targets for preventing and treating glaucoma and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22396016

  15. In vitro hypoxic preconditioning of embryonic stem cells as a strategy of promoting cell survival and functional benefits after transplantation into the ischemic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Theus, Michelle Hedrick; Wei, Ling; Cui, Lin; Francis, Kevin; Hu, Xinyang; Keogh, Christine; Yu, Shan Ping

    2008-04-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning (HP) and stem cell transplantation have been extensively studied as individual therapies for ischemic stroke. The present investigation is an initial effort to combine these methods to achieve increased therapeutic effects after brain ischemia. Sublethal in vitro hypoxia pretreatment significantly enhanced the tolerance of neurally-differentiating embryonic stem (ES) cells and primary bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) to apoptotic cell death (40-50% reduction in cell death and caspase-3 activation). The HP protective effects on cultured cells lasted for at least 6 days. HP increased secretion of erythropoietin (EPO) and upregulated expression of bcl-2, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1alpha), erythropoietin receptor (EPOR), neurofilament (NF), and synaptophysin in ES cell-derived neural progenitor cells (ES-NPCs). The HP cytoprotective effect was diminished by blocking EPOR, while pretreatment of ES-NPCs with recombinant human EPO mimicked the HP effect. HP-primed ES-NPCs survived better 3 days after transplantation into the ischemic brain (30-40% reduction in cell death and caspase-3 activation). Finally, transplanted HP-primed ES-NPCs exhibited extensive neuronal differentiation in the ischemic brain, accelerated and enhanced recovery of sensorimotor function when compared to transplantation of non-HP-treated ES-NPCs. The cell-priming strategy aimed to promote transplanted cell survival and their tissue repair capability provides a simple yet effective way of optimizing cell transplantation therapy.

  16. Inhibition of hypoxia inducible factor-1α downregulates the expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition early marker proteins without undermining cell survival in hypoxic lens epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Neelam, Sudha; Brooks, Morgan M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify potential therapeutic strategies to slow down or prevent the expression of early-onset epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker proteins (fibronectin and alpha smooth muscle actin, α-SMA) without sacrificing the synthesis and accumulation of the prosurvival protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cultured virally transformed human lens epithelial (HLE) cells. Methods HLE-B3 cells, maintained in a continuous hypoxic environment (1% oxygen), were treated with SB216763, a specific inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) catalytic activity. Western blot analysis was employed to detect the cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of β-catenin, as well as the total lysate content of fibronectin and α-SMA. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure the levels of VEGF in cell culture medium. A hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) translation inhibitor and an HIF-2α translation inhibitor were independently employed to evaluate the effect of hypoxia inducible factor inhibition on EMT marker protein and VEGF expression. XAV932 was used to assess the suppression of nuclear β-catenin and its downstream effect on EMT marker proteins and VEGF expression. Results SB216763-treated HLE-B3 cells caused marked inhibition of GSK-3β activity prompting a significant increase in the translocation of cytoplasmic β-catenin to the nucleus. The enhancement of nuclear β-catenin looked as if it positively correlated with a significant increase in the basal expression of VEGF as well as increased expression of fibronectin and α-SMA. In conjunction with SB216763, coadministration of an HIF-1α translation inhibitor, but not an HIF-2α translation inhibitor, markedly suppressed the expression of fibronectin and α-SMA without affecting VEGF levels. Treatment with XAV932 significantly reduced the level of nuclear β-catenin, but the levels of neither the EMT marker proteins nor VEGF were changed

  17. Upregulation of miRNA3195 and miRNA374b Mediates the Anti-Angiogenic Properties of Melatonin in Hypoxic PC-3 Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Eun Jung; Won, Gunho; Lee, Jihyun; Lee, Sangyoon; Kim, Sung-hoon

    2015-01-01

    Recently microRNAs (miRNAs) have been attractive targets with their key roles in biological regulation through post-transcription to control mRNA stability and protein translation. Though melatonin was known as an anti-angiogenic agent, the underlying mechanism of melatonin in PC-3 prostate cancer cells under hypoxia still remains unclear. Thus, in the current study, we elucidated the important roles of miRNAs in melatonin-induced anti-angiogenic activity in hypoxic PC-3 cells. miRNA array revealed that 33 miRNAs (>2 folds) including miRNA3195 and miRNA 374b were significantly upregulated and 16 miRNAs were downregulated in melatonin-treated PC-3 cells under hypoxia compared to untreated control. Melatonin significantly attenuated the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 alpha, HIF-2 alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) at mRNA level in hypoxic PC-3 cells. Consistently, melatonin enhanced the expression of miRNA3195 and miRNA 374b in hypoxic PC-3 cells by qRT-PCR analysis. Of note, overexpression of miRNA3195 and miRNA374b mimics attenuated the mRNA levels of angiogenesis related genes such as HIF-1alpha, HIF-2 alpha and VEGF in PC-3 cells under hypoxia. Furthermore, overexpression of miRNA3195 and miRNA374b suppressed typical angiogenic protein VEGF at the protein level and VEGF production induced by melatonin, while antisense oligonucleotides against miRNA 3195 or miRNA 374b did not affect VEGF production induced by melatonin. Also, overexpression of miR3195 or miR374b reduced HIF-1 alpha immunofluorescent expression in hypoxic PC-3 compared to untreated control. Overall, our findings suggest that upregulation of miRNA3195 and miRNA374b mediates anti-angiogenic property induced by melatonin in hypoxic PC-3 cells. PMID:25553085

  18. Study of the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effects of transglutaminase II on apoptosis in the osteosarcoma MG-63 cell line under hypoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    WANG, GUOBIN; FU, LIMEI; CHEN, FANGMIN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between the apoptosis phenomenon in the MG-63 osteosarcoma cell line, and transglutaminase II (TG2) expression. The relationship between the anti-apoptotic mechanism of TG2 and the expression of cytochrome c as well as caspase-3 under hypoxic conditions was also verified. A hypoxic culture of MG-63 cells was prepared. The hypoxia and TG2 siRNA hypoxia groups were established, and the cultures were incubated for 12 h under hypoxic conditions. TG2 activity, TG2 protein expression and its mRNA level were investigated. Cytochrome c and caspase-3 protein levels in the TG2 nucleus and cytoplasm were measured. The apoptotic rate was also monitored. The results showed that TG2 activity, TG2 protein expression and its mRNA level in the hypoxia group were significantly higher than those of the siRNA hypoxia group. The results showed statistically insignificant differences (P<0.05). By contrast, a comparison of the two groups in the cytoplasm yielded no statistically significant differences (P>0.05). Cytochrome c and caspase-3 protein levels in the hypoxia group were significantly higher than those of the TG2 siRNA hypoxia group. The results showed statistically significant differences (P<0.05). By contrast, the protein levels in the cytoplasm were significantly lower than those of the TG2 siRNA hypoxia group, with differences being statistically significant (P<0.05). The differences in apoptotic rates between the hypoxia and TG2 siRNA hypoxia groups were also statistically significant (P<0.05). Under hypoxic conditions, a high TG2 expression inhibited the apoptosis of the MG-63 osteosarcoma cell line. This effect was probably associated with its suppressive activity on the transportation of cytochrome c and caspase-3 from nucleus to cytoplasm. PMID:26788145

  19. Hypergravity and hypobaric hypoxic conditions promote endothelial cell and platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, David A; Yin, Wei

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk is heightened during exposure to altered gravity and/or altered barometric conditions. Previous work has suggested that this heightened cardiovascular risk is due to enhancements of endothelial cell inflammatory and/or thrombogenic responses. In recent work, the role of platelets on instigating or inhibiting endothelial cell responses associated with cardiovascular disease has been found to be dependent on both biochemical and biophysical factors. In this work, we aimed to determine how two biophysical forces, gravity and atmospheric pressure, alter endothelial cell and platelet functions and their interactions to instigate or inhibit cardiovascular disease responses. To address this aim, endothelial cells and platelets were subjected to a force 8 times greater than the normal gravitational force, for up to 30 minutes. In separate experiments, endothelial cells and platelets were subjected to 50% of normal atmospheric pressure. Endothelial cell and platelet responses, associated with cardiovascular diseases, were measured as a time course during exposure. In general, the exposure of endothelial cells to either hypergravity or hypobaric conditions enhanced cardiovascular disease responses. However, the presence of platelets generally inhibited endothelial cell responses. Platelet activation was, however, somewhat enhanced under both hypergravity and hypobaric conditions. Our data suggest that altered biophysical forces can modulate endothelial cell and platelet responses that are salient for cardiovascular disease progression. However, the interaction of these two cells tends to restrain the progression of the pro-cardiovascular disease responses. PMID:25211651

  20. Cell Death Conversion under Hypoxic Condition in Tumor Development and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yu; Li, Peng; Ji, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia, which is common during tumor progression, plays important roles in tumor biology. Failure in cell death in response to hypoxia contributes to progression and metastasis of tumors. On the one hand, the metabolic and oxidative stress following hypoxia could lead to cell death by triggering signal cascades, like LKB1/AMPK, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, and altering the levels of effective components, such as the Bcl-2 family, Atg and p62. On the other hand, hypoxia-induced autophagy can serve as a mechanism to turn over nutrients, so as to mitigate the adverse condition and then avoid cell death potentially. Due to the effective role of hypoxia, this review focuses on the crosstalk in cell death under hypoxia in tumor progression. Additionally, the illumination of cell death in hypoxia could shed light on the clinical applications of cell death targeted therapy. PMID:26512660

  1. Hypoxic control of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Erinn B.; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic disease is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths and involves critical interactions between tumor cells and the microenvironment. Hypoxia is a potent microenvironmental factor promoting metastatic progression. Clinically, hypoxia and the expression of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors HIF-1 and HIF-2 are associated with increased distant metastasis and poor survival in a variety of tumor types. Moreover, HIF signaling in malignant cells influences multiple steps within the metastatic cascade. Here we review research focused on elucidating the mechanisms by which the hypoxic tumor microenvironment promotes metastatic progression. These studies have identified potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets regulated by hypoxia that could be incorporated into strategies aimed at preventing and treating metastatic disease. PMID:27124451

  2. Synthesis, characterisation and evaluation of a novel copper-64 complex with selective uptake in EMT-6 cells under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Knight, James C; Wuest, Melinda; Saad, Fawaz A; Wang, Monica; Chapman, David W; Jans, Hans-Soenke; Lapi, Suzanne E; Kariuki, Benson M; Amoroso, Angelo J; Wuest, Frank

    2013-09-01

    The radiometal (64)Cu is now widely used in the development of diagnostic imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The present study has led to the development and evaluation of a novel chelating agent for (64)Cu: the new monothiourea tripodal ligand 1-benzoyl-3-{6-[(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-amino)-methyl]-pyridin-2-yl}-thiourea (MTUBo). X-ray crystallographic analysis has shown this ligand forms a mononuclear complex with copper(II) and co-ordinates via a trigonal bipyramidal N4S array of donor atoms. Promisingly, cell uptake studies revealed that (64)Cu-MTUBo selectively accumulates in EMT-6 cells incubated under hypoxic conditions which may result from its relatively high Cu(II/I) redox potential. Small-animal PET imaging and ex vivo biodistribution studies in EMT-6 tumor bearing BALB/c mice revealed significant tumor uptake after 1 h p.i., yielding tumor-to-muscle (T/M) and tumor-to-blood (T/B) ratios of 8.1 and 1.1, respectively. However, injection of (64)Cu-acetate resulted in similar uptake indicating that the observed uptake was most likely non-specific. Despite showing high in vitro stability, it is likely that in vivo the complex undergoes transchelation to proteins within the blood in a relatively short timeframe. For comparison, the hypoxia imaging agent (64)Cu-ATSM was also evaluated in the same murine tumor model and showed about 60% higher tumor uptake than (64)Cu-MTUBo.

  3. Enhanced Healing of Rat Calvarial Bone Defects with Hypoxic Conditioned Medium from Mesenchymal Stem Cells through Increased Endogenous Stem Cell Migration via Regulation of ICAM-1 Targeted-microRNA-221.

    PubMed

    Chang, Woochul; Kim, Ran; Park, Sang In; Jung, Yu Jin; Ham, Onju; Lee, Jihyun; Kim, Ji Hyeong; Oh, Sekyung; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jongmin; Park, Moon-Seo; Chung, Yong-An; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Maeng, Lee-So

    2015-07-01

    The use of conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells may be a feasible approach for regeneration of bone defects through secretion of various components of mesenchymal stem cells such as cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Mesenchymal stem cells secrete and accumulate multiple factors in conditioned medium under specific physiological conditions. In this study, we investigated whether the conditioned medium collected under hypoxic condition could effectively influence bone regeneration through enhanced migration and adhesion of endogenous mesenchymal stem cells. Cell migration and adhesion abilities were increased through overexpression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in hypoxic conditioned medium treated group. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was upregulated by microRNA-221 in mesenchymal stem cells because microRNAs are key regulators of various biological functions via gene expression. To investigate the effects in vivo, evaluation of bone regeneration by computed tomography and histological assays revealed that osteogenesis was enhanced in the hypoxic conditioned medium group relative to the other groups. These results suggest that behavioral changes of endogenous mesenchymal stem cells through microRNA-221 targeted-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression under hypoxic conditions may be a potential treatment for patients with bone defects.

  4. The transcription of the alarmin cytokine interleukin-1 alpha is controlled by hypoxia inducible factors 1 and 2 alpha in hypoxic cells.

    PubMed

    Rider, Peleg; Kaplanov, Irena; Romzova, Marianna; Bernardis, Liora; Braiman, Alex; Voronov, Elena; Apte, Ron N

    2012-01-01

    During hypoxia, cells undergo transcriptional changes to adjust to metabolic stress, to promote cell survival, and to induce pro-angiogenic factors. Hypoxia-induced factors (HIFs) regulate these transcriptional alterations. Failure to restore oxygen levels results in cell death by necrosis. IL-1α is one of the most important mediators of sterile inflammation following hypoxia-mediated necrosis. During hypoxia, IL-1α is up-regulated and released from necrotic cells, promoting the initiation of sterile inflammation. This study examined the role of IL-1α transcription in initiation of hypoxic stress and the correlation between IL-1α transcription and HIFα factors. In an epithelial cell line cultured under hypoxic conditions, IL-1α transcription was up-regulated in a process mediated and promoted by HIFα factors. IL-1α transcription was also up-regulated in hypoxia in a fibroblast cell line, however, in these cells, HIFα factors inhibited the elevation of transcription. These data suggest that HIFα factors play a significant role in initiating sterile inflammation by controlling IL-1α transcription during hypoxia in a differential manner, depending on the cell type.

  5. The transcription of the alarmin cytokine interleukin-1 alpha is controlled by hypoxia inducible factors 1 and 2 alpha in hypoxic cells

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Peleg; Kaplanov, Irena; Romzova, Marianna; Bernardis, Liora; Braiman, Alex; Voronov, Elena; Apte, Ron N.

    2012-01-01

    During hypoxia, cells undergo transcriptional changes to adjust to metabolic stress, to promote cell survival, and to induce pro-angiogenic factors. Hypoxia-induced factors (HIFs) regulate these transcriptional alterations. Failure to restore oxygen levels results in cell death by necrosis. IL-1α is one of the most important mediators of sterile inflammation following hypoxia-mediated necrosis. During hypoxia, IL-1α is up-regulated and released from necrotic cells, promoting the initiation of sterile inflammation. This study examined the role of IL-1α transcription in initiation of hypoxic stress and the correlation between IL-1α transcription and HIFα factors. In an epithelial cell line cultured under hypoxic conditions, IL-1α transcription was up-regulated in a process mediated and promoted by HIFα factors. IL-1α transcription was also up-regulated in hypoxia in a fibroblast cell line, however, in these cells, HIFα factors inhibited the elevation of transcription. These data suggest that HIFα factors play a significant role in initiating sterile inflammation by controlling IL-1α transcription during hypoxia in a differential manner, depending on the cell type. PMID:23049530

  6. Immunosuppression by hypoxic cell radiosensitizers: a phenomenon of potential clinical importance

    SciTech Connect

    Rockwell, S.; Kapp, D.S.

    1982-06-01

    The nitroimidazoles metronidazole, misonidazol, and desmethyl misonidazole are currently undergoing clinical trials as possible adjuncts to radiotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the effectiveness of these agents and also documenting the pharmacokinetics and toxicities of radiosensitizing doses of these drugs in man. A variety of toxic effects have been noted in man, including anorexia, nausea and vomiting, peripheral neuropathy, central nervous system symptoms, ototoxicity, allergy, and fear. Laboratory studies have also suggested that these agents have potential to be mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic. In the editorial presented, the author attempts to draw attention to an additional toxic effect of nitroimidazoles - the inhibition of cell-mediated immune responses. (JMT)

  7. Neutrophils Oppose Uterine Epithelial Carcinogenesis via Debridement of Hypoxic Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Blaisdell, Adam; Crequer, Amandine; Columbus, Devin; Daikoku, Takiko; Mittal, Khush; Dey, Sudhansu K; Erlebacher, Adrian

    2015-12-14

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are largely considered to foster cancer development despite wielding an arsenal of cytotoxic agents. Using a mouse model of PTEN-deficient uterine cancer, we describe a surprising inhibitory role for PMNs in epithelial carcinogenesis. By inducing tumor cell detachment from the basement membrane, PMNs impeded early-stage tumor growth and retarded malignant progression. Unexpectedly, PMN recruitment and tumor growth control occurred independently of lymphocytes and cellular senescence and instead ensued as part of the tumor's intrinsic inflammatory response to hypoxia. In humans, a PMN gene signature correlated with improved survival in several cancer subtypes, including PTEN-deficient uterine cancer. These findings provide insight into tumor-associated PMNs and reveal a context-specific capacity for PMNs to directly combat tumorigenesis.

  8. Autophagy regulates the apoptosis of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxic condition via AMP-activated protein kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Yang, Ming; Wang, Yabin; Wang, Le; Jin, Zhitao; Ding, Liping; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Lina; Jiang, Wei; Gao, Guojie; Yang, Junke; Lu, Bingwei; Cao, Feng; Hu, Taohong

    2016-06-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have been demonstrated as an ideal autologous stem cells source for cell-based therapy for myocardial infarction (MI). However, poor viability of donor stem cells after transplantation limits their therapeutic efficiency, whereas the underlying mechanism is still poorly understood. Autophagy, a highly conserved process of cellular degradation, is required for maintaining homeostasis and normal function. Here, we investigated the potential role of autophagy on apoptosis in BM-MSCs induced by hypoxic injury. BM-MSCs, isolated from male C57BL/6 mice, were subjected to hypoxia and serum deprivation (H/SD) injury for 6, 12, and 24 h, respectively. The autophagy state was regulated by 3-methyladenine (3MA) and rapamycin administration. Furthermore, compound C was administrated to inhibit AMPK. The apoptosis induced by H/SD was determined by TUNEL assays. Meanwhile, autophagy was measured by GFP-LC3 plasmids transfection and transmission electron microscope. Moreover, protein expressions were evaluated by Western blot assay. In the present study, we found that hypoxic stress increased autophagy and apoptosis in BM-MSCs time dependently. Meanwhile, hypoxia increased the activity of AMPK/mTOR signal pathway. Moreover, increased apoptosis in BM-MSCs under hypoxia was abolished by 3-MA, whereas was aggravated by rapamycin. Furthermore, the increased autophagy and apoptosis in BM-MSCs induced by hypoxia were abolished by AMPK inhibitor compound C. These data provide evidence that hypoxia induced AMPK/mTOR signal pathway activation which regulated the apoptosis and autophagy in BM-MSCs. Furthermore, the apoptosis of BM-MSCs under hypoxic condition was regulated by autophagy via AMPK/mTOR pathway. PMID:27005844

  9. Hypoxic pre-conditioning increases the infiltration of endothelial cells into scaffolds for dermal regeneration pre-seeded with mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fierro, Fernando A; O'Neal, Adam J; Beegle, Julie R; Chávez, Myra N; Peavy, Thomas R; Isseroff, Roslyn R; Egaña, José T

    2015-01-01

    Many therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) rely on their ability to produce and release paracrine signals with chemotactic and pro-angiogenic activity. These characteristics, however, are mostly studied under standard in vitro culture conditions. In contrast, various novel cell-based therapies imply pre-seeding MSC into bio-artificial scaffolds. Here we describe human bone marrow-derived MSC seeded in Integra matrices, a common type of scaffold for dermal regeneration (SDR). We show and measured the distribution of MSC within the SDR, where cells clearly establish physical interactions with the scaffold, exhibiting constant metabolic activity for at least 15 days. In the SDR, MSC secrete VEGF and SDF-1α and induce transwell migration of CD34(+) hematopoietic/endothelial progenitor cells, which is inhibited in the presence of a CXCR4/SDF-1α antagonist. MSC in SDR respond to hypoxia by altering levels of angiogenic signals such as Angiogenin, Serpin-1, uPA, and IL-8. Finally, we show that MSC-containing SDR that have been pre-incubated in hypoxia show higher infiltration of endothelial cells after implantation into immune deficient mice. Our data show that MSC are fully functional ex vivo when implanted into SDR. In addition, our results strongly support the notion of hypoxic pre-conditioning MSC-containing SDR, in order to promote angiogenesis in the wounds.

  10. Inactivation of hypoxia-induced YAP by statins overcomes hypoxic resistance tosorafenib in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tian-yi; Zhuang, Lin-han; Hu, Yan; Zhou, Yu-lu; Lin, Wen-kai; Wang, Dan-dan; Wan, Zi-qian; Chang, Lin-lin; Chen, Ying; Ying, Mei-dan; Chen, Zi-bo; Ye, Song; Lou, Jian-shu; He, Qiao-jun; Zhu, Hong; Yang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor used as a first-line treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but it has shown modest to low response rates. The characteristic tumour hypoxia of advanced HCC maybe a major factor underlying hypoxia-mediated treatment failure. Thus, it is urgent to elucidate the mechanisms of hypoxia-mediated sorafenib resistance in HCC. In this study, we found that hypoxia induced the nuclear translocation of Yes associate-Protein (YAP) and the subsequent transactivation of target genes that promote cell survival and escape apoptosis, thereby leading to sorafenib resistance. Statins, the inhibitors of hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase, could ameliorate hypoxia-induced nuclear translocation of YAP and suppress mRNA levels of YAP target genes both in vivo and in vitro. Combined treatment of statins with sorafenib greatly rescued the loss of anti-proliferative effects of sorafenib under hypoxia and improved the inhibitory effects on HepG2 xenograft tumour growth, accompanied by enhanced apoptosis as evidenced by the increased sub-G1 population and PARP cleavage. The expression levels of YAP and its target genes were highly correlated with poor prognosis and predicted a high risk of HCC patients. These findings collectively suggest that statins utilization maybe a promising new strategy to counteract hypoxia-mediated resistance to sorafenib in HCC patients. PMID:27476430

  11. Inactivation of hypoxia-induced YAP by statins overcomes hypoxic resistance tosorafenib in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian-Yi; Zhuang, Lin-Han; Hu, Yan; Zhou, Yu-Lu; Lin, Wen-Kai; Wang, Dan-Dan; Wan, Zi-Qian; Chang, Lin-Lin; Chen, Ying; Ying, Mei-Dan; Chen, Zi-Bo; Ye, Song; Lou, Jian-Shu; He, Qiao-Jun; Zhu, Hong; Yang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor used as a first-line treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but it has shown modest to low response rates. The characteristic tumour hypoxia of advanced HCC maybe a major factor underlying hypoxia-mediated treatment failure. Thus, it is urgent to elucidate the mechanisms of hypoxia-mediated sorafenib resistance in HCC. In this study, we found that hypoxia induced the nuclear translocation of Yes associate-Protein (YAP) and the subsequent transactivation of target genes that promote cell survival and escape apoptosis, thereby leading to sorafenib resistance. Statins, the inhibitors of hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase, could ameliorate hypoxia-induced nuclear translocation of YAP and suppress mRNA levels of YAP target genes both in vivo and in vitro. Combined treatment of statins with sorafenib greatly rescued the loss of anti-proliferative effects of sorafenib under hypoxia and improved the inhibitory effects on HepG2 xenograft tumour growth, accompanied by enhanced apoptosis as evidenced by the increased sub-G1 population and PARP cleavage. The expression levels of YAP and its target genes were highly correlated with poor prognosis and predicted a high risk of HCC patients. These findings collectively suggest that statins utilization maybe a promising new strategy to counteract hypoxia-mediated resistance to sorafenib in HCC patients. PMID:27476430

  12. Redox stress is not essential for the pseudo-hypoxic phenotype of succinate dehydrogenase deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Selak, Mary A; Durán, Raul V; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2006-01-01

    HIFalpha prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs) are a family of enzymes that regulate protein levels of the alpha subunit of the hypoxia inducible transcription factor (HIF) under different oxygen levels. PHDs catalyse the conversion of a prolyl residue, molecular oxygen and alpha-ketoglutarate to hydroxy-prolyl, carbon dioxide and succinate in a reaction dependent on ferrous iron and ascorbate as cofactors. Recently it was shown that pseudo-hypoxia, HIF induction under normoxic conditions, is an important feature of tumours generated as a consequence of inactivation of the mitochondrial tumour suppressor 'succinate dehydrogenase' (SDH). Two models have been proposed to describe the link between SDH inhibition and HIF activation. Both models suggest that a mitochondrial-generated signal leads to the inhibition of PHDs in the cytosol, however, the models differ in the nature of the proposed messenger. The first model postulates that mitochondrial-generated hydrogen peroxide mediates signal transduction while the second model implicates succinate as the molecular messenger which leaves the mitochondrion and inhibits PHDs in the cytosol. Here we show that pseudo-hypoxia can be observed in SDH-suppressed cells in the absence of oxidative stress and in the presence of effective antioxidant treatment.

  13. Altered Stra13 and Dec2 circadian gene expression in hypoxic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guillaumond, Fabienne; Lacoche, Samuel; Dulong, Sandrine; Grechez-Cassiau, Aline; Filipski, Elisabeth; Li, Xiao-Mei; Levi, Francis; Berra, Edurne; Delaunay, Franck; Teboul, Michele

    2008-05-16

    The circadian system regulates rhythmically most of the mammalian physiology in synchrony with the environmental light/dark cycle. Alteration of circadian clock gene expression has been associated with tumour progression but the molecular links between the two mechanisms remain poorly defined. Here we show that Stra13 and Dec2, two circadian transcriptional regulators which play a crucial role in cell proliferation and apoptosis are overexpressed and no longer rhythmic in serum shocked fibroblasts treated with CoCl{sub 2,} a substitute of hypoxia. This effect is associated with a loss of circadian expression of the clock genes Rev-erb{alpha} and Bmal1, and the clock-controlled gene Dbp. Consistently, cotransfection assays demonstrate that STRA13 and DEC2 both antagonize CLOCK:BMAL1 dependent transactivation of the Rev-erb{alpha} and Dbp promoters. Using a transplantable osteosarcoma tumour model, we show that hypoxia is associated with altered circadian expression of Stra13, Dec2, Rev-erb{alpha}, Bmal1 and Dbp in vivo. These observations collectively support the notion that overexpression of Stra13 and Dec2 links hypoxia signalling to altered circadian clock gene expression.

  14. MicroRNA response to hypoxic stress in soft tissue sarcoma cells: microRNA mediated regulation of HIF3α

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypoxia is often encountered in solid tumors and known to contribute to aggressive tumor behavior, radiation- and chemotherapy resistance resulting in a poor prognosis for the cancer patient. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a role in the regulation of the tumor cell response to hypoxia, however, not much is known about the involvement of miRNAs in hypoxic signalling pathways in soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Method A panel of twelve STS cell lines was exposed to atmospheric oxygen concentrations (normoxia) or 1% oxygen (hypoxia) for up to 48 h. Hypoxic conditions were verified and miRNA expression profiles were assessed by LNA™ oligonucleotide microarrays and RT-PCR after 24 h. The expression of target genes regulated by hypoxia responsive miRNAs is examined by end-point PCR and validated by luciferase reporter constructs. Results Exposure of STS cell lines to hypoxic conditions gave rise to upregulation of Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) 1α protein levels and increased mRNA expression of HIF1 target genes CA9 and VEGFA. Deregulation of miRNA expression after 24 h of hypoxia was observed. The most differentially expressed miRNAs (p < 0.001) in response to hypoxia were miR-185-3p, miR-485-5p, miR-216a-5p (upregulated) and miR-625-5p (downregulated). The well-known hypoxia responsive miR-210-3p could not be reliably detected by the microarray platform most likely for technical reasons, however, its upregulation upon hypoxic stress was apparent by qPCR. Target prediction algorithms identified 11 potential binding sites for miR-485-5p and a single putative miR-210-3p binding site in the 3’UTR of HIF3α, the least studied member of the HIF family. We showed that HIF3α transcripts, expressing a 3’UTR containing the miR-485-5p and miR-210-3p target sites, are expressed in all sarcoma cell lines and upregulated upon hypoxia. Additionally, luciferase reporter constructs containing the 3’UTR of HIF3α were used to demonstrate regulation of HIF3α by miR-210

  15. TcO(PnA.O-1-(2-nitroimidazole)) [BMS-181321], a new technetium-containing nitroimidazole complex for imaging hypoxia: synthesis, characterization, and xanthine oxidase-catalyzed reduction.

    PubMed

    Linder, K E; Chan, Y W; Cyr, J E; Malley, M F; Nowotnik, D P; Nunn, A D

    1994-01-01

    A technetium(V)oxo nitroimidazole complex that shows promise for imaging regional hypoxia in vivo, [BMS-181321, TcO(PnAO-1-(2-nitroimidazole))] (1) was prepared from 3,3,9,9-tetramethyl-1-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,8-diazaundecane -2,10-dione dioxime, a 2-nitroimidazole-containing derivative of propyleneamine oxime (PnAO). The 99Tc complex [99Tc]Oxo[[3,3,9,9-tetramethyl-1-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,8- diazaundecane-2,10-dione dioximato]-(3-)-N,N',N'',N''']technetium (V) was synthesized both from pertechnetate and [TcO(Eg)2]- (Eg = ethylene glycol). A new synthetic route to TcO(PnAO) (2) is also described. 99TcO(PnAO-1-(2-nitroimidazole)) was characterized by 1H NMR, IR, and UV/vis spectroscopy, HPLC, FAB mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography. Electrochemistry of 1 reveals that the nitro redox chemistry found in the ligand is maintained upon coordination to technetium but shifts to a slightly more positive potential. Using chiral HPLC (Chiracel OD), 99mTc (1) was resolved into its two enantiomers. However, the two isomers were found to racemize quickly (t1/2 < 2 min) in the presence of water. Localization of 1 is believed to be mediated by enzymatically catalyzed reduction of the nitroimidazole group, so the in vitro reaction of 99Tc(1) with the nitroreductase enzyme xanthine oxidase (XOD) was studied. XOD catalyzed the quantitative reduction of the nitroimidazole group on the molecule under anaerobic conditions in the presence of hypoxanthine. No reaction was noted using a non-nitro-containing complex (2). The rate of reduction of the Tc-nitroimidazole complex (1.5 +/- 0.16 nmol/min per unit XOD) was faster than that observed previously for the nitroimidazole BATOs (BATO = boronic acid adduct of technetium dioxime) and was about two-thirds that of fluoromisonidazole, a compound that has proven useful for imaging hypoxia in humans when labeled with 18F. These data suggest that BMS-181321 (1) has the potential to be recognized by nitroreductase enzymes in

  16. A Novel Microfluidic Platform for High-Resolution Imaging of a Three-Dimensional Cell Culture under a Controlled Hypoxic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Funamoto, Kenichi; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Liu, Yuchun; Ochs, Christopher J.; Kim, Choong

    2014-01-01

    Low oxygen tensions experienced in various pathological and physiological conditions are a major stimulus for angiogenesis. Hypoxic conditions play a critical role in regulating cellular behaviour including migration, proliferation and differentiation. This study introduces the use of a microfluidic device that allows for the control of oxygen tension for the study of different three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures for various applications. The device has a central 3D gel region acting as an external cellular matrix, flanked by media channels. On each side, there is a peripheral gas channel through which suitable gas mixtures are supplied to establish a uniform oxygen concentration or gradient within the device. The effects of various parameters, such as gas and media flow rates, device thickness, and diffusion coefficients of oxygen were examined using numerical simulations to determine the characteristics of the microfluidic device. A polycarbonate (PC) film with a low oxygen diffusion coefficient was embedded in the device in proximity above the channels to prevent oxygen diffusion from the incubator environment into the Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) device. The oxygen tension in the device was then validated experimentally using a ruthenium-coated (Ru-coated) oxygen-sensing glass cover slip which confirmed the establishment of low uniform oxygen tensions (< 3%) or an oxygen gradient across the gel region. To demonstrate the utility of the microfluidic device for cellular experiments under hypoxic conditions, migratory studies of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were performed. The microfluidic device allowed for imaging cellular migration with high-resolution, exhibiting an enhanced migration in hypoxia in comparison to normoxia. This microfluidic device presents itself as a promising platform for the investigation of cellular behaviour in a 3D gel scaffold under varying hypoxic conditions. PMID:23023115

  17. Changes in Interleukin-1 alpha serum levels after transplantation of umbilical cord blood cells in a model of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, Katja; Tenbusch, Matthias; May, Caroline; Marcus, Katrin; Meier, Carola

    2013-03-01

    Transplantation of human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) cells is a potential approach for the treatment of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Neurological and motor deficits resulting from the brain lesion are ameliorated upon transplantation. The molecular mechanisms underlying these improvements are currently being unravelled. One parameter identified as part of the beneficial effects of hUCB cells is the reduction of brain inflammation. It is, however, unclear whether the modulation of brain inflammation is due to local or systemic effects of hUCB cells. In this study, the effects of hUCB cell transplantation in a model of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury were investigated at the systemic level by measurement of serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines by multiplex bead arrays. Two days after induction of the brain damage, levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines Interleukin-1α (IL-1α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) were increased in the serum of rats. Application of hUCB cells, in turn, correlated with a reduced elevation of serum levels of these pro-inflammatory cytokines. This decrease was accompanied by a reduced expression of CD68, a marker protein of activated microglia/macrophages in the brain. Therefore, systemic modulation of the immune response by hUCB cells could represent one possible mechanism of how these cells might mediate their beneficial effects. Creation of a regenerative environment with reduced inflammation might account for the functional regeneration observed upon hUCB cell treatment in lesioned animals.

  18. Bidirectional signalling between EphA2 and ephrinA1 increases tubular cell attachment, laminin secretion and modulates erythropoietin expression after renal hypoxic injury.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Stéphane; Rudloff, Stefan; Koenig, Katrin Franziska; Karthik, Swapna; Hoogewijs, David; Huynh-Do, Uyen

    2016-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in hospitalized patients and has a poor prognosis, the severity of AKI being linked to progression to chronic kidney disease. This stresses the need to search for protective mechanisms during the acute phase. We investigated kidney repair after hypoxic injury using a rat model of renal artery branch ligation, which led to an oxygen gradient vertical to the corticomedullary axis. Three distinct zones were observed: tubular necrosis, infarction border zone and preserved normal tissue. EphA2 is a receptor tyrosine kinase with pivotal roles in cell architecture, migration and survival, upon juxtacrine contact with its membrane-bound ligand EphrinA1. Following hypoxia, EphA2 was up-regulated in cortical and medullary tubular cells, while EphrinA1 was up-regulated in interstitial cells adjacent to peritubular capillaries. Moreover, erythropoietin (EPO) messenger RNA (mRNA) was strongly expressed in the border zone of infarcted kidney within the first 6 h. To gain more insight into the biological impact of EphA2 and EphrinA1 up-regulation, we activated the signalling pathways in vitro using recombinant EphrinA1/Fc or EphA2/Fc proteins. Stimulation of EphA2 forward signalling in the proximal tubular cell line HK2 increased cell attachment and laminin secretion at the baso-lateral side. Conversely, activation of reverse signalling through EphrinA1 expressed by Hep3B cells promoted EPO production at both the transcriptional and protein level. Strikingly, in co-culture experiments, juxtacrine contact between EphA2 expressing MDCK and EphrinA1 expressing Hep3B was sufficient to induce a significant up-regulation of EPO mRNA production in the latter cells, even in the absence of hypoxic conditions. The synergistic effects of EphA2 and hypoxia led to a 15-20-fold increase of EPO expression. Collectively, our results suggest an important role of EphA2/EphrinA1 signalling in kidney repair after hypoxic injury through stimulation of (i) tubular

  19. NOR-1/NR4A3 regulates the cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 2 (cIAP2) in vascular cells: role in the survival response to hypoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Judith; Galán, María; Martí-Pàmies, Ingrid; Romero, José María; Camacho, Mercedes; Rodríguez, Cristina; Martínez-González, José

    2016-01-01

    Vascular cell survival is compromised under pathological conditions such as abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We have previously shown that the nuclear receptor NOR-1 is involved in the survival response of vascular cells to hypoxia. Here, we identify the anti-apoptotic protein cIAP2 as a downstream effector of NOR-1. NOR-1 and cIAP2 were up-regulated in human AAA samples, colocalizing in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). While NOR-1 silencing reduced cIAP2 expression in vascular cells, lentiviral over-expression of this receptor increased cIAP2 mRNA and protein levels. The transcriptional regulation of the human cIAP2 promoter was analyzed in cells over-expressing NOR-1 by luciferase reporter assays, electrophoretic mobility shift analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation, identifying a NGFI-B site (NBRE-358/-351) essential for NOR-1 responsiveness. NOR-1 and cIAP2 were up-regulated by hypoxia and by a hypoxia mimetic showing a similar time-dependent pattern. Deletion and site-directed mutagenesis studies show that NOR-1 mediates the hypoxia-induced cIAP2 expression. While NOR-1 over-expression up-regulated cIAP2 and limited VSMC apoptosis induced by hypoxic stress, cIAP2 silencing partially prevented this NOR-1 pro-survival effect. These results indicate that cIAP2 is a target of NOR-1, and suggest that this anti-apoptotic protein is involved in the survival response to hypoxic stress mediated by NOR-1 in vascular cells. PMID:27654514

  20. NADPH:cytochrome c (P450) reductase activates tirapazamine (SR4233) to restore hypoxic and oxic cytotoxicity in an aerobic resistant derivative of the A549 lung cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, M P; Patterson, A V; Chinje, E C; Harris, A L; Stratford, I J

    2000-01-01

    Tirapazamine (TPZ, SR4233, WIN 59075) is a bioreductive drug that is activated in regions of low oxygen tension to a cytotoxic radical intermediate. This labile metabolite shows high selective toxicity towards hypoxic cells, such as those found in solid tumours. Under aerobic conditions, redox cycling occurs with subsequent generation of superoxide radicals, which are also cytotoxic. NADPH:cytochrome c (P450) reductase (P450R) is a one-electron reducing enzyme that efficiently activates TPZ. Recently a derivative of the A549 non-small cell lung cancer cell line (A549c50) was generated that showed substantially reduced P450R activity compared to its parental line (Elwell et al (1997) Biochem Pharmacol54: 249–257). Here, it is demonstrated that the A549c50 cells are markedly more resistant to TPZ under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. In addition, these cells have a dramatically impaired ability to metabolize TPZ to its two-electron reduction product, SR4317, under hypoxic conditions when compared to wild-type cells. P450R activity in the A549c50 cells was reintroduced to similar levels as that seen in the parental A549 cells by transfection of the full-length cDNA for human P450R. These P450R over-expressing cells exhibit restored sensitivity to TPZ under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions, comparable to that found in the original parental A549 cells. Further, the ability of the transfected cells to metabolize TPZ to SR4317 under hypoxic conditions is also shown to be restored. This provides further evidence that P450R can play an important role in the activation, metabolism and toxicity of this lead bioreductive drug. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10682679

  1. The long non-coding RNA – HIF1A-AS2 facilitates the maintenance of mesenchymal glioblastoma stem-like cells in hypoxic niches

    PubMed Central

    Mineo, Marco; Ricklefs, Franz; Rooj, Arun K.; Lyons, Shawn M.; Ivanov, Pavel; Ansari, Khairul I.; Nakano, Ichiro; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Godlewski, Jakub; Bronisz, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Long-non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have an undefined role in the pathobiology of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). These tumors are genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous with transcriptome subtype-specific GBM stem-like cells (GSCs) that adapt to the brain tumor microenvironment, including hypoxic niches. We identified hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha-antisense RNA 2 (HIF1A-AS2) as a subtype-specific hypoxia inducible lncRNA, up-regulated in mesenchymal GSCs. Its deregulation affects GSC growth, self-renewal and hypoxia-dependent molecular reprogramming. Amongst the HIF1A-AS2 interactome, IGF2BP2 and DHX9 were identified as direct partners. This association was needed for maintenance of expression of their target gene, HMGA1. Down-regulation of HIF1A-AS2 led to delayed growth of mesenchymal GSC tumors, survival benefits, and impaired expression of HMGA1 in vivo. Our data demonstrate that HIF1A-AS2 contributes to GSCs’ speciation and adaptation to hypoxia within the tumor microenvironment, acting directly through its interactome/targets and indirectly by modulating responses to hypoxic stress depending on the subtype-specific genetic context. PMID:27264189

  2. The Long Non-coding RNA HIF1A-AS2 Facilitates the Maintenance of Mesenchymal Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells in Hypoxic Niches.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Marco; Ricklefs, Franz; Rooj, Arun K; Lyons, Shawn M; Ivanov, Pavel; Ansari, Khairul I; Nakano, Ichiro; Chiocca, E Antonio; Godlewski, Jakub; Bronisz, Agnieszka

    2016-06-14

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have an undefined role in the pathobiology of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). These tumors are genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous with transcriptome subtype-specific GBM stem-like cells (GSCs) that adapt to the brain tumor microenvironment, including hypoxic niches. We identified hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha-antisense RNA 2 (HIF1A-AS2) as a subtype-specific hypoxia-inducible lncRNA, upregulated in mesenchymal GSCs. Its deregulation affects GSC growth, self-renewal, and hypoxia-dependent molecular reprogramming. Among the HIF1A-AS2 interactome, IGF2BP2 and DHX9 were identified as direct partners. This association was needed for maintenance of expression of their target gene, HMGA1. Downregulation of HIF1A-AS2 led to delayed growth of mesenchymal GSC tumors, survival benefits, and impaired expression of HMGA1 in vivo. Our data demonstrate that HIF1A-AS2 contributes to GSCs' speciation and adaptation to hypoxia within the tumor microenvironment, acting directly through its interactome and targets and indirectly by modulating responses to hypoxic stress depending on the subtype-specific genetic context. PMID:27264189

  3. Patterns and Levels of Hypoxia in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas and Their Relationship to Patient Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Sydney M. V. Du, Kevin L.; Chalian, Ara A.; Mick, Rosemarie; Zhang, Paul J.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Quon, Harry; Lustig, Robert; Weinstein, Gregory S.; Koch, Cameron J.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: EF5, a 2-nitroimidazole hypoxia marker, was used to study the presence, levels, and prognostic significance of hypoxia in primary head and neck squamous cell tumors. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, or larynx with at least 2 years of clinical follow-up were included in this study. Quantitative analyses of EF5 immunofluorescence was carried out, and these data were compared with patient outcome. Results: EF5 immunostaining showed substantial intra- and intertumoral hypoxic heterogeneity. The majority of cells in all tumors were well oxygenated. Three patterns of EF5 binding in cells were identified using criteria based on the cellular region that was stained (peripheral or central) and the relationship of binding to necrosis. We tested the association between EF5-binding levels with event-free and overall survival irrespective of the pattern of cellular binding or treatment regimen. Patients with tumors containing EF5-binding regions corresponding to severe hypoxia ({<=}0.1% oxygen) had a shorter event-free survival time than patients with pO{sub 2} values greater than 0.1% (p = 0.032). Nodal status was also predictive for outcome. Conclusions: These data illustrate the potential utility of EF5 binding based on quantitative immunohistochemistry of tissue pO{sub 2} and provide support for the development of noninvasive hypoxia positron emission tomographic studies with fluorine 18-labeled EF5.

  4. Kinetics of a putative hypoxic tissue marker, Technetium-99m-nitroimidazole (BMS181321), in normoxic, hypoxic, ischemic and stunned myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Kusuoka, Hideo; Hashimoto, Katsuji; Fukuchi, Kazuki

    1994-08-01

    This study focused on the kinetics of the newly developed {sup 99m}TTc-nitroimidazole, propyleneamine oxime-1,2-nitroimidazole (BMS181321) in the different setting of myocardial perfusion states and oxygenation levels, and compared the kinetics of BMS181321 with those of other technetium analogues. The kinetics of BMS181321 were evaluated in isolated perfused rat hearts. Technetium-99m-hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) and a non-nitroimidazole-containing analogue of BMS 181321 (6-methyl propyleneamine oxime; PAO-6-Me) were used to compare their kinetics with those of BMS181321. BMS181321 cleared quickly from normoxic hearts and the retention in the myocardium 10 min after injection was 0.84% {plus_minus} 0.04% ID/g wet wt (mean {plus_minus} s.e.m.). In contrast, BMS181321 was retained after reperfusion when it was injected before ischemia; the uptake in the myocardium 10 min after reperfusion was significantly greater than in controls (23.9% {plus_minus} 3.9%ID/g wt, p<0.05). These results indicate that {sup 99m}Tc-BMS181321 is well trapped in ischemic myocardium and moderately trapped in hypoxic myocardium, but washed out quickly in stunned myocardium. The residence time influences the amount retained. 14 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Hypoxic Preconditioning Alleviates Ethanol Neurotoxicity: the Involvement of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiping; Bower, Kimberly A.; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Xu, Mei; Luo, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is a neuroteratogen and neurodegeneration is the most devastating consequence of developmental exposure to ethanol. A sublethal preconditioning has been proposed as a neuroprotective strategy against several central nervous system (CNS) neurodegenerative diseases. We have recently demonstrated that autophagy is a protective response to alleviate ethanol toxicity. A modest hypoxic preconditioning (1% oxygen) did not cause neurotoxicity but induced autophagy (Tzeng et al., 2010). We therefore hypothesize that the modest hypoxic preconditioning may offer a protection against ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. We showed here that the modest hypoxic preconditioning (1% oxygen) for 8 hours significantly alleviated ethanol-induced death of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Under the normoxia condition, cell viability in ethanol-exposed cultures (316 mg/dl for 48 hrs) was 49 ± 6% of untreated controls; however, with hypoxic preconditioning, cell viability in the ethanol-exposed group increased to 78 ± 7% of the controls (p < 0.05; n = 3). Bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of autophagosome and lysosome fusion, blocked hypoxic preconditioning-mediated protection. Similarly, inhibition of autophagic initiation by wortmannin also eliminated hypoxic preconditioning-mediated protection. In contrast, activation of autophagy by rapamycin further enhanced neuroprotection caused by hypoxic preconditioning. Taken together, the results confirm that autophagy is a protective response against ethanol neurotoxicity and the modest hypoxic preconditioning can offer neuroprotection by activating autophagic pathways. PMID:23568540

  6. BDNF Pretreatment of Human Embryonic-Derived Neural Stem Cells Improves Cell Survival and Functional Recovery After Transplantation in Hypoxic-Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Sahar; Smith, Tenille N; Wang, Nancy; Chua, Joshua Y; Westbroek, Erick; Wang, Kendrick; Guzman, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Intra-arterial neural stem cell (NSC) therapy has the potential to improve long-term outcomes after stroke. Here we evaluate if pretreatment of NSCs with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) prior to transplantation improves cell engraftment and functional recovery following hypoxic-ischemic (HI) stroke. Human embryonic-derived NSCs with or without BDNF pretreatment (1 h, 100 ng/ml) were transplanted 3 days after HI stroke. Functional recovery was assessed using the horizontal ladder test. Cell engraftment was evaluated using bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and histological counts of SC121(+) cells. Fluoro-Jade C (FJC) and NeuN stains were used to evaluate neuroprotection. The effect of BDNF on NSCs was analyzed using a migration assay, immunocytochemistry, Luminex proteomic assay, and RT-qPCR.BLI analysis demonstrated significantly higher photon flux in the BDNF-treated NSC group compared to untreated NSC (p = 0.049) and control groups (p = 0.0021) at 1 week after transplantation. Immunohistochemistry confirmed increased transplanted cell survival in the cortex (p = 0.0126) and hippocampus (p = 0.0098) of animals injected with BDNF-treated NSCs compared to untreated NSCs. Behavioral testing revealed that the BDNF-treated NSC group demonstrated increased sensorimotor recovery compared to the untreated NSC and control groups (p < 0.001) over the 1-month period (p < 0.001) following transplantation. A significant improvement in performance was found in the BDNF-treated NSC group compared to the control group at 14, 21, and 28 (p < 0.05) days after transplantation. The cortex and hippocampus of the BDNF-treated NSC group had significantly more SC121(+) NSCs (p = 0.0125, p = 0.0098), fewer FJC(+) neurons (p = 0.0370, p = 0.0285), and a higher percentage of NeuN(+) expression (p = 0.0354) in the cortex compared to the untreated NSC group. BDNF treatment of NSCs resulted in significantly greater migration to SDF-1, secretion of M-CSF, VEGF, and expression of CXCR4

  7. Hypoxia in Tumor Angiogenesis and Metastasis: Evaluation of VEGF and MMP Over-expression and Down-Regulation of HIF-1alpha with RNAi in Hypoxic Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Shruti

    Background: As tumor mass grows beyond a few millimeters in diameter, the angiogenic "switch" is turned on leading to recruitment of blood vessels from surrounding artery and veins. However, the tumor mass is poorly perfused and there are pockets of hypoxia or lower oxygen concentrations relative to normal tissue. Hypoxia-inducing factor-1a (HIF-1a), a transcription factor, is activated when the oxygen concentration is low. Upon activation of HIF-1a, a number of other genes also turn on that allows the tumor to become more aggressive and resistant to therapy. Purpose: The main objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of hypoxia-induced HIF-1a followed by over-expression of angiogenic and metastatic markers in tumor cells and down-regulation of HIF-1a using nanoparticle-delivered RNA interference therapy. Methods: Human ovarian (SKOV3) and breast (MDA-MB-231) adenocarcinoma cells were incubated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Following hypoxia treatment of the cells, HIF-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), and MMP-9 expression was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. For intracellular delivery of HIF-1a gene silencing small interfering RNA (siRNA), type B gelatin nanoparticles were fabricated using the solvent displacement method and the surface was modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG, Mol. wt. 2kDa). Cellular uptake and distribution of the nanoparticles was observed with Cy3-siRNA loaded, FITC-conjugated gelatin nanoparticles. Cytotoxicity of the nanoparticle formulations was evaluated in both the cell lines. siRNA was transfected in the gelatin nanoparticles under hypoxic conditions. Total cellular protein and RNA were extracted for analysis of HIF1a, VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. Results: MDA-MB-231 and SKOV3 cells show increased expression of HIF1a under hypoxic conditions compared to baseline levels at normoxic conditions. ELISA and western blots of VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 appear to

  8. Preparation of Nucleosides Derived from 2-Nitroimidazole and d-Arabinose, d-Ribose, and d-Galactose by the Vorbrüggen Method and Their Conversion to Potential Precursors for Tracers To Image Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    2-Nitroimidazole was silylated using hexaethyldisilazane and then reacted with 1-O-acetyl derivatives of d-arabinose, d-ribose, and d-galactose in acetonitrile at mild temperatures (−20 °C to rt), catalyzed by triethylsilyl triflate (Vorbrüggen conditions). The α-anomer was formed in the former case and the β-anomers in the latter two cases (highly) selectively. When d-arabinose and d-ribose were silylated with tert-butyldiphenylsilyl chloride in pyridine at the hydroxyl groups at C-5 and acetylated at the other ones in a one-pot reaction, mixtures of anomeric 1-O-acetyl derivatives were obtained. These were coupled by the Vorbrüggen method and then deblocked at C-5 and tosylated to give precursors for tracers to image hypoxia in four steps without using Hg(CN)2 necessary for other methods. The Vorbrüggen conditions enable a shorter route to azomycin nucleoside analogues than the previous coupling procedures. PMID:21905640

  9. Transcriptional up-regulation of inhibitory PAS domain protein gene expression by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1): a negative feedback regulatory circuit in HIF-1-mediated signaling in hypoxic cells.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yuichi; Uenishi, Rie; Okamoto, Kensaku; Isoe, Tsubasa; Hosono, Osamu; Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Kanopka, Arvydas; Poellinger, Lorenz; Haneda, Masakazu; Morimoto, Chikao

    2007-05-11

    The inhibitory PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain protein (IPAS), a dominant negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs), is potentially implicated in negative regulation of angiogenesis in such tissues as the avascular cornea of the eye. We have previously shown IPAS mRNA expression is up-regulated in hypoxic tissues, which at least in part involves hypoxia-dependent alternative splicing of the transcripts from the IPAS/HIF-3alpha locus. In the present study, we demonstrate that a hypoxia-driven transcriptional mechanism also plays a role in augmentation of IPAS gene expression. Isolation and analyses of the promoter region flanking to the first exon of IPAS gene revealed a functional hypoxia response element at position -834 to -799, whereas the sequence upstream of the HIF-3alpha first exon scarcely responded to hypoxic stimuli. A transient transfection experiment demonstrated that HIF-1alpha mediates IPAS promoter activation via the functional hypoxia response element under hypoxic conditions and that a constitutively active form of HIF-1alpha is sufficient for induction of the promoter in normoxic cells. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed binding of the HIF-1 complex to the element in a hypoxia-dependent manner. Taken together, HIF-1 directly up-regulates IPAS gene expression through a mechanism distinct from RNA splicing, providing a further level of negative feedback gene regulation in adaptive responses to hypoxic/ischemic conditions. PMID:17355974

  10. Protective Effects of N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine in Human Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells and Restoration of Motor Function in Neonatal Rats with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dongsun; Shin, Kyungha; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Choi, Youngjin; Jang, Ja-Young; Kim, Jihyun; Jeong, Heon-Sang; Lee, Wooryoung; Lee, Yoon-Bok; Kim, Seung Up; Joo, Seong Soo; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Since oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are the target cells of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), the present study was aimed at investigating the protective effects of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), a well-known antioxidant and precursor of glutathione, in OPCs as well as in neonatal rats. Methods. In in vitro study, protective effects of NAC on KCN cytotoxicity in F3.Olig2 OPCs were investigated via MTT assay and apoptotic signal analysis. In in vivo study, NAC was administered to rats with HIE induced by hypoxia-ischemia surgery at postnatal day 7, and their motor functions and white matter demyelination were analyzed. Results. NAC decreased KCN cytotoxicity in F3.Olig2 cells and especially suppressed apoptosis by regulating Bcl2 and p-ERK. Administration of NAC recovered motor functions such as the using ratio of forelimb contralateral to the injured brain, locomotor activity, and rotarod performance of neonatal HIE animals. It was also confirmed that NAC attenuated demyelination in the corpus callosum, a white matter region vulnerable to HIE. Conclusion. The results indicate that NAC exerts neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo by preserving OPCs, via regulation of antiapoptotic signaling, and that F3.Olig2 human OPCs could be a good tool for screening of candidates for demyelinating diseases. PMID:25918547

  11. Hypoxic Preconditioning Inhibits Hypoxia-induced Apoptosis of Cardiac Progenitor Cells via the PI3K/Akt-DNMT1-p53 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rongfeng; Sun, Yuning; Chen, Zhongpu; Yao, Yuyu; Ma, Genshan

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that hypoxic preconditioning (HP) can enhance the survival and proliferation of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs); however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we report that HP of c-kit (+) CPCs inhibits p53 via the PI3K/Akt-DNMT1 pathway. First, CPCs were isolated from the hearts of C57BL/6 mice and further purified by magnetic-activated cell sorting. Next, these cells were cultured under either normoxia (H0) or HP for 6 hours (H6) followed by oxygen–serum deprivation for 24 hours (24h). Flow cytometric analysis and MTT assays revealed that hypoxia-preconditioned CPCs exhibited an increased survival rate. Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR assays showed that p53 was obviously inhibited, while DNMT1 and DNMT3β were both significantly up-regulated by HP. Bisulphite sequencing analysis indicated that DNMT1 and DNMT3β did not cause p53 promoter hypermethylation. A reporter gene assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis further demonstrated that DNMT1 bound to the promoter locus of p53 in hypoxia-preconditioned CPCs. Together, these observations suggest that HP of CPCs could lead to p53 inhibition by up-regulating DNMT1 and DNMT3β, which does not result in p53 promoter hypermethylation, and that DNMT1 might directly repress p53, at least in part, by binding to the p53 promoter locus. PMID:27488808

  12. Avian embryos in hypoxic environments.

    PubMed

    León-Velarde, F; Monge-C, C

    2004-08-12

    Avian embryos at high altitude do not benefit of the maternal protection against hypoxia as in mammals. Nevertheless, avian embryos are known to hatch successfully at altitudes between 4,000 and 6,500 m. This review considers some of the processes that bring about the outstanding modifications in the pressure differences between the environment and mitochondria of avian embryos in hypoxic environments. Among species, some maintain normal levels of oxygen consumption ( VO2) have a high oxygen carrying capacity, lower the air cell-arterial pressure difference ( PAO2 - PaO2 ) with a constant pH. Other species decrease VO2, increase only slightly the oxygen carrying capacity, have a higher PAO2 - PaO2 difference than sea-level embryos and lower the PCO2 and pH. High altitude embryos, and those exposed to hypoxia have an accelerated decline of erythrocyte ATP levels during development and an earlier stimulation of 2,3-BPG synthesis. A higher Bohr effect may ensure high tissue PO2 in the presence of the high-affinity hemoglobin. Independently of the strategy used, they serve together to promote suitable rates of development and successful hatching of high altitude birds in hypoxic environments.

  13. Radio-sensitization effect of an mTOR inhibitor, temsirolimus, on lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ushijima, Hiroki; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Oike, Takahiro; Komachi, Mayumi; Yoshimoto, Yuya; Ando, Ken; Okonogi, Noriyuki; Sato, Hiro; Noda, Shin-ei; Saito, Jun-ichi; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) correlates with cell survival under hypoxia and regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), a key protein in hypoxia-related events. However, the role of mTOR in radio-resistance has not been fully investigated. Therefore, the effect of mTOR on the radio-resistance of cancer cells under hypoxia was evaluated using the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus. Clonogenic survival was examined in the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line under normoxia or hypoxia, with or without temsirolimus. An oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was calculated using the D10 values, the doses giving 10% survival. Western blotting was performed to investigate the effect of temsirolimus on mTOR and the HIF-1α pathway under normoxia and hypoxia. A549 cells showed a radio-resistance of 5.1 and 14.2 Gy, as indicated by D10 values under normoxia and hypoxia, respectively; the OER was 2.8. The cell survival rates under hypoxia and with temsirolimus remarkably decreased compared with those under normoxia. The D10 values of the cells under normoxia and hypoxia were 4.8 and 5.4 Gy, respectively (OER = 1.1). mTOR expression was suppressed by temsirolimus under both normoxia and hypoxia. HIF-1α expression decreased under hypoxia in the presence of temsirolimus. These results suggest that temsirolimus can overcome the radio-resistance induced by hypoxia. When the fact that mTOR acts upstream of HIF-1α is considered, our data suggest that the restoration of radiation sensitivity by temsirolimus under hypoxia may be associated with the suppression of the HIF-1α pathway. Temsirolimus could therefore be used as a hypoxic cell radio-sensitizer. PMID:25887043

  14. Tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) coordinate heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) expression in hypoxic nucleus pulposus cells: role of Hsp70 in HIF-1α degradation.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Shilpa S; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Skubutyte, Renata; Shapiro, Irving M; Risbud, Makarand V

    2012-05-01

    The objective of our study was to examine the regulation of hypoxic expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in nucleus pulposus cells and to determine if Hsp70 promoted hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α degradation. Rat nucleus pulposus cells were maintained in culture in either 21% or 1% oxygen. To determine the regulation of Hsp70 expression by tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) and HIF-1/2, loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments and mutational analysis of the Hsp70 promoter were performed. Hypoxia increased Hsp70 expression in nucleus pulposus cells. Noteworthy, hypoxia increased TonEBP transactivation and mutation of TonE motifs blocked hypoxic induction of the Hsp70 promoter. In contrast, mutation of hypoxia response element (HRE) motifs coupled with loss-of-function experiments suggested that HIF-1 and HIF-2 suppressed Hsp70 promoter activity and transcription. Interestingly, HIF-α interferes with TonEBP function and suppresses the inductive effect of TonEBP on the Hsp70 promoter. In terms of Hsp70 function, when treated with Hsp70 transcriptional inhibitor, KNK437, there was an increase in HIF-1α protein stability and transcriptional activity. Likewise, when Hsp70 was overexpressed, the stability of HIF-1α and its transcriptional activity decreased. Hsp70 interacted with HIF-1α under hypoxic conditions and evidenced increased binding when treated with MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor. These results suggest that Hsp70 may promote HIF-1α degradation through the proteasomal pathway in nucleus pulposus cells. In hypoxic and hyperosmolar nucleus pulposus cells, Hsp70, TonEBP, and HIFs form a regulatory loop. We propose that the positive regulation by TonEBP and negative regulation of Hsp70 by HIF-1 and HIF-2 may serve to maintain Hsp70 levels in these cells, whereas Hsp70 may function in controlling HIF-1α homeostasis. PMID:22322648

  15. Transplantation of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Restores the Neurobehavioral Disorders of Rats With Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dongsun; Lee, Sun Hee; Bae, Dae Kwon; Yang, Yun-Hui; Yang, Goeun; Kyung, Jangbeen; Kim, Dajeong; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Hong, Jin Tae; Shin, Il Seob; Kang, Sung Keun; Ra, Jeong Chan; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2013-01-01

    Improving the effects of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) on the demyelination and neurobehavioral function was investigated in an experimental model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Seven-day-old male rats were subjected to hypoxia-ischemia-lipopolysaccharide and intracerebroventricularly transplanted with human ASCs (4 × 105 cells/rat) once at postnatal day 10 (PND10) or repeatedly at PND10, 17, 27, and 37. Neurobehavioral abnormalities (at PND20, 30, and 40) and cognitive functions (at PND41–44) were evaluated using multiple test systems. Human ASCs recovered the using ratio of forelimb contralateral to the injured brain, improved locomotor activity, and restored rota-rod performance of HIE animals, in addition to showing a marked improvement of cognitive functions. It was confirmed that transplanted human ASCs migrated to injured areas and differentiated into oligodendrocytes expressing myelin basic protein (MBP). Moreover, transplanted ASCs restored production of growth and neurotrophic factors and expression of decreased inflammatory cytokines, leading to attenuation of host MBP loss. The results indicate that transplanted ASCs restored neurobehavioral functions by producing MBP as well as by preserving host myelins, which might be mediated by ASCs’ anti-inflammatory activity and release of growth and neurotrophic factors. PMID:26858861

  16. Effect of shRNA-mediated knockdown of vascular endothelial growth factor on the proliferation of choroid-retinal endothelial cells under hypoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    LIU, AI-HUA; SUN, JING; SHI, YI; SUN, GUO-LING; ZHANG, HONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cell proliferation under hypoxic conditions. Gene knockdown of VEGF was conducted in the choroid-retinal endothelial RF/6A cell line by transfection with short hairpin RNA (shRNA), in which a shRNA fragment against VEGF was synthesized and cloned into the vector, pSilencer 2.1-U6 neo. Subsequently, a model of hypoxia was established in the RF/6A cell line via treatment with CoCl2, into which the recombinant plasmids, containing the VEGF-targeting shRNA (p-shRNA), were transfected. The study included four treatment groups, namely a control group (normal group), a hypoxia group treated with CoCl2 (CoCl2 group), a control plasmid group that were subjected to CoCl2 treatment and transfection with a pSilencer 2.1-U6 neo plasmid without the shRNA (CoCl2 + p-NC group), and a group treated with CoCl2 and transfected with a pSilencer 2.1-U6 neo plasmid containing the VEGF-targeting shRNA (CoCl2 + p-shRNA group). Subsequent to treatment, the mRNA and protein expression levels of VEGF were evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively, In addition, cell proliferation was assessed. RF/6A cells treated with CoCl2 reduced cell connectivity, irregular morphology and reduced thickness compared with the cells in the normal group. However, cells in the CoCl2 + p-shRNA group exhibited an improved morphology compared with the CoCl2 and CoCl2 + p-NC groups. Cell proliferation in the CoCl2 group was enhanced in a time-dependent manner. However, the hypoxia-induced increase in cell proliferation was significantly inhibited in the CoCl2 + p-shRNA group, with inhibition rates of 16, 32 and 38% at 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression levels of VEGF were increased in the CoCl2 group when compared with the normal group, and these hypoxia-induced increases in VEGF expression were reduced in the CoCl2 + p-shRNA group

  17. Endogenous IL-6 of mesenchymal stem cell improves behavioral outcome of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage neonatal rats by supressing apoptosis in astrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yan; He, Mulan; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Liu, Jinngjing; Hou, Nali; Bin, Tan; Zhang, Yun; Li, Tingyu; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation reduces the neurological impairment caused by hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) via immunomodulation. In the current study, we found that MSC transplantation improved learning and memory function and enhanced long-term potentiation in neonatal rats subjected to HIBD and the amount of IL-6 released from MSCs was far greater than that of other cytokines. However, the neuroprotective effect of MSCs infected with siIL-6-transduced recombinant lentivirus (siIL-6 MSCs) was significantly weakened in the behavioural tests and electrophysiological analysis. Meanwhile, the hippocampal IL-6 levels were decreased following siIL-6 MSC transplantation. In vitro, the levels of IL-6 release and the levels of IL-6R and STAT3 expression were increased in both primary neurons and astrocytes subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) following MSCs co-culture. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was upregulated and the pro-apoptotic protein Bax was downregulated in OGD-injured astrocytes co-cultured with MSCs. However, the siIL-6 MSCs suppressed ratio of Bcl-2/Bax in the injured astrocytes and induced apoptosis number of the injured astrocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of MSC transplantation in neonatal HIBD rats is partly mediated by IL-6 to enhance anti-apoptosis of injured astrocytes via the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:26766745

  18. Vasoreparative dysfunction of CD34+ cells in diabetic individuals involves hypoxic desensitization and impaired autocrine/paracrine mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jarajapu, Yagna P R; Hazra, Sugata; Segal, Mark; Li Calzi, Sergio; LiCalzi, Sergio; Jadhao, Chandra; Jhadao, Chandra; Qian, Kevin; Mitter, Sayak K; Raizada, Mohan K; Boulton, Michael E; Grant, Maria B

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cells derived from individuals with diabetes would exhibit functional defects including inability to respond to hypoxia and altered paracrine/autocrine function that would impair the angiogenic potential of these cells. Circulating mononuclear cells isolated from diabetic (n = 69) and nondiabetic (n = 46) individuals were used to grow endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC), early endothelial progenitor cells (eEPCs) and isolate CD34+ cells. ECFCs and eEPCs were established from only 15% of the diabetic individuals tested thus directing our main effort toward examination of CD34+ cells. CD34+ cells were plated in basal medium to obtain cell-free conditioned medium (CM). In CM derived from CD34+ cells of diabetic individuals (diabetic-CM), the levels of stem cell factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and thrombopoietin were lower, and IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) levels were higher than CM derived from nondiabetic individuals (nondiabetic-CM). Hypoxia did not upregulate HIF1α in CD34+ cells of diabetic origin. Migration and proliferation of nondiabetic CD34+ cells toward diabetic-CM were lower compared to nondiabetic-CM. Attenuation of pressure-induced constriction, potentiation of bradykinin relaxation, and generation of cGMP and cAMP in arterioles were observed with nondiabetic-CM, but not with diabetic-CM. Diabetic-CM failed to induce endothelial tube formation from vascular tissue. These results suggest that diabetic subjects with microvascular complications exhibit severely limited capacity to generate ex-vivo expanded endothelial progenitor populations and that the vasoreparative dysfunction observed in diabetic CD34+ cells is due to impaired autocrine/paracrine function and reduced sensitivity to hypoxia. PMID:24713821

  19. Opiorphin-dependent upregulation of CD73 (a key enzyme in the adenosine signaling pathway) in corporal smooth muscle cells exposed to hypoxic conditions and in corporal tissue in pre-priapic sickle cell mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, S; Davies, K P

    2015-07-01

    The precise molecular mechanisms underlying priapism associated with sickle cell disease remain to be defined. However, there is increasing evidence that upregulated activity of the opiorphin and adenosine pathways in corporal tissue, resulting in heighted relaxation of smooth muscle, have an important role in development of priapism. A key enzyme in the adenosine pathway is CD73, an ecto-5'-nucleotidase (5'-ribonucleotide phosphohydrolase; EC 3.1.3.5) which catalyzes the conversion of adenosine mononucleotides to adenosine. In the present study we investigated how sickle cell disease and hypoxia regulate the interplay between opiorphin and CD73. In the corpora of sickle cell mice we observed significantly elevated expression of both the mouse opiorphin homolog mSmr3a (14-fold) and CD73 (2.2-fold) relative to non-sickle cell controls at a life stage before the exhibition of priapism. Sickle cell disease has a pronounced hypoxic component, therefore we determined if CD73 was also modulated in in vitro corporal smooth muscle (CSM) models of hypoxia. Hypoxia significantly increased CD73 protein and mRNA expression by 1.5-fold and 2-fold, respectively. We previously demonstrated that expression of another component of the adenosine signaling pathway, the adensosine 2B receptor, can be regulated by sialorphin (the rat opiorphin homolologue), and we demonstrate that sialorphin also regulates CD73 expression in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Using siRNA to knockdown sialorphin mRNA expression in CSM cells in vitro, we demonstrate that the hypoxic upregulation of CD73 is dependent on the upregulation of sialorphin. Overall, our data provide further evidence to support a role for opiorphin in CSM in regulating the cellular response to hypoxia or sickle cell disease by activating smooth muscle relaxant pathways.

  20. Opiorphin-dependent up-regulation of CD73 (a key enzyme in the adenosine signaling pathway) in corporal smooth muscle cells exposed to hypoxic conditions and in corporal tissue in pre-priapic sickle cell mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shibo; Davies, Kelvin P.

    2015-01-01

    The precise molecular mechanisms underlying priapism associated with sickle cell disease remain to be defined. However, there is increasing evidence that up-regulated activity of the opiorphin and adenosine pathways in corporal tissue, resulting in heighted relaxation of smooth muscle, play an important role in development of priapism. A key enzyme in the adenosine pathway is CD73, an ecto-5-prime-nucleotidase (5-prime-ribonucleotide phosphohydrolase; EC 3.1.3.5) which catalyzes the conversion of adenosine mononucleotides to adenosine. In the present study we investigated how sickle cell disease and hypoxia regulate the interplay between opiorphin and CD73. In the corpora of sickle cell mice we observed significantly elevated expression of both the mouse opiorphin homologue mSmr3a (14-fold) and CD73 (2.2-fold) relative to non-sickle cell controls at a life-stage prior to the exhibition of priapism. Sickle cell disease has a pronounced hypoxic component, therefore we determined if CD73 was also modulated in in vitro corporal smooth muscle (CSM) models of hypoxia. Hypoxia significantly increased CD73 protein and mRNA expression by 1.5-fold and 2-fold, respectively. We previously demonstrated that expression of another component of the adenosine signaling pathway, the adensosine 2B receptor, can be regulated by sialorphin (the rat opiorphin homolologue), and we demonstrate that sialorphin also regulates CD73 expression in a dose and time dependent fashion. Using siRNA to knock-down sialorphin mRNA expression in CSM cells in vitro, we demonstrate that the hypoxic up-regulation of CD73 is dependent on the up-regulation of sialorphin. Overall our data provides further evidence to support a role for opiorphin in CSM in regulating the cellular response regulating response to hypoxia or sickle cell disease by activating smooth muscle relaxant pathways. PMID:25833166

  1. Glial-Restricted Precursors Protect Neonatal Brain Slices from Hypoxic-Ischemic Cell Death Without Direct Tissue Contact.

    PubMed

    Sweda, Romy; Phillips, Andre W; Marx, Joel; Johnston, Michael V; Wilson, Mary Ann; Fatemi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Glial-Restricted Precursors (GRPs) are tripotential progenitors that have been shown to exhibit beneficial effects in several preclinical models of neurological disorders, including neonatal brain injury. The mechanisms of action of these cells, however, require further study, as do clinically relevant questions such as timing and route of cell administration. Here, we explored the effects of GRPs on neonatal hypoxia-ischemia during acute and subacute stages, using an in vitro transwell co-culture system with organotypic brain slices exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). OGD-exposed slices that were then co-cultured with GRPs without direct cell contact had decreased tissue injury and cortical cell death, as evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and propidium iodide (PI) staining. This effect was more pronounced when cells were added during the subacute phase of the injury. Furthermore, GRPs reduced the amount of glutamate in the slice supernatant and changed the proliferation pattern of endogenous progenitor cells in brain slices. In summary, we show that GRPs exert a neuroprotective effect on neonatal hypoxia-ischemia without the need for direct cell-cell contact, thus confirming the rising view that beneficial actions of stem cells are more likely attributable to trophic or immunomodulatory support rather than to long-term integration. PMID:27149035

  2. Anaerobic respiration sustains mitochondrial membrane potential in a prolyl hydroxylase pathway-activated cancer cell line in a hypoxic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiji; Sato, Michihiko

    2014-02-15

    To elucidate how tumor cells produce energy in oxygen-depleted microenvironments, we studied the possibility of mitochondrial electron transport without oxygen. We produced well-controlled oxygen gradients (ΔO2) in monolayer-cultured cells. We then visualized oxygen levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΦm) in individual cells by using the red shift of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence and a cationic fluorescent dye, respectively. In this two-dimensional tissue model, ΔΦm was abolished in cells >500 μm from the oxygen source [the anoxic front (AF)], indicating limitations in diffusional oxygen delivery. This result perfectly matched GFP-determined ΔO2. In cells pretreated with dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG), a prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD) inhibitor, the AF was expanded to 1,500-2,000 μm from the source. In these cells, tissue ΔO2 was substantially decreased, indicating that PHD pathway activation suppressed mitochondrial respiration. The expansion of the AF and the reduction of ΔO2 were much more prominent in a cancer cell line (Hep3B) than in the equivalent fibroblast-like cell line (COS-7). Hence, the results indicate that PHD pathway-activated cells can sustain ΔΦm, despite significantly decreased electron flux to complex IV. Complex II inhibition abolished the effect of DMOG in expanding the AF, although tissue ΔO2 remained shallow. Separate experiments demonstrated that complex II plays a substantial role in sustaining ΔΦm in DMOG-pretreated Hep3B cells with complex III inhibition. From these results, we conclude that PHD pathway activation can sustain ΔΦm in an otherwise anoxic microenvironment by decreasing tissue ΔO2 while activating oxygen-independent electron transport in mitochondria.

  3. Effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on mitochondrial function of neuronal cells in the cortex of neonatal rats after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Yang, L.; Hei, M.Y.; Dai, J.J.; Hu, N.; Xiang, X.Y.

    2016-01-01

    The timing and mechanisms of protection by hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) have only been partially elucidated. We monitored the effect of HBO on the mitochondrial function of neuronal cells in the cerebral cortex of neonatal rats after HIBD. Neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats (total of 360 of both genders) were randomly divided into normal control, HIBD, and HIBD+HBO groups. The HBO treatment began immediately after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and continued once a day for 7 consecutive days. Animals were euthanized 0, 2, 4, 6, and 12 h post-HI to monitor the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) occurring soon after a single dose of HBO treatment, as well as 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 days post-HI to study ΔΨm changes after a series of HBO treatments. Fluctuations in ΔΨm were observed in the ipsilateral cortex in both HIBD and HIBD+HBO groups. Within 2 to 12 h after HI insult, the ΔΨm of the HIBD and HIBD+HBO groups recovered to some extent. A secondary drop in ΔΨm was observed in both groups during the 1-4 days post-HI period, but was more severe in the HIBD+HBO group. There was a secondary recovery of ΔΨm observed in the HIBD+HBO group, but not in the HIBD group, during the 5-7 days period after HI insult. HBO therapy may not lead to improvement of neural cell mitochondrial function in the cerebral cortex in the early stage post-HI, but may improve it in the sub-acute stage post-HI. PMID:27119428

  4. T Helper Cell Activation and Expansion Is Sensitive to Glutaminase Inhibition under Both Hypoxic and Normoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sener, Zeynep; Cederkvist, Fritjof H; Volchenkov, Roman; Holen, Halvor L; Skålhegg, Bjørn S

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses often take place where nutrients and O2 availability are limited. This has an impact on T cell metabolism and influences activation and effector functions. T cell proliferation and expansion are associated with increased consumption of glutamine which is needed in a number of metabolic pathways and regulate various physiological processes. The first step in endogenous glutamine metabolism is reversible and is regulated by glutaminase (GLS1 and GLS2) and glutamine synthase (GLUL). There are two isoforms of GLS1, Kidney type glutaminase (KGA) and Glutaminase C (GAC). The aim of this study is to investigate the expression, localization and role of GLS1 and GLUL in naïve and activated human CD4+ T cells stimulated through the CD3 and CD28 receptors under normoxia and hypoxia. In proliferating cells, GAC was upregulated and KGA was downregulated, and both enzymes were located to the mitochondria irrespective of O2 levels. By contrast GLUL is localized to the cytoplasm and was upregulated under hypoxia. Proliferation was dependent on glutamine consumption, as glutamine deprivation and GLS1 inhibition decreased proliferation and expression of CD25 and CD226, regardless of O2 availability. Again irrespective of O2, GLS1 inhibition decreased the proportion of CCR6 and CXCR3 expressing CD4+ T cells as well as cytokine production. We propose that systemic Th cell activation and expansion might be dependent on glutamine but not O2 availability. PMID:27467144

  5. T Helper Cell Activation and Expansion Is Sensitive to Glutaminase Inhibition under Both Hypoxic and Normoxic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sener, Zeynep; Cederkvist, Fritjof H.; Volchenkov, Roman; Holen, Halvor L.; Skålhegg, Bjørn S.

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses often take place where nutrients and O2 availability are limited. This has an impact on T cell metabolism and influences activation and effector functions. T cell proliferation and expansion are associated with increased consumption of glutamine which is needed in a number of metabolic pathways and regulate various physiological processes. The first step in endogenous glutamine metabolism is reversible and is regulated by glutaminase (GLS1 and GLS2) and glutamine synthase (GLUL). There are two isoforms of GLS1, Kidney type glutaminase (KGA) and Glutaminase C (GAC). The aim of this study is to investigate the expression, localization and role of GLS1 and GLUL in naïve and activated human CD4+ T cells stimulated through the CD3 and CD28 receptors under normoxia and hypoxia. In proliferating cells, GAC was upregulated and KGA was downregulated, and both enzymes were located to the mitochondria irrespective of O2 levels. By contrast GLUL is localized to the cytoplasm and was upregulated under hypoxia. Proliferation was dependent on glutamine consumption, as glutamine deprivation and GLS1 inhibition decreased proliferation and expression of CD25 and CD226, regardless of O2 availability. Again irrespective of O2, GLS1 inhibition decreased the proportion of CCR6 and CXCR3 expressing CD4+ T cells as well as cytokine production. We propose that systemic Th cell activation and expansion might be dependent on glutamine but not O2 availability. PMID:27467144

  6. T Helper Cell Activation and Expansion Is Sensitive to Glutaminase Inhibition under Both Hypoxic and Normoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sener, Zeynep; Cederkvist, Fritjof H; Volchenkov, Roman; Holen, Halvor L; Skålhegg, Bjørn S

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses often take place where nutrients and O2 availability are limited. This has an impact on T cell metabolism and influences activation and effector functions. T cell proliferation and expansion are associated with increased consumption of glutamine which is needed in a number of metabolic pathways and regulate various physiological processes. The first step in endogenous glutamine metabolism is reversible and is regulated by glutaminase (GLS1 and GLS2) and glutamine synthase (GLUL). There are two isoforms of GLS1, Kidney type glutaminase (KGA) and Glutaminase C (GAC). The aim of this study is to investigate the expression, localization and role of GLS1 and GLUL in naïve and activated human CD4+ T cells stimulated through the CD3 and CD28 receptors under normoxia and hypoxia. In proliferating cells, GAC was upregulated and KGA was downregulated, and both enzymes were located to the mitochondria irrespective of O2 levels. By contrast GLUL is localized to the cytoplasm and was upregulated under hypoxia. Proliferation was dependent on glutamine consumption, as glutamine deprivation and GLS1 inhibition decreased proliferation and expression of CD25 and CD226, regardless of O2 availability. Again irrespective of O2, GLS1 inhibition decreased the proportion of CCR6 and CXCR3 expressing CD4+ T cells as well as cytokine production. We propose that systemic Th cell activation and expansion might be dependent on glutamine but not O2 availability.

  7. Understanding Hypoxic Drive and the Release of Hypoxic Vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Inkrott, Jon C

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the hypoxic drive and release of hypoxic vasoconstriction in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease population can be somewhat confusing and misunderstood. Furthermore, the hypoxic drive theory is one in which there really is no scientific evidence to support and yet continues to prosper in every aspect of care in regard to the chronic lung patient, from prehospital all the way to intensive care unit and home care therapy. This subject review will hopefully enhance some understanding of what exactly goes on with these patients and the importance of providing oxygen when it is desperately needed.

  8. A hypoxic signature marks tumors formed by disseminated tumor cells in the BALB-neuT mammary cancer model.

    PubMed

    Msaki, Aichi; Pastò, Anna; Curtarello, Matteo; Arigoni, Maddalena; Barutello, Giuseppina; Calogero, Raffaele Adolfo; Macagno, Marco; Cavallo, Federica; Amadori, Alberto; Indraccolo, Stefano

    2016-05-31

    Metastasis is the final stage of cancer progression. Some evidence indicates that tumor cell dissemination occurs early in the natural history of cancer progression. Disseminated tumor cells (DTC) have been described in the bone marrow (BM) of cancer patients as well as in experimental models, where they correlate with later development of metastasis. However, little is known about the tumorigenic features of DTC obtained at different time points along tumor progression. Here, we found that early DTC isolated from BM of 15-17 week-old Her2/neu transgenic (BALB-neuT) mice were not tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice. In contrast, DTC-derived tumors were easily detectable when late DTC obtained from 19-22 week-old BALB-neuT mice were injected. Angiogenesis, which contributes to regulate tumor dormancy, appeared dispensable to reactivate late DTC, although it accelerated growth of secondary DTC tumors. Compared with parental mammary tumors, gene expression profiling disclosed a distinctive transcriptional signature of late DTC tumors which was enriched for hypoxia-related transcripts and was maintained in ex-vivo cell culture. Altogether, these findings highlight a different tumorigenic potential of early and late DTC in the BALB-neuT model and describe a HIF-1α-related transcriptional signature in DTC tumors, which may render DTC angiogenesis-competent, when placed in a favourable environment.

  9. The protective role of 5-HMF against hypoxic injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Ming; Wu, Li-Ying; Zhao, Tong; Xiong, Lei; Huang, Xin; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Fan, Xue-Lai; Xiao, Cheng-Rong; Gao, Yue; Ma, Yun-Bao; Chen, Ji-Jun; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Fan, Ming

    2011-05-01

    In an attempt to find new types of anti-hypoxic agents from herbs, we identified 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) as a natural agent that fulfills the criterion. 5-HMF, the final product of carbohydrate metabolism, has favorable biological effects such as anti-oxidant activity and inhibiting sickling of red blood cells. The role of 5-HMF in hypoxia, however, is not yet. Our pilot results showed that pretreatment with 5-HMF markedly increased both the survival time and the survival rate of mice under hypoxic stress. The present study was aimed to further investigate the protective role of 5-HMF and the underlying mechanisms in hypoxic injury using ECV304 cells as an in vitro model. ECV304 cells pretreated with or without 5-HMF for 1 h were exposed to hypoxic condition (0.3% O(2)) for 24 h and then cell apoptosis, necrosis, the changes of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the expressions of phosphorylation- extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) were investigated. Pretreatment with 5-HMF markedly attenuated hypoxia-induced cell necrosis and apoptosis at late stage (p < 0.01). Furthermore, pretreatment with 5-HMF rescued both the decline of the MMP and the increase of p-ERK protein under hypoxia. In a word, these results indicated that 5-HMF had protective effects against hypoxic injury in ECV304 cells, and its effects on MMP and p-ERK may be involved in the mechanism. PMID:21057989

  10. Effect of hydralazine on the tumor cytotoxicity of the hypoxic cell cytotoxin RSU-1069: evidence for therapeutic gain

    SciTech Connect

    Chaplin, D.J.; Acker, B.

    1987-04-01

    The effect of the vasodilator hydralazine on both the tumor and systemic toxicity of RSU-1069 has been evaluated in C57B1 mice bearing Lewis lung tumors. The results obtained indicate that both hydralazine and RSU-1069 are cytotoxic to the Lewis lung tumor on their own. However, administration of hydralazine (5 mg/kg PO) at times up to either 3 hr before or 3 hr after RSU-1069 (0.1 mg/g IP) results in a level of cell killing greater than expected from additive effects. This potentiation by hydralazine was observed with doses of RSU-1069 from 0.01 to 0.1 mg/g. The results obtained using excision assays were confirmed using in situ growth delay as the endpoint. Growth delay (+/- s.e.m.) values for tumors to double in volume of 1.5 (+/- 1.2), 2.0 (+/- 1.3) and 6.0 (+/- 0.9) were obtained for hydralazine (5 mg/kg PO) alone, RSU-1069 (0.1 mg/g IP) alone and for hydralazine administered at the same time as RSU-1069 respectively. In contrast to the potentiating effect of hydralazine on the tumor cytotoxicity of RSU-1069, it had no significant effect on the systemic toxicity of RSU-1069 as measured by LD50/30d. No detailed studies to examine the mechanism responsible for the potentiation of tumor cytotoxicity have been performed in the present study. However, the results obtained would be consistent with previous reports that vasodilators such as hydralazine can selectively reduce tumor blood flow and thus oxygenation. Such reduced tumor oxygenation would increase the cytotoxic effects of RSU-1069 which is known to be more toxic to cells at reduced oxygen levels.

  11. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) is upregulated in a HIF-1α-dependent manner in 518A2 human melanoma cells under hypoxic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mandl, Markus Kapeller, Barbara; Lieber, Roman; Macfelda, Karin

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •HIF-1β is a hypoxia-responsive protein in 518A2 human melanoma cells. •HIF-1β is upregulated in a HIF-1α-dependent manner under hypoxic conditions. •HIF-1β is not elevated due to heterodimerization with HIF-1α per se. •HIF-1β inducibility has a biological relevance as judged in Het-CAM model. -- Abstract: Solid tumors include hypoxic areas due to excessive cell proliferation. Adaptation to low oxygen levels is mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway promoting invasion, metastasis, metabolic alterations, chemo-resistance and angiogenesis. The transcription factor HIF-1, the major player within this pathway consists of HIF-1α and HIF-1β. The alpha subunit is continuously degraded under normoxia and becomes stabilized under reduced oxygen supply. In contrast, HIF-1β is generally regarded as constitutively expressed and being present in excess within the cell. However, there is evidence that the expression of this subunit is more complex. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of HIF-1β in human melanoma cells. Among a panel of five different cell lines, in 518A2 cells exposed to the hypoxia-mimetic cobalt chloride HIF-1β was rapidly elevated on protein level. Knockdown experiments performed under cobalt chloride-exposure and hypoxia revealed that this effect was mediated by HIF-1α. The non-canonical relationship between these subunits was further confirmed by pharmacologic inhibition of HIF-1α and by expression of a dominant-negative HIF mutant. Overexpression of HIF-1α showed a time delay in HIF-1β induction, thus arguing for HIF-1β de novo synthesis rather than protein stabilization by heterodimerization. A Hen’s egg test-chorioallantoic membrane model of angiogenesis and invasion indicated a local expression of HIF-1β and implies a biological relevance of these findings. In summary, this study demonstrates the HIF-1α-dependent regulation of HIF-1β under hypoxic conditions for the first time. The

  12. Hypoxic adipocytes pattern early heterotopic bone formation.

    PubMed

    Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth; Gannon, Francis H; Ozen, Mustafa; Ittmann, Michael M; Gugala, Zbigniew; Hipp, John A; Moran, Kevin M; Fouletier-Dilling, Christine M; Schumara-Martin, Shannon; Lindsey, Ronald W; Heggeness, Michael H; Brenner, Malcolm K; Davis, Alan R

    2007-02-01

    The factors contributing to heterotopic ossification, the formation of bone in abnormal soft-tissue locations, are beginning to emerge, but little is known about microenvironmental conditions promoting this often devastating disease. Using a murine model in which endochondral bone formation is triggered in muscle by bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), we studied changes near the site of injection of BMP2-expressing cells. As early as 24 hours later, brown adipocytes began accumulating in the lesional area. These cells stained positively for pimonidazole and therefore generated hypoxic stress within the target tissue, a prerequisite for the differentiation of stem cells to chondrocytes and subsequent heterotopic bone formation. We propose that aberrant expression of BMPs in soft tissue stimulates production of brown adipocytes, which drive the early steps of heterotopic endochondral ossification by lowering oxygen tension in adjacent tissue, creating the correct environment for chondrogenesis. Results in misty gray lean mutant mice not producing brown fat suggest that white adipocytes convert into fat-oxidizing cells when brown adipocytes are unavailable, providing a compensatory mechanism for generation of a hypoxic microenvironment. Manipulation of the transcriptional control of adipocyte fate in local soft-tissue environments may offer a means to prevent or treat development of bone in extraskeletal sites. PMID:17255330

  13. Targeting hypoxic response for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Paolicchi, Elisa; Gemignani, Federica; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija; Dedhar, Shoukat; Mutti, Luciano; Landi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic tumor microenvironment (HTM) is considered to promote metabolic changes, oncogene activation and epithelial mesenchymal transition, and resistance to chemo- and radio-therapy, all of which are hallmarks of aggressive tumor behavior. Cancer cells within the HTM acquire phenotypic properties that allow them to overcome the lack of energy and nutrients supply within this niche. These phenotypic properties include activation of genes regulating glycolysis, glucose transport, acidosis regulators, angiogenesis, all of which are orchestrated through the activation of the transcription factor, HIF1A, which is an independent marker of poor prognosis. Moreover, during the adaptation to a HTM cancer cells undergo deep changes in mitochondrial functions such as “Warburg effect” and the “reverse Warburg effect”. This review aims to provide an overview of the characteristics of the HTM, with particular focus on novel therapeutic strategies currently in clinical trials, targeting the adaptive response to hypoxia of cancer cells. PMID:26859576

  14. Hypoxic Tumor Environments Exhibit Disrupted Collagen I Fibers and Low Macromolecular Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kakkad, Samata M.; Penet, Marie-France; Akhbardeh, Alireza; Pathak, Arvind P.; Solaiyappan, Meiyappan; Raman, Venu; Leibfritz, Dieter; Glunde, Kristine; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic tumor microenvironments result in an aggressive phenotype and resistance to therapy that lead to tumor progression, recurrence, and metastasis. While poor vascularization and the resultant inadequate drug delivery are known to contribute to drug resistance, the effect of hypoxia on molecular transport through the interstitium, and the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in mediating this transport are unexplored. The dense mesh of fibers present in the ECM can especially influence the movement of macromolecules. Collagen 1 (Col1) fibers form a key component of the ECM in breast cancers. Here we characterized the influence of hypoxia on macromolecular transport in tumors, and the role of Col1 fibers in mediating this transport using an MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model engineered to express red fluorescent protein under hypoxia. Magnetic resonance imaging of macromolecular transport was combined with second harmonic generation microscopy of Col1 fibers. Hypoxic tumor regions displayed significantly decreased Col1 fiber density and volume, as well as significantly lower macromolecular draining and pooling rates, than normoxic regions. Regions adjacent to severely hypoxic areas revealed higher deposition of Col1 fibers and increased macromolecular transport. These data suggest that Col1 fibers may facilitate macromolecular transport in tumors, and their reduction in hypoxic regions may reduce this transport. Decreased macromolecular transport in hypoxic regions may also contribute to poor drug delivery and tumor recurrence in hypoxic regions. High Col1 fiber density observed around hypoxic regions may facilitate the escape of aggressive cancer cells from hypoxic regions. PMID:24349142

  15. Hypoxic turtles keep their cool.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jesper G; Wang, Tobias; Madsen, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    Several species of freshwater turtles spend the winter submerged in ice-covered lakes in a state of severe metabolic depression. It has been proposed that the hibernating turtles are comatose and entirely unresponsive, which raises the question of how they detect the arrival of spring and whether they respond to sensory information during hibernation. Using evoked potential studies in cold hypoxic turtles exposed to light and vibration, we show that hibernating turtles maintain neural responsiveness to light stimuli during prolonged hypoxia, while responsiveness to vibration is lost. This reveals a state of differential neural shutdown, in different sensory systems in the cold hypoxic turtle brain. In behavioral studies we show that turtles held for 14 days in hibernation increase locomotor activity in response to light or elevated temperatures, but not to vibration or increased oxygen. We conclude that hibernating freshwater turtles are not comatose, but remain vigilant during overwintering in cold hypoxia. PMID:27227001

  16. SUMO Signaling by Hypoxic Inactivation of SUMO-Specific Isopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Kathrin; Wagner, Kristina; Mendler, Luca; Hölper, Soraya; Dehne, Nathalie; Müller, Stefan

    2016-09-13

    Post-translational modification of proteins with ubiquitin-like SUMO modifiers is a tightly regulated and highly dynamic process. The SENP family of SUMO-specific isopeptidases comprises six cysteine proteases. They are instrumental in counterbalancing SUMO conjugation, but their regulation is not well understood. We demonstrate that in hypoxic cell extracts, the catalytic activity of SENP family members, in particular SENP1 and SENP3, is inhibited in a rapid and fully reversible process. Comparative mass spectrometry from normoxic and hypoxic cells defines a subset of hypoxia-induced SUMO1 targets, including SUMO ligases RanBP2 and PIAS2, glucose transporter 1, and transcriptional regulators. Among the most strongly induced targets, we identified the transcriptional co-repressor BHLHE40, which controls hypoxic gene expression programs. We provide evidence that SUMOylation of BHLHE40 is reversed by SENP1 and contributes to transcriptional repression of the metabolic master regulator gene PGC-1α. We propose a pathway that connects oxygen-controlled SENP activity to hypoxic reprogramming of metabolism. PMID:27626674

  17. Adaptation of iron requirement to hypoxic conditions at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Max; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2015-12-15

    Adequate acclimatization time to enable adjustment to hypoxic conditions is one of the most important aspects for mountaineers ascending to high altitude. Accordingly, most reviews emphasize mechanisms that cope with reduced oxygen supply. However, during sojourns to high altitude adjustment to elevated iron demand is equally critical. Thus in this review we focus on the interaction between oxygen and iron homeostasis. We review the role of iron 1) in the oxygen sensing process and erythropoietin (Epo) synthesis, 2) in gene expression control mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor-2 (HIF-2), and 3) as an oxygen carrier in hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochromes. The blood hormone Epo that is abundantly expressed by the kidney under hypoxic conditions stimulates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow, a process requiring high iron levels. To ensure that sufficient iron is provided, Epo-controlled erythroferrone that is expressed in erythroid precursor cells acts in the liver to reduce expression of the iron hormone hepcidin. Consequently, suppression of hepcidin allows for elevated iron release from storage organs and enhanced absorption of dietary iron by enterocytes. As recently observed in sojourners at high altitude, however, iron uptake may be hampered by reduced appetite and gastrointestinal bleeding. Reduced iron availability, as observed in a hypoxic mountaineer, enhances hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and may contribute to other hypoxia-related diseases. Overall, adequate systemic iron availability is an important prerequisite to adjust to high-altitude hypoxia and may have additional implications for disease-related hypoxic conditions.

  18. Signal transduction in hypoxic cells: inducible nuclear translocation and recruitment of the CBP/p300 coactivator by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Kallio, P J; Okamoto, K; O'Brien, S; Carrero, P; Makino, Y; Tanaka, H; Poellinger, L

    1998-11-16

    In response to decreased cellular oxygen concentrations the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/PAS (Per, Arnt, Sim) hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, HIF-1alpha, mediates activation of networks of target genes involved in angiogenesis, erythropoiesis and glycolysis. Here we demonstrate that the mechanism of activation of HIF-1alpha is a multi-step process which includes hypoxia-dependent nuclear import and activation (derepression) of the transactivation domain, resulting in recruitment of the CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300 coactivator. Inducible nuclear accumulation was shown to be dependent on a nuclear localization signal (NLS) within the C-terminal end of HIF-1alpha which also harbors the hypoxia-inducible transactivation domain. Nuclear import of HIF-1alpha was inhibited by either deletion or a single amino acid substitution within the NLS sequence motif and, within the context of the full-length protein, these mutations also resulted in inhibition of the transactivation activity of HIF-1alpha and recruitment of CBP. However, nuclear localization per se was not sufficient for transcriptional activation, since fusion of HIF-1alpha to the heterologous GAL4 DNA-binding domain generated a protein which showed constitutive nuclear localization but required hypoxic stimuli for function as a CBP-dependent transcription factor. Thus, hypoxia-inducible nuclear import and transactivation by recruitment of CBP can be functionally separated from one another and play critical roles in signal transduction by HIF-1alpha.

  19. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brandon J.; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893

  20. Carrot and stick: HIF-alpha engages c-Myc in hypoxic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Huang, L E

    2008-04-01

    The past decade of research on hypoxic responses has provided a considerable understanding of how cells respond to hypoxic stress at the molecular level, thanks to the identification and molecular cloning of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, HIF-1alpha. Numerous target genes have since been identified to account for various aspects of the hypoxic response, including angiogenesis and glycolysis. Yet, fundamental questions remain regarding the mechanisms by which hypoxia controls cell proliferation, genetic instability, mitochondrial biogenesis, and oxidative respiration in cancer cells. Although the proto-oncoprotein c-Myc appears to be the diametrical opposite of HIF-1alpha in most of these processes, recent studies indicate that c-Myc is an integral part of the HIF-alpha-c-Myc molecular pathway in the hypoxic response. It has been shown that HIF-alpha engages with Myc by various mechanisms to achieve oxygen homeostasis for cell survival. This article focuses on the intricate roles of c-Myc in the hypoxic response, discusses various mechanisms controlling c-Myc activity by HIF-alpha for the regulation of hypoxia-responsive genes, and emphasizing the outcome of gene expression apparently dependent upon hypoxic conditions, cellular context, and gene promoter.

  1. INHIBITION OF ERN1 SIGNALING ENZYME AFFECTS HYPOXIC REGULATION OF THE EXPRESSION OF E2F8, EPAS1, HOXC6, ATF3, TBX3 AND FOXF1 GENES IN U87 GLIOMA CELLS.

    PubMed

    Minchenko, O H; Tsymbal, D O; Minchenko, D O; Kovalevska, O V; Karbovskyi, L L; Bikfalvi, A

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia as well as the endoplasmic reticulum stress are important factors of malignant tumor growth and control of the expression of genes, which regulate numerous metabolic processes and cell proliferation. Furthermore, blockade of ERN1 (endoplasmic reticulum to nucleus 1) suppresses cell proliferation and tumor growth. We studied the effect of hypoxia on the expression of genes encoding the transcription factors such as E2F8 (E2F transcription factor 8), EPAS1 (endothelial PAS domain protein 1), TBX3 (T-box 3), ATF3 (activating transcription factor 3), FOXF1 (forkhead box F), and HOXC6 (homeobox C6) in U87 glioma cells with and without ERN1 signaling enzyme function. We have established that hypoxia enhances the expression of HOXC6, E2F8, ATF3, and EPAS1 genes but does not change TBX3 and FOXF1 gene expression in glioma cells with ERNI function. At the same time, the expression level of all studied genes is strongly decreased, except for TBX3 gene, in glioma cells without ERN1 function. Moreover, the inhibition of ERN1 signaling enzyme function significantly modifies the effect of hypoxia on the expression of these transcription factor genes. removes or introduces this regulation as well as changes a direction or magnitude of hypoxic regulation. Present study demonstrates that fine-tuning of the expression of proliferation related genes depends upon hypoxia and ERN1-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling and correlates with slower proliferation rate of glioma cells without ERN1 function. PMID:26255341

  2. Hyperbaric oxygen suppresses hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Lu, Mengru; Li, Qing-Jie; Zhang, Zhuo; Wu, Zheng-Zheng; Li, Jie; Qian, Lai; Xu, Yun; Wang, Zhong-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The optimal therapeutic time-window and protective mechanism of hyperbaric oxygen in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage remain unclear. This study aimed to determine the neuroprotective effects of hyperbaric oxygen. Following hypoxic-ischemic brain damage modeling in neonatal rats, hyperbaric oxygen was administered at 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours and 1 week after hypoxia, respectively, once daily for 1 week. Fourteen days after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage, cell density and apoptosis rate, number of Fas-L+, caspase-8+, and caspase-3+ neuronal cells, levels of nitric oxide, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase in hippocampus were examined. Morris water maze test was conducted 28 days after insult. Significant improvements were found in cell density, rate of apoptosis, oxidative stress markers, FasL, and caspases in rats treated with hyperbaric oxygen within 72 hours compared to hypoxic-ischemic injury. Similarly, time-dependent behavioral amelioration was observed in pups treated with hyperbaric oxygen. Our findings suggest that hyperbaric oxygen protects against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage by inhibiting oxidative stress and FasL-induced apoptosis, and optimal therapeutic time window is within 72 hours after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  3. Transforming growth factor-beta1 upregulation triggers pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation and apoptosis imbalance in rats with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension via the PTEN/AKT pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Cao, Yonggang; Sun, Shuyang; Zhu, Jinquan; Gao, Shan; Pang, Jie; Zhu, Daling; Sun, Zengxian

    2016-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFβ1) and Phosphatase and Tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) are involved in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis of various cell types. In previous studies, we have shown that TGFβ1 and PTEN play an important role in the progression of pulmonary vascular remodeling induced by pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). However, the mechanisms involved in the activation of PASMCs between TGFβ1 and PTEN pathways remain unknown. We found that pulmonary vascular walls in hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) rats were thicker than the vessels from normal rats in vivo. Substantially higher levels of TGFβ1 and significant loss of PTEN expression were observed in the lungs of PAH rats when compared with normoxia. Meanwhile, AKT, a downstream proliferative signaling protein of the PTEN antagonist PI3K, was markedly activated in the lungs of PAH rats. In vitro studies using PASMCs showed that TGFβ1 increased cell proliferation in PTEN-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that TGFβ1 enhanced cell survival, up-regulated the expression of Bcl-2 and procaspase-3, decreased the number of TUNEL-positive cells and caspase-3 expression in PASMCs under serum-deprived (SD) condition via PI3K/AKT pathway. The results further establish that TGFβ1 promoted PAH by decreasing PTEN expression and increasing PI3K/AKT activation in the lung. In conclusion, TGFβ1 mediated PTEN inactivation and resistance to apoptosis seems to be key mediators of lung vascular remodeling associated with PAH. These findings further clarify molecular mechanisms that support targeting PTEN/AKT signaling pathway to attenuate pathogenic derangements in PAH.

  4. Current and experimental pharmacological approaches in neonatal hypoxic- ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Zalewska, Teresa; Jaworska, Joanna; Ziemka-Nalecz, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury still remains an important issue as it is a frequent cause of neonatal death and life-long neurobehavioral and cognitive dysfunction. In spite of the decades of research which led us to a better knowledge of the pathological mechanism of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, the clinical use of potential neuroprotective drugs (including, among others, excitatory amino acids antagonists, free radical inhibitors and scavengers, growth factors, xenon, cannabinoids, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic agents) became avoided owing to insufficiency and /or treatment-induced undesirable side effects. The only available effective treatment, hypothermia, neither provides complete brain protection nor stimulates the repair necessary for neurodevelopmental outcome. This fact brings about increased interest in alternative methods of therapy, such as regenerative medicine using stem cells. Growing number of in vivo preclinical studies revealed that mesenchymal stem cells as well as human cord blood cells may improve functional outcome after HI insult and may represent a new beneficial treatment modality for infants developing hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. In this review we briefly highlight the present and potential forthcoming therapeutic treatments aimed at attenuation of the detrimental effects of neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

  5. Measuring DNA Replication in Hypoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Foskolou, Iosifina P; Biasoli, Deborah; Olcina, Monica M; Hammond, Ester M

    2016-01-01

    It is imperative that dividing cells maintain replication fork integrity in order to prevent DNA damage and cell death. The investigation of DNA replication is of high importance as alterations in this process can lead to genomic instability, a known causative factor of tumor development. A simple, sensitive, and informative technique which enables the study of DNA replication, is the DNA fiber assay, an adaptation of which is described in this chapter. The DNA fiber method is a powerful tool, which allows the quantitative and qualitative analysis of DNA replication at the single molecule level. The sequential pulse labeling of live cells with two thymidine analogues and the subsequent detection with specific antibodies and fluorescence imaging allows direct examination of sites of DNA synthesis. In this chapter, we describe how this assay can be performed in conditions of low oxygen levels (hypoxia)-a physiologically relevant stress that occurs in most solid tumors. Moreover, we suggest ways on how to overcome the technical problems that arise while using the hypoxic chambers.

  6. Vitreous Mediators in Retinal Hypoxic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    dell'Omo, Roberto; Semeraro, Francesco; Bamonte, Giulio; Cifariello, Francesco; Romano, Mario R.; Costagliola, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    The causes of retinal hypoxia are many and varied. Under hypoxic conditions, a variety of soluble factors are secreted into the vitreous cavity including growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines. Cytokines, which usually serve as signals between neighboring cells, are involved in essentially every important biological process, including cell proliferation, inflammation, immunity, migration, fibrosis, tissue repair, and angiogenesis. Cytokines and chemokines are multifunctional mediators that can direct the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation, promote the process, enhance immune responses, and promote stem cell survival, development, and homeostasis. The modern particle-based flow cytometric analysis is more direct, stable and sensitive than the colorimetric readout of the conventional ELISA but, similar to ELISA, is influenced by vitreous hemorrhage, disruption of the blood-retina barrier, and high serum levels of a specific protein. Finding patterns in the expression of inflammatory cytokines specific to a particular disease can substantially contribute to the understanding of its basic mechanism and to the development of a targeted therapy. PMID:23365490

  7. Using the endocannabinoid system as a neuroprotective strategy in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Celador, I.; Goñi-de-Cerio, F.; Alvarez, Antonia; Hilario, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important causes of brain injury in the neonatal period is a perinatal hypoxic-ischemic event. This devastating condition can lead to long-term neurological deficits or even death. After hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, a variety of specific cellular mechanisms are set in motion, triggering cell damage and finally producing cell death. Effective therapeutic treatments against this phenomenon are still unavailable because of complex molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. After a thorough understanding of the mechanism underlying neural plasticity following hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, various neuroprotective therapies have been developed for alleviating brain injury and improving long-term outcomes. Among them, the endocannabinoid system emerges as a natural system of neuroprotection. The endocannabinoid system modulates a wide range of physiological processes in mammals and has demonstrated neuroprotective effects in different paradigms of acute brain injury, acting as a natural neuroprotectant. The aim of this review is to study the use of different therapies to induce long-term therapeutic effects after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, and analyze the important role of the endocannabinoid system as a new neuroprotective strategy against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. PMID:25206720

  8. The neuronal control of hypoxic ventilation: erythropoietin and sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Max; Tissot van Patot, Martha; Soliz, Jorge

    2009-10-01

    Using mice, we demonstrated that when oxygen supply is lowered, erythropoietin (Epo), the main regulator of red blood cell production, modulates the ventilatory response by interacting with central (brainstem) and peripheral (carotid bodies) respiratory centers. We showed that enhanced Epo levels in the brainstem increased the hypoxic ventilatory response, and that intracerebroventricular injection of an Epo antagonist (soluble Epo receptor) abolished the ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia. More recently, we have found that the impact of Epo on ventilation occurs in a sex-dependent manner. Keeping in mind that women are less susceptible to several respiratory sicknesses and syndromes than men, we suggest that Epo plays a key role in sexually-dimorphic hypoxic ventilation. Accordingly, we foresee that Epo has a potential therapeutic use as treatment for hypoxia-associated ventilatory diseases. PMID:19845617

  9. [Proteic marker of hypoxic-ischemic damage].

    PubMed

    Crestini, A; Piscopo, P; Malvezzi Campeggi, L; Confaloni, A

    2001-01-01

    Perinatal hypoxic injury is the major cause of normal neural developmental alterations. Recent studies concerning animal models show that an hypoxic/ischaemic event triggers a process taking to a synaptic architecture reorganization which induces a transient change in the synaptic (synapsin 1, SNAP 25, APP) and neuronal (MAP2, N-CAM, GAP-43 and presenilins) protein expression. Here we review the post-translational modifications of some proteins after hypoxic-ischaemic events. A deeper study on synaptic proteins plasticity could give an important key for the understanding of the recovery mechanisms of the nervous system.

  10. Low-dose radiation suppresses Pokemon expression under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Whan; Yu, Kweon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Kwon, Kisang; Hwang, Tae-Sik; Kwon, O-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Our previous data demonstrated that CoCl2-induced hypoxia controls endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated and other intracellular factors. One of them, the transcription factor Pokemon, was differentially regulated by low-dose radiation (LDR). There are limited data regarding how this transcription factor is involved in expression of the unfolded protein response (UPR) under hypoxic conditions. The purpose of this study was to obtain clues on how Pokemon is involved in the UPR. Pokemon was selected as a differentially expressed gene under hypoxic conditions; however, its regulation was clearly repressed by LDR. It was also demonstrated that both expression of ER chaperones and ER stress sensors were affected by hypoxic conditions, and the same results were obtained when cells in which Pokemon was up- or down-regulated were used. The current state of UPR and LDR research associated with the Pokemon pathway offers an important opportunity to understand the oncogenesis, senescence, and differentiation of cells, as well as to facilitate introduction of new therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:24772825

  11. Low-dose radiation suppresses Pokemon expression under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Whan; Yu, Kweon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Kwon, Kisang; Hwang, Tae-Sik; Kwon, O-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Our previous data demonstrated that CoCl2-induced hypoxia controls endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated and other intracellular factors. One of them, the transcription factor Pokemon, was differentially regulated by low-dose radiation (LDR). There are limited data regarding how this transcription factor is involved in expression of the unfolded protein response (UPR) under hypoxic conditions. The purpose of this study was to obtain clues on how Pokemon is involved in the UPR. Pokemon was selected as a differentially expressed gene under hypoxic conditions; however, its regulation was clearly repressed by LDR. It was also demonstrated that both expression of ER chaperones and ER stress sensors were affected by hypoxic conditions, and the same results were obtained when cells in which Pokemon was up- or down-regulated were used. The current state of UPR and LDR research associated with the Pokemon pathway offers an important opportunity to understand the oncogenesis, senescence, and differentiation of cells, as well as to facilitate introduction of new therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals.

  12. Impact of siRNA targeting of β-catenin on differentiation of rat neural stem cells and gene expression of Ngn1 and BMP4 following in vitro hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhu, Cuicui; Luo, Qiong; Dong, Jv; Liu, Lv; Li, Min; Zhu, Hongtao; Ma, Xiangping; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible damage-repair mechanisms of neural stem cells (NSCs) following hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD). NSCs obtained from Sprague Dawley rats were treated with tissue homogenate from normal or HIBD tissue, and β-catenin expression was silenced using siRNA. The differentiation of NSCs was observed by immunofluorescence, and semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were applied to detect the mRNA and protein expression levels of Ngn1 and BMP4 in the NSCs. Compared with control NSCs, culture with brain tissue homogenate significantly increased the differentiation of NSCs into neurons and oligodendrocytes (P<0.05), whereas differentiation into astrocytes was significantly reduced (P<0.05). Compared with negative control-transfected cells, knockdown of β-catenin expression significantly decreased the differentiation of NSCs into neurons and oligodendrocytes (P<0.01), whereas the percentage of NSCs differentiated into astrocytes was significantly increased (P<0.01). Compared with control NSCs, the mRNA and protein expression levels of Ngn1 were significantly increased (P<0.01) and BMP4 levels were significantly reduced (P<0.01) by exposure of the cells to brain tissue homogenate. Compared with the negative control plasmid-transfected NSCs, the levels of Ngn1 mRNA and protein were significantly reduced by β-catenin siRNA (P<0.01), whereas BMP4 levels were significantly increased (P<0.01). In summary, the damaged brain tissues in HIBD may promote NSCs to differentiate into neurons for self-repair processes. β-Catenin, BMP4 and Ngn1 may be important for the coordination of NSC proliferation and differentiation following HIBD. PMID:27573468

  13. Involvement of SIRT1 in hypoxic down-regulation of c-Myc and β-catenin and hypoxic preconditioning effect of polyphenols

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Kyung-Soo; Park, Jun-Ik; Kim, Mi-Ju; Kim, Hak-Bong; Lee, Jae-Won; Dao, Trong Tuan; Oh, Won Keun; Kang, Chi-Dug; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2012-03-01

    SIRT1 has been found to function as a Class III deacetylase that affects the acetylation status of histones and other important cellular nonhistone proteins involved in various cellular pathways including stress responses and apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the role of SIRT1 signaling in the hypoxic down-regulations of c-Myc and β-catenin and hypoxic preconditioning effect of the red wine polyphenols such as piceatannol, myricetin, quercetin and resveratrol. We found that the expression of SIRT1 was significantly increased in hypoxia-exposed or hypoxic preconditioned HepG2 cells, which was closely associated with the up-regulation of HIF-1α and down-regulation of c-Myc and β-catenin expression via deacetylation of these proteins. In addition, blockade of SIRT1 activation using siRNA or amurensin G, a new potent SIRT1 inhibitor, abolished hypoxia-induced HIF-1α expression but increased c-Myc and β-catenin expression. SIRT1 was also found to stabilize HIF-1α protein and destabilize c-Myc, β-catenin and PHD2 under hypoxia. We also found that myricetin, quercetin, piceatannol and resveratrol up-regulated HIF-1α and down-regulated c-Myc, PHD2 and β-catenin expressions via SIRT1 activation, in a manner that mimics hypoxic preconditioning. This study provides new insights of the molecular mechanisms of hypoxic preconditioning and suggests that polyphenolic SIRT1 activators could be used to mimic hypoxic/ischemic preconditioning. -- Graphical abstract: Polyphenols mimicked hypoxic preconditioning by up-regulating HIF-1α and SIRT1 and down-regulating c-Myc, PHD2, and β-catenin. HepG2 cells were pretreated with the indicated doses of myricetin (MYR; A), quercetin (QUR; B), or piceatannol (PIC; C) for 4 h and then exposed to hypoxia for 4 h. Levels of HIF-1α, SIRT1, c-Myc, β-catenin, and PHD2 were determined by western blot analysis. The data are representative of three individual experiments. Highlights: ► SIRT1 expression is increased in hypoxia

  14. Autophagy contributes to the survival of CD133+ liver cancer stem cells in the hypoxic and nutrient-deprived tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-Jiao; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Guo, Xian-Ling; Sun, Kai; Han, Zhi-Peng; Li, Rong; Zhao, Qiu-Dong; Deng, Wei-Jie; Xie, Xu-Qin; Zhang, Jian-Wei; Wu, Meng-Chao; Wei, Li-Xin

    2013-10-01

    Liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs) can drive and maintain hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) growth, metastasis, and recurrence. Therefore, they are potentially responsible for the poor prognosis of HCC. Oxygen and nutrient deficiencies are common characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. However, how LCSCs adapt to oxygen- and nutrient-deprived conditions is unclear. Here, we used immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry analysis to show that CD133+ cells were significantly enriched after hypoxia and nutrient starvation (H/S) in the human HCC cell line Huh7. Sorted CD133+ cells showed higher survival, less apoptosis, and possess higher clonogenic ability under H/S compared to the CD133- population. Under H/S, electron microscopy revealed more advanced autophagic vesicles in CD133+ cells. Additionally, CD133+ cells had higher autophagy levels as measured by both RT-qPCR and Western blotting. CD133+ cells had more accumulated GFP-LC3 puncta, which can be detected by fluorescence microscopy. The autophagic inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) significantly increased apoptosis and decreased the clonogenic capacity of CD133+ cells under H/S. Pre-culturing in H/S enhanced the sphere-forming capacity of CD133+ cells. However, CQ significantly impaired this process. Therefore, autophagy is essential for LCSCs maintenance. CD133+ cells were also found to have a higher tumor-forming ability in vivo, which could be inhibited by CQ administration. Collectively, our results indicate that the involvement of autophagy in maintenance of CD133+ LCSCs under the oxygen- and nutrient-deprived conditions that are typical of the tumor microenvironment in HCC. Therefore, autophagy inhibitors may make LCSCs more sensitive to the tumor microenvironment and be useful in improving anti-cancer treatments.

  15. [Use of hypoxic training in sports medicine].

    PubMed

    Radzievskiĭ, P A

    1997-01-01

    Examinations of high-quality athletes during their hypoxic adaptation under low-pressure mountain conditions and under normal pressures during normobaric interval hypoxic training included into the planned sports preparation of athletes indicated changes in respiration, blood flow, blood respiratory function, tissue oxygen consumption, aerobic productivity and working capacity. The use of a combined regimen was shown to have benefits in enhancing aerobic productivity and general working capacity, this was applied in sports medicine while training athletes for important tournaments.

  16. [The expression of Akt kinase in the heart ventricles under hypoxic preconditioning and myocardial remodeling].

    PubMed

    Portnichenko, A G; Lapikova-Briginskaia, T Iu; Vasilenko, M I; Portnichenko, G V; Maslov, L N; Moĭbenko, A A

    2013-01-01

    Activation of Akt-dependent mechanisms may play a significant role in the cellular response under hypoxic preconditioning and myocardial remodeling. The impact of hypoxic preconditioning, and remodeling on the expression of Akt kinase in the heart ventricles was investigated. Wistar male rats, the residents of plains or middle altitude (2100 m above sea level), were exposed to hypoxic preconditioning by "lifting" in the barochamber at the "height" of 5,600 m in 3 h. In the right and left ventricles of the heart, Akt protein expression was determined by Western blotting. It was shown, that hypoxic preconditioning causes the induction of Akt kinase in the ventricles during the period of delayed cardioprotection (1-3 days after preconditioning). Myocardial remodeling induced by chronic hypoxia in middle altitude was associated with elevated Akt expression in the myocardium, more pronounced in the left ventricle. Progression of hypoxic myocardial remodeling found in part of the animals was accompanied by a reduction of the cell hypoxic reactivity, including Akt induction in response to preconditioning. Thus, Akt kinase is involved in the mechanisms of hypoxia induced late preconditioning and myocardial remodeling in chronic hypoxia. Inhibitory regulatory mechanism was found to limit the induction of Akt in myocardium after remodeling.

  17. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  18. Hypoxic culture conditions for Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells from Wharton's jelly: a critical parameter to consider in a therapeutic context.

    PubMed

    Reppel, Loic; Margossian, Talar; Yaghi, Layale; Moreau, Philippe; Mercier, Nathalie; Leger, Leonore; Hupont, Sebastien; Stoltz, Jean-Francois; Bensoussan, Daniele; Huselstein, Celine

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells from human Wharton's jelly (WJ-MSC) are an abundant and interesting source of stem cells for applications in cell and tissue engineering. Their fetal origin confers specific characteristics compared to Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells isolated from human bone marrow (BM-MSC). The aim of this work was to optimize WJ-MSC culture conditions for their subsequent clinical use. We focused on the influence of oxygen concentration during monolayer expansion on several parameters to characterize MSC. Our work distinguished WJ-MSC from BM-MSC in terms of proliferation, telomerase activity and adipogenic differentiation. We also showed that hypoxia had a beneficial effect on proliferation potential, clonogenic capacity and to a lesser extent, on HLA-G expression of WJ-MSC during their expansion. Moreover, we reported for the first time an increase in chondrogenic differentiation when WJ-MSC were expanded under hypoxia. In an allogeneic therapeutic context, production of clinical batches requires generating high numbers of MSC whilst maintaining the cells' properties. Considering our results, hypoxia will be an important parameter to take into account. In addition, the clinical use of WJ-MSC would provide significant numbers of cells with maintenance of their proliferation and differentiation potential, particularly their chondrogenic potential. Due to their chondrogenic differentiation potential, WJ-MSC promise to be an interesting source of MSC for cell therapy or tissue engineering for cartilage repair and/or regeneration.

  19. Game performance and intermittent hypoxic training

    PubMed Central

    Hinckson, E A; Hamlin, M J; Wood, M R; Hopkins, W G

    2007-01-01

    Live high‐train low altitude exposure simulated by hypoxic devices may improve athletic performance. In this study, intermittent normobaric hypoxia was achieved with the GO2altitude® hypoxicator to determine its effects on sea level performance in rugby players. Ten players were randomly assigned to two groups. Players in each group received 14 sessions of either hypoxic (10–15% O2) or normoxic (21% O2) exposure at rest over 14 consecutive days in a single blind fashion. Various performance measures were obtained consecutively in a single testing session pre‐ and post‐exposure. Effects of hypoxic exposure on maximum speed and sprint times were trivial (<1.0%) but unclear (90% likely range, ±5% to ±9%). In rugby simulation, hypoxic exposure produced impairments of peak power in two scrums (15%, ±8%; 9%, ±7%) and impairments of time in offensive sprints (7%, ±8%) and tackle sprints (11%, ±9%). Pending further research, rugby players would be unwise to use normobaric intermittent hypoxic exposure to prepare for games at sea level. PMID:17311807

  20. Estetrol attenuates neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Tskitishvili, Ekaterine; Nisolle, Michelle; Munaut, Carine; Pequeux, Christel; Gerard, Celine; Noel, Agnes; Foidart, Jean-Michel

    2014-11-01

    Estetrol (E4) is a recently described natural estrogen with four hydroxyl-groups that is synthesized exclusively during pregnancy by the human fetal liver. It has important antioxidative activity. The aim of the present study was to define the importance of E4 in the attenuation of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Antioxidative effect of 650μM, 3.25mM and 6.5mM E4 on primary hippocampal cell cultures was studied before/after H202-induced oxidative stress. To examine oxidative stress and cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase activity and cell proliferation colorimetric assays were performed. To study the neuroprotective and therapeutic effects of E4 in vivo neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy model of 7-day-old newborn rat pups was used. The neuroprotective and therapeutic effects of estetrol before/after hypoxic-ischemic insult was studied in 1mg/kg/day, 5mg/kg/day, 10mg/kg/day, 50mg/kg/day E4 pretreated/treated groups and compared with the sham and the vehicle treated groups. The body temperature of the rat pups was examined along with their body and brain weights. Brains were studied at the level of the hippocampus and cortex. Intact cell counting and expressions of microtubule-associated protein-2, doublecortin and vascular-endothelial growth factor were evaluated by histo- and immunohistochemistry. ELISAs were performed on blood samples to detect concentrations of S100B and glial fibrillary acidic protein as brain damage markers. This work reveals for the first time that E4 significantly decreases LDH activity and enhances cell proliferation in primary hippocampal neuronal cell cultures in vitro, and decreases the early gray matter loss and promotes neuro- and angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:25079370

  1. Release of Matrix Metalloproteinases-2 and 9 by S-Nitrosylated Caveolin-1 Contributes to Degradation of Extracellular Matrix in tPA-Treated Hypoxic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Gang; Zhu, Yihui; Jun, Wei; Ma, Wenlin; Wu, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage remains the most feared complication in tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) thrombolysis for ischemic stroke. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly elucidated. In this study, we reported an important role of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) s-nitrosylation in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and 9 secretion from tPA-treated ischemic endothelial cells. Brain vascular endothelial cells (bEND3) were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 2 h before adding recombinant human tPA for 6 h. This treatment induced a significant increase of MMP2 and 9 in the media of bEND3 cells and a simultaneous degradation of fibronectin and laminin β-1, the two main components of extracellular matrix (ECM). Inhibition of MMP2 and 9 with SB-3CT completely blocked the degradation of fibronectin and laminin β-1. ODG+tPA treatment led to Cav-1 shedding from bEND3 cells into the media. Notably, OGD triggered nitric oxide (NO) production and S-nitrosylationof Cav-1 (SNCav-1). Meanwhile tPA induced activation of ERK signal pathway and stimulates the secretion of SNCav-1. Pretreatment of bEND3 cells with C-PTIO (a NO scavenger) or U0126 (a specific ERK inhibitor) significantly reduced OGD-induced S-nitrosylation of Cav-1 in cells and blocked the secretion of Cav-1 and MMP2 and 9 into the media as well as the degradation of fibronectin and laminin β-1 in OGD and tPA-treated cells. These data indicate that OGD-triggered Cav-1 S-nitrosylation interacts with tPA-induced ERK activation to augment MMP2 and 9 secretion and subsequent ECM degradation, which may account for the exacerbation of ischemic blood brain barrier damage following tPA thrombolysis for ischemic stroke. PMID:26881424

  2. Release of Matrix Metalloproteinases-2 and 9 by S-Nitrosylated Caveolin-1 Contributes to Degradation of Extracellular Matrix in tPA-Treated Hypoxic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Haoming; Cheng, Youjun; Bi, Gang; Zhu, Yihui; Jun, Wei; Ma, Wenlin; Wu, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage remains the most feared complication in tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) thrombolysis for ischemic stroke. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly elucidated. In this study, we reported an important role of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) s-nitrosylation in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and 9 secretion from tPA-treated ischemic endothelial cells. Brain vascular endothelial cells (bEND3) were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 2 h before adding recombinant human tPA for 6 h. This treatment induced a significant increase of MMP2 and 9 in the media of bEND3 cells and a simultaneous degradation of fibronectin and laminin β-1, the two main components of extracellular matrix (ECM). Inhibition of MMP2 and 9 with SB-3CT completely blocked the degradation of fibronectin and laminin β-1. ODG+tPA treatment led to Cav-1 shedding from bEND3 cells into the media. Notably, OGD triggered nitric oxide (NO) production and S-nitrosylationof Cav-1 (SNCav-1). Meanwhile tPA induced activation of ERK signal pathway and stimulates the secretion of SNCav-1. Pretreatment of bEND3 cells with C-PTIO (a NO scavenger) or U0126 (a specific ERK inhibitor) significantly reduced OGD-induced S-nitrosylation of Cav-1 in cells and blocked the secretion of Cav-1 and MMP2 and 9 into the media as well as the degradation of fibronectin and laminin β-1 in OGD and tPA-treated cells. These data indicate that OGD-triggered Cav-1 S-nitrosylation interacts with tPA-induced ERK activation to augment MMP2 and 9 secretion and subsequent ECM degradation, which may account for the exacerbation of ischemic blood brain barrier damage following tPA thrombolysis for ischemic stroke.

  3. Release of Matrix Metalloproteinases-2 and 9 by S-Nitrosylated Caveolin-1 Contributes to Degradation of Extracellular Matrix in tPA-Treated Hypoxic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Haoming; Cheng, Youjun; Bi, Gang; Zhu, Yihui; Jun, Wei; Ma, Wenlin; Wu, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage remains the most feared complication in tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) thrombolysis for ischemic stroke. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly elucidated. In this study, we reported an important role of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) s-nitrosylation in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and 9 secretion from tPA-treated ischemic endothelial cells. Brain vascular endothelial cells (bEND3) were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 2 h before adding recombinant human tPA for 6 h. This treatment induced a significant increase of MMP2 and 9 in the media of bEND3 cells and a simultaneous degradation of fibronectin and laminin β-1, the two main components of extracellular matrix (ECM). Inhibition of MMP2 and 9 with SB-3CT completely blocked the degradation of fibronectin and laminin β-1. ODG+tPA treatment led to Cav-1 shedding from bEND3 cells into the media. Notably, OGD triggered nitric oxide (NO) production and S-nitrosylationof Cav-1 (SNCav-1). Meanwhile tPA induced activation of ERK signal pathway and stimulates the secretion of SNCav-1. Pretreatment of bEND3 cells with C-PTIO (a NO scavenger) or U0126 (a specific ERK inhibitor) significantly reduced OGD-induced S-nitrosylation of Cav-1 in cells and blocked the secretion of Cav-1 and MMP2 and 9 into the media as well as the degradation of fibronectin and laminin β-1 in OGD and tPA-treated cells. These data indicate that OGD-triggered Cav-1 S-nitrosylation interacts with tPA-induced ERK activation to augment MMP2 and 9 secretion and subsequent ECM degradation, which may account for the exacerbation of ischemic blood brain barrier damage following tPA thrombolysis for ischemic stroke. PMID:26881424

  4. Oroxylin A regulates glucose metabolism in response to hypoxic stress with the involvement of Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in human hepatoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qinsheng; Yin, Qian; Wei, Libin; Zhou, Yuxin; Qiao, Chen; Guo, Yongjian; Wang, Xiaotang; Ma, Shiping; Lu, Na

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic alteration in cancer cells is one of the most conspicuous characteristics that distinguish cancer cells from normal cells. In this study, we investigated the influence and signaling ways of oroxylin A affecting cancer cell energy metabolism under hypoxia. The data showed that oroxylin A remarkably reduced the generation of lactate and glucose uptake under hypoxia in HepG2 cells. Moreover, oroxylin A inhibited HIF-1α expression and its stability. The downstream targets (PDK1, LDHA, and HK II), as well as their mRNA levels were also suppressed by oroxylin A under hypoxia. The silencing or the overexpression of HIF-1α assays suggested that HIF-1α is required for metabolic effect of oroxylin A in HepG2 cells during hypoxia. Furthermore, oroxylin A could reduce the expression of complex III in mitochondrial respiratory chain, and then decrease the accumulation of ROS at moderate concentrations (0-50 µM) under hypoxia, which was benefit for its inhibition on glycolytic activity by decreasing ROS-mediated HIF-1 expression. Besides, oroxylin A didn't cause the loss of MMP under hypoxia and had no obvious effects on the expression of OXPHOS complexes, suggesting that oroxylin A did not affect mitochondrial mass at the moderate stress of oroxylin A. The suppressive effect of oroxylin A on glycolysis led to a significantly repress of ATP generation, for ATP generation mostly depends on glycolysis in HepG2 cells. This study revealed a new aspect of glucose metabolism regulation of oroxylin A under hypoxia, which may contribute to its new anticancer mechanism. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26259145

  5. Intermittent hypoxic training: fact and fancy.

    PubMed

    Levine, Benjamin D

    2002-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxic training (IHT) refers to the discontinuous use of normobaric or hypobaric hypoxia, in an attempt to reproduce some of the key features of altitude acclimatization, with the ultimate goal to improve sea-level athletic performance. In general, IHT can be divided into two different strategies: (1) providing hypoxia at rest with the primary goal being to stimulate altitude acclimatization or (2) providing hypoxia during exercise, with the primary goal being to enhance the training stimulus. Each approach has many different possible application strategies, with the essential variable among them being the "dose" of hypoxia necessary to achieve the desired effect. One approach, called living high-training low, has been shown to improve sea-level endurance performance. This strategy combines altitude acclimatization (2500 m) with low altitude training to ensure high-quality training. The opposite strategy, living low-training high, has also been proposed by some investigators. The primacy of the altitude acclimatization effect in IHT is demonstrated by the following facts: (1) living high-training low clearly improves performance in athletes of all abilities, (2) the mechanism of this improvement is primarily an increase in erythropoietin, leading to increased red cell mass, V(O2max), and running performance, and (3) rather than intensifying the training stimulus, training at altitude or under hypoxia leads to the opposite effect - reduced speeds, reduced power output, reduced oxygen flux - and therefore is not likely to provide any advantage for a well-trained athlete.

  6. The lethal interaction of x ray and penicillin induced lesions following x-irradiation of Escherichia coli B/r in the presence of hypoxic cell sensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Gillies, N.E.; Obioha, F.I.

    1982-03-01

    When Escherichia coli B/r were x-irradiated under anoxia in the presence of different electron-affinic sensitizers and then incubated in broth containing penicillin (at a concentration that did not kill unirradiated cells) additional killing of the bacteria occurred provided the sensitizers were of relatively high lipophilicity. The overall effect was to increase the efficiency of these sensitizers. It is concluded that sensitizer-dependent latent radiation lesions(s) are produced in membrane components of the cell envelope that interact with damage caused by penicillin in the peptidoglycan layer and this causes the additional lethality.

  7. A lab-on-a-chip for hypoxic patch clamp measurements combined with optical tweezers and spectroscopy- first investigations of single biological cells.

    PubMed

    Alrifaiy, Ahmed; Borg, Johan; Lindahl, Olof A; Ramser, Kerstin

    2015-04-18

    The response and the reaction of the brain system to hypoxia is a vital research subject that requires special instrumentation. With this research subject in focus, a new multifunctional lab-on-a-chip (LOC) system with control over the oxygen content for studies on biological cells was developed. The chip was designed to incorporate the patch clamp technique, optical tweezers and absorption spectroscopy. The performance of the LOC was tested by a series of experiments. The oxygen content within the channels of the LOC was monitored by an oxygen sensor and verified by simultaneously studying the oxygenation state of chicken red blood cells (RBCs) with absorption spectra. The chicken RBCs were manipulated optically and steered in three dimensions towards a patch-clamp micropipette in a closed microfluidic channel. The oxygen level within the channels could be changed from a normoxic value of 18% O 2 to an anoxic value of 0.0-0.5% O 2. A time series of 3 experiments were performed, showing that the spectral transfer from the oxygenated to the deoxygenated state occurred after about 227 ± 1 s and a fully developed deoxygenated spectrum was observed after 298 ± 1 s, a mean value of 3 experiments. The tightness of the chamber to oxygen diffusion was verified by stopping the flow into the channel system while continuously recording absorption spectra showing an unchanged deoxygenated state during 5400 ± 2 s. A transfer of the oxygenated absorption spectra was achieved after 426 ± 1 s when exposing the cell to normoxic buffer. This showed the long time viability of the investigated cells. Successful patching and sealing were established on a trapped RBC and the whole-cell access (Ra) and membrane (Rm) resistances were measured to be 5.033 ± 0.412 M Ω and 889.7 ± 1.74 M Ω respectively.

  8. Microfluidic Platform Generates Oxygen Landscapes for Localized Hypoxic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rexius, Megan L.; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B.; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T.

    2014-01-01

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes. PMID:25315003

  9. Sirtuin 6 protects the heart from hypoxic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Maksin-Matveev, Anna; Kanfi, Yariv; Hochhauser, Edith; Isak, Ahuva; Cohen, Haim Y.; Shainberg, Asher

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. We investigated whether life extension is associated with cardioprotection against hypoxia. The proposed study is to develop approaches to reduce hypoxic damage through the use of the sirtuin pathway and to elucidate the mechanism involved. For that purpose we subjected cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice (TG) with over-expression of SIRT6, to hypoxic stress in cell cultures. We hypothesized that cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice subjected to prolonged hypoxia may release survival factors or fewer damage markers to protect them from hypoxic stress compared with wild type (WT) mice. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) released to the medium and propidium iodide (PI) binding, were markedly decreased following hypoxia in TG cardiomyocytes. The protective mechanism of SIRT6 over-expression includes the activation of pAMPKα pathway, the increased protein level of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2), the inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), the decrease of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the reduction in the protein level of phospho-protein kinase B (pAkt) during hypoxia. Together, all these processes impede the necrosis/apoptosis pathways leading to the improved survival of cardiomyocytes following hypoxia, which might explain life extension. - Highlights: • Sirtuin 6 is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 protects cardiocytes from hypoxia and oxidative stress. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 activates the pAMPKα pathway and the Bcl2 expression. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 decreases ROS formation and pAkt level during hypoxia. • These pathways protect cardiocytes from hypoxia and might explain lifespan extension.

  10. Phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex precedes HIF-1-mediated effects and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 upregulation during the first hours of hypoxic treatment in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Andreas David; Walbrecq, Geoffroy; Kozar, Ines; Behrmann, Iris; Haan, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is an important gatekeeper enzyme connecting glycolysis to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Thereby, it has a strong impact on the glycolytic flux as well as the metabolic phenotype of a cell. PDC activity is regulated via reversible phosphorylation of three serine residues on the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) E1α subunit. Phosphorylation of any of these residues by the PDH kinases (PDKs) leads to a strong decrease in PDC activity. Under hypoxia, the inactivation of the PDC has been described to be dependent on the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)-induced PDK1 protein upregulation. In this study, we show in two hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 and JHH-4) that, during the adaptation to hypoxia, PDH is already phosphorylated at time points preceding HIF-1-mediated transcriptional events and PDK1 protein upregulation. Using siRNAs and small molecule inhibitor approaches, we show that this inactivation of PDC is independent of HIF-1α expression but that the PDKs need to be expressed and active. Furthermore, we show that reactive oxygen species might be important for the induction of this PDH phosphorylation since it correlates with the appearance of an altered redox state in the mitochondria and is also inducible by H2O2 treatment under normoxic conditions. Overall, these results show that neither HIF-1 expression nor PDK1 upregulation is necessary for the phosphorylation of PDH during the first hours of the adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:27800515

  11. [STRESS AND INFARCT LIMITING EFFECTS OF EARLY HYPOXIC PRECONDITIONING].

    PubMed

    Lishmanov, Yu B; Maslov, L N; Sementsov, A S; Naryzhnaya, N V; Tsibulnikov, S Yu

    2015-09-01

    It was established that early hypoxic preconditioning is an adaptive state different from eustress and distress. Hypoxic preconditioning has the cross effects, increasing the tolerance of the heart to ischemia-reperfusion and providing antiulcerogenic effect during immobilization stress.

  12. Novel Roles for Protein Kinase Cδ-dependent Signaling Pathways in Acute Hypoxic Stress-induced Autophagy*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jo-Lin; Lin, Her H.; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Lin, Anning; Forman, Henry J.; Ann, David K.

    2008-01-01

    Macroautophagy, a tightly orchestrated intracellular process for bulk degradation of cytoplasmic proteins or organelles, is believed to be essential for cell survival or death in response to stress conditions. Recent observations indicate that autophagy is an adaptive response in cells subjected to prolonged hypoxia. However, the signaling mechanisms that activate autophagy under acute hypoxic stress are not clearly understood. In this study, we show that acute hypoxic stress by treatment with 1% O2 or desferroxamine, a hypoxia-mimetic agent, of cells renders a rapid induction of LC3-II level changes and green fluorescent protein-LC3 puncta accumulation, hallmarks of autophagic processing, and that this process involves protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), and occurs prior to the induction of BNIP3 (Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa interacting protein 3). Interestingly, hypoxic stress leads to a rapid and transient activation of JNK in Pa-4 or mouse embryo fibroblast cells. Acute hypoxic stress-induced changes in LC3-II level and JNK activation are attenuated in Pa-4 cells by dominant negative PKCδKD or in mouse embryo fibroblast/PKCδ-null cells. Intriguingly, the requirement of PKCδ is not apparent for starvation-induced autophagy. The importance of PKCδ in hypoxic stress-induced adaptive responses is further supported by our findings that inhibition of PKCδ-facilitated autophagy by 3-methyladenine or Atg5 knock-out renders a greater prevalence of cell death following prolonged desferroxamine treatment, whereas PKCδ- or JNK1-deficient cells exhibit resistance to extended hypoxic exposure. These results uncover dual roles of PKCδ-dependent signaling in the cell fate determination upon hypoxic exposure. PMID:18836180

  13. Detection of hypoxic fractions in murine tumors by comet assay: Comparison with other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q.; Kavanagh, M.C.; Newcombe, D.

    1995-12-01

    The alkaline comet assay was used to detect the hypoxic fractions of murine tumors. A total of four tumor types were tested using needle aspiration biopsies taken immediately after a radiation dose of 15 Gy. Initial studies confirmed that the normalized tail moment, a parameter reflecting single-strand DNA breaks induced by the radiation, was linearly related to radiation dose. Further, it was shown that for a mixed population (1:1) of cells irradiated under air-breathing or hypoxic conditions, the histogram of normal tail moment values obtained from analyzing 400 cells in the population had a double peak which, when fitted with two Gaussian distributions, gave a good estimate of the proportion of the two subpopulations. For the four tumor types, the means of the calculated hypoxic fractions from four or five individual tumors were 0.15 {+-} 0.04 for B16F1, 0.08 {+-} 0.04 for KHT-LP1, 0.17 {+-} 0.04 for RIF-1 and 0.04 {+-} 0.01 for SCCVII. Analysis of variance showed that the hypoxic fraction in KHT-LP1 tumors is significantly lower than those of the other three tumors (P = 0.026) but that there is no significant difference in hypoxic fraction between B16F1, RIF-1 and SCCVII tumors (P = 0.574). Results from multiple samples taken from each of five RIF-1 tumors showed that the intertumor heterogeneity of hypoxic fractions was greater than that within the same tumor. The mean hypoxic fraction obtained using the comet assay for the four tumor types was compared with the hypoxic fraction determined by the clonogenic assay, or median pO{sub 2} values, or [{sup 3}H]misonidazole binding in the same tumor types. The values of hypoxic fraction obtained with the comet assay were two to four times lower than those measured by the paired survival method. Preliminary results obtained with a dose of 5 Gy were consistent with those obtained using 15 Gy. These results suggest the further development of the comet assay for clinical studies. 21 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. CFTR and sphingolipids mediate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Tabeling, Christoph; Yu, Hanpo; Wang, Liming; Ranke, Hannes; Goldenberg, Neil M; Zabini, Diana; Noe, Elena; Krauszman, Adrienn; Gutbier, Birgitt; Yin, Jun; Schaefer, Michael; Arenz, Christoph; Hocke, Andreas C; Suttorp, Norbert; Proia, Richard L; Witzenrath, Martin; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2015-03-31

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) optimizes pulmonary ventilation-perfusion matching in regional hypoxia, but promotes pulmonary hypertension in global hypoxia. Ventilation-perfusion mismatch is a major cause of hypoxemia in cystic fibrosis. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) may be critical in HPV, potentially by modulating the response to sphingolipids as mediators of HPV. HPV and ventilation-perfusion mismatch were analyzed in isolated mouse lungs or in vivo. Ca(2+) mobilization and transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) translocation were studied in human pulmonary (PASMCs) or coronary (CASMCs) artery smooth muscle cells. CFTR inhibition or deficiency diminished HPV and aggravated ventilation-perfusion mismatch. In PASMCs, hypoxia caused CFTR to interact with TRPC6, whereas CFTR inhibition attenuated hypoxia-induced TRPC6 translocation to caveolae and Ca(2+) mobilization. Ca(2+) mobilization by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was also attenuated by CFTR inhibition in PASMCs, but amplified in CASMCs. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) blocked HPV, whereas exogenous nSMase caused TRPC6 translocation and vasoconstriction that were blocked by CFTR inhibition. nSMase- and hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction, yet not TRPC6 translocation, were blocked by inhibition or deficiency of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) or antagonism of S1P receptors 2 and 4 (S1P2/4). S1P and nSMase had synergistic effects on pulmonary vasoconstriction that involved TRPC6, phospholipase C, and rho kinase. Our findings demonstrate a central role of CFTR and sphingolipids in HPV. Upon hypoxia, nSMase triggers TRPC6 translocation, which requires its interaction with CFTR. Concomitant SphK1-dependent formation of S1P and activation of S1P2/4 result in phospholipase C-mediated TRPC6 and rho kinase activation, which conjointly trigger vasoconstriction. PMID:25829545

  15. CFTR and sphingolipids mediate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Tabeling, Christoph; Yu, Hanpo; Wang, Liming; Ranke, Hannes; Goldenberg, Neil M.; Zabini, Diana; Noe, Elena; Krauszman, Adrienn; Gutbier, Birgitt; Yin, Jun; Schaefer, Michael; Arenz, Christoph; Hocke, Andreas C.; Suttorp, Norbert; Proia, Richard L.; Witzenrath, Martin; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) optimizes pulmonary ventilation-perfusion matching in regional hypoxia, but promotes pulmonary hypertension in global hypoxia. Ventilation-perfusion mismatch is a major cause of hypoxemia in cystic fibrosis. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) may be critical in HPV, potentially by modulating the response to sphingolipids as mediators of HPV. HPV and ventilation-perfusion mismatch were analyzed in isolated mouse lungs or in vivo. Ca2+ mobilization and transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) translocation were studied in human pulmonary (PASMCs) or coronary (CASMCs) artery smooth muscle cells. CFTR inhibition or deficiency diminished HPV and aggravated ventilation-perfusion mismatch. In PASMCs, hypoxia caused CFTR to interact with TRPC6, whereas CFTR inhibition attenuated hypoxia-induced TRPC6 translocation to caveolae and Ca2+ mobilization. Ca2+ mobilization by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was also attenuated by CFTR inhibition in PASMCs, but amplified in CASMCs. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) blocked HPV, whereas exogenous nSMase caused TRPC6 translocation and vasoconstriction that were blocked by CFTR inhibition. nSMase- and hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction, yet not TRPC6 translocation, were blocked by inhibition or deficiency of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) or antagonism of S1P receptors 2 and 4 (S1P2/4). S1P and nSMase had synergistic effects on pulmonary vasoconstriction that involved TRPC6, phospholipase C, and rho kinase. Our findings demonstrate a central role of CFTR and sphingolipids in HPV. Upon hypoxia, nSMase triggers TRPC6 translocation, which requires its interaction with CFTR. Concomitant SphK1-dependent formation of S1P and activation of S1P2/4 result in phospholipase C-mediated TRPC6 and rho kinase activation, which conjointly trigger vasoconstriction. PMID:25829545

  16. Item and order recognition memory in subjects with hypoxic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, R O; Kesner, R P; Goldstein, M

    1995-03-01

    Subjects with hypoxic brain injury resulting in significant cell loss in the hippocampus but not the parahippocampal gyrus or temporal lobes and normal control subjects were tested for memory impairments. The Denman Memory Scale was given to all subjects as a baseline memory assessment. All subjects were then tested for item and order recognition memory for lists of six words, pictures, abstract pictures, spatial locations, and motor responses. Results indicated that hypoxic subjects are impaired compared to control subjects on the Denman memory scale for verbal, non-verbal, and full-scale memory quotients. In addition, results indicated that compared to control subjects, hypoxic subjects displayed item and order recognition deficits for words, pictures, abstract pictures, and spatial locations. A recency effect for item recognition of abstract pictures, spatial locations, and hand positions was found. For motor response order recognition, both primacy and recency effects were found, with deficits in performance for the middle items of the list. It appears that subjects with hypoxic brain injury in the face of severe memory deficits for words, pictures, abstract pictures, and spatial locations display residual capacity for remembering the last items for spatial locations, abstract designs, and hand positions. Hypoxic subjects also display residual capacity for remembering motor responses using episodic or data-based memory.

  17. Neuroprotective effect of zinc chelator DEDTC in a zebrafish (Danio rerio) Model of Hypoxic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinge; Li, Yang V

    2013-03-01

    A study was conducted using zebrafish as a model of hypoxic brain injury to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of zinc (Zn(2+)) chelation. The accumulation of intracellular Zn(2+) is a significant causal factor of the neuronal injury, and has been implicated in cell death followed by ischemic stroke. In this study, the zebrafish was placed in the hypoxia chamber with an extremely low level of dissolved oxygen (less than 0.8 mg/L), which is similar to the conditions in a complete global ischemic stroke. Approximately 50% of zebrafish died after a short period (≈11 min) of hypoxic treatment, suggesting that this is a responsive model system for use in evaluating treatments for hypoxic brain damage. The application of DEDTC reduced intracellular Zn(2+) accumulation and produced a concentration-dependent effect by increasing the survival rate of zebrafish. Zn(2+) chelation also enhanced zebrafish tolerance for hypoxia. When the brain damages were evaluated with TTC staining, the zebrafish that were treated with DEDTC in hypoxic treatment yielded the improvement of TTC staining that was similar to the healthy zebrafish brain. The results support that rising intracellular Zn(2+) plays a critical role in the neuronal damages, and demonstrate the protective effects of Zn(2+) chelation in hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in zebrafish.

  18. Hypoxic Conditioning as a New Therapeutic Modality

    PubMed Central

    Verges, Samuel; Chacaroun, Samarmar; Godin-Ribuot, Diane; Baillieul, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Preconditioning refers to a procedure by which a single noxious stimulus below the threshold of damage is applied to the tissue in order to increase resistance to the same or even different noxious stimuli given above the threshold of damage. Hypoxic preconditioning relies on complex and active defenses that organisms have developed to counter the adverse consequences of oxygen deprivation. The protection it confers against ischemic attack for instance as well as the underlying biological mechanisms have been extensively investigated in animal models. Based on these data, hypoxic conditioning (consisting in recurrent exposure to hypoxia) has been suggested a potential non-pharmacological therapeutic intervention to enhance some physiological functions in individuals in whom acute or chronic pathological events are anticipated or existing. In addition to healthy subjects, some benefits have been reported in patients with cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases as well as in overweight and obese individuals. Hypoxic conditioning consisting in sessions of intermittent exposure to moderate hypoxia repeated over several weeks may induce hematological, vascular, metabolic, and neurological effects. This review addresses the existing evidence regarding the use of hypoxic conditioning as a potential therapeutic modality, and emphasizes on many remaining issues to clarify and future researches to be performed in the field. PMID:26157787

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor: an attractive target in the treatment of hypoxic/ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Zhou, Hui; Lu, Jie; Qu, Yi; Yu, Dan; Tong, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia or ischemia results in cell death and cerebral edema, as well as other cellular reactions such as angiogenesis and the reestablishment of functional microvasculature to promote recovery from brain injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor is expressed in the central nervous system after hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and is involved in the process of brain repair via the regulation of angiogenesis, neurogenesis, neurite outgrowth, and cerebral edema, which all require vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. In this review, we focus on the role of the vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway in the response to hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and discuss potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:26981109

  20. Vascular endothelial growth factor: an attractive target in the treatment of hypoxic/ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hui; Zhou, Hui; Lu, Jie; Qu, Yi; Yu, Dan; Tong, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia or ischemia results in cell death and cerebral edema, as well as other cellular reactions such as angiogenesis and the reestablishment of functional microvasculature to promote recovery from brain injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor is expressed in the central nervous system after hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and is involved in the process of brain repair via the regulation of angiogenesis, neurogenesis, neurite outgrowth, and cerebral edema, which all require vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. In this review, we focus on the role of the vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway in the response to hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and discuss potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:26981109

  1. Combining hypoxic methods for peak performance.

    PubMed

    Millet, Gregoire P; Roels, B; Schmitt, L; Woorons, X; Richalet, J P

    2010-01-01

    New methods and devices for pursuing performance enhancement through altitude training were developed in Scandinavia and the USA in the early 1990s. At present, several forms of hypoxic training and/or altitude exposure exist: traditional 'live high-train high' (LHTH), contemporary 'live high-train low' (LHTL), intermittent hypoxic exposure during rest (IHE) and intermittent hypoxic exposure during continuous session (IHT). Although substantial differences exist between these methods of hypoxic training and/or exposure, all have the same goal: to induce an improvement in athletic performance at sea level. They are also used for preparation for competition at altitude and/or for the acclimatization of mountaineers. The underlying mechanisms behind the effects of hypoxic training are widely debated. Although the popular view is that altitude training may lead to an increase in haematological capacity, this may not be the main, or the only, factor involved in the improvement of performance. Other central (such as ventilatory, haemodynamic or neural adaptation) or peripheral (such as muscle buffering capacity or economy) factors play an important role. LHTL was shown to be an efficient method. The optimal altitude for living high has been defined as being 2200-2500 m to provide an optimal erythropoietic effect and up to 3100 m for non-haematological parameters. The optimal duration at altitude appears to be 4 weeks for inducing accelerated erythropoiesis whereas <3 weeks (i.e. 18 days) are long enough for beneficial changes in economy, muscle buffering capacity, the hypoxic ventilatory response or Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity. One critical point is the daily dose of altitude. A natural altitude of 2500 m for 20-22 h/day (in fact, travelling down to the valley only for training) appears sufficient to increase erythropoiesis and improve sea-level performance. 'Longer is better' as regards haematological changes since additional benefits have been shown as hypoxic exposure

  2. Honey dilution impact on in vitro wound healing: Normoxic and hypoxic condition.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Amrita; Bag, Swarnendu; Barui, Ananya; Banerjee, Provas; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2015-01-01

    Honey is known as a popular healing agent against tropical infections and wounds. However, the effects of honey dilutions on keratinocyte (HaCaT) wound healing under hypoxic condition is still not explored. In this study, we examined whether honey dilution have wound healing potential under hypoxic stress. The antioxidant potential and healing efficacy of honey dilution on in vitro wound of human epidermal keratinocyte (HaCaT cells) under hypoxia (3% O2 ), and normoxia is explored by nitro blue tetrazolium assay. The cell survival % quantified by MTT assay to select four honey dilutions like 10, 1, 0.1, and 0.01 v/v% and the changes in cellular function was observed microscopically. Further, the cell proliferation, migration, cell-cell adhesion, and relevant gene expression were studied by flow cytometry, migration/scratch assay, immunocytochemistry, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The expression pattern of cardinal molecular features viz. E-cadherin, cytoskeletal protein F-actin, p63, and hypoxia marker Hif 1α were examined. Honey dilution in 0.1% v/v combat wound healing limitations in vitro under normoxia and hypoxia (3%). Its wound healing potential was quantified by immunocytochemistry and real-time PCR for the associated molecular features that were responsible for cell proliferation and migration. Our data showed that honey dilution can be effective in hypoxic wound healing. Additionally, it reduced superoxide generation and supplied favorable bioambience for cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation during hypoxic wound healing. These findings may reveal the importance of honey as an alternative and cost effective therapeutic natural product for wound healing in hypoxic condition.

  3. Plasticity in the Neonatal Brain following Hypoxic-Ischaemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic damage to the developing brain is a leading cause of child death, with high mortality and morbidity, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive disabilities. The developmental stage of the brain and the severity of the insult influence the selective regional vulnerability and the subsequent clinical manifestations. The increased susceptibility to hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) of periventricular white matter in preterm infants predisposes the immature brain to motor, cognitive, and sensory deficits, with cognitive impairment associated with earlier gestational age. In term infants HI causes selective damage to sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. Even though the immature brain is more malleable to external stimuli compared to the adult one, a hypoxic-ischaemic event to the neonate interrupts the shaping of central motor pathways and can affect normal developmental plasticity through altering neurotransmission, changes in cellular signalling, neural connectivity and function, wrong targeted innervation, and interruption of developmental apoptosis. Models of neonatal HI demonstrate three morphologically different types of cell death, that is, apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy, which crosstalk and can exist as a continuum in the same cell. In the present review we discuss the mechanisms of HI injury to the immature brain and the way they affect plasticity. PMID:27047695

  4. Exercise induced release of von Willebrand factor: evidence for hypoxic reperfusion microvascular injury in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, A J; Williams, R B; Stevens, C R; Lawrie, A S; Cox, N L; Blake, D R

    1992-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that rheumatoid synovitis may be perpetuated by the generation of reactive oxygen species during hypoxic reperfusion injury. The latter occurs because increased intra-articular pressure during exercise exceeds synovial capillary perfusion pressure, impairing blood flow. The object of this study was to establish a marker for and the mechanism of synovial hypoxic reperfusion injury. Von Willebrand factor (vWF) is only released from endothelial cells and platelets and is an in vivo and in vitro marker of endothelial injury. In vivo exercise induced changes in plasma vWF were therefore investigated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with controls and in vitro vWF release by human umbilical vein endothelial cells subjected to hypoxia reperfusion. Pre-exercise plasma vWF levels were 1001 and 817 IU/l, increasing after exercise to 1658 and 845 IU/l in patients with RA and controls respectively. Von Willebrand factor release from human umbilical vein endothelial cells followed a biphasic pattern, occurring during both hypoxia and reperfusion. Hypoxia reperfusion induced vWF release by human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro suggests that exercise induced vWF release in patients with RA is best explained by synovial hypoxic reperfusion injury. This study supports evidence that generation of reactive oxygen species plays a principal part in synovial hypoxic reperfusion injury and suggests vWF as a useful marker of this phenomenon. Images PMID:1444624

  5. Targeting hypoxic microenvironment of pancreatic xenografts with the hypoxia-activated prodrug TH-302

    PubMed Central

    Lohse, Ines; Rasowski, Joanna; Cao, Pinjiang; Pintilie, Melania; Do, Trevor; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Hill, Richard P.; Hedley, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Previous reports have suggested that the hypoxic microenvironment provides a niche that supports tumor stem cells, and that this might explain clinical observations linking hypoxia to metastasis. To test this, we examined the effects of a hypoxia-activated prodrug, TH-302, on the tumor-initiating cell (TIC) frequency of patient-derived pancreatic xenografts (PDX). The frequencies of TIC, measured by limiting dilution assay, varied widely in 11 PDX models, and were correlated with rapid growth but not with the levels of hypoxia. Treatment with either TH-302 or ionizing radiation (IR), to target hypoxic and well-oxygenated regions, respectively, reduced TIC frequency, and the combination of TH-302 and IR was much more effective in all models tested. The combination was also more effective than TH-302 or IR alone controlling tumor growth, particularly treating the more rapidly-growing/hypoxic models. These findings support the clinical utility of hypoxia targeting in combination with radiotherapy to treat pancreatic cancers, but do not provide strong evidence for a hypoxic stem cell niche. PMID:27248663

  6. Effects of chronic normobaric hypoxic and hypercapnic exposure in rats: Prevention of experimental chronic mountain sickness by hypercapnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, B.; Bonkovsky, H. L.; Ou, Lo-Chang

    1987-09-01

    A syndrome of experimental chronic mountain sickness can be produced in the Hilltop strain of Sprague-Dawley rats by chronic hypobaric hypoxic exposure. This syndrome is characterized by polycythemia, plasma hemoglobinemia, pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy with eventual failure and death. It has generally been assumed that these changes are caused by chronic hypoxemia, not by hypobaric exposure per se. We have now confirmed this directly by showing that chronic normobaric hypoxic exposure (10.5% O2) produces similar hematologic and hemodynamic changes. Further, the addition of hypercapnic exposure to the hypoxic exposure blunted or prevented the effects of the hypoxic exposure probably by stimulating respiration, thus increasing the rate of oxygen delivery to the cells. Changes in the rate-controlling enzymes of hepatic heme metabolism, 5-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase, and in cytochrome(s) P-450, the major hepatic hemoprotein(s), were also measured in hypoxic and hypercapnic rats. Hypoxia decreased 5-aminolevulinate synthase and increased cytochrome(s) P-450, probably by increasing the size of a “regulatory” heme pool within hepatocytes. These changes were also prevented by the addition of hypercapnic to hypoxic exposure.

  7. Facilitation of human osteoblast apoptosis by sulindac and indomethacin under hypoxic injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Tsai, An-Ly; Chen, Yen-Chu; Fan, Shih-Chen; Huang, Chun-Hsien; Wu, Chia-Ching; Chang, Chih-Han

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemia injury occurs after trauma causes consequential bone necrosis. Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently used in orthopedic clinics for pain relief. However, the underlying mechanism and outcome for usage of NSAIDs is poorly understood. To investigate the damage and loss of osteoblast function in hypoxia, two hypoxia mimetics, cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) and desferrioxamine (DFO), were used to create an in vitro hypoxic microenvironment. The cell damage was observed by decreases of cell viability and increases in cyclooxygenase-2 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Cell apoptosis was confirmed by WST-1 cytotoxic assays and flow cytometry. The functional expression of osteoblast in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was significantly decreased by CoCl(2) and inhibited when treated with DFO. To simulate the use of NSAID after hypoxic injury, four types of anti-inflammatory drugs, sulindac sulfide (SUL), indomethacin (IND), aspirin (Asp), and sodium salicylate (NaS), were applied to osteoblasts after 1 h of hypoxia mimetic treatment. SUL and IND further enhanced cell death after hypoxia. ALP activity was totally abolished in hypoxic osteoblasts under IND treatment. Facilitation of osteoblast apoptosis occurred regardless of IND dosage under hypoxic conditions. To investigate osteoblast in vivo, local hypoxia was created by fracture of tibia and then treated the injured mice with IND by oral feeding. IND-induced osteoblast apoptosis was confirmed by positive staining of TUNEL assay in fractured mice. Significant delay of fracture healing in bone tissue was also observed with the treatment of IND. These results provide information pertaining to choosing appropriate anti-inflammatory drugs for orthopedic patients. PMID:21882223

  8. Neuroprotective agents for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiaofeng; Chen, Wu; Sinha, Bharati; Tu, Yanyang; Manning, Simon; Thomas, Niranjan; Zhou, Shuanhu; Jiang, Hong; Ma, He; Kroessler, Daphne A; Yao, Jiemin; Li, Zhipu; Inder, Terry E; Wang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic (H-I) brain injury in newborns is a major cause of morbidity and mortality that claims thousands of lives each year. In this review, we summarize the promising neuroprotective agents tested on animal models and pilot clinical studies of neonatal H-I brain injury according to the different phases of the disease. These agents target various phases of injury including the early phase of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis as well as late-phase inflammatory reaction and neural repair. We analyze the cell survival and cell death pathways modified by these agents in neonatal H-I brain injury. We aim to 'build a bridge' between animal trials of neuroprotective agents and potential candidate treatments for future clinical applications against H-I encephalopathy. PMID:26360053

  9. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Espinoza, I.; Peschke, P.; Karger, C. P.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. Methods: A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii) hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Results: The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core. Within the

  10. Innate hypothermia after hypoxic ischaemic delivery.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Dulip

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this review is to collate the literature on the phenomenon of impaired thermal adaptation after hypoxic ischaemic (HI) delivery often culminating in hypothermia. This phenomenon appears different in severity and duration to a spontaneous postnatal fall in temperature observed after normal delivery. The original observation and contemporary descriptions of the temperature response to HI are described and a mechanism of action is proposed that may be utilised as a novel biomarker for HI. PMID:25675993

  11. Innate hypothermia after hypoxic ischaemic delivery.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Dulip

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this review is to collate the literature on the phenomenon of impaired thermal adaptation after hypoxic ischaemic (HI) delivery often culminating in hypothermia. This phenomenon appears different in severity and duration to a spontaneous postnatal fall in temperature observed after normal delivery. The original observation and contemporary descriptions of the temperature response to HI are described and a mechanism of action is proposed that may be utilised as a novel biomarker for HI.

  12. Hypoxic remodelling of Ca{sup 2+} stores does not alter human cardiac myofibroblast invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Riches, K.; Hettiarachchi, N.T.; Porter, K.E.; Peers, C.

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Bradykinin promotes migration and proliferation of myofibroblasts. {yields} Such activity is Ca{sup 2+}-dependent and occurs under hypoxic conditions. {yields} Hypoxia increased myofibroblast Ca{sup 2+} stores but not influx evoked by bradykinin. {yields} Myofibroblast migration and proliferation was unaffected by hypoxia. -- Abstract: Cardiac fibroblasts are the most abundant cell type in the heart, and play a key role in the maintenance and repair of the myocardium following damage such as myocardial infarction by transforming into a cardiac myofibroblast (CMF) phenotype. Repair occurs through controlled proliferation and migration, which are Ca{sup 2+} dependent processes, and often requires the cells to operate within a hypoxic environment. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce infarct size through the promotion of bradykinin (BK) stability. Although CMF express BK receptors, their activity under the reduced O{sub 2} conditions that occur following infarct are entirely unexplored. Using Fura-2 microfluorimetry on primary human CMF, we found that hypoxia significantly increased the mobilisation of Ca{sup 2+} from intracellular stores in response to BK whilst capacitative Ca{sup 2+} entry (CCE) remained unchanged. The enhanced store mobilisation was due to a striking increase in CMF intracellular Ca{sup 2+}-store content under hypoxic conditions. However, BK-induced CMF migration or proliferation was not affected following hypoxic exposure, suggesting that Ca{sup 2+} influx rather than mobilisation is of primary importance in CMF migration and proliferation.

  13. Synthesis, in vitro aerobic and hypoxic cytotoxicity and radiosensitizing activity of novel metronidazole tethered 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Several 2, 4-dinitrophenyl and 2,4-dinitrophenylamine tethered 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) compared to their components have shown minimal or no cytotoxicity to HT-29 cell line under aerobic conditions but high cytotoxicity and radiosensitizing effects under hypoxic conditions. In the present study the cytotoxicity and radiation potentiation of three novel analogues of these compounds by replacing 2,4-dinitrophenyl moiety with 2-methyl-5-nitroimidazole, a known radiosensitizer and cytotoxic agent was investigated. Methods Tethered compounds 7–9 were prepared by the reaction of 1-(t-butoxycarbonyl)-5-fluorouracil 6 with metronidazole esters 2–4 followed by removal of the t-butoxycarbonyl protecting group. Cytotoxicity of compounds in HT-29 cells with or without radiation were determined by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), propidium iodide (PI)-digitonin and clonogenic assays. Results Tethered compounds 7–9 induced time-and concentration–dependent cytotoxicity under hypoxia but had no significant effect under aerobic conditions. These compounds also showed selective and concentration- dependent radiosensitization effects under hypoxic conditions. Conclusion Tethered compounds 7–9 compared to 5-FU 5 showed minimal cytotoxicities under aerobic and selective radiosensitizing activities under hypoxic conditions. Also effects of these compounds were higher than those of metronidazole 1 which is a known cytotoxin and radiosensitizer under hypoxic conditions. PMID:24359860

  14. Gold nanoparticles enhance anti-tumor effect of radiotherapy to hypoxic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jae-Won; Chung, Ui Seok; Koh, Won-Gun; Keum, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hypoxia can impair the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Therefore, a new strategy is necessary for enhancing the response to RT. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of nanoparticles and RT is effective in eliminating the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors. Materials and Methods Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) consisting of a silica core with a gold shell were used. CT26 colon cancer mouse model was developed to study whether the combination of RT and GNPs reduced hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) was used as a hypoxia marker. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining were conducted to evaluate cell death. Results Hypoxic tumor cells had an impaired response to RT. GNPs combined with RT enhanced anti-tumor effect in hypoxic tumor compared with RT alone. The combination of GNPs and RT decreased tumor cell viability compare to RT alone in vitro. Under hypoxia, tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed a higher response than that shown by tumors treated with RT alone. When a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger was added, the enhanced antitumor effect of GNPs + RT was diminished. Conclusion In the present study, hypoxic tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed favorable responses, which might be attributable to the ROS production induced by GNPs + RT. Taken together, GNPs combined with RT seems to be potential modality for enhancing the response to RT in hypoxic tumors. PMID:27730800

  15. Simulating hypoxia-induced acidic environment in cancer cells facilitates mobilization and redox-cycling of genomic copper by daidzein leading to pro-oxidant cell death: implications for the sensitization of resistant hypoxic cancer cells to therapeutic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mohammad F; Ahmad, Aamir; Bhat, Showket H; Khan, Husain Y; Zubair, Haseeb; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Hadi, Sheikh M

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of action involved in the anti-cancer activity of daidzein and identification of cancer specific micro-environment as therapeutic target of this secondary metabolite derived from soy. Our data indicated that daidzein induces cellular DNA breakage, anti-proliferative effects and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We demonstrated that such a daidzein-induced anti-cancer action involves a copper-dependant pathway in which endogenous copper is mobilized by daidzein and redox-cycled to generate reactive oxygen species which act as an upstream signal leading to pro-oxidant cell death. Further in the context of hypoxia being a resistant factor against standard therapies and that an effect secondary to hypoxia is the intracellular acidification, we show that the anticancer activity of daidzein is modulated positively in acidic pH but copper-specific chelator is still able to inhibit daidzein activity. Moreover, an experimental setup of hypoxia mimic (cobalt chloride) revealed an enhanced sensitivity of cancer cells to the cytotoxic effects of daidzein which was neutralized in the presence of neocuproine. The findings support a paradigm shift from the conventional antioxidant property of dietary isoflavones to molecules capable of initiating a pro-oxidant signaling mediated by reactive oxygen species. Further, the clinical relevance of such an action mechanism in cancer chemoprevention is also proposed. This study identified endogenous copper as a molecular target and acidic pH as a modulating factor for the therapeutic activity of daidzein against cancer. The evidence presented highlights the potential of dietary agents as adjuvants to standard therapeutic regimens. PMID:26872803

  16. Simulating hypoxia-induced acidic environment in cancer cells facilitates mobilization and redox-cycling of genomic copper by daidzein leading to pro-oxidant cell death: implications for the sensitization of resistant hypoxic cancer cells to therapeutic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mohammad F; Ahmad, Aamir; Bhat, Showket H; Khan, Husain Y; Zubair, Haseeb; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Hadi, Sheikh M

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of action involved in the anti-cancer activity of daidzein and identification of cancer specific micro-environment as therapeutic target of this secondary metabolite derived from soy. Our data indicated that daidzein induces cellular DNA breakage, anti-proliferative effects and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We demonstrated that such a daidzein-induced anti-cancer action involves a copper-dependant pathway in which endogenous copper is mobilized by daidzein and redox-cycled to generate reactive oxygen species which act as an upstream signal leading to pro-oxidant cell death. Further in the context of hypoxia being a resistant factor against standard therapies and that an effect secondary to hypoxia is the intracellular acidification, we show that the anticancer activity of daidzein is modulated positively in acidic pH but copper-specific chelator is still able to inhibit daidzein activity. Moreover, an experimental setup of hypoxia mimic (cobalt chloride) revealed an enhanced sensitivity of cancer cells to the cytotoxic effects of daidzein which was neutralized in the presence of neocuproine. The findings support a paradigm shift from the conventional antioxidant property of dietary isoflavones to molecules capable of initiating a pro-oxidant signaling mediated by reactive oxygen species. Further, the clinical relevance of such an action mechanism in cancer chemoprevention is also proposed. This study identified endogenous copper as a molecular target and acidic pH as a modulating factor for the therapeutic activity of daidzein against cancer. The evidence presented highlights the potential of dietary agents as adjuvants to standard therapeutic regimens.

  17. Effect of a second nitroimidazole redox centre on the accumulation of a hypoxia marker: synthesis and in vitro evaluation of 99mTc-labeled bisnitroimidazole propylene amine oxime complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huafan; Zhou, Hao; Li, Zejun; Wang, Xiangyun; Chu, Taiwei

    2012-01-01

    Up to now, most of the hypoxia markers contain only one nitroimidazole redox centre, such as Oxo[[3,3,9,9-tetramethyl-1-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,8-diazaundecane-2,10-dione dioximato] (3-)-N,N',N″,N″']-technetium ((99m)Tc-1, BMS181321). Introducing a second nitroimidazole redox centre may enhance the hypoxic accumulation of the markers. In the present work, four (99m)Tc-1 (BMS181321, containing one 2-nitroimidazole) analogues, that is, (99m)Tc-2 (containing two 2-nitroimidazoles), (99m)Tc-3 (containing one 4-nitroimidazole), (99m)Tc-4 (containing two 4-nitroimidazoles) and (99m)Tc-5 (containing both a 2-nitroimidazole and a 4-nitroimidazole) were synthesized, and the hypoxic accumulation was evaluated in vitro using murine sarcoma S180 cells. (99m)Tc-3 and (99m)Tc-4 displayed no significant anoxic/normoxic differentials, whereas (99m)Tc-1 (BMS181321), (99m)Tc-2 and (99m)Tc-5 showed high anoxic cellular uptakes. The anoxic uptake of (99m)Tc-2 reached up to 59.0±0.9% at 4h, which was 2.4 times as that of (99m)Tc-1. (99m)Tc-2 displayed high hypoxic accumulation, indicating that introducing a second nitroimidazole redox centre, that is, 2-nitroimidazole, affected the hypoxic accumulation. Consequently, (99m)Tc-2 may serve as a viable candidate for hypoxia marker. This finding may eventually lead to the development of compounds containing multi-redox centres as hypoxia markers.

  18. Modulation of the Hypoxic Response.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia stimulates a variety of adaptive responses, many mediated via the hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) family of transcriptional complexes. The balance of HIF-1, -2 and -3 controls a variety of genes, directly up-regulating transcription of genes involved in erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, vasomotor tone, metabolic pathways and processes related to cell multiplication and survival, and indirectly reducing the transcription of genes with other effects. HIF transcription factors are heterodimers consisting of an oxygen-regulated alpha chain bound to the constitutive aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator. Under circumstances where oxygen is abundant the activity of the alpha chain is blocked by the actions of members of a family of oxygen-, iron- and oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase enzymes. Hydroxylation of two critical prolyl residues by the HIF prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3) leads to recognition by the von Hippel-Lindau E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, polyubiquitylation of the alpha chain and its consequent destruction by the proteasome. Hydroxylation of an asparaginyl residue by Factor Inhibiting HIF prevents any surviving HIF alpha chains from recruiting p300-CBP proteins, important for maximal transcriptional activation. Under conditions of acute hypoxia enzyme activity is suppressed, the HIF alpha chains are allowed to exist in their active form and target gene transcription is enhanced. In sustained hypoxia, adaptive responses mediated by the HIF pathway reduce oxygen demand and increase oxygen supply and thus ultimately down-regulate the pathway. However, a number of other processes also modulate HIF signalling and the balance between HIF-1 and HIF-2 actions. These include the generation of antisense HIF-1 and micro RNAs, up-regulation of HIF-3 alpha, antagonism of the HIF-p300 interaction by CITED2, increased PHD2 and PHD3 levels and effects on the pool of ankyrins within the cell which compete with HIF for the action of FIH. Additionally, effects on

  19. Hypoxic-induced stress protein expression in rat cardiac myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, G.; Geoghegan, T.E.

    1986-05-01

    Mammalian stress proteins can be induced in cells and tissues exposed to a variety of conditions including hyperthermia and diminished O/sub 2/ supply. The authors have previously shown that the expression of three stress proteins (71, 85, and 95 kDa) was induced in cardiac tissue from mice exposed to hypoxic conditions. The expression of mRNAs coding for the 85 and 95 kDa proteins increase with time of exposure to hypoxia, while the mRNA coding for the 71 kDa protein is transiently induced. The authors extended these studies to investigate the expression of stress proteins in isolated rat cardiac myocytes. Freshly prepared myocytes were exposed to control, hypoxic, anoxic, or heat-shock environments for up to 16 h. The proteins were then labeled for 6 hours with (/sup 35/S)methionine. Analysis of the solubilized proteins by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography showed that there was a 6-fold increase in synthesis of the 85 kDa protein upon exposure to hypoxia but not heat-shock conditions. The 71 kDa protein was present at high levels in both control and treated myocyte protein preparations, and presumably had been induced during the isolation procedure. Total RNA isolated from intact rat heart and isolated myocytes was compared by cell-free translation analysis and showed induction of RNAs coding for several stress proteins in the myocyte preparation. The induced proteins at 85 and 95 kDa have molecular weights similar to reported cell stress and/or glucose-regulated proteins.

  20. Possible role of lysophosphatidic acid in rat model of hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by cellular and structural changes in the vascular wall of pulmonary arteries. We hypothesized that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lipid, is implicated in this vascular remodeling in a rat model of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Exposure of Wistar rats to 10% O2 for 3 weeks induced an increase in the mean serum levels of LPA, to 40.9 (log-detransformed standard deviations: 23.4–71.7) μM versus 21.6 (11.0–42.3) μM in a matched control animal group (P = 0.037). We also observed perivascular LPA immunohistochemical staining in lungs of hypoxic rats colocalized with the secreted lysophospholipase D autotaxin (ATX). Moreover, ATX colocalized with mast cell tryptase, suggesting implication of these cells in perivascular LPA production. Hypoxic rat lungs expressed more ATX transcripts (2.4-fold) and more transcripts of proteins implicated in cell migration: β2 integrin (1.74-fold), intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; 1.84-fold), and αM integrin (2.70-fold). Serum from the hypoxic group of animals had significantly higher chemoattractant properties toward rat primary lung fibroblasts, and this increase in cell migration could be prevented by the LPA receptor 1 and 3 antagonists. LPA also increased adhesive properties of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells as well as those of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, via the activation of LPA receptor 1 or 3 followed by the stimulation of gene expression of ICAM-1, β-1, E-selectin, and vascular cell adhesion molecule integrins. In conclusion, chronic hypoxia increases circulating and tissue levels of LPA, which might induce fibroblast migration and recruitment of mononuclear cells in pulmonary vasculature, both of which contribute to pulmonary vascular remodeling. PMID:25621161

  1. Enhanced radiation-sensitivity by preincubation with nitroimidazoles: Effect of glutathione depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, C.J. ); Skov, K.A. )

    1994-05-15

    The mechanism of enhanced radiosensitization by nitroheterocyclics after a preincubation period under hypoxic conditions was investigated. The hypothesis that this phenomenon was caused by glutathione depletion was tested. The phenomena of enhanced radiosensitization by nitroheterocyclics after a preincubation period under hypoxic conditions is potentially of importance therapeutically because essentially nonlethal preradiation exposures to the electron affinic drugs cause a much larger radiation sensitization than would otherwise be expected. We have investigated this interesting property of several 2-nitroimidazoles to determine its possible cause and to test various hypotheses about maximizing its possible therapeutic benefit. In view of many observations that thiols are depleted by incubation of cells with nitroimidazoles under hypoxic conditions, we have specifically investigated this aspect of the preincubation effect. Depletion of glutathione was either enhanced by an overnight incubation with buthionine sulfoximine or minimized by preincubation with a 2-nitroimidazole which is sterically inhibited from causing thiol depletion. When conditions were chosen which minimized variations in cellular glutathione content during the preincubation period, no preincubation effect was observed. At low, therapeutically relevant radiation doses, where 2-nitroimidazoles are less efficient sensitizers, the preincubation effect may be even more important, but thiol depletion still minimizes its impact in this region of the dose-response curve. These results suggest that the preincubation effect is caused by a [open quotes]self-sensitization[close quotes] involving the known enhancement of radiation sensitization by thiol depletion. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Time Domains of the Hypoxic Ventilatory Response and Their Molecular Basis

    PubMed Central

    Pamenter, Matthew E.; Powell, Frank L.

    2016-01-01

    Ventilatory responses to hypoxia vary widely depending on the pattern and length of hypoxic exposure. Acute, prolonged, or intermittent hypoxic episodes can increase or decrease breathing for seconds to years, both during the hypoxic stimulus, and also after its removal. These myriad effects are the result of a complicated web of molecular interactions that underlie plasticity in the respiratory control reflex circuits and ultimately control the physiology of breathing in hypoxia. Since the time domains of the physiological hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) were identified, considerable research effort has gone toward elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate these varied responses. This research has begun to describe complicated and plastic interactions in the relay circuits between the peripheral chemoreceptors and the ventilatory control circuits within the central nervous system. Intriguingly, many of these molecular pathways seem to share key components between the different time domains, suggesting that varied physiological HVRs are the result of specific modifications to overlapping pathways. This review highlights what has been discovered regarding the cell and molecular level control of the time domains of the HVR, and highlights key areas where further research is required. Understanding the molecular control of ventilation in hypoxia has important implications for basic physiology and is emerging as an important component of several clinical fields. PMID:27347896

  3. Buyanghuanwu Tang therapy for neonatal rats with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiyao; Min, Yue; Gu, Weiwang; Wang, Yujue; Tian, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a clinical syndrome manifested by neurological symptoms in the first days of life in term infants. Purpose: To investigate the therapy effect of Buyanghuanwu Tang (BYHWT), a decoction with 7 herbal ingredients, on neonatal rats with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and its mechanism. Methods: 50 3-week male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into normal control group, model group, BYHWT 1d group, BYHWT 3d group and BYHWT 7d group, 10 rats in each group. The HIE model of was established in later 4 groups. The later 3 groups were treated with BYHWT for 1, 3 and 7 days, respectively, and the normal control group and model group were treated with PBS. The Morris water maze test and dynamic 18F-FDG-PET/CT imaging were performed. The changes of hippocampal tissue observed by histopathologic examination, and the expressions of JNK1/JNK2 and TNF-α protein were observed western blotting. Results: Compared with model group, the impaired performance on distance and latency parameters was mitigated in BYHWT 1d group, BYHWT 3d group and BYHWT 7d group (P < 0.01), the FDG uptake was decreased in BYHWT 3d group and BYHWT 7d group, the apoptotic cells and inflammatory cells were significantly decreased in BYHWT 3d group and BYHWT 7d group, and the expressions of JNK1/JNK2 and TNF-α protein were significantly decreased in BYHWT 7d group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: BYHWT can delay the HIE onset and preserve the motor function, primarily by regulating inflammation, apoptosis and inhibition by mediating JNK signaling. PMID:26770451

  4. Effect of venoruton on hypoxic stress-induced neurotoxicity in mice and oxygen free radical generation by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Shukla, V K; Sethi, A K; Garg, S K; Ganguly, N K; Kulkarni, S K

    1989-01-01

    Venoruton offers a protection against hypoxic stress-induced neurotoxicity (convulsions and death) in mice. It also inhibits free radical generation, since it produces a concentration-dependent (5-160 micrograms/10(6) cells/ml) decrease of chemiluminescence response from human neutrophils. The maximum inhibition was observed at 140 micrograms/10(6) cells/ml. The in vivo protective effect against hypoxic stress-induced neurotoxicity has been correlated to the inhibitory action of venoruton on oxygen free radical generation.

  5. Exercise delays the hypoxic thermal response in rats.

    PubMed

    Ray, A D; Roberts, A J; Lee, S D; Farkas, G A; Michlin, C; Rifkin, D I; Ostrow, P T; Krasney, J A

    2003-07-01

    Exercise exacerbates acute mountain sickness. In infants and small mammals, hypoxia elicits a decrease in body temperature (Tb) [hypoxic thermal response (HTR)], which may protect against hypoxic tissue damage. We postulated that exercise would counteract the HTR and promote hypoxic tissue damage. Tb was measured by telemetry in rats (n = 28) exercising or sedentary in either normoxia or hypoxia (10% O2, 24 h) at 25 degrees C ambient temperature (Ta). After 24 h of normoxia, rats walked at 10 m/min on a treadmill (30 min exercise, 30 min rest) for 6 h followed by 18 h of rest in either hypoxia or normoxia. Exercising normoxic rats increased Tb ( degrees C) vs. baseline (39.68 +/- 0.99 vs. 38.90 +/- 0.95, mean +/- SD, P < 0.05) and vs. sedentary normoxic rats (38.0 +/- 0.09, P < 0.05). Sedentary hypoxic rats decreased Tb (36.15 +/- 0.97 vs. 38.0 +/- 0.36, P < 0.05) whereas Tb was maintained in the exercising hypoxic rats during the initial 6 h of exercise (37.61 +/- 0.55 vs. 37.72 +/- 1.25, not significant). After exercise, Tb in hypoxic rats reached a nadir similar to that in sedentary hypoxic rats (35.05 +/- 1.69 vs. 35.03 +/- 1.32, respectively). Tb reached its nadir significantly later in exercising hypoxic vs. sedentary hypoxic rats (10.51 +/- 1.61 vs. 5.36 +/- 1.83 h, respectively; P = 0.002). Significantly greater histopathological damage and water contents were observed in brain and lungs in the exercising hypoxic vs. sedentary hypoxic and normoxic rats. Thus exercise early in hypoxia delays but does not prevent the HTR. Counteracting the HTR early in hypoxia by exercise exacerbates brain and lung damage and edema in the absence of ischemia.

  6. Germination under Extreme Hypobaric and Hypoxic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hirofumi

    Is the agriculture on Mars without a pressured greenhouse dome possible? In order to inves-tigate a possibility of plant cultivation for the space agriculture on Mars, germination rate for six species of plant, Jute, Chrysanthemum, Komatsuna, Cucumber, Okra, and Eggplant under extreme hypobaric and hypoxic condition was measured. Oxygen partial pressure was 1kPa which was equal to 1/100 of normal earth atmosphere. Seeds of Jute and Cucumber were able to germinate in six species. In the case of Jute, germination rate under the oxygen partial pressure of 1kPa was very high, 70

  7. Effect of a short-term hypoxic treatment followed by re-aeration on free radicals level and antioxidative enzymes in lupine roots.

    PubMed

    Garnczarska, Małgorzata; Bednarski, Waldemar

    2004-03-01

    To investigate whether re-aeration after a short-term hypoxic pre-treatment (for 2, 12 or 24 h) induces oxidative stress, the temporal sequence of physiological reactions, including the level of free radicals, hydrogen peroxide production, and changes in antioxidative enzymes, was characterized in roots of hydroponically grown lupine (Lupinus luteus L., cv. Juno) seedlings. By using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we found that the exposure of hypoxically grown roots (hypoxic pre-treatment for 12 and 24 h) to air caused an increase in the level of free radicals. The amount of hydrogen peroxide also tended to increase when hypoxically pre-treated roots were re-aerated, which attests to a higher production of reactive oxygen species. Re-aeration caused a higher activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) and catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6), whereas the activity of peroxidase (POX, EC 1.11.1.7) was only slightly influenced. The roots were less tolerant to longer hypoxic pre-treatments, with a significant decrease in viability, associated with death of root tips immediately after hypoxic stress. Roots exposed to hypoxia for 2 h showed less pronounced responses and their viability was not affected by hypoxic stress and re-aeration. These results indicate that re-aeration following short-term hypoxia imposes a mild oxidative stress. This led us to conclude that re-oxygenation stress per se was not the key factor for cell death in root tips.

  8. Extreme Hypoxic Conditions Induce Selective Molecular Responses and Metabolic Reset in Detached Apple Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Cukrov, Dubravka; Zermiani, Monica; Brizzolara, Stefano; Cestaro, Alessandro; Licausi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Van Veen, Hans; Zuccolo, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tonutti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith) fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control) and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen) conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments. A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase) gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa) oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs. 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses, and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These data suggest

  9. Extreme Hypoxic Conditions Induce Selective Molecular Responses and Metabolic Reset in Detached Apple Fruit.

    PubMed

    Cukrov, Dubravka; Zermiani, Monica; Brizzolara, Stefano; Cestaro, Alessandro; Licausi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Van Veen, Hans; Zuccolo, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tonutti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith) fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control) and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen) conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments. A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase) gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa) oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs. 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses, and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These data suggest

  10. [STRESS AND INFARCT LIMITING EFFECTS OF EARLY HYPOXIC PRECONDITIONING].

    PubMed

    Lishmanov, Yu B; Maslov, L N; Sementsov, A S; Naryzhnaya, N V; Tsibulnikov, S Yu

    2015-09-01

    It was established that early hypoxic preconditioning is an adaptive state different from eustress and distress. Hypoxic preconditioning has the cross effects, increasing the tolerance of the heart to ischemia-reperfusion and providing antiulcerogenic effect during immobilization stress. PMID:26672158

  11. Prevention of experimental stroke by hypercapnic-hypoxic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, N N; Bespalov, A G; Kulikov, V P

    2008-09-01

    The effectiveness of hypercapnic hypoxic training in the prevention of acute disturbances in cerebral circulation was studied under experimental conditions. Hypercapnic hypoxic training was followed by a significant decrease in the severity of neurological deficit and locomotor and coordination disorders after cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:19240841

  12. Visualizing the antivascular effect of bortezomib on the hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaorong; Ackerstaff, Ellen; He, Fuqiu; Xing, Ligang; Hsiao, Hung Tsung; Koutcher, Jason A; Ling, C Clifton; Li, Gloria C

    2015-10-27

    Bortezomib, a novel proteasome inhibitor, has been approved for treating multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma and studied pre-clinically and clinically for solid tumors. Preferential cytotoxicity of bortezomib was found toward hypoxic tumor cells and endothelial cells in vitro. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of a pretreatment hypoxic tumor microenvironment on the effects of bortezomib in vitro and ex vivo, and explore the feasibility of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) to noninvasively evaluate the biological effects of bortezomib. It was shown in vitro by Western blot, flow cytometry, and ELISA that bortezomib accumulated HIF-1α in non-functional forms and blocks its hypoxia response in human colorectal cancer cell lines. Ex vivo experiments were performed with fluorescent immunohistochemical staining techniques using multiple endogenous and exogenous markers to identify hypoxia (pimonidazole, HRE-TKeGFP), blood flow/permeability (Hoechst 33342), micro-vessels (CD31 and SMA), apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3) and hypoxia response (CA9). After bortezomib administration, overall apoptosis index was significantly increased and blood perfusion was dramatically decreased in tumor xenografts. More importantly, apoptosis signals were found preferentially located in moderate and severe pretreatment hypoxic regions in both tumor and endothelial cells. Meanwhile, DCE MRI examinations showed that the tumor blood flow and permeability decreased significantly after bortezomib administration. The present study revealed that bortezomib reduces tumor hypoxia response and blood perfusion, thus, presenting antivascular properties. It will be important to determine the hypoxic/perfusion status pre- and during treatment at further translational studies.

  13. Ethylene enhances water transport in hypoxic aspen.

    PubMed

    Kamaluddin, Mohammed; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2002-03-01

    Water transport was examined in solution culture grown seedlings of aspen (Populus tremuloides) after short-term exposures of roots to exogenous ethylene. Ethylene significantly increased stomatal conductance, root hydraulic conductivity (L(p)), and root oxygen uptake in hypoxic seedlings. Aerated roots that were exposed to ethylene also showed enhanced L(p). An ethylene action inhibitor, silver thiosulphate, significantly reversed the enhancement of L(p) by ethylene. A short-term exposure of excised roots to ethylene significantly enhanced the root water flow (Q(v)), measured by pressurizing the roots at 0.3 MPa. The Q(v) values in ethylene-treated roots declined significantly when 50 microM HgCl(2) was added to the root medium and this decline was reversed by the addition of 20 mM 2-mercaptoethanol. The results suggest that the response of Q(v) to ethylene involves mercury-sensitive water channels and that root-absorbed ethylene enhanced water permeation through roots, resulting in an increase in root water transport and stomatal opening in hypoxic seedlings.

  14. The role of hydrogen sulphide in the control of breathing in hypoxic zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Porteus, Cosima S; Abdallah, Sara J; Pollack, Jacob; Kumai, Yusuke; Kwong, Raymond W M; Yew, Hong M; Milsom, William K; Perry, Steve F

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated the role of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) in oxygen sensing, intracellular signalling and promotion of ventilatory responses to hypoxia in adult and larval zebrafish (Danio rerio). Both larval and adult zebrafish exhibited a dose-dependent increase in ventilation to sodium sulphide (Na2S), an H2S donor. In vertebrates, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) are enzymes that catalyse the endogenous production of H2S. In adult zebrafish, inhibition of both CBS and CSE with aminooxyacetate (AOA) and propargyl glycine (PPG) blunted or abolished the hypoxic hyperventilation, and the addition of Na2S to the water partially rescued the effects of inhibiting endogenous H2S production. In zebrafish larvae (4 days post-fertilization), gene knockdown of either CBS or CSE using morpholinos attenuated the hypoxic ventilatory response. Furthermore, the intracellular calcium concentration of isolated neuroepithelial cells (NECs), which are putative oxygen chemoreceptors, increased significantly when these cells were exposed to 50 μm Na2S, supporting a role for H2S in Ca2+-evoked neurotransmitter release in these cells. Finally, immunohistochemical labelling showed that NECs dissociated from adult gill contained CBS and CSE, whereas cutaneous NECs in larval zebrafish expressed only CSE. Taken together, these data show that H2S can be produced in the putative oxygen-sensing cells of zebrafish, the NECs, in which it appears to play a pivotal role in promoting the hypoxic ventilatory response. PMID:24756639

  15. NF-κB-dependent transcriptional upregulation of cyclin D1 exerts cytoprotection against hypoxic injury upon EGFR activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Dong; Xu, Liang; Tang, Kan-Kai; Gong, Fang-Xiao; Liu, Jing-Quan; Ni, Yin; Jiang, Ling-Zhi; Hong, Jun; Han, Fang; Li, Qian; Yang, Xiang-Hong; Sun, Ren-Hua; Mo, Shi-Jing

    2016-09-10

    Apoptosis of neural cells is one of the main pathological features in hypoxic/ischemic brain injury. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) might be a potential therapeutic target for hypoxic/ischemic brain injury since NF-κB has been found to be inactivated after hypoxia exposure, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms of NF-κB inactivation are largely unknown. Here we report that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation prevents neuron-like PC12 cells apoptosis in response to hypoxia via restoring NF-κB-dependent transcriptional upregulation of cyclin D1. Functionally, EGFR activation by EGF stimulation mitigates hypoxia-induced PC12 cells apoptosis in both dose- and time-dependent manner. Of note, EGFR activation elevates IKKβ phosphorylation, increases IκBα ubiquitination, promotes P65 nuclear translocation and recruitment at cyclin D1 gene promoter as well as upregulates cyclin D1 expression. EGFR activation also abrogates the decrease of IKKβ phosphorylation, reduction of IκBα ubiquitination, blockade of P65 nuclear translocation and recruitment at cyclin D1 gene promoter as well as downregulation of cyclin D1 expression induced by hypoxia. Furthermore, NF-κB-dependent upregulation of cyclin D1 is instrumental for the EGFR-mediated cytoprotection against hypoxic apoptosis. In addition, the dephosphorylation of EGFR induced by either EGF siRNA transfection or anti-HB-EGF neutralization antibody treatment enhances hypoxic cytotoxicity, which are attenuated by EGF administration. Our results highlight the essential role of NF-κB-dependent transcriptional upregulation of cyclin D1 in EGFR-mediated cytoprotective effects under hypoxic preconditioning and support further investigation of EGF in clinical trials of patients with hypoxic/ischemic brain injury.

  16. Acute Hypoxic Test in Patients with Prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Shatylo, Valerii B; Serebrovska, Tatiana V; Gavalko, Anna V; Egorov, Egor; Korkushko, Oleg V

    2016-06-01

    Shatylo, Valerii B., Tetiana V. Serebrovska, Anna V. Gavalko, Egor Egorov, and Oleg V. Korkushko. Acute hypoxic test in patients with prediabetes. High Alt Med Biol. 17:101-107, 2016.-Prediabetes is a state of impaired carbohydrate metabolism when not all of the symptoms required to label a person as diabetic are present, but blood glucose is higher than in healthy subjects. Recent evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia training (IHT) might provide a cost-effective strategy for improving metabolic functioning. One of the most important aspects of the successful IHT application is individualized approach to hypoxic dose and regimen prescription. To establish the relationships between indices of carbohydrate metabolism and individual resistance to hypoxia, the acute hypoxic test (AHT, breathing gas mixture with 12% O2 during 20 minutes) was performed in 33 healthy volunteers (mean age, 63.0, range, 44-76; fasting plasma glucose (FPG) less than 5.6 mmol/L and 2 hours postoral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) glycemia less than 7.8 mmol/L) and 30 patients with impaired glucose metabolism (mean age, 65.5, range, 44-75; FPG from 5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L and 2 hours post-OGTT glycemia from 7.8 to 11 mmol/L). Negative correlation was found between the SaO2 level at 20th minute AHT and FPG (r = -0.83; p < 0.01) and insulin (r = -0.27; p < 0.05), as well as 2 hours post-OGTT glucose and insulin levels (r = -0.75 and -0.40, respectively). Longer recovery time and less effective functioning of respiratory and cardiovascular systems were also registered in patients with prediabetes showing that their cardiovascular resilience is impaired compared to normoglycemic controls. These patterns of relationship must be considered when assigning the individual modes of IHT. PMID:27213550

  17. Corticosteroid responses following hypoxic preconditioning provide neuroprotection against subsequent hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yangzheng; Bhatt, Abhay J

    2015-08-01

    Limited research has evaluated the corticosteroids (CS) response in hypoxic preconditioning (PC) induced neuroprotection against subsequent hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury in newborns. To measure, CS response to hypoxic PC, at postnatal day 6 (P6), rat pups were randomly divided into sham, NoPC (exposure to 21% O2) and PC (exposure to 8% O2 for 3h) groups. In a separate experiment, at P6, rat pups were randomly divided into three groups (sham, NoPC+HI, PC+HI). Rat pups in NoPC+HI and PC+HI groups, respectively had normoxic or hypoxic exposure for 3h at P6 and then had the right carotid artery permanently ligated followed by 140 min of hypoxia at P7 (HI). Plasma CS levels were measured at 0.5, 1, 3, 6 and 12h after hypoxic PC and hypoxic PC followed by HI. To investigate whether CS response to hypoxic PC provides neuroprotection against HI, at P6, rat pups were randomly divided into five groups. Fifteen minutes prior to PC or normoxic exposure, rat pups in DMSO+PC+HI and DMSO+NoPC+HI groups received DMSO while in RU486+PC+HI and RU486+NoPC+HI groups received RU486 (glucocorticoid receptor blocker, 60 mg/kg) s.c., respectively. Afterwards, rat pups were exposed to normoxia (DMSO+NoPC+HI, RU486+NoPC+HI) or hypoxia (DMSO+PC+HI, RU486+PC+HI) for 3h and then HI 24h later (P7). Rat pups at the corresponding age without any exposure to PC or HI or RU486/DMSO were used as sham. We found that hypoxic PC caused CS surge as well as augmented CS surge and preserved the glucocorticoid feedback regulation after HI. Hypoxic PC reduced HI induced early and delayed brain damage. RU486 partially but significantly inhibited hypoxic PC induced neuroprotection.

  18. Acute kidney injury with hypoxic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Zachary; Hoffmann, Paul; Owshalimpur, David

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old Caucasian man was transferred from a remote clinic with acute kidney injury for the prior 7–10 days preceded by gastroenteritis. His kidney biopsy showed non-specific mesangiopathic glomerular changes, minimal tubulointerstitial disease without sclerosis, crescents, nor evidence of vasculitis. On his third hospital day, he developed acute hypoxic respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Pulmonary renal syndromes ranked highest on his differential diagnosis. He was extubated after 2 days of mechanical ventilation and after pulse dose steroids. His lung biopsy showed pulmonary capillaritis. Our case describes a patient with clinically appearing renopulmonary syndrome, but found to have pulmonary capillaritis, a rare form of lung disease that may also cause acute kidney injury. PMID:25246473

  19. Natural Compounds Regulate Glycolysis in Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian-Li; Chen, Ying-Ge

    2015-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, Otto Heinrich Warburg described an elevated rate of glycolysis occurring in cancer cells, even in the presence of atmospheric oxygen (the Warburg effect). Recently it became a therapeutically interesting strategy and is considered as an emerging hallmark of cancer. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is one of the key transcription factors that play major roles in tumor glycolysis and could directly trigger Warburg effect. Thus, how to inhibit HIF-1-depended Warburg effect to assist the cancer therapy is becoming a hot issue in cancer research. In fact, HIF-1 upregulates the glucose transporters (GLUT) and induces the expression of glycolytic enzymes, such as hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase. So small molecules of natural origin used as GLUT, hexokinase, or pyruvate kinase isoform M2 inhibitors could represent a major challenge in the field of cancer treatment. These compounds aim to suppress tumor hypoxia induced glycolysis process to suppress the cell energy metabolism or enhance the susceptibility of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. In this review, we highlight the role of natural compounds in regulating tumor glycolysis, with a main focus on the glycolysis under hypoxic tumor microenvironment. PMID:25685782

  20. Kill-painting of hypoxic tumours in charged particle therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tinganelli, Walter; Durante, Marco; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Krämer, Michael; Maier, Andreas; Kraft-Weyrather, Wilma; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Friedrich, Thomas; Scifoni, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    Solid tumours often present regions with severe oxygen deprivation (hypoxia), which are resistant to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Increased radiosensitivity as a function of the oxygen concentration is well described for X-rays. It has also been demonstrated that radioresistance in anoxia is reduced using high-LET radiation rather than conventional X-rays. However, the dependence of the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) on radiation quality in the regions of intermediate oxygen concentrations, those normally found in tumours, had never been measured and biophysical models were based on extrapolations. Here we present a complete survival dataset of mammalian cells exposed to different ions in oxygen concentration ranging from normoxia (21%) to anoxia (0%). The data were used to generate a model of the dependence of the OER on oxygen concentration and particle energy. The model was implemented in the ion beam treatment planning system to prescribe uniform cell killing across volumes with heterogeneous radiosensitivity. The adaptive treatment plans have been validated in two different accelerator facilities, using a biological phantom where cells can be irradiated simultaneously at three different oxygen concentrations. We thus realized a hypoxia-adapted treatment plan, which will be used for painting by voxel of hypoxic tumours visualized by functional imaging. PMID:26596243

  1. LET-painting increases tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Niels; Toftegaard, Jakob; Lühr, Armin; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Scifoni, Emanuele; Krämer, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver; Mortensen, Lise Saksø; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B

    2014-01-01

    LET-painting was suggested as a method to overcome tumour hypoxia. In vitro experiments have demonstrated a well-established relationship between the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and linear energy transfer (LET), where OER approaches unity for high-LET values. However, high-LET radiation also increases the risk for side effects in normal tissue. LET-painting attempts to restrict high-LET radiation to compartments that are found to be hypoxic, while applying lower LET radiation to normoxic tissues. Methods. Carbon-12 and oxygen-16 ion treatment plans with four fields and with homogeneous dose in the target volume, are applied on an oropharyngeal cancer case with an identified hypoxic entity within the tumour. The target dose is optimised to achieve a tumour control probability (TCP) of 95% when assuming a fully normoxic tissue. Using the same primary particle energy fluence needed for this plan, TCP is recalculated for three cases assuming hypoxia: first, redistributing LET to match the hypoxic structure (LET-painting). Second, plans are recalculated for varying hypoxic tumour volume in order to investigate the threshold volume where TCP can be established. Finally, a slight dose boost (5-20%) is additionally allowed in the hypoxic subvolume to assess its impact on TCP. Results. LET-painting with carbon-12 ions can only achieve tumour control for hypoxic subvolumes smaller than 0.5 cm(3). Using oxygen-16 ions, tumour control can be achieved for tumours with hypoxic subvolumes of up to 1 or 2 cm(3). Tumour control can be achieved for tumours with even larger hypoxic subvolumes, if a slight dose boost is allowed in combination with LET-painting. Conclusion. Our findings clearly indicate that a substantial increase in tumour control can be achieved when applying the LET-painting concept using oxygen-16 ions on hypoxic tumours, ideally with a slight dose boost.

  2. Post-hypoxic Myoclonus: Current Concepts, Neurophysiology, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Harsh V.; Caviness, John N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Myoclonus may occur after hypoxia. In 1963, Lance and Adams described persistent myoclonus with other features after hypoxia. However, myoclonus occurring immediately after hypoxia may demonstrate different syndromic features from classic Lance–Adams syndrome (LAS). The aim of this review is to provide up-to-date information about the spectrum of myoclonus occurring after hypoxia with emphasis on neurophysiological features. Methods A literature search was performed on PubMed database from 1960 to 2015. The following search terms were used: “myoclonus,” “post anoxic myoclonus,” “post hypoxic myoclonus,” and “Lance Adams syndrome.” The articles describing clinical features, neurophysiology, management, and prognosis of post-hypoxic myoclonus cases were included for review. Results Several reports in the literature were separated clinically into “acute post-hypoxic myoclonus,” which occurred within hours of severe hypoxia, and “chronic post-hypoxic myoclonus,” which occurred with some recovery of mental status as the LAS. Acute post-hypoxic myoclonus was generalized in the setting of coma. Chronic post-hypoxic myoclonus presented as multifocal cortical action myoclonus that was significantly disabling. There was overlap of neurophysiological findings for these two syndromes but also different features. Treatment options for these two distinct clinical–neurophysiologic post-hypoxic myoclonus syndromes were approached differently. Discussion The review of clinical and neurophysiological findings suggests that myoclonus after hypoxia manifests in one or a combination of distinct syndromes: acute and/or chronic myoclonus. The mechanism of post-hypoxic myoclonus may arise either from cortical and/or subcortical structures. More research is needed to clarify mechanisms and treatment of post-hypoxic myoclonus. PMID:27708982

  3. Inhibition of TYRO3/Akt signaling participates in hypoxic injury in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan-zhen; Wang, Wei; Xian, Na; Wu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the TYRO3/Akt signaling pathway in hypoxic injury to hippocampal neurons. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that hypoxia inhibited the proliferation and viability of hippocampal neurons. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay demonstrated that hypoxia induced neuronal apoptosis in a time-dependent manner, with a greater number of apoptotic cells with longer hypoxic exposure. Immunofluorescence labeling revealed that hypoxia suppressed TYRO3 expression. Western blot assay showed that hypoxia decreased Akt phosphorylation levels in a time-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings suggest that hypoxia inhibits the proliferation of hippocampal neurons and promotes apoptosis, and that the inhibition of the TYRO3/Akt signaling pathway plays an important role in hypoxia-induced neuronal injury. PMID:27335558

  4. Joint immobilization induced hypoxic and inflammatory conditions in rat knee joints.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Yutaka; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Suda, Hideaki; Ando, Akira; Onoda, Yoshito; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Hatori, Kouki; Itoi, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the hypoxic and inflammatory conditions after immobilization in the joint capsule of rat knees. The unilateral knee joints of adult male rats were immobilized with an internal fixator (Im group) for 1 day, 3 days, and 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Sham-operated animals had holes drilled in the femur and tibia and screws inserted without a plate (control group). The number of cells and blood vessels in the capsule were histologically examined. The hypoxic condition in the capsule was histologically examined with a Hypoxyprobe™-1. The gene expressions related to the hypoxic (hypoxia inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and fibroblast growth factor 2) and inflammatory conditions [interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1α, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and tumor necrosis factor-β] were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The number of cells was unchanged at 1 day in the two groups; however, the number significantly increased at 3 days in the Im group. The number of blood vessels in the Im group gradually decreased. Strong immunostaining of Hypoxyprobe™-1 around the blood vessels was observed in the Im group. The gene expressions of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and fibroblast growth factor 2 were significantly higher in the Im group compared with those in the control group. The gene expressions of IL-6, IL-1α, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-β were significantly higher in the Im group compared with those in the control group. These data indicated that joint immobilization induced hypoxic and inflammatory conditions in the joint capsule, which might be an initiating factor for joint contracture.

  5. Overexpression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) induces a hypoxic response in Nicotiana tabacum leaves

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Pedro; Okura, Vagner; Pena, Izabella A.; Maia, Renato; Maia, Ivan G.; Arruda, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) decreases reactive oxygen species production under stress conditions by uncoupling the electrochemical gradient from ATP synthesis. This study combined transcriptome profiling with experimentally induced hypoxia to mechanistically dissect the impact of Arabidopsis thaliana UCP1 (AtUCP1) overexpression in tobacco. Transcriptomic analysis of AtUCP1-overexpressing (P07) and wild-type (WT) plants was carried out using RNA sequencing. Metabolite and carbohydrate profiling of hypoxia-treated plants was performed using 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. The transcriptome of P07 plants revealed a broad induction of stress-responsive genes that were not strictly related to the mitochondrial antioxidant machinery, suggesting that overexpression of AtUCP1 imposes a strong stress response within the cell. In addition, transcripts that mapped into carbon fixation and energy expenditure pathways were broadly altered. It was found that metabolite markers of hypoxic adaptation, such as alanine and tricarboxylic acid intermediates, accumulated in P07 plants under control conditions at similar rates to WT plants under hypoxia. These findings indicate that constitutive overexpression of AtUCP1 induces a hypoxic response. The metabolites that accumulated in P07 plants are believed to be important in signalling for an improvement in carbon assimilation and induction of a hypoxic response. Under these conditions, mitochondrial ATP production is less necessary and fermentative glycolysis becomes critical to meet cell energy demands. In this scenario, the more flexible energy metabolism along with an intrinsically activated hypoxic response make these plants better adapted to face several biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:26494730

  6. Notch1 is associated with the multidrug resistance of hypoxic osteosarcoma by regulating MRP1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Guo, D; Tang, B; Zhang, Y; Zhang, K; Nie, L

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia and Notch signaling pathway are closely related and both participate in cell proliferation and drug resistance of tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia and Notch signaling pathway in cell proliferation and drug resistance of osteosarcoma (OS) remain unclear. In this study, to further evaluate the role of hypoxia and Notch1 on drug resistance of OS, we investigated the influence of inhibiting Notch1 pathway by Notch1 small interference RNA (siRNA) on human MG-63 OS cells in hypoxia. Our data showed that hypoxia promoted OS cell proliferation, induced the G0/G1-S-G2/M phase transition, and increased multidrug resistance of human OS cells. Western blot analysis suggested that hypoxia increased the expression of HIF-1α, Notch1, and multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP1) in human OS cells. Notch1 siRNA inhibits proliferation and increases apoptosis of hypoxic OS cells. Finally, these hypoxic OS cells can be sensitized to multidrug treatment through inhibition of the Notch protein expression by siRNA. Repression of the Notch protein expression resulted in down-regulation of MRP1 protein. These data support the conclusion that Notch signaling is up-regulated in human OS cells under hypoxia and Notch1 may represent a viable target to overcome chemoresistant OS cells in a hypoxic niche by regulating MRP1 gene expression. PMID:27468877

  7. Hypoxic regulation of osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption activity

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Helen J

    2015-01-01

    Bone integrity is maintained throughout life via the homeostatic actions of bone cells, namely, osteoclasts, which resorb bone, and osteoblasts, which produce bone. Disruption of this balance in favor of osteoclast activation results in pathological bone loss, which occurs in conditions including osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, primary bone cancer, and cancer metastasis to bone. Hypoxia also plays a major role in these conditions, where it is associated with disease progression and poor prognosis. In recent years, considerable interest has arisen in the mechanisms whereby hypoxia and the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors, HIF-1α and HIF-2α, affect bone remodeling and bone pathologies. This review summarizes the current evidence for hypoxia-mediated regulation of osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption activity. Role(s) of HIF and HIF target genes in the formation of multinucleated osteoclasts from cells of the monocyte–macrophage lineage and in the activation of bone resorption by mature osteoclasts will be discussed. Specific attention will be paid to hypoxic metabolism and generation of ATP by osteoclasts. Hypoxia-driven increases in both glycolytic flux and mitochondrial metabolic activity, along with consequent generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, have been found to be essential for osteoclast formation and resorption activity. Finally, evidence for the use of HIF inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents targeting bone resorption in osteolytic disease will be discussed. PMID:27774484

  8. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed.

  9. Hypothermia for Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in Infants ≥ 36 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Rosemary D.; Shankaran, Seetha

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a serious condition affecting infants which can result in death and disability. This is a summary of pathogenesis of HIE, animal studies of cooling for hypoxic and ischemic models, human hypothermia trials, and the American Academy of Pediatrics publication on hypothermia for HIE. Hypothermia for neonatal HIE is continuing to evolve as a therapy. Studies, gaps in knowledge and opportunities for research are presented herein. PMID:19762176

  10. Reactive Nitrogen Species in Mitochondria and Their Implications in Plant Energy Status and Hypoxic Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kapuganti Jagadis; Igamberdiev, Abir U.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic and anoxic conditions result in the energy crisis that leads to cell damage. Since mitochondria are the primary organelles for energy production, the support of these organelles in a functional state is an important task during oxygen deprivation. Plant mitochondria adapted the strategy to survive under hypoxia by keeping electron transport operative even without oxygen via the use of nitrite as a terminal electrons acceptor. The process of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide (NO) in the mitochondrial electron transport chain recycles NADH and leads to a limited rate of ATP production. The produced ATP alongside with the ATP generated by fermentation supports the processes of transcription and translation required for hypoxic survival and recovery of plants. Non-symbiotic hemoglobins (called phytoglobins in plants) scavenge NO and thus contribute to regeneration of NAD+ and nitrate required for the operation of anaerobic energy metabolism. This overall operation represents an important strategy of biochemical adaptation that results in the improvement of energy status and thereby in protection of plants in the conditions of hypoxic stress. PMID:27047533

  11. Adenosine Receptor Blockade by Caffeine Inhibits Carotid Sinus Nerve Chemosensory Activity in Chronic Intermittent Hypoxic Animals.

    PubMed

    Sacramento, J F; Gonzalez, C; Gonzalez-Martin, M C; Conde, S V

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a key excitatory neurotransmitter at the synapse between O(2)-sensing chemoreceptor cells-carotid sinus nerve (CSN) endings in the carotid body (CB). Herein, we have investigated the significance of adenosine, through the blockade of its receptors with caffeine, on the CB hypoxic sensitization induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) in the rat. CIH animals were obtained by submitting rats during 15 days from 8:00 to 16:00 to 10 %O(2) for 40 s and 20 % O(2) for 80 s (i.e., 30 episodes/h). Caffeine (1 mM) was tested in spontaneous and 5 %O(2) evoked-CSN chemosensory activity in normoxic and CIH animals. CIH decreased basal spontaneous activity but increased significantly CSN activity evoked by acute hypoxia. Caffeine did not modify basal spontaneous activity in normoxic rats, but decreased significantly by 47.83 % basal activity in CIH animals. In addition, acute application of caffeine decreased 49.31 % and 56.01 % the acute hypoxic response in normoxic and CIH animals, respectively. We demonstrate that adenosine contributes to fix CSN basal activity during CIH, being also involved in hypoxic CB chemotransduction. It is concluded that adenosine participates in CB sensitization during CIH. PMID:26303475

  12. Reactive Nitrogen Species in Mitochondria and Their Implications in Plant Energy Status and Hypoxic Stress Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kapuganti Jagadis; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic and anoxic conditions result in the energy crisis that leads to cell damage. Since mitochondria are the primary organelles for energy production, the support of these organelles in a functional state is an important task during oxygen deprivation. Plant mitochondria adapted the strategy to survive under hypoxia by keeping electron transport operative even without oxygen via the use of nitrite as a terminal electrons acceptor. The process of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide (NO) in the mitochondrial electron transport chain recycles NADH and leads to a limited rate of ATP production. The produced ATP alongside with the ATP generated by fermentation supports the processes of transcription and translation required for hypoxic survival and recovery of plants. Non-symbiotic hemoglobins (called phytoglobins in plants) scavenge NO and thus contribute to regeneration of NAD(+) and nitrate required for the operation of anaerobic energy metabolism. This overall operation represents an important strategy of biochemical adaptation that results in the improvement of energy status and thereby in protection of plants in the conditions of hypoxic stress. PMID:27047533

  13. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, carotid body function and erythropoietin production in adult rats perinatally exposed to hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Lloret, Jesus; Ramirez, Maria; Olea, Elena; Moral-Sanz, Javier; Cogolludo, Angel; Castañeda, Javier; Yubero, Sara; Agapito, Teresa; Gomez-Niño, Angela; Rocher, Asuncion; Rigual, Ricardo; Obeso, Ana; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco; González, Constancio

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalians possess three cell systems that are activated by acute bodily hypoxia: pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC), carotid body chemoreceptor cells (CBCC) and erythropoietin (EPO)-producing cells. In rats, chronic perinatal hyperoxia causes permanent carotid body (CB) atrophy and functional alterations of surviving CBCC. There are no studies on PASMC or EPO-producing cells. Our aim is to define possible long-lasting functional changes in PASMC or EPO-producing cells (measured as EPO plasma levels) and, further, to analyse CBCC functional alterations. We used 3- to 4-month-old rats born and reared in a normal atmosphere or exposed to perinatal hyperoxia (55–60% O2 for the last 5–6 days of pregnancy and 4 weeks after birth). Perinatal hyperoxia causes an almost complete loss of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), which was correlated with lung oxidative status in early postnatal life and prevented by antioxidant supplementation in the diet. O2-sensitivity of K+ currents in the PASMC of hyperoxic animals is normal, indicating that their inhibition is not sufficient to trigger HPV. Perinatal hyperoxia also abrogated responses elicited by hypoxia on catecholamine and cAMP metabolism in the CB. An increase in EPO plasma levels elicited by hypoxia was identical in hyperoxic and control animals, implying a normal functioning of EPO-producing cells. The loss of HPV observed in adult rats and caused by perinatal hyperoxia, comparable to oxygen therapy in premature infants, might represent a previously unrecognized complication of such a medical intervention capable of aggravating medical conditions such as regional pneumonias, atelectases or general anaesthesia in adult life. Key points Adult animals that have been perinatally exposed to oxygen-rich atmospheres (hyperoxia), recalling those used for oxygen therapy in infants, exhibit a loss of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, whereas vasoconstriction elicited by depolarizing agents is

  14. FUNDC1 regulates mitochondrial dynamics at the ER-mitochondrial contact site under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenxian; Lin, Chunxia; Wu, Keng; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Xiaojing; Li, Wen; Zhuang, Haixia; Zhang, Xingliang; Chen, Hao; Li, Shupeng; Yang, Yue; Lu, Yue; Wang, Jingjing; Zhu, Runzhi; Zhang, Liangqing; Sui, Senfang; Tan, Ning; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Jingjing; Li, Longxuan; Feng, Du

    2016-07-01

    In hypoxic cells, dysfunctional mitochondria are selectively removed by a specialized autophagic process called mitophagy. The ER-mitochondrial contact site (MAM) is essential for fission of mitochondria prior to engulfment, and the outer mitochondrial membrane protein FUNDC1 interacts with LC3 to recruit autophagosomes, but the mechanisms integrating these processes are poorly understood. Here, we describe a new pathway mediating mitochondrial fission and subsequent mitophagy under hypoxic conditions. FUNDC1 accumulates at the MAM by associating with the ER membrane protein calnexin. As mitophagy proceeds, FUNDC1/calnexin association attenuates and the exposed cytosolic loop of FUNDC1 interacts with DRP1 instead. DRP1 is thereby recruited to the MAM, and mitochondrial fission then occurs. Knockdown of FUNDC1, DRP1, or calnexin prevents fission and mitophagy under hypoxic conditions. Thus, FUNDC1 integrates mitochondrial fission and mitophagy at the interface of the MAM by working in concert with DRP1 and calnexin under hypoxic conditions in mammalian cells. PMID:27145933

  15. Myocardial kinetics of fluorine-18 misonidazole: A marker of hypoxic myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, M.E.; Dence, C.S.; Hwang, D.R.; Welch, M.J.; Bergmann, S.R.

    1989-03-01

    Fluoromisonidazole, a member of a class of compounds referred to as ''hypoxic sensitizers,'' accumulates in hypoxic, viable tumor cells. We hypothesized that it might therefore accumulate also in ischemic, but non-necrotic myocardium potentially salvageable by interventional therapy. To evaluate the myocardial kinetics of (18F)fluoromisonidazole (FM), 20 isolated perfused rabbit hearts were used to characterize the uptake and binding of tracer under control conditions (n = 6), or with ischemia (flow 10% of control, n = 5), hypoxia without low flow (control flow rates with hypoxic medium, n = 5), or with reperfusion (n = 4). Myocardial retention of tracer detected externally with gamma scintillation probes after 20 min of constant (18F)FM infusion followed by 20 min of washout with nonradioactive buffer was 41 +/- 7% and 46 +/- 8% of peak activity in hearts subjected to ischemia or hypoxia, respectively, and significantly higher than in hearts subjected to either control perfusion or to ischemia followed by reperfusion (18 +/- 6 and 16 +/- 5% of peak activity, respectively, p less than 0.01). The biologic half-time of retained tracer was 40 hr in all hearts indicating essentially irreversible binding. Based on these findings, we measured uptake of (18F)FM using positron emission tomography in five dogs subjected to acute coronary occlusion. Five to thirteen millicuries of tracer were injected within 3 hr of occlusion. Within 30 min after administration of tracer, 18F accumulation in ischemic myocardium was greater than that observed in normal myocardium. The results indicate that (18F)FM accumulates in ischemic myocardium in relation to diminished tissue oxygen content and not simply because of diminished flow. Thus, this class of compounds may be potentially useful to help identify hypoxic myocardium.

  16. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 3-aryl-quinoxaline-2-carbonitrile 1,4-di-N-oxide derivatives as hypoxic selective anti-tumor agents.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunzhen; Xia, Qing; Shangguan, Shihao; Liu, Xiaowen; Hu, Yongzhou; Sheng, Rong

    2012-08-13

    A series of 3-aryl-2-quinoxaline-carbonitrile 1,4-di-N-oxide derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated for hypoxic and normoxic cytotoxic activity against human SMMC-7721, K562, KB, A549 and PC-3 cell lines. Many of these new compounds displayed more potent hypoxic cytotoxic activity compared with TX-402 and TPZ in the tumor cells based evaluation, which confirmed our hypothesis that the replacement of the 3-amine with the substituted aryl ring of TX-402 increases the hypoxic anti-tumor activity. The preliminary SAR revealed that 3-chloro was a favorable substituent in the phenyl ring for hypoxic cytotoxicity and 7-methyl or 7-methoxy substituted derivatives exhibited better hypoxic selectivity against most of the tested cell lines. The most potent compound, 7-methyl-3-(3-chlorophenyl)-quinoxaline-2-carbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (9h) was selected for further anti-tumor evaluation and mechanistic study. It also exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against BEL-7402, HepG2, HL-60, NCI-H460, HCT-116 and CHP126 cell lines in hypoxia with IC₅₀ values ranging from 0.31 to 3.16 μM, and preliminary mechanism study revealed that 9h induced apoptosis in a caspase-dependent pathway.

  17. Mass Law Predicts Hyperbolic Hypoxic Ventilatory Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severinghaus, John W.

    The hyperbolic hypoxic ventilatory response vs PaO2, HVRp, is interpreted as relecting a mass hyperbolic relationship of cytochrome PcO2 to cytochrome potential Ec, offset 32 torr by the constant diffusion gradient between arterial blood and cytochrome in CB at its constant metabolic rate dot VO_2 . Ec is taken to be a linear function of redox reduction and CB ventilatory drive. As Ec rises in hypoxia, the absolute potentials of each step in the citric acid cycle rises equally while the potential drop across each step remains constant because flux rate remains constant. A hypothetic HVRs ( dot VE vs SaO2) response curve computed from these assumptions is strikingly non linear. A hypothetic HVRp calculated from an assumed linear HVRs cannot be fit to the observed hyperbolic increase of ventilation in response to isocapnic hypoxia at PO2 less than 40 torr. The incompatibility of these results suggest that in future studies HVRs will not be found to be linear, especially below 80% SaO2 and HVRp will fail to be accurately hyperbolic.

  18. Pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction: how strong? How fast?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehan, D. W.; Klocke, R. A.; Farhi, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a minimally invasive technique for studying regional blood flow in conscious sheep, bypassing the complications of open-chest surgery, flow probes and tracer infusion. We quantitate regional perfusion continuously on the basis of regional clearance of methane (methane is produced in the sheep rumen, enters the circulation and is eliminated nearly completely (greater than 95%) in the lung). Tracheal intubation with a dual-lumen catheter isolates the gas exchange of the right apical lobe (RAL; less than 15% of the lung) from that of the remainder of the lung, which serves as a control (CL). We measure RAL and CL methane elimination by entraining expirates in constant flows, sampled continuously for methane. Results obtained with this technique and from regional oxygen uptake are in excellent agreement. We have found that hypoxic vasoconstriction is far more potent and stable during eucapnic hypoxia than during hypocapnic hypoxia. The time course of the vasoconstriction suggests that many of the data in the literature may have been obtained prior to steady state.

  19. Hypoxic Hepatitis: A Review and Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Waseem, Najeff; Chen, Po-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypoxic hepatitis (HH), also known as ischemic hepatitis or shock liver, is characterized by a massive, rapid rise in serum aminotransferases resulting from reduced oxygen delivery to the liver. The most common predisposing condition is cardiac failure, followed by circulatory failure as occurs in septic shock and respiratory failure. HH does, however, occur in the absence of a documented hypotensive event or shock state in 50% of patients. In intensive care units, the incidence of HH is near 2.5%, but has been reported as high as 10% in some studies. The pathophysiology is multifactorial, but often involves hepatic congestion from right heart failure along with reduced hepatic blood flow, total body hypoxemia, reduced oxygen uptake by hepatocytes or reperfusion injury following ischemia. The diagnosis is primarily clinical, and typically does not require liver biopsy. The definitive treatment of HH involves correction of the underlying disease state, but successful management includes monitoring for the potential complications such as hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, hyperammonemia and hepatopulmonary syndrome. Prognosis of HH remains poor, especially for cases in which there was a delay in diagnosis. The in-hospital mortality rate is >50%, and the most frequent cause of death is the predisposing condition and not the liver injury itself. PMID:27777895

  20. Bifurcate effects of glucose on caspase-independent cell death during hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, Toshihiko; Nara, Akina; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Uemura, Koichi

    2010-06-04

    We investigated the effect of glucose on hypoxic death of rat cardiomyocyte-derived H9c2 cells and found that there is an optimal glucose concentration for protection against hypoxic cell death. Hypoxic cell death in the absence of glucose is accompanied by rapid ATP depletion, release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria, and nuclear chromatin condensation, all of which are inhibited by glucose in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, excessive glucose also induces hypoxic cell death that is not accompanied by these events, suggesting a change in the mode of cell death between hypoxic cells with and without glucose supplementation.

  1. The effects of hypoxic bradycardia and extracellular HCO3(-)/CO2 on hypoxic performance in the eel heart.

    PubMed

    Joyce, William; Simonsen, Maj; Gesser, Hans; Wang, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    During hypoxia, fishes exhibit a characteristic hypoxic bradycardia, the functional significance of which remains debated. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that hypoxic bradycardia primarily safeguards cardiac performance. In preparations from the European eel (Anguilla anguilla), a decrease in stimulation frequency from 40 to 15 beats min(-1), which replicates hypoxic bradycardia in vivo, vastly improved cardiac performance during hypoxia in vitro. As eels display dramatic shifts in extracellular HCO3(-)/CO2, we further investigated the effect this has upon hypoxic cardiac performance. Elevations from 10 mmol l(-1) HCO3(-)/1% CO2 to 40 mmol l(-1) HCO3(-)/4% CO2 had few effects on performance; however, further, but still physiologically relevant, increases to 70 mmol l(-1) HCO3(-)/7% CO2 compromised hypoxia tolerance. We revealed a four-way interaction between HCO3(-)/CO2, contraction frequency, hypoxia and performance over time, whereby the benefit of hypoxic bradycardia was most prolonged at 10 mmol l(-1) HCO3(-)/1% CO2. Together, our data suggest that hypoxic bradycardia greatly benefits cardiac performance, but its significance may be context specific.

  2. Lungs at high-altitude: genomic insights into hypoxic responses.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Aastha; Mohammad, Ghulam; Norboo, Tsering; Newman, John H; Pasha, M A Qadar

    2015-07-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude (HA) results in reduced blood arterial oxygen saturation, perfusion of organs with hypoxemic blood, and direct hypoxia of lung tissues. The pulmonary complications in the cells of the pulmonary arterioles due to hypobaric hypoxia are the basis of the pathophysiological mechanisms of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). Some populations that have dwelled at HA for thousands of years have evolutionarily adapted to this environmental stress; unadapted populations may react with excessive physiological responses that impair health. Individual variations in response to hypoxia and the mechanisms of HA adaptation provide insight into physiological responses. Adaptive and maladaptive responses include alterations in pathways such as oxygen sensing, hypoxia signaling, K(+)- and Ca(2+)-gated channels, redox balance, and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Physiological imbalances are linked with genetic susceptibilities, and nonhomeostatic responses in gene regulation that occur by small RNAs, histone modification, and DNA methylation predispose susceptible humans to these HA illnesses. Elucidation of the interaction of these factors will lead to a more comprehensive understanding of HA adaptations and maladaptations and will lead to new therapeutics for HA disorders related to hypoxic lungs.

  3. Elevation of Circulating miR-210-3p in High-Altitude Hypoxic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Cheng; Zhou, Wanqing; Shi, Yonghui; Guo, Pengtao; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Junjun; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zhang, Chunni

    2016-01-01

    Background: The induction of miR-210-3p, a master hypoxamir, is a consistent feature of the hypoxic response in both normal and malignant cells. However, whether miR-210-3p acts as a circulating factor in response to a hypoxic environment remains unknown. The current study aimed to examine the effect of a high-altitude hypoxic environment on circulating miR-210-3p. Methods: We examined and compared the levels of miR-210-3p using TaqMan-based qRT-PCR in both peripheral blood cells and plasma from 84 ethnic Chinese Tibetans residing at 3560 m, 46 newly arrived migrant Han Chinese (Tibet Han) and 82 Han Chinese residing at 8.9 m (Nanjing Han). Furthermore, we analyzed the correlations of miR-210-3p with hematological indices. Results: The relative concentrations of miR-210-3p to internal reference U6 in blood cells were significantly higher in the Tibet Han group (1.01 ± 0.11, P < 0.001) and in the Tibetan group (1.17 ± 0.09, P < 0.001) than in the Nanjing Han group (0.51 ± 0.04). The absolute concentrations of plasma miR-210-3p were also markedly elevated in the Tibet Han group (503.54 ± 42.95 fmol/L, P = 0.004) and in the Tibetan group (557.78 ± 39.84 fmol/L, P < 0.001) compared to the Nanjing Han group (358.39 ± 16.16 fmol/L). However, in both blood cells and plasma, miR-210-3p levels were not significantly different between the Tibet Han group and the Tibetan group (P = 0.280, P = 0.620, respectively). Plasma miR-210-3p concentrations were positively correlated with miR-210-3p levels in blood cells (r = 0.192, P = 0.005). Furthermore, miR-210-3p levels in both blood cells and plasma showed strong positive correlations with red blood cell counts and hemoglobin and hematocrit values. Conclusion: These data demonstrated, for the first time, that miR-210-3p might act as a circulating factor in response to hypoxic environments and could be associated with human adaptation to life at high altitudes. PMID:27014085

  4. Advancing hypoxic training in team sports: from intermittent hypoxic training to repeated sprint training in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Faiss, Raphaël; Girard, Olivier; Millet, Grégoire P

    2013-12-01

    Over the past two decades, intermittent hypoxic training (IHT), that is, a method where athletes live at or near sea level but train under hypoxic conditions, has gained unprecedented popularity. By adding the stress of hypoxia during 'aerobic' or 'anaerobic' interval training, it is believed that IHT would potentiate greater performance improvements compared to similar training at sea level. A thorough analysis of studies including IHT, however, leads to strikingly poor benefits for sea-level performance improvement, compared to the same training method performed in normoxia. Despite the positive molecular adaptations observed after various IHT modalities, the characteristics of optimal training stimulus in hypoxia are still unclear and their functional translation in terms of whole-body performance enhancement is minimal. To overcome some of the inherent limitations of IHT (lower training stimulus due to hypoxia), recent studies have successfully investigated a new training method based on the repetition of short (<30 s) 'all-out' sprints with incomplete recoveries in hypoxia, the so-called repeated sprint training in hypoxia (RSH). The aims of the present review are therefore threefold: first, to summarise the main mechanisms for interval training and repeated sprint training in normoxia. Second, to critically analyse the results of the studies involving high-intensity exercises performed in hypoxia for sea-level performance enhancement by differentiating IHT and RSH. Third, to discuss the potential mechanisms underpinning the effectiveness of those methods, and their inherent limitations, along with the new research avenues surrounding this topic.

  5. Targeting radiosensitizers to DNA by attachment of an intercalating group: Nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridines

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, D.S.; Panicucci, R.; McClelland, R.A.; Rauth, A.M. )

    1991-07-01

    The nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridine series of compounds (NLP-1, 2, and 3) were synthesized under the assumption that it should be possible to enhance the molar efficiency of 2-nitroimidazoles as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and cytotoxins by targeting them to their likely site of action, DNA. The targeting group chosen was the phenanthridine moiety, the major component of the classical DNA intercalating compound, ethidium bromide. The sole difference between the compounds is the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the nitroimidazole to the phenanthridine. The phenanthridine group with a three-carbon side chain, P-1, was also synthesized to allow studies on the effect of the targeting group by itself. The ability of the compounds to bind to DNA is inversely proportional to their linker chain length with binding constant values ranging from approximately 1 {times} 10(5) mol-1 for NLP-2 to 6 {times} 10(5) mol-1 for NLP-3. The NLP compounds show selective toxicity to hypoxic cells at 37 degrees C at external drug concentrations 10-40 times lower than would be required for untargeted 2-nitroimidazoles such as misonidazole in vitro. Toxicity to both hypoxic and aerobic cells is dependent on the linker chain: the shorter the chain, the greater the toxicity. In addition, the NLP compounds radiosensitize hypoxic cells at external drug concentrations as low as 0.05 mM with almost the full oxygen effect being observed at a concentration of 0.5 mM. These concentrations are 10-100 times lower than would be required for similar radiosensitization using misonidazole. Radiosensitizing ability is independent of linker chain length. The present compounds represent prototypes for further studies of the efficacy and mechanism of action of 2-nitroimidazoles targeted to DNA by linkage to an intercalating group.

  6. SILAC-based proteomic analysis reveals that salidroside antagonizes cobalt chloride-induced hypoxic effects by restoring the tricarboxylic acid cycle in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhong-Wei; Chen, Xi; Jin, Xiao-Han; Meng, Xiang-Yan; Zhou, Xin; Fan, Feng-Xu; Mao, Shi-Yun; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Shan, Na-Na; Li, Yu-Ming; Xu, Rui-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic status alters the energy metabolism and induces cell injury in cardiomyocytes, and it further triggers the occurrence and development of cardiovascular diseases. Our previous studies have shown that salidroside (SAL) exhibits anti-hypoxic activity. However, the mechanisms remain obscure. In the present study, we successfully screened 92 different expression proteins in CoCl2-induced hypoxic conditions, 106 different expression proteins in the SAL-mediated anti-hypoxic group were compared with the hypoxic group using quantitative proteomics strategy, respectively. We confirmed that SAL showed a positive protective function involving the acetyl-CoA metabolic, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle using bioinformatics analysis. We also demonstrated that SAL plays a critical role in restoring the TCA cycle and in protecting cardiomyocytes from oxidative injury via up-regulation expressions of PDHE1-B, ACO2, SUCLG1, SUCLG2 and down-regulation of MDH2. SAL also inhibited H9c2 cell apoptosis by inhibiting the activation of pro-apoptotic molecules caspase 3 and caspase 9 as well as activation of the anti-apoptotic molecular Bcl-2. Additionally, SAL also improved mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intercellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) accumulation and inhibited the excessive consumption of ATP in H9c2 cells. PMID:26435418

  7. SILAC-based proteomic analysis reveals that salidroside antagonizes cobalt chloride-induced hypoxic effects by restoring the tricarboxylic acid cycle in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhong-Wei; Chen, Xi; Jin, Xiao-Han; Meng, Xiang-Yan; Zhou, Xin; Fan, Feng-Xu; Mao, Shi-Yun; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Shan, Na-Na; Li, Yu-Ming; Xu, Rui-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic status alters the energy metabolism and induces cell injury in cardiomyocytes, and it further triggers the occurrence and development of cardiovascular diseases. Our previous studies have shown that salidroside (SAL) exhibits anti-hypoxic activity. However, the mechanisms remain obscure. In the present study, we successfully screened 92 different expression proteins in CoCl2-induced hypoxic conditions, 106 different expression proteins in the SAL-mediated anti-hypoxic group were compared with the hypoxic group using quantitative proteomics strategy, respectively. We confirmed that SAL showed a positive protective function involving the acetyl-CoA metabolic, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle using bioinformatics analysis. We also demonstrated that SAL plays a critical role in restoring the TCA cycle and in protecting cardiomyocytes from oxidative injury via up-regulation expressions of PDHE1-B, ACO2, SUCLG1, SUCLG2 and down-regulation of MDH2. SAL also inhibited H9c2 cell apoptosis by inhibiting the activation of pro-apoptotic molecules caspase 3 and caspase 9 as well as activation of the anti-apoptotic molecular Bcl-2. Additionally, SAL also improved mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intercellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) accumulation and inhibited the excessive consumption of ATP in H9c2 cells.

  8. Chick embryos have the same pattern of hypoxic lower-brain activation as fetal mammals.

    PubMed

    Landry, Jeremy P; Hawkins, Connor; Lee, Aaron; Coté, Alexandra; Balaban, Evan; Pompeiano, Maria

    2016-01-01

    cFos expression (indicating a particular kind of neuronal activation) was examined in embryonic day (E) 18 chick embryos after exposure to 4 h of either normoxia (21% O2), modest hypoxia (15% O2), or medium hypoxia (10% O2). Eight regions of the brainstem and hypothalamus were surveyed, including seven previously shown to respond to hypoxia in late-gestation mammalian fetuses (Breen et al., 1997; Nitsos and Walker, 1999b). Hypoxia-related changes in chick embryo brain activation mirrored those found in fetal mammals with the exception of the medullary Raphe, which showed decreased hypoxic activation, compared with no change in mammals. This difference may be explained by the greater anapyrexic responses of chick embryos relative to mammalian fetuses. Activation in the A1/C1 region was examined in more detail to ascertain whether an O2-sensitive subpopulation of these cells containing heme oxygenase 2 (HMOX2) may drive hypoxic brain responses before the maturation of peripheral O2-sensing. HMOX2-positive and -negative catecholaminergic cells and interdigitating noncatecholaminergic HMOX2-positive cells all showed significant changes in cFos expression to hypoxia, with larger population responses seen in the catecholaminergic cells. Hypoxia-induced activation of lower-brain regions studied here was significantly better correlated with activation of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) than with that of HMOX2-containing A1/C1 neurons. Together, these observations suggest that (1) the functional circuitry controlling prenatal brain responses to hypoxia is strongly conserved between birds and mammals, and (2) NTS neurons are a more dominant driving force for prenatal hypoxic cFos brain responses than O2-sensing A1/C1 neurons.

  9. The different mechanisms of hypoxic acclimatization and adaptation in Lizard Phrynocephalus vlangalii living on Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

    PubMed

    He, Jianzheng; Xiu, Minghui; Tang, Xiaolong; Yue, Feng; Wang, Ningbo; Yang, Shaobin; Chen, Qiang

    2013-03-01

    Phrynocephalus vlangalii is a species of lizard endemic in China, which lives on Qinghai-Tibet Plateau ranging from 2000 to 4600 m above sea level. In this study, P. vlangalii were collected from low altitude (2750 m) and high altitude (4564 m). The lizards from low altitude were acclimatized in simulated hypoxic chamber (equivalent to 4600 m) for 7, 15, and 30 days. The hematological parameters, heart weight, myocardial capillary density, and myocardial enzyme activities were examined. The results showed that acclimatization to hypoxia significantly increased hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]), hematocrit (Hct), heart weight (HW), heart weight to body mass (HW/BM), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, but markedly decreased mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity. Red blood cell (RBC) count, body mass (BM), myocardial capillary density did not change markedly during hypoxic acclimatization. On the other hand, [Hb], Hct, MCHC, HW/BM, myocardium capillary density, and SDH activity of P. vlangalii from high altitude were remarkably higher than those from low-altitude; however, LDH activity of high-altitude P. vlangalii was lower than that of low-altitude lizards. There was no significant difference in HW or BM between populations of high-altitude and low-altitude. Based on the present data, we suggest that P. vlangalii has special anatomical, physiological, and biochemical accommodate mechanisms to live in hypoxic environment, and the regulative mechanisms are different between hypoxic acclimatization and adaptation.

  10. Renal medullary Na-K-ATPase and hypoxic injury in perfused rat kidneys.

    PubMed

    Epstein, F H; Silva, P; Spokes, K; Brezis, M; Rosen, S

    1989-11-01

    We wished to see if chronic alterations in Na-K-ATPase activity in the medullary thick ascending limb would modify the susceptibility of its cells to the hypoxic injury produced by perfusion of the isolated kidney. Rats were fed a diet high (64%) or low (8%) in protein for three weeks. Renal medullary Na-K-ATPase was 75 +/- 12 U/mg protein/hr (mean +/- SE) in the high protein group and 44 +/- 3 in rats given low protein. After 90 minutes of perfusion, the kidneys of rats fed a high protein diet showed almost all mTAL cells near the inner medulla with severe damage (93 +/- 4.8%), whereas the same zone in perfused kidneys of rats on a low protein diet showed only 47 +/- 7.7% injury. In a similar fashion, damage to mTAL cells seen in perfused kidneys was greatly augmented by compensatory renal hypertrophy produced by removal of the contralateral kidney two weeks earlier, and by a diet high in potassium given for two weeks, procedures which also increased the activity of medullary Na-K-ATPase. The results suggest that the level of transport work of medullary cells mediated by Na-K-ATPase is a determinant of the vulnerability of mTAL cells to hypoxic injury.

  11. Adaptation of the myoglobin knockout mouse to hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Schlieper, Georg; Kim, Jie-Hoon; Molojavyi, Andrei; Jacoby, Christoph; Laussmann, Tim; Flögel, Ulrich; Gödecke, Axel; Schrader, Jürgen

    2004-04-01

    Myoglobin knockout (myo-/-) mice were previously reported to show no obvious phenotype but revealed several compensatory mechanisms that include increases in cardiac capillary density, coronary flow, and hemoglobin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether severe hypoxic stress can exhaust these compensatory mechanisms and whether this can be monitored on the gene and protein level. Myo-/- and wild-type (WT) mice we e exposed to hypoxia (10% O(2)) fo 2 wk. Thereafter hemodynamic parameters were investigated by invasive measurement combined with magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiac gene and protein expression were analyzed using cDNA arrays and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis plus mass spectrometry, respectively. Hematocrit levels increased from 44% (WT) and 48% (myo-/-) to 72% in both groups. Similar to WT controls, hypoxic myo-/- animals maintained stable cardiovascular function (mean arterial blood pressure 82.4 mmHg, ejection fraction 72.5%). Cardiac gene expression of hypoxic myo-/- mice differed significantly from WT controls in 17 genes (e.g., keratinocyte lipid binding protein +202%, cytochrome c oxidase Vb +41%). Interestingly, hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha remained unchanged in both groups. Proteome analysis revealed reduced levels of heart fatty acid-binding protein and heat shock protein 27 both in hypoxic myo-/- and WT mice. Our data thus demonstrate that myo-/- mice do not decompensate du ing hypoxic st ess but a e surprisingly well adapted. Changes in ene gy metabolism of fatty acids may contribute to the robustness of myoglobin-deficient mice. PMID:14656764

  12. Psychological strain: examining the effect of hypoxic bedrest and confinement.

    PubMed

    Stavrou, Nektarios A M; McDonnell, Adam C; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to assess the effect of a 10-day exposure to the environmental stressors anticipated in future lunar habitats on indices of psychological strain. In addition to the reduced gravity of the Moon, future habitats on the Moon will likely maintain a hypobaric hypoxic environment. The hypobaric environment will eliminate the need for long decompression profiles prior to each extra-vehicular activity. We investigated the indices of psychological strain during three 10-day conditions, designed to assess the separate and combined effects of inactivity/unloading and normobaric hypoxia on several physiological systems. Eleven male participants underwent three 10-day campaigns in a randomised manner: 1) normobaric normoxic bed rest (NBR), 2) normobaric hypoxic bed rest (HBR) and 3) normobaric hypoxic ambulatory confinement (HAMB). The most negative psychological profile appeared on day 10 of the HBR and HAMB (hypoxic) conditions. Concomitantly, a decrease in positive emotions was observed from baseline to day 10 of the HBR and NBR conditions. Thus, confinement in a hypoxic environment seems to exert a negative effect on an individual's psychological mood.

  13. Adaptation of the myoglobin knockout mouse to hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Schlieper, Georg; Kim, Jie-Hoon; Molojavyi, Andrei; Jacoby, Christoph; Laussmann, Tim; Flögel, Ulrich; Gödecke, Axel; Schrader, Jürgen

    2004-04-01

    Myoglobin knockout (myo-/-) mice were previously reported to show no obvious phenotype but revealed several compensatory mechanisms that include increases in cardiac capillary density, coronary flow, and hemoglobin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether severe hypoxic stress can exhaust these compensatory mechanisms and whether this can be monitored on the gene and protein level. Myo-/- and wild-type (WT) mice we e exposed to hypoxia (10% O(2)) fo 2 wk. Thereafter hemodynamic parameters were investigated by invasive measurement combined with magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiac gene and protein expression were analyzed using cDNA arrays and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis plus mass spectrometry, respectively. Hematocrit levels increased from 44% (WT) and 48% (myo-/-) to 72% in both groups. Similar to WT controls, hypoxic myo-/- animals maintained stable cardiovascular function (mean arterial blood pressure 82.4 mmHg, ejection fraction 72.5%). Cardiac gene expression of hypoxic myo-/- mice differed significantly from WT controls in 17 genes (e.g., keratinocyte lipid binding protein +202%, cytochrome c oxidase Vb +41%). Interestingly, hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha remained unchanged in both groups. Proteome analysis revealed reduced levels of heart fatty acid-binding protein and heat shock protein 27 both in hypoxic myo-/- and WT mice. Our data thus demonstrate that myo-/- mice do not decompensate du ing hypoxic st ess but a e surprisingly well adapted. Changes in ene gy metabolism of fatty acids may contribute to the robustness of myoglobin-deficient mice.

  14. Psychological strain: examining the effect of hypoxic bedrest and confinement.

    PubMed

    Stavrou, Nektarios A M; McDonnell, Adam C; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to assess the effect of a 10-day exposure to the environmental stressors anticipated in future lunar habitats on indices of psychological strain. In addition to the reduced gravity of the Moon, future habitats on the Moon will likely maintain a hypobaric hypoxic environment. The hypobaric environment will eliminate the need for long decompression profiles prior to each extra-vehicular activity. We investigated the indices of psychological strain during three 10-day conditions, designed to assess the separate and combined effects of inactivity/unloading and normobaric hypoxia on several physiological systems. Eleven male participants underwent three 10-day campaigns in a randomised manner: 1) normobaric normoxic bed rest (NBR), 2) normobaric hypoxic bed rest (HBR) and 3) normobaric hypoxic ambulatory confinement (HAMB). The most negative psychological profile appeared on day 10 of the HBR and HAMB (hypoxic) conditions. Concomitantly, a decrease in positive emotions was observed from baseline to day 10 of the HBR and NBR conditions. Thus, confinement in a hypoxic environment seems to exert a negative effect on an individual's psychological mood. PMID:25484354

  15. Cardiovascular and respiratory developmental plasticity under oxygen depleted environment and in genetically hypoxic zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Nadeem; Schwerte, Thorsten

    2010-08-01

    Known vertebrate response to low oxygen concentration include change in carbohydrate metabolism, increase in nitric oxide, stimulation of red blood cell and hemoglobin production and induction of gene expression for glycolytic enzymes and hormones. Also, extreme hypoxia plays main role in pathological studies of cardiac dysfunction. The morphological and physiological developmental studies of the cardiovascular system under low oxygen are important as it is directly related to oxygen supply and consumption. Furthermore, cardiac function demands high energy during system development and thus it is most likely to be affected by hypoxia. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) can act as a model organism for oxygen demand management study as in natural environment, due to ecological disturbances, it is exposed to changes in oxygen concentrations routinely and thus would have natural ability to cope with it for survival. We have studied, in zebrafish, i) cardiovascular flexibility under extreme hypoxia (PO(2)=20 Torr, 3 kPa) at 3-10 dpf (days post-fertilization), ii) cardiac re-animation in normoxia (PO(2)=152 Torr, 20 kPa) after 90 min of anoxia (PO(2)=0 Torr, 0 kPa)-induced suspended animation at 4 dpf and iii) oxygen consumption in 8 dpf von Hippel-Lindau (vhl(-)(/)(-)) mutant that exhibits an artificial hypoxic response under normoxic conditions. In hypoxic fish, cardiac output, stroke volume and end-diastolic volume were elevated while intersegmental blood vessels vascularization index at 6 dpf and at 10 dpf was 22% and 11% higher respectively as compared to the normoxic fish. The heart rate in hypoxic fish was lower until 6 dpf and then showed an elevated trend. There was no significant difference in body length between the hypoxic and normoxic individuals. The observed changes may have enhanced the performance of the cardiovascular system for oxygen uptake. We also report for the first time that the post-anoxia re-animated heart rate returns to normal after 48h. Measurement of

  16. A cellular stress response (CSR) that interacts with NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) is a new regulator of hypoxic response.

    PubMed

    Oguro, Ami; Koyama, Chika; Xu, Jing; Imaoka, Susumu

    2014-02-28

    NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) was previously found to contribute to the hypoxic response of cells, but the mechanism was not clarified. In this study, we identified a cellular stress response (CSR) as a new factor interacting with NPR by a yeast two-hybrid system. Overexpression of CSR enhanced the induction of erythropoietin and hypoxia response element (HRE) activity under hypoxia in human hepatocarcinoma cell lines (Hep3B), while knockdown of CSR suppressed them. This new finding regarding the interaction of NPR with CSR provides insight into the function of NPR in hypoxic response.

  17. Sites and ionic mechanisms of hypoxic vasoconstriction in frog skin.

    PubMed

    Malvin, G M; Walker, B R

    2001-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the cellular mechanisms mediating hypoxic vasoconstriction (HVC) in frog skin, an important vertebrate respiratory organ, are similar to those mediating HVC in the pulmonary vasculature of mammals. An accepted hypothesis in the lung is that alveolar hypoxia alters the redox potential in vascular smooth muscle cells of arterial vessels. This decreases membrane K+ conductance, causing depolarization. Depolarization increases the open probability of L-type Ca2+ channels, facilitating Ca2+ entry into the cell, which leads to vascular smooth muscle contraction and vasoconstriction. We studied the cutaneous microcirculation of the frog (Xenopus laevis) web by enclosing the web in a transparent chamber that was ventilated with different gas mixtures. Arteriolar and venular diameters were measured by video microscopy. Drugs were applied topically or intravascularly. A dose-dependent constriction to hypoxia occurred in arterioles but not venules, although both vessel types constricted to similar degrees to the thromboxane mimetic U-46619. The magnitude of HVC was not associated with arteriolar size. Constriction of arterioles with 4-amino pyridine, a K+-channel antagonist, was blocked by the L-type Ca2+-channel blocker nifedipine. Nifedipine also antagonized HVC and hypercapnic vasoconstriction. Bay K 8664, a drug that increases the open probability of L-type Ca2+ channels, augmented HVC. These data support our hypothesis that the cellular mechanisms mediating HVC are similar in frog skin and mammalian lungs. This similarity between amphibian and mammalian tissues suggests that the mechanisms of HVC may have arisen relatively early in vertebrate evolution. In addition, because of its structural simplicity and easy accessibility, frog skin may be a useful tissue for studying this general phenomenon in vivo.

  18. Hypoxic Stress Induced by Hydralazine Leads to a Loss of Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and an Increase in Efflux Transporter Activity.

    PubMed

    Chatard, Morgane; Puech, Clémentine; Roche, Frederic; Perek, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by hypoxic stress is crucial to reduce blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in some neurological diseases. Since the brain is a complex organ, it makes the interpretation of in vivo data difficult, so BBB studies are often investigated using in vitro models. However, the investigation of hypoxia in cellular pathways is complex with physical hypoxia because HIF-1α (factor induced by hypoxia) has a short half-life. We had set up an innovative and original method of induction of hypoxic stress by hydralazine that was more reproducible, which allowed us to study its impact on an in vitro BBB model. Our results showed that hydralazine, a mimetic agent of the hypoxia pathway, had the same effect as physical hypoxia, with few cytotoxicity effects on our cells. Hypoxic stress led to an increase of BBB permeability which corresponded to an opening of our BBB model. Study of tight junction proteins revealed that this hypoxic stress decreased ZO-1 but not occludin expression. In contrast, cells established a defence mechanism by increasing expression and activity of their efflux transporters (Pgp and MRP-1). This induction method of hypoxic stress by hydralazine is simple, reproducible, controllable and suitable to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved by hypoxia on the BBB. PMID:27337093

  19. Modification of the volumetric growth responses and steady-state hypoxic fractions of xenografted DLD-2 human colon carcinomas by administration of basic fibroblast growth factor or suramin.

    PubMed Central

    Leith, J. T.; Papa, G.; Quaranto, L.; Michelson, S.

    1992-01-01

    We studied the growth characteristics and hypoxic fractions of DLD-2 human colon tumours xenografted into male nude mice either in the unperturbed state or after i.p. injection (q.i.d. x 7) of basic fibroblast growth factor (0.25 mg kg-1) or suramin (50 mg kg-1). Hypoxic fractions were measured by clonogenic excision assay 1 day after administration b FGF or suramin was stopped. As compared to controls, the growth of tumours in b FGF treated mice was increased by a factor of 1.5 as indicated by the relative volumes of tumours on the day of excision. Similarly, suramin decreased the growth of DLD-2 tumours by a factor of 1.6. The percentage of hypoxic cells in control neoplasms was 42.9% (95% confidence limits 34.2-52.1%). In mice that received basic fibroblast growth factor injections, hypoxic fractions decreased to 19.1% (95% confidence limits 13.5-26.9%). In contrast, in mice treated with suramin, the percentage of hypoxic cells increased to 74.0% (95% confidence limits 65.3-83.9%). These data indicate that the biology of solid tumours can be significantly modified by alteration of growth factor status. PMID:1503909

  20. Hypoxic Stress Induced by Hydralazine Leads to a Loss of Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and an Increase in Efflux Transporter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chatard, Morgane; Puech, Clémentine

    2016-01-01

    Understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by hypoxic stress is crucial to reduce blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in some neurological diseases. Since the brain is a complex organ, it makes the interpretation of in vivo data difficult, so BBB studies are often investigated using in vitro models. However, the investigation of hypoxia in cellular pathways is complex with physical hypoxia because HIF-1α (factor induced by hypoxia) has a short half-life. We had set up an innovative and original method of induction of hypoxic stress by hydralazine that was more reproducible, which allowed us to study its impact on an in vitro BBB model. Our results showed that hydralazine, a mimetic agent of the hypoxia pathway, had the same effect as physical hypoxia, with few cytotoxicity effects on our cells. Hypoxic stress led to an increase of BBB permeability which corresponded to an opening of our BBB model. Study of tight junction proteins revealed that this hypoxic stress decreased ZO-1 but not occludin expression. In contrast, cells established a defence mechanism by increasing expression and activity of their efflux transporters (Pgp and MRP-1). This induction method of hypoxic stress by hydralazine is simple, reproducible, controllable and suitable to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved by hypoxia on the BBB. PMID:27337093

  1. Enhanced non-eupneic breathing following hypoxic, hypercapnic or hypoxic-hypercapnic gas challenges in conscious mice

    PubMed Central

    Getsy, Paulina M.; Davis, Jesse; Coffee, Gregory A.; May, Walter J.; Palmer, Lisa A.; Strohl, Kingman P.; Lewis, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    C57BL6 mice display non-eupneic breathing and spontaneous apneas during wakefulness and sleep as well as markedly disordered breathing following cessation of a hypoxic challenge. We examined whether (1) C57BL6 mice display marked non-eupneic breathing following hypercapnic or hypoxic-hypercapnic challenges, and (2) compared the post-hypoxia changes in non-eupneic breathing of C57BL6 mice to those of B6AF1 (57BL6 dam × A/J sire) and Swiss-Webster mice, which display different ventilatory responses than C57BL6 mice. C57BL6 mice displayed marked increases in respiratory frequency and non-eupneic breathing upon return to room-air after hypoxic (10% O2, 90% N2), hypercapnic (5% CO2, 21% O2, 74% N2) and hypoxic-hypercapnic (10% O2, 5% CO2, 85% N2) challenges. B6AF1 mice displayed less tachypnea and reduced non-eupneic breathing post-hypoxia, whereas Swiss-Webster mice displayed robust tachypnea with minimal increases in non-eupneic breathing post-hypoxia. These studies demonstrate that non-eupneic breathing increases after physiologically-relevant hypoxic-hypercapnic challenge in C57BL6 mice and suggest that further studies with these and B6AF1 and Swiss-Webster mice will help define the genetics of non-eupneic breathing. PMID:25242462

  2. [Intermittent hypoxic training--the state of science].

    PubMed

    Schöffel, N; Senff, T; Gerber, A; de Roux, A; Bauer, T T; Groneberg, D A

    2008-05-01

    Intermittent hypoxic training (IHT) plays an important role concerning methods of training. Considering the enormous logistic and pecuniary investments for altitude training, there is a high demand for more efficient concepts. The intermittent hypoxic training is a new, alternative form of altitude training. The idea of IHT is to economise the currently most reliable and evaluated method which is known as "live high - train low" (LHTL). Thus, IHT combines a normal training at sea level with short training sessions in a chamber that creates a hypoxic but normobaric environment. Its aim is to initiate a similar level of erythropoesis as that usually achieved through long stays in high altitude with a minimised effort. This study analyses the results of selected studies that deal with IHT, evaluating the performance improvements in general and possible haematological variances/changes specifically.

  3. [Hypothermia as a treatment for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy after neonatal asphyxia--update].

    PubMed

    Kessel, Irena; Waisman, Dan; Barzilai, Menashe; Soloveichick, Marina; Rotschild, Avi

    2013-09-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) due to neonatal asphyxia is an important cause of irreversible bad neurodevelopmental outcomes in children. Understanding the mechanisms causing the central nervous system cell death enabled the development of new treatment strategies that may decrease the severity of neurological damage. This survey includes data on epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features and diagnostic criteria of HIE. We discuss the neuro-protective mechanisms of therapeutic hypothermia and provide data on clinical studies conducted to investigate the impact and safety of this treatment in newborn infants affected by HIE. In addition, other therapeutic options of neuro-protective agents are mentioned.

  4. Microbial mineralization of dichloroethene and vinyl chloride under hypoxic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    2011-01-01

    Mineralization of 14C-radiolabled vinyl chloride ([1,2-14C] VC) and cis-dichloroethene ([1,2-14C] cis-DCE) under hypoxic (initial dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations about 0.1 mg/L) and nominally anoxic (DO minimum detection limit = 0.01 mg/L) was examined in chloroethene-exposed sediments from two groundwater and two surface water sites. The results show significant VC and dichloroethene (DCE) mineralization under hypoxic conditions. All the sample treatments exhibited pseudo-first-order kinetics for DCE and VC mineralization over an extended range of substrate concentrations. First-order rates for VC mineralization were approximately 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher in hypoxic groundwater sediment treatments and at least three times higher in hypoxic surface water sediment treatments than in the respective anoxic treatments. For VC, oxygen-linked processes accounted for 65 to 85% of mineralization at DO concentrations below 0.1 mg/L, and 14CO2 was the only degradation product observed in VC treatments under hypoxic conditions. Because the lower detection limit for DO concentrations measured in the field is typically 0.1 to 0.5 mg/L, these results indicate that oxygen-linked VC and DCE biodegradation can be significant under field conditions that appear anoxic. Furthermore, because rates of VC mineralization exceeded rates of DCE mineralization under hypoxic conditions, DCE accumulation without concomitant accumulation of VC may not be evidence of a DCE degradative “stall” in chloroethene plumes. Significantly, mineralization of VC above the level that could reasonably be attributed to residual DO contamination was also observed in several nominally anoxic (DO minimum detection limit = 0.01 mg/L) microcosm treatments.

  5. Hypoxic stress-enhanced expression and release of adrenomedullin (AM) and up-regulated AM receptors, while glucose starvation reduced AM expression and release and down-regulated AM receptors in monkey renal cells.

    PubMed

    Drímal, J; Drímal, J; Drímal, D

    2006-01-01

    The proliferative peptide adrenomedullin (AM) has a wide distribution in a variety of tissues and cells. The mechanism how the AM gene is regulated in cells is not yet known. The renal cortex, renal vascular smooth muscles, glomeruli and tubular epithelial cells are very sensitive to hypoxia. Renal hypoxia produces acute renal tubular necrosis and markedly induces AM expression in damaged cells. However, little information is available regarding the possible pathophysiological production and release of renal tubular AM. Regulation of membrane-bound AM receptors in renal cells has not yet been systematically studied. To elucidate the potential pathological role of human AM we examined the production and release of AM, as well as the characteristics of surface membrane AM receptors in cultured monkey renal tubular epithelial cells (RC) exposed to hypoxia, induced with endothelin-1, and subjected to glucose deprivation. Exposure of RC to hypoxia (1 % O(2), 5 % CO(2) in N(2)), and to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) increased production and secretion of AM and increased specific [(125)I]AM binding on RC. Metabolic stress (1 % glucose in the cultivation medium) and preincubation of RC with rival peptide endothelin-1 significantly reduced immunoreactive-AM in a conditioned medium and whole cell surface membrane AM binding on RC. Altogether, our data suggest that the AM is involved in the adaptation of renal tubular cells to hypoxia. Increased expression of AM mRNA and regulation of AM receptors in metabolic stress may function as an important autocrine/paracrine regulator(s) of renal tubular epithelial cells.

  6. Prostaglandins and estradiol-induced attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, J T; Gordon, J B; Malamet, R L; Wetzel, R C

    1985-10-01

    Pretreatment with estradiol (20 mg IM) attenuated vasoreactivity to decreases in inspired PIO2, lowered baseline resistance measured under conditions of maximal vasodilation (PIO2 = 0 mm Hg), and appeared to increase prostaglandin release in isolated, blood-perfused lungs of juvenile female sheep. Indomethacin (40 micrograms/ml) inhibited prostaglandin release and restored hypoxic vasoreactivity in estrogen-treated lungs, but did not alter the estrogen-induced decrease in baseline resistance. These results suggest that estradiol enhanced the production of prostaglandins which secondarily attenuated hypoxic vasoreactivity. The estradiol-induced decrease in baseline resistance, however, must have been mediated by some other mechanism.

  7. Chemical composition of rainbow trout urine following acute hypoxic stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, Joseph B.

    1969-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii) were anesthetized with MS-222, catheterized, and introduced into urine collecting chambers. Twenty-four hours after introduction, a 4-hour accumulation of urine was collected to serve as the control. Water flow to the chambers was then discontinued for 30 minutes during which the oxygen content of the water exiting in the chamber dropped from 4.9 to 2.8 mg/l. Following this hypoxic stress fresh water was restored and accumulated urine samples were taken for analysis at 1, 4, and 20 hours post-hypoxic stress. Rainbow trout excrete abnormally high concentrations of Na, K, Mg, Cl, and inorganic PO4 following hypoxia.

  8. Optimization of tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours by radiation dose redistribution: a modelling study.

    PubMed

    Søvik, Aste; Malinen, Eirik; Bruland, Øyvind S; Bentzen, Søren M; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2007-01-21

    Tumour hypoxia is a known cause of clinical resistance to radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to model the effects on tumour control probability (TCP) of selectively boosting the dose to hypoxic regions in a tumour, while keeping the mean tumour dose constant. A tumour model with a continuous oxygen distribution, incorporating pO(2) histograms published for head and neck patients, was developed. Temporal and spatial variations in the oxygen distribution, non-uniform cell density and cell proliferation during treatment were included in the tumour modelling. Non-uniform dose prescriptions were made based on a segmentation of the tumours into four compartments. The main findings were: (1) Dose redistribution considerably improved TCP for all tumours. (2) The effect on TCP depended on the degree of reoxygenation during treatment, with a maximum relative increase in TCP for tumours with poor or no reoxygenation. (3) Acute hypoxia reduced TCP moderately, while underdosing chronic hypoxic cells gave large reductions in TCP. (4) Restricted dose redistribution still gave a substantial increase in TCP as compared to uniform dose boosts. In conclusion, redistributing dose according to tumour oxygenation status might increase TCP when the tumour response to radiotherapy is limited by chronic hypoxia. This could potentially improve treatment outcome in a subpopulation of patients who respond poorly to conventional radiotherapy. PMID:17202629

  9. Satellite-based empirical models linking river plume dynamics with hypoxic area andvolume

    EPA Science Inventory

    Satellite-based empirical models explaining hypoxic area and volume variation were developed for the seasonally hypoxic (O2 < 2 mg L−1) northern Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi River. Annual variations in midsummer hypoxic area and ...

  10. Hypoxia and the Lung: Beyond Hypoxic Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Nicolls, Mark R.; Voelkel, Norbert F.

    2011-01-01

    This article extends the influence and effects of hypoxia on the lung beyond vasoconstriction and regional blood flow control. Clearly, hypoxia, via the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, induces a large number of genes encoding proteins, which control cellular metabolism and growth and also participate in inflammation. Hypoxia, likely via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), recruits bone marrow precursor cells to the lung and affects the behavior of immune cells. How hypoxia shapes immune responses through VEGF and its receptors on mast cells, eosinophils, and dendritic cells and through lung endothelial cell/lymphocyte interactions will be a productive area for future research. PMID:17511589

  11. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Hypoxic/Ischemic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fengbao; Shi, Jian; Shi, Qianqian; Xu, Xianlin; Xia, Ying; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    Tissue hypoxia/ischemia is a pathological feature of many human disorders including stroke, myocardial infarction, hypoxic/ischemic nephropathy, as well as cancer. In the kidney, the combination of limited oxygen supply to the tissues and high oxygen demand is considered the main reason for the susceptibility of the kidney to hypoxic/ischemic injury. In recent years, increasing evidence has indicated that a reduction in renal oxygen tension/blood supply plays an important role in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, and renal tumorigenesis. However, the underlying signaling mechanisms, whereby hypoxia alters cellular behaviors, remain poorly understood. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key signal-transducing enzymes activated by a wide range of extracellular stimuli, including hypoxia/ischemia. There are four major family members of MAPKs: the extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1 and -2 (ERK1/2), the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), p38 MAPKs, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-5 (ERK5/BMK1). Recent studies, including ours, suggest that these MAPKs are differentially involved in renal responses to hypoxic/ischemic stress. This review will discuss their changes in hypoxic/ischemic pathophysiology with acute kidney injury, chronic kidney diseases and renal carcinoma. PMID:27544204

  12. MODULATION OF HYPOXIC PULMONARY VASOCONSTRICTION BY ERYTHROCYTIC NITRIC OXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    American Heart Association 2001

    Modulation of Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction by Erythrocytic NO
    McMahon TJ1, Gow AJ1, Huang YCT4, Stamler JS1,2,3
    Departments of Medicine1 and Biochemistry2, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute3,
    Duke University Med...

  13. Nitrous oxide emissions from the Gulf of Mexico Hypoxic Zone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The production of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, in hypoxic coastal zones remains poorly characterized due to a lack of data, though large nitrogen inputs and deoxygenation typical of these systems create the potential for large N2O emissions. We report the first N...

  14. Study for Germination Under Extreme Hypobaric and Hypoxic Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, H.

    2010-04-01

    In order to investigate a possibility of plant cultivation for the space agriculture on Mars, germination rate for six species of plant under extreme hypobaric and hypoxic condition was measured. As a result, seeds of Jute and Cucumber were able to germinate in six species.

  15. Hypoxia targeted carbon nanotubes as a sensitive contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Aguirre, Andres; Biswal, Nrusingh C.; Pavlik, Christopher; Smith, Michael B.; Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Zhu, Quing

    2011-03-01

    Development of new and efficient contrast agents is of fundamental importance to improve detection sensitivity of smaller lesions. Within the family of nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNT) not only have emerged as a new alternative and efficient transporter and translocater of therapeutic molecules but also as a photoacoustic molecular imaging agent owing to its strong optical absorption in the near-infrared region. Drugs, Antibodies and nucleic acids could functionalize the CNT and prepare an appropriate system for delivering the cargos to cells and organs. In this work, we present a novel photoacoustic contrast agent which is based on a unique hypoxic marker in the near infrared region, 2-nitroimidazole -bis carboxylic acid derivative of Indocyanine Green conjugated to single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT-2nitroimidazole-ICG). The 2-nitroimidazole-ICG has an absorption peak at 755 nm and an extinction coefficient of 20,5222 M-1cm-1. The conjugation of this marker with SWCNT shows more than 25 times enhancement of optical absorption of carbon nanotubes in the near infrared region. This new conjugate has been optically evaluated and shows promising results for high contrast photoacoustic imaging of deeply located tumors. The conjugate specifically targets tumor hypoxia, an important indicator of tumor metabolism and tumor therapeutic response. The detection sensitivity of the new contrast agent has been evaluated in-vitro cell lines and with in-vivo tumors in mice.

  16. VEGF receptors mediate hypoxic remodeling of adult ovine carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Adeoye, Olayemi O; Bouthors, Vincent; Hubbell, Margaret C; Williams, James M; Pearce, William J

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that VEGF contributes to hypoxic remodeling of arterial smooth muscle, although hypoxia produces only transient increases in VEGF that return to normoxic levels despite sustained changes in arterial structure and function. To explore how VEGF might contribute to long-term hypoxic vascular remodeling, this study explores the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia produces sustained increases in smooth muscle VEGF receptor density that mediate long-term vascular effects of hypoxia. Carotid arteries from adult sheep maintained at sea level or altitude (3,820 m) for 110 days were harvested and denuded of endothelium. VEGF levels were similar in chronically hypoxic and normoxic arteries, as determined by immunoblotting. In contrast, VEGF receptor levels were significantly increased by 107% (VEGF-R1) and 156% (VEGF-R2) in hypoxic compared with normoxic arteries. In arteries that were organ cultured 24 h with 3 nM VEGF, VEGF replicated effects of hypoxia on abundances of smooth muscle α actin (SMαA), myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), and MLC20 and the effects of hypoxia on colocalization of MLC20 with SMαA, as measured via confocal microscopy. VEGF did not replicate the effects of chronic hypoxia on colocalization of MLCK with SMαA or MLCK with MLC20, suggesting that VEGF's role in hypoxic remodeling is highly protein specific, particularly for contractile protein organization. VEGF effects in organ culture were inhibited by VEGF receptor blockers vatalinib (240 nM) and dasatinib (6.3 nM). These findings support the hypothesis that long-term upregulation of VEGF receptors help mediate sustained effects of hypoxia on the abundance and colocalization of contractile proteins in arterial smooth muscle. PMID:25038104

  17. A model to simulate the oxygen distribution in hypoxic tumors for different vascular architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Espinoza, Ignacio; Peschke, Peter; Karger, Christian P.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: As hypoxic cells are more resistant to photon radiation, it is desirable to obtain information about the oxygen distribution in tumors prior to the radiation treatment. Noninvasive techniques are currently not able to provide reliable oxygenation maps with sufficient spatial resolution; therefore mathematical models may help to simulate microvascular architectures and the resulting oxygen distributions in the surrounding tissue. Here, the authors present a new computer model, which uses the vascular fraction of tumor voxels, in principle measurable noninvasively in vivo, as input parameter for simulating realistic PO2 histograms in tumors, assuming certain 3D vascular architectures.Methods: Oxygen distributions were calculated by solving a reaction-diffusion equation in a reference volume using the particle strength exchange method. Different types of vessel architectures as well as different degrees of vascular heterogeneities are considered. Two types of acute hypoxia (ischemic and hypoxemic) occurring additionally to diffusion-limited (chronic) hypoxia were implemented as well.Results: No statistically significant differences were observed when comparing 2D- and 3D-vessel architectures (p > 0.79 in all cases) and highly heterogeneously distributed linear vessels show good agreement, when comparing with published experimental intervessel distance distributions and PO2 histograms. It could be shown that, if information about additional acute hypoxia is available, its contribution to the hypoxic fraction (HF) can be simulated as well. Increases of 128% and 168% in the HF were obtained when representative cases of ischemic and hypoxemic acute hypoxia, respectively, were considered in the simulations.Conclusions: The presented model is able to simulate realistic microscopic oxygen distributions in tumors assuming reasonable vessel architectures and using the vascular fraction as macroscopic input parameter. The model may be used to generate PO2 histograms

  18. Targeting the hypoxic fraction of tumours using hypoxia-activated prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Roger M

    2016-03-01

    The presence of a microenvironment within most tumours containing regions of low oxygen tension or hypoxia has profound biological and therapeutic implications. Tumour hypoxia is known to promote the development of an aggressive phenotype, resistance to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy and is strongly associated with poor clinical outcome. Paradoxically, it is recognised as a high-priority target and one of the therapeutic strategies designed to eradicate hypoxic cells in tumours is a group of compounds known collectively as hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAPs) or bioreductive drugs. These drugs are inactive prodrugs that require enzymatic activation (typically by 1 or 2 electron oxidoreductases) to generate cytotoxic species with selectivity for hypoxic cells being determined by (1) the ability of oxygen to either reverse or inhibit the activation process and (2) the presence of elevated expression of oxidoreductases in tumours. The concepts underpinning HAP development were established over 40 years ago and have been refined over the years to produce a new generation of HAPs that are under preclinical and clinical development. The purpose of this article is to describe current progress in the development of HAPs focusing on the mechanisms of action, preclinical properties and clinical progress of leading examples.

  19. An inducible autoregulatory loop between HIPK2 and Siah2 at the apex of the hypoxic response.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Marco A; de la Vega, Laureano; Möller, Andreas; Bowtell, David D L; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) results in reprogrammed gene expression patterns that induce multifaceted cellular responses. Here we identify a regulated interaction between the serine/threonine kinase HIPK2 and the ubiquitin E3 ligase Siah2 as a mechanism controlling the hypoxic response. Under normoxic conditions, several mechanisms ensure HIPK2 stability: only a fraction of HIPK2 is found in association with Siah2, whereas HIPK2-mediated phosphorylation of this E3 ligase at positions 26, 28 and 68 weakens mutual binding and destabilizes its phosphorylated interaction partner. Hypoxic conditions allow a markedly increased HIPK2/Siah2 interaction and result in efficient polyubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation of the kinase. Accordingly, hypoxia-induced HIPK2 elimination is markedly reduced in Siah2-deficient cells. As HIPK2 has an important role as a negative regulator of gene expression, its elimination from promoter-associated repressor complexes allows the induction of a substantial fraction of hypoxia-induced genes.

  20. HDAC6 maintains mitochondrial connectivity under hypoxic stress by suppressing MARCH5/MITOL dependent MFN2 degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hak-June; Nagano, Yoshito; Choi, Su Jin; Park, Song Yi; Kim, Hongtae; Yao, Tso-Pang; Lee, Joo-Yong

    2015-09-04

    Mitochondria undergo fusion and fission in response to various metabolic stresses. Growing evidences have suggested that the morphological change of mitochondria by fusion and fission plays a critical role in protecting mitochondria from metabolic stresses. Here, we showed that hypoxia treatment could induce interaction between HDAC6 and MFN2, thus protecting mitochondrial connectivity. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that a mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MARCH5/MITOL was responsible for hypoxia-induced MFN2 degradation in HDAC6 deficient cells. Notably, genetic abolition of HDAC6 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis model mice showed MFN2 degradation with MARCH5 induction. Our results indicate that HDAC6 is a critical regulator of MFN2 degradation by MARCH5, thus protecting mitochondrial connectivity from hypoxic stress. - Highlights: • Hypoxic stress induces the interaction between HDAC6 and MFN2. • Hypoxic stress activates MARCH5 in HDAC6 deficient cells to degrade MFN2. • HDAC6 is required to maintain mitochondrial connectivity under hypoxia. • MARCH5 is increased and promotes the degradation of MFN2 in HDAC6 KO ALS mice.

  1. Pentoxifylline Alleviates Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemia-Induced Short-term Memory Impairment by Suppressing Apoptosis in the Hippocampus of Rat Pups

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage is a major cause of acute mortality and chronic neurologic morbidity in infants and children. We investigated the effects of pentoxifylline, a methylxanthine derivative and type-4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor, on short-term memory and apoptotic neuronal cell death in the hippocampus following perinatal hypoxic-ischemia in newborn rats. Methods: We used a step-down avoidance task to evaluate short-term memory and 3ʹ-5ʹ-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) assay to detect cAMP levels. We evaluated apoptosis using a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay for evidence of DNA fragmentation, immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 levels, and western blot for Bcl-2 and Bax. Results: Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic injury increased apoptotic cell death in the hippocampus, resulting in impaired short-term memory with decreased cAMP levels. Pentoxifylline treatment improved short-term memory by suppressing apoptotic cell death in the hippocampus with elevated cAMP levels. Conclusions: Pentoxifylline ameliorated perinatal hypoxic-ischemia in rat pups. This alleviating effect could be ascribed to the inhibition apoptosis due to increased cAMP production by pentoxifylline. PMID:27377942

  2. Bacterial Hypoxic Responses Revealed as Critical Determinants of the Host-Pathogen Outcome by TnSeq Analysis of Staphylococcus aureus Invasive Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Aimee D.; Snyder, Daniel J.; Putnam, Nicole E.; Valentino, Michael D.; Hammer, Neal D.; Lonergan, Zachery R.; Hinger, Scott A.; Aysanoa, Esar E.; Blanchard, Catlyn; Dunman, Paul M.; Wasserman, Gregory A.; Chen, John; Shopsin, Bo; Gilmore, Michael S.; Skaar, Eric P.; Cassat, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is capable of infecting nearly every organ in the human body. In order to infiltrate and thrive in such diverse host tissues, staphylococci must possess remarkable flexibility in both metabolic and virulence programs. To investigate the genetic requirements for bacterial survival during invasive infection, we performed a transposon sequencing (TnSeq) analysis of S. aureus during experimental osteomyelitis. TnSeq identified 65 genes essential for staphylococcal survival in infected bone and an additional 148 mutants with compromised fitness in vivo. Among the loci essential for in vivo survival was SrrAB, a staphylococcal two-component system previously reported to coordinate hypoxic and nitrosative stress responses in vitro. Healthy bone is intrinsically hypoxic, and intravital oxygen monitoring revealed further decreases in skeletal oxygen concentrations upon S. aureus infection. The fitness of an srrAB mutant during osteomyelitis was significantly increased by depletion of neutrophils, suggesting that neutrophils impose hypoxic and/or nitrosative stresses on invading bacteria. To more globally evaluate staphylococcal responses to changing oxygenation, we examined quorum sensing and virulence factor production in staphylococci grown under aerobic or hypoxic conditions. Hypoxic growth resulted in a profound increase in quorum sensing-dependent toxin production, and a concomitant increase in cytotoxicity toward mammalian cells. Moreover, aerobic growth limited quorum sensing and cytotoxicity in an SrrAB-dependent manner, suggesting a mechanism by which S. aureus modulates quorum sensing and toxin production in response to environmental oxygenation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that bacterial hypoxic responses are key determinants of the staphylococcal-host interaction. PMID:26684646

  3. The role of inflammation in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension: from cellular mechanisms to clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Poth, Jens M.; Fini, Mehdi A.; Olschewski, Andrea; El Kasmi, Karim C.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (PH) comprises a heterogeneous group of diseases sharing the common feature of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling. The disease is usually characterized by mild to moderate pulmonary vascular remodeling that is largely thought to be reversible compared with the progressive irreversible disease seen in World Health Organization (WHO) group I disease. However, in these patients, the presence of PH significantly worsens morbidity and mortality. In addition, a small subset of patients with hypoxic PH develop “out-of-proportion” severe pulmonary hypertension characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling that is irreversible and similar to that in WHO group I disease. In all cases of hypoxia-related vascular remodeling and PH, inflammation, particularly persistent inflammation, is thought to play a role. This review focuses on the effects of hypoxia on pulmonary vascular cells and the signaling pathways involved in the initiation and perpetuation of vascular inflammation, especially as they relate to vascular remodeling and transition to chronic irreversible PH. We hypothesize that the combination of hypoxia and local tissue factors/cytokines (“second hit”) antagonizes tissue homeostatic cellular interactions between mesenchymal cells (fibroblasts and/or smooth muscle cells) and macrophages and arrests these cells in an epigenetically locked and permanently activated proremodeling and proinflammatory phenotype. This aberrant cellular cross-talk between mesenchymal cells and macrophages promotes transition to chronic nonresolving inflammation and vascular remodeling, perpetuating PH. A better understanding of these signaling pathways may lead to the development of specific therapeutic targets, as none are currently available for WHO group III disease. PMID:25416383

  4. Influence of a high-altitude hypoxic environment on human plasma microRNA profiles

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Shi, Yonghui; Wang, Cheng; Guo, Pengtao; Wang, Junjun; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zhang, Chunni

    2015-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are promising disease biomarkers. However, the influence of high-altitude hypoxic environments on plasma miRNA profiles remains unknown. This study included a total of 509 plasma samples from 278 native Tibetans and 80 newly arrived migrant Han Chinese (Tibet Han) residing at 3560 m and 151 Han Chinese residing at 8.9 m (Nanjing Han). The levels of 754 miRNAs were initially determined using a TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) in two pooled samples from 50 Tibet Han and 50 Nanjing Han individuals. Some markedly altered miRNAs in Tibet Han were subsequently measured in all 509 plasma samples by individual qRT-PCR. Compared with the Nanjing Han, 172 miRNAs were differentially expressed in the Tibet Han (105 upregulated and 67 downregulated). The correlation coefficient for the two groups was 0.72. Several upregulated miRNAs were randomly selected for analysis by qRT-PCR, and the results were consistent with those identified by TLDA. These miRNAs were also significantly increased in the Tibetans compared with the Nanjing Han. Furthermore, these altered miRNAs showed strong positive correlations with red blood cell counts and hemoglobin values. These data are the first to provide clear evidence that a high-altitude hypoxic environment significantly affects human plasma miRNA profiles. PMID:26468998

  5. Mechanisms and consequences of ATMIN repression in hypoxic conditions: roles for p53 and HIF-1

    PubMed Central

    Leszczynska, Katarzyna B.; Göttgens, Eva-Leonne; Biasoli, Deborah; Olcina, Monica M.; Ient, Jonathan; Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Bernhardt, Stephan; Giaccia, Amato J.; Hammond, Ester M.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced replication stress is one of the most physiologically relevant signals known to activate ATM in tumors. Recently, the ATM interactor (ATMIN) was identified as critical for replication stress-induced activation of ATM in response to aphidicolin and hydroxyurea. This suggests an essential role for ATMIN in ATM regulation during hypoxia, which induces replication stress. However, ATMIN also has a role in base excision repair, a process that has been demonstrated to be repressed and less efficient in hypoxic conditions. Here, we demonstrate that ATMIN is dispensable for ATM activation in hypoxia and in contrast to ATM, does not affect cell survival and radiosensitivity in hypoxia. Instead, we show that in hypoxic conditions ATMIN expression is repressed. Repression of ATMIN in hypoxia is mediated by both p53 and HIF-1α in an oxygen dependent manner. The biological consequence of ATMIN repression in hypoxia is decreased expression of the target gene, DYNLL1. An expression signature associated with p53 activity was negatively correlated with DYNLL1 expression in patient samples further supporting the p53 dependent repression of DYNLL1. Together, these data demonstrate multiple mechanisms of ATMIN repression in hypoxia with consequences including impaired BER and down regulation of the ATMIN transcriptional target, DYNLL1. PMID:26875667

  6. Regulation of HIF-1α signaling and chemoresistance in acute lymphocytic leukemia under hypoxic conditions of the bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Frolova, Olga; Samudio, Ismael; Benito, Juliana Maria; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Kornblau, Steven M; Markovic, Ana; Schober, Wendy; Lu, Hongbo; Qiu, Yi Hua; Buglio, Daniela; McQueen, Teresa; Pierce, Sherry; Shpall, Elizabeth; Konoplev, Sergej; Thomas, Deborah; Kantarjian, Hagop; Lock, Richard; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2012-08-01

    Overcoming resistance to chemotherapy is the main therapeutic challenge in the treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Interactions between leukemia cells and the microenvironment promote leukemia cell survival and confer resistance to chemotherapy. Hypoxia is an integral component of bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1), a key regulator of the cellular response to hypoxia, regulates cell growth and metabolic adaptation to hypoxia. HIF-1α expression, analyzed by Reverse Phase Protein Arrays in 92 specimens from newly diagnosed patients with pre-B-ALL, had a negative prognostic impact on survival (p = 0.0025). Inhibition of HIF-1α expression by locked mRNA antagonist (LNA) promoted chemosensitivity under hypoxic conditions, while pharmacological or genetic stabilization of HIF-1α under normoxia inhibited cell growth and reduced apoptosis induction by chemotherapeutic agents. Co-culture of pre-B ALL or REH cells with BM-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) under hypoxia resulted in further induction of HIF-1α protein and acquisition of the glycolytic phenotype, in part via stroma-induced AKT/mTOR signaling. mTOR blockade with everolimus reduced HIF-1α expression, diminished glucose uptake and glycolytic rate and partially restored the chemosensitivity of ALL cells under hypoxia/stroma co-cultures. Hence, mTOR inhibition or blockade of HIF-1α-mediated signaling may play an important role in chemosensitization of ALL cells under hypoxic conditions of the BM microenvironment.

  7. White matter changes in patients with hypoxic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, M; Moscatelli, A; Bigler, E D; Caltagirone, C; Carlesimo, G A

    2011-02-01

    A deficit of declarative memory is a common sequela after a hypoxic episode. While the role of gray matter changes (i.e., atrophy of hippocampal formation) as mainly responsible for memory loss has been emphasized, the role of the white matter damage has so far been neglected. The present study was aimed at evaluating whether white matter damage, within the neural circuitry responsible for declarative memory functioning, is present in anoxic patients. We assessed, by means of voxel-based morphometry, the integrity of white matter regions in five patients with hypoxic amnesia. When anoxic patients were compared to healthy controls, significantly less white matter density was detected in the fornix, anterior portion of the cingulum bundle and uncinate fasciculus bilaterally. We conclude that cerebral hypoxia may alter, together with the hippocampi, the integrity of white matter fibers throughout the memory-limbic system.

  8. Popularity of hypoxic training methods for endurance-based professional and amateur athletes.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Herms, J; Julià-Sánchez, S; Hamlin, M J; Corbi, F; Pagès, T; Viscor, G

    2015-05-01

    Scientific debate continues into whether hypoxic training has any performance benefit for athletes, and although this type of training seems popular, to our knowledge little empirical evidence on its popularity with endurance-based athletes exists. To quantify the usage of hypoxic training in endurance-based athletes we asked 203 athletes (amateur = 108, professional = 95) to complete a 17-question survey during 2013-2014 season. Compared to amateurs, professional athletes were 4.5 times (3.0-6.8, odds ratio, 95% confidence limits) more likely to undertake hypoxic training. Live-high train-low was the most popular hypoxic training protocol for athletes (52% professional and 80% amateur) with live-high train-high also used (38% professional, 20% amateur). Compared to amateurs, professional athletes tended to use evidence-based hypoxic training methods, seek advice on hypoxic training from reliable sources and were generally more realistic about the potential performance gains as a result of hypoxic training. Almost one third (25-30%) of all athletes suffered illness during their hypoxic training. Compared to amateurs, professional athletes are more likely to undertake hypoxic training and tend to follow current scientific guidelines. Attenuation of the ill effects that occur during hypoxic training may be accomplished if athletes give more attention to monitoring stress and training levels.

  9. [Progress on Hypoxic-ischemic Brain Damage Associated with CCR2 and CCL2].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu-jia; Li, Ru-bo; Ma, Shi-yu; Lü, Meng-yan

    2016-02-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) is referred to a common type of cerebral damage, which is caused by injury, leading to shallow bleeding in the cortex with intact cerebral pia mater. In recent years, studies show that a various kinds of immune cells and immune cellular factors are involved in the occurrence of HIBD. CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is a representative of CC chemokine receptor, and is widely distributed in cerebral neuron, astrocyte, and microglial cells, and is the main chemo-tactic factor receptor in brain tissue. CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) is a kind of basophilic protein and the ligand of CCR2, and plays an important role in inflammation. In order to provide evidence for correlational studies in HIBD, this review will introduce the biological characteristics of CCR2 and CCL2, and illustrate the relationship between the immunoreactivity and HIBD. PMID:27295859

  10. Perfusion of nonventilated lung: failure of hypoxic vasoconstriction

    SciTech Connect

    Sostman, H.D.; Neumann, R.D.; Gottschalk, A.; Greenspan, R.H.

    1983-07-01

    Alveolar hypoxia is a well established cause of regional vasoconstriction such that nonventilated segments are not perfused. The paradoxical situation of retained perfusion of nonventilated lung has seldom been discussed. Three clinical examples are illustrated. In each case coexistent chronic obstructive lung disease may have contributed to this unexpected finding by reducing pulmonary vascular capacity such that blood flow diversion from hypoxic segments was not possible.

  11. [Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury: pathogenesis and neuropathology].

    PubMed

    Radulova, P; Slancheva, B

    2014-01-01

    The perinatal period represents a clinical setting of potential risk for injury to developing brain secondary to many causes, with the chance for long-lasting, profound neurocognitive deficits. Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury leads to serious long-term morbidities. The leading pathogenetic mechanisms are hypoxia and/or ischemia, as a result of perinatal asphyxia. Understanding of the underlying pathophysiology will help the physicians in the general supportive management and neuroprotection of the neonatal brain.

  12. Ventilatory effects of substance P-saporin lesions in the nucleus tractus solitarii of chronically hypoxic rats

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhenxing; Powell, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    During ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH), time-dependent increases in ventilation lower Pco2 levels, and this persists on return to normoxia. We hypothesized that plasticity in the caudal nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) contributes to VAH, as the NTS receives the first synapse from the carotid body chemoreceptor afferents and also contains CO2-sensitive neurons. We lesioned cells in the caudal NTS containing the neurokinin-1 receptor by microinjecting the neurotoxin saporin conjugated to substance P and measured ventilatory responses in awake, unrestrained rats 18 days later. Lesions did not affect hypoxic or hypercapnic ventilatory responses in normoxic control rats, in contrast to published reports for similar lesions in other central chemosensitive areas. Also, lesions did not affect the hypercapnic ventilatory response in chronically hypoxic rats (inspired Po2 = 90 Torr for 7 days). These results suggest functional differences between central chemoreceptor sites. However, lesions significantly increased ventilation in normoxia or acute hypoxia in chronically hypoxic rats. Hence, chronic hypoxia increases an inhibitory effect of neurokinin-1 receptor neurons in the NTS on ventilatory drive, indicating that these neurons contribute to plasticity during chronic hypoxia, although such plasticity does not explain VAH. PMID:21593425

  13. Hypoxic cutaneous vasodilation is sustained during brief cold stress and is not affected by changes in CO2.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Grant H; Fieger, Sarah M; Minson, Christopher T; Halliwill, John R

    2010-04-01

    Hypoxia decreases core body temperature in animals and humans during cold exposure. In addition, hypoxia increases skin blood flow in thermoneutral conditions, but the impact of hypoxic vasodilation on vasoconstriction during cold exposure is unknown. In this study, skin blood flow was assessed using laser-Doppler flowmetry, and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as red blood cell flux/mean arterial pressure and normalized to baseline (n = 7). Subjects were exposed to four different conditions in the steady state (normoxia and poikilocapnic, isocapnic, and hypercapnic hypoxia) and were cooled for 10 min using a water-perfused suit in each condition. CVC increased during all three hypoxic exposures (all P < 0.05 vs. baseline), and the magnitude of these steady-state responses was not affected by changes in end-tidal CO(2) levels. During poikilocapnic and hypercapnic hypoxia, cold exposure reduced CVC to the same levels observed during normoxic cooling (P > 0.05 vs. normoxia), whereas CVC remained elevated throughout cold exposure during isocapnic hypoxia (P < 0.05 vs. normoxia). The magnitude of vasoconstriction during cold stress was similar in all conditions (P > 0.05). Thus the magnitude of cutaneous vasodilation during steady-state hypoxia is not affected by CO(2) responses. In addition, the magnitude of reflex vasoconstriction is not altered by hypoxia, such that the upward shift in skin blood flow (hypoxic vasodilation) is maintained during whole body cooling.

  14. Neuropsychological outcomes of pediatric burn patients who sustained hypoxic episodes.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Marta; Robertson, Carrie; Murphy, Kevin D; Rosenberg, Laura; Mlcak, Ronald; Robert, Rhonda S; Herndon, David N; Meyer, Walter J

    2005-11-01

    The neuropsychological outcomes of children who suffered hypoxic episodes following their burns are not completely understood and vary depending on the nature and severity of the episode. A retrospective review of youth that were admitted to this acute burn care facility over the past 20 years was conducted to identify the extent of cognitive and affective difficulties. Thirty-nine children who sustained hypoxic injuries related to their burns were compared with 21 controls that were matched for age, TBSA, and time of injury. Approximately a third of the children who survived from the hypoxia group continued to have long-term cognitive and emotional difficulties. For those who recovered reasonably well, no differences were found from the matched burned controls. These results probably underestimate the true extent of neuropsychological difficulties experienced by these youth given that detailed cognitive testing was not routinely performed. Prospective studies are needed to further characterize the full nature of difficulties and outcomes associated with burn related hypoxic injuries.

  15. Mitochondrial Akt Regulation of Hypoxic Tumor Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Chae, Young Chan; Vaira, Valentina; Caino, M Cecilia; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Seo, Jae Ho; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Lucignani, Giovanni; Bertolini, Irene; Locatelli, Marco; Bryant, Kelly G; Ghosh, Jagadish C; Lisanti, Sofia; Ku, Bonsu; Bosari, Silvano; Languino, Lucia R; Speicher, David W; Altieri, Dario C

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia is a universal driver of aggressive tumor behavior, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. Using a phosphoproteomics screen, we now show that active Akt accumulates in the mitochondria during hypoxia and phosphorylates pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) on Thr346 to inactivate the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. In turn, this pathway switches tumor metabolism toward glycolysis, antagonizes apoptosis and autophagy, dampens oxidative stress, and maintains tumor cell proliferation in the face of severe hypoxia. Mitochondrial Akt-PDK1 signaling correlates with unfavorable prognostic markers and shorter survival in glioma patients and may provide an "actionable" therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:27505672

  16. Monte-Carlo model development for evaluation of current clinical target volume definition for heterogeneous and hypoxic glioblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddasi, L.; Bezak, E.; Harriss-Phillips, W.

    2016-05-01

    Clinical target volume (CTV) determination may be complex and subjective. In this work a microscopic-scale tumour model was developed to evaluate current CTV practices in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) external radiotherapy. Previously, a Geant4 cell-based dosimetry model was developed to calculate the dose deposited in individual GBM cells. Microscopic extension probability (MEP) models were then developed using Matlab-2012a. The results of the cell-based dosimetry model and MEP models were combined to calculate survival fractions (SF) for CTV margins of 2.0 and 2.5 cm. In the current work, oxygenation and heterogeneous radiosensitivity profiles were incorporated into the GBM model. The genetic heterogeneity was modelled using a range of α/β values (linear-quadratic model parameters) associated with different GBM cell lines. These values were distributed among the cells randomly, taken from a Gaussian-weighted sample of α/β values. Cellular oxygen pressure was distributed randomly taken from a sample weighted to profiles obtained from literature. Three types of GBM models were analysed: homogeneous-normoxic, heterogeneous-normoxic, and heterogeneous-hypoxic. The SF in different regions of the tumour model and the effect of the CTV margin extension from 2.0-2.5 cm on SFs were investigated for three MEP models. The SF within the beam was increased by up to three and two orders of magnitude following incorporation of heterogeneous radiosensitivities and hypoxia, respectively, in the GBM model. However, the total SF was shown to be overdominated by the presence of tumour cells in the penumbra region and to a lesser extent by genetic heterogeneity and hypoxia. CTV extension by 0.5 cm reduced the SF by a maximum of 78.6  ±  3.3%, 78.5  ±  3.3%, and 77.7  ±  3.1% for homogeneous and heterogeneous-normoxic, and heterogeneous hypoxic GBMs, respectively. Monte-Carlo model was developed to quantitatively evaluate SF for genetically

  17. Monte-Carlo model development for evaluation of current clinical target volume definition for heterogeneous and hypoxic glioblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddasi, L.; Bezak, E.; Harriss-Phillips, W.

    2016-05-01

    Clinical target volume (CTV) determination may be complex and subjective. In this work a microscopic-scale tumour model was developed to evaluate current CTV practices in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) external radiotherapy. Previously, a Geant4 cell-based dosimetry model was developed to calculate the dose deposited in individual GBM cells. Microscopic extension probability (MEP) models were then developed using Matlab-2012a. The results of the cell-based dosimetry model and MEP models were combined to calculate survival fractions (SF) for CTV margins of 2.0 and 2.5 cm. In the current work, oxygenation and heterogeneous radiosensitivity profiles were incorporated into the GBM model. The genetic heterogeneity was modelled using a range of α/β values (linear-quadratic model parameters) associated with different GBM cell lines. These values were distributed among the cells randomly, taken from a Gaussian-weighted sample of α/β values. Cellular oxygen pressure was distributed randomly taken from a sample weighted to profiles obtained from literature. Three types of GBM models were analysed: homogeneous-normoxic, heterogeneous-normoxic, and heterogeneous-hypoxic. The SF in different regions of the tumour model and the effect of the CTV margin extension from 2.0–2.5 cm on SFs were investigated for three MEP models. The SF within the beam was increased by up to three and two orders of magnitude following incorporation of heterogeneous radiosensitivities and hypoxia, respectively, in the GBM model. However, the total SF was shown to be overdominated by the presence of tumour cells in the penumbra region and to a lesser extent by genetic heterogeneity and hypoxia. CTV extension by 0.5 cm reduced the SF by a maximum of 78.6  ±  3.3%, 78.5  ±  3.3%, and 77.7  ±  3.1% for homogeneous and heterogeneous-normoxic, and heterogeneous hypoxic GBMs, respectively. Monte-Carlo model was developed to quantitatively evaluate SF for genetically

  18. [The hypoxic syndrome in children with cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Yurieva, E A; Sukhorukov, V S; Vozdvijenskaia, E S; Novikova, N M; Kharabadze, M N; Yablonskaia, M I

    2015-02-01

    The children with inherited cardiopathy including hypersensitive (n = 85) and dilatation (n=10) cardiopathy as well as cardiopathy under Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (n = 70) combined with different inherited heart disease were examined to establish signs of hematic and tissue hypoxia. The most typical signs turned out periodic decrease of blood pCO2 with increasing of content of lactate and pyruvate in blood and saliva, multiple caries of teeth and high rate of systemic hypoplasia of enamel of both temporary and permanent teeth. The study established decrease in blood of level of macro-ergic compounds (ATP, ADF AMP) with increasing of excretion calcium and phosphates with urine. The increase of rate of mutations of hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase in lymphocytes with increasing of content of uric acid in blood and/or in urine was detected. The study revealed increasing of processes of peroxide oxidation, alterations of morphology of cells of skeletal muscles (RRF) and accumulation ofcalcium, lipids and alteration of structure of mitochondria. PMID:26027255

  19. The Regenerative Potential of Female Skeletal Muscle upon Hypobaric Hypoxic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Mancinelli, Rosa; Di Filippo, Ester S.; Verratti, Vittore; Fulle, Stefania; Toniolo, Luana; Reggiani, Carlo; Pietrangelo, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to determine whether a 14-day trekking expeditions, in high altitude hypoxic environment, triggers redox disturbance at the level of satellite cells (adult stem cells) in young women. Methods: We collected muscle biopsies from Vastus Lateralis muscle for both single fiber analysis and satellite cells isolation. The samples collected before (PRE-Hypoxia) and after (POST-Hypoxia) the trekking in the Himalayas were compared. Satellite cells were investigated for oxidative stress (oxidant production, antioxidant enzyme activity, and lipid damage), mitochondrial potential variation, gene profile of HIF, and myogenic transcription factors (Pax7, MyoD, myogenin), and miRNA expression (miR-1, miR-133, miR-206). Results: The nuclear domain analysis showed a significant fusion and consequent reduction of the Pax7+ satellite cells in the single mature fibers. The POST-Hypoxia myoblasts obtained by two out of six volunteers showed high superoxide anion production and lipid peroxidation along with impaired dismutase and catalase and mitochondrial potential. The transcription profile and miRNA expression were different for oxidized and non-oxidized cells. Conclusions: The present study supports the phenomenon of hypobaric-hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and its role in the impairment of the regenerative capacity of satellite cells derived from the V. Lateralis muscle of young adult female subjects. PMID:27471475

  20. Cellular expression and localization of DGKζ-interacting NAP1-like proteins in the brain and functional implications under hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nobuya; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Okada, Masashi; Iseki, Ken; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Goto, Kaoru

    2014-11-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) catalyzes conversion of a lipid second messenger diacylglycerol to another messenger molecule phosphatidic acid. Consequently, DGK plays a pivotal role in cellular pathophysiology by regulating the levels of these two messengers. We reported previously that DGKζ translocates from the nucleus to cytoplasm in hippocampal neurons under ischemic/hypoxic stress. In addition, we also identified nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1)-like proteins NAP1L1 and NAP1L4 as novel DGKζ-interacting partners using a proteomic approach and revealed that these NAP1-like proteins induce cytoplasmic translocation of DGKζ in overexpressed cells because NAP1-like proteins associate with the nuclear localization signal of DGKζ and block its nuclear import via importin α. In the present study, we examined whether NAP1-like proteins are expressed in the brain and whether the molecular interaction of DGKζ and NAP1-like proteins would be changed in the brain after hypoxic stress. Immunohistochemistry revealed that NAP1L1 and NAP1L4 are widely expressed in neurons and glial cells in the brain with some differences. After 3 days of transient whole-body hypoxic stress, DGKζ translocated from the nucleus to cytoplasm in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, whereas NAP1-like proteins remained in the cytoplasm. Contrary to our expectations, NAP1-like proteins showed no change in their expression levels. The molecular interaction between DGKζ and NAP1-like proteins was attenuated after hypoxic stress. These results suggest that DGKζ cytoplasmic translocation in neurons under hypoxic stress is regulated by some mechanism which differs from that mediated by NAP1-like proteins. PMID:24893663

  1. The effects of altitude/hypoxic training on oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity in elite athletes – a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hun-young; Hwang, Hyejung; Park, Jonghoon; Lee, Seongno; Lim, Kiwon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was designed as a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing effectiveness of altitude/hypoxic training (experimental) versus sea-level training (control) on oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity of elite athletes in Korea. [Methods] Databases (Research Information Service System, Korean studies Information Service System, National Assembly Library) were for randomized controlled trials comparing altitude/hypoxic training versus sea-level training in elite athletes. Studies published in Korea up to December 2015 were eligible for inclusion. Oxygen delivery capacity of the blood was quantified by red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), erythropoietin (EPO); and aerobic exercise capacity was quantified by maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). RBC, Hb, Hct, VO2max represented heterogeneity and compared post-intervention between altitude/hypoxic training and sea-level training in elite athletes by a random effect model meta-analysis. EPO represented homogeneity and meta-analysis performed by a fixed effect model. Eight independent studies with 156 elite athletes (experimental: n = 82, control: n = 74) were included in the metaanalysis. [Results] RBC (4.499×105 cell/ul, 95 % CI: 2.469 to 6.529), Hb (5.447 g/dl, 95 % CI: 3.028 to 7.866), Hct (3.639 %, 95 % CI: 1.687 to 5.591), EPO (0.711 mU/mL, 95% CI: 0.282 to 1.140), VO2max (1.637 ml/kg/min, 95% CI: 0.599 to 1.400) showed significantly greater increase following altitude/hypoxic training, as compared with sea-level training. [Conclusion] For elite athletes in Korea, altitude/ hypoxic training appears more effective than sea-level training for improvement of oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity. PMID:27298808

  2. Differential and irreversible CNS ontogenic reduction in maximal MK-801 binding site number in the NMDA receptor after acute hypoxic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Vacotto, M; Rodríguez Gil, D J; Mitridate de Novara, A; Fiszer de Plazas, S

    2003-06-27

    CNS exposure to hypoxia impairs excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Our aim was to determine variations induced by normobaric acute hypoxic hypoxia (8% O(2) for 60 min) on the NMDA receptor complex, as well as their potential reversibility after normoxic recovery. To this end, [3H]MK-801 binding assays to a synaptic membrane fraction isolated from chick optic lobes were performed. Previous studies throughout development had disclosed a characteristic age-dependent pattern. Results at embryonic day (ED) 12 and 18 indicated two distinct MK-801 binding sites. Hypoxic treatment failed to alter either the high affinity site dissociation constant (K(d)) or its maximal binding capacity (B(max)), whereas the low affinity site B(max) was significantly decreased (50% and 30% at ED12 and 18, respectively), without alteration in its K(d) values. Hypoxic embryos restored for 48 h at ED12 to normoxic conditions displayed unchanged MK-801 binding reduction, unlike those treated likewise at ED18 whose values fully recovered control levels. To conclude, hypoxic treatment reduces low affinity MK-801 B(max) in the NMDA receptor which proves irreversible up to ED12. Such early neuronal vulnerability may be due to post-transcriptional changes, to endocytosis followed by receptor degradation, or alternatively to cell death.

  3. Neuroinflammation and Neuroimmune Dysregulation after Acute Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury of Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bhalala, Utpal S.; Koehler, Raymond C.; Kannan, Sujatha

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury to developing brain results from birth asphyxia in neonates and from cardiac arrest in infants and children. It is associated with varying degrees of neurologic sequelae, depending upon the severity and length of HI. Global HI triggers a series of cellular and biochemical pathways that lead to neuronal injury. One of the key cellular pathways of neuronal injury is inflammation. The inflammatory cascade comprises activation and migration of microglia – the so-called “brain macrophages,” infiltration of peripheral macrophages into the brain, and release of cytotoxic and proinflammatory cytokines. In this article, we review the inflammatory and immune mechanisms of secondary neuronal injury after global HI injury to developing brain. Specifically, we highlight the current literature on microglial activation in relation to neuronal injury, proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory/restorative pathways, the role of peripheral immune cells, and the potential use of immunomodulators as neuroprotective compounds. PMID:25642419

  4. Cytoprotection against Hypoxic and/or MPP⁺ Injury: Effect of δ-Opioid Receptor Activation on Caspase 3.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Zhi, Feng; Shao, Naiyuan; Wang, Rong; Yang, Yilin; Xia, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The pathological changes of Parkinson's disease (PD) are, at least partially, associated with the dysregulation of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and caspase 3. Since hypoxic and neurotoxic insults are underlying causes of PD, and since δ-opioid receptor (DOR) is neuroprotective against hypoxic/ischemic insults, we sought to determine whether DOR activation could protect the cells from damage induced by hypoxia and/or MPP⁺ by regulating PINK1 and caspase 3 expressions. We exposed PC12 cells to either severe hypoxia (0.5%-1% O₂) for 24-48 h or to MPP⁺ at different concentrations (0.5, 1, 2 mM) and then detected the levels of PINK1 and cleaved caspase 3. Both hypoxia and MPP⁺ reduced cell viability, progressively suppressed the expression of PINK1 and increased the cleaved caspase 3. DOR activation using UFP-512, effectively protected the cells from hypoxia and/or MPP⁺ induced injury, reversed the reduction in PINK1 protein and significantly attenuated the increase in the cleaved caspase 3. On the other hand, the application of DOR antagonist, naltrindole, greatly decreased cell viability and increased cleaved caspase 3. These findings suggest that DOR is cytoprotective against both hypoxia and MPP⁺ through the regulation of PINK1 and caspase 3 pathways. PMID:27517901

  5. Targeting the hypoxic response in bone tissue engineering: A balance between supply and consumption to improve bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stiers, Pieter-Jan; van Gastel, Nick; Carmeliet, Geert

    2016-09-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a promising therapeutic alternative for bone grafting of large skeletal defects. It generally comprises an ex vivo engineered combination of a carrier structure, stem/progenitor cells and growth factors. However, the success of these regenerative implants largely depends on how well implanted cells will adapt to the hostile and hypoxic host environment they encounter after implantation. In this review, we will discuss how hypoxia signalling may be used to improve bone regeneration in a tissue-engineered construct. First, hypoxia signalling induces angiogenesis which increases the survival of the implanted cells as well as stimulates bone formation. Second, hypoxia signalling has also angiogenesis-independent effects on mesenchymal cells in vitro, offering exciting new possibilities to improve tissue-engineered bone regeneration in vivo. In addition, studies in other fields have shown that benefits of modulating hypoxia signalling include enhanced cell survival, proliferation and differentiation, culminating in a more potent regenerative implant. Finally, the stimulation of endochondral bone formation as a physiological pathway to circumvent the harmful effects of hypoxia will be briefly touched upon. Thus, angiogenic dependent and independent processes may counteract the deleterious hypoxic effects and we will discuss several therapeutic strategies that may be combined to withstand the hypoxia upon implantation and improve bone regeneration. PMID:26768117

  6. Drosophila cyclin D/Cdk4 regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and aging and sensitizes animals to hypoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Icreverzi, Amalia; Flor de la Cruz, Aida; Van Voorhies, Wayne A

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila cyclin D (CycD) is the single fly ortholog of the mammalian cyclin D1 and promotes both cell cycle progression and cellular growth. However, little is known about how CycD promotes cell growth. We show here that CycD/Cdk4 hyperactivity leads to increased mitochondrial biogenesis (mitobiogenesis), mitochondrial mass, NRF-1 activity (Tfam transcript levels) and metabolic activity in Drosophila, whereas loss of CycD/Cdk4 activity has the opposite effects. Surprisingly, both CycD/Cdk4 addition and loss of function increase mitochondrial superoxide production and decrease lifespan, indicating that an imbalance in mitobiogenesis may lead to oxidative stress and aging. In addition, we provide multiple lines of evidence indicating that CycD/Cdk4 activity affects the hypoxic status of cells and sensitizes animals to hypoxia. Both mitochondrial and hypoxia-related effects can be detected at global transcriptional level. We propose that mitobiogenesis and the hypoxic stress response have an antagonistic relationship, and that CycD/Cdk4 levels regulate mitobiogenesis contemporaneous to the cell cycle, such that only when cells are sufficiently oxygenated can they proliferate. PMID:22293404

  7. Cytoprotection against Hypoxic and/or MPP+ Injury: Effect of δ–Opioid Receptor Activation on Caspase 3

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuan; Zhi, Feng; Shao, Naiyuan; Wang, Rong; Yang, Yilin; Xia, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The pathological changes of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are, at least partially, associated with the dysregulation of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and caspase 3. Since hypoxic and neurotoxic insults are underlying causes of PD, and since δ-opioid receptor (DOR) is neuroprotective against hypoxic/ischemic insults, we sought to determine whether DOR activation could protect the cells from damage induced by hypoxia and/or MPP+ by regulating PINK1 and caspase 3 expressions. We exposed PC12 cells to either severe hypoxia (0.5%–1% O2) for 24–48 h or to MPP+ at different concentrations (0.5, 1, 2 mM) and then detected the levels of PINK1 and cleaved caspase 3. Both hypoxia and MPP+ reduced cell viability, progressively suppressed the expression of PINK1 and increased the cleaved caspase 3. DOR activation using UFP-512, effectively protected the cells from hypoxia and/or MPP+ induced injury, reversed the reduction in PINK1 protein and significantly attenuated the increase in the cleaved caspase 3. On the other hand, the application of DOR antagonist, naltrindole, greatly decreased cell viability and increased cleaved caspase 3. These findings suggest that DOR is cytoprotective against both hypoxia and MPP+ through the regulation of PINK1 and caspase 3 pathways. PMID:27517901

  8. Time domains of the hypoxic ventilatory response in ectothermic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Porteus, Cosima; Hedrick, Michael S; Hicks, James W; Wang, Tobias; Milsom, William K

    2011-04-01

    Over a decade has passed since Powell et al. (Respir Physiol 112:123-134, 1998) described and defined the time domains of the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) in adult mammals. These time domains, however, have yet to receive much attention in other vertebrate groups. The initial, acute HVR of fish, amphibians and reptiles serves to minimize the imbalance between oxygen supply and demand. If the hypoxia is sustained, a suite of secondary adjustments occur giving rise to a more long-term balance (acclimatization) that allows the behaviors of normal life. These secondary responses can change over time as a function of the nature of the stimulus (the pattern and intensity of the hypoxic exposure). To add to the complexity of this process, hypoxia can also lead to metabolic suppression (the hypoxic metabolic response) and the magnitude of this is also time dependent. Unlike the original review of Powell et al. (Respir Physiol 112:123-134, 1998) that only considered the HVR in adult animals, we also consider relevant developmental time points where information is available. Finally, in amphibians and reptiles with incompletely divided hearts the magnitude of the ventilatory response will be modulated by hypoxia-induced changes in intra-cardiac shunting that also improve the match between O(2) supply and demand, and these too change in a time-dependent fashion. While the current literature on this topic is reviewed here, it is noted that this area has received little attention. We attempt to redefine time domains in a more 'holistic' fashion that better accommodates research on ectotherms. If we are to distinguish between the genetic, developmental and environmental influences underlying the various ventilatory responses to hypoxia, however, we must design future experiments with time domains in mind. PMID:21312038

  9. Biophysical basis of hypoxic radioprotection by deoxygenated dextran-hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.T.; Hill, R.P.

    1986-08-01

    Perfusion with deoxygenated dextran-hemoglobin provides an effective method for inducing hypoxic radioprotection of normal tissues during radiation treatment of tumors. In this study, the dependence of P50, the half-saturation pressure of oxygen binding to dextran-hemoglobin, was analyzed as a function of solution temperature and pH. The variation of attainable radioprotection with P50, and with the amount of collateral blood entering into the perfused region, was calculated. Upon perfusion of canine gracilis muscle with deoxygenated dextran-hemoglobin, a rapid onset of extensive venous hypoxia was observed.

  10. [Therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Gulczyńska, Ewa; Gadzinowski, Janusz

    2012-03-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia in the perinatal period is a serious condition affecting infants, which can result in death and cerebral palsy and associated disabilities. There has been significant research progress in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy over the last 2 decades. Many new molecular mechanisms of asphyxia have been identified. Despite all these advances, therapeutic interventions in HIE remain to be limited. Recently it has been revealed that mild therapeutic hypothermia is the only modality shown to improve neurologic outcome. The authors present a summary of pathogenesis of HIE, animal studies of cooling for hypoxic and ischemic models, and first publications on human therapeutic hypothermia trials. The diagnosis of encephalopathy in full-term neonates and enrollment criteria for hypothermia are also discussed. The current data from randomized control trials of hypothermia as neuroprotection for full and near-term infants are presented along with the results of meta-analyses of these trials. Finally the status of ongoing neonatal hypothermia trials as well as status of therapeutic hypothermia in Poland is summarized.

  11. Ethylene Enhances Water Transport in Hypoxic Aspen1

    PubMed Central

    Kamaluddin, Mohammed; Zwiazek, Janusz J.

    2002-01-01

    Water transport was examined in solution culture grown seedlings of aspen (Populus tremuloides) after short-term exposures of roots to exogenous ethylene. Ethylene significantly increased stomatal conductance, root hydraulic conductivity (Lp), and root oxygen uptake in hypoxic seedlings. Aerated roots that were exposed to ethylene also showed enhanced Lp. An ethylene action inhibitor, silver thiosulphate, significantly reversed the enhancement of Lp by ethylene. A short-term exposure of excised roots to ethylene significantly enhanced the root water flow (Qv), measured by pressurizing the roots at 0.3 MPa. The Qv values in ethylene-treated roots declined significantly when 50 μm HgCl2 was added to the root medium and this decline was reversed by the addition of 20 mm 2-mercaptoethanol. The results suggest that the response of Qv to ethylene involves mercury-sensitive water channels and that root-absorbed ethylene enhanced water permeation through roots, resulting in an increase in root water transport and stomatal opening in hypoxic seedlings. PMID:11891251

  12. Effects of hypoxic preconditioning on synaptic ultrastructure in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Sun, Zhishan; Sun, Shufeng; Duan, Yunxia; Shi, Jingfei; Qi, Zhifeng; Meng, Ran; Sun, Yongxin; Zeng, Xianwei; Chui, Dehua; Ji, Xunming

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) elicits resistance to more drastic subsequent insults, which potentially provide neuroprotective therapeutic strategy, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we examined the effects of HPC on synaptic ultrastructure in olfactory bulb of mice. Mice underwent up to five cycles of repeated HPC treatments, and hypoxic tolerance was assessed with a standard gasp reflex assay. As expected, HPC induced an increase in tolerance time. To assess synaptic responses, Western blots were used to quantify protein levels of representative markers for glia, neuron, and synapse, and transmission electron microscopy was used to examine synaptic ultrastructure and mitochondrial density. HPC did not significantly alter the protein levels of astroglial marker (GFAP), neuron-specific markers (GAP43, Tuj-1, and OMP), synaptic number markers (synaptophysin and SNAP25) or the percentage of excitatory synapses versus inhibitory synapses. However, HPC significantly affected synaptic curvature and the percentage of synapses with presynaptic mitochondria, which showed concomitant change pattern. These findings demonstrate that HPC is associated with changes in synaptic ultrastructure. PMID:25155519

  13. Redistribution of pulmonary blood flow during hypoxic exercise.

    PubMed

    Kuwahira, I; Moue, Y; Urano, T; Kamiya, U; Iwamoto, T; Ishii, M; Clancy, R L; Gonzalez, N C

    2001-08-01

    Pulmonary blood flow (PBF) distribution was studied at rest and during exercise in rats acclimatized to chronic hypoxia (barometric pressure [PB] 370 Torr for 3 weeks, A rats) and non-acclimatized (NA) littermates. Both A and NA rats exercised in hypoxia (inspired O2 pressure [PIO2] approximately 70 Torr) or in normoxia (PlO2 approximately 145 Torr). PBF distribution was determined using fluorescent-labeled microspheres injected into the right atrium. The lungs were cut into 28 samples to determine relative scatter of specific PBF ([sample fluorescence intensity/sample dry weight)/(total lung fluorescence intensity/total lung dry weight]). Exercise produced redistribution of PBF both in NA and A rats, and this effect was larger in hypoxia than in normoxia, with minimal redistribution occurring during normoxic exercise in NA rats. The pattern of distribution varies considerably among individual animals. As a result of distribution, the previous high flow areas would be overperfused during hypoxic exercise in some rats. The results support the concept that hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is not uniform and suggest that the combination of hypoxia and exercise may lead to overperfusion and capillary leak in some individuals. PMID:11531029

  14. The effects of altitude training are mediated primarily by acclimatization, rather than by hypoxic exercise.

    PubMed

    Levine, B D; Stray-Gundersen, J

    2001-01-01

    For training at altitude to be effective, it must provide some advantage above and beyond similar training at sea level. This advantage could be provided by: 1) acclimatization to altitude which improves oxygen transport and/or utilization; 2) hypoxic exercise which "intensifies" the training stimulus; or 3) some combination of both. Controlled studies of "typical" altitude training, involving both altitude acclimatization and hypoxic exercise have never been shown to improve sea level performance. This failure has been attributed to reduced training loads at altitude. One approach developed by Levine and Stray-Gundersen, called "living high-training low" has been shown to improve sea level performance over events lasting 8-20 minutes. This strategy combines altitude acclimatization (2,500 m) with low altitude training to get the optimal effect. The opposite strategy, "living low-training high" is proposed by Dr. Hoppeler in this debate. In defense of the primacy of the altitude acclimatization effect, data will be presented to support the following: 1). Living high-training low clearly improves performance in athletes of all abilities; 2). The mechanism of this improvement is primarily an increase in erythropoietin leading to increased red cell mass, VO2max, and running performance; 3). Rather than intensifying the training stimulus, training at altitude leads to the opposite effect--reduced speeds, reduced power output, reduced oxygen flux--and, following the principal of symmorphosis, is not likely to provide any advantage for a well trained athlete; 4). At the moderate altitudes used by most athletes, resting oxygen delivery to skeletal muscle is well preserved, arguing against any detrimental effect on "protein synthesis"; 5). It is possible however, that at significantly higher altitudes, acclimatization leads to appetite suppression, inhibition of protein synthesis, muscle wasting, excessive ventilatory work, and metabolic compensation that is NOT

  15. Metabolite analysis of Mycobacterium species under aerobic and hypoxic conditions reveals common metabolic traits.

    PubMed

    Drapal, Margit; Wheeler, Paul R; Fraser, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    A metabolite profiling approach has been implemented to elucidate metabolic adaptation at set culture conditions in five Mycobacterium species (two fast- and three slow-growing) with the potential to act as model organisms for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Analysis has been performed over designated growth phases and under representative environments (nutrient and oxygen depletion) experienced by Mtb during infection. The procedure was useful in determining a range of metabolites (60-120 compounds) covering nucleotides, amino acids, organic acids, saccharides, fatty acids, glycerols, -esters, -phosphates and isoprenoids. Among these classes of compounds, key biomarker metabolites, which can act as indicators of pathway/process activity, were identified. In numerous cases, common metabolite traits were observed for all five species across the experimental conditions (e.g. uracil indicating DNA repair). Amino acid content, especially glutamic acid, highlighted the different properties between the fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria studied (e.g. nitrogen assimilation). The greatest similarities in metabolite composition between fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria were apparent under hypoxic conditions. A comparison to previously reported transcriptomic data revealed a strong correlation between changes in transcription and metabolite content. Collectively, these data validate the changes in the transcription at the metabolite level, suggesting transcription exists as one of the predominant modes of cellular regulation in Mycobacterium. Sectors with restricted correlation between metabolites and transcription (e.g. hypoxic cultivation) warrant further study to elucidate and exploit post-transcriptional modes of regulation. The strong correlation between the laboratory conditions used and data derived from in vivo conditions, indicate that the approach applied is a valuable addition to our understanding of cell regulation in these Mycobacterium species.

  16. MicroRNA regulation of DNA repair gene expression in hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Meredith E; Kulshreshtha, Ritu; Ivan, Mircea; Glazer, Peter M

    2009-02-01

    Genetic instability is a hallmark of cancer; the hypoxic tumor microenvironment has been implicated as a cause of this phenomenon. MicroRNAs (miR) are small nonprotein coding RNAs that can regulate various cellular pathways. We report here that two miRs, miR-210 and miR-373, are up-regulated in a hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha-dependent manner in hypoxic cells. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that these miRs could regulate factors implicated in DNA repair pathways. Forced expression of miR-210 was found to suppress the levels of RAD52, which is a key factor in homology-dependent repair (HDR); the forced expression of miR-373 led to a reduction in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) protein, RAD23B, as well as in RAD52. Consistent with these results, both RAD52 and RAD23B were found to be down-regulated in hypoxia, but in both cases, the hypoxia-induced down-regulation could be partially reversed by antisense inhibition of miR-210 and miR-373. Importantly, luciferase reporter assays indicated that miR-210 is capable of interacting with the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of RAD52 and that miR-373 can act on the 3' UTR of RAD23B. These results indicate that hypoxia-inducible miR-210 and miR-373 play roles in modulating the expression levels of key proteins involved in the HDR and NER pathways, providing new mechanistic insight into the effect of hypoxia on DNA repair and genetic instability in cancer.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of electro acupuncture on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in newborn rats Ass.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Li, Wenjie; Liang, Yiqun; Yang, Zhonghua; Liu, Jingdong; Wang, Yejun; Su, Nailun

    2014-11-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a common and potentially devastating condition in the neonate, associated with high mortality and morbidity. Effective treatment options are limited and therefore alternative therapies such as acupuncture are increasingly used. Previous studies have shown that electro acupuncture promoted proliferation of neural progenitor cell and increased expression of neurotrophic factor in HIE. However, effects of electro acupuncture on downstream signaling pathways have been rarely researched. So, in the present study, we aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of electro acupuncture on HIE and to further investigate the role of GDNF family receptor member RET and its key downstream PI3-K/Akt pathway in the process. A rat HIE model was constructed by the left common carotid artery (LCCA) ligation method in combination with hypoxic treatment. Considering that Baihui (GV20), Dazhui (GV14), Quchi (LI11) and Yongquan (KI1) are commonly used in clinics for stroke treatment and are easy to locate, we chose the above four acupoints as the combination for electro acupuncture treatment which was performed once a day for different time periods. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and transmission electron microscopy results showed that electro acupuncture could ameliorate neurologic damage and alleviate the degenerative changes of ultra structure of cortical neurons in rats subjected to HIE. And the longer acupuncture treatment lasted, the better its therapeutic effect would be. This was accompanied by gradually increased expression of GDNF family receptor RET at the mRNA level and its downstream signaling Akt at the protein level in the ischemic cortex. These findings suggest that electro acupuncture shows neuroprotective effects in HIE, which at least in part is attributed to activation of PI3-K/Akt signaling pathway.

  18. Notch Activation of Ca2+ Signaling in the Development of Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kimberly A.; Voiriot, Guillaume; Tang, Haiyang; Fraidenburg, Dustin R.; Song, Shanshan; Yamamura, Hisao; Yamamura, Aya; Guo, Qiang; Wan, Jun; Pohl, Nicole M.; Tauseef, Mohammad; Bodmer, Rolf; Ocorr, Karen; Thistlethwaite, Patricia A.; Haddad, Gabriel G.; Powell, Frank L.; Makino, Ayako; Mehta, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an important physiological response that optimizes the ventilation/perfusion ratio. Chronic hypoxia causes vascular remodeling, which is central to the pathogenesis of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH). We have previously shown that Notch3 is up-regulated in HPH and that activation of Notch signaling enhances store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), an important mechanism that contributes to pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and contraction. Here, we investigate the role of Notch signaling in HPV and hypoxia-induced enhancement of SOCE. We examined SOCE in human PASMCs exposed to hypoxia and pulmonary arterial pressure in mice using the isolated perfused/ventilated lung method. Wild-type and canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) 6−/− mice were exposed to chronic hypoxia to induce HPH. Inhibition of Notch signaling with a γ-secretase inhibitor attenuates hypoxia-enhanced SOCE in PASMCs and hypoxia-induced increase in pulmonary arterial pressure. Our results demonstrate that hypoxia activates Notch signaling and up-regulates TRPC6 channels. Additionally, treatment with a Notch ligand can mimic hypoxic responses. Finally, inhibition of TRPC6, either pharmacologically or genetically, attenuates HPV, hypoxia-enhanced SOCE, and the development of HPH. These results demonstrate that hypoxia-induced activation of Notch signaling mediates HPV and the development of HPH via functional activation and up-regulation of TRPC6 channels. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration and PASMC proliferation is critical to elucidation of the pathogenesis of HPH. Targeting Notch regulation of TRPC6 will be beneficial in the development of novel therapies for pulmonary hypertension associated with hypoxia. PMID:25569851

  19. Hypoxic environments as refuge against predatory fish in the Amazonian floodplains.

    PubMed

    Anjos, M B; De Oliveira, R R; Zuanon, J

    2008-02-01

    Several groups of Amazonian fishes exhibit behavioral, morphological and physiological characteristics that allow occupying hypoxic environments, despite the energetic costs of living in such harsh conditions. One of the supposed advantages of occupying hypoxic habitats would be a lower predation pressure resulting from a lower number of piscivorous fishes in those environments. We tested this hypothesis in an area of the Amazon River floodplain through gill net fishing in normoxic and hypoxic habitats. From the 103 species caught, 38 were classified as piscivores. We found no difference in the number of piscivorous species captured in hypoxic and normoxic habitats (chi2 = 0.23; p = 0.63; df = 1) but piscivorous individuals were more numerous in normoxic than in hypoxic sampling stations (chi2 = 104.4; p < 0.001; df = 1). This indicates that environments submitted to low oxygen conditions may in fact function as refuges against piscivorous fishes in the Amazonian floodplains.

  20. Hypoxic stress inhibits multiple aspects of the potato tuber wound response. [Solanum tuberosum L

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, W.; Cook, L.; Vayda, M.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers subjected to wounding under hypoxic stress do not synthesize RNA species that are induced in response to wounding in aerobic conditions. Further, wound-response proteins fail to be synthesized when wounded tubers are transferred to hypoxic conditions although messenger RNAs which encode them persist for many hours after transfer. Hypoxic stress also prevents the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine by wounded tubers that occurs in aerobic conditions. In contrast, hypoxic tubers accumulate and translate transcripts of genes whose products are involved in anaerobic metabolism whether or not they are wounded. Both the hypoxic response and the aerobic wound response preclude the synthesis of proteins encoded by messenger RNAs which accumulated during the tuberization process and which can be translated in vitro. Finally, wounding elicits the degradation of a subset of these tuberization-associated transcripts. These data indicate a complex and precise regulation of gene expression at several levels of macromolecular synthesis.

  1. Hypoxic ventilatory responses in Tibetan residents of 4400 m compared with 3658 m.

    PubMed

    Curran, L S; Zhuang, J; Droma, T; Land, L; Moore, L G

    1995-06-01

    Lifelong Tibetan residents of 3658 m ventilate as much and have hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responsiveness as least as great as acclimatized newcomers, and likely greater than lifelong North or South American high-altitude residents. To determine whether Tibetans residing at altitudes > 3658 m maintained similar levels of ventilation, hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses, we transported 20 lifelong residents of > or = 4400 m to 3658 m for comparison with 27 similarly-aged male Tibetan residents of 3658 m. At 3658 m, the 4400 m compared with the 3658 m Tibetans had similar levels of minute ventilation and arterial O2 saturation, higher respiratory quotients but lower hypoxic ventilatory responses. We conclude that Tibetan residents of > or = 4400 m ventilate as much as Tibetan residents of 3658 m despite an altitude-associated blunting of their hypoxic ventilatory responses. Thus, factors other than hypoxic ventilatory chemosensitivity are likely to be important contributors to resting ventilation among Tibetan high altitude residents.

  2. Peptidylarginine deiminases: novel drug targets for prevention of neuronal damage following hypoxic ischemic insult (HI) in neonates.

    PubMed

    Lange, Sigrun; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Thei, Laura; Mawjee, Priyanka; Bennett, Kate; Thompson, Paul R; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Nicholas, Anthony P; Peebles, Donald; Hristova, Mariya; Raivich, Gennadij

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischaemic (HI) injury frequently causes neural impairment in surviving infants. Our knowledge of the underlying molecular mechanisms is still limited. Protein deimination is a post-translational modification caused by Ca(+2) -regulated peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs), a group of five isozymes that display tissue-specific expression and different preference for target proteins. Protein deimination results in altered protein conformation and function of target proteins, and is associated with neurodegenerative diseases, gene regulation and autoimmunity. In this study, we used the neonatal HI and HI/infection [lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation] murine models to investigate changes in protein deimination. Brains showed increases in deiminated proteins, cell death, activated microglia and neuronal loss in affected brain areas at 48 h after hypoxic ischaemic insult. Upon treatment with the pan-PAD inhibitor Cl-amidine, a significant reduction was seen in microglial activation, cell death and infarct size compared with control saline or LPS-treated animals. Deimination of histone 3, a target protein of the PAD4 isozyme, was increased in hippocampus and cortex specifically upon LPS stimulation and markedly reduced following Cl-amidine treatment. Here, we demonstrate a novel role for PAD enzymes in neural impairment in neonatal HI Encephalopathy, highlighting their role as promising new candidates for drug-directed intervention in neurotrauma. Hypoxic Ischaemic Insult (HI) results in activation of peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs) because of calcium dysregulation. Target proteins undergo irreversible changes of protein bound arginine to citrulline, resulting in protein misfolding. Infection in synergy with HI causes up-regulation of TNFα, nuclear translocation of PAD4 and change in gene regulation as a result of histone deimination. Pharmacological PAD inhibition significantly reduced HI brain damage.

  3. The role and regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha expression in brain development and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiyong; Heijnen, Cobi J; van der Kooij, Michael A; Groenendaal, Floris; van Bel, Frank

    2009-12-11

    During neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, activation of transcription of a series of genes is induced to stimulate erythropoiesis, anti-apoptosis, apoptosis, necrosis and angiogenesis. A key factor mediating these gene transcriptions is hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha). During hypoxia, HIF-1alpha protein is stabilized and heterodimerizes with HIF-1beta to form HIF-1, subsequently regulating the expression of target genes. HIF-1alpha participates in early brain development and proliferation of neuronal precursor cells. Under pathological conditions, HIF-1alpha is known to play an important role in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury: on the one hand, HIF-1alpha has neuroprotective effects whereas it can also have neurotoxic effects. HIF-1alpha regulates the transcription of erythropoietin (EPO), which induces several pathways associated with neuroprotection. HIF-1alpha also promotes the expression of vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF), which is related to neovascularization in hypoxic-ischemic brain areas. In addition, HIF-1alpha has an anti-apoptotic effect by increasing the expression of anti-apoptotic factors such as EPO during mild hypoxia. The neurotoxic effects of HIF-1alpha are represented by its participation in the apoptotic process by increasing the stability of the tumor suppressor protein p53 during severe hypoxia. Moreover, HIF-1alpha plays a role in cell necrosis, by interacting with calcium and calpain. HIF-1alpha can also exacerbate brain edema via increasing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Given these properties, HIF-1alpha has both neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects after hypoxia-ischemia. These events are cell type specific and related to the severity of hypoxia. Unravelling of the complex functions of HIF-1alpha may be important when designing neuroprotective therapies for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

  4. Studies on cerebral protection of digoxin against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kaiwei; Tan, Danfeng; He, Miao; Guo, Dandan; Huang, Juan; Wang, Xia; Liu, Chentao; Zheng, Xiangrong

    2016-08-17

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) is a major cause of neonatal acute deaths and chronic nervous system damage. Our present study was designed to investigate the possible neuroprotective effect of digoxin-induced pharmacological preconditioning after hypoxia-ischemia and underlying mechanisms. Neonatal rats were assigned randomly to control, HIBD, or HIBD+digoxin groups. Pharmacological preconditioning was induced by administration of digoxin 72 h before inducing HIBD by carotid occlusion+hypoxia. Behavioral assays, and neuropathological and apoptotic assessments were performed to examine the effects; the expression of Na/K ATPase was also assessed. Rats in the HIBD group showed deficiencies on the T-maze, radial water maze, and postural reflex tests, whereas the HIBD+digoxin group showed significant improvements on all behavioral tests. The rats treated with digoxin showed recovery of pathological conditions, increased number of neural cells and proliferative cells, and decreased number of apoptotic cells. Meanwhile, an increased expression level of Na/K ATPase was observed after digoxin preconditioning treatment. The preconditioning treatment of digoxin contributed toward an improved functional recovery and exerted a marked neuroprotective effect including promotion of cell proliferation and reduction of apoptosis after HIBD, and the neuroprotective action was likely associated with increased expression of Na/K ATPase. PMID:27362436

  5. Hypoxic Signaling and the Cellular Redox Tumor Environment Determine Sensitivity to MTH1 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bräutigam, Lars; Pudelko, Linda; Jemth, Ann-Sofie; Gad, Helge; Narwal, Mohit; Gustafsson, Robert; Karsten, Stella; Carreras Puigvert, Jordi; Homan, Evert; Berndt, Carsten; Berglund, Ulrika Warpman; Stenmark, Pål; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-04-15

    Cancer cells are commonly in a state of redox imbalance that drives their growth and survival. To compensate for oxidative stress induced by the tumor redox environment, cancer cells upregulate specific nononcogenic addiction enzymes, such as MTH1 (NUDT1), which detoxifies oxidized nucleotides. Here, we show that increasing oxidative stress in nonmalignant cells induced their sensitization to the effects of MTH1 inhibition, whereas decreasing oxidative pressure in cancer cells protected against inhibition. Furthermore, we purified zebrafish MTH1 and solved the crystal structure of MTH1 bound to its inhibitor, highlighting the zebrafish as a relevant tool to study MTH1 biology. Delivery of 8-oxo-dGTP and 2-OH-dATP to zebrafish embryos was highly toxic in the absence of MTH1 activity. Moreover, chemically or genetically mimicking activated hypoxia signaling in zebrafish revealed that pathologic upregulation of the HIF1α response, often observed in cancer and linked to poor prognosis, sensitized embryos to MTH1 inhibition. Using a transgenic zebrafish line, in which the cellular redox status can be monitored in vivo, we detected an increase in oxidative pressure upon activation of hypoxic signaling. Pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine protected embryos with activated hypoxia signaling against MTH1 inhibition, suggesting that the aberrant redox environment likely causes sensitization. In summary, MTH1 inhibition may offer a general approach to treat cancers characterized by deregulated hypoxia signaling or redox imbalance. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2366-75. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26862114

  6. The influence of hypoxic physical activity on cfDNA as a new marker of vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zembron-Lacny, Agnieszka; Baldy-Chudzik, Katarzyna; Orysiak, Joanna; Sitkowski, Dariusz; Banach, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is important for many biomedical disciplines including the field of exercise biochemistry and physiology. It is likely that cfDNA is released into the plasma by apoptosis of endothelial cells and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and/or by NETosis of immune cells induced by strenuous exercise. Increases of cfDNA are described to be a potential hallmark for the overtraining syndrome, and might be related to aseptic vascular inflammation in athletes. Yet, the relevance of systemic inflammation and cfDNA with endothelial dysfunction in athletes still remains unclear. In this review article, we provide a current overview of exercise-induced cfDNA release to the circulation with special emphasis on its relationship with apoptosis and NETosis and the effect of hypoxic physical activity on vascular inflammation in athletes. PMID:26788076

  7. The influence of hypoxic physical activity on cfDNA as a new marker of vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pokrywka, Andrzej; Zembron-Lacny, Agnieszka; Baldy-Chudzik, Katarzyna; Orysiak, Joanna; Sitkowski, Dariusz; Banach, Maciej

    2015-12-10

    The phenomenon of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is important for many biomedical disciplines including the field of exercise biochemistry and physiology. It is likely that cfDNA is released into the plasma by apoptosis of endothelial cells and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and/or by NETosis of immune cells induced by strenuous exercise. Increases of cfDNA are described to be a potential hallmark for the overtraining syndrome, and might be related to aseptic vascular inflammation in athletes. Yet, the relevance of systemic inflammation and cfDNA with endothelial dysfunction in athletes still remains unclear. In this review article, we provide a current overview of exercise-induced cfDNA release to the circulation with special emphasis on its relationship with apoptosis and NETosis and the effect of hypoxic physical activity on vascular inflammation in athletes. PMID:26788076

  8. Effect of alveolar pressure on pulmonary artery pressure in chronically hypoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Wach, R; Emery, C J; Bee, D; Barer, G R

    1987-02-01

    The effect on pulmonary artery pressure of a rise in alveolar pressure differed in chronically hypoxic rats (10% O2 for 3-5 weeks) compared with control rats. Chronically hypoxic rats have newly muscularised walls in arterioles in the alveolar region. Isolated lungs of chronically hypoxic and control rats were perfused with blood under conditions in which alveolar pressure was greater than left atrial pressure during both normoxia and hypoxia. Alveolar pressure was the effective downstream pressure. Pressure-flow lines were measured at low and high alveolar pressure (5 and 15 mmHg). During normoxia pressure-flow lines of chronically hypoxic rats had a steeper slope (higher resistance) and greater extrapolated intercept on the pressure axis (effective downstream pressure) than control rats. In both groups of rats the change from low to high alveolar pressure during normoxia caused an approximately parallel shift in the pressure-flow line similar to the change in alveolar pressure. During hypoxia, which led to an increase in slope and intercept in both groups of rats, the effect of a rise in alveolar pressure differed in chronically hypoxic from control rats. In control rats there was a small parallel shift in the pressure-flow line that was much less than the increase in alveolar pressure; in chronically hypoxic rats there was a large parallel shift in the pressure-flow line that was greater than the increase in alveolar pressure. Thus in chronically hypoxic rats hypoxic vasoconstriction probably occurred mainly in muscular alveolar vessels, whereas in control rats it probably occurred upstream in extra-alveolar vessels. At constant blood flow the relation between pulmonary artery pressure and alveolar pressure was measured while alveolar pressure was reduced from approximately 15 mmHg to zero during both normoxia and hypoxia. In control and chronically hypoxic rats the slope of this line was less than 1. At an alveolar pressure of 2-3 mmHg there was an inflection

  9. Increased cytochrome c in rat cerebrospinal fluid after cardiac arrest and its effects on hypoxic neuronal survival.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Sarnaik, Syana M; Manole, Mioara D; Chen, Yaming; Shinde, Sunita N; Li, Wenjin; Rose, Marie; Alexander, Henry; Chen, Jie; Clark, Robert S B; Graham, Steven H; Hickey, Robert W

    2012-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteins may be useful biomarkers of neuronal death and ultimate prognosis after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Cytochrome c has been identified in the CSF of children following traumatic brain injury. Cytochrome c is required for cellular respiration but it is also a central component of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Thus, in addition to serving as a biomarker, cytochrome c release into CSF may have an effect upon survival of adjacent neurons. In this study, we use Western blot and ELISA to show that cytochrome c is elevated in CSF obtained from pediatric rats following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Using biotinylated human cytochrome c in culture media we show that cytochrome c crosses the cell membrane and is incorporated into mitochondria of neurons exposed to anoxia. Lastly, we show that addition of human cytochrome c to primary neuronal culture exposed to anoxia improves survival. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show cytochrome c is elevated in CSF following hypoxic ischemic brain injury. Results from primary neuronal culture suggest that extracellular cytochrome c is able to cross the cell membrane of injured neurons, incorporate into mitochondria, and promote survival following anoxia.

  10. Hemoglobin, nitric oxide and molecular mechanisms of hypoxic vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Barry W.; Stamler, Jonathan S.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2009-01-01

    The protected transport of nitric oxide (NO) by hemoglobin (Hb) links the metabolic activity of working tissue to the regulation of its local blood supply through hypoxic vasodilation. This physiologic mechanism is allosterically coupled to the O2 saturation of Hb and involves the covalent binding of NO to a cysteine residue in the β-chain of Hb (Cys β93) to form S-nitrosohemoglobin (SNO-Hb). Subsequent S-transnitrosation, the transfer of NO groups to thiols on the RBC membrane and then in the plasma, preserves NO vasodilator activity for delivery to the vascular endothelium. This SNO-Hb paradigm provides insight into the respiratory cycle and a new therapeutic focus for diseases involving abnormal microcirculatory perfusion. In addition, the formation of S-nitrosothiols in other proteins may regulate an array of physiological functions. PMID:19781996

  11. The hypoxia signaling pathway and hypoxic adaptation in fishes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wuhan

    2015-02-01

    The hypoxia signaling pathway is an evolutionarily conserved cellular signaling pathway present in animals ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to mammals. The pathway is crucial for oxygen homeostasis maintenance. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α and HIF-2α) are master regulators in the hypoxia signaling pathway. Oxygen concentrations vary a lot in the aquatic environment. To deal with this, fishes have adapted and developed varying strategies for living in hypoxic conditions. Investigations into the strategies and mechanisms of hypoxia adaptation in fishes will allow us to understand fish speciation and breed hypoxia-tolerant fish species/strains. This review summarizes the process of the hypoxia signaling pathway and its regulation, as well as the mechanism of hypoxia adaptation in fishes.

  12. Hypoxia inducible factors and the response to hypoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Majmundar, Amar J.; Wong, Waihay J.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen (O2) is an essential nutrient that serves as a key substrate in cellular metabolism and bioenergetics. In a variety of physiological and pathological states, organisms encounter insufficient O2 availability, or hypoxia. In order to cope with this stress, evolutionarily conserved responses are engaged. In mammals, the primary transcriptional response to hypoxic stress is mediated by the Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). While canonically regulated by prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing enzymes (PHDs), the HIFα subunits are intricately responsive to numerous other factors including Factor Inhibiting HIF-1α (FIH1), sirtuins, and metabolites. These transcription factors function in normal tissue homeostasis and impinge on critical aspects of disease progression and recovery. Insights from basic HIF biology are being translated into pharmaceuticals targeting the HIF pathway. PMID:20965423

  13. Satellite-based empirical models linking river plume dynamics with hypoxic area and volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Chengfeng; Lehrter, John C.; Hu, Chuanmin; Obenour, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    Satellite-based empirical models explaining hypoxic area and volume variation were developed for the seasonally hypoxic (O2 < 2 mg L-1) northern Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi River. Annual variations in midsummer hypoxic area and volume were related to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-derived monthly estimates of river plume area (km2) and average, inner shelf chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a, mg m-3). River plume area in June was negatively related with midsummer hypoxic area (km2) and volume (km3), while July inner shelf Chl a was positively related to hypoxic area and volume. Multiple regression models using river plume area and Chl a as independent variables accounted for most of the variability in hypoxic area (R2 = 0.92) or volume (R2 = 0.89). These models explain more variation in hypoxic area than models using Mississippi River nutrient loads as independent variables. The results here also support a hypothesis that confinement of the river plume to the inner shelf is an important mechanism controlling hypoxia area and volume in this region.

  14. A scenario and forecast model for Gulf of Mexico hypoxic area and volume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne; Obenour, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    For almost three decades, the relative size of the hypoxic region on the Louisiana-Texas continental shelf has drawn scientific and policy attention. During that time, both simple and complex models have been used to explore hypoxia dynamics and to provide management guidance relating the size of the hypoxic zone to key drivers. Throughout much of that development, analyses had to accommodate an apparent change in hypoxic sensitivity to loads and often cull observations due to anomalous meteorological conditions. Here, we describe an adaptation of our earlier, simple biophysical model, calibrated to revised hypoxic area estimates and new hypoxic volume estimates through Bayesian estimation. This application eliminates the need to cull observations and provides revised hypoxic extent estimates with uncertainties, corresponding to different nutrient loading reduction scenarios. We compare guidance from this model application, suggesting an approximately 62% nutrient loading reduction is required to reduce Gulf hypoxia to the Action Plan goal of 5,000 km2, to that of previous applications. In addition, we describe for the first time, the corresponding response of hypoxic volume. We also analyze model results to test for increasing system sensitivity to hypoxia formation, but find no strong evidence of such change.

  15. Retinal degeneration in rats induced by CI-1010, a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Breider, M A; Pilcher, G D; Graziano, M J; Gough, A W

    1998-01-01

    The anti-cancer compound CI-1010, designated as (R)-alpha-([(2-bromoethyl)amino]methyl)-2-nitro-1H-imidazole-1-ethanol monohydrobromide, has a proposed dual mechanism of action due to alkylating and radiosensitizing activities. To assess potential toxicity, adult Wistar rats were treated with a single intravenous injection (0, 50, 100, 150, 225, or 350 mg/kg) and necropsied at 4 or 29 days following treatment. In a repeated dose experiment, rats were injected daily (0, 10, 40, or 80 mg/kg; 5 doses/wk) for 3 wk and necropsied at the end of week 3 or 7. CI-1010 induced retinal degeneration by 4 days after a single injection of > or = 225 mg/kg or by 3 wk of repeated injections of > or = 40 mg/kg. The locally extensive to diffuse retinal degeneration involved the photoreceptor and outer nuclear layer. The photoreceptor layer was vacuolated and compressed corresponding to ultrastructural evidence of inner segment swelling and outer segment fragmentation. The outer nuclear layer was thinned due to loss of nuclei and contained numerous pyknotic or karyorrhectic nuclei. These nuclear changes were morphologically consistent with apoptosis and many outer nuclear layer nuclei labeled with in situ TdT-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labeling (Apoptag). The retinal degeneration was nonreversible, evidenced by increased lesion severity and incidence after CI-1010 was withdrawn for either 25 or 28 days.

  16. Hypoxic repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is necessary for metabolic reprogramming and growth of model tumours.

    PubMed

    Golias, Tereza; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sun, Ramon; Kumar, Bhavna; Brown, Nicole V; Swanson, Benjamin J; Pai, Reetesh; Jaitin, Diego; Le, Quynh-Thu; Teknos, Theodoros N; Denko, Nicholas C

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cells fulfil the bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs of proliferation using the available environmental metabolites. Metabolic adaptation to hypoxia causes decreased mitochondrial function and increased lactate production. This work examines the biological importance of the hypoxia-inducible inhibitory phosphorylations on the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α subunit. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were genetically manipulated to alter the net phosphorylation of PDH E1α through reduced kinase expression or enhanced phosphatase expression. The modified cells were tested for hypoxic changes in phosphorylated E1α, mitochondrial metabolism and growth as xenografted tumours. Even though there are four PDHK genes, PDHK1 is essential for inhibitory PDH phosphorylation of E1α at serine 232, is partially responsible for modification of serines 293 and 300, and these phosphorylations are necessary for model tumour growth. In order to determine the clinical relevance, a cohort of head and neck cancer patient biopsies was examined for phosphorylated E1α and expression of PDHK1. Patients with detectable 232 phosphorylation or expression of PDHK1 tend to have worse clinical outcome. These data show that PDHK1 activity is unique and non-redundant in the family of PHDK enzymes and a PDHK1 specific inhibitor would therefore have anti-cancer activity with reduced chance of side effects from inhibition of other PDHKs. PMID:27498883

  17. Hypoxic repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is necessary for metabolic reprogramming and growth of model tumours

    PubMed Central

    Golias, Tereza; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sun, Ramon; Kumar, Bhavna; Brown, Nicole V.; Swanson, Benjamin J.; Pai, Reetesh; Jaitin, Diego; Le, Quynh-Thu; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Denko, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cells fulfil the bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs of proliferation using the available environmental metabolites. Metabolic adaptation to hypoxia causes decreased mitochondrial function and increased lactate production. This work examines the biological importance of the hypoxia-inducible inhibitory phosphorylations on the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α subunit. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were genetically manipulated to alter the net phosphorylation of PDH E1α through reduced kinase expression or enhanced phosphatase expression. The modified cells were tested for hypoxic changes in phosphorylated E1α, mitochondrial metabolism and growth as xenografted tumours. Even though there are four PDHK genes, PDHK1 is essential for inhibitory PDH phosphorylation of E1α at serine 232, is partially responsible for modification of serines 293 and 300, and these phosphorylations are necessary for model tumour growth. In order to determine the clinical relevance, a cohort of head and neck cancer patient biopsies was examined for phosphorylated E1α and expression of PDHK1. Patients with detectable 232 phosphorylation or expression of PDHK1 tend to have worse clinical outcome. These data show that PDHK1 activity is unique and non-redundant in the family of PHDK enzymes and a PDHK1 specific inhibitor would therefore have anti-cancer activity with reduced chance of side effects from inhibition of other PDHKs. PMID:27498883

  18. Role of Mitochondria in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yujiao; Tucker, Donovan; Dong, Yan; Zhao, Ningjun; Zhuo, Xiaoying; Zhang, Quanguang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemia (HI) causes severe brain injury in neonates. It’s one of the leading causes to neonatal death and pediatric disability, resulting in devastating consequences, emotionally and economically, to their families. A series of events happens in this process, e.g. excitatory transmitter release, extracelluar Ca2+ influxing, mitochondrial dysfunction, energy failure, and neuron death. There are two forms of neuron death after HI insult: necrosis and apoptosis, apoptosis being the more prevalent form. Mitochondria handle a series of oxidative reactions, and yield energy for various cellular activities including the maintainance of membrane potential and preservation of intracellular ionic homeostasis. Therefore mitochondria play a critical role in neonatal neurodegeneration following HI, and mitochondrial dysfunction is the key point in neurodegenerative evolution. Because of this, exploring effective mitochondria-based clinical strategies is crucial. Today the only efficacious clinic treatment is hypothermia. However, due to its complex management, clinical complication and autoimmune decrease, its clinical application is limited. So far, many mitochondria-based strategies have been reported neuroprotective in animal models, which offers promise on neonatal therapy. However, since their clinical effectiveness are still unclear, plenty of studies need to be continued in the future. According to recent reports, two novel strategies have been proposed: methylene blue (MB) and melatonin. Although they are still in primary stage, the underlying mechanisms indicate promising clinical applications. Every neurological therapeutic strategy has its intrinsic deficit and limited efficacy, therefore in the long run, the perfect clinical therapy for hypoxic-ischemic neonatal brain injury will be based on the combination of multiple strategies. PMID:27441209

  19. Military applications of hypoxic training for high-altitude operations.

    PubMed

    Muza, Stephen R

    2007-09-01

    Rapid deployment of unacclimatized soldiers to high mountainous environments causes debilitating effects on operational capabilities (physical work performance), and force health (altitude sickness). Most of these altitude-induced debilitations can be prevented or ameliorated by a wide range of physiological responses collectively referred to as altitude acclimatization. Acclimatization to a target altitude can be induced by slow progressive ascents or continuous sojourns at intermediate altitudes. However, this "altitude residency" requirement reduces their utilization in rapid response military missions that exploit the air mobility capability of modern military forces to quickly deploy to an area of operations on short notice. A more recent approach to induce altitude acclimatization is the use of daily intermittent hypoxic exposures (IHE) in lieu of continuous residence at high altitudes. IHE treatments consist of three elements: 1) IHE simulated altitude (inspired oxygen partial pressure: PIO2), 2) IHE session duration, and 3) total number of IHE sessions over the treatment period. This paper reviews and summarizes the results of 25 published IHE studies. This review finds that an IHE altitude>or=4000 m, and daily exposure duration of at least 1.5 h repeated over a week or more are required to have a high probability of developing altitude acclimatization. The efficacy of shorter duration (<1.5 h) hypoxic exposures at >or=4000 m simulated altitudes, and longer exposures (>4 h) at moderate altitudes (2500-3500 m) is not well documented. The predominate IHE-induced altitude acclimatization response appears to be increased arterial oxygen content through ventilatory acclimatization. Thus, IHE is a promising approach to provide the benefits of altitude acclimatization to low-altitude-based soldiers before their deployment to high mountainous regions.

  20. Oxygen supply maps for hypoxic microenvironment visualization in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Niels J.; Schüffler, Peter J.; Zhong, Qing; Falkner, Florian; Rechsteiner, Markus; Rüschoff, Jan H.; Fankhauser, Christian; Drach, Matthias; Largo, Remo; Tremp, Mathias; Poyet, Cedric; Sulser, Tullio; Kristiansen, Glen; Moch, Holger; Buhmann, Joachim; Müntener, Michael; Wild, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intratumoral hypoxia plays an important role with regard to tumor biology and susceptibility to radio- and chemotherapy. For further investigation of hypoxia-related changes, areas of certain hypoxia must be reliably detected within cancer tissues. Pimonidazole, a 2-nitroimindazole, accumulates in hypoxic tissue and can be easily visualized using immunohistochemistry. Materials and Methods: To improve detection of highly hypoxic versus normoxic areas in prostate cancer, immunoreactivity of pimonidazole and a combination of known hypoxia-related proteins was used to create computational oxygen supply maps of prostate cancer. Pimonidazole was intravenously administered before radical prostatectomy in n = 15 patients, using the da Vinci robot-assisted surgical system. Prostatectomy specimens were immediately transferred into buffered formaldehyde, fixed overnight, and completely embedded in paraffin. Pimonidazole accumulation and hypoxia-related protein expression were visualized by immunohistochemistry. Oxygen supply maps were created using the normalized information from pimonidazole and hypoxia-related proteins. Results: Based on pimonidazole staining and other hypoxia.related proteins (osteopontin, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, and glucose transporter member 1) oxygen supply maps in prostate cancer were created. Overall, oxygen supply maps consisting of information from all hypoxia-related proteins showed high correlation and mutual information to the golden standard of pimonidazole. Here, we describe an improved computer-based ex vivo model for an accurate detection of oxygen supply in human prostate cancer tissue. Conclusions: This platform can be used for precise colocalization of novel candidate hypoxia-related proteins in a representative number of prostate cancer cases, and improve issues of single marker correlations. Furthermore, this study provides a source for further in situ tests and biochemical investigations PMID:26955501

  1. Insulin Receptor Substrate-1 Activation Mediated p53 Downregulation Protects Against Hypoxic-Ischemia in the Neonatal Brain.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yi-Fang; Jiang, Si-Tse; Chow, Yen-Hung; Huang, Chao-Ching; Ho, Chien-Jung; Chou, Ya-Ping

    2016-08-01

    This study determined if dietary restriction (DR) protects against hypoxic-ischemia (HI) in the neonatal brain via insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1)/Akt pathway-mediated downregulation of p53 in the neurovascular unit. On postnatal (P) day 7, HI was induced in rat pups grouped from P1 into normal litter size (NL, 12 pups/dam) and increased litter size (DR, 18 pups/dam). In vivo IRS-1 anti-sense oligonucleotide and IRS-1 overexpressed recombinant adenovirus were given, and neurovascular damage was assessed. In vitro models of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) examined the inhibition and overexpression of IRS-1 on p53 and cell death in neurons and endothelial cells. Compared to NL pups, DR pups had significantly higher IRS-1, p-IRS-1, and pAkt levels, decreased p53, more tight junction proteins, reduced blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage after HI, and less infarct volumes at P21. Immunofluorescence revealed that IRS-1 was upregulated in the endothelial cells and neurons of DR pups. IRS-1 downregulation in DR pups reduced p-Akt, increased p53, worsened BBB damage, and increased brain injury, whereas IRS-1 overexpression in NL pups upregulated p-Akt, decreased p53, attenuated BBB damage, and decreased brain injury. In vitro, IRS-1 downregulation aggravated cell death in neurons and endothelial cells and is associated with decreased p-Akt and increased p53. In contrast, IRS-1 overexpression reduced cell death in endothelial cells with increased p-Akt and decreased p53. In conclusion, DR reduces neurovascular damage after HI in the neonatal brain through an IRS-1/Akt-mediated p53 downregulation, suggesting that IRS-1 signaling is a therapeutic target for hypoxic brain injury in neonates.

  2. Adenosine A1 receptors contribute to immune regulation after neonatal hypoxic ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Winerdal, Max; Winerdal, Malin E; Wang, Ying-Qing; Fredholm, Bertil B; Winqvist, Ola; Ådén, Ulrika

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal brain hypoxic ischemia (HI) often results in long-term motor and cognitive impairments. Post-ischemic inflammation greatly effects outcome and adenosine receptor signaling modulates both HI and immune cell function. Here, we investigated the influence of adenosine A1 receptor deficiency (A1R(-/-)) on key immune cell populations in a neonatal brain HI model. Ten-day-old mice were subjected to HI. Functional outcome was assessed by open locomotion and beam walking test and infarction size evaluated. Flow cytometry was performed on brain-infiltrating cells, and semi-automated analysis of flow cytometric data was applied. A1R(-/-) mice displayed larger infarctions (+33%, p < 0.05) and performed worse in beam walking tests (44% more mistakes, p < 0.05) than wild-type (WT) mice. Myeloid cell activation after injury was enhanced in A1R(-/-) versus WT brains. Activated B lymphocytes expressing IL-10 infiltrated the brain after HI in WT, but were less activated and did not increase in relative frequency in A1R(-/-). Also, A1R(-/-) B lymphocytes expressed less IL-10 than their WT counterparts, the A1R antagonist DPCPX decreased IL-10 expression whereas the A1R agonist CPA increased it. CD4(+) T lymphocytes including FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells, were unaffected by genotype, whereas CD8(+) T lymphocyte responses were smaller in A1R(-/-) mice. Using PCA to characterize the immune profile, we could discriminate the A1R(-/-) and WT genotypes as well as sham operated from HI-subjected animals. We conclude that A1R signaling modulates IL-10 expression by immune cells, influences the activation of these cells in vivo, and affects outcome after HI. PMID:26608888

  3. The neuroprotection of hypoxic preconditioning on rat brain against traumatic brain injury by up-regulated transcription factor Nrf2 and HO-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Shu, Longfei; Wang, Chunlin; Wang, Jinbiao; Zhang, Yongming; Zhang, Xing; Yang, Yanyan; Zhuo, Jianwei; Liu, Jiachuan

    2016-01-12

    Hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) increases the inherent tolerance of brain tissue suffering from severe hypoxia or ischemia insult by stimulating the protective ability of the brain. However, little is known concerning the effect of HPC on traumatic brain injury (TBI). We designed this study to investigate the effect of HPC on TBI and explore its underlying mechanisms. We found that HPC significantly alleviates neurological dysfunction, lessens brain edema, reduces cell apoptosis, increases neuronal survival, up-regulates the expressions of Nrf2 and HO-1, and decreases the inducer of protein carbonyls, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine in the brain tissue of rats 24h after brain injury. However, no influence was observed in normal rats after only 3d of hypoxic training. Results further indicated that HPC protects the brain against traumatic damage. This protective effect may be achieved by up-regulating Nrf2 and HO-1 expression and alleviating oxidative stress damage. PMID:26590328

  4. Argon protects against hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats through activation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hailin; Mitchell, Sian; Ciechanowicz, Sarah; Savage, Sinead; Wang, Tianlong; Ji, Xunming; Ma, Daqing

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) has a high mortality rate with neuropsychological impairment. This study investigated the neuroprotective effects of argon against neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. In vitro cortical neuronal cell cultures derived from rat foetuses were subjected to an oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) challenge for 90 minutes and then exposed to 70% argon or nitrogen with 5% carbon dioxide and balanced with oxygen for 2 hours. In vivo, seven-day-old rats were subjected to unilateral common carotid artery ligation followed by hypoxic (8% oxygen balanced with nitrogen) insult for 90 minutes. They were exposed to 70% argon or nitrogen balanced with oxygen for 2 hours. In vitro, argon treatment of cortical neuronal cultures resulted in a significant increase of p-mTOR and Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2(Nrf2) and protection against OGD challenge. Inhibition of m-TOR through Rapamycin or Nrf2 through siRNA abolished argon-mediated cyto-protection. In vivo, argon exposure significantly enhanced Nrf2 and its down-stream effector NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase, Quinone 1(NQO1) and superoxide dismutase 1(SOD1). Oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neuronal cell death were significantly decreased and brain infarction was markedly reduced. Blocking PI-3K through wortmannin or ERK1/2 through U0126 attenuated argon-mediated neuroprotection. These data provide a new molecular mechanism for the potential application of argon as a neuroprotectant in HIE. PMID:27016422

  5. Argon protects against hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats through activation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hailin; Mitchell, Sian; Ciechanowicz, Sarah; Savage, Sinead; Wang, Tianlong; Ji, Xunming; Ma, Daqing

    2016-05-01

    Perinatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) has a high mortality rate with neuropsychological impairment. This study investigated the neuroprotective effects of argon against neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury.In vitro cortical neuronal cell cultures derived from rat foetuses were subjected to an oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) challenge for 90 minutes and then exposed to 70% argon or nitrogen with 5% carbon dioxide and balanced with oxygen for 2 hours.In vivo, seven-day-old rats were subjected to unilateral common carotid artery ligation followed by hypoxic (8% oxygen balanced with nitrogen) insult for 90 minutes. They were exposed to 70% argon or nitrogen balanced with oxygen for 2 hours. In vitro, argon treatment of cortical neuronal cultures resulted in a significant increase of p-mTOR and Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2(Nrf2) and protection against OGD challenge. Inhibition of m-TOR through Rapamycin or Nrf2 through siRNA abolished argon-mediated cyto-protection. In vivo, argon exposure significantly enhanced Nrf2 and its down-stream effector NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase, Quinone 1(NQO1) and superoxide dismutase 1(SOD1). Oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neuronal cell death were significantly decreased and brain infarction was markedly reduced. Blocking PI-3K through wortmannin or ERK1/2 through U0126 attenuated argon-mediated neuroprotection.These data provide a new molecular mechanism for the potential application of Argon as a neuroprotectant in HIE.

  6. The protective effect of heat acclimation from hypoxic damage in the brain involves changes in the expression of glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yacobi, Assaf; Stern Bach, Yael; Horowitz, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Long-term heat acclimation (34 °C, 30d) alters the physiological responses and the metabolic state of organisms. It also improves ability to cope with hypoxic stress via a cross-tolerance mechanism. Within the brain, the hippocampal and frontal cortex neurons are the most sensitive to hypoxia and cell death is mainly caused by calcium influx via glutamate-gated ion channels, specifically NMDA and AMPA receptors. GluN1 subunit levels of NMDA-R correspond to NMDA-R levels. GluN2B/GluN2A subunit ratio is a qualitative index of channel activity; a higher ratio implies lower calcium permeability. The GluA2 subunit of AMPA-R controls channel permeability by inhibiting calcium penetration. Here, in rats model we (i)used behavioral-assessment tests to evaluate heat acclimation mediated hypoxic (15’ 4.5 ± 0.5% O2) neuroprotection, (ii) measured protein and transcript levels of NMDA-R and AMPA-R subunits before and after hypoxia in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex, to evaluate the role of Ca2+ in neuro-protection/cross-tolerance. Behavioral tests confirmed hypoxic tolerance in long-term (30d) but not in short-term (2d) heat acclimated rats. Hypoxic tolerance in the long-term acclimated phenotype was accompanied by a significant decrease in basal NMDA receptor GluN1 protein and an increase in its mRNA. The long-term acclimated rats also showed post ischemic increases in the GluN2B/GluN2A subunit ratio and GluA2 subunit of the AMPA receptor, supporting the hypothesis that reduced calcium permeability contributes to heat acclimation mediated hypoxia cross-tolerance. Abrupt post ischemic change in GluN2B/GluN2A subunit ratio with no change in NMDA-R subunits transcript levels implies that post-translational processes are inseparable acclimatory cross-tolerance mechanism. PMID:27583282

  7. Disturbed hypoxic responses as a pathogenic mechanism of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Catrina, Sergiu-Bogdan; Zheng, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is a chronic complication of diabetes that is characterized by impaired wound healing in the lower extremities. DFU remains a major clinical challenge because of poor understanding of its pathogenic mechanisms. Impaired wound healing in diabetes is characterized by decreased angiogenesis, reduced bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) recruitment, and decreased fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation and migration. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested that increased hypoxic conditions and impaired cellular responses to hypoxia are essential pathogenic factors of delayed wound healing in DFU. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1, a heterodimer of HIF-1α and HIF-1β) is a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis that mediates the adaptive cellular responses to hypoxia by regulating the expression of genes involved in angiogenesis, metabolic changes, proliferation, migration, and cell survival. However, HIF-1 signalling is inhibited in diabetes as a result of hyperglycaemia-induced HIF-1α destabilization and functional repression. Increasing HIF-1α expression and activity using various approaches promotes angiogenesis, EPC recruitment, and granulation, thereby improving wound healing in experimental diabetes. The mechanisms underlying HIF-1α regulation in diabetes and the therapeutic strategies targeting HIF-1 signalling for the treatment of diabetic wounds are discussed in this review. Further investigations of the pathways involved in HIF-1α regulation in diabetes are required to advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying impaired wound healing in diabetes and to provide a foundation for developing novel therapeutic approaches to treat DFU.

  8. A Qualitative Study of Physician Perspectives on Prognostication in Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Lisa Anne; Bell, Emily; Racine, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is the most frequent cause of neonatal encephalopathy and yields a great degree of morbidity and mortality. From an ethical and clinical standpoint, neurological prognosis is fundamental in the care of neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. This qualitative study explores physician perspectives about neurological prognosis in neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. This study aimed, through semistructured interviews with neonatologists and pediatric neurologists, to understand the practice of prognostication. Qualitative thematic content analysis was used for data analysis. The authors report 2 main findings: (1) neurological prognosis remains fundamental to quality-of-life predictions and considerations of best interest, and (2) magnetic resonance imaging is presented to parents with a greater degree of certainty than actually exists. Further research is needed to explore both the parental perspective and, prospectively, the impact of different clinical approaches and styles to prognostication for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

  9. Reduction of the prenatal hypoxic-ischemic brain edema with noscapine.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, M; Siadatpour, Zahra; Ziai, S A; Mehrpour, M; Benaissa, Faouzya; Nobakht, M

    2003-01-01

    Cytotoxic free radicals and release of several neurotransmitters such as bradykinin contribute to the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. We have studied the efficacy of noscapine, an opium alkaloid and a bradykinin antagonist, in reducing post-hypoxic-ischemic damage in developing brain of 7-d-old rat pups. Hypoxic-ischemic injury to the right cerebral hemisphere was produced by legation of the right common carotid artery followed by 3 h of hypoxia with 8% oxygen. Thirty to 45 min before hypoxia the rat pups received noscapine (dose = 0.5-2 mg/kg) or saline. Pups were scarified at 24 h post recovery for the assessment of cerebral damage by histological methods. Our results showed that noscapine was an effective agent in reducing the extent of brain injury after hypoxic-ischemic insult to neonatal rats. Therefore, it is concluded that noscapine may be a useful drug in the managements of patients after stroke.

  10. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein (Srb1) Is Required for Hypoxic Adaptation and Virulence in the Dimorphic Fungus Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Juwen C.; Smulian, A. George

    2016-01-01

    The Histoplasma capsulatum sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP), Srb1 is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH), leucine zipper DNA binding protein family of transcription factors that possess a unique tyrosine (Y) residue instead of an arginine (R) residue in the bHLH region. We have determined that Srb1 message levels increase in a time dependent manner during growth under oxygen deprivation (hypoxia). To further understand the role of Srb1 during infection and hypoxia, we silenced the gene encoding Srb1 using RNA interference (RNAi); characterized the resulting phenotype, determined its response to hypoxia, and its ability to cause disease within an infected host. Silencing of Srb1 resulted in a strain of H. capsulatum that is incapable of surviving in vitro hypoxia. We found that without complete Srb1 expression, H. capsulatum is killed by murine macrophages and avirulent in mice given a lethal dose of yeasts. Additionally, silencing Srb1 inhibited the hypoxic upregulation of other known H. capsulatum hypoxia-responsive genes (HRG), and genes that encode ergosterol biosynthetic enzymes. Consistent with these regulatory functions, Srb1 silenced H. capsulatum cells were hypersensitive to the antifungal azole drug itraconazole. These data support the theory that the H. capsulatum SREBP is critical for hypoxic adaptation and is required for H. capsulatum virulence. PMID:27711233

  11. Efficient hypoxic activation of the anticancer agent AQ4N by CYP2S1 and CYP2W1.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Clinton R; Lee, Melody; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2010-09-01

    AQ4N [1,4-bis{[2-(dimethylamino-N-oxide)ethyl]amino}-5,8-dihydroxyanthracene-9,10-dione], a prodrug with two dimethylamino N-oxide groups, is converted to the topoisomerase II inhibitor AQ4 [1,4-bis{[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]amino}-5,8-dihydroxy-anthracene-9,10-dione] by reduction of the N-oxides to dimethylamino substituents. Earlier studies showed that several drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes can catalyze this reductive reaction under hypoxic conditions comparable with those in solid tumors. CYP2S1 and CYP2W1, two extrahepatic P450 enzymes identified from the human genome whose functions are unknown, are expressed in hypoxic tumor cells at much higher levels than in normal tissue. Here, we demonstrate that CYP2S1, contrary to a published report (Mol Pharmacol 76:1031-1043, 2009), is efficiently reduced by NADPH-P450 reductase. Most importantly, both CYP2S1 and CYP2W1 are better catalysts for the reductive activation of AQ4N to AQ4 than all previously examined P450 enzymes. The overexpression of CYP2S1 and CYP2W1 in tumor tissues, together with their high catalytic activities for AQ4N activation, suggests that they may be exploited for the localized activation of anticancer prodrugs.

  12. Hypoxic regulation of glutamine metabolism through HIF1 and SIAH2 supports lipid synthesis that is necessary for tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ramon C; Denko, Nicholas C

    2014-02-01

    Recent reports have identified a phenomenon by which hypoxia shifts glutamine metabolism from oxidation to reductive carboxylation. We now identify the mechanism by which HIF-1 activation results in a dramatic reduction in the activity of the key mitochondrial enzyme complex α ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (αKGDH). HIF-1 activation promotes SIAH2 targeted ubiquitination and proteolysis of the 48 kDa splice variant of the E1 subunit of the αKGDH complex (OGDH2). Knockdown of SIAH2 or mutation of the ubiquitinated lysine residue on OGDH2 (336KA) reverses the hypoxic drop in αKGDH activity, stimulates glutamine oxidation, and reduces glutamine-dependent lipid synthesis. 336KA OGDH2-expressing cells require exogenous lipids or citrate for growth in hypoxia in vitro and fail to grow as model tumors in immunodeficient mice. Reversal of hypoxic mitochondrial function may provide a target for the development of next-generation anticancer agents targeting tumor metabolism. PMID:24506869

  13. Antisense suppression of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) sucrose synthase 3 (CsSUS3) reduces hypoxic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyun; Sui, Xiaolei; Guo, Jinju; Wang, Zhenyu; Cheng, Jintao; Ma, Si; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Zhenxian

    2014-03-01

    Sucrose synthase (SUS; EC 2.4.1.13) plays important roles in sugar metabolism and abiotic stress response. But the genes encoding SUS in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) have not been well studied. Here, we isolated four cucumber sucrose synthase genes (CsSUS). Among them, CsSUS3, which highly expressed in the roots, was chosen for further study. Immunolocalization and subcellular localization analysis indicated that CsSUS3 localized in the cytosol and the plasma membrane, and mainly existed in the companion cells of phloem in the roots. When suffering hypoxia stress from flooding, CsSUS3 expression and SUS activity in roots increased, especially in the lateral roots; moreover, the soluble SUS activity increased clearly, but the membrane fraction hardly changed. Compared with the wild-type cucumbers, the transgenic lines with antisense expression of CsSUS3 were more sensitive to flooding. After 6 d of flooding, the SUS activity, soluble sugar and uridine 5'-diphosphate glucose (UDPG) content and the ratio of ATP/ADP in the roots of transgenic plants were significantly lower than that in wild-type plants. Moreover, the transgenic lines grew more slowly with more yellow necrosis in the leaves. These findings suggested CsSUS3 participated in resisting hypoxic stress. Furthermore, the mechanism of CsSUS3 in resisting hypoxic stress was also discussed.

  14. Nitrite Regulates Hypoxic Vasodilation via Myoglobin–Dependent Nitric Oxide Generation

    PubMed Central

    Totzeck, Matthias; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; Luedike, Peter; Berenbrink, Michael; Klare, Johann P.; Steinhoff, Heinz-Juergen; Semmler, Dominik; Shiva, Sruti; Williams, Daryl; Kipar, Anja; Gladwin, Mark T.; Schrader, Juergen; Kelm, Malte; Cossins, Andrew R.; Rassaf, Tienush

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypoxic vasodilation is a physiological response to low oxygen (O2) tension that increases blood supply to match metabolic demands. While this response has been characterized for more than 100 years, the underlying hypoxic sensing and effector signaling mechanisms remain uncertain. We have shown that deoxygenated myoglobin (deoxyMb) in the heart can reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO˙) and thereby contribute to cardiomyocyte NO˙ signaling during ischemia. Based on recent observations that Mb is expressed in the vasculature of hypoxia-tolerant fish, we hypothesized that endogenous nitrite may contribute to physiological hypoxic vasodilation via reactions with vascular Mb to form NO˙. Methods and Results We here show that Mb is expressed in vascular smooth muscle and contributes significantly to nitrite-dependent hypoxic vasodilation in vivo and ex vivo. The generation of NO˙ from nitrite reduction by deoxyMb activates canonical soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling pathways. In vivo and ex vivo vasodilation responses, the reduction of nitrite to NO˙ and the subsequent signal transduction mechanisms were all significantly impaired in mice without myoglobin (Mb−/−). Hypoxic vasodilation studies in Mb, endothelial and inducible NO synthase knockout models (eNOS−/−, iNOS−/−) suggest that only Mb contributes to systemic hypoxic vasodilatory responses in mice. Conclusions Endogenous nitrite is a physiological effector of hypoxic vasodilation. Its reduction to NO˙ via the heme globin Mb enhances blood flow and matches O2 supply to increased metabolic demands under hypoxic conditions. PMID:22685116

  15. Hemoglobin Effects on Nitric Oxide Mediated Hypoxic Vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zimei; Cooper, Chris E

    2016-01-01

    The brain responds to hypoxia with an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, such an increase is generally believed to start only after the oxygen tension decreases to a certain threshold level. Although many mechanisms (different vasodilator and different generation and metabolism mechanisms of the vasodilator) have been proposed at the molecular level, none of them has gained universal acceptance. Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play a central role in the regulation of oxygen supply since it is a vasodilator whose production and metabolism are both oxygen dependent. We have used a computational model that simulates blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the brain (BRAINSIGNALS) to test mechanism by which NO may elucidate hypoxic vasodilation. The first model proposed that NO was produced by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and metabolized by the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). NO production declined with decreasing oxygen concentration given that oxygen is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, this was balanced by NO metabolism by CCO, which also declined with decreasing oxygen concentration. However, the NOS effect was dominant; the resulting model profiles of hypoxic vasodilation only approximated the experimental curves when an unfeasibly low K m for oxygen for NOS was input into the model. We therefore modified the model such that NO generation was via the nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin instead of NOS, whilst keeping the metabolism of NO by CCO the same. NO production increased with decreasing oxygen concentration, leading to an improved reproduction of the experimental CBF versus PaO2 curve. However, the threshold phenomenon was not perfectly reproduced. In this present work, we incorporated a wider variety of oxygen dependent and independent NO production and removal mechanisms. We found that the addition of NO removal via oxidation to nitrate mediated by oxyhemoglobin resulted in the

  16. Reduced miR-659-3p Levels Correlate with Progranulin Increase in Hypoxic Conditions: Implications for Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Piscopo, Paola; Grasso, Margherita; Fontana, Francesca; Crestini, Alessio; Puopolo, Maria; Del Vescovo, Valerio; Venerosi, Aldina; Calamandrei, Gemma; Vencken, Sebastian F.; Greene, Catherine M.; Confaloni, Annamaria; Denti, Michela A.

    2016-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a secreted protein expressed ubiquitously throughout the body, including the brain, where it localizes in neurons and is activated microglia. Loss-of-function mutations in the GRN gene are an important cause of familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). PGRN has a neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory activity, and it is neuroprotective in several injury conditions, such as oxygen or glucose deprivation, oxidative injury, and hypoxic stress. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that hypoxia induces the up-regulation of GRN transcripts. Several studies have shown microRNAs (miRNAs) involvement in hypoxia. Moreover, in FTLD patients with a genetic variant of GRN (rs5848), the reinforcement of miR-659-3p binding site has been suggested to be a risk factor. Here, we report that miR-659-3p interacts directly with GRN 3′UTR as shown by luciferase assay in HeLa cells and ELISA and Western Blot analysis in HeLa and Kelly cells. Moreover, we demonstrate the physical binding between GRN mRNA and miR-659-3p employing a miRNA capture-affinity technology in SK-N-BE and Kelly cells. In order to study miRNAs involvement in hypoxia-mediated up-regulation of GRN, we evaluated miR-659-3p levels in SK-N-BE cells after 24 h of hypoxic treatment, finding them inversely correlated to GRN transcripts. Furthermore, we analyzed an animal model of asphyxia, finding that GRN mRNA levels increased at post-natal day (pnd) 1 and pnd 4 in rat cortices subjected to asphyxia in comparison to control rats and miR-659-3p decreased at pnd 4 just when GRN reached the highest levels. Our results demonstrate the interaction between miR-659-3p and GRN transcript and the involvement of miR-659-3p in GRN up-regulation mediated by hypoxic/ischemic insults. PMID:27199656

  17. Archaeal enrichment in the hypoxic zone in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Lauren E; Thrash, J Cameron; deRada, Sergio; Rabalais, Nancy N; Mason, Olivia U

    2015-10-01

    Areas of low oxygen have spread exponentially over the past 40 years, and are cited as a key stressor on coastal ecosystems. The world's second largest coastal hypoxic (≤ 2 mg of O2 l(-1)) zone occurs annually in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The net effect of hypoxia is the diversion of energy flow away from higher trophic levels to microorganisms. This energy shunt is consequential to the overall productivity of hypoxic water masses and the ecosystem as a whole. In this study, water column samples were collected at 39 sites in the nGOM, 21 of which were hypoxic. Analysis of the microbial community along a hypoxic to oxic dissolved oxygen gradient revealed that the relative abundance (iTag) of Thaumarchaeota species 16S rRNA genes (> 40% of the microbial community in some hypoxic samples), the absolute abundance (quantitative polymerase chain reaction; qPCR) of Thaumarchaeota 16S rRNA genes and archaeal ammonia-monooxygenase gene copy number (qPCR) were significantly higher in hypoxic samples. Spatial interpolation of the microbial and chemical data revealed a continuous, shelfwide band of low dissolved oxygen waters that were dominated by Thaumarchaeota (and Euryarchaeota), amoA genes and high concentrations of phosphate in the nGOM, thus implicating physicochemical forcing on microbial abundance.

  18. Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors and NAD(P)H mediate Ca2+ signaling required for hypoxic preconditioning of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bickler, P E; Fahlman, C S; Gray, J; McKleroy, W

    2009-04-21

    Exposure of neurons to a non-lethal hypoxic stress greatly reduces cell death during subsequent severe ischemia (hypoxic preconditioning, HPC). In organotypic cultures of rat hippocampus, we demonstrate that HPC requires inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptor-dependent Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) triggered by increased cytosolic NAD(P)H. Ca2+ chelation with intracellular BAPTA, ER Ca2+ store depletion with thapsigargin, IP3 receptor block with xestospongin, and RNA interference against subtype 1 of the IP3 receptor all blunted the moderate increases in [Ca2+](i) (50-100 nM) required for tolerance induction. Increases in [Ca2+](i) during HPC and neuroprotection following HPC were not prevented with NMDA receptor block or by removing Ca2+ from the bathing medium. Increased NAD(P)H fluorescence in CA1 neurons during hypoxia and demonstration that NADH manipulation increases [Ca2+](i) in an IP3R-dependent manner revealed a primary role of cellular redox state in liberation of Ca2+ from the ER. Blockade of IP3Rs and intracellular Ca2+ chelation prevented phosphorylation of known HPC signaling targets, including MAPK p42/44 (ERK), protein kinase B (Akt) and CREB. We conclude that the endoplasmic reticulum, acting via redox/NADH-dependent intracellular Ca2+ store release, is an important mediator of the neuroprotective response to hypoxic stress.

  19. Identification of Hypoxia-Inducible Target Genes of Aspergillus fumigatus by Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Cellular Respiration as an Important Contributor to Hypoxic Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Kristin; Pähtz, Vera; Hillmann, Falk; Vaknin, Yakir; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Roth, Martin; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Osherov, Nir; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic, airborne pathogen that causes invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. During the infection process, A. fumigatus is challenged by hypoxic microenvironments occurring in inflammatory, necrotic tissue. To gain further insights into the adaptation mechanism, A. fumigatus was cultivated in an oxygen-controlled chemostat under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Transcriptome analysis revealed a significant increase in transcripts associated with cell wall polysaccharide metabolism, amino acid and metal ion transport, nitrogen metabolism, and glycolysis. A concomitant reduction in transcript levels was observed with cellular trafficking and G-protein-coupled signaling. To learn more about the functional roles of hypoxia-induced transcripts, we deleted A. fumigatus genes putatively involved in reactive nitrogen species detoxification (fhpA), NAD+ regeneration (frdA and osmA), nitrogen metabolism (niaD and niiA), and respiration (rcfB). We show that the nitric oxygen (NO)-detoxifying flavohemoprotein gene fhpA is strongly induced by hypoxia independent of the nitrogen source but is dispensable for hypoxic survival. By deleting the nitrate reductase gene niaD, the nitrite reductase gene niiA, and the two fumarate reductase genes frdA and osmA, we found that alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate and fumarate, do not have a significant impact on growth of A. fumigatus during hypoxia, but functional mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes are essential under these conditions. Inhibition studies indicated that primarily complexes III and IV play a crucial role in the hypoxic growth of A. fumigatus. PMID:25084861

  20. Identification of hypoxia-inducible target genes of Aspergillus fumigatus by transcriptome analysis reveals cellular respiration as an important contributor to hypoxic survival.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Kristin; Pähtz, Vera; Hillmann, Falk; Vaknin, Yakir; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Roth, Martin; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Osherov, Nir; Brakhage, Axel A; Kniemeyer, Olaf

    2014-09-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic, airborne pathogen that causes invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. During the infection process, A. fumigatus is challenged by hypoxic microenvironments occurring in inflammatory, necrotic tissue. To gain further insights into the adaptation mechanism, A. fumigatus was cultivated in an oxygen-controlled chemostat under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Transcriptome analysis revealed a significant increase in transcripts associated with cell wall polysaccharide metabolism, amino acid and metal ion transport, nitrogen metabolism, and glycolysis. A concomitant reduction in transcript levels was observed with cellular trafficking and G-protein-coupled signaling. To learn more about the functional roles of hypoxia-induced transcripts, we deleted A. fumigatus genes putatively involved in reactive nitrogen species detoxification (fhpA), NAD(+) regeneration (frdA and osmA), nitrogen metabolism (niaD and niiA), and respiration (rcfB). We show that the nitric oxygen (NO)-detoxifying flavohemoprotein gene fhpA is strongly induced by hypoxia independent of the nitrogen source but is dispensable for hypoxic survival. By deleting the nitrate reductase gene niaD, the nitrite reductase gene niiA, and the two fumarate reductase genes frdA and osmA, we found that alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate and fumarate, do not have a significant impact on growth of A. fumigatus during hypoxia, but functional mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes are essential under these conditions. Inhibition studies indicated that primarily complexes III and IV play a crucial role in the hypoxic growth of A. fumigatus.

  1. North Pacific deglacial hypoxic events linked to abrupt ocean warming.

    PubMed

    Praetorius, S K; Mix, A C; Walczak, M H; Wolhowe, M D; Addison, J A; Prahl, F G

    2015-11-19

    Marine sediments from the North Pacific document two episodes of expansion and strengthening of the subsurface oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) accompanied by seafloor hypoxia during the last deglacial transition. The mechanisms driving this hypoxia remain under debate. We present a new high-resolution alkenone palaeotemperature reconstruction from the Gulf of Alaska that reveals two abrupt warming events of 4-5 degrees Celsius at the onset of the Bølling and Holocene intervals that coincide with sudden shifts to hypoxia at intermediate depths. The presence of diatomaceous laminations and hypoxia-tolerant benthic foraminiferal species, peaks in redox-sensitive trace metals, and enhanced (15)N/(14)N ratio of organic matter, collectively suggest association with high export production. A decrease in (18)O/(16)O values of benthic foraminifera accompanying the most severe deoxygenation event indicates subsurface warming of up to about 2 degrees Celsius. We infer that abrupt warming triggered expansion of the North Pacific OMZ through reduced oxygen solubility and increased marine productivity via physiological effects; following initiation of hypoxia, remobilization of iron from hypoxic sediments could have provided a positive feedback on ocean deoxygenation through increased nutrient utilization and carbon export. Such a biogeochemical amplification process implies high sensitivity of OMZ expansion to warming.

  2. Erythropoietin: a novel therapy for hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Wu, Yvonne W; Gonzalez, Fernando F

    2015-04-01

    Perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) occurs in 1 to 3 per 1000 term births. HIE is not preventable in most cases, and therapies are limited. Hypothermia improves outcomes and is the current standard of care. Yet, clinical trials suggest that 44-53% of infants who receive hypothermia will die or suffer moderate to severe neurological disability. In this article, we review the preclinical and clinical evidence for erythropoietin (EPO) as a potential novel neuroprotective agent for the treatment of HIE. EPO is a novel neuroprotective agent, with remarkable neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects in animals. Rodent and primate models of neonatal brain injury support the safety and efficacy of multiple EPO doses for improving histological and functional outcomes after hypoxia-ischaemia. Small clinical trials of EPO in neonates with HIE have also provided evidence supporting safety and preliminary efficacy in humans. There is currently insufficient evidence to support the use of high-dose EPO in newborns with HIE. However, several on-going trials will provide much needed data regarding the safety and efficacy of this potential new therapy when given in conjunction with hypothermia for HIE. Novel neuroprotective therapies are needed to further reduce the rate and severity of neurodevelopmental disabilities resulting from HIE. High-dose EPO is a promising therapy that can be administered in conjunction with hypothermia. However, additional data are needed to determine the safety and efficacy of this adjuvant therapy for HIE.

  3. Erythropoietin: a novel therapy for hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Wu, Yvonne W; Gonzalez, Fernando F

    2015-04-01

    Perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) occurs in 1 to 3 per 1000 term births. HIE is not preventable in most cases, and therapies are limited. Hypothermia improves outcomes and is the current standard of care. Yet, clinical trials suggest that 44-53% of infants who receive hypothermia will die or suffer moderate to severe neurological disability. In this article, we review the preclinical and clinical evidence for erythropoietin (EPO) as a potential novel neuroprotective agent for the treatment of HIE. EPO is a novel neuroprotective agent, with remarkable neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects in animals. Rodent and primate models of neonatal brain injury support the safety and efficacy of multiple EPO doses for improving histological and functional outcomes after hypoxia-ischaemia. Small clinical trials of EPO in neonates with HIE have also provided evidence supporting safety and preliminary efficacy in humans. There is currently insufficient evidence to support the use of high-dose EPO in newborns with HIE. However, several on-going trials will provide much needed data regarding the safety and efficacy of this potential new therapy when given in conjunction with hypothermia for HIE. Novel neuroprotective therapies are needed to further reduce the rate and severity of neurodevelopmental disabilities resulting from HIE. High-dose EPO is a promising therapy that can be administered in conjunction with hypothermia. However, additional data are needed to determine the safety and efficacy of this adjuvant therapy for HIE. PMID:25800490

  4. Language in children with neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Chenia; Carneiro, Luciana; Vernier, Luíza; Cesa, Carla; Guardiola, Ana; Vidor, Deisi

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (NHIE) is a common neurologic injury, and it may compromise the child's language and cognition. Understanding the process of language acquisition becomes possible with concise knowledge about children's global development. Objective The aim of this study was to observe if language acquisition and development are impaired in children with NHIE. Methods Seventy children with NHIE from 1 to 24 months old were analyzed in a Pediatric Neurology Service of Hospital of Porto Alegre, South of Brazil using the Brunet-Lezine Scale. Statistical analysis used SPSS 13.0 software. Results Twenty-four (60%) of the subjects were boys, with mean gestational age of 35.8 weeks (standard deviation of 4.6) and mean Apgar score of 6.0 at 1 minute and 7.1 at 5 minutes. The variables age versus language showed significant inverse correlation (r =  - 0.566; p = 0.028). As the subjects aged, language tasks became more specific and dependent on the subject's direct action, rather than the subjective interpretation of their guardian. This correlation seems to be closely associated with scale configuration and