Science.gov

Sample records for 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase

  1. Directed Regulation of Multienzyme Complexes of 2-Oxo Acid Dehydrogenases Using Phosphonate and Phosphinate Analogs of 2-Oxo Acids.

    PubMed

    Artiukhov, A V; Graf, A V; Bunik, V I

    2016-12-01

    2-Oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes are important metabolic checkpoints functioning at the intercept of sugar and amino acid degradation. This review presents a short summary of architectural, catalytic, and regulatory principles of the complexes structure and function, based on recent advances in studies of well-characterized family members. Special attention is given to use of synthetic phosphonate and phosphinate analogs of 2-oxo acids as selective and efficient inhibitors of the cognate complexes in biological systems of bacterial, plant, and animal origin. We summarize our own results concerning the application of synthetic analogs of 2-oxo acids in situ and in vivo to reveal functional interactions between 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes and other components of metabolic networks specific to different cells and tissues. Based on our study of glutamate excitotoxicity in cultured neurons, we show how a modulation of metabolism by specific inhibition of its key reaction may be employed to correct pathologies. This approach is further developed in our study on the action of the phosphonate analog of 2-oxoglutarate in animals. The study revealed that upregulation of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is involved in animal stress response and may provide increased resistance to damaging effects, underlying so-called preconditioning. The presented analysis of published data suggests synthetic inhibitors of metabolic checkpoints as promising tools to solve modern challenges of systems biology, metabolic engineering, and medicine.

  2. Kinetic and spectral investigation of allosteric interaction of coenzymes with 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strumiło, S.; Czygier, M.; Kondracikowska, J.; Dobrzyń, P.; Czerniecki, J.

    2002-09-01

    The possible role of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) in the regulation of both multienzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDC) has been investigated by kinetic and spectral methods. The purified PDC and OGDC from animal heart muscle were near saturated with endogenous TPP. The PDC containing the bound coenzyme showed hysteretic behaviour manifested in a lag phase of the catalysed reaction after the contact of PDC with substrates. Exogenous TPP added to the full reaction medium led to a disappearance of the lag phase and to strong reduction of the Michaelis constant ( Km) value for pyruvate, and more moderate decrease of Km for both coenzyme A and NAD. In the case of OGDC exogenous TPP also decreased S 0.5 ( Km) for substrate 2-oxoglutarate. In addition, exogenous TPP changed both the UV and circular dichroism spectra of PDC and last one of OGDC, and lowered the fluorescence emission of the multienzyme complexes containing bound molecules of endogenous coenzyme in their active sites. Thiamine pyrophosphate seems to play, besides its coenzyme function, the role of positive allosteric effector which causes conformational changes of the multienzyme complexes and increases their affinity to substrates.

  3. Limited proteolysis and sequence analysis of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes from Escherichia coli. Cleavage sites and domains in the dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase components.

    PubMed Central

    Packman, L C; Perham, R N

    1987-01-01

    The structures of the dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (E2) components of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes from Escherichia coli were investigated by limited proteolysis. Trypsin and Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase were used to excise the three lipoyl domains from the E2p component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and the single lipoyl domain from the E2o component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. The principal sites of action of these enzymes on each E2 chain were determined by sequence analysis of the isolated lipoyl fragments and of the truncated E2p and E2o chains. Each of the numerous cleavage sites (12 in E2p, six in E2o) fell within similar segments of the E2 chains, namely stretches of polypeptide rich in alanine, proline and/or charged amino acids. These regions are clearly accessible to proteinases of Mr 24,000-28,000 and, on the basis of n.m.r. spectroscopy, some of them have previously been implicated in facilitating domain movements by virtue of their conformational flexibility. The limited proteolysis data suggest that E2p and E2o possess closer architectural similarities than would be predicted from inspection of their amino acid sequences. As a result of this work, an error was detected in the sequence of E2o inferred from the previously published sequence of the encoding gene, sucB. The relevant peptides from E2o were purified and sequenced by direct means; an amended sequence is presented. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3297046

  4. Chronic alcoholism in rats induces a compensatory response, preserving brain thiamine diphosphate, but the brain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases are inactivated despite unchanged coenzyme levels.

    PubMed

    Parkhomenko, Yulia M; Kudryavtsev, Pavel A; Pylypchuk, Svetlana Yu; Chekhivska, Lilia I; Stepanenko, Svetlana P; Sergiichuk, Andrej A; Bunik, Victoria I

    2011-06-01

    Thiamine-dependent changes in alcoholic brain were studied using a rat model. Brain thiamine and its mono- and diphosphates were not reduced after 20 weeks of alcohol exposure. However, alcoholism increased both synaptosomal thiamine uptake and thiamine diphosphate synthesis in brain, pointing to mechanisms preserving thiamine diphosphate in the alcoholic brain. In spite of the unchanged level of the coenzyme thiamine diphosphate, activities of the mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate and pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes decreased in alcoholic brain. The inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was caused by its increased phosphorylation. The inactivation of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) correlated with a decrease in free thiols resulting from an elevation of reactive oxygen species. Abstinence from alcohol following exposure to alcohol reactivated OGDHC along with restoration of the free thiol content. However, restoration of enzyme activity occurred before normalization of reactive oxygen species levels. Hence, the redox status of cellular thiols mediates the action of oxidative stress on OGDHC in alcoholic brain. As a result, upon chronic alcohol consumption, physiological mechanisms to counteract the thiamine deficiency and silence pyruvate dehydrogenase are activated in rat brain, whereas OGDHC is inactivated due to impaired antioxidant ability.

  5. Benzoic acid and specific 2-oxo acids activate hepatic efflux of glutamate at OAT2.

    PubMed

    Pfennig, Till; Herrmann, Beate; Bauer, Tim; Schömig, Edgar; Gründemann, Dirk

    2013-02-01

    The liver is the principal source of glutamate in blood plasma. Recently we have discovered that efflux of glutamate from hepatocytes is catalyzed by the transporter OAT2 (human gene symbol SLC22A7). Organic anion transporter 2 (OAT2) is an integral membrane protein of the sinusoidal membrane domain; it is primarily expressed in liver and much less in kidney, both in rats and humans. Many years ago, Häussinger and coworkers have demonstrated in isolated perfused rat liver that benzoic acid or specific 2-oxo acid analogs of amino acids like e.g. 2-oxo-4-methyl-pentanoate ('2-oxo-leucine') strongly stimulate release of glutamate (up to 7-fold); '2-oxo-valine' and the corresponding amino acids were without effect. The molecular mechanism of efflux stimulation has remained unclear. In the present study, OAT2 from human and rat were heterologously expressed in 293 cells. Addition of 1 mmol/l benzoic acid to the external medium increased OAT2-specific efflux of glutamate up to 20-fold; '2-oxo-leucine' was also effective, but not '2-oxo-valine'. Similar effects were seen for efflux of radiolabeled orotic acid. Expression of OAT2 did not increase uptake of benzoic acid; thus, benzoic acid is no substrate, and trans-stimulation can be excluded. Instead, further experiments suggest that increased efflux of glutamate is caused by direct interaction of benzoic acid and specific 2-oxo acids with OAT2. We propose that stimulators bind to a distinct extracellular site and thereby accelerate relocation of the empty substrate binding site to the intracellular face. Increased glutamate efflux at OAT2 could be the main benefit of benzoate treatment in patients with urea cycle defects.

  6. Substrate specificity of thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Gabriele; Luttik, Marijke A H; Kötter, Peter; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2012-11-01

    Fusel alcohols are precursors and contributors to flavor and aroma compounds in fermented beverages, and some are under investigation as biofuels. The decarboxylation of 2-oxo acids is a key step in the Ehrlich pathway for fusel alcohol production. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, five genes share sequence similarity with genes encoding thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases (2ODCs). PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6 encode differentially regulated pyruvate decarboxylase isoenzymes; ARO10 encodes a 2-oxo-acid decarboxylase with broad substrate specificity, and THI3 has not yet been shown to encode an active decarboxylase. Despite the importance of fusel alcohol production in S. cerevisiae, the substrate specificities of these five 2ODCs have not been systematically compared. When the five 2ODCs were individually overexpressed in a pdc1Δ pdc5Δ pdc6Δ aro10Δ thi3Δ strain, only Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the linear-chain 2-oxo acids pyruvate, 2-oxo-butanoate, and 2-oxo-pentanoate in cell extracts. The presence of a Pdc isoenzyme was also required for the production of n-propanol and n-butanol in cultures grown on threonine and norvaline, respectively, as nitrogen sources. These results demonstrate the importance of pyruvate decarboxylases in the natural production of n-propanol and n-butanol by S. cerevisiae. No decarboxylation activity was found for Thi3 with any of the substrates tested. Only Aro10 and Pdc5 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the aromatic substrate phenylpyruvate, with Aro10 showing superior kinetic properties. Aro10, Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 exhibited activity with all branched-chain and sulfur-containing 2-oxo acids tested but with markedly different decarboxylation kinetics. The high affinity of Aro10 identified it as a key contributor to the production of branched-chain and sulfur-containing fusel alcohols.

  7. Substrate Specificity of Thiamine Pyrophosphate-Dependent 2-Oxo-Acid Decarboxylases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, Gabriele; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; Kötter, Peter; Pronk, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    Fusel alcohols are precursors and contributors to flavor and aroma compounds in fermented beverages, and some are under investigation as biofuels. The decarboxylation of 2-oxo acids is a key step in the Ehrlich pathway for fusel alcohol production. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, five genes share sequence similarity with genes encoding thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases (2ODCs). PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6 encode differentially regulated pyruvate decarboxylase isoenzymes; ARO10 encodes a 2-oxo-acid decarboxylase with broad substrate specificity, and THI3 has not yet been shown to encode an active decarboxylase. Despite the importance of fusel alcohol production in S. cerevisiae, the substrate specificities of these five 2ODCs have not been systematically compared. When the five 2ODCs were individually overexpressed in a pdc1Δ pdc5Δ pdc6Δ aro10Δ thi3Δ strain, only Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the linear-chain 2-oxo acids pyruvate, 2-oxo-butanoate, and 2-oxo-pentanoate in cell extracts. The presence of a Pdc isoenzyme was also required for the production of n-propanol and n-butanol in cultures grown on threonine and norvaline, respectively, as nitrogen sources. These results demonstrate the importance of pyruvate decarboxylases in the natural production of n-propanol and n-butanol by S. cerevisiae. No decarboxylation activity was found for Thi3 with any of the substrates tested. Only Aro10 and Pdc5 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the aromatic substrate phenylpyruvate, with Aro10 showing superior kinetic properties. Aro10, Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 exhibited activity with all branched-chain and sulfur-containing 2-oxo acids tested but with markedly different decarboxylation kinetics. The high affinity of Aro10 identified it as a key contributor to the production of branched-chain and sulfur-containing fusel alcohols. PMID:22904058

  8. Pyruvate Decarboxylase Catalyzes Decarboxylation of Branched-Chain 2-Oxo Acids but Is Not Essential for Fusel Alcohol Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    ter Schure, Eelko G.; Flikweert, Marcel T.; van Dijken, Johannes P.; Pronk, Jack T.; Verrips, C. Theo

    1998-01-01

    The fusel alcohols 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-methyl-propanol are important flavor compounds in yeast-derived food products and beverages. The formation of these compounds from branched-chain amino acids is generally assumed to occur via the Ehrlich pathway, which involves the concerted action of a branched-chain transaminase, a decarboxylase, and an alcohol dehydrogenase. Partially purified preparations of pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1) have been reported to catalyze the decarboxylation of the branched-chain 2-oxo acids formed upon transamination of leucine, isoleucine, and valine. Indeed, in a coupled enzymatic assay with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase, cell extracts of a wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain exhibited significant decarboxylation rates with these branched-chain 2-oxo acids. Decarboxylation of branched-chain 2-oxo acids was not detectable in cell extracts of an isogenic strain in which all three PDC genes had been disrupted. Experiments with cell extracts from S. cerevisiae mutants expressing a single PDC gene demonstrated that both PDC1- and PDC5-encoded isoenzymes can decarboxylate branched-chain 2-oxo acids. To investigate whether pyruvate decarboxylase is essential for fusel alcohol production by whole cells, wild-type S. cerevisiae and an isogenic pyruvate decarboxylase-negative strain were grown on ethanol with a mixture of leucine, isoleucine, and valine as the nitrogen source. Surprisingly, the three corresponding fusel alcohols were produced in both strains. This result proves that decarboxylation of branched-chain 2-oxo acids via pyruvate decarboxylase is not an essential step in fusel alcohol production. PMID:9546164

  9. High-performance liquid chromatographic method for profiling 2-oxo acids in urine and its application in evaluating vitamin status in rats.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Katsumi; Nakata, Chifumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    B-group vitamins are involved in the catabolism of 2-oxo acids. To identify the functional biomarkers of B-group vitamins, we developed a high-performance liquid chromatographic method for profiling 2-oxo acids in urine and applied this method to urine samples from rats deficient in vitamins B1 and B6 and pantothenic acid. 2-Oxo acids were reacted with 1,2-diamino-4,5-methylenebenzene to produce fluorescent derivatives, which were then separated using a TSKgel ODS-80Ts column with 30 mmol/L of KH2PO4 (pH 3.0):acetonitrile (7:3) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Vitamin B1 deficiency increased urinary levels of all 2-oxo acids, while vitamin B6 deficiency only increased levels of sum of 2-oxaloacetic acid and pyruvic acid, and pantothenic acid deficiency only increased levels of 2-oxoisovaleric acid. Profiles of 2-oxo acids in urine samples might be a non-invasive way of clarifying the functional biomarker of B-group vitamins.

  10. Camphor revisited: involvement of a unique monooxygenase in metabolism of 2-oxo-delta 3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Ougham, H J; Taylor, D G; Trudgill, P W

    1983-01-01

    Previously, Pseudomonas putida was shown to degrade (+)-camphor, and cleavage of the first ring of the bicyclic structure involved two monooxygenases (a hydroxylase and a ring oxygen-inserting enzyme), a dehydrogenase, and spontaneous cleavage of an unstable oxygenation product (lactone). Cleavage of the second ring was not demonstrated but was assumed also to occur by ring oxygen insertion, since the predicted oxygenation product was extracted from whole-cell incubation systems. Our investigation established that metabolism of the first ring cleavage intermediate, 2-oxo-delta 3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid, occurred through the sequential action of two inducible enzymes, a coenzyme A ester synthetase and an oxygenase. The oxygenase was purified to homogeneity and had a molecular weight of 106,000. This enzyme carried a single molecule of flavin adenine dinucleotide and consisted of two identical subunits. Iron was not present at a significant level. The oxygenase was specific for NADPH as the electron donor and absolutely specific for the coenzyme A ester of 2-oxo-delta 3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid as the substrate. The reaction stoichiometry was compatible with this enzyme being a monooxygenase, and a mass spectral analysis of the methyl ester of the product confirmed the insertion of a single oxygen atom. The enzyme appeared to be analogous to, although distinct from. 2,5-diketocamphane 1,2-monooxygenase in catalyzing a "biological Baeyer-Villiger" reaction with the formation of a lactone. Structural analogy suggested that this lactone, like the first, was also unstable and susceptible to spontaneous ring opening, although this was not experimentally established. Images PMID:6848481

  11. Evidence for the targeting by 2-oxo-dehydrogenase enzymes in the T cell response of primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Van de Water, J; Ansari, A A; Surh, C D; Coppel, R; Roche, T; Bonkovsky, H; Kaplan, M; Gershwin, M E

    1991-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic autoimmune liver disease that includes the presence of lymphoid infiltrates in portal tracts, high titer autoantibodies against pyruvate dehydrogenase-E2 (PDH-E2) and branched chain ketoacid dehydrogenase-E2 (BCKD-E2), and biliary tract destruction. The mechanism by which the autoimmune response is induced, the specificity of damage to the biliary epithelium, and the role of T cells in PBC are still unknown. To address these issues, we have taken advantage of a mouse mAb, coined C355.1, and studied its reactivity against a panel of liver tissue from normal subjects as well as a panel of liver specimens from patients with PBC, progressive sclerosing cholangitis, and chronic active hepatitis (CAH). C355.1, much like human autoantibodies to PDH-E2, reacts exclusively by immunoblotting with PDH-E2, binds to the inner lipoyl domain of the protein, and inhibits PDH-E2 activity in vitro. In addition, we have also attempted to develop cloned T cell lines that react with PDH-E2 and/or BCKD-E2 using liver biopsies from patients with PBC, compared with CAH. Although monoclonal C355.1 produced typical mitochondrial fluorescence on sections of normal liver, pancreas, lung, heart, thyroid, and kidney, it produced a distinct and intense reactivity when used to stain the bile ducts of patients with PBC. Nine of 13 PBC liver biopsies studied herein contained bile ducts on light microscopy, all of which reacted intensely at a 1:100 culture supernatant dilution of monoclonal C355.1. In contrast, although bile ducts of liver specimens from normals, CAH, and progressive sclerosing cholangitis also reacted with C355.1, such reactivity was exclusively mitochondrial and readily detectable only at a dilution of 1:2. More importantly, we generated CD4+, CD8-, alpha beta TCR+ cloned T cell lines from patients with PBC, but not from CAH, that produced IL-2 specifically in response to PDH-E2 or BCKD-E2.

  12. Biocatalytic Resolution of Rac-α-Ethyl-2-Oxo-Pyrrolidineacetic Acid Methyl Ester by Immobilized Recombinant Bacillus cereus Esterase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Yong; Liu, Yin-Yan; Luo, Wei-Feng; Zheng, Ren-Chao; Ying, Xiang-Xian; Wang, Zhao

    2016-04-01

    A new esterase-producing strain (Bacillus cereus WZZ001) which exhibiting high hydrolytic activity and excellent enantioselectivity on rac-α-ethyl-2-oxo-pyrrolidineacetic acid methyl ester (R, S-1) has been isolated from soil sample by our laboratory. In this study, the stereoselective hydrolysis of (R, S-1) was performed using the recombinant Bacillus cereus esterase which expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Under the optimized conditions of pH 8.0, 35 °C, and concentration of substrate 400 mM, a successful enzymatic resolution was achieved with an e.e. s of 99.5 % and conversion of 49 %. Immobilization considerably increased the reusability of the recombinant esterase; the immobilized enzyme showed excellent reusability during 6 cycles of repeated 2 h reactions at 35 °C. Thereby, it makes the recombinant B. cereus esterase a usable biocatalyst for industrial application.

  13. Spectrophotometric studies of 4-[N'-(4-imino-2-oxo-thiazolidin-5-ylidene)-hydrazino]-benzenesulfonic acid as a reagent for the determination of palladium.

    PubMed

    Lozynska, Lesya; Tymoshuk, Oleksandr; Chaban, Taras

    2015-01-01

    The spectrophotometric behavior of a new, first-time synthesized reagent - 4-[N'-(4-imino-2-oxo-thiazolidin-5-ylidene)hydrazino]-benzenesulfonic acid (ITHBA), has been investigated. A simple, rapid, accurate, selective and sensitive method for the spectrophotometric determination of Pd(II) ions using this reagent was developed. The optimal conditions for the formation of the complexes were found. The molar absorptivity at λ = 438 nm is 7.5 × 10(3) L mol(-1) cm(-1), and Beer's law is observed for the concentrations ranging from 0.2-2.2 µg mL-1Pd(II). The effects of extraneous ions were investigated. The method proved to be successful in determination of palladium in the intermetallides and resistor. The accuracy of spectrophotometric palladium assay in real objects with 4-[N'-(4-imino-2-oxo-thiazolidin-5-ylidene)-hydrazino]-benzenesulfonic acid has been confirmed by voltammetric or atomic absorption spectroscopy method.

  14. 40 CFR 721.10019 - Benzoic acid, 2-chloro-5-nitro-, 1,1-dimethyl-2-oxo-2-(2-propenyloxy) ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-dimethyl-2-oxo-2-(2-propenyloxy) ethyl ester. 721.10019 Section 721.10019 Protection of Environment...-, 1,1-dimethyl-2-oxo-2-(2-propenyloxy) ethyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...-dimethyl-2-oxo-2-(2-propenyloxy) ethyl ester (PMN P-01-563; CAS No. 174489-76-0) is subject to...

  15. Syntheses and biological activities of potent potassium channel openers derived from (+/-)-2-oxo-1-pyridin-3-yl-cyclohexanecarbothioic acid methylamide: new potassium channel openers.

    PubMed

    Brown, T J; Chapman, R F; Mason, J S; Palfreyman, M N; Vicker, N; Walsh, R J

    1993-05-28

    The syntheses and biological activities of (+/-)-2-(cyanomethylene)-1-pyridin-3-ylcyclohexanecarbothioic++ + acid methylamide (6) and trans-(+/-)-2-(cyanomethyl)-1-pyridin-3-ylcyclohexanecarbothioic acid methylamide (14) derived from (+/-)-2-oxo-1-pyridin-3-ylcyclohexanecarbothioic acid methylamide (4) are reported. Compounds were tested for antagonism of potassium-induced contraction of de-endothelialized rat aorta. The effects of modification of 6 and 14 on in vitro K(+)-channel opening activity are presented. These new series of potassium channel openers so derived are best exemplified by (+/-)-2-[2-(phenylsulfanyl)ethylidene]-1-pyridin-3-ylcyclohexan ecarbothioic acid methylamide (13d, RP 66266) and trans-(+/-)-2-[2-[(phenylsulfonyl)amino]ethyl]-1-pyridin-3- ylcyclohexanecarbothioic acid methylamide (25a, RP 66784), which have IC90 values of 3 and 0.3 nM, respectively. The potency of the most active compounds indicates a possible interaction at an extra binding site. The compounds described herein are potential antihypertensive and antianginal agents.

  16. Spectral and in vitro antimicrobial properties of 2-oxo-4-phenyl-6-styryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-pyrimidine-5-carboxylic acid transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhankar, Raksha P.; Rahatgaonkar, Anjali M.; Chorghade, Mukund S.; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2-oxo-4-phenyl-6-styryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-pyrimidine-5-carboxylic acid (ADP) was complexed with acetates of Mn(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). The structures of the ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by microanalysis, IR, NMR, UV-vis spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility and TGA-DTA analyses. Octahedral and square planar geometries were suggested for the complexes in which the central metal ion coordinated with sbnd O donors of ligand and acetate ions. Each ligand binds the metal using carboxylate oxygens. The ligand and complexes were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities against different species of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The present novel pyrimidine containing complexes could constitute a new group of antibacterial and antifungal agents.

  17. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman) investigations and quantum chemical calculations of 4-hydroxy-2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinoline-7-carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Ulahannan, Rajeev T; Panicker, C Yohannan; Varghese, Hema Tresa; Van Alsenoy, C; Musiol, Robert; Jampilek, Josef; Anto, P L

    2014-01-01

    Quinoline derivatives have good nonlinear optical properties and have been extensively studied due to their great potential application in the field of organic light emitting diodes. Quantum chemical calculations of the equilibrium geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman activities of 4-hydroxy-2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinoline-7-carboxylic acid in the ground state were reported. Potential energy distribution of normal modes of vibrations was done using GAR2PED program. The synthesis, (1)H NMR and PES scan results are also discussed. Nonlinear optical behavior of the examined molecule was investigated by the determination of first hyperpolarizability. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show the chemical activity of the molecule. The stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interaction and charge delocalization has been analyzed using NBO analysis. The calculated geometrical parameters are in agreement with that of similar derivatives.

  18. Metabolism of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to 2-oxo-3-hydroxy LSD (O-H-LSD) in human liver microsomes and cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Klette, K L; Anderson, C J; Poch, G K; Nimrod, A C; ElSohly, M A

    2000-10-01

    The metabolism of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to 2-oxo-3-hydroxy lysergic acid diethylamide (O-H-LSD) was investigated in liver microsomes and cyropreserved hepatocytes from humans. Previous studies have demonstrated that O-H-LSD is present in human urine at concentrations 16-43 times greater than LSD, the parent compound. Additionally, these studies have determined that O-H-LSD is not generated during the specimen extraction and analytical processes or due to parent compound degradation in aqueous urine samples. However, these studies have not been conclusive in demonstrating that O-H-LSD is uniquely produced during in vivo metabolism. Phase I drug metabolism was investigated by incubating human liver microsomes and cryopreserved human hepatocytes with LSD. The reaction was quenched at various time points, and the aliquots were extracted using liquid partitioning and analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. O-H-LSD was positively identified in all human liver microsomal and human hepatocyte fractions incubated with LSD. In addition, O-H-LSD was not detected in any microsomal or hepatocyte fraction not treated with LSD nor in LSD specimens devoid of microsomes or hepatocytes. This study provides definitive evidence that O-H-LSD is produced as a metabolic product following incubation of human liver microsomes and hepatocytes with LSD.

  19. Chloroplast protection in plum pox virus-infected peach plants by L-2-oxo-4-thiazolidine-carboxylic acid treatments: effect in the proteome.

    PubMed

    Clemente-Moreno, María José; Díaz-Vivancos, Pedro; Rubio, Manuel; Fernández-García, Nieves; Hernández, José A

    2013-03-01

    Sharka, a disease caused by plum pox virus (PPV), has a significant economic impact on fruit tree production. In this work, we analysed the effect of (2,1,3)-benzothiadiazole (BTH) and L-2-oxo-4-thiazolidine-carboxylic acid (OTC) on plant growth and virus content. OTC reduced sharka symptom, stimulated plant growth and alleviated PPV-induced oxidative stress, indicated by a lack of changes in some oxidative stress parameters. PPV infection reduced chloroplast electron transport efficiency. However, in the presence of BTH or OTC, no changes in the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters were observed. PPV produced an alteration in chloroplast ultrastructure, giving rise to a decrease in starch contents that was less dramatic in OTC-treated plants. Furthermore, PPV reduced the abundance of proteins associated with photosynthesis, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and photorespiration. These changes did not take place in OTC-treated plants, and increases in the expression of proteins related with the aforementioned processes, including ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, were produced, which correlated with the lower decrease in starch contents observed in PPV-infected plants treated with OTC. The results suggested that OTC treatment provides protection to the photosynthetic machinery and/or the chloroplast metabolism in PPV-infected peaches. Thus, OTC could have practical implications in agriculture in improving the vigour of different plant species as well as in immunizing plants against pathogens.

  20. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid and oxindole-3-acetic acid to 2,3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-1H indole-3-acetic acid-7'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside in Zea mays seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonhebel, H. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Radiolabeled oxindole-3-acetic acid was metabolized by roots, shoots, and caryopses of dark grown Zea mays seedlings to 2,3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-1H indole-3-acetic acid-7'-O-beta-D-glycopyranoside with the simpler name of 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside. This compound was also formed from labeled indole-3-acetic acid supplied to intact seedlings and root segments. The glucoside of 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid was also isolated as an endogenous compound in the caryopses and shoots of 4-day-old seedlings. It accumulates to a level of 4.8 nanomoles per plant in the kernel, more than 10 times the amount of oxindole-3-acetic acid. In the shoot it is present at levels comparable to that of oxindole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-acetic acid (62 picomoles per shoot). We conclude that 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside is a natural metabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in Z. mays seedlings. From the data presented in this paper and in previous work, we propose the following route as the principal catabolic pathway for indole-3-acetic acid in Zea seedlings: Indole-3-acetic acid --> Oxindole-3-acetic acid --> 7-Hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid --> 7-Hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside.

  1. Structural and theoretical studies of [6-bromo-1-(4-fluorophenylmethyl)-4(1H)-quinolinon-3-yl)]-4-hydroxy-2-oxo-3-butenoïc acid as HIV-1 integrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Vandurm, Pierre; Cauvin, Christine; Guiguen, Allan; Georges, Benoît; Le Van, Kiet; Martinelli, Valérie; Cardona, Christelle; Mbemba, Gladys; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Hevesi, László; Van Lint, Carine; Wouters, Johan

    2009-08-15

    Ethyl [6-bromo-1-(4-fluorophenylmethyl)-4(1H)-quinolinon-3-yl]-4-hydroxy-2-oxo-3-butenoate 1 and [6-bromo-1-(4-fluorophenylmethyl)-4(1H)-quinolinon-3-yl)]-4-hydroxy-2-oxo-3-butenoïc acid 2 were synthesized as potential HIV-1 integrase inhibitors and evaluated for their enzymatic and antiviral activity, acidic compound 2 being more potent than ester compound 1. X-ray diffraction analyses and theoretical calculations show that the diketoacid chain of compound 2 is preferentially coplanar with the quinolinone ring (dihedral angle of 0-30 degrees ). Docking studies suggest binding modes in agreement with structure-activity relationships.

  2. Detection of metabolites of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in human urine specimens: 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD, a prevalent metabolite of LSD.

    PubMed

    Poch, G K; Klette, K L; Hallare, D A; Manglicmot, M G; Czarny, R J; McWhorter, L K; Anderson, C J

    1999-03-05

    Seventy-four urine specimens previously found to contain lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were analyzed by a new procedure for the LSD metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD (O-H-LSD) using a Finnigan LC-MS-MS system. This procedure proved to be less complex, shorter to perform and provides cleaner chromatographic characteristics than the method currently utilized by the Navy Drug Screening Laboratories for the extraction of LSD from urine by GC-MS. All of the specimens used in the study screened positive for LSD by radioimmunoassay (Roche Abuscreen). Analysis by GC-MS revealed detectable amounts of LSD in all of the specimens. In addition, isolysergic diethylamide (iso-LSD), a byproduct of LSD synthesis, was quantitated in 64 of the specimens. Utilizing the new LC-MS-MS method, low levels of N-desmethyl-LSD (nor-LSD), another identified LSD metabolite, were detected in some of the specimens. However, all 74 specimens contained O-H-LSD at significantly higher concentrations than LSD, iso-LSD, or nor-LSD alone. The O-H-LSD concentration ranged from 732 to 112 831 pg/ml (mean, 16340 pg/ml) by quantification with an internal standard. The ratio of O-H-LSD to LSD ranged from 1.1 to 778.1 (mean, 42.9). The presence of O-H-LSD at substantially higher concentrations than LSD suggests that the analysis for O-H-LSD as the target analyte by employing LC-MS-MS will provide a much longer window of detection for the use of LSD than the analysis of the parent compound, LSD.

  3. DL-S-(2-[N-3-(2-oxo-tetrahydrothienyl)acetamido])-thioglycolic acid: a novel mucolytic agent of the class of homocysteine thiolactone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gobetti, M; Pedrazzoli, A; Bradamante, S

    1986-01-01

    The synthesis and the characterization of some DL-homocysteine thiolactone derivatives are described. Rabbits, affected by acute bronchitis, treated orally with the title compounds showed a considerable reduction of the viscosity of the bronchial mucus. DL-S-(2-[N-3-(2-oxo-tetrahydrothienyl)acetamido

  4. Functional analysis and transcriptional regulation of two orthologs of ARO10, encoding broad-substrate-specificity 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases, in the brewing yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus CBS1483.

    PubMed

    Bolat, Irina; Romagnoli, Gabriele; Zhu, Feibai; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2013-09-01

    The hybrid genomes of Saccharomyces pastorianus consist of subgenomes similar to those of S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus, and impact of the genome structure on flavour production and its regulation is poorly understood. This study focuses on ARO10, a 2-oxo-acid decarboxylase involved in production of higher alcohols. In S. pastorianus CBS1483, four ARO10 copies were identified, three resembled S. cerevisiae ARO10 and one S. eubayanus ARO10. Substrate specificities of lager strain (Lg)ScAro10 and LgSeubAro10 were compared by individually expressing them in a pdc1Δ-pdc5Δ-pdc6Δ-aro10Δ-thi3Δ S. cerevisiae strain. Both isoenzymes catalysed decarboxylation of the 2-oxo-acids derived from branched-chain, sulphur-containing amino acids and preferably phenylpyruvate. Expression of both alleles was induced by phenylalanine, however in contrast to the S. cerevisiae strain, the two genes were not induced by leucine. Additionally, LgSeubARO10 showed higher basal expression levels during growth with ammonia. ARO80, which encodes ARO10 transcriptional activator, is located on CHRIV and counts three Sc-like and one Seub-like copies. Deletion of LgSeubARO80 did not affect LgSeubARO10 phenylalanine induction, revealing 'trans' regulation across the subgenomes. ARO10 transcript levels showed a poor correlation with decarboxylase activities. These results provide insights into flavour formation in S. pastorianus and illustrate the complexity of functional characterization in aneuploid strains.

  5. Active site directed irreversible inactivation of brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase by the conjugated substrate analogue (E)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid: development of a suicide substrate.

    PubMed

    Kuo, D J; Jordan, F

    1983-08-02

    (E)-4-(4-Chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid (CPB) was found to irreversibly inactivate brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC, EC 4.1.1.1) in a biphasic, sigmoidal manner, as is found for the kinetic behavior of substrate. An expression was derived for two-site irreversible inhibition of allosteric enzymes, and the kinetic behavior of CPB fit the expression for two-site binding. The calculated Ki's of 0.7 mM and 0.3 mM for CPB were assigned to the catalytic site and the regulatory site, respectively. The presence of pyruvic acid at high concentrations protected PDC from inactivation, whereas low concentrations of pyruvic acid accelerated inactivation by CPB. Pyruvamide, a known allosteric activator of PDC, was found to enhance inactivation by CPB. The results can be explained if pyruvamide binds only to a regulatory site, but CPB and pyruvic acid compete for both the regulatory and the catalytic centers. [1-14C]CPB was found to lose 14CO2 concurrently with the inactivation of the enzyme. Therefore, CPB was being turned over by PDC, in addition to inactivating it. CPB can be labeled a suicide-type inactivator for PDC.

  6. 40 CFR 721.10020 - Benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro-, 1,1-dimethyl-2-oxo-2-(2-propenyloxy) ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro-, 1,1... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10020 Benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro-,...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10020 - Benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro-, 1,1-dimethyl-2-oxo-2-(2-propenyloxy) ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro-, 1,1... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10020 Benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro-,...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10020 - Benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro-, 1,1-dimethyl-2-oxo-2-(2-propenyloxy) ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro-, 1,1... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10020 Benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro-,...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10020 - Benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro-, 1,1-dimethyl-2-oxo-2-(2-propenyloxy) ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro-, 1,1... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10020 Benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro-,...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10020 - Benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro-, 1,1-dimethyl-2-oxo-2-(2-propenyloxy) ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro-, 1,1... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10020 Benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzoic acid, 5-amino-2-chloro-,...

  11. Synthesis, spectroscopic, crystal structure and DNA binding of Ru(II) complexes with 2-hydroxy-benzoic acid [1-(4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-2H-pyran-3-yl)-ethylidene]-hydrazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitrapriya, Nataraj; Sathiya Kamatchi, Thangavel; Zeller, Matthias; Lee, Hyosun; Natarajan, Karuppannan

    2011-10-01

    Reactions of 2-hydroxy-benzoic acid [1-(4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-2H-pyran-3-yl)-ethylidene]-hydrazide (H 2L) with [RuHCl(CO)(EPh 3) 3] (E = P or As) were carried out and the new complexes obtained were characterized by elemental analysis, electronic, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Complex ( 1) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/ c with unit cell dimensions a = 18.6236(17) Å, b = 12.8627(12) Å, c = 21.683(2) Å, α = 90.00, β = 114.626(2), γ = 90.00 V = 4721.8(8) Å, Z = 4. The crystal structure of the complex shows Ru(II) atom is six-coordinated, forming a slightly distorted octahedral geometry with two P atoms in axial positions, and three chelating donor atoms of the tridentate Schiff base ligand and one carbonyl group located in the equatorial plane. The molecular structure is stabilized by intramolecular O—H···N interactions. No intermolecular hydrogen bond was observed. The intramolecular hydrogen bond exists between the oxygen atom from salicylic acid moiety and nitrogen from the same moiety. A variety of solution studies were carried out for the determination of DNA binding mode of the complexes. The results suggest that both complexes bind to Herring sperm DNA via non intercalative mode.

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopic, crystal structure and DNA binding of Ru(II) complexes with 2-hydroxy-benzoic acid [1-(4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-2H-pyran-3-yl)-ethylidene]-hydrazide.

    PubMed

    Chitrapriya, Nataraj; Kamatchi, Thangavel Sathiya; Zeller, Matthias; Lee, Hyosun; Natarajan, Karuppannan

    2011-10-15

    Reactions of 2-hydroxy-benzoic acid [1-(4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-2H-pyran-3-yl)-ethylidene]-hydrazide (H(2)L) with [RuHCl(CO)(EPh(3))(3)] (E = P or As) were carried out and the new complexes obtained were characterized by elemental analysis, electronic, IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopic techniques and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Complex (1) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c with unit cell dimensions a=18.6236(17) Å, b=12.8627(12) Å, c=21.683(2) Å, α=90.00, β=114.626(2), γ=90.00 V=4721.8(8) Å, Z=4. The crystal structure of the complex shows Ru(II) atom is six-coordinated, forming a slightly distorted octahedral geometry with two P atoms in axial positions, and three chelating donor atoms of the tridentate Schiff base ligand and one carbonyl group located in the equatorial plane. The molecular structure is stabilized by intramolecular O-H···N interactions. No intermolecular hydrogen bond was observed. The intramolecular hydrogen bond exists between the oxygen atom from salicylic acid moiety and nitrogen from the same moiety. A variety of solution studies were carried out for the determination of DNA binding mode of the complexes. The results suggest that both complexes bind to Herring sperm DNA via non intercalative mode.

  13. Stereospecific synthesis of (R)-2-hydroxy carboxylic acids using recombinant E. coli BL21 overexpressing YiaE from Escherichia coli K12 and glucose dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyungdon; Choi, Hyeon-Lok; Fadnavis, Nitin W; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2005-01-01

    The yiaE gene from Escherichia coli K12 was functionally expressed in E. coli BL21 using an IPTG inducible pET expression system (2.1 U/mg), and YiaE was purified to a specific activity of 18 U/mg. The purified enzyme catalyzes reduction of various aromatic and aliphatic 2-oxo carboxylic acids to the corresponding (R)-2-hydoxy carboxylic acids using NADPH. For practical applications, the problem of NADPH recycle was effectively solved by using recombinant E. coli overexpressing YiaE and glucose dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis in the same cell. The recombinant E. coli was used to prepare (R)-phenyllactic acid and (R)-2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutanoic acid from the corresponding 2-oxo carboxylic acids (98% ee) while the alpha-carbonyl group of 2,4-dioxo-4-phenylbutyric acid was reduced regio- and stereospecifically to give (R)-2-hydroxy-4-oxo-4-phenylbutyric acid (97% ee) in quantitative yields. The cells could be recycled for 3 days at room temperature in 100 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) without loss of activity, which reduced to 70% after 1 week.

  14. Structure of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase from Klebsiella pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Michalska, Karolina; Cuff, Marianne E.; Tesar, Christine; Feldmann, Brian; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2011-08-01

    The crystal structure of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase from the De Ley–Doudoroff pathway of galactose metabolism has been determined at 2.1 Å resolution. In most organisms, efficient d-galactose utilization requires the highly conserved Leloir pathway that converts d-galactose to d-glucose 1-phosphate. However, in some bacterial and fungal species alternative routes of d-galactose assimilation have been identified. In the so-called De Ley–Doudoroff pathway, d-galactose is metabolized into pyruvate and d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate in five consecutive reactions carried out by specific enzymes. The penultimate step in this pathway involves the phosphorylation of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate to 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate 6-phosphate catalyzed by 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase, with ATP serving as a phosphoryl-group donor. Here, a crystal structure of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase from Klebsiella pneumoniae determined at 2.1 Å resolution is reported, the first structure of an enzyme from the De Ley–Doudoroff pathway. Structural comparison indicates that the enzyme belongs to the ASKHA (acetate and sugar kinases/hsc70/actin) family of phosphotransferases. The protein is composed of two α/β domains, each of which contains a core common to all family members. Additional elements introduced between conserved structural motifs define the unique features of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase and possibly determine the biological function of the protein.

  15. The Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complexes: Structure-based Function and Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mulchand S.; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from all known living organisms comprise three principal catalytic components for their mission: E1 and E2 generate acetyl-coenzyme A, whereas the FAD/NAD+-dependent E3 performs redox recycling. Here we compare bacterial (Escherichia coli) and human PDCs, as they represent the two major classes of the superfamily of 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes with different assembly of, and interactions among components. The human PDC is subject to inactivation at E1 by serine phosphorylation by four kinases, an inactivation reversed by the action of two phosphatases. Progress in our understanding of these complexes important in metabolism is reviewed. PMID:24798336

  16. Synthesis of biologically active 1'-(2-oxo-2H-benzopyran-6-yl)- 5'-hydroxy-2'-methylindole-3'-amido-2"-phenyl-thiazolidene-4"-ones.

    PubMed

    Mulwad, Vinata V; Parmar, Hitesh T; Mir, Abid A

    2011-01-01

    6-Aminocoumarins on refluxing with ethyl acetoacetate in 1,2-dichloroethane gave two products: 3'-(2-oxo-2H-benzopyran-6-yl-amino)-but-2'-enoic acid ethyl ester 2a-c and N-(-2-oxo-2H-benzopyran-6-yl)-3'-oxo-butyramide 3a-c. Compounds 2a-c on treatment with 1,4-benzoquinone in N2-atmosphere yielded 1'-( 2-oxo-2H-benzopyran-6-yl)-5'-hydroxy-2'-methyl-3'-carbethoxyindoles 4a-c, which on further treatment with hydrazine hydrate gave 1'-(2-oxo-2H-benzopyran-6-yl)-5'-hydroxy-2'-methylindole-3'-acid hydrazides 5a-c. These acid hydrazides were treated with benzaldehyde to give 1'-(2-oxo-2H-benzopyran-6-yl)-5'-hydroxy-2'-methylindole-3'-benzylidene hydrazides 6a-c, which on further treatment with mercaptoacetic acid in 1,4-dioxane yielded 1'-(2-oxo-2H-benzopyran-6-yl)-5'-hydroxy-2'-methylindole-3'-amido-2"-phenylthiazolidene-4"-ones 7a-c. The structures of the compounds have been established on the basis of spectral and analytical data. All compounds have been screened for their antimicrobial activity and have been found to exhibit significant antibacterial and antifungal activities.

  17. Structure of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase from Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Michalska, Karolina; Cuff, Marianne E.; Tesar, Christine; Feldmann, Brian; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    In most organisms, efficient d-galactose utilization requires the highly conserved Leloir pathway that converts d-galactose to d-glucose 1-phosphate. However, in some bacterial and fungal species alternative routes of d-galactose assimilation have been identified. In the so-called De Ley–Doudoroff pathway, d-galactose is metabolized into pyruvate and d-­glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate in five consecutive reactions carried out by specific enzymes. The penultimate step in this pathway involves the phosphorylation of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate to 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate 6-phosphate catalyzed by 2-­oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase, with ATP serving as a phosphoryl-group donor. Here, a crystal structure of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase from Klebsiella pneumoniae determined at 2.1 Å resolution is reported, the first structure of an enzyme from the De Ley–Doudoroff pathway. Structural comparison indicates that the enzyme belongs to the ASKHA (acetate and sugar kinases/hsc70/actin) family of phosphotransferases. The protein is composed of two α/β domains, each of which contains a core common to all family members. Additional elements introduced between conserved structural motifs define the unique features of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase and possibly determine the biological function of the protein. PMID:21795809

  18. The quantitation of 2-oxo-3-hydroxy lysergic acid diethylamide (O-H-LSD) in human urine specimens, a metabolite of LSD: comparative analysis using liquid chromatography-selected ion monitoring mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Poch, G K; Klette, K L; Anderson, C

    2000-04-01

    This paper compares the potential forensic application of two sensitive and rapid procedures (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry) for the detection and quantitation of 2-oxo-3-hydroxy lysergic acid diethylamide (O-H-LSD) a major LSD metabolite. O-H-LSD calibration curves for both procedures were linear over the concentration range 0-8,000 pg/mL with correlation coefficients (r2) greater than 0.99. The observed limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) for O-H-LSD in both procedures was 400 pg/mL. Sixty-eight human urine specimens that had previously been found to contain LSD by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were reanalyzed by both procedures for LSD and O-H-LSD. These specimens contained a mean concentration of O-H-LSD approximately 16 times higher than the LSD concentration. Because both LC methods produce similar results, either procedure can be readily adapted to O-H-LSD analysis for use in high-volume drug-testing laboratories. In addition, the possibility of significantly increasing the LSD detection time window by targeting this major LSD metabolite for analysis may influence other drug-free workplace programs to test for LSD.

  19. Single amino acid polymorphism in aldehyde dehydrogenase gene superfamily.

    PubMed

    Priyadharshini Christy, J; George Priya Doss, C

    2015-01-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase gene superfamily comprises of 19 genes and 3 pseudogenes. These superfamily genes play a vital role in the formation of molecules that are involved in life processes, and detoxification of endogenous and exogenous aldehydes. ALDH superfamily genes associated mutations are implicated in various diseases, such as pyridoxine-dependent seizures, gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria, type II Hyperprolinemia, Sjogren-Larsson syndrome including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Accumulation of large DNA variations data especially Single Amino acid Polymorphisms (SAPs) in public databases related to ALDH superfamily genes insisted us to conduct a survey on the disease associated mutations and predict their function impact on protein structure and function. Overall this study provides an update and highlights the importance of pathogenic mutations in associated diseases. Using KD4v and Project HOPE a computational based platform, we summarized all the deleterious properties of SAPs in ALDH superfamily genes by the providing valuable insight into structural alteration rendered due to mutation. We hope this review might provide a way to define the deleteriousness of a SAP and helps to understand the molecular basis of the associated disease and also permits precise diagnosis and treatment in the near future.

  20. Human liver class I alcohol dehydrogenase gammagamma isozyme: the sole cytosolic 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase of iso bile acids.

    PubMed

    Marschall, H U; Oppermann, U C; Svensson, S; Nordling, E; Persson, B; Höög, J O; Jörnvall, H

    2000-04-01

    3beta-Hydroxy (iso) bile acids are formed during enterohepatic circulation from 3alpha-hydroxy bile acids and constitute normal compounds in plasma but are virtually absent in bile. Isoursodeoxycholic acid (isoUDCA) is a major metabolite of UDCA. In a recent study it was found that after administration of isoUDCA, UDCA became the major acid in bile. Thus, epimerization of the 3beta-hydroxy to a 3alpha-hydroxy group, catalyzed by 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSD) and 3-oxo-reductases must occur. The present study aims to characterize the human liver bile acid 3beta-HSD. Human liver cytosol and recombinant alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) betabeta and gammagamma isozymes were subjected to native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and isoelectric focusing. Activity staining with oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) or oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)) as cofactors and various iso bile acids as substrates was used to screen for 3beta-HSD activity. Reaction products were identified and quantified by gas chromotography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Computer-assisted substrate docking of isoUDCA to the active site of a 3-dimensional model of human class I gammagamma ADH was performed. ADH gammagamma isozyme was identified as the iso bile acid 3beta-HSD present in human liver cytosol, with NAD(+) as a cofactor. Values for k(cat)/K(m) were in the rank order isodeoxycholic acid (isoDCA), isochenodeoxycholic acid (isoCDCA), isoUDCA, and isolithocholic acid (isoLCA) (0.10, 0.09, 0.08, and 0. 05 min(-1) x micromol/L(-1), respectively). IsoUDCA fits as substrate to the 3-dimensional model of the active-site of ADH gammagamma. ADH gammagamma isozyme was defined as the only bile acid 3beta-HSD in human liver cytosol. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases are candidates for the binding and transport of 3alpha-hydroxy bile acids. We assume that ADH gammagamma isozyme is involved in cytosolic bile acid binding and transport processes as well.

  1. Structural, spectral, thermal and biological studies on (Z)-N-benzoyl-N‧-(2-oxo-2-(phenylamino)acetyl)carbamohydrazonothioic acid (H2PABT) and its Cd(II), Hg(II), Zn(II) and U(VI)O22+ complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, T. A.; Ahmed, Sara F.; El-Gammal, O. A.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.

    2015-07-01

    A new metal complexes formed by the reaction of (Z)-N-benzoyl-N‧-(2-oxo-2-(phenylamino)acetyl)carbamohydrazonothioic acid (H2PABT) and Cd(II), Hg(II), Zn(II) and U(VI)O22+ ions. The isolated complexes were prepared and characterized by conventional techniques. The IR data revealed that the ligand behaves as mononegative tridentate in Zn(II) and U(VI)O22+ complexes also, binegative tetradentate on Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes. On the basis of magnetic and electronic spectral data an octahedral geometry for the U(VI)O22+ complex, a tetrahedral structure for the Cd(II), Zn(II) and Hg(II) complexes have been proposed. The IR spectrum of ligand which determined experimentally is compared with those obtained theoretically from DFT calculations. Also, the bond lengths, bond angles, HOMO, LUMO and dipole moments have been calculated. The calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gap reveals that charge transfer occurs within the ligand molecules. The calculated values of binding energies indicates the stability of complexes is higher that of ligand. Also, the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the different thermal degradation steps of the complexes were determined by Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. Moreover, the ligand and its complexes were screened against Bacillus subtilis as Gram positive bacteria and Escherichia coli Gram negative bacteria using the inhibitory zone diameter. Also the antitumor activities of the ligand and its complexes have been evaluated against liver (HePG2) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells. Out of all the synthesized compounds, [Hg2(PABT)Cl2(H2O)2] and [(UO2)(HPABT)(OAc)(H2O)] complexes showed high antibacterial activity with 55.5% while H2PABT showed the best cytotoxic effect on liver and breast cancer cells with IC50 2.10 and 5.91 of cytotoxicity respectively.

  2. In vivo regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in Rhizopus oryzae to improve L-lactic acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Thitiprasert, Sitanan; Sooksai, Sarintip; Thongchul, Nuttha

    2011-08-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is becoming more important due to its ability to produce an optically pure L: -lactic acid. However, fermentation by Rhizopus usually suffers from low yield because of production of ethanol as a byproduct. Limiting ethanol production in living immobilized R. oryzae by inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was observed in shake flask fermentation. The effects of ADH inhibitors added into the medium on the regulation of ADH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as the production of cell biomass, lactic acid, and ethanol were elucidated. 1,2-diazole and 2,2,2-trifluroethanol were found to be the effective inhibitors used in this study. The highest lactic acid yield of 0.47 g/g glucose was obtained when 0.01 mM 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol was present during the production phase of the pregrown R. oryzae. This represents about 38% increase in yield as compared with that from the simple glucose fermentation. Fungal metabolism was suppressed when iodoacetic acid, N-ethylmaleimide, 4,4'-dithiodipyridine, or 4-hydroxymercury benzoic acid were present. Dramatic increase in ADH and LDH activities but slight change in product yields might be explained by the inhibitors controlling enzyme activities at the pyruvate branch point. This showed that in living R. oryzae, the inhibitors regulated the flux through the related pathways.

  3. Levels of Alpha-Glycerophosphate Dehydrogenase, Triosephosphate Isomerase and Lactic Acid Dehydrogenase in Muscles of the Cockroach, ’Periplaneta americana’ L.,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The level of alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase is slightly higher in leg muscle than in thoracic muscle of the American cockroach, Periplaneta ... americana . Triosephosphate isomerase in leg muscle is about twice that of thoracic muscle. There is little lactic acid dehydrogenase in both muscles. (Author)

  4. Rv0132c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Encodes a Coenzyme F420-Dependent Hydroxymycolic Acid Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Purwantini, Endang; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup

    2013-01-01

    The ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to manipulate and evade human immune system is in part due to its extraordinarily complex cell wall. One of the key components of this cell wall is a family of lipids called mycolic acids. Oxygenation of mycolic acids generating methoxy- and ketomycolic acids enhances the pathogenic attributes of M. tuberculosis. Thus, the respective enzymes are of interest in the research on mycobacteria. The generation of methoxy- and ketomycolic acids proceeds through intermediary formation of hydroxymycolic acids. While the methyl transferase that generates methoxymycolic acids from hydroxymycolic acids is known, hydroxymycolic acids dehydrogenase that oxidizes hydroxymycolic acids to ketomycolic acids has been elusive. We found that hydroxymycolic acid dehydrogenase is encoded by the rv0132c gene and the enzyme utilizes F420, a deazaflavin coenzyme, as electron carrier, and accordingly we called it F420-dependent hydroxymycolic acid dehydrogenase. This is the first report on the involvement of F420 in the synthesis of a mycobacterial cell envelope. Also, F420-dependent hydroxymycolic acid dehydrogenase was inhibited by PA-824, and therefore, it is a previously unknown target for this new tuberculosis drug. PMID:24349169

  5. Amino acid substitutions at glutamate-354 in dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli lower the sensitivity of pyruvate dehydrogenase to NADH.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhentao; Do, Phi Minh; Rhee, Mun Su; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2012-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) of Escherichia coli is inhibited by NADH. This inhibition is partially reversed by mutational alteration of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LPD) component of the PDH complex (E354K or H322Y). Such a mutation in lpd led to a PDH complex that was functional in an anaerobic culture as seen by restoration of anaerobic growth of a pflB, ldhA double mutant of E. coli utilizing a PDH- and alcohol dehydrogenase-dependent homoethanol fermentation pathway. The glutamate at position 354 in LPD was systematically changed to all of the other natural amino acids to evaluate the physiological consequences. These amino acid replacements did not affect the PDH-dependent aerobic growth. With the exception of E354M, all changes also restored PDH-dependent anaerobic growth of and fermentation by an ldhA, pflB double mutant. The PDH complex with an LPD alteration E354G, E354P or E354W had an approximately 20-fold increase in the apparent K(i) for NADH compared with the native complex. The apparent K(m) for pyruvate or NAD(+) for the mutated forms of PDH was not significantly different from that of the native enzyme. A structural model of LPD suggests that the amino acid at position 354 could influence movement of NADH from its binding site to the surface. These results indicate that glutamate at position 354 plays a structural role in establishing the NADH sensitivity of LPD and the PDH complex by restricting movement of the product/substrate NADH, although this amino acid is not directly associated with NAD(H) binding.

  6. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  7. The Arabidopsis thaliana REDUCED EPIDERMAL FLUORESCENCE1 Gene Encodes an Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Involved in Ferulic Acid and Sinapic Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ramesh B.; Bastress, Kristen L.; Ruegger, Max O.; Denault, Jeff W.; Chapple, Clint

    2004-01-01

    Recent research has significantly advanced our understanding of the phenylpropanoid pathway but has left in doubt the pathway by which sinapic acid is synthesized in plants. The reduced epidermal fluorescence1 (ref1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana accumulates only 10 to 30% of the sinapate esters found in wild-type plants. Positional cloning of the REF1 gene revealed that it encodes an aldehyde dehydrogenase, a member of a large class of NADP+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. Consistent with this finding, extracts of ref1 leaves exhibit low sinapaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. These data indicate that REF1 encodes a sinapaldehyde dehydrogenase required for sinapic acid and sinapate ester biosynthesis. When expressed in Escherichia coli, REF1 was found to exhibit both sinapaldehyde and coniferaldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and further phenotypic analysis of ref1 mutant plants showed that they contain less cell wall–esterified ferulic acid. These findings suggest that both ferulic acid and sinapic acid are derived, at least in part, through oxidation of coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde. This route is directly opposite to the traditional representation of phenylpropanoid metabolism in which hydroxycinnamic acids are instead precursors of their corresponding aldehydes. PMID:14729911

  8. Mechanism of activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase by dichloroacetate and other halogenated carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Sue; Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.

    1974-01-01

    dichloroacetate inhibited incorporation of 14C from [U-14C]glucose, [U-14C]fructose and from [U-14C]lactate into CO2 and glyceride fatty acid. 8. It is concluded that the inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase by dichloroacetate may account for the activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate oxidation which it induces in isolated rat heart and diaphragm muscles, subject to certain assumptions as to the distribution of dichloroacetate across the plasma membrane and the mitochondrial membrane. 9. It is suggested that activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase by dichloroacetate could contribute to its hypoglycaemic effect by interruption of the Cori and alanine cycles. 10. It is suggested that the inhibitory effect of dichloroacetate on fatty acid synthesis in adipose tissue may involve an additional effect or effects of the compound. PMID:4478069

  9. Functional characterization of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignin is a significant recalcitrant in the conversion of plant biomass to bioethanol. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyze key steps in the pathway of lignin monomer biosynthesis. Brown midrib mutants in Zea mays and Sorghum bicolor with impaired...

  10. Improved Production of Propionic Acid in Propionibacterium jensenii via Combinational Overexpression of Glycerol Dehydrogenase and Malate Dehydrogenase from Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Zhuge, Xin; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua

    2015-01-01

    Microbial production of propionic acid (PA), an important chemical building block used as a preservative and chemical intermediate, has gained increasing attention for its environmental friendliness over traditional petrochemical processes. In previous studies, we constructed a shuttle vector as a useful tool for engineering Propionibacterium jensenii, a potential candidate for efficient PA synthesis. In this study, we identified the key metabolites for PA synthesis in P. jensenii by examining the influence of metabolic intermediate addition on PA synthesis with glycerol as a carbon source under anaerobic conditions. We also further improved PA production via the overexpression of the identified corresponding enzymes, namely, glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and fumarate hydratase (FUM). Compared to those in wild-type P. jensenii, the activities of these enzymes in the engineered strains were 2.91- ± 0.17- to 8.12- ± 0.37-fold higher. The transcription levels of the corresponding enzymes in the engineered strains were 2.85- ± 0.19- to 8.07- ± 0.63-fold higher than those in the wild type. The coexpression of GDH and MDH increased the PA titer from 26.95 ± 1.21 g/liter in wild-type P. jensenii to 39.43 ± 1.90 g/liter in the engineered strains. This study identified the key metabolic nodes limiting PA overproduction in P. jensenii and further improved PA titers via the coexpression of GDH and MDH, making the engineered P. jensenii strain a potential industrial producer of PA. PMID:25595755

  11. Physiological Function of Alcohol Dehydrogenases and Long-Chain (C30) Fatty Acids in Alcohol Tolerance of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, D. S.; Jung, S.-H.; Shen, G.-J.; Hollingsworth, R. I.; Zeikus, J. G.

    2002-01-01

    A mutant strain (39E H8) of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus that displayed high (8% [vol/vol]) ethanol tolerance for growth was developed and characterized in comparison to the wild-type strain (39E), which lacks alcohol tolerance (<1.5% [vol/vol]). The mutant strain, unlike the wild type, lacked primary alcohol dehydrogenase and was able to increase the percentage of transmembrane fatty acids (i.e., long-chain C30 fatty acids) in response to increasing levels of ethanol. The data support the hypothesis that primary alcohol dehydrogenase functions primarily in ethanol consumption, whereas secondary alcohol dehydrogenase functions in ethanol production. These results suggest that improved thermophilic ethanol fermentations at high alcohol levels can be developed by altering both cell membrane composition (e.g., increasing transmembrane fatty acids) and the metabolic machinery (e.g., altering primary alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activities). PMID:11916712

  12. Structural and Mechanistic Studies on Klebsiella pneumoniae 2-Oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-11-12

    The stereospecific oxidative degradation of uric acid to (S)-allantoin was recently shown to proceed via three enzymatic steps. The final conversion is a decarboxylation of the unstable intermediate 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline (OHCU) and is catalyzed by OHCU decarboxylase. Here we present the structures of Klebsiella pneumoniae OHCU decarboxylase in unliganded form and with bound allantoin. These structures provide evidence that ligand binding organizes the active site residues for catalysis. Modeling of the substrate and intermediates provides additional support for this hypothesis. In addition we characterize the steady state kinetics of this enzyme and report the first OHCU decarboxylase inhibitor, allopurinol, a structural isomer of hypoxanthine. This molecule is a competitive inhibitor of K. pneumoniae OHCU decarboxylase with a K{sub i} of 30 {+-} 2 {micro}m. Circular dichroism measurements confirm structural observations that this inhibitor disrupts the necessary organization of the active site. Our structural and biochemical studies also provide further insights into the mechanism of catalysis of OHCU decarboxylation.

  13. Preferential affinity of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quazepam for type I benzodiazepine recognition sites in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Corda, M.G.; Giorgi, O.; Longoni, B.; Ongini, E.; Montaldo, S.; Biggio, G.

    1988-01-01

    The hypnotic drug quazepam and its active metabolite 2-oxo-quazepam (2-oxo-quaz) are two benzodiazepines (BZ) containing a trifluoroethyl moiety on the ring nitrogen at position 1, characterized by their preferential affinity for Type I BZ recognition sites. In the present study we characterized the binding of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz in discrete areas of the human brain. Saturation analysis demonstrated specific and saturable binding of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz to membrane preparations from human cerebellum. Hill plot analysis of displacement curves of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding by 2-oxo-quaz yielded Hill coefficients of approximately 1 in the cerebellum and significantly less than 1 in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, thalamus and pons. Self and cross displacement curves for /sup 3/H-FNT and /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz binding in these brain areas indicated that 2-oxo-quaz binds with different affinities to two populations of binding sites. High affinity binding sites were more abundant in the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus, whereas low affinity sites were predominant in the caudate nucleus and pons. Competition studies of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz and /sup 3/H-FNT using unlabelled ligands indicated that compounds which preferentially bind to Type I sites are more potent at displacing /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz than /sup 3/H-FNT from cerebral cortex membrane preparations. 26 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  14. Production of racemic lactic acid in Pediococcus cerevisiae cultures by two lactate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Gordon, G L; Doelle, H W

    1975-02-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent d(minus)-and l(plus)-lactate dehydrogenases have been partially purified 89- and 70-fold simultaneously from cell-free extracts of Pediococcus cerevisiae. Native molecular weights, as estimated from molecular sieve chromatography and electrophoresis in nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels, are 71,000 to 73,000 for d(minus)-lactate dehydrogenase and 136,000 to 139,000 for l(plus)-lactate dehydrogenase. Electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing gels reveals subunits with approximate molecular weights of 37,000 to 39,000 for both enzymes. By lowering the pyruvate concentration from 5.0 to 0.5 mM, the pH optimum for pyruvate reduction by d(minus)-lactate dehydrogenase decreases from pH 8.0 to 3.6. However, l(plus)-lactate dehydrogenase displays an optimum for pyruvate reduction between pH 4.5 and 6.0 regardless of the pyruvate concentration. The enzymes obey Michaelis-Menten kinetics for both pyruvate and reduced NAD at pH 5.4 and 7.4, with increased affinity for both substrates at the acid pH. alpha-Ketobutyrate can be used as a reducible substrate, whereas oxamate has no inhibitory effect on lactate oxidation by either enzyme. Adenosine triphosphate causes inhibition of both enzymes by competition with reduced NAD. Adenosine diphosphate is also inhibitory under the same conditions, whereas NAD acts as a product inhibitor. These results are discussed with relation to the lactate isomer production during the growth cycle of P. cerevisiae.

  15. Coenzyme Q releases the inhibitory effect of free fatty acids on mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Rauchová, Hana; Drahota, Zdenek; Rauch, Pavel; Fato, Romana; Lenaz, Giorgio

    2003-01-01

    Data presented in this paper show that the size of the endogenous coenzyme Q (CoQ) pool is not a limiting factor in the activation of mitochondrial glycerophosphate-dependent respiration by exogenous CoQ(3), since successive additions of succinate and NADH to brown adipose tissue mitochondria further increase the rate of oxygen uptake. Because the inhibition of glycerophosphate-dependent respiration by oleate was eliminated by added CoQ(3), our data indicate that the activating effect of CoQ(3) is related to the release of the inhibitory effect of endogenous free fatty acids (FFA). Both the inhibitory effect of FFA and the activating effect of CoQ(3) could be demonstrated only for glycerophosphate-dependent respiration, while succinate- or NADH-dependent respiration was not affected. The presented data suggest differences between mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase and succinate or NADH dehydrogenases in the transfer of reducing equivalents to the CoQ pool.

  16. The effect of fatty acids on the regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase in perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Scholz, R; Olson, M S; Schwab, A J; Schwabe, U; Noell, C; Braun, W

    1978-05-16

    The effect of fatty acids on the rate of pyruvate decarboxylation was studied in perfused livers from fed rats. The production of 14CO2 from infused [1-14C]pyruvate was employed as a monitor of the flux through the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction. A correction for other decarboxylation reactions was made using kinetic analyses. Fatty acid (octanoate or oleate) infusion caused a stimulation of pyruvate decarboxylation at pyruvate concentrations in the perfusate below 1 mM (up to 3-fold at 0.05 mM pyruvate) but decreased the rate to one-third of control rates at pyruvate concentrations near 5 mM. These effects were half-maximal at fatty acid concentrations below 0.1 mM. Infusion of 3-hydroxybutyrate also caused a marked stimulation of pyruvate decarboxylation at low pyruvate concentrations. The data suggest that the mechanism by which fatty acids stimulate the flux through the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction in perfused liver at low (limiting) pyruvate concentrations involves an acceleration of pyruvate transport into the mitochondrial compartment due to an exchange with acetoacetate. Furthermore, it is proposed that a relationship exists between ketogenesis and the regulation of pyruvate oxidation at pyruvate concentrations approximating conditions in vivo.

  17. Amino-Acid Sequence of NADP-Specific Glutamate Dehydrogenase of Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, John C.; Chambers, Geoffrey K.; Holder, Anthony A.; Baron, Andrew J.; Taylor, John G.; Fincham, John R. S.; Blumenthal, Kenneth M.; Moon, Kenneth; Smith, Emil L.

    1974-01-01

    A tentative primary structure of the NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase [L-glutamate: NADP oxidoreductase (deaminating), EC 1.4.1.4] from Neurospora crassa has been determined. The proposed sequence contains 452 amino-acid residues in each of the identical subunits of the hexameric enzyme. Comparison of the sequence with that of the bovine liver enzyme reveals considerable homology in the amino-terminal portion of the chain, including the vicinity of the reactive lysine, with only shorter stretches of homology within the carboxyl-terminal regions. The significance of this distribution of homologous regions is discussed. PMID:4155068

  18. Structural insights into the production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid by aldehyde dehydrogenase from Azospirillum brasilense

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hyeoncheol Francis; Park, Sunghoon; Yoo, Tae Hyeon; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2017-01-01

    3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) is an important platform chemical to be converted to acrylic acid and acrylamide. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), an enzyme that catalyzes the reaction of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) to 3-HP, determines 3-HP production rate during the conversion of glycerol to 3-HP. To elucidate molecular mechanism of 3-HP production, we determined the first crystal structure of a 3-HP producing ALDH, α-ketoglutarate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Azospirillum basilensis (AbKGSADH), in its apo-form and in complex with NAD+. Although showing an overall structure similar to other ALDHs, the AbKGSADH enzyme had an optimal substrate binding site for accepting 3-HPA as a substrate. Molecular docking simulation of 3-HPA into the AbKGSADH structure revealed that the residues Asn159, Gln160 and Arg163 stabilize the aldehyde- and the hydroxyl-groups of 3-HPA through hydrogen bonds, and several hydrophobic residues, such as Phe156, Val286, Ile288, and Phe450, provide the optimal size and shape for 3-HPA binding. We also compared AbKGSADH with other reported 3-HP producing ALDHs for the crucial amino acid residues for enzyme catalysis and substrate binding, which provides structural implications on how these enzymes utilize 3-HPA as a substrate. PMID:28393833

  19. Production of optically pure L-phenyllactic acid by using engineered Escherichia coli coexpressing L-lactate dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaojuan; Zhao, Mingyue; Zang, Ying; Zhou, Ying; Ouyang, Jia

    2015-08-10

    L-Phenyllactic acid (L-PLA) is a novel antiseptic agent with broad and effective antimicrobial activity. In addition, L-PLA has been used for synthesis of poly(phenyllactic acid)s, which exhibits better mechanical properties than poly(lactic acid)s. However, the concentration and optical purity of L-PLA produced by native microbes was rather low. An NAD-dependent L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-nLDH) from Bacillus coagulans NL01 was confirmed to have a good ability to produce L-PLA from phenylpyruvic acid (PPA). In the present study, l-nLDH gene and formate dehydrogenase gene were heterologously coexpressed in Escherichia coli. Through two coupled reactions, 79.6mM l-PLA was produced from 82.8mM PPA in 40min and the enantiomeric excess value of L-PLA was high (>99%). Therefore, this process suggested a promising alternative for the production of chiral l-PLA.

  20. Regulation of hepatic branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in rats fed a high-fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC) regulates branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism at the level of branched chain alpha-ketoacid (BCKA) catabolism. It has been demonstrated that the activity of hepatic BCKDC is markedly decreased in type 2 diabetic animal...

  1. 15-Oxoeicosatetraenoic acid is a 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase-derived electrophilic mediator of inflammatory signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Nathaniel W; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Gao, Yang; Blair, Ian A; Freeman, Bruce A; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus

    2015-06-05

    Bioactive lipids govern cellular homeostasis and pathogenic inflammatory processes. Current dogma holds that bioactive lipids, such as prostaglandins and lipoxins, are inactivated by 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15PGDH). In contrast, the present results reveal that catabolic "inactivation" of hydroxylated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) yields electrophilic α,β-unsaturated ketone derivatives. These endogenously produced species are chemically reactive signaling mediators that induce tissue protective events. Electrophilic fatty acids diversify the proteome through post-translational alkylation of nucleophilic cysteines in key transcriptional regulatory proteins and enzymes that govern cellular metabolic and inflammatory homeostasis. 15PGDH regulates these processes as it is responsible for the formation of numerous electrophilic fatty acids including the arachidonic acid metabolite, 15-oxoeicosatetraenoic acid (15-oxoETE). Herein, the role of 15-oxoETE in regulating signaling responses is reported. In cell cultures, 15-oxoETE activates Nrf2-regulated antioxidant responses (AR) and inhibits NF-κB-mediated pro-inflammatory responses via IKKβ inhibition. Inhibition of glutathione S-transferases using ethacrynic acid incrementally increased the signaling capacity of 15-oxoETE by decreasing 15-oxoETE-GSH adduct formation. This work demonstrates that 15PGDH plays a role in the regulation of cell and tissue homeostasis via the production of electrophilic fatty acid signaling mediators.

  2. Novel 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid analogues as potent and selective inhibitors of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiangdong; Lawrence, Harshani; Ganeshapillai, Dharshini; Cruttenden, Adrian; Purohit, Atul; Reed, Michael J; Vicker, Nigel; Potter, Barry V L

    2004-08-15

    Extensive structural modifications to the 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid template are described and their effects on the SAR of the 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isozymes type 1 and 2 from the rat are investigated. Isoform selective inhibitors have been discovered and compound 7 N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3beta-hydroxy-11-oxo-18beta-olean-12-en-30-oic acid amide is highlighted as a very potent selective inhibitor of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 with an IC(50) = 4pM.

  3. The contribution of lactic acid to acidification of tumours: studies of variant cells lacking lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, M.; Hasuda, K.; Stamato, T.; Tannock, I. F.

    1998-01-01

    Solid tumours develop an acidic extracellular environment with high concentration of lactic acid, and lactic acid produced by glycolysis has been assumed to be the major cause of tumour acidity. Experiments using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-deficient ras-transfected Chinese hamster ovarian cells have been undertaken to address directly the hypothesis that lactic acid production is responsible for tumour acidification. The variant cells produce negligible quantities of lactic acid and consume minimal amounts of glucose compared with parental cells. Lactate-producing parental cells acidified lightly-buffered medium but variant cells did not. Tumours derived from parental and variant cells implanted into nude mice were found to have mean values of extracellular pH (pHe) of 7.03 +/- 0.03 and 7.03 +/- 0.05, respectively, both of which were significantly lower than that of normal muscle (pHe = 7.43 +/- 0.03; P < 0.001). Lactic acid concentration in variant tumours (450 +/- 90 microg g(-1) wet weight) was much lower than that in parental tumours (1880 +/- 140 microg/g(-1)) and similar to that in serum (400 +/- 35 microg/g(-1)). These data show discordance between mean levels of pHe and lactate content in tumours; the results support those of Newell et al (1993) and suggest that the production of lactic acid via glycolysis causes acidification of culture medium, but is not the only mechanism, and is probably not the major mechanism responsible for the development of an acidic environment within solid tumours. PMID:9667639

  4. Membrane-bound sugar alcohol dehydrogenase in acetic acid bacteria catalyzes L-ribulose formation and NAD-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase is independent of the oxidative fermentation.

    PubMed

    Adachi, O; Fujii, Y; Ano, Y; Moonmangmee, D; Toyama, H; Shinagawa, E; Theeragool, G; Lotong, N; Matsushita, K

    2001-01-01

    To identify the enzyme responsible for pentitol oxidation by acetic acid bacteria, two different ribitol oxidizing enzymes, one in the cytosolic fraction of NAD(P)-dependent and the other in the membrane fraction of NAD(P)-independent enzymes, were examined with respect to oxidative fermentation. The cytoplasmic NAD-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.56) was crystallized from Gluconobacter suboxydans IFO 12528 and found to be an enzyme having 100 kDa of molecular mass and 5 s as the sedimentation constant, composed of four identical subunits of 25 kDa. The enzyme catalyzed a shuttle reversible oxidoreduction between ribitol and D-ribulose in the presence of NAD and NADH, respectively. Xylitol and L-arabitol were well oxidized by the enzyme with reaction rates comparable to ribitol oxidation. D-Ribulose, L-ribulose, and L-xylulose were well reduced by the enzyme in the presence of NADH as cosubstrates. The optimum pH of pentitol oxidation was found at alkaline pH such as 9.5-10.5 and ketopentose reduction was found at pH 6.0. NAD-Dependent ribitol dehydrogenase seemed to be specific to oxidoreduction between pentitols and ketopentoses and D-sorbitol and D-mannitol were not oxidized by this enzyme. However, no D-ribulose accumulation was observed outside the cells during the growth of the organism on ribitol. L-Ribulose was accumulated in the culture medium instead, as the direct oxidation product catalyzed by a membrane-bound NAD(P)-independent ribitol dehydrogenase. Thus, the physiological role of NAD-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase was accounted to catalyze ribitol oxidation to D-ribulose in cytoplasm, taking D-ribulose to the pentose phosphate pathway after being phosphorylated. L-Ribulose outside the cells would be incorporated into the cytoplasm in several ways when need for carbon and energy sources made it necessary to use L-ribulose for their survival. From a series of simple experiments, membrane-bound sugar alcohol dehydrogenase was concluded to be

  5. Expression of Lactate Dehydrogenase in Aspergillus niger for L-Lactic Acid Production.

    PubMed

    Dave, Khyati K; Punekar, Narayan S

    2015-01-01

    Different engineered organisms have been used to produce L-lactate. Poor yields of lactate at low pH and expensive downstream processing remain as bottlenecks. Aspergillus niger is a prolific citrate producer and a remarkably acid tolerant fungus. Neither a functional lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from nor lactate production by A. niger is reported. Its genome was also investigated for the presence of a functional ldh. The endogenous A. niger citrate synthase promoter relevant to A. niger acidogenic metabolism was employed to drive constitutive expression of mouse lactate dehydrogenase (mldhA). An appraisal of different branches of the A. niger pyruvate node guided the choice of mldhA for heterologous expression. A high copy number transformant C12 strain, displaying highest LDH specific activity, was analyzed under different growth conditions. The C12 strain produced 7.7 g/l of extracellular L-lactate from 60 g/l of glucose, in non-neutralizing minimal media. Significantly, lactate and citrate accumulated under two different growth conditions. Already an established acidogenic platform, A. niger now promises to be a valuable host for lactate production.

  6. Effects of low molecular-weight organic acids and dehydrogenase activity in rhizosphere sediments of mangrove plants on phytoremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Fang, Ling; Lin, Li; Luan, Tiangang; Tam, Nora F Y

    2014-03-01

    This work evaluated the roles of the low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) from root exudates and the dehydrogenase activity in the rhizosphere sediments of three mangrove plant species on the removal of mixed PAHs. The results showed that the concentrations of LMWOAs and dehydrogenase activity changed species-specifically with the levels of PAH contamination. In all plant species, the concentration of citric acid was the highest, followed by succinic acid. For these acids, succinic acid was positively related to the removal of all the PAHs except Chr. Positive correlations were also found between the removal percentages of 4-and 5-ring PAHs and all LMWOAs, except citric acid. LMWOAs enhanced dehydrogenase activity, which positively related to PAH removal percentages. These findings suggested that LMWOAs and dehydrogenase activity promoted the removal of PAHs. Among three mangrove plants, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, the plant with the highest root biomass, dehydrogenase activity and concentrations of LMWOAs, was most efficient in removing PAHs.

  7. An amino acid substitution in the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} gene, affecting mitochondrial import of the precursor protein

    SciTech Connect

    Takakubo, F.; Thorburn, D.R.; Dahl, H.H.M.

    1995-10-01

    A mutation in the mitochondrial targeting sequence was characterized in a male patient with X chromosome-linked pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} deficiency. The mutation was a base substitution of G by C at nucleotide 134 in the mitochondrial targeting sequence of the PDHA1 gene, resulting in an arginine-to-proline substitution at codon 10 (R10P). Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in cultured skin fibroblasts was 28% of the control value, and immunoblot analysis revealed a decreased level of pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha}immunoreactivity. Chimeric constructs in which the normal and mutant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} targeting sequences were attached to the mitochondrial matrix protein ornithine transcarbamylase were synthesized in a cell free translation system, and mitochondrial import of normal and mutant proteins was compared in vitro. The results show that ornithine transcarbamylase targeted by the mutant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} sequence was translocated into the mitochondrial matrix at a reduced rate, suggesting that defective import is responsible for the reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase level in mitochondria. The mutation was also present in an affected brother and the mildly affected mother. The clinical presentations of this X chromosome-linked disorder in affected family members are discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an amino acid substitution in a mitochondrial targeting sequence resulting in a human genetic disease. 58 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Metabolic reprogramming by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-lactic acid axis: Linking metabolism and diverse neuropathophysiologies.

    PubMed

    Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Lee, In-Kyu; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that there is a complex interplay between metabolism and chronic disorders in the nervous system. In particular, the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase (PDK)-lactic acid axis is a critical link that connects metabolic reprogramming and the pathophysiology of neurological disorders. PDKs, via regulation of PDH complex activity, orchestrate the conversion of pyruvate either aerobically to acetyl-CoA, or anaerobically to lactate. The kinases are also involved in neurometabolic dysregulation under pathological conditions. Lactate, an energy substrate for neurons, is also a recently acknowledged signaling molecule involved in neuronal plasticity, neuron-glia interactions, neuroimmune communication, and nociception. More recently, the PDK-lactic acid axis has been recognized to modulate neuronal and glial phenotypes and activities, contributing to the pathophysiologies of diverse neurological disorders. This review covers the recent advances that implicate the PDK-lactic acid axis as a novel linker of metabolism and diverse neuropathophysiologies. We finally explore the possibilities of employing the PDK-lactic acid axis and its downstream mediators as putative future therapeutic strategies aimed at prevention or treatment of neurological disorders.

  9. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase Generation of Electrophilic Lipid Signaling Mediators from Hydroxy Ω-3 Fatty Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Wenzel, Sally; Sobol, Robert W.; Holguin, Fernando; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15PGDH) is the primary enzyme catalyzing the conversion of hydroxylated arachidonic acid species to their corresponding oxidized metabolites. The oxidation of hydroxylated fatty acids, such as the conversion of prostaglandin (PG) E2 to 15-ketoPGE2, by 15PGDH is viewed to inactivate signaling responses. In contrast, the typically electrophilic products can also induce anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative responses. This study determined that hydroxylated docosahexaenoic acid metabolites (HDoHEs) are substrates for 15PGDH. Examination of 15PGDH substrate specificity was conducted in cell culture (A549 and primary human airway epithelia and alveolar macrophages) using chemical inhibition and shRNA knockdown of 15PGDH. Substrate specificity is broad and relies on the carbon position of the acyl chain hydroxyl group. 14-HDoHE was determined to be the optimal DHA substrate for 15PGDH, resulting in the formation of its electrophilic metabolite, 14-oxoDHA. Consistent with this, 14-HDoHE was detected in bronchoalveolar lavage cells of mild to moderate asthmatics, and the exogenous addition of 14-oxoDHA to primary alveolar macrophages inhibited LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression. These data reveal that 15PGDH-derived DHA metabolites are biologically active and can contribute to the salutary signaling actions of Ω-3 fatty acids. PMID:25586183

  10. Equilibrium concentrations for pyruvate dehydrogenase and the citric acid cycle at specified concentrations of certain coenzymes.

    PubMed

    Alberty, Robert A

    2004-04-01

    It is of interest to calculate equilibrium compositions of systems of biochemical reactions at specified concentrations of coenzymes because these reactants tend to be in steady states. Thermodynamic calculations under these conditions require the definition of a further transformed Gibbs energy G" by use of a Legendre transform. These calculations are applied to the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction plus the citric acid cycle, but steady-state concentrations of CoA, acetyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA cannot be specified because they are involved in the conservation of carbon atoms. These calculations require the use of linear algebra to obtain further transformed Gibbs energies of formation of reactants and computer programs to calculate equilibrium compositions. At specified temperature, pH, ionic strength and specified concentrations of several coenzymes, the equilibrium composition depends on the specified concentrations of the coenzymes and the initial amounts of reactants.

  11. Structure and mechanism of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase in complex with the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid.

    PubMed

    Sintchak, M D; Fleming, M A; Futer, O; Raybuck, S A; Chambers, S P; Caron, P R; Murcko, M A; Wilson, K P

    1996-06-14

    The structure of inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) in complex with IMP and mycophenolic acid (MPA) has been determined by X-ray diffraction. IMPDH plays a central role in B and T lymphocyte replication. MPA is a potent IMPDH inhibitor and the active metabolite of an immunosuppressive drug recently approved for the treatment of allograft rejection. IMPDH comprises two domains: a core domain, which is an alpha/beta barrel and contains the active site, and a flanking domain. The complex, in combination with mutagenesis and kinetic data, provides a structural basis for understanding the mechanism of IMPDH activity and indicates that MPA inhibits IMPDH by acting as a replacement for the nicotinamide portion of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide cofactor and a catalytic water molecule.

  12. A pivotal role for beta-aminoisobutyric acid and oxidative stress in dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency?

    PubMed

    van Kuilenburg, A B P; Stroomer, A E M; Abeling, N G G M; van Gennip, A H

    2006-01-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) constitutes the first step of the pyrimidine degradation pathway in which the pyrimidine bases uracil and thymine are catabolised to beta-alanine and beta-aminoisobutyric acid (beta-AIB), respectively. The mean concentration of beta-AIB was approximately 5- to 8-fold lower in urine of patients with a DPD deficiency, when compared to age-matched controls. Comparable levels of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were present in urine from controls and DPD patients at the age <2 year. In contrast, slightly elevated levels of 8-OHdG were detected in urine from DPD patients with an age >2 year, suggesting the presence of increased oxidative stress.

  13. Selective affinity of the benzodiazepines quazepam and 2-oxo-quazepam for BZ1 binding site and demonstration of H-2-oxo-quazepam as a BZ1 selective radioligand

    SciTech Connect

    Billard, W.; Crosby, G.; Iorio, L.; Chipkin, R.; Barnett, A.

    1988-01-01

    Quazepam and 2-oxo-quazepam are novel benzodiazepines containing a trifluoroethyl substituent on the ring nitrogen at position number1. Detailed competition binding experiments (25 to 30 concs.) at 4/sup 0/C were undertaken with these compounds versus /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam using synaptic membranes from rat cortex or cerebellum. Unlike other benzodiazepines, both quazepam and 2-oxo-quazepam distinguished two populations of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding sites in rat cortex which were present in roughly equal proportions and for which the compounds displayed a greater than 20-fold difference in affinity. In cerebellum, no such discrimination of sites was noted for 2-oxo-quazepam, but quazepam did distinguish a small, low affinity population of sites. /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quazepam was prepared and used in competition studies to substantiate the conclusion that these compounds discriminate two populations of benzodiazepine sites in rat cortex. This new radioligand was shown to specifically label BZ binding sites with high affinity in a saturable manner. The competition experiments were then conducted using /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quazepam at a radioligand concentration sufficiently low to ensure that only the higher affinity binding sites which 2-oxo-quazepam discriminates would be occupied. 15 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  14. Inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase by malonic acid produces an "excitotoxic" lesion in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Greene, J G; Porter, R H; Eller, R V; Greenamyre, J T

    1993-09-01

    Excitotoxicity and defects in neuronal energy metabolism have both been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease. These two mechanisms may be linked through the NMDA receptor, activation of which is dependent on neuronal membrane potential. Because the ability to maintain membrane potential is dependent on neuronal energy metabolism, bioenergetic defects may affect NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity. We now report that reversible inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), an enzyme central to both the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the electron transport chain, produces an "excitotoxic" lesion in rat striatum that can be blocked by the NMDA antagonist MK-801. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received intrastriatal stereotaxic injections of the SDH inhibitor malonic acid (1 or 2 mumol) in combination with intraperitoneal injections of vehicle or MK-801 (5 mg/kg) 30 min before and 210 min after malonic acid. Animals were killed 72 h after surgery, and brains were processed for histology, cytochrome oxidase activity, and [3H]MK-801 and [3H]AMPA autoradiography. The higher dose of malonic acid (2 mumol) produced large lesions that were markedly attenuated by treatment with MK-801 (28.1 +/- 3.6 vs. 4.7 +/- 2.6 mm3; p < 0.001). [3H]MK-801 and [3H]AMPA binding were reduced in the lesions by 60 and 63%, respectively. One micromole of malonic acid produced smaller lesions that were almost completely blocked by MK-801 treatment (9.6 +/- 1.3 vs. 0.06 +/- 0.04 mm3; p < 0.0001). The toxic effects of malonic acid were due specifically to inhibition of SDH inasmuch as coinjection of a threefold excess of succinate with the malonic acid blocked the striatal lesions (p < 0.002).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Lactic acid production by Rhizopus oryzae transformants with modified lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Skory, C D

    2004-04-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is capable of producing high levels of lactic acid by the fermentation of glucose. Yields typically vary over 60-80%, with the remaining glucose diverted primarily into ethanol fermentation. The goal of this work was to increase lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, so lactic acid fermentation could more effectively compete for available pyruvate. Three different constructs, pLdhA71X, pLdhA48XI, and pLdhA89VII, containing various lengths of the ldhA gene fragment, were transformed into R. oryzae. This fungus rarely integrates DNA used for transformation, but instead relies on extra-chromosomal replication in a high-copy number. Plasmid pLdhA48XI was linearized prior to transformation in order to facilitate integration into the pyrG gene used for selection. Isolates transformed with ldhA containing plasmid were compared with both the wild-type parent strain and the auxotrophic recipient strain containing vector only. All isolates transformed with pLdhA71X or pLdhA48XI had multiple copies of the ldhA gene that resulted in ldhA transcript accumulation, LDH specific activity, and lactic acid production higher than the controls. Integration of plasmid pLdhA48XI increased the stability of the strain, but did not seem to offer any benefit for increasing lactic acid production. Since lactic acid fermentation competes with ethanol and fumaric acid production, it was not unexpected that increased lactic acid production was always concomitant with decreased ethanol and fumaric acid. Plasmid pLdhA71X, containing a large ldhA fragment (6.1 kb), routinely yielded higher levels of lactic acid than the smaller region (3.3 kb) used to construct plasmid pLdhA48XI. The greatest levels of ldhA transcript and enzyme production occurred with isolates transformed with plasmid pLdhA89VII. However, these transformants always produced less lactic acid and higher amounts of ethanol, fumaric, and glycerol compared with the control.

  16. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and citric acid cycle intermediates during high cardiac power generation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naveen; Okere, Isidore C; Brunengraber, Daniel Z; McElfresh, Tracy A; King, Kristen L; Sterk, Joseph P; Huang, Hazel; Chandler, Margaret P; Stanley, William C

    2005-01-15

    A high rate of cardiac work increases citric acid cycle (CAC) turnover and flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH); however, the mechanisms for these effects are poorly understood. We tested the hypotheses that an increase in cardiac energy expenditure: (1) activates PDH and reduces the product/substrate ratios ([NADH]/[NAD(+)] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH]); and (2) increases the content of CAC intermediates. Measurements were made in anaesthetized pigs under control conditions and during 15 min of a high cardiac workload induced by dobutamine (Dob). A third group was made hyperglycaemic (14 mm) to stimulate flux through PDH during the high work state (Dob + Glu). Glucose and fatty acid oxidation were measured with (14)C-glucose and (3)H-oleate. Compared with control, the high workload groups had a similar increase in myocardial oxygen consumption ( and cardiac power. Dob increased PDH activity and glucose oxidation above control, but did not reduce the [NADH]/[NAD(+)] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH] ratios, and there were no differences between the Dob and Dob + Glu groups. An additional group was treated with Dob + Glu and oxfenicine (Oxf) to inhibit fatty acid oxidation: this increased [CoA-SH] and glucose oxidation compared with Dob; however, there was no further activation of PDH or decrease in the [NADH]/[NAD(+)] ratio. Content of the 4-carbon CAC intermediates succinate, fumarate and malate increased 3-fold with Dob, but there was no change in citrate content, and the Dob + Glu and Dob + Glu + Oxf groups were not different from Dob. In conclusion, compared with normal conditions, at high myocardial energy expenditure (1) the increase in flux through PDH is regulated by activation of the enzyme complex and continues to be partially controlled through inhibition by fatty acid oxidation, and (2) there is expansion of the CAC pool size at the level of 4-carbon intermediates that is largely independent of myocardial fatty acid oxidation.

  17. Papyriferic acid, an antifeedant triterpene from birch trees, inhibits succinate dehydrogenase from liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    McLean, Stuart; Richards, Stephen M; Cover, Siow-Leng; Brandon, Sue; Davies, Noel W; Bryant, John P; Clausen, Thomas P

    2009-10-01

    Papyriferic acid (PA) is a triterpene that is secreted by glands on twigs of the juvenile ontogenetic phase of resin producing tree birches (e.g., Betula neoalaskana, B. pendula) and that deters browsing by mammals such as the snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus). We investigated the pharmacology of PA as a first step in understanding its antifeedant effect. After oral administration to rats, PA and several metabolites were found in feces but not urine, indicating that little was absorbed systemically. Metabolism involved various combinations of hydrolysis of its acetyl and malonyl ester groups, and hydroxylation of the terpene moiety. The presence of a malonyl group suggested a possible interaction with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), a mitochondrial enzyme known to be competitively inhibited by malonic acid. The effect of PA on the oxidation of succinate by SDH was examined in mitochondrial preparations from livers of ox, rabbit, and rat. In all three species, PA was a potent inhibitor of SDH. Kinetic analysis indicated that, unlike malonate, PA acted by an uncompetitive mechanism, meaning that it binds to the enzyme-substrate complex. The hydrolysis product of PA, betulafolienetriol oxide, was inactive on SDH. Overall, the evidence suggests that PA acts as the intact molecule and interacts at a site other than the succinate binding site, possibly binding to the ubiquinone sites on complex II. Papyriferic acid was potent (K(iEIS) ranged from 25 to 45 microM in the three species) and selective, as malate dehydrogenase was unaffected. Although rigorous proof will require further experiments, we have a plausible mechanism for the antifeedant effect of PA: inhibition of SDH in gastrointestinal cells decreases mitochondrial energy production resulting in a noxious stimulus, 5-HT release, and sensations of nausea and discomfort. There is evidence that the co-evolution of birches and hares over a large and geographically-diverse area in Northern Europe and America has

  18. Crystal structure of human aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A3 complexed with NAD+ and retinoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Andrea; Li, Jianfeng; Donini, Stefano; Sobol, Robert W.; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) catalyzes the oxidation of retinal to the pleiotropic factor retinoic acid using NAD+. The level of ALDHs enzymatic activity has been used as a cancer stem cell marker and seems to correlate with tumour aggressiveness. Elevated ALDH1A3 expression in mesenchymal glioma stem cells highlights the potential of this isozyme as a prognosis marker and drug target. Here we report the first crystal structure of human ALDH1A3 complexed with NAD+ and the product all-trans retinoic acid (REA). The tetrameric ALDH1A3 folds into a three domain-based architecture highly conserved along the ALDHs family. The structural analysis revealed two different and coupled conformations for NAD+ and REA that we propose to represent two snapshots along the catalytic cycle. Indeed, the isoprenic moiety of REA points either toward the active site cysteine, or moves away adopting the product release conformation. Although ALDH1A3 shares high sequence identity with other members of the ALDH1A family, our structural analysis revealed few peculiar residues in the 1A3 isozyme active site. Our data provide information into the ALDH1As catalytic process and can be used for the structure-based design of selective inhibitors of potential medical interest. PMID:27759097

  19. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase binds nucleic acids in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Jeremy E; Hamaguchi, Nobuko; Belenky, Peter; Mortimer, Sarah E; Stanton, Martin; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2004-01-01

    Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. In addition to the catalytic domain, IMPDH contains a subdomain of unknown function composed of two cystathione beta-synthase domains. Our results, using three different assays, show that IMPDHs from Tritrichomonas foetus, Escherichia coli, and both human isoforms bind single-stranded nucleic acids with nanomolar affinity via the subdomain. Approx. 100 nucleotides are bound per IMPDH tetramer. Deletion of the subdomain decreases affinity 10-fold and decreases site size to 60 nucleotides, whereas substitution of conserved Arg/Lys residues in the subdomain with Glu decreases affinity by 20-fold. IMPDH is found in the nucleus of human cells, as might be expected for a nucleic-acid-binding protein. Lastly, immunoprecipitation experiments show that IMPDH binds both RNA and DNA in vivo. These experiments indicate that IMPDH has a previously unappreciated role in replication, transcription or translation that is mediated by the subdomain. PMID:14766016

  20. Formation of ursodeoxycholic acid from chenodeoxycholic acid by a 7 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-elaborating Eubacterium aerofaciens strain cocultured with 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-elaborating organisms.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, I A; Rochon, Y P; Hutchison, D M; Holdeman, L V

    1982-01-01

    A gram-positive, anaerobic, chain-forming, rod-shaped anaerobe (isolate G20-7) was isolated from normal human feces. This organism was identified by cellular morphology as well as fermentative and biochemical data as Eubacterium aerofaciens. When isolate G20-7 was grown in the presence of Bacteroides fragilis or Escherichia coli (or another 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase producer) and chenodeoxycholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid produced. Time course curves revealed that 3 alpha-hydroxy-7-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid produced by B. fragilis or E. coli or introduced into the medium as a pure substance was reduced by G20-7 specifically to ursodeoxycholic acid. The addition of glycine- and taurine-conjugated primary bile acids (chenodeoxycholic and cholic acids) and other bile acids to binary cultures of B. fragilis and G20-7 revealed that (i) both conjugates were hydrolyzed to give free bile acids, (ii) ursocholic acid (3 alpha, 7 beta, 12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholanoic acid) was produced when conjugated (or free) cholic acid was the substrate, and (iii) the epimerization reaction was at least partially reversible. Corroborating these observations, an NADP-dependent 7 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (reacting specifically with 7 beta-OH-groups) was demonstrated in cell-free preparations of isolate G20-7; production of the enzyme was optimal at between 12 and 18 h of growth. This enzyme, when measured in the oxidative direction, was active with ursodeoxycholic acid, ursocholic acid, and the taurine conjugate of ursodeoxycholic acid (but not with chenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic, or cholic acids) and displayed an optimal pH range of 9.8 to 10.2 Images PMID:6758698

  1. Synthesis of novel biologically active heterocyclic compounds from 2-oxo-2H-benzopyran-6-yl-imidazolidine.

    PubMed

    Mulwad, Vinata V; Langi, Bhushan P; Chaskar, Atul C

    2011-01-01

    6-Aminocoumarin on treatment with oxalyl chloride gives coumarinyl-6-isocynate (1a-c) which on treatment with glycine gives 1H-3-[2'-oxo-2'H-benzopyran-6'-yl]-5-imidazolidine-2, 4-dione (2a-c). (2a-c) when refluxed with o-chlorobenzaldehyde, m-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde and 3-nitrobenzaldehyde separately gives 1H-5-(2"-chlorobenzylidene)-3-(2'-oxo-2'H-benzopyran-6'-yl) imidazolidine-2,4-dione (3a-c), 1H-5-(3"-hydroxybenzylidene)-3-(2'-oxo-2'H-benzopyran-6'-yl) imidazolidine-2,4-dione (4a-c), 1H-5-(3",4"-dimethoxybenzylidene)-3-(2'-oxo-2'H-benzopyran-6'-yl) imidazolidine-2,4-dione (5a-c) and 1H-5-(3"-nitrobenzylidene)-3-(2'-oxo-2'H-benzopyran-6'-yl) imidazolidine-2,4-dione (6a-c), respectively. 3-(2"-Chlorophenyl)-3a,4-dihydro-6-(2'-oxo-2'H-benzopyran-6'-yl) imidazo[4,5-c]isoxazol-5-one 7a-c is obtained from (3a-c) and hydroxylamine hydrochloride while 2,3a,4-trihydro-3-(3"-hydroxyphenyl)-6-(2'-oxo-2'H-benzopyran-6'-yl) imidazo[4,5-c]pyrazol-5-one (8a-c) obtained by reaction of (4a-c) with hydrazine hydrate. Compound (5a-c) on treatment with urea gives 5,7-dihydro-2-hydroxy-6-(3",4"-dimethoxyphenyl)-9-(2'-oxo-2'H-benzopyran-6'-yl) purin-8-one (9a-c) and compound (6a-c) on treatment with thiourea gives 5,7-dihydro-2-mercapto-6-(3"-nitrophenyl)-9-(2'-oxo-2'H-benzopyran-6'-yl)purin-8-one (10a-c). The structures of the compounds have been established on the basis of spectral analytical data. All the compounds have been screened for their antimicrobial activities against three bacterial strains S. aureus, S. typhi and E. coli. Compounds 2b, 3b, 4b, 5b, 6b, 7b, 8b, 9b and 10b with the presence of methyl groups at C7' and C8' of coumarin moiety were found to be more active than others.

  2. Phosphatidic Acid Binds to Cytosolic Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase and Promotes Its Cleavage in Arabidopsis *

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Chul; Guo, Liang; Wang, Xuemin

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) is a class of lipid messengers involved in a variety of physiological processes. To understand how PA mediates cell functions in plants, we used a PA affinity membrane assay to isolate PA-binding proteins from Camelina sativa followed by mass spectrometric sequencing. A cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC) was identified to bind to PA, and detailed analysis was carried out subsequently using GAPC1 and GAPC1 from Arabidopsis. The PA and GAPC binding was abolished by the cation zinc whereas oxidation of GAPCs promoted the PA binding. PA had little impact on the GAPC catalytic activity in vitro, but the PA treatment of Arabidopsis seedlings induced proteolytic cleavage of GAPC2 and inhibited Arabidopsis seedling growth. The extent of PA inhibition was greater in GAPC-overexpressing than wild-type seedlings, but the greater PA inhibition was abolished by application of zinc to the seedling. The PA treatment also reduced the expression of genes involved in PA synthesis and utilization, and the PA-reduced gene expression was partially recovered by zinc treatment. These data suggest that PA binds to oxidized GAPDH and promotes its cleavage and that the PA and GAPC interaction may provide a signaling link coordinating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. PMID:23504314

  3. Design of novel dihydroxynaphthoic acid inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Megnassan, Eugene; Keita, Melalie; Bieri, Cecile; Esmel, Akori; Frecer, Vladimir; Miertus, Stanislav

    2012-09-01

    We have studied inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (pfLDH) by dihydroxynaphthoic acid (DHNA) analogues derivatives of hemigossypol-sesquiterpene found in cottonseed known to exhibit antimalarial activity. Molecular models of pfLDH-DHNA complexes were prepared from high-resolution crystal structures containing DHNA and azole inhibitors and binding affinities of the inhibitors were computed by molecular mechanics - polarizable continuum model of solvation (MM-PCM) approach. The 3D structures of the pfLDH-DHNA complexes were validated by a QSAR model, which confirmed consistency between the computed binding affinities and experimental inhibition constants for a training set and validation set of twelve DHNA inhibitors obtained from literature. Novel more potent DHNA analogs were identified by structure-based molecular design and predicted to inhibit pfLDH in the low nanomolar concentration range. In addition, the designed DHNA analogs displayed favorable predicted ADME-related profiles and an elevated selectivity for the pfLDH over the human isoform.

  4. Identification and Validation of Aspartic Acid Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase as a New Anti-Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Target

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jianzhou; Yang, Yanhui; Xiao, Chunling; Guan, Yan; Hao, Xueqin; Deng, Qi; Lu, Zhongyang

    2015-01-01

    Aspartic acid semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH) lies at the first branch point in the essential aspartic acid biosynthetic pathway that is found in bacteria and plants but is absent from animals. Mutations in the asadh gene encoding ASADH produce an inactive enzyme, which is lethal. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the hypothesis that ASADH represents a new anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) target. An asadh promoter-replacement mutant MTB, designated MTB::asadh, in which asadh gene expression is regulated by pristinamycin, was constructed to investigate the physiological functions of ASADH in the host bacteria. Bacterial growth was evaluated by monitoring OD600 and ASADH expression was analyzed by Western blotting. The results showed that the growth and survival of MTB::asadh was completely inhibited in the absence of the inducer pristinamycin. Furthermore, the growth of the mutant was rigorously dependent on the presence of the inducer in the medium. The starved mutant exhibited a marked reduction (approximately 80%) in the cell wall materials compared to the wild-type, in addition to obvious morphological differences that were apparent in scanning electron microscopy studies; however, with the addition of pristinamycin, the cell wall contents and morphology similar to those of the wild-type strain were recovered. The starved mutant also exhibited almost no pathogenicity in an in vitro model of infection using mouse macrophage J774A.1 cells. The mutant showed a concentration-dependent recovery of pathogenicity with the addition of the inducer. These findings implicate ASADH as a promising target for the development of novel anti-MTB drugs. PMID:26437401

  5. Identification and Validation of Aspartic Acid Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase as a New Anti-Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Target.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianzhou; Yang, Yanhui; Xiao, Chunling; Guan, Yan; Hao, Xueqin; Deng, Qi; Lu, Zhongyang

    2015-09-30

    Aspartic acid semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH) lies at the first branch point in the essential aspartic acid biosynthetic pathway that is found in bacteria and plants but is absent from animals. Mutations in the asadh gene encoding ASADH produce an inactive enzyme, which is lethal. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the hypothesis that ASADH represents a new anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) target. An asadh promoter-replacement mutant MTB, designated MTB::asadh, in which asadh gene expression is regulated by pristinamycin, was constructed to investigate the physiological functions of ASADH in the host bacteria. Bacterial growth was evaluated by monitoring OD600 and ASADH expression was analyzed by Western blotting. The results showed that the growth and survival of MTB::asadh was completely inhibited in the absence of the inducer pristinamycin. Furthermore, the growth of the mutant was rigorously dependent on the presence of the inducer in the medium. The starved mutant exhibited a marked reduction (approximately 80%) in the cell wall materials compared to the wild-type, in addition to obvious morphological differences that were apparent in scanning electron microscopy studies; however, with the addition of pristinamycin, the cell wall contents and morphology similar to those of the wild-type strain were recovered. The starved mutant also exhibited almost no pathogenicity in an in vitro model of infection using mouse macrophage J774A.1 cells. The mutant showed a concentration-dependent recovery of pathogenicity with the addition of the inducer. These findings implicate ASADH as a promising target for the development of novel anti-MTB drugs.

  6. Effect of malonate and p-chlorophenoxy acetic acid on hepatic succinic dehydrogenase activity of ageing lizards.

    PubMed

    Jena, B S; Patnaik, B K

    1990-01-01

    The degree of inhibition of hepatic succinic dehydrogenase activity by malonate, a competitive inhibitor, did not differ between young and middle-aged lizards. On the other hand, the same parameter increased significantly between middle-aged and old lizards. The percent inhibition of enzyme activity by p-chlorophenoxy acetic acid was also age-dependent, being higher in middle-aged and old than in young lizards.

  7. The Pyruvate and α-Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complexes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyze Pyocyanin and Phenazine-1-carboxylic Acid Reduction via the Subunit Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Nathaniel R; Wang, Benjamin X; Hoy, Julie A; Newman, Dianne K

    2017-03-31

    Phenazines are a class of redox-active molecules produced by diverse bacteria and archaea. Many of the biological functions of phenazines, such as mediating signaling, iron acquisition, and redox homeostasis, derive from their redox activity. Although prior studies have focused on extracellular phenazine oxidation by oxygen and iron, here we report a search for reductants and catalysts of intracellular phenazine reduction in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Enzymatic assays in cell-free lysate, together with crude fractionation and chemical inhibition, indicate that P. aeruginosa contains multiple enzymes that catalyze the reduction of the endogenous phenazines pyocyanin and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in both cytosolic and membrane fractions. We used chemical inhibitors to target general enzyme classes and found that an inhibitor of flavoproteins and heme-containing proteins, diphenyleneiodonium, effectively inhibited phenazine reduction in vitro, suggesting that most phenazine reduction derives from these enzymes. Using natively purified proteins, we demonstrate that the pyruvate and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes directly catalyze phenazine reduction with pyruvate or α-ketoglutarate as electron donors. Both complexes transfer electrons to phenazines through the common subunit dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, a flavoprotein encoded by the gene lpdG Although we were unable to co-crystallize LpdG with an endogenous phenazine, we report its X-ray crystal structure in the apo-form (refined to 1.35 Å), bound to NAD(+) (1.45 Å), and bound to NADH (1.79 Å). In contrast to the notion that phenazines support intracellular redox homeostasis by oxidizing NADH, our work suggests that phenazines may substitute for NAD(+) in LpdG and other enzymes, achieving the same end by a different mechanism.

  8. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 3 converts farnesal into farnesoic acid in the corpora allata of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Perez, Crisalejandra; Nouzova, Marcela; Clifton, Mark E; Garcia, Elena Martin; LeBlanc, Elizabeth; Noriega, Fernando G

    2013-08-01

    The juvenile hormones (JHs) play a central role in insect reproduction, development and behavior. Interrupting JH biosynthesis has long been considered a promising strategy for the development of target-specific insecticides. Using a combination of RNAi, in vivo and in vitro studies we characterized the last unknown biosynthetic enzyme of the JH pathway, a fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (AaALDH3) that oxidizes farnesal into farnesoic acid (FA) in the corpora allata (CA) of mosquitoes. The AaALDH3 is structurally and functionally a NAD(+)-dependent class 3 ALDH showing tissue- and developmental-stage-specific splice variants. Members of the ALDH3 family play critical roles in the development of cancer and Sjögren-Larsson syndrome in humans, but have not been studies in groups other than mammals. Using a newly developed assay utilizing fluorescent tags, we demonstrated that AaALDH3 activity, as well as the concentrations of farnesol, farnesal and FA were different in CA of sugar and blood-fed females. In CA of blood-fed females the low catalytic activity of AaALDH3 limited the flux of precursors and caused a remarkable increase in the pool of farnesal with a decrease in FA and JH synthesis. The accumulation of the potentially toxic farnesal stimulated the activity of a reductase that converted farnesal back into farnesol, resulting in farnesol leaking out of the CA. Our studies indicated AaALDH3 plays a key role in the regulation of JH synthesis in blood-fed females and mosquitoes seem to have developed a "trade-off" system to balance the key role of farnesal as a JH precursor with its potential toxicity.

  9. Glutamate dehydrogenase requirement for apoptosis induced by aristolochic acid in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Victor; Whyard, Terry; Bonala, Radha; Johnson, Francis; Grollman, Arthur

    2011-12-01

    Ingestion of aristolochic acids (AA) contained in herbal remedies results in a renal disease and, frequently, urothelial malignancy. The genotoxicity of AA in renal cells, including mutagenic DNA adduct formation, is well-documented. However, the mechanisms of AA-induced tubular atrophy and renal fibrosis are largely unknown. Epithelial cell death is a critical characteristic of these pathological conditions. To elucidate the mechanisms of AA-induced cytotoxicity, we explored AA-interacting proteins in tubular epithelial cells (TEC). We found that AA interacts with a mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and moderately inhibits its activity. We report that AA induces cell death in GDH-knockdown TEC preferentially via non-apoptotic means, whereas in GDH-positive cells, death was executed by both the non-apoptotic and apoptotic mechanisms. Apoptosis is an energy-reliant process and demands higher adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) consumption than does the non-apoptotic cell death. We found that, after AAI treatment, the ATP depletion is more pronounced in GDH-knockdown cells. When we reduced ATP in TEC cells by inhibition of glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration, cell death mode switched from apoptosis and necrosis to necrosis only. In addition, in cells incubated at low glucose and no glutamine conditions, oxaloacetate and pyruvate reduced AAI-induced apoptosis our data suggest that AAI-GDH interactions in TEC are critical for the induction of apoptosis by direct inhibition of GDH activity. AA binding may also induce changes in GDH conformation and promote interactions with other molecules or impair signaling by GDH metabolic products, leading to apoptosis.

  10. Regulation of the activity of lactate dehydrogenases from four lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Feldman-Salit, Anna; Hering, Silvio; Messiha, Hanan L; Veith, Nadine; Cojocaru, Vlad; Sieg, Antje; Westerhoff, Hans V; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Wade, Rebecca C; Fiedler, Tomas

    2013-07-19

    Despite high similarity in sequence and catalytic properties, the l-lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) display differences in their regulation that may arise from their adaptation to different habitats. We combined experimental and computational approaches to investigate the effects of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), phosphate (Pi), and ionic strength (NaCl concentration) on six LDHs from four LABs studied at pH 6 and pH 7. We found that 1) the extent of activation by FBP (Kact) differs. Lactobacillus plantarum LDH is not regulated by FBP, but the other LDHs are activated with increasing sensitivity in the following order: Enterococcus faecalis LDH2 ≤ Lactococcus lactis LDH2 < E. faecalis LDH1 < L. lactis LDH1 ≤ Streptococcus pyogenes LDH. This trend reflects the electrostatic properties in the allosteric binding site of the LDH enzymes. 2) For L. plantarum, S. pyogenes, and E. faecalis, the effects of Pi are distinguishable from the effect of changing ionic strength by adding NaCl. 3) Addition of Pi inhibits E. faecalis LDH2, whereas in the absence of FBP, Pi is an activator of S. pyogenes LDH, E. faecalis LDH1, and L. lactis LDH1 and LDH2 at pH 6. These effects can be interpreted by considering the computed binding affinities of Pi to the catalytic and allosteric binding sites of the enzymes modeled in protonation states corresponding to pH 6 and pH 7. Overall, the results show a subtle interplay among the effects of Pi, FBP, and pH that results in different regulatory effects on the LDHs of different LABs.

  11. Salicylic Acid-Dependent Plant Stress Signaling via Mitochondrial Succinate Dehydrogenase1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Louise F.

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are known for their role in ATP production and generation of reactive oxygen species, but little is known about the mechanism of their early involvement in plant stress signaling. The role of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) in salicylic acid (SA) signaling was analyzed using two mutants: disrupted in stress response1 (dsr1), which is a point mutation in SDH1 identified in a loss of SA signaling screen, and a knockdown mutant (sdhaf2) for SDH assembly factor 2 that is required for FAD insertion into SDH1. Both mutants showed strongly decreased SA-inducible stress promoter responses and low SDH maximum capacity compared to wild type, while dsr1 also showed low succinate affinity, low catalytic efficiency, and increased resistance to SDH competitive inhibitors. The SA-induced promoter responses could be partially rescued in sdhaf2, but not in dsr1, by supplementing the plant growth media with succinate. Kinetic characterization showed that low concentrations of either SA or ubiquinone binding site inhibitors increased SDH activity and induced mitochondrial H2O2 production. Both dsr1 and sdhaf2 showed lower rates of SA-dependent H2O2 production in vitro in line with their low SA-dependent stress signaling responses in vivo. This provides quantitative and kinetic evidence that SA acts at or near the ubiquinone binding site of SDH to stimulate activity and contributes to plant stress signaling by increased rates of mitochondrial H2O2 production, leading to part of the SA-dependent transcriptional response in plant cells. PMID:28209841

  12. New insights in dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency: a pivotal role for beta-aminoisobutyric acid?

    PubMed

    Van Kuilenburg, André B P; Stroomer, Alida E M; Van Lenthe, Henk; Abeling, Nico G G M; Van Gennip, Albert H

    2004-04-01

    DPD (dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase) constitutes the first step of the pyrimidine degradation pathway, in which the pyrimidine bases uracil and thymine are catabolized to beta-alanine and the R-enantiomer of beta-AIB (beta-aminoisobutyric acid) respectively. The S-enantiomer of beta-AIB is predominantly derived from the catabolism of valine. It has been suggested that an altered homoeostasis of beta-alanine underlies some of the clinical abnormalities encountered in patients with a DPD deficiency. In the present study, we demonstrated that only a slightly decreased concentration of beta-alanine was present in the urine and plasma, whereas normal levels of beta-alanine were present in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with a DPD deficiency. Therefore the metabolism of beta-alanine-containing peptides, such as carnosine, may be an important factor involved in the homoeostasis of beta-alanine in patients with DPD deficiency. The mean concentration of beta-AIB was approx. 2-3-fold lower in cerebrospinal fluid and urine of patients with a DPD deficiency, when compared with controls. In contrast, strongly decreased levels (10-fold) of beta-AIB were present in the plasma of DPD patients. Our results demonstrate that, under pathological conditions, the catabolism of valine can result in the production of significant amounts of beta-AIB. Furthermore, the observation that the R-enantiomer of beta-AIB is abundantly present in the urine of DPD patients suggests that significant cross-over exists between the thymine and valine catabolic pathways.

  13. Microwave-assisted synthesis, structural elucidation and biological assessment of 2-(2-acetamidophenyl)-2-oxo-N phenyl acetamide and N-(2-(2-oxo-2(phenylamino)acetyl)phenyl)propionamide derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazzali, Mohamed; El-Faham, Ayman; Abdel-Megeed, Ahmed; Al-Farhan, Khalid

    2012-04-01

    A facile solid-state synthesis of 2-(2-acetamidophenyl)-2-oxo-N phenyl acetamide and N-(2-(2-oxo-2(phenylamino)acetyl)phenyl)propionamide six derivatives has been achieved by microwave promoted condensation of N-acylisatin or N-propionylisatin with various aniline derivatives. The six products were characterized by IR and NMR (H1 and C13). Only two of them, The N-[2-(4-Bromo-phenylaminooxalyl)-phenyl]-propionamide and 2-(2-Acetylamino-phenyl)-2-oxo-N-p-tolyl-acetamide molecular structures were verified by X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The Br⋯Br intermolecular interaction in the crystal structure of N-[2-(4-Bromo-phenylaminooxalyl)-phenyl]-propionamide was evaluated by DFT/B3LYP calculation. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against eight bacterial strains and two fungal species. The N-[2-(4-Bromo-phenylaminooxalyl)-phenyl]-propionamide and 2-(2-Acetylamino-phenyl)-2-oxo-N-p-tolyl-acetamide exhibit selective high inhibitory effects against Aspergillus niger and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively.

  14. Branched-chain amino acid metabolon: interaction of glutamate dehydrogenase with the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm).

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Nautiyal, Manisha; Wynn, R Max; Mobley, James A; Chuang, David T; Hutson, Susan M

    2010-01-01

    The catabolic pathway for branched-chain amino acids includes deamination followed by oxidative decarboxylation of the deaminated product branched-chain alpha-keto acids, catalyzed by the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm) and branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC). We found that BCATm binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC, forming a metabolon that allows channeling of branched-chain alpha-keto acids from BCATm to E1. The protein complex also contains glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1), 4-nitrophenylphosphatase domain and non-neuronal SNAP25-like protein homolog 1, pyruvate carboxylase, and BCKDC kinase. GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP) form of BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-BCATm and other metabolon proteins. Leucine activates GDH1, and oxidative deamination of glutamate is increased further by addition of PMP-BCATm. Isoleucine and valine are not allosteric activators of GDH1, but in the presence of 5'-phosphate-BCATm, they convert BCATm to PMP-BCATm, stimulating GDH1 activity. Sensitivity to ADP activation of GDH1 was unaffected by PMP-BCATm; however, addition of a 3 or higher molar ratio of PMP-BCATm to GDH1 protected GDH1 from GTP inhibition by 50%. Kinetic results suggest that GDH1 facilitates regeneration of the form of BCATm that binds to E1 decarboxylase of the BCKDC, promotes metabolon formation, branched-chain amino acid oxidation, and cycling of nitrogen through glutamate.

  15. Characterization of the major dehydrogenase related to d-lactic acid synthesis in Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Eom, Hyun-Ju; Park, Jung-Mi; Seo, Eunyoung; Ahn, Ji Eun; Kim, Tae-Jip; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Han, Nam Soo

    2012-10-10

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 is a lactic acid bacterium that converts pyruvate mainly to d-(-)-lactic acid by using d-(-)-lactate dehydrogenase (ldhD). The aim of this study was to identify the gene responsible for d-lactic acid formation in this organism and to characterize the enzyme to facilitate the production of optically pure d-lactic acid. A genomic analysis of L. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 revealed that 7 genes encode lactate-related dehydrogenase. According to transcriptomic, proteomic, and phylogenetic analyses, LEUM_1756 was the major gene responsible for the production of d-lactic acid. The LEUM_1756 gene, of 996bp and encoding 332 amino acids (36.5kDa), was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Star from an inducible pET-21a(+) vector. The enzyme was purified by Ni-NTA column chromatography and showed a specific activity of 4450U/mg, significantly higher than those of other previously reported ldhDs. The gel permeation chromatography analysis showed that the purified enzyme exists as tetramers in solution and this was the first report among lactic acid bacteria. The pH and temperature optima were pH 8.0 and 30°C, respectively, for the pyruvate reduction reaction, and pH 11.0 and 20°C, respectively, for the lactate oxidation reaction. The K(m) kinetic parameters for pyruvate and lactate were 0.58mM and 260mM, respectively. In addition, the k(cat) values for pyruvate and lactate were 2900s(-1) and 2280s(-1), respectively. The enzyme was not inhibited by Ca(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Na(+), or urea, but was inhibited by 1mM Zn(2+) and 1mM SDS.

  16. Pistacia lentiscus Oleoresin: Virtual Screening and Identification of Masticadienonic and Isomasticadienonic Acids as Inhibitors of 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 1.

    PubMed

    Vuorinen, Anna; Seibert, Julia; Papageorgiou, Vassilios P; Rollinger, Judith M; Odermatt, Alex; Schuster, Daniela; Assimopoulou, Andreana N

    2015-04-01

    In traditional medicine, the oleoresinous gum of Pistacia lentiscus var. chia, so-called mastic gum, has been used to treat multiple conditions such as coughs, sore throats, eczema, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. Mastic gum is rich in triterpenes, which have been postulated to exert antidiabetic effects and improve lipid metabolism. In fact, there is evidence of oleanonic acid, a constituent of mastic gum, acting as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist, and mastic gum being antidiabetic in mice in vivo. Despite these findings, the exact antidiabetic mechanism of mastic gum remains unknown. Glucocorticoids play a key role in regulating glucose and fatty acid metabolism, and inhibition of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 that converts inactive cortisone to active cortisol has been proposed as a promising approach to combat metabolic disturbances including diabetes. In this study, a pharmacophore-based virtual screening was applied to filter a natural product database for possible 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 inhibitors. The hit list analysis was especially focused on the triterpenoids present in Pistacia species. Multiple triterpenoids, such as masticadienonic acid and isomasticadienonic acid, main constituents of mastic gum, were identified. Indeed, masticadienonic acid and isomasticadienonic acid selectively inhibited 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 over 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 at low micromolar concentrations. These findings suggest that inhibition of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 contributes to the antidiabetic activity of mastic gum.

  17. Which way does the citric acid cycle turn during hypoxia? The critical role of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Chinopoulos, Christos

    2013-08-01

    The citric acid cycle forms a major metabolic hub and as such it is involved in many disease states involving energetic imbalance. In spite of the fact that it is being branded as a "cycle", during hypoxia, when the electron transport chain does not oxidize reducing equivalents, segments of this metabolic pathway remain operational but exhibit opposing directionalities. This serves the purpose of harnessing high-energy phosphates through matrix substrate-level phosphorylation in the absence of oxidative phosphorylation. In this Mini-Review, these segments are appraised, pointing to the critical importance of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex dictating their directionalities.

  18. Metabolic fate of unsaturated glucuronic/iduronic acids from glycosaminoglycans: molecular identification and structure determination of streptococcal isomerase and dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yukie; Oiki, Sayoko; Takase, Ryuichi; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2015-03-06

    Glycosaminoglycans in mammalian extracellular matrices are degraded to their constituents, unsaturated uronic (glucuronic/iduronic) acids and amino sugars, through successive reactions of bacterial polysaccharide lyase and unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase. Genes coding for glycosaminoglycan-acting lyase, unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase, and the phosphotransferase system are assembled into a cluster in the genome of pathogenic bacteria, such as streptococci and clostridia. Here, we studied the streptococcal metabolic pathway of unsaturated uronic acids and the structure/function relationship of its relevant isomerase and dehydrogenase. Two proteins (gbs1892 and gbs1891) of Streptococcus agalactiae strain NEM316 were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. 4-Deoxy-l-threo-5-hexosulose-uronate (Dhu) nonenzymatically generated from unsaturated uronic acids was converted to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate via 3-deoxy-d-glycero-2,5-hexodiulosonate through successive reactions of gbs1892 isomerase (DhuI) and gbs1891 NADH-dependent reductase/dehydrogenase (DhuD). DhuI and DhuD enzymatically corresponded to 4-deoxy-l-threo-5-hexosulose-uronate ketol-isomerase (KduI) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate dehydrogenase (KduD), respectively, involved in pectin metabolism, although no or low sequence identity was observed between DhuI and KduI or between DhuD and KduD, respectively. Genes for DhuI and DhuD were found to be included in the streptococcal genetic cluster, whereas KduI and KduD are encoded in clostridia. Tertiary and quaternary structures of DhuI and DhuD were determined by x-ray crystallography. Distinct from KduI β-barrels, DhuI adopts an α/β/α-barrel structure as a basic scaffold similar to that of ribose 5-phosphate isomerase. The structure of DhuD is unable to accommodate the substrate/cofactor, suggesting that conformational changes are essential to trigger enzyme catalysis. This is the first report on the bacterial metabolism of

  19. Two shikimate dehydrogenases, VvSDH3 and VvSDH4, are involved in gallic acid biosynthesis in grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Bontpart, Thibaut; Marlin, Thérèse; Vialet, Sandrine; Guiraud, Jean-Luc; Pinasseau, Lucie; Meudec, Emmanuelle; Sommerer, Nicolas; Cheynier, Véronique; Terrier, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    In plants, the shikimate pathway provides aromatic amino acids that are used to generate numerous secondary metabolites, including phenolic compounds. In this pathway, shikimate dehydrogenases (SDH) ‘classically’ catalyse the reversible dehydrogenation of 3-dehydroshikimate to shikimate. The capacity of SDH to produce gallic acid from shikimate pathway metabolites has not been studied in depth. In grapevine berries, gallic acid mainly accumulates as galloylated flavan-3-ols. The four grapevine SDH proteins have been produced in Escherichia coli. In vitro, VvSDH1 exhibited the highest ‘classical’ SDH activity. Two genes, VvSDH3 and VvSDH4, mainly expressed in immature berry tissues in which galloylated flavan-3-ols are accumulated, encoded enzymes with lower ‘classical’ activity but were able to produce gallic acid in vitro. The over-expression of VvSDH3 in hairy-roots increased the content of aromatic amino acids and hydroxycinnamates, but had little or no effect on molecules more distant from the shikimate pathway (stilbenoids and flavan-3-ols). In parallel, the contents of gallic acid, β-glucogallin, and galloylated flavan-3-ols were increased, attesting to the influence of this gene on gallic acid metabolism. Phylogenetic analysis from dicotyledon SDHs opens the way for the examination of genes from other plants which accumulate gallic acid-based metabolites. PMID:27241494

  20. Two shikimate dehydrogenases, VvSDH3 and VvSDH4, are involved in gallic acid biosynthesis in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Bontpart, Thibaut; Marlin, Thérèse; Vialet, Sandrine; Guiraud, Jean-Luc; Pinasseau, Lucie; Meudec, Emmanuelle; Sommerer, Nicolas; Cheynier, Véronique; Terrier, Nancy

    2016-05-01

    In plants, the shikimate pathway provides aromatic amino acids that are used to generate numerous secondary metabolites, including phenolic compounds. In this pathway, shikimate dehydrogenases (SDH) 'classically' catalyse the reversible dehydrogenation of 3-dehydroshikimate to shikimate. The capacity of SDH to produce gallic acid from shikimate pathway metabolites has not been studied in depth. In grapevine berries, gallic acid mainly accumulates as galloylated flavan-3-ols. The four grapevine SDH proteins have been produced in Escherichia coli In vitro, VvSDH1 exhibited the highest 'classical' SDH activity. Two genes, VvSDH3 and VvSDH4, mainly expressed in immature berry tissues in which galloylated flavan-3-ols are accumulated, encoded enzymes with lower 'classical' activity but were able to produce gallic acid in vitro The over-expression of VvSDH3 in hairy-roots increased the content of aromatic amino acids and hydroxycinnamates, but had little or no effect on molecules more distant from the shikimate pathway (stilbenoids and flavan-3-ols). In parallel, the contents of gallic acid, β-glucogallin, and galloylated flavan-3-ols were increased, attesting to the influence of this gene on gallic acid metabolism. Phylogenetic analysis from dicotyledon SDHs opens the way for the examination of genes from other plants which accumulate gallic acid-based metabolites.

  1. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase during infusion of fatty acids of varying chain lengths in the perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Latipää, P M; Peuhkurinen, K J; Hiltunen, J K; Hassinen, I E

    1985-12-01

    The effects of a homologous series of fatty acids with a chain length of two to eight on the rate of pyruvate oxidation and covalent interconversions of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) were studied in isolated perfused rat hearts. In the Langendorff-perfused heart beating at 5 Hz against an aortic pressure of 59 mmHg (7.85 kPa), a positive linear correlation was found between the fraction of PDH existing in the active non-phosphorylated form of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHa) and the pyruvate oxidation rate until the PDHa fraction increased to 48%. This value resulted in a saturation of the citric acid cycle and further activation did not increase the metabolic flux. The PDHa content of the tissue was higher during infusion of odd carbon number fatty acids than during infusion of even carbon number fatty acids. Propionate caused an almost maximal (93%) activation of PDH. A negative correlation was found between the mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ ratio and the PDHa content. A negative correlation was also found between the acetyl-CoA/CoA ratio and the tissue PDHa content. The rate of labelled CO2 production, the specific radioactivity of tissue alanine and the metabolic balance sheet demonstrated that the alanine aminotransferase reaction in the total tissue does not reach equilibrium with the mitochondrial pyruvate pool during propionate oxidation, but the equilibrium is reached during the oxidation of even-number carbon fatty acids. This suggests that pyruvate is formed from propionate-derived metabolites also in the cytosol, although the primary metabolism of propionate occurs in the mitochondria. The results indicate that the rate of pyruvate oxidation in the myocardium is mainly regulated by covalent interconversion of PDH. During propionate oxidation the PDHa content in the tissue can increase beyond the point of saturation of the citric acid cycle and this indicates that feedback inhibition of the enzyme is rate-determining under these conditions.

  2. L-Malate dehydrogenase activity in the reductive arm of the incomplete citric acid cycle of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Charles E

    2013-11-01

    The autotrophic nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea does not synthesize 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase under aerobic conditions and so has an incomplete citric acid cycle. L-malate (S-malate) dehydrogenase (MDH) from N. europaea was predicted to show similarity to the NADP(+)-dependent enzymes from chloroplasts and was separated from the NAD(+)-dependent proteins from most other bacteria or mitochondria. MDH activity in a soluble fraction from N. europaea ATCC 19718 was measured spectrophotometrically and exhibited simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the reductive direction, activity with NADH increased from pH 6.0 to 8.5 but activity with NADPH was consistently lower and decreased with pH. At pH 7.0, the K m for oxaloacetate was 20 μM; the K m for NADH was 22 μM but that for NADPH was at least 10 times higher. In the oxidative direction, activity with NAD(+) increased with pH but there was very little activity with NADP(+). At pH 7.0, the K m for L-malate was 5 mM and the K m for NAD(+) was 24 μM. The reductive activity was quite insensitive to inhibition by L-malate but the oxidative activity was very sensitive to oxaloacetate. MDH activity was not strongly activated or inhibited by glycolytic or citric acid cycle metabolites, adenine nucleotides, NaCl concentrations, or most metal ions, but increased with temperature up to about 55 °C. The reductive activity was consistently 10-20 times higher than the oxidative activity. These results indicate that the L-malate dehydrogenase in N. europaea is similar to other NAD(+)-dependent MDHs (EC 1.1.1.37) but physiologically adapted for its role in a reductive biosynthetic sequence.

  3. The amino acid sequence of Neurospora NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase. The tryptic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, J C; Taylor, J G; Jackson, A A; Chambers, G K; Fincham, J R

    1975-01-01

    The NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase of Neurospora crassa was digested with trypsin, and peptides accounting for 441 out of the 452 residues of the polypeptide chain were isolated and substantially sequenced. Additional experimental detail has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50052 (11 pages) with the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, W. Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained under the terms given in Biochem J. (1975) 145, 5. PMID:1000

  4. Characterization of carnitine and fatty acid metabolism in the long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient mouse

    PubMed Central

    van Vlies, Naomi; Tian, Liqun; Overmars, Henk; Bootsma, Albert H.; Kulik, Willem; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Wood, Philip A.; Vaz, Frédéric M.

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe a novel method which enables the analysis of tissue acylcarnitines and carnitine biosynthesis intermediates in the same sample. This method was used to investigate the carnitine and fatty acid metabolism in wild-type and LCAD−/− (long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient) mice. In agreement with previous results in plasma and bile, we found accumulation of the characteristic C14:1-acylcarnitine in all investigated tissues from LCAD−/− mice. Surprisingly, quantitatively relevant levels of 3-hydroxyacylcarnitines were found to be present in heart, muscle and brain in wild-type mice, suggesting that, in these tissues, long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase is rate-limiting for mitochondrial β-oxidation. The 3-hydroxyacylcarnitines were absent in LCAD−/− tissues, indicating that, in this situation, the β-oxidation flux is limited by the LCAD deficiency. A profound deficiency of acetylcarnitine was observed in LCAD−/− hearts, which most likely corresponds with low cardiac levels of acetyl-CoA. Since there was no carnitine deficiency and only a marginal elevation of potentially cardiotoxic acylcarnitines, we conclude from these data that the cardiomyopathy in the LCAD−/− mouse is caused primarily by a severe energy deficiency in the heart, stressing the important role of LCAD in cardiac fatty acid metabolism in the mouse. PMID:15535801

  5. A novel 18 beta-glycyrrhetinic acid analogue as a potent and selective inhibitor of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2.

    PubMed

    Vicker, Nigel; Su, Xiangdong; Lawrence, Harshani; Cruttenden, Adrian; Purohit, Atul; Reed, Michael J; Potter, Barry V L

    2004-06-21

    Using 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid as a template, the synthesis of a series of secondary amides at the 30-position is described and the effects of these modifications on the SAR of the 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isozymes type 1 and 2 from the rat are investigated. An isoform selective inhibitor has been discovered and compound 5, N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3beta-hydroxy-11-oxo-18beta-olean-12-en-30-oic acid amide, is highlighted as a very potent and selective inhibitor of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 with an IC(50)=4 pM.

  6. Effect of acetic acid present in bagasse hydrolysate on the activities of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase in Candida guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luanne Helena Augusto; das Graças de Almeida Felipe, Maria; Vitolo, Michele; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2004-11-01

    The first two steps in xylose metabolism are catalyzed by NAD(P)H-dependent xylose reductase (XR) (EC 1.1.1.21) and NAD(P)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) (EC 1.1.1.9), which lead to xylose-->xylitol-->xylulose conversion. Xylitol has high commercial value, due to its sweetening and anticariogenic properties, as well as several clinical applications. The acid hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse allows the separation of a xylose-rich hemicellulosic fraction that can be used as a substrate for Candida guilliermondii to produce xylitol. However, the hydrolysate contains acetic acid, an inhibitor of microbial metabolism. In this study, the effect of acetic acid on the activities of XR and XDH and on xylitol formation by C. guilliermondii were studied. For this purpose, fermentations were carried out in bagasse hydrolysate and in synthetic medium. The activities of XR and XDH were higher in the medium containing acetic acid than in control medium. Moreover, none of the fermentative parameters were significantly altered during cell culture. It was concluded that acetic acid does not interfere with xylitol formation since the increase in XR activity is proportional to XDH activity, leading to a greater production of xylitol and its subsequent conversion to xylulose.

  7. Inhibition of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex by the myeloperoxidase products, hypochlorous acid and mono-N-chloramine.

    PubMed

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Xu, Hui; Gibson, Gary E

    2005-01-01

    Abstract alpha-Ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDHC) complex activity is diminished in a number of neurodegenerative disorders and its diminution in Alzheimer Disease (AD) is thought to contribute to the major loss of cerebral energy metabolism that accompanies this disease. The loss of KGDHC activity appears to be predominantly due to post-translation modifications. Thiamine deficiency also results in decreased KGDHC activity and a selective neuronal loss. Recently, myeloperoxidase has been identified in the activated microglia of brains from AD patients and thiamine-deficient animals. Myeloperoxidase produces a powerful oxidant, hypochlorous acid that reacts with amines to form chloramines. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of hypochlorous acid and chloramines to inhibit the activity of KGDHC activity as a first step towards investigating the role of myeloperoxidase in AD. Hypochlorous acid and mono-N-chloramine both inhibited purified and cellular KGDHC and the order of inhibition of the purified complex was hypochlorous acid (1x) > mono-N-chloramine (approximately 50x) > hydrogen peroxide (approximately 1,500). The inhibition of cellular KGDHC occurred with no significant loss of cellular viability at all exposure times that were examined. Thus, hypochlorous acid and chloramines have the potential to inactivate a major target in neurodegeneration.

  8. Palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex formulation enhances activities of Krebs cycle dehydrogenases and respiratory complexes I-IV in the heart of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Sudheesh, N P; Ajith, T A; Janardhanan, K K; Krishnan, C V

    2009-08-01

    Age-related decline in the capacity to withstand stress, such as ischemia and reperfusion, results in congestive heart failure. Though the mechanisms underlying cardiac decay are not clear, age dependent somatic damages to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), loss of mitochondrial function, and a resultant increase in oxidative stress in heart muscle cells may be responsible for the increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. The effect of a safe nutritional supplement, POLY-MVA, containing the active ingredient palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex, was evaluated on the activities of the Krebs cycle enzymes such as isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase as well as mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and IV in heart mitochondria of aged male albino rats of Wistar strain. Administration of 0.05 ml/kg of POLY-MVA (which is equivalent to 0.38 mg complexed alpha-lipoic acid/kg, p.o), once daily for 30 days, was significantly (p<0.05) effective to enhance the Krebs cycle dehydrogenases, and mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. The unique electronic and redox properties of palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex appear to be a key to this physiological effectiveness. The results strongly suggest that this formulation might be effective to protect the aging associated risk of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Cloning, Baeyer-Villiger Biooxidations, and Structures of the Camphor Pathway 2-Oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-Trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-Coenzyme A Monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453

    PubMed Central

    Leisch, Hannes; Shi, Rong; Grosse, Stephan; Morley, Krista; Bergeron, Hélène; Cygler, Miroslaw; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie

    2012-01-01

    A dimeric Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) catalyzing the lactonization of 2-oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-coenzyme A (CoA), a key intermediate in the metabolism of camphor by Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453, had been initially characterized in 1983 by Ougham and coworkers (H. J. Ougham, D. G. Taylor, and P. W. Trudgill, J. Bacteriol. 153:140–152, 1983). Here we cloned and overexpressed the 2-oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-CoA monooxygenase (OTEMO) in Escherichia coli and determined its three-dimensional structure with bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) at a 1.95-Å resolution as well as with bound FAD and NADP+ at a 2.0-Å resolution. OTEMO represents the first homodimeric type 1 BVMO structure bound to FAD/NADP+. A comparison of several crystal forms of OTEMO bound to FAD and NADP+ revealed a conformational plasticity of several loop regions, some of which have been implicated in contributing to the substrate specificity profile of structurally related BVMOs. Substrate specificity studies confirmed that the 2-oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid coenzyme A ester is preferred over the free acid. However, the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) favors 2-n-hexyl cyclopentanone (4.3 × 105 M−1 s−1) as a substrate, although its affinity (Km = 32 μM) was lower than that of the CoA-activated substrate (Km = 18 μM). In whole-cell biotransformation experiments, OTEMO showed a unique enantiocomplementarity to the action of the prototypical cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) and appeared to be particularly useful for the oxidation of 4-substituted cyclohexanones. Overall, this work extends our understanding of the molecular structure and mechanistic complexity of the type 1 family of BVMOs and expands the catalytic repertoire of one of its original members. PMID:22267661

  10. Inhibition of 3beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities in rat Leydig cells by perfluorooctane acid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Binghai; Chu, Yanhui; Hardy, Dianne O; Li, Xiao-kun; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2010-01-01

    Perfluorooctane acid (PFOA) is classified as a persistent organic pollutant and as an endocrine disruptor. The mechanism by which PFOA causes reduced testosterone production in males is not known. We tested our hypothesis that PFOA interferes with Leydig cell steroidogenic enzymes by measuring its effect on 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 (17beta-HSD3) activities in rat testis microsomes and Leydig cells. The IC(50)s of PFOA and mode of inhibition were assayed. PFOA inhibited microsomal 3beta-HSD with an IC(50) of 53.2+/-25.9 microM and 17beta-HSD3 with an IC(50) 17.7+/-6.8 microM. PFOA inhibited intact Leydig cell 3beta-HSD with an IC(50) of 146.1+/-0.9 microM and 17beta-HSD3 with an IC(50) of 194.8+/-1.0 microM. The inhibitions of 3beta-HSD and 17beta-HSD3 by PFOA were competitive for the substrates. In conclusion, PFOA inhibits 3beta-HSD and 17beta-HSD3 in rat Leydig cells.

  11. Teneligliptin Decreases Uric Acid Levels by Reducing Xanthine Dehydrogenase Expression in White Adipose Tissue of Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of teneligliptin on uric acid metabolism in male Wistar rats and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The rats were fed with a normal chow diet (NCD) or a 60% high-fat diet (HFD) with or without teneligliptin for 4 weeks. The plasma uric acid level was not significantly different between the control and teneligliptin groups under the NCD condition. However, the plasma uric acid level was significantly decreased in the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared to the HFD-fed control rats. The expression levels of xanthine dehydrogenase (Xdh) mRNA in liver and epididymal adipose tissue of NCD-fed rats were not altered by teneligliptin treatment. On the other hand, Xdh expression was reduced significantly in the epididymal adipose tissue of the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared with that of HFD-fed control rats, whereas Xdh expression in liver did not change significantly in either group. Furthermore, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. DPP-4 treatment significantly increased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. With DPP-4 pretreatment, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh mRNA expression compared to the DPP-4-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In conclusion, our studies suggest that teneligliptin reduces uric acid levels by suppressing Xdh expression in epididymal adipose tissue of obese subjects. PMID:27652270

  12. A new high phenyl lactic acid-yielding Lactobacillus plantarum IMAU10124 and a comparative analysis of lactate dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiqing; Zhang, Shuli; Shi, Yan; Shen, Fadi; Wang, Haikuan

    2014-07-01

    Phenyl lactic acid (PLA) has been widely reported as a new natural antimicrobial compound. In this study, 120 Lactobacillus plantarum strains were demonstrated to produce PLA using high-performance liquid chromatography. Lactobacillus plantarum IMAU10124 was screened with a PLA yield of 0.229 g L(-1) . Compared with all previous reports, this is the highest PLA-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) when grown in MRS broth without any optimizing conditions. When 3.0 g L(-1) phenyl pyruvic acid (PPA) was added to the medium as substrate, PLA production reached 2.90 g L(-1) , with the highest 96.05% conversion rate. A lowest PLA-yielding L. plantarum IMAU40105 (0.043 g L(-1) ) was also screened. It was shown that the conversion from PPA to PLA by lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) is the key factor in the improvement of PLA production by LAB. Comparing the LDH gene of two strains, four amino acid mutation sites were found in this study in the LDH of L. plantarum IMAU10124.

  13. A survey for isoenzymes of glucosephosphate isomerase, phosphoglucomutase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in C3-, C 4-and crassulacean-acid-metabolism plants, and green algae.

    PubMed

    Herbert, M; Burkhard, C; Schnarrenberger, C

    1979-01-01

    Two isoenzymes each of glucosephosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9), phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.43) were separated by (NH4)2SO4 gradient solubilization and DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange chromatography from green leaves of the C3-plants spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), of the Crassulacean-acid-metabolism plants Crassula lycopodioides Lam., Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Sedum rubrotinctum R.T. Clausen, and from the green algae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardii. After isolation of cell organelles from spinach leaves by isopyenic centrifugation in sucrose gradients one of two isoenzymes of each of the four enzymes was found to be associated with whole chloroplasts while the other was restricted to the soluble cell fraction, implying the same intracellular distribution of these isoenzymes also in the other species.Among C4-plants, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were found in only one form in corn (Zea mays L.), sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) and Coix lacrymajobi L., but as two isoenzymes in Atriplex spongiosa L. and Portulaca oleracea L. In corn, the two dehydrogenases were mainly associated with isolated mesophyll protoplasts while in Atriplex spongiosa they were of similar specific activity in both mesophyll protoplasts and bundle-sheath strands. In all five C4-plants three isoenzymes of glucosephosphate isomerase and phosphoglucomutase were found. In corn two were localized in the bundle-sheath strands and the third one in the mesophyll protoplasts. The amount of activity of the enzymes was similar in each of the two cell fractions. Apparently, C4 plants have isoenzymes not only in two cell compartments, but also in physiologically closely linked cell types such as mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells.

  14. Effect of Butanedioic Acid Mono (2,2-Dimethylhydrazide) on the Activity of Membrane-Bound Succinate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    See, Raymond M.; Foy, Chester L.

    1982-01-01

    Mitochondria isolated from hypocotyls of five-day-old bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. `Black Valentine') seedlings rapidly oxidized succinate, malate, and NADH. Oxidation rates, respiratory control, and ADP:O ratios obtained with saturating concentrations of all three substrates indicated that the mitochondria were tightly coupled. The mitochondrial preparation was then employed to investigate the respiration-inhibiting effects of butanedioic acid mono (2,2-dimethyl-hydrazide) (daminozide) a plant growth retardant having structural similarity to an endogenous respiratory substrate (succinate). Daminozide markedly inhibited the activity of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase. Inhibition was of the competitive type (apparent Ki, 20.2 millimolar) with respect to succinate. Although not excluding other hypotheses, the results support an active role for daminozide in the suppression of respiration as an important metabolic site of its action as a plant growth regulator. PMID:16662493

  15. Structure and function of Plasmodium falciparum malate dehydrogenase: role of critical amino acids in co-substrate binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Anupam; Tripathi, Abhai K; Desai, Prashant V; Mukherjee, Prasenjit K; Avery, Mitchell A; Walker, Larry A; Tekwani, Babu L

    2009-01-01

    The malaria parasite thrives on anaerobic fermentation of glucose for energy. Earlier studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that a cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (PfMDH) with striking similarity to lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) might complement PfLDH function in Plasmodium falciparum. The N-terminal glycine motif, which forms a characteristic Rossman dinucleotide-binding fold in the co-substrate binding pocket, differentiates PfMDH (GlyXGlyXXGly) from other eukaryotic and prokaryotic malate dehydrogenases (GlyXXGlyXXGly). The amino acids lining the co-substrate binding pocket are completely conserved in MDHs from different species of human, primate and rodent malaria parasites. Based on this knowledge and conserved domains among prokaryotic and eukaryotic MDH, the role of critical amino acids lining the co-substrate binding pocket was analyzed in catalytic functions of PfMDH using site-directed mutagenesis. Insertion of Ala at the 9th or 10th position, which converts the N-terminal GlyXGlyXXGly motif (characteristic of malarial MDH and LDH) to GlyXXGlyXXGly (as in bacterial and eukaryotic MDH), uncoupled regulation of the enzyme through substrate inhibition. The dinucleotide fold GlyXGlyXXGly motif seems not to be responsible for the distinct affinity of PfMDH to 3-acetylpyridine-adenine dinucleotide (APAD, a synthetic analog of NAD), since Ala9 and Ala10 insertion mutants still utilized APADH. The Gln11Met mutation, which converts the signature glycine motif in PfMDH to that of PfLDH, did not change the enzyme function. However, the Gln11Gly mutant showed approximately a 5-fold increase in catalytic activity, and higher susceptibility to inhibition with gossypol. Asn119 and His174 participate in binding of both co-substrate and substrate. The Asn119Gly mutant exhibited approximately a 3-fold decrease in catalytic efficiency, while mutation of His174 to Asn or Ala resulted in an inactive enzyme. These studies provide critical insights into the co

  16. Synthesis of new glycyrrhetinic acid derived ring A azepanone, 29-urea and 29-hydroxamic acid derivatives as selective 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gaware, Rawindra; Khunt, Rupesh; Czollner, Laszlo; Stanetty, Christian; Da Cunha, Thierry; Kratschmar, Denise V; Odermatt, Alex; Kosma, Paul; Jordis, Ulrich; Classen-Houben, Dirk

    2011-03-15

    Glycyrrhetinic acid, the metabolite of the natural product glycyrrhizin, is a well known nonselective inhibitor of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) type 1 and type 2. Whereas inhibition of 11β-HSD1 is currently under consideration for treatment of metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, 11β-HSD2 inhibitors may find therapeutic applications in chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of cancer. Recently, we published a series of hydroxamic acid derivatives of glycyrrhetinic acid showing high selectivity for 11β-HSD2. The most potent and selective compound is active against human 11β-HSD2 in the low nanomolar range with a 350-fold selectivity over human 11β-HSD1. Starting from the lead compounds glycyrrhetinic acid and the hydroxamic acid derivatives, novel triterpene type derivatives were synthesized and analyzed for their biological activity against overexpressed human 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 in cell lysates. Here we describe novel 29-urea- and 29-hydroxamic acid derivatives of glycyrrhetinic acid as well as derivatives with the Beckman rearrangement of the 3-oxime to a seven-membered ring, and the rearrangement of the C-ring from 11-keto-12-ene to 12-keto-9(11)-ene. The combination of modifications on different positions led to compounds comprising further improved selective inhibition of 11β-HSD2 in the lower nanomolar range with up to 3600-fold selectivity.

  17. A role for AMPK in the inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by polyunsaturated fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Kohan, Alison B.; Talukdar, Indrani; Walsh, Callee M.; Salati, Lisa M.

    2009-10-09

    Both polyunsaturated fatty acids and AMPK promote energy partitioning away from energy consuming processes, such as fatty acid synthesis, towards energy generating processes, such as {beta}-oxidation. In this report, we demonstrate that arachidonic acid activates AMPK in primary rat hepatocytes, and that this effect is p38 MAPK-dependent. Activation of AMPK mimics the inhibition by arachidonic acid of the insulin-mediated induction of G6PD. Similar to intracellular signaling by arachidonic acid, AMPK decreases insulin signal transduction, increasing Ser{sup 307} phosphorylation of IRS-1 and a subsequent decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Overexpression of dominant-negative AMPK abolishes the effect of arachidonic acid on G6PD expression. These data suggest a role for AMPK in the inhibition of G6PD by polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  18. A ROLE FOR AMPK IN THE INHIBITION OF GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE BY POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Kohan, Alison B.; Talukdar, Indrani; Walsh, Callee M.; Salati, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Both polyunsaturated fatty acids and AMPK promote energy partitioning away from energy consuming processes, such as fatty acid synthesis, towards energy generating processes, such as β-oxidation. In this report, we demonstrate that arachidonic acid activates AMPK in primary rat hepatocytes, and that this effect is p38 MAPK-dependent. Activation of AMPK mimics the inhibition by arachidonic acid of the insulin-mediated induction of G6PD. Similar to intracellular signaling by arachidonic acid, AMPK decreases insulin signal transduction, increasing Ser307 phosphorylation of IRS-1 and a subsequent decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Overexpression of dominant-negative AMPK abolishes the effect of arachidonic acid on G6PD expression. These data suggest a role for AMPK in the inhibition of G6PD by polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:19646964

  19. Enhancement of cell growth and glycolic acid production by overexpression of membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase in Gluconobacter oxydans DSM 2003.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Shi, Lulu; Mao, Xinlei; Lin, Jinping; Wei, Dongzhi

    2016-11-10

    Membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase (mADH) was overexpressed in Gluconobacter oxydans DSM 2003, and the effects on cell growth and glycolic acid production were investigated. The transcription levels of two terminal ubiquinol oxidases (bo3 and bd) in the respiratory chain of the engineered strain G. oxydans-adhABS were up-regulated by 13.4- and 3.8-fold, respectively, which effectively enhanced the oxygen uptake rate, resulting in higher resistance to acid. The cell biomass of G. oxydans-adhABS could increase by 26%-33% when cultivated in a 7L bioreactor. The activities of other major membrane-bound dehydrogenases were also increased to some extent, particularly membrane-bound aldehyde dehydrogenase (mALDH), which is involved in the catalytic oxidation of aldehydes to the corresponding acids and was 1.26-fold higher. Relying on the advantages of the above, G. oxydans-adhABS could produce 73.3gl(-1) glycolic acid after 45h of bioconversion with resting cells, with a molar yield 93.5% and a space-time yield of 1.63gl(-1)h(-1). Glycolic acid production could be further improved by fed-batch fermentation. After 45h of culture, 113.8gl(-1) glycolic acid was accumulated, with a molar yield of 92.9% and a space-time yield of 2.53gl(-1)h(-1), which is the highest reported glycolic acid yield to date.

  20. Function of Several Critical Amino Acids in Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Revealed by Its Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Ciszak, E.; Patel, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1), an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer, catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate and reductive acetylation of lipoyl moieties of the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The roles of beta W135, alpha P188, alpha M181, alpha H15 and alpha R349 of E1 determined by kinetic analysis were reassessed by analyzing the three-dimensional structure of human E1. The residues identified above are found to play a structural role rather than being directly involved in catalysis: beta W135 is the center residue in the hydrophobic interaction between beta and beta' subunits; alpha P188 and alpha M181 are critical for the conformation of the TPP-binding motif and interaction between alpha and beta subunits; alpha H15, is necessary for the organization of the N-terminus of alpha and alpha'; subunits and alpha R349 supports the interaction of the C-terminus of the alpha subunits with the beta subunits. Analysis of several critical E1 residues confirms the importance of residues distant from the active site for subunit interactions and enzyme function.

  1. Expression of mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase and α-keto-acid dehydrogenase in rat brain: implications for neurotransmitter metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jeffrey T.; Sweatt, Andrew J.; Hutson, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    In the brain, metabolism of the essential branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) leucine, isoleucine, and valine, is regulated in part by protein synthesis requirements. Excess BCAAs are catabolized or excreted. The first step in BCAA catabolism is catalyzed by the branched chain aminotransferase (BCAT) isozymes, mitochondrial BCATm and cytosolic BCATc. A product of this reaction, glutamate, is the major excitatory neurotransmitter and precursor of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The BCATs are thought to participate in a α-keto-acid nitrogen shuttle that provides nitrogen for synthesis of glutamate from α-ketoglutarate. The branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC) catalyzes the second, irreversible step in BCAA metabolism, which is oxidative decarboxylation of the branched-chain α-keto acid (BCKA) products of the BCAT reaction. Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD) results from genetic defects in BCKDC, which leads to accumulation of toxic levels of BCAAs and BCKAs that result in brain swelling. Immunolocalization of BCATm and BCKDC in rats revealed that BCATm is present in astrocytes in white matter and in neuropil, while BCKDC is expressed only in neurons. BCATm appears uniformly distributed in astrocyte cell bodies throughout the brain. The segregation of BCATm to astrocytes and BCKDC to neurons provides further support for the existence of a BCAA-dependent glial-neuronal nitrogen shuttle since the data show that BCKAs produced by glial BCATm must be exported to neurons. Additionally, the neuronal localization of BCKDC suggests that MSUD is a neuronal defect involving insufficient oxidation of BCKAs, with secondary effects extending beyond the neuron. PMID:22654736

  2. Contributory roles of two l-lactate dehydrogenases for l-lactic acid production in thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lifan; Zhang, Caili; Lyu, Pengcheng; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Limin; Yu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans is considered to be a more promising producer for bio-chemicals, due to its capacity to withstand harsh conditions. Two L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) encoding genes (ldhL1 and ldhL2) and one D-LDH encoding gene (ldhD) were annotated from the B. coagulans DSM1 genome. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the expression of ldhL2 was undetectable while the ldhL1 transcription level was much higher than that of ldhD at all growth phases. Deletion of the ldhL2 gene revealed no difference in fermentation profile compared to the wild-type strain, while ldhL1 single deletion or ldhL1ldhL2 double deletion completely blocked L-lactic acid production. Complementation of ldhL1 in the above knockout strains restored fermentation profiles to those observed in the wild-type strain. This study demonstrates ldhL1 is crucial for L-lactic acid production and NADH balance in B. coagulans DSM1 and lays the fundamental for engineering the thermotolerant B. coagulans strain as a platform chemicals producer. PMID:27885267

  3. Fatty acid labeling from glutamine in hypoxia can be explained by isotope exchange without net reductive isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) flux.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; Kamphorst, Jurre J; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Shlomi, Tomer

    2013-10-25

    Acetyl-CoA is an important anabolic precursor for lipid biosynthesis. In the conventional view of mammalian metabolism, acetyl-CoA is primarily derived by the oxidation of glucose-derived pyruvate in mitochondria. Recent studies have employed isotope tracers to show that in cancer cells grown in hypoxia or with defective mitochondria, a major fraction of acetyl-CoA is produced via another route, reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate (catalyzed by reverse flux through isocitrate dehydrogenase, IDH). Here, we employ a quantitative flux model to show that in hypoxia and in cells with defective mitochondria, oxidative IDH flux persists and may exceed the reductive flux. Therefore, IDH flux may not be a net contributor to acetyl-CoA production, although we cannot rule out net reductive IDH flux in some compartments. Instead of producing large amounts of net acetyl-CoA reductively, the cells adapt by reducing their demand for acetyl-CoA by importing rather than synthesizing fatty acids. Thus, fatty acid labeling from glutamine in hypoxia can be explained by spreading of label without net reductive IDH flux.

  4. Contributory roles of two l-lactate dehydrogenases for l-lactic acid production in thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lifan; Zhang, Caili; Lyu, Pengcheng; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Limin; Yu, Bo

    2016-11-25

    Thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans is considered to be a more promising producer for bio-chemicals, due to its capacity to withstand harsh conditions. Two L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) encoding genes (ldhL1 and ldhL2) and one D-LDH encoding gene (ldhD) were annotated from the B. coagulans DSM1 genome. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the expression of ldhL2 was undetectable while the ldhL1 transcription level was much higher than that of ldhD at all growth phases. Deletion of the ldhL2 gene revealed no difference in fermentation profile compared to the wild-type strain, while ldhL1 single deletion or ldhL1ldhL2 double deletion completely blocked L-lactic acid production. Complementation of ldhL1 in the above knockout strains restored fermentation profiles to those observed in the wild-type strain. This study demonstrates ldhL1 is crucial for L-lactic acid production and NADH balance in B. coagulans DSM1 and lays the fundamental for engineering the thermotolerant B. coagulans strain as a platform chemicals producer.

  5. Intrastriatal injections of the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor, malonate, cause a rise in extracellular amino acids that is blocked by MK-801.

    PubMed

    Messam, C A; Greene, J G; Greenamyre, J T; Robinson, M B

    1995-07-03

    The effects of intrastriatal injections of a reversible inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, malonate, on the extracellular concentrations of amino acid neurotransmitters were examined using a microdialysis probe that was positioned a fixed distance from an injection cannula. Malonate (2 mumol) caused a 23 +/- 5-fold increase in extracellular glutamate (Glu), a 18 +/- 6-fold increase extracellular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a modest increase in extracellular aspartate (Asp, 2.9 +/- 0.8-fold increase). Administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (5 mg/kg) prior to injection of malonate almost completely blocked these increases. This study provides direct evidence that inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase causes an increase in extracellular amino acid neurotransmitters and further evidence that bioenergetic defects may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative diseases through an excitotoxic mechanism.

  6. Retardation of Senescence in Red Clover Leaf Discs by a New Antiozonant, N-[2-(2-Oxo-1-imidazolidinyl)ethyl]-N′-phenylurea 1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Edward H.; Bennett, Jesse H.; Heggestad, Howard E.

    1981-01-01

    Dark-induced senescence in leaf discs from O3-sensitive red clover trifoliates (Trifolium pratense L. cv. `Pennscott') was markedly retarded by treatment with N-[2-(2-oxo-1-imidazolidinyl)ethyl-N′-phenylurea (EDU). EDU also protects against acute and chronic foliar O3 injury when sprayed on intact leaves or supplied to the plants through soil application. Senescence retardation was measured by time-dependent analyses of chlorophyll, protein, and RNA in discs floated on aqueous EDU solutions ranging from 0 to 500 micrograms per milliliter EDU. Chlorophyll degradation, total protein, and nucleic acids were followed over 10-day test periods. EDU at 500 micrograms per milliliter (50 milligrams per pot), a concentration known to provide optimal protection to intact leaves against O3 injury, was most effective in preventing chlorosis and in maintaining high concentrations of protein and RNA in the discs. In discs treated with 500 micrograms per milliliter EDU 90% of the chlorophyll was retained after 10 days in the dark. In contrast, lower concentrations (0, 125, and 250 micrograms per milliliter) showed the complete loss of chlorophyll or an intermediate retardation. The intermediate concentrations were similarly less effective in maintaining protein and RNA levels in the dark stressed leaf discs. It is suggested that EDU retards senescence and mitigates O3 injury through the induction of specific free radical scavenging enzymes and in sustaining RNA and protein synthesis. Images PMID:16661672

  7. Biosynthesis of Germacrene A Carboxylic Acid in Chicory Roots. Demonstration of a Cytochrome P450 (+)-Germacrene A Hydroxylase and NADP+-Dependent Sesquiterpenoid Dehydrogenase(s) Involved in Sesquiterpene Lactone Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    de Kraker, Jan-Willem; Franssen, Maurice C. R.; Dalm, Marcella C. F.; de Groot, Aede; Bouwmeester, Harro J.

    2001-01-01

    Sprouts of chicory (Cichorium intybus), a vegetable grown in the dark, have a slightly bitter taste associated with the presence of guaianolides, eudesmanolides, and germacranolides. The committed step in the biosynthesis of these compounds is catalyzed by a (+)-germacrene A synthase. Formation of the lactone ring is the postulated next step in biosynthesis of the germacrene-derived sesquiterpene lactones. The present study confirms this hypothesis by isolation of enzyme activities from chicory roots that introduce a carboxylic acid function in the germacrene A isopropenyl side chain, which is necessary for lactone ring formation. (+)-Germacrene A is hydroxylated to germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-trien-12-ol by a cytochrome P450 enzyme, and is subsequently oxidized to germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-trien-12-oic acid by NADP+-dependent dehydrogenase(s). Both oxidized germacrenes were detected as their Cope-rearrangement products elema-1,3,11(13)-trien-12-ol and elema-1,3,11(13)-trien-12-oic acid, respectively. The cyclization products of germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-trien-12-ol, i.e. costol, were also observed. The (+)-germacrene A hydroxylase is inhibited by carbon monoxide (blue-light reversible), has an optimum pH at 8.0, and hydroxylates β-elemene with a modest degree of enantioselectivity. PMID:11299372

  8. Substituted 2-[(2-Oxo-2H-[1,2,4]triazino [2,3-c]quinazolin-6-yl)thio]acetamides with Thiazole and Thiadiazole Fragments: Synthesis, Physicochemical Properties, Cytotoxicity, and Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Sergey I.; Nosulenko, Inna S.; Voskoboynik, Alexey Yu.; Berest, Galina G.; Antypenko, Lyudmyla N.; Antypenko, Alexey N.; Katsev, Andrey M.

    2012-01-01

    The series of novel N-R-2-[(3-R-2-oxo-2H-[1,2,4]triazino[2,3-c]quinazolin-6-yl)thio]acetamides with thiazole and thiadiazole fragments in a molecule were obtained by alkylation of potassium salts 1.1–1.4 by N-hetaryl-2-chloroacetamides and by aminolysis of activated acids 2.1–2.4 with N,N’-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI). The structures of compounds were determined by IR, 1H NMR, MS, and EI-MS analysis. The results of cytotoxicity evaluated by the bioluminescence inhibition of bacterium Photobacterium leiognathi, Sh1 showed that the compounds have considerable cytotoxicity. The synthesized compounds were tested for anticancer activity in NCI against 60 cell lines. Among the highly active compounds 3.1, 3.2, and 6.5, 2-[(3-methyl-2-oxo-2H-[1,2,4]triazino[2,3-c]quinazolin-6-yl)thio]-N-(1,3-thiazol-2-yl)acetamide (3.1) was found to be the most active anticancer agent against the cell lines of colon cancer (GI50 at 0.41–0.69 μM), melanoma (GI50 0.48–13.50 μM), and ovarian cancer (GI50 0.25–5.01 μM). The structure-activity relationship (SAR-analysis) was discussed. PMID:23264935

  9. Radiosynthesis and preliminary PET evaluation of (18)F-labeled 2-(1-(3-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile for imaging AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gengyang; Jones, Graham B; Vasdev, Neil; Liang, Steven H

    2016-10-01

    To prompt the development of (18)F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) tracers for the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor, we have prepared (18)F-labeled 2-(1-(3-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile ([(18)F]8). The radiosynthesis was achieved by a one-pot two-step method that utilized a spirocyclic hypervalent iodine(III) mediated radiofluorination to prepare the (18)F-labeled 1-bromo-3-fluorobenzene ([(18)F]15) intermediate with K(18)F. A subsequent copper(I) iodide mediated coupling reaction was carried out with 2-(2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile (10) to [(18)F]8 in 10±2% uncorrected radiochemical yield relative to starting (18)F-fluoride with >99% radiochemical purity and 29.6±7.4Gbq/μmol specific activity at the time of injection. PET imaging studies with the title radiotracer in normal mice demonstrated good brain uptake (peak standardized uptake value (SUV)=2.3±0.1) and warrants further in vivo validation.

  10. Structure and Function of Plasmodium falciparum malate dehydrogenase: Role of Critical Amino Acids in C-substrate Binding Procket

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malaria parasite thrives on anaerobic fermentation of glucose for energy. Earlier studies from our lab have demonstrated that a cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (PfMDH) with striking similarity to lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) might complement PfLDH function in Plasmodium falciparum. The N-terminal g...

  11. Free fatty acid inhibition of the insulin induction of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in rat hepatocyte monolayers.

    PubMed

    Salati, L M; Adkins-Finke, B; Clarke, S D

    1988-01-01

    Rat hepatocytes in monolayer culture were utilized to determine if the decrease in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity resulting from the ingestion of fat can be mimicked by the addition of fatty acids to a chemically, hormonally defined medium. G6PD activity in cultured hepatocytes was induced several-fold by insulin. Dexamethasone or T3 did not amplify the insulin induction of G6PD. Glucose alone increased G6PD activity in cultured hepatocytes from fasted donors by nearly 500%. Insulin in combination with glucose induced G6PD an additional two-fold. The increase in G6PD activity caused by glucose was greater in hepatocytes isolated from 72 hr-fasted rats as compared to fed donor rats. Such a response was reminiscent of the "overshoot" phenomenon in which G6PD activity is induced well above the normal level by fasting-refeeding rats a high glucose diet. Addition of linoleate to the medium resulted in a significant suppression of insulin's ability to induce G6PD, but linoleate had no effect on the induction of G6PD activity by glucose alone. A shift to the right in the insulin-response curve for the induction of G6PD also was detected for the induction of malic enzyme and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Arachidonate (0.25 mM) was a significantly more effective inhibitor of the insulin action than linoleate was. Apparently rat hepatocytes in monolayer culture can be utilized as a model to investigate the molecular mechanism by which fatty acids inhibit the production of lipogenic enzymes. In part, this mechanism of fatty acid inhibition involves desensitization of hepatocytes to the lipogenic action of insulin.

  12. Glutamate dehydrogenase (RocG) in Bacillus licheniformis WX-02: Enzymatic properties and specific functions in glutamic acid synthesis for poly-γ-glutamic acid production.

    PubMed

    Tian, Guangming; Wang, Qin; Wei, Xuetuan; Ma, Xin; Chen, Shouwen

    2017-04-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA), a natural biopolymer, is widely used in cosmetics, medicine, food, water treatment, and agriculture owing to its features of moisture sequestration, cation chelation, non-toxicity and biodegradability. Intracellular glutamic acid, the substrate of γ-PGA, is a limiting factor for high yield in γ-PGA production. Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis are both important γ-PGA producing strains, and B. subtilis synthesizes glutamic acid in vivo using the unique GOGAT/GS pathway. However, little is known about the glutamate synthesis pathway in B. licheniformis. The aim of this work was to characterize the glutamate dehydrogenase (RocG) in glutamic acid synthesis from B. licheniformis with both in vivo and in vitro experiments. By re-directing the carbon flux distribution, the rocG gene deletion mutant WX-02ΔrocG produced intracellular glutamic acid with a concentration of 90ng/log(CFU), which was only 23.7% that of the wild-type WX-02 (380ng/log(CFU)). Furthermore, the γ-PGA yield of mutant WX-02ΔrocG was 5.37g/L, a decrease of 45.3% compared to the wild type (9.82g/L). In vitro enzymatic assays of RocG showed that RocG has higher affinity for 2-oxoglutarate than glutamate, and the glutamate synthesis rate was far above degradation. This is probably the first study to reveal the glutamic acid synthesis pathway and the specific functions of RocG in B. licheniformis. The results indicate that γ-PGA production can be enhanced through improving intracellular glutamic acid synthesis.

  13. The role of hydrophobic amino acids of K-segments in the cryoprotection of lactate dehydrogenase by dehydrins.

    PubMed

    Hara, Masakazu; Endo, Takuya; Kamiya, Keita; Kameyama, Ayuko

    2017-03-01

    Dehydrins, which are group 2 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, accumulate in plants during the development of the embryo and exposure to abiotic stresses including low temperature. Dehydrins exhibit cryoprotection of freezing-sensitive enzymes, e.g. lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Although it has been reported that K-segments conserved in dehydrins are related to their cryoprotection activity, it has not been determined which sequence features of the K-segments contribute to the cryoprotection. A cryoprotection assay using LDH indicated that 13 K-segments including 12 K-segments found in Arabidopsis dehydrins and a typical K-segment (TypK, EKKGIMEKIKEKLPG) derived from the K-segments of many plants showed similar cryoprotective activities. Mutation of the TypK sequence demonstrated that hydrophobic amino acids were clearly involved in preventing the cryoinactivation, cryoaggregation, and cryodenaturation of LDH. We propose that the cryoprotective activities of dehydrins may be made possible by the hydrophobic residues of the K-segments.

  14. Expression of the betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase gene in barley in response to osmotic stress and abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Ishitani, M; Nakamura, T; Han, S Y; Takabe, T

    1995-01-01

    When subjected to salt stress or drought, some vascular plants such as barley respond with an increased accumulation of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine (betaine), being the last step of betaine synthesis catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). We report here cloning and characterization of BADH cDNA from barley, a monocot, and the expression pattern of a BADH transcript. An open reading frame of 1515 bp encoded a protein which showed high homology to BADH enzymes present in other plants (spinach and sugar-beet) and in Escherichia coli. Transgenic tobacco plants harboring the clone expressed high levels of both BADH protein and its enzymatic activity. Northern blot analyses indicated that BADH mRNA levels increased almost 8-fold and 2-fold, respectively, in leaves and roots of barley plants grown in high-salt conditions, and that these levels decreased upon release of the stress, whereas they did not decrease under continuous salt stress. BADH transcripts also accumulate in response to water stress or drought, indicating a common response of the plant to osmotic changes that affect its water status. The addition of abscisic acid (ABA) to plants during growth also increased the levels of BADH transcripts dramatically, although the response was delayed when compared to that found for salt-stressed plants. Removal of plant roots before transferring the plants to high-salt conditions reduced only slightly the accumulation of BADH transcripts in the leaves.

  15. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and arsenite: LD(50) in hamsters and in vitro inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Petrick, J S; Jagadish, B; Mash, E A; Aposhian, H V

    2001-06-01

    Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), a metabolite of inorganic arsenic, has received very little attention from investigators of arsenic metabolism in humans. MMA(III), like sodium arsenite, contains arsenic in the +3 oxidation state. Although we have previously demonstrated that it is more toxic than arsenite in cultured Chang human hepatocytes, there are no data showing in vivo toxicity of MMA(III). When MMA(III) or sodium arsenite was administered intraperitoneally to hamsters, the LD(50)s were 29.3 and 112.0 micromol/kg of body wt, respectively. In addition, inhibition of hamster kidney or purified porcine heart pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity by MMA(III) or arsenite was determined. To inhibit hamster kidney PDH activity by 50%, the concentrations (mean +/- SE) of MMA(III) as methylarsine oxide, MMA(III) as diiodomethylarsine, and arsenite were 59.9 +/- 6.5, 62.0 +/- 1.8, and 115.7 +/- 2.3 microM, respectively. To inhibit activity of purified porcine heart PDH activity by 50%, the concentrations (mean +/- SE) of MMA(III) as methylarsine oxide and arsenite were 17.6 +/- 4.1 and 106.1 +/- 19.8 microM, respectively. These data demonstrate that MMA(III) is more toxic than inorganic arsenite, both in vivo and in vitro, and call into question the hypothesis that methylation of inorganic arsenic is a detoxication process.

  16. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutations prime the all-trans retinoic acid myeloid differentiation pathway in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Boutzen, Héléna; Saland, Estelle; Larrue, Clément; de Toni, Fabienne; Gales, Lara; Castelli, Florence A.; Cathebas, Mathilde; Zaghdoudi, Sonia; Stuani, Lucille; Kaoma, Tony; Riscal, Romain; Yang, Guangli; Hirsch, Pierre; David, Marion; De Mas-Mansat, Véronique; Delabesse, Eric; Vallar, Laurent; Delhommeau, François; Jouanin, Isabelle; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Le Cam, Laurent; Linares, Laetitia K.; Junot, Christophe; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vergez, François; Récher, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by the accumulation of malignant blasts with impaired differentiation programs caused by recurrent mutations, such as the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations found in 15% of AML patients. These mutations result in the production of the oncometabolite (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), leading to a hypermethylation phenotype that dysregulates hematopoietic differentiation. In this study, we identified mutant R132H IDH1-specific gene signatures regulated by key transcription factors, particularly CEBPα, involved in myeloid differentiation and retinoid responsiveness. We show that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) at clinically achievable doses markedly enhanced terminal granulocytic differentiation in AML cell lines, primary patient samples, and a xenograft mouse model carrying mutant IDH1. Moreover, treatment with a cell-permeable form of 2-HG sensitized wild-type IDH1 AML cells to ATRA-induced myeloid differentiation, whereas inhibition of 2-HG production significantly reduced ATRA effects in mutant IDH1 cells. ATRA treatment specifically decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis of mutant IDH1 blasts in vitro. ATRA also reduced tumor burden of mutant IDH1 AML cells xenografted in NOD–Scid–IL2rγnull mice and markedly increased overall survival, revealing a potent antileukemic effect of ATRA in the presence of IDH1 mutation. This therapeutic strategy holds promise for this AML patient subgroup in future clinical studies. PMID:26951332

  17. Inhibition of snowshoe hare succinate dehydrogenase activity as a mechanism of deterrence for papyriferic acid in birch.

    PubMed

    Forbey, Jennifer Sorensen; Pu, Xinzhu; Xu, Dong; Kielland, Knut; Bryant, John

    2011-12-01

    The plant secondary metabolite papyriferic acid (PA) deters browsing by snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) on the juvenile developmental stage of the Alaska paper birch (Betula neoalaskana). However, the physiological mechanism that reduces browsing remains unknown. We used pharmacological assays and molecular modeling to test the hypothesis that inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a mode of action (MOA) of toxicity of PA in snowshoe hares. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the effect of PA on the activity of SDH in liver mitochondria isolated from wild hares. In addition, we used molecular modeling to determine the specific binding site of PA on SDH. We found that PA inhibits SDH from hares by an uncompetitive mechanism in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular modeling suggests that inhibition of SDH is a result of binding of PA at the ubiquinone binding sites in complex II. Our results provide a MOA for toxicity that may be responsible for the concentration-dependent anti-feedant effects of PA. We propose that snowshoe hares reduce the dose-dependent toxic consequences of PA by relying on efflux transporters and metabolizing enzymes that lower systemic exposure to dietary PA.

  18. Salicylic acid stimulates secretion of the normally symplastic enzyme mannitol dehydrogenase: a possible defense against mannitol-secreting fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fang-yi; Zamski, Eli; Guo, Wei-wen; Pharr, D Mason; Williamson, John D

    2009-11-01

    The sugar alcohol mannitol is an important carbohydrate with well-documented roles in both metabolism and osmoprotection in many plants and fungi. In addition to these traditionally recognized roles, mannitol is reported to be an antioxidant and as such may play a role in host-pathogen interactions. Current research suggests that pathogenic fungi can secrete mannitol into the apoplast to suppress reactive oxygen-mediated host defenses. Immunoelectron microscopy, immunoblot, and biochemical data reported here show that the normally symplastic plant enzyme, mannitol dehydrogenase (MTD), is secreted into the apoplast after treatment with the endogenous inducer of plant defense responses salicylic acid (SA). In contrast, a cytoplasmic marker protein, hexokinase, remained cytoplasmic after SA-treatment. Secreted MTD retained activity after export to the apoplast. Given that MTD converts mannitol to the sugar mannose, MTD secretion may be an important component of plant defense against mannitol-secreting fungal pathogens such as Alternaria. After SA treatment, MTD was not detected in the Golgi apparatus, and its SA-induced secretion was resistant to brefeldin A, an inhibitor of Golgi-mediated protein transport. Together with the absence of a known extracellular targeting sequence on the MTD protein, these data suggest that a plant's response to pathogen challenge may include secretion of selected defensive proteins by as yet uncharacterized, non-Golgi mechanisms.

  19. Synthesis of novel 3-amino and 29-hydroxamic acid derivatives of glycyrrhetinic acid as selective 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stanetty, Christian; Czollner, Laszlo; Koller, Iris; Shah, Priti; Gaware, Rawindra; Cunha, Thierry Da; Odermatt, Alex; Jordis, Ulrich; Kosma, Paul; Classen-Houben, Dirk

    2010-11-01

    Glycyrrhetinic acid, the metabolite of the natural product glycyrrhizin, is a well known nonselective inhibitor of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) type 1 and type 2. Whereas inhibition of 11β-HSD1 is currently under consideration for treatment of metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, 11β-HSD2 inhibitors may find therapeutic applications in chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of cancer. So far, no selective 11β-HSD2 inhibitor has been developed and neither animal studies nor clinical trials have been reported based on 11β-HSD2 inhibition. Starting from the lead compound glycyrrhetinic acid, novel triterpene type derivatives were synthesized and analyzed for their biological activity against overexpressed human 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 in cell lysates. Several hydroxamic acid derivatives showed high selectivity for 11β-HSD2. The most potent and selective compound is active against human 11β-HSD2 in the low nanomolar range with a 350-fold selectivity over human 11β-HSD1.

  20. Mechanism for enhanced 5-aminolevulinic acid fluorescence in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutant malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Sung Kwon; Kim, Seung-Ki; Park, Sung-Hye; Kim, Hyeonjin; Lee, Se-Hoon; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sunghyouk; Park, Chul-Kee

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence-guided surgery using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) has become the main treatment modality in malignant gliomas. However unlike glioblastomas, there are inconsistent result about fluorescence status in WHO grade III gliomas. Here, we show that mutational status of IDH1 is linked to 5-ALA fluorescence. Using genetically engineered malignant glioma cells harboring wild type (U87MG-IDH1WT) or mutant (U87MG-IDH1R132H) IDH1, we demonstrated a lag in 5-ALA metabolism and accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in U87MG-IDH1R132H cells. Next, we used liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to screen for tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle-related metabolite changes caused by 5-ALA exposure. We observed low baseline levels of NADPH, an essential cofactor for the rate-limiting step of heme degradation, in U87MG-IDH1R132H cells. High levels of NADPH are required to metabolize excessive 5-ALA, giving a plausible reason for the temporarily enhanced 5-ALA fluorescence in mutant IDH1 cells. This hypothesis was supported by the results of metabolic screening in human malignant glioma samples. In conclusion, we have discovered a relationship between enhanced 5-ALA fluorescence and IDH1 mutations in WHO grade III gliomas. Low levels of NADPH in tumors with mutated IDH1 is responsible for the enhanced fluorescence. PMID:26008980

  1. Biochemical changes of the synovial liquid of corpses with regard to the cause of death. 2: Alkaline phosphatase, lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH), and glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT).

    PubMed

    More, D S; Arroyo, M C

    1985-04-01

    We studied the activity of various enzymes in the synovial liquid of 100 corpses with regard to the cause of death finding that the alkaline phospatase and glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) are increased in cranioencephalic trauma, possibly as a result of the important cellular lysis which goes with them; and lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH) is increased in the pulmonary processes, almost certainly with relation to the great quantity of this enzyme in the lung.

  2. Highly stereoselective biosynthesis of (R)-α-hydroxy carboxylic acids through rationally re-designed mutation of D-lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaojuan; Sheng, Binbin; Gao, Chao; Zhang, Haiwei; Qin, Tong; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2013-12-02

    An NAD-dependent D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-nLDH) of Lactobacillus bulgaricus ATCC 11842 was rationally re-designed for asymmetric reduction of a homologous series of α-keto carboxylic acids such as phenylpyruvic acid (PPA), α-ketobutyric acid, α-ketovaleric acid, β-hydroxypyruvate. Compared with wild-type D-nLDH, the Y52L mutant D-nLDH showed elevated activities toward unnatural substrates especially with large substitutes at C-3. By the biocatalysis combined with a formate dehydrogenase for in situ generation of NADH, the corresponding (R)-α-hydroxy carboxylic acids could be produced at high yields and highly optical purities. Taking the production of chiral (R)-phenyllactic acid (PLA) from PPA for example, 50 mM PPA was completely reduced to (R)-PLA in 90 min with a high yield of 99.0% and a highly optical purity (>99.9% e.e.) by the coupling system. The results presented in this work suggest a promising alternative for the production of chiral α-hydroxy carboxylic acids.

  3. Mild reductions in cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity result in lower amino acid contents and pigmentation without impacting growth

    PubMed Central

    Sulpice, Ronan; Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Osorio, Sonia; Krahnert, Ina; Stitt, Mark; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were generated targeting the cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (SlICDH1) via the RNA interference approach. The resultant transformants displayed a relatively mild reduction in the expression and activity of the target enzyme in the leaves. However, biochemical analyses revealed that the transgenic lines displayed a considerable shift in metabolism, being characterized by decreases in the levels of the TCA cycle intermediates, total amino acids, photosynthetic pigments, starch and NAD(P)H. The plants showed little change in photosynthesis with the exception of a minor decrease in maximum photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm), and a small decrease in growth compared to the wild type. These results reveal that even small changes in cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity lead to noticeable alterations in the activities of enzymes involved in primary nitrate assimilation and in the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate derived amino acids. These data are discussed within the context of current models for the role of the various isoforms of isocitrate dehydrogenase within plant amino acid metabolism. PMID:20473773

  4. Mild reductions in cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity result in lower amino acid contents and pigmentation without impacting growth.

    PubMed

    Sulpice, Ronan; Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Osorio, Sonia; Krahnert, Ina; Stitt, Mark; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2010-10-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were generated targeting the cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (SlICDH1) via the RNA interference approach. The resultant transformants displayed a relatively mild reduction in the expression and activity of the target enzyme in the leaves. However, biochemical analyses revealed that the transgenic lines displayed a considerable shift in metabolism, being characterized by decreases in the levels of the TCA cycle intermediates, total amino acids, photosynthetic pigments, starch and NAD(P)H. The plants showed little change in photosynthesis with the exception of a minor decrease in maximum photosynthetic efficiency (F (v)/F (m)), and a small decrease in growth compared to the wild type. These results reveal that even small changes in cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity lead to noticeable alterations in the activities of enzymes involved in primary nitrate assimilation and in the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate derived amino acids. These data are discussed within the context of current models for the role of the various isoforms of isocitrate dehydrogenase within plant amino acid metabolism.

  5. Production of ethyl (R)-2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutanoate via reduction of ethyl 2-oxo-4-phenylbutanoate in an interface bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Oda, S; Inada, Y; Kobayashi, A; Ohta, H

    1998-09-01

    Ethyl (R)-2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutanoate [(R)-EHPB], a useful intermediate for the synthesis of various anti-hypertension drugs, was produced via microbial reduction of ethyl 2-oxo-4-phenylbutanoate [EOPB] in an interface bioreactor. Rhodotorula minuta IFO 0920 and Candida holmii KPY 12402 were selected as the best type culture and isolated yeasts, respectively. The highest enantiomeric excess of (R)-EHPB produced by R. minuta and C. holmii were 95 and 94%, respectively. C. holmii was used for the reduction of EOPB in a pad-packed interface bioreactor (inner volume, 3 liter). After incubation for 4 days, 4.4 g of (R)-EHPB was obtained via extraction with methanol followed by column chromatography. The overall yield, chemical purity, and enantiomeric excess of (R)-EHPB were 58%, 99.1%, and 90%, respectively.

  6. Thiamin-responsive maple-syrup-urine disease: decreased affinity of the mutant branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase for alpha-ketoisovalerate and thiamin pyrophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, D T; Ku, L S; Cox, R P

    1982-01-01

    The biochemical basis for the therapeutic effects of thiamin in thiamin-responsive maple-syrup-urine disease (MSUD) was investigated in intact and disrupted fibroblast cultures from normals and patients with various forms of MSUD. Decarboxylation of alpha-keto[1-14C]isovalerate (KIV) by intact cells from a thiamin-responsive MSUD patient was at 30-40% of the normal rate with or without thiamin in the incubation medium. Under similar conditions, intact classical MSUD fibroblasts failed to decarboxylate KIV. Branched-chain alpha-keto acid (BCKA) dehydrogenase activity measured in disrupted cells from the thiamin-responsive subject showed sigmoidal kinetics in the absence of thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), with an increased concentration of substrate needed for half-maximal velocity (K0.5 for KIV = 7 mM vs. 0.05 mM in normal cells). When assayed with 0.2 mM TPP present, the mutant enzyme showed (i) a shift in kinetics to near Michaelis-Menten type as observed with the normal BCKA dehydrogenase and (ii) a lower K0.5 value of 4 mM for KIV, suggesting a TPP-mediated increase in the mutant enzyme's affinity for substrate. By contrast, TPP increased only the Vmax and was without effect on the apparent Km for KIV of the BCKA dehydrogenase from cells of normals and patients with classical MSUD and variant thiamin-responsive MSUD (grade 3). Measurement of the apparent Km for TPP of the BCKA dehydrogenase from thiamin-responsive mutant MSUd cells showed a 16-fold increase in the constant to 25 microM compared to enzymes from normal or classical MSUD cells. These findings demonstrate that the primary defect in the thiamin-responsive MSUD patient is a reduced affinity of the mutant BCKA dehydrogenase for TPP that results in impaired oxidative decarboxylation of BCKA. PMID:6954481

  7. Inhibition of human and rat 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 by 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiangdong; Vicker, Nigel; Lawrence, Harshani; Smith, Andrew; Purohit, Atul; Reed, Michael J; Potter, Barry V L

    2007-05-01

    11beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) plays an important role in regulating the cortisol availability to bind to corticosteroid receptors within specific tissue. Recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms of metabolic syndrome indicate that elevation of cortisol levels within specific tissues through the action of 11beta-HSD1 could contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. Therefore, selective inhibitors of 11beta-HSD1 have been investigated as potential treatments for metabolic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus type 2 or obesity. Here we report the discovery and synthesis of some 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid (18beta-GA) derivatives (2-5) and their inhibitory activities against rat hepatic11beta-HSD1 and rat renal 11beta-HSD2. Once the selectivity over the rat type 2 enzyme was established, these compounds' ability to inhibit human 11beta-HSD1 was also evaluated using both radioimmunoassay (RIA) and homogeneous time resolved fluorescence (HTRF) methods. The 11-modified 18beta-GA derivatives 2 and 3 with apparent selectivity for rat 11beta-HSD1 showed a high percentage inhibition for human microsomal 11beta-HSD1 at 10 microM and exhibited IC50 values of 400 and 1100 nM, respectively. The side chain modified 18beta-GA derivatives 4 and 5, although showing selectivity for rat 11beta-HSD1 inhibited human microsomal 11beta-HSD1 with IC50 values in the low micromolar range.

  8. A new class of IMP dehydrogenase with a role in self-resistance of mycophenolic acid producing fungi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many secondary metabolites produced by filamentous fungi have potent biological activities, to which the producer organism must be resistant. An example of pharmaceutical interest is mycophenolic acid (MPA), an immunosuppressant molecule produced by several Penicillium species. The target of MPA is inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), which catalyses the rate limiting step in the synthesis of guanine nucleotides. The recent discovery of the MPA biosynthetic gene cluster from Penicillium brevicompactum revealed an extra copy of the IMPDH-encoding gene (mpaF) embedded within the cluster. This finding suggests that the key component of MPA self resistance is likely based on the IMPDH encoded by mpaF. Results In accordance with our hypothesis, heterologous expression of mpaF dramatically increased MPA resistance in a model fungus, Aspergillus nidulans, which does not produce MPA. The growth of an A. nidulans strain expressing mpaF was only marginally affected by MPA at concentrations as high as 200 μg/ml. To further substantiate the role of mpaF in MPA resistance, we searched for mpaF orthologs in six MPA producer/non-producer strains from Penicillium subgenus Penicillium. All six strains were found to hold two copies of IMPDH. A cladistic analysis based on the corresponding cDNA sequences revealed a novel group constituting mpaF homologs. Interestingly, a conserved tyrosine residue in the original class of IMPDHs is replaced by a phenylalanine residue in the new IMPDH class. Conclusions We identified a novel variant of the IMPDH-encoding gene in six different strains from Penicillium subgenus Penicillium. The novel IMPDH variant from MPA producer P. brevicompactum was shown to confer a high degree of MPA resistance when expressed in a non-producer fungus. Our study provides a basis for understanding the molecular mechanism of MPA resistance and has relevance for biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:21923907

  9. Co-expression of two heterologous lactate dehydrogenases genes in Kluyveromyces marxianus for l-lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Won; In, Jung Hoon; Park, Joon-Bum; Shin, Jonghyeok; Park, Jin Hwan; Sung, Bong Hyun; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Seo, Jin-Ho; Park, Jin-Byoung; Kim, Soo Rin; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2017-01-10

    Lactic acid (LA) is a versatile compound used in the food, pharmaceutical, textile, leather, and chemical industries. Biological production of LA is possible by yeast strains expressing a bacterial gene encoding l-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Kluyveromyces marxianus is an emerging non-conventional yeast with various phenotypes of industrial interest. However, it has not been extensively studied for LA production. In this study, K. marxianus was engineered to express and co-express various heterologous LDH enzymes that were reported to have different pH optimums. Specifically, three LDH enzymes originating from Staphylococcus epidermidis (SeLDH; optimal at pH 5.6), Lactobacillus acidophilus (LaLDH; optimal at pH 5.3), and Bos taurus (BtLDH; optimal at pH 9.8) were functionally expressed individually and in combination in K. marxianus, and the resulting strains were compared in terms of LA production. A strain co-expressing SeLDH and LaLDH (KM5 La+SeLDH) produced 16.0g/L LA, whereas the strains expressing those enzymes individually produced only 8.4 and 6.8g/L, respectively. This co-expressing strain produced 24.0g/L LA with a yield of 0.48g/g glucose in the presence of CaCO3. Our results suggest that co-expression of LDH enzymes with different pH optimums provides sufficient LDH activity under dynamic intracellular pH conditions, leading to enhanced production of LA compared to individual expression of the LDH enzymes.

  10. Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biologic...

  11. Supplementation of medium with diammonium hydrogen phosphate enhanced the D-lactate dehydrogenase levels leading to increased D-lactic acid productivity.

    PubMed

    Singhvi, Mamata; Jadhav, Akanksha; Gokhale, Digambar

    2013-10-01

    The production of D-lactic acid by Lactobacillus lactis RM2-24 was investigated using modified media to increase the efficiency of the fermentation process. The results indicated that the addition of 5 g/l peptone and 1 g/l (NH4)2HPO4 enhanced D-lactic acid production by 32%, as compared to that obtained from non supplemented media, with a productivity of 3.0 g/l/h. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) expression profile in these different media was studied which resulted in appearance of additional LDH isoform produced by cells when they were grown in HSYE supplemented with (NH4)2HPO4. The additional LDH appears to be L-LDH contributing to production of L-lactic acid in the fermented broth. This is totally new information in the lactic acid fermentation and could be very useful to industries engaged in D-lactic acid production.

  12. Carbon Flux Trapping: Highly Efficient Production of Polymer-Grade d-Lactic Acid with a Thermophilic d-Lactate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Tao, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2016-08-17

    High production of polymer-grade d-lactic acid is urgently required, particularly for the synthesis of polylactic acid. High-temperature fermentation has multiple advantages, such as lower equipment requirement and energy consumption, which are essential for lowering operating costs. We identified and introduced a unique d-lactate dehydrogenase into a thermotolerant butane-2,3-diol-producing strain. Carbon flux "trapping" was achieved by a "trapping point" created by combination of the introduced enzyme and the host efflux pump, which afforded irreversible transport of d-lactic acid. The overall carbon flux of the engineered strain was significantly enhanced and was redistributed predominantly to d-lactic acid. Under optimized conditions at 50 °C, d-lactic acid reached the highest titer (226.6 g L(-1) ) reported to date. This discovery allows us to extend the carbon flux trapping strategy to engineering complex metabolic networks.

  13. Human acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-9 plays a novel role in the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Ensenauer, Regina; He, Miao; Willard, Jan-Marie; Goetzman, Eric S; Corydon, Thomas J; Vandahl, Brian B; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Isaya, Grazia; Vockley, Jerry

    2005-09-16

    Unsaturated fatty acids play an important role in the prevention of human diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancer, and neurodegeneration. However, their oxidation in vivo by acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs) that catalyze the first step of each cycle of mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation is not entirely understood. Recently, a novel ACAD (ACAD-9) of unknown function that is highly homologous to human very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was identified by large-scale random sequencing. To characterize its enzymatic role, we have expressed ACAD-9 in Escherichia coli, purified it, and determined its pattern of substrate utilization. The N terminus of the mature form of the enzyme was identified by in vitro mitochondrial import studies of precursor protein. A 37-amino acid leader peptide was cleaved sequentially by two mitochondrial peptidases to yield a predicted molecular mass of 65 kDa for the mature subunit. Submitochondrial fractionation studies found native ACAD-9 to be associated with the mitochondrial membrane. Gel filtration analysis indicated that, like very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, ACAD-9 is a dimer, in contrast to the other known ACADs, which are tetramers. Purified mature ACAD-9 had maximal activity with long-chain unsaturated acyl-CoAs as substrates (C16:1-, C18:1-, C18:2-, C22:6-CoA). These results suggest a previously unrecognized role for ACAD-9 in the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids. Because of the substrate specificity and abundance of ACAD-9 in brain, we speculate that it may play a role in the turnover of lipid membrane unsaturated fatty acids that are essential for membrane integrity and structure.

  14. Oxidation of 3,4-dehydro-D-proline and other D-amino acid analogues by D-alanine dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Charles E

    2004-09-15

    3,4-Dehydro-DL-proline is a toxic analogue of L-proline which has been useful in studying the uptake and metabolism of this key amino acid. When membrane fractions from Escherichia coli strain UMM5 (putA1::Tn5 proC24) lacking both L-proline dehydrogenase and L-Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase were incubated with 3,4-dehydro-DL-proline, pyrrole-2-carboxylate was formed. There was no enzyme activity with 3,4-dehydro-L-proline, but activity was restored after racemization of the substrate. Oxidation of 3,4-dehydro-DL-proline by membrane fractions from strain UMM5 was induced by growth in minimal medium containing D- or L-alanine, had a pH optimum of 9, and was competitively inhibited by D-alanine. An E. coli strain with no D-alanine dehydrogenase activity due to the dadA237 mutation was unable to oxidize either 3,4-dehydro-D-proline or D-alanine, as were spontaneous Dad(-) mutants of E. coli strain UMM5. Membrane fractions containing D-alanine dehydrogenase also catalyzed the oxidation of D-2-aminobutyrate, D-norvaline, D-norleucine, cis-4-hydroxy-D-proline, and DL-ethionine. These results indicate that d-alanine dehydrogenase is responsible for the residual 3,4-dehydro-DL-proline oxidation activity in putA proC mutants of E. coli and provide further evidence that this enzyme plays a general role in the metabolism of D-amino acids and their analogues.

  15. Simultaneous determination of LSD and 2-oxo-3-hydroxy LSD in hair and urine by LC-MS/MS and its application to forensic cases.

    PubMed

    Jang, Moonhee; Kim, Jihyun; Han, Inhoi; Yang, Wonkyung

    2015-11-10

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is administered in low dosages, which makes its detection in biological matrices a major challenge in forensic toxicology. In this study, two sensitive and reliable methods based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were established and validated for the simultaneous determination of LSD and its metabolite, 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD (O-H-LSD), in hair and urine. Target analytes in hair were extracted using methanol at 38°C for 15h and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. For urine sample preparation, liquid-liquid extraction was performed. Limits of detection (LODs) in hair were 0.25pg/mg for LSD and 0.5pg/mg for O-H-LSD. In urine, LODs were 0.01 and 0.025ng/ml for LSD and O-H-LSD, respectively. Method validation results showed good linearity and acceptable precision and accuracy. The developed methods were applied to authentic specimens from two legal cases of LSD ingestion, and allowed identification and quantification of LSD and O-H-LSD in the specimens. In the two cases, LSD concentrations in hair were 1.27 and 0.95pg/mg; O-H-LSD was detected in one case, but its concentration was below the limit of quantification. In urine samples collected from the two suspects 8 and 3h after ingestion, LSD concentrations were 0.48 and 2.70ng/ml, respectively, while O-H-LSD concentrations were 4.19 and 25.2ng/ml, respectively. These methods can be used for documenting LSD intake in clinical and forensic settings.

  16. Major Role of NAD-Dependent Lactate Dehydrogenases in the Production of l-Lactic Acid with High Optical Purity by the Thermophile Bacillus coagulans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Limin; Cai, Yumeng; Zhu, Lingfeng; Guo, Honglian; Yu, Bo

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus coagulans 2-6 is an excellent producer of optically pure l-lactic acid. However, little is known about the mechanism of synthesis of the highly optically pure l-lactic acid produced by this strain. Three enzymes responsible for lactic acid production-NAD-dependent l-lactate dehydrogenase (l-nLDH; encoded by ldhL), NAD-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase (d-nLDH; encoded by ldhD), and glycolate oxidase (GOX)-were systematically investigated in order to study the relationship between these enzymes and the optical purity of lactic acid. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DSM 20081 (a d-lactic acid producer) and Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum DSM 20174 (a dl-lactic acid producer) were also examined in this study as comparative strains, in addition to B. coagulans. The specific activities of key enzymes for lactic acid production in the three strains were characterized in vivo and in vitro, and the levels of transcription of the ldhL, ldhD, and GOX genes during fermentation were also analyzed. The catalytic activities of l-nLDH and d-nLDH were different in l-, d-, and dl-lactic acid producers. Only l-nLDH activity was detected in B. coagulans 2-6 under native conditions, and the level of transcription of ldhL in B. coagulans 2-6 was much higher than that of ldhD or the GOX gene at all growth phases. However, for the two Lactobacillus strains used in this study, ldhD transcription levels were higher than those of ldhL. The high catalytic efficiency of l-nLDH toward pyruvate and the high transcription ratios of ldhL to ldhD and ldhL to the GOX gene provide the key explanations for the high optical purity of l-lactic acid produced by B. coagulans 2-6.

  17. Selective inhibition of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 by 18alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid but not 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid.

    PubMed

    Classen-Houben, Dirk; Schuster, Daniela; Da Cunha, Thierry; Odermatt, Alex; Wolber, Gerhard; Jordis, Ulrich; Kueenburg, Bernhard

    2009-02-01

    Elevated cortisol concentrations have been associated with metabolic diseases such as diabetes type 2 and obesity. 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11beta-HSD) type 1, catalyzing the conversion of inactive 11-ketoglucocorticoids into their active 11beta-hydroxy forms, plays an important role in the regulation of cortisol levels within specific tissues. The selective inhibition of 11beta-HSD1 is currently considered as promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of metabolic diseases. In recent years, natural compound-derived drug design has gained considerable interest. 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), a metabolite of the natural product glycyrrhizin, is not selective and inhibits both 11beta-HSD1 and 11beta-HSD2. Here, we compare the biological activity of 18beta-GA and its diastereomer 18alpha-GA against the two enzymes in lysates of transfected HEK-293 cells and show that 18alpha-GA selectively inhibits 11beta-HSD1 but not 11beta-HSD2. This is in contrast to 18beta-GA, which preferentially inhibits 11beta-HSD2. Using a pharmacophore model based on the crystal structure of the GA-derivative carbenoxolone in complex with human 11beta-HSD1, we provide an explanation for the differences in the activities of 18alpha-GA and 18beta-GA. This model will be used to design novel selective derivatives of GA.

  18. 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 is involved in bile acid homeostasis by modulating fatty acid transport protein-5 in the liver of micea

    PubMed Central

    Penno, Carlos A.; Morgan, Stuart A.; Rose, Adam J.; Herzig, Stephan; Lavery, Gareth G.; Odermatt, Alex

    2014-01-01

    11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 (11β-HSD1) plays a key role in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation. Besides, it metabolizes some oxysterols and bile acids (BAs). The GR regulates BA homeostasis; however, the impact of impaired 11β-HSD1 activity remained unknown. We profiled plasma and liver BAs in liver-specific and global 11β-HSD1-deficient mice. 11β-HSD1-deficiency resulted in elevated circulating unconjugated BAs, an effect more pronounced in global than liver-specific knockout mice. Gene expression analyses revealed decreased expression of the BA-CoA ligase Fatp5, suggesting impaired BA amidation. Reduced organic anion-transporting polypeptide-1A1 (Oatp1a1) and enhanced organic solute-transporter-β (Ostb) mRNA expression were observed in livers from global 11β-HSD1-deficient mice. The impact of 11β-HSD1-deficiency on BA homeostasis seems to be GR-independent because intrahepatic corticosterone and GR target gene expression were not substantially decreased in livers from global knockout mice. Moreover, Fatp5 expression in livers from hepatocyte-specific GR knockout mice was unchanged. The results revealed a role for 11β-HSD1 in BA homeostasis. PMID:25061560

  19. Inhibition of several enzymes by gold compounds. II. beta-Glucuronidase, acid phosphatase and L-malate dehydrogenase by sodium thiomalatoraurate (I), sodium thiosulfatoaurate (I) and thioglucosoaurate (I).

    PubMed

    Lee, M T; Ahmed, T; Haddad, R; Friedman, M E

    1989-01-01

    Bovine liver beta-D-glucuronide glucuronohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.32), wheat germ acid phosphatase (orthophosphoric monoesterphosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.2) and bovine liver L-malate dehydrogenase (L-malate: NAD oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.37) were inhibited by a series of gold (I) complexes that have been used as anti-inflammatory drugs. Both sodium thiosulfatoaurate (I) (Na AuTs) and sodium thiomalatoraurate (NaAuTM) effectively inhibited all three enzymes, while thioglucosoaurate (I) (AuTG) only inhibited L-malate dehydrogenase. The equilibrium constants (K1) ranged from nearly 4000 microM for the NaAuTM-beta-glucuronidase interaction to 24 microM for the NaAuTS-beta-glucuronidase interaction. The rate of covalent bond formation (kp) ranged from 0.00032 min-1 for NaAuTM-beta-glucuronidase formation to 1.7 min-1 for AuTG-L-malate dehydrogenase formation. The equilibrium data shows that the gold (I) drugs bind by several orders lower than the gold (III) compounds, suggesting a significantly stronger interaction between the more highly charged gold ion and the enzyme. Yet the rate of covalent bond formation depends as much on the structure of the active site as upon the lability of the gold-ligand bond. It was also observed that the more effective the gold inhibition the more toxic the compound.

  20. An enantioselective NADP(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase responsible for cooxidative production of (3S)-5-hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Minoru; Matsumura, Aline Tiemi; Kurosaki, Kaishi; Chhetri, Rajan Thapa; Motomatsu, Shigekazu; Suzuki, Ichiro; Sahabi, Danladi Mahuta

    2016-06-01

    A soil bacterium, Mycobacterium sp. B-009, is able to grow on racemic 1,2-propanediol (PD). The strain was revealed to oxidize 3-methyl-1,5-pentanediol (MPD) to 5-hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid (HMPA) during growth on PD. MPD was converted into an almost equimolar amount of the S-form of HMPA (S-HMPA) at 72%ee, suggesting the presence of an enantioselective MPD dehydrogenase (MPD-DH). As expected, an NADP(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the initial step of MPD oxidation, was detected and purified from the cell-free extract. This enzyme was suggested to be a homodimeric medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR). The catalytic and kinetic parameters indicated that MPD is the most suitable substrate for the enzyme. The enzyme was encoded by a 1047-bp gene (mpd1) and several mycobacterial strains were found to have putative MDR genes similar to mpd1. In a phylogenetic tree, MPD-DH formed an independent clade together with the putative MDR of Mycobacterium neoaurum, which produces opportunistic infections.

  1. “Scanning mutagenesis” of the amino acid sequences flanking phosphorylation site 1 of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is regulated by reversible seryl-phosphorylation of the E1alpha subunit by a dedicated, intrinsic kinase. The phospho-complex is reactivated when dephosphorylated by an intrinsic PP2C-type protein phosphatase. Both the position of the phosphorylated...

  2. Dimeth-yl(2-oxo-2-phenyl-eth-yl)sulfanium bromide.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhiling; Liu, Weiwei; Yin, Fujun

    2010-11-17

    Single crystals of the title compound, C(10)H(13)OS(+)·Br(-), were obtained from ethyl acetate/ethyl ether after reaction of acetophenone with hydro-bromic acid and dimethyl-sulfoxide. The carbonyl group is almost coplanar with the neighbouring phenyl ring [O-C-C-C = 178.9 (2)°]. The sulfanium group shows a trigonal-pyramidal geometry at the S atom. The crystal structure is stabil-ized by C-H⋯Br hydrogen-bonding inter-actions. Weak π-π inter-actions link adjacent phenyl rings [centroid-centroid distance = 3.946 (2) Å].

  3. Overexpression of the NADP+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (icdA) in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keiichi; Hattori, Takasumi; Hayashi, Rie; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2014-01-01

    In the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, NADP(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP(+)-ICDH) catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation of isocitric acid to form α-ketoglutaric acid with NADP(+) as a cofactor. We constructed an NADP(+)-ICDH gene (icdA)-overexpressing strain (OPI-1) using Aspergillus niger WU-2223L as a host and examined the effects of increase in NADP(+)-ICDH activity on citric acid production. Under citric acid-producing conditions with glucose as the carbon source, the amounts of citric acid produced and glucose consumed by OPI-1 for the 12-d cultivation period decreased by 18.7 and 10.5%, respectively, compared with those by WU-2223L. These results indicate that the amount of citric acid produced by A. niger can be altered with the NADP(+)-ICDH activity. Therefore, NADP(+)-ICDH is an important regulator of citric acid production in the TCA cycle of A. niger. Thus, we propose that the icdA gene is a potentially valuable tool for modulating citric acid production by metabolic engineering.

  4. JWH-018 ω-OH, a shared hydroxy metabolite of the two synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and AM-2201, undergoes oxidation by alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in vitro forming the carboxylic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Holm, Niels Bjerre; Noble, Carolina; Linnet, Kristian

    2016-09-30

    Synthetic cannabinoids are new psychoactive substances (NPS) acting as agonists at the cannabinoid receptors. The aminoalkylindole-type synthetic cannabinoid naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) was among the first to appear on the illicit drug market and its metabolism has been extensively investigated. The N-pentyl side chain is a major site of human cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidative metabolism, and the ω-carboxylic acid metabolite appears to be a major in vivo human urinary metabolite. This metabolite is, however, not formed to any significant extent in human liver microsomal (HLM) incubations raising the possibility that the discrepancy is due to involvement of cytosolic enzymes. Here we demonstrate in incubations with human liver cytosol (HLC), that JWH-018 ω-OH, but not the JWH-018 parent compound, is a substrate for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. The sole end-product identified in HLC was the JWH-018 ω-COOH metabolite, while trapping tests with methoxyamine proved the presence of the aldehyde intermediate. ADH/ALDH and UDP-glucuronosyl-transferases (UGT) enzymes may therefore both act on the JWH-018 ω-OH substrate. Finally, we note that for [1-(5-fluoropentyl)indol-3-yl]-naphthalen-1-yl-methanone (AM-2201), the ω-fluorinated analog of JWH-018, a high amount of JWH-018 ω-OH was formed in HLM incubated without NADPH, suggesting that the oxidative defluorination is efficiently catalyzed by non-CYP enzyme(s). The pathway presented here may therefore be especially important for N-(5-fluoropentyl) substituted synthetic cannabinoids, because the oxidative defluorination can occur even if the CYP-mediated metabolism preferentially takes place on other parts of the molecule than the N-alkyl side chain. Controlled clinical studies in humans are ultimately required to demonstrate the in vivo importance of the oxidation pathway presented here.

  5. Scaffold electrodes based on thioctic acid-capped gold nanoparticles coordinated Alcohol Dehydrogenase and Azure A films for high performance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Anquela, C; García-Mendiola, T; Abad, José M; Pita, M; Pariente, F; Lorenzo, E

    2015-12-01

    Nanometric size gold nanoparticles capped with thiotic acid are used to coordinate with the Zn (II) present in the catalytic center of Alcohol Dehydrogenase (ADH). In combination with the NADH oxidation molecular catalyst Azure A, electrografted onto carbon screen-printed electrodes, they are used as scaffold electrodes for the construction of a very efficient ethanol biosensor. The final biosensing device exhibits a highly efficient ethanol oxidation with low overpotential of -0.25 V besides a very good analytical performance with a detection limit of 0.14±0.01 μM and a stable response for more than one month.

  6. Dimeth­yl(2-oxo-2-phenyl­eth­yl)sulfanium bromide

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhiling; Liu, Weiwei; Yin, Fujun

    2010-01-01

    Single crystals of the title compound, C10H13OS+·Br−, were obtained from ethyl acetate/ethyl ether after reaction of acetophenone with hydro­bromic acid and dimethyl­sulfoxide. The carbonyl group is almost coplanar with the neighbouring phenyl ring [O—C—C—C = 178.9 (2)°]. The sulfanium group shows a trigonal–pyramidal geometry at the S atom. The crystal structure is stabil­ized by C—H⋯Br hydrogen-bonding inter­actions. Weak π–π inter­actions link adjacent phenyl rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.946 (2) Å]. PMID:21589491

  7. Structure of D-lactate dehydrogenase from Aquifex aeolicus complexed with NAD(+) and lactic acid (or pyruvate).

    PubMed

    Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Strange, Richard W; Ellis, Mark J; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Inoue, Yumiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hasnain, S Samar

    2009-12-01

    The crystal structure of D-lactate dehydrogenase from Aquifex aeolicus (aq_727) was determined to 2.12 A resolution in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 90.94, b = 94.43, c = 188.85 A. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the coenzyme-binding domain of Lactobacillus helveticus D-lactate dehydrogenase and contained two homodimers in the asymmetric unit. Each subunit of the homodimer was found to be in a ;closed' conformation with the NADH cofactor bound to the coenzyme-binding domain and with a lactate (or pyruvate) molecule bound at the interdomain active-site cleft.

  8. Homo-D-lactic acid fermentation from arabinose by redirection of the phosphoketolase pathway to the pentose phosphate pathway in L-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Yoshida, Shogo; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-08-01

    Optically pure d-lactic acid fermentation from arabinose was achieved by using the Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB 8826 strain whose l-lactate dehydrogenase gene was deficient and whose phosphoketolase gene was substituted with a heterologous transketolase gene. After 27 h of fermentation, 38.6 g/liter of d-lactic acid was produced from 50 g/liter of arabinose.

  9. Functions of defense-related proteins and dehydrogenases in resistance response induced by salicylic acid in sweet cherry fruits at different maturity stages.

    PubMed

    Chan, Zhulong; Wang, Qing; Xu, Xiangbin; Meng, Xianghong; Qin, Guozheng; Li, Boqiang; Tian, Shiping

    2008-11-01

    We report here a comparative analysis of sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruits proteome induced by salicylic acid (SA) at different maturity stages. The results demonstrated that SA enhanced the resistance of sweet cherry fruits against Penicillium expansum, resulting in lower disease incidences and smaller lesion diameters, especially at earlier maturity stage. Based on proteomics analysis, 13 and 28 proteins were identified after SA treatment at earlier (A) and later (B) maturity stage, respectively. Seven antioxidant proteins and three pathogenesis related-proteins were identified at both A and B stages, while five heat shock proteins and four dehydrogenases were only detected at B stage. SA treatment also stimulated higher transcript levels of peroxidase, but repressed that of catalase. Moreover, some proteins regulated by SA at B maturity stage were identified as enzymes involved in glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle. These findings indicated that younger sweet cherry fruits showed stronger resistance against pathogen invasion after SA treatment. It further indicated that antioxidant proteins were involved in the resistance response of fruits at every maturity stage, while heat shock proteins and dehydrogenases might potentially act as factors only at later maturity stages.

  10. Influence of human serum albumin on the bile acid-mediated inhibition of liver microsomal type 1 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yorio; Funagayama, Mayumi; Shinohara, Akio; Koshimoto, Chihiro; Furusawa, Hidemi; Nakahara, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Saitoh, Tomokazu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Komaki, Kansei

    2014-09-01

    The influence of human serum albumin (HSA) on the bile acid-mediated inhibition of liver microsomal type 1 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD1) was studied in vitro. A rat liver microsomal fraction was prepared, and the 11β-HSD1 enzyme activity in the presence of various concentrations of bile acids and HSA was determined using hydrocortisone as the substrate. The products of the reaction were extracted and analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. The magnitude of the inhibition decreased with the addition of HSA in a dose-dependent manner. Four percent human albumin decreased the inhibitory effects of 100 μM chenodeoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid from 89.9 ± 5.6 to 54.5 ± 6.1% and from 83.8 ± 4.8 to 20.8 ± 4.2%, respectively. In contrast, ursodeoxycholic acid and deoxycholic acid showed no inhibitory effect on the enzyme activity in the presence of 4% human serum albumin, and the addition of 1% γ-globulin to the assay mixture in the presence of bile acids did not affect the enzyme activity. Our in vitro study showed that the addition of HSA ameliorated the inhibition of 11β-HSD1 and that the magnitude of the change is dependent on the species of bile acid, presumably based on the numbers of hydroxyl groups. These results suggest that HSA seems to protect the bile acid-mediated inhibition of 11β-HSD1 in the healthy subject. On the other hand, in the patients with obstructive biliary diseases, not only elevated serum bile acid but also the accompanying hypoalbuminemia is important to evaluate the pathophysiology of the bile acid-mediated inhibition of 11β-HSD1 of the disease.

  11. Conversion of L-sorbosone to L-ascorbic acid by a NADP-dependent dehydrogenase in bean and spinach leaf. [Phaseolus vulgaris L. ; Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Loewus, M.W.; Bedgar, D.L.; Saito, Kazumi; Loewus, F.A. )

    1990-11-01

    An NADP-dependent dehydrogenase catalyzing the conversion of L-sorbosone to L-ascorbic acid has been isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Spinacia oleracea L. and partially purified. It is stable at {minus}20{degree}C for up to 8 months. Molecular masses, as determined by gel filtration, were 21 and 29 kilodaltons for bean and spinach enzymes, respectively. K{sub m} for sorbosone were 12 {plus minus} 2 and 18 {plus minus} 2 millimolar and for NADP{sup +}, 0.14 {plus minus} 0.05 and 1.2 {plus minus} 0.5 millimolar, for bean and spinach, respectively. Lycorine, a purported inhibitor of L-ascorbic acid biosynthesis, had no effect on the reaction.

  12. First row transition metal complexes of (E)-2-(2-(2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinyl)-2-oxo-N-phenylacetamide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, T. A.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.; Rakha, T. H.; El-Ayaan, Usama

    2011-12-01

    Manganese(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), and chromium(III) complexes of (E)-2-(2-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)hydrazinyl)-2-oxo-N-phenylacetamide were synthesized and characterized by elemental and thermal (TG and DTA) analyses, IR, UV-vis and 1H NMR spectra as well as magnetic moment. Mononuclear complexes are obtained with 1:1 molar ratio except [Mn(HOS) 2(H 2O) 2] and [Co(OS) 2](H 2O) 2 complexes which are obtained with 1:2 molar ratios. The IR spectra of ligand and metal complexes reveal various modes of chelation. The ligand behaves as a monobasic bidentate one and coordination occurs via the enolic oxygen atom and azomethine nitrogen atom. The ligand behaves also as a monobasic tridentate one and coordination occurs through the carbonyl oxygen atom, azomethine nitrogen atom and the hydroxyl oxygen. Moreover, the ligand behaves as a dibasic tridentate and coordination occurs via the enolic oxygen, azomethine nitrogen and the hydroxyl oxygen atoms. The electronic spectra and magnetic moment measurements reveal that all complexes possess octahedral geometry except the copper complexes possesses a square planar geometry. From the modeling studies, the bond length, bond angle, HOMO, LUMO and dipole moment had been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligands and their investigated complexes. The thermal studies showed the type of water molecules involved in metal complexes as well as the thermal decomposition of some metal complexes. The protonation constant of the ligand and the stability constant of metal complexes were determined pH-metrically in 50% (v/v) dioxane-water mixture at 298 K and found to be consistent with Irving-Williams order. Moreover, the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of these compounds against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherechia coli and Candida albicans were determined.

  13. A membrane-associated adenylate cyclase modulates lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities required for bull sperm capacitation induced by hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Silvina; Córdoba, Mariana

    2017-04-01

    Hyaluronic acid, as well as heparin, is a glycosaminoglycan present in the female genital tract of cattle. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxidative metabolism and intracellular signals mediated by a membrane-associated adenylate cyclase (mAC), in sperm capacitation with hyaluronic acid and heparin, in cryopreserved bull sperm. The mAC inhibitor, 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, was used in the present study. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) activities and lactate concentration were determined spectrophotometrically in the incubation medium. Capacitation and acrosome reaction were evaluated by chlortetracycline technique, while plasma membrane and acrosome integrity were determined by trypan blue stain/differential interference contrast microscopy. Heparin capacitated samples had a significant decrease in LDH and CK activities, while in hyaluronic acid capacitated samples LDH and CK activities both increased compared to control samples, in heparin and hyaluronic acid capacitation conditions, respectively. A significant increase in lactate concentration in the incubation medium occurred in hyaluronic acid-treated sperm samples compared to heparin treatment, indicating this energetic metabolite is produced during capacitation. The LDH and CK enzyme activities and lactate concentrations in the incubation medium were decreased with 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine treatment in hyaluronic acid samples. The mAC inhibitor significantly inhibited heparin-induced capacitation of sperm cells, but did not completely inhibit hyaluronic acid capacitation. Therefore, hyaluronic acid and heparin are physiological glycosaminoglycans capable of inducing in vitro capacitation in cryopreserved bull sperm, stimulating different enzymatic pathways and intracellular signals modulated by a mAC. Hyaluronic acid induces sperm capacitation involving LDH and CK activities, thereby reducing oxidative metabolism, and this process is mediated by mAC.

  14. Specific inhibition by synthetic analogs of pyruvate reveals that the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction is essential for metabolism and viability of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bunik, Victoria I; Artiukhov, Artem; Kazantsev, Alexey; Goncalves, Renata; Daloso, Danilo; Oppermann, Henry; Kulakovskaya, Elena; Lukashev, Nikolay; Fernie, Alisdair; Brand, Martin; Gaunitz, Frank

    2015-11-24

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and its phosphorylation are considered essential for oncotransformation, but it is unclear whether cancer cells require PDHC to be functional or silenced. We used specific inhibition of PDHC by synthetic structural analogs of pyruvate to resolve this question. With isolated and intramitochondrial PDHC, acetyl phosphinate (AcPH, KiAcPH = 0.1 μM) was a much more potent competitive inhibitor than the methyl ester of acetyl phosphonate (AcPMe, KiAcPMe = 40 μM). When preincubated with the complex, AcPH also irreversibly inactivated PDHC. Pyruvate prevented, but did not reverse the inactivation. The pyruvate analogs did not significantly inhibit other 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases. Different cell lines were exposed to the inhibitors and a membrane-permeable precursor of AcPMe, dimethyl acetyl phosphonate, which did not inhibit isolated PDHC. Using an ATP-based assay, dependence of cellular viability on the concentration of the pyruvate analogs was followed. The highest toxicity of the membrane-permeable precursor suggested that the cellular action of charged AcPH and AcPMe requires monocarboxylate transporters. The relevant cell-specific transcripts extracted from Gene Expression Omnibus database indicated that cell lines with higher expression of monocarboxylate transporters and PDHC components were more sensitive to the PDHC inhibitors. Prior to a detectable antiproliferative action, AcPH significantly changed metabolic profiles of the investigated glioblastoma cell lines. We conclude that catalytic transformation of pyruvate by pyruvate dehydrogenase is essential for the metabolism and viability of glioblastoma cell lines, although metabolic heterogeneity causes different cellular sensitivities and/or abilities to cope with PDHC inhibition.

  15. Metabolism of lysine in alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase-deficient fibroblasts: evidence for an alternative pathway of pipecolic acid formation.

    PubMed

    Struys, Eduard A; Jakobs, Cornelis

    2010-01-04

    The mammalian degradation of lysine is believed to proceed via two distinct routes, the saccharopine and the pipecolic acid routes, that ultimately converge at the level of alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde (alpha-AASA). alpha-AASA dehydrogenase-deficient fibroblasts were grown in cell culture medium supplemented with either L-[alpha-(15)N]lysine or L-[epsilon-(15)N]lysine to explore the exact route of lysine degradation. L-[alpha-(15)N]lysine was catabolised into [(15)N]saccharopine, [(15)N]alpha-AASA, [(15)N]Delta(1)-piperideine-6-carboxylate, and surprisingly in [(15)N]pipecolic acid, whereas L-[epsilon-(15)N]lysine resulted only in the formation of [(15)N]saccharopine. These results imply that lysine is exclusively degraded in fibroblasts via the saccharopine branch, and pipecolic acid originates from an alternative precursor. We hypothesize that pipecolic acid derives from Delta(1)-piperideine-6-carboxylate by the action of Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid reductase, an enzyme involved in proline metabolism.

  16. Efficient production of L-Lactic acid by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a genome-integrated L-lactate dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Nobuhiro; Saitoh, Satoshi; Tokuhiro, Kenro; Nagamori, Eiji; Matsuyama, Takashi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Takahashi, Haruo

    2005-04-01

    We developed a metabolically engineered yeast which produces lactic acid efficiently. In this recombinant strain, the coding region for pyruvate decarboxylase 1 (PDC1) on chromosome XII is substituted for that of the l-lactate dehydrogenase gene (LDH) through homologous recombination. The expression of mRNA for the genome-integrated LDH is regulated under the control of the native PDC1 promoter, while PDC1 is completely disrupted. Using this method, we constructed a diploid yeast transformant, with each haploid genome having a single insertion of bovine LDH. Yeast cells expressing LDH were observed to convert glucose to both lactate (55.6 g/liter) and ethanol (16.9 g/liter), with up to 62.2% of the glucose being transformed into lactic acid under neutralizing conditions. This transgenic strain, which expresses bovine LDH under the control of the PDC1 promoter, also showed high lactic acid production (50.2 g/liter) under nonneutralizing conditions. The differences in lactic acid production were compared among four different recombinants expressing a heterologous LDH gene (i.e., either the bovine LDH gene or the Bifidobacterium longum LDH gene): two transgenic strains with 2microm plasmid-based vectors and two genome-integrated strains.

  17. Biosynthesis of Ascorbic Acid in Kidney Bean. l-Galactono-γ-Lactone Dehydrogenase Is an Intrinsic Protein Located at the Mitochondrial Inner Membrane1

    PubMed Central

    Siendones, Emilio; González-Reyes, José A.; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos; Navas, Plácido; Córdoba, Francisco

    1999-01-01

    Hypocotyls of kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) accumulated ascorbate after preincubation with a number of possible precursors, mainly l-galactono-γ-lactone (l-GL) and l-gulono-γ-lactone. The increase in the intracellular ascorbate concentration was parallel to the high stimulation of the l-GL dehydrogenase (l-GLD) activity measured in vitro using l-GL as a substrate and cytochrome c as an electron acceptor. Cell fractionation using a continuous linear Percoll gradient demonstrated that l-GLD is associated with mitochondria; therefore, pure mitochondria were isolated and subjected to detergent treatment to separate soluble from membrane-linked proteins. l-GLD activity was mainly associated with the detergent phase, suggesting that a membrane-intrinsic protein is responsible for the ascorbic acid biosynthetic activity. Subfractionation of mitochondria demonstrated that l-GLD is located at the inner membrane. PMID:10398727

  18. An amperometric D-amino acid biosensor prepared with a thermostable D-proline dehydrogenase and a carbon nanotube-ionic liquid gel.

    PubMed

    Tani, Yuji; Itoyama, Yukiko; Nishi, Kenichi; Wada, Chikahiro; Shoda, Yoshio; Satomura, Takenori; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Hayashi, Yukako; Yabutani, Tomoki; Motonaka, Junko

    2009-07-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) gel, which is composed of a mixture of single-wall CNT, an ionic liquid, and a thermostable D-proline dehydrogenase (D-Pro DH) immobilized electrode was utilized for the determination of D-amino acids (DAAs) in food samples. When a critical comparison with CNT, Ketjen Black (KB), and carbon powder (CP) was also carried out, the CNT/D-Pro DH immobilized electrode showed the highest sensitivity and the lowest detection limit of D-proline. In addition, the CNT/D-Pro DH immobilized electrode was applied to detection of DAAs in rice wine and vinegar samples. The concentrations of DAAs in rice wine and vinegar samples were 0.0210 +/- 0.0001 and 0.55 +/- 0.05 mmol L(-1), respectively.

  19. Higher thermostability of l-lactate dehydrogenases is a key factor in decreasing the optical purity of d-lactic acid produced from Lactobacillus coryniformis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Sol-A; Jun, Chanha; Joo, Jeong Chan; Kim, Seil; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2014-05-10

    Lactobacillus coryniformis is known to produce d-lactic acid as a dominant fermentation product at a cultivation temperature of approximately 30°C. However, the considerable production of l-lactic acid is observed when the fermentation temperature is greater than 40°C. Because optically pure lactates are synthesized from pyruvate by the catalysis of chiral-specific d- or l-lactate dehydrogenase, the higher thermostability of l-LDHs is assumed to be one of the key factors decreasing the optical purity of d-lactic acid produced from L. coryniformis at high temperature. To verify this hypothesis, two types of d-ldh genes and six types of l-ldh genes based on the genomic information of L. coryniformis were synthesized and expressed in Escherichia coli. Among the LDHs tested, five LDHs showed activity and were used to construct polyclonal antibodies. d-LDH1, l-LDH2, and l-LDH3 were found to be expressed in L. coryniformis by Western blotting analysis. The half-life values (t1/2) of the LDHs at 40°C were estimated to be 10.50, 41.76, and 2311min, and the T50(10) values were 39.50, 39.90, and 58.60°C, respectively. In addition, the Tm values were 36.0, 41.0, and 62.4°C, respectively, which indicates that l-LDH has greater thermostability than d-LDH. The higher thermostability of l-LDHs compared with that of d-LDH1 may be a major reason why the enantiopurity of d-lactic acid is decreased at high fermentation temperatures. The key enzymes characterized will suggest a direction for the design of genetically modified lactic acid bacteria to produce optically pure d-lactic acid.

  20. Cloning, expression, and biochemical characterization of a novel NADP(+)-dependent 7α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Clostridium difficile and its application for the oxidation of bile acids.

    PubMed

    Bakonyi, Daniel; Hummel, Werner

    2017-04-01

    A gene encoding a novel 7α-specific NADP(+)-dependent hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Clostridium difficile was cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was purified using an N-terminal hexa-his-tag and biochemically characterized. The optimum temperature is at 60°C, but the enzyme is inactivated at this temperature with a half-life time of 5min. Contrary to other known 7α-HSDHs, for example from Clostridium sardiniense or E. coli, the enzyme from C. difficile does not display a substrate inhibition. In order to demonstrate the applicability of this enzyme, a small-scale biotransformation of the bile acid chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) into 7-ketolithocholic acid (7-KLCA) was carried out with simultaneous regeneration of NADP(+) using an NADPH oxidase that resulted in a complete conversion (<99%). Furthermore, by a structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, cofactor specificity of the 7α-HSDH from Clostridium difficile was altered to accept NAD(H). This mutant was biochemically characterized and compared to the wild-type.

  1. Pathways of Amino Acid Degradation in Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) with Special Reference to Lysine-Ketoglutarate Reductase/Saccharopine Dehydrogenase (LKR/SDH)

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Pin-Jun; Yuan, San-Yue; Tang, Yao-Hua; Li, Kai-Long; Yang, Lu; Fu, Qiang; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Nilaparvata lugens harbors yeast-like symbionts (YLSs). In present paper, a genome-wide analysis found 115 genes from Ni. lugens and 90 genes from YLSs that were involved in the metabolic degradation of 20 proteinogenic amino acids. These 205 genes encoded for 77 enzymes. Accordingly, the degradation pathways for the 20 amino acids were manually constructed. It is postulated that Ni. lugens can independently degrade fourteen amino acids (threonine, alanine, glycine, serine, aspartate, asparagine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, glutamate, glutamine, proline, histidine, leucine and lysine). Ni. lugens and YLSs enzymes may work collaboratively to break down tryptophan, cysteine, arginine, isoleucine, methionine and valine. We cloned a lysine-ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase gene (Nllkr/sdh) that encoded a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the first two steps of lysine catabolism. Nllkr/sdh is widely expressed in the first through fifth instar nymphs and adults, and is highly expressed in the fat body, ovary and gut in adults. Ingestion of dsNllkr/sdh by nymphs successfully knocked down the target gene, and caused nymphal/adult mortality, shortened nymphal development stage and reduced adult fresh weight. Moreover, Nllkr/sdh knockdown resulted in three defects: wings were shortened and thickened; cuticles were stretched and thinned; and old nymphal cuticles remained on the tips of legs and abdomen and were not completely shed. These data indicate that impaired lysine degradation negatively affects the survival and development of Ni. lugens. PMID:26000452

  2. Tiller number is altered in the ascorbic acid-deficient rice suppressed for L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yonghai; Yu, Le; Tong, Jianhua; Ding, Junhui; Wang, Ruozhong; Lu, Yusheng; Xiao, Langtao

    2013-03-01

    The tiller of rice (Oryza sativa L.), which determines the panicle number per plant, is an important agronomic trait for grain production. Ascorbic acid (Asc) is a major plant antioxidant that serves many functions in plants. L-Galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH, EC 1.3.2.3) is an enzyme that catalyzes the last step of Asc biosynthesis in plants. Here we show that the GLDH-suppressed transgenic rices, GI-1 and GI-2, which have constitutively low (between 30% and 50%) leaf Asc content compared with the wild-type plants, exhibit a significantly reduced tiller number. Moreover, lower growth rate and plant height were observed in the Asc-deficient plants relative to the trait values of the wild-type plants at different tillering stages. Further examination showed that the deficiency of Asc resulted in a higher lipid peroxidation, a loss of chlorophyll, a loss of carotenoids, and a lower rate of CO(2) assimilation. In addition, the level of abscisic acid was higher in GI-1 plants, while the level of jasmonic acid was higher in GI-1 and GI-2 plants at different tillering stages. The results we presented here indicated that Asc deficiency was likely responsible for the promotion of premature senescence, which was accompanied by a marked decrease in photosynthesis. These observations support the conclusion that the deficiency of Asc alters the tiller number in the GLDH-suppressed transgenics through promoting premature senescence and changing phytohormones related to senescence.

  3. De novo fatty acid biosynthesis and elongation in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient mice supplemented with odd or even medium-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Sara; Behringer, Sidney; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2015-11-01

    An even medium-chain triglyceride (MCT)-based diet is the mainstay of treatment in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency (VLCADD). Previous studies with magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown an impact of MCT on the average fatty acid chain length in abdominal fat. We therefore assume that medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are elongated and accumulate in tissue as long-chain fatty acids. In this study, we explored the hepatic effects of long-term supplementation with MCT or triheptanoin, an odd-chain C7-based triglyceride, in wild-type and VLCAD-deficient (VLCAD(-/-) ) mice after 1 year of supplementation as compared with a control diet. The de novo biosynthesis and elongation of fatty acids, and peroxisomal β-oxidation, were quantified by RT-PCR. This was followed by a comprehensive analysis of hepatic and cardiac fatty acid profiles by GC-MS. Long-term application of even and odd MCFAs strongly induced de novo biosynthesis and elongation of fatty acids in both wild-type and VLCAD(-/-) mice, leading to an alteration of the hepatic fatty acid profiles. We detected de novo-synthesized and elongated fatty acids, such as heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n9), eicosanoic acid (C20:1n9), erucic acid (C22:1n9), and mead acid (C20:3n9), that were otherwise completely absent in mice under control conditions. In parallel, the content of monounsaturated fatty acids was massively increased. Furthermore, we observed strong upregulation of peroxisomal β-oxidation in VLCAD(-/-) mice, especially when they were fed an MCT diet. Our data raise the question of whether long-term MCFA supplementation represents the most efficient treatment in the long term. Studies on the hepatic toxicity of triheptanoin are still ongoing.

  4. Development and validation of a rapid turboflow LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of LSD and 2-oxo-3-hydroxy LSD in serum and urine samples of emergency toxicological cases.

    PubMed

    Dolder, Patrick C; Liechti, Matthias E; Rentsch, Katharina M

    2015-02-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a widely used recreational drug. The aim of the present study is to develop a quantitative turboflow LC-MS/MS method that can be used for rapid quantification of LSD and its main metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy LSD (O-H-LSD) in serum and urine in emergency toxicological cases without time-consuming extraction steps. The method was developed on an ion-trap LC-MS/MS instrument coupled to a turbulent-flow extraction system. The validation data showed no significant matrix effects and no ion suppression has been observed in serum and urine. Mean intraday accuracy and precision for LSD were 101 and 6.84%, in urine samples and 97.40 and 5.89% in serum, respectively. For O-H-LSD, the respective values were 97.50 and 4.99% in urine and 107 and 4.70% in serum. Mean interday accuracy and precision for LSD were 100 and 8.26% in urine and 101 and 6.56% in serum, respectively. For O-H-LSD, the respective values were 101 and 8.11% in urine and 99.8 and 8.35% in serum, respectively. The lower limit of quantification for LSD was determined to be 0.1 ng/ml. LSD concentrations in serum were expected to be up to 8 ng/ml. 2-Oxo-3-hydroxy LSD concentrations in urine up to 250 ng/ml. The new method was accurate and precise in the range of expected serum and urine concentrations in patients with a suspected LSD intoxication. Until now, the method has been applied in five cases with suspected LSD intoxication where the intake of the drug has been verified four times with LSD concentrations in serum in the range of 1.80-14.70 ng/ml and once with a LSD concentration of 1.25 ng/ml in urine. In serum of two patients, the O-H-LSD concentration was determined to be 0.99 and 0.45 ng/ml. In the urine of a third patient, the O-H-LSD concentration was 9.70 ng/ml.

  5. Improved production of homo-D-lactic acid via xylose fermentation by introduction of xylose assimilation genes and redirection of the phosphoketolase pathway to the pentose phosphate pathway in L-Lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Yoshida, Shogo; Yamada, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-12-01

    The production of optically pure d-lactic acid via xylose fermentation was achieved by using a Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB 8826 strain whose l-lactate dehydrogenase gene was deficient and whose phosphoketolase genes were replaced with a heterologous transketolase gene. After 60 h of fermentation, 41.2 g/liter of d-lactic acid was produced from 50 g/liter of xylose.

  6. A succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein subunit-like transcript is upregulated in Ilex paraguariensis leaves in response to water deficit and abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Raúl M; Maiale, Santiago J; Pessino, Silvina C; Bottini, Rubén; Ruiz, Oscar A; Sansberro, Pedro A

    2013-04-01

    Ilex paraguariensis plants were subjected to progressive soil water deficit, and differential display (DD) was used to analyse gene expression in leaves to characterise physiological responses to mild and severe water deficits. A cDNA fragment showing strong homology with the flavoprotein subunit (SDH1) of succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (succinate dehydrogenase, SDH, EC 1.3.5.1) was upregulated in plants exposed to drought. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the SDH1-like transcript level began to increase when the leaf relative water content (RWC) decreased to 78% and peaked when the RWC dropped to 57%. A correlation between abscisic acid (ABA) concentration and variations in transcript levels was assessed by GC-SIM. After rehydration, SDH1 mRNA and ABA returned to their initial levels. In stressed leaves sprayed with ABA SDH1 mRNA accumulated in greater levels compared to stressed leaves that did not receive ABA. Moreover, the enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase increased 1.5-fold in the mature leaves of ABA-treated plants. This physiological response may be related to the tendency of this species to minimise water losses through stomatal closure in the early stages of dehydration to avoid tissue desiccation. As the leaf water potential diminished due to an increase in water restriction, I. paraguariensis leaf tissues reacted by making osmotic adjustments to sustain tissue metabolic activity, which enables the recovery of photosynthesis upon re-watering. These results provide new insights concerning the linkage between plant respiration and photosynthetic metabolism that could be potentially further used in breeding programs aiming water tolerant genotypes.

  7. Two d-2-Hydroxy-acid Dehydrogenases in Arabidopsis thaliana with Catalytic Capacities to Participate in the Last Reactions of the Methylglyoxal and β-Oxidation Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Engqvist, Martin; Drincovich, María F.; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Maurino, Verónica G.

    2009-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana locus At5g06580 encodes an ortholog to Saccharomyces cerevisiae d-lactate dehydrogenase (AtD-LDH). The recombinant protein is a homodimer of 59-kDa subunits with one FAD per monomer. A substrate screen indicated that AtD-LDH catalyzes the oxidation of d- and l-lactate, d-2-hydroxybutyrate, glycerate, and glycolate using cytochrome c as an electron acceptor. AtD-LDH shows a clear preference for d-lactate, with a catalytic efficiency 200- and 2000-fold higher than that for l-lactate and glycolate, respectively, and a Km value for d-lactate of ∼160 μm. Knock-out mutants showed impaired growth in the presence of d-lactate or methylglyoxal. Collectively, the data indicated that the protein is a d-LDH that participates in planta in the methylglyoxal pathway. Web-based bioinformatic tools revealed the existence of a paralogous protein encoded by locus At4g36400. The recombinant protein is a homodimer of 61-kDa subunits with one FAD per monomer. A substrate screening revealed highly specific d-2-hydroxyglutarate (d-2HG) conversion in the presence of an organic cofactor with a Km value of ∼580 μm. Thus, the enzyme was characterized as a d-2HG dehydrogenase (AtD-2HGDH). Analysis of knock-out mutants demonstrated that AtD-2HGDH is responsible for the total d-2HGDH activity present in A. thaliana. Gene coexpression analysis indicated that AtD-2HGDH is in the same network as several genes involved in β-oxidation and degradation of branched-chain amino acids and chlorophyll. It is proposed that AtD-2HGDH participates in the catabolism of d-2HG most probably during the mobilization of alternative substrates from proteolysis and/or lipid degradation. PMID:19586914

  8. Development of an amine dehydrogenase for synthesis of chiral amines.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Michael J; Vázquez-Figueroa, Eduardo; Woodall, Nicholas B; Moore, Jeffrey C; Bommarius, Andreas S

    2012-04-16

    A leucine dehydrogenase has been successfully altered through several rounds of protein engineering to an enantioselective amine dehydrogenase. Instead of the wild-type α-keto acid, the new amine dehydrogenase now accepts the analogous ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), which corresponds to exchange of the carboxy group by a methyl group to produce chiral (R)-1,3-dimethylbutylamine.

  9. LC-ESI-MS/MS on an ion trap for the determination of LSD, iso-LSD, nor-LSD and 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD in blood, urine and vitreous humor.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Donata; Frison, Giampietro; Maietti, Sergio; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2007-07-01

    A method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), its epimer iso-LSD, and its main metabolites nor-LSD and 2-oxo-3-hydroxy LSD in blood, urine, and, for the first time, vitreous humor samples. The method is based on liquid/liquid extraction and liquid chromatography-multiple mass spectrometry detection in an ion trap mass spectrometer, in positive ion electrospray ionization conditions. Five microliter of sample are injected and analysis time is 12 min. The method is specific, selective and sensitive, and achieves limits of quantification of 20 pg/ml for both LSD and nor-LSD in blood, urine, and vitreous humor. No significant interfering substance or ion suppression was identified for LSD, iso-LSD, and nor-LSD. The interassay reproducibilities for LSD at 20 pg/ml and 2 ng/ml in urine were 8.3 and 5.6%, respectively. Within-run precision using control samples at 20 pg/ml and 2 ng/ml was 6.9 and 3.9%. Mean recoveries of two concentrations spiked into drug free samples were in the range 60-107% in blood, 50-105% in urine, and 65-105% in vitreous humor. The method was successfully applied to the forensic determination of postmortem LSD levels in the biological fluids of a multi drug abuser; for the first time, LSD could be detected in vitreous humor.

  10. Clustered Genes Encoding 2-Keto-l-Gulonate Reductase and l-Idonate 5-Dehydrogenase in the Novel Fungal d-Glucuronic Acid Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kuivanen, Joosu; Arvas, Mikko; Richard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    D-Glucuronic acid is a biomass component that occurs in plant cell wall polysaccharides and is catabolized by saprotrophic microorganisms including fungi. A pathway for D-glucuronic acid catabolism in fungal microorganisms is only partly known. In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger, the enzymes that are known to be part of the pathway are the NADPH requiring D-glucuronic acid reductase forming L-gulonate and the NADH requiring 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase that forms L-idonate. With the aid of RNA sequencing we identified two more enzymes of the pathway. The first is a NADPH requiring 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase that forms L-idonate, GluD. The second is a NAD(+) requiring L-idonate 5-dehydrogenase forming 5-keto-gluconate, GluE. The genes coding for these two enzymes are clustered and share the same bidirectional promoter. The GluD is an enzyme with a strict requirement for NADP(+)/NADPH as cofactors. The kcat for 2-keto-L-gulonate and L-idonate is 21.4 and 1.1 s(-1), and the Km 25.3 and 12.6 mM, respectively, when using the purified protein. In contrast, the GluE has a strict requirement for NAD(+)/NADH. The kcat for L-idonate and 5-keto-D-gluconate is 5.5 and 7.2 s(-1), and the Km 30.9 and 8.4 mM, respectively. These values also refer to the purified protein. The gluD deletion resulted in accumulation of 2-keto-L-gulonate in the liquid cultivation while the gluE deletion resulted in reduced growth and cessation of the D-glucuronic acid catabolism.

  11. Clustered Genes Encoding 2-Keto-l-Gulonate Reductase and l-Idonate 5-Dehydrogenase in the Novel Fungal d-Glucuronic Acid Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kuivanen, Joosu; Arvas, Mikko; Richard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    D-Glucuronic acid is a biomass component that occurs in plant cell wall polysaccharides and is catabolized by saprotrophic microorganisms including fungi. A pathway for D-glucuronic acid catabolism in fungal microorganisms is only partly known. In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger, the enzymes that are known to be part of the pathway are the NADPH requiring D-glucuronic acid reductase forming L-gulonate and the NADH requiring 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase that forms L-idonate. With the aid of RNA sequencing we identified two more enzymes of the pathway. The first is a NADPH requiring 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase that forms L-idonate, GluD. The second is a NAD+ requiring L-idonate 5-dehydrogenase forming 5-keto-gluconate, GluE. The genes coding for these two enzymes are clustered and share the same bidirectional promoter. The GluD is an enzyme with a strict requirement for NADP+/NADPH as cofactors. The kcat for 2-keto-L-gulonate and L-idonate is 21.4 and 1.1 s-1, and the Km 25.3 and 12.6 mM, respectively, when using the purified protein. In contrast, the GluE has a strict requirement for NAD+/NADH. The kcat for L-idonate and 5-keto-D-gluconate is 5.5 and 7.2 s-1, and the Km 30.9 and 8.4 mM, respectively. These values also refer to the purified protein. The gluD deletion resulted in accumulation of 2-keto-L-gulonate in the liquid cultivation while the gluE deletion resulted in reduced growth and cessation of the D-glucuronic acid catabolism. PMID:28261181

  12. Molecular characterization of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, D J; Robertson, A G; Fewson, C A

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of xylB and xylC from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, the genes encoding benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II, were determined. The complete nucleotide sequence indicates that these two genes form part of an operon and this was supported by heterologous expression and physiological studies. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II is a 51654 Da protein with 484 amino acids per subunit and it is typical of other prokaryotic and eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenases. Benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase has a subunit Mr of 38923 consisting of 370 amino acids, it stereospecifically transfers the proR hydride of NADH, and it is a member of the family of zinc-dependent long-chain alcohol dehydrogenases. The enzyme appears to be more similar to animal and higher-plant alcohol dehydrogenases than it is to most other microbial alcohol dehydrogenases. Residue His-51 of zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases is thought to be necessary as a general base for catalysis in this category of alcohol dehydrogenases. However, this residue was found to be replaced in benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from A. calcoaceticus by an isoleucine, and the introduction of a histidine residue in this position did not alter the kinetic coefficients, pH optimum or substrate specificity of the enzyme. Other workers have shown that His-51 is also absent from the TOL-plasmid-encoded benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase of Pseudomonas putida and so these two closely related enzymes presumably have a catalytic mechanism that differs from that of the archetypal zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:9494109

  13. Molecular structures and conformations of 1-benzenesulphonyl-2-oxo-5-alkoxypyrrolidines with anti-amnesic activity. X-ray, 1H-NMR and quantum mechanical (PM3) studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Maria E.; Bandoli, Giuliano; Dolmella, Alessandro; Grassi, Antonio; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.; Toja, Emilio

    1991-04-01

    The crystal and molecular structures of the nootropic agents RU-47001 ((±) 1-(4-nitrobenzenesulphonyl)-2-oxo-5-ethoxypyrrolidine) and RU-47064 ((±) 1-(4-nitrobenzenesulphonyl)-2-oxo-5-isopropyloxypyrrolidine) have been determined by X-ray analysis and their solution conformation has been investigated using 1H NMR spectroscopy. The conformations of these molecules together with those of their analogues RU-35929 ((±) 1-benzenesulphonyl-2-oxo-5-ethoxypyrrolidine), RU-47010 ((±) 1-(3-pyridinylsulphonyl)-2-oxo-5-ethoxypyrrolidine) and RU-35965 ((±) 1-benzenesulphonyl-2-oxo-5-isopropyloxypyrrolidine) have been deduced from semi-quantitative PM3 type theoretical calculations. The main feature of all compounds consists of a common envelope conformation with C (4) at the flap of the pyrrolidinone ring in the solid, that in solution changes into the analogous, but opposite, possible puckered conformational isomer. The 5-alkoxy groups were found rather flexible in solution. Theoretical preferred conformations about NS and SC bonds were in acceptable agreement with those of the solid state. The calculated torsional energetics suggested that 1- 5 do not undergo conformational interconversion.

  14. Lactate dehydrogenase test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003471.htm Lactate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a protein that helps produce energy ...

  15. Diagnostic value of serum lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme and amino acid patterns in several schistosomal and non-schistosomal disorders as compared to other biochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S A; Gad, M Z

    1996-08-01

    Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzyme and amino acid (a.a) patterns were evaluated in comparison to several other biochemical parameters for liver and renal function with the objective of clarifying the differential diagnosis of hepatic disorders and predicting the outcome of schistosomal infection in Egyptian patients. Patients examined included those with complicated hepatic disorders and others with different stages of schistosomal infestation, hepatoma or bladder cancer, in addition to a normal control group. Several biochemical parameters appeared to be useful in establishing consistent differences or similarities between the studied groups. Examples are; elevated serum AST/ALT ratio and methionine content in chronic schistosomiasis, elevated serum urea/creatinine ratio and leucine content in all schistosomal patients and extremely high levels of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) in the urine of non-schistosomal bladder cancer patients. In addition, characteristic LDH isoenzyme profiles distinguish between the studied groups, in particular separating chronic schistosomiasis from schistosomal bladder cancer and hepatoma from other hepatic disorders.

  16. An enzymatic bridge between carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism: regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase by reversible phosphorylation in a severe hypoxia-tolerant crayfish.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Neal J; Storey, Kenneth B

    2012-04-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) (EC 1.4.1.3) is a crucial enzyme involved in bridging two metabolic pathways, gating the use of glutamate for either amino acid metabolism, or carbohydrate metabolism. The present study investigated GDH from tail muscle of the freshwater crayfish Orconectes virilis exploring changes to kinetic properties, phosphorylation levels and structural stability between two forms of the enzyme (aerobic control and 20-h severe hypoxic). Evidence indicated that GDH was converted to a high phosphate form under oxygen limitation. ProQ Diamond phosphoprotein staining showed a 42% higher bound phosphate content on GDH from muscle of severely hypoxic crayfish compared with the aerobic form, and treatment of this GDH with commercial phosphatase (alkaline phosphatase), and treatments that stimulated the activities of different endogenous protein phosphatases (stimulating PP1 + PP2A, PP2B, and PP2C) yielded significant increases in the fold activation by ADP of GDH from both control and severe hypoxic conditions. By contrast, stimulation of the activities of endogenous protein kinases (AMPK, PKA or CaMK) significantly reduced the ADP fold activation from control animals. The physiological consequence of severe hypoxia-induced GDH phosphorylation may be to suppress GDH activity under low oxygen, shutting off this critical bridge point between two metabolic pathways.

  17. Antisense inhibition of the iron-sulphur subunit of succinate dehydrogenase enhances photosynthesis and growth in tomato via an organic acid-mediated effect on stomatal aperture.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Wagner L; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Osorio, Sonia; Usadel, Björn; Fuentes, Daniela; Nagy, Réka; Balbo, Ilse; Lehmann, Martin; Studart-Witkowski, Claudia; Tohge, Takayuki; Martinoia, Enrico; Jordana, Xavier; Damatta, Fábio M; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2011-02-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants expressing a fragment of the Sl SDH2-2 gene encoding the iron sulfur subunit of the succinate dehydrogenase protein complex in the antisense orientation under the control of the 35S promoter exhibit an enhanced rate of photosynthesis. The rate of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was reduced in these transformants, and there were changes in the levels of metabolites associated with the TCA cycle. Furthermore, in comparison to wild-type plants, carbon dioxide assimilation was enhanced by up to 25% in the transgenic plants under ambient conditions, and mature plants were characterized by an increased biomass. Analysis of additional photosynthetic parameters revealed that the rate of transpiration and stomatal conductance were markedly elevated in the transgenic plants. The transformants displayed a strongly enhanced assimilation rate under both ambient and suboptimal environmental conditions, as well as an elevated maximal stomatal aperture. By contrast, when the Sl SDH2-2 gene was repressed by antisense RNA in a guard cell-specific manner, changes in neither stomatal aperture nor photosynthesis were observed. The data obtained are discussed in the context of the role of TCA cycle intermediates both generally with respect to photosynthetic metabolism and specifically with respect to their role in the regulation of stomatal aperture.

  18. Leucine-induced activation of translational initiation is partly regulated by the branched-chain {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in C2C12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Naoya . E-mail: nakai@hss.osaka-u.ac.jp; Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Tamura, Tomohiro; Tamura, Noriko; Hamada, Koichiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2006-05-19

    Branched-chain amino acid leucine has been shown to activate the translational regulators through the mammalian target of rapamycin. However, the leucine's effects are self-limiting because leucine promotes its own disposal by an oxidative pathway. The irreversible and rate-limiting step in the leucine oxidation pathway is catalyzed by the branched-chain {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex. The complex contains E1 ({alpha}2{beta}2), E2, and E3 subunits, and its activity is abolished by phosphorylation of the E1{alpha} subunit by BCKDH kinase. The relationship between the activity of BCKDH complex and leucine-mediated activation of the protein translation was investigated using the technique of RNA interference. The activity of BCKDH complex in C2C12 cell was modulated by transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) for BCKDH E2 subunit or BCKDH kinase. Transfection of siRNAs decreased the mRNA expression and protein amount of corresponding gene. Suppression of either E2 subunit or kinase produced opposite effects on the cell proliferation and the activation of translational regulators by leucine. Suppression of BCKDH kinase for 48 h resulted in decreasing cell proliferation. In contrast, E2 suppression led to increased amount of total cellular protein. The phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase by leucine was increased in E2-siRNA transfected C2C12 cells, whereas the leucine's effect was diminished in kinase-siRNA transfected cells. These results suggest that the activation of the translational regulators by leucine was partly regulated by the activity of BCKDH complex.

  19. Structural and Functional Studies of WlbA: A Dehydrogenase Involved in the Biosynthesis of 2,3-Diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-d-mannuronic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Thoden, James B.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2010-09-08

    2,3-Diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-D-mannuronic acid (ManNAc3NAcA) is an unusual dideoxy sugar first identified nearly 30 years ago in the lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa O:3a,d. It has since been observed in other organisms, including Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. Five enzymes are required for the biosynthesis of UDP-ManNAc3NAcA starting from UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Here we describe a structural study of WlbA, the NAD-dependent dehydrogenase that catalyzes the second step in the pathway, namely, the oxidation of the C-3{prime} hydroxyl group on the UDP-linked sugar to a keto moiety and the reduction of NAD{sup +} to NADH. This enzyme has been shown to use {alpha}-ketoglutarate as an oxidant to regenerate the oxidized dinucleotide. For this investigation, three different crystal structures were determined: the enzyme with bound NAD(H), the enzyme in a complex with NAD(H) and {alpha}-ketoglutarate, and the enzyme in a complex with NAD(H) and its substrate (UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminuronic acid). The tetrameric enzyme assumes an unusual quaternary structure with the dinucleotides positioned quite closely to one another. Both {alpha}-ketoglutarate and the UDP-linked sugar bind in the WlbA active site with their carbon atoms (C-2 and C-3{prime}, respectively) abutting the re face of the cofactor. They are positioned {approx}3 {angstrom} from the nicotinamide C-4. The UDP-linked sugar substrate adopts a highly unusual curved conformation when bound in the WlbA active site cleft. Lys 101 and His 185 most likely play key roles in catalysis.

  20. A Spontaneous Missense Mutation in Branched Chain Keto Acid Dehydrogenase Kinase in the Rat Affects Both the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems.

    PubMed

    Zigler, J Samuel; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Wright, Megan; Klise, Andrew; Sundin, Olof; Broman, Karl W; Hejtmancik, Fielding; Huang, Hao; Patek, Bonnie; Sergeev, Yuri; Hose, Stacey; Brayton, Cory; Xaiodong, Jiao; Vasquez, David; Maragakis, Nicholas; Mori, Susumu; Goldman, David; Hoke, Ahmet; Sinha, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    A novel mutation, causing a phenotype we named frogleg because its most obvious characteristic is a severe splaying of the hind limbs, arose spontaneously in a colony of Sprague-Dawley rats. Frogleg is a complex phenotype that includes abnormalities in hind limb function, reduced brain weight with dilated ventricles and infertility. Using micro-satellite markers spanning the entire rat genome, the mutation was mapped to a region of rat chromosome 1 between D1Rat131 and D1Rat287. Analysis of whole genome sequencing data within the linkage interval, identified a missense mutation in the branched-chain alpha-keto dehydrogenase kinase (Bckdk) gene. The protein encoded by Bckdk is an integral part of an enzyme complex located in the mitochondrial matrix of many tissues which regulates the levels of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), leucine, isoleucine and valine. BCAAs are essential amino acids (not synthesized by the body), and circulating levels must be tightly regulated; levels that are too high or too low are both deleterious. BCKDK phosphorylates Ser293 of the E1α subunit of the BCKDH protein, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the catabolism of the BCAAs, inhibiting BCKDH and thereby, limiting breakdown of the BCAAs. In contrast, when Ser293 is not phosphorylated, BCKDH activity is unchecked and the levels of the BCAAs will decrease dramatically. The mutation is located within the kinase domain of Bckdk and is predicted to be damaging. Consistent with this, we show that in rats homozygous for the mutation, phosphorylation of BCKDH in the brain is markedly decreased relative to wild type or heterozygous littermates. Further, circulating levels of the BCAAs are reduced by 70-80% in animals homozygous for the mutation. The frogleg phenotype shares important characteristics with a previously described Bckdk knockout mouse and with human subjects with Bckdk mutations. In addition, we report novel data regarding peripheral neuropathy of the hind limbs.

  1. Relative vulnerability of dopamine and GABA neurons in mesencephalic culture to inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase by malonate and 3-nitropropionic acid and protection by NMDA receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Zeevalk, G D; Derr-Yellin, E; Nicklas, W J

    1995-12-01

    The effects of different severities of metabolic stress on dopamine (DA) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) cell loss were examined in rat mesencephalic culture. Partial metabolic inhibition was induced in 12-day-old cultures by a 24-hr treatment with various concentrations of 3-nitropropionic acid(3-NPA, 0.1-0.5 mM) or malonate (10-50 mM), irreversible and reversible inhibitors of the Krebs cycle enzyme, succinate dehydrogenase. Cell damage to the DA and GABA populations was assessed after a 48-hr recovery period by simultaneous measurement of high affinity uptake for 3H-DA and 14C-GABA. 3-NPA or malonate caused a dose-dependent loss of DA uptake (EC50 0.21 or 42 mM, respectively). 3-NPA treatment was equally detrimental to the GABA population, whereas malonate exposure did not cause any significant loss of GABA uptake. The presence of the NMDA antagonist, MK-801 (1 microM), during 24 hr of 3-NPA or malonate treatment fully protected against DA and GABA loss with 50 mM malonate or 0.25 mM 3-NPA and partially protected versus 0.5 mM 3-NPA. To determine the degree of metabolic stress imposed by 3-NPA and malonate, 12-day-old cultures were treated with 0.5 mM 3-NPA or 50 mM malonate for 3 hr and the rate of lactate formation was measured. lactate was increased nearly 2-fold at 3 hr of treatment with 3-NPA, but was not significantly elevated above basal with malonate treatment. SDH activity was decreased by 48 or 58% after 3 hr of treatment with 0.25 and 0.5 mM 3-NPA, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. A Spontaneous Missense Mutation in Branched Chain Keto Acid Dehydrogenase Kinase in the Rat Affects Both the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zigler, J. Samuel; Hodgkinson, Colin A.; Wright, Megan; Klise, Andrew; Broman, Karl W.; Huang, Hao; Patek, Bonnie; Sergeev, Yuri; Hose, Stacey; Xaiodong, Jiao; Vasquez, David; Maragakis, Nicholas; Mori, Susumu; Goldman, David; Sinha, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    A novel mutation, causing a phenotype we named frogleg because its most obvious characteristic is a severe splaying of the hind limbs, arose spontaneously in a colony of Sprague-Dawley rats. Frogleg is a complex phenotype that includes abnormalities in hind limb function, reduced brain weight with dilated ventricles and infertility. Using micro-satellite markers spanning the entire rat genome, the mutation was mapped to a region of rat chromosome 1 between D1Rat131 and D1Rat287. Analysis of whole genome sequencing data within the linkage interval, identified a missense mutation in the branched-chain alpha-keto dehydrogenase kinase (Bckdk) gene. The protein encoded by Bckdk is an integral part of an enzyme complex located in the mitochondrial matrix of many tissues which regulates the levels of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), leucine, isoleucine and valine. BCAAs are essential amino acids (not synthesized by the body), and circulating levels must be tightly regulated; levels that are too high or too low are both deleterious. BCKDK phosphorylates Ser293 of the E1α subunit of the BCKDH protein, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the catabolism of the BCAAs, inhibiting BCKDH and thereby, limiting breakdown of the BCAAs. In contrast, when Ser293 is not phosphorylated, BCKDH activity is unchecked and the levels of the BCAAs will decrease dramatically. The mutation is located within the kinase domain of Bckdk and is predicted to be damaging. Consistent with this, we show that in rats homozygous for the mutation, phosphorylation of BCKDH in the brain is markedly decreased relative to wild type or heterozygous littermates. Further, circulating levels of the BCAAs are reduced by 70–80% in animals homozygous for the mutation. The frogleg phenotype shares important characteristics with a previously described Bckdk knockout mouse and with human subjects with Bckdk mutations. In addition, we report novel data regarding peripheral neuropathy of the hind limbs

  3. Synthesis, structure and in vitro pharmacological evaluation of a novel 2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinoline-3-carbaldehyde (2'-methylbenzoyl) hydrazone bridged copper(II) coordination polymer.

    PubMed

    Senthil Raja, Duraisamy; Ramachandran, Eswaran; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Natarajan, Karuppannan

    2013-06-01

    A novel ligand bridged copper(II) coordination polymer, [Cu(HL)(NO3)]n has been synthesized by reacting 2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinoline-3-carbaldehyde (2'-methylbenzoyl) hydrazone (H2L) with Cu(NO3)2·3H2O, and characterized by X-ray diffraction studies. The DNA interaction studies revealed that the compounds could interact with CT-DNA through intercalation. A gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complex to cleave the pBR322 plasmid DNA. The protein binding studies indicated that the complex exhibited strong binding affinities. Investigations of antioxidative properties showed that the polymeric Cu(II) complex has strong radical scavenging potencies. The cytotoxic effect of the compounds showed that the polymeric complex exhibited excellent anticancer activity against Hep G2, and A431 cells which is six to ten times better than that of well-known commercial anticancer drug, cisplatin.

  4. Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA interaction and antioxidant activities of two novel water-soluble Cu2+ complexes derivated from 2-oxo-quinoline-3-carbaldehyde Schiff-bases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeng-Chen; Wang, Bao-Dui; Yang, Zheng-Yin; Li, Yong; Qin, Dong-Dong; Li, Tian-Rong

    2009-11-01

    Two novel 2-oxo-quinoline-3-carbaldehyde (4'-hydroxybenzoyl) hydrazone, thiosemicarbazone ligands and its corresponding Cu(2+) complexes were synthesized, and the two complexes' structures were determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction. The interaction of the two Cu(2+) complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity measurement. The experimental evidences indicated that the two water-soluble Cu(2+) complexes could strongly bind to CT-DNA via an intercalation mechanism. The intrinsic binding constants of complexes 1 and 2 with CT-DNA were 7.31 x 10(6) and 2.33 x 10(6)M(-1), respectively. Furthermore, the antioxidant activities (hydroxyl radical and superoxide) of the two water-soluble metal complexes were determined by hydroxyl radical and superoxide scavenging method in vitro.

  5. 3, 4-dihydroxyl-phenyl lactic acid restores NADH dehydrogenase 1 α subunit 10 to ameliorate cardiac reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Yuan; He, Ke; Pan, Chun-Shui; Li, Quan; Liu, Yu-Ying; Yan, Li; Wei, Xiao-Hong; Hu, Bai-He; Chang, Xin; Mao, Xiao-Wei; Huang, Dan-Dan; Wang, Li-Jun; Hu, Shui-Wang; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Guo-Cheng; Fan, Jing-Yu; Fan, Tai-Ping; Han, Jing-Yan

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to detect the role of 3, 4-dihydroxyl-phenyl lactic acid (DLA) during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induced myocardial injury with emphasis on the underlying mechanism of DLA antioxidant. Male Spragu-Dawley (SD) rats were subjected to left descending artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. Treatment with DLA ameliorated myocardial structure and function disorder, blunted the impairment of Complex I activity and mitochondrial function after I/R. The results of 2-D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis revealed that DLA prevented the decrease in NDUFA10 expression, one of the subunits of Complex I. To find the target of DLA, the binding affinity of Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) to DLA and DLA derivatives with replaced two phenolic hydroxyls was detected using surface plasmon resonance and bilayer interferometry. The results showed that DLA could activate SIRT1 after I/R probably by binding to this protein, depending on phenolic hydroxyl. Moreover, the importance of SIRT1 to DLA effectiveness was confirmed through siRNA transfection in vitro. These results demonstrated that DLA was able to prevent I/R induced decrease in NDUFA10 expression, improve Complex I activity and mitochondrial function, eventually attenuate cardiac structure and function injury after I/R, which was possibly related to its ability of binding to and activating SIRT1.

  6. Comprehensive Analysis of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydrogenase (ALAD) Variants and Renal Cell Carcinoma Risk among Individuals Exposed to Lead

    PubMed Central

    van Bemmel, Dana M.; Boffetta, Paolo; Liao, Linda M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Menashe, Idan; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen; Karami, Sara; Zaridze, David; Matteev, Vsevolod; Janout, Vladimir; Kollarova, Hellena; Bencko, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Mates, Dana; Slamova, Alena; Rothman, Nathaniel; Han, Summer S.; Rosenberg, Philip S.; Brennan, Paul; Chow, Wong-Ho; Moore, Lee E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic studies are reporting associations between lead exposure and human cancers. A polymorphism in the 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) gene affects lead toxicokinetics and may modify the adverse effects of lead. Methods The objective of this study was to evaluate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the ALAD region among renal cancer cases and controls to determine whether genetic variation alters the relationship between lead and renal cancer. Occupational exposure to lead and risk of cancer was examined in a case-control study of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Comprehensive analysis of variation across the ALAD gene was assessed using a tagging SNP approach among 987 cases and 1298 controls. Occupational lead exposure was estimated using questionnaire-based exposure assessment and expert review. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression. Results The adjusted risk associated with the ALAD variant rs8177796CT/TT was increased (OR = 1.35, 95%CI = 1.05–1.73, p-value = 0.02) when compared to the major allele, regardless of lead exposure. Joint effects of lead and ALAD rs2761016 suggest an increased RCC risk for the homozygous wild-type and heterozygous alleles (GGOR = 2.68, 95%CI = 1.17–6.12, p = 0.01; GAOR = 1.79, 95%CI = 1.06–3.04 with an interaction approaching significance (pint = 0.06).. No significant modification in RCC risk was observed for the functional variant rs1800435(K68N). Haplotype analysis identified a region associated with risk supporting tagging SNP results. Conclusion A common genetic variation in ALAD may alter the risk of RCC overall, and among individuals occupationally exposed to lead. Further work in larger exposed populations is warranted to determine if ALAD modifies RCC risk associated with lead exposure. PMID:21799727

  7. An integrated bienzyme glucose oxidase-fructose dehydrogenase-tetrathiafulvalene-3-mercaptopropionic acid-gold electrode for the simultaneous determination of glucose and fructose.

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Susana; Loaiza, Oscar A; Pedrero, María; de Villena, F Javier Manuel; Pingarrón, José M

    2004-06-01

    A bienzyme biosensor for the simultaneous determination of glucose and fructose was developed by coimmobilising glucose oxidase (GOD), fructose dehydrogenase (FDH), and the mediator, tetrathiafulvalene (TTF), by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde atop a 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a gold disk electrode (AuE). The performance of this bienzyme electrode under batch and flow injection (FI) conditions, as well as an amperometric detection in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), are reported. The order of enzyme immobilisation atop the MPA-SAM affected the biosensor amperometric response in terms of sensitivity, with the immobilisation order GOD, FDH, TTF being selected. Similar analytical characteristics to those obtained with single GOD or FDH SAM-based biosensors for glucose and fructose were achieved with the bienzyme electrode, indicating that no noticeable changes in the biosensor responses to the analytes occurred as a consequence of the coimmobilisation of both enzymes on the same MPA-AuE. The suitability of the bienzyme biosensor for the analysis of real samples under flow injection conditions was tested by determining glucose in two certified serum samples. The simultaneous determination of glucose and fructose in the same sample cannot be performed without a separation step because at the detection potential used (+0.10 V), both sugars show amperometric response. Consequently, HPLC with amperometric detection at the TTF-FDH-GOD-MPA-AuE was accomplished. Glucose and fructose were simultaneously determined in honey, cola softdrink, and commercial apple juice, and the results were compared with those obtained by using other reference methods.

  8. A highly efficient green synthesis of N-alkyl 2-[(2-oxo-2-aryl ethyl) amino] benzamide derivatives from reaction of isatoic anhydride, primary amines and 2-bromoacethophenone.

    PubMed

    Sabbaghan, Maryam; Hossaini, Zinatossadat

    2012-11-01

    N-alkyl 2-[(2-oxo-2-aryl ethyl)amino] benzamide derivatives have been synthesized in high yields. This involves three-component reaction of isatoic anhydride, primary amines in the presence of 2-bromoacethophenone derivatives. The reaction workup is simple and the products can be easily separated from the reaction mixture.

  9. Delineation of the Caffeine C-8 Oxidation Pathway in Pseudomonas sp. Strain CBB1 via Characterization of a New Trimethyluric Acid Monooxygenase and Genes Involved in Trimethyluric Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Sujit Kumar; Yu, Chi-Li; Das, Shuvendu; Louie, Tai Man; Gakhar, Lokesh

    2012-01-01

    The molecular basis of the ability of bacteria to live on caffeine via the C-8 oxidation pathway is unknown. The first step of this pathway, caffeine to trimethyluric acid (TMU), has been attributed to poorly characterized caffeine oxidases and a novel quinone-dependent caffeine dehydrogenase. Here, we report the detailed characterization of the second enzyme, a novel NADH-dependent trimethyluric acid monooxygenase (TmuM), a flavoprotein that catalyzes the conversion of TMU to 1,3,7-trimethyl-5-hydroxyisourate (TM-HIU). This product spontaneously decomposes to racemic 3,6,8-trimethylallantoin (TMA). TmuM prefers trimethyluric acids and, to a lesser extent, dimethyluric acids as substrates, but it exhibits no activity on uric acid. Homology models of TmuM against uric acid oxidase HpxO (which catalyzes uric acid to 5-hydroxyisourate) reveal a much bigger and hydrophobic cavity to accommodate the larger substrates. Genes involved in the caffeine C-8 oxidation pathway are located in a 25.2-kb genomic DNA fragment of CBB1, including cdhABC (coding for caffeine dehydrogenase) and tmuM (coding for TmuM). Comparison of this gene cluster to the uric acid-metabolizing gene cluster and pathway of Klebsiella pneumoniae revealed two major open reading frames coding for the conversion of TM-HIU to S-(+)-trimethylallantoin [S-(+)-TMA]. The first one, designated tmuH, codes for a putative TM-HIU hydrolase, which catalyzes the conversion of TM-HIU to 3,6,8-trimethyl-2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline (TM-OHCU). The second one, designated tmuD, codes for a putative TM-OHCU decarboxylase which catalyzes the conversion of TM-OHCU to S-(+)-TMA. Based on a combination of enzymology and gene-analysis, a new degradative pathway for caffeine has been proposed via TMU, TM-HIU, TM-OHCU to S-(+)-TMA. PMID:22609920

  10. In situ nucleic acid hybridization of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 in primary biliary cirrhosis: pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 messenger RNA is expressed in hepatocytes but not in biliary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Van de Water, J; Leung, P S; Coppel, R L; Nakanuma, Y; Gershwin, M E

    1997-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase-E2, or a cross-reactive molecule, has been shown by a variety of immunohistochemical methods to be present in increased amounts in biliary epithelial cells (BEC) in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). In this study, to further understand the nature of the immunoreactive molecule in BEC, we examined the expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 (PDC-E2) messenger RNA (mRNA) and PDC-E2 protein in sections of livers from patients and controls to help identify the molecule found in BEC. We performed in situ hybridization using an antisense probe against the major epitope of PDC-E2. The data were very striking and suggested that there was no increased production of PDC-E2 in BEC. For example, in livers from patients with PBC, PDC-E2 mRNA was found in periportal hepatocytes in 16 of 17 cases (94%). In contrast, interlobular bile ducts and septal bile ducts had detectable levels of PDC-E2 mRNA in only 1 of 17 (6%) and 3 of 8 (38%) cases, respectively. Interestingly, proliferating bile ductules contained detectable levels of mRNA in 12 of 15 cases (80%). In control liver, periportal hepatocytes were positive in 15 of 17 cases (88%). Interlobular bile ducts, septal bile ducts, and proliferating bile ductules expressed mRNA signals in 4 of 17 (24%), 2 of 10 (20%), and 14 of 16 (88%), respectively. When formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections were examined by immunohistochemical staining with anti-PDC-E2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) C355.1, the interlobular bile ducts showed typical aberrant apical staining in all 10 PBC cases, but 0 of 9 liver controls. Periportal hepatocytes, proliferating bile ductules and infiltrating mononuclear cells stained with C355.1 but in a characteristic mitochondrial staining pattern. The presence of a PDC-E2-like molecule recognized by C355.1 is not reflected by the expression levels of PDC-E2 mRNA in the BEC of patients with PBC.

  11. Detection of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor in various adipose tissue depots of dairy cows supplemented with conjugated linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Friedauer, K; Dänicke, S; Schulz, K; Sauerwein, H; Häussler, S

    2015-10-01

    Early lactating cows mobilize adipose tissue (AT) to provide energy for milk yield and maintenance and are susceptible to metabolic disorders and impaired immune response. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), mainly the trans-10, cis-12 isomer, reduce milk fat synthesis and may attenuate negative energy balance. Circulating glucocorticoids (GC) are increased during parturition in dairy cows and mediate differentiating and anti-inflammatory effects via glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the presence of the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1). Activated GC are the main ligands for both receptors in AT; therefore, we hypothesized that tissue-specific GC metabolism is effected by varying amounts of GR, MR and 11βHSD1 and/or their localization within AT depots. Furthermore, the lipolytic and antilipogenic effects of CLA might influence the GC/GR/MR system in AT. Therefore, we aimed to localize GR and MR as well as the expression pattern and activity of 11βHSD1 in different AT depots during early lactation in dairy cows and to identify potential effects of CLA. Primiparous German Holstein cows were divided into a control (CON) and a CLA group. From day 1 post-partum (p.p.) until sample collection, the CLA group was fed with 100 g/d CLA (contains 10 g each of the cis-9, trans-11 and the trans-10, cis-12-CLA isomers). CON cows (n = 5 each) were slaughtered on day 1, 42 and 105 p.p., while CLA cows (n = 5 each) were slaughtered on day 42 and 105 p.p. Subcutaneous fat from tailhead, withers and sternum, and visceral fat from omental, mesenteric and retroperitoneal depots were sampled. The localization of GR and 11βHSD1 in mature adipocytes - being already differentiated - indicates that GC promote other effects via GR than differentiation. Moreover, MR were observed in the stromal vascular cell fraction and positively related to the pre-adipocyte marker Pref-1. However, only marginal CLA effects were observed in this study.

  12. Inhibition of Chikungunya Virus Replication by 1-[(2-Methylbenzimidazol-1-yl) Methyl]-2-Oxo-Indolin-3-ylidene] Amino] Thiourea(MBZM-N-IBT)

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Priyadarsee; Kumar, Abhishek; Mamidi, Prabhudutta; Kumar, Sameer; Basantray, Itishree; Saswat, Tanuja; Das, Indrani; Nayak, Tapas Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Subudhi, Bharat Bhusan; Chattopadhyay, Soma

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection is one of the most challenging human Arboviral infections with global significance and without any specific antiviral. In this investigation, 1-[(2-methylbenzimidazol-1-yl) methyl]-2-oxo-indolin-3-ylidene] amino] thiourea (MBZM-N-IBT) was synthesised as a molecular hybrid of 2-methyl benzimidazole and isatin-β-thiosemicarbazone and its anti-CHIKV property was evaluated. The release of infectious virus particles was calculated by plaque assay, expression profile of viral RNA was estimated by RT-PCR and viral protein profiles were assessed by Western blot and FACS analyses. The safety index of MBZM-N-IBT was found to be >21. The CHIKV infectious viral particle formation was abrogated around 76.02% by MBZM-N-IBT during infection in mammalian system and the viral RNA synthesis was reduced by 65.53% and 23.71% for nsP2 and E1 respectively. Surprisingly, the viral protein levels were reduced by 97% for both nsP2 and E2. In the time-of-addition experiment it abrogated viral infection at early as well as late phase of viral life cycle, which indicates about multiple mechanisms for its anti-CHIKV action. In silico analysis justified development of MBZM-N-IBT with good affinities for potential target proteins of CHIKV and related virus. With predictions of good drug-likeness property, it shows potential of a drug candidate which needs further experimental validation. PMID:26843462

  13. Crystal structures, DNA-binding and cytotoxic activities studies of Cu(II) complexes with 2-oxo-quinoline-3-carbaldehyde Schiff-bases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeng-Chen; Wang, Bao-Dui; Li, Bo; Wang, Qin; Yang, Zheng-Yin; Li, Tian-Rong; Li, Yong

    2010-11-01

    Three novel 2-oxo-quinoline-3-carbaldehyde Schiff-bases and their Cu(II) complexes were synthesized. The molecular structures of Cu(II) complexes were determined by X-ray crystal diffraction. The DNA-binding modes of the complexes were also investigated by UV-vis absorption spectrum, fluorescence spectrum, viscosity measurement and EB-DNA displacement experiment. The experimental evidences indicated that the ligands and Cu(II) complexes could interact with CT-DNA (calf-thymus DNA) through intercalation, respectively. Comparative cytotoxic activities of ligands and Cu(II) complexes were also determined by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] and SRB (sulforhodamine B) methods. The results showed that the three Cu(II) complexes exhibited more effective cytotoxic activity against HL60 cells and HeLa cells than corresponding ligands. Also, CuL(3) showed higher cytotoxic activity than CuL(1) and CuL(2).

  14. Inhibition of Chikungunya Virus Replication by 1-[(2-Methylbenzimidazol-1-yl) Methyl]-2-Oxo-Indolin-3-ylidene] Amino] Thiourea(MBZM-N-IBT).

    PubMed

    Mishra, Priyadarsee; Kumar, Abhishek; Mamidi, Prabhudutta; Kumar, Sameer; Basantray, Itishree; Saswat, Tanuja; Das, Indrani; Nayak, Tapas Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Subudhi, Bharat Bhusan; Chattopadhyay, Soma

    2016-02-04

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection is one of the most challenging human Arboviral infections with global significance and without any specific antiviral. In this investigation, 1-[(2-methylbenzimidazol-1-yl) methyl]-2-oxo-indolin-3-ylidene] amino] thiourea (MBZM-N-IBT) was synthesised as a molecular hybrid of 2-methyl benzimidazole and isatin-β-thiosemicarbazone and its anti-CHIKV property was evaluated. The release of infectious virus particles was calculated by plaque assay, expression profile of viral RNA was estimated by RT-PCR and viral protein profiles were assessed by Western blot and FACS analyses. The safety index of MBZM-N-IBT was found to be >21. The CHIKV infectious viral particle formation was abrogated around 76.02% by MBZM-N-IBT during infection in mammalian system and the viral RNA synthesis was reduced by 65.53% and 23.71% for nsP2 and E1 respectively. Surprisingly, the viral protein levels were reduced by 97% for both nsP2 and E2. In the time-of-addition experiment it abrogated viral infection at early as well as late phase of viral life cycle, which indicates about multiple mechanisms for its anti-CHIKV action. In silico analysis justified development of MBZM-N-IBT with good affinities for potential target proteins of CHIKV and related virus. With predictions of good drug-likeness property, it shows potential of a drug candidate which needs further experimental validation.

  15. One-Pot Three-Component Synthesis of Novel Diethyl((2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinolin-3-yl)(arylamino)methyl)phosphonate as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yi-Lin; Wu, Zhi-Lin; Xiao, Meng-Wu; Tang, Yu-Ting; Li, Kang-Ming; Ye, Jiao; Xiang, Jian-Nan; Hu, Ai-Xi

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of discovering new anticancer agents, we have designed and synthesized novel α-aminophosphonate derivatives containing a 2-oxoquinoline structure using a convenient one-pot three-component method. The newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for antitumor activities against the A549 (human lung adenocarcinoma cell), HeLa (human cervical carcinoma cell), MCF-7 (human breast cancer cell), and U2OS (human osteosarcoma cell) cancer cell lines in vitro, employing a standard 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results of pharmacological screening indicated that many compounds exhibited moderate to high levels of antitumor activities against the tested cancer cell lines and that most compounds showed more potent inhibitory activities comparable to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) which was used as a positive control. The mechanism of representative compound 4u (diethyl((2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinolin-3-yl)(phenyl-amino)methyl)phosphonate) indicated that the compound mainly arrested HeLa cells in S and G2 stages and was accompanied by apoptosis in HeLa cells. This action was confirmed by acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, Hoechst 33342 staining, and flow cytometry. PMID:27136538

  16. Effects of donor-acceptor groups on the structural and electronic properties of 4-(methoxymethyl)-6-methyl-5-nitro-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümüş, Hacer Pir; Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2014-11-01

    Quantum chemical calculations on the geometric parameters, harmonic vibrational wavenumbers and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts values of 4-(methoxymethyl)-6-methyl-5-nitro-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile [C9H9N3O4] molecule in ground state were performed using the ab initio HF and density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The results of optimized molecular structure were presented and compared with X-ray diffraction results. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts values were compared with experimental values of the investigated molecule. The observed and calculated values were found to be in good agreement. Since the title compound contains different electron-donor and -acceptor groups as well as lone pair electrons, and multiple bonds, the effects of these groups on the structural and electronic properties are found out. In addition, conformational, natural bond orbital (NBO), nonlinear optical (NLO) analysis, frontier molecular orbital energies, molecular surfaces, Mulliken charges and atomic polar tensor based charges were investigated using HF and DFT methods.

  17. Evidence in support of lysine 77 and histidine 96 as acid-base catalytic residues in saccharopine dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vidya Prasanna; Thomas, Leonard M; Bobyk, Kostyantyn D; Andi, Babak; Cook, Paul F; West, Ann H

    2012-01-31

    Saccharopine dehydrogenase (SDH) catalyzes the final reaction in the α-aminoadipate pathway, the conversion of l-saccharopine to l-lysine (Lys) and α-ketoglutarate (α-kg) using NAD⁺ as an oxidant. The enzyme utilizes a general acid-base mechanism to conduct its reaction with a base proposed to accept a proton from the secondary amine of saccharopine in the oxidation step and a group proposed to activate water to hydrolyze the resulting imine. Crystal structures of an open apo form and a closed form of the enzyme with saccharopine and NADH bound have been determined at 2.0 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. In the ternary complex, a significant movement of domain I relative to domain II that closes the active site cleft between the two domains and brings H96 and K77 into the proximity of the substrate binding site is observed. The hydride transfer distance is 3.6 Å, and the side chains of H96 and K77 are properly positioned to act as acid-base catalysts. Preparation of the K77M and H96Q single-mutant and K77M/H96Q double-mutant enzymes provides data consistent with their role as the general acid-base catalysts in the SDH reaction. The side chain of K77 initially accepts a proton from the ε-amine of the substrate Lys and eventually donates it to the imino nitrogen as it is reduced to a secondary amine in the hydride transfer step, and H96 protonates the carbonyl oxygen as the carbinolamine is formed. The K77M, H976Q, and K77M/H96Q mutant enzymes give 145-, 28-, and 700-fold decreases in V/E(t) and >10³-fold increases in V₂/K(Lys)E(t) and V₂/K(α-kg)E(t) (the double mutation gives >10⁵-fold decreases in the second-order rate constants). In addition, the K77M mutant enzyme exhibits a primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect of 2.0 and an inverse solvent deuterium isotope effect of 0.77 on V₂/K(Lys). A value of 2.0 was also observed for (D)(V₂/K(Lys))(D₂O) when the primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect was repeated in D₂O, consistent with a

  18. Sorbitol dehydrogenase inhibitors (SDIs): a new potent, enantiomeric SDI, 4-[2-1R-hydroxy-ethyl)-pyrimidin-4-yl]piperazine-1-sulfonic acid dimethylamide.

    PubMed

    Mylari, B L; Oates, P J; Beebe, D A; Brackett, N S; Coutcher, J B; Dina, M S; Zembrowski, W J

    2001-08-16

    We report here on our medicinal chemistry and pharmacology efforts to provide a potent sorbitol dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDI) as a tool to probe a recently disclosed hypothesis centered on the role of sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) in the second step of the polyol pathway, under conditions of high glucose flux. Starting from a weak literature lead, 2, and through newly developed structure-activity relationships, we have designed and executed an unambiguous synthesis of enantiomeric SDI, 6, which is at least 10x more potent than 2. Also, 6 potently inhibits SDH in streptozotocin-diabetic rat sciatic nerve. We have described an expedient synthesis of a key building template, 33, for future research in the SDI area that may facilitate the discovery of even more potent SDIs with longer duration of action in vivo.

  19. Synthesis of new oxadiazole, pyrazole and pyrazolin-5-one bearing 2-((4-methyl-2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl)oxy)acetohydrazide analogs as potential antibacterial and antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, M; Bheemaraju, G; Manjunath, G; Venkata Ramana, P

    2016-01-01

    Two series of diversely substituted phenyldiazenyl(2-(4-methyl-2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yloxy)acetyl)3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazole 11a-g and phenyldiazenyl-1-(2-(4-methyl-2-oxo-4-chromen-7-yloxy)acetyl)-3-methyl-1H-pyrazol-5(4)H-one 12a-j were synthesized. All these compounds were characterized by IR, NMR, mass spectra and elemental analyses. The compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antibacterial activity against some Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and screened for antifungal activity against A. niger, U. maydis. The compounds showed moderate to very good antibacterial activities.

  20. Long-chain 3-hydroxy fatty acids accumulating in long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiencies uncouple oxidative phosphorylation in heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Anelise M; Amaral, Alexandre U; Busanello, Estela N B; Grings, Mateus; Castilho, Roger F; Wajner, Moacir

    2013-02-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a common clinical feature of some inherited disorders of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation including mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP) and isolated long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiencies. Since individuals affected by these disorders present tissue accumulation of various fatty acids, including long-chain 3-hydroxy fatty acids, in the present study we investigated the effect of 3-hydroxydecanoic (3 HDCA), 3-hydroxydodecanoic (3 HDDA), 3-hydroxytetradecanoic (3 HTA) and 3-hydroxypalmitic (3 HPA) acids on mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, estimated by oximetry, NAD(P)H content, hydrogen peroxide production, membrane potential (ΔΨ) and swelling in rat heart mitochondrial preparations. We observed that 3 HTA and 3 HPA increased resting respiration and diminished the respiratory control and ADP/O ratios using glutamate/malate or succinate as substrates. Furthermore, 3 HDDA, 3 HTA and 3 HPA decreased ΔΨ, the matrix NAD(P)H pool and hydrogen peroxide production. These data indicate that these fatty acids behave as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. We also verified that 3 HTA-induced uncoupling-effect was not mediated by the adenine nucleotide translocator and that this fatty acid induced the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening in calcium-loaded organelles since cyclosporin A prevented the reduction of mitochondrial ΔΨ and swelling provoked by 3 HTA. The present data indicate that major 3-hydroxylated fatty acids accumulating in MTP and LCHAD deficiencies behave as strong uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation potentially impairing heart energy homeostasis.

  1. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  2. Short communication inhibitory activity of 4-[(1,2-dihydro-2-oxo-3H-indol-3-ylidene)amino]-N-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl) benzenesulphonamide and its derivatives against orthopoxvirus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Periyasamy; Murugesh, Narayanan; Chandramohan, Markandavel; Keith, Kathy A; Kern, Earl R

    2006-01-01

    4-[(1,2-Dihydro-2-oxo-3H-indol-3-ylidene)amino]-N-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl) benzenesulphonamide and its derivatives were tested in vitro for antiviral activity against vaccinia and cowpox virus replication in human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells, and their activity was compared with cidofovir (CDV). Among the tested compounds, 4-[(5-methyl-1,2-dihydro-2-oxo-3-H-indol-3-ylidene)amino]-N-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl)benzene-sulphonamide was the most active against vaccinia virus, with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) value of 18 microM and 4-[(N-acetyl-1,2-dihydro-2-oxo-3-H-indol-3-ylidene)amino]-N-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl) benzenesulphonamide was the most active against cowpox virus (EC50=33 microM). Cidofovir was found to have an EC50 of 20 microM and 32 microM against vaccinia and cowpox virus, respectively. Most of the tested compounds were non-cytotoxic (>300 microM) in HFF cells as determined by a neutral red uptake assay. The substitution of a halogen atom at the 5-position of isatin abolished the antiviral activity.

  3. Efficient production of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch by using a genetically modified L-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient and alpha-amylase-secreting Lactobacillus plantarum strain.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Zhang, Qiao; Shinkawa, Satoru; Yoshida, Shogo; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve direct and efficient fermentation of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch, we constructed L-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhL1)-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum and introduced a plasmid encoding Streptococcus bovis 148 alpha-amylase (AmyA). The resulting strain produced only D-lactic acid from glucose and successfully expressed amyA. With the aid of secreting AmyA, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished. After 48 h of fermentation, 73.2 g/liter of lactic acid was produced with a high yield (0.85 g per g of consumed sugar) and an optical purity of 99.6%. Moreover, a strain replacing the ldhL1 gene with an amyA-secreting expression cassette was constructed. Using this strain, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished in the absence of selective pressure by antibiotics. This is the first report of direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw starch.

  4. Xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida Fu1: two molybdenum-containing dehydrogenases of novel structural composition.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, K; Andreesen, J R

    1990-01-01

    The constitutive xanthine dehydrogenase and the inducible 2-furoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase could be labeled with [185W]tungstate. This labeling was used as a reporter to purify both labile proteins. The radioactivity cochromatographed predominantly with the residual enzymatic activity of both enzymes during the first purification steps. Both radioactive proteins were separated and purified to homogeneity. Antibodies raised against the larger protein also exhibited cross-reactivity toward the second smaller protein and removed xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity up to 80 and 60% from the supernatant of cell extracts, respectively. With use of cell extract, Western immunoblots showed only two bands which correlated exactly with the activity stains for both enzymes after native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Molybdate was absolutely required for incorporation of 185W, formation of cross-reacting material, and enzymatic activity. The latter parameters showed a perfect correlation. This evidence proves that the radioactive proteins were actually xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase. The apparent molecular weight of the native xanthine dehydrogenase was about 300,000, and that of 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase was 150,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of both enzymes revealed two protein bands corresponding to molecular weights of 55,000 and 25,000. The xanthine dehydrogenase contained at least 1.6 mol of molybdenum, 0.9 ml of cytochrome b, 5.8 mol of iron, and 2.4 mol of labile sulfur per mol of enzyme. The composition of the 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase seemed to be similar, although the stoichiometry was not determined. The oxidation of furfuryl alcohol to furfural and further to 2-furoic acid by Pseudomonas putida Fu1 was catalyzed by two different dehydrogenases. Images PMID:2170335

  5. Characterization of the developmentally regulated Bacillus subtilis glucose dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lampel, K A; Uratani, B; Chaudhry, G R; Ramaley, R F; Rudikoff, S

    1986-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the structural gene for glucose dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.47) of Bacillus subtilis was determined and comprises 780 base pairs. The subunit molecular weight of glucose dehydrogenase as deduced from the nucleotide sequence is 28,196, which agrees well with the subunit molecular weight of 31,500 as determined from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The sequence of the 49 amino acids at the NH2 terminus of glucose dehydrogenase purified from sporulating B. subtilis cells matched the amino acid sequence derived from the DNA sequence. Glucose dehydrogenase was purified from an Escherichia coli strain harboring pEF1, a plasmid that contains the B. subtilis gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase. This enzyme has the identical amino acid sequence at the NH2 terminus as the B. subtilis enzyme. A putative ribosome-binding site, 5'-AGGAGG-3', which is complementary to the 3' end of the 16S rRNA of B. subtilis, was found 6 base pairs preceding the translational start codon of the structural gene of glucose dehydrogenase. No known promoterlike DNA sequences that are recognized by B. subtilis RNA polymerases were present immediately preceding the translational start site of the glucose dehydrogenase structural gene. The glucose dehydrogenase gene was found to be under sporulation control at the trancriptional level. A transcript of 1.6 kilobases hybridized to a DNA fragment within the structural gene of glucose dehydrogenase. This transcript was synthesized 3 h after the cessation of vegetative growth concomitant to the appearance of glucose dehydrogenase. Images PMID:3082854

  6. [Thermal stability of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase incorporated into highly concentrated gels].

    PubMed

    Kulis, Iu Iu

    1979-03-01

    The rate constants for inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase in solution at 65 degrees C (pH 7,5) are 0,72 and 0,013 min-1, respectively. The enzyme incorporation into acrylamide gels results in immobilized enzymes, whose residual activity is 18--25% of the original one. In 6,7% gels the rate of thermal inactivation for lactate dehydrogenase is decreased nearly 10-fold, whereas the inactivation rate for alcohol dehydrogenase is increased 4,6-fold as compared to the soluble enzymes. In 14% and 40% gels the inactivation constants for lactate dehydrogenase are 6,3.10(-3) and 5,9.10(-4) min-1, respectively. In 60% gels the thermal inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase is decelerated 3600-fold as compared to the native enzyme. The enthalpy and enthropy for the inactivation of the native enzyme are equal to 62,8 kcal/mole and 116,9 cal/(mole.grad.) for the native enzyme and those of gel-incorporated (6,7%) enzyme -- 38,7 kcal/mole and 42 cal/(mole.grad.), respectively. The thermal stability of alcohol dehydrogenase in 60% gels is increased 12-fold. To prevent gel swelling, methacrylic acid and allylamine were added to the matrix, with subsequent treatment by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The enzyme activity of the modified gels is 2,7--3% of that for the 6,7% gels. The stability of lactate dehydrogenase in such gels is significantly increased. A mechanism of stabilization of the subunit enzymes in highly concentrated gels is discussed.

  7. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 42. Read More Enzyme Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Hemoglobin Review Date 2/11/2016 Updated by: ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics G6PD Deficiency Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... step that metabolizes groups of fats called medium-chain fatty acids and short-chain fatty acids. Mutations in the HADH gene lead ... a shortage of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids cannot be metabolized ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... down proteins from food into smaller parts called amino acids. Amino acids can be further processed to provide energy for ... methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency cannot process a particular amino acid called isoleucine. Most cases of 2-methylbutyryl-CoA ...

  10. Decarboxylative 1,4-Addition of α-Oxocarboxylic Acids with Michael Acceptors Enabled by Photoredox Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Zu; Shang, Rui; Cheng, Wan-Min; Fu, Yao

    2015-10-02

    Enabled by iridium photoredox catalysis, 2-oxo-2-(hetero)arylacetic acids were decarboxylatively added to various Michael acceptors including α,β-unsaturated ester, ketone, amide, aldehyde, nitrile, and sulfone at room temperature. The reaction presents a new type of acyl Michael addition using stable and easily accessible carboxylic acid to formally generate acyl anion through photoredox-catalyzed radical decarboxylation.

  11. A chemical proteomic probe for detecting dehydrogenases: catechol rhodanine.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xia; Sem, Daniel S

    2012-01-01

    Inherent complexity of the proteome often demands that it be studied as manageable subsets, termed subproteomes. A subproteome can be defined in a number of ways, although a pragmatic approach is to define it based on common features in an active site that lead to binding of a common small molecule ligand (e.g., a cofactor or a cross-reactive drug lead). The subproteome, so defined, can be purified using that common ligand tethered to a resin, with affinity chromatography. Affinity purification of a subproteome is described in the next chapter. That subproteome can then be analyzed using a common ligand probe, such as a fluorescent common ligand that can be used to stain members of the subproteome in a native gel. Here, we describe such a fluorescent probe, based on a catechol rhodanine acetic acid (CRAA) ligand that binds to dehydrogenases. The CRAA ligand is fluorescent and binds to dehydrogenases at pH > 7, and hence can be used effectively to stain dehydrogenases in native gels to identify what subset of proteins in a mixture are dehydrogenases. Furthermore, if one is designing inhibitors to target one or more of these dehydrogenases, the CRAA staining can be performed in a competitive assay format, with or without inhibitor, to assess the selectivity of the inhibitor for the targeted dehydrogenase. Finally, the CRAA probe is a privileged scaffold for dehydrogenases, and hence can easily be modified to increase affinity for a given dehydrogenase.

  12. Discovery of N-(4-(2-Amino-3-chloropyridin-4-yloxy)-3-fluorophenyl)-4-ethoxy-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carboxamide (BMS-777607), a Selective and Orally Efficacious Inhibitor of the Met Kinase Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Gretchen M.; An, Yongmi; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Clark, Cheryl; Cornelius, Lyndon A.M.; Dai, Jun; Gullo-Brown, Johnni; Gupta, Ashok; Henley, Benjamin; Hunt, John T.; Jeyaseelan, Robert; Kamath, Amrita; Kim, Kyoung; Lippy, Jonathan; Lombardo, Louis J.; Manne, Veeraswamy; Oppenheimer, Simone; Sack, John S.; Schmidt, Robert J.; Shen, Guoxiang; Stefanski, Kevin; Tokarski, John S.; Trainor, George L.; Wautlet, Barri S.; Wei, Donna; Williams, David K.; Zhang, Yingru; Zhang, Yueping; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M.

    2009-12-01

    Substituted N-(4-(2-aminopyridin-4-yloxy)-3-fluoro-phenyl)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carboxamides were identified as potent and selective Met kinase inhibitors. Substitution of the pyridine 3-position gave improved enzyme potency, while substitution of the pyridone 4-position led to improved aqueous solubility and kinase selectivity. Analogue 10 demonstrated complete tumor stasis in a Met-dependent GTL-16 human gastric carcinoma xenograft model following oral administration. Because of its excellent in vivo efficacy and favorable pharmacokinetic and preclinical safety profiles, 10 has been advanced into phase I clinical trials.

  13. Down Regulation of Asparagine Synthetase and 3-Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase, and the Up-Regulation of Serine Dehydratase in Rat Liver from Intake of Excess Amount of Leucine Are Not Related to Leucine-Caused Amino Acid Imbalance.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ryoji; Takai, Marie; Namaki, Hiroya; Minami, Kimiko; Imamura, Wataru; Kato, Hisanori; Kamei, Yasutomi; Kanamoto, Ryuhei

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine synthetase (ASNS), 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) and serine dehydratase (SDS) in rat liver are expressed in response to protein and amino acid intake. In the present study, we examined the expression of these enzymes in relation to amino acid imbalance caused by leucine. Rats were subjected to leucine administration in the diet or orally between meals. Consumption of more than 2% leucine in a 6% casein diet suppressed food intake and caused growth retardation in a dose-dependent manner, but this was not seen in a 12% or 40% casein diet. ASNS and PHGDH expression in the liver was significantly induced by the 6% casein diet and was suppressed by leucine in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the SDS expression was induced. These effects were leucine specific and not seen with ingestion of isoleucine or valine. However, leucine orally administered between meals did not change the food intake or growth of rats fed a 6% casein die, though it similarly affected the expression of ASNS, PHGDH and SDS in the liver. These results suggest that the growth retardation caused by leucine imbalance was mainly because of the suppression of food intake, and demonstrated that there are no causal relationships between ASNS, PHGDH and SDS expression and amino acid imbalance caused by leucine.

  14. The Role of the ydiB Gene, Which Encodes Quinate/Shikimate Dehydrogenase, in the Production of Quinic, Dehydroshikimic and Shikimic Acids in a PTS- Strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    García, Sofía; Flores, Noemí; De Anda, Ramón; Hernández, Georgina; Gosset, Guillermo; Bolívar, Francisco; Escalante, Adelfo

    2017-01-01

    The culture of engineered Escherichia coli for shikimic acid (SA) production results in the synthesis of quinic acid (QA) and dehydroshikimic acid (DHS), reducing SA yield and impairing downstream processes. The synthesis of QA by quinate/shikimate dehydrogenase (YdiB, ydiB) has been previously proposed; however, the precise role for this enzyme in the production of QA in engineered strains of E. coli for SA production remains unclear. We report the effect of the inactivation or the overexpression of ydiB in E. coli strain PB12.SA22 on SA, QA, and DHS production in batch fermentor cultures. The results showed that the inactivation of ydiB resulted in a 75% decrease in the molar yield of QA and a 6.17% reduction in the yield of QA (mol/mol) relative to SA with respect to the parental strain. The overexpression of ydiB caused a 500% increase in the molar yield of QA and resulted in a 152% increase in QA (mol/mol) relative to SA, with a sharp decrease in SA production. Production of SA, QA, and DHS in parental and derivative ydiB strains suggests that the synthesis of QA results from the reduction of 3-dehydroquinate by YdiB before its conversion to DHS.

  15. Salicylic acid binding of mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase E2 affects mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport chain components and plays a role in basal defense against tobacco mosaic virus in tomato.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yangwenke; Tian, Miaoying; Zhang, Huan; Li, Xin; Wang, Yu; Xia, Xiaojian; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Yanhong; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-02-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a critical role in plant defense against pathogen invasion. SA-induced viral defense in plants is distinct from the pathways mediating bacterial and fungal defense and involves a specific pathway mediated by mitochondria; however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. The SA-binding activity of the recombinant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (Slα-kGDH) E2 subunit of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was characterized. The biological role of this binding in plant defenses against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was further investigated via Slα-kGDH E2 silencing and transient overexpression in plants. Slα-kGDH E2 was found to bind SA in two independent assays. SA treatment, as well as Slα-kGDH E2 silencing, increased resistance to TMV. SA did not further enhance TMV defense in Slα-kGDH E2-silenced tomato plants but did reduce TMV susceptibility in Nicotiana benthamiana plants transiently overexpressing Slα-kGDH E2. Furthermore, Slα-kGDH E2-silencing-induced TMV resistance was fully blocked by bongkrekic acid application and alternative oxidase 1a silencing. These results indicated that binding by Slα-kGDH E2 of SA acts upstream of and affects the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which plays an important role in basal defense against TMV. The findings of this study help to elucidate the mechanisms of SA-induced viral defense.

  16. A mutation in the E2 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in Arabidopsis reduces plant organ size and enhances the accumulation of amino acids and intermediate products of the TCA cycle.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hailan; Du, Xiaoqiu; Zhang, Fengxia; Zhang, Fang; Hu, Yong; Liu, Shichang; Jiang, Xiangning; Wang, Guodong; Liu, Dong

    2012-08-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (mtPDC) plays a pivotal role in controlling the entry of carbon into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle for energy production. This multi-enzyme complex consists of three components: E1, E2, and E3. In Arabidopsis, there are three genes, mtE2-1, mtE2-2, and mtE2-3, which encode the putative mtPDC E2 subunit but how each of them contributes to the total mtPDC activity remains unknown. In this work, we characterized an Arabidopsis mutant, m132, that has abnormal small organs. Molecular cloning indicated that the phenotype of m132 is caused by a mutation in the mtE2-1 gene, which results in a truncation of 109 amino acids at the C-terminus of the encoded protein. In m132, mtPDC activity is only 30% of the WT and ATP production is severely impaired. The mutation in the mtE2-1 gene also leads to the over-accumulation of most intermediate products of the TCA cycle and of all the amino acids for protein synthesis. Our results suggest that, among the three mtE2 genes, mtE2-1 is a major contributor to the function of Arabidopsis mtPDC and that the functional disruption of mtE2-1 profoundly affects plant growth and development, as well as its metabolism.

  17. Down-regulation of lactate dehydrogenase-A by siRNAs for reduced lactic acid formation of Chinese hamster ovary cells producing thrombopoietin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Lee, Gyun Min

    2007-02-01

    Lactate, one of the major waste products in mammalian cell culture, can inhibit cell growth and affect cellular metabolism at high concentrations. To reduce lactate formation, lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDH-A), an enzyme catalyzing the conversion of glucose-derived pyruvate to lactate, was down-regulated by an expression vector of small interfering RNAs (siRNA) in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells producing human thrombopoietin (hTPO). Three clones expressing low levels of LDH-A, determined by reverse transcription-PCR and an enzyme activity test, were established in addition to a negative control cell line. LDH-A activities in the three clones were decreased by 75-89%, compared with that of the control CHO cell line, demonstrating that the effect of siRNA is more significant than that of other traditional methods such as homologous recombination (30%) and antisense mRNA (29%). The specific glucose consumption rates of the three clones were reduced to 54-87% when compared to the control cell line. Similarly, the specific lactate production rates were reduced to 45-79% of the control cell line level. In addition, reduction of LDH-A did not impair either cell proliferation or hTPO productivity. Taken together, these results show that the lactate formation rate in rCHO cell culture can be efficiently reduced through the down-regulation of LDH via siRNA.

  18. Stable shRNA Silencing of Lactate Dehydrogenase A (LDHA) in Human MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells Fails to Alter Lactic Acid Production, Glycolytic activity, ATP or Survival

    PubMed Central

    MACK, NZINGA; MAZZIO, ELIZABETH A; BAUER, DAVID; ROZAS, HERNAN FLORES; SOLIMAN, KARAM F.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background In the US, African Americans have a high death rate from triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), characterized by lack of hormone receptors (ER, PR, HER2/ERRB2) which are otherwise valuable targets of chemotherapy. There is a need to identify novel targets that negatively impact TNBC tumorigenesis. TNBCs release an abundance of lactic acid, under normoxic, hypoxic and hyperoxic conditions; this referred to as the Warburg effect. Accumulated lactic acid sustains peri-cellular acidity which propels metastatic invasion and malignant aggressive transformation. The source of lactic acid is believed to be via conversion of pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the last step of glycolysis, with most studies focusing on the LDHA isoform. Materials and Methods In this study, LDHA was silenced using long-term MISSION® shRNA lentivirus in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Downregulation of LDHA transcription and protein expression was confirmed by Western Blot, immunocytochemistry and qPCR. A number of parameters were measured in fully viable vector controls versus knockdown (KD) clones, including levels of lactic acid produced, glucose consumed, ATP and basic metabolic rates. Results The data show lentivirus V-165 generated a knock-down clone most effective in reducing both gene and protein levels to less than 1% of vector controls. Stable KD showed absolutely no changes in cell viability, lactic acid production, ATP, glucose consumption or basic metabolic rate. Given the complete absence of impact on any observed parameter by LDH-A KD and this being somewhat contrary to findings in the literature, further analysis was required to determine why. Whole-transcriptome analytic profile on MDA-MB-231 for LDH subtypes using Agilent Human Genome 4×44k microarrays, where the data show the following component breakdown. Transcripts 30.47 % LDHA, 69.36% LDHB, 0.12% LDHC and 0.05% LDHD. Conclusion These findings underscore the importance of alternative isoforms of

  19. Succinate Dehydrogenase Loss in Familial Paraganglioma: Biochemistry, Genetics, and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Her, Yeng F.; Maher, L. James

    2015-01-01

    It is counterintuitive that metabolic defects reducing ATP production can cause, rather than protect from, cancer. Yet this is precisely the case for familial paraganglioma, a form of neuroendocrine malignancy caused by loss of succinate dehydrogenase in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Here we review biochemical, genetic, and epigenetic considerations in succinate dehydrogenase loss and present leading models and mysteries associated with this fascinating and important tumor. PMID:26294907

  20. Chemical modification of lysozyme, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and bovine eye lens proteins induced by peroxyl radicals: role of oxidizable amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Andrea; López-Alarcón, Camilo; Kogan, Marcelo; Lissi, Eduardo; Davies, Michael J; Silva, Eduardo

    2013-01-18

    Chemical and structural alterations to lysozyme (LYSO), glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), and bovine eye lens proteins (BLP) promoted by peroxyl radicals generated by the thermal decomposition of 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH) under aerobic conditions were investigated. SDS-PAGE analysis of the AAPH-treated proteins revealed the occurrence of protein aggregation, cross-linking, and fragmentation; BLP, which are naturally organized in globular assemblies, were the most affected proteins. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of BLP shows the formation of complex protein aggregates after treatment with AAPH. These structural modifications were accompanied by the formation of protein carbonyl groups and protein hydroperoxides. The yield of carbonyls was lower than that for protein hydroperoxide generation and was unrelated to protein fragmentation. The oxidized proteins were also characterized by significant oxidation of Met, Trp, and Tyr (but not other) residues, and low levels of dityrosine. As the dityrosine yield is too low to account for the observed cross-linking, we propose that aggregation is associated with tryptophan oxidation and Trp-derived cross-links. It is also proposed that Trp oxidation products play a fundamental role in nonrandom fragmentation and carbonyl group formation particularly for LYSO and G6PD. These data point to a complex mechanism of peroxyl-radical mediated modification of proteins with monomeric (LYSO), dimeric (G6PD), and multimeric (BLP) structural organization, which not only results in oxidation of protein side chains but also gives rise to radical-mediated protein cross-links and fragmentation, with Trp species being critical intermediates.

  1. Cyclopiazonic acid biosynthesis gene cluster gene cpaM is required for speradine A biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tokuoka, Masafumi; Kikuchi, Tomoki; Shinohara, Yasutomo; Koyama, Akifumi; Iio, Shin-Ichiro; Kubota, Takaaki; Kobayashi, Jun'ichi; Koyama, Yasuji; Totsuka, Akira; Shindo, Hitoshi; Sato, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Speradine A is a derivative of cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) found in culture of an Aspergillus tamarii isolate. Heterologous expression of a predicted methyltransferase gene, cpaM, in the cpa biosynthesis gene cluster of A. tamarii resulted in the speradine A production in a 2-oxoCPA producing A. oryzae strain, indicating cpaM is involved in the speradine A biosynthesis.

  2. Production of optically pure L-lactic acid from lignocellulosic hydrolysate by using a newly isolated and D-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient Lactobacillus paracasei strain.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yang-Cheng; Yuan, Shuo-Fu; Wang, Chun-An; Huang, Yin-Jung; Guo, Gia-Luen; Hwang, Wen-Song

    2015-12-01

    The use of lignocellulosic feedstock for lactic acid production with a difficulty is that the release of inhibitory compounds during the pretreatment process which inhibit the growth of microorganism. Thus we report a novel lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus paracasei 7 BL, that has a high tolerance to inhibitors and produced optically pure l-lactic acid after the interruption of ldhD gene. The strain 7 BL fermented glucose efficiently and showed high titer of l-lactic acid (215 g/l) by fed-batch strategy. In addition, 99 g/l of l-lactic acid with high yield (0.96 g/g) and productivity (2.25-3.23 g/l/h) was obtained by using non-detoxified wood hydrolysate. Rice straw hydrolysate without detoxification was also tested and yielded a productivity rate as high as 5.27 g/l/h. Therefore, L. paracasei 7 BL represents a potential method of l-lactic acid production from lignocellulosic biomass and has attractive application for industries.

  3. Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Rdhe2 Is a Novel Retinol Dehydrogenase Essential for Frog Embryonic Development*

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Olga V.; Lee, Seung-Ah; Adams, Mark K.; Chang, Chenbei; Kedishvili, Natalia Y.

    2012-01-01

    The enzymes responsible for the rate-limiting step in retinoic acid biosynthesis, the oxidation of retinol to retinaldehyde, during embryogenesis and in adulthood have not been fully defined. Here, we report that a novel member of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily, frog sdr16c5, acts as a highly active retinol dehydrogenase (rdhe2) that promotes retinoic acid biosynthesis when expressed in mammalian cells. In vivo assays of rdhe2 function show that overexpression of rdhe2 in frog embryos leads to posteriorization and induction of defects resembling those caused by retinoic acid toxicity. Conversely, antisense morpholino-mediated knockdown of endogenous rdhe2 results in phenotypes consistent with retinoic acid deficiency, such as defects in anterior neural tube closure, microcephaly with small eye formation, disruption of somitogenesis, and curved body axis with bent tail. Higher doses of morpholino induce embryonic lethality. Analyses of retinoic acid levels using either endogenous retinoic acid-sensitive gene hoxd4 or retinoic acid reporter cell line both show that the levels of retinoic acid are significantly decreased in rdhe2 morphants. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that Xenopus rdhe2 functions as a retinol dehydrogenase essential for frog embryonic development in vivo. Importantly, the retinol oxidizing activity of frog rdhe2 is conserved in its mouse homologs, suggesting that rdhe2-related enzymes may represent the previously unrecognized physiologically relevant retinol dehydrogenases that contribute to retinoic acid biosynthesis in higher vertebrates. PMID:22291023

  4. Vi Antigen Biosynthesis in Salmonella typhi: Characterization of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine C-6 Dehydrogenase (TviB) and UDP-N-acetylglucosaminuronic Acid C-4 Epimerase (TviC)†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Zhou, Ying; Bao, Hongbo; Liu, Hung-wen

    2008-01-01

    Vi antigen, the virulence factor of Salmonella typhi, has been used clinically as a molecular vaccine. TviB and TviC are two enzymes involved in the formation of Vi antigen, a linear polymer consisting of α-1,4-linked N-acetylgalactosaminuronate. Protein sequence analysis suggests that TviB is a dehydrogenase and TviC is an epimerase. Both enzymes are expected to be NAD+ dependent. In order to verify their functions, TviB and TviC were cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and characterized. The C-terminal His6-tagged TviB protein, purified from soluble cell fractions in the presence of 10 mM DTT, shows UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 6-dehydrogenase activity, and is capable of catalyzing the conversion of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) to UDP-N-acetylglucosaminuronic acid (UDP-GlcNAcA) with a kcat value of 15.5 ± 1.0 min−1. The Km values of TviB for UDP-GlcNAc and NAD+ are 77 ± 9 μM and 276 ± 52 μM, respectively. TviC, purified as C-terminal hexahistidine-tagged protein, shows UDP-GlcNAcA 4-epimerase and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine (UDP-GalNAc) 4-epimerase activities. The Km values of TviC for UDP-GlcNAcA and UDP-N-acetylgalactosaminuronic acid (UDP-GalNAcA) are 20 ± 1 μM and 42 ± 2 μM, respectively. The kcat value for the conversion of UDP-GlcNAcA to UDP-GalNAcA is 56.8 ± 0.5 min−1, while that for the reverse reaction is 39.1 ± 0.6 min−1. These results show that the biosynthesis of Vi antigen is initiated by the TviB-catalyzed oxidation of UDP-GlcNAc to UDP-GalNAc, followed by the TviC-catalyzed epimerization at C-4 to form UDP-GalNAcA, which serves as the building block for the formation of Vi polymer. These results set the stage for future in vitro biosynthesis of Vi antigen. These enzymes may also be drug targets to inhibit Vi antigen production. PMID:16800641

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of the biological activities of some 3-{[5-(6-methyl-4-aryl-2-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidin-5-yl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl]-imino}-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one derivatives.

    PubMed

    George, Sonia; Parameswaran, Manoj Kumar; Chakraborty, Acharjee Raja; Ravi, Thengungal Kochupappy

    2008-03-01

    Reaction of ethyl-6-methyl-2-oxo-4-aryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidin-5-carboxylates (1a-i) with hydrazine hydrate yielded 6-methyl-2-oxo-4-aryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidin-5-carbohydrazides (2a-i). These products, on reaction with cyanogen bromide, gave 5-(5-amino-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)-6-methyl-4-aryl-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2 (1H)-ones (3a-i). The resultant aminooxadiazolylpyrimidinones were condensed with isatin to obtain various 3-{[5-(6-methyl-4-aryl-2-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidin-5-yl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl]-imino}-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-ones (4a-i). These products were characterized by IR, 1H NMR, mass spectra and elemental analysis. Products (4a-i) revealed promising antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activity.

  6. Protein engineering reveals ancient adaptive replacements in isocitrate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Antony M.; Golding, G. Brian

    1997-01-01

    Evolutionary analysis indicates that eubacterial NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.1.42) first evolved from an NAD-dependent precursor about 3.5 billion years ago. Selection in favor of utilizing NADP was probably a result of niche expansion during growth on acetate, where isocitrate dehydrogenase provides 90% of the NADPH necessary for biosynthesis. Amino acids responsible for differing coenzyme specificities were identified from x-ray crystallographic structures of Escherichia coli isocitrate dehydrogenase and the distantly related Thermus thermophilus NAD-dependent isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. Site-directed mutagenesis at sites lining the coenzyme binding pockets has been used to invert the coenzyme specificities of both enzymes. Reconstructed ancestral sequences indicate that these replacements are ancestral. Hence the adaptive history of molecular evolution is amenable to experimental investigation. PMID:9096353

  7. Influence of long-term hyper-gravity on the reactivity of succinic acid dehydrogenase and NADPH-diaphorase in the central nervous system of fish: a histochemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anken, R. H.; Rahmann, H.

    In the course of a densitometric evaluation, the histochemically demonstrated reactivity of succinic acid dehydrogenase (SDH) and of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPHD) was determined in different brain nuclei of two teleost fish (cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus, swordtail fish Xiphophorus helleri), which had been kept under 3g hyper-gravity for 8 days. SDH was chosen since it is a rate limiting enzyme of the Krebs cycle and therefore it is regarded as a marker for metabolic and neuronal activity. NADPHD reactivity reflects the activity of nitric oxide synthase. Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous intercellular messenger that has been suggested to play a major role in several different in vivo models of neuronal plasticity including learning. Within particular vestibulum-connected brain centers, significant effects of hyper-gravity were obtained, e.g., in the magnocellular nucleus, a primary vestibular relay ganglion of the brain stem octavolateralis area, in the superior rectus subdivision of the oculomotoric nucleus and within cerebellar eurydendroid cells, which in teleosts possibly resemble the deep cerebellar nucleus of higher vertebrates. Non-vestibulum related nuclei did not respond to hypergravity in a significant way. The effect of hyper-gravity found was much less distinct in adult animals as compared to the circumstances seen in larval fish (Anken et al., Adv. Space Res. 17, 1996), possibly due to a development correlated loss of neuronal plasticity.

  8. Methodological problems in the histochemical demonstration of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Bernocchi, G; Barni, S

    1983-12-01

    Methodological aspects of the histochemical technique for the demonstration of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity (EC 1.2.1.24) (indicative of the degradative step of gamma-aminobutyric acid catabolism) have been analysed in rat Purkinje neurons, where gamma-aminobutyric acid has been shown to be a neurotransmitter, and in hepatocytes, where it is metabolized. During a histochemical incubation for the enzyme, artefacts of succinate dehydrogenase activity and the 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction are produced. Inhibition of these artefacts by the addition of two inhibitors, malonate and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, revealed specific reaction products. Formazan granules, which can be ascribed only to specific succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity, are obtained by adding malonate to the incubation medium in order to inhibit both succinate dehydrogenase activity and nothing dehydrogenase. The formation of these granules is completely inhibited by p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, an inhibitor of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity. Different levels of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity were noted in Purkinje neurons. This activity was also found in hepatocytes, mostly in the portal area, but with a lesser degree of intensity and specificity. Indeed, non-specific formazan granules were still produced, because of the 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction, even in the presence of malonate. Thus, a malonate-insensitive 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction seems to be present in neural and hepatic tissues.

  9. [Class III alcohol dehydrogenase and its role in the human body].

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Sani, Tufik Alizade; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    Class III alcohol dehydrogenase is composed of two chi subunits, encoded by the ADH5 gene and existing in all tissues examined. It possesses a great ability to metabolize long-chain alcohols, while its capacity to oxidize ethanol is very limited. The amino-acid sequence homology and identical structural and kinetic properties indicate that class III alcohol dehydrogenase and formaldehyde dehydrogenase are identical enzymes. ADH III plays a significant role in the metabolism of formaldehyde in the human body.

  10. LACTIC DEHYDROGENASES OF PSEUDOMONAS NATRIEGENS.

    PubMed

    WALKER, H; EAGON, R G

    1964-07-01

    Walker, Hazel (University of Georgia, Athens), and R. G. Eagon. Lactic dehydrogenases of Pseudomonas natriegens. J. Bacteriol. 88:25-30. 1964.-Lactic dehydrogenases specific for d- and l-lactate were demonstrated in Pseudomonas natriegens. The l-lactic dehydrogenase showed considerable heat stability, and 40% of the activity remained in extracts after heating at 60 C for 10 min. An essential thiol group for enzyme activity was noted. The results of these experiments were consistent with the view that lactate was dehydrogenated initially by a flavin cofactor and that electrons were transported through a complete terminal oxidase system to oxygen. The intracellular site of these lactic dehydrogenases was shown to be the cell membrane. It was suggested that the main physiological role of these lactic dehydrogenases is that of lactate utilization.

  11. The ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevented colitis-associated carcinogenesis through blocking dissociation of β-catenin complex, inhibiting COX-2 through repressing NF-κB, and inducing 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Han, Young-Min; Jeong, Migyeung; Park, Jong-Min; Kim, Mi-Young; Go, Eun-Jin; Cha, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Jo; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that diets containing an increased ratio of ω-6 : ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are a risk factor for colon cancer and might affect tumorigenesis. Therefore, dietary ω-3 PUFA administration may be a preventive strategy against colon cancer. Until now, the exact molecular mechanisms and required dietary doses of ω-3 PUFAs for cancer prevention were unknown. In this study, we explored the anti-tumorigenic mechanisms of ω-3 PUFAs against a colitis-associated cancer (CAC) model. Through in vitro cell models involving docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) administration, down-regulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and up-regulation of Bax, accompanied by blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation, the main mechanisms responsible for DHA-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells were determined. Results included significant reduction in azoxymethane-initiated, dextran sodium sulfate-promoted CACs, as well as significant preservation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) and significant inhibition of Cyclooxyganase-2 (COX-2) and Prostaglandin E2(P < 0.01). Additional mechanisms and significant induction of apoptosis in both tumor and non-tumor tissues were also noted in fat-1 transgenic (TG) mice. The lipid profiles of colon tissues measured in all specimens revealed that intake greater than 3 g ω-3 PUFA/60 kg of body weight showed tissue levels similar to those seen in fat-1 TG mice, preventing cancer. Our study concluded that COX-2 inhibition, 15-PGDH preservation, apoptosis induction, and blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation contributed to the anti-tumorigenesis effect of ω-3 PUFAs, and an intake higher than 3g ω-3 PUFAs/60 kg of body weight can assist in CAC prevention. PMID:27566583

  12. Quantitation of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-induced D and L enantiomers of 2-hydroxyglutaric acid in biological fluids by a fully validated liquid tandem mass spectrometry method, suitable for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Poinsignon, Vianney; Mercier, Lionel; Nakabayashi, Koïchi; David, Muriel D; Lalli, Alexandre; Penard-Lacronique, Virginie; Quivoron, Cyril; Saada, Véronique; De Botton, Stéphane; Broutin, Sophie; Paci, Angelo

    2016-06-01

    A recent update of the hallmarks of cancer includes metabolism with deregulating cellular energetics. Activating mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) metabolic enzymes leading to the abnormal accumulation of 2-hydroxyglutaric acid (2-HGA) have been described in hematologic malignancies and solid tumours. The diagnostic value of 2-HGA levels in blood to identify IDH mutations and its prognostic significance have been reported. We developed a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method allowing a rapid, accurate and precise simultaneous quantification of both L and D enantiomers of 2-HGA in blood samples from acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients, suitable for clinical applications. The method was also develop for preclinical applications from cellular and tissues samples. Deuterated (R,S)-2-hydroxyglutaric acid, disodium salt was used as internal standard and added to samples before a solid phase extraction on Phenomenex STRATA™-XL-A (200mg-3mL) 33μm cartridges. A derivatization step with (+)- o,o'-diacetyl-l-tartaric anhydride permitted to separate the two resulting diastereoisomers without chiral stationary phase, on a C18 column combined to a Xevo TQ-MS Waters mass spectrometer with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. This method allows standard curves to be linear over the range 0.34-135.04μM with r(2) values>0.999 and low matrix effects (<11.7%). This method, which was validated according to current EMA guidelines, is accurate between-run (<3.1%) and within-run (<7.9%) and precise between-run (<5.3CV%) and within-run (<6.2CV%), and is suitable for clinical and preclinical applications.

  13. The ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevented colitis-associated carcinogenesis through blocking dissociation of β-catenin complex, inhibiting COX-2 through repressing NF-κB, and inducing 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Min; Jeong, Migyeung; Park, Jong-Min; Kim, Mi-Young; Go, Eun-Jin; Cha, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Jo; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-09-27

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that diets containing an increased ratio of ω-6 : ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are a risk factor for colon cancer and might affect tumorigenesis. Therefore, dietary ω-3 PUFA administration may be a preventive strategy against colon cancer. Until now, the exact molecular mechanisms and required dietary doses of ω-3 PUFAs for cancer prevention were unknown. In this study, we explored the anti-tumorigenic mechanisms of ω-3 PUFAs against a colitis-associated cancer (CAC) model. Through in vitro cell models involving docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) administration, down-regulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and up-regulation of Bax, accompanied by blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation, the main mechanisms responsible for DHA-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells were determined. Results included significant reduction in azoxymethane-initiated, dextran sodium sulfate-promoted CACs, as well as significant preservation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) and significant inhibition of Cyclooxyganase-2 (COX-2) and Prostaglandin E2(P < 0.01). Additional mechanisms and significant induction of apoptosis in both tumor and non-tumor tissues were also noted in fat-1 transgenic (TG) mice. The lipid profiles of colon tissues measured in all specimens revealed that intake greater than 3 g ω-3 PUFA/60 kg of body weight showed tissue levels similar to those seen in fat-1 TG mice, preventing cancer. Our study concluded that COX-2 inhibition, 15-PGDH preservation, apoptosis induction, and blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation contributed to the anti-tumorigenesis effect of ω-3 PUFAs, and an intake higher than 3g ω-3 PUFAs/60 kg of body weight can assist in CAC prevention.

  14. Claisen-Schmidt condensation: Synthesis of (1S,6R)/(1R,6S)-2-oxo-N,4,6-triarylcyclohex-3-enecarboxamide derivatives with different substituents in H2 O/EtOH.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyyed Rasul

    2016-11-01

    A simple, green, and direct three-component condensation of acetophenone, aromatic aldehydes with 3-oxo-N-phenylbutanamide (acetoacetanilide) to generate some novel (1S,6R)/(1R,6S)-2-oxo-N,4,6-triarylcyclohex-3-enecarboxamide derivatives was carried out over K2 CO3 (10 mol%) with high efficiency in water/ethanol as green solvent at room temperature. This protocol proceeded via Claisen-Schmidt condensation and Michael addition. The present methodology offers several advantages, such as short reaction time, high yield, more readily available and inexpensive materials, more environmentally friendly, no need for column chromatography, simple work-up procedure, and the absence of volatile and hazardous organic solvents.

  15. Relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase extended family.

    PubMed Central

    Perozich, J.; Nicholas, H.; Wang, B. C.; Lindahl, R.; Hempel, J.

    1999-01-01

    One hundred-forty-five full-length aldehyde dehydrogenase-related sequences were aligned to determine relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) extended family. The alignment reveals only four invariant residues: two glycines, a phenylalanine involved in NAD binding, and a glutamic acid that coordinates the nicotinamide ribose in certain E-NAD binary complex crystal structures, but which may also serve as a general base for the catalytic reaction. The cysteine that provides the catalytic thiol and its closest neighbor in space, an asparagine residue, are conserved in all ALDHs with demonstrated dehydrogenase activity. Sixteen residues are conserved in at least 95% of the sequences; 12 of these cluster into seven sequence motifs conserved in almost all ALDHs. These motifs cluster around the active site of the enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis of these ALDHs indicates at least 13 ALDH families, most of which have previously been identified but not grouped separately by alignment. ALDHs cluster into two main trunks of the phylogenetic tree. The largest, the "Class 3" trunk, contains mostly substrate-specific ALDH families, as well as the class 3 ALDH family itself. The other trunk, the "Class 1/2" trunk, contains mostly variable substrate ALDH families, including the class 1 and 2 ALDH families. Divergence of the substrate-specific ALDHs occurred earlier than the division between ALDHs with broad substrate specificities. A site on the World Wide Web has also been devoted to this alignment project. PMID:10210192

  16. Cofactor engineering of ketol-acid reductoisomerase (IlvC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (YqhD) improves the fusel alcohol yield in algal protein anaerobic fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weihua; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary Bao; Jaryenneh, James Dekontee; Davis, Ryan W.

    2016-08-24

    Recently the feasibility of conversion of algal protein to mixed alcohols has been demonstrated with an engineered E.coli strain, enabling comprehensive utilization of the biomass for biofuel applications. However, the yield and titers of mixed alcohol production must be improved for market adoption. A major limiting factor for achieving the necessary yield and titer improvements is cofactor imbalance during the fermentation of algal protein. To resolve this problem, a directed evolution approach was applied to modify the cofactor specificity of two key enzymes (IlvC and YqhD) from NADPH to NADH in the mixed alcohol metabolic pathway. Using high throughput screening, more than 20 YqhD mutants were identified to show activity on NADH as a cofactor. Of these 20 mutants, the top five of YqhD mutants were selected for combination with two IlvC mutants with NADH as a cofactor for the modification of the protein conversion strain. The combination of the IlvC and YqhD mutants yielded a refined E.coli strain, subtype AY3, with increased fusel alcohol yield of ~60% compared to wild type under anaerobic fermentation on amino acid mixtures. When applied to real algal protein hydrolysates, the strain AY3 produced 100% and 38% more total mixed alcohols than the wild type strain on two different algal hydrolysates, respectively. The results indicate that cofactor engineering is a promising approach to improve the feasibility of bioconversion of algal protein into mixed alcohols as advanced biofuels.

  17. Cofactor engineering of ketol-acid reductoisomerase (IlvC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (YqhD) improves the fusel alcohol yield in algal protein anaerobic fermentation

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Weihua; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary Bao; Jaryenneh, James Dekontee; ...

    2016-08-24

    Recently the feasibility of conversion of algal protein to mixed alcohols has been demonstrated with an engineered E.coli strain, enabling comprehensive utilization of the biomass for biofuel applications. However, the yield and titers of mixed alcohol production must be improved for market adoption. A major limiting factor for achieving the necessary yield and titer improvements is cofactor imbalance during the fermentation of algal protein. To resolve this problem, a directed evolution approach was applied to modify the cofactor specificity of two key enzymes (IlvC and YqhD) from NADPH to NADH in the mixed alcohol metabolic pathway. Using high throughput screening,more » more than 20 YqhD mutants were identified to show activity on NADH as a cofactor. Of these 20 mutants, the top five of YqhD mutants were selected for combination with two IlvC mutants with NADH as a cofactor for the modification of the protein conversion strain. The combination of the IlvC and YqhD mutants yielded a refined E.coli strain, subtype AY3, with increased fusel alcohol yield of ~60% compared to wild type under anaerobic fermentation on amino acid mixtures. When applied to real algal protein hydrolysates, the strain AY3 produced 100% and 38% more total mixed alcohols than the wild type strain on two different algal hydrolysates, respectively. The results indicate that cofactor engineering is a promising approach to improve the feasibility of bioconversion of algal protein into mixed alcohols as advanced biofuels.« less

  18. AROMATIC METABOLISM IN PLANTS. I. A STUDY OF THE PREPHENATE DEHYDROGENASE FROM BEAN PLANTS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Prephenate dehydrogenase (prephenate: NADP(+) oxidoreductase (decarboxylating)) was isolated from cotyledons of wax bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L. var...mung bean ( Phaseolus aureus Roxb.). A study was made of the variation in the amount of prephenate dehydrogenase and aromatic amino acid transaminase in

  19. Ribitol dehydrogenase of Klebsiella aerogenes. Sequence and properties of wild-type and mutant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Dothie, J M; Giglio, J R; Moore, C B; Taylor, S S; Hartley, B S

    1985-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the sequence of 249 amino acids in ribitol dehydrogenase-A from Klebsiella aerogenes. Continuous culture on xylitol yields strains that superproduce 'wild-type' enzyme but mutations appear to have arisen in this process. Other strains selected by such continuous culture produce enzymes with increased specific activity for xylitol but without loss of ribitol activity. One such enzyme, ribitol dehydrogenase-D, has Pro-196 for Gly-196. Another, ribitol dehydrogenase-B, has a different mutation. PMID:3904726

  20. Evolution of lactate dehydrogenase-A homologs of barracuda fishes (genus Sphyraena) from different thermal environments: differences in kinetic properties and thermal stability are due to amino acid substitutions outside the active site.

    PubMed

    Holland, L Z; McFall-Ngai, M; Somero, G N

    1997-03-18

    Orthologous homologs of lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDH-A) (EC 1.1.1.27; NAD+:lactate oxidoreductase) of six barracuda species (genus Sphyraena) display differences in Michaelis-Menten constants (apparent Km) for substrate (pyruvate) and cofactor (NADH) that reflect evolution at different habitat temperatures. Significant increases in Km with increasing measurement temperature occur for all homologs, yet Km at normal body temperatures is similar among species because of the inverse relationship between adaptation temperature and Km. Thermal stabilities of the homologs also differ. To determine the amino acid substitutions responsible for differences in Km and thermal stability, peptide mapping of the LDH-As of all six species was first performed. Then, the amino acid sequences of the three homologs having the most similar peptide maps, those of the north temperate species, S. argentea, the subtropical species, S. lucasana, and the south temperate species, S. idiastes, were deduced from the respective cDNA sequences. At most, there were four amino acid substitutions between any pair of species, none of which occurred in the loop or substrate binding sites of the enzymes. The sequence of LDH-A from S. lucasana differs from that of S. idiastes only at position 8. The homolog of S. argentea differs from the other two sequences at positions 8, 61, 68, and 223. We used a full-length cDNA clone of LDH-A of S. lucasana to test, by site-directed mutagenesis, the importance of these sequence changes in establishing the observed differences in kinetics and thermal stability. Differences in sequence at sites 61 and/or 68 appear to account for the differences in Km between the LDH-As of S. argentea and S. lucasana. Differences at position 8 appear to account for the difference in thermal stability between the homologs of S. argentea and S. lucasana. Evolutionary adaptation of proteins to temperature thus may be achieved by minor changes in sequence at locations outside of active

  1. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  2. Altered kinetic properties of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex due to mutation of the beta-subunit of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid decarboxylase (E1) component in lymphoblastoid cells derived from patients with maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed Central

    Indo, Y; Kitano, A; Endo, F; Akaboshi, I; Matsuda, I

    1987-01-01

    Branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complexes of lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from patients with classical maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) phenotypes were studied in terms of their catalytic functions and analyzed by immunoblotting, using affinity purified anti-bovine BCKDH antibody. Kinetic studies on three cell lines derived from patients with the classical phenotype showed sigmoidal or near sigmoidal kinetics for overall BCKDH activity and a deficiency of the E1 component activity. An immunoblot study revealed a markedly decreased amount of the E1 beta subunit accompanied by weak staining of the E1 alpha subunit. The E2 and E3 component exhibited a cross-reactive peptide. Thus, in at least some patients with MSUD, mutations of the E1 beta subunit might provide an explanation for the altered kinetic properties of the BCKDH complex. Images PMID:3597778

  3. Distribution, purification, and characterization of thermostable phenylalanine dehydrogenase from thermophilic actinomycetes.

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, T; Takada, H; Yoshimura, T; Esaki, N; Soda, K

    1991-01-01

    Phenylalanine dehydrogenase (L-phenylalanine:NAD oxidoreductase, deaminating; EC 1.4.1.-) was found in various thermophilic actinomycetes. We purified the enzyme to homogeneity from Thermoactinomyces intermedius IFO 14230 by heat treatment and by Red Sepharose 4B, DEAE-Toyopearl, Sepharose CL-4B, and Sephadex G-100 chromatographies with a 13% yield. The relative molecular weight of the native enzyme was estimated to be about 270,000 by gel filtration. The enzyme consists of six subunits identical in molecular weight (41,000) and is highly thermostable: it is not inactivated by incubation at pH 7.2 and 70 degrees C for at least 60 min or in the range of pH 5 to 10.8 at 50 degrees C for 10 min. The enzyme preferably acts on L-phenylalanine and its 2-oxo analog, phenylpyruvate, in the presence of NAD and NADH, respectively. Initial velocity and product inhibition studies showed that the oxidative deamination proceeds through a sequential ordered binary-ternary mechanism. The Km values for L-phenylalanine, NAD, phenylpyruvate, NADH, and ammonia were 0.22, 0.078, 0.045, 0.025, and 106 mM, respectively. The pro-S hydrogen at C-4 of the dihydronicotinamide ring of NADH was exclusively transferred to the substrate. Images PMID:2061279

  4. Purification of xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase from chicken liver.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, K; Brody, M S; Hille, R

    1996-05-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase from chicken liver are oxomolybdenum enzymes which catalyze the oxidation of xanthine to uric acid and sulfite to sulfate, respectively. Independent purification protocols have been previously described for both enzymes. Here we describe a procedure by which xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase are purified simultaneously from the same batch of fresh chicken liver. Also, unlike the protocols described earlier, this procedure avoids the use of acetone extraction as well as a heat step, thus minimizing damage to the molybdenum centers of the enzymes.

  5. The α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex in cancer metabolic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Vatrinet, Renaud; Leone, Giulia; De Luise, Monica; Girolimetti, Giulia; Vidone, Michele; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Porcelli, Anna Maria

    2017-01-01

    Deregulated metabolism is a well-established hallmark of cancer. At the hub of various metabolic pathways deeply integrated within mitochondrial functions, the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex represents a major modulator of electron transport chain activity and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) flux, and is a pivotal enzyme in the metabolic reprogramming following a cancer cell's change in bioenergetic requirements. By contributing to the control of α-ketoglutarate levels, dynamics, and oxidation state, the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase is also essential in modulating the epigenetic landscape of cancer cells. In this review, we will discuss the manifold roles that this TCA enzyme and its substrate play in cancer.

  6. Bis(3-acetyl-6-methyl-2-oxo-2H-pyran-4-olato)bis­(dimethyl sulfoxide)nickel(II)

    PubMed Central

    Djedouani, Amel; Boufas, Sihem; Bendaas, Abderrahmen; Allain, Magali; Bouet, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, [Ni(C8H7O4)2{(CH3)2SO}2], the NiII atom is located on a crystallographic centre of symmetry and has a distorted octa­hedral coordination geometry of type MO6. The bidentate dehydro­acetic acid (DHA) ligands occupy the equatorial plane of the complex in a trans configuration, and the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) ligands are weakly coordinated through their O atoms in the axial positions. PMID:21577732

  7. Zwitterionic 6-methyl-2-oxo-3-[1-(ureido­iminio)eth­yl]-2H-pyran-4-olate monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Djedouani, Amel; Boufas, Sihem; Allain, Magali; Bouet, Gilles; Khan, Mustayeen

    2008-01-01

    The title compound, C9H11N3O4·H2O, was prepared by the reaction of dehydro­acetic acid and semicarbazide hydro­chloride. It crystallizes in a zwitterionic form with cationic iminium and anionic enolate groups. In the crystal structure, the almost planar mol­ecules are held together by N—H⋯O, O—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, some of them involving the water molecules. PMID:21201765

  8. Stringency of substrate specificity of Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Boernke, W. E.; Millard, C. S.; Stevens, P. W.; Kakar, S. N.; Stevens, F. J.; Donnelly, M. I.; Nebraska Wesleyan Univ.

    1995-09-10

    malate dehydrogenase. However, when expressed in a strain of E. coli unable to ferment glucose, the mutant enzyme restored growth and produced lactic acid as the sole fermentation product.

  9. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: specific activity and influence on the production of acetic acid, ethanol and higher alcohols in the first 48 h of fermentation of grape must.

    PubMed

    Millán, C; Mauricio, J C; Ortega, J M

    1990-01-01

    The changes in the specific activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-I and ADH-II) and aldehyde dehydrogenases [AIDH-NADP+ and AIDH-NAD(P)+] from Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the first 48 h of fermentation of grape must were investigated. The biosynthesis of ADH-I and AIDH-NADP+ took place basically during the adaptation of the yeasts to the must (first 4 h), while that of ADH-II occurred immediately after exponential growth (after 12 h). From the products produced by the yeast, only the specific rate of production of ethanol was found to be directly related to the specific activity of ADH-I.

  10. Properties and subunit structure of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Hiraoka, T; Koike, K; Ogasahara, K; Kanzaki, T

    1976-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase [EC 1.2.4.1] was separated from the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and its molecular weight was estimated to be about 150,000 by sedimentation equilibrium methods. The enzyme was dissociated into two subunits (alpha and beta), with estimated molecular weights of 41,000 (alpha) and 36,000 (beta), respectively, by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The subunits were separated by phosphocellulose column chromatography and their chemical properties were examined. The subunit structure of the pyruvate dehydrogenase was assigned as alpha2beta2. The content of right-handed alpha-helix in the enzyme molecule was estimated to be about 29 and 28% by optical rotatory dispersion and by circular dichroism, respectively. The enzyme contained no thiamine-PP, and its dehydrogenase activity was completely dependent on added thiamine-PP and partially dependent on added Mg2+ and Ca2+. The Km value of pyruvate dehydrogenase for thiamine diphosphate was estimated to be 6.5 X 10(-5) M in the presence of Mg2+ or Ca2+. The enzyme showed highly specific activity for thiamine-PP dependent oxidation of both pyruvate and alpha-ketobutyrate, but it also showed some activity with alpha-ketovalerate, alpha-ketoisocaproate, and alpha-ketoisovalerate. The pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was strongly inhibited by bivalent heavy metal ions and by sulfhydryl inhibitors; and the enzyme molecule contained 27 moles of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-reactive sulfhydryl groups and a total of 36 moles of sulfhydryl groups. The inhibitory effect of p-chloromercuribenzoate was prevented by preincubating the enzyme with thiamine-PP plus pyruvate. The structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase necessary for formation of the complex is also reported.

  11. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a spectrophotometric assay and an activity staining in a native gel of the dehydrogenase. New insights in the recently discovered organocatalytic Michael addition of water led to the conclusion that the previously performed experiments to identify MhyADH as a bi-functional enzyme and their results need to be reconsidered and the reliability of the methodology used needs to be critically evaluated. PMID:24949265

  12. Novel acidic 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) inhibitor with reduced acyl glucuronide liability: the discovery of 4-[4-(2-adamantylcarbamoyl)-5-tert-butyl-pyrazol-1-yl]benzoic acid (AZD8329).

    PubMed

    Scott, James S; deSchoolmeester, Joanne; Kilgour, Elaine; Mayers, Rachel M; Packer, Martin J; Hargreaves, David; Gerhardt, Stefan; Ogg, Derek J; Rees, Amanda; Selmi, Nidhal; Stocker, Andrew; Swales, John G; Whittamore, Paul R O

    2012-11-26

    Inhibition of 11β-HSD1 is viewed as a potential target for the treatment of obesity and other elements of the metabolic syndrome. We report here the optimization of a carboxylic acid class of inhibitors from AZD4017 (1) to the development candidate AZD8329 (27). A structural change from pyridine to pyrazole together with structural optimization led to an improved technical profile in terms of both solubility and pharmacokinetics. The extent of acyl glucuronidation was reduced through structural optimization of both the carboxylic acid and amide substituents, coupled with a reduction in lipophilicity leading to an overall increase in metabolic stability.

  13. Binding region of alanopine dehydrogenase predicted by unbiased molecular dynamics simulations of ligand diffusion.

    PubMed

    Gohlke, Holger; Hergert, Ulrike; Meyer, Tatu; Mulnaes, Daniel; Grieshaber, Manfred K; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2013-10-28

    Opine dehydrogenases catalyze the reductive condensation of pyruvate with L-amino acids. Biochemical characterization of alanopine dehydrogenase from Arenicola marina revealed that this enzyme is highly specific for L-alanine. Unbiased molecular dynamics simulations with a homology model of alanopine dehydrogenase captured the binding of L-alanine diffusing from solvent to a putative binding region near a distinct helix-kink-helix motif. These results and sequence comparisons reveal how mutations and insertions within this motif dictate the L-amino acid specificity.

  14. Purification and characterization of limonoate dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus fascians.

    PubMed

    Humanes, L; López-Ruiz, A; Merino, M T; Roldán, J M; Diez, J

    1997-09-01

    Limonoate dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus fascians has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by a procedure that consists of ion-exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography. The native enzyme has a molecular mass of around 128,000 Da and appears to be composed of four similar subunits (30,000 Da each). The isoelectric point is 4.9 as determined by isoelectric focusing. The homogeneous enzyme was used to determine the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. The enzyme was purified from cells grown in either fructose or limonoate as a carbon source. Limonoate dehydrogenase activity was higher in limonoate-grown cultures. Additionally, the enzyme preparations differed in their affinity for limonoids but not for NAD+. In all cases limonoate dehydrogenase exhibited a higher catalytic rate and stronger affinity for limonoate A-ring lactone than for disodium limonoate, the limonoid traditionally used for in vitro activity assays. Our data confirm previous reports proposing that limonoate A-ring lactone is the physiological substrate for limonoate dehydrogenase. The increase in limonoate dehydrogenase activity observed in limonoate-grown cultures appears to be caused by a rise in protein levels, since chloramphenicol prevented such an effect.

  15. 4-Hy-droxy-5-meth-oxy-N,1-dimethyl-2-oxo-N-[4-(tri-fluoro-meth-yl)phen-yl]-1,2-di-hydro-quinoline-3-carboxamide.

    PubMed

    Akinboye, Emmanuel S; Butcher, Ray J; Yildirim, Sema Ozturk; Isaacs, John T

    2014-03-01

    The title compound, C20H17F3N2O4, named tasquinimod, is a second-generation oral quinoline-3-carboxamide analogue, which is currently in phase III clinical trials for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. The quinoline unit is almost planar (r.m.s. deviation of fitted atoms = 0.0075 Å). The carboxamide side chain, substituted at position 3, is tilted by 88.07 (7)° to the quinoline plane. Both the methyl and carbonyl groups of this carboxamide side chain are in a syn conformation. The 4-(tri-fluoro-meth-yl)phenyl plane is inclined at 50.62 (17)° to the plane of the carboxamide side chain, and at 87.14 (4)° to the plane of the quinoline ring system. The 4-hy-droxy H atom acts as a double proton donor in an intra-molecular hydrogen bond to the 5-position meth-oxy O atom and in an inter-molecular contact to the 2-oxo group, generating a chain along [010] in the crystal structure.

  16. Structural, spectral, thermal and biological studies on 2-oxo-N‧-((4-oxo-4H-chromen-3-yl)methylene)-2-(phenylamino)acetohydrazide (H2L) and its metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, Ola A.; El-Reash, Gaber Abu; Ahmed, Sara F.

    2012-01-01

    A new series of metal complexes formed by the reaction of 2-oxo-N'-((4-oxo-4H-chromen-3-yl)methylene)-2-(phenylamino)acetohydrazide(H 2L) and Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Hg(II) and U(VI) O22+ ions. The isolated complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, spectral (IR, UV-visible and 1H NMR) as well as magnetic and thermal measurements. The data revealed that the ligand acts as neutral ON or ONO as well as mononegative ONO. On the basis of magnetic and electronic spectral data an octahedral geometry for the Co(II), Cu(II) and U(VI)O 2 complexes, a tetrahedral structure for the Ni(II), Cd(II), Zn(II) and Hg(II) complexes have been proposed. The bond length, bond angle, HOMO, LUMO, dipole moment and charges on the atoms have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligand and the investigated complexes. Also, kinetic parameters were determined for each thermal degradation stage of some complexes using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. Moreover, the ligand and its complexes were screened against Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) as Gram positive bacteria and Pseudomonas aeuroginosa ( Pa) Gram negative bacteria using the inhibitory zone diameter.

  17. Design, synthesis, and characterization of (1-(4-aryl)- 1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)methyl, substituted phenyl-6-methyl-2-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carboxylates against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Venugopala, Katharigatta N; Dharma Rao, G B; Bhandary, Subhrajyoti; Pillay, Melendhran; Chopra, Deepak; Aldhubiab, Bandar E; Attimarad, Mahesh; Alwassil, Osama Ibrahim; Harsha, Sree; Mlisana, Koleka

    2016-01-01

    The novel (1-(4-aryl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)methyl, substituted phenyl-6-methyl-2-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carboxylate derivatives were synthesized by the click reaction of the dihydropyrimidinones, bearing a terminal alkynyl group, with various substituted aryl azides at room temperature using a catalytic amount of Cu(OAc)2 and sodium ascorbate in a 1:2 ratio of acetone and water as a solvent. The newly synthesized compounds were characterized by a number of spectroscopic techniques, such as infrared, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, 1H, and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance along with single crystal X-ray diffraction. The current procedure for the synthesis of 1,2,3-triazole hybrids with dihydropyrimidinones is appropriate for the synthesis of a library of analogs 7a-l and the method accessible here is operationally simple and has excellent yields. The title compounds 7a-l were evaluated for their in vitro antitubercular activity against H37RV and multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by resazurin microplate assay plate method and it was found that compound 7d was promising against H37RV and multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis at 10 and 15 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:27601885

  18. Synthesis, experimental spectra (IR & Raman and NMR), vibrational analysis and theoretical DFT investigations of N-(5-(4-methylbenzoyl)-2-oxo-4-(4-methylphenyl)pyrimidine-1(2H)-yl)-4-methylbenzamide.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Lütfiye; Şahan, Emine; Önal, Zülbiye; Özpozan, Talat

    2014-08-14

    The title molecule, N-(5-(4-methylbenzoyl)-2-oxo-4-(4-methylphenyl)pyrimidine-1(2H)-yl)-4-methylbenzamide (C27H23N3O3), was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, Raman, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectral data. To determine conformational flexibility, potential energy surfaces of the title compound were obtained by DFT regarding the selected degree of torsional freedom, which was varied from 0° to 360° in 6° and 20° steps. The ten conformers of the title compound were determined and it was found that the conformer 1 basis the most stable one. All conformers were also optimized by using the density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with the 6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p) and cc-pVDZ basis sets in the ground state. Potential energy distribution was calculated with the 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The vibrational spectra were recorded in solid phase IR and Raman spectra were compared based on the results of the theoretical calculations. The formation of hydrogen bonds was explained using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and spectroscopic analysis. NMR analysis and frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) were also investigated by DFT.

  19. Comparative ligational, optical band gap and biological studies on Cr(III) and Fe(III) complexes of hydrazones derived from 2-hydrazinyl-2-oxo-N-phenylacetamide with both vanillin and O-vanillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, T. A.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.; Attia, M. I.; El-Tabai, M. N.

    2015-09-01

    The Cr(III) and Fe(III) complexes of hydrazones derived from the condensation of 2-hydrazinyl-2-oxo-N-phenylacetamide with both vanillin and o-vanillin synthesized and characterized by different conventional physicochemical techniques. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the different decomposition steps were calculated using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger equations. The bond lengths, bond angles, HOMO, LUMO, dipole moment and binding energy calculated by DFT calculations. The optical band gap (Eg) values equal 3.28, 3.03, 3.58 and 3.57 eV for [Cr(HL1)Cl2(H2O)2](0.75H2O), [Cr(HL2)Cl2(H2O)](H2O), [Fe(HL1)Cl2(H2O)2](0.5H2O) and [Fe(HL2)2Cl(H2O)](3H2O) complexes, respectively. The antibacterial activities tested against Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli bacteria.

  20. Inhibition of mild steel corrosion by 1,4,6-trimethyl-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile and synergistic effect of halide ion in 0.5 M H2SO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourya, Punita; Singh, Praveen; Rastogi, R. B.; Singh, M. M.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of iodide ions on inhibitive performance of 1,4,6-trimethyl-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile (TODPCN) on mild steel (MS) corrosion in 0.5 M H2SO4 was studied using gravimetric and electrochemical measurements. TODPCN inhibits the corrosion of MS to the extent of 62.3% at its lowest concentration (0.5 mM) and its inhibition efficiency (η) further increases on increasing concentration at 298 K. The adsorption of TODPCN on MS was found to follow the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The value of η increased on the addition of 2.0 mM KI. The value of synergism parameter being more than unity indicates that the enhanced η value in the presence of iodide ions is only due to synergism. Thus, a cooperative mechanism of inhibition exists between the iodide anion and TODPCN cations. The increase in surface coverage in the presence of KI indicates that iodide ions enhance the adsorption of TODPCN. The surface morphology of corroded/inhibited MS was studied by atomic force microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of inhibited MS surface was carried out to determine the composition of the adsorbed film. Some quantum chemical parameters and the Mulliken charge densities for TODPCN calculated by density functional theory provided further insight into the mechanism of inhibition.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dehydrogenase-B pieces (subunits) of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme. This enzyme is found throughout the body and is important ... cells. There are five different forms of this enzyme, each made up of four protein subunits. Various ...

  2. Kinetic mechanism of chicken liver xanthine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Bruguera, P; Lopez-Cabrera, A; Canela, E I

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic behaviour of chicken-liver xanthine dehydrogenase (xanthine/NAD+ oxidoreductase; EC 1.2.1.37) has been studied. Steady-state results, obtained from a wide range of concentrations of substrates and products, were fitted by rational functions of degree 1:1, 1:2, 2:2 and 3:3 with respect to substrates, and 0:1, 1:1, 0:2 and 1:2 with regard to products, using a non-linear regression program which guarantees the fit. The goodness of fit was improved using a computer program that combines model discrimination, parameter refinement and sequential experimental design. The AIC and F tests were also used for model discrimination. For comparative purposes, the xanthine/oxygen oxidoreductase reaction was also studied. From the functions which give the maximum improvement, the complete rate equation was deduced. The significance of the terms was stated by the above methods. It was concluded that xanthine dehydrogenase requires a minimum mechanism of degree 1:1 for xanthine, 2:2 for NAD+, 1:1 for uric acid and 1:2 for NADH in the xanthine/NAD+ oxidoreductase reaction. These are the minimum degrees required but a rate equation of higher degree is not excluded. PMID:3422556

  3. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Revisited

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Jerome T.; Henderson, Alfred R.

    1984-01-01

    Hemolytic diseases associated with drugs have been recognized since antiquity. Many of these anemias have been associated with oxidizing agents and deficiencies in the intraerythrocytic enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This paper outlines the discovery, prevalence, and variants of this enzyme. Methods of diagnosis of associated anemias are offered. PMID:6502728

  4. NADP+-Preferring d-Lactate Dehydrogenase from Sporolactobacillus inulinus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lingfeng; Xu, Xiaoling; Wang, Limin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxy acid dehydrogenases, including l- and d-lactate dehydrogenases (L-LDH and D-LDH), are responsible for the stereospecific conversion of 2-keto acids to 2-hydroxyacids and extensively used in a wide range of biotechnological applications. A common feature of LDHs is their high specificity for NAD+ as a cofactor. An LDH that could effectively use NADPH as a coenzyme could be an alternative enzymatic system for regeneration of the oxidized, phosphorylated cofactor. In this study, a d-lactate dehydrogenase from a Sporolactobacillus inulinus strain was found to use both NADH and NADPH with high efficiencies and with a preference for NADPH as its coenzyme, which is different from the coenzyme utilization of all previously reported LDHs. The biochemical properties of the D-LDH enzyme were determined by X-ray crystal structural characterization and in vivo and in vitro enzymatic activity analyses. The residue Asn174 was demonstrated to be critical for NADPH utilization. Characterization of the biochemical properties of this enzyme will contribute to understanding of the catalytic mechanism and provide referential information for shifting the coenzyme utilization specificity of 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. PMID:26150461

  5. Crystal structure of homoisocitrate dehydrogenase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Hendershot, Jenna M.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2013-09-18

    Lysine biosynthesis in fungi, euglena, and certain archaebacteria occurs through the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway. Enzymes in the first steps of this pathway have been proposed as potential targets for the development of antifungal therapies, as they are absent in animals but are conserved in several pathogenic fungi species, including Candida, Cryptococcus, and Aspergillus. One potential antifungal target in the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway is the third enzyme in the pathway, homoisocitrate dehydrogenase (HICDH), which catalyzes the divalent metal-dependent conversion of homoisocitrate to 2-oxoadipate (2-OA) using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) as a cofactor. HICDH belogns to a family of {beta}-hydroxyacid oxidative decarboxylases that includes malate dehydrogenase, tartrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), and 3-isopropylmalte dehydrogenase (IPMDH). ICDH and IPMDH are well-characterized enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) in the citric acid cycle and the conversion of 3-isopropylmalate to 2-oxoisovalerate in the leucine biosynthetic pathway, respectively. Recent structural and biochemical studies of HICDH reveal that this enzyme shares sequence, structural, and mechanistic homology with ICDH and IPMDH. To date, the only published structures of HICDH are from the archaebacteria Thermus thermophilus (TtHICDH). Fungal HICDHs diverge from TtHICDH in several aspects, including their thermal stability, oligomerization state, and substrate specificity, thus warranting further characterization. To gain insights into these differences, they determined crystal structures of a fungal Schizosaccharomyces pombe HICDH (SpHICDH) as an apoenzyme and as a binary complex with additive tripeptide glycyl-glycyl-glycine (GGG) to 1.55 {angstrom} and 1.85 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Finally, a comparison of the SpHICDH and TtHICDH structures reveal differences in

  6. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Monkenbusch, M.; Stadler, A. Biehl, R.; Richter, D.; Ollivier, J.; Zamponi, M.

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D{sub 2}O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains.

  7. Molecular characterization of an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed Central

    Nair, R V; Bennett, G N; Papoutsakis, E T

    1994-01-01

    A gene (aad) coding for an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) was identified immediately upstream of the previously cloned ctfA (J. W. Cary, D. J. Petersen, E. T. Papoutsakis, and G. N. Bennett, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 56:1576-1583, 1990) of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and sequenced. The 2,619-bp aad codes for a 96,517-Da protein. Primer extension analysis identified two transcriptional start sites 83 and 243 bp upstream of the aad start codon. The N-terminal section of AAD shows homology to aldehyde dehydrogenases of bacterial, fungal, mammalian, and plant origin, while the C-terminal section shows homology to alcohol dehydrogenases of bacterial (which includes three clostridial alcohol dehydrogenases) and yeast origin. AAD exhibits considerable amino acid homology (56% identity) over its entire sequence to the trifunctional protein encoded by adhE from Escherichia coli. Expression of aad from a plasmid in C. acetobutylicum showed that AAD, which appears as a approximately 96-kDa band in denaturing protein gels, provides elevated activities of NADH-dependent butanol dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and butyraldehyde dehydrogenase, and a small increase in NADH-dependent ethanol dehydrogenase. A 957-bp open reading frame that could potentially encode a 36,704-Da protein was identified upstream of aad. Images PMID:8300540

  8. Solid-state structure and solution conformation of the nootropic agent N[2-( N,N-Diisopropylamino)ethyl]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinacetamide sulphate. X-ray and homonuclear two-dimensional 1H NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandoli, Giuliano; Nicolini, Marino; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.; Grassi, Antonio; Perly, Bruno

    1987-04-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of the nootropic agent N-[2-( N,N-diisopropyl-amino)ethyl]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinacetamide sulphate was determined by X-ray analysis. The conformational properties in the solution state were deduced from the 1H-NMR spectrum run in 2H 2O at 500 MHz. Spectral assignments were made with the aid of the COSY 45 shift correlation experiment. Crystals were triclinic with unit cell dimensions a = 13.410(10), b = 11.382(8), c = 6.697(4) », α = 83.80(3), β = 88.61(3)and γ = 72.25(6)° ; space group Poverline1. The structure was determined from 1047 three-dimensional counter data and refined to a value of 7.5% for the conventional discrepancy factor R. One molecule of the solvent acetonitrile is incorporated per two of the (C 14H 28N 3O 2) +-(HSO 4) -. The five-membered heterocyclic ring is in an envelope ( Cs) conformation and the "flap" atom deviates by 0.31 » from the plane of the other four. This plane forms a dihedral angle of 71.4° with the amide group, with the CO fragment directed toward the ring. All bond angles and distances are in good agreement with expected standard values. A strong OH⋯O intermolecular bond (2.61 ») links the cation of the hydrogen-sulphate anion, while the loosely held MeCN molecule is trapped in the polar pockets. The molecular conformation in the solid was compared with results from 1H NMR spectral analysis which showed that in solution wide torsional oscillations can occur about the bonds of the chain bonded to the N(1) atom.

  9. Effect of fermented sea tangle on the alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jae-Young; Jeong, Jae-Jun; Yang, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Bae-Jin; Cho, Young-Su

    2011-08-01

    Sea tangle, a kind of brown seaweed, was fermented with Lactobacillus brevis BJ-20. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content in fermented sea tangle (FST) was 5.56% (w/w) and GABA in total free amino acid of FST was 49.5%. The effect of FST on the enzyme activities and mRNA protein expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) involved in alcohol metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. Yeast was cultured in YPD medium supplemented with different concentrations of FST powder [0, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.0% (w/v)] for 18 h. FST had no cytotoxic effect on the yeast growth. The highest activities and protein expressions of ADH and ALDH from the cell-free extracts of S. cerevisiae were evident with the 0.4% and 0.8% (w/v) FST-supplemented concentrations, respectively. The highest concentrations of GABA as well as minerals (Zn, Ca, and Mg) were found in the cell-free extracts of S. cerevisiae cultured in medium supplemented with 0.4% (w/v) FST. The levels of GABA, Zn, Ca, and Mg in S. cerevisiae were strongly correlated with the enzyme activities of ADH and ALDH in yeast. These results indicate that FST can enhance the enzyme activities and protein expression of ADH and ALDH in S. cerevisiae.

  10. Glutamate dehydrogenases: the why and how of coenzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Engel, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    NAD(+) and NADP(+), chemically similar and with almost identical standard oxidation-reduction potentials, nevertheless have distinct roles, NAD(+) serving catabolism and ATP generation whereas NADPH is the biosynthetic reductant. Separating these roles requires strict specificity for one or the other coenzyme for most dehydrogenases. In many organisms this holds also for glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH), NAD(+)-dependent for glutamate oxidation, NADP(+)-dependent for fixing ammonia. In higher animals, however, GDH has dual specificity. It has been suggested that GDH in mitochondria reacts only with NADP(H), the NAD(+) reaction being an in vitro artefact. However, contrary evidence suggests mitochondrial GDH not only reacts with NAD(+) but maintains equilibrium using the same pool as accessed by β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase. Another complication is the presence of an energy-linked dehydrogenase driving NADP(+) reduction by NADH, maintaining the coenzyme pools at different oxidation-reduction potentials. Its coexistence with GDH makes possible a futile cycle, control of which is not yet properly explained. Structural studies show NAD(+)-dependent, NADP(+)-dependent and dual-specificity GDHs are closely related and a few site-directed mutations can reverse specificity. Specificity for NAD(+) or for NADP(+) has probably emerged repeatedly during evolution, using different structural solutions on different occasions. In various GDHs the P7 position in the coenzyme-binding domain plays a key role. However, whereas in other dehydrogenases an acidic P7 residue usually hydrogen bonds to the 2'- and 3'-hydroxyls, dictating NAD(+) specificity, among GDHs, depending on detailed conformation of surrounding residues, an acidic P7 may permit binding of NAD(+) only, NADP(+) only, or in higher animals both.

  11. On the role of microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase in metabolism of aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Antonenkov, V D; Pirozhkov, S V; Panchenko, L F

    1987-11-30

    To elucidate a possible role of membrane-bound aldehyde dehydrogenase in the detoxication of aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation, the substrate specificity of the highly purified microsomal enzyme was investigated. The aldehyde dehydrogenase was active with different aliphatic aldehydes including 4-hydroxyalkenals, but did not react with malonic dialdehyde. When Fe/ADP-ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation of arachidonic acid was carried out in an in vitro system, the formation of products which react with microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase was observed parallel with malonic dialdehyde accumulation.

  12. Inhibition of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase by fluorescamine.

    PubMed

    Jay, D; Jay, E G; Garcia, C

    1993-12-01

    Fluorescamine rapidly inactivated membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase. The inhibition of the enzyme by this reagent was prevented by succinate and malonate, suggesting that the group modified by fluorescamine was located at the active site. The modification of the active site sulfhydryl group by 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) did not alter the inhibitory action of fluorescamine. However, the protective effect of malonate against fluorescamine inhibition was abolished in the enzyme modified at the thiol.

  13. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2010-09-01

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as rad OH and ONOO -. In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  14. Human dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 11 is a novel type of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Miyagi, Namiki; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Hara, Akira; Ikari, Akira

    2016-03-25

    We report characterization of a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily encoded in a human gene, DHRS11. The recombinant protein (DHRS11) efficiently catalyzed the conversion of the 17-keto group of estrone, 4- and 5-androstenes and 5α-androstanes into their 17β-hydroxyl metabolites with NADPH as a coenzyme. In contrast, it exhibited reductive 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity toward 5β-androstanes, 5β-pregnanes, 4-pregnenes and bile acids. Additionally, DHRS11 reduced α-dicarbonyls (such as diacetyl and methylglyoxal) and alicyclic ketones (such as 1-indanone and loxoprofen). The enzyme activity was inhibited in a mixed-type manner by flavonoids, and competitively by carbenoxolone, glycyrrhetinic acid, zearalenone, curcumin and flufenamic acid. The expression of DHRS11 mRNA was observed widely in human tissues, most abundantly in testis, small intestine, colon, kidney and cancer cell lines. Thus, DHRS11 represents a novel type of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase with unique catalytic properties and tissue distribution.

  15. Thermal stability of chimeric isopropylmalate dehydrogenase genes constructed from a thermophile and a mesophile.

    PubMed

    Numata, K; Muro, M; Akutsu, N; Nosoh, Y; Yamagishi, A; Oshima, T

    1995-01-01

    Chimeric isopropylmalate dehydrogenases were constructed by connecting the genes isolated from an extreme thermophile, Thermus thermophilus, and a mesophile, Bacillus subtilis. These genes were expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzymes were purified and analysed. Enzymes of T.thermophilus and B.subtilis and chimeric enzymes showed similar enzymological characteristics except for thermal stability. The stability of each enzyme was approximately proportional to the content of the amino acid sequence from the T.thermophilus enzyme. The results suggested that amino acid residues contributing the thermal stability distribute themselves, in general, evenly at least in the N-terminal half of the amino acid sequence of T.thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase.

  16. The multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenation disorders, glutaric aciduria type II and ethylmalonic-adipic aciduria. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, and electron transfer flavoprotein activities in fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Amendt, B A; Rhead, W J

    1986-01-01

    The multiple acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenation disorders (MAD) include severe (S) and mild (M) variants, glutaric aciduria type II (MAD:S) and ethylmalonic-adipic aciduria (MAD:M). Intact MAD:M mitochondria oxidized [1-14C]octanoate, [1-14C]palmityl-CoA, and [1,5-14C]glutarate at 20-46% of control levels; MAD:S mitochondria oxidized these three substrates at 0.4-18% of control levels. In MAD:M mitochondria, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ADH) activities were similar to control, whereas MAD:S ADH activities ranged from 38% to 73% of control. Electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) activities in five MAD:M cell lines ranged from 29 to 51% of control (P less than 0.01); ETF deficiency was the primary enzymatic defect in two MAD:M lines. In four MAD:S patients, ETF activities ranged from 3% to 6% of control (P less than 0.001); flavin adenine dinucleotide addition increased residual ETF activity from 4% to 21% of control in a single MAD:S line (P less than 0.01). Three MAD:S patients had ETF activities ranging from 33 to 53% of control; other investigators found deficient ETF-dehydrogenase activity in these MAD:S and three of our MAD:M cell lines. PMID:3722376

  17. A novel 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase from Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7T acting as a key enzyme during catabolism of 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Marc; Deters, Anika; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    3-Sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase (AcdDPN7) is a new desulfinase that catalyzes the sulfur abstraction from 3SP-CoA in the betaproteobacterium Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7(T). During investigation of a Tn5::mob-induced mutant defective in growth on 3,3'-dithiodipropionate (DTDP) and also 3-sulfinopropionate (3SP), the transposon insertion was mapped to an open reading frame with the highest homology to an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acd) from Burkholderia phenoliruptrix strain BR3459a (83% identical and 91% similar amino acids). An A. mimigardefordensis Δacd mutant was generated and verified the observed phenotype of the Tn5::mob-induced mutant. For enzymatic studies, AcdDPN7 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pLysS by using pET23a::acdDPN7. The purified protein is yellow and contains a noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, as verified by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) analyses. Size-exclusion chromatography revealed a native molecular mass of about 173 kDa, indicating a homotetrameric structure (theoretically 179 kDa), which is in accordance with other members of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. In vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated that the purified enzyme converted 3SP-CoA into propionyl-CoA and sulfite (SO3(2-)). Kinetic studies of AcdDPN7 revealed a Vmax of 4.19 μmol min(-1) mg(-1), an apparent Km of 0.013 mM, and a kcat/Km of 240.8 s(-1) mM(-1) for 3SP-CoA. However, AcdDPN7 is unable to perform a dehydrogenation, which is the usual reaction catalyzed by members of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Comparison to other known desulfinases showed a comparably high catalytic efficiency of AcdDPN7 and indicated a novel reaction mechanism. Hence, AcdDPN7 encodes a new desulfinase based on an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.8.x) scaffold. Concomitantly, we identified the gene product that is responsible for the

  18. Characterization of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 3

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Caroline E.; Brocklehurst, Keith; Pickersgill, Richard W.; Warren, Martin J.

    2005-01-01

    RALDH3 (retinal dehydrogenase 3) was characterized by kinetic and binding studies, protein engineering, homology modelling, ligand docking and electrostatic-potential calculations. The major recognition determinant of an RALDH3 substrate was shown to be an eight-carbon chain bonded to the aldehyde group whose kinetic influence (kcat/Km at pH 8.5) decreases when shortened or lengthened. Surprisingly, the β-ionone ring of all-trans-retinal is not a major recognition site. The dissociation constants (Kd) of the complexes of RALDH3 with octanal, NAD+ and NADH were determined by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. The similarity of the Kd values for the complexes with NAD+ and with octanal suggests a random kinetic mechanism for RALDH3, in contrast with the ordered sequential mechanism often associated with aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes. Inhibition of RALDH3 by tri-iodothyronine binding in competition with NAD+, predicted by the modelling, was established kinetically and by immunoprecipitation. Mechanistic implications of the kinetically influential ionizations with macroscopic pKa values of 5.0 and 7.5 revealed by the pH-dependence of kcat are discussed. Analogies with data for non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus mutans, together with the present modelled structure of the thioacyl RALDH3, suggest (a) that kcat characterizes deacylation of this intermediate for specific substrates and (b) the assignment of the pKa of the major ionization (approximating to 7.5) to the perturbed carboxy group of Glu280 whose conjugate base is envisaged as supplying general base catalysis to attack of a water molecule. The macroscopic pKa of the minor ionization (5.0) is considered to approximate to that of the carboxy group of Glu488. PMID:16241904

  19. Cellobiose dehydrogenase in cellulose degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, L.; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro

    1996-10-01

    Cellobiose dehydrogenase is produced by a variety of fungi. Although it was already discovered during the 70`s, it`s role in cellulose and lignin degradation is yet ambiguous. The enzyme contains both heme and FAD as prosthetic groups, and seems to have a domain specifically designed to bind the enzyme to cellulose. It`s affinity to amorphous cellulose is higher than to crystalline cellulose. We will report on the binding behavior of the enzyme, its usefulness in elucidation of cellulose structures and also, possibilities for applications such as its use in measuring individual and synergistic mechanisms for cellulose degradation by endo- and exo-glucanases.

  20. Targeting isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takeo; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; DiNardo, Courtney D; Atkins, Johnique T; Janku, Filip

    2016-05-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an essential enzyme for cellular respiration in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Recurrent mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 are prevalent in several cancers including glioma, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cholangiocarcinoma and chondrosarcoma. The mutated IDH1 and IDH2 proteins have a gain-of-function, neomorphic activity, catalyzing the reduction of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) by NADPH. Cancer-associated IDH mutations block normal cellular differentiation and promote tumorigenesis via the abnormal production of the oncometabolite 2-HG. High levels of 2-HG have been shown to inhibit α-KG dependent dioxygenases, including histone and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) demethylases, which play a key role in regulating the epigenetic state of cells. Current targeted inhibitors of IDH1 (AG120, IDH305), IDH2 (AG221), and pan-IDH1/2 (AG881) selectively inhibit mutant IDH protein and induce cell differentiation in in vitro and in vivo models. Preliminary results from phase I clinical trials with IDH inhibitors in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies have demonstrated an objective response rate ranging from 31% to 40% with durable responses (>1 year) observed. Furthermore, the IDH inhibitors have demonstrated early signals of activity in solid tumors with IDH mutations, including cholangiocarcinomas and low grade gliomas.

  1. Modification of Rhizopus lactate dehydrogenase for improved resistance to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizopus oryzae is frequently used for fermentative production of lactic acid. We determined that one of the key enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), involved in synthesis of lactic acid by R. oryzae was significantly inhibited by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) at physiological concentrations. Thi...

  2. Amphibian alcohol dehydrogenase, the major frog liver enzyme. Relationships to other forms and assessment of an early gene duplication separating vertebrate class I and class III alcohol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Cederlund, E.; Joernvall, H. ); Peralba, J.M.; Pares, X. )

    1991-03-19

    Submammalian alcohol dehydrogenase structures can be used to evaluate the origins and functions of different types of the mammalian enzyme. Two avian forms were recently reported, and the authors now define the major amphibian alcohol dehydrogenase. The enzyme from the liver of the Green frog Rana perezi was purified, carboxymethylated, and submitted to amino acid sequence determination by peptide analysis of six different digest. The protein has a 375-residue subunit and is a class I alcohol dehydrogenase, bridging the gap toward the original separation of the classes that are observable in the human alcohol dehydrogenase system. In relation to the human class I enzyme, the amphibian protein has residue identities exactly halfway (68%) between those for the corresponding avian enzyme (74%) and the human class III enzyme (62%), suggesting an origin of the alcohol dehnydrogenase classes very early in or close to the evolution of the vertebrate line. This conclusion suggests that these enzyme classes are more universal among animals than previously realized and constitutes the first real assessment of the origin of the duplications leading to the alcohol dehydrogenase classes. In conclusion, the amphibian enzyme allows a rough positioning of the divergence of the alcohol dehydrogenase classes, shows that the class I type is widesprread in vertebrates, and functionally conforms with greater variations at the substrate-binding than the coenzyme-binding site.

  3. Characteristics of external and internal NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in Hoya carnosa mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hoang Thi Kim; Nose, Akihiro

    2012-12-01

    This study aims at characterizing NAD(P)H dehydrogenases on the inside and outside of the inner membrane of mitochondria of one phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-crassulacean acid metabolism plant, Hoya carnosa. In crassulacean acid metabolism plants, NADH is produced by malate decarboxylation inside and outside mitochondria. The relative importance of mitochondrial alternative NADH dehydrogenases and their association was determined in intact-and alamethicin-permeabilized mitochondria of H. carnosa to discriminate between internal and external activities. The major findings in H. carnosa mitochondria are: (i) external NADPH oxidation is totally inhibited by DPI and totally dependent on Ca(2+), (ii) external NADH oxidation is partially inhibited by DPI and mainly dependent on Ca(2+), (iii) total NADH oxidation measured in permeabilized mitochondria is partially inhibited by rotenone and also by DPI, (iv) total NADPH oxidation measured in permeabilized mitochondria is partially dependent on Ca(2+) and totally inhibited by DPI. The results suggest that complex I, external NAD(P)H dehydrogenases, and internal NAD(P)H dehydrogenases are all linked to the electron transport chain. Also, the total measurable NAD(P)H dehydrogenases activity was less than the total measurable complex I activity, and both of these enzymes could donate their electrons not only to the cytochrome pathway but also to the alternative pathway. The finding indicated that the H. carnosa mitochondrial electron transport chain is operating in a classical way, partitioning to both Complex I and alternative Alt. NAD(P)H dehydrogenases.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Anaerobic Ethylbenzene Dehydrogenase, a Novel Mo-Fe-S Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Hope A.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2001-01-01

    The first step in anaerobic ethylbenzene mineralization in denitrifying Azoarcus sp. strain EB1 is the oxidation of ethylbenzene to (S)-(−)-1-phenylethanol. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, which catalyzes this reaction, is a unique enzyme in that it mediates the stereoselective hydroxylation of an aromatic hydrocarbon in the absence of molecular oxygen. We purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase to apparent homogeneity and showed that the enzyme is a heterotrimer (αβγ) with subunit masses of 100 kDa (α), 35 kDa (β), and 25 kDa (γ). Purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase contains approximately 0.5 mol of molybdenum, 16 mol of iron, and 15 mol of acid-labile sulfur per mol of holoenzyme, as well as a molydopterin cofactor. In addition to ethylbenzene, purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase was found to oxidize 4-fluoro-ethylbenzene and the nonaromatic hydrocarbons 3-methyl-2-pentene and ethylidenecyclohexane. Sequencing of the encoding genes revealed that ebdA encodes the α subunit, a 974-amino-acid polypeptide containing a molybdopterin-binding domain. The ebdB gene encodes the β subunit, a 352-amino-acid polypeptide with several 4Fe-4S binding domains. The ebdC gene encodes the γ subunit, a 214-amino-acid polypeptide that is a potential membrane anchor subunit. Sequence analysis and biochemical data suggest that ethylbenzene dehydrogenase is a novel member of the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family of molybdopterin-containing enzymes. PMID:11443088

  5. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(−)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L-1 of optically pure D(−)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min-1 (mg protein)-1. By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(−) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates. PMID:22065761

  6. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-11-22

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(-)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L(-1) of optically pure D(-)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min(-1) (mg protein)(-1). By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(-) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates.

  7. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  11. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Nannelli, Caterina; Notaro, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    G6PD is a housekeeping gene expressed in all cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is part of the pentose phosphate pathway, and its main physiologic role is to provide NADPH. G6PD deficiency, one of the commonest inherited enzyme abnormalities in humans, arises through one of many possible mutations, most of which reduce the stability of the enzyme and its level as red cells age. G6PD-deficient persons are mostly asymptomatic, but they can develop severe jaundice during the neonatal period and acute hemolytic anemia when they ingest fava beans or when they are exposed to certain infections or drugs. G6PD deficiency is a global health issue.

  12. Opine dehydrogenases in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Harcet, Matija; Perina, Drago; Pleše, Bruna

    2013-10-01

    It is well known today that opine production anaerobic pathways are analogs to the classical glycolytic pathway (lactate production pathway). These pathways, catalyzed by a group of enzymes called opine dehydrogenases (OpDHs), ensure continuous flux of glycolysis and a constant supply of ATP by maintaining the NADH/NAD(+) ratio during exercise and hypoxia, thus regulating the cytosolic redox balance in glycolysis under anoxia. OpDHs are distributed in a wide range of marine invertebrate phyla, including sponges (Porifera). Phylogenetic analyses supported with enzymatic assays strongly indicate that sponge OpDHs constitute an enzyme class unrelated to other OpDHs. Therefore, OpDHs in marine invertebrates are divided into two groups, a mollusk/annelid type and a sponge type, which belongs to the OCD/mu-crystallin family.

  13. Aerobic biodegradation of 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid produced from dibenzothiophene metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.F.; Cheng, S.M.; Fedorak, P.M.

    2006-01-15

    Dibenzothiophene is a sulfur heterocycle found in crude oils and coal. The biodegradation of dibenzothiophene through the Kodama pathway by Pseudomonas sp. strain BT1d leads to the formation of three disulfides: 2-oxo-2-(2-thiophenyl)ethanoic acid disulfide, 2-oxo-2-(2-thiophenyl)ethanoic acid-2-benzoic acid disulfide, and 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid. When provided as the carbon and sulfur source in liquid medium, 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid was degraded by soil enrichment cultures. Two bacterial isolates, designated strains RM1 and RM6, degraded 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid when combined in the medium. Isolate RM6 was found to have an absolute requirement for vitamin B{sub 12}, and it degraded 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid in pure culture when the medium was supplemented with this vitamin. Isolate RM6 also degraded 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid in medium containing sterilized supernatants from cultures of isolate RM1 grown on glucose or benzoate. Isolate RM6 was identified as a member of the genus Variovorax using the Biolog system and 16S rRNA gene analysis. Although the mechanism of disulfide metabolism could not be determined, benzoic acid was detected as a transient metabolite of 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid biodegradation by Variovorax sp. strain RM6. In pure culture, this isolate mineralized 2,2'-dithiodibenzoic acid, releasing 59% of the carbon as carbon dioxide and 88% of the sulfur as sulfate.

  14. Herbicidal Activity of an Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase Inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Wittenbach, V. A.; Teaney, P. W.; Hanna, W. S.; Rayner, D. R.; Schloss, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    Isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) is the third enzyme specific to leucine biosynthesis. It catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of 3-isopropylmalate (3-IPM) to 2-ketoisocaproic acid. The partially purified enzyme from pea (Pisum sativum L.) shows a broad pH optimum of 7.8 to 9.1 and has Km values for 3-IPM and NAD of 18 and 40 [mu]M, respectively. O-Isobutenyl oxalylhydroxamate (O-IbOHA) has been discovered to be an excellent inhibitor of the pea IPMDH, with an apparent inhibitor constant of 5 nM. As an herbicide, O-IbOHA showed only moderate activity on a variety of broadleaf and grass species. We characterized the herbicidal activity of O-IbOHA on corn (Zea mays L.), a sensitive species; giant foxtail (Setaria faberi) and morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea [L.] Roth), moderately tolerant species; and soybean [Glycine max L. Merr.), a tolerant species. Differences in tolerance among the species were not due to differences in the sensitivity of IPMDH. Studies with [14C]O-IbOHA suggested that uptake and translocation were not major limitations for herbicidal activity, nor were they determinants of tolerance. Moreover, metabolism could not account for the difference in tolerance of corn, foxtail, and morning glory, although it might account for the tolerance of soybean. Herbicidal activity on all four species was correlated with the accumulation of 3-IPM in the plants. PMID:12232331

  15. Purification and characterization of dimeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenase from dog liver.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Nakanishi, M; Deyashiki, Y; Hara, A; Matsuura, K; Ohya, I

    1994-09-01

    High NADP(+)-linked dihydrodiol dehydrogenase activity was detected in dog liver cytosol, from which a dimeric enzyme composed of M(r) 39,000 subunits was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme oxidized trans-cyclohexanediol, and trans-dihydrodiols of benzene and naphthalene, the [1R,2R]-isomers of which were selectively oxidized. In the reverse reaction in the presence of NADPH as a coenzyme, the enzyme reduced alpha-dicarbonyl compounds, such as methylglyoxal, 3-deoxyglucosone, and diacetyl, and some compounds with a carbonyl group, such as glyceraldehyde, lactaldehyde, and acetoin. 4-Hydroxyphenylketones and ascorbates inhibited the enzyme. The results of steady-state kinetic analyses indicated that the reaction proceeds through an ordered bi bi mechanism with the coenzyme binding to the free enzyme, and suggested that the inhibitors bind to the enzyme-NADP+ binary complex. The dimeric enzyme was detected in liver and kidney of dog, and was immunochemically similar to the dimeric enzymes from monkey kidney, rabbit lens, and pig liver. The sequences (total 127 amino acid residues) of eight peptides derived on enzymatic digestion of the dog liver enzyme did not show significant similarity with the primary structures of members of the aldo-keto reductase and short chain dehydrogenase superfamilies, which include monomeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase, respectively.

  16. Functional Analysis of a Mosquito Short Chain Dehydrogenase Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Mayoral, Jaime G.; Leonard, Kate T.; Defelipe, Lucas A.; Turjansksi, Adrian G.; Nouzova, Marcela; Noriegal, Fernando G.

    2013-01-01

    The short chain dehydrogenases (SDR) constitute one the oldest and largest families of enzymes with over 46,000 members in sequence databases. About 25% of all known dehydrogenases belong to the SDR family. SDR enzymes have critical roles in lipid, amino acid, carbohydrate, hormone and xenobiotic metabolism as well as in redox sensor mechanisms. This family is present in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryota, emphasizing their versatility and fundamental importance for metabolic processes. We identified a cluster of eight SDRs in the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AaSDRs). Members of the cluster differ in tissue specificity and developmental expression. Heterologous expression produced recombinant proteins that had diverse substrate specificities, but distinct from the conventional insect alcohol (ethanol) dehydrogenases. They are all NADP+-dependent and they have S-enantioselectivity and preference for secondary alcohols with 8–15 carbons. Homology modeling was used to build the structure of AaSDR1 and two additional cluster members. The computational study helped explain the selectivity towards the (10S)-isomers as well as the reduced activity of AaSDR4 and AaSDR9 for longer isoprenoid substrates. Similar clusters of SDRs are present in other species of insects, suggesting similar selection mechanisms causing duplication and diversification of this family of enzymes. PMID:23238893

  17. Cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus proline dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    White, Tommi A.; Tanner, John J.

    2005-08-01

    Cloning, purification and crystallization of T. thermophilus proline dehydrogenase is reported. The detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside was used to reduce polydispersity, which enabled crystallization. Nature recycles l-proline by converting it to l-glutamate. This four-electron oxidation process is catalyzed by the two enzymes: proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ{sup 1}-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase. This note reports the cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus PRODH, which is the prototype of a newly discovered superfamily of bacterial monofunctional PRODHs. The results presented here include production of a monodisperse protein solution through use of the detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside and the growth of native crystals that diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2. The space group is P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 82.2, b = 89.6, c = 94.3 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain two protein molecules and 46% solvent. Molecular-replacement trials using a fragment of the PRODH domain of the multifunctional Escherichia coli PutA protein as the search model (24% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of T. thermophilus PRODH will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  18. Characterization of two β-decarboxylating dehydrogenases from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kento; Nakanishi, Fumika; Tomita, Takeo; Akiyama, Nagisa; Lassak, Kerstin; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, a hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon, possesses two β-decarboxylating dehydrogenase genes, saci_0600 and saci_2375, in its genome, which suggests that it uses these enzymes for three similar reactions in lysine biosynthesis through 2-aminoadipate, leucine biosynthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. To elucidate their roles, these two genes were expressed in Escherichia coli in the present study and their gene products were characterized. Saci_0600 recognized 3-isopropylmalate as a substrate, but exhibited slight and no activity for homoisocitrate and isocitrate, respectively. Saci_2375 exhibited distinct and similar activities for isocitrate and homoisocitrate, but no detectable activity for 3-isopropylmalate. These results suggest that Saci_0600 is a 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase for leucine biosynthesis and Saci_2375 is a dual function enzyme serving as isocitrate-homoisocitrate dehydrogenase. The crystal structure of Saci_0600 was determined as a closed-form complex that binds 3-isopropylmalate and Mg(2+), thereby revealing the structural basis for the extreme thermostability and novel-type recognition of the 3-isopropyl moiety of the substrate.

  19. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) in bacteria: a bioinformatic perspective.

    PubMed

    Kisiela, Michael; Skarka, Adam; Ebert, Bettina; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    Steroidal compounds including cholesterol, bile acids and steroid hormones play a central role in various physiological processes such as cell signaling, growth, reproduction, and energy homeostasis. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs), which belong to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) or aldo-keto reductases (AKR), are important enzymes involved in the steroid hormone metabolism. HSDs function as an enzymatic switch that controls the access of receptor-active steroids to nuclear hormone receptors and thereby mediate a fine-tuning of the steroid response. The aim of this study was the identification of classified functional HSDs and the bioinformatic annotation of these proteins in all complete sequenced bacterial genomes followed by a phylogenetic analysis. For the bioinformatic annotation we constructed specific hidden Markov models in an iterative approach to provide a reliable identification for the specific catalytic groups of HSDs. Here, we show a detailed phylogenetic analysis of 3α-, 7α-, 12α-HSDs and two further functional related enzymes (3-ketosteroid-Δ(1)-dehydrogenase, 3-ketosteroid-Δ(4)(5α)-dehydrogenase) from the superfamily of SDRs. For some bacteria that have been previously reported to posses a specific HSD activity, we could annotate the corresponding HSD protein. The dominating phyla that were identified to express HSDs were that of Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Moreover, some evolutionarily more ancient microorganisms (e.g., Cyanobacteria and Euryachaeota) were found as well. A large number of HSD-expressing bacteria constitute the normal human gastro-intestinal flora. Another group of bacteria were originally isolated from natural habitats like seawater, soil, marine and permafrost sediments. These bacteria include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading species such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Rhodococcus. In conclusion, HSDs are found in a wide variety of microorganisms including

  20. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, B C; Fathi, A T; DiNardo, C D; Pollyea, D A; Chan, S M; Swords, R

    2017-01-01

    Alterations to genes involved in cellular metabolism and epigenetic regulation are implicated in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies. Recurring mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes are detected in approximately 20% of adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 5% of adults with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). IDH proteins are homodimeric enzymes involved in diverse cellular processes, including adaptation to hypoxia, histone demethylation and DNA modification. The IDH2 protein is localized in the mitochondria and is a critical component of the tricarboxylic acid (also called the ‘citric acid' or Krebs) cycle. Both IDH2 and IDH1 (localized in the cytoplasm) proteins catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Mutant IDH enzymes have neomorphic activity and catalyze reduction of α-KG to the (R) enantiomer of 2-hydroxyglutarate, which is associated with DNA and histone hypermethylation, altered gene expression and blocked differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. The prognostic significance of mutant IDH (mIDH) is controversial but appears to be influenced by co-mutational status and the specific location of the mutation (IDH1-R132, IDH2-R140, IDH2-R172). Treatments specifically or indirectly targeted to mIDH are currently under clinical investigation; these therapies have been generally well tolerated and, when used as single agents, have shown promise for inducing responses in some mIDH patients when used as first-line treatment or in relapsed or refractory AML or MDS. Use of mIDH inhibitors in combination with drugs with non-overlapping mechanisms of action is especially promising, as such regimens may address the clonal heterogeneity and the multifactorial pathogenic processes involved in mIDH myeloid malignancies. Advances in mutational analysis have made testing more rapid and convenient, and less expensive; such testing should become part of routine diagnostic workup and repeated at

  1. Microbial Oxidation of Methane and Methanol: Crystallization of Methanol Dehydrogenase and Properties of Holo- and Apo-Methanol Dehydrogenase from Methylomonas methanica

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ramesh N.; Hou, Ching T.; Felix, Andre

    1978-01-01

    Procedures are described for the purification and crystallization of methanol dehydrogenase from the soluble fraction of the type I obligate methylotroph Methylomonas methanica strain S1. The crystallized enzyme is homogeneous as judged by acrylamide gel electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. The enzyme had a high pH optimum (9.5) and required ammonium salt as an activator. In the presence of phenazine methosulfate as an electron acceptor, the enzyme catalyzed the oxidation of primary alcohols and formaldehyde. Secondary, tertiary, and aromatic alcohols were not oxidized. The molecular weight as well as subunit size of methanol dehydrogenase was 60,000, indicating that it is monomeric. The sedimentation constant (s20,w) was 3.1S. The amino acid composition of the crystallized enzyme is also presented. Antisera prepared against the crystalline enzyme were nonspecific; they cross-reacted with and inhibited the isofunctional enzyme from other obligate methylotrophic bacteria. The crystalline methanol dehydrogenase had an absorption peak at 350 nm in the visible region and weak fluorescence peaks at 440 and 470 nm due to the presence of a pteridine derivative as the prosthetic group. A procedure was developed for the preparation of apo-methanol dehydrogenase. The molecular weights, sedimentation constants, electrophoretic mobilities, and immunological properties of apo- and holo-methanol dehydrogenases are identical. Apo-methanol dehydrogenase lacked the absorption peak at 350 nm and the fluorescence peaks at 440 and 470 nm and was catalytically inactive. All attempts to reconstitute an active enzyme from apo-methanol dehydrogenase, using various pteridine derivatives, were unsuccessful. Images PMID:415046

  2. Structural Basis for "Flip-Flop" Action of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand

    2003-01-01

    The derivative of vitamin B1, thiamin pyrophosphate is a cofactor of pyruvate dehydrogenase, a component enzyme of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex that plays a major role in directing energy metabolism in the cell. This cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha)-C(=O) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. In alpha(sub 2)beta(sub 2)-tetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, there are two cofactor binding sites, each of them being a center of independently conducted, although highly coordinated enzymatic reactions. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites can now be understood based on the recently determined crystal structure of the holo-form of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.95A resolution. The structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase was determined using a combination of MAD phasing and molecular replacement followed by rounds of torsion-angles molecular-dynamics simulated-annealing refinement. The final pyruvate dehydrogenase structure included coordinates for all protein amino acids two cofactor molecules, two magnesium and two potassium ions, and 742 water molecules. The structure was refined to R = 0.202 and R(sub free) = 0.244. Our structural analysis of the enzyme folding and domain assembly identified a simple mechanism of this protein motion required for the conduct of catalytic action.

  3. Molecular determinants of the cofactor specificity of ribitol dehydrogenase, a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hee-Jung; Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Singh, Ranjitha; Kang, Yun Chan; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2012-05-01

    Ribitol dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis (ZmRDH) catalyzes the conversion of ribitol to d-ribulose and concomitantly reduces NAD(P)(+) to NAD(P)H. A systematic approach involving an initial sequence alignment-based residue screening, followed by a homology model-based screening and site-directed mutagenesis of the screened residues, was used to study the molecular determinants of the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH. A homologous conserved amino acid, Ser156, in the substrate-binding pocket of the wild-type ZmRDH was identified as an important residue affecting the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH. Further insights into the function of the Ser156 residue were obtained by substituting it with other hydrophobic nonpolar or polar amino acids. Substituting Ser156 with the negatively charged amino acids (Asp and Glu) altered the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH toward NAD(+) (S156D, [k(cat)/K(m)(,NAD)]/[k(cat)/K(m)(,NADP)] = 10.9, where K(m)(,NAD) is the K(m) for NAD(+) and K(m)(,NADP) is the K(m) for NADP(+)). In contrast, the mutants containing positively charged amino acids (His, Lys, or Arg) at position 156 showed a higher efficiency with NADP(+) as the cofactor (S156H, [k(cat)/K(m)(,NAD)]/[k(cat)/K(m)(,NADP)] = 0.11). These data, in addition to those of molecular dynamics and isothermal titration calorimetry studies, suggest that the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH can be modulated by manipulating the amino acid residue at position 156.

  4. Characterization of interactions of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase with its binding protein in the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2010-05-07

    Unlike pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from prokaryotes, PDCs from higher eukaryotes have an additional structural component, E3-binding protein (BP), for binding of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) in the complex. Based on the 3D structure of the subcomplex of human (h) E3 with the di-domain (L3S1) of hBP, the amino acid residues (H348, D413, Y438, and R447) of hE3 for binding to hBP were substituted singly by alanine or other residues. These substitutions did not have large effects on hE3 activity when measured in its free form. However, when these hE3 mutants were reconstituted in the complex, the PDC activity was significantly reduced to 9% for Y438A, 20% for Y438H, and 18% for D413A. The binding of hE3 mutants with L3S1 determined by isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the binding affinities of the Y438A, Y438H, and D413A mutants to L3S1 were severely reduced (1019-, 607-, and 402-fold, respectively). Unlike wild-type hE3 the binding of the Y438A mutant to L3S1 was accompanied by an unfavorable enthalpy change and a large positive entropy change. These results indicate that hE3-Y438 and hE3-D413 play important roles in binding of hE3 to hBP.

  5. Gene silencing in phlebotomine sand flies: Xanthine dehydrogenase knock down by dsRNA microinjections.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Mauricio R; Alexander, Bruce; Bates, Paul A; Dillon, Rod J

    2008-06-01

    Lutzomyia longipalpis are vectors of medically important visceral leishmaniasis in South America. Blood-fed adult females digest large amounts of protein, and xanthine dehydrogenase is thought to be a key enzyme involved in protein catabolism through the production of urate. Large amounts of heme are also released during digestion with potentially damaging consequences, as heme can generate oxygen radicals that damage lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. However, urate is an antioxidant that may prevent such oxidative damage produced by heme. We investigated xanthine dehydrogenase by developing the RNAi technique for sand flies and used this technique to knock down the Lu. longipalpis xanthine dehydrogenase gene to evaluate its role in survival of adult females after blood feeding. The gene sequence of Lu. longipalpis xanthine dehydrogenase is described together with expression in different life cycle stages and RNAi knock down. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR of xanthine dehydrogenase expression showed a significant increase in expression after bloodmeal ingestion. Microinjection of dsRNA via the thorax of 1-day-old adult female sand flies resulted in approximately 40% reduction of xanthine dehydrogenase gene expression in comparison to flies injected with a control dsRNA. A significant reduction of urate in the whole body and excretions of Lu. longipalpis was observed after dsRNA xanthine dehydrogenase microinjection and feeding 96h later on rabbit blood. Sand flies injected with XDH dsRNA also exhibit significantly reduced life span in comparison with the mock-injected group when fed on sucrose or when rabbit blood fed, showing that urate could be indeed an important free radical scavenger in Lu. longipalpis. The demonstration of xanthine dehydrogenase knock down by dsRNA microinjection, low mortality of microinjected insects and the successful bloodfeeding of injected insects demonstrated the utility of RNAi as a tool for functional analysis of genes in phlebotomine

  6. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.

    1996-10-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based upon the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with continuous cofactor recycle. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value commodity chemical.

  7. Oxidative Stress, Disrupted Energy Metabolism, and Altered Signaling Pathways in Glutaryl-CoA Dehydrogenase Knockout Mice: Potential Implications of Quinolinic Acid Toxicity in the Neuropathology of Glutaric Acidemia Type I.

    PubMed

    Seminotti, Bianca; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Ribeiro, Rafael Teixeira; Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Colín-González, Ana Laura; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Santamaría, Abel; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the effects of an acute intrastriatal QUIN administration on cellular redox and bioenergetics homeostasis, as well as on important signaling pathways in the striatum of wild-type (Gcdh (+/+) , WT) and knockout mice for glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (Gcdh (-/-) ) fed a high lysine (Lys, 4.7 %) chow. QUIN increased lactate release in both Gcdh (+/+) and Gcdh (-/-) mice and reduced the activities of complex IV and creatine kinase only in the striatum of Gcdh (-/-) mice. QUIN also induced lipid and protein oxidative damage and increased the generation of reactive nitrogen species, as well as the activities of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase 2, and glutathione-S-transferase in WT and Gcdh (-/-) animals. Furthermore, QUIN induced DCFH oxidation (reactive oxygen species production) and reduced GSH concentrations (antioxidant defenses) in Gcdh (-/-) . An early increase of Akt and phospho-Erk 1/2 in the cytosol and Nrf2 in the nucleus was also observed, as well as a decrease of cytosolic Keap1caused by QUIN, indicating activation of the Nrf2 pathway mediated by Akt and phospho-Erk 1/2, possibly as a compensatory protective mechanism against the ongoing QUIN-induced toxicity. Finally, QUIN increased NF-κB and diminished IκBα expression, evidencing a pro-inflammatory response. Our data show a disruption of energy and redox homeostasis associated to inflammation induced by QUIN in the striatum of Gcdh (-/-) mice submitted to a high Lys diet. Therefore, it is presumed that QUIN may possibly contribute to the pathophysiology of striatal degeneration in children with glutaric aciduria type I during inflammatory processes triggered by infections or vaccinations.

  8. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency in children with non-ketotic hypoglycemia and low carnitine levels.

    PubMed

    Stanley, C A; Hale, D E; Coates, P M; Hall, C L; Corkey, B E; Yang, W; Kelley, R I; Gonzales, E L; Williamson, J R; Baker, L

    1983-11-01

    Three children in two families presented in early childhood with episodes of illness associated with fasting which resembled Reye's syndrome: coma, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and fatty liver. One child died with cerebral edema during an episode. Clinical studies revealed an absence of ketosis on fasting (plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate less than 0.4 mmole/liter) despite elevated levels of free fatty acids (2.6-4.2 mmole/liter) which suggested that hepatic fatty acid oxidation was impaired. Urinary dicarboxylic acids were elevated during illness or fasting. Total carnitine levels were low in plasma (18-25 mumole/liter), liver (200-500 nmole/g), and muscle (500-800 nmole/g); however, treatment with L-carnitine failed to correct the defect in ketogenesis. Studies on ketone production from fatty acid substrates by liver tissue in vitro showed normal rates from short-chain fatty acids, but very low rates from all medium and long-chain fatty acid substrates. These results suggested that the defect was in the mid-portion of the intramitochondrial beta-oxidation pathway at the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase step. A new assay for the electron transfer flavoprotein-linked acyl-CoA dehydrogenases was used to test this hypothesis. This assay follows the decrease in electron transfer flavoprotein fluorescence as it is reduced by acyl-CoA-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase complex. Results with octanoyl-CoA as substrate indicated that patients had less than 2.5% normal activity of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. The activities of short-chain and isovaleryl acyl-CoA dehydrogenases were normal; the activity of long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was one-third normal. These results define a previously unrecognized inherited metabolic disorder of fatty acid oxidation due to deficiency of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... conversion is essential to begin the series of chemical reactions that produce energy for cells. The pyruvate dehydrogenase ... E3, each of which performs part of the chemical reaction that converts pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. In addition, ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skin on the palms and soles (hand-foot syndrome); shortness of breath; and hair loss may also ... dehydrogenase deficiency , with its early-onset neurological symptoms, is a rare disorder. Its prevalence is ...

  11. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Waitkus, Matthew S.; Diplas, Bill H.; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg132 of IDH1 and Arg172 of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy. PMID:26188014

  12. Often Ignored Facts about the Control of the 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strumilo, Slawomir

    2005-01-01

    Information about the control of the activity of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC), a key enzyme in the citric acid cycle, is not well covered in the biochemical education literature, especially as it concerns the allosteric regulation of OGDHC by adenine nucleotide and ortophosphate. From experimental work published during the last…

  13. Threonine-Insensitive Homoserine Dehydrogenase From Soybean: Genomic Organization, Kinetic Mechanism, and In vivo Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartate kinase (AK) and homoserine dehydrogenase (HSD) functions as key regulatory enzymes at branch points in the aspartate amino acid pathway and are feedback inhibited by threonine. In plants, the biochemical properties of AK and bifunctional AK-HSD enzymes have been characterized, but the mol...

  14. Molecular mimicry in primary biliary cirrhosis. Evidence for biliary epithelial expression of a molecule cross-reactive with pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Water, J; Turchany, J; Leung, P S; Lake, J; Munoz, S; Surh, C D; Coppel, R; Ansari, A; Nakanuma, Y; Gershwin, M E

    1993-01-01

    Sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) react with enzymes of the 2-oxo dehydrogenase pathways, particularly PDC-E2. These enzymes are present in all nucleated cells, yet autoimmune damage is confined to biliary epithelial cells. Using a panel of eight mouse monoclonal antibodies and a human combinatorial antibody specific for PDC-E2, we examined by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy sections of liver from patients with PBC, progressive sclerosing cholangitis, and hepatocarcinoma. The monoclonal antibodies gave typical mitochondrial immunofluorescence on biliary epithelium and on hepatocytes from patients with either PBC, progressive sclerosing cholangitis, or hepatocarcinoma. However, one of eight mouse monoclonal antibodies (C355.1) and the human combinatorial antibody reacted with great intensity and specificity with the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells from patients with PBC. Simultaneous examination of these sections with an antiisotype reagent for human IgA revealed high IgA staining in the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells in patients with PBC. IgG and IgA antibodies to PDC-E2 were detected in the bile of patients with PBC but not normal controls. We believe that this data may be interpreted as indicating that a molecule cross-reactive with PDC-E2 is expressed at high levels in the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells in PBC. Images PMID:8514873

  15. Molecular mimicry in primary biliary cirrhosis. Evidence for biliary epithelial expression of a molecule cross-reactive with pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2.

    PubMed

    Van de Water, J; Turchany, J; Leung, P S; Lake, J; Munoz, S; Surh, C D; Coppel, R; Ansari, A; Nakanuma, Y; Gershwin, M E

    1993-06-01

    Sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) react with enzymes of the 2-oxo dehydrogenase pathways, particularly PDC-E2. These enzymes are present in all nucleated cells, yet autoimmune damage is confined to biliary epithelial cells. Using a panel of eight mouse monoclonal antibodies and a human combinatorial antibody specific for PDC-E2, we examined by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy sections of liver from patients with PBC, progressive sclerosing cholangitis, and hepatocarcinoma. The monoclonal antibodies gave typical mitochondrial immunofluorescence on biliary epithelium and on hepatocytes from patients with either PBC, progressive sclerosing cholangitis, or hepatocarcinoma. However, one of eight mouse monoclonal antibodies (C355.1) and the human combinatorial antibody reacted with great intensity and specificity with the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells from patients with PBC. Simultaneous examination of these sections with an antiisotype reagent for human IgA revealed high IgA staining in the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells in patients with PBC. IgG and IgA antibodies to PDC-E2 were detected in the bile of patients with PBC but not normal controls. We believe that this data may be interpreted as indicating that a molecule cross-reactive with PDC-E2 is expressed at high levels in the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells in PBC.

  16. Structural Studies of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvate in the presence of Mg(2+) and thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) followed by the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The three-dimensional structure of human E1 is elucidated using the methods of macromolecular X-ray crystallography. The structure is an alpha, alpha', beta and beta' tetramer with the protein units being in the tetrahedral arrangement. Each 361-residue alpha-subunit and 329-residue beta-subunit is composed of a beta-sheet core surrounded by alpha-helical domains. Each subunit is in extensive contact with all the three subunits involving TPP and magnesium cofactors, and potassium ions. The two binding sites for TPP are at the alpha-beta' and alpha'-beta interfaces, each involving a magnesium ion and Phe6l, His63, Tyr89, and Met200 from the alpha-subunit (or alpha'-subunit), and Met81 Phe85, His128 from the beta-subunit (or beta'-subunit). K+ ions are nestled between two beta-sheets and the end of an alpha-helix in each beta-subunit, where they are coordinated by four carbonyl oxygen groups from Ile12, Ala160, Asp163, and Asnl65, and a water molecule. The catalytic C2 carbon of thiazolium ring in this structure forms a 3.2 A contact with a water molecule involved in a series of H-bonds with other water molecules, and indirectly with amino acids including those involved in the catalysis and regulation of the enzyme.

  17. Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase Structure and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) alcohol dehydrogenase I (ADH1) is the constitutive enzyme that reduces acetaldehyde to ethanol during the fermentation of glucose. ADH1 is a homotetramer of subunits with 347 amino acid residues. A structure for ADH1 was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.4 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains four different subunits, arranged as similar dimers named AB and CD. The unit cell contains two different tetramers made up of “back-to-back” dimers, AB:AB and CD:CD. The A and C subunits in each dimer are structurally similar, with a closed conformation, bound coenzyme, and the oxygen of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol ligated to the catalytic zinc in the classical tetrahedral coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, and His-66. In contrast, the B and D subunits have an open conformation with no bound coenzyme, and the catalytic zinc has an alternative, inverted coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, His-66, and the carboxylate of Glu-67. The asymmetry in the dimeric subunits of the tetramer provides two structures that appear to be relevant for the catalytic mechanism. The alternative coordination of the zinc may represent an intermediate in the mechanism of displacement of the zinc-bound water with alcohol or aldehyde substrates. Substitution of Glu-67 with Gln-67 decreases the catalytic efficiency by 100-fold. Previous studies of structural modeling, evolutionary relationships, substrate specificity, chemical modification, and site-directed mutagenesis are interpreted more fully with the three-dimensional structure. PMID:25157460

  18. Regulation of heart muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.; Denton, Richard M.

    1974-01-01

    1. The activity of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase was assayed by the incorporation of [32P]phosphate from [γ-32P]ATP into the dehydrogenase complex. There was a very close correlation between this incorporation and the loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity with all preparations studied. 2. Nucleoside triphosphates other than ATP (at 100μm) and cyclic 3′:5′-nucleotides (at 10μm) had no significant effect on kinase activity. 3. The Km for thiamin pyrophosphate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 0.76μm. Sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate, ADP and GTP were competitive inhibitors against thiamin pyrophosphate in the dehydrogenase reaction. 4. The Km for ATP of the intrinsic kinase assayed in three preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase was in the range 13.9–25.4μm. Inhibition by ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate was predominantly competitive, but there was nevertheless a definite non-competitive element. Thiamin pyrophosphate and sodium pyrophosphate were uncompetitive inhibitors against ATP. It is suggested that ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate inhibit the kinase mainly by binding to the ATP site and that the adenosine moiety may be involved in this binding. It is suggested that thiamin pyrophosphate, sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate and ADP may inhibit the kinase by binding through pyrophosphate or imidodiphosphate moieties at some site other than the ATP site. It is not known whether this is the coenzyme-binding site in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction. 5. The Km for pyruvate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 35.5μm. 2-Oxobutyrate and 3-hydroxypyruvate but not glyoxylate were also substrates; all three compounds inhibited pyruvate oxidation. 6. In preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase free of thiamin pyrophosphate, pyruvate inhibited the kinase reaction at all concentrations in the range 25–500μm. The inhibition was uncompetitive. In the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate

  19. Structural organization of the human sorbitol dehydrogenase gene (SORD)

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, T.; Carper, D.; Popescu, N.C.

    1995-03-01

    The primary structure of human sorbitol dehydrogenase (SORD) was determined by cDNA and genomic cloning. The nucleotide sequence of the mRNA covers 2471 bp including an open reading frame that yields a protein of 356 amino acid residues. The gene structure of SORD spans approximatley 30 kb divided into 9 exons and 8 introns. The gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.1 by in situ hybridization. Two transcription initiation sites were detected. Three Sp1 sites and a repetitive sequence (CAAA){sub 5} were observed in the 5{prime} noncoding region; no classical TATAA or CCAAT elements were found. The related alcohol dehydrogenases and {zeta}-crystallin have the same gene organization split by 8 introns, but no splice points coincide between SORD and these gene types. The deduced amino acid sequence of the SORD structure differs at a few positions from the directly determined protein sequence, suggesting allelic forms of the enzyme. High levels of SORD transcripts were observed in lens and kidney, as judged from Northern blot analysis. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Characterization of succinate dehydrogenase and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, S; Panten, U

    1983-12-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase activities in homogenates of rat and ob/ob mouse pancreatic islets were only 13% of the activities in homogenates of liver and were also several times lower than in homogenates of pancreatic acinar tissue. This indicates that the content of mitochondria in pancreatic islet cells is very low. The very low activity of succinate dehydrogenase is in agreement with the low mitochondrial volume in the cytoplasmic ground substance of pancreatic islet cells as observed in morphometric studies. This may represent the poor equipment of pancreatic islet cells with electron transport chains and thus provide a regulatory role for the generation of reducing equivalents and chemical energy for the regulation of insulin secretion. The activities of succinate dehydrogenase in tissue homogenates of pancreatic islets, pancreatic acinar tissue, and liver were significantly inhibited by malonate and diazoxide but not by glucose, mannoheptulose, streptozotocin, or verapamil. Tolbutamide inhibited only pancreatic islet succinate dehydrogenase significantly, providing evidence for a different behavior of pancreatic islet cell mitochondria. Therefore diazoxide and tolbutamide may affect pancreatic islet function through their effects on succinate dehydrogenase activity. The activities of alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in homogenates of pancreatic islets and liver from rats and ob/ob mice were in the same range, while activities in homogenates of pancreatic acinar tissue were lower. None of the test agents affected alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase activity. Thus the results provide no support for the recent contention that alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase activity may be critical for the regulation of insulin secretion.

  1. Monoterpene metabolism. Cloning, expression, and characterization of (-)-isopiperitenol/(-)-carveol dehydrogenase of peppermint and spearmint.

    PubMed

    Ringer, Kerry L; Davis, Edward M; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-03-01

    The essential oils of peppermint (Mentha x piperita) and spearmint (Mentha spicata) are distinguished by the oxygenation position on the p-menthane ring of the constitutive monoterpenes that is conferred by two regiospecific cytochrome P450 limonene-3- and limonene-6-hydroxylases. Following hydroxylation of limonene, an apparently similar dehydrogenase oxidizes (-)-trans-isopiperitenol to (-)-isopiperitenone in peppermint and (-)-trans-carveol to (-)-carvone in spearmint. Random sequencing of a peppermint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library revealed a large number of clones that specified redox-type enzymes, including dehydrogenases. Full-length dehydrogenase clones were screened by functional expression in Escherichia coli using a recently developed in situ assay. A single full-length acquisition encoding (-)-trans-isopiperitenol dehydrogenase (ISPD) was isolated. The (-)-ISPD cDNA has an open reading frame of 795 bp that encodes a 265-residue enzyme with a calculated molecular mass of 27,191. Nondegenerate primers were designed based on the (-)-trans-ISPD cDNA sequence and employed to screen a spearmint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library from which a 5'-truncated cDNA encoding the spearmint homolog, (-)-trans-carveol-dehydrogenase, was isolated. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification and RACE were used to acquire the remaining 5'-sequence from RNA isolated from oil gland secretory cells of spearmint leaf. The full-length spearmint dehydrogenase shares >99% amino acid identity with its peppermint homolog and both dehydrogenases are capable of utilizing (-)-trans-isopiperitenol and (-)-trans-carveol. These isopiperitenol/carveol dehydrogenases are members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and are related to other plant short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases involved in secondary metabolism (lignan biosynthesis), stress responses, and phytosteroid biosynthesis, but they are quite dissimilar (approximately 13% identity) to the monoterpene

  2. The conserved Lysine69 residue plays a catalytic role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The shikimate pathway is an attractive target for the development of antitubercular agents because it is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, but absent in humans. M. tuberculosis aroE-encoded shikimate dehydrogenase catalyzes the forth reaction in the shikimate pathway. Structural and functional studies indicate that Lysine69 may be involved in catalysis and/or substrate binding in M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Investigation of the kinetic properties of mutant enzymes can bring important insights about the role of amino acid residues for M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Findings We have performed site-directed mutagenesis, steady-state kinetics, equilibrium binding measurements and molecular modeling for both the wild-type M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase and the K69A mutant enzymes. The apparent steady-state kinetic parameters for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase were determined; the catalytic constant value for the wild-type enzyme (50 s-1) is 68-fold larger than that for the mutant K69A (0.73 s-1). There was a modest increase in the Michaelis-Menten constant for DHS (K69A = 76 μM; wild-type = 29 μM) and NADPH (K69A = 30 μM; wild-type = 11 μM). The equilibrium dissociation constants for wild-type and K69A mutant enzymes are 32 (± 4) μM and 134 (± 21), respectively. Conclusion Our results show that the residue Lysine69 plays a catalytic role and is not involved in substrate binding for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. These efforts on M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase catalytic mechanism determination should help the rational design of specific inhibitors, aiming at the development of antitubercular drugs. PMID:19917104

  3. Tandem orientation of duplicated xanthine dehydrogenase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana: differential gene expression and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Hesberg, Christine; Hänsch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R; Bittner, Florian

    2004-04-02

    Xanthine dehydrogenase from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana was analyzed on molecular and biochemical levels. Whereas most other organisms appear to own only one gene for xanthine dehydrogenase A. thaliana possesses two genes in tandem orientation spaced by 704 base pairs. The cDNAs as well as the proteins AtXDH1 and AtXDH2 share an overall identity of 93% and show high homologies to xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms. Whereas AtXDH2 mRNA is expressed constitutively, alterations of AtXDH1 transcript levels were observed at various stresses like drought, salinity, cold, and natural senescence, but also after abscisic acid treatment. Transcript alteration did not mandatorily result in changes of xanthine dehydrogenase activities. Whereas salt treatment had no effect on xanthine dehydrogenase activities, cold stress caused a decrease, but desiccation and senescence caused a strong increase of activities in leaves. Because AtXDH1 presumably is the more important isoenzyme in A. thaliana it was expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified, and used for biochemical studies. AtXDH1 protein is a homodimer of about 300 kDa consisting of identical subunits of 150 kDa. Like xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms AtXDH1 uses hypoxanthine and xanthine as main substrates and is strongly inhibited by allopurinol. AtXDH1 could be activated by the purified molybdenum cofactor sulfurase ABA3 that converts inactive desulfo-into active sulfoenzymes. Finally it was found that AtXDH1 is a strict dehydrogenase and not an oxidase, but is able to produce superoxide radicals indicating that besides purine catabolism it might also be involved in response to various stresses that require reactive oxygen species.

  4. Over-Expression, Purification and Crystallization of Human Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Y. S.; Ciszak, Ewa; Patel, Mulchand

    2000-01-01

    Dehydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3; dihydrolipoan-tide:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.8.1.4) is a common catalytic component found in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, and branched-chain cc-keto acid dehydrogenase complex. E3 is also a component (referred to as L protein) of the glycine cleavage system in bacterial metabolism (2). Active E3 forms a homodimer with four distinctive subdomain structures (FAD binding, NAD+ binding, central and interface domains) with non-covalently but tightly bound FAD in the holoenzyme. Deduced amino acids from cloned full-length human E3 gene showed a total of 509 amino acids with a leader sequence (N-terminal 35 amino acids) that is excised (mature form) during transportation of expressed E3 into mitochondria membrane. So far, three-dimensional structure of human E3 has not been reported. Our effort to achieve the elucidation of the X-ray crystal structure of human E3 will be presented. Recombinant pPROEX-1 expression vector (from GIBCO BRL Life Technologies) having the human E3 gene without leader sequence was constructed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and subsequent ligation, and cloned in E.coli XL1-Blue by transformation. Since pPROEX-1 vector has an internal His-tag (six histidine peptide) located at the upstream region of a multicloning site, one-step affinity purification of E3 using nickelnitriloacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose resin, which has a strong affinity to His-tag, was feasible. Also a seven-amino-acid spacer peptide and a recombinant tobacco etch virus protease recognition site (seven amino acids peptide) found between His-tag and first amino acid of expressed E3 facilitated the cleavage of His-tag from E3 after the affinity purification. By IPTG induction, ca. 15 mg of human E3 (mature form) was obtained from 1L LB culture with overnight incubation at 25C. Over 98% of purity of E3 from one-step Ni-NTA agarose affinity purification was confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis. For

  5. Biofuel cell anode: NAD +/glucose dehydrogenase-coimmobilized ketjenblack electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, T.; Oike, M.; Yoshino, S.; Yatagawa, Y.; Haneda, K.; Kaji, H.; Nishizawa, M.

    2009-09-01

    We have studied the coimmobilization of glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and its cofactor, oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD +), on a ketjenblack (KB) electrode as a step toward a biofuel cell anode that works without mediators. A KB electrode was first treated with a sulfuric acid/nitric acid/water mixture to lower the overvoltage for NADH oxidation, and was next chemically modified with NAD + and GDH. The improved GDH/NAD +/KB electrode is found to oxidize glucose around 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. A biofuel cell constructed with a bilirubin oxidase-immobilized KB cathode showed a maximum power density of 52 μW/cm 2 at 0.3 V.

  6. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  7. Sorbitol dehydrogenase: structure, function and ligand design.

    PubMed

    El-Kabbani, O; Darmanin, C; Chung, R P-T

    2004-02-01

    Sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), a member of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase protein family and the second enzyme of the polyol pathway of glucose metabolism, converts sorbitol to fructose strictly using NAD(+) as coenzyme. SDH is expressed almost ubiquitously in all mammalian tissues. The enzyme has attracted considerable interest due to its implication in the development of diabetic complications and thus its tertiary structure may facilitate the development of drugs for the treatment of diabetes sufferers. Modelling studies suggest that SDH is structurally homologous to mammalian alcohol dehydrogenase with respect to conserved zinc binding motif and a hydrophobic substrate-binding pocket. Recently, the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of a mammalian SDH was solved, and it was found that while the overall 3-D structures of SDH and alcohol dehydrogenase are similar, the zinc coordination in the active sites of the two enzymes is different. The available structural and biochemical information of SDH are currently being utilized in a structure-based approach to develop drugs for the treatment or prevention of the complications of diabetes. This review provides an overview of the recent advances in the structure, function and drug development fields of sorbitol dehydrogenase.

  8. Molecular basis of maple syrup urine disease: novel mutations at the E1 alpha locus that impair E1(alpha 2 beta 2) assembly or decrease steady-state E1 alpha mRNA levels of branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, J. L.; Fisher, C. R.; Cox, R. P.; Chuang, D. T.

    1994-01-01

    We report the occurrence of three novel mutations in the E1 alpha (BCKDHA) locus of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKAD) complex that cause maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). An 8-bp deletion in exon 7 is present in one allele of a compound-heterozygous patient (GM-649). A single C nucleotide insertion in exon 2 occurs in one allele of an intermediate-MSUD patient (Lo). The second allele of patient Lo carries an A-to-G transition in exon 9 of the E1 alpha gene. This missense mutation changes Tyr-368 to Cys (Y368C) in the E1 alpha subunit. Both the 8-bp deletion and the single C insertion generate a downstream nonsense codon. Both mutations appear to be associated with a low abundance of the mutant E1 alpha mRNA, as determined by allele-specific oligonucleotide probing. Transfection studies strongly suggest that the Y368C substitution in the E1 alpha subunit impairs its proper assembly with the normal E1 beta. Unassembled as well as misassembled E1 alpha and E1 beta subunits are degraded in the cell. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8037208

  9. Crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of human pyruvate dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, E.; Korotchkina, L. G.; Hong, Y. S.; Joachimiak, A.; Patel, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) is a component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The enzyme catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvic acid and the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. E1 is an alpha(2)beta(2) tetramer ( approximately 154 kDa). Crystals of this recombinant enzyme have been grown in polyethylene glycol 3350 using a vapor-diffusion method at 295 K. The crystals are characterized as orthorhombic, space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 64.2, b = 126.9, c = 190.2 A. Crystals diffracted to a minimum d spacing of 2.5 A. The asymmetric unit contains one alpha(2)beta(2) tetrameric E1 assembly; self-rotation function analysis showed a pseudo-twofold symmetry relating the two alphabeta dimers.

  10. Selected dehydrogenases in Yarrowia lipolytica JMY 861: their role in the synthesis of flavor compounds.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Marya; St-Louis, Richard; Husson, Florence; Kermasha, Selim

    2016-09-01

    The presence of selected dehydrogenases, including alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-YL) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-YL), in Yarrowia lipolytica JMY 861, and their potential role in flavor synthesis were investigated. The experimental findings showed that using reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) as cofactor, the ADH-YL activity in vitro was 6-fold higher than that with reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH); however, under the experimental conditions used in this study, an ALDH-YL activity was not detected. The in situ hexanal reduction reaction was found to be instantaneous; however, when the yeast cells suspension was diluted 150 times, the initial relative hexanal concentration was increased by 84.1%. The chromatographic analyses indicated the conversion, in situ, of linoleic acid hydroperoxides (HPODs) into volatile C6-compounds after 60 min of HPODs addition to the yeast cells suspension.

  11. Isolation and biochemical characterization of a glucose dehydrogenase from a hay infusion metagenome.

    PubMed

    Basner, Alexander; Antranikian, Garabed

    2014-01-01

    Glucose hydrolyzing enzymes are essential to determine blood glucose level. A high-throughput screening approach was established to identify NAD(P)-dependent glucose dehydrogenases for the application in test stripes and the respective blood glucose meters. In the current report a glucose hydrolyzing enzyme, derived from a metagenomic library by expressing recombinant DNA fragments isolated from hay infusion, was characterized. The recombinant clone showing activity on glucose as substrate exhibited an open reading frame of 987 bp encoding for a peptide of 328 amino acids. The isolated enzyme showed typical sequence motifs of short-chain-dehydrogenases using NAD(P) as a co-factor and had a sequence similarity between 33 and 35% to characterized glucose dehydrogenases from different Bacillus species. The identified glucose dehydrogenase gene was expressed in E. coli, purified and subsequently characterized. The enzyme, belonging to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases, shows a broad substrate range with a high affinity to glucose, xylose and glucose-6-phosphate. Due to its ability to be strongly associated with its cofactor NAD(P), the enzyme is able to directly transfer electrons from glucose oxidation to external electron acceptors by regenerating the cofactor while being still associated to the protein.

  12. Isolation and Biochemical Characterization of a Glucose Dehydrogenase from a Hay Infusion Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Basner, Alexander; Antranikian, Garabed

    2014-01-01

    Glucose hydrolyzing enzymes are essential to determine blood glucose level. A high-throughput screening approach was established to identify NAD(P)-dependent glucose dehydrogenases for the application in test stripes and the respective blood glucose meters. In the current report a glucose hydrolyzing enzyme, derived from a metagenomic library by expressing recombinant DNA fragments isolated from hay infusion, was characterized. The recombinant clone showing activity on glucose as substrate exhibited an open reading frame of 987 bp encoding for a peptide of 328 amino acids. The isolated enzyme showed typical sequence motifs of short-chain-dehydrogenases using NAD(P) as a co-factor and had a sequence similarity between 33 and 35% to characterized glucose dehydrogenases from different Bacillus species. The identified glucose dehydrogenase gene was expressed in E. coli, purified and subsequently characterized. The enzyme, belonging to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases, shows a broad substrate range with a high affinity to glucose, xylose and glucose-6-phosphate. Due to its ability to be strongly associated with its cofactor NAD(P), the enzyme is able to directly transfer electrons from glucose oxidation to external electron acceptors by regenerating the cofactor while being still associated to the protein. PMID:24454935

  13. Biochemical Characterization of Putative Adenylate Dimethylallyltransferase and Cytokinin Dehydrogenase from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Frébortová, Jitka; Greplová, Marta; Seidl, Michael F.; Heyl, Alexander; Frébort, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins, a class of phytohormones, are adenine derivatives common to many different organisms. In plants, these play a crucial role as regulators of plant development and the reaction to abiotic and biotic stress. Key enzymes in the cytokinin synthesis and degradation in modern land plants are the isopentyl transferases and the cytokinin dehydrogenases, respectively. Their encoding genes have been probably introduced into the plant lineage during the primary endosymbiosis. To shed light on the evolution of these proteins, the genes homologous to plant adenylate isopentenyl transferase and cytokinin dehydrogenase were amplified from the genomic DNA of cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The putative isopentenyl transferase was shown to be functional in a biochemical assay. In contrast, no enzymatic activity was detected for the putative cytokinin dehydrogenase, even though the principal domains necessary for its function are present. Several mutant variants, in which conserved amino acids in land plant cytokinin dehydrogenases had been restored, were inactive. A combination of experimental data with phylogenetic analysis indicates that adenylate-type isopentenyl transferases might have evolved several times independently. While the Nostoc genome contains a gene coding for protein with characteristics of cytokinin dehydrogenase, the organism is not able to break down cytokinins in the way shown for land plants. PMID:26376297

  14. Structural Insights into l-Tryptophan Dehydrogenase from a Photoautotrophic Cyanobacterium, Nostoc punctiforme.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Taisuke; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Kitamura, Megumi; Hakumai, Yuichi; Fukui, Kenji; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Ashiuchi, Makoto; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2017-01-15

    l-Tryptophan dehydrogenase from Nostoc punctiforme NIES-2108 (NpTrpDH), despite exhibiting high amino acid sequence identity (>30%)/homology (>50%) with NAD(P)(+)-dependent l-Glu/l-Leu/l-Phe/l-Val dehydrogenases, exclusively catalyzes reversible oxidative deamination of l-Trp to 3-indolepyruvate in the presence of NAD(+) Here, we determined the crystal structure of the apo form of NpTrpDH. The structure of the NpTrpDH monomer, which exhibited high similarity to that of l-Glu/l-Leu/l-Phe dehydrogenases, consisted of a substrate-binding domain (domain I, residues 3 to 133 and 328 to 343) and an NAD(+)/NADH-binding domain (domain II, residues 142 to 327) separated by a deep cleft. The apo-NpTrpDH existed in an open conformation, where domains I and II were apart from each other. The subunits dimerized themselves mainly through interactions between amino acid residues around the β-1 strand of each subunit, as was observed in the case of l-Phe dehydrogenase. The binding site for the substrate l-Trp was predicted by a molecular docking simulation and validated by site-directed mutagenesis. Several hydrophobic residues, which were located in the active site of NpTrpDH and possibly interacted with the side chain of the substrate l-Trp, were arranged similarly to that found in l-Leu/l-Phe dehydrogenases but fairly different from that of an l-Glu dehydrogenase. Our crystal structure revealed that Met-40, Ala-69, Ile-74, Ile-110, Leu-288, Ile-289, and Tyr-292 formed a hydrophobic cluster around the active site. The results of the site-directed mutagenesis experiments suggested that the hydrophobic cluster plays critical roles in protein folding, l-Trp recognition, and catalysis. Our results provide critical information for further characterization and engineering of this enzyme.

  15. Fundamental molecular differences between alcohol dehydrogenase classes.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, O; Atrian, S; Luque, T; Hjelmqvist, L; Gonzàlez-Duarte, R; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    Two types of alcohol dehydrogenase in separate protein families are the "medium-chain" zinc enzymes (including the classical liver and yeast forms) and the "short-chain" enzymes (including the insect form). Although the medium-chain family has been characterized in prokaryotes and many eukaryotes (fungi, plants, cephalopods, and vertebrates), insects have seemed to possess only the short-chain enzyme. We have now also characterized a medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase in Drosophila. The enzyme is identical to insect octanol dehydrogenase. It is a typical class III alcohol dehydrogenase, similar to the corresponding human form (70% residue identity), with mostly the same residues involved in substrate and coenzyme interactions. Changes that do occur are conservative, but Phe-51 is of functional interest in relation to decreased coenzyme binding and increased overall activity. Extra residues versus the human enzyme near position 250 affect the coenzyme-binding domain. Enzymatic properties are similar--i.e., very low activity toward ethanol (Km beyond measurement) and high selectivity for formaldehyde/glutathione (S-hydroxymethylglutathione; kcat/Km = 160,000 min-1.mM-1). Between the present class III and the ethanol-active class I enzymes, however, patterns of variability differ greatly, highlighting fundamentally separate molecular properties of these two alcohol dehydrogenases, with class III resembling enzymes in general and class I showing high variation. The gene coding for the Drosophila class III enzyme produces an mRNA of about 1.36 kb that is present at all developmental stages of the fly, compatible with the constitutive nature of the vertebrate enzyme. Taken together, the results bridge a previously apparent gap in the distribution of medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenases and establish a strictly conserved class III enzyme, consistent with an important role for this enzyme in cellular metabolism. Images PMID:8197167

  16. Inhibition of etoposide-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity in L1210 cells by dehydrogenase inhibitors and other agents.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, A J; Glisson, B S; Hande, K R; Ross, W E

    1984-02-01

    The mechanism of action of 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin-9-(4,6-O-ethylidene-beta-D-glucopyra noside) (VP-16), an important antitumor agent, is unclear. There is evidence that DNA may be the target of action because VP-16 causes single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA and produces cytotoxicity over a similar dose range. We have hypothesized that an enzyme system, such as dehydrogenase, catalyzes an oxidation-reduction reaction involving the pendant phenolic group which forms an active metabolite that causes the DNA damage and cytotoxicity. To test our hypothesis, we investigated the effect of disulfiram, an aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor, and its metabolite, diethyldithiocarbamate, on VP-16-induced DNA damage in L1210 cells. Using the alkaline elution technique to assay DNA damage, we found that disulfiram and diethyldithiocerbamate inhibited VP-16-induced single-strand breaks. Both compounds were also capable of significantly reducing VP-16-induced cytotoxicity. Oxalic acid, pyrophosphate, and malonic acid, competitive inhibitors of succinate dehydrogenase, and the naturally occurring dehydrogenase substrates, succinic acid, beta-glycerophosphate, and isocitric acid, also blocked the effects of VP-16. Free-radical scavengers were also studied. While sodium benzoate was particularly effective in preventing drug-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity, a number of other scavengers were not. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that VP-16 is activated by an enzyme such as a dehydrogenase which transforms it into an active intermediate resulting in DNA damage and, consequently, cell death.

  17. A Novel 3-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase That Regulates Reproductive Development and Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Wollam, Joshua; Magner, Daniel B.; Magomedova, Lilia; Rass, Elisabeth; Shen, Yidong; Rottiers, Veerle; Habermann, Bianca; Cummins, Carolyn L.; Antebi, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous small molecule metabolites that regulate animal longevity are emerging as a novel means to influence health and life span. In C. elegans, bile acid-like steroids called the dafachronic acids (DAs) regulate developmental timing and longevity through the conserved nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12, a homolog of mammalian sterol-regulated receptors LXR and FXR. Using metabolic genetics, mass spectrometry, and biochemical approaches, we identify new activities in DA biosynthesis and characterize an evolutionarily conserved short chain dehydrogenase, DHS-16, as a novel 3-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Through regulation of DA production, DHS-16 controls DAF-12 activity governing longevity in response to signals from the gonad. Our elucidation of C. elegans bile acid biosynthetic pathways reveals the possibility of novel ligands as well as striking biochemical conservation to other animals, which could illuminate new targets for manipulating longevity in metazoans. PMID:22505847

  18. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems.

  19. 21 CFR 862.1565 - 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6 PGD) in serum and erythrocytes. Measurements of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase are used in the diagnosis and treatment of certain liver diseases (such as hepatitis) and anemias....

  20. Phenylbutyrate Therapy for Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency and Lactic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Rosa; Manco, Giuseppe; Lamantea, Eleonora; Nusco, Edoardo; Ferrante, Mariella I.; Sordino, Paolo; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Lee, Brendan; Zeviani, Massimo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is a build-up of lactic acid in the blood and tissues, which can be due to several inborn errors of metabolism as well as nongenetic conditions. Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. Phosphorylation of specific serine residues of the E1α subunit of PDHC by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) inactivates the enzyme, whereas dephosphorylation restores PDHC activity. We found that phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of PDK. Phenylbutyrate given to C57B6/L wild-type mice results in a significant increase in PDHC enzyme activity and a reduction of phosphorylated E1α in brain, muscle, and liver compared to saline-treated mice. By means of recombinant enzymes, we showed that phenylbutyrate prevents phosphorylation of E1α through binding and inhibition of PDK, providing a molecular explanation for the effect of phenylbutyrate on PDHC activity. Phenylbutyrate increases PDHC activity in fibroblasts from PDHC-deficient patients harboring various molecular defects and corrects the morphological, locomotor, and biochemical abnormalities in the noam631 zebrafish model of PDHC deficiency. In mice, phenylbutyrate prevents systemic lactic acidosis induced by partial hepatectomy. Because phenylbutyrate is already approved for human use in other diseases, the findings of this study have the potential to be rapidly translated for treatment of patients with PDHC deficiency and other forms of primary and secondary lactic acidosis. PMID:23467562

  1. alpha-Ketoglutarate dehydrogenase mutant of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, M J; Fraenkel, D G

    1979-01-01

    A mutant of Rhizobium meliloti selected as unable to grow on L-arabinose also failed to grow on acetate or pyruvate. It grew, but slower than the parental strain, on many other carbon sources. Assay showed it to lack alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (kgd) activity, and revertants of normal growth phenotype contained the activity again. Other enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and of the glyoxylate cycle were present in both mutant and parent strains. Enzymes of pyruvate metabolism were also assayed. L-Arabinose degradation in R. meliloti was found to differ from the known pathway in R. japonicum, since the former strain lacked 2-keto-o-deoxy-L-arabonate aldolase but contained alpha-ketoglutarate semialdehyde dehydrogenase; thus, it is likely that R. meliloti has the L-arabinose pathway leading to alpha-ketoglutarate rather than the one to glycolaldehyde and pyruvate. This finding accounts for the L-arabinose negativity of the mutant. Resting cells of the mutant were able to metabolize the three substrates which did not allow growth. PMID:762018

  2. [Interaction of succinate dehydrogenase and oxaloacetate].

    PubMed

    Kotliar, A B; Vinogradov, A D

    1984-04-01

    The equilibrium and rate constants for interaction of the reduced and oxidized membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.99.1) with oxaloacetate were determined. The 10-fold decrease in the oxaloacetate affinity for the reduced enzyme was shown to be due to the 10-fold increase of the enzyme-inhibitor complex dissociation rate, which occurs upon its reduction. The rate of dissociation induced by succinate is 10 times higher than that induced by malonate in the submitochondrial particles, being equal in the soluble enzyme preparations. The rates of dissociation induced by malonate excess, or by the enzyme irreversibly utilizing oxaloacetate (transaminase in the presence of glutamate) are also equal. The data obtained suggest that succinate dehydrogenase interaction with succinate and oxaloacetate results from the competition for a single dicarboxylate-specific site. In submitochondrial particles all succinate dehydrogenase molecules are in redox equilibrium provided for by endogenous ubiquinone. No electronic equilibrium between the individual enzyme molecules exists, when succinate dehydrogenase is solubilized.

  3. Characterization of uronate dehydrogenases catalysing the initial step in an oxidative pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pick, André; Schmid, Jochen; Sieber, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Uronate dehydrogenases catalyse the oxidation of uronic acids to aldaric acids, which represent ‘top value-added chemicals’ that have the potential to substitute petroleum-derived chemicals. The identification and annotation of three uronate dehydrogenases derived from Fulvimarina pelagi HTCC2506, Streptomyces viridochromogenes DSM 40736 and Oceanicola granulosus DSM 15982 via sequence analysis is described. Characterization and comparison with two known uronate dehydrogenases in regard to substrate spectrum, catalytic activity and pH as well as temperature dependence was performed. The catalytic efficiency was investigated in two different buffer systems; potassium phosphate and Tris-HCl. In addition to the typical and well available substrates glucuronate and galacturonate also mannuronate as part of many structural polysaccharides were tested. The uronate dehydrogenase of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Pseudomonas syringae showed catalytic dependency on the buffer system resulting in an increased Km especially for glucuronate in potassium phosphate compared with Tris-HCl buffer. Enzyme stability at 37°C of the different Udhs was in the order: P. syringae < S. viridochromogens < A. tumefaciens < F. pelagi < O. granulosus. All enzymes showed activity within a broad pH range from 7.0 to 9.5, only O. granulosus had a very narrow range around 7.0. PMID:25884328

  4. Dehydrogenase and Oxoreductase Activities of Porcine Placental 11Beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    dehydrogenase (IIB-HSD) were measured in tissue fragment cultures on day 75 of gestation. Dehydrogenase activity was over fivefold greater than oxoreductase...oxoreductase activities in porcine placentae under physiological conditions using placental explant culture and endogenous concentrations of coenzymes and...f!M range). In human placental tissue fragments at midterm and late pregnancy ( 12, 18) and in trophoblast cell cultures from term placentae ( 41

  5. Characterization of xylitol dehydrogenase from Debaryomyces hansenii

    SciTech Connect

    Girio, F.M.; Amaral-Collaco, M.T.; Pelica, F.

    1996-01-01

    The xylitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.9) from xylose-grown cells of Debaryomyces hansenii was partially purified in two chromatographic steps, and characterization studies were carried out in order to investigate the role of the xylitol dehydrogenase-catalyzed step in the regulation of D-xylose metabolism. The enzyme was most active at pH 9.0-9.5, and exhibited a broad polyol specificity. The Michaelis constants for xylitol and NAD{sup +} were 16.5 and 0.55 mM, respectively. Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} did not affect the enzyme activity. Conversely, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+} strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. It was concluded that NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase from D. hansenii has similarities with other xylose-fermenting yeasts in respect to optimal pH, substrate specificity, and K{sub m} value for xylitol, and therefore should be named L-iditol:NAD{sup +}-5-oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.14). The reason D. hansenii is a good xylitol producer is not because of its value of K for xylitol, which is low enough to assure its fast oxidation by NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase. However, a higher K{sub m} value of xylitol dehydrogenase for NAD{sup +} compared to the K{sub m} values of other xylose-fermenting yeasts may be responsible for the higher xylitol yields. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Properties of formate dehydrogenase in Methanobacterium formicicum

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, N.L.; Ferry, J.G.

    1982-04-01

    Soluble formate dehydrogenase from Methanobacterium formicicum was purified 71-fold with a yield of 35%. Purification was performed anaerobically in the presence of 10 mM sodium azide which stabilized the enzyme. The purified enzyme reduced, with formate, 50..mu..mol of methyl viologen per min per mg of protein and 8.2 ..mu..mol of coenzyme F/sub 420/ per min per mg of protein. The apparent K/sub m/ for 7,8-didemethyl-8-hydroxy-5-deazariboflavin, a hydrolytic derivative of coenzyme F/sub 420/, was 10-fold greater (63 ..mu..M) than for coenzyme F/sub 420/ (6 ..mu..M). The purified enzyme also reduced flavin mononucleotide (K/sub m/ = 13 ..mu..M) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (K/sub m/ = 25 ..mu..M) with formate, but did not reduce NAD/sup +/ or NADP/sup +/. The reduction of NADP/sup +/ with formate required formate dehydrogenase, coenzyme F/sub 420/, and coenzyme F/sub 420/:NADP/sup +/ oxidoreductase. The formate dehydrogenase had an optimal pH of 7.9 when assayed with the physiological electron acceptor coenzyme F/sub 420/. The optimal reaction rate occurred at 55/sup 0/C. The molecular weight was 288,000 as determined by gel filtration. The purified formate dehydrogenase was strongly inhibited by cyanide (K/sub i/ = 6 ..mu..M), azide (K/sub i/ = 39 ..mu..M),..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..-dipyridyl, and 1,10-phenanthroline. Denaturation of the purified formate dehydrogenase with sodium dodecyl sulfate under aerobic conditions revealed a fluorescent compound. Maximal excitation occurred at 385 nm, with minor peaks at 277 and 302 nm. Maximal fluorescence emission occurred at 455 nm.

  7. Regulation by retinoids of luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor, cholesterol side-chain cleavage cytochrome P-450, 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta (5-4)-isomerase and 17 alpha-hydroxylase/C17-20 lyase cytochrome P-450 messenger ribonucleic acid levels in the K9 mouse Leydig cell line.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, A; Rogier, E; Astraudo, C; Duquenne, C; Finaz, C

    1994-12-01

    Vitamin A is a potent regulator of testicular function. We have reported that retinol (R) and retinoic acid (RA) induced a down regulation of luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (LH/CG) binding sites in K9 Leydig cells. In the present study we evaluated the effect of R and RA on LH/CG receptors, cholesterol side-chain cleavage cytochrome P-450 (P-450 scc), 17 alpha-hydroxylase/C17-20 lyase (P-450 17 alpha) and 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta HSD) mRNA levels in K9 mouse Leydig cells. To validate K9 cells as a model for studying Leydig cell steroidogenesis at the molecular level, we first investigated the effect of hCG on mRNA levels of the steroidogenic enzymes. P-450 scc, 3 beta HSD and P-450 17 alpha were expressed constitutively. The addition of 10 ng/ml hCG enhanced mRNA levels for the three genes within 2 h. Maximal accumulation of P-450 scc, P-450 17 alpha and 3 beta HSD mRNA in treated cells represents a 2.5-, 8.5- and 4-fold increase over control values, respectively. P-450 17 alpha expression reached a maximum by 4 h and then declined rapidly to return to control value by 24 h. The pattern of LH/CG receptor mRNAs in K9 cells was very similar to that of MA10 Leydig cells and showed six transcripts of 1.1, 1.6, 1.9, 2.6, 4.2 and 7.0 kb. Treatment of cells with R or RA resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in all six species.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Aldehyde dehydrogenase is used by cancer cells for energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joon Hee; Lee, Seon-Hyeong; Hong, Dongwan; Lee, Jae-Seon; Ahn, Hee-Sung; Ahn, Ju-Hyun; Seong, Tae Wha; Lee, Chang-Hun; Jang, Hyonchol; Hong, Kyeong Man; Lee, Cheolju; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Soo-Youl

    2016-01-01

    We found that non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells express high levels of multiple aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) isoforms via an informatics analysis of metabolic enzymes in NSCLC and immunohistochemical staining of NSCLC clinical tumor samples. Using a multiple reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry analysis, we found that multiple ALDH isozymes were generally abundant in NSCLC cells compared with their levels in normal IMR-90 human lung cells. As a result of the catalytic reaction mediated by ALDH, NADH is produced as a by-product from the conversion of aldehyde to carboxylic acid. We hypothesized that the NADH produced by ALDH may be a reliable energy source for ATP production in NSCLC. This study revealed that NADH production by ALDH contributes significantly to ATP production in NSCLC. Furthermore, gossypol, a pan-ALDH inhibitor, markedly reduced the level of ATP. Gossypol combined with phenformin synergistically reduced the ATP levels, which efficiently induced cell death following cell cycle arrest. PMID:27885254

  9. Fabricating polystyrene fiber-dehydrogenase assemble as a functional biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    An, Hongjie; Jin, Bo; Dai, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Immobilization of the enzymes on nano-structured materials is a promising approach to enhance enzyme stabilization, activation and reusability. This study aimed to develop polystyrene fiber-enzyme assembles to catalyze model formaldehyde to methanol dehydrogenation reaction, which is an essential step for bioconversion of CO2 to a renewable bioenergy. We fabricated and modified electrospun polystyrene fibers, which showed high capability to immobilize dehydrogenase for the fiber-enzyme assembles. Results from evaluation of biochemical activities of the fiber-enzyme assemble showed that nitriation with the nitric/sulfuric acid ratio (v/v, 10:1) and silanization treatment delivered desirable enzyme activity and long-term storage stability, showing great promising toward future large-scale applications.

  10. Expanding the clinical spectrum of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaie, L.; Klomp, L. W. J.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M. E.; Spaapen, L. J. M.; Haagen, A. A. M.; Dorland, L.

    2010-01-01

    3-Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency is considered to be a rare cause of congenital microcephaly, infantile onset of intractable seizures and severe psychomotor retardation. Here, we report for the first time a very mild form of genetically confirmed 3-PGDH deficiency in two siblings with juvenile onset of absence seizures and mild developmental delay. Amino acid analysis showed serine values in CSF and plasma identical to what is observed in the severe infantile form. Both patients responded favourably to relatively low dosages of serine supplementation with cessation of seizures, normalisation of their EEG abnormalities and improvement of well-being and behaviour. These cases illustrate that 3-PGDH deficiency can present with mild symptoms and should be considered as a treatable disorder in the differential diagnosis of mild developmental delay and seizures. Synopsis: we present a novel mild phenotype in patients with 3-PGDH deficiency. PMID:21113737

  11. [Sorbitol-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Gene Polymorhism in Malus Mill. (Rosaceae)].

    PubMed

    Boris, K V; Kudryavtsev, A M; Kochieva, E Z

    2015-11-01

    The sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (S6PDH) sequences of six representatives of the genus Malus, which belong to five different taxonomic sections, were examined for the first time. The exon-intron structure and polymorphism of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of these genes was characterized. The intraspecific polymorphism of the S6PDH gene was assessed for the first time in 40 Russian and foreign apple (Malus domestica) cultivars. It was demonstrated that the interspecific polymorphism level of the S6PDH coding sequences in the studied. representatives of the genus Malus was 4%, and the intraspecific polymorphism level of M. domestica cultivars was very low, constituting 0.96%.

  12. 1-Heteroaryl-3-phenoxypropan-2-ones as inhibitors of cytosolic phospholipase A₂α and fatty acid amide hydrolase: Effect of the replacement of the ether oxygen with sulfur and nitrogen moieties on enzyme inhibition and metabolic stability.

    PubMed

    Sundermann, Tom; Fabian, Jörg; Hanekamp, Walburga; Lehr, Matthias

    2015-05-15

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are enzymes, which have emerged as attractive targets for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs. We recently reported that certain 3-phenoxy-substituted 1-heteroarylpropan-2-ones are inhibitors of cPLA2α and/or FAAH. Starting from 1-[2-oxo-3-(4-phenoxyphenoxy)propyl]indole-5-carboxylic acid (3) and 1-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)-3-(4-phenoxyphenoxy)propan-2-one (4), the effect of the replacement of the oxygen in position 3 of the propan-2-one scaffold by sulfur and nitrogen containing moieties on inhibition of cPLA2α and fatty acid amide hydrolase as well as on metabolic stability in rat liver S9 fractions was investigated. As a result of these structure-activity relationship studies it was found that the ether oxygen is of great importance for enzyme inhibitory potency. Replacement by sulfur led to an about 100-fold decrease of enzyme inhibition, nitrogen and substituted nitrogen atoms at this position even resulted in inactivity of the compounds. The effect of the structural variations performed on metabolic stability of the important ketone pharmacophore was partly different in the two series of compounds. While introduction of SO and SO2 significantly increased stability of the ketone against reduction in case of the indole-5-carboxylic acid 3, it had no effect in case of the benzotriazole 4. Further analysis of the metabolism of 3 and 4 in rat liver S9 fractions revealed that the major metabolite of 3 was the alcohol 53 formed by reduction of the keto group. In contrast, in case of 4 beside keto reduction an excessive hydroxylation of the terminal phenoxy group occurred leading to the dihydroxy compound 50. Experiments with enzyme inhibitors showed that the phenylhydroxylation of 4 was catalyzed by tranylcypromine sensitive cytochrome P450 isoforms, while the reduction of the ketone function of 3 and 4 was mainly caused by cytosolic short chain dehydrogenases

  13. Synthesis and bioactivity of some new N-aryl/alkyl/cyclohexyl-N'-(2,3-dihydro-2-oxo-4H-benz[e][1,3,2]oxazaphosphorin-2-yl) ureas.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Y B; Gunasekar, D; Devendranath Reddy, C; Suresh Reddy, C; Tran, Kevin; Le, Thanh; Berlin, K Darrell; Srinivasan, S; Charitha Devi, M

    2005-10-01

    Several new substituted oxazaphosphorinyl urea derivatives of the type RR'P(O)NHC(O)NHR'' were synthesized from alpha-(3-chloro-4-fluoroanilino)-o-cresol by reaction with chlorides of aryl/alkyl/cyclohexyl carbamidophosphoric acids in the presence of triethylamine at 0-50 degrees C. Their significant insecticidal and antimicrobial activity and promotion of Rhizobium bacteria growth in the soil without effect on the host tissue suggests their possible commercial application as ecofriendly pesticides and antimicrobial agents.

  14. "Enzymogenesis": classical liver alcohol dehydrogenase origin from the glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase line.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, O; Jörnvall, H

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the activity and structure of lower vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenases reveals that relationships between the classical liver and yeast enzymes need not be continuous. Both the ethanol activity of class I-type alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) and the glutathione-dependent formaldehyde activity of the class III-type enzyme [formaldehyde:NAD+ oxidoreductase (glutathione-formylating), EC 1.2.1.1] are present in liver down to at least the stage of bony fishes (cod liver: ethanol activity, 3.4 units/mg of protein in one enzyme; formaldehyde activity, 4.5 units/mg in the major form of another enzyme). Structural analysis of the latter protein reveals it to be a typical class III enzyme, with limited variation from the mammalian form and therefore with stable activity and structure throughout much of the vertebrate lineage. In contrast, the classical alcohol dehydrogenase (the class I enzyme) appears to be the emerging form, first in activity and later also in structure. The class I activity is present already in the piscine line, whereas the overall structural-type enzyme is not observed until amphibians and still more recent vertebrates. Consequently, the class I/III duplicatory origin appears to have arisen from a functional class III form, not a class I form. Therefore, ethanol dehydrogenases from organisms existing before this duplication have origins separate from those leading to the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenases. The latter now often occur in isozyme forms from further gene duplications and have a high rate of evolutionary change. The pattern is, however, not simple and we presently find in cod the first evidence for isozymes also within a class III alcohol dehydrogenase. Overall, the results indicate that both of these classes of vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenase are important and suggest a protective metabolic function for the whole enzyme system. Images PMID:1409630

  15. Purification, Characterization, and Submitochondrial Localization of a 58-Kilodalton NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Luethy, M. H.; Thelen, J. J.; Knudten, A. F.; Elthon, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    An NADH dehydrogenase activity from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) root mitochondria was purified to a 58-kD protein doublet. An immunologically related dehydrogenase was partially purified from maize (Zea mays L. B73) mitochondria to a 58-kD protein doublet, a 45-kD protein, and a few other less prevalent proteins. Polyclonal antibodies prepared against the 58-kD protein of red beet roots were found to immunoprecipitate the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase activity. The antibodies cross-reacted to similar proteins in mitochondria from a number of plant species but not to rat liver mitochondrial proteins. The polyclonal antibodies were used in conjunction with maize mitochondrial fractionation to show that the 58-kD protein was likely part of a protein complex loosely associated with the membrane fraction. A membrane-impermeable protein cross-linking agent was used to further show that the majority of the 58-kD protein was located on the outer surface of the inner mitochondrial membrane or in the intermembrane space. Analysis of the cross-linked 58-kD NAD(P)H dehydrogenase indicated that specific proteins of 64, 48, and 45 kD were cross-linked to the 58-kD protein doublet. The NAD(P)H dehydrogenase activity was not affected by ethyleneglycol-bis([beta]-aminoethyl ether)-N,N[prime] -tetraacetic acid or CaCl2, was stimulated somewhat (21%) by flavin mononucleotide, was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (49%) and mersalyl (40%), and was inhibited by a bud scale extract of Platanus occidentalis L. containing platanetin (61%). PMID:12228370

  16. Purification and properties of 7, 8-diaminopelargonic acid aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Stoner, G L; Eisenberg, M A

    1975-06-10

    The enzyme 7, 8-diaminopelargonic acid aminotransferase utilizes S-adenosyl-L-methionine to transaminate the biotin precurson 7-keto-8-aminopelargonic acid and form the next intermediate in the pathway, 7, 8-diaminopelargonic acid. The enzyme has been purified nearly 1000-fold from an extract of a regulatory mutant of Escherichia coli which is derepressed for the enzymes of the biotin operon. The extract was treated with protamine sulfate, ammonium sulfate, and subjected to acid and heat treatments. Subsequently, the enzyme was chromatographed on columns of DEAE-cellulose, phosphocellulose, hydroxylapatite, and two Sephadex G-100. The resulting purified preparation was judged 86% homogeneous by the scanning of of a stained disc gel. The enzymatic activity was associated with the major band in gels run at two different gel concentrations and two different pH values. The cofactor, pyridoxal phosphate, can be resolved from the enzyme in the presence of phosphate buffer after incubation with the amino donor, S-adenosyl-L-methionine. A molecular weight estimation of 94,000 plus or minus 10, 000 has been obtained by gel filtration and sucrose gradient sedimentation studies. Gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate, shows a single subunit with a molecular weight of 47, 000 plus or minus 3, 000 indicating a dimeric enzyme. A neutral compound was detected in the acidified reaction mixture which was derived from the methionine moiety of S-adenosyl-L-methionine and was present in amounts equivalent to the 7, 8-diaminopelargonic acid produced in the reaction mixture. It is suggested that the keto product of the reaction, i.e. S-adenosyl-2-oxo-4-methylthiobutyric acid, may decompose nonenzymatically under the conditions of the reaction to form 5'-methylthioadenosine and the neutral compound, 2-oxo-3-butenoic acid.

  17. Pro-haloacetate Nanoparticles for Efficient Cancer Therapy via Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Santosh K.; Ye, Mao; Ostadhossein, Fatemeh; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-01-01

    Anticancer agents based on haloacetic acids are developed for inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), an enzyme responsible for reversing the suppression of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Through molecular docking studies mono- and dihaloacetates are identified as potent PDK2 binders and matched their efficiency with dichloroacetic acid. In silico screening directed their conversion to phospholipid prodrugs, which were subsequently self-assembled to pro-haloacetate nanoparticles. Following a thorough physico-chemical characterization, the functional activity of these novel agents was established in wide ranges of human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo in rodents. Results indicated that the newly explored PDK modulators can act as efficient agent for cancer regression. A Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) assay mechanistically confirmed that these agents trigger their activity through the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. PMID:27323896

  18. Pro-haloacetate Nanoparticles for Efficient Cancer Therapy via Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Santosh K.; Ye, Mao; Ostadhossein, Fatemeh; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-06-01

    Anticancer agents based on haloacetic acids are developed for inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), an enzyme responsible for reversing the suppression of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Through molecular docking studies mono- and dihaloacetates are identified as potent PDK2 binders and matched their efficiency with dichloroacetic acid. In silico screening directed their conversion to phospholipid prodrugs, which were subsequently self-assembled to pro-haloacetate nanoparticles. Following a thorough physico-chemical characterization, the functional activity of these novel agents was established in wide ranges of human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo in rodents. Results indicated that the newly explored PDK modulators can act as efficient agent for cancer regression. A Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) assay mechanistically confirmed that these agents trigger their activity through the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

  19. Purification of arogenate dehydrogenase from Phenylobacterium immobile.

    PubMed

    Mayer, E; Waldner-Sander, S; Keller, B; Keller, E; Lingens, F

    1985-01-07

    Phenylobacterium immobile, a bacterium which is able to degrade the herbicide chloridazon, utilizes for L-tyrosine synthesis arogenate as an obligatory intermediate which is converted in the final biosynthetic step by a dehydrogenase to tyrosine. This enzyme, the arogenate dehydrogenase, has been purified for the first time in a 5-step procedure to homogeneity as confirmed by electrophoresis. The Mr of the enzyme that consists of two identical subunits amounts to 69000 as established by gel electrophoresis after cross-linking the enzyme with dimethylsuberimidate. The Km values were 0.09 mM for arogenate and 0.02 mM for NAD+. The enzyme has a high specificity with respect to its substrate arogenate.

  20. The molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase operon and the tungsten formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase operon from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. Structures and transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Hochheimer, A; Linder, D; Thauer, R K; Hedderich, R

    1996-11-15

    Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum contains a tungsten formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (FwdABCD) and a molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (FmdABC). The fwdHFGDACB operon encoding the tungsten enzyme has recently been characterized. We report here on the structure and expression of the gene cluster encoding the molybdenum enzyme. This gene cluster is composed of three open reading frames (fmdECB). The fmdB gene was found to encode the molybdopterin-dinucleotide-binding subunit harboring the enzyme's active site; FmdB is thus functionally equivalent to FwdB. fmdC encodes a protein with sequence similarity to FwdC in its N-terminal part and with sequence similarity to FwdD in its C-terminal part; FmdC is thus functionally equivalent to FwdC and FwdD. Interestingly, the fmd operon lacks a gene fmdA encoding the subunit FmdA of the molybdenum enzyme. FmdA has the same apparent molecular mass and the same N-terminal amino acid sequence as FwdA and only one DNA sequence encoding for this N-terminal amino acid sequence was found in the M. thermoautotrophicum genome. It is therefore proposed that FmdA and FwdA are encoded by the same gene namely fwdA in the fwd operon. In agreement with this proposal is the finding that fwdA is expressed constitutively: northern-blot analysis of RNA from tungstate- and molybdate-grown cells of M. thermo-autotrophicum revealed that the fwdHFGDACB gene cluster is transcribed in the presence of either molybdate or tungstate in the growth medium whereas the fmdECB gene cluster was only transcribed when molybdate was present.

  1. Dimerization and enzymatic activity of fungal 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kristan, Katja; Deluca, Dominga; Adamski, Jerzy; Stojan, Jure; Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2005-01-01

    Background 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17β-HSDcl) is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. SDR proteins usually function as dimers or tetramers and 17β-HSDcl is also a homodimer under native conditions. Results We have investigated here which secondary structure elements are involved in the dimerization of 17β-HSDcl and examined the importance of dimerization for the enzyme activity. Sequence similarity with trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea indicated that Arg129 and His111 from the αE-helices interact with the Asp121, Glu117 and Asp187 residues from the αE and αF-helices of the neighbouring subunit. The Arg129Asp and His111Leu mutations both rendered 17β-HSDcl monomeric, while the mutant 17β-HSDcl-His111Ala was dimeric. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis confirmed the conservation of the secondary structure in both monomers. The three mutant proteins all bound coenzyme, as shown by fluorescence quenching in the presence of NADP+, but both monomers showed no enzymatic activity. Conclusion We have shown by site-directed mutagenesis and structure/function analysis that 17β-HSDcl dimerization involves the αE and αF helices of both subunits. Neighbouring subunits are connected through hydrophobic interactions, H-bonds and salt bridges involving amino acid residues His111 and Arg129. Since the substitutions of these two amino acid residues lead to inactive monomers with conserved secondary structure, we suggest dimerization is a prerequisite for catalysis. A detailed understanding of this dimerization could lead to the development of compounds that will specifically prevent dimerization, thereby serving as a new type of inhibitor. PMID:16359545

  2. Assay of prolyl 4-hydroxylase by the chromatographic determination of [14C]succinic acid on ion-exchange minicolumns.

    PubMed Central

    Cunliffe, C J; Franklin, T J; Gaskell, R M

    1986-01-01

    An assay for prolyl 4-hydroxylase (EC 1.14.11.2) is described which measures succinic acid produced during the decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutaric acid in the presence of poly(L-Pro-Gly-L-Pro). [1-14C]Succinic acid was separated from its precursor 2-oxo[5-14C]glutaric acid by using ion-exchange minicolumns. The contamination of succinic acid by 2-oxoglutaric acid was approx. 1%, and the recovery of succinic acid was 100%. Kinetic parameters of prolyl 4-hydroxylase measured by the assay showed good agreement with published values. Our experience indicates that the measurement of prolyl 4-hydroxylase by the production of succinic acid is especially suited to investigations involving large numbers of assays. PMID:3028379

  3. Peafowl lactate dehydrogenase: problem of isoenzyme identification.

    PubMed

    Rose, R G; Wilson, A C

    1966-09-16

    Peafowl, like other vertebrates, contain multiple forms of lactate dehydrogenase. The electrophoretic properties of the peafowl isoenzymes are unusual in that the isoenzyme from heart tissue can be either more or less anodic than that of muscle, depending on the pH. This finding focuses attention on the problem of isoenzyme identification. It is suggested that isoenzymes be identified on the basis of properties that are chemically and biologically more significant than electrophoretic mobility.

  4. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Smithgall, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microsomal monoxygenases proceeds through trans-dihydrodiol metabolites to diol-epoxide ultimate carcinogens. This thesis directly investigated the role of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, a cytosolic NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase, in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols. A wide variety of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols were synthesized and shown to be substrates for the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase, including several potent proximate carcinogens derived from 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 5-methylchrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Since microsomal activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is highly stereospecific, the stereochemical course of enzymatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation was monitored using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. The major product formed from the dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene was characterized using UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy, and appears to be 4-hydroxy-1,2-naphthoquinone. Mass spectral analysis suggests that an analogous hydroxylated o-quinone is formed as the major product of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols was shown to be potently inhibited by all of the major classes of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Enhancement of trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogen oxidation may protect against possible adverse effects of the aspirin-like drugs, and help maintain the balance between activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  5. Multivalent Repression of Aspartic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Boy, Emmanuelle; Patte, Jean-Claude

    1972-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli in which the lysine-sensitive aspartokinase is feedback-resistant are described. In these strains, as well as in the wild type, aspartic semialdehyde dehydrogenase is subject to multivalent repression by lysine, threonine, and methionine. When these amino acids were added to a culture in minimal medium, the differential rate of synthesis of the enzyme dropped to zero and remained there for about one generation. PMID:4404058

  6. An Open-label Phase 2 Study of UX007 (Triheptanoin) in Subjects With Long-Chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders (LC-FAOD)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Long-chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders (LC-FAOD); Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase (CPT II) Deficiency; Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (VLCAD) Deficiency; Longchain 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (LCHAD) Deficiency; Trifunctional Protein (TFP) Deficiency

  7. Structural relationship between the hexameric and tetrameric family of glutamate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Britton, K L; Baker, P J; Rice, D W; Stillman, T J

    1992-11-01

    The family of glutamate dehydrogenases include a group of hexameric oligomers with a subunit M(r) of around 50,000, which are closely related in amino acid sequence and a smaller group of tetrameric oligomers based on a much larger subunit with M(r) 115,000. Sequence comparisons have indicated a low level of similarity between the C-terminal portion of the tetrameric enzymes and a substantial region of the polypeptide chain for the more widespread hexameric glutamate dehydrogenases. In the light of the solution of the three-dimensional structure of the hexameric NAD(+)-linked glutamate dehydrogenase from Clostridium symbiosum, we have undertaken a detailed examination of the alignment of the sequence for the C-terminal domain of the tetrameric Neurospora crassa glutamate dehydrogenase against the sequence and the molecular structure of that from C. symbiosum. This analysis reveals that the residues conserved between these two families are clustered in the three-dimensional structure and points to a remarkably similar layout of the glutamate-binding site and the active-site pocket, though with some differences in the mode of recognition of the nucleotide cofactor.

  8. Equine acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) in 14 horses associated with ingestion of Maple leaves (Acer pseudoplatanus) covered with European tar spot (Rhytisma acerinum).

    PubMed

    van der Kolk, J H; Wijnberg, I D; Westermann, C M; Dorland, L; de Sain-van der Velden, M G M; Kranenburg, L C; Duran, M; Dijkstra, J A; van der Lugt, J J; Wanders, R J A; Gruys, E

    2010-01-01

    This case-series describes fourteen horses suspected of equine acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) also known as atypical myopathy of which seven cases were confirmed biochemically with all horses having had access to leaves of the Maple tree (Acer pseudoplatanus) covered with European tar spot (Rhytisma acerinum). Assessment of organic acids, glycine conjugates, and acylcarnitines in urine was regarded as gold standard in the biochemical diagnosis of equine acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

  9. Rapid inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase: an initiating event in high dietary fat-induced loss of metabolic flexibility in the heart.

    PubMed

    Crewe, Clair; Kinter, Michael; Szweda, Luke I

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac function depends on the ability to switch between fatty acid and glucose oxidation for energy production in response to changes in substrate availability and energetic stress. In obese and diabetic individuals, increased reliance on fatty acids and reduced metabolic flexibility are thought to contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease. Mechanisms by which cardiac mitochondria contribute to diet-induced metabolic inflexibility were investigated. Mice were fed a high fat or low fat diet for 1 d, 1 wk, and 20 wk. Cardiac mitochondria isolated from mice fed a high fat diet displayed a diminished ability to utilize the glycolytically derived substrate pyruvate. This response was rapid, occurring within the first day on the diet, and persisted for up to 20 wk. A selective increase in the expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 and inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase are responsible for the rapid suppression of pyruvate utilization. An important consequence is that pyruvate dehydrogenase is sensitized to inhibition when mitochondria respire in the presence of fatty acids. Additionally, increased expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 preceded any observed diet-induced reductions in the levels of glucose transporter type 4 and glycolytic enzymes and, as judged by Akt phosphorylation, insulin signaling. Importantly, diminished insulin signaling evident at 1 wk on the high fat diet did not occur in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 knockout mice. Dietary intervention leads to a rapid decline in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 levels and recovery of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity indicating an additional form of regulation. Finally, an overnight fast elicits a metabolic response similar to that induced by high dietary fat obscuring diet-induced metabolic changes. Thus, our data indicate that diet-induced inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase may be an initiating event in decreased oxidation of glucose and increased reliance of the heart on

  10. Fluorescence lifetime analysis and effect of magnesium ions on binding of NADH to human aldehyde dehydrogenase 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) catalyzes oxidation of toxic aldehydes to carboxylic acids. Physiologic levels of Mg2+ ions influence ALDH1 activity in part by increasing NADH binding affinity to the enzyme thus reducing activity. By using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, we have resolved t...

  11. Cellobionic acid inhibition of cellobiohydrolase I and cellobiose dehydrogenase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    End-product inhibition by cellobiose and glucose is a rate-limiting factor in cellulose hydrolysis by cellulases. While cellobiose and glucose inhibition have been extensively investigated, cellobionate inhibition has been minimally studied despite the discovery that accessory proteins such as cello...

  12. Repression of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth by Regulating Met/EGFR/VEGFR-Akt/NF-κB Pathways with Theanine and Its Derivative, (R)-2-(6,8-Dibromo-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxamido)-5-(ethylamino)-5-oxopentanoic Ethyl Ester (DTBrC).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoying; Li, Zheng; Wan, Xiaochun; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Rongqin; Liu, Zhenzhen; Ji, Dexin; Zhang, Huarong; Wu, Fei; Tian, Huihui; Liu, Kun; Wu, Benhao

    2016-09-21

    To explore the potential of theanine against cancer, we have studied the anticancer activities of theanine from tea and its semisynthesized derivative, (R)-2-(6,8-dibromo-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxamido)-5-(ethylamino)-5-oxopentanoic ethyl ester (DTBrC), in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HHC). Theanine and DTBrC displayed inhibitory effects on the growth and migration of HHC cells in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. Theanine and DTBrC significantly enhanced the repression of HHC cell growth in combination with anticancer drug pirarubicin. Theanine and DTBrC completely suppressed HGF- and EGF+HGF-induced migration with a reduction of p53 tumor suppressor level and enhanced the p53 protein expression in HHC cells. The Akt and NF-κB knockdown greatly reduced cancer cell migration with a decrease in CD44 expression. DTBrC and theanine significantly repressed the protein expressions in the Met/EGFR/VEGFR-Akt/NF-κB pathways, which might be the mechanism for their biologic effects.

  13. Biochemical and structural characterization of Plasmodium falciparum glutamate dehydrogenase 2.

    PubMed

    Zocher, Kathleen; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Kehr, Sebastian; Fischer, Marina; Rahlfs, Stefan; Becker, Katja

    2012-05-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (GDHs) play key roles in cellular redox, amino acid, and energy metabolism, thus representing potential targets for pharmacological interventions. Here we studied the functional network provided by the three known glutamate dehydrogenases of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The recombinant production of the previously described PfGDH1 as hexahistidyl-tagged proteins was optimized. Additionally, PfGDH2 was cloned, recombinantly produced, and characterized. Like PfGDH1, PfGDH2 is an NADP(H)-dependent enzyme with a specific activity comparable to PfGDH1 but with slightly higher K(m) values for its substrates. The three-dimensional structure of hexameric PfGDH2 was solved to 3.1 Å resolution. The overall structure shows high similarity with PfGDH1 but with significant differences occurring at the subunit interface. As in mammalian GDH1, in PfGDH2 the subunit-subunit interactions are mainly assisted by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions, whereas in PfGDH1 these contacts are mediated by networks of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. In accordance with this, the known bovine GDH inhibitors hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol were more effective on PfGDH2 than on PfGDH1. Subcellular localization was determined for all three plasmodial GDHs by fusion with the green fluorescent protein. Based on our data, PfGDH1 and PfGDH3 are cytosolic proteins whereas PfGDH2 clearly localizes to the apicoplast, a plastid-like organelle specific for apicomplexan parasites. This study provides new insights into the structure and function of GDH isoenzymes of P. falciparum, which represent potential targets for the development of novel antimalarial drugs.

  14. Inhibitory effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on alcohol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Carper, W R; Dorey, R C; Beber, J H

    1987-10-01

    We investigated the effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) in vitro. We observed a time-dependent inhibition of this dehydrogenase by disulfiram and diethyldithiocarbamate similar to that obtained for aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3). These results suggest a possible explanation for various side effects observed in the clinical use of Antabuse.

  15. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  16. Regulation of insulin release by factors that also modify glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Fahien, L A; MacDonald, M J; Kmiotek, E H; Mertz, R J; Fahien, C M

    1988-09-25

    Leucine and monomethyl succinate initiate insulin release, and glutamine potentiates leucine-induced insulin release. Alanine enhances and malate inhibits leucine plus glutamine-induced insulin release. The insulinotropic effect of leucine is at least in part secondary to its ability to activate glutamate oxidation by glutamate dehydrogenase (Sener, A., Malaisse-Lagae, F., and Malaisse, W. J. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 78, 5460-5464). The effect of these other amino acids or Krebs cycle intermediates on insulin release also correlates with their effects on glutamate dehydrogenase and their ability to regulate inhibition of this enzyme by alpha-ketoglutarate. For example, glutamine enhances insulin release and islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity only in the presence of leucine. This could be because leucine, especially in the presence of alpha-ketoglutarate, increases the Km of glutamate and converts alpha-ketoglutarate from a noncompetitive to a competitive inhibitor of glutamate. Thus, in the presence of leucine, this enzyme is more responsive to high levels of glutamate and less responsive to inhibition by alpha-ketoglutarate. Malate could decrease and alanine could increase insulin release because malate increases the generation of alpha-ketoglutarate in islet mitochondria via the combined malate dehydrogenase-aspartate aminotransferase reaction, and alanine could decrease the level of alpha-ketoglutarate via the alanine transaminase reaction. Monomethyl succinate alone is as stimulatory of insulin release as leucine alone, and glutamine enhances the action of both. Succinyl coenzyme A, leucine, and GTP are all bound in the same region on glutamate dehydrogenase, where GTP is a potent inhibitor and succinyl coenzyme A and leucine are comparable activators. Thus, the insulinotropic properties of monomethyl succinate could result from it increasing the level of succinyl coenzyme A and decreasing the level of GTP via the succinate thiokinase reaction.

  17. A lipoamide dehydrogenase from Neisseria meningitidis has a lipoyl domain.

    PubMed

    Bringas, R; Fernandez, J

    1995-04-01

    A protein of molecular weight of 64 kDa (p64k) found in the outer membrane of Neisseria meningitidis shows a high degree of homology with both the lipoyl domain of the acetyltransferase and the entire sequence of the lipoamide dehydrogenase, the E2 and E3 components of the dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes, respectively. The alignment of the p64k with lipoyl domains and lipoamide dehydrogenases from different species is presented. The possible implications of this protein in binding protein-dependent transport are discussed. This is the first lipoamide dehydrogenase reported to have a lipoyl domain.

  18. Inhibition of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase by disulfiram.

    PubMed

    Jay, D

    1991-04-01

    The effect of disulfiram on succinate oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase activities of beef heart submitochondrial particles was studied. Results show that disulfiram inhibits both functions. Succinate and malonate suppress the inhibitory action of disulfiram when succinate dehydrogenase is stabilized in an active conformation. Disulfiram is not able to inhibit the enzyme when succinate dehydrogenase is inactivated by oxaloacetate. The inhibitory effect of disulfiram is reverted by the addition of dithiothreitol. From these results, it is proposed that disulfiram inhibits the utilization of succinate by a direct modification of an -SH group located in the catalytically active site of succinate dehydrogenase.

  19. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  3. Placental glucose dehydrogenase polymorphism in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y J; Paik, S G; Park, H Y

    1994-12-01

    The genetic polymorphism of placental glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated in 300 Korean placentae using horizontal starch gel electrophoresis. The allele frequencies for GDH1, GDH2 and GDH3 were 0.537, 0.440 and 0.005, respectively, which were similar to those in Japanese. We also observed an anodal allele which was similar to the GDH4 originally reported in Chinese populations at a low frequency of 0.015. An additional new cathodal allele (named GDH6) was observed in the present study with a very low frequency of 0.003.

  4. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in mammalian ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the reversible inter-conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia. High levels of GDH activity is found in mammalian liver, kidney, brain, and pancreas. In the liver, GDH reaction appears to be close-to-equilibrium, providing the appropriate ratio of ammonia and amino acids for urea synthesis in periportal hepatocytes. In addition, GDH produces glutamate for glutamine synthesis in a small rim of pericentral hepatocytes. Hence, hepatic GDH can be either a source for ammonia or an ammonia scavenger. In the kidney, GDH function produces ammonia from glutamate to control acidosis. In the human, the presence of two differentially regulated isoforms (hGDH1 and hGDH2) suggests a complex role for GDH in ammonia homeostasis. Whereas hGDH1 is sensitive to GTP inhibition, hGDH2 has dissociated its function from GTP control. Furthermore, hGDH2 shows a lower optimal pH than hGDH1. The hGDH2 enzyme is selectively expressed in human astrocytes and Sertoli cells, probably facilitating metabolic recycling processes essential for their supportive role. Here, we report that hGDH2 is also expressed in the epithelial cells lining the convoluted tubules of the renal cortex. As hGDH2 functions more efficiently under acidotic conditions without the operation of the GTP energy switch, its presence in the kidney may increase the efficacy of the organ to maintain acid base equilibrium.

  5. CO2 Photoreduction by Formate Dehydrogenase and a Ru-Complex in a Nanoporous Glass Reactor.

    PubMed

    Noji, Tomoyasu; Jin, Tetsuro; Nango, Mamoru; Kamiya, Nobuo; Amao, Yutaka

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the conversion of CO2 to formic acid under ambient conditions in a photoreduction nanoporous reactor using a photosensitizer, methyl viologen (MV(2+)), and formate dehydrogenase (FDH). The overall efficiency of this reactor was 14 times higher than that of the equivalent solution. The accumulation rate of formic acid in the nanopores of 50 nm is 83 times faster than that in the equivalent solution. Thus, this CO2 photoreduction nanoporous glass reactor will be useful as an artificial photosynthesis system that converts CO2 to fuel.

  6. Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD 9) is the long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in human embryonic and fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Oey, N A; Ruiter, J P N; Ijlst, L; Attie-Bitach, T; Vekemans, M; Wanders, R J A; Wijburg, F A

    2006-07-21

    We recently reported the expression and activity of several fatty acid oxidation enzymes in human embryonic and fetal tissues including brain and spinal cord. Liver and heart showed expression of both very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) mRNA. However, while mRNA expression of LCHAD could be clearly detected in the retina and spinal cord, expression of VLCAD mRNA was low to undetectable in these tissues. Nevertheless, abundant acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) activity was detected with palmitoyl-CoA as substrate in fetal central nervous tissue. These conflicting data suggested the presence of a different long-chain ACAD in human embryonic and fetal brain. In this study, using in situ hybridization as well as enzymatic studies, we identified acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD 9) as the long-chain ACAD in human embryonic and fetal central nervous tissue. Until now, no clinical signs and symptoms of central nervous system involvement have been reported in VLCAD deficiency. A novel long-chain FAO defect, i.e., ACAD 9 deficiency with only central nervous system involvement, could, if not lethal during intra uterine development, easily escape proper diagnosis, since probably no classical signs and symptoms of FAO deficiency will be observed. Screening for ACAD 9 deficiency in patients with undefined neurological symptoms and/or impairment in neurological development of unknown origin is necessary to establish if ACAD 9 deficiency exists as a separate disease entity.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of L-threonine dehydrogenase (TDH) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, A; Mikolajek, H; Wright, J N; Coker, A; Erskine, P T; Cooper, J B; Bashir, Q; Rashid, N; Jamil, F; Akhtar, M

    2008-09-01

    The enzyme L-threonine dehydrogenase catalyses the NAD(+)-dependent conversion of L-threonine to 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate, which is the first reaction of a two-step biochemical pathway involved in the metabolism of threonine to glycine. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of L-threonine dehydrogenase (Tk-TDH) from the hyperthermophilic organism Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 is reported. This threonine dehydrogenase consists of 350 amino acids, with a molecular weight of 38 kDa, and was prepared using an Escherichia coli expression system. The purified native protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and crystals grew in the tetragonal space group P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 124.5, c = 271.1 A. Diffraction data were collected to 2.6 A resolution and preliminary analysis indicates that there are four molecules in the asymmetric unit of the crystal.

  8. [Effects of Light Near-Infrared Radiation on Rats Assessed by Succinate Dehydrogenase Activity in Lymphocytes on Blood Smears].

    PubMed

    Khunderyakova, N V; Zakharchenko, A V; Zakharchenko, M V; Muller, H; Fedotcheva, I; Kondrashova, M N

    2015-01-01

    Biological effects of light near infrared radiation (850 nm), with modulation acoustic frequency of 101 Hz, was studied. The study was conducted on rats, the effect was recorded by succinate dehydrogenase activity in lymphocytes on the blood smear after administration of the activating dose of adrenaline, which simulates the state of the organism in the early stages of the pathogenic effects (stress). A pronounced regulating effect of infrared radiation on the activity of succinate dehydrogenase in animals activated by adrenaline was shown. Infrared radiation has a normalizing effect reducing the degree of inhibition or activation of the enzyme induced by adrenaline and had no effect on the control animals. Thus, by modulating the activity of succinate dehydrogenase infrared radiation regulates energy production in the mitochondria supported by the most powerful oxidation substrate--succinic acid, which is especially pronounced under stress.

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel Dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 1 genea from human fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Xu, M; Cheng, C; Zhou, Z; Huang, Y; Zhao, W; Zeng, L; Xu, J; Fu, X; Ying, K; Xie, Y; Mao, Y

    2001-01-01

    Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) constitute a large protein family of NAD(P)(H)-dependent oxidoreductase. They are defined by distinct, common sequence motifs and show a wide range of substrate specialisms. By large-scale sequencing analysis of a human fetal brain cDNA library, we isolated a novel human SDR-type dehydrogenase/reductase gene named Dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 1 (DHRS1). The DHRS1 cDNA is 1411 base pair in length, encoding a 314-amino-acid polypeptide which has a SDR motif. Northern blot reveals two bands, of about 0.9 and 1.4 kb in size. These two forms are expressed in many tissues. The DHRS1 gene is localized on chromosome 14q21.3. It has 9 exons and spans 9.2 kb of the genomic DNA.

  10. Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis depends on lipoamide dehydrogenase, a member of three multienzyme complexes.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Aditya; Bryk, Ruslana; Shi, Shuangping; Rhee, Kyu; Rath, Poonam; Schnappinger, Dirk; Ehrt, Sabine; Nathan, Carl

    2011-01-20

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) adapts to persist in a nutritionally limited macrophage compartment. Lipoamide dehydrogenase (Lpd), the third enzyme (E3) in Mtb's pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH), also serves as E1 of peroxynitrite reductase/peroxidase (PNR/P), which helps Mtb resist host-reactive nitrogen intermediates. In contrast to Mtb lacking dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (DlaT), the E2 of PDH and PNR/P, Lpd-deficient Mtb is severely attenuated in wild-type and immunodeficient mice. This suggests that Lpd has a function that DlaT does not share. When DlaT is absent, Mtb upregulates an Lpd-dependent branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKADH) encoded by pdhA, pdhB, pdhC, and lpdC. Without Lpd, Mtb cannot metabolize branched-chain amino acids and potentially toxic branched-chain intermediates accumulate. Mtb deficient in both DlaT and PdhC phenocopies Lpd-deficient Mtb. Thus, Mtb critically requires BCKADH along with PDH and PNR/P for pathogenesis. These findings position Lpd as a potential target for anti-infectives against Mtb.

  11. Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenases: Dynamic History of Protein Family Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mohsen, Al-Walid

    2014-01-01

    The acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs) are enzymes that catalyze the α,β-dehydrogenation of acyl-CoA esters in fatty acid and amino acid catabolism. Eleven ACADs are now recognized in the sequenced human genome, and several homologs have been reported from bacteria, fungi, plants, and nematodes. We performed a systematic comparative genomic study, integrating homology searches with methods of phylogenetic reconstruction, to investigate the evolutionary history of this family. Sequence analyses indicate origin of the family in the common ancestor of Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryota, illustrating its essential role in the metabolism of early life. At least three ACADs were already present at that time: ancestral glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCD), isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IVD), and ACAD10/11. Two gene duplications were unique to the eukaryotic domain: one resulted in the VLCAD and ACAD9 paralogs and another in the ACAD10 and ACAD11 paralogs. The overall patchy distribution of specific ACADs across the tree of life is the result of dynamic evolution that includes numerous rounds of gene duplication and secondary losses, interdomain lateral gene transfer events, alteration of cellular localization, and evolution of novel proteins by domain acquisition. Our finding that eukaryotic ACAD species are more closely related to bacterial ACADs is consistent with endosymbiotic origin of ACADs in eukaryotes and further supported by the localization of all nine previously studied ACADs in mitochondria. PMID:19639238

  12. Microbiologically produced carboxylic acids used as building blocks in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Aurich, Andreas; Specht, Robert; Müller, Roland A; Stottmeister, Ulrich; Yovkova, Venelina; Otto, Christina; Holz, Martina; Barth, Gerold; Heretsch, Philipp; Thomas, Franziska A; Sicker, Dieter; Giannis, Athanassios

    2012-01-01

    Oxo- and hydroxy-carboxylic acids are of special interest in organic synthesis. However, their introduction by chemical reactions tends to be troublesome especially with regard to stereoselectivity. We describe herein the biotechnological preparation of selected oxo- and hydroxycarboxylic acids under "green" conditions and their use as promising new building blocks. Thereby, our biotechnological goal was the development of process fundamentals regarding the variable use of renewable raw materials, the development of a multi purpose bioreactor and application of a pilot plant with standard equipment for organic acid production to minimize the technological effort. Furthermore the development of new product isolation procedures, with the aim of direct product recovery, capture of products or single step operation, was necessary. The application of robust and approved microorganisms, also genetically modified, capable of using a wide range of substrates as well as producing a large spectrum of products, was of special importance. Microbiologically produced acids, like 2-oxo-glutaric acid and 2-oxo-D-gluconic acid, are useful educts for the chemical synthesis of hydrophilic triazines, spiro-connected heterocycles, benzotriazines, and pyranoic amino acids. The chiral intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, (2R,3S)-isocitric acid, is another promising compound. For the first time our process provides large quantities of enantiopure trimethyl (2R,3S)-isocitrate which was used in subsequent chemical transformations to provide new chiral entities for further usage in total synthesis and pharmaceutical research.Oxo- and hydroxy-carboxylic acids are of special interest in organic synthesis. However, their introduction by chemical reactions tends to be troublesome especially with regard to stereoselectivity. We describe herein the biotechnological preparation of selected oxo- and hydroxycarboxylic acids under "green" conditions and their use as promising new building

  13. SDR-O: an orphan short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase localized at mouse chromosome 10/human chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiguo; Song, Min-Sun; Napoli, Joseph L

    2002-07-10

    We report cloning a cDNA that encodes a novel short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase, SDR-O, conserved in mouse, human and rat. Human and mouse liver express SDR-O (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase-orphan) mRNA intensely. The mouse embryo expresses SDR-O mRNA as early as day seven. Human SDR-O localizes on chromosome 12; mouse SDR-O localizes on chromosome 10 with CRAD1, CRAD2 and RDH4. SDR-O shares highest amino acid similarity with rat RoDH1 and mouse RDH1 (69-70%), but does not have the retinol and 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity of either, nor is it active as a 17beta- or 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductases catalyse the metabolism of ligands that bind with nuclear receptors: the occurrence of 'orphan' nuclear receptors may imply existence of 'orphan' SDR, suggesting that SDR-O may catalyse the metabolism of another class of nuclear receptor ligand. Alternatively, SDR-O may not have a catalytic function, but may regulate metabolism by binding substrates/products and/or by serving as a regulatory factor.

  14. Molecular Analysis of the Gene Encoding F420-Dependent Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Purwantini, Endang; Daniels, Lacy

    1998-01-01

    The gene fgd, which codes for F420-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (FGD), was cloned from Mycobacterium smegmatis, and its sequence was determined and analyzed. A homolog of FGD which has a very high similarity to the M. smegmatis FGD-derived amino acid sequence was identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. FGD showed significant homology with F420-dependent N5,N10-methylene-tetrahydromethanopterin reductase (MER) from methanogenic archaea and with several hypothetical proteins from M. tuberculosis and Archaeoglobus fulgidus, but FGD showed no significant homology with NADP-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases. Multiple alignment of FGD and MER proteins revealed four conserved consensus sequences. Multiple alignment of FGD with the hypothetical proteins also revealed portions of the same conserved sequences. Moderately high levels of FGD were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) carrying fgd in pBluescript. PMID:9555906

  15. DENATURATION AND RENATURATION OF MALIC DEHYDROGENASE IN A CELL-FREE EXTRACT FROM A MARINE PSYCHROPHILE.

    PubMed

    BURTON, S D; MORITA, R Y

    1963-11-01

    Burton, Sheril D. (Oregon State University, Corvallis), and Richard Y. Morita. Denaturation and renaturation of malic dehydrogenase in a cell-free extract from a marine psychrophile. J. Bacteriol. 86:1019-1024. 1963.-Malic dehydrogenase from a marine psychrophilic vibrio (PS 207) was found to be heat-sensitive at 30 C, the maximal growth temperature for the organism. Initial denaturation was reversible, with maximal renaturation occurring when the denatured enzyme was slowly cooled in the presence of mercaptoethanol, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and malate. No renaturation occurred when these compounds were added after slow cooling, or when the renaturation mixture was rapidly cooled. Mercaptoethylamine, cysteine, glutathione, or mercaptoacetic acid could not replace mercaptoethanol. The kinetics of denaturation and renaturation suggest the presence of several malic isozymes each with different heat labilities, or that these processes are occurring in several distinct steps.

  16. Nucleotide sequence of yeast GDH1 encoding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Moye, W S; Amuro, N; Rao, J K; Zalkin, H

    1985-07-15

    The yeast GDH1 gene encodes NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. This gene was isolated by complementation of an Escherichia coli glutamate auxotroph. NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase was overproduced 6-10-fold in Saccharomyces cerevisiae bearing GDH1 on a multicopy plasmid. The nucleotide sequence of the 1362-base pair coding region and 5' and 3' flanking sequences were determined. Transcription start sites were located by S1 nuclease mapping. Regulation of GDH1 was not maintained when the gene was present on a multicopy plasmid. Protein secondary structure predictions identified a region with potential to form the dinucleotide-binding domain. The amino acid sequences of the yeast and Neurospora crassa enzymes are 63% conserved. Unlike the N. crassa gene, yeast GDH1 has no introns.

  17. In search for function of two human orphan SDR enzymes: hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase like 2 (HSDL2) and short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase-orphan (SDR-O).

    PubMed

    Kowalik, Dorota; Haller, Ferdinand; Adamski, Jerzy; Moeller, Gabriele

    2009-11-01

    The protein superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) today comprises over 20,000 members found in pro- and eukaryotes. Despite low amino acid sequence identity (only 15-30%), they share several similar characteristics in conformational structures, the N-terminal cofactor (NAD(P)/NAD(P)H) binding region being the most conserved. The enzymes catalyze oxido-reductive reactions and have a broad spectrum of substrates. Not all recently identified SDRs have been analyzed in detail yet, and we therefore characterized two rudimentarily annotated human SDR candidates: an orphan SDR (SDR-O) and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase like 2 (HSDL2). We analyzed the amino acid sequence for cofactor preference, performed subcellular localization studies, and a screening for substrates of the enzymes, including steroid hormones and retinoids. None of both tested proteins showed a significant conversion of steroid hormones. However, the peroxisomal localization of human HSDL2 may suggest an involvement in fatty acid metabolism. For SDR-O a weak conversion of retinal into retinol was detectable in the presence of the cofactor NADH.

  18. Catecholamine regulation of lactate dehydrogenase in rat brain cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; McGinnis, J.F.; de Vellis, J.

    1980-03-25

    The mechanism of catecholamine induction of the soluble cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) was studied in the rat glial tumor cell line, C6. Lactate dehydrogenase was partially purified from extracts of (/sup 3/H)leucine-labeled cells by affinity gel chromatography and quantitatively immunoprecipitated with anti-lactate dehydrogenase-5 IgG and with antilactate dehydrogenase-1 IgG. The immunoprecipitates were dissociated and electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Using this methodology, the increased enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase in norepinephrine-treated C6 cells was observed to be concomitant with the increased synthesis of enzyme molecules. Despite the continued presence of norepinephrine, the specific increase in the rate of synthesis of lactate dehydrogenase was transient. It was first detected at 4 h, was maximum at 9 h, and returned to basal levels by 24 h. The half-life of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity was 36 h during the induction and 40 h during deinduction. The half-life for decay of /sup 3/H-labeled lactate dehydrogenase was 41 h. These observations suggest that the increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity in norepinephrine-treated cells does not involve any change in the rate of degradation. Norepinephrine increased the specific rate of synthesis of both lactate dehydrogenase-5 (a tetramer of four M subunits) and lactate dehydrogenase-1 (a tetramer of four H subunits), although to different extents. Since these subunits are coded for by two separate genes on separate chromosomes, it suggests that the regulatory mechanism involves at least two separate sites of action.

  19. Novel chiral tool, (R)-2-octanol dehydrogenase, from Pichia finlandica: purification, gene cloning, and application for optically active α-haloalcohols.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Kudoh, Masatake

    2013-09-01

    A novel enantioselective alcohol dehydrogenase, (R)-2-octanol dehydrogenase (PfODH), was discovered among methylotrophic microorganisms. The enzyme was purified from Pichia finlandica and characterized. The molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated to be 83,000 and 30,000 by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, respectively. The enzyme was an NAD(+)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and showed a strict enantioselectivity, very broad substrate specificity, and high tolerance to SH reagents. A gene-encoding PfODH was cloned and sequenced. The gene consisted of 765 nucleotides, coding polypeptides of 254 amino acids. The gene was singly expressed and coexpressed together with a formate dehydrogenase as an NADH regenerator in an Escherichia coli. Ethyl (S)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate and (S)-2-chloro-1-phenylethanol were synthesized using a whole-cell biocatalyst in more than 99 % optical purity.

  20. Toxic Neuronal Death by Glyeraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and Mitochondria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    Neuroreport, 10(5), 1149-1153. Sioud, M., & Jespersen, L. (1996). Enhancement of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase...1996) Enhancemen t of hammerhead r ibozyme cata lysis by glycera ldehyde-3- phospha te dehydrogenase. J Mol Biol 257:775–789. Sirover MA (1997) Role of

  1. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5560 Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system. (a) Identification. A lactic...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5560 Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system. (a) Identification. A lactic...

  3. IMP dehydrogenase from Pneumocystis carinii as a potential drug target.

    PubMed Central

    O'Gara, M J; Lee, C H; Weinberg, G A; Nott, J M; Queener, S F

    1997-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, a specific inhibitor of IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH; EC 1.1.1.205), is a potent inhibitor of Pneumocystis carinii growth in culture, suggesting that IMPDH may be a sensitive target for chemotherapy in this organism. The IMPDH gene was cloned as a first step to characterizing the enzyme and developing selective inhibitors. A 1.3-kb fragment containing a portion of the P. carinii IMPDH gene was amplified by PCR with two degenerate oligonucleotides based on conserved sequences in IMPDH from humans and four different microorganisms. Northern hybridization analysis showed the P. carinii IMPDH mRNA to be approximately 1.6 kb. The entire cDNA encoding P. carinii IMPDH was isolated and cloned. The deduced amino acid sequence of P. carinii IMPDH shared homology with bacterial (31 to 38%), protozoal (48 to 59%), mammalian (60 to 62%), and fungal (62%) IMPDH enzymes. The IMPDH cDNA was expressed by using a T7 expression system in an IMPDH-deficient strain of Escherichia coli (strain S phi 1101). E. coli S phi 1101 cells containing the P. carinii IMPDH gene were able to grow on medium lacking guanine, implying that the protein expressed in vivo was functional. Extracts of these E. coli cells contained IMPDH activity that had an apparent Km for IMP of 21.7 +/- 0.3 microM and an apparent Km for NAD of 314 +/- 84 microM (mean +/- standard error of the mean; n = 3), and the activity was inhibited by mycophenolic acid (50% inhibitory concentration, 24 microM; n = 2). PMID:8980752

  4. 3-(2-Oxo-2-phenylethylidene)-2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-pyrazino[2,1-a]isoquinolin-4(11bH)-one (compound 1), a novel potent Nrf2/ARE inducer, protects against DSS-induced colitis via inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajing; Wang, Hong; Qian, Chen; Tang, Jingjing; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Xiuting; You, Qidong; Hu, Rong

    2016-02-01

    NLRP3 inflammasome is a key component of the inflammatory process and its dysregulation contributes to IBD for its ability to induce IL-1β release. Previously, we reported that a novel small molecular activator of Nrf2, 3-(2-oxo-2-phenylethylidene)-2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-pyrazino-[2,1-a]isoquinolin-4(11bH)-one (compound 1) can prevent the development of colorectal adenomas in AOM-DSS models. Here we further investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of compound 1 in DSS-induced colitis in C57BL/6 and NLRP3(-/-) mice, and revealed the possible modulation by compound 1 of NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated IL-1β release from macrophages. In C57BL/6 mice, oral administration of compound 1 significantly attenuated DSS-induced colonic pathological damage, remarkably inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration and decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) and IL-1β secretion in colons. In contrast, mice deficient for NLRP3 were less sensitive to DSS-induced acute colitis, and compound 1 treatment exerted no protective effect on DSS-induced intestinal inflammation in NLRP3(-/-) mice. The protective effect of compound 1 may be attributed to its inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome and Nrf2 activation in colons. Furthermore, compound 1, as a small molecular activator of Nrf2, significantly inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation in both THP-1 derived macrophages and bone-marrow derived macrophages, as indicated by reduced expression of NLRP3 and cleaved caspase-1, and lowered IL-1β secretion. Finally, compound 1-induced NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition is through blocking NLRP3 priming step and dependent on Nrf2 activation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that compound 1 might be a potential agent for the treatment of IBD by targeting Nrf2 and NLRP3 inflammasome.

  5. Conformations of Diphosphopyridine Coenzymes upon Binding to Dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Yu; Eichner, Ronald D.; Kaplan, Nathan O.

    1973-01-01

    The binding of oxidized as well as reduced coenzyme to some dehydrogenases has been studied under different concentration ratios and temperatures by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A significant difference in the spectral behavior between DPN+ and DPNH upon binding is interpreted in terms of fast and slow on-off rates relative to the nuclear magnetic resonance time scale in the binding of these two coenzymes. Significant downfield shifts of DPN+ were observed upon binding, comparable in magnitude to those expected upon opening (destacking) of the coenzymes in the case of chicken-muscle and lobster-tail lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) and yeast alchol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1.). A preliminary survey of several other dehydrogenases is consistent with these findings. In the case of 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde dehydrogenase, there is a possibility that the coenzyme exists in the folded form. PMID:4351183

  6. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  7. The retinaldehyde reductase activity of DHRS3 is reciprocally activated by retinol dehydrogenase 10 to control retinoid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mark K; Belyaeva, Olga V; Wu, Lizhi; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2014-05-23

    The retinoic acid-inducible dehydrogenase reductase 3 (DHRS3) is thought to function as a retinaldehyde reductase that controls the levels of all-trans-retinaldehyde, the immediate precursor for bioactive all-trans-retinoic acid. However, the weak catalytic activity of DHRS3 and the lack of changes in retinaldehyde conversion to retinol and retinoic acid in the cells overexpressing DHRS3 undermine its role as a physiologically important all-trans-retinaldehyde reductase. This study demonstrates that DHRS3 requires the presence of retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10) to display its full catalytic activity. The RDH10-activated DHRS3 acts as a robust high affinity all-trans-retinaldehyde-specific reductase that effectively converts retinaldehyde back to retinol, decreasing the rate of retinoic acid biosynthesis. In turn, the retinol dehydrogenase activity of RDH10 is reciprocally activated by DHRS3. At E13.5, DHRS3-null embryos have ∼4-fold lower levels of retinol and retinyl esters, but only slightly elevated levels of retinoic acid. The membrane-associated retinaldehyde reductase and retinol dehydrogenase activities are decreased by ∼4- and ∼2-fold, respectively, in Dhrs3(-/-) embryos, and Dhrs3(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit reduced metabolism of both retinaldehyde and retinol. Neither RDH10 nor DHRS3 has to be itself catalytically active to activate each other. The transcripts encoding DHRS3 and RDH10 are co-localized at least in some tissues during development. The mutually activating interaction between the two related proteins may represent a highly sensitive and conserved mechanism for precise control over the rate of retinoic acid biosynthesis.

  8. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Bitto, Eduard; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-08-13

    Since first discovered in Zea mays, cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) genes have been identified in many plants including rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, which possesses CKX homologues (AtCKX1-AtCKX7). So far, the three-dimensional structure of only Z. mays CKX (ZmCKX1) has been determined. The crystal structures of ZmCKX1 have been solved in the native state and in complex with reaction products and a slowly reacting substrate. The structures revealed four glycosylated asparagine residues and a histidine residue covalently linked to FAD. Combined with the structural information, recent biochemical analyses of ZmCKX1 concluded that the final products of the reaction, adenine and a side chain aldehyde, are formed by nonenzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cytokinin imine products resulting directly from CKX catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtCKX7 (gene locus At5g21482.1, UniProt code Q9FUJ1).

  9. NADH electrochemical sensor coupled with dehydrogenase enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Hideko; Mascini, Marco )

    1992-06-01

    A graphite electrode assembled in a flow cell has shown to be a good detector for NADH. Current is linearly dependent on concentration in the range 10{sup {minus}7}-10{sup {minus}3} M without any mediator at the potential applied of 300 mV vs Ag/AgCl. Lactate and alcohol dehydrogenases were immobilized near to the electrode surface or in a reactor to obtain an NADH-based biosensor for lactate or ethanol. With lactate the authors succeeded to obtain a response only if the reactor was used and for alcohol a current proportional to the concentration was obtained either if the enzyme was immobilized in a membrane and placed near the electrode surface or when the enzyme was immobilized in a reactor form. By FIA procedures fast responses and recoveries were obtained, but with a short linear range.

  10. [Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hitoshi; Ogura, Hiromi

    2015-07-01

    In the past 10 years, we have diagnosed congenital hemolytic anemia in 294 patients, approximately 33% of whom were found to have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. It is becoming more common for Japanese to marry people of other ethnic origins, such that G6PD deficiency is becoming more prevalent in Japan. Japanese G6PD deficiency tends to be diagnosed in the neonatal period due to severe jaundice, while G6PD-deficient patients with foreign ancestors tend to be diagnosed at the onset of an acute hemolytic crisis before the age of six. It is difficult to predict the clinical course of each patient by G6PD activity, reduced glutathione content, or the presence/absence of severe neonatal jaundice. We propose that both neonatal G6PD screening and systematic analyses of G6PD gene mutations may be useful for personalized management of patients with G6PD-deficient hemolytic anemia.

  11. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; Weretilnyk, E.A.; Weigel, P.

    1986-04-01

    Betaine is synthesized in spinach chloroplasts via the pathway Choline ..-->.. Betaine Aldehyde ..-->.. Betaine; the second step is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The subcellular distribution of BADH was determined in leaf protoplast lysates; BADH isozymes were separated by 6-9% native PAGE. The chloroplast stromal fraction contains a single BADH isozyme (number1) that accounts for > 80% of the total protoplast activity; the extrachloroplastic fraction has a minor isozyme (number2) which migrates more slowly than number1. Both isozymes appear specific for betaine aldehyde, are more active with NAD than NADP, and show a ca. 3-fold activity increase in salinized leaves. The phenotype of a natural variant of isozyme number1 suggests that the enzyme is a dimer.

  12. Cloning and high-level expression of the glutathione-independent formaldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, K; Takahashi, M; Yoshimoto, T; Tsuru, D

    1994-01-01

    A DNA fragment of 485 bp was specifically amplified by PCR with primers based on the N-terminal sequence of the purified formaldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.46) from Pseudomonas putida and on that of a cyanogen bromide-derived peptide. With this product as a probe, a gene coding for formaldehyde dehydrogenase (fdhA) in P. putida chromosomal DNA was cloned in Escherichia coli DH5 alpha. Sequencing analysis revealed that the fdhA gene contained 1,197-bp open reading frame, encoding a protein composed of 399 amino acid residues whose calculated molecular weight was 42,082. The transformant of E. coli DH5 alpha harboring the hybrid plasmid, pFDHK3DN71, showed about 50-fold-higher formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity than P. putida. The predicted amino acid sequence contained several features characteristic of the zinc-containing medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family. Most of the glycine residues strictly conserved within the family, including a Gly-Xaa-Gly-Xaa-Xaa-Gly pattern in the coenzyme binding domain, were well conserved in this enzyme. Regions around both the catalytic and the structural zinc atoms were also conserved. Analyses of structural and enzymatic characteristics indicated that P. putida FDH belongs to the medium-chain ADH family, with mixed properties of mammalian class I and III ADHs. Images PMID:8169197

  13. Identification of 3-Sulfinopropionyl Coenzyme A (CoA) Desulfinases within the Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, Marc; Demming, Rebecca Michaela; Krewing, Marco; Rose, Judith; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study, the essential role of 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acd) in Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7T (AcdDPN7) during degradation of 3,3′-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) was elucidated. DTDP is a sulfur-containing precursor substrate for biosynthesis of polythioesters (PTEs). AcdDPN7 showed high amino acid sequence similarity to acyl-CoA dehydrogenases but was unable to catalyze a dehydrogenation reaction. Hence, it was investigated in the present study whether 3SP-CoA desulfinase activity is an uncommon or a widespread property within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Therefore, proteins of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily from Advenella kashmirensis WT001, Bacillus cereus DSM31, Cupriavidus necator N-1, Escherichia coli BL21, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, Ralstonia eutropha H16, Variovorax paradoxus B4, Variovorax paradoxus S110, and Variovorax paradoxus TBEA6 were expressed in E. coli strains. All purified acyl-CoA dehydrogenases appeared as homotetramers, as revealed by size exclusion chromatography. AcdS110, AcdB4, AcdH16, and AcdKT2440 were able to dehydrogenate isobutyryl-CoA. AcdKT2440 additionally dehydrogenated butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA, whereas AcdDSM31 dehydrogenated only butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA. No dehydrogenation reactions were observed with propionyl-CoA, isovaleryl-CoA, succinyl-CoA, and glutaryl-CoA for any of the investigated acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. Only AcdTBEA6, AcdN-1, and AcdLB400 desulfinated 3SP-CoA and were thus identified as 3SP-CoA desulfinases within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family, although none of these three Acds dehydrogenated any of the tested acyl-CoA thioesters. No appropriate substrates were identified for AcdBL21 and AcdWT001. Spectrophotometric assays provided apparent Km and Vmax values for active substrates and indicated the applicability of phylogenetic analyses to predict the substrate range of

  14. Identification of 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (CoA) desulfinases within the Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Marc; Demming, Rebecca Michaela; Krewing, Marco; Rose, Judith; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    In a previous study, the essential role of 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acd) in Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7(T) (AcdDPN7) during degradation of 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) was elucidated. DTDP is a sulfur-containing precursor substrate for biosynthesis of polythioesters (PTEs). AcdDPN7 showed high amino acid sequence similarity to acyl-CoA dehydrogenases but was unable to catalyze a dehydrogenation reaction. Hence, it was investigated in the present study whether 3SP-CoA desulfinase activity is an uncommon or a widespread property within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Therefore, proteins of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily from Advenella kashmirensis WT001, Bacillus cereus DSM31, Cupriavidus necator N-1, Escherichia coli BL21, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, Ralstonia eutropha H16, Variovorax paradoxus B4, Variovorax paradoxus S110, and Variovorax paradoxus TBEA6 were expressed in E. coli strains. All purified acyl-CoA dehydrogenases appeared as homotetramers, as revealed by size exclusion chromatography. AcdS110, AcdB4, AcdH16, and AcdKT2440 were able to dehydrogenate isobutyryl-CoA. AcdKT2440 additionally dehydrogenated butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA, whereas AcdDSM31 dehydrogenated only butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA. No dehydrogenation reactions were observed with propionyl-CoA, isovaleryl-CoA, succinyl-CoA, and glutaryl-CoA for any of the investigated acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. Only AcdTBEA6, AcdN-1, and AcdLB400 desulfinated 3SP-CoA and were thus identified as 3SP-CoA desulfinases within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family, although none of these three Acds dehydrogenated any of the tested acyl-CoA thioesters. No appropriate substrates were identified for AcdBL21 and AcdWT001. Spectrophotometric assays provided apparent Km and Vmax values for active substrates and indicated the applicability of phylogenetic analyses to predict the substrate range of

  15. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the production of the protein building block ( amino acid ) serine. Specifically, the enzyme converts a substance called ... Resources MedlinePlus (5 links) Encyclopedia: Microcephaly Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: ...

  16. [Pharmacological significance of alpha lipoic acid in up to date treatment of diabetic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Becić, Fahir; Kapić, Elvedina; Rakanović-Todić, Maida

    2008-01-01

    Alpha lipoic acid is important intramolecular redox system. It is coenzyme of piruvate dehydrogenase and ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. Alpha lipoic acid has enzymatic and cytoprotective effect. It has key role in citric acid cycle, as a coenzyme. Therapeutic efficacy of alpha lipoic acid in diabetic neuropathy is based on reaction with free radicals and lipophylic antioxydans properties. Clinical studies results showed efficacy and safety of alpha liponic acid application in patients with diabetic neuropathy.

  17. Purification and Characterization of a Novel NAD(P)+-Farnesol Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Seman-Kamarulzaman, Ahmad-Faris; Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile hormones have attracted attention as safe and selective targets for the design and development of environmentally friendly and biorational insecticides. In the juvenile hormone III biosynthetic pathway, the enzyme farnesol dehydrogenase catalyzes the oxidation of farnesol to farnesal. In this study, farnesol dehydrogenase was extracted from Polygonum minus leaves and purified 204-fold to apparent homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography using DEAE-Toyopearl, SP-Toyopearl, and Super-Q Toyopearl, followed by three successive purifications by gel filtration chromatography on a TSK-gel GS3000SW. The enzyme is a heterodimer comprised of subunits with molecular masses of 65 kDa and 70 kDa. The optimum temperature and pH were 35°C and pH 9.5, respectively. Activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents, metal-chelating agents and heavy metal ions. The enzyme utilized both NAD+ and NADP+ as coenzymes with Km values of 0.74 mM and 40 mM, respectively. Trans, trans-farnesol was the preferred substrate for the P. minus farnesol dehydrogenase. Geometrical isomers of trans, trans-farnesol, cis, trans-farnesol and cis, cis-farnesol were also oxidized by the enzyme with lower activity. The Km values for trans, trans-farnesol, cis, trans-farnesol and cis, cis-farnesol appeared to be 0.17 mM, 0.33 mM and 0.42 mM, respectively. The amino acid sequences of 4 tryptic peptides of the enzyme were analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS spectrometry, and showed no significant similarity to those of previously reported farnesol dehydrogenases. These results suggest that the purified enzyme is a novel NAD(P)+-dependent farnesol dehydrogenase. The purification and characterization established in the current study will serve as a basis to provide new information for recombinant production of the enzyme. Therefore, recombinant farnesol dehydrogenase may provide a useful molecular tool in manipulating juvenile hormone biosynthesis to generate transgenic plants for pest control. PMID:26600471

  18. Metabolism of the novel IMP dehydrogenase inhibitor benzamide riboside.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Walter; Salamon, Alexandra; Szekeres, Thomas

    2002-04-01

    Benzamide riboside (BR) is a novel anticancer agent exhibiting pronounced activity against several human tumor cell lines via the inhibition of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) that catalyzes the formation of xanthine 5'-monophosphate from inosine 5'-monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, thereby restricting the biosynthesis of guanylates. Phosphorylation of BR to its 5'-monophosphate derivative appears to be ubiquitous in most cells catalyzed by the enzymes, adenosine kinase, nicotinamide nucleoside kinase and 5' nucleotidase. BR 5'-monophosphate is then converted to the active metabolite benzamide adenine dinucleotide (BAD) by NMN adenylyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of NAD. As BAD is more potent in the inhibition of IMPDH than BR and BR 5'-monophosphate, cytotoxicity of BR is closely connected with intercellular metabolism to BAD. However, intracellular BAD level is also affected by BADase activity, a phosphodiesterase which hydrolyzes BAD to BR-5'-monophosphate and AMP. A recent study demonstrates enzymatic deamination of BR to non-cytotoxic benzene carboxylic acid (BR-COOH) as the main hepatic BR biotransformation product in rat liver. As the IMPDH inhibitors tiazofurin and ribavirin exhibit predominant accumulation and biotransformation in liver, hepatic metabolism may be an important factor also for BR activation and inactivation and should be considered in human liver during cancer therapy when BR is used as a single drug or in combination with other anticancer agents.

  19. Computational design of glutamate dehydrogenase in Bacillus subtilis natto.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Li; Wang, Jia-Le; Hu, Yu; Qian, Bing-Jun; Yao, Xiao-Min; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Jian-Hua

    2013-04-01

    Bacillus subtilis natto is widely used in industry to produce natto, a traditional and popular Japanese soybean food. However, during its secondary fermentation, high amounts of ammonia are released to give a negative influence on the flavor of natto. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a key enzyme for the ammonia produced and released, because it catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate to alpha-ketoglutarate using NAD(+) or NADP(+) as co-factor during carbon and nitrogen metabolism processes. To solve this problem, we employed multiple computational methods model and re-design GDH from Bacillus subtilis natto. Firstly, a structure model of GDH with cofactor NADP(+) was constructed by threading and ab initio modeling. Then the substrate glutamate were flexibly docked into the structure model to form the substrate-binding mode. According to the structural analysis of the substrate-binding mode, Lys80, Lys116, Arg196, Thr200, and Ser351 in the active site were found could form a significant hydrogen bonding network with the substrate, which was thought to play a crucial role in the substrate recognition and position. Thus, these residues were then mutated into other amino acids, and the substrate binding affinities for each mutant were calculated. Finally, three single mutants (K80A, K116Q, and S351A) were found to have significant decrease in the substrate binding affinities, which was further supported by our biochemical experiments.

  20. Inactivation of Bakers' yeast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Sungwoo; Joshi, J.G. )

    1989-04-18

    Preincubation of yeast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) with Al(III) produced an inactive enzyme containing 1 mol of Al(III)/mol of enzyme subunit. None of the enzyme-bound Al(III) was dissociated by dialysis against 10 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.0, containing 0.2 mM EDTA at 4{degree}C for 24 h. Citrate, NADP{sup +}, EDTA, or NaF protected the enzyme against the Al(III) inactivation. The Al(III)-inactivated enzyme, however, was completely reactivated only by citrate and NaF. The dissociation constant for the enzyme-aluminum complex was calculated to be 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M with NaF, a known reversible chelator for aluminum. Modification of histidine and lysine residues of the enzyme with diethyl pyrocarbonate and acetylsalicylic acid, respectively, inactivated the enzyme. However, the modified enzyme still bound 1 mol of Al(III)/mol of enzyme subunit. Circular dichroism studies showed that the binding of Al(III) to the enzyme induced a decrease in {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet and an increase in random coil. Therefore, it is suggested that inactivation of G6PD by Al(III) is due to the conformational change induced by Al(III) binding.

  1. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cancer stem cells: potential as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Clark, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to current chemotherapeutic or radiation-based cancer treatment strategies is a serious concern. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are typically able to evade treatment and establish a recurrent tumor or metastasis, and it is these that lead to the majority of cancer deaths. Therefore, a major current goal is to develop treatment strategies that eliminate the resistant CSCs as well as the bulk tumor cells in order to achieve complete disease clearance. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are important for maintenance and differentiation of stem cells as well as normal development. There is expanding evidence that ALDH expression increases in response to therapy and promotes chemoresistance and survival mechanisms in CSCs. This perspective will discuss a paper by Cojoc and colleagues recently published in Cancer Research, that indicates ALDHs play a key role in resistance to radiation therapy and tumor recurrence in prostate cancer. The authors suggest that ALDHs are a potential therapeutic target for treatment prostate cancer patients to limit radiation resistance and disease recurrence. The findings are consistent with work from other cancers showing ALDHs are major contributors of CSC signaling and resistance to anti-cancer treatments. This perspective will address representative work concerning the validity of ALDH and the associated retinoic acid signaling pathway as chemotherapeutic targets for prostate as well as other cancers. PMID:28149880

  2. Green tea polyphenols modulate insulin secretion by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Kwagh, Jae; Doliba, Nicolai M; Qin, Wei; Najafi, Habiba; Collins, Heather W; Matschinsky, Franz M; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2006-04-14

    Insulin secretion by pancreatic beta-cells is stimulated by glucose, amino acids, and other metabolic fuels. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) has been shown to play a regulatory role in this process. The importance of GDH was underscored by features of hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia syndrome, where a dominant mutation causes the loss of inhibition by GTP and ATP. Here we report the effects of green tea polyphenols on GDH and insulin secretion. Of the four compounds tested, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate were found to inhibit GDH with nanomolar ED(50) values and were therefore found to be as potent as the physiologically important inhibitor GTP. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that EGCG inhibits BCH-stimulated insulin secretion, a process that is mediated by GDH, under conditions where GDH is no longer inhibited by high energy metabolites. EGCG does not affect glucose-stimulated insulin secretion under high energy conditions where GDH is probably fully inhibited. We have further shown that these compounds act in an allosteric manner independent of their antioxidant activity and that the beta-cell stimulatory effects are directly correlated with glutamine oxidation. These results demonstrate that EGCG, much like the activator of GDH (BCH), can facilitate dissecting the complex regulation of insulin secretion by pharmacologically modulating the effects of GDH.

  3. Phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from Ascaris suum

    SciTech Connect

    Thissen, J.; Komuniecki, R.

    1987-05-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) from body wall muscle of the porcine nematode, Ascaris suum, plays a pivotal role in anaerobic mitochondrial metabolism. As in mammalian mitochondria, PDC activity is inhibited by the phosphorylation of the ..cap alpha..PDH subunit, catalyzed by an associated PDH/sub a/ kinase. However, in contrast to PDC's isolated from all other eukaryotic sources, phosphorylation decreases the mobility of the ..cap alpha..PDH subunit on SDS-PAGE and permits the separation of the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH's. Phosphorylation and the inactivation of the Ascaris PDC correspond directly, and the additional phosphorylation that occurs after complete inactivation in mammalian PDC's is not observed. The purified ascarid PDC incorporates 10 nmoles /sup 32/P/mg P. Autoradiography of the radiolabeled PDC separated by SDS-PAGE yields a band which corresponds to the phosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH and a second, faint band which is present only during the first three minutes of PDC inactivation, intermediate between the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH subunit. Tryptic digests of the /sup 32/P-PDC yields one major phosphopeptide, when separated by HPLC, and its amino acid sequence currently is being determined.

  4. RECIPIENT PRETRANSPLANT INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN NONMYELOABLATIVE HCT

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Risler, Linda J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S.; Boeckh, Michael J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5’- monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T-cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation, but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient’s pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient’s sensitivity to MMF, but confirmatory studies are needed. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  5. Yeast cell-based analysis of human lactate dehydrogenase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Lulu Ahmed; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Human lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has attracted attention as a potential target for cancer therapy and contraception. In this study, we reconstituted human lactic acid fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with the goal of constructing a yeast cell-based LDH assay system. pdc null mutant yeast (mutated in the endogenous pyruvate decarboxylase genes) are unable to perform alcoholic fermentation; when grown in the presence of an electron transport chain inhibitor, pdc null strains exhibit a growth defect. We found that introduction of the human gene encoding LDHA complemented the pdc growth defect; this complementation depended on LDHA catalytic activity. Similarly, introduction of the human LDHC complemented the pdc growth defect, even though LDHC did not generate lactate at the levels seen with LDHA. In contrast, the human LDHB did not complement the yeast pdc null mutant, although LDHB did generate lactate in yeast cells. Expression of LDHB as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) fusion yielded blebs in yeast, whereas LDHA-RFP and LDHC-RFP fusion proteins exhibited cytosolic distribution. Thus, LDHB exhibits several unique features when expressed in yeast cells. Because yeast cells are amenable to genetic analysis and cell-based high-throughput screening, our pdc/LDH strains are expected to be of use for versatile analyses of human LDH.

  6. Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase causing excessive acetaldehyde production from ethanol by oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Sylvia I; Jin, Ling; Gasparovich, Stephen R; Tao, Lin

    2013-07-01

    Ethanol consumption and poor oral hygiene are risk factors for oral and oesophageal cancers. Although oral streptococci have been found to produce excessive acetaldehyde from ethanol, little is known about the mechanism by which this carcinogen is produced. By screening 52 strains of diverse oral streptococcal species, we identified Streptococcus gordonii V2016 that produced the most acetaldehyde from ethanol. We then constructed gene deletion mutants in this strain and analysed them for alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenases by zymograms. The results showed that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol and ethanol, respectively. Two additional dehydrogenases, S-AdhA and TdhA, were identified with specificities to the secondary alcohol 2-propanol and threonine, respectively, but not to ethanol. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase even though its adhE gene encodes a putative bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Mutants with adhE deletion showed greater tolerance to ethanol in comparison with the wild-type and mutant with adhA or adhB deletion, indicating that AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Analysis of 19 additional strains of S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. oralis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis showed expressions of up to three alcohol dehydrogenases, but none showed detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, except one strain that showed a novel ALDH. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase may contribute to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by certain oral streptococci.

  7. Discovery of a potent, selective, and orally bioavailable acidic 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) inhibitor: discovery of 2-[(3S)-1-[5-(cyclohexylcarbamoyl)-6-propylsulfanylpyridin-2-yl]-3-piperidyl]acetic acid (AZD4017).

    PubMed

    Scott, James S; Bowker, Suzanne S; Deschoolmeester, Joanne; Gerhardt, Stefan; Hargreaves, David; Kilgour, Elaine; Lloyd, Adele; Mayers, Rachel M; McCoull, William; Newcombe, Nicholas J; Ogg, Derek; Packer, Martin J; Rees, Amanda; Revill, John; Schofield, Paul; Selmi, Nidhal; Swales, John G; Whittamore, Paul R O

    2012-06-28

    Inhibition of 11β-HSD1 is an attractive mechanism for the treatment of obesity and other elements of the metabolic syndrome. We report here the discovery of a nicotinic amide derived carboxylic acid class of inhibitors that has good potency, selectivity, and pharmacokinetic characteristics. Compound 11i (AZD4017) is an effective inhibitor of 11β-HSD1 in human adipocytes and exhibits good druglike properties and as a consequence was selected for clinical development.

  8. Probing reactivity of PQQ-dependent carbohydrate dehydrogenases using artificial electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Tetianec, Lidija; Bratkovskaja, Irina; Kulys, Juozas; Casaite, Vida; Meskys, Rolandas

    2011-02-01

    The kinetic parameters of carbohydrate oxidation catalyzed by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and Escherichia coli PQQ-dependent aldose sugar dehydrogenase (ASDH) were determined using various electron acceptors. The radical cations of organic compounds and 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol are the most reactive with both enzymes in presence of glucose. The reactivity of dioxygen with ASDH is low; the bimolecular constant k (ox) = 660 M(-1) s(-1), while GDH reactivity with dioxygen is even less. The radical cation of 3-(10H-phenoxazin-10-yl)propionic acid was used as electron acceptor for reduced enzyme in the study of dehydrogenases carbohydrates specificity. Mono- and disaccharide reactivity with GDH is higher than the reactivity of oligosaccharides. For ASDH, the reactivity increased with the carbohydrate monomer number increase. The specificity of quinoproteins was compared with specificity of flavoprotein Microdochium nivale carbohydrate oxidase due to potential enzymes application for lactose oxidation.

  9. Isolated isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: an unrecognized defect in human valine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Roe, C R; Cederbaum, S D; Roe, D S; Mardach, R; Galindo, A; Sweetman, L

    1998-12-01

    A 2-year-old female was well until 12 months of age when she was found to be anemic and had dilated cardiomyopathy. Total plasma carnitine was 6 microM and acylcarnitine analysis while receiving carnitine supplement revealed an increase in the four-carbon species. Urine organic acids were normal. In vitro analysis of the mitochondrial pathways for beta oxidation, and leucine, valine, and isoleucine metabolism was performed in fibroblasts using stable isotope-labeled precursors to these pathways followed by acylcarnitine analysis by tandem mass spectrometry. 16-2H3-palmitate was metabolized normally down to the level of butyryl-CoA thus excluding SCAD deficiency. 13C6-leucine and 13C6-isoleucine were also metabolized normally. 13C5-valine incubation revealed a significant increase in 13C4-isobutyrylcarnitine without any incorporation into propionylcarnitine as is observed normally. These same precursors were also evaluated in fibroblasts with proven ETF-QO deficiency in which acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies in each of these pathways was clearly identified. These results indicate that in the human, there is an isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase which exists as a separate enzyme serving only the valine pathway in addition to the 2-methyl branched-chain dehydrogenase which serves both the valine and the isoleucine pathways in both rat and human.

  10. Modulation of ethanol stress tolerance by aldehyde dehydrogenase in the mycorrhizal fungus Tricholoma vaccinum.

    PubMed

    Asiimwe, Theodore; Krause, Katrin; Schlunk, Ines; Kothe, Erika

    2012-08-01

    We report the first mycorrhizal fungal aldehyde dehydrogenase gene, ald1, which was isolated from the basidiomycete Tricholoma vaccinum. The gene, encoding a protein Ald1 of 502 amino acids, is up-regulated in ectomycorrhiza. Phylogenetic analyses using 53 specific fungal aldehyde dehydrogenases from all major phyla in the kingdom of fungi including Ald1 and two partial sequences of T. vaccinum were performed to get an insight in the evolution of the aldehyde dehydrogenase family. By using competitive and real-time RT-PCR, ald1 is up-regulated in response to alcohol and aldehyde-related stress. Furthermore, heterologous expression of ald1 in Escherichia coli and subsequent in vitro enzyme activity assay demonstrated the oxidation of propionaldehyde and butyraldehyde with different kinetics using either NAD(+) or NADP(+) as cofactors. In addition, overexpression of ald1 in T. vaccinum after Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation increased ethanol stress tolerance. These results demonstrate the ability of Ald1 to circumvent ethanol stress, a critical function in mycorrhizal habitats.

  11. A bifunctional enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis exhibiting secondary alcohol dehydrogenase-catalase activities.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rojas, Enriqueta; Kurt, Tutku; Schmidt, Udo; Meyer, Vera; Garbe, Leif-Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases have long been recognized as potential biocatalyst for production of chiral fine and bulk chemicals. They are relevant for industry in enantiospecific production of chiral compounds. In this study, we identified and purified a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SdcA) from Rhodococcus erythropolis oxidizing γ-lactols into γ-lactones. SdcA showed broad substrate specificity on γ-lactols; secondary aliphatic alcohols with 8 and 10 carbon atoms were also substrates and oxidized with (2S)-stereospecificity. The enzyme exhibited moderate stability with a half-life of 5 h at 40 °C and 20 days at 4 °C. Mass spectrometric identification revealed high sequence coverage of SdcA amino acid sequence to a highly conserved catalase from R. erythropolis. The corresponding encoding gene was isolated from genomic DNA and subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 cells. In addition, the recombinant SdcA was purified and characterized in order to confirm that the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and catalase activity correspond to the same enzyme.

  12. Purification, Characterization, and Submitochondrial Localization of the 32-Kilodalton NADH Dehydrogenase from Maize.

    PubMed Central

    Knudten, A. F.; Thelen, J. J.; Luethy, M. H.; Elthon, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    Plant mitochondria have the unique ability to directly oxidize exogenous NAD(P)H. We recently separated two NAD(P)H dehydrogenase activities from maize (Zea mays L.) mitochondria using anion-exchange (Mono Q) chromatography. The first peak of activity oxidized only NADH, whereas the second oxidized both NADH and NADPH. In this paper we describe the purification of the first peak of activity to a 32-kD protein. Polyclonal antibodies to the 32-kD protein were used to show that it was present in mitochondria from several plant species. Two-dimensional gel analysis of the 32-kD NADH dehydrogenase indicated that it consisted of two major and one minor isoelectric forms. Immunoblot analysis of submitochondrial fractions indicated that the 32-kD protein was enriched in the soluble protein fraction after mitochondrial disruption and fractionation; however, some association with the membrane fraction was observed. The membrane-impermeable protein cross-linking agent 3,3[prime] -dithiobis-(sulfosuccinimidylpropionate) was used to further investigate the submitochondrial location of the 32-kD NADH dehydrogenase. The 32-kD protein was localized to the outer surface of the inner mitochondrial membrane or to the intermembrane space. The pH optimum for the enzyme was 7.0. The activity was found to be severely inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, mersalyl, and dicumarol, and stimulated somewhat by flavin mononucleotide. PMID:12232393

  13. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 4 (PDK4) gene expression by glucocorticoids and insulin.

    PubMed

    Connaughton, Sara; Chowdhury, Farhana; Attia, Ramy R; Song, Shulan; Zhang, Yi; Elam, Marshall B; Cook, George A; Park, Edwards A

    2010-02-05

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and is a key regulatory enzyme in the oxidation of glucose to acetyl-CoA. Phosphorylation of PDC by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK) inhibits its activity. The expression of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) gene is increased in fasting and other conditions associated with the switch from the utilization of glucose to fatty acids as an energy source. Transcription of the PDK4 gene is elevated by glucocorticoids and inhibited by insulin. In this study, we have investigated the factors involved in the regulation of the PDK4 gene by these hormones. Glucocorticoids stimulate PDK4 through two glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding sites located more than 6000 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site. Insulin inhibits the glucocorticoid induction in part by causing dissociation of the GR from the promoter. Previously, we found that the estrogen related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) stimulates the expression of PDK4. Here, we determined that one of the ERRalpha binding sites contributes to the insulin inhibition of PDK4. A binding site for the forkhead transcription factor (FoxO1) is adjacent to the ERRalpha binding sites. FoxO1 participates in the glucocorticoid induction of PDK4 and the regulation of this gene by insulin. Our data demonstrate that glucocorticoids and insulin each modulate PDK4 gene expression through complex hormone response units that contain multiple factors.

  14. Changes in cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activities from sugarcane cultivars inoculated with Sporisorium scitamineum sporidia.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rocío; Alarcón, Borja; de Armas, Roberto; Vicente, Carlos; Legaz, María Estrella

    2012-06-01

    This study describes a method for determining cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity in sugarcane stems using reverse phase (RP) high-performance liquid chromatography to elucidate their possible lignin origin. Activity is assayed using the reverse mode, the oxidation of hydroxycinnamyl alcohols into hydroxycinnamyl aldehydes. Appearance of the reaction products, coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde is determined by measuring absorbance at 340 and 345 nm, respectively. Disappearance of substrates, coniferyl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol is measured at 263 and 273 nm, respectively. Isocratic elution with acetonitrile:acetic acid through an RP Mediterranea sea C18 column is performed. As case examples, we have examined two different cultivars of sugarcane; My 5514 is resistant to smut, whereas B 42231 is susceptible to the pathogen. Inoculation of sugarcane stems elicits lignification and produces significant increases of coniferyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) and sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD). Production of lignin increases about 29% in the resistant cultivar and only 13% in the susceptible cultivar after inoculation compared to uninoculated plants. Our results show that the resistance of My 5514 to smut is likely derived, at least in part, to a marked increase of lignin concentration by the activation of CAD and SAD.

  15. Mycofactocin-associated mycobacterial dehydrogenases with non-exchangeable NAD cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Haft, Daniel H.; Pierce, Phillip G.; Mayclin, Stephen J.; Sullivan, Amy; Gardberg, Anna S.; Abendroth, Jan; Begley, Darren W.; Phan, Isabelle Q.; Staker, Bart L.; Myler, Peter J.; Marathias, Vasilios M.; Lorimer, Donald D.; Edwards, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    During human infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) survives the normally bacteriocidal phagosome of macrophages. Mtb and related species may be able to combat this harsh acidic environment which contains reactive oxygen species due to the mycobacterial genomes encoding a large number of dehydrogenases. Typically, dehydrogenase cofactor binding sites are open to solvent, which allows NAD/NADH exchange to support multiple turnover. Interestingly, mycobacterial short chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) within family TIGR03971 contain an insertion at the NAD binding site. Here we present crystal structures of 9 mycobacterial SDRs in which the insertion buries the NAD cofactor except for a small portion of the nicotinamide ring. Line broadening and STD-NMR experiments did not show NAD or NADH exchange on the NMR timescale. STD-NMR demonstrated binding of the potential substrate carveol, the potential product carvone, the inhibitor tricyclazol, and an external redox partner 2,6-dichloroindophenol (DCIP). Therefore, these SDRs appear to contain a non-exchangeable NAD cofactor and may rely on an external redox partner, rather than cofactor exchange, for multiple turnover. Incidentally, these genes always appear in conjunction with the mftA gene, which encodes the short peptide MftA, and with other genes proposed to convert MftA into the external redox partner mycofactocin. PMID:28120876

  16. The functional readthrough extension of malate dehydrogenase reveals a modification of the genetic code

    PubMed Central

    Hofhuis, Julia; Schueren, Fabian; Nötzel, Christopher; Lingner, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta; Jahn, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Translational readthrough gives rise to C-terminally extended proteins, thereby providing the cell with new protein isoforms. These may have different properties from the parental proteins if the extensions contain functional domains. While for most genes amino acid incorporation at the stop codon is far lower than 0.1%, about 4% of malate dehydrogenase (MDH1) is physiologically extended by translational readthrough and the actual ratio of MDH1x (extended protein) to ‘normal' MDH1 is dependent on the cell type. In human cells, arginine and tryptophan are co-encoded by the MDH1x UGA stop codon. Readthrough is controlled by the 7-nucleotide high-readthrough stop codon context without contribution of the subsequent 50 nucleotides encoding the extension. All vertebrate MDH1x is directed to peroxisomes via a hidden peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS) in the readthrough extension, which is more highly conserved than the extension of lactate dehydrogenase B. The hidden PTS of non-mammalian MDH1x evolved to be more efficient than the PTS of mammalian MDH1x. These results provide insight into the genetic and functional co-evolution of these dually localized dehydrogenases. PMID:27881739

  17. Efficient production of L-lactic acid from xylose by a recombinant Candida utilis strain.

    PubMed

    Tamakawa, Hideyuki; Ikushima, Shigehito; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Efficient L-lactic acid production from xylose was achieved using a pyruvate decarboxylase-deficient Candida utilis strain expressing an L-lactate dehydrogenase, an NADH-preferring mutated xylose reductase (XR), a xylitol dehydrogenase and a xylulokinase. The recombinant strain showed 53% increased L-lactic acid production compared with the reference strain expressing native XR (NADPH-preferring).

  18. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Hernandez, Agustin; Speed, Haley; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-03-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes waterborne diseases worldwide. There is no effective therapy for C. parvum infection. The parasite depends mainly on glycolysis for energy production. Lactate dehydrogenase is a major regulator of glycolysis. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase and high resolution crystal structures of the apo-enzyme and four ternary complexes. The ternary complexes capture the enzyme bound to NAD/NADH or its 3-acetylpyridine analog in the cofactor binding pocket, while the substrate binding site is occupied by one of the following ligands: lactate, pyruvate or oxamate. The results reveal distinctive features of the parasitic enzyme. For example, C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase prefers the acetylpyridine analog of NADH as a cofactor. Moreover, it is slightly less sensitive to gossypol inhibition compared with mammalian lactate dehydrogenases and not inhibited by excess pyruvate. The active site loop and the antigenic loop in C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are considerably different from those in the human counterpart. Structural features and enzymatic properties of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are similar to enzymes from related parasites. Structural comparison with malate dehydrogenase supports a common ancestry for the two genes.

  19. Expression and Characterization of a Novel 1,3-Propanediol Dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xianghui; Yun, Junhua; Qi, Yilin; Zhang, Huanhuan; Wang, Fei; Guo, Qi; Cao, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    1,3-Propanediol dehydrogenase (PDOR) is important in the biosynthesis of 1,3-propanediol. In the present study, the dhaT gene encoding PDOR was cloned from Lactobacillus brevis 6239 and expressed in Escherichia coli for the first time. Sequence analysis revealed that PDOR containing two Fe(2+)-binding motifs and a cofactor motif belongs to the type III alcohol dehydrogenase. The purified recombinant PDOR exhibited a single band of 42 kDa according to SDS-PAGE. Optimal temperatures and pH values of this dehydrogenase are 37 °C, 7.5 for reduction and 25 °C, 9.5 for oxidation, respectively. We found that PDOR was more stable in acid buffer than in alkaline condition, and 60 % of its relative activity still remained after a 2-h incubation at 37 °C. The activity of PDOR can be enhanced in the presence of Mn(2+) or Fe(2+) iron and inhibited by EDTA or PMSF by different degrees. The K m and V max of this dehydrogenase are 1.25 mM, 64.02 μM min(-1) mg(-1) for propionaldehyde and 2.26 mM, 35.05 μM min(-1) mg(-1) for 1,3-PD, respectively. Substrate specificity analysis showed that PDOR has a broad range of substrate specificities. The modeling superposition indicated that the structural differences may account for the diversity of PDORs' properties. Thus, our PDOR is a potential candidate for facilitating the 1,3-PD biosynthesis.

  20. The metabolic role and evolution of L-arabinitol 4-dehydrogenase of Hypocrea jecorina.

    PubMed

    Pail, Manuela; Peterbauer, Thomas; Seiboth, Bernhard; Hametner, Christian; Druzhinina, Irina; Kubicek, Christian P

    2004-05-01

    L-Arabinitol 4-dehydrogenase (Lad1) of the cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic fungus Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph: Trichoderma reesei) has been implicated in the catabolism of L-arabinose, and genetic evidence also shows that it is involved in the catabolism of D-xylose in xylitol dehydrogenase (xdh1) mutants and of D-galactose in galactokinase (gal1) mutants of H. jecorina. In order to identify the substrate specificity of Lad1, we have recombinantly produced the enzyme in Escherichia coli and purified it to physical homogeneity. The resulting enzyme preparation catalyzed the oxidation of pentitols (L-arabinitol) and hexitols (D-allitol, D-sorbitol, L-iditol, L-mannitol) to the same corresponding ketoses as mammalian sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), albeit with different catalytic efficacies, showing highest k(cat)/K(m) for L-arabinitol. However, it oxidized galactitol and D-talitol at C4 exclusively, yielding L-xylo-3-hexulose and D-arabino-3-hexulose, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of Lad1 showed that it is a member of a terminal clade of putative fungal arabinitol dehydrogenase orthologues which separated during evolution of SDHs. Juxtapositioning of the Lad1 3D structure over that of SDH revealed major amino acid exchanges at topologies flanking the binding pocket for d-sorbitol. A lad1 gene disruptant was almost unable to grow on L-arabinose, grew extremely weakly on L-arabinitol, D-talitol and galactitol, showed reduced growth on D-sorbitol and D-galactose and a slightly reduced growth on D-glucose. The weak growth on L-arabinitol was completely eliminated in a mutant in which the xdh1 gene had also been disrupted. These data show not only that Lad1 is indeed essential for the catabolism of L-arabinose, but also that it constitutes an essential step in the catabolism of several hexoses; this emphasizes the importance of such reductive pathways of catabolism in fungi.

  1. A pH-Dependent Kinetic Model of Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase from Multiple Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Moxley, Michael A.; Beard, Daniel A.; Bazil, Jason N.

    2014-01-01

    Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase is a flavoenzyme that reversibly catalyzes the oxidation of reduced lipoyl substrates with the reduction of NAD+ to NADH. In vivo, the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase component (E3) is associated with the pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate, and glycine dehydrogenase complexes. The pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex connects the glycolytic flux to the tricarboxylic acid cycle and is central to the regulation of primary metabolism. Regulation of PDH via regulation of the E3 component by the NAD+/NADH ratio represents one of the important physiological control mechanisms of PDH activity. Furthermore, previous experiments with the isolated E3 component have demonstrated the importance of pH in dictating NAD+/NADH ratio effects on enzymatic activity. Here, we show that a three-state mechanism that represents the major redox states of the enzyme and includes a detailed representation of the active-site chemistry constrained by both equilibrium and thermodynamic loop constraints can be used to model regulatory NAD+/NADH ratio and pH effects demonstrated in progress-curve and initial-velocity data sets from rat, human, Escherichia coli, and spinach enzymes. Global fitting of the model provides stable predictions to the steady-state distributions of enzyme redox states as a function of lipoamide/dihydrolipoamide, NAD+/NADH, and pH. These distributions were calculated using physiological NAD+/NADH ratios representative of the diverse organismal sources of E3 analyzed in this study. This mechanistically detailed, thermodynamically constrained, pH-dependent model of E3 provides a stable platform on which to accurately model multicomponent enzyme complexes that implement E3 from a variety of organisms. PMID:25517164

  2. Formate dehydrogenase from the methane oxidizer Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed Central

    Yoch, D C; Chen, Y P; Hardin, M G

    1990-01-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (NAD+ dependent) was isolated from the obligate methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. When the enzyme was isolated anaerobically, two forms of the enzyme were seen on native polyacrylamide gels, DE-52 cellulose and Sephacryl S-300 columns; they were approximately 315,000 and 155,000 daltons. The enzyme showed two subunits on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The Mr of the alpha-subunit was 53,800 +/- 2,800, and that of the beta-subunit was 102,600 +/- 3,900. The enzyme (Mr 315,000) was composed of these subunits in an apparent alpha 2 beta 2 arrangement. Nonheme iron was present at a concentration ranging from 11 to 18 g-atoms per mol of enzyme (Mr 315,000). Similar levels of acid-labile sulfide were detected. No other metals were found in stoichiometric amounts. When the enzyme was isolated aerobically, there was no cofactor requirement for NAD reduction; however, when isolated anaerobically, activity was 80 to 90% dependent on the addition of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) to the reaction mixture. Furthermore, the addition of formate to an active, anoxic solution of formate dehydrogenase rapidly inactivated it in the absence of an electron acceptor; this activity could be reconstituted approximately 85% by 50 nM FMN. Flavin adenine dinucleotide could not replace FMN in reconstituting enzyme activity. The Kms of formate dehydrogenase for formate, NAD, and FMN were 146, 200, and 0.02 microM, respectively. "Pseudomonas oxalaticus" formate dehydrogenase, which has physical characteristics nearly identical to those of the M. trichosporium enzyme, was also shown to be inactivated under anoxic conditions by formate and reactivated by FMN. The evolutionary significance of this similarity is discussed. Images PMID:2376564

  3. Lactate dehydrogenase activity is inhibited by methylmalonate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saad, Laura O; Mirandola, Sandra R; Maciel, Evelise N; Castilho, Roger F

    2006-04-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMAemia) is an inherited metabolic disorder of branched amino acid and odd-chain fatty acid metabolism, involving a defect in the conversion of methylmalonyl-coenzyme A to succinyl-coenzyme A. Systemic and neurological manifestations in this disease are thought to be associated with the accumulation of methylmalonate (MMA) in tissues and biological fluids with consequent impairment of energy metabolism and oxidative stress. In the present work we studied the effect of MMA and two other inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex II (malonate and 3-nitropropionate) on the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in tissue homogenates from adult rats. MMA potently inhibited LDH-catalyzed conversion of lactate to pyruvate in liver and brain homogenates as well as in a purified bovine heart LDH preparation. LDH was about one order of magnitude less sensitive to inhibition by MMA when catalyzing the conversion of pyruvate to lactate. Kinetic studies on the inhibition of brain LDH indicated that MMA inhibits this enzyme competitively with lactate as a substrate (K (i)=3.02+/-0.59 mM). Malonate and 3-nitropropionate also strongly inhibited LDH-catalyzed conversion of lactate to pyruvate in brain homogenates, while no inhibition was observed by succinate or propionate, when present in concentrations of up to 25 mM. We propose that inhibition of the lactate/pyruvate conversion by MMA contributes to lactate accumulation in blood, metabolic acidemia and inhibition of gluconeogenesis observed in patients with MMAemia. Moreover, the inhibition of LDH in the central nervous system may also impair the lactate shuttle between astrocytes and neurons, compromising neuronal energy metabolism.

  4. Biochemical analysis of the modular enzyme inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Nimmesgern, E; Black, J; Futer, O; Fulghum, J R; Chambers, S P; Brummel, C L; Raybuck, S A; Sintchak, M D

    1999-11-01

    Two prominent domains have been identified in the X-ray crystal structure of inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a core domain consisting of an alpha/beta barrel which contains the active site and an inserted subdomain whose structure is less well defined. The core domain encompassing amino acids 1-108 and 244-514 of wild-type human IMPDH (II) connected by the tetrapeptide linker Ile-Arg-Thr-Gly was expressed. The subdomain including amino acids 99-244 of human wild-type IMPDH (II) was expressed as a His-tagged fusion protein, where the His-tag was removable by enterokinase cleavage. These two proteins as well as wild-type human IMPDH (II), all proteins expressed in Escherichia coli, have been purified to apparent homogeneity. Both the wild-type and core domain proteins are tetrameric and have very similar enzymatic activities. In contrast, the subdomain migrates as a monomer or dimer on a gel filtration column and lacks enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectropolarimetry indicates that the core domain retains secondary structure very similar to full-length IMPDH, with 30% alpha-helix and 30% beta-sheet vs 33% alpha-helix and 29% beta-sheet for wild-type protein. Again, the subdomain protein is distinguished from both wild-type and core domain proteins by its content of secondary structure, with only 15% each of alpha-helix and beta-sheet. These studies demonstrate that the core domain of IMPDH expressed separately is both structurally intact and enzymatically active. The availability of the modules of IMPDH will aid in dissecting the architecture of this enzyme of the de novo purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway, which is an important target for immunosuppressive and antiviral drugs.

  5. Priapism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: An underestimated correlation?

    PubMed

    De Rose, Aldo Franco; Mantica, Guglielmo; Tosi, Mattia; Bovio, Giulio; Terrone, Carlo

    2016-10-05

    Priapism is a rare clinical condition characterized by a persistent erection unrelated to sexual excitement. Often the etiology is idiopathic. Three cases of priapism in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency patients have been described in literature. We present the case of a 39-year-old man with glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, who reached out to our department for the arising of a non-ischemic priapism without arteriolacunar fistula. We suggest that the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency could be an underestimated risk factor for priapism.

  6. Crystal structure of 7,8-benzocoumarin-4-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Swamy, R Ranga; Gowda, Ramakrishna; Gowda, K V Arjuna; Basanagouda, Mahantesha

    2015-08-01

    The fused-ring system in the title compound [systematic name: 2-(2-oxo-2H-benzo[h]chromen-4-yl)acetic acid], C15H10O4, is almost planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.031 Å) and the Car-C-C=O (ar = aromatic) torsion angle for the side chain is -134.4 (3)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, generating [100] C(8) chains, where the acceptor atom is the exocyclic O atom of the fused-ring system. The packing is consolidated by a very weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bond to the same acceptor atom. Together, these inter-actions lead to undulating (001) layers in the crystal.

  7. Degradation of organic acids by dairy lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, F Z; Abo-Elnaga, I G

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and twelve different strains of lactic acid bacteria, belonging to the genera Leuconostoc, Streptococcus, and Lactobacillus, were examined for the ability to degrade 10 organic acids by detecting gas production, using the conventional Durham tube method. All the strains did not break down succinate, glutarate, 2-oxo-glutarate, and mucate. Malate, citrate, pyruvate, fumarate, tartrate, and gluconate were variably attacked. Streptococcus cremoiris AM2, ML8, and SK11 required glucose to produce gas from citrate, whereas Leuconostoc citrovorum and Streptococcus faecalis did not. Streptococcus cremoris differed from the other streptococci in not producing gas from gluconate. From all lactic acid bacteria examined, only Lactobacillus plantarum formed gas from tartarate. Determination of acetoin and diacetyl proved to be a more reliable evidence for assessing the degradation of pyruvate, compared with detection of gas production. Homofermentative lactobacilli and Leuconostoc citrovorum produced acetoin and diacetyl from pyruvate, whereas beta-bacteria did not, a character that would be of taxonomic value. Streptobacteria degraded pyruvate in the presence of glucose with lactate as the major product together with a mean acetate of 4.1%, ethanol 7.9%, acetoin 1.7%, and diacetyl 2.6% yield on a molar basis after 60 days at 30 degrees C. L. brevis produced acetate and lactate. Formation of diacetyl from pyruvate by lactic acid bacteria may play an important role in flavour development in fermenting dairy products, especially in cheese, where lactic acid bacteria usually predominate, and pyruvate is probably excreted in the breaking down of lactose and in the oxidative deamination of alanine by the accompanying microflora.

  8. Extraction and separation of lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors from Poria cocos (Schw.) Wolf based on a hyphenated technique and in vitro methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Sainan; Zhang, Jianxu; Li, Senlin; Liu, Chunming; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2017-02-20

    Stroke is one of the most common diseases worldwide. Lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors are widely used in the treatment of ischemic stroke, with natural products considered a promising source of lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors. In this study, ultrafiltration liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was used for the screening and identification of lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors from Poria cocos. Five lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors were selected: dehydropachymic acid, pachymic acid, dehydrotrametenolic acid, trametenolic acid, and eburicoic acid. The inhibitors were extracted and isolated with purities of 96.75, 98.15, 97.25, 95.46, and 94.88%, respectively, by using a new "hyphenated" strategy of microwave-assisted extraction coupled with counter-current chromatography and centrifugal partition chromatography by a two-phase solvent system of n-hexane/ethyl acetate/ethanol/water at the volume ratio 0.965:1.000:0.936:0.826 v/v/v/v. The bioactivity of the isolated compounds was assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay in PC12 cells. The results also showed that the hyphenated technique of microwave-assisted extraction coupled with counter-current chromatography and centrifugal partition chromatography was an efficient method for the continuous extraction and online isolation of chemical constituents from medicinal herbs. Furthermore, the research route based on the activity screening, extraction, separation, and activity verification of the compounds offered advantages of efficiency, orientation, and objectivity.

  9. Metabolic control of cell division in α-proteobacteria by a NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Beaufay, François; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prior to initiate energy-consuming processes, such as DNA replication or cell division, cells need to evaluate their metabolic status. We have recently identified and characterized a new connection between metabolism and cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We showed that an NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GdhZ) coordinates growth with cell division according to its enzymatic activity. Here we report the conserved role of GdhZ in controlling cell division in another α-proteobacterium, the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus. We also discuss the importance of amino acids as a main carbon source for α-proteobacteria. PMID:27066186

  10. Relationship between a stress membrane protein of Oenococcus oeni and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Carreté, Ramon; Reguant, Cristina; Bordons, Albert; Constantí, Magda

    2005-10-01

    The goal of this study was to analyze how the profiles of membrane proteins of Oenococcus oeni change under particular stress conditions of wine. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein profiles of membrane fraction showed that a 40-kDa protein was overexpressed in the presence of SO2. The sequence of its N-terminal fragment showed a significant identity with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDHs), but the protein showed no GAPDH activity. This sequence was compared with those of other GAPDHs with ClustalW alignment, and it was found to be somewhat similar to that of the cell-wall and membrane proteins of other lactic acid bacteria.

  11. Study of the interaction of cadmium with membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Jay, D; Zamorano, R; Muñoz, E; Gleason, R; Boldu, J L

    1991-04-01

    Cadmium ions inhibit membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase with a second-order rate constant of 10.42 mM-1 s-1 at pH 7.35 and 25 degrees C. Succinate and malonate protect the enzyme against cadmium ion inhibition. The protection pattern exerted by succinate and malonate suggests that the group modified by cadmium is located at the active site. The pH curve of inactivation by Cd2+ indicates the involvement of an amino acid residue with pKa of 7.23.

  12. Sequence and structural aspects of the functional diversification of plant alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Claudia E; Salzano, Francisco M; de Souza, Osmar Norberto; Freitas, Loreta B

    2007-07-01

    The glycolytic proteins in plants are coded by small multigene families, which provide an interesting contrast to the high copy number of gene families studied to date. The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) genes encode glycolytic enzymes that have been characterized in some plant families. Although the amino acid sequences of zinc-containing long-chain ADHs are highly conserved, the metabolic function of this enzyme is variable. They also have different patterns of expression and are submitted to differences in nonsynonymous substitution rates between gene copies. It is possible that the Adh copies have been retained as a consequence of adaptative amino acid replacements which have conferred subtle changes in function. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that there have been a number of separate duplication events within angiosperms, and that genes labeled Adh1, Adh2 and Adh3 in different groups may not be homologous. Nonsynonymous/synonymous ratios yielded no signs of positive selection. However, the coefficients of functional divergence (theta) estimated between the Adh1 and Adh2 gene groups indicate statistically significant site-specific shift of evolutionary rates between them, as well as between those of different botanical families, suggesting that altered functional constraints may have taken place at some amino acid residues after their diversification. The theoretical three-dimensional structure of the alcohol dehydrogenase from Arabis blepharophylla was constructed and verified to be stereochemically valid.

  13. Production and characterization of L-fucose dehydrogenase from newly isolated Acinetobacter sp. strain SA-134.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Takashi; Morita, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms producing L-fucose dehydrogenase were screened from soil samples, and one of the isolated bacterial strains SA-134 was identified as Acinetobacter sp. by 16S rDNA gene analysis. The strain grew well utilizing L-fucose as a sole source of carbon, but all other monosaccharides tested such as D-glucose and D-arabinose did not support the growth of the strain in the absence of L-fucose. D-Arabinose inhibited the growth even in the culture medium containing L-fucose. Although the strain grew on some organic acids and amino acids such as citric acid and L-alanine as sole sources of carbon, the enzyme was produced only in the presence of L-fucose. The fucose dehydrogenase was purified to apparently homogeneity from the strain, and the native enzyme was a monomer of 25 kD. L-Fucose and D-arabinose were good substrates for the enzyme, but L-galactose was a poor substrate. The enzyme acted on both NAD(+) and NADP(+) in the similar manner.

  14. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone encoding rat mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, P M; Tellam, J; May, V L; Strauss, A W

    1986-01-01

    We have determined the complete sequence of the rat mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) precursor derived from nucleotide sequence of the cDNA. A single synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide probe was used to screen a rat atrial cDNA library constructed in lambda gt10. A 1.2 kb full-length cDNA clone provided the first complete amino acid sequence of pre-mMDH. The 1014 nucleotide-long open reading frame encodes the 314 residue long mature mMDH protein and a 24 amino acid NH2-terminal extension which directs mitochondrial import and is cleaved from the precursor after import to generate mature mMDH. The amino acid composition of the transit peptide is polar and basic. The pre-mMDH transit peptide shows marked homology with those of two other enzymes targeted to the rat mitochondrial matrix. Images PMID:3755817

  15. Atomic-Resolution Structure of an N(5) Flavin Adduct in D-Arginine Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Guoxing; Yuan, Hongling; Wang, Siming; Gadda, Giovanni; Weber, Irene T.

    2011-09-06

    D-Arginine dehydrogenase (DADH) catalyzes the flavin-dependent oxidative deamination of D-arginine and other D-amino acids to the corresponding imino acids. The 1.07 {angstrom} atomic-resolution structure of DADH crystallized with D-leucine unexpectedly revealed a covalent N(5) flavin adduct, instead of the expected iminoleucine product in the active site. This acyl adduct has been successfully reproduced by photoreduction of DADH in the presence of 4-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid (ketoleucine). The iminoleucine may be released readily because of weak interactions in the binding site, in contrast to iminoarginine, converted to ketoleucine, which reacts with activated FAD to form the covalently linked acyl adduct.

  16. Mapping of chorismate mutase and prephenate dehydrogenase domains in the Escherichia coli T-protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuqing; Vincent, Sarah; Wilson, David B; Ganem, Bruce

    2003-02-01

    The Escherichia coli bifunctional T-protein transforms chorismic acid to p-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid in the l-tyrosine biosynthetic pathway. The 373 amino acid T-protein is a homodimer that exhibits chorismate mutase (CM) and prephenate dehydrogenase (PDH) activities, both of which are feedback-inhibited by tyrosine. Fifteen genes coding for the T-protein and various fragments thereof were constructed and successfully expressed in order to characterize the CM, PDH and regulatory domains. Residues 1-88 constituted a functional CM domain, which was also dimeric. Both the PDH and the feedback-inhibition activities were localized in residues 94-373, but could not be separated into discrete domains. The activities of cloned CM and PDH domains were comparatively low, suggesting some cooperative interactions in the native state. Activity data further indicate that the PDH domain, in which NAD, prephenate and tyrosine binding sites were present, was more unstable than the CM domain.

  17. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases, such as viral hepatitis,...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... is a device that is intended to measure the activity of the enzyme malic dehydrogenase in serum and... diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  19. ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASES EXPRESSION DURING POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT: LIVER VS. LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment, and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Although the lung can be a major target for aldehyde toxicity, development of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), which detoxify aldehydes, in lung has be...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  10. Mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase (stomach alcohol dehydrogenase): structure, origin, and correlation with enzymology.

    PubMed Central

    Parés, X; Cederlund, E; Moreno, A; Hjelmqvist, L; Farrés, J; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    The structure of a mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase has been determined by peptide analysis of the protein isolated from rat stomach. The structure indicates that the enzyme constitutes a separate alcohol dehydrogenase class, in agreement with the distinct enzymatic properties; the class IV enzyme is somewhat closer to class I (the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenase; approximately 68% residue identities) than to the other classes (II, III, and V; approximately 60% residue identities), suggesting that class IV might have originated through duplication of an early vertebrate class I gene. The activity of the class IV protein toward ethanol is even higher than that of the classical liver enzyme. Both Km and kcat values are high, the latter being the highest of any class characterized so far. Structurally, these properties are correlated with replacements at the active site, affecting both substrate and coenzyme binding. In particular, Ala-294 (instead of valine) results in increased space in the middle section of the substrate cleft, Gly-47 (instead of a basic residue) results in decreased charge interactions with the coenzyme pyrophosphate, and Tyr-363 (instead of a basic residue) may also affect coenzyme binding. In combination, these exchanges are compatible with a promotion of the off dissociation and an increased turnover rate. In contrast, residues at the inner part of the substrate cleft are bulky, accounting for low activity toward secondary alcohols and cyclohexanol. Exchanges at positions 259-261 involve minor shifts in glycine residues at a reverse turn in the coenzyme-binding fold. Clearly, class IV is distinct in structure, ethanol turnover, stomach expression, and possible emergence from class I. PMID:8127901

  11. Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases.

    PubMed

    Smilda, T; Kamminga, A H; Reinders, P; Baron, W; van Hylckama Vlieg, J E; Beintema, J J

    2001-05-01

    Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenases and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) are presented. Like alcohol dehydrogenases from other Drosophila species, the enzyme from D. simulans is more active on secondary than on primary alcohols, although ethanol is its only known physiological substrate. Several secondary alcohols were used to determine the kinetic parameters kcat and Km. The results of these experiments indicate that the substrate-binding region of the enzyme allows optimal binding of a short ethyl side-chain in a small binding pocket, and of a propyl or butyl side-chain in large binding pocket, with stereospecificity for R(-) alcohols. At a high concentration of R(-) alcohols substrate activation occurs. The kcat and Km values determined under these conditions are about two-fold, and two orders of magnitude, respectively, higher than those at low substrate concentrations. Sequence alignment of several SDRs of known, and unknown three-dimensional structures, indicate the presence of several conserved residues in addition to those involved in the catalyzed reactions. Structural roles of these conserved residues could be derived from observations made on superpositioned structures of several SDRs with known structures. Several residues are conserved in tetrameric SDRs, but not in dimeric ones. Two halohydrin-halide-lyases show significant homology with SDRs in the catalytic domains of these enzymes, but they do not have the structural features required for binding NAD+. Probably these lyases descend from an SDR, which has lost the capability to bind NAD+, but the enzyme reaction mechanisms may still be similar.

  12. Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Lorite, María J.; Tachil, Jörg; Sanjuán, Juán; Meyer, Ortwin; Bedmar, Eulogio J.

    2000-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)2 subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the COD