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Sample records for 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex

  1. Often Ignored Facts about the Control of the 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strumilo, Slawomir

    2005-01-01

    Information about the control of the activity of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC), a key enzyme in the citric acid cycle, is not well covered in the biochemical education literature, especially as it concerns the allosteric regulation of OGDHC by adenine nucleotide and ortophosphate. From experimental work published during the last…

  2. Human 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Forms a Thiamin-derived Radical by Aerobic Oxidation of the Enamine Intermediate*

    PubMed Central

    Nemeria, Natalia S.; Ambrus, Attila; Patel, Hetalben; Gerfen, Gary; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Tretter, Laszlo; Zhou, Jieyu; Wang, Junjie; Jordan, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Herein are reported unique properties of the human 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (OGDHc), a rate-limiting enzyme in the Krebs (citric acid) cycle. (a) Functionally competent 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (E1o-h) and dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase components have been expressed according to kinetic and spectroscopic evidence. (b) A stable free radical, consistent with the C2-(C2α-hydroxy)-γ-carboxypropylidene thiamin diphosphate (ThDP) cation radical was detected by electron spin resonance upon reaction of the E1o-h with 2-oxoglutarate (OG) by itself or when assembled from individual components into OGDHc. (c) An unusual stability of the E1o-h-bound C2-(2α-hydroxy)-γ-carboxypropylidene thiamin diphosphate (the “ThDP-enamine”/C2α-carbanion, the first postdecarboxylation intermediate) was observed, probably stabilized by the 5-carboxyl group of OG, not reported before. (d) The reaction of OG with the E1o-h gave rise to superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide (reactive oxygen species (ROS)). (e) The relatively stable enzyme-bound enamine is the likely substrate for oxidation by O2, leading to the superoxide anion radical (in d) and the radical (in b). (f) The specific activity assessed for ROS formation compared with the NADH (overall complex) activity, as well as the fraction of radical intermediate occupying active centers of E1o-h are consistent with each other and indicate that radical/ROS formation is an “off-pathway” side reaction comprising less than 1% of the “on-pathway” reactivity. However, the nearly ubiquitous presence of OGDHc in human tissues, including the brain, makes these findings of considerable importance in human metabolism and perhaps disease. PMID:25210035

  3. Human 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex E1 component forms a thiamin-derived radical by aerobic oxidation of the enamine intermediate.

    PubMed

    Nemeria, Natalia S; Ambrus, Attila; Patel, Hetalben; Gerfen, Gary; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Tretter, Laszlo; Zhou, Jieyu; Wang, Junjie; Jordan, Frank

    2014-10-24

    Herein are reported unique properties of the human 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (OGDHc), a rate-limiting enzyme in the Krebs (citric acid) cycle. (a) Functionally competent 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (E1o-h) and dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase components have been expressed according to kinetic and spectroscopic evidence. (b) A stable free radical, consistent with the C2-(C2α-hydroxy)-γ-carboxypropylidene thiamin diphosphate (ThDP) cation radical was detected by electron spin resonance upon reaction of the E1o-h with 2-oxoglutarate (OG) by itself or when assembled from individual components into OGDHc. (c) An unusual stability of the E1o-h-bound C2-(2α-hydroxy)-γ-carboxypropylidene thiamin diphosphate (the "ThDP-enamine"/C2α-carbanion, the first postdecarboxylation intermediate) was observed, probably stabilized by the 5-carboxyl group of OG, not reported before. (d) The reaction of OG with the E1o-h gave rise to superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide (reactive oxygen species (ROS)). (e) The relatively stable enzyme-bound enamine is the likely substrate for oxidation by O2, leading to the superoxide anion radical (in d) and the radical (in b). (f) The specific activity assessed for ROS formation compared with the NADH (overall complex) activity, as well as the fraction of radical intermediate occupying active centers of E1o-h are consistent with each other and indicate that radical/ROS formation is an "off-pathway" side reaction comprising less than 1% of the "on-pathway" reactivity. However, the nearly ubiquitous presence of OGDHc in human tissues, including the brain, makes these findings of considerable importance in human metabolism and perhaps disease. PMID:25210035

  4. Detailed kinetics and regulation of mammalian 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC), a key regulatory point of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, plays vital roles in multiple pathways of energy metabolism and biosynthesis. The catalytic mechanism and allosteric regulation of this large enzyme complex are not fully understood. Here computer simulation is used to test possible catalytic mechanisms and mechanisms of allosteric regulation of the enzyme by nucleotides (ATP, ADP), pH, and metal ion cofactors (Ca2+ and Mg2+). Results A model was developed based on an ordered ter-ter enzyme kinetic mechanism combined with con-formational changes that involve rotation of one lipoic acid between three catalytic sites inside the enzyme complex. The model was parameterized using a large number of kinetic data sets on the activity of OGDHC, and validated by comparison of model predictions to independent data. Conclusions The developed model suggests a hybrid rapid-equilibrium ping-pong random mechanism for the kinetics of OGDHC, consistent with previously reported mechanisms, and accurately describes the experimentally observed regulatory effects of cofactors on the OGDHC activity. This analysis provides a single consistent theoretical explanation for a number of apparently contradictory results on the roles of phosphorylation potential, NAD (H) oxidation-reduction state ratio, as well as the regulatory effects of metal ions on ODGHC function. PMID:21943256

  5. Three-dimensional solution structure of the E3-binding domain of the dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase core from the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Robien, M A; Clore, G M; Omichinski, J G; Perham, R N; Appella, E; Sakaguchi, K; Gronenborn, A M

    1992-04-01

    The three-dimensional solution structure of a 51-residue synthetic peptide comprising the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3)-binding domain of the dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (E2) core of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex of Escherichia coli has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and hybrid distance geometry-dynamical simulated annealing calculations. The structure is based on 630 approximate interproton distance and 101 torsion angle (phi, psi, chi 1) restraints. A total of 56 simulated annealing structures were calculated, and the atomic rms distribution about the mean coordinate positions for residues 12-48 of the synthetic peptide is 1.24 A for the backbone atoms, 1.68 A for all atoms, and 1.33 A for all atoms excluding the six side chains which are disordered at chi 1 and the seven which are disordered at chi 2; when the irregular partially disordered loop from residues 31 to 39 is excluded, the rms distribution drops to 0.77 A for the backbone atoms, 1.55 A for all atoms, and 0.89 A for ordered side chains. Although proton resonance assignments for the N-terminal 11 residues and the C-terminal 3 residues were obtained, these two segments of the polypeptide are disordered in solution as evidenced by the absence of nonsequential nuclear Overhauser effects. The solution structure of the E3-binding domain consists of two parallel helices (residues 14-23 and 40-48), a short extended strand (24-26), a five-residue helical-like turn, and an irregular (and more disordered) loop (residues 31-39). This report presents the first structure of an E3-binding domain from a 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1554728

  6. Antisense Inhibition of the 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex in Tomato Demonstrates Its Importance for Plant Respiration and during Leaf Senescence and Fruit Maturation[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Wagner L.; Tohge, Takayuki; Osorio, Sonia; Lohse, Marc; Balbo, Ilse; Krahnert, Ina; Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Usadel, Björn; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants expressing a fragment of the gene encoding the E1 subunit of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex in the antisense orientation and exhibiting substantial reductions in the activity of this enzyme exhibit a considerably reduced rate of respiration. They were, however, characterized by largely unaltered photosynthetic rates and fruit yields but restricted leaf, stem, and root growth. These lines displayed markedly altered metabolic profiles, including changes in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and in the majority of the amino acids but unaltered pyridine nucleotide content both in leaves and during the progression of fruit ripening. Moreover, they displayed a generally accelerated development exhibiting early flowering, accelerated fruit ripening, and a markedly earlier onset of leaf senescence. In addition, transcript and selective hormone profiling of gibberellins and abscisic acid revealed changes only in the former coupled to changes in transcripts encoding enzymes of gibberellin biosynthesis. The data obtained are discussed in the context of the importance of this enzyme in both photosynthetic and respiratory metabolism as well as in programs of plant development connected to carbon–nitrogen interactions. PMID:22751214

  7. Assignment of function to Histidines 260 and 298 by engineering the E1 component of the Escherichia coli 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex; substitutions that lead to acceptance of substrates lacking the 5-carboxyl group.†

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Da Jeong; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Balakrishnan, Anand; Patel, Hetalben; Song, Jaeyoung; Wang, Junjie; Jordan, Frank; Farinas, Edgardo T.

    2011-01-01

    The first component (E1o) of the Escherichia coli 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHc) was engineered to accept substrates lacking the 5-carboxylate group by subjecting H260 and H298 to saturation mutagenesis. Apparently, H260 is required for substrate recognition, but H298 could be replaced by hydrophobic residues of similar molecular volume. To interrogate whether the second component would enable synthesis of acyl-coenzymeA derivatives, hybrid complexes consisting of recombinant components of OGDHc (o) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (p) enzymes were constructed, suggesting that a different component is the ‘gatekeeper’ for specificity for these two multienzyme complexes in bacteria, E1p for pyruvate, but E2o for 2-oxoglutarate. PMID:21809826

  8. Calcium-insensitive splice variants of mammalian E1 subunit of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex with tissue-specific patterns of expression.

    PubMed

    Denton, Richard M; Pullen, Timothy J; Armstrong, Craig T; Heesom, Kate J; Rutter, Guy A

    2016-05-01

    The 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH) complex is an important control point in vertebrate mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, including in the citrate cycle and catabolism of alternative fuels including glutamine. It is subject to allosteric regulation by NADH and the ATP/ADP ratio, and by Ca(2+) through binding to the E1 subunit. The latter involves a unique Ca(2+)-binding site which includes D(114)ADLD (site 1). Here, we describe three splice variants of E1 in which either the exon expressing this site is replaced with another exon (loss of site 1, LS1) or an additional exon is expressed leading to the insertion of 15 amino acids just downstream of site 1 (Insert), or both changes occur together (LS1/Insert). We show that all three variants are essentially Ca(2+)-insensitive. Comparison of massive parallel sequence (RNA-Seq) databases demonstrates predominant expression of the Ca(2+)-sensitive archetype form in heart and skeletal muscle, but substantial expression of the Ca(2+)-insensitive variants in brain, pancreatic islets and other tissues. Detailed proteomic and activity studies comparing OGDH complexes from rat heart and brain confirmed the substantial difference in expression between these tissues. The evolution of OGDH variants was explored using bioinformatics, and this indicated that Ca(2+)-sensitivity arose with the emergence of chordates. In all species examined, this was associated with the co-emergence of Ca(2+)-insensitive variants suggesting a retained requirement for the latter in some settings. Tissue-specific expression of OGDH splice variants may thus provide a mechanism that tunes the control of the enzyme to the specialized metabolic and signalling needs of individual cell types. PMID:26936970

  9. Mitochondrial Probe Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) Inhibits the Krebs Cycle Enzyme 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Tůma, Petr; Weiszenstein, Martin; Polák, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) salts have been widely used to measure the mitochondrial membrane potential and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) moiety has been attached to many bioactive compounds including antioxidants to target them into mitochondria thanks to their high affinity to accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix. The adverse effects of these compounds on cellular metabolism have been insufficiently studied and are still poorly understood. Micromolar concentrations of TPMP cause a progressive inhibition of cellular respiration in adherent cells without a marked effect on mitochondrial coupling. In permeabilized cells the inhibition was limited to NADH-linked respiration. We found a mixed inhibition of the Krebs cycle enzyme 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) with an estimated IC50 3.93 [3.70–4.17] mM, which is pharmacologically plausible since it corresponds to micromolar extracellular concentrations. Increasing the lipophilic character of the used TPP+ compound further potentiates the inhibition of OGDHC activity. This effect of TPMP on the Krebs cycle ought to be taken into account when interpreting observations on cells and mitochondria in the presence of TPP+ derivatives. Compounds based on or similar to TPP+ derivatives may also be used to alter OGDHC activity for experimental or therapeutic purposes. PMID:27537184

  10. Mitochondrial Probe Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) Inhibits the Krebs Cycle Enzyme 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Tůma, Petr; Weiszenstein, Martin; Polák, Jan; Trnka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) salts have been widely used to measure the mitochondrial membrane potential and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) moiety has been attached to many bioactive compounds including antioxidants to target them into mitochondria thanks to their high affinity to accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix. The adverse effects of these compounds on cellular metabolism have been insufficiently studied and are still poorly understood. Micromolar concentrations of TPMP cause a progressive inhibition of cellular respiration in adherent cells without a marked effect on mitochondrial coupling. In permeabilized cells the inhibition was limited to NADH-linked respiration. We found a mixed inhibition of the Krebs cycle enzyme 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) with an estimated IC50 3.93 [3.70-4.17] mM, which is pharmacologically plausible since it corresponds to micromolar extracellular concentrations. Increasing the lipophilic character of the used TPP+ compound further potentiates the inhibition of OGDHC activity. This effect of TPMP on the Krebs cycle ought to be taken into account when interpreting observations on cells and mitochondria in the presence of TPP+ derivatives. Compounds based on or similar to TPP+ derivatives may also be used to alter OGDHC activity for experimental or therapeutic purposes. PMID:27537184

  11. Up-regulation of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase as a stress response.

    PubMed

    Graf, Anastasia; Trofimova, Lidia; Loshinskaja, Alexandra; Mkrtchyan, Garik; Strokina, Anastasiia; Lovat, Maxim; Tylicky, Adam; Strumilo, Slawomir; Bettendorff, Lucien; Bunik, Victoria I

    2013-01-01

    2-Oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (OGDHC) operates at a metabolic cross-road, mediating Ca(2+)- and ADP-dependent signals in mitochondria. Here, we test our hypothesis that OGDHC plays a major role in the neurotransmitter metabolism and associated stress response. This possibility was assessed using succinyl phosphonate (SP), a highly specific and efficient in vivo inhibitor of OGDHC. Animals exposed to toxicants (SP, ethanol or MnCl(2)), trauma or acute hypoxia showed intrinsic up-regulation of OGDHC in brain and heart. The known mechanism of the SP action as OGDHC inhibitor pointed to the up-regulation triggered by the enzyme impairment. The animal behavior and skeletal muscle or heart performance were tested to correlate physiology with the OGDHC regulation and associated changes in the glutamate and cellular energy status. The SP-treated animals exhibited interdependent changes in the brain OGDHC activity, glutamate level and cardiac autonomic balance, suggesting the neurotransmitter role of glutamate to be involved in the changed heart performance. Energy insufficiency after OGDHC inhibition was detectable neither in animals up to 25 mg/kg SP, nor in cell culture during 24 h incubation with 0.1 mM SP. However, in animals subjected to acute ethanol intoxication SP did evoke energy deficit, decreasing muscular strength and locomotion and increasing the narcotic sleep duration. This correlated with the SP-induced decrease in NAD(P)H levels of the ethanol-exposed neurons. Thus, we show the existence of natural mechanisms to up-regulate mammalian OGDHC in response to stress, with both the glutamate neurotransmission and energy production potentially involved in the OGDHC impact on physiological performance. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Bioenergetic dysfunction, adaptation and therapy. PMID:22814169

  12. Physiological Regulation of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase and the Role of 2-Oxoglutarate in Prochlorococcus sp. Strain PCC 9511

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Jesús; Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Rangel-Zúñiga, Oriol Alberto; García-Fernández, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH; EC 1.1.1.42) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate, to produce 2-oxoglutarate. The incompleteness of the tricarboxylic acids cycle in marine cyanobacteria confers a special importance to isocitrate dehydrogenase in the C/N balance, since 2-oxoglutarate can only be metabolized through the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase pathway. The physiological regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase was studied in cultures of Prochlorococcus sp. strain PCC 9511, by measuring enzyme activity and concentration using the NADPH production assay and Western blotting, respectively. The enzyme activity showed little changes under nitrogen or phosphorus starvation, or upon addition of the inhibitors DCMU, DBMIB and MSX. Azaserine, an inhibitor of glutamate synthase, induced clear increases in the isocitrate dehydrogenase activity and icd gene expression after 24 h, and also in the 2-oxoglutarate concentration. Iron starvation had the most significant effect, inducing a complete loss of isocitrate dehydrogenase activity, possibly mediated by a process of oxidative inactivation, while its concentration was unaffected. Our results suggest that isocitrate dehydrogenase responds to changes in the intracellular concentration of 2-oxoglutarate and to the redox status of the cells in Prochlorococcus. PMID:25061751

  13. Inhibition of mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase impairs viability of cancer cells in a cell-specific metabolism-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Bunik, Victoria I; Mkrtchyan, Garik; Grabarska, Aneta; Oppermann, Henry; Daloso, Danilo; Araujo, Wagner L; Juszczak, Malgorzata; Rzeski, Wojciech; Bettendorff, Lucien; Fernie, Alisdair R; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Stepulak, Andrzej; Gaunitz, Frank

    2016-05-01

    2-Oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH) of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often implied to be inactive in cancer, but this was not experimentally tested. We addressed the question through specific inhibition of OGDH by succinyl phosphonate (SP). SP action on different cancer cells was investigated using indicators of cellular viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS), metabolic profiling and transcriptomics. Relative sensitivity of various cancer cells to SP changed with increasing SP exposure and could differ in the ATP- and NAD(P)H-based assays. Glioblastoma responses to SP revealed metabolic sub-types increasing or decreasing cellular ATP/NAD(P)H ratio under OGDH inhibition. Cancer cell homeostasis was perturbed also when viability indicators were SP-resistant, e.g. in U87 and N2A cells. The transcriptomics database analysis showed that the SP-sensitive cells, such as A549 and T98G, exhibit the lowest expression of OGDH compared to other TCA cycle enzymes, associated with higher expression of affiliated pathways utilizing 2-oxoglutarate. Metabolic profiling confirmed the dependence of cellular SP reactivity on cell-specific expression of the pathways. Thus, oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate is significant for the interdependent homeostasis of NAD(P)H, ATP, ROS and key metabolites in various cancer cells. Assessment of cell-specific responses to OGDH inhibition is of diagnostic value for anticancer strategies. PMID:27027236

  14. Induction of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production by GSH mediated S-glutathionylation of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Craig Ayre, D; Christian, Sherri L

    2016-08-01

    2-Oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (Ogdh) is an important mitochondria redox sensor that can undergo S-glutathionylation following an increase in H2O2 levels. Although S-glutathionylation is required to protect Ogdh from irreversible oxidation while simultaneously modulating its activity it remains unknown if glutathione can also modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by the complex. We report that reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione control O2(∙-)/H2O2 formation by Ogdh through protein S-glutathionylation reactions. GSSG (1mM) induced a modest decrease in Ogdh activity which was associated with a significant decrease in O2(∙-)/H2O2 formation. GSH had the opposite effect, amplifying O2(∙-)/H2O2 formation by Ogdh. Incubation of purified Ogdh in 2.5mM GSH led to significant increase in O2(∙-)/H2O2 formation which also lowered NADH production. Inclusion of enzymatically active glutaredoxin-2 (Grx2) in reaction mixtures reversed the GSH-mediated amplification of O2(∙-)/H2O2 formation. Similarly pre-incubation of permeabilized liver mitochondria from mouse depleted of GSH showed an approximately ~3.5-fold increase in Ogdh-mediated O2(∙-)/H2O2 production that was matched by a significant decrease in NADH formation which could be reversed by Grx2. Taken together, our results demonstrate GSH and GSSG modulate ROS production by Ogdh through S-glutathionylation of different subunits. This is also the first demonstration that GSH can work in the opposite direction in mitochondria-amplifying ROS formation instead of quenching it. We propose that this regulatory mechanism is required to modulate ROS emission from Ogdh in response to variations in glutathione redox buffering capacity. PMID:26928132

  15. Induction of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production by GSH mediated S-glutathionylation of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Mailloux, Ryan J.; Craig Ayre, D.; Christian, Sherri L.

    2016-01-01

    2-Oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (Ogdh) is an important mitochondria redox sensor that can undergo S-glutathionylation following an increase in H2O2 levels. Although S-glutathionylation is required to protect Ogdh from irreversible oxidation while simultaneously modulating its activity it remains unknown if glutathione can also modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by the complex. We report that reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione control O2∙-/H2O2 formation by Ogdh through protein S-glutathionylation reactions. GSSG (1 mM) induced a modest decrease in Ogdh activity which was associated with a significant decrease in O2∙-/H2O2 formation. GSH had the opposite effect, amplifying O2∙-/H2O2 formation by Ogdh. Incubation of purified Ogdh in 2.5 mM GSH led to significant increase in O2∙-/H2O2 formation which also lowered NADH production. Inclusion of enzymatically active glutaredoxin-2 (Grx2) in reaction mixtures reversed the GSH-mediated amplification of O2∙-/H2O2 formation. Similarly pre-incubation of permeabilized liver mitochondria from mouse depleted of GSH showed an approximately ~3.5-fold increase in Ogdh-mediated O2∙-/H2O2 production that was matched by a significant decrease in NADH formation which could be reversed by Grx2. Taken together, our results demonstrate GSH and GSSG modulate ROS production by Ogdh through S-glutathionylation of different subunits. This is also the first demonstration that GSH can work in the opposite direction in mitochondria-amplifying ROS formation instead of quenching it. We propose that this regulatory mechanism is required to modulate ROS emission from Ogdh in response to variations in glutathione redox buffering capacity. PMID:26928132

  16. 2-Oxoglutarate dehydrogenase is a more significant source of O2(·-)/H2O2 than pyruvate dehydrogenase in cardiac and liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Gardiner, Danielle; O'Brien, Marisa

    2016-08-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (Pdh) and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (Ogdh) are vital for Krebs cycle metabolism and sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). O2(·-)/H2O2 formation by Pdh and Ogdh from porcine heart were compared when operating under forward or reverse electron transfer conditions. Comparisons were also conducted with liver and cardiac mitochondria. During reverse electron transfer (RET) from NADH, purified Ogdh generated ~3-3.5× more O2(·-)/H2O2 in comparison to Pdh when metabolizing 0.5-10µM NADH. Under forward electron transfer (FET) conditions Ogdh generated ~2-4× more O2(·-)/H2O2 than Pdh. In both liver and cardiac mitochondria, Ogdh displayed significantly higher rates of ROS formation when compared to Pdh. Ogdh was also a significant source of ROS in liver mitochondria metabolizing 50µM and 500µM pyruvate or succinate. Finally, we also observed that DTT directly stimulated O2(·-)/H2O2 formation by purified Pdh and Ogdh and in cardiac or liver mitochondria in the absence of substrates and cofactors. Taken together, Ogdh is a more potent source of ROS than Pdh in liver and cardiac tissue. Ogdh is also an important ROS generator regardless of whether pyruvate or succinate serve as the sole source of carbon. Our observations provide insight into the ROS generating capacity of either complex in cardiac and liver tissue. The evidence presented herein also indicates DTT, a reductant that is routinely added to biological samples, should be avoided when assessing mitochondrial O2(·-)/H2O2 production. PMID:27394173

  17. From PII Signaling to Metabolite Sensing: A Novel 2-Oxoglutarate Sensor That Details PII - NAGK Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lüddecke, Jan; Forchhammer, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The widespread PII signal transduction proteins are known for integrating signals of nitrogen and energy supply and regulating cellular behavior by interacting with a multitude of target proteins. The PII protein of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus forms complexes with the controlling enzyme of arginine synthesis, N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) in a 2-oxoglutarate- and ATP/ADP-dependent manner. Fusing NAGK and PII proteins to either CFP or YFP yielded a FRET sensor that specifically responded to 2-oxoglutarate. The impact of the fluorescent tags on PII and NAGK was evaluated by enzyme assays, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and isothermal calorimetric experiments. The developed FRET sensor provides real-time data on PII - NAGK interaction and its modulation by the effector molecules ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate in vitro. Additionally to its utility to monitor 2-oxoglutarate levels, the FRET assay provided novel insights into PII - NAGK complex formation: (i) It revealed the formation of an encounter-complex between PII and NAGK, which holds the proteins in proximity even in the presence of inhibitors of complex formation; (ii) It revealed that the PII T-loop residue Ser49 is neither essential for complex formation with NAGK nor for activation of the enzyme but necessary to form a stable complex and efficiently relieve NAGK from arginine inhibition; (iii) It showed that arginine stabilizes the NAGK hexamer and stimulates PII - NAGK interaction. PMID:24349456

  18. From PII signaling to metabolite sensing: a novel 2-oxoglutarate sensor that details PII-NAGK complex formation.

    PubMed

    Lüddecke, Jan; Forchhammer, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The widespread PII signal transduction proteins are known for integrating signals of nitrogen and energy supply and regulating cellular behavior by interacting with a multitude of target proteins. The PII protein of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus forms complexes with the controlling enzyme of arginine synthesis, N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) in a 2-oxoglutarate- and ATP/ADP-dependent manner. Fusing NAGK and PII proteins to either CFP or YFP yielded a FRET sensor that specifically responded to 2-oxoglutarate. The impact of the fluorescent tags on PII and NAGK was evaluated by enzyme assays, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and isothermal calorimetric experiments. The developed FRET sensor provides real-time data on PII - NAGK interaction and its modulation by the effector molecules ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate in vitro. Additionally to its utility to monitor 2-oxoglutarate levels, the FRET assay provided novel insights into PII - NAGK complex formation: (i) It revealed the formation of an encounter-complex between PII and NAGK, which holds the proteins in proximity even in the presence of inhibitors of complex formation; (ii) It revealed that the PII T-loop residue Ser49 is neither essential for complex formation with NAGK nor for activation of the enzyme but necessary to form a stable complex and efficiently relieve NAGK from arginine inhibition; (iii) It showed that arginine stabilizes the NAGK hexamer and stimulates PII - NAGK interaction. PMID:24349456

  19. Mechanism of Disruption of the Amt-GlnK Complex by PII-Mediated Sensing of 2-Oxoglutarate

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Sarah; Schleberger, Paula; Lü, Wei; Wacker, Tobias; Pflüger, Tobias; Litz, Claudia; Andrade, Susana L. A.

    2011-01-01

    GlnK proteins regulate the active uptake of ammonium by Amt transport proteins by inserting their regulatory T-loops into the transport channels of the Amt trimer and physically blocking substrate passage. They sense the cellular nitrogen status through 2-oxoglutarate, and the energy level of the cell by binding both ATP and ADP with different affinities. The hyperthermophilic euryarchaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus possesses three Amt proteins, each encoded in an operon with a GlnK ortholog. One of these proteins, GlnK2 was recently found to be incapable of binding 2-OG, and in order to understand the implications of this finding we conducted a detailed structural and functional analysis of a second GlnK protein from A. fulgidus, GlnK3. Contrary to Af-GlnK2 this protein was able to bind both ATP/2-OG and ADP to yield inactive and functional states, respectively. Due to the thermostable nature of the protein we could observe the exact positioning of the notoriously flexible T-loops and explain the binding behavior of GlnK proteins to their interaction partner, the Amt proteins. A thermodynamic analysis of these binding events using microcalorimetry evaluated by microstate modeling revealed significant differences in binding cooperativity compared to other characterized PII proteins, underlining the diversity and adaptability of this class of regulatory signaling proteins. PMID:22039461

  20. Phosphonate Analogs of 2-Oxoglutarate Perturb Metabolism and Gene Expression in Illuminated Arabidopsis Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Wagner L.; Tohge, Takayuki; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Daloso, Danilo M.; Nimick, Mhairi; Krahnert, Ina; Bunik, Victoria I.; Moorhead, Greg B. G.; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2012-01-01

    Although the role of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (2-OGDHC) has previously been demonstrated in plant heterotrophic tissues its role in photosynthetically active tissues remains poorly understood. By using a combination of metabolite and transcript profiles we here investigated the function of 2-OGDHC in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana via use of specific phosphonate inhibitors of the enzyme. Incubation of leaf disks with the inhibitors revealed that they produced the anticipated effects on the in situ enzyme activity. In vitro experiments revealed that succinyl phosphonate (SP) and a carboxy ethyl ester of SP are slow-binding inhibitors of the 2-OGDHC. Our results indicate that the reduced respiration rates are associated with changes in the regulation of metabolic and signaling pathways leading to an imbalance in carbon-nitrogen metabolism and cell homeostasis. The inducible alteration of primary metabolism was associated with altered expression of genes belonging to networks of amino acids, plant respiration, and sugar metabolism. In addition, by using isothermal titration calorimetry we excluded the possibility that the changes in gene expression resulted from an effect on 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) binding to the carbon/ATP sensing protein PII. We also demonstrated that the 2OG degradation by the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase strongly influences the distribution of intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the GABA shunt. Our results indicate that the TCA cycle activity is clearly working in a non-cyclic manner upon 2-OGDHC inhibition during the light period. PMID:22876250

  1. Cyanobacterial NADPH dehydrogenase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Teruo; Mi, Hualing

    2007-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess functionally distinct multiple NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes that are essential to CO2 uptake, photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration. The unique nature of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes is the presence of subunits involved in CO2 uptake. Other than CO2 uptake, chloroplastic NDH-1 complex has similar role as cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes in photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration (chlororespiration). In this mini-review we focus on the structure and function of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes and their phylogeny. The function of chloroplastic NDH-1 complex and characteristics of plants defective in NDH-1 are also described forcomparison.

  2. The Emergence of 2-Oxoglutarate as a Master Regulator Metabolite.

    PubMed

    Huergo, Luciano F; Dixon, Ray

    2015-12-01

    The metabolite 2-oxoglutarate (also known as α-ketoglutarate, 2-ketoglutaric acid, or oxoglutaric acid) lies at the intersection between the carbon and nitrogen metabolic pathways. This compound is a key intermediate of one of the most fundamental biochemical pathways in carbon metabolism, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. In addition, 2-oxoglutarate also acts as the major carbon skeleton for nitrogen-assimilatory reactions. Experimental data support the conclusion that intracellular levels of 2-oxoglutarate fluctuate according to nitrogen and carbon availability. This review summarizes how nature has capitalized on the ability of 2-oxoglutarate to reflect cellular nutritional status through evolution of a variety of 2-oxoglutarate-sensing regulatory proteins. The number of metabolic pathways known to be regulated by 2-oxoglutarate levels has increased significantly in recent years. The signaling properties of 2-oxoglutarate are highlighted by the fact that this metabolite regulates the synthesis of the well-established master signaling molecule, cyclic AMP (cAMP), in Escherichia coli. PMID:26424716

  3. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Based on Interaction of PII and PipX Proteins Provides a Robust and Specific Biosensor for 2-Oxoglutarate, a Central Metabolite and a Signaling Molecule.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Lin; Bernard, Christophe S; Hubert, Pierre; My, Laetitia; Zhang, Cheng-Cai

    2013-12-26

    2-Oxoglutarate is a central metabolite and a signalling molecule in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The cellular levels of 2-oxoglutarate vary rapidly in response to environmental changes, but an easy and reliable approach is lacking for the measurement of 2-oxoglutarate. Here we report a biosensor of 2-oxoglutarate based on the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dissociation of the PII-PipX protein complex from cyanobacteria. Fusions of PII and PipX to either CFP or YFP could form a complex and their interaction could be detected by FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer). Mutations in PII or PipX that affect their interaction strongly decrease the FRET signal. Furthermore, the FRET signal is negatively affected, in a specific and concentration-dependent manner, by the presence of 2-oxoglutarate. This 2-oxoglutarate biosensor responds specifically and rapidly to a large range of 2-oxoglutarate levels, and is highly robust under different conditions, including in bacterial cell extracts. We further used this biosensor to study the interaction between PII and its effectors, and our data indicate that excess in Mg(2+) ions is a key factor for PII to respond efficiently to an increase in 2-oxoglutarate levels. This study paves the way for probing the dynamics of 2-oxoglutarate in various organisms and provides a valuable tool for the understanding of the molecular mechanism in metabolic regulation. PMID:24373496

  4. Porphyrin accumulation in mitochondria is mediated by 2-oxoglutarate carrier.

    PubMed

    Kabe, Yasuaki; Ohmori, Masashi; Shinouchi, Kazuya; Tsuboi, Yasunori; Hirao, Satoshi; Azuma, Motoki; Watanabe, Hajime; Okura, Ichiro; Handa, Hiroshi

    2006-10-20

    Heme (Fe-protoporphyrin IX), an endogenous porphyrin derivative, is an essential molecule in living aerobic organisms and plays a role in a variety of physiological processes such as oxygen transport, respiration, and signal transduction. For the biosynthesis of heme or the mitochondrial heme proteins, heme or its biosynthetic precursor porphyrin must be transported into mitochondria from cytosol. The mechanism of porphyrin accumulation in the mitochondrial inner membrane is unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the mechanism of mitochondrial translocation of porphyrin derivatives. We showed that palladium meso-tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (PdTCPP), a phosphorescent porphyrin derivative, accumulated in the mitochondria of several cell lines. Using affinity latex beads, we showed that 2-oxoglutarate carrier (OGC), the mitochondrial transporter of 2-oxoglutarate, bound to PdTCPP, and in vitro PdTCPP inhibited 2-oxoglutarate uptake into mitochondria in a competitive manner (Ki = 15 microM). Interestingly, all types of porphyrin derivatives examined in this study competitively inhibited 2-oxoglutarate uptake into mitochondria, including protoporphyrin IX, coproporphyrin III, and hemin. Furthermore, mitochondrial accumulation of porphyrins was inhibited by 2-oxoglutarate or OGC inhibitor. These results suggested that porphyrin accumulation in mitochondria is mediated by OGC and that porphyrins are able to competitively inhibit 2-oxoglutarate uptake into mitochondria. This is the first report of a putative mechanism for accumulation of porphyrins in the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:16920706

  5. The 2-Oxoacid Dehydrogenase Complexes in Mitochondria Can Produce Superoxide/Hydrogen Peroxide at Much Higher Rates Than Complex I*

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Casey L.; Goncalves, Renata L. S.; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Yadava, Nagendra; Bunik, Victoria I.; Brand, Martin D.

    2014-01-01

    Several flavin-dependent enzymes of the mitochondrial matrix utilize NAD+ or NADH at about the same operating redox potential as the NADH/NAD+ pool and comprise the NADH/NAD+ isopotential enzyme group. Complex I (specifically the flavin, site IF) is often regarded as the major source of matrix superoxide/H2O2 production at this redox potential. However, the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH), branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH), and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complexes are also capable of considerable superoxide/H2O2 production. To differentiate the superoxide/H2O2-producing capacities of these different mitochondrial sites in situ, we compared the observed rates of H2O2 production over a range of different NAD(P)H reduction levels in isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria under conditions that favored superoxide/H2O2 production from complex I, the OGDH complex, the BCKDH complex, or the PDH complex. The rates from all four complexes increased at higher NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratios, although the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes produced superoxide/H2O2 at high rates only when oxidizing their specific 2-oxoacid substrates and not in the reverse reaction from NADH. At optimal conditions for each system, superoxide/H2O2 was produced by the OGDH complex at about twice the rate from the PDH complex, four times the rate from the BCKDH complex, and eight times the rate from site IF of complex I. Depending on the substrates present, the dominant sites of superoxide/H2O2 production at the level of NADH may be the OGDH and PDH complexes, but these activities may often be misattributed to complex I. PMID:24515115

  6. Structural bases for the specific interactions between the E2 and E3 components of the Thermus thermophilus 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Tadashi; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Kamiya, Nobuo

    2008-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), branched-chain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase (BCDH) and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH) are multienzyme complexes that play crucial roles in several common metabolic pathways. These enzymes belong to a family of 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes that contain multiple copies of three different components (E1, E2 and E3). For the Thermus thermophilus enzymes, depending on its substrate specificity (pyruvate, branched-chain 2-oxo acid or 2-oxoglutarate), each complex has distinctive E1 (E1p, E1b or E1o) and E2 (E2p, E2b or E2o) components and one of the two possible E3 components (E3b and E3o). (The suffixes, p, b and o identify their respective enzymes, PDH, BCDH and OGDH.) Our biochemical characterization demonstrates that only three specific E3*E2 complexes can form (E3b*E2p, E3b*E2b and E3o*E2o). X-ray analyses of complexes formed between the E3 components and the peripheral subunit-binding domains (PSBDs), derived from the corresponding E2-binding partners, reveal that E3b interacts with E2p and E2b in essentially the same manner as observed for Geobacillus stearothermophilus E3*E2p, whereas E3o interacts with E2o in a novel fashion. The buried intermolecular surfaces of the E3b*PSBDp/b and E3o*PSBDo complexes differ in size, shape and charge distribution and thus, these differences presumably confer the binding specificities for the complexes. PMID:18316329

  7. Phosphorylation site on yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlinger, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Yeast cells were disrupted in a Manton-Gaulin laboratory homogenizer. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified by fractionation with polyethylene glycol, isoelectric precipitation, ultracentrifugation and chromatography on hydroxylapatite. Final purification of the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was achieved by cation-exchange high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). No endogenous pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity was detected during the purification. However, the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was phosphorylated and inactivated with purified pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase from bovine kidney. Tryptic digestion of the /sup 32/P-labeled complex yielded a single phosphopeptide which was purified to homogeniety. The tryptic digest was subjected to chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. Radioactive fractions were pooled, concentrated, and subjected to anion-exchange HPLC. The column was developed with a linear gradient of ammonium acetate. Final purification of the phosphopeptide was achieved by chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column developed with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. The amino acid sequence of the homogeneous peptide was determined by manual modified Edman degradation.

  8. Protein Hydroxylation Catalyzed by 2-Oxoglutarate-dependent Oxygenases*

    PubMed Central

    Markolovic, Suzana; Wilkins, Sarah E.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The post-translational hydroxylation of prolyl and lysyl residues, as catalyzed by 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent oxygenases, was first identified in collagen biosynthesis. 2OG oxygenases also catalyze prolyl and asparaginyl hydroxylation of the hypoxia-inducible factors that play important roles in the adaptive response to hypoxia. Subsequently, they have been shown to catalyze N-demethylation (via hydroxylation) of Nϵ-methylated histone lysyl residues, as well as hydroxylation of multiple other residues. Recent work has identified roles for 2OG oxygenases in the modification of translation-associated proteins, which in some cases appears to be conserved from microorganisms through to humans. Here we give an overview of protein hydroxylation catalyzed by 2OG oxygenases, focusing on recent discoveries. PMID:26152730

  9. Novel Inhibitors Complexed with Glutamate Dehydrogenase: ALLOSTERIC REGULATION BY CONTROL OF PROTEIN DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Smith, Christopher J.; Walker, Matthew T.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2009-12-01

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate using NAD(P){sup +} as coenzyme. Unlike its counterparts from other animal kingdoms, mammalian GDH is regulated by a host of ligands. The recently discovered hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia disorder showed that the loss of allosteric inhibition of GDH by GTP causes excessive secretion of insulin. Subsequent studies demonstrated that wild-type and hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia forms of GDH are inhibited by the green tea polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate and epicatechin gallate. This was followed by high throughput studies that identified more stable inhibitors, including hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol. Shown here are the structures of GDH complexed with these three compounds. Hexachlorophene forms a ring around the internal cavity in GDH through aromatic stacking interactions between the drug and GDH as well as between the drug molecules themselves. In contrast, GW5074 and bithionol both bind as pairs of stacked compounds at hexameric 2-fold axes between the dimers of subunits. The internal core of GDH contracts when the catalytic cleft closes during enzymatic turnover. None of the drugs cause conformational changes in the contact residues, but all bind to key interfaces involved in this contraction process. Therefore, it seems likely that the drugs inhibit enzymatic turnover by inhibiting this transition. Indeed, this expansion/contraction process may play a major role in the inter-subunit communication and allosteric regulation observed in GDH.

  10. Functional diversity of 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenases in plant metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, Scott C.; Facchini, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative enzymes catalyze many different reactions in plant metabolism. Among this suite of enzymes are the 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenases (2-ODDs). Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) as often considered the most versatile oxidative enzymes in nature, but the diversity and complexity of reactions catalyzed by 2-ODDs is superior to the CYPs. The list of oxidative reactions catalyzed by 2-ODDs includes hydroxylations, demethylations, desaturations, ring closure, ring cleavage, epimerization, rearrangement, halogenation, and demethylenation. Furthermore, recent work, including the discovery of 2-ODDs involved in epigenetic regulation, and others catalyzing several characteristic steps in specialized metabolic pathways, support the argument that 2-ODDs are among the most versatile and important oxidizing biological catalysts. In this review, we survey and summarize the pertinent literature with a focus on several key reactions catalyzed by 2-ODDs, and discuss the significance and impact of these enzymes in plant metabolism. PMID:25346740

  11. Transcription Activation by NtcA and 2-Oxoglutarate of Three Genes Involved in Heterocyst Differentiation in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120▿

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Ana; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2008-01-01

    In Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, differentiation of heterocysts takes place in response to the external cue of combined nitrogen deprivation, allowing the organism to fix atmospheric nitrogen in oxic environments. NtcA, a global transcriptional regulator of cyanobacteria, is required for activation of the expression of multiple genes involved in heterocyst differentiation, including key regulators that are specific to the process. We have set up a fully defined in vitro system, which includes the purified Anabaena RNA polymerase, and have studied the effects of NtcA and its signaling effector 2-oxoglutarate on RNA polymerase binding, open complex formation, and transcript production from promoters of the hetC, nrrA, and devB genes that are activated by NtcA at different stages of heterocyst differentiation. Both RNA polymerase and NtcA could specifically bind to the target DNA in the absence of any effector. 2-Oxoglutarate had a moderate positive effect on NtcA binding, and NtcA had a limited positive effect on RNA polymerase recruitment at the promoters. However, a stringent requirement of both NtcA and 2-oxoglutarate was observed for the detection of open complexes and transcript production at the three investigated promoters. These results support a key role for 2-oxoglutarate in transcription activation in the developing heterocyst. PMID:18658268

  12. The amino-terminal GAF domain of Azotobacter vinelandii NifA binds 2-oxoglutarate to resist inhibition by NifL under nitrogen-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Little, Richard; Dixon, Ray

    2003-08-01

    The expression of genes required for the synthesis of molybdenum nitrogenase in Azotobacter vinelandii is controlled by the NifL-NifA transcriptional regulatory complex in response to nitrogen, carbon, and redox status. Activation of nif gene expression by the transcriptional activator NifA is inhibited by direct protein-protein interaction with NifL under conditions unfavorable for nitrogen fixation. We have recently shown that the NifL-NifA system responds directly to physiological concentrations of 2-oxoglutarate, resulting in relief of NifA activity from inhibition by NifL under conditions when fixed nitrogen is limiting. The inhibitory activity of NifL is restored under conditions of excess combined nitrogen through the binding of the signal transduction protein Av GlnK to the carboxyl-terminal domain of NifL. The amino-terminal domain of NifA comprises a GAF domain implicated in the regulatory response to NifL. A truncated form of NifA lacking this domain is not responsive to 2-oxoglutarate in the presence of NifL, suggesting that the GAF domain is required for the response to this ligand. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we demonstrate stoichiometric binding of 2-oxoglutarate to both the isolated GAF domain and the full-length A. vinelandii NifA protein with a dissociation constant of approximately 60 microm. Limited proteolysis experiments indicate that the binding of 2-oxoglutarate increases the susceptibility of the GAF domain to trypsin digestion and also prevents NifL from protecting these cleavage sites. However, protection by NifL is restored when the non-modified (non-uridylylated) form of Av GlnK is also present. Our results suggest that the binding of 2-oxoglutarate to the GAF domain of NifA may induce a conformational change that prevents inhibition by NifL under conditions when fixed nitrogen is limiting. PMID:12759352

  13. Unity in diversity, a systems approach to regulating plant cell physiology by 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Siddhartha

    2015-01-01

    Could a disjoint group of enzymes synchronize their activities and execute a complex multi-step, measurable, and reproducible response? Here, I surmise that the alpha-ketoglutarate dependent superfamily of non-haem iron (II) dioxygenases could influence cell physiology as a cohesive unit, and that the broad spectra of substrates transformed is an absolute necessity to this portrayal. This eclectic group comprises members from all major taxa, and participates in pesticide breakdown, hypoxia signaling, and osmotic stress neutralization. The oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate to succinate is coupled with a concomitant substrate hydroxylation and, in most cases, is followed by an additional specialized conversion. The domain profile of a protein sequence was used as an index of miscellaneous reaction chemistry and interpreted alongside existent kinetic data in a linear model of integrated function. Statistical parameters were inferred by the creation of a novel, empirically motivated flat-file database of over 3800 sequences (DB2OG) with putative 2-oxoglutarate dependent activity. The collated information was categorized on the basis of existing annotation schema. The data suggests that 2OG-dependent enzymes incorporate several desirable features of a systems level player. DB2OG, is free, accessible without a login to all users, and available at the following URL (http://comp-biol.theacms.in/DB2OG.html). PMID:25814993

  14. Unity in diversity, a systems approach to regulating plant cell physiology by 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Siddhartha

    2015-01-01

    Could a disjoint group of enzymes synchronize their activities and execute a complex multi-step, measurable, and reproducible response? Here, I surmise that the alpha-ketoglutarate dependent superfamily of non-haem iron (II) dioxygenases could influence cell physiology as a cohesive unit, and that the broad spectra of substrates transformed is an absolute necessity to this portrayal. This eclectic group comprises members from all major taxa, and participates in pesticide breakdown, hypoxia signaling, and osmotic stress neutralization. The oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate to succinate is coupled with a concomitant substrate hydroxylation and, in most cases, is followed by an additional specialized conversion. The domain profile of a protein sequence was used as an index of miscellaneous reaction chemistry and interpreted alongside existent kinetic data in a linear model of integrated function. Statistical parameters were inferred by the creation of a novel, empirically motivated flat-file database of over 3800 sequences (DB2OG) with putative 2-oxoglutarate dependent activity. The collated information was categorized on the basis of existing annotation schema. The data suggests that 2OG-dependent enzymes incorporate several desirable features of a systems level player. DB2OG, is free, accessible without a login to all users, and available at the following URL (http://comp-biol.theacms.in/DB2OG.html). PMID:25814993

  15. Interrogating the Druggability of the 2-Oxoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase Target Class by Chemical Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Joberty, Gérard; Boesche, Markus; Brown, Jack A; Eberhard, Dirk; Garton, Neil S; Humphreys, Philip G; Mathieson, Toby; Muelbaier, Marcel; Ramsden, Nigel G; Reader, Valérie; Rueger, Anne; Sheppard, Robert J; Westaway, Susan M; Bantscheff, Marcus; Lee, Kevin; Wilson, David M; Prinjha, Rab K; Drewes, Gerard

    2016-07-15

    The 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase target class comprises around 60 enzymes including several subfamilies with relevance to human disease, such as the prolyl hydroxylases and the Jumonji-type lysine demethylases. Current drug discovery approaches are largely based on small molecule inhibitors targeting the iron/2-oxoglutarate cofactor binding site. We have devised a chemoproteomics approach based on a combination of unselective active-site ligands tethered to beads, enabling affinity capturing of around 40 different dioxygenase enzymes from human cells. Mass-spectrometry-based quantification of bead-bound enzymes using a free-ligand competition-binding format enabled the comprehensive determination of affinities for the cosubstrate 2-oxoglutarate and for oncometabolites such as 2-hydroxyglutarate. We also profiled a set of representative drug-like inhibitor compounds. The results indicate that intracellular competition by endogenous cofactors and high active site similarity present substantial challenges for drug discovery for this target class. PMID:27197014

  16. The mitochondrial dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate carriers do not transport glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Booty, Lee M.; King, Martin S.; Thangaratnarajah, Chancievan; Majd, Homa; James, Andrew M.; Kunji, Edmund R.S.; Murphy, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione carries out vital protective roles within mitochondria, but is synthesised in the cytosol. Previous studies have suggested that the mitochondrial dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate carriers were responsible for glutathione uptake. We set out to characterise the putative glutathione transport by using fused membrane vesicles of Lactococcus lactis overexpressing the dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate carriers. Although transport of the canonical substrates could be measured readily, an excess of glutathione did not compete for substrate uptake nor could transport of glutathione be measured directly. Thus these mitochondrial carriers do not transport glutathione and the identity of the mitochondrial glutathione transporter remains unknown. PMID:25637873

  17. The mitochondrial dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate carriers do not transport glutathione.

    PubMed

    Booty, Lee M; King, Martin S; Thangaratnarajah, Chancievan; Majd, Homa; James, Andrew M; Kunji, Edmund R S; Murphy, Michael P

    2015-02-27

    Glutathione carries out vital protective roles within mitochondria, but is synthesised in the cytosol. Previous studies have suggested that the mitochondrial dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate carriers were responsible for glutathione uptake. We set out to characterise the putative glutathione transport by using fused membrane vesicles of Lactococcus lactis overexpressing the dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate carriers. Although transport of the canonical substrates could be measured readily, an excess of glutathione did not compete for substrate uptake nor could transport of glutathione be measured directly. Thus these mitochondrial carriers do not transport glutathione and the identity of the mitochondrial glutathione transporter remains unknown. PMID:25637873

  18. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex from Chloroplasts of Pisum sativum L 1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael; Randall, Douglas D.

    1979-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is associated with intact chloroplasts and mitochondria of 9-day-old Pisum sativum L. seedlings. The ratio of the mitochondrial complex to the chloroplast complex activities is about 3 to 1. Maximal rates observed for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity ranged from 6 to 9 micromoles of NADH produced per milligram of chlorophyll per hour. Osmotic rupture of pea chloroplasts released 88% of the complex activity, indicating that chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is a stromal complex. The pH optimum for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was between 7.8 and 8.2, whereas the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex had a pH optimum between 7.3 and 7.7. Chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity was specific for pyruvate, dependent upon coenzyme A and NAD and partially dependent upon Mg2+ and thiamine pyrophosphate. Chloroplast-associated pyruvate dehydrogenase complex provides a direct link between pyruvate metabolism and chloroplast fatty acid biosynthesis by providing the substrate, acetyl-CoA, necessary for membrane development in young plants. Images PMID:16661100

  19. Mechanism of 2-oxoglutarate signaling by the Synechococcus elongatus PII signal transduction protein

    PubMed Central

    Fokina, Oleksandra; Chellamuthu, Vasuki-Ranjani; Forchhammer, Karl; Zeth, Kornelius

    2010-01-01

    PII proteins control key processes of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria, archaea, and plants in response to the central metabolites ATP, ADP, and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG), signaling cellular energy and carbon and nitrogen abundance. This metabolic information is integrated by PII and transmitted to regulatory targets (key enzymes, transporters, and transcription factors), modulating their activity. In oxygenic phototrophs, the controlling enzyme of arginine synthesis, N-acetyl-glutamate kinase (NAGK), is a major PII target, whose activity responds to 2-OG via PII. Here we show structures of the Synechococcus elongatus PII protein in complex with ATP, Mg2+, and 2-OG, which clarify how 2-OG affects PII–NAGK interaction. PII trimers with all three sites fully occupied were obtained as well as structures with one or two 2-OG molecules per PII trimer. These structures identify the site of 2-OG located in the vicinity between the subunit clefts and the base of the T loop. The 2-OG is bound to a Mg2+ ion, which is coordinated by three phosphates of ATP, and by ionic interactions with the highly conserved residues K58 and Q39 together with B- and T-loop backbone interactions. These interactions impose a unique T-loop conformation that affects the interactions with the PII target. Structures of PII trimers with one or two bound 2-OG molecules reveal the basis for anticooperative 2-OG binding and shed light on the intersubunit signaling mechanism by which PII senses effectors in a wide range of concentrations. PMID:21041661

  20. Mechanism of 2-oxoglutarate signaling by the Synechococcus elongatus PII signal transduction protein.

    PubMed

    Fokina, Oleksandra; Chellamuthu, Vasuki-Ranjani; Forchhammer, Karl; Zeth, Kornelius

    2010-11-16

    P(II) proteins control key processes of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria, archaea, and plants in response to the central metabolites ATP, ADP, and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG), signaling cellular energy and carbon and nitrogen abundance. This metabolic information is integrated by P(II) and transmitted to regulatory targets (key enzymes, transporters, and transcription factors), modulating their activity. In oxygenic phototrophs, the controlling enzyme of arginine synthesis, N-acetyl-glutamate kinase (NAGK), is a major P(II) target, whose activity responds to 2-OG via P(II). Here we show structures of the Synechococcus elongatus P(II) protein in complex with ATP, Mg(2+), and 2-OG, which clarify how 2-OG affects P(II)-NAGK interaction. P(II) trimers with all three sites fully occupied were obtained as well as structures with one or two 2-OG molecules per P(II) trimer. These structures identify the site of 2-OG located in the vicinity between the subunit clefts and the base of the T loop. The 2-OG is bound to a Mg(2+) ion, which is coordinated by three phosphates of ATP, and by ionic interactions with the highly conserved residues K58 and Q39 together with B- and T-loop backbone interactions. These interactions impose a unique T-loop conformation that affects the interactions with the P(II) target. Structures of P(II) trimers with one or two bound 2-OG molecules reveal the basis for anticooperative 2-OG binding and shed light on the intersubunit signaling mechanism by which P(II) senses effectors in a wide range of concentrations. PMID:21041661

  1. Novel flavonol 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenase: affinity purification, characterization, and kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Anzellotti, D; Ibrahim, R K

    2000-10-15

    A 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase [EC 1.14.11-] that catalyzes the 6-hydroxylation of partially methylated flavonols has been purified to near homogeneity from Chrysosplenium americanum. Enzyme purification was achieved by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superose 12 and Mono Q columns as well as by affinity chromatography on 2-oxoglutarate-Sepharose and immunoaffinity columns. The specific activity of the 6-hydroxylase eluted from Mono Q (97.1 pkat/mg) was enriched 538-fold, with a 0.63% recovery. Both affinity chromatography steps resulted in the elimination of most contaminating proteins, but not without loss of enzyme activity and stability. The molecular mass of both the native and denatured enzyme was found to be 42 and 45 kDa, respectively, suggesting a monomeric protein. The enzyme exhibits strict specificity for position 6 of partially methylated flavonols possessing a 7-methoxyl group, indicating its involvement in the biosynthesis of polymethylated flavonols in this plant. The cofactor dependence of the enzyme is similar to that of other plant dioxygenases, particularly its dependence on ferrous ions for catalytic activity and reactivation. Internal amino acid sequence information indicated its relatedness to other plant flavonoid dioxygenases. The results of substrate interaction kinetics and product inhibition studies suggest an ordered, sequential reaction mechanism (TerTer), where 2-oxoglutarate is the first substrate to bind, followed by O2 and the flavonol substrate. Product release occurs in the reverse order where the hydroxylated flavonol is the first to be released, followed by CO2 and succinate. To our knowledge, this is the first reported 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase that catalyzes the aromatic hydroxylation of a flavonoid compound. PMID:11068865

  2. Purification and characterization of 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from a thermophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic bacterium, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6.

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, K S; Ishii, M; Igarashi, Y; Kodama, T

    1996-01-01

    2-Oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from a thermophilic, obligately autotrophic, hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6, was purified to homogeneity by precipitation with ammonium sulfate and by fractionation by DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B, polyacrylate-quaternary amine, hydroxyapatite, and Superdex-200 chromatography. The purified enzyme had a molecular mass of about 105 kDa and comprised two subunits (70 kDa and 35 kDa). The activity of the 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase was detected by the use of 2-oxoglutarate, coenzyme A, and one of several electron acceptors in substrate amounts (ferredoxin isolated from H. thermophilus, flavin adenine dinucleotide, flavin mononucleotide, or methyl viologen). NAD, NADP, and ferredoxins from Chlorella spp. and Clostridium pasteurianum were ineffective. The enzyme was extremely thermostable; the temperature optimum for 2-oxoglutarate oxidation was above 80 degrees C, and the time for a 50% loss of activity at 70 degrees C under anaerobic conditions was 22 h. The optimum pH for a 2-oxoglutarate oxidation reaction was 7.6 to 7.8. The apparent Km values for 2-oxoglutarate and coenzyme A at 70 degrees C were 1.42 mM and 80 microM, respectively. PMID:8655524

  3. Catalytic Mechanisms of Fe(II)- and 2-Oxoglutarate-dependent Oxygenases*

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Salette; Hausinger, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear non-heme Fe(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent oxygenases comprise a large family of enzymes that utilize an Fe(IV)-oxo intermediate to initiate diverse oxidative transformations with important biological roles. Here, four of the major types of Fe(II)/2OG-dependent reactions are detailed: hydroxylation, halogenation, ring formation, and desaturation. In addition, an atypical epimerization reaction is described. Studies identifying several key intermediates in catalysis are concisely summarized, and the proposed mechanisms are explained. In addition, a variety of other transformations catalyzed by selected family members are briefly described to further highlight the chemical versatility of these enzymes. PMID:26152721

  4. A reporter ligand NMR screening method for 2-oxoglutarate oxygenase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Demetriades, Marina; Hardy, Adam P.; Lejeune, Clarisse; Smart, Tristan J.; Szöllössi, Andrea; Kawamura, Akane; Schofield, Christopher J.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The human 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) dependent oxygenases belong to a family of structurally related enzymes that play important roles in many biological processes. We report that competition-based NMR methods, using 2OG as a reporter ligand, can be used for quantitative and site-specific screening of ligand binding to 2OG oxygenases. The method was demonstrated using hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylases and histone demethylases, and KD values were determined for inhibitors that compete with 2OG at the metal centre. This technique is also useful as a screening or validation tool for inhibitor discovery, as exemplified by work with protein-directed dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC). PMID:23234607

  5. The neuroprotective effect of 2-oxoglutarate in the experimental ischemia of hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, T N; Ushakova, G A; Osadchenko, I; Skibo, G G; Pierzynowski, S G

    2011-04-01

    In this study we investigated the potential neuroprotective effect of 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) on the hippocampus in the transient vessel occlusion ischemia model in the Mongolian gerbil. The morphological and biochemical studies were performed at 7 days after occlusion of carotid arteries. The acute reduction of NeuN-positive neurons in the CA1 pyramidal layer of the hippocampus was accompanied by increased staining intensity for GFAP-positive astrocytes, indicative of glial reaction. The neuron death in the CA1 area coincided with a strong 2.4 fold decrease in the membrane forms of neuronal cell adhesion molecules and elevated levels of astrocyte-specific proteins (soluble GFAP to 2,6 times; filament GFAP to 1,5 times; calcium-binding protein S-100b to 1,6 times). Treatment with 2-oxoglutarate (2.28 g/l drinking water) for between 7 and 21 days attenuated the neuronal death and reactive astrogliosis in this model of experimental ischemia by 20-50%. Our results suggest that 2-OG may prevent the disturbances of neural cells that usually take place during ischemic pathology. PMID:21673372

  6. A mimic of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huanyu; Breslow, Ronald

    2010-10-15

    Pyruvic acid undergo decarboxylation catalyzed by a hydrophobic thiazolium salt and reacts with a hydrophobic analog of lipoic acid to form a hydrophobic acylthioester that reacts with aniline to form acetanilide in water, but only in the presence of a hydrophobically modified polyaziridine that acts to gather the reactants just as the enzyme complex does. PMID:20826089

  7. Chronic alcoholism in rats induces a compensatory response, preserving brain thiamine diphosphate, but the brain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases are inactivated despite unchanged coenzyme levels.

    PubMed

    Parkhomenko, Yulia M; Kudryavtsev, Pavel A; Pylypchuk, Svetlana Yu; Chekhivska, Lilia I; Stepanenko, Svetlana P; Sergiichuk, Andrej A; Bunik, Victoria I

    2011-06-01

    Thiamine-dependent changes in alcoholic brain were studied using a rat model. Brain thiamine and its mono- and diphosphates were not reduced after 20 weeks of alcohol exposure. However, alcoholism increased both synaptosomal thiamine uptake and thiamine diphosphate synthesis in brain, pointing to mechanisms preserving thiamine diphosphate in the alcoholic brain. In spite of the unchanged level of the coenzyme thiamine diphosphate, activities of the mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate and pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes decreased in alcoholic brain. The inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was caused by its increased phosphorylation. The inactivation of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) correlated with a decrease in free thiols resulting from an elevation of reactive oxygen species. Abstinence from alcohol following exposure to alcohol reactivated OGDHC along with restoration of the free thiol content. However, restoration of enzyme activity occurred before normalization of reactive oxygen species levels. Hence, the redox status of cellular thiols mediates the action of oxidative stress on OGDHC in alcoholic brain. As a result, upon chronic alcohol consumption, physiological mechanisms to counteract the thiamine deficiency and silence pyruvate dehydrogenase are activated in rat brain, whereas OGDHC is inactivated due to impaired antioxidant ability. PMID:21517848

  8. 2-Oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases in the biosynthesis of simple coumarins

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Bun-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Coumarins are natural plant products that have been the subject of extensive phytochemical and pharmacological research studies in the past few decades. The core structure of coumarins is derived from the respective cinnamates via ortho-hydroxylation of the aromatic ring, trans/cis isomerization, and lactonization. Various substitution patterns of coumarins have been reported, whereas the biosynthesis of coumarins remains elusive. Ortho-hydroxylation is a key step in simple coumarin biosynthesis as a branch point from the lignin biosynthetic pathway. 2-Oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (2OGDs) from plants convert cinnamate derivatives into simple coumarins through the process of ortho-hydroxylation. This review describes the 2OGDs involved in coumarin biosynthesis and their substrate specificities. PMID:25404933

  9. Structural investigations of E. Coli dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in solution: Small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadinova, L. A.; Rodina, E. V.; Vorobyeva, N. N.; Kurilova, S. A.; Nazarova, T. I.; Shtykova, E. V.

    2016-05-01

    Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli (LpD) is a bacterial enzyme that is involved in the central metabolism and shared in common between the pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes. In the crystal structure, E. coli LpD is known to exist as a dimer. The present work is focused on analyzing the solution structure of LpD by small-angle X-ray scattering, molecular docking, and analytical ultracentrifugation. It was shown that in solution LpD exists as an equilibrium mixture of a dimer and a tetramer. The presence of oligomeric forms is determined by the multifunctionality of LpD in the cell, in particular, the required stoichiometry in the complexes.

  10. Characterization of interactions of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase with its binding protein in the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2010-05-07

    Unlike pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from prokaryotes, PDCs from higher eukaryotes have an additional structural component, E3-binding protein (BP), for binding of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) in the complex. Based on the 3D structure of the subcomplex of human (h) E3 with the di-domain (L3S1) of hBP, the amino acid residues (H348, D413, Y438, and R447) of hE3 for binding to hBP were substituted singly by alanine or other residues. These substitutions did not have large effects on hE3 activity when measured in its free form. However, when these hE3 mutants were reconstituted in the complex, the PDC activity was significantly reduced to 9% for Y438A, 20% for Y438H, and 18% for D413A. The binding of hE3 mutants with L3S1 determined by isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the binding affinities of the Y438A, Y438H, and D413A mutants to L3S1 were severely reduced (1019-, 607-, and 402-fold, respectively). Unlike wild-type hE3 the binding of the Y438A mutant to L3S1 was accompanied by an unfavorable enthalpy change and a large positive entropy change. These results indicate that hE3-Y438 and hE3-D413 play important roles in binding of hE3 to hBP.

  11. The 2-oxoglutarate supply exerts significant control on the lysine synthesis flux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Héctor; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Rumjanek, Franklin D; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma

    2013-11-01

    To determine the extent to which the supply of the precursor 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) controls the synthesis of lysine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing exponentially in high glucose, top-down elasticity analysis was used. Three groups of reactions linked by 2-OG were defined. The 2-OG supply group comprised all metabolic steps leading to its formation, and the two 2-OG consumer groups comprised the enzymes and transporters involved in 2-OG transformation into lysine and glutamate and their further utilization for protein synthesis and storage. Various 2-OG steady-state concentrations that produced different fluxes to lysine and glutamate were attained using yeast mutants with increasing activities of Krebs cycle enzymes and decreased activities of Lys synthesis enzymes. The elasticity coefficients of the three enzyme groups were determined from the dependence of the amino acid fluxes on the 2-OG concentration. The respective degrees of control on the flux towards lysine (flux control coefficients) were determined from their elasticities, and were 1.1, 0.41 and -0.52 for the 2-OG producer group and the Lys and Glu branches, respectively. Thus, the predominant control exerted by the 2-OG supply on the rate of lysine synthesis suggests that over-expression of 2-OG producer enzymes may be a highly effective strategy to enhance Lys production. PMID:24034837

  12. PII signal transduction proteins are ATPases whose activity is regulated by 2-oxoglutarate

    PubMed Central

    Radchenko, Martha V.; Thornton, Jeremy; Merrick, Mike

    2013-01-01

    PII proteins are one of the most widespread families of signal transduction proteins in nature, being ubiquitous throughout bacteria, archaea, and plants. In all these organisms, PII proteins coordinate many facets of nitrogen metabolism by interacting with and regulating the activities of enzymes, transcription factors, and membrane transport proteins. The primary mode of signal perception by PII proteins derives from their ability to bind the effector molecules 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) and ATP or ADP. The role of 2-OG as an indicator of cellular nitrogen status is well understood, but the function of ATP/ADP binding has remained unresolved. We have now shown that the Escherichia coli PII protein, GlnK, has an ATPase activity that is inhibited by 2-OG. Hence, when a drop in the cellular 2-OG pool signals nitrogen sufficiency, 2-OG depletion of GlnK causes bound ATP to be hydrolyzed to ADP, leading to a conformational change in the protein. We propose that the role of ATP/ADP binding in E. coli GlnK is to effect a 2-OG-dependent molecular switch that drives a conformational change in the T loops of the PII protein. We have further shown that two other PII proteins, Azospirillum brasilense GlnZ and Arabidopsis thaliana PII, have a similar ATPase activity, and we therefore suggest that this switch mechanism is likely to be a general property of most members of the PII protein family. PMID:23818625

  13. 5-Carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline is a Broad Spectrum 2-Oxoglutarate Oxygenase Inhibitor which Causes Iron Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Aik, WeiShen; Che, Ka Hing; Li, Xuan Shirley; Kristensen, Jan B. L.; King, Oliver N. F.; Chan, Mun Chiang; Yeoh, Kar Kheng; Choi, Hwanho; Walport, Louise J.; Thinnes, Cyrille C.; Bush, Jacob T.; Lejeune, Clarisse; Rydzik, Anna M.; Rose, Nathan R.; Bagg, Eleanor A.; McDonough, Michael A.; Krojer, Tobias; Yue, Wyatt W.; Ng, Stanley S.; Olsen, Lars; Brennan, Paul E.; Oppermann, Udo; Muller-Knapp, Susanne; Klose, Robert J.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Kawamura, Akane

    2015-01-01

    2-Oxoglutarate and iron dependent oxygenases are therapeutic targets for human diseases. Using a representative 2OG oxygenase panel, we compare the inhibitory activities of 5-carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline (IOX1) and 4-carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline (4C8HQ) with that of two other commonly used 2OG oxygenase inhibitors, N-oxalylglycine (NOG) and 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (2,4-PDCA). The results reveal that IOX1 has a broad spectrum of activity, as demonstrated by the inhibition of transcription factor hydroxylases, representatives of all 2OG dependent histone demethylase subfamilies, nucleic acid demethylases and γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase. Cellular assays show that, unlike NOG and 2,4-PDCA, IOX1 is active against both cytosolic and nuclear 2OG oxygenases without ester derivatisation. Unexpectedly, crystallographic studies on these oxygenases demonstrate that IOX1, but not 4C8HQ, can cause translocation of the active site metal, revealing a rare example of protein ligand-induced metal movement PMID:26682036

  14. Nonmetabolizable analogue of 2-oxoglutarate elicits heterocyst differentiation under repressive conditions in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Sophie; Chen, Han; Bédu, Sylvie; Ziarelli, Fabio; Peng, Ling; Zhang, Cheng-Cai

    2005-01-01

    In response to combined nitrogen starvation in the growth medium, the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is able to develop a particular cell type, called a heterocyst, specialized in molecular nitrogen fixation. Heterocysts are regularly intercalated among vegetative cells and represent 5–10% of all cells along each filament. In unicellular cyanobacteria, the key Krebs cycle intermediate, 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG), has been suggested as a nitrogen status signal, but in vivo evidence is still lacking. In this study we show that nitrogen starvation causes 2-OG to accumulate transiently within cells of Anabaena PCC 7120, reaching a maximal intracellular concentration of ≈0.1 mM 1 h after combined nitrogen starvation. A nonmetabolizable fluorinated 2-OG derivative, 2,2-difluoropentanedioic acid (DFPA), was synthesized and used to demonstrate the signaling function of 2-OG in vivo. DFPA is shown to be a structural analogue of 2-OG and the process of its uptake and accumulation in vivo can be followed by 19F magic angle spinning NMR because of the presence of the fluorine atom and its chemical stability. DFPA at a threshold concentration of 0.3 mM triggers heterocyst differentiation under repressing conditions. The multidisciplinary approaches using synthetic fluorinated analogues, magic angle spinning NMR for their analysis in vivo, and techniques of molecular biology provide a powerful means to identify the nature of the signals that remain unknown or poorly defined in many signaling pathways. PMID:15985552

  15. Molecular structure of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Vogel, O; Hoehn, B; Henning, U

    1972-06-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase core complex from E. coli K-12, defined as the multienzyme complex that can be obtained with a unique polypeptide chain composition, has a molecular weight of 3.75 x 10(6). All results obtained agree with the following numerology. The core complex consists of 48 polypeptide chains. There are 16 chains (molecular weight = 100,000) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase component, 16 chains (molecular weight = 80,000) of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase component, and 16 chains (molecular weight = 56,000) of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase component. Usually, but not always, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is produced in vivo containing at least 2-3 mol more of dimers of the pyruvate dehydrogenase component than the stoichiometric ratio with respect to the core complex. This "excess" component is bound differently than are the eight dimers in the core complex. PMID:4556465

  16. Molecular Structure of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex from Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Otto; Hoehn, Barbara; Henning, Ulf

    1972-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase core complex from E. coli K-12, defined as the multienzyme complex that can be obtained with a unique polypeptide chain composition, has a molecular weight of 3.75 × 106. All results obtained agree with the following numerology. The core complex consists of 48 polypeptide chains. There are 16 chains (molecular weight = 100,000) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase component, 16 chains (molecular weight = 80,000) of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase component, and 16 chains (molecular weight = 56,000) of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase component. Usually, but not always, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is produced in vivo containing at least 2-3 mol more of dimers of the pyruvate dehydrogenase component than the stoichiometric ratio with respect to the core complex. This “excess” component is bound differently than are the eight dimers in the core complex. Images PMID:4556465

  17. Phenylbutyrate Therapy for Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency and Lactic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Rosa; Manco, Giuseppe; Lamantea, Eleonora; Nusco, Edoardo; Ferrante, Mariella I.; Sordino, Paolo; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Lee, Brendan; Zeviani, Massimo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is a build-up of lactic acid in the blood and tissues, which can be due to several inborn errors of metabolism as well as nongenetic conditions. Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. Phosphorylation of specific serine residues of the E1α subunit of PDHC by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) inactivates the enzyme, whereas dephosphorylation restores PDHC activity. We found that phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of PDK. Phenylbutyrate given to C57B6/L wild-type mice results in a significant increase in PDHC enzyme activity and a reduction of phosphorylated E1α in brain, muscle, and liver compared to saline-treated mice. By means of recombinant enzymes, we showed that phenylbutyrate prevents phosphorylation of E1α through binding and inhibition of PDK, providing a molecular explanation for the effect of phenylbutyrate on PDHC activity. Phenylbutyrate increases PDHC activity in fibroblasts from PDHC-deficient patients harboring various molecular defects and corrects the morphological, locomotor, and biochemical abnormalities in the noam631 zebrafish model of PDHC deficiency. In mice, phenylbutyrate prevents systemic lactic acidosis induced by partial hepatectomy. Because phenylbutyrate is already approved for human use in other diseases, the findings of this study have the potential to be rapidly translated for treatment of patients with PDHC deficiency and other forms of primary and secondary lactic acidosis. PMID:23467562

  18. Fur activates expression of the 2-oxoglutarate oxidoreductase genes (oorDABC) in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Gilbreath, Jeremy J; West, Abby L; Pich, Oscar Q; Carpenter, Beth M; Michel, Sarah; Merrell, D Scott

    2012-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen that colonizes the gastric mucosa of ∼50% of the world's population. Within this colonization niche, the bacteria encounter large fluctuations in nutrient availability. As such, it is critical that this organism regulate expression of key metabolic enzymes so that they are present when environmental conditions are optimal for growth. One such enzyme is the 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) oxidoreductase (OOR), which catalyzes the conversion of α-ketoglutarate to succinyl coenzyme A (succinyl-CoA) and CO(2). Previous studies from our group suggested that the genes that encode the OOR are activated by iron-bound Fur (Fe-Fur); microarray analysis showed that expression of oorD, oorA, and oorC was altered in a fur mutant strain of H. pylori. The goal of the present work was to more thoroughly characterize expression of the oorDABC genes in H. pylori as well as to define the role of Fe-Fur in this process. Here we show that these four genes are cotranscribed as an operon and that expression of the operon is decreased in a fur mutant strain. Transcriptional start site mapping and promoter analysis revealed the presence of a canonical extended -10 element but a poorly conserved -35 element upstream of the +1. Additionally, we identified a conserved Fur binding sequence ∼130 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site. Transcriptional analysis using promoter fusions revealed that this binding sequence was required for Fe-Fur-mediated activation. Finally, fluorescence anisotropy assays indicate that Fe-Fur specifically bound this Fur box with a relatively high affinity (dissociation constant [K(d)] = 200 nM). These findings provide novel insight into the genetic regulation of a key metabolic enzyme and add to our understanding of the diverse roles Fur plays in gene regulation in H. pylori. PMID:23002221

  19. Transformation linked decrease of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Eboli, M L; Pasquini, A

    1994-10-14

    Epidermis exhibits glycolytic features peculiar to cancer cells. The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, both active (PDHa) and total (PDHt) forms, has been investigated and compared in epidermis and epidermal carcinomas from human source. Low or undetectable PDHa is found in either normal and neoplastic tissue. PDHt is unchanged in human epidermis between the second and seventh decades of life but is dramatically decreased following neoplastic transformation (0.107 and 0.026 units/g fresh tissue for epidermis and epidermal carcinoma, respectively). As PDH plays a key role in mitochondrial carbohydrate metabolism, the decrease of total enzymic capacity found in tumors suggest that different mechanisms regulate PDH expression and, in turn, glycolytic mechanisms of epidermis and cancer cells. PMID:7954343

  20. Dietary 2-oxoglutarate mitigates gastrectomy-evoked structural changes in cartilage of female rats.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Ewa; Kurlak, Paulina; Pierzynowski, Stefan G

    2016-01-01

    Gastrectomy (Gx) leads to osteopenia/osteoporosis in humans and animals. However, little is known about the influence of Gx on the cartilage in this regard. Recent studies have demonstrated a protective effect of 2-oxoglutaric acid (2-Ox) on bone and cartilage. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether 2-Ox can mitigate eventual Gx-induced cartilage impairment. Twenty female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to Gx and randomly divided into two groups: Gx + 2-Ox and Gx. Another 20 rats were sham-operated (ShO) and randomly divided into two groups: ShO + 2-Ox and ShO. The daily dose of 2-Ox administered to the rats in the drinking water was 0.43 g per 100 g rat. After eight weeks, rats were euthanized and femora and tibiae were collected. Histology and histomorphometry analyses of the articular cartilage and the growth plate were done. Gx resulted in a 32% (±44.5 femur, ±35.8 tibia) decrease in overall thickness of articular cartilage in both bones (femur: ShO 279.1 ± 48.5 vs. Gx 190.2 ± 38.4 µm, tibia: ShO 222.9 ± 50.3 µm vs. Gx 151.3 ± 52.6 µm) (in some zones up to 58 ± 28.0%), and in the growth plate up to 20% (±22.4) (femur: ShO 243.0 ± 34.0 vs. Gx 207.0 ± 33.7 µm, tibia: ShO 220.0 ± 24.6 µm vs. Gx 171.1 ± 16.1 µm). Gx altered the spatial distribution of thick and thin collagen fibers, and chondrocyte shape and size. 2-Ox administration prevented the reduction in both cartilages thickness (Gx + 2-Ox: articular cartilage 265.2 ± 53.8 µm, 235.6 ± 42.7 µm, growth plate 236.7 ± 39.2 µm, 191.3 ± 16.5 µm in femur and tibia, respectively), and abolished the spatial changes in collagen distribution and structure induced by Gx. Gx affects cartilage structure and thickness, however, 2-Ox administration mitigates these effects and showed protective and stimulatory properties. Our observations suggest that dietary 2-Ox can be used to offset

  1. Structure prediction of Fe(II) 2-oxoglutarate dioxygenase from a psychrophilic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica PI12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Nik Yusnoraini; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Raih, Mohd Firdaus; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul

    2015-09-01

    A cDNA encoding Fe(II) 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) dependent dioxygenases was isolated from psychrophilic yeast, Glaciozyma antarctica PI12. We have successfully amplified 1,029 bp cDNA sequence that encodes 342 amino acid with predicted molecular weight 38 kDa. The prediction protein was analysed using various bioinformatics tools to explore the properties of the protein. Based on a BLAST search analysis, the Fe2OX amino acid sequence showed 61% identity to the sequence of oxoglutarate/iron-dependent oxygenase from Rhodosporidium toruloides NP11. SignalP prediction showed that the Fe2OX protein contains no putative signal peptide, which suggests that this enzyme most probably localised intracellularly.The structure of Fe2OX was predicted by homology modelling using MODELLER9v11. The model with the lowest objective function was selected from hundred models generated using MODELLER9v11. Analysis of the structure revealed the longer loop at Fe2OX from G.antarctica that might be responsible for the flexibility of the structure, which contributes to its adaptation to low temperatures. Fe2OX hold a highly conserved Fe(II) binding HXD/E…H triad motif. The binding site for 2-oxoglutarate was found conserved for Arg280 among reported studies, however the Phe268 was found to be different in Fe2OX.

  2. Why are the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes so large? Generation of an active trimeric complex.

    PubMed

    Marrott, Nia L; Marshall, Jacqueline J T; Svergun, Dmitri I; Crennell, Susan J; Hough, David W; van den Elsen, Jean M H; Danson, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The four-component polypeptides of the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complex from the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum assemble to give an active multienzyme complex possessing activity with the branched-chain 2-oxoacids derived from leucine, isoleucine and valine, and with pyruvate. The dihydrolipoyl acyl-transferase (E2) core of the complex is composed of identical trimer-forming units that assemble into a novel 42-mer structure comprising octahedral and icosahedral geometric aspects. From our previously determined structure of this catalytic core, the inter-trimer interactions involve a tyrosine residue near the C-terminus secured in a hydrophobic pocket of an adjacent trimer like a ball-and-socket joint. In the present study, we have deleted the five C-terminal amino acids of the E2 polypeptide (IIYEI) and shown by equilibrium centrifugation that it now only assembles into a trimeric enzyme. This was confirmed by SAXS analysis, although this technique showed the presence of approximately 20% hexamers. The crystal structure of the trimeric truncated E2 core has been determined and shown to be virtually identical with the ones observed in the 42-mer, demonstrating that removal of the C-terminal anchor does not significantly affect the individual monomer or trimer structures. The truncated E2 is still able to bind both 2-oxoacid decarboxylase (E1) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) components to give an active complex with catalytic activity similar to the native multienzyme complex. This is the first report of an active mini-complex for this enzyme, and raises the question of why all 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes assemble into such large structures. PMID:25088564

  3. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  4. Crystal structure of homoisocitrate dehydrogenase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Hendershot, Jenna M.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2013-09-18

    Lysine biosynthesis in fungi, euglena, and certain archaebacteria occurs through the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway. Enzymes in the first steps of this pathway have been proposed as potential targets for the development of antifungal therapies, as they are absent in animals but are conserved in several pathogenic fungi species, including Candida, Cryptococcus, and Aspergillus. One potential antifungal target in the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway is the third enzyme in the pathway, homoisocitrate dehydrogenase (HICDH), which catalyzes the divalent metal-dependent conversion of homoisocitrate to 2-oxoadipate (2-OA) using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) as a cofactor. HICDH belogns to a family of {beta}-hydroxyacid oxidative decarboxylases that includes malate dehydrogenase, tartrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), and 3-isopropylmalte dehydrogenase (IPMDH). ICDH and IPMDH are well-characterized enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) in the citric acid cycle and the conversion of 3-isopropylmalate to 2-oxoisovalerate in the leucine biosynthetic pathway, respectively. Recent structural and biochemical studies of HICDH reveal that this enzyme shares sequence, structural, and mechanistic homology with ICDH and IPMDH. To date, the only published structures of HICDH are from the archaebacteria Thermus thermophilus (TtHICDH). Fungal HICDHs diverge from TtHICDH in several aspects, including their thermal stability, oligomerization state, and substrate specificity, thus warranting further characterization. To gain insights into these differences, they determined crystal structures of a fungal Schizosaccharomyces pombe HICDH (SpHICDH) as an apoenzyme and as a binary complex with additive tripeptide glycyl-glycyl-glycine (GGG) to 1.55 {angstrom} and 1.85 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Finally, a comparison of the SpHICDH and TtHICDH structures reveal differences in

  5. Ascorbate as a Co-Factor for Fe- and 2-Oxoglutarate Dependent Dioxygenases: Physiological Activity in Tumor Growth and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Caroline; Vissers, Margreet C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Ascorbate is a specific co-factor for a large family of enzymes known as the Fe- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases. These enzymes are found throughout biology and catalyze the addition of a hydroxyl group to various substrates. The proline hydroxylase that is involved in collagen maturation is well known, but in recent times many new enzymes and functions have been uncovered, including those involved in epigenetic control and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) regulation. These discoveries have provided crucial mechanistic insights into how ascorbate may affect tumor biology. In particular, there is growing evidence that HIF-1-dependent tumor progression may be inhibited by increasing tumor ascorbate levels. However, rigorous clinical intervention studies are lacking. This review will explore the physiological role of ascorbate as an enzyme co-factor and how this mechanism relates to cancer biology and treatment. The use of ascorbate in cancer should be informed by clinical studies based on such mechanistic hypotheses. PMID:25540771

  6. Papaverine 7-O-demethylase, a novel 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(2+)-dependent dioxygenase from opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Scott C; Facchini, Peter J

    2015-09-14

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) produces several pharmacologically important benzylisoquinoline alkaloids including the vasodilator papaverine. Pacodine and palaudine are tri-O-methylated analogs of papaverine, which contains four O-linked methyl groups. However, the biosynthetic origin of pacodine and palaudine has not been established. Three members of the 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(2+)-dependent dioxygenases (2ODDs) family in opium poppy display widespread O-dealkylation activity on several benzylisoquinoline alkaloids with diverse structural scaffolds, and two are responsible for the antepenultimate and ultimate steps in morphine biosynthesis. We report a novel 2ODD from opium poppy catalyzing the efficient substrate- and regio-specific 7-O-demethylation of papaverine yielding pacodine. The occurrence of papaverine 7-O-demethylase (P7ODM) expands the enzymatic scope of the 2ODD family in opium poppy and suggests an unexpected biosynthetic route to pacodine. PMID:26264169

  7. The effect of dietary administration of 2-oxoglutaric acid on the cartilage and bone of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Ewa; Bienko, Marek; Radzki, Radoslaw P; Pierzynowski, Stefan G

    2013-08-01

    2-Oxoglutaric acid (2-Ox), a precursor to hydroxyproline - the most abundant amino acid in bone collagen, exerts protective effects on bone development during different stages of organism development; however, little is known about the action of 2-Ox on cartilage. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the influence of dietary 2-Ox supplementation on the growth plate, articular cartilage and bone of growing rats. A total of twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the study. Half of the rats received 2-oxoglutarate at a dose of 0·75 g/kg body weight per d in their drinking-water. Body and organ weights were measured. Histomorphometric analyses of the cartilage and bone tissue of the femora and tibiae were conducted, as well as bone densitometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Rats receiving 2-Ox had an increased body mass (P<0·001) and absolute liver weight (P=0·031). Femoral length (P=0·045) and bone mineral density (P=0·014), overall thickness of growth plate (femur P=0·036 and tibia P=0·026) and the thickness of femoral articular cartilage (P<0·001) were also increased. 2-Ox administration had no effect on the mechanical properties or on any of the measured pQCT parameters for both bones analysed. There were also no significant differences in histomorphometric parameters of tibial articular cartilage and autofluorescence of femoral and tibial growth plate cartilage. Dietary supplementation with 2-Ox to growing rats exerts its effects mainly on cartilage tissue, having only a slight influence on bone. The effect of 2-Ox administration was selective, depending on the particular bone and type of cartilage analysed. PMID:23308390

  8. Structural analysis of the wheat genes encoding NADH-dependent glutamine-2-oxoglutarate amidotransferases genes and correlation with grain protein content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen uptake and the efficient absorption and metabolism of nitrogen are essential elements in attempts to breed improved cereal cultivars for grain or silage production. One of the enzymes related to nitrogen metabolism is glutamine-2-oxoglutarate amidotransferase (GOGAT). Together with glutami...

  9. Crystal structure of Pseudomonas fluorescens mannitol 2-dehydrogenase binary and ternary complexes. Specificity and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd; Wilson, David K

    2002-11-01

    Long-chain mannitol dehydrogenases are secondary alcohol dehydrogenases that are of wide interest because of their involvement in metabolism and potential applications in agriculture, medicine, and industry. They differ from other alcohol and polyol dehydrogenases because they do not contain a conserved tyrosine and are not dependent on Zn(2+) or other metal cofactors. The structures of the long-chain mannitol 2-dehydrogenase (54 kDa) from Pseudomonas fluorescens in a binary complex with NAD(+) and ternary complex with NAD(+) and d-mannitol have been determined to resolutions of 1.7 and 1.8 A and R-factors of 0.171 and 0.176, respectively. These results show an N-terminal domain that includes a typical Rossmann fold. The C-terminal domain is primarily alpha-helical and mediates mannitol binding. The electron lone pair of Lys-295 is steered by hydrogen-bonding interactions with the amide oxygen of Asn-300 and the main-chain carbonyl oxygen of Val-229 to act as the general base. Asn-191 and Asn-300 are involved in a web of hydrogen bonding, which precisely orients the mannitol O2 proton for abstraction. These residues also aid in stabilizing a negative charge in the intermediate state and in preventing the formation of nonproductive complexes with the substrate. The catalytic lysine may be returned to its unprotonated state using a rectifying proton tunnel driven by Glu-292 oscillating among different environments. Despite low sequence homology, the closest structural neighbors are glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, N-(1-d-carboxylethyl)-l-norvaline dehydrogenase, UDP-glucose dehydrogenase, and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, indicating a possible evolutionary relationship among these enzymes. PMID:12196534

  10. Co-operative intermolecular kinetics of 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases may be essential for system-level regulation of plant cell physiology

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Siddhartha

    2015-01-01

    Can the stimulus-driven synergistic association of 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases be influenced by the kinetic parameters of binding and catalysis?In this manuscript, I posit that these indices are necessary and specific for a particular stimulus, and are key determinants of a dynamic clustering that may function to mitigate the effects of this trigger. The protein(s)/sequence(s) that comprise this group are representative of all major kingdoms of life, and catalyze a generic hydroxylation, which is, in most cases accompanied by a specialized conversion of the substrate molecule. Iron is an essential co-factor for this transformation and the response to waning levels is systemic, and mandates the simultaneous participation of molecular sensors, transporters, and signal transducers. Here, I present a proof-of-concept model, that an evolving molecular network of 2OG-dependent enzymes can maintain iron homeostasis in the cytosol of root hair cells of members of the family Gramineae by actuating a non-reductive compensatory chelation by the phytosiderophores. Regression models of empirically available kinetic data (iron and alpha-ketoglutarate) were formulated, analyzed, and compared. The results, when viewed in context of the superfamily responding as a unit, suggest that members can indeed, work together to accomplish system-level function. This is achieved by the establishment of transient metabolic conduits, wherein the flux is dictated by kinetic compatibility of the participating enzymes. The approach adopted, i.e., predictive mathematical modeling, is integral to the hypothesis-driven acquisition of experimental data points and, in association with suitable visualization aids may be utilized for exploring complex plant biochemical systems. PMID:26236316

  11. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-05-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific 'carbonic anhydrase domain' of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe 'life without complex I'. PMID:27122571

  12. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific ‘carbonic anhydrase domain’ of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe ‘life without complex I’. PMID:27122571

  13. Molecular cloning of hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase, a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, from cultured roots of Hyoscyamus niger.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, J; Okabe, S; Hashimoto, T; Yamada, Y

    1991-05-25

    Roots of several solanaceous plants produce anticholinergic alkaloids, hyoscyamine and scopolamine. Hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase, a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase (EC 1.14.11.11), catalyzes hydroxylation of hyoscyamine in the biosynthetic pathway leading to scopolamine. We report here on the isolation of cDNA clones encoding the hydroxylase from a cDNA library made from mRNA of the cultured roots of Hyoscyamus niger. The library was screened with three synthetic oligonucleotides that encode amino acid sequences of internal peptide fragments of the purified hydroxylase. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the cloned cDNA revealed an open reading frame that encodes 344 amino acids (Mr = 38,999). All 12 internal peptide fragments determined in the purified enzyme were found in the amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA. With computer-aided comparison to other proteins we found that the hydroxylase is homologous to two synthases involved in the biosynthesis of beta-lactam antibiotics in some microorganisms and the gene products of tomato pTOM13 cDNA and maize A2 locus which had been proposed to catalyze oxidative reactions in the biosynthesis of ethylene and anthocyan, respectively. RNA blotting hybridization showed that mRNA of the hydroxylase is abundant in cultured roots and present in plant roots, but absent in leaves, stems, and cultured cells of H. niger. PMID:2033047

  14. Slow-binding inhibition of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex by acetylphosphinate.

    PubMed

    Schönbrunn-Hanebeck, E; Laber, B; Amrhein, N

    1990-05-22

    The pyruvate analogue acetylphosphinate (CH3-CO-PO2H2) inhibits the pyruvate dehydrogenase component (E1) of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex in a time-dependent process with biphasic reaction kinetics. The formation of an initial, rapidly reversible enzyme-inhibitor complex (EI) with an apparent Ki of 0.12 +/- 0.025 microM is followed by the conversion to a tighter complex (EI) at a maximal rate of k3 = 0.87 +/- 0.34 min-1. The inhibition is reversible (dissociation rate constant k4 = 0.038 +/- 0.002 min-1), requires the presence of the cofactors thiamin pyrophosphate and Mg2+, and is competitive with regard to pyruvate. The microscopic rate constants give a value of 5 nM for the overall dissociation constant [Ki = [E] [I]/[( EI] + [EI]) = Kik4/(k3 + k4)] compared with values of 10 and 3.5 nM obtained by steady-state methods. Thus acetylphosphinate binds by 5 orders of magnitude more tightly to pyruvate dehydrogenase than does pyruvate (Km = 0.35 mM). Acetylphosphinate also affects the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex fluorescence when excited at 290 nm in a time-dependent manner with a maximal rate constant of 0.99 min-1, suggesting a conformational change in the enzyme complex as the slow step in conversion of EI to EI (k3). All these features taken together suggest that the interaction of the pyruvate dehydrogenase with acetylphosphinate involves the formation of a thiamin pyrophosphate-acetylphosphinate adduct that resembles the normal reaction intermediate, 2-(1-carboxy-1-hydroxyethyl)thiamin pyrophosphate (alpha-lactylthiamin pyrophosphate). PMID:2194562

  15. Expression of Aeromonas caviae ST pyruvate dehydrogenase complex components mediate tellurite resistance in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Miguel E.; Molina, Roberto C.; Diaz, Waldo A.; Pradenas, Gonzalo A.; Vasquez, Claudio C.

    2009-02-27

    Potassium tellurite (K{sub 2}TeO{sub 3}) is harmful to most organisms and specific mechanisms explaining its toxicity are not well known to date. We previously reported that the lpdA gene product of the tellurite-resistant environmental isolate Aeromonas caviae ST is involved in the reduction of tellurite to elemental tellurium. In this work, we show that expression of A. caviae ST aceE, aceF, and lpdA genes, encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide transacetylase, and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, respectively, results in tellurite resistance and decreased levels of tellurite-induced superoxide in Escherichia coli. In addition to oxidative damage resulting from tellurite exposure, a metabolic disorder would be simultaneously established in which the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex would represent an intracellular tellurite target. These results allow us to widen our vision regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial tellurite resistance by correlating tellurite toxicity and key enzymes of aerobic metabolism.

  16. /sup 15/N-Ammonia assimilation, 2-oxoglutarate transport, and glutamate export in spinach chloroplasts in the presence of dicarboxylates in the light

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, K.C.; Boyle, F.A.; Flugge, I.U.; Heldt, H.W.

    1987-11-01

    The direct incorporation of /sup 15/NH/sub 4/Cl into amino acids in illuminated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate plus malate was determined. The amido-N of glutamine was the most highly labeled N-atom during /sup 15/NH/sub 4/ assimilation in the presence of malate. In 4 minutes the /sup 15/N-label of the amido-N of glutamine was 37% enriched. In contrast, values obtained for both the N-atom of glutamate and the amino-N of glutamine were only about 20% while that of the N-atom of aspartate was only 3%. The addition of malate during the assimilation of /sup 15/NH/sub 4/Cl and Na/sup 15/NO/sub 2/ greatly increased the /sup 15/N-label into glutamine but did not qualitatively change the order of the incorporation of /sup 15/N-label into all the amino acids examined. This evidence indicates the direct involvement of the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase pathway for ammonia and nitrite assimilation in isolated chloroplasts. The addition of malate or succinate during ammonia assimilation also led to more than 3-fold increase in (/sup 14/C)2-oxoglutarate transport into the chloroplast as well as an increase in the export of (/sup 14/C)glutamate out of the chloroplast. Little (/sup 14/C)glutamine was detected in the medium of the chloroplast preparations. The stimulation of /sup 15/N-incorporation and (/sup 14/C)glutamate export by malate could be directly attributed to the increase in 2-oxoglutarate transport activity (via the 2-oxoglutarate translocator) observed in the presence of exogenous malate.

  17. 2-Oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases are sensors of energy metabolism, oxygen availability, and iron homeostasis: potential role in the regulation of aging process.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Kauppinen, Anu; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the members of an ancient family of nonheme Fe(2+)/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (2-OGDO) are involved in the functions associated with the aging process. 2-Oxoglutarate and O2 are the obligatory substrates and Fe(2+) a cofactor in the activation of 2-OGDO enzymes, which can induce the hydroxylation of distinct proteins and the demethylation of DNA and histones. For instance, ten-eleven translocation 1-3 (TET1-3) are the demethylases of DNA, whereas Jumonji C domain-containing histone lysine demethylases (KDM2-7) are the major epigenetic regulators of chromatin landscape, known to be altered with aging. The functions of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3) as well as those of collagen hydroxylases are associated with age-related degeneration. Moreover, the ribosomal hydroxylase OGFOD1 controls mRNA translation, which is known to decline with aging. 2-OGDO enzymes are the sensors of energy metabolism, since the Krebs cycle intermediate 2-oxoglutarate is an activator whereas succinate and fumarate are the potent inhibitors of 2-OGDO enzymes. In addition, O2 availability and iron redox homeostasis control the activities of 2-OGDO enzymes in tissues. We will briefly elucidate the catalytic mechanisms of 2-OGDO enzymes and then review the potential functions of the above-mentioned 2-OGDO enzymes in the control of the aging process. PMID:26118662

  18. Identification and analysis of the genes coding for the putative pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex in Acholeplasma laidlawii.

    PubMed Central

    Wallbrandt, P; Tegman, V; Jonsson, B H; Wieslander, A

    1992-01-01

    A monospecific antibody recognizing two membrane proteins in Acholeplasma laidlawii identified a plasmid clone from a genomic library. The nucleotide sequence of the 4.6-kbp insert contained four sequential genes coding for proteins of 39 kDa (E1 alpha, N terminus not cloned), 36 kDa (E1 beta), 57 kDa (E2), and 36 kDa (E3; C terminus not cloned). The N termini of the cloned E2, E1 beta, and native A. laidlawii E2 proteins were verified by amino acid sequencing. Computer-aided searches showed that the translated DNA sequences were homologous to the four subenzymes of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes from gram-positive bacteria and humans. The plasmid-encoded 57-kDa (E2) protein was recognized by antibodies against the E2 subenzymes of the pyruvate and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes from Bacillus subtilis. A substantial fraction of the E2 protein as well as part of the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzymatic activity was associated with the cytoplasmic membrane in A. laidlawii. In vivo complementation with three different Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase-defective mutants showed that the four plasmid-encoded proteins were able to restore pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in E. coli. Since A. laidlawii lacks oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and most likely branched-chain dehydrogenase enzyme complex activities, these results strongly suggest that the sequenced genes code for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Images PMID:1735725

  19. The crystallographic structure of the mannitol 2-dehydrogenase NADP+ binary complex from Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Hörer, S; Stoop, J; Mooibroek, H; Baumann, U; Sassoon, J

    2001-07-20

    Mannitol, an acyclic six-carbon polyol, is one of the most abundant sugar alcohols occurring in nature. In the button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, it is synthesized from fructose by the enzyme mannitol 2-dehydrogenase (MtDH; EC ) using NADPH as a cofactor. Mannitol serves as the main storage carbon (up to 50% of the fruit body dry weight) and plays a critical role in growth, fruit body development, osmoregulation, and salt tolerance. Furthermore, mannitol dehydrogenases are being evaluated for commercial mannitol production as alternatives to the less efficient chemical reduction of fructose. Given the importance of mannitol metabolism and mannitol dehydrogenases, MtDH was cloned into the pET28 expression system and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Kinetic and physicochemical properties of the recombinant enzyme are indistinguishable from the natural enzyme. The crystal structure of its binary complex with NADP was solved at 1.5-A resolution and refined to an R value of 19.3%. It shows MtDH to be a tetramer and a member of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family of enzymes. The catalytic residues forming the so-called catalytic triad can be assigned to Ser(149), Tyr(169), and Lys(173). PMID:11335726

  20. Bcl-2 is a novel interacting partner for the 2-oxoglutarate carrier and a key regulator of mitochondrial glutathione.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Heather M; Marquardt, Kristin; Lash, Lawrence H; Linseman, Daniel A

    2012-01-15

    Despite making up only a minor fraction of the total cellular glutathione, recent studies indicate that the mitochondrial glutathione pool is essential for cell survival. Selective depletion of mitochondrial glutathione is sufficient to sensitize cells to mitochondrial oxidative stress (MOS) and intrinsic apoptosis. Glutathione is synthesized exclusively in the cytoplasm and must be actively transported into mitochondria. Therefore, regulation of mitochondrial glutathione transport is a key factor in maintaining the antioxidant status of mitochondria. Bcl-2 resides in the outer mitochondrial membrane where it acts as a central regulator of the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. In addition, Bcl-2 displays an antioxidant-like function that has been linked experimentally to the regulation of cellular glutathione content. We have previously demonstrated a novel interaction between recombinant Bcl-2 and reduced glutathione (GSH), which was antagonized by either Bcl-2 homology-3 domain (BH3) mimetics or a BH3-only protein, recombinant Bim. These previous findings prompted us to investigate if this novel Bcl-2/GSH interaction might play a role in regulating mitochondrial glutathione transport. Incubation of primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) with the BH3 mimetic HA14-1 induced MOS and caused specific depletion of the mitochondrial glutathione pool. Bcl-2 was coimmunoprecipitated with GSH after chemical cross-linking in CGNs and this Bcl-2/GSH interaction was antagonized by preincubation with HA14-1. Moreover, both HA14-1 and recombinant Bim inhibited GSH transport into isolated rat brain mitochondria. To further investigate a possible link between Bcl-2 function and mitochondrial glutathione transport, we next examined if Bcl-2 associated with the 2-oxoglutarate carrier (OGC), an inner mitochondrial membrane protein known to transport glutathione in liver and kidney. After cotransfection of CHO cells, Bcl-2 was coimmunoprecipitated with OGC and this novel

  1. Bcl-2 is a novel interacting partner for the 2-oxoglutarate carrier and a key regulator of mitochondrial glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Heather M.; Marquardt, Kristin; Lash, Lawrence H.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite making up only a minor fraction of the total cellular glutathione, recent studies indicate that the mitochondrial glutathione pool is essential for cell survival. Selective depletion of mitochondrial glutathione is sufficient to sensitize cells to mitochondrial oxidative stress (MOS)1 and intrinsic apoptosis. Glutathione is synthesized exclusively in the cytoplasm and must be actively transported into mitochondria. Therefore, regulation of mitochondrial glutathione transport is a key factor in maintaining the antioxidant status of mitochondria. Bcl-2 is resident in the outer mitochondrial membrane where it acts as a central regulator of the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. In addition, Bcl-2 displays an antioxidant-like function that has been linked experimentally to the regulation of cellular glutathione content. We have previously demonstrated a novel interaction between recombinant Bcl-2 and reduced glutathione (GSH) which was antagonized by either Bcl-2 homology-3 domain (BH3) mimetics or a BH3-only protein, recombinant Bim. These previous findings prompted us to investigate if this novel Bcl-2/GSH interaction might play a role in regulating mitochondrial glutathione transport. Incubation of primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) with the BH3 mimetic, HA14-1, induced MOS and caused specific depletion of the mitochondrial glutathione pool. Bcl-2 was co-immunoprecipitated with GSH following chemical cross-linking in CGNs and this Bcl-2/GSH interaction was antagonized by pre-incubation with HA14-1. Moreover, both HA14-1 and recombinant Bim inhibited GSH transport into isolated rat brain mitochondria. To further investigate a possible link between Bcl-2 function and mitochondrial glutathione transport, we next examined if Bcl-2 associated with the 2-oxoglutarate carrier (OGC), an inner mitochondrial membrane protein known to transport glutathione in liver and kidney. Following co-transfection of CHO cells, Bcl-2 was co-immunoprecipitated with OGC

  2. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in cancer: An old metabolic gatekeeper regulated by new pathways and pharmacological agents.

    PubMed

    Saunier, Elise; Benelli, Chantal; Bortoli, Sylvie

    2016-02-15

    Cancer cells exhibit an altered metabolism which is characterized by a preference for aerobic glycolysis more than mitochondrial oxidation of pyruvate. This provides anabolic support and selective growth advantage for cancer cells. Recently, a new concept has arisen suggesting that these metabolic changes may be due, in part, to an attenuated mitochondrial function which results from the inhibition of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). This mitochondrial complex links glycolysis to the Krebs cycle and the current understanding of its regulation involves the cyclic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation by specific pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatases (PDPs). PMID:25868605

  3. Trichomonas hydrogenosomes contain the NADH dehydrogenase module of mitochondrial complex I.

    PubMed

    Hrdy, Ivan; Hirt, Robert P; Dolezal, Pavel; Bardonová, Lucie; Foster, Peter G; Tachezy, Jan; Embley, T Martin

    2004-12-01

    Hydrogenosomes are double-membraned ATP-producing and hydrogen-producing organelles of diverse anaerobic eukaryotes. In some versions of endosymbiotic theory they are suggested to be homologues of mitochondria, but alternative views suggest they arose from an anaerobic bacterium that was distinct from the mitochondrial endosymbiont. Here we show that the 51-kDa and 24-kDa subunits of the NADH dehydrogenase module in complex I, the first step in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, are active in hydrogenosomes of Trichomonas vaginalis. Like mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase, the purified Trichomonas enzyme can reduce a variety of electron carriers including ubiquinone, but unlike the mitochondrial enzyme it can also reduce ferredoxin, the electron carrier used for hydrogen production. The presence of NADH dehydrogenase solves the long-standing conundrum of how hydrogenosomes regenerate NAD+ after malate oxidation. Phylogenetic analyses show that the Trichomonas 51-kDa homologue shares common ancestry with the mitochondrial enzyme. Recruitment of complex I subunits into a H2-producing pathway provides evidence that mitochondria and hydrogenosomes are aerobic and anaerobic homologues of the same endosymbiotically derived organelle. PMID:15577909

  4. Expression of a cytoplasmic transhydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in formation of 2-oxoglutarate due to depletion of the NADPH pool.

    PubMed

    Nissen, T L; Anderlund, M; Nielsen, J; Villadsen, J; Kielland-Brandt, M C

    2001-01-15

    The intracellular redox state of a cell is to a large extent defined by the concentration ratios of the two pyridine nucleotide systems NADH/NAD(+) and NADPH/NADP(+) and has a significant influence on product formation in microorganisms. The enzyme pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase, which can catalyse transfer of reducing equivalents between the two nucleotide systems, occurs in several organisms, but not in yeasts. The purpose of this work was to analyse how metabolism during anaerobic growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae might be altered when transfer of reducing equivalents between the two systems is made possible by expression of a cytoplasmic transhydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. We therefore cloned sth, encoding this enzyme, and expressed it under the control of a S. cerevisiae promoter in a strain derived from the industrial model strain S. cerevisiae CBS8066. Anaerobic batch cultivations in high-performance bioreactors were carried out in order to allow quantitative analysis of the effect of transhydrogenase expression on product formation and on the intracellular concentrations of NADH, NAD(+), NADPH and NADP(+). A specific transhydrogenase activity of 4.53 U/mg protein was measured in the extracts from the strain expressing the sth gene from A. vinelandii, while no transhydrogenase activity could be detected in control strains without the gene. Production of the transhydrogenase caused a significant increase in formation of glycerol and 2-oxoglutarate. Since NADPH is used to convert 2-oxoglutarate to glutamate while glycerol formation increases when excess NADH is formed, this suggested that transhydrogenase converted NADH and NADP(+) to NAD(+) and NADPH. This was further supported by measurements of the intracellular nucleotide concentrations. Thus, the (NADPH/NADP(+)):(NADH/NAD(+)) ratio was reduced from 35 to 17 by the transhydrogenase. The increased formation of 2-oxoglutarate was accompanied by a two-fold decrease in the maximal specific

  5. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Corynebacterium glutamicum: an attractive target for metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Blombach, Bastian

    2014-12-20

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) catalyzes the oxidative thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA and CO2. Since pyruvate is a key metabolite of the central metabolism and also the precursor for several relevant biotechnological products, metabolic engineering of this multienzyme complex is a promising strategy to improve microbial production processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge and achievements on metabolic engineering approaches to tailor the PDHC of Corynebacterium glutamicum for the bio-based production of l-valine, 2-ketosiovalerate, pyruvate, succinate and isobutanol and to improve l-lysine production. PMID:24486441

  6. A new role for α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex: regulating metabolism through post-translational modification of other enzymes.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Mary C; Rae, Caroline D

    2015-07-01

    This Editorial highlights a study by Gibson et al. published in this issue of JNeurochem, in which the authors reveal a novel role for the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) in post-translational modification of proteins. KGDHC may catalyze post-translational modification of itself as well as several other proteins by succinylation of lysine residues. The authors' report of an enzyme responsible for succinylation of key mitochondrial enzymes represents a major step toward our understanding of the complex functional metabolome. TCA, tricarboxylic acid; KG, α-ketoglutarate; KGDHC, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex; FUM, fumarase; MDH, malate dehydrogenase; ME, malic enzyme; GDH, glutamate dehydrogenase; AAT, aspartate aminotransferase; GS, glutamine synthetase; PAG, phosphate-activated glutaminase; SIRT3, silent information regulator 3; SIRT5, silent information regulator 5. PMID:26052752

  7. Functional hepatocyte heterogeneity. Vascular 2-oxoglutarate is almost exclusively taken up by perivenous, glutamine-synthetase-containing hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Stoll, B; Hüssinger, D

    1989-05-15

    1. In isolated perfused rat liver maximal rates of 2-[1-14C]oxoglutarate uptake were about 0.4 mumol.g-1 .min-1; half-maximal rates of 2-[14C]oxoglutarate uptake were observed with influent concentrations of about 100 microM. 2-[14C]Oxoglutarate uptake by the liver was not affected by the direction of perfusion, but was decreased by about 80-90% when Na+ in the perfusion fluid was substituted by choline+, suggesting a Na+-dependence of hepatic 2-oxoglutarate uptake. In the absence of added ammonia, [14C]oxoglutarate uptake by the liver was about twice the net oxoglutarate uptake, indicating a simultaneous release of unlabeled oxoglutarate from perfused rat liver. 2. 14C-Labeled metabolites derived from [1-14C]oxoglutarate and recovered in the effluent perfusate were 14CO2 and 14C-labeled glutamate and glutamine; they accounted for 85-100% of the radiolabel taken up by the liver. 14CO2 was the major product (more than 70%) from [1-14C]oxoglutarate taken up the liver, provided glutamine synthesis was either inhibited by methionine sulfoximine or the endogenous rate of glutamine production was below 40 nmol.g-1.min-1. 3. Stimulation of glutamine synthesis by ammonia did not affect [14C]oxoglutarate uptake by the liver, but considerably increased net hepatic oxoglutarate uptake, indicating a decreased release of unlabeled oxoglutarate from the liver. Stepwise stimulation of hepatic glutamine synthesis led to a gradual decrease of 14CO2 production and radiolabel was recovered increasingly as [14C]glutamine in the effluent. At high rates of glutamine formation (i.e. about 0.6 mumol.g-1.min-1), about 60% of the [1-14C]oxoglutarate taken up by the liver was recovered in the effluent as [14C]glutamine. 14CO2 and [14C]glutamine production from added [1-14C]oxoglutarate were dependent on the rate of hepatic glutamine synthesis but not on the direction of perfusion. Extrapolation of 14C incorporation into glutamine to maximal rates of hepatic glutamine synthesis yielded an

  8. Alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex-dependent succinylation of proteins in neurons and neuronal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Gary E; Xu, Hui; Chen, Huan-Lian; Chen, Wei; Denton, Travis T; Zhang, Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Reversible post-translation modifications of proteins are common in all cells and appear to regulate many processes. Nevertheless, the enzyme(s) responsible for the alterations and the significance of the modification are largely unknown. Succinylation of proteins occurs and causes large changes in the structure of proteins; however, the source of the succinyl groups, the targets, and the consequences of these modifications on other proteins remain unknown. These studies focused on succinylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results demonstrate that the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) can serve as a trans-succinylase that mediates succinylation in an α-ketoglutarate-dependent manner. Inhibition of KGDHC reduced succinylation of both cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins in cultured neurons and in a neuronal cell line. Purified KGDHC can succinylate multiple proteins including other enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle leading to modification of their activity. Inhibition of KGDHC also modifies acetylation by modifying the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The much greater effectiveness of KGDHC than succinyl-CoA suggests that the catalysis owing to the E2k succinyltransferase is important. Succinylation appears to be a major signaling system and it can be mediated by KGDHC. Reversible post-translation modifications of proteins are common and may regulate many processes. Succinylation of proteins occurs and causes large changes in the structure of proteins. However, the source of the succinyl groups, the targets, and the consequences of these modifications on other proteins remains unknown. The results demonstrate that the mitochondrial α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) can succinylate multiple mitochondrial proteins and alter their function. Succinylation appears to be a major signaling system and it can be mediated by KGDHC. PMID:25772995

  9. Alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex-dependent succinylation of proteins in neurons and neuronal cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Gary E.; Xu, Hui; Chen, Huan-Lian; Chen, Wei; Denton, Travis; Zhang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Reversible post-translation modifications of proteins are common in all cells and appear to regulate many processes. Nevertheless, the enzyme(s) responsible for the alterations and the significance of the modification are largely unknown. Succinylation of proteins occurs and causes large changes in the structure of proteins; however, the source of the succinyl groups, the targets, and the consequences of these modifications on other proteins are unknown. These studies focused on succinylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results demonstrate that the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) can serve as a trans-succinylase that mediates succinylation in an α-ketoglutarate-dependent manner. Inhibition of KGDHC reduced suc-cinylation of both cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins in cultured neurons and in a neuronal cell line. Purified KGDHC can succinylate multiple proteins including other enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle leading to modification of their activity. Inhibition of KGDHC also modifies acetylation by modifying the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The much greater effectiveness of KGDHC than succinyl CoA suggests that the catalysis due to the E2k suc-cinyltransferase is important. Succinylation appears to be a major signaling system and it can be mediated by KGDHC. PMID:25772995

  10. Involvement of Candida albicans pyruvate dehydrogenase complex protein X (Pdx1) in filamentation

    PubMed Central

    F.Vellucci, Vincent; Gygax, Scott; Hostetter, Margaret K.

    2007-01-01

    For 50 years, physiologic studies in Candida albicans have associated fermentation with filamentation and respiration with yeast morphology. Analysis of the mitochondrial proteome of a C. albicans NDH51 mutant, known to be defective in filamentation, identified increased expression of several proteins in the respiratory pathway. Most notable was a 15-fold increase in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex protein X (Pdx1), an essential component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. In basal salts medium with 100 mM glucose as carbon source, two independent pdx1 mutants displayed a filamentation defect identical to ndh51; reintegration of one PDX1 allele restored filamentation. Concentrations of glucose ≤100 mM did not correct the filamentation defect. Expanding on previous work, these studies suggest that increased expression of proteins extraneous to the electron transport chain compensates for defects in the respiratory pathway to maintain yeast morphology. Mitochondrial proteomics can aid in the identification of C. albicans genes not previously implicated in filamentation. PMID:17254815

  11. Expression, purification and crystallization of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase complexed with orotate

    SciTech Connect

    Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Takashima, Eizo; Osanai, Arihiro; Shimizu, Hironari; Nara, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2005-10-01

    The Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme in pyrimidine de novo biosynthesis and redox homeostasis, was crystallized in complex with its first reaction product, orotate. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD) catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate, the fourth step and the only redox reaction in the de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine. DHOD from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcDHOD) has been expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Crystals of the TcDHOD–orotate complex were grown at 277 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant. The crystals diffract to better than 1.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation (λ = 0.900 Å). X-ray diffraction data were collected at 100 K and processed to 1.9 Å resolution with 98.2% completeness and an overall R{sub merge} of 7.8%. The TcDHOD crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.87, b = 71.89, c = 123.27 Å. The presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit (2 × 34 kDa) gives a crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 2.2 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 44%.

  12. Fluorescence energy-transfer studies on the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Scouten, W H; De Graaf-Hess, A C; De Kok, A; Grande, H J; Visser, A J; Veeger, C

    1978-03-01

    Fluorescence energy transfer has been employed to estimate the minimum distance between each of the active sites of the 4 component enzymes of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex from Azotobacter vinelandii. No energy transfer was seen between thiochrome diphosphate, bound to the pyruvate decarboxylase active site, and the FAD of the lipoamide dehydrogenase active site. Likewise, several fluorescent sulfhydryl labels, which were specifically bound to the lipoyl moiety of lipoyl transacetylase, showed no energy transfer to either the flavin or thiochrome diphosphate. These observations suggest that all the active centers of the complex are quite far apart (greater than or equal to 40 nm), at least during some stages of catalysis. These results do not preclude the possibility that the distances change during catalysis. Several of the fluorescent probes used possessed multiple fluorescent lifetimes, as shown by determination of lifetime averages by both phase and modulation measurements on a phase fluorimeter. These lifetimes are shown to result from multiple factors, not necessarily related to multiple protein conformations. PMID:348464

  13. In crystallo posttranslational modification within a MauG/pre-methylamine dehydrogenase complex.

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, L. M. R.; Sanishvili, R.; Davidson, V. L.; Wilmot, C. M.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Minnesota; Univ. of Mississippi

    2010-03-12

    MauG is a diheme enzyme responsible for the posttranslational modification of two tryptophan residues to form the tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) cofactor of methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH). MauG converts preMADH, containing monohydroxylated {beta}Trp{sup 57}, to fully functional MADH by catalyzing the insertion of a second oxygen atom into the indole ring and covalently linking {beta}Trp{sup 57} to {beta}Trp{sup 108}. We have solved the x-ray crystal structure of MauG complexed with preMADH to 2.1 angstroms. The c-type heme irons and the nascent TTQ site are separated by long distances over which electron transfer must occur to achieve catalysis. In addition, one of the hemes has an atypical His-Tyr axial ligation. The crystalline protein complex is catalytically competent; upon addition of hydrogen peroxide, MauG-dependent TTQ synthesis occurs.

  14. “Scanning mutagenesis” of the amino acid sequences flanking phosphorylation site 1 of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is regulated by reversible seryl-phosphorylation of the E1alpha subunit by a dedicated, intrinsic kinase. The phospho-complex is reactivated when dephosphorylated by an intrinsic PP2C-type protein phosphatase. Both the position of the phosphorylated...

  15. Distribution of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Activities between Chloroplasts and Mitochondria from Leaves of Different Species.

    PubMed Central

    Lernmark, U.; Gardestrom, P.

    1994-01-01

    Protoplasts from barley (Hordeum vulgare), pea (Pisum sativum), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves were fractionated into chloroplast- and mitochondrion-enriched fractions. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex capacities in mitochondria (mtPDC) and chloroplasts (cpPDC) were measured in appropriate fractions under conditions optimal for each isozyme. The total cellular capacity of PDC was similar in barley and pea but about 50% lower in wheat and spinach. In pea a distribution of 87% mtPDC and 13% cpPDC was found on a cellular basis. In barley, wheat, and spinach the subcellular distribution was the opposite, with about 15% mtPDC and 85% cpPDC. cpPDC activity was constant at about 0.1 nmol cell-1 h-1 in cells from different regions along the developing barley leaf and showed no correlation with developmental patterns of photosynthetic parameters, such as increasing Chl and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. Similarly, the capacity of the mitochondrial isoform did not change during barley leaf development and had a developmental pattern similar to that of citrate synthase and fumarase. Differences in subcellular distribution of PDCs in barley and pea are proposed to be due to differences in regulation, not to changes in isozyme proportions during leaf development or to species-specific differences in phosphorylation state of mtPDC after organelle separation. PMID:12232437

  16. Stable over-expression of the 2-oxoglutarate carrier enhances neuronal cell resistance to oxidative stress via Bcl-2-dependent mitochondrial GSH transport.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Heather M; Brock, Samantha; Gray, Josie J; Linseman, Daniel A

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) is a key endogenous antioxidant and its maintenance is critical for cell survival. Here, we generated stable NSC34 motor neuron-like cell lines over-expressing the mitochondrial GSH transporter, the 2-oxoglutarate carrier (OGC), to further elucidate the importance of mitochondrial GSH transport in determining neuronal resistance to oxidative stress. Two stable OGC cell lines displayed specific increases in mitochondrial GSH content and resistance to oxidative and nitrosative stressors, but not staurosporine. Inhibition of transport through OGC reduced levels of mitochondrial GSH and resensitized the stable cell lines to oxidative stress. The stable OGC cell lines displayed significant up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein, B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2). This result was reproduced in parental NSC34 cells by chronic treatment with GSH monoethylester, which specifically increased mitochondrial GSH levels. Knockdown of Bcl-2 expression decreased mitochondrial GSH and resensitized the stable OGC cells to oxidative stress. Finally, endogenous OGC was co-immunoprecipitated with Bcl-2 from rat brain lysates in a GSH-dependent manner. These data are the first to show that increased mitochondrial GSH transport is sufficient to enhance neuronal resistance to oxidative stress. Moreover, sustained and specific enhancement of mitochondrial GSH leads to increased Bcl-2 expression, a required mechanism for the maintenance of increased mitochondrial GSH levels. Stable over-expression of the 2-oxoglutarate carrier (OGC) in a motor neuronal cell line induced a specific increase in mitochondrial GSH and markedly enhanced resistance to oxidative stress. Over-expression of OGC also induced Bcl-2 expression which was owing to the specific increase in mitochondrial GSH. Intriguingly, enhanced expression of Bcl-2 was required to sustain OGC-dependent GSH transport into the mitochondria. Thus, OGC and Bcl-2 work in a concerted manner to maintain the

  17. Surface Induced Dissociation Yields Quaternary Substructure of Refractory Noncovalent Phosphorylase B and Glutamate Dehydrogenase Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xin; Zhou, Mowei; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2014-03-01

    Ion mobility (IM) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) coupled with native MS are useful for studying noncovalent protein complexes. Collision induced dissociation (CID) is the most common MS/MS dissociation method. However, some protein complexes, including glycogen phosphorylase B kinase (PHB) and L-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) examined in this study, are resistant to dissociation by CID at the maximum collision energy available in the instrument. Surface induced dissociation (SID) was applied to dissociate the two refractory protein complexes. Different charge state precursor ions of the two complexes were examined by CID and SID. The PHB dimer was successfully dissociated to monomers and the GDH hexamer formed trimeric subcomplexes that are informative of its quaternary structure. The unfolding of the precursor and the percentages of the distinct products suggest that the dissociation pathways vary for different charge states. The precursors at lower charge states (+21 for PHB dimer and +27 for GDH hexamer) produce a higher percentage of folded fragments and dissociate more symmetrically than the precusors at higher charge states (+29 for PHB dimer and +39 for GDH hexamer). The precursors at lower charge state may be more native-like than the higher charge state because a higher percentage of folded fragments and a lower percentage of highly charged unfolded fragments are detected. The combination of SID and charge reduction is shown to be a powerful tool for quaternary structure analysis of refractory noncovalent protein complexes, as illustrated by the data for PHB dimer and GDH hexamer.

  18. Structural and Thermodynamic Basis for Weak Interactions between Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase and Subunit-binding Domain of the Branched-chain [alpha]-Ketoacid Dehydrogenase Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Wynn, R. Max; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Naik, Mandar T.; Young, Brittany B.; Huang, Tai-huang; Chuang, David T.

    2012-02-27

    The purified mammalian branched-chain {alpha}-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC), which catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of branched-chain {alpha}-keto acids, is essentially devoid of the constituent dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase component (E3). The absence of E3 is associated with the low affinity of the subunit-binding domain of human BCKDC (hSBDb) for hE3. In this work, sequence alignments of hSBDb with the E3-binding domain (E3BD) of the mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex show that hSBDb has an arginine at position 118, where E3BD features an asparagine. Substitution of Arg-118 with an asparagine increases the binding affinity of the R118N hSBDb variant (designated hSBDb*) for hE3 by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. The enthalpy of the binding reaction changes from endothermic with the wild-type hSBDb to exothermic with the hSBDb* variant. This higher affinity interaction allowed the determination of the crystal structure of the hE3/hSBDb* complex to 2.4-{angstrom} resolution. The structure showed that the presence of Arg-118 poses a unique, possibly steric and/or electrostatic incompatibility that could impede E3 interactions with the wild-type hSBDb. Compared with the E3/E3BD structure, the hE3/hSBDb* structure has a smaller interfacial area. Solution NMR data corroborated the interactions of hE3 with Arg-118 and Asn-118 in wild-type hSBDb and mutant hSBDb*, respectively. The NMR results also showed that the interface between hSBDb and hE3 does not change significantly from hSBDb to hSBDb*. Taken together, our results represent a starting point for explaining the long standing enigma that the E2b core of the BCKDC binds E3 far more weakly relative to other {alpha}-ketoacid dehydrogenase complexes.

  19. The yeast complex I equivalent NADH dehydrogenase rescues pink1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Vilain, Sven; Esposito, Giovanni; Haddad, Dominik; Schaap, Onno; Dobreva, Mariya P; Vos, Melissa; Van Meensel, Stefanie; Morais, Vanessa A; De Strooper, Bart; Verstreken, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Pink1 is a mitochondrial kinase involved in Parkinson's disease, and loss of Pink1 function affects mitochondrial morphology via a pathway involving Parkin and components of the mitochondrial remodeling machinery. Pink1 loss also affects the enzymatic activity of isolated Complex I of the electron transport chain (ETC); however, the primary defect in pink1 mutants is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ETC deficiency is upstream of other pink1-associated phenotypes. We expressed Saccaromyces cerevisiae Ndi1p, an enzyme that bypasses ETC Complex I, or sea squirt Ciona intestinalis AOX, an enzyme that bypasses ETC Complex III and IV, in pink1 mutant Drosophila and find that expression of Ndi1p, but not of AOX, rescues pink1-associated defects. Likewise, loss of function of subunits that encode for Complex I-associated proteins displays many of the pink1-associated phenotypes, and these defects are rescued by Ndi1p expression. Conversely, expression of Ndi1p fails to rescue any of the parkin mutant phenotypes. Additionally, unlike pink1 mutants, fly parkin mutants do not show reduced enzymatic activity of Complex I, indicating that Ndi1p acts downstream or parallel to Pink1, but upstream or independent of Parkin. Furthermore, while increasing mitochondrial fission or decreasing mitochondrial fusion rescues mitochondrial morphological defects in pink1 mutants, these manipulations fail to significantly rescue the reduced enzymatic activity of Complex I, indicating that functional defects observed at the level of Complex I enzymatic activity in pink1 mutant mitochondria do not arise from morphological defects. Our data indicate a central role for Complex I dysfunction in pink1-associated defects, and our genetic analyses with heterologous ETC enzymes suggest that Ndi1p-dependent NADH dehydrogenase activity largely acts downstream of, or in parallel to, Pink1 but upstream of Parkin and mitochondrial remodeling. PMID:22242018

  20. Phenylbutyrate increases pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity in cells harboring a variety of defects

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Rosa; Boutron, Audrey; Brivet, Michele; Kerr, Douglas; Morava, Eva; Rodenburg, Richard J; Bonafé, Luisa; Baumgartner, Matthias R; Anikster, Yair; Braverman, Nancy E; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Objective Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. PDHC deficiency is genetically heterogenous and most patients have defects in the X-linked E1-α gene but defects in the other components of the complex encoded by PDHB, PDHX, DLAT, DLD genes or in the regulatory enzyme encoded by PDP1 have also been found. Phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases and thus, has potential for therapy of patients with PDHC deficiency. In the present study, we investigated response to phenylbutyrate of multiple cell lines harboring all known gene defects resulting in PDHC deficiency. Methods Fibroblasts of patients with PDHC deficiency were studied for their enzyme activity at baseline and following phenylbutyrate incubation. Drug responses were correlated with genotypes and protein levels by Western blotting. Results Large deletions affecting PDHA1 that result in lack of detectable protein were unresponsive to phenylbutyrate, whereas increased PDHC activity was detected in most fibroblasts harboring PDHA1 missense mutations. Mutations affecting the R349-α residue were directed to proteasome degradation and were consistently unresponsive to short-time drug incubation but longer incubation resulted in increased levels of enzyme activity and protein that may be due to an additional effect of phenylbutyrate as a molecular chaperone. Interpretation PDHC enzyme activity was enhanced by phenylbutyrate in cells harboring missense mutations in PDHB, PDHX, DLAT, DLD, and PDP1 genes. In the prospect of a clinical trial, the results of this study may allow prediction of in vivo response in patients with PDHC deficiency harboring a wide spectrum of molecular defects. PMID:25356417

  1. Dichloroacetate, the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex and the Modulation of mESC Pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ana Sofia; Correia, Marcelo; Gomes, Andreia; Pereira, Sandro L.; Perestrelo, Tânia; Sousa, Maria Inês; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex is localized in the mitochondrial matrix catalyzing the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA and NADH. For proper complex regulation the E1-α subunit functions as an on/off switch regulated by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. In different cell types one of the four-pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms (PDHK1-4) can phosphorylate this subunit leading to PDH inactivation. Our previous results with human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESC), suggested that PDHK could be a key regulator in the metabolic profile of pluripotent cells, as it is upregulated in pluripotent stem cells. Therefore, we wondered if metabolic modulation, via inexpensive pharmacological inhibition of PDHK, could impact metabolism and pluripotency. Methods/Results In order to assess the importance of the PDH cycle in mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (mESC), we incubated cells with the PDHK inhibitor dichloroacetate (DCA) and observed that in its presence ESC started to differentiate. Changes in mitochondrial function and proliferation potential were also found and protein levels for PDH (both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated) and PDHK1 were monitored. Interestingly, we were also able to describe a possible pathway that involves Hif-1α and p53 during DCA-induced loss of pluripotency. Results with ESCs treated with DCA were comparable to those obtained for cells grown without Leukemia Inhibitor Factor (LIF), used in this case as a positive control for differentiation. Conclusions DCA negatively affects ESC pluripotency by changing cell metabolism and elements related to the PDH cycle, suggesting that PDHK could function as a possible metabolic gatekeeper in ESC, and may be a good target to modulate metabolism and differentiation. Although further molecular biology-based experiments are required, our data suggests that inactive PDH favors pluripotency and that ESC have similar strategies as cancer cells to maintain a glycolytic

  2. Free energy landscape of the Michaelis complex of lactate dehydrogenase: A network analysis of atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaoliang; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    It has long been recognized that the structure of a protein is a hierarchy of conformations interconverting on multiple time scales. However, the conformational heterogeneity is rarely considered in the context of enzymatic catalysis in which the reactant is usually represented by a single conformation of the enzyme/substrate complex. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion of pyruvate and lactate with concomitant interconversion of two forms of the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD+). Recent experimental results suggest that multiple substates exist within the Michaelis complex of LDH, and they are catalytic competent at different reaction rates. In this study, millisecond-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were performed on LDH to explore the free energy landscape of the Michaelis complex, and network analysis was used to characterize the distribution of the conformations. Our results provide a detailed view of the kinetic network the Michaelis complex and the structures of the substates at atomistic scale. It also shed some light on understanding the complete picture of the catalytic mechanism of LDH.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of binary and ternary complexes of Haloferax mediterranei glucose dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Esclapez, Julia; Britton, K. Linda; Baker, Patrick J.; Fisher, Martin; Pire, Carmen; Ferrer, Juan; Bonete, María José; Rice, David W.

    2005-08-01

    Single crystals of binary and ternary complexes of wild-type and D38C mutant H. mediterranei glucose dehydrogenase have been obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Haloferax mediterranei glucose dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.47) belongs to the medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily and requires zinc for catalysis. In the majority of these family members, the catalytic zinc is tetrahedrally coordinated by the side chains of a cysteine, a histidine, a cysteine or glutamate and a water molecule. In H. mediterranei glucose dehydrogenase, sequence analysis indicates that the zinc coordination is different, with the invariant cysteine replaced by an aspartate residue. In order to analyse the significance of this replacement and to contribute to an understanding of the role of the metal ion in catalysis, a range of binary and ternary complexes of the wild-type and a D38C mutant protein have been crystallized. For most of the complexes, crystals belonging to space group I222 were obtained using sodium/potassium citrate as a precipitant. However, for the binary and non-productive ternary complexes with NADPH/Zn, it was necessary to replace the citrate with 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol. Despite the radical change in conditions, the crystals thus formed were isomorphous.

  4. Regulation of hepatic branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in rats fed a high-fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC) regulates branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism at the level of branched chain alpha-ketoacid (BCKA) catabolism. It has been demonstrated that the activity of hepatic BCKDC is markedly decreased in type 2 diabetic animal...

  5. Cooperativity in highly aggregated enzyme systems. A slow transition model for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bisswanger, H

    1984-02-25

    Three models are compared describing cooperative phenomena in enzymatic reactions in order to explain sigmoidal saturation curves found with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Escherichia coli: the concerted model, the sequential model, and the slow transition model. Both the concerted and the sequential model were considered especially with regard to the increasing number of identical interaction subunits (protomers) in order to get close to the situation found with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex which consists of 24 protomers. Applying the sequential model to a great number of protomers results in a weak increase of the Hill coefficient, while, in addition to this effect, the concerted model drastically shifts the sigmoidal range of the saturation function to very low ligand concentrations. Such shift is seen with saturation curves of pyruvate and thiamine disphosphate with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and a good fit with theoretical curves derived from the concerted model is obtained. However, subcomplexes with a reduced number of protomers exhibited no change in saturation behavior, thus providing evidence against concerted conformational changes of all subunits of the enzyme complex. A scheme for the initial reaction of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex based on slow transitions is presented and a rate equation has been derived. Ordered binding of thiamine diphosphate and pyruvate and a ligand-induced slow transition between a less active and a fully active enzyme form has been assumed. The curves simulated with this model are in agreement with all essential kinetic data, which are observed with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex: the atypical shape of the saturation curves of pyruvate and thiamine diphosphate, the respective Hill coefficients and Michaelis constants, the hyperbolic binding behavior of thiamine diphosphate, and the inhibition pattern found for acetyl coenzyme A. PMID:6365912

  6. Effect of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on L-lysine production with Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Blombach, Bastian; Schreiner, Mark E; Moch, Matthias; Oldiges, Marco; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2007-09-01

    Intracellular precursor supply is a critical factor for amino acid productivity of Corynebacterium glutamicum. To test for the effect of improved pyruvate availability on L-lysine production, we deleted the aceE gene encoding the E1p enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) in the L-lysine-producer C. glutamicum DM1729 and characterised the resulting strain DM1729-BB1 for growth and L-lysine production. Compared to the host strain, C. glutamicum DM1729-BB1 showed no PDHC activity, was acetate auxotrophic and, after complete consumption of the available carbon sources glucose and acetate, showed a more than 50% lower substrate-specific biomass yield (0.14 vs 0.33 mol C/mol C), an about fourfold higher biomass-specific L-lysine yield (5.27 vs 1.23 mmol/g cell dry weight) and a more than 40% higher substrate-specific L-lysine yield (0.13 vs 0.09 mol C/mol C). Overexpression of the pyruvate carboxylase or diaminopimelate dehydrogenase genes in C. glutamicum DM1729-BB1 resulted in a further increase in the biomass-specific L-lysine yield by 6 and 56%, respectively. In addition to L-lysine, significant amounts of pyruvate, L-alanine and L-valine were produced by C. glutamicum DM1729-BB1 and its derivatives, suggesting a surplus of precursor availability and a further potential to improve L-lysine production by engineering the L-lysine biosynthetic pathway. PMID:17333167

  7. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency and its relationship with epilepsy frequency--An overview.

    PubMed

    Bhandary, Suman; Aguan, Kripamoy

    2015-10-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) is a member of a family of multienzyme complexes that provides the link between glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle by catalyzing the physiologically irreversible decarboxylation of various 2-oxoacid substrates to their corresponding acyl-CoA derivatives, NADH and CO2. PDHc deficiency is a metabolic disorder commonly associated with lactic acidosis, progressive neurological and neuromuscular degeneration that vary with age and gender. In this review, we aim to discuss the relationship between occurrence of epilepsy and PDHc deficiency associated with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (E1α subunit (PDHA1) and E1β subunit (PDHB)) and PDH phosphatase (PDP) deficiency. PDHc plays a crucial role in the aerobic carbohydrate metabolism and regulates the use of carbohydrate as the source of oxidative energy. In severe PDHc deficiency, the energy deficit impairs brain development in utero resulting in physiological and structural changes in the brain that contributes to the subsequent onset of epileptogenesis. Epileptogenesis in PDHc deficiency is linked to energy failure and abnormal neurotransmitter metabolism that progressively alters neuronal excitability. This metabolic blockage might be restricted via inclusion of ketogenic diet that is broken up by β-oxidation and directly converting it to acetyl-CoA, and thereby improving the patient's health condition. Genetic counseling is essential as PDHA1 deficiency is X-linked. The demonstration of the X-chromosome localization of PDHA1 resolved a number of questions concerning the variable phenotype displayed by patients with E1 deficiency. Most patients show a broad range of neurological abnormalities, with the severity showing some dependence on the nature of the mutation in the Elα gene, while PDHB and PDH phosphatase (PDP) deficiencies are of autosomal recessive inheritance. However, in females, the disorder is further complicated by the pattern of X

  8. Conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active complex by the phosphate reaction in heart mitochondria is inhibited by alloxan-diabetes or starvation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hutson, N J; Kerbey, A L; Randle, P J; Sugden, P H

    1978-08-01

    1. The conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active (dephosphorylated) complex by pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase is inhibited in heart mitochondria prepared from alloxan-diabetic or 48h-starved rats, in mitochondria prepared from acetate-perfused rat hearts and in mitochondria prepared from normal rat hearts incubated with respiratory substrates for 6 min (as compared with 1 min). 2. This conclusion is based on experiments with isolated intact mitochondria in which the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase reaction was inhibited by pyruvate or ATP depletion (by using oligomycin and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone), and in experiments in which the rate of conversion of inactive complex into active complex by the phosphatase was measured in extracts of mitochondria. The inhibition of the phosphatase reaction was seen with constant concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ (activators of the phosphatase). The phosphatase reaction in these mitochondrial extracts was not inhibited when an excess of exogenous pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate was used as substrate. It is concluded that this inhibition is due to some factor(s) associated with the substrate (pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex) and not to inhibition of the phosphatase as such. 3. This conclusion was verified by isolating pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex, free of phosphatase, from hearts of control and diabetic rats an from heart mitochondria incubed for 1min (control) or 6min with respiratory substrates. The rates of re-activation of the inactive complexes were then measured with preparations of ox heart or rat heart phosphatase. The rates were lower (relative to controls) with inactive complex from hearts of diabetic rats or from heart mitochondria incubated for 6min with respiratory substrates. 4. The incorporation of 32Pi into inactive complex took 6min to complete in rat heart mitocondria. The extent of incorporation was consistent with

  9. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase constitute an energy-consuming redox circuit.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H; Lin, Chien-Te; Ryan, Terence E; Reese, Lauren R; Gilliam, Laura A A; Cathey, Brook L; Lark, Daniel S; Smith, Cody D; Muoio, Deborah M; Neufer, P Darrell

    2015-04-15

    Cellular proteins rely on reversible redox reactions to establish and maintain biological structure and function. How redox catabolic (NAD+/NADH) and anabolic (NADP+/NADPH) processes integrate during metabolism to maintain cellular redox homoeostasis, however, is unknown. The present work identifies a continuously cycling mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm)-dependent redox circuit between the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT). PDHC is shown to produce H2O2 in relation to reducing pressure within the complex. The H2O2 produced, however, is effectively masked by a continuously cycling redox circuit that links, via glutathione/thioredoxin, to NNT, which catalyses the regeneration of NADPH from NADH at the expense of ΔΨm. The net effect is an automatic fine-tuning of NNT-mediated energy expenditure to metabolic balance at the level of PDHC. In mitochondria, genetic or pharmacological disruptions in the PDHC-NNT redox circuit negate counterbalance changes in energy expenditure. At the whole animal level, mice lacking functional NNT (C57BL/6J) are characterized by lower energy-expenditure rates, consistent with their well-known susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. These findings suggest the integration of redox sensing of metabolic balance with compensatory changes in energy expenditure provides a potential mechanism by which cellular redox homoeostasis is maintained and body weight is defended during periods of positive and negative energy balance. PMID:25643703

  10. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex: metabolic link to ischemic brain injury and target of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Martin, Erica; Rosenthal, Robert E; Fiskum, Gary

    The mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme complex (greater than 7 million Daltons) that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to form acetyl CoA, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (the reduced form, NADH), and CO(2). This reaction constitutes the bridge between anaerobic and aerobic cerebral energy metabolism. PDHC enzyme activity and immunoreactivity are lost in selectively vulnerable neurons after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. Evidence from experiments carried out in vitro suggests that reperfusion-dependent loss of activity is caused by oxidative protein modifications. Impaired enzyme activity may explain the reduced cerebral glucose and oxygen consumption that occurs after cerebral ischemia. This hypothesis is supported by the hyperoxidation of mitochondrial electron transport chain components and NAD(H) that occurs during reperfusion, indicating that NADH production, rather than utilization, is rate limiting. Additional support comes from the findings that immediate postischemic administration of acetyl-L-carnitine both reduces brain lactate/pyruvate ratios and improves neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest in animals. As acetyl-L-carnitine is converted to acetyl CoA, the product of the PDHC reaction, it follows that impaired production of NADH is due to reduced activity of either PDHC or one or more steps in glycolysis. Impaired cerebral energy metabolism and PDHC activity are associated also with neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, suggesting that this enzyme is an important link in the pathophysiology of both acute brain injury and chronic neurodegeneration. PMID:15562436

  11. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase constitute an energy consuming redox circuit

    PubMed Central

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.; Lin, Chien-Te; Ryan, Terence E.; Reese, Lauren R.; Gilliam, Laura A. A.; Cathey, Brook L.; Lark, Daniel S.; Smith, Cody D.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cellular proteins rely on reversible redox reactions to establish and maintain biological structure and function. How redox catabolic (NAD+:NADH) and anabolic (NADP+:NADPH) processes integrate during metabolism to maintain cellular redox homeostasis however is unknown. The present work identifies a continuously cycling, mitochondrial membrane potential-dependent redox circuit between the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT). PDHC is shown to produce H2O2 in relation to reducing pressure within the complex. The H2O2 produced however is effectively masked by a continuously cycling redox circuit that links, via glutathione/thioredoxin, to NNT, which catalyzes the regeneration of NADPH from NADH at the expense of the mitochondrial membrane potential. The net effect is an automatic fine tuning of NNT-mediated energy expenditure to metabolic balance at the level of PDHC. In mitochondria, genetic or pharmacological disruptions in the PDHC-NNT redox circuit negate counterbalance changes in energy expenditure. At the whole animal level, mice lacking functional NNT (C57BL/6J) are characterized by lower energy expenditure rates, consistent with their well known susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. These findings suggest the integration of redox sensing of metabolic balance with compensatory changes in energy expenditure provides a potential mechanism by which cellular redox homeostasis is maintained and body weight is defended during periods of positive and negative energy balance. PMID:25643703

  12. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex: Metabolic Link to Ischemic Brain Injury and Target of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Erica; Rosenthal, Robert E.; Fiskum, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme complex (greater than 7 million Daltons) that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to form acetyl CoA, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (the reduced form, NADH), and CO2. This reaction constitutes the bridge between anaerobic and aerobic cerebral energy metabolism. PDHC enzyme activity and immunoreactivity are lost in selectively vulnerable neurons after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. Evidence from experiments carried out in vitro suggests that reperfusion-dependent loss of activity is caused by oxidative protein modifications. Impaired enzyme activity may explain the reduced cerebral glucose and oxygen consumption that occurs after cerebral ischemia. This hypothesis is supported by the hyperoxidation of mitochondrial electron transport chain components and NAD(H) that occurs during reperfusion, indicating that NADH production, rather than utilization, is rate limiting. Additional support comes from the findings that immediate postischemic administration of acetyl-l-carnitine both reduces brain lactate/pyruvate ratios and improves neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest in animals. As acetyl-l-carnitine is converted to acetyl CoA, the product of the PDHC reaction, it follows that impaired production of NADH is due to reduced activity of either PDHC or one or more steps in glycolysis. Impaired cerebral energy metabolism and PDHC activity are associated also with neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, suggesting that this enzyme is an important link in the pathophysiology of both acute brain injury and chronic neurodegeneration. PMID:15562436

  13. Acetylphosphinate is the most potent mechanism-based substrate-like inhibitor of both the human and E. coli pyruvate dehydrogenase components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    PubMed Central

    Nemeria, Natalia S.; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Chakraborty, Sumit; Patel, Mulchand S.; Jordan, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Two analogues of pyruvate, acetylphosphinate and acetylmethylphosphinate were tested as inhibitors of the E1 (pyruvate dehydrogenase) component of the human and Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes. This is the first instance of such studies on the human enzyme. The acetylphosphinate is a stronger inhibitor of both enzymes (Ki< 1 μM) than acetylmethylphosphinate. Both inhibitors are found to be reversible tight-binding inhibitors. With both inhibitors and with both enzymes, the inhibition apparently takes place by formation of a C2α-phosphinolactylthiamin diphosphate derivative, a covalent adduct of the inhibitor and the coenzyme, mimicking the behavior of substrate and forming a stable analogue of the C2α-lactylthiamin diphosphate. Formation of the intermediate analogue in each case is confirmed by the appearance of a positive circular dichroism signal in the 305-306 nm range, attributed to the 1',4'-iminopyrimidine tautomeric form of the coenzyme. It is further shown that the αHis63 residue of the human E1 has a role in the formation of C2α-lactylthiamin diphosphate since the αHis63Ala variant is only modestly inhibited by either inhibitor, nor did either compound generate the circular dichroism bands assigned to different tautomeric forms of the 4'-aminopyrimidine ring of the coenzyme seen with the wild type enzyme. Interestingly, opposite enantiomers of the carboligase side product acetoin are produced by the human and bacterial enzymes. PMID:17070897

  14. Acetylphosphinate is the most potent mechanism-based substrate-like inhibitor of both the human and Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Nemeria, Natalia S; Korotchkina, Lioubov G; Chakraborty, Sumit; Patel, Mulchand S; Jordan, Frank

    2006-12-01

    Two analogues of pyruvate, acetylphosphinate and acetylmethylphosphinate were tested as inhibitors of the E1 (pyruvate dehydrogenase) component of the human and Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes. This is the first instance of such studies on the human enzyme. The acetylphosphinate is a stronger inhibitor of both enzymes (Ki < 1 microM) than acetylmethylphosphinate. Both inhibitors are found to be reversible tight-binding inhibitors. With both inhibitors and with both enzymes, the inhibition apparently takes place by formation of a C2alpha-phosphinolactylthiamin diphosphate derivative, a covalent adduct of the inhibitor and the coenzyme, mimicking the behavior of substrate and forming a stable analogue of the C2alpha-lactylthiamin diphosphate. Formation of the intermediate analogue in each case is confirmed by the appearance of a positive circular dichroism band in the 305-306 nm range, attributed to the 1',4'-iminopyrimidine tautomeric form of the coenzyme. It is further shown that the alphaHis63 residue of the human E1 has a role in the formation of C2alpha-lactylthiamin diphosphate since the alphaHis63Ala variant is only modestly inhibited by either inhibitor, nor did either compound generate the circular dichroism bands assigned to different tautomeric forms of the 4'-aminopyrimidine ring of the coenzyme seen with the wild-type enzyme. Interestingly, opposite enantiomers of the carboligase side product acetoin are produced by the human and bacterial enzymes. PMID:17070897

  15. Nucleotide sequence encoding the flavoprotein and hydrophobic subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, D; Darlison, M G; Wilde, R J; Guest, J R

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 3614 base-pair segment of DNA containing the sdhA gene, encoding the flavoprotein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli, and two genes sdhC and sdhD, encoding small hydrophobic subunits, has been determined. Together with the iron-sulphur protein gene (sdhB) these genes form an operon (sdhCDAB) situated between the citrate synthase gene (gltA) and the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex genes (sucAB): gltA-sdhCDAB-sucAB. Transcription of the gltA and sdhCDAB gene appears to diverge from a single intergenic region that contains two pairs of potential promoter sequences and two putative CRP (cyclic AMP receptor protein)-binding sites. The sdhA structural gene comprises 1761 base-pairs (587 codons, excluding the initiation codon, AUG) and it encodes a polypeptide of Mr 64268 that is strikingly homologous with the flavoprotein subunit of fumarate reductase (frdA gene product). The FAD-binding region, including the histidine residue at the FAD-attachment site, has been identified by its homology with other flavoproteins and with the flavopeptide of the bovine heart mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase. Potential active-site cysteine and histidine residues have also been indicated by the comparisons. The sdhC (384 base-pairs) and sdhD (342 base-pairs) structural genes encode two strongly hydrophobic proteins of Mr 14167 and 12792 respectively. These proteins resemble in size and composition, but not sequence, the membrane anchor proteins of fumarate reductase (the frdC and frdD gene products). PMID:6383359

  16. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of ascites tumour. Activation by AMP and other properties of potential significance in metabolic regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Lazo, P A; Sols, A

    1980-01-01

    1. AMP is an activator of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of the Ehrlich--Lettré ascites tumour, increasing its V up to 2-fold, with Ka of 40 microM at pH 7.4. This activation appears to be an allosteric effect on the decarboxylase subunit of the complex. 2. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex has a Km for pyruvate within the range 17--36 microM depending on the pH, the optimum pH being approx. 7.4, with a V of approx. 0.1 unit/g of cells. The rate-limiting step is dependent on the transformation of the enzyme--substrate complex. The Km for CoA is 15 microM. The Km for NAD+ is 0.7 mM for both the complex and the lipoamide dehydrogenase. The complex is inhibited by acetyl-CoA competitively with CoA; the Ki is 60 microM. The lipoamide dehydrogenase is inhibited by NADH and NADPH competitively with NAD+, with Ki values of 80 and 90 microM respectively. In the reverse reaction the Km values for NADH and NADPH are essentially equal to their Ki values for the forward reaction, the V for the latter being 0.09 of that of the former. Hence the reaction rate of the complex in vivo is likely to be markedly affected by feedback isosteric inhibition by reduced nicotinamide nucleotides and possibly acetyl-CoA. PMID:7193456

  17. Heterologous Production of an Energy-Conserving Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Complex in the Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Schut, Gerrit J; Lipscomb, Gina L; Nguyen, Diep M N; Kelly, Robert M; Adams, Michael W W

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a CO dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na(+)/H(+) antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na(+) motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na(+)-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificial chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100°C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80°C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms. PMID:26858706

  18. Heterologous Production of an Energy-Conserving Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Complex in the Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Schut, Gerrit J.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Nguyen, Diep M. N.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a CO dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na+/H+ antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na+ motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na+-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificial chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100°C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80°C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms. PMID:26858706

  19. Heterologous production of an energy-conserving carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complex in the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schut, Gerrit J.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Nguyen, Diep M. N.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2016-01-29

    In this study, carbon monoxide (CO) is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a CO dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na+/H+ antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na+ motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na+-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificialmore » chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100° C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80° C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms.« less

  20. Mechanistic implications from structures of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase complexed with coenzyme and an alcohol.

    PubMed

    Plapp, Bryce V; Charlier, Henry A; Ramaswamy, S

    2016-02-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I is a homotetramer of subunits with 347 amino acid residues, catalyzing the oxidation of alcohols using NAD(+) as coenzyme. A new X-ray structure was determined at 3.0 Å where both subunits of an asymmetric dimer bind coenzyme and trifluoroethanol. The tetramer is a pair of back-to-back dimers. Subunit A has a closed conformation and can represent a Michaelis complex with an appropriate geometry for hydride transfer between coenzyme and alcohol, with the oxygen of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol ligated at 2.1 Å to the catalytic zinc in the classical tetrahedral coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, and His-66. Subunit B has an open conformation, and the coenzyme interacts with amino acid residues from the coenzyme binding domain, but not with residues from the catalytic domain. Coenzyme appears to bind to and dissociate from the open conformation. The catalytic zinc in subunit B has an alternative, inverted coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, His-66 and the carboxylate of Glu-67, while the oxygen of trifluoroethanol is 3.5 Å from the zinc. Subunit B may represent an intermediate in the mechanism after coenzyme and alcohol bind and before the conformation changes to the closed form and the alcohol oxygen binds to the zinc and displaces Glu-67. PMID:26743849

  1. Expression, purification and crystallization of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase complexed with orotate.

    PubMed

    Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Takashima, Eizo; Osanai, Arihiro; Shimizu, Hironari; Nara, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2005-10-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD) catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate, the fourth step and the only redox reaction in the de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine. DHOD from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcDHOD) has been expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Crystals of the TcDHOD-orotate complex were grown at 277 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant. The crystals diffract to better than 1.8 A resolution using synchrotron radiation (lambda = 0.900 A). X-ray diffraction data were collected at 100 K and processed to 1.9 A resolution with 98.2% completeness and an overall Rmerge of 7.8%. The TcDHOD crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 67.87, b = 71.89, c = 123.27 A. The presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit (2 x 34 kDa) gives a crystal volume per protein weight (VM) of 2.2 A3 Da(-1) and a solvent content of 44%. PMID:16511183

  2. Active-Loop Dynamics within the Michaelis Complex of Lactate Dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Nie, Beining; Lodewyks, Kara; Deng, Hua; Desamero, Ruel Z B; Callender, Robert

    2016-07-12

    Laser-induced temperature-jump relaxation spectroscopy was used to study the active site mobile-loop dynamics found in the binding of the NADH nucleotide cofactor and oxamate substrate mimic to lactate dehydrogenase in Bacillus stearothermophilus thermophilic bacteria (bsLDH). The kinetic data can be best described by a model in which NADH can bind only to the open-loop apoenzyme, oxamate can bind only to the bsLDH·NADH binary complex in the open-loop conformation, and oxamate binding is followed by closing of the active site loop preventing oxamate unbinding. The open and closed states of the loop are in dynamic equilibrium and interconvert on the submillisecond time scale. This interconversion strongly accelerates with an increase in temperature because of significant enthalpy barriers. Binding of NADH to bsLDH results in minor changes of the loop dynamics and does not shift the open-closed equilibrium, but binding of the oxamate substrate mimic shifts this equilibrium to the closed state. At high excess oxamate concentrations where all active sites are nearly saturated with the substrate mimic, all active site mobile loops are mainly closed. The observed active-loop dynamics for bsLDH is very similar to that previously observed for pig heart LDH. PMID:27319381

  3. On dioxygen permeation through a dehydrogenase-pyrroloquinoline quinone complex. A molecular-dynamics investigation.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Francesco

    2014-02-01

    In this work, an all atom model of the quinoprotein dehydrogenase PqqC in complex with the PQQ (=4,5-dihydro-4,5-dioxo-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-f]quinoline-2,7,9-tricarboxylic acid) cofactor and dioxygen (O2 ), solvated with TIP3 water in periodic boxes, was subjected to random-acceleration molecular dynamics (RAMD). It was found that O2 leaves the active binding pocket, in front of PQQ, to get to the solvent, as easily as with a variety of other O2 -activating enzymes, O2 carriers, and gas-sensing proteins. The shortest pathway, orthogonal to the center of the mean plane of PQQ, was largely preferred by O2 over pathways slightly deviating from this line. These observations challenge the interpretation of an impermeable active binding pocket of PqqC-PQQ, as drawn from both X-ray diffraction data of the crystal at low temperature and physiological experimentation. PMID:24591312

  4. Is there a signal transduction pathway that links events at the plasma membrane to the phosphorylation state of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monoclonal antibodies against the E1a subunit were used to quantify the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (mtPDC) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) was used to calibrate the ELISA. Antibodies against a synthetic ph...

  5. Energy Sensing versus 2-Oxoglutarate Dependent ATPase Switch in the Control of Synechococcus PII Interaction with Its Targets NAGK and PipX

    PubMed Central

    Lüddecke, Jan; Forchhammer, Karl

    2015-01-01

    PII proteins constitute a superfamily of highly conserved signaling devices, common in all domains of life. Through binding of the metabolites ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG), they undergo conformational changes which allow them to regulate a variety of target proteins including enzymes, transport proteins and transcription factors. But, in reverse, these target proteins also modulate the metabolite sensing properties of PII, as has been recently shown. We used this effect to refine our PII based Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensor and amplify its sensitivity towards ADP. With this enhanced sensor setup we addressed the question whether the PII protein from the model organism Synechococcus elongatus autonomously switches into the ADP conformation through ATPase activity as proposed in a recently published model. The present study disproves ATPase activity as a relevant mechanism for the transition of PII into the ADP state. In the absence of 2-OG, only the ATP/ADP ratio and concentration of ADP directs the competitive interaction of PII with two targets, one of which preferentially binds PII in the ATP-state, the other in the ADP-state. PMID:26317540

  6. Stable over-expression of the 2-oxoglutarate carrier enhances neuronal cell resistance to oxidative stress via Bcl-2-dependent mitochondrial GSH transport

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Heather M.; Brock, Samantha; Gray, Josie J.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) is a key endogenous antioxidant and its maintenance is critical for cell survival. Here, we generated stable NSC34 motor neuron-like cell lines over-expressing the mitochondrial GSH transporter, the 2-oxoglutarate carrier (OGC), to further elucidate the importance of mitochondrial GSH transport in determining neuronal resistance to oxidative stress. Two stable OGC cell lines displayed specific increases in mitochondrial GSH content and resistance to oxidative and nitrosative stressors, but not staurosporine. Inhibition of transport through OGC reduced levels of mitochondrial GSH and resensitized the stable cell lines to oxidative stress. The stable OGC cell lines displayed significant up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein, B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2). This result was reproduced in parental NSC34 cells by chronic treatment with GSH monoethylester, which specifically increased mitochondrial GSH levels. Knockdown of Bcl-2 expression decreased mitochondrial GSH and resensitized the stable OGC cells to oxidative stress. Finally, endogenous OGC was co-immunoprecipitated with Bcl-2 from rat brain lysates in a GSH-dependent manner. These data are the first to show that increased mitochondrial GSH transport is sufficient to enhance neuronal resistance to oxidative stress. Moreover, sustained and specific enhancement of mitochondrial GSH leads to increased Bcl-2 expression, a required mechanism for the maintenance of increased mitochondrial GSH levels. PMID:24606213

  7. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... control the activity of the complex: pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase turns on (activates) the complex, while pyruvate dehydrogenase ... binding protein (the PDHX gene), and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase (the PDP1 gene) have been identified in people ...

  8. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers

    PubMed Central

    Nemeria, Natalia S.; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4′-aminopyrimidine N1′ atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu571, Glu235, and Glu237) and Arg606 resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu235 makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu571 residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time. PMID:20106967

  9. Energy Landscape of the Michaelis Complex of Lactate Dehydrogenase: Relationship to Catalytic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion between pyruvate and lactate with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) as a cofactor. Using isotope-edited difference Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy on the “live” reaction mixture (LDH·NADH·pyruvate ⇌ LDH·NAD+·lactate) for the wild-type protein and a mutant with an impaired catalytic efficiency, a set of interconverting conformational substates within the pyruvate side of the Michaelis complex tied to chemical activity is revealed. The important structural features of these substates include (1) electronic orbital overlap between pyruvate’s C2=O bond and the nicotinamide ring of NADH, as shown from the observation of a delocalized vibrational mode involving motions from both moieties, and (2) a characteristic hydrogen bond distance between the pyruvate C2=O group and active site residues, as shown by the observation of at least four C2=O stretch bands indicating varying degrees of C2=O bond polarization. These structural features form a critical part of the expected reaction coordinate along the reaction path, and the ability to quantitatively determine them as well as the substate population ratios in the Michaelis complex provides a unique opportunity to probe the structure–activity relationship in LDH catalysis. The various substates have a strong variance in their propensity toward on enzyme chemistry. Our results suggest a physical mechanism for understanding the LDH-catalyzed chemistry in which the bulk of the rate enhancement can be viewed as arising from a stochastic search through an available phase space that, in the enzyme system, involves a restricted ensemble of more reactive conformational substates as compared to the same chemistry in solution. PMID:24576110

  10. Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Is an Important Component of CXCL10-Mediated Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schutte, Kirsten M.; Fisher, Debra J.; Burdick, Marie D.; Mehrad, Borna; Mathers, Amy J.; Mann, Barbara J.; Nakamoto, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are best recognized for their role within the innate immune system as chemotactic cytokines, signaling and recruiting host immune cells to sites of infection. Certain chemokines, such as CXCL10, have been found to play an additional role in innate immunity, mediating CXCR3-independent killing of a diverse array of pathogenic microorganisms. While this is still not clearly understood, elucidating the mechanisms underlying chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity may facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies effective against antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Here, we show that CXCL10 exerts antibacterial effects on clinical and laboratory strains of Escherichia coli and report that disruption of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc), which converts pyruvate to acetyl coenzyme A, enables E. coli to resist these antimicrobial effects. Through generation and screening of a transposon mutant library, we identified two mutants with increased resistance to CXCL10, both with unique disruptions of the gene encoding the E1 subunit of PDHc, aceE. Resistance to CXCL10 also occurred following deletion of either aceF or lpdA, genes that encode the remaining two subunits of PDHc. Although PDHc resides within the bacterial cytosol, electron microscopy revealed localization of immunogold-labeled CXCL10 to the bacterial cell surface in both the E. coli parent and aceE deletion mutant strains. Taken together, our findings suggest that while CXCL10 interacts with an as-yet-unidentified component on the cell surface, PDHc is an important mediator of killing by CXCL10. To our knowledge, this is the first description of PDHc as a key bacterial component involved in the antibacterial effect of a chemokine. PMID:26553462

  11. Novel binding motif and new flexibility revealed by structural analyses of a pyruvate dehydrogenase-dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase subcomplex from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Wang, Junjie; Nemeria, Natalia S; Reynolds, Shelley; Brown, Ian; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Calero, Guillermo; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2014-10-24

    The Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex contains multiple copies of three enzymatic components, E1p, E2p, and E3, that sequentially carry out distinct steps in the overall reaction converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. Efficient functioning requires the enzymatic components to assemble into a large complex, the integrity of which is maintained by tethering of the displaced, peripheral E1p and E3 components to the E2p core through non-covalent binding. We here report the crystal structure of a subcomplex between E1p and an E2p didomain containing a hybrid lipoyl domain along with the peripheral subunit-binding domain responsible for tethering to the core. In the structure, a region at the N terminus of each subunit in the E1p homodimer previously unseen due to crystallographic disorder was observed, revealing a new folding motif involved in E1p-E2p didomain interactions, and an additional, unexpected, flexibility was discovered in the E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex, both of which probably have consequences in the overall multienzyme complex assembly. This represents the first structure of an E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex involving a homodimeric E1p, and the results may be applicable to a large range of complexes with homodimeric E1 components. Results of HD exchange mass spectrometric experiments using the intact, wild type 3-lipoyl E2p and E1p are consistent with the crystallographic data obtained from the E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex as well as with other biochemical and NMR data reported from our groups, confirming that our findings are applicable to the entire E1p-E2p assembly. PMID:25210042

  12. JBP1 and JBP2 Proteins Are Fe2+/2-Oxoglutarate-dependent Dioxygenases Regulating Hydroxylation of Thymidine Residues in Trypanosome DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Cliffe, Laura J.; Hirsch, Gwen; Wang, Jin; Ekanayake, Dilrukshi; Bullard, Whitney; Hu, Muhan; Wang, Yinsheng; Sabatini, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that O-linked glucosylation of thymine in trypanosome DNA (base J) regulates polymerase II transcription initiation. In vivo analysis has indicated that base J synthesis is initiated by the hydroxylation of thymidine by proteins (JBP1 and JBP2) homologous to the Fe2+/2-oxoglutarate (2-OG)-dependent dioxygenase superfamily where hydroxylation is driven by the oxidative decarboxylation of 2-OG, forming succinate and CO2. However, no direct evidence for hydroxylase activity has been reported for the JBP proteins. We now demonstrate recombinant JBP1 hydroxylates thymine specifically in the context of dsDNA in a Fe2+-, 2-OG-, and O2-dependent manner. Under anaerobic conditions, the addition of Fe2+ to JBP1/2-OG results in the formation of a broad absorption spectrum centered at 530 nm attributed to metal chelation of 2-OG bound to JBP, a spectroscopic signature of Fe2+/2-OG-dependent dioxygenases. The N-terminal thymidine hydroxylase domain of JBP1 is sufficient for full activity and mutation of residues involved in coordinating Fe2+ inhibit iron binding and thymidine hydroxylation. Hydroxylation in vitro and J synthesis in vivo is inhibited by known inhibitors of Fe2+/2-OG-dependent dioxygenases. The data clearly demonstrate the JBP enzymes are dioxygenases acting directly on dsDNA, confirming the two-step J synthesis model. Growth of trypanosomes in hypoxic conditions decreases JBP1 and -2 activity, resulting in reduced levels of J and changes in parasite virulence previously characterized in the JBP KO. The influence of environment upon J biosynthesis via oxygen-sensitive regulation of JBP1/2 has exciting implications for the regulation of gene expression and parasite adaptation to different host niches. PMID:22514282

  13. Ab initio structural modeling of and experimental validation for Chlamydia trachomatis protein CT296 reveal structural similarity to Fe(II) 2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemege, Kyle E.; Hickey, John M.; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Zhang, Yang; Hefty, P. Scott

    2012-02-13

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a medically important pathogen that encodes a relatively high percentage of proteins with unknown function. The three-dimensional structure of a protein can be very informative regarding the protein's functional characteristics; however, determining protein structures experimentally can be very challenging. Computational methods that model protein structures with sufficient accuracy to facilitate functional studies have had notable successes. To evaluate the accuracy and potential impact of computational protein structure modeling of hypothetical proteins encoded by Chlamydia, a successful computational method termed I-TASSER was utilized to model the three-dimensional structure of a hypothetical protein encoded by open reading frame (ORF) CT296. CT296 has been reported to exhibit functional properties of a divalent cation transcription repressor (DcrA), with similarity to the Escherichia coli iron-responsive transcriptional repressor, Fur. Unexpectedly, the I-TASSER model of CT296 exhibited no structural similarity to any DNA-interacting proteins or motifs. To validate the I-TASSER-generated model, the structure of CT296 was solved experimentally using X-ray crystallography. Impressively, the ab initio I-TASSER-generated model closely matched (2.72-{angstrom} C{alpha} root mean square deviation [RMSD]) the high-resolution (1.8-{angstrom}) crystal structure of CT296. Modeled and experimentally determined structures of CT296 share structural characteristics of non-heme Fe(II) 2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzymes, although key enzymatic residues are not conserved, suggesting a unique biochemical process is likely associated with CT296 function. Additionally, functional analyses did not support prior reports that CT296 has properties shared with divalent cation repressors such as Fur.

  14. Identification of a unique 2-oxoglutarate-dependent flavone 7-O-demethylase completes the elucidation of the lipophilic flavone network in basil.

    PubMed

    Berim, Anna; Kim, Min-Jeong; Gang, David R

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule demethylation is considered unusual in plants. Of the studied instances, the N-demethylation of nicotine is catalyzed by a Cyt P450 monooxygenase, while the O-dealkylation of alkaloids in Papaver somniferum is mediated by 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (2-ODDs). This report describes a 2-ODD regiospecifically catalyzing the 7-O-demethylation of methoxylated flavones in peltate trichomes of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.). Three candidate 2-ODDs were identified in the basil trichome transcriptome database. Only the candidate designated ObF7ODM1 was found to be active with and highly specific for the proposed natural substrates, gardenin B and 8-hydroxysalvigenin. Of the characterized 2-ODDs, ObF7ODM1 is most closely related to O-demethylases from Papaver. The demethylase activity in trichomes from four basil chemotypes matches well with the abundance of ObF7ODM1 peptides and transcripts in the same trichome preparations. Treatment of basil plants with a 2-ODD inhibitor prohexadione-calcium significantly reduced the accumulation of 7-O-demethylated flavone nevadensin, confirming the involvement of a 2-ODD in its formation. Notably, the full-length open reading frame of ObF7ODM1 contains a second in-frame AUG codon 57 nucleotides downstream of the first translation initiation codon. Both AUG codons are recognized by bacterial translation machinery during heterologous gene expression. The N-truncated ObF7ODM1 is nearly inactive. The N-terminus essential for activity is unique to ObF7ODM1 and does not align with the sequences of other 2-ODDs. Further studies will reveal whether alternative translation initiation plays a role in regulating the O-demethylase activity in planta. Molecular identification of the flavone 7-O-demethylase completes the biochemical elucidation of the lipophilic flavone network in basil. PMID:25378691

  15. Solution Structure and Characterisation of the Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Core Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakrishnan, S.; Kelly, S.M.; Gilbert, R.J.C.; Callow, P.; Bhella, D.; Forsyth, T.; Lindsay, J.G.; Byron, O.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is a key multi-enzyme assembly that is responsible for glucose homeostasis maintenance and conversion of pyruvate into acetyl-CoA. It comprises a central pentagonal dodecahedral core consisting of two subunit types (E2 and E3BP) to which peripheral enzymes (E1 and E3) bind tightly but non-covalently. Currently, there are two conflicting models of PDC (E2 + E3BP) core organisation: the ‘addition’ model (60 + 12) and the ‘substitution’ model (48 + 12). Here we present the first ever low-resolution structures of human recombinant full-length PDC core (rE2/E3BP), truncated PDC core (tE2/E3BP) and native bovine heart PDC core (bE2/E3BP) obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering. These structures, corroborated by negative-stain and cryo electron microscopy data, clearly reveal open pentagonal core faces, favouring the ‘substitution’ model of core organisation. The native and recombinant core structures are all similar to the truncated bacterial E2 core crystal structure obtained previously. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of rE2/E3BP and rE2/E3BP:E3 directly confirm that the core has open pentagonal faces, agree with scattering-derived models and show density extending outwards from their surfaces, which is much more structurally ordered in the presence of E3. Additionally, analytical ultracentrifugation characterisation of rE2/E3BP, rE2 (full-length recombinant E2-only) and tE2/E3BP supports the substitution model. Superimposition of the small-angle neutron scattering tE2/E3BP and truncated bacterial E2 crystal structures demonstrates conservation of the overall pentagonal dodecahedral morphology, despite evolutionary diversity. In addition, unfolding studies using circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy show that the rE2/E3BP is less stable than its rE2 counterpart, indicative of a role for E3BP in core destabilisation. The architectural

  16. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals 2-Oxoacid Dehydrogenase Complex Lipoylation Correlation with Aerobiosis in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Borziak, Kirill; Posner, Mareike G.; Upadhyay, Abhishek; Danson, Michael J.; Bagby, Stefan; Dorus, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic analyses have advanced our understanding of ecological microbial diversity, but to what extent can metagenomic data be used to predict the metabolic capacity of difficult-to-study organisms and their abiotic environmental interactions? We tackle this question, using a comparative genomic approach, by considering the molecular basis of aerobiosis within archaea. Lipoylation, the covalent attachment of lipoic acid to 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes (OADHCs), is essential for metabolism in aerobic bacteria and eukarya. Lipoylation is catalysed either by lipoate protein ligase (LplA), which in archaea is typically encoded by two genes (LplA-N and LplA-C), or by a lipoyl(octanoyl) transferase (LipB or LipM) plus a lipoic acid synthetase (LipA). Does the genomic presence of lipoylation and OADHC genes across archaea from diverse habitats correlate with aerobiosis? First, analyses of 11,826 biotin protein ligase (BPL)-LplA-LipB transferase family members and 147 archaeal genomes identified 85 species with lipoylation capabilities and provided support for multiple ancestral acquisitions of lipoylation pathways during archaeal evolution. Second, with the exception of the Sulfolobales order, the majority of species possessing lipoylation systems exclusively retain LplA, or either LipB or LipM, consistent with archaeal genome streamlining. Third, obligate anaerobic archaea display widespread loss of lipoylation and OADHC genes. Conversely, a high level of correspondence is observed between aerobiosis and the presence of LplA/LipB/LipM, LipA and OADHC E2, consistent with the role of lipoylation in aerobic metabolism. This correspondence between OADHC lipoylation capacity and aerobiosis indicates that genomic pathway profiling in archaea is informative and that well characterized pathways may be predictive in relation to abiotic conditions in difficult-to-study extremophiles. Given the highly variable retention of gene repertoires across the archaea

  17. Structure of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex E1 component from Escherichia coli at 1.85 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Nemeria, Natalia; Brunskill, Andrew; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Sax, Martin; Yan, Yan; Jordan, Frank; Guest, John R; Furey, William

    2002-04-23

    The crystal structure of the recombinant thiamin diphosphate-dependent E1 component from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) has been determined at a resolution of 1.85 A. The E. coli PDHc E1 component E1p is a homodimeric enzyme and crystallizes with an intact dimer in an asymmetric unit. Each E1p subunit consists of three domains: N-terminal, middle, and C-terminal, with all having alpha/beta folds. The functional dimer contains two catalytic centers located at the interface between subunits. The ThDP cofactors are bound in the "V" conformation in clefts between the two subunits (binding involves the N-terminal and middle domains), and there is a common ThDP binding fold. The cofactors are completely buried, as only the C2 atoms are accessible from solution through the active site clefts. Significant structural differences are observed between individual domains of E1p relative to heterotetrameric multienzyme complex E1 components operating on branched chain substrates. These differences may be responsible for reported alternative E1p binding modes to E2 components within the respective complexes. This paper represents the first structural example of a functional pyruvate dehydrogenase E1p component from any species. It also provides the first representative example for the entire family of homodimeric (alpha2) E1 multienzyme complex components, and should serve as a model for this class of enzymes. PMID:11955070

  18. Crystal structures of complexes of NAD{sup +}-dependent formate dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 with formate

    SciTech Connect

    Filippova, E. V. Polyakov, K. M.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Stekhanova, T. N.; Boiko, K. M.; Sadykhov, I. G.; Tishkov, V. I.; Popov, V. O.; Labru, N.

    2006-07-15

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 catalyzes oxidation of formate to NI{sub 2} with the coupled reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}). The three-dimensional structures of the apo form (the free enzyme) and the holo form (the ternary FDH-NAD{sup +}-azide complex) of FDH have been established earlier. In the present study, the structures of FDH complexes with formate are solved at 2.19 and 2.28 A resolution by the molecular replacement method and refined to the R factors of 22.3 and 20.5%, respectively. Both crystal structures contain four protein molecules per asymmetric unit. These molecules form two dimers identical to the dimer of the apo form of FDH. Two possible formatebinding sites are found in the active site of the FDH structure. In the complexes the sulfur atom of residue Cys354 exists in the oxidized state.

  19. Conformational Heterogeneity in the Michaelis Complex of Lactate Dehydrogenase: An Analysis of Vibrational Spectroscopy Using Markov and Hidden Markov Models.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoliang; Schwartz, Steven D

    2016-07-14

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion of pyruvate and lactate. Recent isotope-edited IR spectroscopy suggests that conformational heterogeneity exists within the Michaelis complex of LDH, and this heterogeneity affects the propensity toward the on-enzyme chemical step for each Michaelis substate. By combining molecular dynamics simulations with Markov and hidden Markov models, we obtained a detailed kinetic network of the substates of the Michaelis complex of LDH. The ensemble-average electric fields exerted onto the vibrational probe were calculated to provide a direct comparison with the vibrational spectroscopy. Structural features of the Michaelis substates were also analyzed on atomistic scales. Our work not only clearly demonstrates the conformational heterogeneity in the Michaelis complex of LDH and its coupling to the reactivities of the substates, but it also suggests a methodology to simultaneously resolve kinetics and structures on atomistic scales, which can be directly compared with the vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:27347759

  20. Localization of the gene (OGDH) coding for the E1k component of the [alpha]-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex to chromosome 7p13-p11. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, P.; Cai, X.; Ali, G.; Blass, J.P. )

    1994-03-15

    [alpha]-Ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (E1k), also designated oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH; EC 1.2.4.2), is a component of the enzyme complex that catalyzes the conversion of [alpha]-ketogluterate to succinyl coenzyme A, a critical step in the Krebs tricarboxylic acid cycle. Deficiencies in the activity of this enzyme complex have been observed in brain and peripheral cells of patients with Alzheimer's disease. This finding led the authors to localize the genes for the polypeptides that compose the [alpha]-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KDGHC). The E1k locus was mapped to chromosome 7p13-p11.2 using a pair of human-rodent somatic cell hybrid panels. A second related sequence, possibly a pseudogene, was identified and mapped to chromosome 10. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Separation of dehydrogenases on polyaminomethylstyrene.

    PubMed

    Schöpp, W; Meinert, S; Thyfronitou, J; Aurich, H

    1975-01-29

    The binding of dehydrogenases, especially alcohol dehydrogenase, and other proteins to several ion exchangers and hydrophobic polymers was investigated. Quantitative parameters for the stability of the polymer-protein complexes (obtained form double reciprocal plots) indicate a high but different affinity of many proteins for polyaminomethylstyrene. The chromatography of a mixture of five dehydrogenases and human serum albumin on polyaminomethylstyrene is described. PMID:237012

  2. Tyr-phosphorylation of PDP1 toggles recruitment between ACAT1 and SIRT3 to regulate pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jun; Shan, Changliang; Kang, Hee-Bum; Elf, Shannon; Xie, Jianxin; Tucker, Meghan; Gu, Ting-Lei; Aguiar, Mike; Lonning, Scott; Chen, Huaibin; Mohammadi, Moosa; Britton, Laura-Mae P.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Aleckovic, Masa; Kang, Yibin; Kaluz, Stefan; Devi, Narra; Van Meir, Erwin; Hitosugi, Taro; Seo, Jae Ho; Lonial, Sagar; Gaddh, Manila; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna J.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Boggon, Titus J.; Kang, Sumin; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is crucial for glucose homoeostasis in mammalian cells. The current understanding of PDC regulation involves inhibitory serine phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) by PDH kinase (PDK), whereas dephosphorylation of PDH by PDH phosphatase (PDP) activates PDC. Here we report that lysine acetylation of PDHA1 and PDP1 is common in EGF-stimulated cells and diverse human cancer cells. K321 acetylation inhibits PDHA1 by recruiting PDK1 and K202 acetylation inhibits PDP1 by dissociating its substrate PDHA1, both of which are important to promote glycolysis in cancer cells and consequent tumor growth. Moreover, we identified mitochondrial ACAT1 and SIRT3 as the upstream acetyltransferase and deacetylase, respectively, of PDHA1 and PDP1, while knockdown of ACAT1 attenuates tumor growth. Furthermore, Y381 phosphorylation of PDP1 dissociates SIRT3 and recruits ACAT1 to PDC. Together, hierarchical, distinct post-translational modifications act in concert to control molecular composition of PDC and contribute to the Warburg effect. PMID:24486017

  3. Heterologous Overexpression and Characterization of a Flavoprotein-Cytochrome c Complex Fructose Dehydrogenase of Gluconobacter japonicus NBRC3260

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Shota; Goda-Tsutsumi, Maiko; Kano, Kenji; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2013-01-01

    A heterotrimeric flavoprotein-cytochrome c complex fructose dehydrogenase (FDH) of Gluconobacter japonicus NBRC3260 catalyzes the oxidation of d-fructose to produce 5-keto-d-fructose and is used for diagnosis and basic research purposes as a direct electron transfer-type bioelectrocatalysis. The fdhSCL genes encoding the FDH complex of G. japonicus NBRC3260 were isolated by a PCR-based gene amplification method with degenerate primers designed from the amino-terminal amino acid sequence of the large subunit and sequenced. Three open reading frames for fdhSCL encoding the small, cytochrome c, and large subunits, respectively, were found and were presumably in a polycistronic transcriptional unit. Heterologous overexpression of fdhSCL was conducted using a broad-host-range plasmid vector, pBBR1MCS-4, carrying a DNA fragment containing the putative promoter region of the membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase gene of Gluconobacter oxydans and a G. oxydans strain as the expression host. We also constructed derivatives modified in the translational initiation codon to ATG from TTG, designated TTGFDH and ATGFDH. Membranes of the cells producing recombinant TTGFDH and ATGFDH showed approximately 20 times and 100 times higher specific activity than those of G. japonicus NBRC3260, respectively. The cells producing only FdhS and FdhL had no fructose-oxidizing activity, but showed significantly high d-fructose:ferricyanide oxidoreductase activity in the soluble fraction of cell extracts, whereas the cells producing the FDH complex showed activity in the membrane fraction. It is reasonable to conclude that the cytochrome c subunit is responsible not only for membrane anchoring but also for ubiquinone reduction. PMID:23275508

  4. Metabolism and epigenetics in the nervous system: Creating cellular fitness and resistance to neuronal death in neurological conditions via modulation of oxygen-, iron-, and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S; Kumar, Amit; Shao, Diana S; Zille, Marietta; Bourassa, Megan W; Caulfield, Joseph T; Alim, Ishraq; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2015-12-01

    Modern definitions of epigenetics incorporate models for transient but biologically important changes in gene expression that are unrelated to DNA code but responsive to environmental changes such as injury-induced stress. In this scheme, changes in oxygen levels (hypoxia) and/or metabolic co-factors (iron deficiency or diminished 2-oxoglutarate levels) are transduced into broad genetic programs that return the cell and the organism to a homeostatic set point. Over the past two decades, exciting studies have identified a superfamily of iron-, oxygen-, and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that sit in the nucleus as modulators of transcription factor stability, co-activator function, histone demethylases, and DNA demethylases. These studies have provided a concrete molecular scheme for how changes in metabolism observed in a host of neurological conditions, including stroke, traumatic brain injury, and Alzheimer's disease, could be transduced into adaptive gene expression to protect the nervous system. We will discuss these enzymes in this short review, focusing primarily on the ten eleven translocation (TET) DNA demethylases, the jumonji (JmJc) histone demethylases, and the oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (HIF PHDs). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:26232572

  5. Hydroperoxidic inhibitor of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase activity, tightly bound to the enzyme-NAD+ complex, characteristically degrades the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Skurský, L; Rezác, M; Khan, A N; Zídek, L; Rocek, J

    1992-01-01

    The strong inhibition of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLAD) by p-methylbenzyl hydroperoxide (XyHP) is only transient, XyHP behaves also as a pseudo-substrate of the enzyme and in the presence of NAD+, is degraded by HLAD to (as yet unidentified) non-inhibiting products while the NAD+ is converted to a derivative similar to the "NADX", originally observed in an analogous reaction of HLAD with hydrogen peroxide. The apparent KM for XyHP is approximately 10(4) times smaller than that for H2O2. The catalytic constant kcat for HLAD degradation of XyHP is two orders of magnitude less than that for ethanol dehydrogenation. XyHP inhibits both directions of the alcohol-aldehyde interconversion with equal potency. The first step of the inhibition mechanism is a tight binding of XyHP to the binary HLAD-NAD+ complex. PMID:1284958

  6. Effect of an Oxygen-Tolerant Bifurcating Butyryl Coenzyme A Dehydrogenase/Electron-Transferring Flavoprotein Complex from Clostridium difficile on Butyrate Production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Aboulnaga, El-Hussiny; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Schiffels, Johannes; El-Refai, Ahmed; Buckel, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The butyrogenic genes from Clostridium difficile DSM 1296T have been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzymes acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) C-acetyltransferase, 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, crotonase, phosphate butyryltransferase, and butyrate kinase and the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase complex composed of the dehydrogenase and two electron-transferring flavoprotein subunits were individually produced in E. coli and kinetically characterized in vitro. While most of these enzymes were measured using well-established test systems, novel methods to determine butyrate kinase and butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase activities with respect to physiological function were developed. Subsequently, the individual genes were combined to form a single plasmid-encoded operon in a plasmid vector, which was successfully used to confer butyrate-forming capability to the host. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that C. difficile possesses a bifurcating butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase which catalyzes the NADH-dependent reduction of ferredoxin coupled to the reduction of crotonyl-CoA also by NADH. Since the reoxidation of ferredoxin by a membrane-bound ferredoxin:NAD+-oxidoreductase enables electron transport phosphorylation, additional ATP is formed. The butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase from C. difficile is oxygen stable and apparently uses oxygen as a co-oxidant of NADH in the presence of air. These properties suggest that this enzyme complex might be well suited to provide butyryl-CoA for solventogenesis in recombinant strains. The central role of bifurcating butyryl-CoA dehydrogenases and membrane-bound ferredoxin:NAD oxidoreductases (Rhodobacter nitrogen fixation [RNF]), which affect the energy yield of butyrate fermentation in the clostridial metabolism, is discussed. PMID:23772070

  7. Theoretical study of the catalytic mechanism of E1 subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiang; Liu, Yongjun

    2013-11-12

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) is a member of a family of 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase (OADH) multienzyme complexes involved in several central points of oxidative metabolism, and the E1 subunit is the most important component in the entire PDHc catalytic system, which catalyzes the reversible transfer of an acetyl group from a pyruvate to the lipoyl group of E2 subunit lipoly domain. In this article, the catalytic mechanism of the E1 subunit has been systematically studied using density functional theory (DFT). Four possible pathways with different general acid/base catalysts in decarboxylation and reductive acylation processes were explored. Our calculation results indicate that the 4'-amino pyrimidine of ThDP and residue His128 are the most likely proton donors in the decarboxylation and reductive acylation processes, respectively. During the reaction, each C-C and C-S bond formation or cleavage process, except for the liberation of CO2, is always accompanied by a proton transfer between the substrates and proton donors. The liberation of CO2 is calculated to be the rate-limiting step for the overall reaction, with an energy barrier of 13.57 kcal/mol. The decarboxylation process is endothermic by 5.32 kcal/mol, whereas the reductive acylation process is exothermic with a value of 5.74 kcal/mol. The assignment of protonation states of the surrounding residues can greatly influence the reaction. Residues His128 and His271 play roles in positioning the first substrate pyruvate and second substrate lipoyl group, respectively. PMID:24171427

  8. The Role of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase in Apoptosis Induction in Response to Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex III

    PubMed Central

    Khutornenko, A. A.; Dalina, A. A.; Chernyak, B. V.; Chumakov, P. M.; Evstafieva, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    A mechanism for the induction of programmed cell death (apoptosis) upon dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain has been studied. Previously, we had found that inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome bc1, a component of the electron transport chain complex III, leads to activation of tumor suppressor p53, followed by apoptosis induction. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is coupled to the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway via the mitochondrial enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). The p53 activation induced in response to the inhibition of the electron transport chain complex III has been shown to be triggered by the impairment of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis due to the suppression of DHODH. However, it remained unclear whether the suppression of the DHODH function is the main cause of the observed apoptotic cell death. Here, we show that apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells induced by the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex III inhibition can be prevented by supplementation with uridine or orotate (products of the reaction catalyzed by DHODH) rather than with dihydroorotate (a DHODH substrate). We conclude that apoptosis is induced in response to the impairment of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis caused by the inhibition of DHODH. The conclusion is supported by the experiment showing that downregulation of DHODH by RNA interference leads to accumulation of the p53 tumor suppressor and to apoptotic cell death. PMID:24772329

  9. Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E2 and E3BP Core Subunits: New Models and Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Hezaveh, Samira; Zeng, An-Ping; Jandt, Uwe

    2016-05-19

    Targeted manipulation and exploitation of beneficial properties of multienzyme complexes, especially for the design of novel and efficiently structured enzymatic reaction cascades, require a solid model understanding of mechanistic principles governing the structure and functionality of the complexes. This type of system-level and quantitative knowledge has been very scarce thus far. We utilize the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (hPDC) as a versatile template to conduct corresponding studies. Here we present new homology models of the core subunits of the hPDC, namely E2 and E3BP, as the first time effort to elucidate the assembly of hPDC core based on molecular dynamic simulation. New models of E2 and E3BP were generated and validated at atomistic level for different properties of the proteins. The results of the wild type dimer simulations showed a strong hydrophobic interaction between the C-terminal and the hydrophobic pocket which is the main driving force in the intertrimer binding and the core self-assembly. On the contrary, the C-terminal truncated versions exhibited a drastic loss of hydrophobic interaction leading to a dimeric separation. This study represents a significant step toward a model-based understanding of structure and function of large multienzyme systems like PDC for developing highly efficient biocatalyst or bioreaction cascades. PMID:27104227

  10. An Arabidopsis Mutant with High Cyclic Electron Flow around Photosystem I (hcef) Involving the NADPH Dehydrogenase Complex[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Aaron K.; Cruz, Jeffrey A.; Kohzuma, Kaori; Dhingra, Amit; Kramer, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic electron flow (CEFI) has been proposed to balance the chloroplast energy budget, but the pathway, mechanism, and physiological role remain unclear. We isolated a new class of mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana, hcef for high CEF1, which shows constitutively elevated CEF1. The first of these, hcef1, was mapped to chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. Crossing hcef1 with pgr5, which is deficient in the antimycin A–sensitive pathway for plastoquinone reduction, resulted in a double mutant that maintained the high CEF1 phenotype, implying that the PGR5-dependent pathway is not involved. By contrast, crossing hcef1 with crr2-2, deficient in thylakoid NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH) complex, results in a double mutant that is highly light sensitive and lacks elevated CEF1, suggesting that NDH plays a direct role in catalyzing or regulating CEF1. Additionally, the NdhI component of the NDH complex was highly expressed in hcef1, whereas other photosynthetic complexes, as well as PGR5, decreased. We propose that (1) NDH is specifically upregulated in hcef1, allowing for increased CEF1; (2) the hcef1 mutation imposes an elevated ATP demand that may trigger CEF1; and (3) alternative mechanisms for augmenting ATP cannot compensate for the loss of CEF1 through NDH. PMID:20081115

  11. Combination therapy of normobaric oxygen with hypothermia or ethanol modulates pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in thromboembolic cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lipeng; Thibodeau, Alexa; Peng, Changya; Ji, Xunming; Rastogi, Radhika; Xin, Ruiqiang; Singh, Sunpreet; Geng, Xiaokun; Rafols, Jose A; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-08-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) is a brain mitochondrial matrix enzyme. PDH impairment after stroke is particularly devastating given PDH's critical role in the link between anaerobic and aerobic metabolism. This study evaluates the restoration of oxidative metabolism and energy regulation with a therapeutic combination of normobaric oxygen (NBO) plus either therapeutic hypothermia (TH) or ethanol. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion with an autologous embolus. One hour after occlusion, tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) was administered alone or with NBO (60%), EtOH (1.0 g/kg), or TH (33°C), either singly or in combination. Neurological deficit score and infarct volume were assessed 24 hr after t-PA-induced reperfusion. PDH activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were measured 3 and 24 hr after t-PA. Western blotting was used to detect PDH and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) protein expression. After t-PA in ischemic rats, NBO combined with TH or EtOH most effectively decreased infarct volume and neurological deficit. The combined therapies produced greater increases in PDH activity and protein expression as well as greater decreases in PDK expression. Compared with the monotherapeutic approaches, the combined therapies provided the most significant declines in ROS generation. Reperfusion with t-PA followed by 60% NBO improves the efficacy of EtOH or TH in neuroprotection by ameliorating oxidative injury and improving PDH regulation. Comparable neuroprotective effects were found when treating with either EtOH or TH, suggesting a similar mechanism of neuroprotection and the possibility of substituting EtOH for TH in clinical settings. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27027410

  12. Temporal changes in the involvement of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in muscle lactate accumulation during lipopolysaccharide infusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Alamdari, N; Constantin-Teodosiu, D; Murton, A J; Gardiner, S M; Bennett, T; Layfield, R; Greenhaff, P L

    2008-01-01

    A characteristic manifestation of sepsis is muscle lactate accumulation. This study examined any putative (causative) association between pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) inhibition and lactate accumulation in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of rats infused with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and explored the involvement of increased transcription of muscle-specific pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isoenzymes. Conscious, male Sprague–Dawley rats were infused i.v. with saline (0.4 ml h−1, control) or LPS (150 μg kg−1 h−1) for 2 h, 6 h or 24 h (n = 6–8). Muscle lactate concentration was elevated after 2, 6 and 24 h LPS infusion. Muscle PDC activity was the same at 2 h and 6 h, but was 65% lower after 24 h of LPS infusion (P < 0.01), when there was a 47% decrease in acetylcarnitine concentration (P < 0.05), and a 24-fold increase in PDK4 mRNA expression (P < 0.001). These changes were preceded by marked increases in tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 mRNA expression at 2 h. The findings indicate that the early (2 and 6 h) elevation in muscle lactate concentration during LPS infusion was not attributable to limited muscle oxygen availability or ATP production (evidenced by unchanged ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr) concentrations) or to PDC inhibition, whereas after 24 h, muscle lactate accumulation appears to have resulted from PDC activation status limiting pyruvate flux, most probably due to cytokine-mediated up-regulation of PDK4 transcription. PMID:18218678

  13. Subunit Q Is Required to Stabilize the Large Complex of NADPH Dehydrogenase in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiaohong; Rong, Weiqiong; Gao, Fudan; Ogawa, Teruo; Ma, Weimin

    2015-06-01

    Two major complexes of NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) have been identified in cyanobacteria. A large complex (NDH-1L) contains NdhD1, NdhF1, and NdhP, which are absent in a medium size complex (NDH-1M). They play important roles in respiration, NDH-1-dependent cyclic electron transport around photosystem I, and CO2 uptake. Two mutants sensitive to high light for growth and impaired in cyclic electron transport around photosystem I were isolated from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 transformed with a transposon-bearing library. Both mutants had a tag in an open reading frame encoding a product highly homologous to NdhQ, a single-transmembrane small subunit of the NDH-1L complex, identified in Thermosynechococcus elongatus by proteomics strategy. Deletion of ndhQ disassembled about one-half of the NDH-1L to NDH-1M and consequently impaired respiration, but not CO2 uptake. During prolonged incubation of the thylakoid membrane with n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside at room temperature, the rest of the NDH-1L in ΔndhQ was disassembled completely to NDH-1M and was much faster than in the wild type. In the ndhP-deletion mutant (ΔndhP) background, absence of NdhQ almost completely disassembled the NDH-1L to NDH-1M, similar to the results observed in the ΔndhD1/ΔndhD2 mutant. We therefore conclude that both NdhQ and NdhP are essential to stabilize the NDH-1L complex. PMID:25873552

  14. Large scale dynamics of the Michaelis complex in Bacillus stearothermophilus lactate dehydrogenase revealed by a single-tryptophan mutant study.

    PubMed

    Nie, Beining; Deng, Hua; Desamero, Ruel; Callender, Robert

    2013-03-19

    Large scale dynamics within the Michaelis complex mimic of Bacillus stearothermophilus thermophilic lactate dehydrogenase, bsLDH·NADH·oxamate, were studied with site specific resolution by laser-induced temperature jump relaxation spectroscopy with a time resolution of 20 ns. NADH emission and Trp emission from the wild type and a series of single-tryptophan bsLDH mutants, with the tryptophan positions different distances from the active site, were used as reporters of evolving structure in response to the rapid change in temperature. Several distinct dynamical events were observed on the millisecond to microsecond time scale involving motion of atoms spread over the protein, some occurring concomitantly or nearly concomitantly with structural changes at the active site. This suggests that a large portion of the protein-substrate complex moves in a rather concerted fashion to bring about catalysis. The catalytically important surface loop undergoes two distinct movements, both needed for a competent enzyme. Our results also suggest that what is called "loop motion" is not just localized to the loop and active site residues. Rather, it involves the motion of atoms spread over the protein, even some quite distal from the active site. How these results bear on the catalytic mechanism of bsLDH is discussed. PMID:23428201

  15. Dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase is physically associated with the respiratory complex and its loss leads to mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fang, JingXian; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Yagi, Mikako; Matsumoto, Shinya; Amamoto, Rie; Takazaki, Shinya; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Kang, Dongchon

    2012-01-01

    Some mutations of the DHODH (dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase) gene lead to postaxial acrofacial dysostosis or Miller syndrome. Only DHODH is localized at mitochondria among enzymes of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway. Since the pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway is coupled to the mitochondrial RC (respiratory chain) via DHODH, impairment of DHODH should affect the RC function. To investigate this, we used siRNA (small interfering RNA)-mediated knockdown and observed that DHODH knockdown induced cell growth retardation because of G2/M cell-cycle arrest, whereas pyrimidine deficiency usually causes G1/S arrest. Inconsistent with this, the cell retardation was not rescued by exogenous uridine, which should bypass the DHODH reaction for pyrimidine synthesis. DHODH depletion partially inhibited the RC complex III, decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, and increased the generation of ROS (reactive oxygen species). We observed that DHODH physically interacts with respiratory complexes II and III by IP (immunoprecipitation) and BN (blue native)/SDS/PAGE analysis. Considering that pyrimidine deficiency alone does not induce craniofacial dysmorphism, the DHODH mutations may contribute to the Miller syndrome in part through somehow altered mitochondrial function. PMID:23216091

  16. Engineering acetyl coenzyme A supply: functional expression of a bacterial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the cytosol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Barbara U; van Rossum, Harmen M; Luttik, Marijke A H; Akeroyd, Michiel; Benjamin, Kirsten R; Wu, Liang; de Vries, Simon; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2014-01-01

    The energetic (ATP) cost of biochemical pathways critically determines the maximum yield of metabolites of vital or commercial relevance. Cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a key precursor for biosynthesis in eukaryotes and for many industrially relevant product pathways that have been introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, such as isoprenoids or lipids. In this yeast, synthesis of cytosolic acetyl-CoA via acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) involves hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and pyrophosphate. Here, we demonstrate that expression and assembly in the yeast cytosol of an ATP-independent pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) from Enterococcus faecalis can fully replace the ACS-dependent pathway for cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis. In vivo activity of E. faecalis PDH required simultaneous expression of E. faecalis genes encoding its E1α, E1β, E2, and E3 subunits, as well as genes involved in lipoylation of E2, and addition of lipoate to growth media. A strain lacking ACS that expressed these E. faecalis genes grew at near-wild-type rates on glucose synthetic medium supplemented with lipoate, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. A physiological comparison of the engineered strain and an isogenic Acs(+) reference strain showed small differences in biomass yields and metabolic fluxes. Cellular fractionation and gel filtration studies revealed that the E. faecalis PDH subunits were assembled in the yeast cytosol, with a subunit ratio and enzyme activity similar to values reported for PDH purified from E. faecalis. This study indicates that cytosolic expression and assembly of PDH in eukaryotic industrial microorganisms is a promising option for minimizing the energy costs of precursor supply in acetyl-CoA-dependent product pathways. Importance: Genetically engineered microorganisms are intensively investigated and applied for production of biofuels and chemicals from renewable sugars. To make such processes economically and environmentally sustainable, the energy

  17. Natural substances (acetogenins) from the family Annonaceae are powerful inhibitors of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase (Complex I).

    PubMed Central

    Degli Esposti, M; Ghelli, A; Ratta, M; Cortes, D; Estornell, E

    1994-01-01

    Natural products from the plants of the family Annonaceae, collectively called Annonaceous acetogenins, are very potent inhibitors of the NADH-ubiquinone reductase (Complex I) activity of mammalian mitochondria. The properties of five of such acetogenins are compared with those of rotenone and piericidin, classical potent inhibitors of Complex I. Rolliniastatin-1 and rolliniastatin-2 are more powerful than piericidin in terms of both their inhibitory constant and the protein-dependence of their titre in bovine submitochondrial particles. These acetogenins could be considered therefore the most potent inhibitors of mammalian Complex I. Squamocin and otivarin also have an inhibitory constant lower than that of piericidin, but display a larger protein-dependence of the titre. Squamocin and otivarin, contrary to the other acetogenins, behave qualitatively like rotenone. Rolliniastatin-2 shows unique properties as its interaction, although mutually exclusive to that of piericidin, appears to be mutually non-exclusive to that of rotenone. It is the first time that a potent inhibitor of Complex I is found not to overlap the active site of rotenone. PMID:8037664

  18. Effect of Ganoderma lucidum on the activities of mitochondrial dehydrogenases and complex I and II of electron transport chain in the brain of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ajith, T A; Sudheesh, N P; Roshny, D; Abishek, G; Janardhanan, K K

    2009-03-01

    Dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, being direct intracellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), is important in the pathogenesis of number of ageing associated human disorders. Effect of ethanol extract of Ganoderma lucidum on the activities of mitochondrial dehydrogenases; complex I and II of electron transport chain have been evaluated in the aged rat brain. Aged male Wistar rats were administered with ethanol extract of G. lucidum (50 and 250mg/kg, p.o) once daily for 15 days. Similarly DL-alpha-lipoic acid (100mg/kg, p.o) administered group was kept as the reference standard. Young and aged rats administered with water were kept as young and aged control, respectively. The effect of treatment was assessed by estimating the activities of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (alpha-KGDH), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), complex I and II in the mitochondria of rat brain. Results of the study demonstrated that the extract of G. lucidum (50 and 250mg/kg) significantly (p<0.01) enhanced the activities of PDH, alpha-KGDH, SDH, complex I and II when compared to that of the aged control animals. The level of the lipid peroxidation was significantly lowered (p<0.01) in the G. lucidum treated group with respect to that of aged control. However, we could not find any statistically significant difference between the activities of enzymes in groups treated with 50 and 250mg/kg of G. lucidum. The activity exhibited by the extract of G. lucidum in the present study can be partially correlated to its antioxidant activity. The results of the study concluded that the extract of G. lucidum may effective to improve the function of mitochondria in aged rat brain, suggest its possible therapeutic application against ageing associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19041385

  19. Cross-linking and 1H n.m.r. spectroscopy of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Leonard C.; Perham, Richard N.; Roberts, Gordon C. K.

    1982-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Escherichia coli was treated with o-phenylene bismaleimide in the presence of the substrate pyruvate, producing almost complete cross-linking of the lipoate acetyltransferase polypeptide chains as judged by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. This took place without effect on the catalytic activities of the other two component enzymes and with little evidence of cross-links being formed with other types of protein subunit. Limited proteolysis with trypsin indicated that the cross-links were largely confined to the lipoyl domains of the lipoate acetyltransferase component of the same enzyme particle. This intramolecular cross-linking had no effect on the very sharp resonances observed in the 1H n.m.r. spectrum of the enzyme complex, which derive from regions of highly mobile polypeptide chain in the lipoyl domains. Comparison of the spin–spin relaxation times, T2, with the measured linewidths supported the idea that the highly mobile region is best characterized as a random coil. Intensity measurements in spin-echo spectra showed that it comprises a significant proportion (probably not less than one-third) of a lipoyl domain and is thus much more than a small hinge region, but there was insufficient intensity in the resonances to account for the whole lipoyl domain. On the other hand, no evidence was found in the 1H n.m.r. spectrum for a substantial structured region around the lipoyl-lysine residues that was free to move on the end of this highly flexible connection. If such a structured region were bound to other parts of the enzyme complex for a major part of its time, its resonances might be broadened sufficiently to evade detection by 1H n.m.r. spectroscopy. ImagesFig. 2.Fig. 3. PMID:6753833

  20. Investigation of the complex between rabbit muscle glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and aldolase using fluorescence laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orstan, Aydin; Gafni, Ari

    1990-05-01

    The interaction of rabbit muscle aldolase with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) labeled with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) has been investigated at 25°C in Tris buffer, pH 7. 5. The addition of 5 to1 0 fold excess of aldolase to 0.1-1 micron GPDH labeled with FITC (GPDHFITC) causes a large increase in both the fluorescence and polarization of FITC over a period of several hours, reflecting the formation ofa complex between the enzymes. When GPDH-FITC is incubated with either 1 mM NAD or ADP, the fluorescence of FITC increases while the polarization decreases, indicating that these nucleotides may increase the degree of dissociation of tetrameric GPDH. The rate of approach to equilibrium during the formation of the complex between the two enzymes increases in the presence of either NAD or ADP but decreases with increasing concentrations ofGPDH. Therefore, the interaction of the enzymes may involve the dissociation of tetrameric GPDH into smaller units. Aldolase causes no changes in the fluorescence properties of probes that are attacted to the active site cysteine residues of GPDH, such as fluorescein acrylamide, indicating that when the active site of GPDH is blocked the formation of the complex between the two enzymes is prevented. When GPDH-FITC is incubated with either excess NAD or aldolase, the average fluorescence lifetime of FITC slowly increases and approaches that of free FITC. Since fluorescein is quenched by tryptophan, it is likely that the increases observed both in the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of GPDH-FITC during its interaction with aldolase arise from the removal of tryptophan residues from the vicinity of the FITC groups as a result of changes either in the conformation or in the degree of dissociation of tetrameric GPDH.

  1. Molecular alterations and expression of succinate dehydrogenase complex in wild-type KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Celestino, Ricardo; Lima, Jorge; Faustino, Alexandra; Vinagre, João; Máximo, Valdemar; Gouveia, António; Soares, Paula; Lopes, José Manuel

    2013-05-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, disclosing somatic KIT, PDGFRA and BRAF mutations. Loss of function of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex is an alternative molecular mechanism in GISTs, namely in carriers of germline mutations of the SDH complex that develop Carney-Stratakis dyad characterized by multifocal GISTs and multicentric paragangliomas (PGLs). We studied a series of 25 apparently sporadic primary wild-type (WT) KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF GISTs occurring in patients without personal or familial history of PGLs, re-evaluated clinicopathological features and analyzed molecular alterations and immunohistochemistry expression of SDH complex. As control, we used a series of well characterized 49 KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. SDHB expression was absent in 20% and SDHB germline mutations were detected in 12% of WT GISTs. Germline SDHB mutations were significantly associated to younger age at diagnosis. A significant reduction in SDHB expression in WT GISTs was found when compared with KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. No significant differences were found when comparing DOG-1 and c-KIT expression in WT, SDHB-mutated and KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. Our results confirm the occurrence of germline SDH genes mutations in isolated, apparently sporadic WT GISTs. WT KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF GISTs without SDHB or SDHA/SDHB expression may correspond to Carney-Stratakis dyad or Carney triad. Most importantly, the possibility of PGLs (Carney-Stratakis dyad) and/or pulmonary chondroma (Carney triad) should be addressed in these patients and their kindred. PMID:22948025

  2. DLAT subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is upregulated in gastric cancer-implications in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Wen Quan Jonathan; Ow, Ghim Siong; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A; Chong, Shirly; Lim, Yoon Pin

    2015-01-01

    An iTRAQ-based tandem mass spectrometry approach was employed to relatively quantify proteins in the membrane proteome of eleven gastric cancer cell lines relative to a denominator non-cancer gastric epithelial cell line HFE145. Of the 882 proteins detected, 57 proteins were found to be upregulated with > 1.3-fold change in at least 6 of the 11 cell lines. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that these proteins are significantly associated with cancer, cell growth and proliferation, death, survival and cell movement. The catalogue of membrane proteins presented that are potential regulators/effectors of gastric cancer progression has implications in cancer therapy. DLAT, a subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, was selected as a candidate protein for further studies as its function in gastric cancer has yet to be established. SiRNA studies supported a role of DLAT in gastric cancer cell proliferation and carbohydrate metabolism, reprogramming of which is a hallmark of cancer. Our study contributes to recent interest and discussion in cancer energetics and related phenomena such as the Warburg and Reverse Warburg effects. Future mechanistic studies should lead to the elucidation of the mode of action of DLAT in human gastric cancer and establish DLAT as a viable drug target. PMID:26279757

  3. Isolation, characterization, and mapping of gene encoding dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (E2k) of human [alpha]-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, G.; Cai, Xingang; Sheu, Kwan-Fu R.; Blass, J.P. ); Wasco, W.; Gaston, S.M.; Tanzi, R.E.; Cooper, A.J.L.; Gusella, J.F. ); Szabo, P. )

    1994-03-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced cDNAs representing the full-length (2987-bp) gene for dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (E2k component) of the human [alpha]-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KHDHC) from a human fetal brain cDNA library. The E2k cDNA was mapped to human chromosome 14 using a somatic cell hybrid panel, and more precisely to band 14q24.3 by in situ hybridization. This cDNA also cross-hybridized to an apparent E2k pseudogene on chromosome 1p31. Northern analysis revealed the E2k gene to be ubiquitously expressed in peripheral tissues and brain. Interestingly, chromosome 14q24.3 has recently been reported to contain gene defects for an early-onset form of familial Alzheimer's disease and for Machado-Joseph disease. Future studies will be necessary to determine whether the E2K gene plays a role in either of these two disorders.

  4. Nicotine Dehydrogenase Complexed with 6-Hydroxypseudooxynicotine Oxidase Involved in the Hybrid Nicotine-Degrading Pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens S33

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huili; Xie, Kebo; Yu, Wenjun; Hu, Liejie; Huang, Haiyan; Xie, Huijun

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine, a major toxic alkaloid in tobacco wastes, is degraded by bacteria, mainly via pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways. Previously, we discovered a new hybrid of the pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways in Agrobacterium tumefaciens S33 and characterized its key enzyme 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylpyridine (HSP) hydroxylase. Here, we purified the nicotine dehydrogenase initializing the nicotine degradation from the strain and found that it forms a complex with a novel 6-hydroxypseudooxynicotine oxidase. The purified complex is composed of three different subunits encoded by ndhAB and pno, where ndhA and ndhB overlap by 4 bp and are ∼26 kb away from pno. As predicted from the gene sequences and from chemical analyses, NdhA (82.4 kDa) and NdhB (17.1 kDa) harbor a molybdopterin cofactor and two [2Fe-2S] clusters, respectively, whereas Pno (73.3 kDa) harbors an flavin mononucleotide and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Mutants with disrupted ndhA or ndhB genes did not grow on nicotine but grew well on 6-hydroxynicotine and HSP, whereas the pno mutant did not grow on nicotine or 6-hydroxynicotine but grew well on HSP, indicating that NdhA and NdhB are responsible for initialization of nicotine oxidation. We successfully expressed pno in Escherichia coli and found that the recombinant Pno presented 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol reduction activity when it was coupled with 6-hydroxynicotine oxidation. The determination of reaction products catalyzed by the purified enzymes or mutants indicated that NdhAB catalyzed nicotine oxidation to 6-hydroxynicotine, whereas Pno oxidized 6-hydroxypseudooxynicotine to 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylsemialdehyde pyridine. These results provide new insights into this novel hybrid pathway of nicotine degradation in A. tumefaciens S33. PMID:26729714

  5. The complex structures of isocitrate dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermocellum and Desulfotalea psychrophila suggest a new active site locking mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S.; Fedøy, Anita-Elin; Leiros, Ingar; Steen, Ida Helene

    2012-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) catalyzes the oxidative NAD(P)+-dependent decarboxylation of isocitrate into α-ketoglutarate and CO2 and is present in organisms spanning the biological range of temperature. We have solved two crystal structures of the thermophilic Clostridium thermocellum IDH (CtIDH), a native open apo CtIDH to 2.35 Å and a quaternary complex of CtIDH with NADP+, isocitrate and Mg2+ to 2.5 Å. To compare to these a quaternary complex structure of the psychrophilic Desulfotalea psychrophila IDH (DpIDH) was also resolved to 1.93 Å. CtIDH and DpIDH showed similar global thermal stabilities with melting temperatures of 67.9 and 66.9 °C, respectively. CtIDH represents a typical thermophilic enzyme, with a large number of ionic interactions and hydrogen bonds per residue combined with stabilization of the N and C termini. CtIDH had a higher activity temperature optimum, and showed greater affinity for the substrates with an active site that was less thermolabile compared to DpIDH. The uncompensated negative surface charge and the enlarged methionine cluster in the hinge region both of which are important for cold activity in DpIDH, were absent in CtIDH. These structural comparisons revealed that prokaryotic IDHs in subfamily II have a unique locking mechanism involving Arg310, Asp251′ and Arg255 (CtIDH). These interactions lock the large domain to the small domain and direct NADP+ into the correct orientation, which together are important for NADP+ selectivity. PMID:23650595

  6. Comparative analysis of the catalytic components in the archaeal dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenase complexes.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Ryushi; Noguchi, Chiaki; Higashi, Marie; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2013-04-01

    Two types of hetero-oligomeric dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenases (α4β4 and αβγδ types) are expressed in the hyperthermophilic archaea belonging to Thermococcales. In both enzymes, the β subunit (PDHβ) is responsible for catalyzing L-proline dehydrogenation. The genes encoding the two enzyme types form respective clusters that are completely conserved among Pyrococcus and Thermococcus strains. To compare the enzymatic properties of PDHβs from α4β4- and αβγδ-type enzyme complexes, eight PDHβs (four of each type) from Pyrococcus furiosus DSM3638, Pyrococcus horikoshii OT-3, Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 JCM12380 and Thermococcus profundus DSM9503 were expressed in Escherichia coli cells and purified to homogeneity using one-step Ni-chelating chromatography. The α4β4-type PDHβs showed greater thermostability than most of the αβγδ-type PDHβs: the former retained more than 80 % of their activity after heating at 70 °C for 20 min, while the latter showed different thermostabilities under the same conditions. In addition, the α4β4-type PDHβs utilized ferricyanide as the most preferable electron acceptor, whereas αβγδ-type PDHβs preferred 2, 6-dichloroindophenol, with one exception. These results indicate that the differences in the enzymatic properties of the PDHβs likely reflect whether they were from an αβγδ- or α4β4-type complex, though the wider divergence observed within αβγδ-type PDHβs based on the phylogenetic analysis may also be responsible for their inconsistent enzymatic properties. By contrast, differences in the kinetic parameters among the PDHβs did not reflect the complex type. Interestingly, the k cat value for free α4β4-type PDHβ from P. horikoshii was much larger than the value for the same subunit within the α4β4-complex. This indicates that the isolated PDHβ could be a useful element for an electrochemical system for detection of L-proline. PMID:22752365

  7. Atomic-Resolution Structures of Horse Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase with NAD[superscript +] and Fluoroalcohols Define Strained Michaelis Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Plapp, Bryce V.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2013-01-16

    Structures of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase complexed with NAD{sup +} and unreactive substrate analogues, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol or 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol, were determined at 100 K at 1.12 or 1.14 {angstrom} resolution, providing estimates of atomic positions with overall errors of 0.02 {angstrom}, the geometry of ligand binding, descriptions of alternative conformations of amino acid residues and waters, and evidence of a strained nicotinamide ring. The four independent subunits from the two homodimeric structures differ only slightly in the peptide backbone conformation. Alternative conformations for amino acid side chains were identified for 50 of the 748 residues in each complex, and Leu-57 and Leu-116 adopt different conformations to accommodate the different alcohols at the active site. Each fluoroalcohol occupies one position, and the fluorines of the alcohols are well-resolved. These structures closely resemble the expected Michaelis complexes with the pro-R hydrogens of the methylene carbons of the alcohols directed toward the re face of C4N of the nicotinamide rings with a C-C distance of 3.40 {angstrom}. The oxygens of the alcohols are ligated to the catalytic zinc at a distance expected for a zinc alkoxide (1.96 {angstrom}) and participate in a low-barrier hydrogen bond (2.52 {angstrom}) with the hydroxyl group of Ser-48 in a proton relay system. As determined by X-ray refinement with no restraints on bond distances and planarity, the nicotinamide rings in the two complexes are slightly puckered (quasi-boat conformation, with torsion angles of 5.9{sup o} for C4N and 4.8{sup o} for N1N relative to the plane of the other atoms) and have bond distances that are somewhat different compared to those found for NAD(P){sup +}. It appears that the nicotinamide ring is strained toward the transition state on the path to alcohol oxidation.

  8. Engineering Acetyl Coenzyme A Supply: Functional Expression of a Bacterial Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in the Cytosol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Barbara U.; van Rossum, Harmen M.; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; Akeroyd, Michiel; Benjamin, Kirsten R.; Wu, Liang; de Vries, Simon; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The energetic (ATP) cost of biochemical pathways critically determines the maximum yield of metabolites of vital or commercial relevance. Cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a key precursor for biosynthesis in eukaryotes and for many industrially relevant product pathways that have been introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, such as isoprenoids or lipids. In this yeast, synthesis of cytosolic acetyl-CoA via acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) involves hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and pyrophosphate. Here, we demonstrate that expression and assembly in the yeast cytosol of an ATP-independent pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) from Enterococcus faecalis can fully replace the ACS-dependent pathway for cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis. In vivo activity of E. faecalis PDH required simultaneous expression of E. faecalis genes encoding its E1α, E1β, E2, and E3 subunits, as well as genes involved in lipoylation of E2, and addition of lipoate to growth media. A strain lacking ACS that expressed these E. faecalis genes grew at near-wild-type rates on glucose synthetic medium supplemented with lipoate, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. A physiological comparison of the engineered strain and an isogenic Acs+ reference strain showed small differences in biomass yields and metabolic fluxes. Cellular fractionation and gel filtration studies revealed that the E. faecalis PDH subunits were assembled in the yeast cytosol, with a subunit ratio and enzyme activity similar to values reported for PDH purified from E. faecalis. This study indicates that cytosolic expression and assembly of PDH in eukaryotic industrial microorganisms is a promising option for minimizing the energy costs of precursor supply in acetyl-CoA-dependent product pathways. PMID:25336454

  9. Structure of Trypanosoma cruzi glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase complexed with chalepin, a natural product inhibitor, at 1.95 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Pavão, F; Castilho, M S; Pupo, M T; Dias, R L A; Correa, A G; Fernandes, J B; da Silva, M F G F; Mafezoli, J; Vieira, P C; Oliva, G

    2002-06-01

    The structure of the glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) from Trypanosoma cruzi complexed with chalepin, a natural product from Pilocarpus spicatus, has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.95 A resolution. The structure is in the apo form without cofactors in the subunits of the tetrameric gGAPDH in the asymmetric unit. Unequivocal density corresponding to the inhibitor was clearly identified in one monomer. The final refined model of the complex shows extensive conformational changes when compared with the native structure. The mode of binding of chalepin to gGAPDH and its implications for inhibitor design are discussed. PMID:12044862

  10. Identification of the novel interacting partners of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in human CCRF-CEM and HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Hazir; Qasim, Muhammad; Oellerich, Michael; Asif, Abdul R

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify proteins that interact with the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) to enable it to carry out its crucial cell signaling functions. Endogenous and myc-tag mTORC1 was purified, in-gel tryptic digested and then identified by nano-LC ESI Q-TOF MS/MS analysis. A total of nine novel interacting proteins were identified in both endogenous and myc-tag mTORC1 purifications. These new mTORC1 interacting partners include heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2/B1, enhancer of mRNA decapping protein 4, 60S acidic ribosomal protein, P0, nucleolin, dynamin 2, glyceraldehyde 3 phosphate dehydrogenase, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, glycosyl transferase 25 family member 1 and prohibitin 2. Furthermore hnRNP A2/B1 and dynamin 2 interaction with mTORC1 was confirmed on immunoblotting. The present study has for the first time identified novel interacting partners of mTORC1 in human T lymphoblasts (CCRF-CEM) and human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. These new interacting proteins may offer new targets for therapeutic interventions in human diseases caused by perturbed mTORC1 signaling. PMID:24646917

  11. Structure and Function of the Catalytic Domain of the Dihydrolipoyl Acetyltransferase Component in Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junjie; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Kumaran, Sowmini; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Reynolds, Shelley; Calero, Guillermo; Brukh, Roman; Kakalis, Lazaros; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) catalyzing conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA comprises three components: E1p, E2p, and E3. The E2p is the five-domain core component, consisting of three tandem lipoyl domains (LDs), a peripheral subunit binding domain (PSBD), and a catalytic domain (E2pCD). Herein are reported the following. 1) The x-ray structure of E2pCD revealed both intra- and intertrimer interactions, similar to those reported for other E2pCDs. 2) Reconstitution of recombinant LD and E2pCD with E1p and E3p into PDHc could maintain at least 6.4% activity (NADH production), confirming the functional competence of the E2pCD and active center coupling among E1p, LD, E2pCD, and E3 even in the absence of PSBD and of a covalent link between domains within E2p. 3) Direct acetyl transfer between LD and coenzyme A catalyzed by E2pCD was observed with a rate constant of 199 s−1, comparable with the rate of NADH production in the PDHc reaction. Hence, neither reductive acetylation of E2p nor acetyl transfer within E2p is rate-limiting. 4) An unprecedented finding is that although no interaction could be detected between E1p and E2pCD by itself, a domain-induced interaction was identified on E1p active centers upon assembly with E2p and C-terminally truncated E2p proteins by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. The inclusion of each additional domain of E2p strengthened the interaction with E1p, and the interaction was strongest with intact E2p. E2p domain-induced changes at the E1p active site were also manifested by the appearance of a circular dichroism band characteristic of the canonical 4′-aminopyrimidine tautomer of bound thiamin diphosphate (AP). PMID:24742683

  12. Structure and function of the catalytic domain of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase component in Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Nemeria, Natalia S; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Kumaran, Sowmini; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Reynolds, Shelley; Calero, Guillermo; Brukh, Roman; Kakalis, Lazaros; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2014-05-30

    The Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) catalyzing conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA comprises three components: E1p, E2p, and E3. The E2p is the five-domain core component, consisting of three tandem lipoyl domains (LDs), a peripheral subunit binding domain (PSBD), and a catalytic domain (E2pCD). Herein are reported the following. 1) The x-ray structure of E2pCD revealed both intra- and intertrimer interactions, similar to those reported for other E2pCDs. 2) Reconstitution of recombinant LD and E2pCD with E1p and E3p into PDHc could maintain at least 6.4% activity (NADH production), confirming the functional competence of the E2pCD and active center coupling among E1p, LD, E2pCD, and E3 even in the absence of PSBD and of a covalent link between domains within E2p. 3) Direct acetyl transfer between LD and coenzyme A catalyzed by E2pCD was observed with a rate constant of 199 s(-1), comparable with the rate of NADH production in the PDHc reaction. Hence, neither reductive acetylation of E2p nor acetyl transfer within E2p is rate-limiting. 4) An unprecedented finding is that although no interaction could be detected between E1p and E2pCD by itself, a domain-induced interaction was identified on E1p active centers upon assembly with E2p and C-terminally truncated E2p proteins by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. The inclusion of each additional domain of E2p strengthened the interaction with E1p, and the interaction was strongest with intact E2p. E2p domain-induced changes at the E1p active site were also manifested by the appearance of a circular dichroism band characteristic of the canonical 4'-aminopyrimidine tautomer of bound thiamin diphosphate (AP). PMID:24742683

  13. Sulfur-rich zinc chemistry: new tris(thioimidazolyl)hydroborate ligands and their zinc complex chemistry related to the structure and function of alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Tesmer, M; Shu, M; Vahrenkamp, H

    2001-07-30

    The 1-substituted tris(2-thioimidazolyl)hydroborate ligands Tt(R) were prepared as the potassium salts from KBH(4) and the corresponding 1-R-2-thioimidazole for R = t-Bu and C(6)H(4)-p-CH(CH(3))(2) (Cum). Their reactions with zinc salts yielded the tetrahedral complexes Tt(R)Zn-X with X = F, Cl, ONO(2) and (Tt(t)()(-)(Bu))(2)Zn. With zinc perchlorate the labile perchlorate complexes Tt(R)Zn-OClO(3) were obtained. They served as starting materials for the incorporation of substrates which are relevant for the chemistry of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase: Ethanol led to [Tt(t)()(-Bu)Zn.EtOH] ClO(4).EtOH, p-nitrophenol (NitOH) yielded Tt(Cum)Zn-ONit. Pyridine-2-carbaldehyde and salicylic aldehyde were incorporated as N(pyridine) and O(phenolate) coligands with possible additional O(aldehyde) coordination. Substituted pyridyl methanols (R-PyCH(2)OH) yielded the trinuclear complexes [(Tt(t)()(-Bu))(2)Zn(3)(R-PyCH(2)O)(2)] (ClO(4))(2) with bridging Tt and pyridylmethoxide ligands. Preliminary experiments on the functional modeling of alcohol dehydrogenase have shown that TtZn complexes promote both the dehydrogenation of 2-propanol and the hydrogenation of pentafluorobenzaldehyde. PMID:11466063

  14. L-Galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase is an assembly factor of the membrane arm of mitochondrial complex I in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Schimmeyer, Joram; Bock, Ralph; Meyer, Etienne H

    2016-01-01

    L-Galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH) catalyses the last enzymatic step of the ascorbate biosynthetic pathway in plants. GLDH is localised to mitochondria and several reports have shown that GLDH is associated with complex I of the respiratory chain. In a gldh knock-out mutant, complex I is not detectable, suggesting that GLDH is essential for complex I assembly or stability. GLDH has not been identified as a genuine complex I subunit, instead, it is present in a smaller, lowly abundant version of complex I called complex I*. In addition, GLDH activity has also been detected in smaller protein complexes within mitochondria membranes. Here, we investigated the role of GLDH during complex I assembly. We identified GLDH in complexes co-localising with some complex I assembly intermediates. Using a mutant that accumulates complex I assembly intermediates, we confirmed that GLDH is associated with the complex I assembly intermediates of 400 and 450 kDa. In addition, we detected accumulation of the 200 kDa complex I assembly intermediate in the gldh mutant. Taken together, our data suggest that GLDH is an assembly factor of the membrane arm of complex I. This function appears to be independent of the role of GLDH in ascorbate synthesis, as evidenced by the ascorbate-deficient mutant vtc2-1 accumulating wild-type levels of complex I. Therefore, we propose that GLDH is a dual-function protein that has a second, non-enzymatic function in complex I assembly as a plant-specific assembly factor. We propose an updated model for complex I assembly that includes complex I* as an assembly intermediate. PMID:26520835

  15. Effect of diet and starvation on the activity state of branched-chain 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase complex in rat liver and heart.

    PubMed

    Solomon, M; Cook, K G; Yeaman, S J

    1987-12-10

    In rats fed a high-protein diet, the branched-chain 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase complex in liver was essentially fully active and its activity state was unaffected by subsequent starvation for 48 h. Feeding with a low-protein diet led to a decrease in the activity state which was essentially reversed by 48 h of starvation. In heart, the enzyme was primarily inactive (activity state 18%) in rats fed a high-protein diet, with both low-protein diet and starvation leading to a further decrease in the activity state. PMID:3676350

  16. Species-specific differences in tissue-specific expression of alcohol dehydrogenase are under the control of complex cis-acting loci: Evidence from Drosophila hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganayakulu, G.; Reddy, A.R. ); Kirkpatrick, R.B.; Martin, P.F. )

    1991-12-01

    Differences in the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase in the hindgut and testis of adult Drosophila virilis, D. texana, D. novamexicana and D. borealis flies were observed. These heritable differences do not arise due to chromosomal rearrangements, since the polytene chromosome banding patterns did not reveal any such gross chromosomal rearrangements near the Adh locus in any of the tested species. Analysis of the interspecific hybrids revealed that these differences are controlled by complex cis-acting genetic loci. Further, the cis-acting locus controlling the expression of ADH in testis was found to be separable by crossing-over.

  17. The Expression of 2-Oxoglutarate/Malate Translocator in the Bundle-Sheath Mitochondria of Panicum miliaceum, a NAD-Malic Enzyme-Type C4 Plant, Is Regulated by Light and Development.

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, M.; Sugiyama, T.

    1997-01-01

    The bundle-sheath mitochondria in NAD-malic enzyme-type C4 plants participate in the C4 dicarboxylate cycle and require high capacities of translocators to accommodate the high rates of exchange of metabolites involved in photosynthesis. In Panicum miliaceum, a NAD-malic enzyme-type C4 plant, the steady-state level of mRNA for the mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG)/malate translocator was higher in leaves than in nonphotosynthetic tissues. Furthermore, the expression of the gene for the mitochondrial 2-OG/malate translocator was restricted to bundle-sheath cells (BSC) but not mesophyll cells. The transcript level of the BSC-located mitochondrial 2-OG/malate translocator increased during greening in accordance with levels of photosynthetic genes, although the relative transcript levels of other mitochondrial membrane proteins decreased. The specific activities of C4 photosynthetic enzymes and the relative abundance of the 2-OG/malate translocator protein in bundle-sheath mitochondria increased in successive sections from the basal meristem to the distal tip, whereas the specific activities of mitochondrial respiratory enzymes remained constant or decreased. These findings indicate that the specific 2-OG/malate translocator in BSC mitochondria of P. miliaceum is expressed in concert with C4 enzymes during the differentiation of BSC and parallels the capacity of C4 photosynthesis. Most unusual, northern analysis showed that significant amounts of unspliced mRNAs, the levels of which are variable during greening, were present in leaf tissues. It is possible that this incomplete splicing is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of expression of this gene. PMID:12223705

  18. Resolving the Role of Plant Glutamate Dehydrogenase. I. in vivo Real Time Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Labboun, Soraya; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Roscher, Albrecht; Bedu, Magali; Restivo, Francesco M.; Velanis, Christos N.; Skopelitis, Damianos S.; Moshou, Panagiotis N.; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A.; Suzuki, Akira; Hirel, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    In higher plants the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzyme catalyzes the reversible amination of 2-oxoglutarate to form glutamate, using ammonium as a substrate. For a better understanding of the physiological function of GDH either in ammonium assimilation or in the supply of 2-oxoglutarate, we used transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants overexpressing the two genes encoding the enzyme. An in vivo real time 15N-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy approach allowed the demonstration that, when the two GDH genes were overexpressed individually or simultaneously, the transgenic plant leaves did not synthesize glutamate in the presence of ammonium when glutamine synthetase (GS) was inhibited. In contrast we confirmed that the primary function of GDH is to deaminate Glu. When the two GDH unlabeled substrates ammonium and Glu were provided simultaneously with either [15N]Glu or 15NH4+ respectively, we found that the ammonium released from the deamination of Glu was reassimilated by the enzyme GS, suggesting the occurrence of a futile cycle recycling both ammonium and Glu. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the GDH enzyme, in conjunction with NADH-GOGAT, contributes to the control of leaf Glu homeostasis, an amino acid that plays a central signaling and metabolic role at the interface of the carbon and nitrogen assimilatory pathways. Thus, in vivo NMR spectroscopy appears to be an attractive technique to follow the flux of metabolites in both normal and genetically modified plants. PMID:19690000

  19. Presence and regulation of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed Central

    Meixner-Monori, B; Kubicek, C P; Habison, A; Kubicek-Pranz, E M; Röhr, M

    1985-01-01

    alpha-Ketoglutarate dehydrogenase has been demonstrated for the first time in cell extracts from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. A minimum protein concentration of 5 mg/ml is necessary for detecting enzyme activity, but a maximum of ca. 0.060 mumol/min per mg of protein is observed only when the protein concentration is above 9 mg/ml. alpha-Ketoglutarate can partly stabilize the enzyme against dilution in the assay system. Neither bovine serum albumin nor a variety of substrates or effectors of the enzyme could stabilize the enzyme against inactivation by dilution. A kinetic analysis of the enzyme revealed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with respect to alpha-ketoglutarate, coenzyme A, and NAD. Thiamine PPi was required for maximal activity. NADH, oxaloacetate, succinate, and cis-aconitate were found to inhibit the enzyme; AMP was without effect. Monovalent cations including NH4+ were inhibitory at high concentrations (greater than 20 mM). The highest enzyme activity was found in rapidly growing mycelia (glucose-NH4+ or glucose-peptone medium). We discuss the possibility that citric acid accumulation is caused by oxaloacetate and NADH inhibition of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase of A. niger. PMID:3968029

  20. Mutations in the X-linked E{sub 1}{alpha} subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase: Exon skipping, insertion of duplicate sequence, and missense mutations leading to the deficiency of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, K.; Mackay, N.; Petrova-Benedict, P.; Robinson, B.H.; Federico, A.; Fois, A.; Cole, D.E.C.; Robertson, E.

    1995-03-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH)-complex deficiency is an inborn error of metabolism that is extremely heterogeneous in its presentation and clinical course. In a study of 14 patients (7 females and 7 males), we have found a mutation in the coding region of the E{sub 1}{alpha} gene in all 14 patients. Two female patients had the same 7-bp deletion at nt 927; another female patient had a 3-bp deletion at nt 931. Another female patient was found to have a deletion of exon 6 in her cDNA. Two other female patients were found to have insertions, one of 13 bp at nt 981 and one of 46 bp at nucleotide 1078. Two male patients were found to have a 4-bp insertion at nucleotide 1163. The remaining six patients all had missense mutations. A male patient and a female patient both had an A1133G mutation. The other missense mutations were C214T, C615A, and C787G (two patients). Five of these mutations are novel mutations, five had been previously reported in other patients, and two were published observations in other patients in an E{sub 1}{alpha}-mutation summary. In the four cases where parent DNA was available, only one mother was found to be a carrier of the same mutation as her child. 61 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Crystal structures of shikimate dehydrogenase AroE from Thermus thermophilus HB8 and its cofactor and substrate complexes: insights into the enzymatic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Kunishima, Naoki

    2007-10-19

    Shikimate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.25) catalyses the fourth step of the shikimate pathway which is required for the synthesis of the aromatic amino acids and other aromatic compounds in bacteria, microbial eukaryotes, and plants. The crystal structures of the shikimate dehydrogenase AroE from Thermus thermophilus HB8 in its ligand-free form, binary complexes with cofactor NADP+ or substrate shikimate, and the ternary complex with both NADP(H) and shikimate were determined by X-ray diffraction method at atomic resolutions. The crystals are nearly isomorphous with the asymmetric unit containing a dimer, each subunit of which has a bi-domain structure of compact alpha/beta sandwich folds. The two subunits of the enzyme display asymmetry in the crystals due to different relative orientations between the N- and C-terminal domains resulting in a slightly different closure of the interdomain clefts. NADP(H) is bound to the more closed form only. This closed conformation with apparent higher affinity to the cofactor is also observed in the unliganded crystal form, indicating that the NADP(H) binding to TtAroE may follow the selection mode where the cofactor binds to the subunit that happens to be in the closed conformation in solution. Crystal structures of the closed subunits with and without NADP(H) show no significant structural difference, suggesting that the cofactor binding to the closed subunit corresponds to the lock-and-key model in TtAroE. On the other hand, shikimate binds to both open and closed subunit conformers of both apo and NADP(H)-liganded holo enzyme forms. The ternary complex TtAroE:NADP(H):shikimate allows unambiguous visualization of the SDH permitting elucidation of the roles of conserved residues Lys64 and Asp100 in the hydride ion transfer between NADP(H) and shikimate. PMID:17825835

  2. The gamma-aminobutyric acid shunt contributes to closing the tricarboxylic acid cycle in Synechocystis sp PCC 6803

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, W; Brune, D; Vermaas, WFJ

    2014-07-16

    A traditional 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is missing in the cyanobacterial tricarboxylic acid cycle. To determine pathways that convert 2-oxoglutarate into succinate in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a series of mutant strains, Delta sll1981, Delta slr0370, Delta slr1022 and combinations thereof, deficient in 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase (Sll1981), succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (Slr0370), and/or in gamma-aminobutyrate metabolism (Slr1022) were constructed. Like in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, N-acetylornithine aminotransferase, encoded by slr1022, was shown to also function as gamma-aminobutyrate aminotransferase, catalysing gamma-aminobutyrate conversion to succinic semialdehyde. As succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase converts succinic semialdehyde to succinate, an intact gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is present in Synechocystis. The Delta sll1981 strain, lacking 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase, exhibited a succinate level that was 60% of that in wild type. However, the succinate level in the Delta slr1022 and Delta slr0370 strains and the Delta sll1981/Delta slr1022 and Delta sll1981/Delta slr0370 double mutants was reduced to 20-40% of that in wild type, suggesting that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt has a larger impact on metabolite flux to succinate than the pathway via 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase. C-13-stable isotope analysis indicated that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt catalysed conversion of glutamate to succinate. Independent of the 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase bypass, the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is a major contributor to flux from 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate to succinate in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  3. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NADH alternative dehydrogenase Ndi1p, as a tool to identify new genes involved in complex I related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cossard, Raynald; Esposito, Michela; Sellem, Carole H.; Pitayu, Laras; Vasnier, Christelle; Delahodde, Agnès; Dassa, Emmanuel P.

    2015-01-01

    Isolated complex I deficiencies are one of the most commonly observed biochemical features in patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders. In the majority of these clinical cases the molecular bases of the diseases remain unknown suggesting the involvement of unidentified factors that are critical for complex I function. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NDI1 gene, encoding the mitochondrial internal NADH dehydrogenase was previously shown to complement a complex I deficient strain in Caenorhabditis elegans with notable improvements in reproduction and whole organism respiration. These features indicate that Ndi1p can functionally integrate the respiratory chain, allowing complex I deficiency complementation. Taking into account the Ndi1p ability to bypass complex I, we evaluate the possibility to extend the range of defects/mutations causing complex I deficiencies that can be alleviated by NDI1 expression. We report here that NDI1 expressing animals unexpectedly exhibit a slightly shortened lifespan, a reduction in the progeny, and a depletion of the mitochondrial genome. However, Ndi1p is expressed and targeted to the mitochondria as a functional protein that confers rotenone resistance to those animals without affecting their respiration rate and ATP content. We show that the severe embryonic lethality level caused by the RNAi knockdowns of complex I structural subunit encoding genes (e.g., NDUFV1, NDUFS1, NDUFS6, NDUFS8, or GRIM-19 human orthologs) in wild type animals is significantly reduced in the Ndi1p expressing worm. All together these results open up the perspective to identify new genes involved in complex I function, assembly, or regulation by screening an RNAi library of genes leading to embryonic lethality that should be rescued by NDI1 expression. PMID:26124772

  4. NADP-Specific Electron-Bifurcating [FeFe]-Hydrogenase in a Functional Complex with Formate Dehydrogenase in Clostridium autoethanogenum Grown on CO

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuning; Huang, Haiyan; Kahnt, Jörg; Mueller, Alexander P.; Köpke, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Flavin-based electron bifurcation is a recently discovered mechanism of coupling endergonic to exergonic redox reactions in the cytoplasm of anaerobic bacteria and archaea. Among the five electron-bifurcating enzyme complexes characterized to date, one is a heteromeric ferredoxin- and NAD-dependent [FeFe]-hydrogenase. We report here a novel electron-bifurcating [FeFe]-hydrogenase that is NADP rather than NAD specific and forms a complex with a formate dehydrogenase. The complex was found in high concentrations (6% of the cytoplasmic proteins) in the acetogenic Clostridium autoethanogenum autotrophically grown on CO, which was fermented to acetate, ethanol, and 2,3-butanediol. The purified complex was composed of seven different subunits. As predicted from the sequence of the encoding clustered genes (fdhA/hytA-E) and from chemical analyses, the 78.8-kDa subunit (FdhA) is a selenocysteine- and tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase, the 65.5-kDa subunit (HytB) is an iron-sulfur flavin mononucleotide protein harboring the NADP binding site, the 51.4-kDa subunit (HytA) is the [FeFe]-hydrogenase proper, and the 18.1-kDa (HytC), 28.6-kDa (HytD), 19.9-kDa (HytE1), and 20.1-kDa (HytE2) subunits are iron-sulfur proteins. The complex catalyzed both the reversible coupled reduction of ferredoxin and NADP+ with H2 or formate and the reversible formation of H2 and CO2 from formate. We propose the complex to have two functions in vivo, namely, to normally catalyze CO2 reduction to formate with NADPH and reduced ferredoxin in the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway and to catalyze H2 formation from NADPH and reduced ferredoxin when these redox mediators get too reduced during unbalanced growth of C. autoethanogenum on CO (E0′ = −520 mV). PMID:23893107

  5. Elucidation of the Interaction Loci of the Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E2·E3BP Core with Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 1 and Kinase 2 by H/D Exchange Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) comprises three principal catalytic components for its mission: E1, E2, and E3. The core of the complex is a strong subcomplex between E2 and an E3-binding protein (E3BP). The PDC is subject to regulation at E1 by serine phosphorylation by four kinases (PDK1–4), an inactivation reversed by the action of two phosphatases (PDP1 and -2). We report H/D exchange mass spectrometric (HDX-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies in the first attempt to define the interaction loci between PDK1 and PDK2 with the intact E2·E3BP core and their C-terminally truncated proteins. While the three lipoyl domains (L1 and L2 on E2 and L3 on E3BP) lend themselves to NMR studies and determination of interaction maps with PDK1 and PDK2 at the individual residue level, HDX-MS allowed studies of interaction loci on both partners in the complexes, PDKs, and other regions of the E2·E3BP core, as well, at the peptide level. HDX-MS suggested that the intact E2·E3BP core enhances the binding specificity of L2 for PDK2 over PDK1, while NMR studies detected lipoyl domain residues unique to interaction with PDK1 and PDK2. The E2·E3BP core induced more changes on PDKs than any C-terminally truncated protein, with clear evidence of greater plasticity of PDK1 than of PDK2. The effect of L1L2S paralleled HDX-MS results obtained with the intact E2·E3BP core; hence, L1L2S is an excellent candidate with which to define interaction loci with these two PDKs. Surprisingly, L3S′ induced moderate interaction with both PDKs according to both methods. PMID:25436986

  6. An Orange Ripening Mutant Links Plastid NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase Complex Activity to Central and Specialized Metabolism during Tomato Fruit Maturation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Nashilevitz, Shai; Melamed-Bessudo, Cathy; Izkovich, Yinon; Rogachev, Ilana; Osorio, Sonia; Itkin, Maxim; Adato, Avital; Pankratov, Ilya; Hirschberg, Joseph; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Wolf, Shmuel; Usadel, Björn; Levy, Avraham A.; Rumeau, Dominique; Aharoni, Asaph

    2010-01-01

    In higher plants, the plastidial NADH dehydrogenase (Ndh) complex supports nonphotochemical electron fluxes from stromal electron donors to plastoquinones. Ndh functions in chloroplasts are not clearly established; however, its activity was linked to the prevention of the overreduction of stroma, especially under stress conditions. Here, we show by the characterization of OrrDs, a dominant transposon-tagged tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant deficient in the NDH-M subunit, that this complex is also essential for the fruit ripening process. Alteration to the NDH complex in fruit changed the climacteric, ripening-associated metabolites and transcripts as well as fruit shelf life. Metabolic processes in chromoplasts of ripening tomato fruit were affected in OrrDs, as mutant fruit were yellow-orange and accumulated substantially less total carotenoids, mainly β-carotene and lutein. The changes in carotenoids were largely influenced by environmental conditions and accompanied by modifications in levels of other fruit antioxidants, namely, flavonoids and tocopherols. In contrast with the pigmentation phenotype in mature mutant fruit, OrrDs leaves and green fruits did not display a visible phenotype but exhibited reduced Ndh complex quantity and activity. This study therefore paves the way for further studies on the role of electron transport and redox reactions in the regulation of fruit ripening and its associated metabolism. PMID:20571113

  7. The Impact of the Branched-Chain Ketoacid Dehydrogenase Complex on Amino Acid Homeostasis in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Cheng; Uygun, Sahra; Shiu, Shin-Han; Last, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) Leu, Ile, and Val are among nine essential amino acids that must be obtained from the diet of humans and other animals, and can be nutritionally limiting in plant foods. Despite genetic evidence of its importance in regulating seed amino acid levels, the full BCAA catabolic network is not completely understood in plants, and limited information is available regarding its regulation. In this study, transcript coexpression analyses revealed positive correlations among BCAA catabolism genes in stress, development, diurnal/circadian, and light data sets. A core subset of BCAA catabolism genes, including those encoding putative branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase subunits, is highly expressed during the night in plants on a diel cycle and in prolonged darkness. Mutants defective in these subunits accumulate higher levels of BCAAs in mature seeds, providing genetic evidence for their function in BCAA catabolism. In addition, prolonged dark treatment caused the mutants to undergo senescence early and overaccumulate leaf BCAAs. These results extend the previous evidence that BCAAs can be catabolized and serve as respiratory substrates at multiple steps. Moreover, comparison of amino acid profiles between mature seeds and dark-treated leaves revealed differences in amino acid accumulation when BCAA catabolism is perturbed. Together, these results demonstrate the consequences of blocking BCAA catabolism during both normal growth conditions and under energy-limited conditions. PMID:25986129

  8. Anaerobic degradation of nitrilotriacetate (NTA) in a denitrifying bacterium: purification and characterization of the NTA dehydrogenase-nitrate reductase enzyme complex.

    PubMed Central

    Jenal-Wanner, U; Egli, T

    1993-01-01

    The initial step in the anoxic metabolism of nitrilotriacetate (NTA) was investigated in a denitrifying member of the gamma subgroup of the Proteobacteria. In membrane-free cell extracts, the first step of NTA oxidation was catalyzed by a protein complex consisting of two enzymes, NTA dehydrogenase (NTADH) and nitrate reductase (NtR). The products formed were iminodiacetate and glyoxylate. Electrons derived from the oxidation of NTA were transferred to nitrate only via the artificial dye phenazine methosulfate, and nitrate was stoichiometrically reduced to nitrite. NTADH activity could be measured only in the presence of NtrR and vice versa. The NTADH-NtrR enzyme complex was purified and characterized. NTADH and NtrR were both alpha 2 dimers and had molecular weights of 170,000 and 105,000, respectively. NTADH contained covalently bound flavin cofactor, and NtrR contained a type b cytochrome. Optimum NTA-oxidizing activity was achieved at a molar ratio of NTADH to NtrR of approximately 1:1. So far, NTA is the only known substrate for NTADH. This is the first report of a redox enzyme complex catalyzing the oxidation of a substrate and concomitantly reducing nitrate. Images PMID:8250558

  9. Human 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-ligand complexes: crystals of different space groups with various cations and combined seeding and co-crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.-W.; Han, Q.; Qiu, W.; Campbell, R. L.; Xie, B.-X.; Azzi, A.; Lin, S.-X.

    1999-01-01

    Human estrogenic 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD1) is responsible for the synthesis of active estrogens that stimulate the proliferation of breast cancer cells. The enzyme has been crystallized using a Mg 2+/PEG (3500)/β-octyl glucoside system [Zhu et al., J. Mol. Biol. 234 (1993) 242]. The space group of these crystals is C2. Here we report that cations can affect 17β-HSD1 crystallization significantly. In the presence of Mn 2+ instead of Mg 2+, crystals have been obtained in the same space group with similar unit cell dimensions. In the presence of Li + and Na + instead of Mg 2+, the space group has been changed to P2 12 12 1. A whole data set for a crystal of 17ß-HSD1 complex with progesterone grown in the presence of Li + has been collected to 1.95 Å resolution with a synchrotron source. The cell dimensions are a=41.91 Å, b=108.21 Å, c=117.00 Å. The structure has been preliminarily determined by molecular replacement, yielding important information on crystal packing in the presence of different cations. In order to further understand the structure-function relationship of 17β-HSD1, enzyme complexes with several ligands have been crystallized. As the steroids have very low aqueous solubility, we used a combined method of seeding and co-crystallization to obtain crystals of 17β-HSD1 complexed with various ligands. This method provides ideal conditions for growing complex crystals, with ligands such as 20α-hydroxysteroid progesterone, testosterone and 17β-methyl-estradiol-NADP +. Several complex structures have been determined with reliable electronic density of the bound ligands.

  10. Leucine-induced activation of translational initiation is partly regulated by the branched-chain {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in C2C12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Naoya . E-mail: nakai@hss.osaka-u.ac.jp; Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Tamura, Tomohiro; Tamura, Noriko; Hamada, Koichiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2006-05-19

    Branched-chain amino acid leucine has been shown to activate the translational regulators through the mammalian target of rapamycin. However, the leucine's effects are self-limiting because leucine promotes its own disposal by an oxidative pathway. The irreversible and rate-limiting step in the leucine oxidation pathway is catalyzed by the branched-chain {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex. The complex contains E1 ({alpha}2{beta}2), E2, and E3 subunits, and its activity is abolished by phosphorylation of the E1{alpha} subunit by BCKDH kinase. The relationship between the activity of BCKDH complex and leucine-mediated activation of the protein translation was investigated using the technique of RNA interference. The activity of BCKDH complex in C2C12 cell was modulated by transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) for BCKDH E2 subunit or BCKDH kinase. Transfection of siRNAs decreased the mRNA expression and protein amount of corresponding gene. Suppression of either E2 subunit or kinase produced opposite effects on the cell proliferation and the activation of translational regulators by leucine. Suppression of BCKDH kinase for 48 h resulted in decreasing cell proliferation. In contrast, E2 suppression led to increased amount of total cellular protein. The phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase by leucine was increased in E2-siRNA transfected C2C12 cells, whereas the leucine's effect was diminished in kinase-siRNA transfected cells. These results suggest that the activation of the translational regulators by leucine was partly regulated by the activity of BCKDH complex.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the complex of NADH and 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas sp. B-0831

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Sachiyo; Nakamura, Shota; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Ueda, Shigeru; Uchiyama, Susumu; Kobayashi, Yuji; Oda, Masayuki

    2006-06-01

    The complex of NADH and 3α-HSD from Pseudomonas sp. B-0831 has been crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.8 Å resolution. The NAD(P){sup +}-dependent enzyme 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD) catalyzes the reversible interconversion of hydroxyl and oxo groups at position 3 of the steroid nucleus. The complex of NADH and 3α-HSD from Pseudomonas sp. B-0831 was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Refinement of crystallization conditions with microseeding improved the quality of the X-ray diffraction data to a resolution of 1.8 Å. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.46, b = 82.25, c = 86.57 Å, and contained two molecules, reflecting dimer formation of 3α-HSD, in the asymmetric unit.

  12. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification targeting a gene within the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the pdhA gene, for rapid detection of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fanqing; Bao, Shijun; Yu, Shengqing; Cheng, Jinghua; Tan, Lei; Qiu, Xvsheng; Song, Cuiping; Dai, Yabin; Fei, Rongmei; Ding, Chan

    2015-05-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum infections impose a significant economic burden on the poultry industry. In the current study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed and optimized to detect M. gallisepticum based on a gene within the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the pdhA gene, which codes for the major subunit (E1α) in the complex. The reaction conditions were optimized, and the specificity was confirmed by successful amplification of several M. gallisepticum strains, while no amplification was detected with 20 other major bacterial and viral pathogens of poultry. Additionally, the LAMP assay achieved 10-fold higher sensitivity than an existing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The LAMP assay was applied to swab samples collected from poultry farms and compared with PCR. The positive detection rate was 20.2% (37/183) by LAMP and 13.1% (24/183) by PCR. The LAMP assay could provide a cost-effective, quick, and sensitive method for the detection of M. gallisepticum. PMID:26038479

  13. Crystal Structures of CO and NO Adducts of MauG in Complex with Pre-Methylamine Dehydrogenase: Implications for the Mechanism of Dioxygen Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yukl, Erik T.; Goblirsch, Brandon R.; Davidson, Victor L.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2011-09-28

    MauG is a diheme enzyme responsible for the post-translational formation of the catalytic tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) cofactor in methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH). MauG can utilize hydrogen peroxide, or molecular oxygen and reducing equivalents, to complete this reaction via a catalytic bis-Fe(IV) intermediate. Crystal structures of diferrous, Fe(II)-CO, and Fe(II)-NO forms of MauG in complex with its preMADH substrate have been determined and compared to one another as well as to the structure of the resting diferric MauG-preMADH complex. CO and NO each bind exclusively to the 5-coordinate high-spin heme with no change in ligation of the 6-coordinate low-spin heme. These structures reveal likely roles for amino acid residues in the distal pocket of the high-spin heme in oxygen binding and activation. Glu113 is implicated in the protonation of heme-bound diatomic oxygen intermediates in promoting cleavage of the O-O bond. Pro107 is shown to change conformation on the binding of each ligand and may play a steric role in oxygen activation by positioning the distal oxygen near Glu113. Gln103 is in a position to provide a hydrogen bond to the Fe(IV){double_bond}O moiety that may account for the unusual stability of this species in MauG.

  14. Structures of the G81A mutant form of the active chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and its complex with two of its substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Dewanti, Asteriani; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Mitra, Bharati; Mathews, F. Scott

    2009-06-01

    The crystal structure of the G81A mutant form of the chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and of its complexes with two of its substrates reveal productive and non-productive modes of binding for the catalytic reaction. The structure also indicates the role of G81A in lowering the redox potential of the flavin co-factor leading to an ∼200-fold slower catalytic rate of substrate oxidation. (S)-Mandelate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Pseudomonas putida, a membrane-associated flavoenzyme, catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-mandelate to benzoylformate. Previously, the structure of a catalytically similar chimera, MDH-GOX2, rendered soluble by the replacement of its membrane-binding segment with the corresponding segment of glycolate oxidase (GOX), was determined and found to be highly similar to that of GOX except within the substituted segments. Subsequent attempts to cocrystallize MDH-GOX2 with substrate proved unsuccessful. However, the G81A mutants of MDH and of MDH-GOX2 displayed ∼100-fold lower reactivity with substrate and a modestly higher reactivity towards molecular oxygen. In order to understand the effect of the mutation and to identify the mode of substrate binding in MDH-GOX2, a crystallographic investigation of the G81A mutant of the MDH-GOX2 enzyme was initiated. The structures of ligand-free G81A mutant MDH-GOX2 and of its complexes with the substrates 2-hydroxyoctanoate and 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate were determined at 1.6, 2.5 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. In the ligand-free G81A mutant protein, a sulfate anion previously found at the active site is displaced by the alanine side chain introduced by the mutation. 2-Hydroxyoctanoate binds in an apparently productive mode for subsequent reaction, while 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate is bound to the enzyme in an apparently unproductive mode. The results of this investigation suggest that a lowering of the polarity of the flavin environment resulting from the displacement of nearby water molecules caused by

  15. The lactate dehydrogenase--reduced nicotinamide--adenine dinucleotide--pyruvate complex. Kinetics of pyruvate binding and quenching of coeznyme fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Südi, J

    1974-04-01

    The stopped-flow kinetic studies described in this and the following paper (Südi, 1974) demonstrate that a Haldane-type description of the reversible lactate dehydrogenase reaction presents an experimentally feasible task. Combined results of these two papers yield numerical values for the six rate constants defined by the following equilibrium scheme, where E represents lactate dehydrogenase: [Formula: see text] The experiments were carried out at pH8.4 at a relatively low temperature (6.3 degrees C) with the pig heart enzyme. Identification of the above two intermediates and determination of the corresponding rate constants actually involve four series of independent observations in these studies, since (a) the reaction can be followed in both directions, and (b) both the u.v. absorption and the fluorescence of the coenzymes are altered in the reaction, and it is shown that these two spectral changes do not occur simultaneously. Kinetic observations made in the reverse direction are reported in this paper. It is demonstrated that the fluorescence of NADH can no longer be observed in the ternary complex E(NADH) (Pyr). Even though the oxidation-reduction reaction rapidly follows the formation of this complex, the numerical values of k(-4) (8.33x10(5)m(-1).s(-1)) and k(+4) (222s(-1)) are easily obtained from a directly observed second-order reaction step in which fluorescent but not u.v.-absorbing material is disappearing. U.v.-absorption measurements do not clearly resolve the subsequent oxidation-reduction step from the dissociation of lactate. It is shown that this must be due partly to the instrumental dead time, and partly to a low transient concentration of E(NAD+) (Lac) in the two-step sequential reaction in which the detectable disappearance of u.v.-absorbing material takes place. It is estimated that about one-tenth of the total change in u.v. absorption is due to a ;burst reaction' in which E(NAD+) (Lac) is produced, and this estimation yields, from k

  16. A Cluster of Four Homologous Small RNAs Modulates C1 Metabolism and the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in Rhodobacter sphaeroides under Various Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Billenkamp, Fabian; Peng, Tao; Berghoff, Bork A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In bacteria, regulatory RNAs play an important role in the regulation and balancing of many cellular processes and stress responses. Among these regulatory RNAs, trans-encoded small RNAs (sRNAs) are of particular interest since one sRNA can lead to the regulation of multiple target mRNAs. In the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, several sRNAs are induced by oxidative stress. In this study, we focused on the functional characterization of four homologous sRNAs that are cotranscribed with the gene for the conserved hypothetical protein RSP_6037, a genetic arrangement described for only a few sRNAs until now. Each of the four sRNAs is characterized by two stem-loops that carry CCUCCUCCC motifs in their loops. They are induced under oxidative stress, as well as by various other stress conditions, and were therefore renamed here sRNAs CcsR1 to CcsR4 (CcsR1–4) for conserved CCUCCUCCC motif stress-induced RNAs 1 to 4. Increased CcsR1–4 expression decreases the expression of genes involved in C1 metabolism or encoding components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex either directly by binding to their target mRNAs or indirectly. One of the CcsR1–4 target mRNAs encodes the transcriptional regulator FlhR, an activator of glutathione-dependent methanol/formaldehyde metabolism. Downregulation of this glutathione-dependent pathway increases the pool of glutathione, which helps to counteract oxidative stress. The FlhR-dependent downregulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex reduces a primary target of reactive oxygen species and reduces aerobic electron transport, a main source of reactive oxygen species. Our findings reveal a previously unknown strategy used by bacteria to counteract oxidative stress. IMPORTANCE Phototrophic organisms have to cope with photo-oxidative stress due to the function of chlorophylls as photosensitizers for the formation of singlet oxygen. Our study assigns an important role in photo-oxidative stress resistance to a

  17. Electron-Transfer Pathways in the Heme and Quinone-Binding Domain of Complex II (Succinate Dehydrogenase)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Single electron transfers have been examined in complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) by the method of pulse radiolysis. Electrons are introduced into the enzyme initially at the [3Fe–4S] and ubiquinone sites followed by intramolecular equilibration with the b heme of the enzyme. To define thermodynamic and other controlling parameters for the pathways of electron transfer in complex II, site-directed variants were constructed and analyzed. Variants at SdhB-His207 and SdhB-Ile209 exhibit significantly perturbed electron transfer between the [3Fe–4S] cluster and ubiquinone. Analysis of the data using Marcus theory shows that the electronic coupling constants for wild-type and variant enzyme are all small, indicating that electron transfer occurs by diabatic tunneling. The presence of the ubiquinone is necessary for efficient electron transfer to the heme, which only slowly equilibrates with the [3Fe–4S] cluster in the absence of the quinone. PMID:24559074

  18. Analysis of all subunits, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, of the succinate dehydrogenase complex in KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, Maria A; Astolfi, Annalisa; Urbini, Milena; Nannini, Margherita; Paterini, Paola; Indio, Valentina; Saponara, Maristella; Formica, Serena; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Casadio, Rita; Rossi, Giulio; Bertolini, Federica; Santini, Donatella; Pirini, Maria G; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Basso, Umberto; Biasco, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of genes encoding the subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex were described in KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST separately in different reports. In this study, we simultaneously sequenced the genome of all subunits, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD in a larger series of KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST in order to evaluate the frequency of the mutations and explore their biological role. SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD were sequenced on the available samples obtained from 34 KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GISTs. Of these, in 10 cases, both tumor and peripheral blood (PB) were available, in 19 cases only tumor, and in 5 cases only PB. Overall, 9 of the 34 patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST carried mutations in one of the four subunits of the SDH complex (six patients in SDHA, two in SDHB, one in SDHC). WB and immunohistochemistry analysis showed that patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST who harbored SDHA mutations exhibited a significant downregulation of both SDHA and SDHB protein expression, with respect to the other GIST lacking SDH mutations and to KIT/PDGFRA-mutated GIST. Clinically, four out of six patients with SDHA mutations presented with metastatic disease at diagnosis with a very slow, indolent course. Patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST may harbor germline and/or de novo mutations of SDH complex with prevalence for mutations within SDHA, which is associated with a downregulation of SDHA and SDHB protein expression. The presence of germline mutations may suggest that these patients should be followed up for the risk of development of other cancers. PMID:23612575

  19. Analysis of all subunits, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, of the succinate dehydrogenase complex in KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST

    PubMed Central

    Pantaleo, Maria A; Astolfi, Annalisa; Urbini, Milena; Nannini, Margherita; Paterini, Paola; Indio, Valentina; Saponara, Maristella; Formica, Serena; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Casadio, Rita; Rossi, Giulio; Bertolini, Federica; Santini, Donatella; Pirini, Maria G; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Basso, Umberto; Biasco, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of genes encoding the subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex were described in KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST separately in different reports. In this study, we simultaneously sequenced the genome of all subunits, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD in a larger series of KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST in order to evaluate the frequency of the mutations and explore their biological role. SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD were sequenced on the available samples obtained from 34 KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GISTs. Of these, in 10 cases, both tumor and peripheral blood (PB) were available, in 19 cases only tumor, and in 5 cases only PB. Overall, 9 of the 34 patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST carried mutations in one of the four subunits of the SDH complex (six patients in SDHA, two in SDHB, one in SDHC). WB and immunohistochemistry analysis showed that patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST who harbored SDHA mutations exhibited a significant downregulation of both SDHA and SDHB protein expression, with respect to the other GIST lacking SDH mutations and to KIT/PDGFRA-mutated GIST. Clinically, four out of six patients with SDHA mutations presented with metastatic disease at diagnosis with a very slow, indolent course. Patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST may harbor germline and/or de novo mutations of SDH complex with prevalence for mutations within SDHA, which is associated with a downregulation of SDHA and SDHB protein expression. The presence of germline mutations may suggest that these patients should be followed up for the risk of development of other cancers. PMID:23612575

  20. Functional Characterization of the Subunits N, H, J, and O of the NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase Complexes in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 68031[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterial NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes play crucial roles in variety of bioenergetic reactions such as respiration, CO2 uptake, and cyclic electron transport around PSI. Recently, substantial progress has been made in identifying the composition of subunits of NDH-1 complexes. However, the localization and the physiological roles of several subunits in cyanobacteria are not fully understood. Here, by constructing fully segregated ndhN, ndhO, ndhH, and ndhJ null mutants in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, we found that deletion of ndhN, ndhH, or ndhJ but not ndhO severely impaired the accumulation of the hydrophilic subunits of the NDH-1 in the thylakoid membrane, resulting in disassembly of NDH-1MS, NDH-1MS′, as well as NDH-1L, finally causing the severe growth suppression phenotype. In contrast, deletion of NdhO affected the growth at pH 6.5 in air. In the cytoplasm, either NdhH or NdhJ deleted mutant, but neither NdhN nor NdhO deleted mutant, failed to accumulate the NDH-1 assembly intermediate consisting of NdhH, NdhJ, NdhK, and NdhM. Based on these results, we suggest that NdhN, NdhH, and NdhJ are essential for the stability and the activities of NDH-1 complexes, while NdhO for NDH-1 functions under the condition of inorganic carbon limitation in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. We discuss the roles of these subunits and propose a new NDH-1 model. PMID:27208236

  1. Crystal Structure of Binary and Ternary Complexes of Archaeal UDP-galactose 4-Epimerase-like l-Threonine Dehydrogenase from Thermoplasma volcanium*

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Kazunari; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Araki, Tomohiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    A gene from the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma volcanium encoding an l-threonine dehydrogenase (l-ThrDH) with a predicted amino acid sequence that was remarkably similar to the sequence of UDP-galactose 4-epimerase (GalE) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product was purified and characterized. The expressed enzyme was moderately thermostable, retaining more than 90% of its activity after incubation for 10 min at up to 70 °C. The catalytic residue was assessed using site-directed mutagenesis, and Tyr137 was found to be essential for catalysis. To clarify the structural basis of the catalytic mechanism, four different crystal structures were determined using the molecular replacement method: l-ThrDH-NAD+, l-ThrDH in complex with NAD+ and pyruvate, Y137F mutant in complex with NAD+ and l-threonine, and Y137F in complex with NAD+ and l-3-hydroxynorvaline. Each monomer consisted of a Rossmann-fold domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain, and the fold of the catalytic domain showed notable similarity to that of the GalE-like l-ThrDH from the psychrophilic bacterium Flavobacterium frigidimaris KUC-1. The substrate binding model suggests that the reaction proceeds through abstraction of the β-hydroxyl hydrogen of l-threonine via direct proton transfer driven by Tyr137. The factors contributing to the thermostability of T. volcanium l-ThrDH were analyzed by comparing its structure to that of F. frigidimaris l-ThrDH. This comparison showed that the presence of extensive inter- and intrasubunit ion pair networks are likely responsible for the thermostability of T. volcanium l-ThrDH. This is the first description of the molecular basis for the substrate recognition and thermostability of a GalE-like l-ThrDH. PMID:22374996

  2. Structural determinants of enzyme binding affinity: the E1 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli in complex with the inhibitor thiamin thiazolone diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Sax, Martin; Brunskill, Andrew; Nemeria, Natalia; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2004-03-01

    Thiamin thiazolone diphosphate (ThTDP), a potent inhibitor of the E1 component from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc), binds to the enzyme with greater affinity than does the cofactor thiamin diphosphate (ThDP). To identify what determines this difference, the crystal structure of the apo PDHc E1 component complex with ThTDP and Mg(2+) has been determined at 2.1 A and compared to the known structure of the native holoenzyme, PDHc E1-ThDP-Mg(2+) complex. When ThTDP replaces ThDP, reorganization occurs in the protein structure in the vicinity of the active site involving positional and conformational changes in some amino acid residues, a change in the V coenzyme conformation, addition of new hydration sites, and elimination of others. These changes culminate in an increase in the number of hydrogen bonds to the protein, explaining the greater affinity of the apoenzyme for ThTDP. The observed hydrogen bonding pattern is not an invariant feature of ThDP-dependent enzymes but rather specific to this enzyme since the extra hydrogen bonds are made with nonconserved residues. Accordingly, these sequence-related hydrogen bonding differences likewise explain the wide variation in the affinities of different thiamin-dependent enzymes for ThTDP and ThDP. The sequence of each enzyme determines its ability to form hydrogen bonds to the inhibitor or cofactor. Mechanistic roles are suggested for the aforementioned reorganization and its reversal in PDHc E1 catalysis: to promote substrate binding and product release. This study also provides additional insight into the role of water in enzyme inhibition and catalysis. PMID:14992577

  3. Functional Characterization of the Subunits N, H, J, and O of the NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase Complexes in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    He, Zhihui; Mi, Hualing

    2016-06-01

    The cyanobacterial NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes play crucial roles in variety of bioenergetic reactions such as respiration, CO2 uptake, and cyclic electron transport around PSI. Recently, substantial progress has been made in identifying the composition of subunits of NDH-1 complexes. However, the localization and the physiological roles of several subunits in cyanobacteria are not fully understood. Here, by constructing fully segregated ndhN, ndhO, ndhH, and ndhJ null mutants in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, we found that deletion of ndhN, ndhH, or ndhJ but not ndhO severely impaired the accumulation of the hydrophilic subunits of the NDH-1 in the thylakoid membrane, resulting in disassembly of NDH-1MS, NDH-1MS', as well as NDH-1L, finally causing the severe growth suppression phenotype. In contrast, deletion of NdhO affected the growth at pH 6.5 in air. In the cytoplasm, either NdhH or NdhJ deleted mutant, but neither NdhN nor NdhO deleted mutant, failed to accumulate the NDH-1 assembly intermediate consisting of NdhH, NdhJ, NdhK, and NdhM. Based on these results, we suggest that NdhN, NdhH, and NdhJ are essential for the stability and the activities of NDH-1 complexes, while NdhO for NDH-1 functions under the condition of inorganic carbon limitation in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. We discuss the roles of these subunits and propose a new NDH-1 model. PMID:27208236

  4. Photosystem I cyclic electron flow via chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like complex performs a physiological role for photosynthesis at low light

    PubMed Central

    Yamori, Wataru; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Makino, Amane

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic electron transport around photosystem I (PS I) was discovered more than a half-century ago and two pathways have been identified in angiosperms. Although substantial progress has been made in understanding the structure of the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like (NDH) complex, which mediates one route of the cyclic electron transport pathways, its physiological function is not well understood. Most studies focused on the role of the NDH-dependent PS I cyclic electron transport in alleviation of oxidative damage in strong light. In contrast, here it is shown that impairment of NDH-dependent cyclic electron flow in rice specifically causes a reduction in the electron transport rate through PS I (ETR I) at low light intensity with a concomitant reduction in CO2 assimilation rate, plant biomass and importantly, grain production. There was no effect on PS II function at low or high light intensity. We propose a significant physiological function for the chloroplast NDH at low light intensities commonly experienced during the reproductive and ripening stages of rice cultivation that have adverse effects crop yield. PMID:26358849

  5. Bacillus anthracis Inosine 5′-Monophosphate Dehydrogenase in Action: The First Bacterial Series of Structures of Phosphate Ion-, Substrate-, and Product-Bound Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Wu, Ruiying; Wilton, Rosemarie; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Wang, Ximi K.; Zhang, Rongguang; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Mack, Jamey C.; Maltseva, Natalia; Mulligan, Rory; Binkowski, T. Andrew; Gornicki, Piotr; Kuhn, Misty L.; Anderson, Wayne F.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) catalyzes the first unique step of the GMP branch of the purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway. This enzyme is found in organisms of all three kingdoms. IMPDH inhibitors have broad clinical applications in cancer treatment, as antiviral drugs and as immunosuppressants, and have also displayed antibiotic activity. We have determined three crystal structures of Bacillus anthracis IMPDH, in a phosphate ion-bound (termed “apo”) form and in complex with its substrate, inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP), and product, xanthosine 5′-monophosphate (XMP). This is the first example of a bacterial IMPDH in more than one state from the same organism. Furthermore, for the first time for a prokaryotic enzyme, the entire active site flap, containing the conserved Arg-Tyr dyad, is clearly visible in the structure of the apoenzyme. Kinetic parameters for the enzymatic reaction were also determined, and the inhibitory effect of XMP and mycophenolic acid (MPA) has been studied. In addition, the inhibitory potential of two known Cryptosporidium parvum IMPDH inhibitors was examined for the B. anthracis enzyme and compared with those of three bacterial IMPDHs from Campylobacter jejuni, Clostridium perfringens, and Vibrio cholerae. The structures contribute to the characterization of the active site and design of inhibitors that specifically target B. anthracis and other microbial IMPDH enzymes. PMID:22788966

  6. An unexpected phosphate binding site in Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Crystal structures of apo, holo and ternary complex of Cryptosporidium parvum enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2009-06-08

    The structure, function and reaction mechanism of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) have been extensively studied. Based on these studies, three anion binding sites have been identified, one 'Ps' site (for binding the C-3 phosphate of the substrate) and two sites, 'Pi' and 'new Pi', for inorganic phosphate. According to the original flip-flop model, the substrate phosphate group switches from the 'Pi' to the 'Ps' site during the multistep reaction. In light of the discovery of the 'new Pi' site, a modified flip-flop mechanism, in which the C-3 phosphate of the substrate binds to the 'new Pi' site and flips to the 'Ps' site before the hydride transfer, was proposed. An alternative model based on a number of structures of B. stearothermophilus GAPDH ternary complexes (non-covalent and thioacyl intermediate) proposes that in the ternary Michaelis complex the C-3 phosphate binds to the 'Ps' site and flips from the 'Ps' to the 'new Pi' site during or after the redox step. We determined the crystal structure of Cryptosporidium parvum GAPDH in the apo and holo (enzyme + NAD) state and the structure of the ternary enzyme-cofactor-substrate complex using an active site mutant enzyme. The C. parvum GAPDH complex was prepared by pre-incubating the enzyme with substrate and cofactor, thereby allowing free movement of the protein structure and substrate molecules during their initial encounter. Sulfate and phosphate ions were excluded from purification and crystallization steps. The quality of the electron density map at 2{angstrom} resolution allowed unambiguous positioning of the substrate. In three subunits of the homotetramer the C-3 phosphate group of the non-covalently bound substrate is in the 'new Pi' site. A concomitant movement of the phosphate binding loop is observed in these three subunits. In the fourth subunit the C-3 phosphate occupies an unexpected site not seen before and the phosphate binding loop remains in the substrate-free conformation

  7. Novel functions of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex may mediate diverse oxidant-induced changes in mitochondrial enzymes associated with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qingli; Xu, Hui; Kleinman, Wayne A.; Gibson, Gary E.

    2011-01-01

    Measures in autopsied brains from Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) patients reveal a decrease in the activity of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) and an increase in malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity. The present experiments tested whether both changes could be caused by the common oxidant H2O2 and to probe the mechanism underlying these changes. Since the response to H2O2 is modified by the level of the E2k subunit of KGDHC, the interaction of MDH and KGDHC was studied in cells with varying levels of E2k. In cells with only 23% of normal E2k protein levels, one hour treatment with H2O2 decreased KGDHC and increased MDH activity as well as the mRNA level for both cytosolic and mitochondrial MDH. The increase in MDH did not occur in cells with 100% or 46% of normal E2k. Longer treatments with H2O2 inhibited the activity of both enzymes. Glutathione is a major regulator of cellular redox state and can modify enzyme activities. H2O2 converts reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG), which reacts with protein thiols. Treatment of purified KGDHC with GSSG leads to glutathionylation of all three KGDHC subunits. Thus, cellular glutathione level was manipulated by two means to determine the effect on KGDHC and MDH activities. Both buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), which inhibits glutathione synthesis without altering redox state, and H2O2 diminished glutathione to a similar level after 24 hrs. However, H2O2, but not BSO, reduced KGDHC and MDH activities, and the reduction was greater in the E2k-23 line. These findings suggest that the E2k may mediate diverse responses of KGDHC and MDH to oxidants. In addition, the differential response of activities to BSO and H2O2 together with the in vitro interaction of KGDHC with GSSG suggests that glutathionylation is one possible mechanism underlying oxidative stress-induced inhibition of the TCA cycle enzymes. PMID:18206986

  8. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a type of ...

  9. Communication between thiamin cofactors in the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component active centers: evidence for a "direct pathway" between the 4'-aminopyrimidine N1' atoms.

    PubMed

    Nemeria, Natalia S; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-04-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4'-aminopyrimidine N1' atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu(571), Glu(235), and Glu(237)) and Arg(606) resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu(235) makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu(571) residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time. PMID:20106967

  10. Nickel-phendione complex covalently attached onto carbon nanotube/cross linked glucose dehydrogenase as bioanode for glucose/oxygen compartment-less biofuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korani, Aazam; Salimi, Abdollah; Hadadzadeh, Hasan

    2015-05-01

    Here, [Ni(phendion) (phen)]Cl2 complex, (phendion and phen are 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione and 5-amino-1, 10-phenanthrolin) covalently attached onto carboxyl functionalized multi walls carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE/MWCNTs-COOH) using solid phase interactions and combinatorial approaches.The attached [Ni(phendion) (phen)]Cl2 complex displays a surface controlled electrode process and it acts as an effective redox mediator for electrocatalytic oxidation of dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) at reduced overpotentials. With co-immobilization of glucose dehydrogenase enzyme (GDH) by crosslinking an effective biocatalyst for glucose oxidation designed. The onset potential and current density are -0.1 V versus Ag/AgCl electrode and 0.550 mA cm-2, which indicate the applicability of the proposed system as an efficient bioanode for biofuel cell (BFC) design. A GCE/MWCNTs modified with electrodeposited gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a platform for immobilization of bilirubin oxidase (BOD) and the prepared GCE/MWCNTs/AuNPs/BOD biocathode exhibits an onset potential of 0.56 V versus Ag/AgCl. The performance of the fabricated bioanode and biocathode in a membraneless enzyme based glucose/O2 biofuel cell is evaluated. The open circuit voltage of the cell and maximum current density are 520 mV and 0.233 mA cm-2, respectively, while maximum power density of 40 μWcm-2 achieves at voltage of 280 mV with stable output power after 24 h continues operation.

  11. Synthesis and antifungal activity of 5-iodo-1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazole derivatives as pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Bo; He, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Li; You, Ge-Yun; Feng, Ling-Ling; Wan, Jian; He, Hong-Wu

    2015-04-01

    To identify new antifungal lead compound based on inhibitors of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1, a series of 5-iodo-1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazole derivatives 3 were prepared and evaluated for their Escherichia coli PDHc-E1 inhibitory activity and antifungal activity. The in vitro bioassay for the PDHc-E1 inhibition indicated all the compounds exhibited significant inhibition against E. coli PDHc-E1 (IC50<21μM), special compound 3g showed the most potent inhibitory activity (IC50=4.21±0.11μM) and was demonstrated to act as a competitive inhibitor of PDHc-E1. Meanwhile, inhibitor 3g exhibited very good enzyme-selective inhibition of PDHc-E1 between pig heart and E. coli. The assay of antifungal activity showed compounds 3e, 3g, and 3n exhibited fair to good activity against Rhizoctonia solani and Botrytis cinerea even at 12.5μg/mL. Especially compound 3n (EC50=5.4μg/mL; EC90=21.1μg/mL) exhibited almost 5.50 times inhibitory potency against B. cinerea than that of pyrimethanil (EC50=29.6μg/mL; EC90=113.4μg/mL). Therefore, in this study, compound 3n was found to be a novel lead compound for further optimization to find more potent antifungal compounds as microbial PDHc-E1 inhibitors. PMID:25766628

  12. Difficulties in recognition of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on the basis of clinical and biochemical features. The role of next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ciara, E.; Rokicki, D.; Halat, P.; Karkucińska-Więckowska, A.; Piekutowska-Abramczuk, D.; Mayr, J.; Trubicka, J.; Szymańska-Dębińska, T.; Pronicki, M.; Pajdowska, M.; Dudzińska, M.; Giżewska, M.; Krajewska-Walasek, M.; Książyk, J.; Sperl, W.; Płoski, R.; Pronicka, E.

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) defect is a well-known cause of mitochondrial disorders (MD) with at least six responsible genes (PDHA1, PDHB, DLAT, DLD, PDHX, PDP1). The aim of this work was to assess the diagnostic value of biochemical methods in recognition of PDHc defect in Polish patients with suspicion of MD. In the first step, Western blot of the E1α subunit was performed on 86 archive muscle bioptates with suspicion of MD. In the second step, Sanger PDHA1 sequencing was performed in 21 cases with low E1α expression. In the third step, 7 patients with negative results of PDHA1 sequencing were subjected to whole-exome sequencing (WES). This protocol revealed 4 patients with PDHA1 and one with DLD mutations. Four additional probands were diagnosed outside the protocol (WES or Sanger sequencing). The molecular characterization of PDHc defect was conducted in a total of 9 probands: 5 according to and 4 off the protocol. Additionally, two affected relatives were recognized by a family study. Altogether we identified seven different PDHA1 changes, including two novel variants [c.464T > C (p.Met155Thr) and c.856_859dupACTT (p.Arg288Leufs*10)] and one DLD variant. The lactate response to glucose load in the PDHA1 subset was compared to a subset of non PDHc-related MD. Opposite responses were observed, with an increase of 23% and decrease of 27%, respectively. The results show that determining lactate response to glucose load and muscle E1α expression may contribute to distinguishing PDHc-related and other MD, however, WES is becoming the method of choice for MD diagnostics. PMID:27144126

  13. Structures of the G81A mutant form of the active chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and its complex with two of its substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Dewanti, Asteriani; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Mitra, Bharati; Mathews, F. Scott

    2009-06-12

    (S)-Mandelate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Pseudomonas putida, a membrane-associated flavoenzyme, catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-mandelate to benzoylformate. Previously, the structure of a catalytically similar chimera, MDH-GOX2, rendered soluble by the replacement of its membrane-binding segment with the corresponding segment of glycolate oxidase (GOX), was determined and found to be highly similar to that of GOX except within the substituted segments. Subsequent attempts to cocrystallize MDH-GOX2 with substrate proved unsuccessful. However, the G81A mutants of MDH and of MDH-GOX2 displayed {approx}100-fold lower reactivity with substrate and a modestly higher reactivity towards molecular oxygen. In order to understand the effect of the mutation and to identify the mode of substrate binding in MDH-GOX2, a crystallographic investigation of the G81A mutant of the MDH-GOX2 enzyme was initiated. The structures of ligand-free G81A mutant MDH-GOX2 and of its complexes with the substrates 2-hydroxyoctanoate and 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate were determined at 1.6, 2.5 and 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In the ligand-free G81A mutant protein, a sulfate anion previously found at the active site is displaced by the alanine side chain introduced by the mutation. 2-Hydroxyoctanoate binds in an apparently productive mode for subsequent reaction, while 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate is bound to the enzyme in an apparently unproductive mode. The results of this investigation suggest that a lowering of the polarity of the flavin environment resulting from the displacement of nearby water molecules caused by the glycine-to-alanine mutation may account for the lowered catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme, which is consistent with the 30 mV lower flavin redox potential. Furthermore, the altered binding mode of the indolelactate substrate may account for its reduced activity compared with octanoate, as observed in the crystalline state.

  14. Difficulties in recognition of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on the basis of clinical and biochemical features. The role of next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ciara, E; Rokicki, D; Halat, P; Karkucińska-Więckowska, A; Piekutowska-Abramczuk, D; Mayr, J; Trubicka, J; Szymańska-Dębińska, T; Pronicki, M; Pajdowska, M; Dudzińska, M; Giżewska, M; Krajewska-Walasek, M; Książyk, J; Sperl, W; Płoski, R; Pronicka, E

    2016-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) defect is a well-known cause of mitochondrial disorders (MD) with at least six responsible genes (PDHA1, PDHB, DLAT, DLD, PDHX, PDP1). The aim of this work was to assess the diagnostic value of biochemical methods in recognition of PDHc defect in Polish patients with suspicion of MD. In the first step, Western blot of the E1α subunit was performed on 86 archive muscle bioptates with suspicion of MD. In the second step, Sanger PDHA1 sequencing was performed in 21 cases with low E1α expression. In the third step, 7 patients with negative results of PDHA1 sequencing were subjected to whole-exome sequencing (WES). This protocol revealed 4 patients with PDHA1 and one with DLD mutations. Four additional probands were diagnosed outside the protocol (WES or Sanger sequencing). The molecular characterization of PDHc defect was conducted in a total of 9 probands: 5 according to and 4 off the protocol. Additionally, two affected relatives were recognized by a family study. Altogether we identified seven different PDHA1 changes, including two novel variants [c.464T > C (p.Met155Thr) and c.856_859dupACTT (p.Arg288Leufs*10)] and one DLD variant. The lactate response to glucose load in the PDHA1 subset was compared to a subset of non PDHc-related MD. Opposite responses were observed, with an increase of 23% and decrease of 27%, respectively. The results show that determining lactate response to glucose load and muscle E1α expression may contribute to distinguishing PDHc-related and other MD, however, WES is becoming the method of choice for MD diagnostics. PMID:27144126

  15. Lack of mitochondria-generated acetyl-CoA by pyruvate dehydrogenase complex downregulates gene expression in the hepatic de novo lipogenic pathway.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Saleh; Birkaya, Barbara; Rideout, Todd C; Patel, Mulchand S

    2016-07-01

    During the absorptive state, the liver stores excess glucose as glycogen and synthesizes fatty acids for triglyceride synthesis for export as very low density lipoproteins. For de novo synthesis of fatty acids from glucose, the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is the gatekeeper for the generation of acetyl-CoA from glucose-derived pyruvate. Here, we tested the hypothesis that limiting the supply of PDC-generated acetyl-CoA from glucose would have an impact on expression of key genes in the lipogenic pathway. In the present study, although the postnatal growth of liver-specific PDC-deficient (L-PDCKO) male mice was largely unaltered, the mice developed hyperinsulinemia with lower blood glucose levels in the fed state. Serum and liver lipid triglyceride and cholesterol levels remained unaltered in L-PDCKO mice. Expression of several key genes (ACL, ACC1) in the lipogenic pathway and their upstream regulators (LXR, SREBP1, ChREBP) as well as several genes in glucose metabolism (Pklr, G6pd2, Pck1) and fatty acid oxidation (FAT, Cpt1a) was downregulated in livers from L-PDCKO mice. Interestingly, there was concomitant upregulation of lipogenic genes in adipose tissue from L-PDCKO mice. Although, the total hepatic acetyl-CoA content remained unaltered in L-PDCKO mice, modified acetylation profiles of proteins in the nuclear compartment suggested an important role for PDC-generated acetyl-CoA in gene expression in de novo fatty acid synthesis in the liver. This finding has important implications for the regulation of hepatic lipid synthesis in pathological states. PMID:27166281

  16. Platform engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum with reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity for improved production of L-lysine, L-valine, and 2-ketoisovalerate.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Jens; Schwentner, Andreas; Brunnenkan, Britta; Gabris, Christina; Grimm, Simon; Gerstmeir, Robert; Takors, Ralf; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Blombach, Bastian

    2013-09-01

    Exchange of the native Corynebacterium glutamicum promoter of the aceE gene, encoding the E1p subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC), with mutated dapA promoter variants led to a series of C. glutamicum strains with gradually reduced growth rates and PDHC activities. Upon overexpression of the l-valine biosynthetic genes ilvBNCE, all strains produced l-valine. Among these strains, C. glutamicum aceE A16 (pJC4 ilvBNCE) showed the highest biomass and product yields, and thus it was further improved by additional deletion of the pqo and ppc genes, encoding pyruvate:quinone oxidoreductase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, respectively. In fed-batch fermentations at high cell densities, C. glutamicum aceE A16 Δpqo Δppc (pJC4 ilvBNCE) produced up to 738 mM (i.e., 86.5 g/liter) l-valine with an overall yield (YP/S) of 0.36 mol per mol of glucose and a volumetric productivity (QP) of 13.6 mM per h [1.6 g/(liter × h)]. Additional inactivation of the transaminase B gene (ilvE) and overexpression of ilvBNCD instead of ilvBNCE transformed the l-valine-producing strain into a 2-ketoisovalerate producer, excreting up to 303 mM (35 g/liter) 2-ketoisovalerate with a YP/S of 0.24 mol per mol of glucose and a QP of 6.9 mM per h [0.8 g/(liter × h)]. The replacement of the aceE promoter by the dapA-A16 promoter in the two C. glutamicum l-lysine producers DM1800 and DM1933 improved the production by 100% and 44%, respectively. These results demonstrate that C. glutamicum strains with reduced PDHC activity are an excellent platform for the production of pyruvate-derived products. PMID:23835179

  17. Sustained photoevolution of molecular hydrogen in a mutant of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 deficient in the type I NADPH-dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Cournac, Laurent; Guedeney, Geneviève; Peltier, Gilles; Vignais, Paulette M

    2004-03-01

    The interaction between hydrogen metabolism, respiration, and photosynthesis was studied in vivo in whole cells of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 by continuously monitoring the changes in gas concentrations (H2, CO2, and O2) with an online mass spectrometer. The in vivo activity of the bidirectional [NiFe]hydrogenase [H2:NAD(P) oxidoreductase], encoded by the hoxEFUYH genes, was also measured independently by the proton-deuterium (H-D) exchange reaction in the presence of D2. This technique allowed us to demonstrate that the hydrogenase was insensitive to light, was reversibly inactivated by O2, and could be quickly reactivated by NADH or NADPH (+H2). H2 was evolved by cells incubated anaerobically in the dark, after an adaptation period. This dark H2 evolution was enhanced by exogenously added glucose and resulted from the oxidation of NAD(P)H produced by fermentation reactions. Upon illumination, a short (less than 30-s) burst of H2 output was observed, followed by rapid H2 uptake and a concomitant decrease in CO2 concentration in the cyanobacterial cell suspension. Uptake of both H2 and CO2 was linked to photosynthetic electron transport in the thylakoids. In the ndhB mutant M55, which is defective in the type I NADPH-dehydrogenase complex (NDH-1) and produces only low amounts of O2 in the light, H2 uptake was negligible during dark-to-light transitions, allowing several minutes of continuous H2 production. A sustained rate of photoevolution of H2 corresponding to 6 micro mol of H2 mg of chlorophyll(-1) h(-1) or 2 ml of H2 liter(-1) h(-1) was observed over a longer time period in the presence of glucose and was slightly enhanced by the addition of the O2 scavenger glucose oxidase. By the use of the inhibitors DCMU [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] and DBMIB (2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone), it was shown that two pathways of electron supply for H2 production operate in M55, namely photolysis of water at the level of photosystem II and

  18. Plant d-2-Hydroxyglutarate Dehydrogenase Participates in the Catabolism of Lysine Especially during Senescence*

    PubMed Central

    Engqvist, Martin K. M.; Kuhn, Anke; Wienstroer, Judith; Weber, Katrin; Jansen, Erwin E. W.; Jakobs, Cornelis; Weber, Andreas P. M.; Maurino, Veronica G.

    2011-01-01

    d-2-Hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (d-2HGDH) catalyzes the specific and efficient oxidation of d-2-hydroxyglutarate (d-2HG) to 2-oxoglutarate using FAD as a cofactor. In this work, we demonstrate that d-2HGDH localizes to plant mitochondria and that its expression increases gradually during developmental and dark-induced senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating an enhanced demand of respiration of alternative substrates through this enzymatic system under these conditions. Using loss-of-function mutants in d-2HGDH (d2hgdh1) and stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS, we found that the d-isomer of 2HG accumulated in leaves of d2hgdh1 during both forms of carbon starvation. In addition to this, d2hgdh1 presented enhanced levels of most TCA cycle intermediates and free amino acids. In contrast to the deleterious effects caused by a deficiency in d-2HGDH in humans, d2hgdh1 and overexpressing lines of d-2HGDH showed normal developmental and senescence phenotypes, indicating a mild role of d-2HGDH in the tested conditions. Moreover, metabolic fingerprinting of leaves of plants grown in media supplemented with putative precursors indicated that d-2HG most probably originates during the catabolism of lysine. Finally, the l-isomer of 2HG was also detected in leaf extracts, indicating that both chiral forms of 2HG participate in plant metabolism. PMID:21296880

  19. Effects of spermine on mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and the ranges of extramitochondrial Ca2+ to which the matrix Ca2+-sensitive dehydrogenases respond.

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, J G

    1989-01-01

    1. Spermine has previously been reported to be an activator of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake [Nicchitta & Williamson (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 12978-12983]. This is confirmed in the present studies on rat heart, liver and kidney mitochondria by using the activities of the Ca2+-sensitive intramitochondrial dehydrogenases (pyruvate, NAD+-isocitrate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenases) as probes for matrix Ca2+, and also, for the heart mitochondria, by using entrapped fura-2. 2. As also found previously [Damuni, Humphreys & Reed (1984) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 124, 95-99], spermine activated extracted pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase. However, it was found to have no effects at all on the extracted NAD+-isocitrate or 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenases. It also had no effects on activities of the enzymes in mitochondria incubated in the absence of Ca2+, or on the Ca2+-sensitivity of the enzymes in uncoupled mitochondria. 3. Spermine clearly activated 45Ca uptake by coupled mitochondria, but had no effect on Ca2+ egress from mitochondria previously loaded with 45Ca. 4. Spermine (with effective Km values of around 0.2-0.4 mM) caused an approx. 2-3-fold decrease in the effective ranges of extramitochondrial Ca2+ in the activation of the Ca2+-sensitive matrix enzymes in coupled mitochondria from all of the tissues. The effects of spermine appeared to be largely independent of the other effectors of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport, such as Mg2+ (inhibitor of uptake) and Na+ (promoter of egrees). 5. In the most physiological circumstance, coupled mitochondria incubated with Na+ and Mg2+, the presence of saturating spermine (2 mM) resulted in an effective extramitochondrial Ca2+ range for matrix enzyme activation of from about 30-50 nM up to about 800-1200 nM, with half-maximal effects around 250-400 nM-Ca2+. The implications of these findings for the regulation of matrix and extramitochondrial Ca2+ are discussed. PMID:2604711

  20. Identification and characterization of kinetically competent carbinolamine and alpha-iminoglutarate complexes in the glutamate dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of L-glutamate using a multiwavelength transient state approach.

    PubMed

    Maniscalco, S J; Saha, S K; Fisher, H F

    1998-10-13

    A highly constrained and heavily overdetermined multiwavelength transient state kinetic approach has been used to study the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate catalyzed by beef liver glutamate dehydrogenase. Spectra generated using the known enzyme-reduced coenzyme-substrate spectrum served as models for deconvolution of kinetic scan data. Deconvolution of the multiwavelength time course array shows formation of three distinguishable intermediates in the reaction sequence, an ultrablue-shifted complex, an ultrared-shifted complex, and a blue-shifted complex. The ultrablue-shifted entity is identified as the enzyme-NADPH-alpha-iminoglutarate complex (ERI) and the ultrared as the enzyme-NADPH-alpha-carbinolamine complex (ERC). The blue-shifted complex is characterized as the E-NADPH-ketoglutarate species (ERK). The location of these species along the reaction coordinate has been determined and their kinetic competency in the reaction sequence has been established by fitting the concentration time courses of the components for both the alpha-deuterio- and the alpha-protio-L-glutamate reactions to the now highly constrained differential equations derived from a kinetic scheme involving the sequential formation of alpha-iminoglutarate, alpha-carbinolamine, and alpha-ketoglutarate-reduced coenzyme complexes, following the formation of two prehydride transfer complexes. PMID:9772187

  1. Complex genetic findings in a female patient with pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency: Null mutations in the PDHX gene associated with unusual expression of the testis-specific PDHA2 gene in her somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana; Silva, Maria João; Pavlu-Pereira, Hana; Florindo, Cristina; Barroso, Madalena; Marques, Bárbara; Correia, Hildeberto; Oliveira, Anabela; Gaspar, Ana; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Rivera, Isabel

    2016-10-15

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes a key step in the generation of cellular energy and is composed by three catalytic elements (E1, E2, E3), one structural subunit (E3-binding protein), and specific regulatory elements, phosphatases and kinases (PDKs, PDPs). The E1α subunit exists as two isoforms encoded by different genes: PDHA1 located on Xp22.1 and expressed in somatic tissues, and the intronless PDHA2 located on chromosome 4 and only detected in human spermatocytes and spermatids. We report on a young adult female patient who has PDC deficiency associated with a compound heterozygosity in PDHX encoding the E3-binding protein. Additionally, in the patient and in all members of her immediate family, a full-length testis-specific PDHA2 mRNA and a 5'UTR-truncated PDHA1 mRNA were detected in circulating lymphocytes and cultured fibroblasts, being both mRNAs translated into full-length PDHA2 and PDHA1 proteins, resulting in the co-existence of both PDHA isoforms in somatic cells. Moreover, we observed that DNA hypomethylation of a CpG island in the coding region of PDHA2 gene is associated with the somatic activation of this gene transcription in these individuals. This study represents the first natural model of the de-repression of the testis-specific PDHA2 gene in human somatic cells, and raises some questions related to the somatic activation of this gene as a potential therapeutic approach for most forms of PDC deficiency. PMID:27343776

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of L-serine 3-dehydrogenase complexed with NADP+ from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Kazunari; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Araki, Tomohiro; Shibata, Takeshi; Nikki, Takahiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2013-02-01

    An NAD(P)(+)-dependent L-serine 3-dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 120.81, b = 57.40, c = 56.37 Å, β = 106.88°. Diffraction data were collected to 1.57 Å resolution on beamline NE3A at the Photon Factory. The overall R(merge) was 4.2% and the data completeness was 90.1%. PMID:23385753

  3. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  4. BACTERIAL EXPRESSION, PURIFICATION, AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is a very large multi-component structure that catalyzes decarboxylation of pyruvate, yielding CO2, NADH, and acetyl-CoA as products. The decarboxylation reaction is catalyzed by pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1). The PDC occupies a key position in intermediary met...

  5. Crystal structure of Pseudomonas fluorescens mannitol 2-dehydrogenase: evidence for a very divergent long-chain dehydrogenase family.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd; Wilson, David K

    2003-02-01

    Mannitol 2-dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens (pfMDH) is a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase that catalyzes the reversible NAD(P)-dependent oxidation of D-mannitol to D-fructose, D-arabinitol to D-xylulose, and D-sorbitol to L-sorbose. It is a member of the mostly prokaryotic family of long-chain mannitol dehydrogenases that so far includes 66 members. Unlike other alcohol and polyol dehydrogenases that utilize metal cofactors or a conserved active-site tyrosine for catalysis, an invariant lysine is the general base. The crystal structure of pfMDH in a binary complex with NAD(H) and a ternary complex with NAD(H) and D-mannitol have been determined to 1.7 and 1.8 A resolution respectively. Comparison of secondary structure assignment to sequence alignments suggest the shortest members of this family, mannitol-1-phosphate 5-dehydrogenases, retain core elements but lack secondary structural components found on the surface of pfMDH. The elements predicted to be absent are distributed throughout the primary sequence, implying that a simple truncation or fusion did not occur. The closest structural neighbors are 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, UDP-glucose dehydrogenase, N-(1-D-carboxyethyl)-L-norvaline dehydrogenase, and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Although sequence identity is only a barely recognizable 7-10%, conservation of secondary structural elements as well as homologous residues that are contributed to the active site indicates they may be related by divergent evolution. PMID:12604241

  6. Multiple retinoid dehydrogenases in testes cytosol from alcohol dehydrogenase negative or positive deermice.

    PubMed

    Posch, K C; Napoli, J L

    1992-05-28

    Retinoic acid syntheses from retinol by cytosol from testes of alcohol dehydrogenase negative or positive deermice were similar in specific activity and in their insensitivity to 1 M ethanol or 100 mM 4-methylpyrazole. Anion-exchange followed by size-exclusion chromatography revealed multiple and similarly migrating peaks in each cytosol that had both retinol and retinal dehydrogenase activities. Thus, the effects of ethanol on testes cannot be caused by direct inhibition of cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis because retinoid dehydrogenases distinct from mouse class A2 alcohol dehydrogenases, which corresponds to human class I, occurred in testes and they were not inhibited by ethanol. These data also demonstrate the occurrence of multiple cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis activities and indicate that the two reactions of cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis, retinol and retinal dehydrogenation, may be catalyzed by enzymes that occur as complexes. PMID:1599517

  7. Purification of a dichlorophenol-indophenol oxidoreductase from rat and bovine synaptic membranes: tight complex association of a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoform, TOAD64, enolase-gamma and aldolase C.

    PubMed Central

    Bulliard, C; Zurbriggen, R; Tornare, J; Faty, M; Dastoor, Z; Dreyer, J L

    1997-01-01

    NADH-dichlorophenol-indophenol oxidoreductases (PMOs) were purified from synaptic plasma membranes or synaptic vesicles (small recycling vesicles) from both bovine and rat brains and from a neuroblastoma cell line, NB41A3. Several isoforms could be identified in purified plasma membranes and vesicles. Purification of the enzyme activity involved protein extraction with detergents, (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, chromatography under stringent conditions and native PAGE. PMO activity could be attributed to a very tight complex of several proteins that could not be separated except by SDS/PAGE. SDS/PAGE resolved the purified complex into at least five proteins, which could be micro-sequenced and identified unambiguously as hsc70, TOAD64 and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase tightly associated with the brain-specific proteins aldolase C and enolase-gamma. Enzyme activity could be purified from both synaptic plasma membranes and recycling vesicles, yields being much greater from the latter source. Highly purified plasma membranes (prepared from a neuroblastoma cell line NB41A3 by iminobiotinylation of intact cells and affinity purification with avidin and anti-avidin antibodies under very stringent conditions) also displayed PMO activity tightly associated with TOAD64. The association of PMO in a tight complex was confirmed by its immunoprecipitation from cellular and membrane extracts of NB41A3 using antibodies directed against any component protein of the complex followed by immunodetection with antibodies directed against the other members. Antibodies also inhibited the enzyme activity synergistically. In addition, induction of the different components of the complex during dichlorophenol-indophenol stress was demonstrated by the S1 RNase-protection assay in synchronized NB41A3 cells. The role of the complex in membrane fusion and cellular response to extracellular oxidative stress during growth and development is discussed. PMID:9182718

  8. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins from Mycoplasma bovis and Establishment of an Indirect ELISA Based on Recombinant E1 Beta Subunit of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kai; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yuewei; Xu, Jian; Jiang, Fei; Liu, Xu; Xu, Wei; Wu, Wenxue

    2014-01-01

    The pathogen Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) is a major cause of respiratory disease, mastitis, and arthritis in cattle. Screening the key immunogenic proteins and updating rapid diagnostic techniques are necessary to the prevention and control of M. bovis infection. In this study, 19 highly immunogenic proteins from M. bovis strain PD were identified using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Of these 19 proteins, pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component beta subunit (PDHB) showed excellent immune reactivity and repeatability. PDHB was found to be conserved in different M. bovis isolates, as indicated by Western blot analysis. On the basis of these results, a rPDHB-based indirect ELISA (iELISA) was established for the detection of serum antibodies using prokaryotically expressed recombinant PDHB protein as the coating antigen. The specificity analysis result showed that rPDHB-based iELISA did not react with other pathogens assessed in our study except M. agalactiae (which infects sheep and goats). Moreover, 358 serum samples from several disease-affected cattle feedlots were tested using this iELISA system and a commercial kit, which gave positive rates of 50.8% and 39.9%, respectively. The estimated Kappa agreement coefficient between the two methods was 0.783. Notably, 39 positive serum samples that had been missed by the commercial kit were all found to be positive by Western blot analysis. The detection rate of rPDHB-based iELISA was significantly higher than that of the commercial kit at a serum dilution ratio of 1∶5120 to 1∶10,240 (P<0.05). Taken together, these results provide important information regarding the novel immunogenic proteins of M. bovis. The established rPDHB-based iELISA may be suitable for use as a new method of antibody detection in M. bovis. PMID:24520369

  9. Identification of novel immunogenic proteins from Mycoplasma bovis and establishment of an indirect ELISA based on recombinant E1 beta subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhenhong; Fu, Ping; Wei, Kai; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yuewei; Xu, Jian; Jiang, Fei; Liu, Xu; Xu, Wei; Wu, Wenxue

    2014-01-01

    The pathogen Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) is a major cause of respiratory disease, mastitis, and arthritis in cattle. Screening the key immunogenic proteins and updating rapid diagnostic techniques are necessary to the prevention and control of M. bovis infection. In this study, 19 highly immunogenic proteins from M. bovis strain PD were identified using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Of these 19 proteins, pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component beta subunit (PDHB) showed excellent immune reactivity and repeatability. PDHB was found to be conserved in different M. bovis isolates, as indicated by Western blot analysis. On the basis of these results, a rPDHB-based indirect ELISA (iELISA) was established for the detection of serum antibodies using prokaryotically expressed recombinant PDHB protein as the coating antigen. The specificity analysis result showed that rPDHB-based iELISA did not react with other pathogens assessed in our study except M. agalactiae (which infects sheep and goats). Moreover, 358 serum samples from several disease-affected cattle feedlots were tested using this iELISA system and a commercial kit, which gave positive rates of 50.8% and 39.9%, respectively. The estimated Kappa agreement coefficient between the two methods was 0.783. Notably, 39 positive serum samples that had been missed by the commercial kit were all found to be positive by Western blot analysis. The detection rate of rPDHB-based iELISA was significantly higher than that of the commercial kit at a serum dilution ratio of 1∶5120 to 1∶10,240 (P<0.05). Taken together, these results provide important information regarding the novel immunogenic proteins of M. bovis. The established rPDHB-based iELISA may be suitable for use as a new method of antibody detection in M. bovis. PMID:24520369

  10. DNA binding, antioxidant, cytotoxicity (MTT, lactate dehydrogenase, NO), and cellular uptake studies of structurally different nickel(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes: synthesis, spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, R; Kalaivani, P; Huang, R; Poornima, P; Vijaya Padma, V; Dallemer, F; Natarajan, K

    2013-02-01

    Three new nickel(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes have been synthesized and characterized by analytical, spectral, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. In complex 1, the ligand 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehydethiosemicarbazone coordinated as a monobasic tridentate donor, whereas in complexes 2 and 3, the ligands salicylaldehyde-4(N)-ethylthiosemicarbazone and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde-4(N)-ethylthiosemicarbazone coordinated as a dibasic tridentate donor. The DNA binding ability of the complexes in calf thymus DNA was explored by absorption and emission titration experiments. The antioxidant property of the new complexes was evaluated to test their free-radical scavenging ability. In vitro cytotoxicity assays were performed for the new complexes in A549 and HepG2 cell lines. The new compounds overcome cisplatin resistance in the A549 cell line and they were also active in the HepG2 cell line. The cellular uptake study showed the accumulation of the complexes in tumor cells depended on the nature of the ligand attached to the nickel ion. PMID:23274397

  11. NdhM Subunit Is Required for the Stability and the Function of NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase Complexes Involved in CO2 Uptake in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803*

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhihui; Xu, Min; Wu, Yaozong; Lv, Jing; Fu, Pengcheng; Mi, Hualing

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterial type I NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes play a crucial role in a variety of bioenergetic reactions such as respiration, CO2 uptake, and cyclic electron transport around photosystem I. Two types of NDH-1 complexes, NDH-1MS and NDH-1MS′, are involved in the CO2 uptake system. However, the composition and function of the complexes still remain largely unknown. Here, we found that deletion of ndhM caused inactivation of NDH-1-dependent cyclic electron transport around photosystem I and abolishment of CO2 uptake, resulting in a lethal phenotype under air CO2 condition. The mutation of NdhM abolished the accumulation of the hydrophilic subunits of the NDH-1, such as NdhH, NdhI, NdhJ, and NdhK, in the thylakoid membrane, resulting in disassembly of NDH-1MS and NDH-1MS′ as well as NDH-1L. In contrast, the accumulation of the hydrophobic subunits was not affected in the absence of NdhM. In the cytoplasm, the NDH-1 subcomplex assembly intermediates including NdhH and NdhK were seriously affected in the ΔndhM mutant but not in the NdhI-deleted mutant ΔndhI. In vitro protein interaction analysis demonstrated that NdhM interacts with NdhK, NdhH, NdhI, and NdhJ but not with other hydrophilic subunits of the NDH-1 complex. These results suggest that NdhM localizes in the hydrophilic subcomplex of NDH-1 complexes as a core subunit and is essential for the function of NDH-1MS and NDH-1MS′ involved in CO2 uptake in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. PMID:26703473

  12. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Hernandez, Agustin; Speed, Haley; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-03-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes waterborne diseases worldwide. There is no effective therapy for C. parvum infection. The parasite depends mainly on glycolysis for energy production. Lactate dehydrogenase is a major regulator of glycolysis. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase and high resolution crystal structures of the apo-enzyme and four ternary complexes. The ternary complexes capture the enzyme bound to NAD/NADH or its 3-acetylpyridine analog in the cofactor binding pocket, while the substrate binding site is occupied by one of the following ligands: lactate, pyruvate or oxamate. The results reveal distinctive features of the parasitic enzyme. For example, C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase prefers the acetylpyridine analog of NADH as a cofactor. Moreover, it is slightly less sensitive to gossypol inhibition compared with mammalian lactate dehydrogenases and not inhibited by excess pyruvate. The active site loop and the antigenic loop in C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are considerably different from those in the human counterpart. Structural features and enzymatic properties of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are similar to enzymes from related parasites. Structural comparison with malate dehydrogenase supports a common ancestry for the two genes. PMID:25542170

  13. The odyssey of a young gene: structure-function studies in human glutamate dehydrogenases reveal evolutionary-acquired complex allosteric regulation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zaganas, Ioannis V; Kanavouras, Konstantinos; Borompokas, Nikolas; Arianoglou, Giovanna; Dimovasili, Christina; Latsoudis, Helen; Vlassi, Metaxia; Mastorodemos, Vasileios

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the reversible inter-conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia, interconnecting carbon skeleton and nitrogen metabolism. In addition, it functions as an energy switch by its ability to fuel the Krebs cycle depending on the energy status of the cell. As GDH lies at the intersection of several metabolic pathways, its activity is tightly regulated by several allosteric compounds that are metabolic intermediates. In contrast to other mammals that have a single GDH-encoding gene, humans and great apes possess two isoforms of GDH (hGDH1 and hGDH2, encoded by the GLUD1 and GLUD2 genes, respectively) with distinct regulation pattern, but remarkable sequence similarity (they differ, in their mature form, in only 15 of their 505 amino-acids). The GLUD2 gene is considered a very young gene, emerging from the GLUD1 gene through retro-position only recently (<23 million years ago). The new hGDH2 iso-enzyme, through random mutations and natural selection, is thought to have conferred an evolutionary advantage that helped its persistence through primate evolution. The properties of the two highly homologous human GDHs have been studied using purified recombinant hGDH1 and hGDH2 proteins obtained by expression of the corresponding cDNAs in Sf21 cells. According to these studies, in contrast to hGDH1 that maintains basal activity at 35-40 % of its maximal, hGDH2 displays low basal activity that is highly responsive to activation by rising levels of ADP and/or L-leucine which can also act synergistically. While hGDH1 is inhibited potently by GTP, hGDH2 shows remarkable GTP resistance. Furthermore, the two iso-enzymes are differentially inhibited by estrogens, polyamines and neuroleptics, and also differ in heat-lability. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms that underlie these different regulation patterns of the two iso-enzymes (and consequently the evolutionary adaptation of hGDH2 to a new functional role), we have

  14. Reconfiguration of N Metabolism upon Hypoxia Stress and Recovery: Roles of Alanine Aminotransferase (AlaAT) and Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH)

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of climatic change, more heavy precipitation and more frequent flooding and waterlogging events threaten the productivity of arable farmland. Furthermore, crops were not selected to cope with flooding- and waterlogging-induced oxygen limitation. In general, low oxygen stress, unlike other abiotic stresses (e.g., cold, high temperature, drought and saline stress), received little interest from the scientific community and less financial support from stakeholders. Accordingly, breeding programs should be developed and agronomical practices should be adapted in order to save plants’ growth and yield—even under conditions of low oxygen availability (e.g., submergence and waterlogging). The prerequisite to the success of such breeding programs and changes in agronomical practices is a good knowledge of how plants adapt to low oxygen stress at the cellular and the whole plant level. In the present paper, we summarized the recent knowledge on metabolic adjustment in general under low oxygen stress and highlighted thereafter the major changes pertaining to the reconfiguration of amino acids syntheses. We propose a model showing (i) how pyruvate derived from active glycolysis upon hypoxia is competitively used by the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate synthase cycle, leading to alanine accumulation and NAD+ regeneration. Carbon is then saved in a nitrogen store instead of being lost through ethanol fermentative pathway. (ii) During the post-hypoxia recovery period, the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate dehydrogenase cycle mobilizes this carbon from alanine store. Pyruvate produced by the reverse reaction of alanine aminotransferase is funneled to the TCA cycle, while deaminating glutamate dehydrogenase regenerates, reducing equivalent (NADH) and 2-oxoglutarate to maintain the cycle function. PMID:27258319

  15. Reconfiguration of N Metabolism upon Hypoxia Stress and Recovery: Roles of Alanine Aminotransferase (AlaAT) and Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH).

    PubMed

    Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M

    2016-01-01

    In the context of climatic change, more heavy precipitation and more frequent flooding and waterlogging events threaten the productivity of arable farmland. Furthermore, crops were not selected to cope with flooding- and waterlogging-induced oxygen limitation. In general, low oxygen stress, unlike other abiotic stresses (e.g., cold, high temperature, drought and saline stress), received little interest from the scientific community and less financial support from stakeholders. Accordingly, breeding programs should be developed and agronomical practices should be adapted in order to save plants' growth and yield-even under conditions of low oxygen availability (e.g., submergence and waterlogging). The prerequisite to the success of such breeding programs and changes in agronomical practices is a good knowledge of how plants adapt to low oxygen stress at the cellular and the whole plant level. In the present paper, we summarized the recent knowledge on metabolic adjustment in general under low oxygen stress and highlighted thereafter the major changes pertaining to the reconfiguration of amino acids syntheses. We propose a model showing (i) how pyruvate derived from active glycolysis upon hypoxia is competitively used by the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate synthase cycle, leading to alanine accumulation and NAD⁺ regeneration. Carbon is then saved in a nitrogen store instead of being lost through ethanol fermentative pathway. (ii) During the post-hypoxia recovery period, the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate dehydrogenase cycle mobilizes this carbon from alanine store. Pyruvate produced by the reverse reaction of alanine aminotransferase is funneled to the TCA cycle, while deaminating glutamate dehydrogenase regenerates, reducing equivalent (NADH) and 2-oxoglutarate to maintain the cycle function. PMID:27258319

  16. A Novel Nucleus-encoded Chloroplast Protein, PIFI, Is Involved in NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase Complex Mediated Chlororespiratory and Possibly Cyclic Electron Transport in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A transient rise in chlorophyll fluorescence after a light-to-dark transition reflects non-photochemical reduction of the plastoquinone pool. This process is dependent on the activity of the chloroplast NAD(P)H-dehydrogease complex (NDH) which mediates electron flow from stromal reductants to the pl...

  17. Indoleamine 2,3‑dioxygenase downregulates T‑cell receptor complex ζ‑chain and c‑Myc, and reduces proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase levels and mitochondrial glutaminase in human T‑cells.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Tsogka, Konstantina; Sounidaki, Maria; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3‑dioxygenase (IDO), through L‑tryptophan depletion, activates general control non‑derepressible (GCN) 2 kinase and suppresses T‑cell proliferation, in addition to suppressing aerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis, which are required for these rapidly proliferating cells. A number of, however not all of these alterations, are partially mediated through IDO‑induced p53 upregulation. In two‑way mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs), IDO reduced cellular proliferation. In MLR‑derived T‑cells, IDO induced the expression levels of p53 and p21, however concurrently reduced the levels of ζ‑chain, c‑Myc, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH‑A) and glutaminase (GLS)2. However, p53 had no effect on the expression of the above proteins. These results were recapitulated in T‑cells activated with anti‑CD2, anti‑CD3 and anti‑CD28 by direct activation of the GCN2 kinase with tryptophanol. In conclusion, IDO, through GCN2 kinase activation, downregulates the levels of TCR‑complex ζ‑chain and c‑Myc, resulting in the suppression of T‑cell proliferation and a reduction in the levels of LDH‑A and GLS2, which are key enzymes involved in aerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis, respectively. PMID:26647830

  18. Role of intragenic binding of cAMP responsive protein (CRP) in regulation of the succinate dehydrogenase genes Rv0249c-Rv0247c in TB complex mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Gwendowlyn S.; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Peterson, Matthew W.; Gomes, Antonio L.C.; Ma, Zhuo; Galagan, James E.; McDonough, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens adapt to changing environments within their hosts, and the signaling molecule adenosine 3′, 5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) facilitates this process. In this study, we characterized in vivo DNA binding and gene regulation by the cAMP-responsive protein CRP in M. bovis BCG as a model for tuberculosis (TB)-complex bacteria. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep-sequencing (ChIP-seq) showed that CRP associates with ∼900 DNA binding regions, most of which occur within genes. The most highly enriched binding region was upstream of a putative copper transporter gene (ctpB), and crp-deleted bacteria showed increased sensitivity to copper toxicity. Detailed mutational analysis of four CRP binding sites upstream of the virulence-associated Rv0249c-Rv0247c succinate dehydrogenase genes demonstrated that CRP directly regulates Rv0249c-Rv0247c expression from two promoters, one of which requires sequences intragenic to Rv0250c for maximum expression. The high percentage of intragenic CRP binding sites and our demonstration that these intragenic DNA sequences significantly contribute to biologically relevant gene expression greatly expand the genome space that must be considered for gene regulatory analyses in mycobacteria. These findings also have practical implications for an important bacterial pathogen in which identification of mutations that affect expression of drug target-related genes is widely used for rapid drug resistance screening. PMID:25940627

  19. In Planta Mutagenesis of Src Homology 3 Domain-like Fold of NdhS, a Ferredoxin-binding Subunit of the Chloroplast NADH Dehydrogenase-like Complex in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like (NDH) complex mediates cyclic electron transport around photosystem I and chlororespiration in angiosperms. The Src homology 3 domain (SH3)-like fold protein NdhS/CRR31 is an NDH subunit that is necessary for high affinity binding of ferredoxin, indicating that chloroplast NDH functions as a ferredoxin:plastoquinone oxidoreductase. However, the mechanism of the interaction between NdhS and ferredoxin is unclear. In this study, we analyzed their interaction in planta by using site-directed mutagenesis of NdhS. In general, binding of ferredoxin to its target proteins depends on electrostatic interaction. In silico analysis predicted the presence of a positively charged pocket in the SH3-like domain of NdhS, where nine charged residues are highly conserved among plants. Systematic alteration of these sites with neutral glutamine revealed that only arginine 193 was required for high NDH activity in vivo. Further replacement of arginine 193 with negatively charged aspartate or glutamate or hydrophobic alanine significantly decreased the efficiency of ferredoxin-dependent plastoquinone reduction by NDH in ruptured chloroplasts. Similar results were obtained in in vivo analyses of NDH activity and electron transport. From these results, we propose that the positive charge of arginine 193 in the SH3-like domain of NdhS is critical for electrostatic interaction with ferredoxin in vivo. PMID:24225949

  20. New Insights into Human 17β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 14: First Crystal Structures in Complex with a Steroidal Ligand and with a Potent Nonsteroidal Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bertoletti, Nicole; Braun, Florian; Lepage, Mahalia; Möller, Gabriele; Adamski, Jerzy; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard; Marchais-Oberwinkler, Sandrine

    2016-07-28

    17β-HSD14 is a SDR enzyme able to oxidize estradiol and 5-androstenediol using NAD(+). We determined the crystal structure of this human enzyme as the holo form and as ternary complexes with estrone and with the first potent, nonsteroidal inhibitor. The structures reveal a conical, rather large and lipophilic binding site and are the starting point for structure-based inhibitor design. The two natural variants (S205 and T205) were characterized and adopt a similar structure. PMID:27362750

  1. Cyclic Electron Flow around Photosystem I in C3 Plants. In Vivo Control by the Redox State of Chloroplasts and Involvement of the NADH-Dehydrogenase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Joët, Thierry; Cournac, Laurent; Peltier, Gilles; Havaux, Michel

    2002-01-01

    Cyclic electron flow around photosystem (PS) I has been widely described in vitro in chloroplasts or thylakoids isolated from C3 plant leaves, but its occurrence in vivo is still a matter of debate. Photoacoustic spectroscopy and kinetic spectrophotometry were used to analyze cyclic PS I activity in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Petit Havana) leaf discs illuminated with far-red light. Only a very weak activity was measured in air with both techniques. When leaf discs were placed in anaerobiosis, a high and rapid cyclic PS I activity was measured. The maximal energy storage in far-red light increased to 30% to 50%, and the half-time of the P700 re-reduction in the dark decreased to around 400 ms; these values are comparable with those measured in cyanobacteria and C4 plant leaves in aerobiosis. The stimulatory effect of anaerobiosis was mimicked by infiltrating leaves with inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration or of the chlororespiratory oxidase, therefore, showing that changes in the redox state of intersystem electron carriers tightly control the rate of PS I-driven cyclic electron flow in vivo. Measurements of energy storage at different modulation frequencies of far-red light showed that anaerobiosis-induced cyclic PS I activity in leaves of a tobacco mutant deficient in the plastid Ndh complex was kinetically different from that of the wild type, the cycle being slower in the former leaves. We conclude that the Ndh complex is required for rapid electron cycling around PS I. PMID:11842179

  2. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers EVIDENCE FOR A DIRECT PATHWAY BETWEEN THE 4′-AMINOPYRIMIDINE N1′ ATOMS

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeria, Natalia S; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-11-03

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4{prime}-aminopyrimidine N1{prime} atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu{sup 571}, Glu{sup 235}, and Glu{sup 237}) and Arg{sup 606} resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. (1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. (2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. (3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. (4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu{sup 235} makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu{sup 571} residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time.

  3. Asp295 stabilizes the active-site loop structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase, facilitating phosphorylation of Ser292 by pyruvate dehydrogenase-kinase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed an invitro system for detailed analysis of reversible phosphorylation of the plant mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, comprising recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana a2b2-hetero tetrameric pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) plus A.thaliana E1-kinase (AtPDK). Upon addition of MgATP...

  4. Increased sensitivity of photosynthesis to antimycin A induced by inactivation of the chloroplast ndhB gene. Evidence for a participation of the NADH-dehydrogenase complex to cyclic electron flow around photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Joët, T; Cournac, L; Horvath, E M; Medgyesy, P; Peltier, G

    2001-04-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var Petit Havana) ndhB-inactivated mutants (ndhB-) obtained by plastid transformation (E.M. Horvath, S.O. Peter, T. Joët, D. Rumeau, L. Cournac, G.V. Horvath, T.A. Kavanagh, C. Schäfer, G. Peltier, P. MedgyesyHorvath [2000] Plant Physiol 123: 1337-1350) were used to study the role of the NADH-dehydrogenase complex (NDH) during photosynthesis and particularly the involvement of this complex in cyclic electron flow around photosystem I (PSI). Photosynthetic activity was determined on leaf discs by measuring CO2 exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence quenchings during a dark-to-light transition. In the absence of treatment, both non-photochemical and photochemical fluorescence quenchings were similar in ndhB- and wild type (WT). When leaf discs were treated with 5 microM antimycin A, an inhibitor of cyclic electron flow around PSI, both quenchings were strongly affected. At steady state, maximum photosynthetic electron transport activity was inhibited by 20% in WT and by 50% in ndhB-. Under non-photorespiratory conditions (2% O2, 2,500 microL x L(-1) CO2), antimycin A had no effect on photosynthetic activity of WT, whereas a 30% inhibition was observed both on quantum yield of photosynthesis assayed by chlorophyll fluorescence and on CO2 assimilation in ndhB-. The effect of antimycin A on ndhB- could not be mimicked by myxothiazol, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 complex, therefore showing that it is not related to an inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain but rather to an inhibition of cyclic electron flow around PSI. We conclude to the existence of two different pathways of cyclic electron flow operating around PSI in higher plant chloroplasts. One of these pathways, sensitive to antimycin A, probably involves ferredoxin plastoquinone reductase, whereas the other involves the NDH complex. The absence of visible phenotype in ndhB- plants under normal conditions is explained by the complement of these two

  5. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase from halophilic archaebacteria: purification and properties of the enzyme from halobacterium halobium

    SciTech Connect

    Danson, J.J.; McQuattie, A.; Stevenson, K.J.

    1986-07-01

    Halophilic archaebacteria possess dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase activity but apparently lack the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes of which it is usually an integral component. In this paper, the purification of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase from Halobacterium halobium is reported. The enzyme is a dimer with a polypeptide chain M/sub r/ of 58,000 (+/-3000). The amino acid composition of the enzyme is compared with those of the eubacterial and eukaryotic dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases, and evidence is presented to suggest that the N-terminal amino acid of the H. halobium enzyme is blocked. Chemical modification with the trivalent arsenical reagent (p-aminophenyl)dichloroarsine indicates the involvement of a reversibly reducible disulfide bond in the enzyme's catalytic mechanism. The possible metabolic role of this dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in the absence of 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes is discussed.

  6. Reduced levels of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase decrease the glutamate content of ripe tomato fruit but have no effect on green fruit or leaves.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Gisela; D'Angelo, Matilde; Sulpice, Ronan; Stitt, Mark; Valle, Estela M

    2015-06-01

    Glutamate (Glu) is a taste enhancer that contributes to the characteristic flavour of foods. In fruit of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), the Glu content increases dramatically during the ripening process, becoming the most abundant free amino acid when the fruit become red. There is also a concomitant increase in NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity during the ripening transition. This enzyme is located in the mitochondria and catalyses the reversible amination of 2-oxoglutarate to Glu. To investigate the potential effect of GDH on Glu metabolism, the abundance of GDH was altered by artificial microRNA technology. Efficient silencing of all the endogenous SlGDH genes was achieved, leading to a dramatic decrease in total GDH activity. This decrease in GDH activity did not lead to any clear morphological or metabolic phenotype in leaves or green fruit. However, red fruit on the transgenic plants showed markedly reduced levels of Glu and a large increase in aspartate, glucose and fructose content in comparison to wild-type fruit. These results suggest that GDH is involved in the synthesis of Glu in tomato fruit during the ripening processes. This contrasts with the biological role ascribed to GDH in many other tissues and species. Overall, these findings suggest that GDH has a major effect on the control of metabolic composition during tomato fruit ripening, but not at other stages of development. PMID:25878356

  7. Characterization of a NADH-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase Mutant of Arabidopsis Demonstrates the Key Role of this Enzyme in Root Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism[W

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Jean-Xavier; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Armengaud, Patrick; Clément, Gilles; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pelletier, Sandra; Catterou, Manuella; Azzopardi, Marianne; Gibon, Yves; Lea, Peter J.; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The role of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated by studying the physiological impact of a complete lack of enzyme activity in an Arabidopsis thaliana plant deficient in three genes encoding the enzyme. This study was conducted following the discovery that a third GDH gene is expressed in the mitochondria of the root companion cells, where all three active GDH enzyme proteins were shown to be present. A gdh1-2-3 triple mutant was constructed and exhibited major differences from the wild type in gene transcription and metabolite concentrations, and these differences appeared to originate in the roots. By placing the gdh triple mutant under continuous darkness for several days and comparing it to the wild type, the evidence strongly suggested that the main physiological function of NADH-GDH is to provide 2-oxoglutarate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The differences in key metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the triple mutant versus the wild type indicated that, through metabolic processes operating mainly in roots, there was a strong impact on amino acid accumulation, in particular alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, and aspartate in both roots and leaves. These results are discussed in relation to the possible signaling and physiological functions of the enzyme at the interface of carbon and nitrogen metabolism. PMID:23054470

  8. Characterization of a NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase mutant of Arabidopsis demonstrates the key role of this enzyme in root carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Jean-Xavier; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Armengaud, Patrick; Clément, Gilles; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pelletier, Sandra; Catterou, Manuella; Azzopardi, Marianne; Gibon, Yves; Lea, Peter J; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric

    2012-10-01

    The role of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated by studying the physiological impact of a complete lack of enzyme activity in an Arabidopsis thaliana plant deficient in three genes encoding the enzyme. This study was conducted following the discovery that a third GDH gene is expressed in the mitochondria of the root companion cells, where all three active GDH enzyme proteins were shown to be present. A gdh1-2-3 triple mutant was constructed and exhibited major differences from the wild type in gene transcription and metabolite concentrations, and these differences appeared to originate in the roots. By placing the gdh triple mutant under continuous darkness for several days and comparing it to the wild type, the evidence strongly suggested that the main physiological function of NADH-GDH is to provide 2-oxoglutarate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The differences in key metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the triple mutant versus the wild type indicated that, through metabolic processes operating mainly in roots, there was a strong impact on amino acid accumulation, in particular alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, and aspartate in both roots and leaves. These results are discussed in relation to the possible signaling and physiological functions of the enzyme at the interface of carbon and nitrogen metabolism. PMID:23054470

  9. Complex formation and catalytic activation by the PII signaling protein of N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase from Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942.

    PubMed

    Maheswaran, Mani; Urbanke, Claus; Forchhammer, Karl

    2004-12-31

    The signal transduction protein P(II) from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942 forms a complex with the key enzyme of arginine biosynthesis, N-acetyl-l-glutamate kinase (NAGK). Here we report the effect of complex formation on the catalytic properties of NAGK. Although pH and ion dependence are not affected, the catalytic efficiency of NAGK is strongly enhanced by binding of P(II), with K(m) decreasing by a factor of 10 and V(max) increasing 4-fold. In addition, arginine feedback inhibition of NAGK is strongly decreased in the presence of P(II), resulting in a tight control of NAGK activity under physiological conditions by P(II). Analysis of the NAGK-P(II) complex suggests that one P(II) trimer binds to one NAGK hexamer with a K(d) of approximately 3 nm. Complex formation is strongly affected by ATP and ADP. ADP is a strong inhibitor of complex formation, whereas ATP inhibits complex formation only in the absence of divalent cations or in the presence of Mg(2+) ions, together with increased 2-oxoglutarate concentrations. Ca(2+) is able to antagonize the negative effect of ATP and 2-oxoglutarate. ADP and ATP exert their adverse effect on NAGK-P(II) complex formation through binding to the P(II) protein. PMID:15502156

  10. Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biologic...

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of an electron-transfer complex of ferredoxin and ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase from the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya boryana

    PubMed Central

    Shinmura, Kanako; Muraki, Norifumi; Yoshida, Ayako; Hase, Toshiharu; Kurisu, Genji

    2012-01-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) dependent glutamate synthase (Fd-GOGAT) is a key enzyme involved in nitrogen assimilation that catalyzes the two-electron reductive conversion of Gln and 2-oxoglutarate to two molecules of Glu. Fd serves as an electron donor for Fd-GOGAT and the two proteins form a transient electron-transfer complex. In this study, these two proteins were cocrystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected and processed at 2.65 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P43, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 84.95, c = 476.31 Å. PMID:22442234

  12. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  13. Cloning and mRNA Expression of NADH Dehydrogenase during Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus Development and Pesticide Response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NADH dehydrogenase, the largest of the respiratory complexes, is the first enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have cloned and sequenced cDNA of NADH dehydrogenase gene from Ochlerotatus (Ochlerotatus) taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) adult (GeneBank Accession number: FJ458415). The ...

  14. Loss of Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenase Activity Alters Seed Metabolism Impairing Seed Maturation and Post-Germination Growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sew, Yun Shin; Ströher, Elke; Fenske, Ricarda; Millar, A Harvey

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; EC 1.1.1.37) has multiple roles; the most commonly described is its catalysis of the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The roles of mMDH in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed development and germination were investigated in mMDH1 and mMDH2 double knockout plants. A significant proportion of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds were nonviable and developed only to torpedo-shaped embryos, indicative of arrested seed embryo growth during embryogenesis. The viable mmdh1mmdh2 seeds had an impaired maturation process that led to slow germination rates as well as retarded post-germination growth, shorter root length, and decreased root biomass. During seed development, mmdh1mmdh2 showed a paler green phenotype than the wild type and exhibited deficiencies in reserve accumulation and reduced final seed biomass. The respiration rate of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds was significantly elevated throughout their maturation, consistent with the previously reported higher respiration rate in mmdh1mmdh2 leaves. Mutant seeds showed a consistently higher content of free amino acids (branched-chain amino acids, alanine, serine, glycine, proline, and threonine), differences in sugar and sugar phosphate levels, and lower content of 2-oxoglutarate. Seed-aging assays showed that quiescent mmdh1mmdh2 seeds lost viability more than 3 times faster than wild-type seeds. Together, these data show the important role of mMDH in the earliest phases of the life cycle of Arabidopsis. PMID:27208265

  15. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a spectrophotometric assay and an activity staining in a native gel of the dehydrogenase. New insights in the recently discovered organocatalytic Michael addition of water led to the conclusion that the previously performed experiments to identify MhyADH as a bi-functional enzyme and their results need to be reconsidered and the reliability of the methodology used needs to be critically evaluated. PMID:24949265

  16. Substrate specificity of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Lindstad, R I; Köll, P; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-01-01

    The substrate specificity of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase has been studied by steady-state kinetics over the range pH 7-10. Sorbitol dehydrogenase stereo-selectively catalyses the reversible NAD-linked oxidation of various polyols and other secondary alcohols into their corresponding ketones. The kinetic constants are given for various novel polyol substrates, including L-glucitol, L-mannitol, L-altritol, D-altritol, D-iditol and eight heptitols, as well as for many aliphatic and aromatic alcohols. The maximum velocities (kcat) and the substrate specificity-constants (kcat/Km) are positively correlated with increasing pH. The enzyme-catalysed reactions occur by a compulsory ordered kinetic mechanism with the coenzyme as the first, or leading, substrate. With many substrates, the rate-limiting step for the overall reaction is the enzyme-NADH product dissociation. However, with several substrates there is a transition to a mechanism with partial rate-limitation at the ternary complex level, especially at low pH. The kinetic data enable the elucidation of new empirical rules for the substrate specificity of sorbitol dehydrogenase. The specificity-constants for polyol oxidation vary as a function of substrate configuration with D-xylo> D-ribo > L-xylo > D-lyxo approximately L-arabino > D-arabino > L-lyxo. Catalytic activity with a polyol or an aromatic substrate and various 1-deoxy derivatives thereof varies with -CH2OH > -CH2NH2 > -CH2OCH3 approximately -CH3. The presence of a hydroxyl group at each of the remaining chiral centres of a polyol, apart from the reactive C2, is also nonessential for productive ternary complex formation and catalysis. A predominantly nonpolar enzymic epitope appears to constitute an important structural determinant for the substrate specificity of sorbitol dehydrogenase. The existence of two distinct substrate binding regions in the enzyme active site, along with that of the catalytic zinc, is suggested to account for the lack of

  17. Maple syrup urine disease: The E1{beta} gene of human branched-chain {alpha}-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex has 11 rather than 10 exons, and the 3{prime} UTR in one of the two E1{beta} mRNAs arises from intronic sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.L.; Chuang, D.T.; Cox, R.P.

    1996-06-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) or branched-chain ketoaciduria is caused by a deficiency in the mitochondrial branched-chain {alpha}-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKAD) complex. The clinical manifestations are characterized by accumulation of branched chain amino and {alpha}-ketoacids, which leads to severe cerebral edema with seizures, ketoacidosis, and mental retardation. The BCKAD complex comprises three catalytic components, i.e., a decarboxylase (E1) consisting of two E1{alpha} (M{sub r} = 46,000) and two E1{Beta} (M{sub r} = 37,500) subunits, a transacylase (E2) that contains 24 lipoic acid-bearing subunits, and a dehydrogenase (E3), which is a homodimeric flavoprotein. MSUD is genetically heterogeneous, since mutations in the E1{alpha} subunit (type IA MSUD), the E1{Beta} subunit (type IB), the E2 subunit (type II) and the E3 subunit (type III) have been described. The functional consequences of certain mutations in the BCKAD complex have been studied. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Elevated plasma citrulline: look for dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Haviv, Ruby; Zeharia, Avraham; Belaiche, Corinne; Haimi Cohen, Yishai; Saada, Ann

    2014-02-01

    The E3 subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase/dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase/DLD/lipoamide dehydrogenase/LAD), is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme and also a part of the branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes. DLD deficiency (MIM #246900), is relatively frequent in the Ashkenazi Jewish population but occurs in other populations as well. Early diagnosis is important to prevent episodes of metabolic decompensation, liver failure, and encephalopathy. The clinical presentations are varied and may include Reye-like syndrome, hepatic failure, myopathy, and myoglobinuria. Laboratory markers, such as elevated urinary alpha-ketoglutarate, blood pyruvate, lactate, and ammonia, are mostly nonspecific and not always present, making the diagnosis difficult. Since we observed elevated plasma citrulline levels in a number of confirmed cases, we retrospectively examined the value of citrulline as a biochemical marker for DLD deficiency. Data was gathered from the files of 17 pediatric patients with DLD deficiency, confirmed by enzymatic and genetic analysis. The control group included 19 patients in whom urea cycle defects were ruled out but DLD deficiency was suspected. Seven of the DLD-deficient patients presented with elevated plasma citrulline levels (median value 205 μM, range 59-282 μM) (normal range 1-45 μM) while none in the control patient group. In five patients, elevated citrulline was associated with elevated plasma glutamine and metabolic acidosis. Interestingly, elevated plasma citrulline was associated with the common G229C mutation. In conclusion, we suggest that elevated plasma citrulline in the absence of urea cycle defects warrants an investigation for DLD deficiency. PMID:23995961

  19. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dehydrogenase-B pieces (subunits) of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme. This enzyme is found throughout the body and is important ... cells. There are five different forms of this enzyme, each made up of four protein subunits. Various ...

  20. Expression, purification and characterization of human glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) allosteric regulatory mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jie; Hsu, Betty Y L; MacMullen, Courtney M; Poncz, Mortimer; Smith, Thomas J; Stanley, Charles A

    2002-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyses the reversible oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate in the mitochondrial matrix. In mammals, this enzyme is highly regulated by allosteric effectors. The major allosteric activator and inhibitor are ADP and GTP, respectively; allosteric activation by leucine may play an important role in amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion. The physiological significance of this regulation has been highlighted by the identification of children with an unusual hyperinsulinism/hyperammonaemia syndrome associated with dominant mutations in GDH that cause a loss in GTP inhibition. In order to determine the effects of these mutations on the function of the human GDH homohexamer, we studied the expression, purification and characterization of two of these regulatory mutations (H454Y, which affects the putative GTP-binding site, and S448P, which affects the antenna region) and a mutation designed to alter the putative binding site for ADP (R463A). The sensitivity to GTP inhibition was impaired markedly in the purified H454Y (ED(50), 210 microM) and S448P (ED(50), 3.1 microM) human GDH mutants compared with the wild-type human GDH (ED(50), 42 nM) or GDH isolated from heterozygous patient cells (ED(50), 290 and 280 nM, respectively). Sensitivity to ADP or leucine stimulation was unaffected by these mutations, confirming that they interfere specifically with the inhibitory GTP-binding site. Conversely, the R463A mutation completely eliminated ADP activation of human GDH, but had little effect on either GTP inhibition or leucine activation. The effects of these three mutations on ATP regulation indicated that this nucleotide inhibits human GDH through binding of its triphosphate tail to the GTP site and, at higher concentrations, activates the enzyme through binding of the nucleotide to the ADP site. These data confirm the assignment of the GTP and ADP allosteric regulatory sites on GDH based on X-ray crystallography and provide

  1. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlinger, D.J.; Reed, L.J.

    1986-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). No pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase activity was detected at any stage of the purification. However, the purified PDC was phosphorylated and inactivated by purified PDH kinase from bovine kidney mitochondria, Mg/sup 2 +/, and (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. The protein-bound radioactivity was localized in the PDH ..cap alpha.. subunit. The phosphorylated, inactivated PDC was dephosphorylated and reactivated with purified bovine PDH phosphatase, Mg/sup 2 +/, and Ca/sup 2 +/. From a tryptic digest of phosphorylated yeast PDC a radioactive peptide was isolated by anion and reverse phase HPLC. The sequence of this tetradecapeptide is Tyr-Gly-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Thr-Thr-Tyr-Arg. This sequence is very similar to the sequence of a tryptic phosphopeptide derived from the ..cap alpha.. subunit of bovine kidney and heart PDH: Tyr-His-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Val-Ser-Tyr-Arg.

  2. Heterogeneous expression of protein and mRNA in pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, I D; Kerr, D S; Ho, L; Lusk, M M; Pepin, R A; Javed, A A; Mole, J E; Jesse, B W; Thekkumkara, T J; Pons, G

    1988-01-01

    Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase [pyruvate:lipoamide 2-oxidoreductase (decarboxylating and acceptor-acetylating), EC 1.2.4.1], the first component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is associated with lactic acidosis and central nervous system dysfunction. Using both specific antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase and cDNAs coding for its two alpha and beta subunits, we characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency in 11 patients. Three different patterns were found on immunologic and RNA blot analyses. (i) Seven patients had immunologically detectable crossreactive material for the alpha and beta proteins of pyruvate dehydrogenase. (ii) Two patients had no detectable crossreactive protein for either the alpha or beta subunit but had normal amounts of mRNA for both alpha and beta subunits. (iii) The remaining two patients also had no detectable crossreactive protein but had diminished amounts of mRNA for the alpha subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase only. These results indicate that loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity may be associated with either absent or catalytically inactive proteins, and in those cases in which this enzyme is absent, mRNA for one of the subunits may also be missing. When mRNA for one of the subunits is lacking, both protein subunits are absent, suggesting that a mutation affecting the expression of one of the subunit proteins causes the remaining uncomplexed subunit to be unstable. The results show that several different mutations account for the molecular heterogeneity of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency. Images PMID:3140238

  3. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Bitto, Eduard; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-08-13

    Since first discovered in Zea mays, cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) genes have been identified in many plants including rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, which possesses CKX homologues (AtCKX1-AtCKX7). So far, the three-dimensional structure of only Z. mays CKX (ZmCKX1) has been determined. The crystal structures of ZmCKX1 have been solved in the native state and in complex with reaction products and a slowly reacting substrate. The structures revealed four glycosylated asparagine residues and a histidine residue covalently linked to FAD. Combined with the structural information, recent biochemical analyses of ZmCKX1 concluded that the final products of the reaction, adenine and a side chain aldehyde, are formed by nonenzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cytokinin imine products resulting directly from CKX catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtCKX7 (gene locus At5g21482.1, UniProt code Q9FUJ1).

  4. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-catalyzed chain oxidation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by perhydroxyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, P.C.

    1980-02-10

    The chain oxidation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase NADH by perhydroxyl radicals and propagated by molecular oxygen was studied by the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system, /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-ray, and pulse radiolysis. The chain length, amount of NADH oxidized per HO/sub 2/ generated, increases with increasing acidity of the medium and reaches a value of 73 at pH 5.0. The rate constant for the oxidation of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase NADH complex by HO/sub 2/ was estimated to be 2 x 10/sup 7/ m/sup -1/s/sup -1/ at ambient temperatures (23-24/sup 0/C). Rate studies as a function of pH indicate that O/sub 2//sup -/ is unreactive toward the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase NADH complex. Other dehydrogenases (malate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and isocitric dehydrogenase) studied showed no catalytic activity in the oxidation of NADH by HO/sub 2//O/sub 2//sup -/.

  5. Modulation of the interaction between aldolase and glycerol-phosphate dehydrogenase by fructose phosphates.

    PubMed

    Vértessy, B G; Orosz, F; Ovádi, J

    1991-06-24

    Kinetics of fructose-1,6-disphosphate aldolase (EC 4.1.2.13) catalyzed conversion of fructose phosphates was analyzed by coupling the aldolase reactions to the metabolically sequential enzyme, glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.8), which interacts with aldolase. At low enzyme concentration poly(ethylene glycol) was added to promote complex formation of aldolase and glycerol-phosphate dehydrogenase resulting in a 3-fold increase in KM of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and no change in Vmax. Kinetic parameters for fructose-1-phosphate conversion changed inversely upon complex formation: Vmax increased while KM remained unchanged. Gel penetration and ion-exchange chromatographic experiments showed positive modulation of the interaction of aldolase and dehydrogenase by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. The dissociation constant of the heterologous enzyme complex decreased 10-fold in the presence of this substrate. Fructose-1-phosphate or dihydroxyacetone phosphate had no effect on the dissociation constant of the aldolase-dehydrogenase complex. In addition, titration of fluorescein-labelled glycerol-phosphate dehydrogenase with aldolase indicated that both fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and fructose-2,6-biphosphate enhanced the affinity of aldolase to glycerol-phosphate dehydrogenase. The results of the kinetic and binding experiments suggest that binding of the C-6 phosphate group of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate to aldolase complexed with dehydrogenase is sterically impeded while saturation of the C-6 phosphate group site increases the affinity of aldolase for dehydrogenase. The possible molecular mechanism of the fructose-1,6-bisphosphate modulated interaction is discussed. PMID:2065091

  6. Loss of Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenase Activity Alters Seed Metabolism Impairing Seed Maturation and Post-Germination Growth in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; EC 1.1.1.37) has multiple roles; the most commonly described is its catalysis of the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The roles of mMDH in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed development and germination were investigated in mMDH1 and mMDH2 double knockout plants. A significant proportion of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds were nonviable and developed only to torpedo-shaped embryos, indicative of arrested seed embryo growth during embryogenesis. The viable mmdh1mmdh2 seeds had an impaired maturation process that led to slow germination rates as well as retarded post-germination growth, shorter root length, and decreased root biomass. During seed development, mmdh1mmdh2 showed a paler green phenotype than the wild type and exhibited deficiencies in reserve accumulation and reduced final seed biomass. The respiration rate of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds was significantly elevated throughout their maturation, consistent with the previously reported higher respiration rate in mmdh1mmdh2 leaves. Mutant seeds showed a consistently higher content of free amino acids (branched-chain amino acids, alanine, serine, glycine, proline, and threonine), differences in sugar and sugar phosphate levels, and lower content of 2-oxoglutarate. Seed-aging assays showed that quiescent mmdh1mmdh2 seeds lost viability more than 3 times faster than wild-type seeds. Together, these data show the important role of mMDH in the earliest phases of the life cycle of Arabidopsis. PMID:27208265

  7. Formaldehyde dehydrogenase preparations from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) comprise methanol dehydrogenase and methylene tetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Adeosun, Ekundayo K; Smith, Thomas J; Hoberg, Anne-Mette; Velarde, Giles; Ford, Robert; Dalton, Howard

    2004-03-01

    In methylotrophic bacteria, formaldehyde is an important but potentially toxic metabolic intermediate that can be assimilated into biomass or oxidized to yield energy. Previously reported was the purification of an NAD(P)(+)-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) from the obligate methane-oxidizing methylotroph Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), presumably important in formaldehyde oxidation, which required a heat-stable factor (known as the modifin) for FDH activity. Here, the major protein component of this FDH preparation was shown by biophysical techniques to comprise subunits of 64 and 8 kDa in an alpha(2)beta(2) arrangement. N-terminal sequencing of the subunits of FDH, together with enzymological characterization, showed that the alpha(2)beta(2) tetramer was a quinoprotein methanol dehydrogenase of the type found in other methylotrophs. The FDH preparations were shown to contain a highly active NAD(P)(+)-dependent methylene tetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase that was the probable source of the NAD(P)(+)-dependent formaldehyde oxidation activity. These results support previous findings that methylotrophs possess multiple pathways for formaldehyde dissimilation. PMID:14993320

  8. Cellobiose dehydrogenase in cellulose degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, L.; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro

    1996-10-01

    Cellobiose dehydrogenase is produced by a variety of fungi. Although it was already discovered during the 70`s, it`s role in cellulose and lignin degradation is yet ambiguous. The enzyme contains both heme and FAD as prosthetic groups, and seems to have a domain specifically designed to bind the enzyme to cellulose. It`s affinity to amorphous cellulose is higher than to crystalline cellulose. We will report on the binding behavior of the enzyme, its usefulness in elucidation of cellulose structures and also, possibilities for applications such as its use in measuring individual and synergistic mechanisms for cellulose degradation by endo- and exo-glucanases.

  9. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase in sorghum.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, A J; Saneoka, H; Rhodes, D; Joly, R J; Goldsbrough, P B

    1996-01-01

    The ability to synthesize and accumulate glycine betaine is wide-spread among angiosperms and is thought to contribute to salt and drought tolerance. In plants glycine betaine is synthesized by the two-step oxidation of choline via the intermediate betaine aldehyde, catalyzed by choline monooxygenase and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). Two sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) cDNA clones, BADH1 and BADH15, putatively encoding betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were isolated and characterized. BADH1 is a truncated cDNA of 1391 bp. BADH15 is a full-length cDNA clone, 1812 bp in length, predicted to encode a protein of 53.6 kD. The predicted amino acid sequences of BADH1 and BADH15 share significant homology with other plant BADHs. The effects of water deficit on BADH mRNA expression, leaf water relations, and glycine betaine accumulation were investigated in leaves of preflowering sorghum plants. BADH1 and BADH15 mRNA were both induced by water deficit and their expression coincided with the observed glycine betaine accumulation. During the course of 17 d, the leaf water potential in stressed sorghum plants reached -2.3 MPa. In response to water deficit, glycine betaine levels increased 26-fold and proline levels increased 108-fold. In severely stressed plants, proline accounted for > 60% of the total free amino acid pool. Accumulation of these compatible solutes significantly contributed to osmotic potential and allowed a maximal osmotic adjustment of 0.405 MPa. PMID:8934627

  10. Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency: molecular basis for intrafamilial heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Van Coster, R N; Old, S E; Medori, R; Winter, S; Gubits, R M; Matthews, P M; Brown, R M; Brown, G K; Dahl, H H

    1994-07-01

    Two half-brothers and their mother had symptomatic pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency. The infants had severe congenital lactic acidosis, seizures, and apneic spells and died at the ages 3 and 4 months. The mother was less symptomatic with mental retardation, truncal ataxia, and dysarthria. The residual pyruvate dehydrogenase activities in cultured skin fibroblasts from the 2 infants and their mother were 7, 15, and 10% of control values. Immunoblot analysis showed negligible amounts of E1 alpha and E1 beta subunits of the complex. Northern blot analysis for the E1 alpha subunit showed normal results. In the 2 sons, complementary DNA sequence analysis revealed a cytosine to thymine mutation in exon 4, resulting in a change of arginine 127 to tryptophan in the E1 alpha subunit. Restriction enzyme analysis of the polymerase chain reaction product representing exon 4 of the E1 alpha gene revealed that the mother was a heterozygotes. Complementary DNA restriction analysis and methylation analysis of the X chromosome DXS255 loci revealed skewed activation of the mutant allele, consistent with the deficient pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in the mother's fibroblasts. The milder maternal phenotype is consistent with variable X-inactivation patterns in different organs of female heterozygotes. PMID:8024267

  11. Single motoneuron succinate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, G R; Edgerton, V R

    1989-07-01

    We have developed a quantitative histochemical assay for measurement of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity in single motoneurons. A computer image processing system was used to quantify the histochemical enzyme reaction product and to follow the time course of the reaction. The optimal concentration for each of the ingredients of the incubation medium for the SDH reaction was determined and the importance of using histochemical "blanks" in the determination of enzymatic activity was demonstrated. The enzymatic activity was linear with respect to reaction time and tissue thickness. The procedure described meets the criteria generally considered essential for establishment of a quantitative histochemical assay. The assay was then used to examine the SDH activity of cat and rat motoneurons. It was found that motoneurons with a small soma size had a wide range of SDH activity, whereas those with a large soma size were restricted to low SDH activity. PMID:2732457

  12. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Nannelli, Caterina; Notaro, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    G6PD is a housekeeping gene expressed in all cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is part of the pentose phosphate pathway, and its main physiologic role is to provide NADPH. G6PD deficiency, one of the commonest inherited enzyme abnormalities in humans, arises through one of many possible mutations, most of which reduce the stability of the enzyme and its level as red cells age. G6PD-deficient persons are mostly asymptomatic, but they can develop severe jaundice during the neonatal period and acute hemolytic anemia when they ingest fava beans or when they are exposed to certain infections or drugs. G6PD deficiency is a global health issue. PMID:27040960

  13. Protein-mediated assembly of succinate dehydrogenase and its cofactors.

    PubMed

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Na, Un; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (or complex II; SDH) is a heterotetrameric protein complex that links the tribarboxylic acid cycle with the electron transport chain. SDH is composed of four nuclear-encoded subunits that must translocate independently to the mitochondria and assemble into a mature protein complex embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Recently, it has become clear that failure to assemble functional SDH complexes can result in cancer and neurodegenerative syndromes. The effort to thoroughly elucidate the SDH assembly pathway has resulted in the discovery of four subunit-specific assembly factors that aid in the maturation of individual subunits and support the assembly of the intact complex. This review will focus on these assembly factors and assess the contribution of each factor to the assembly of SDH. Finally, we propose a model of the SDH assembly pathway that incorporates all extant data. PMID:25488574

  14. Protein-mediated assembly of succinate dehydrogenase and its cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G.; Na, Un; Winge, Dennis R.; Rutter, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (or Complex II; SDH) is a heterotetrameric protein complex that links the tribarboxylic acid cycle with the electron transport chain. SDH is composed of four nuclear-encoded subunits that must translocate independently to the mitochondria and assemble into a mature protein complex embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Recently, it has become clear that failure to assemble functional SDH complexes can result in cancer and neurodegenerative syndromes. The effort to thoroughly elucidate the SDH assembly pathway has resulted in the discovery of four subunit-specific assembly factors that aid in the maturation of individual subunits and support the assembly of the intact complex. This review will focus on these assembly factors and assess the contribution of each factor to the assembly of SDH. Finally, we propose a model of the SDH assembly pathway that incorporates all extant data. PMID:25488574

  15. Regulation of human dihydrodiol dehydrogenase by Michael acceptor xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, P J; Jaiswal, A K; Tew, K D

    1994-06-01

    A human oxidoreductase (H-37) that is overexpressed in ethacrynic acid-resistant HT29 colon cells (Ciaccio, P. J., Stuart, J.E., and Tew, K.D. (1993) Mol. Pharmacol. 43, 845-853) has been identified as a dihydrodiol dehydrogenase. Translated protein from a dihydrodiol dehydrogenase cDNA isolated from a library prepared from ethacrynic acid-resistant HT29 cell poly(A+) RNA was recognized by anti-H-37 IgG and was identical in molecular weight with H-37. The isolated cDNA was identical in both nucleotide and amino acid sequences with the recently cloned liver dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (Stolz, A., Hammond, L., Lou, H., Takikawa, H., Ronk, M., and Shively, J.E. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 10448-10457). Using this cDNA as probe, we have examined its induction by Michael acceptors. The steady state dihydrodiol dehydrogenase mRNA level in the ethacrynic acid-resistant line was increased 30-fold relative to that of wild-type cells. Twenty-four hour treatment of wild-type cells with ethacrynic acid or dimethyl maleate increased mRNA 10-fold and 5-fold, respectively. These changes are accompanied by both increased protein expression and increased NADP-dependent 1-acenaphthenol oxidative activity in cell cytosol. In gel shift assays, compared to wild type controls, increased binding of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase human antioxidant response element (hARE) DNA to redox labile protein complexes present in treated and resistant cell nuclear extract was observed. Ethacrynic acid induced CAT activity 2-fold in Hepa1 cells stably transfected with NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase hARE-tk-CAT chimeric gene construct. Thus, dihydrodiol dehydrogenase protein is inducible by de novo synthesis from mRNA by structurally related monofunctional inducer Michael acceptors. Altered in vitro binding of nuclear protein to the hARE is indirect evidence for the involvement of an element similar to hARE in the regulation of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase by these agents. PMID:7515059

  16. Postischemic hyperoxia reduces hippocampal pyruvate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Erica M.; Rosenthal, Robert E.; Kristian, Tibor; Fiskum, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate and represents the sole bridge between anaerobic and aerobic cerebral energy metabolism. Previous studies demonstrating loss of PDHC enzyme activity and immunoreactivity during reperfusion after cerebral ischemia suggest that oxidative modifications are involved. This study tested the hypothesis that hyperoxic reperfusion exacerbates loss of PDHC enzyme activity, possibly due to tyrosine nitration or S-nitrosation. We used a clinically relevant canine ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest model in which, after resuscitation and ventilation on either 100% O2 (hyperoxic) or 21–30% O2 (normoxic), animals were sacrificed at 2 h reperfusion and the brains removed for enzyme activity and immunoreactivity measurements. Animals resuscitated under hyperoxic conditions exhibited decreased PDHC activity and elevated 3-nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in the hippocampus but not the cortex, compared to nonischemic controls. These measures were unchanged in normoxic animals. In vitro exposure of purified PDHC to peroxynitrite resulted in a dose-dependent loss of activity and increased nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity. These results support the hypothesis that oxidative stress contributes to loss of hippocampal PDHC activity during cerebral ischemia and reperfusion and suggest that PDHC is a target of peroxynitrite. PMID:16716897

  17. [Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency and cerebral malformations].

    PubMed

    Eirís, J; Alvarez-Moreno, A; Briones, P; Alonso-Alonso, C; Castro-Gago, M

    1996-10-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is a major cause of primary lactic acidosis and severe global developmental delay. A deficiency of PDH E1 alpha, a subunit of the PDH complex is a prominent cause of congenital lactic acidosis. The E1 alpha cDNA and corresponding genomic DNA have been located in the short arm of the X-chromosome (Xp22-1). A isolated 'cerebral' lactic acidosis with cerebral dysgenesis is a recognized pattern of presentation of PDH deficiency. Here, we report clinical features, magnetic resonance, and biochemical studies of two females aged 6 months (case 1) and 26 months (case 2). Both had severe development delay, minor dysmorphic features, microcephaly, severe hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, cerebral atrophy, ventricular dilatation and increase in serum lactate levels without systemic acidosis. Urinary organic acid profile was compatible with PDH deficiency. Increased CSF lactate and pyruvate levels and reduced total PDH and PDH E1 activities in muscle and fibroblasts were observed in case 1. Otherwise, decreased total PDH activity in muscle but not in fibroblasts was seen in case 2. The PDH E1á gene was sequenced in the case 1 and a deletion in exon 7 was demonstrated. Dysmorphism with severe cerebral malformations in female patients merits a metabolic evaluation, including determination of lactate and pyruvate levels in CSF. PMID:8983728

  18. The Crystal Structure of a Ternary Complex of Betaine Aldehyde Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Provides New Insight Into the Reaction Mechansim and Shows A Novel Binding Mode of the 2'-Phosphate of NADP+ and A Novel Cation Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Segura, L.; Rudino-Pinera, E; Munoz-Clares, R; Horjales, E

    2009-01-01

    In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the NAD(P)+-dependent betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (PaBADH) may play the dual role of assimilating carbon and nitrogen from choline or choline precursors-abundant at infection sites-and producing glycine betaine and NADPH, potentially protective against the high-osmolarity and oxidative stresses prevalent in the infected tissues. Disruption of the PaBADH gene negatively affects the growth of bacteria, suggesting that this enzyme could be a target for antibiotic design. PaBADH is one of the few ALDHs that efficiently use NADP+ and one of the even fewer that require K+ ions for stability. Crystals of PaBADH were obtained under aerobic conditions in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, glycerol, NADP+ and K+ ions. The three-dimensional structure was determined at 2.1-A resolution. The catalytic cysteine (C286, corresponding to C302 of ALDH2) is oxidized to sulfenic acid or forms a mixed disulfide with 2-mercaptoethanol. The glutamyl residue involved in the deacylation step (E252, corresponding to E268 of ALDH2) is in two conformations, suggesting a proton relay system formed by two well-conserved residues (E464 and K162, corresponding to E476 and K178, respectively, of ALDH2) that connects E252 with the bulk water. In some active sites, a bound glycerol molecule mimics the thiohemiacetal intermediate; its hydroxyl oxygen is hydrogen bonded to the nitrogen of the amide groups of the side chain of the conserved N153 (N169 of ALDH2) and those of the main chain of C286, which form the 'oxyanion hole.' The nicotinamide moiety of the nucleotide is not observed in the crystal, and the adenine moiety binds in the usual way. A salt bridge between E179 (E195 of ALDH2) and R40 (E53 of ALDH2) moves the carboxylate group of the former away from the 2?-phosphate of the NADP+, thus avoiding steric clashes and/or electrostatic repulsion between the two groups. Finally, the crystal shows two K+ binding sites per subunit. One is in an

  19. Biochemical and Structural Studies of Uncharacterized Protein PA0743 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Revealed NAD+-dependent l-Serine Dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Tchigvintsev, Anatoli; Singer, Alexander; Brown, Greg; Flick, Robert; Evdokimova, Elena; Tan, Kemin; Gonzalez, Claudio F.; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2012-01-01

    The β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases form a large family of ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze oxidation of various β-hydroxy acid substrates to corresponding semialdehydes. Several known enzymes include β-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, 2-(hydroxymethyl)glutarate dehydrogenase, and phenylserine dehydrogenase, but the vast majority of β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases remain uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that the predicted β-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase PA0743 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa catalyzes an NAD+-dependent oxidation of l-serine and methyl-l-serine but exhibits low activity against β-hydroxyisobutyrate. Two crystal structures of PA0743 were solved at 2.2–2.3-Å resolution and revealed an N-terminal Rossmann fold domain connected by a long α-helix to the C-terminal all-α domain. The PA0743 apostructure showed the presence of additional density modeled as HEPES bound in the interdomain cleft close to the predicted catalytic Lys-171, revealing the molecular details of the PA0743 substrate-binding site. The structure of the PA0743-NAD+ complex demonstrated that the opposite side of the enzyme active site accommodates the cofactor, which is also bound near Lys-171. Site-directed mutagenesis of PA0743 emphasized the critical role of four amino acid residues in catalysis including the primary catalytic residue Lys-171. Our results provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and activity of β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. PMID:22128181

  20. Isolated tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase can synthesize acetoin which inhibits pyruvate oxidation as well as other aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Baggetto, L G; Lehninger, A L

    1987-05-29

    Oxidation of 1 mM pyruvate by Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor mitochondria is inhibited by acetoin, an unusual and important metabolite of pyruvate utilization by cancer cells, by acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal and excess pyruvate. The respiratory inhibition is reversed by other substrates added to pyruvate and also by 0.5 mM ATP. Kinetic properties of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from these tumor mitochondria have been studied. This complex appears to be able to synthesize acetoin from acetaldehyde plus pyruvate and is competitively inhibited by acetoin. The role of a new regulatory pattern for tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase is presented. PMID:3593337

  1. Structural Basis for "Flip-Flop" Action of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand

    2003-01-01

    The derivative of vitamin B1, thiamin pyrophosphate is a cofactor of pyruvate dehydrogenase, a component enzyme of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex that plays a major role in directing energy metabolism in the cell. This cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha)-C(=O) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. In alpha(sub 2)beta(sub 2)-tetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, there are two cofactor binding sites, each of them being a center of independently conducted, although highly coordinated enzymatic reactions. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites can now be understood based on the recently determined crystal structure of the holo-form of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.95A resolution. The structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase was determined using a combination of MAD phasing and molecular replacement followed by rounds of torsion-angles molecular-dynamics simulated-annealing refinement. The final pyruvate dehydrogenase structure included coordinates for all protein amino acids two cofactor molecules, two magnesium and two potassium ions, and 742 water molecules. The structure was refined to R = 0.202 and R(sub free) = 0.244. Our structural analysis of the enzyme folding and domain assembly identified a simple mechanism of this protein motion required for the conduct of catalytic action.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... a chemical that transmits signals in the brain (neurotransmitter) called gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). The primary ... Diseases National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Pediatric Neurotransmitter Disease Association GeneReviews (1 link) Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase ...

  3. Crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of human pyruvate dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, E.; Korotchkina, L. G.; Hong, Y. S.; Joachimiak, A.; Patel, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) is a component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The enzyme catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvic acid and the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. E1 is an alpha(2)beta(2) tetramer ( approximately 154 kDa). Crystals of this recombinant enzyme have been grown in polyethylene glycol 3350 using a vapor-diffusion method at 295 K. The crystals are characterized as orthorhombic, space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 64.2, b = 126.9, c = 190.2 A. Crystals diffracted to a minimum d spacing of 2.5 A. The asymmetric unit contains one alpha(2)beta(2) tetrameric E1 assembly; self-rotation function analysis showed a pseudo-twofold symmetry relating the two alphabeta dimers.

  4. Inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Hurd, Thomas R; Collins, Yvonne; Abakumova, Irina; Chouchani, Edward T; Baranowski, Bartlomiej; Fearnley, Ian M; Prime, Tracy A; Murphy, Michael P; James, Andrew M

    2012-10-12

    Reactive oxygen species are byproducts of mitochondrial respiration and thus potential regulators of mitochondrial function. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDHK2) inhibits the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, thereby regulating entry of carbohydrates into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Here we show that PDHK2 activity is inhibited by low levels of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) generated by the respiratory chain. This occurs via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues 45 and 392 on PDHK2 and results in increased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity. H(2)O(2) derives from superoxide (O(2)(.)), and we show that conditions that inhibit PDHK2 also inactivate the TCA cycle enzyme, aconitase. These findings suggest that under conditions of high mitochondrial O(2)(.) production, such as may occur under nutrient excess and low ATP demand, the increase in O(2)() and H(2)O(2) may provide feedback signals to modulate mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:22910903

  5. Inactivation of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 2 by Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species*

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Thomas R.; Collins, Yvonne; Abakumova, Irina; Chouchani, Edward T.; Baranowski, Bartlomiej; Fearnley, Ian M.; Prime, Tracy A.; Murphy, Michael P.; James, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are byproducts of mitochondrial respiration and thus potential regulators of mitochondrial function. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDHK2) inhibits the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, thereby regulating entry of carbohydrates into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Here we show that PDHK2 activity is inhibited by low levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated by the respiratory chain. This occurs via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues 45 and 392 on PDHK2 and results in increased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity. H2O2 derives from superoxide (O2˙̄), and we show that conditions that inhibit PDHK2 also inactivate the TCA cycle enzyme, aconitase. These findings suggest that under conditions of high mitochondrial O2˙̄ production, such as may occur under nutrient excess and low ATP demand, the increase in O2˙̄ and H2O2 may provide feedback signals to modulate mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:22910903

  6. Direct Observation of Correlated Interdomain Motion in Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Biehl, Ralf; Monkenbusch, Michael; Richter, Dieter; Hoffmann, Bernd; Merkel, Rudolf; Falus, Peter; Preost, Sylvain

    2008-09-26

    Interdomain motions in proteins are essential to enable or promote biochemical function. Neutron spin-echo spectroscopy is used to directly observe the domain dynamics of the protein alcohol dehydrogenase. The collective motion of domains as revealed by their coherent form factor relates to the cleft opening dynamics between the binding and the catalytic domains enabling binding and release of the functional important cofactor. The cleft opening mode hardens as a result of an overall stiffening of the domain complex due to the binding of the cofactor.

  7. Orchestration of Enzymatic Processing by Thiazole/Oxazole-Modified Microcin Dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Melby, Joel O.; Li, Xiangpo; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Thiazole/oxazole-modified microcins (TOMMs) comprise a structurally diverse family of natural products with varied bioactivities linked by the presence of posttranslationally installed thiazol(in)e and oxazol(in)e heterocycles. The detailed investigation of the TOMM biosynthetic enzymes from Bacillus sp. Al Hakam (Balh) has provided significant insight into heterocycle biosynthesis. Thiazoles and oxazoles are installed by the successive action of an ATP-dependent cyclodehydratase (C- and D-protein) and a FMN-dependent dehydrogenase (B-protein), which are responsible for azoline formation and azoline oxidation, respectively. Although several studies have focused on the mechanism of azoline formation, many details regarding the role of the dehydrogenase (B-protein) in overall substrate processing remain unknown. In this work, we evaluated the involvement of the dehydrogenase in determining the order of ring formation, as well as the promiscuity of the Balh and microcin B17 cyclodehydratases to accept a panel of noncognate dehydrogenases. In support of the observed promiscuity, a fluorescence polarization assay was utilized to measure binding of the dehydrogenase to the cyclodehydratase using the intrinsic fluorescence of the FMN cofactor. Ultimately, the noncognate dehydrogenases were shown to possess cyclodehydratase-independent activity. A previous study identified a conserved Lys-Tyr motif to be important for dehydrogenase activity. Using the tools developed in this study, the Lys-Tyr motif was shown to not alter complex formation with the cyclodehydratase nor the reduction potential. Taken with the known crystal structure of a homolog, our data suggest that the Lys-Tyr motif is of catalytic importance. Overall, this study provides a greater level of insight into the complex orchestration of enzymatic activity during TOMM biosynthesis. PMID:24364559

  8. Structural analysis of fungus-derived FAD glucose dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Sakai, Genki; Mori, Kazushige; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Kamitori, Shigehiro; Sode, Koji

    2015-01-01

    We report the first three-dimensional structure of fungus-derived glucose dehydrogenase using flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as the cofactor. This is currently the most advanced and popular enzyme used in glucose sensor strips manufactured for glycemic control by diabetic patients. We prepared recombinant nonglycosylated FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FADGDH) derived from Aspergillus flavus (AfGDH) and obtained the X-ray structures of the binary complex of enzyme and reduced FAD at a resolution of 1.78 Å and the ternary complex with reduced FAD and D-glucono-1,5-lactone (LGC) at a resolution of 1.57 Å. The overall structure is similar to that of fungal glucose oxidases (GOxs) reported till date. The ternary complex with reduced FAD and LGC revealed the residues recognizing the substrate. His505 and His548 were subjected for site-directed mutagenesis studies, and these two residues were revealed to form the catalytic pair, as those conserved in GOxs. The absence of residues that recognize the sixth hydroxyl group of the glucose of AfGDH, and the presence of significant cavity around the active site may account for this enzyme activity toward xylose. The structural information will contribute to the further engineering of FADGDH for use in more reliable and economical biosensing technology for diabetes management. PMID:26311535

  9. Proline dehydrogenase (oxidase) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Phang, James M

    2012-01-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (oxidase, PRODH/POX), the first enzyme in the proline degradative pathway, plays a special role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Proline metabolism catalyzed by PRODH/POX is closely linked with the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and urea cycle. The proline cycle formed by the interconversion of proline and Δ(1) -pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) between mitochondria and cytosol interlocks with pentose phosphate pathway. Importantly, by catalyzing proline to P5C, PRODH/POX donates electrons into the electron transport chain to generate ROS or ATP. In earlier studies, we found that PRODH/POX functions as a tumor suppressor to initiate apoptosis, inhibit tumor growth, and block the cell cycle, all by ROS signaling. It also suppresses hypoxia inducible factor signaling by increasing α-ketoglutarate. During tumor progression, PRODH/POX is under the control of various tumor-associated factors, such as tumor suppressor p53, inflammatory factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), onco-miRNA miR-23b*, and oncogenic transcription factor c-MYC. Recent studies revealed the two-sided features of PRODH/POX-mediated regulation. Under metabolic stress such as oxygen and glucose deprivation, PRODH/POX can be induced to serve as a tumor survival factor through ATP production or ROS-induced autophagy. The paradoxical roles of PRODH/POX can be understood considering the temporal and spatial context of the tumor. Further studies will provide additional insights into this protein and on its metabolic effects in tumors, which may lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:22886911

  10. An autosomal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) polymorphism in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Tan, S G; Ashton, G C

    1976-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) from human saliva has been demonstrated by the zymogram technique. Three phenotypes were found. Family and population studies suggested that these phenotypes are the products of an autosomal locus with two alleles Sgd-1 and Sgd-2. PMID:950237

  11. In planta mutagenesis of Src homology 3 domain-like fold of NdhS, a ferredoxin-binding subunit of the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like complex in Arabidopsis: a conserved Arg-193 plays a critical role in ferredoxin binding.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2013-12-20

    Chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like (NDH) complex mediates cyclic electron transport around photosystem I and chlororespiration in angiosperms. The Src homology 3 domain (SH3)-like fold protein NdhS/CRR31 is an NDH subunit that is necessary for high affinity binding of ferredoxin, indicating that chloroplast NDH functions as a ferredoxin:plastoquinone oxidoreductase. However, the mechanism of the interaction between NdhS and ferredoxin is unclear. In this study, we analyzed their interaction in planta by using site-directed mutagenesis of NdhS. In general, binding of ferredoxin to its target proteins depends on electrostatic interaction. In silico analysis predicted the presence of a positively charged pocket in the SH3-like domain of NdhS, where nine charged residues are highly conserved among plants. Systematic alteration of these sites with neutral glutamine revealed that only arginine 193 was required for high NDH activity in vivo. Further replacement of arginine 193 with negatively charged aspartate or glutamate or hydrophobic alanine significantly decreased the efficiency of ferredoxin-dependent plastoquinone reduction by NDH in ruptured chloroplasts. Similar results were obtained in in vivo analyses of NDH activity and electron transport. From these results, we propose that the positive charge of arginine 193 in the SH3-like domain of NdhS is critical for electrostatic interaction with ferredoxin in vivo. PMID:24225949

  12. Molecular basis of maple syrup urine disease: Novel mutations at the E1[alpha] locus that impair E1([alpha][sub 2][beta][sub 2]) assembly or decrease steady-state E1[alpha] mRNA levels of branched-chain [alpha]-keto acid dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.L.; Fisher, C.R.; Chuang, D.T.; Cox, R.P. )

    1994-08-01

    The authors report the occurrence of three novel mutations in the E1[alpha] (BCKDHA) locus of the branched-chain [alpha]-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKAD) complex that cause maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). An 8-bp deletion in exon 7 is present in one allele of a compound-heterozygous patient (GM-649). A single C nucleotide insertion in exon 2 occurs in one allele of an intermediate-MSUD patient (Lo). The second allele of patient Lo carries an A-to-G transition in exon 9 of the E1[alpha] gene. This missense mutation changes Tyr-368 to Cys (Y368C) in the E1[alpha] subunit. Both the 8-bp deletion and the single C insertion generate a downstream nonsense codon. Both mutations appear to be associated with a low abundance of the mutant E1[alpha] mRNA, as determined by allele-specific oligonucleotide probing. Transfection studies strongly suggest that the Y368C substitution in the E1[alpha] subunit impairs its proper assembly with the normal E1[beta]. Unassembled as well as misassembled E1[alpha] and E1[beta] subunits are degraded in the cell. 32 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  14. Alteration of substrate specificity of alanine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Puja; Aldeborgh, Hannah; Carlucci, Lauren; Walsh, Lauren; Wasserman, Jordan; Zhou, Edward; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Mundorff, Emily C.

    2015-01-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) has a natural history that suggests it would not be a promising candidate for expansion of substrate specificity by protein engineering: it is the only amino acid dehydrogenase in its fold family, it has no sequence or structural similarity to any known amino acid dehydrogenase, and it has a strong preference for l-alanine over all other substrates. By contrast, engineering of the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily members has produced catalysts with expanded substrate specificity; yet, this enzyme family already contains members that accept a broad range of substrates. To test whether the natural history of an enzyme is a predictor of its innate evolvability, directed evolution was carried out on AlaDH. A single mutation identified through molecular modeling, F94S, introduced into the AlaDH from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAlaDH) completely alters its substrate specificity pattern, enabling activity toward a range of larger amino acids. Saturation mutagenesis libraries in this mutant background additionally identified a double mutant (F94S/Y117L) showing improved activity toward hydrophobic amino acids. The catalytic efficiencies achieved in AlaDH are comparable with those that resulted from similar efforts in the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily and demonstrate the evolvability of MtAlaDH specificity toward other amino acid substrates. PMID:25538307

  15. Appearance of Novel Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Isoforms in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during Growth on Nitrate.

    PubMed Central

    Huppe, H. C.; Turpin, D. H.

    1996-01-01

    Extractable glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity is higher from N-limited Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells than from N-sufficient cells. Native gels reveal that the isoform complexity varies depending on the form of N supplied. The isoforms associated with NO3- growth appear within 2 h of switching cells from NH4+ to NO3-. PMID:12226271

  16. Polyethylene glycol-induced heteroassociation of malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, J.M.; Webster, T.A.; Appleman, J.R.; Manley, E.R.; Yu, H.A.; Datta, A.; Ackerson, B.J.; Spivey, H.O.

    1987-10-01

    Studies by dynamic and total intensity light scattering, ultracentrifugation, electron microscopy, and chemical crosslinking on solutions of the pig heart mitochondrial enzymes, malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase (separately and together) demonstrate that polyethylene glycol induces very large homoassociations of each enzyme, and still larger heteroenzyme complexes between these two enzymes in the solution phase. Specificity of this heteroassociation is indicated by the facts that heteroassociations with bovine serum albumin were not observed for either the mitochondrial dehydrogenase or the synthase or between cytosolic malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. The weight fraction of the enzymes in the mitochondrial dehydrogenase-synthase associated particles in the solution phase was less than 0.03% with the dilute conditions used in the dynamic light scattering measurements. Neither palmitoyl-CoA nor other solution conditions tested significantly increased this weight fraction of associated enzymes in the solution phase. Because of the extremely low solubility of the associated species, however, the majority of the enzymes can be precipitated as the heteroenzyme complex. This precipitation is a classical first-order transition in spite of the large particle sizes and broad size distribution. Ionic effects on the solubility of the heteroenzyme complex appear to be of general electrostatic nature. Polyethylene glycol was found to be more potent in precipitating this complex than dextrans, polyvinylpyrrolidones, ficoll, and beta-lactoglobulin.

  17. Structural and catalytic properties of L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Porumb, H; Vancea, D; Mureşan, L; Presecan, E; Lascu, I; Petrescu, I; Porumb, T; Pop, R; Bârzu, O

    1987-04-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus, a non-allosteric enzyme composed of six identical subunits, was purified to homogeneity by chromatography on blue-Sepharose and Sepharose 6B-CL. Like other pyridine-linked dehydrogenases, alanine dehydrogenase is inhibited by Cibacron blue, competitively with respect to NADH and noncompetitively with respect to pyruvate. The enzyme was inactivated by 0.1 M glycine/HCl (pH 2) and reactivated by 0.1 M phosphate (pH 8) supplemented with NAD+ or NADH. The reactivation was characterized by sigmoidal kinetics indicating a complex mechanism involving rate-limiting folding and association steps. Cibacron blue interfered with renaturation, presumably by competition with NADH. Chromatography on Sepharose 6B-CL of the partially renatured alanine dehydrogenase led to the separation of several intermediates, but only the hexamer was characterized by enzymatic activity. By immobilization on Sepharose 4B, alanine dehydrogenase from B. cereus retained 66% of the specific activity of the soluble enzyme. After denaturation of immobilized alanine dehydrogenase with 7 M urea, 37% of the initial protein was still bound to Sepharose, indicating that on the average the hexamer was attached to the matrix via, at most, two subunits. The ability of the denatured, immobilized subunits to pick up subunits from solution shows their capacity to fold back to the native conformation after urea treatment. The formation of "hybrids" between subunits of enzyme from B. cereus and Bacillus subtilis demonstrates the close resemblance of the tertiary and quaternary structures of alanine dehydrogenases from these species. PMID:3104322

  18. Fermentation and alternative respiration compensate for NADH dehydrogenase deficiency in a prokaryotic model of DJ-1-associated Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Messaoudi, Nadia; Gautier, Valérie; Dairou, Julien; Mihoub, Mouhad; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Bouloc, Philippe; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Richarme, Gilbert

    2015-11-01

    YajL is the closest prokaryotic homologue of Parkinson's disease-associated DJ-1, a protein of undefined function involved in the oxidative stress response. We reported recently that YajL and DJ-1 protect cells against oxidative stress-induced protein aggregation by acting as covalent chaperones for the thiol proteome, including the NuoG subunit of NADH dehydrogenase 1, and that NADH dehydrogenase 1 activity is negligible in the yajL mutant. We report here that this mutant compensates for low NADH dehydrogenase activity by utilizing NADH-independent alternative dehydrogenases, including pyruvate oxidase PoxB and d-amino acid dehydrogenase DadA, and mixed acid aerobic fermentations characterized by acetate, lactate, succinate and ethanol excretion. The yajL mutant has a low adenylate energy charge favouring glycolytic flux, and a high NADH/NAD ratio favouring fermentations over pyruvate dehydrogenase and the Krebs cycle. DNA array analysis showed upregulation of genes involved in glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways and alternative respiratory pathways. Moreover, the yajL mutant preferentially catabolized pyruvate-forming amino acids over Krebs cycle-related amino acids, and thus the yajL mutant utilizes pyruvate-centred respiro-fermentative metabolism to compensate for the NADH dehydrogenase 1 defect and constitutes an interesting model for studying eukaryotic respiratory complex I deficiencies, especially those associated with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. PMID:26377309

  19. Histidine 407, a phantom residue in the E1 subunit of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, activates reductive acetylation of lipoamide on the E2 subunit. An explanation for conservation of active sites between the E1 subunit and transketolase.

    PubMed

    Nemeria, Natalia; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Brunskill, Andrew; Sheibani, Farzad; Wei, Wen; Yan, Yan; Zhang, Sheng; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2002-12-31

    Least squares alignment of the E. coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex E1 subunit and yeast transketolase crystal structures indicates a general structural similarity between the two enzymes and provides a plausible location for a short-loop region in the E1 structure that was unobserved due to disorder. The residue H407, located in this region, is shown to be able to penetrate the active site. Suggested by this comparison, the H407A E1 variant was created, and H407 was shown to participate in the reductive acetylation of both an independently expressed lipoyl domain and the intact 1-lipoyl E2 subunit. While the H407A substitution only modestly affected the reaction through pyruvate decarboxylation (ca. 14% activity compared to parental E1), the overall complex has a much impaired activity, at most 0.15% compared to parental E1. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements show that the binding of the lipoyl domain to the H407A E1 variant is much weaker than that to parental E1. At the same time, mass spectrometric measurements clearly demonstrate much impaired reductive acetylation of the independently expressed lipoyl domain and of the intact 1-lipoyl E2 by the H407A variant compared to the parental E1. A proposal is presented to explain the remarkable conservation of the three-dimensional structure at the active centers of the E. coli E1 subunit and transketolase on the basis of the parallels in the ligation-type reactions carried out and the need to protonate a very weak acid, a dithiolane sulfur atom in the former, and a carbonyl oxygen atom in the latter. PMID:12501174

  20. NAD + -dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Alekseeva, A.A.; Savin, S.S.; Tishkov, V.I.

    2011-01-01

    NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH, EC 1.2.1.2) widely occurs in nature. FDH consists of two identical subunits and contains neither prosthetic groups nor metal ions. This type of FDH was found in different microorganisms (including pathogenic ones), such as bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and plants. As opposed to microbiological FDHs functioning in cytoplasm, plant FDHs localize in mitochondria. Formate dehydrogenase activity was first discovered as early as in 1921 in plant; however, until the past decade FDHs from plants had been considerably less studied than the enzymes from microorganisms. This review summarizes the recent results on studying the physiological role, properties, structure, and protein engineering of plant formate dehydrogenases. PMID:22649703

  1. Two different dihydroorotate dehydrogenases in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, P S; Jansen, P J; Hammer, K

    1994-01-01

    The pyrimidine de novo biosynthesis pathway has been characterized for a number of organisms. The general pathway consists of six enzymatic steps. In the characterization of the pyrimidine pathway of Lactococcus lactis, two different pyrD genes encoding dihydroorotate dehydrogenase were isolated. The nucleotide sequences of the two genes, pyrDa and pyrDb, have been determined. One of the deduced amino acid sequences has a high degree of homology to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, and the other resembles the dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis. It is possible to distinguish between the two enzymes in crude extracts by using different electron acceptors. We constructed mutants containing a mutated form of either one or the other or both of the pyrD genes. Only the double mutant is pyrimidine auxotrophic. Images PMID:8021180

  2. Fundamental molecular differences between alcohol dehydrogenase classes.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, O; Atrian, S; Luque, T; Hjelmqvist, L; Gonzàlez-Duarte, R; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    Two types of alcohol dehydrogenase in separate protein families are the "medium-chain" zinc enzymes (including the classical liver and yeast forms) and the "short-chain" enzymes (including the insect form). Although the medium-chain family has been characterized in prokaryotes and many eukaryotes (fungi, plants, cephalopods, and vertebrates), insects have seemed to possess only the short-chain enzyme. We have now also characterized a medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase in Drosophila. The enzyme is identical to insect octanol dehydrogenase. It is a typical class III alcohol dehydrogenase, similar to the corresponding human form (70% residue identity), with mostly the same residues involved in substrate and coenzyme interactions. Changes that do occur are conservative, but Phe-51 is of functional interest in relation to decreased coenzyme binding and increased overall activity. Extra residues versus the human enzyme near position 250 affect the coenzyme-binding domain. Enzymatic properties are similar--i.e., very low activity toward ethanol (Km beyond measurement) and high selectivity for formaldehyde/glutathione (S-hydroxymethylglutathione; kcat/Km = 160,000 min-1.mM-1). Between the present class III and the ethanol-active class I enzymes, however, patterns of variability differ greatly, highlighting fundamentally separate molecular properties of these two alcohol dehydrogenases, with class III resembling enzymes in general and class I showing high variation. The gene coding for the Drosophila class III enzyme produces an mRNA of about 1.36 kb that is present at all developmental stages of the fly, compatible with the constitutive nature of the vertebrate enzyme. Taken together, the results bridge a previously apparent gap in the distribution of medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenases and establish a strictly conserved class III enzyme, consistent with an important role for this enzyme in cellular metabolism. Images PMID:8197167

  3. Differential effects of polyamine on the cytosolic and mitochondrial NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Keiko; Haneda, Miyako; Iwata, Shouko; Yoshino, Masataka

    2012-01-01

    Two isozymes of NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.1.42) exist in mammalian tissues: mitochondrial (ICD1) and cytosolic (ICD2). Effects of polyamines such as spermine, spermidine, and putrescine on the cytosolic and mitochondrial NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenases were analyzed kinetically. Spermine activated ICD2, the cytosolic NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase from rat liver with the increase in the maximal velocity and the decrease in the affinity for the substrates isocitrate and NADP. The activating action of spermine can be explained by "the uncompetitive effect," and the dissociation constant of spermine for the enzyme-substrate complex was determined to be 1.68 mM. Spermidine and putrescine showed little or no effect. ICD1, the mitochondrial form of NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase from rat and porcine heart was inhibited by spermine effectively, and by spermidine and putrescine to a lesser extent. Spermine inhibited the enzyme competitively with respect to NADP, and noncompetitively with respect to isocitrate. K(i) value of the enzyme for spermine was 1.3 mM. These results suggest that activation by spermine of cytosolic NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase can enhance the antioxidant activity by regeneration of GSH, and further is responsible for the stimulation of lipid biosynthesis in cytosol. Spermine may contribute to NADPH supply by enhancing transhydrogenase (EC1.6.1.2) activity through the spermine-dependent activation of Ca(2+) -incorporation to mitochondria. PMID:22674798

  4. Crystal structure of cod liver class I alcohol dehydrogenase: substrate pocket and structurally variable segments.

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, S.; el Ahmad, M.; Danielsson, O.; Jörnvall, H.; Eklund, H.

    1996-01-01

    The structural framework of cod liver alcohol dehydrogenase is similar to that of horse and human alcohol dehydrogenases. In contrast, the substrate pocket differs significantly, and main differences are located in three loops. Nevertheless, the substrate pocket is hydrophobic like that of the mammalian class I enzymes and has a similar topography in spite of many main-chain and side-chain differences. The structural framework of alcohol dehydrogenase is also present in a number of related enzymes like glucose dehydrogenase and quinone oxidoreductase. These enzymes have completely different substrate specificity, but also for these enzymes, the corresponding loops of the substrate pocket have significantly different structures. The domains of the two subunits in the crystals of the cod enzyme further differ by a rotation of the catalytic domains by about 6 degrees. In one subunit, they close around the coenzyme similarly as in coenzyme complexes of the horse enzyme, but form a more open cleft in the other subunit, similar to the situation in coenzyme-free structures of the horse enzyme. The proton relay system differs from the mammalian class I alcohol dehydrogenases. His 51, which has been implicated in mammalian enzymes to be important for proton transfer from the buried active site to the surface is not present in the cod enzyme. A tyrosine in the corresponding position is turned into the substrate pocket and a water molecule occupies the same position in space as the His side chain, forming a shorter proton relay system. PMID:8845755

  5. Psoriatic therapeutics and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cotton, D W; van Rossum, E

    1975-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of various agents on the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase have been studied in vitro. Stress is laid on the calculation of kinetic parameters such as true K-I values. The most active inhibitor was methotrexate, closely followed by cGMP. The increase in inhibitory activity after incubation of methotrexate with liver slices is discussed. PMID:167665

  6. Characterization of xylitol dehydrogenase from Debaryomyces hansenii

    SciTech Connect

    Girio, F.M.; Amaral-Collaco, M.T.; Pelica, F.

    1996-01-01

    The xylitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.9) from xylose-grown cells of Debaryomyces hansenii was partially purified in two chromatographic steps, and characterization studies were carried out in order to investigate the role of the xylitol dehydrogenase-catalyzed step in the regulation of D-xylose metabolism. The enzyme was most active at pH 9.0-9.5, and exhibited a broad polyol specificity. The Michaelis constants for xylitol and NAD{sup +} were 16.5 and 0.55 mM, respectively. Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} did not affect the enzyme activity. Conversely, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+} strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. It was concluded that NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase from D. hansenii has similarities with other xylose-fermenting yeasts in respect to optimal pH, substrate specificity, and K{sub m} value for xylitol, and therefore should be named L-iditol:NAD{sup +}-5-oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.14). The reason D. hansenii is a good xylitol producer is not because of its value of K for xylitol, which is low enough to assure its fast oxidation by NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase. However, a higher K{sub m} value of xylitol dehydrogenase for NAD{sup +} compared to the K{sub m} values of other xylose-fermenting yeasts may be responsible for the higher xylitol yields. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. In Silico Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Peroxisomal 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Fernández, Álvaro D.; Corpas, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    NADPH, whose regeneration is critical for reductive biosynthesis and detoxification pathways, is an essential component in cell redox homeostasis. Peroxisomes are subcellular organelles with a complex biochemical machinery involved in signaling and stress processes by molecules such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO). NADPH is required by several peroxisomal enzymes involved in β-oxidation, NO, and glutathione (GSH) generation. Plants have various NADPH-generating dehydrogenases, one of which is 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH). Arabidopsis contains three 6PGDH genes that probably are encoded for cytosolic, chloroplastic/mitochondrial, and peroxisomal isozymes, although their specific functions remain largely unknown. This study focuses on the in silico analysis of the biochemical characteristics and gene expression of peroxisomal 6PGDH (p6PGDH) with the aim of understanding its potential function in the peroxisomal NADPH-recycling system. The data show that a group of plant 6PGDHs contains an archetypal type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS), while in silico gene expression analysis using affymetrix microarray data suggests that Arabidopsis p6PGDH appears to be mainly involved in xenobiotic response, growth, and developmental processes. PMID:27034898

  8. Murine branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase kinase; cDNA cloning, tissue distribution, and temporal expression during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Doering, C B; Coursey, C; Spangler, W; Danner, D J

    1998-06-01

    These studies were designed to demonstrate the structural and functional similarity of murine branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase and its regulation by the complex-specific kinase. Nucleotide sequence and deduced amino acid sequence for the kinase cDNA demonstrate a highly conserved coding sequence between mouse and human. Tissue-specific expression in adult mice parallels that reported in other mammals. Kinase expression in female liver is influenced by circadian rhythm. Of special interest is the fluctuating expression of this kinase during embryonic development against the continuing increase in the catalytic subunits of this mitochondrial complex during development. The need for regulation of the branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex by kinase expression during embryogenesis is not understood. However, the similarity of murine branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase and its kinase to the human enzyme supports the use of this animal as a model for the human system. PMID:9611264

  9. [Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-deficient renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Agaimy, A

    2016-03-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) represents a type II mitochondrial complex related to the respiratory chain and Krebs cycle. The complex is composed of four major subunits, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC and SDHD. The oncogenic role of this enzyme complex has only recently been recognized and the complex is currently considered an important oncogenic signaling pathway with tumor suppressor properties. In addition to the familial paraganglioma syndromes (types 1-5) as prototypical SDH-related diseases, many other tumors have been defined as SDH-deficient, in particular a subset of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), rare hypophyseal adenomas, a subset of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (recently added) and a variety of other tumor entities, the latter mainly described as rare case reports. As a central core subunit responsible for the integrity of the SDH complex, the expression of SDHB is lost in all SDH-deficient neoplasms irrespective of the specific SDH subunit affected by a genetic mutation in addition to concurrent loss of the subunit specifically affected by genetic alteration. Accordingly, all SDH-deficient neoplasms are by definition SDHB-deficient. The SDH-deficient renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has only recently been well-characterized and it is included as a specific subtype of RCC in the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification published in 2016. In this review, the major clinicopathological, immunohistochemical and genetic features of this rare disease entity are presented and discussed in the context of the broad differential diagnosis. PMID:26979428

  10. Structure of a bacterial enzyme regulated by phosphorylation, isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hurley, J H; Thorsness, P E; Ramalingam, V; Helmers, N H; Koshland, D E; Stroud, R M

    1989-11-01

    The structure of isocitrate dehydrogenase [threo-DS-isocitrate: NADP+ oxidoreductase (decarboxylating), EC 1.1.1.42] from Escherichia coli has been solved and refined at 2.5 A resolution and is topologically different from that of any other dehydrogenase. This enzyme, a dimer of identical 416-residue subunits, is inactivated by phosphorylation at Ser-113, which lies at the edge of an interdomain pocket that also contains many residues conserved between isocitrate dehydrogenase and isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. Isocitrate dehydrogenase contains an unusual clasp-like domain in which both polypeptide chains in the dimer interlock. Based on the structure of isocitrate dehydrogenase and conservation with isopropylmalate dehydrogenase, we suggest that the active site lies in an interdomain pocket close to the phosphorylation site. PMID:2682654

  11. Human Lactate Dehydrogenase A Inhibitors: A Molecular Dynamics Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yun; Pinto, B. Mario

    2014-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) is an important enzyme in fermentative glycolysis, generating most energy for cancer cells that rely on anaerobic respiration even under normal oxygen concentrations. This renders LDHA a promising molecular target for the treatment of various cancers. Several efforts have been made recently to develop LDHA inhibitors with nanomolar inhibition and cellular activity, some of which have been studied in complex with the enzyme by X-ray crystallography. In this work, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) study of the binding interactions of selected ligands with human LDHA. Conventional MD simulations demonstrate different binding dynamics of inhibitors with similar binding affinities, whereas steered MD simulations yield discrimination of selected LDHA inhibitors with qualitative correlation between the in silico unbinding difficulty and the experimental binding strength. Further, our results have been used to clarify ambiguities in the binding modes of two well-known LDHA inhibitors. PMID:24466056

  12. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hormones, and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Markey, Keira A; Uldall, Maria; Botfield, Hannah; Cato, Liam D; Miah, Mohammed A L; Hassan-Smith, Ghaniah; Jensen, Rigmor H; Gonzalez, Ana M; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) results in raised intracranial pressure (ICP) leading to papilledema, visual dysfunction, and headaches. Obese females of reproductive age are predominantly affected, but the underlying pathological mechanisms behind IIH remain unknown. This review provides an overview of pathogenic factors that could result in IIH with particular focus on hormones and the impact of obesity, including its role in neuroendocrine signaling and driving inflammation. Despite occurring almost exclusively in obese women, there have been a few studies evaluating the mechanisms by which hormones and adipokines exert their effects on ICP regulation in IIH. Research involving 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, a modulator of glucocorticoids, suggests a potential role in IIH. Improved understanding of the complex interplay between adipose signaling factors such as adipokines, steroid hormones, and ICP regulation may be key to the understanding and future management of IIH. PMID:27186074

  13. Electrocatalytic hydrocarbon hydroxylation by ethylbenzene dehydrogenase from Aromatoleum aromaticum.

    PubMed

    Kalimuthu, Palraj; Heider, Johann; Knack, Daniel; Bernhardt, Paul V

    2015-02-26

    We report the electrocatalytic activity of ethylbenzene dehydrogenase (EBDH) from the β-proteobacterium Aromatoleum aromaticum. EBDH is a complex 155 kDa heterotrimeric molybdenum/iron-sulfur/heme protein which catalyzes the enantioselective hydroxylation of nonactivated ethylbenzene to (S)-1-phenylethanol without molecular oxygen as cosubstrate. Furthermore, it oxidizes a wide range of other alkyl-substituted aromatic and heterocyclic compounds to their secondary alcohols. Hydroxymethylferrocenium (FM) is used as an artificial electron acceptor for EBDH in an electrochemically driven catalytic system. Electrocatalytic activity of EBDH is demonstrated with both its native substrate ethylbenzene and the related substrate p-ethylphenol. The catalytic system has been modeled by electrochemical simulation across a range of sweep rates and concentrations of each substrate, which provides new insights into the kinetics of the EBDH catalytic mechanism. PMID:25635950

  14. Biochemical properties of alcohol dehydrogenase from Drosophila lebanonensis.

    PubMed Central

    Winberg, J O; Hovik, R; McKinley-McKee, J S; Juan, E; Gonzalez-Duarte, R

    1986-01-01

    Purified Drosophila lebanonensis alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) revealed one enzymically active zone in starch gel electrophoresis at pH 8.5. This zone was located on the cathode side of the origin. Incubation of D. lebanonensis Adh with NAD+ and acetone altered the electrophoretic pattern to more anodal migrating zones. D. lebanonensis Adh has an Mr of 56,000, a subunit of Mr of 28 000 and is a dimer with two active sites per enzyme molecule. This agrees with a polypeptide chain of 247 residues. Metal analysis by plasma emission spectroscopy indicated that this insect alcohol dehydrogenase is not a metalloenzyme. In studies of the substrate specificity and stereospecificity, D. lebanonensis Adh was more active with secondary than with primary alcohols. Both alkyl groups in the secondary alcohols interacted hydrophobically with the alcohol binding region of the active site. The catalytic centre activity for propan-2-ol was 7.4 s-1 and the maximum velocity of most secondary alcohols was approximately the same and indicative of rate-limiting enzyme-coenzyme dissociation. For primary alcohols the maximum velocity varied and was much lower than for secondary alcohols. The catalytic centre activity for ethanol was 2.4 s-1. With [2H6]ethanol a primary kinetic 2H isotope effect of 2.8 indicated that the interconversion of the ternary complexes was rate-limiting. Pyrazole was an ethanol-competitive inhibitor of the enzyme. The difference spectra of the enzyme-NAD+-pyrazole complex gave an absorption peak at 305 nm with epsilon 305 14.5 X 10(3) M-1 X cm-1. Concentrations and amounts of active enzyme can thus be determined. A kinetic rate assay to determine the concentration of enzyme active sites is also presented. This has been developed from active site concentrations established by titration at 305 nm of the enzyme and pyrazole with NAD+. In contrast with the amino acid composition, which indicated that D. lebanonensis Adh and the D. melanogaster alleloenzymes were not

  15. Peafowl lactate dehydrogenase: problem of isoenzyme identification.

    PubMed

    Rose, R G; Wilson, A C

    1966-09-16

    Peafowl, like other vertebrates, contain multiple forms of lactate dehydrogenase. The electrophoretic properties of the peafowl isoenzymes are unusual in that the isoenzyme from heart tissue can be either more or less anodic than that of muscle, depending on the pH. This finding focuses attention on the problem of isoenzyme identification. It is suggested that isoenzymes be identified on the basis of properties that are chemically and biologically more significant than electrophoretic mobility. PMID:5917779

  16. Neuropathology in Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Knerr, Ina; Gibson, K. Michael; Murdoch, Geoffrey; Salomons, Gajja S.; Jakobs, Cornelis; Combs, Susan; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2010-01-01

    Reported here is the novel finding of neuropathology in a patient with succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, an inherited disorder of γ-aminobutyric acid metabolism characterized by intellectual deficiency, hypotonia, and epilepsy, with 4-hydroxybutyric aciduria and abnormalities of the globus pallidus on neuroimaging. A 19-year-old woman of European origin with a neurodevelopmental disorder and epilepsy died unexpectedly in 1998. A postmortem examination was performed, with a final diagnosis of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy patients. Eight years later, her sister with a neurodevelopmental disorder presented at 13 years of age with seizures and was diagnosed with succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency. In the decedent, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency was established at the molecular level, 10 years after her death, using genomic DNA from brain tissue specimens. The neuropathologic findings revealed striking discoloration of the globi pallidi, leptomeningeal congestion, and a scar in the frontal cortex. After detection of the pathogenic homozygous mutation c.1226G>A, p.Gly409Asp in the living sister, it was confirmed in the decedent. An underlying metabolic disease may be an additional risk factor for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy patients. PMID:20304328

  17. Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Gu, Meng-Li; Ji, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. However, there are still 10%-15% of GISTs lacking KIT and PDGFRA mutations, called wild-type GISTs (WT GISTs). Among these so-called WT GISTs, a small subset is associated with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) deficiency, known as SDH-deficient GISTs. In addition, GISTs that occur in Carney triad and Carney-Stratakis syndrome represent specific examples of SDH-deficient GISTs. SDH-deficient GISTs locate exclusively in the stomach, showing predilection for children and young adults with female preponderance. The tumor generally pursues an indolent course and exhibits primary resistance to imatinib therapy in most cases. Loss of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B expression and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) are common features of SDH-deficient GISTs. In WT GISTs without succinate dehydrogenase activity, upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α may lead to increased growth signaling through IGF1R and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR). As a result, IGF1R and VEGFR are promising to be the novel therapeutic targets of GISTs. This review will update the current knowledge on characteristics of SDH-deficient GISTs and further discuss the possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis and clinical management of SDH-deficient GISTs. PMID:25741136

  18. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Smithgall, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microsomal monoxygenases proceeds through trans-dihydrodiol metabolites to diol-epoxide ultimate carcinogens. This thesis directly investigated the role of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, a cytosolic NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase, in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols. A wide variety of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols were synthesized and shown to be substrates for the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase, including several potent proximate carcinogens derived from 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 5-methylchrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Since microsomal activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is highly stereospecific, the stereochemical course of enzymatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation was monitored using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. The major product formed from the dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene was characterized using UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy, and appears to be 4-hydroxy-1,2-naphthoquinone. Mass spectral analysis suggests that an analogous hydroxylated o-quinone is formed as the major product of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols was shown to be potently inhibited by all of the major classes of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Enhancement of trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogen oxidation may protect against possible adverse effects of the aspirin-like drugs, and help maintain the balance between activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  19. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 mutations in cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Benjamin R; Voss, Jesse S; Kerr, Sarah E; Barr Fritcher, Emily G; Graham, Rondell P; Zhang, Lizhi; Highsmith, W Edward; Zhang, Jun; Roberts, Lewis R; Gores, Gregory J; Halling, Kevin C

    2012-10-01

    Somatic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 genes are common in gliomas and help stratify patients with brain cancer into histologic and molecular subtypes. However, these mutations are considered rare in other solid tumors. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 mutations in cholangiocarcinoma and to assess histopathologic differences between specimens with and without an isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation. We sequenced 94 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cholangiocarcinoma (67 intrahepatic and 27 extrahepatic) assessing for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (codon 132) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (codons 140 and 172) mutations. Multiple histopathologic characteristics were also evaluated and compared with isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 mutation status. Of the 94 evaluated specimens, 21 (22%) had a mutation including 14 isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 7 isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 mutations. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations were more frequently observed in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma than in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (28% versus 7%, respectively; P = .030). The 14 isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutations were R132C (n = 9), R132S (n = 2), R132G (n = 2), and R132L (n = 1). The 7 isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 mutations were R172K (n = 5), R172M (n = 1), and R172G (n = 1). Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations were more frequently observed in tumors with clear cell change (P < .001) and poorly differentiated histology (P = .012). The results of this study show for the first time that isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 genes are mutated in cholangiocarcinoma. The results of this study are encouraging because it identifies a new potential target for genotype-directed therapeutic trials and may represent a potential biomarker for earlier detection of cholangiocarcinoma in a subset of cases. PMID:22503487

  20. Over-Expression, Purification and Crystallization of Human Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Y. S.; Ciszak, Ewa; Patel, Mulchand

    2000-01-01

    Dehydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3; dihydrolipoan-tide:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.8.1.4) is a common catalytic component found in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, and branched-chain cc-keto acid dehydrogenase complex. E3 is also a component (referred to as L protein) of the glycine cleavage system in bacterial metabolism (2). Active E3 forms a homodimer with four distinctive subdomain structures (FAD binding, NAD+ binding, central and interface domains) with non-covalently but tightly bound FAD in the holoenzyme. Deduced amino acids from cloned full-length human E3 gene showed a total of 509 amino acids with a leader sequence (N-terminal 35 amino acids) that is excised (mature form) during transportation of expressed E3 into mitochondria membrane. So far, three-dimensional structure of human E3 has not been reported. Our effort to achieve the elucidation of the X-ray crystal structure of human E3 will be presented. Recombinant pPROEX-1 expression vector (from GIBCO BRL Life Technologies) having the human E3 gene without leader sequence was constructed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and subsequent ligation, and cloned in E.coli XL1-Blue by transformation. Since pPROEX-1 vector has an internal His-tag (six histidine peptide) located at the upstream region of a multicloning site, one-step affinity purification of E3 using nickelnitriloacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose resin, which has a strong affinity to His-tag, was feasible. Also a seven-amino-acid spacer peptide and a recombinant tobacco etch virus protease recognition site (seven amino acids peptide) found between His-tag and first amino acid of expressed E3 facilitated the cleavage of His-tag from E3 after the affinity purification. By IPTG induction, ca. 15 mg of human E3 (mature form) was obtained from 1L LB culture with overnight incubation at 25C. Over 98% of purity of E3 from one-step Ni-NTA agarose affinity purification was confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis. For

  1. Deletion of the structural gene for the NADH-dehydrogenase subunit 4 of Synechocystis 6803 alters respiratory properties.

    PubMed Central

    Dzelzkalns, V A; Obinger, C; Regelsberger, G; Niederhauser, H; Kamensek, M; Peschek, G A; Bogorad, L

    1994-01-01

    Chloroplasts and cyanobacteria contain genes encoding polypeptides homologous to some subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory NADH-ubiquinol oxidoreductase complex (NADH dehydrogenase). Nothing is known of the role of the NADH dehydrogenase complex in photosynthesis, respiration, or other functions in chloroplasts, and little is known about the specific roles of the perhaps 42 subunits of this complex in the mitochondrion. Inactivation of a gene for subunit 4 (ndhD-2, ndh4) of this complex in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803 has no effect on photosynthesis, judging from the rate of photoautotrophic growth of mutant cells, but the mutant's respiratory rate is about 6 times greater than that of wild-type cells. Respiratory electron transport activity in cyanobacteria is associated both with photosynthetic thylakoid membranes and with the outer cytoplasmic membrane of the cell. Cytoplasmic membranes of mutant cells have much greater NADH-dependent cytochrome reductase activity than preparations from wild-type cells; this activity remains at wild-type levels in isolated thylakoid membranes. It is suggested that the 56.6-kD product of ndhD-2 is not essential for the activity of a cytoplasmic membrane-bound NADH dehydrogenase but that it regulates the rate of electron flow through the complex, establishing a link between this ndh gene and respiration. The activity of the molecularly distinct thylakoid-bound NADH dehydrogenase is apparently unaffected by the loss of ndhD-2. PMID:7846157

  2. Metabolism of 1-aminoethylphosphinate generates acetylphosphinate, a potent inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Laber, B; Amrhein, N

    1987-01-01

    The alanine analogue 1-aminoethylphosphinate [H3C-CH(NH2)-PO2H2] effectively inhibited anthocyanin synthesis in buckwheat hypocotyls and caused an increase in the concentrations of alanine and alanine-derived metabolites. Aminotransferase inhibitors partially alleviated the effects of the analogue. 1-Aminoethylphosphinate did not affect the growth of Klebsiella pneumoniae under anaerobic conditions, but under aerobic conditions it inhibited growth and caused the massive excretion of pyruvate. The analogue inhibited the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in vitro in the presence of an aminotransferase activity. The transamination product of 1-aminoethylphosphinate, acetylphosphinate (H3C-CO-PO2H2), was found to inhibit the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in a time-dependent reaction that followed first-order and saturation kinetics and required the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate. PMID:3325039

  3. Metabolism of 1-aminoethylphosphinate generates acetylphosphinate, a potent inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Laber, B; Amrhein, N

    1987-12-01

    The alanine analogue 1-aminoethylphosphinate [H3C-CH(NH2)-PO2H2] effectively inhibited anthocyanin synthesis in buckwheat hypocotyls and caused an increase in the concentrations of alanine and alanine-derived metabolites. Aminotransferase inhibitors partially alleviated the effects of the analogue. 1-Aminoethylphosphinate did not affect the growth of Klebsiella pneumoniae under anaerobic conditions, but under aerobic conditions it inhibited growth and caused the massive excretion of pyruvate. The analogue inhibited the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in vitro in the presence of an aminotransferase activity. The transamination product of 1-aminoethylphosphinate, acetylphosphinate (H3C-CO-PO2H2), was found to inhibit the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in a time-dependent reaction that followed first-order and saturation kinetics and required the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate. PMID:3325039

  4. Lactate dehydrogenase X, malate dehydrogenase and total protein in rat spermatozoa during epididymal transit.

    PubMed

    Vermouth, N T; Carriazo, C S; Ponce, R H; Blanco, A

    1986-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase isozyme X (LDH X), malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and total soluble protein have been determined in lysates of spermatozoa isolated from caput, corpus and cauda of rat epididymis. Transit of spermatozoa through epididymis is accompanied by a reduction of LDH X, MDH and total protein per cell in sexually rested animals. The profiles of reduction along epididymal segments are different for the three variables studied. Mating with receptive females during the 5 days prior to determinations increases significantly the levels of MDH in spermatozoa from all sections of epididymis and produces increase of total soluble protein in the cells contained in cauda. PMID:3956158

  5. Structural basis for discriminatory recognition of Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase by a DNA aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Yee-Wai; Kwok, Jane; Law, Alan W. L.; Watt, Rory M.; Kotaka, Masayo; Tanner, Julian A.

    2013-01-01

    DNA aptamers have significant potential as diagnostic and therapeutic agents, but the paucity of DNA aptamer-target structures limits understanding of their molecular binding mechanisms. Here, we report a distorted hairpin structure of a DNA aptamer in complex with an important diagnostic target for malaria: Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH). Aptamers selected from a DNA library were highly specific and discriminatory for Plasmodium as opposed to human lactate dehydrogenase because of a counterselection strategy used during selection. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed aptamer binding to PfLDH with a dissociation constant of 42 nM and 2:1 protein:aptamer molar stoichiometry. Dissociation constants derived from electrophoretic mobility shift assays and surface plasmon resonance experiments were consistent. The aptamer:protein complex crystal structure was solved at 2.1-Å resolution, revealing two aptamers bind per PfLDH tetramer. The aptamers showed a unique distorted hairpin structure in complex with PfLDH, displaying a Watson–Crick base-paired stem together with two distinct loops each with one base flipped out by specific interactions with PfLDH. Aptamer binding specificity is dictated by extensive interactions of one of the aptamer loops with a PfLDH loop that is absent in human lactate dehydrogenase. We conjugated the aptamer to gold nanoparticles and demonstrated specificity of colorimetric detection of PfLDH over human lactate dehydrogenase. This unique distorted hairpin aptamer complex provides a perspective on aptamer-mediated molecular recognition and may guide rational design of better aptamers for malaria diagnostics. PMID:24043813

  6. Emerging concepts in the flavinylation of succinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung J; Winge, Dennis R

    2013-05-01

    The Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH) heterotetrameric complex catalyzes the oxidation of succinate to fumarate in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and in the aerobic respiratory chains of eukaryotes and bacteria. Essential in this catalysis is the covalently-linked cofactor flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in subunit1 (Sdh1) of the SDH enzyme complex. The mechanism of FAD insertion and covalent attachment to Sdh1 is unknown. Our working concept of this flavinylation process has relied mostly on foundational works from the 1990s and by applying the principles learned from other enzymes containing a similarly linked FAD. The discovery of the flavinylation factor Sdh5, however, has provided new insight into the possible mechanism associated with Sdh1 flavinylation. This review focuses on encapsulating prior and recent advances towards understanding the mechanism associated with flavinylation of Sdh1 and how this flavinylation process affects the overall assembly of SDH. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Respiratory complex II: Role in cellular physiology and disease. PMID:23380393

  7. The dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Aeromonas caviae ST exhibits NADH-dependent tellurite reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Castro, Miguel E; Molina, Roberto; Díaz, Waldo; Pichuantes, Sergio E; Vásquez, Claudio C

    2008-10-10

    Potassium tellurite (K(2)TeO(3)) is extremely toxic for most forms of life and only a limited number of organisms are naturally resistant to the toxic effects of this compound. Crude extracts prepared from the environmental isolate Aeromonas caviae ST catalize the in vitro reduction of TeO32- in a NADH-dependent reaction. Upon fractionation by ionic exchange column chromatography three major polypeptides identified as the E1, E2, and E3 components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex were identified in fractions exhibiting tellurite-reducing activity. Tellurite reductase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities co-eluted from a Sephadex gel filtration column. To determine which component(s) of the PDH complex has tellurite reductase activity, the A. caviae ST structural genes encoding for E1 (aceE), E2 (aceF), and E3 (lpdA) were independently cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and their gene products purified. Results indicated that tellurite reductase activity lies almost exclusively in the E3 component, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. The E3 component of the PDH complex from E. coli, Zymomonas mobilis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus also showed NADH-dependent tellurite reductase in vitro suggesting that this enzymatic activity is widely distributed among microorganisms. PMID:18675788

  8. Mitochondrial Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase Is Upregulated in Response to Intermittent Hypoxic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongrong; Luo, Xiaoting; Wu, Jinzi; Thangthaeng, Nopporn; Jung, Marianna E.; Jing, Siqun; Li, Linya; Ellis, Dorette Z.; Liu, Li; Ding, Zhengnian; Forster, Michael J.; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia preconditioning (IHP) has been shown to protect neurons against ischemic stroke injury. Studying how proteins respond to IHP may identify targets that can help fight stroke. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether mitochondrial dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLDH) would respond to IHP and if so, whether such a response could be linked to neuroprotection in ischemic stroke injury. To do this, we subjected male rats to IHP for 20 days and measured the content and activity of DLDH as well as the three α-keto acid dehydrogenase complexes that contain DLDH. We also measured mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activities. Results show that DLDH content was indeed upregulated by IHP and this upregulation did not alter the activities of the three α-keto acid dehydrogenase complexes. Results also show that the activities of the five mitochondrial complexes (I-V) were not altered either by IHP. To investigate whether IHP-induced DLDH upregulation is linked to neuroprotection against ischemic stroke injury, we subjected both DLDH deficient mouse and DLDH transgenic mouse to stroke surgery followed by measurement of brain infarction volume. Results indicate that while mouse deficient in DLDH had exacerbated brain injury after stroke, mouse overexpressing human DLDH also showed increased brain injury after stroke. Therefore, the physiological significance of IHP-induced DLDH upregulation remains to be further investigated. PMID:26078703

  9. Mitochondrial Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase is Upregulated in Response to Intermittent Hypoxic Preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongrong; Luo, Xiaoting; Wu, Jinzi; Thangthaeng, Nopporn; Jung, Marianna E; Jing, Siqun; Li, Linya; Ellis, Dorette Z; Liu, Li; Ding, Zhengnian; Forster, Michael J; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia preconditioning (IHP) has been shown to protect neurons against ischemic stroke injury. Studying how proteins respond to IHP may identify targets that can help fight stroke. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether mitochondrial dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLDH) would respond to IHP and if so, whether such a response could be linked to neuroprotection in ischemic stroke injury. To do this, we subjected male rats to IHP for 20 days and measured the content and activity of DLDH as well as the three α-keto acid dehydrogenase complexes that contain DLDH. We also measured mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activities. Results show that DLDH content was indeed upregulated by IHP and this upregulation did not alter the activities of the three α-keto acid dehydrogenase complexes. Results also show that the activities of the five mitochondrial complexes (I-V) were not altered either by IHP. To investigate whether IHP-induced DLDH upregulation is linked to neuroprotection against ischemic stroke injury, we subjected both DLDH deficient mouse and DLDH transgenic mouse to stroke surgery followed by measurement of brain infarction volume. Results indicate that while mouse deficient in DLDH had exacerbated brain injury after stroke, mouse overexpressing human DLDH also showed increased brain injury after stroke. Therefore, the physiological significance of IHP-induced DLDH upregulation remains to be further investigated. PMID:26078703

  10. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... blood cells), myocardial infarction (heart disease), and some forms of leukemia (cancer of the blood... conditions known to cause increased lactic dehydrogenase levels. (b) Classification. Class I...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... blood cells), myocardial infarction (heart disease), and some forms of leukemia (cancer of the blood... conditions known to cause increased lactic dehydrogenase levels. (b) Classification. Class I...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... blood cells), myocardial infarction (heart disease), and some forms of leukemia (cancer of the blood... conditions known to cause increased lactic dehydrogenase levels. (b) Classification. Class I...

  14. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... blood cells), myocardial infarction (heart disease), and some forms of leukemia (cancer of the blood... conditions known to cause increased lactic dehydrogenase levels. (b) Classification. Class I...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and plasma. Isocitric dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, or acute inflammation of the biliary tract; pulmonary...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and plasma. Isocitric dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, or acute inflammation of the biliary tract; pulmonary...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and plasma. Isocitric dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, or acute inflammation of the biliary tract; pulmonary...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and plasma. Isocitric dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, or acute inflammation of the biliary tract; pulmonary...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and plasma. Isocitric dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, or acute inflammation of the biliary tract; pulmonary...

  20. Lactate dehydrogenase in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Stankovic Stojanovic, Katia; Lionnet, François

    2016-07-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity is elevated in many pathological states. Interest in LDH activity in sickle cell disease (SCD) has developed out of an increased comprehension of the pathophysiological process and the clinical course of the disease. Elevated LDH activity in SCD comes from various mechanisms, especially intravascular hemolysis, as well as ischemia-reperfusion damage and tissular necrosis. Intravascular hemolysis is associated with vasoconstriction, platelet activation, endothelial damage, and vascular complications. LDH has been used as a diagnostic and prognostic factor of acute and chronic complications. In this review we have evaluated the literature where LDH activity was examined during steady-state or acute conditions in SCD. PMID:27138446

  1. A novel mutation in the succinate dehydrogenase subunit D gene in siblings with the hereditary paraganglioma–pheochromocytoma syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Gerard J; Yip, Linwah; Coyne, Christopher; Rangaswamy, Balasubramanya; Dixit, Sanjay B

    2014-01-01

    Germline mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit D gene are now known to be associated with hereditary paraganglioma–pheochromocytoma syndromes. Since the initial succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit D gene mutation was identified about a decade ago, more than 131 unique variants have been reported. We report the case of two siblings presenting with multiple paragangliomas and pheochromocytomas; they were both found to carry a mutation in the succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit D gene involving a substitution of thymine to guanine at nucleotide 236 in exon 3. This particular mutation of the succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit D gene has only been reported in one previous patient in Japan; this is, therefore, the first report of this pathogenic mutation in siblings and the first report of this mutation in North America. With continued screening of more individuals, we will be able to create a robust mutation database that can help us understand disease patterns associated with particular variants and may be a starting point in the development of new therapies for familial paraganglioma syndromes. PMID:27489656

  2. A detailed investigation of the properties of lactate dehydrogenase in which the 'Essential' cysteine-165 is modified by thioalkylation.

    PubMed Central

    Bloxham, D P; Sharma, R P; Wilton, D C

    1979-01-01

    The reaction of pig heart lactate dehydrogenase with methyl methanethiosulphonate resulted in the modification of one thiol group per protomer, and this was located at cysteine-165 in the enzyme sequence. On reduction, both the thiomethylation of cysteine-165 and any changes in kinetic properties of the enzyme were completely reversed. Cysteine-165 has been considered essential for catalytic activity; however, cysteine-165-thiomethylated dehydrogenase possessed full catalytic activity, although the affinity of the enzyme for carbonyl-or hydroxy-containing substrates was markedly decreased. The nicotinamide nucleotide-binding capacity was unaffected, as judged by the formation of fluorescent complexes with NADH. The enzyme-mediated activation of NAD+, as judged by sulphite addition, was unaffected in thiomethylated lactate dehydrogenase. However, the affinity of oxamate for the enzyme--NADH complex was decreased by 100-fold and it was calculated that this constituted a net increase of 10.4 kJ/mol in the activation energy for binding. Thiomethylated lactate dehydrogenase was able to form an abortive adduct between NAD+ and fluoropyruvate. However, the equilibrium constant for adduct formation between pyruvate and NAD+ was too low to demonstrate this complex at reasonable pyruvate concentrations. A conformational change in the protein structure on selective thiomethylation was revealed by the decreased thermostability of the modified enzyme. The alteration of lactate dehydrogenase catalytic properties on modification depended on the bulk of the reagent used, since thioethylation resulted in an increase in Km for pyruvate (13.5 +/- 3.5 mm) and an 85% decrease in maximum catalytic activity. The implications of all these findings for the catalytic mechanism of lactate dehydrogenase are discussed. PMID:36072

  3. Methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase from Clostridium formicoaceticum and methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase, methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase (combined) from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Ljungdahl, L.G.; O'Brien, W.E.; Moore, M.R.; Liu, M.T.

    1980-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase is widely distributed and has been found in every cell type investigated. The NAD-specific enzyme has been purified to homogeneity from Clostridium formicoaceticum and the NADP-specific enzyme has been obtained from Clostridium thermoaceticum. Other sources of the NADP-specific enzyme are Streptococcus species, Escherichia coli, Clostridium cylindrosporum, Salmonella typhimurium, yeast, liver from various animals, calf thymus, and plants. The NAD-specific enzyme has been demonstrated in Acetobacterium woodii, some methane bacteria, and in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. Of considerable interest are the observations that in porcine and ovine livers, as well as in yeast, methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase purified to homogeneity also contains methylenetetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase and formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase activities. Now it appears that the purified methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase from C. thermoaceticum also has cyclohydrolase but not synthetase activity. Methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase has been discussed previously in this series, as has methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase. In C. formicoaceticum and C. thermoaceticum these tetrahydrofolate-dependent enzymes participate in a sequence of metabolic reactions by which carbon dioxide is reduced to the methyl group of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate which in turn is utilized for the synthesis of acetate. This pathway provides the mechanism for disposing of reducing equivalents generated in glycolysis.

  4. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the Clostridium magnum acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system.

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, N; Oppermann, F B; Lorenzl, H; Steinbüchel, A

    1994-01-01

    E2 (dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase) and E3 (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase) of the Clostridium magnum acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system were copurified in a three-step procedure from acetoin-grown cells. The denatured E2-E3 preparation comprised two polypeptides with M(r)s of 49,000 and 67,000, respectively. Microsequencing of both proteins revealed identical amino acid sequences. By use of oligonucleotide probes based on the N-terminal sequences of the alpha and beta subunits of E1 (acetoin dehydrogenase, thymine PPi dependent), which were purified recently (H. Lorenzl, F.B. Oppermann, B. Schmidt, and A. Steinbüchel, Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 63:219-225, 1993), and of E2-E3, structural genes acoA (encoding E1 alpha), acoB (encoding E1 beta), acoC (encoding E2), and acoL (encoding E3) were identified on a single ClaI restriction fragment and expressed in Escherichia coli. The nucleotide sequences of acoA (978 bp), acoB (999 bp), acoC (1,332 bp), and acoL (1,734 bp), as well as those of acoX (996 bp) and acoR (1,956 bp), were determined. The amino acid sequences deduced from acoA, acoB, acoC, and acoL for E1 alpha (M(r), 35,532), E1 beta (M(r), 35,541), E2 (M(r), 48,149), and E3 (M(r), 61,255) exhibited striking similarities to the amino acid sequences of the corresponding components of the Pelobacter carbinolicus acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system and the Alcaligenes eutrophus acetoin-cleaving system, respectively. Significant homologies to the enzyme components of various 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes were also found, indicating a close relationship between the two enzyme systems. As a result of the partial repetition of the 5' coding region of acoC into the corresponding part of acoL, the E3 component of the C. magnum acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system contains an N-terminal lipoyl domain, which is unique among dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases. We found strong similarities between the AcoR and AcoX sequences and the A. eutrophus acoR gene product

  5. Mutations in the Dimer Interface of Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase Promote Site-specific Oxidative Damages in Yeast and Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Vaubel, Rachael A.; Rustin, Pierre; Isaya, Grazia

    2011-01-01

    Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD) is a multifunctional protein well characterized as the E3 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes. Previously, conditions predicted to destabilize the DLD dimer revealed that DLD could also function as a diaphorase and serine protease. However, the relevance of these cryptic activities remained undefined. We analyzed human DLD mutations linked to strikingly different clinical phenotypes, including E340K, D444V, R447G, and R460G in the dimer interface domain that are responsible for severe multisystem disorders of infancy and G194C in the NAD+-binding domain that is typically associated with milder presentations. In vitro, all of these mutations decreased to various degrees dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase activity, whereas dimer interface mutations also enhanced proteolytic and/or diaphorase activity. Human DLD proteins carrying each individual mutation complemented fully the respiratory-deficient phenotype of yeast cells lacking endogenous DLD even when residual dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase activity was as low as 21% of controls. However, under elevated oxidative stress, expression of DLD proteins with dimer interface mutations greatly accelerated the loss of respiratory function, resulting from enhanced oxidative damage to the lipoic acid cofactor of pyruvate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and other mitochondrial targets. This effect was not observed with the G194C mutation or a mutation that disrupts the proteolytic active site of DLD. As in yeast, lipoic acid cofactor was damaged in human D444V-homozygous fibroblasts after exposure to oxidative stress. We conclude that the cryptic activities of DLD promote oxidative damage to neighboring molecules and thus contribute to the clinical severity of DLD mutations. PMID:21930696

  6. A pH-Dependent Kinetic Model of Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase from Multiple Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Moxley, Michael A.; Beard, Daniel A.; Bazil, Jason N.

    2014-01-01

    Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase is a flavoenzyme that reversibly catalyzes the oxidation of reduced lipoyl substrates with the reduction of NAD+ to NADH. In vivo, the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase component (E3) is associated with the pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate, and glycine dehydrogenase complexes. The pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex connects the glycolytic flux to the tricarboxylic acid cycle and is central to the regulation of primary metabolism. Regulation of PDH via regulation of the E3 component by the NAD+/NADH ratio represents one of the important physiological control mechanisms of PDH activity. Furthermore, previous experiments with the isolated E3 component have demonstrated the importance of pH in dictating NAD+/NADH ratio effects on enzymatic activity. Here, we show that a three-state mechanism that represents the major redox states of the enzyme and includes a detailed representation of the active-site chemistry constrained by both equilibrium and thermodynamic loop constraints can be used to model regulatory NAD+/NADH ratio and pH effects demonstrated in progress-curve and initial-velocity data sets from rat, human, Escherichia coli, and spinach enzymes. Global fitting of the model provides stable predictions to the steady-state distributions of enzyme redox states as a function of lipoamide/dihydrolipoamide, NAD+/NADH, and pH. These distributions were calculated using physiological NAD+/NADH ratios representative of the diverse organismal sources of E3 analyzed in this study. This mechanistically detailed, thermodynamically constrained, pH-dependent model of E3 provides a stable platform on which to accurately model multicomponent enzyme complexes that implement E3 from a variety of organisms. PMID:25517164

  7. Catecholamine regulation of lactate dehydrogenase in rat brain cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; McGinnis, J.F.; de Vellis, J.

    1980-03-25

    The mechanism of catecholamine induction of the soluble cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) was studied in the rat glial tumor cell line, C6. Lactate dehydrogenase was partially purified from extracts of (/sup 3/H)leucine-labeled cells by affinity gel chromatography and quantitatively immunoprecipitated with anti-lactate dehydrogenase-5 IgG and with antilactate dehydrogenase-1 IgG. The immunoprecipitates were dissociated and electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Using this methodology, the increased enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase in norepinephrine-treated C6 cells was observed to be concomitant with the increased synthesis of enzyme molecules. Despite the continued presence of norepinephrine, the specific increase in the rate of synthesis of lactate dehydrogenase was transient. It was first detected at 4 h, was maximum at 9 h, and returned to basal levels by 24 h. The half-life of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity was 36 h during the induction and 40 h during deinduction. The half-life for decay of /sup 3/H-labeled lactate dehydrogenase was 41 h. These observations suggest that the increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity in norepinephrine-treated cells does not involve any change in the rate of degradation. Norepinephrine increased the specific rate of synthesis of both lactate dehydrogenase-5 (a tetramer of four M subunits) and lactate dehydrogenase-1 (a tetramer of four H subunits), although to different extents. Since these subunits are coded for by two separate genes on separate chromosomes, it suggests that the regulatory mechanism involves at least two separate sites of action.

  8. Functional Replacement of the Escherichia coli d-(−)-Lactate Dehydrogenase Gene (ldhA) with the l-(+)-Lactate Dehydrogenase Gene (ldhL) from Pediococcus acidilactici†

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, K. T.; Ingram, L. O.

    2003-01-01

    The microbial production of l-(+)-lactic acid is rapidly expanding to allow increased production of polylactic acid (PLA), a renewable, biodegradable plastic. The physical properties of PLA can be tailored for specific applications by controlling the ratio of l-(+) and d-(−) isomers. For most uses of PLA, the l-(+) isomer is more abundant. As an approach to reduce costs associated with biocatalysis (complex nutrients, antibiotics, aeration, product purification, and waste disposal), a recombinant derivative of Escherichia coli W3110 was developed that contains five chromosomal deletions (focA-pflB frdBC adhE ackA ldhA). This strain was constructed from a d-(−)-lactic acid-producing strain, SZ63 (focA-pflB frdBC adhE ackA), by replacing part of the chromosomal ldhA coding region with Pediococcus acidilactici ldhL encoding an l-lactate dehydrogenase. Although the initial strain (SZ79) grew and fermented poorly, a mutant (SZ85) was readily isolated by selecting for improved growth. SZ85 exhibited a 30-fold increase in l-lactate dehydrogenase activity in comparison to SZ79, functionally replacing the native d-lactate dehydrogenase activity. Sequencing revealed mutations in the upstream, coding, and terminator regions of ldhL in SZ85, which are presumed to be responsible for increased l-lactate dehydrogenase activity. SZ85 produced l-lactic acid in M9 mineral salts medium containing glucose or xylose with a yield of 93 to 95%, a purity of 98% (based on total fermentation products), and an optical purity greater than 99%. Unlike other recombinant biocatalysts for l-lactic acid, SZ85 remained prototrophic and is devoid of plasmids and antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:12676706

  9. Aldehyde dehydrogenase protein superfamily in maize.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mei-Liang; Zhang, Qian; Zhou, Ming; Qi, Lei-Peng; Yang, Xiong-Bang; Zhang, Kai-Xuan; Pang, Jun-Feng; Zhu, Xue-Mei; Shao, Ji-Rong; Tang, Yi-Xiong; Wu, Yan-Min

    2012-11-01

    Maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.) is an important model organism for fundamental research in the agro-biotechnology field. Aldehydes were generated in response to a suite of environmental stresses that perturb metabolism including salinity, dehydration, desiccation, and cold and heat shock. Many biologically important aldehydes are metabolized by the superfamily of NAD(P)(+)-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenases. Here, starting from the database of Z. mays, we identified 28 aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes and 48 transcripts by the in silico cloning method using the ALDH-conserved domain amino acid sequence of Arabidopsis and rice as a probe. Phylogenetic analysis shows that all 28 members of the ALDH gene families were classified to ten distinct subfamilies. Microarray data and quantitative real-time PCR analysis reveal that ZmALDH9, ZmALDH13, and ZmALDH17 genes involve the function of drought stress, acid tolerance, and pathogens infection. These results suggested that these three ZmALDH genes might be potentially useful in maize genetic improvement. PMID:22983498

  10. Alcohol dehydrogenases from olive (Olea europaea) fruit.

    PubMed

    Salas, J J; Sánchez, J

    1998-05-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase activity was detected in extracts from the pericarp tissues of developing olive fruits using hexanal as the substrate. Total activity in the crude extract was 20-fold higher with NADPH than with NADH. Three discrete enzymes were resolved by means of a purification protocol involving ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography. One of the enzymes was NAD-dependent and displayed a high K(m) for hexanal (K(m) = 2.1 mM). Two NADP-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases were resolved, one showing a high K(m) for hexanal (K(m) = 1.9 mM) and the second with a lower K(m) for the same substrate (K(m) = 0.04 mM). The three enzymes have been partially purified and their kinetic parameters and specificities for various aldehydes determined. The involvement of these enzymes in the biogenesis of six carbon alcohols constituent of the aroma of olive oil is discussed. PMID:9621451

  11. Triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as Selective Inhibitors of Mycobacterial Lipoamide Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bryk, Ruslana; Arango, Nancy; Venugopal, Aditya; Warren, J. David; Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S.; Lima, Christopher D.; Nathan, Carl

    2010-06-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains the leading single cause of death from bacterial infection. Here we explored the possibility of species-selective inhibition of lipoamide dehydrogenase (Lpd), an enzyme central to Mtb's intermediary metabolism and antioxidant defense. High-throughput screening of combinatorial chemical libraries identified triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as high-nanomolar inhibitors of Mtb's Lpd that were noncompetitive versus NADH, NAD{sup +}, and lipoamide and >100-fold selective compared to human Lpd. Efficacy required the dimethoxy and dichlorophenyl groups. The structure of an Lpd-inhibitor complex was resolved to 2.42 {angstrom} by X-ray crystallography, revealing that the inhibitor occupied a pocket adjacent to the Lpd NADH/NAD{sup +} binding site. The inhibitor did not overlap with the adenosine moiety of NADH/NAD{sup +} but did overlap with positions predicted to bind the nicotinamide rings in NADH and NAD{sup +} complexes. The dimethoxy ring occupied a deep pocket adjacent to the FAD flavin ring where it would block coordination of the NADH nicotinamide ring, while the dichlorophenyl group occupied a more exposed pocket predicted to coordinate the NAD{sup +} nicotinamide. Several residues that are not conserved between the bacterial enzyme and its human homologue were predicted to contribute both to inhibitor binding and to species selectivity, as confirmed for three residues by analysis of the corresponding mutant Mtb Lpd proteins. Thus, nonconservation of residues lining the electron-transfer tunnel in Mtb Lpd can be exploited for development of species-selective Lpd inhibitors.

  12. Crystallographic and spectroscopic snapshots reveal a dehydrogenase in action

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Lu; Davis, Ian; Liu, Fange; Andi, Babak; Esaki, Shingo; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Orville, Allen M.; Liu, Aimin

    2015-01-07

    Aldehydes are ubiquitous intermediates in metabolic pathways and their innate reactivity can often make them quite unstable. There are several aldehydic intermediates in the metabolic pathway for tryptophan degradation that can decay into neuroactive compounds that have been associated with numerous neurological diseases. An enzyme of this pathway, 2-aminomuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, is responsible for ‘disarming’ the final aldehydic intermediate. Here we show the crystal structures of a bacterial analogue enzyme in five catalytically relevant forms: resting state, one binary and two ternary complexes, and a covalent, thioacyl intermediate. We also report the crystal structures of a tetrahedral, thiohemiacetal intermediate, a thioacyl intermediate and an NAD+-bound complex from an active site mutant. These covalent intermediates are characterized by single-crystal and solution-state electronic absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structures reveal that the substrate undergoes an E/Z isomerization at the enzyme active site before an sp3-to-sp2 transition during enzyme-mediated oxidation.

  13. Crystallographic and spectroscopic snapshots reveal a dehydrogenase in action

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huo, Lu; Davis, Ian; Liu, Fange; Andi, Babak; Esaki, Shingo; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Orville, Allen M.; Liu, Aimin

    2015-01-07

    Aldehydes are ubiquitous intermediates in metabolic pathways and their innate reactivity can often make them quite unstable. There are several aldehydic intermediates in the metabolic pathway for tryptophan degradation that can decay into neuroactive compounds that have been associated with numerous neurological diseases. An enzyme of this pathway, 2-aminomuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, is responsible for ‘disarming’ the final aldehydic intermediate. Here we show the crystal structures of a bacterial analogue enzyme in five catalytically relevant forms: resting state, one binary and two ternary complexes, and a covalent, thioacyl intermediate. We also report the crystal structures of a tetrahedral, thiohemiacetal intermediate, a thioacylmore » intermediate and an NAD+-bound complex from an active site mutant. These covalent intermediates are characterized by single-crystal and solution-state electronic absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structures reveal that the substrate undergoes an E/Z isomerization at the enzyme active site before an sp3-to-sp2 transition during enzyme-mediated oxidation.« less

  14. Crystallographic and spectroscopic snapshots reveal a dehydrogenase in action

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Lu; Davis, Ian; Liu, Fange; Andi, Babak; Esaki, Shingo; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Orville, Allen M.; Liu, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    Aldehydes are ubiquitous intermediates in metabolic pathways and their innate reactivity can often make them quite unstable. There are several aldehydic intermediates in the metabolic pathway for tryptophan degradation that can decay into neuroactive compounds that have been associated with numerous neurological diseases. An enzyme of this pathway, 2-aminomuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, is responsible for ‘disarming’ the final aldehydic intermediate. Here we show the crystal structures of a bacterial analogue enzyme in five catalytically relevant forms: resting state, one binary and two ternary complexes, and a covalent, thioacyl intermediate. We also report the crystal structures of a tetrahedral, thiohemiacetal intermediate, a thioacyl intermediate and an NAD+-bound complex from an active site mutant. These covalent intermediates are characterized by single-crystal and solution-state electronic absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structures reveal that the substrate undergoes an E/Z isomerization at the enzyme active site before an sp3-to-sp2 transition during enzyme-mediated oxidation. PMID:25565451

  15. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Malic dehydrogenase test system. 862.1500 Section 862.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1500 Malic dehydrogenase test system....

  16. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase test system. 862.1440 Section 862.1440 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1440 Lactate dehydrogenase...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system. 866.5560 Section 866.5560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5560 Lactic dehydrogenase immunological...

  18. Crystallization and Initial X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Hong, Young-Soo; Joachimiak, Andrzj; Patel, Mulchand S.; Rose, M. Franklin

    2000-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) is a component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The enzyme catalyzes the decarboxylation of pyruvate followed by a reductive acetylation of lipoyl groups of the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. El is an alpha(sub 2)Beta(sub 2) tetrameric assembly of an approximate molecular mass of 154 kDa. The crystals of this recombinant enzyme have been grown from polyethylene glycol 3350 using vapor diffusion method at 295K. The crystals are characterized as orthorhombic, space group P2(sub 1)2(sub 1)2(sub 1), with cell parameters of a = 64.2, b = 126.9 and c = 190.2 A. Crystals diffracted to a minimum d-spacing of 2.5 A. The asymmetric unit contains one alpha(sub 2)Beta(sub 2) tetrameric El assembly, and self-rotation function analysis showed a pseudo-twofold symmetry relating the two monomers.

  19. A novel cofactor-binding mode in bacterial IMP dehydrogenases explains inhibitor selectivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; et al

    2015-01-09

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes withmore » different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. As a result, these findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization.« less

  20. A Novel Cofactor-binding Mode in Bacterial IMP Dehydrogenases Explains Inhibitor Selectivity*

    PubMed Central

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes with different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. These findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization. PMID:25572472

  1. Crystal structure of the NADP+-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase from Vibrio harveyi: structural implications for cofactor specificity and affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Ahvazi, B; Coulombe, R; Delarge, M; Vedadi, M; Zhang, L; Meighen, E; Vrielink, A

    2000-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase from the bioluminescent bacterium, Vibrio harveyi, catalyses the oxidation of long-chain aliphatic aldehydes to acids. The enzyme is unique compared with other forms of aldehyde dehydrogenase in that it exhibits a very high specificity and affinity for the cofactor NADP(+). Structural studies of this enzyme and comparisons with other forms of aldehyde dehydrogenase provide the basis for understanding the molecular features that dictate these unique properties and will enhance our understanding of the mechanism of catalysis for this class of enzyme. The X-ray structure of aldehyde dehydrogenase from V. harveyi has been solved to 2.5-A resolution as a partial complex with the cofactor NADP(+) and to 2. 1-A resolution as a fully bound 'holo' complex. The cofactor preference exhibited by different forms of the enzyme is predominantly determined by the electrostatic environment surrounding the 2'-hydroxy or the 2'-phosphate groups of the adenosine ribose moiety of NAD(+) or NADP(+), respectively. In the NADP(+)-dependent structures the presence of a threonine and a lysine contribute to the cofactor specificity. In the V. harveyi enzyme an arginine residue (Arg-210) contributes to the high cofactor affinity through a pi stacking interaction with the adenine ring system of the cofactor. Further differences between the V. harveyi enzyme and other aldehyde dehydrogenases are seen in the active site, in particular a histidine residue which is structurally conserved with phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. This may suggest an alternative mechanism for activation of the reactive cysteine residue for nucleophilic attack. PMID:10903148

  2. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase expression by the farnesoid X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Savkur, Rajesh S.; Bramlett, Kelli S.; Michael, Laura F.; Burris, Thomas P. . E-mail: burris_thomas_p@lilly.com

    2005-04-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) functions as an important junction in intermediary metabolism by influencing the utilization of fat versus carbohydrate as a source of fuel. Activation of PDC is achieved by phosphatases, whereas, inactivation is catalyzed by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs). The expression of PDK4 is highly regulated by the glucocorticoid and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. We demonstrate that the farnesoid X receptor (FXR; NR1H4), which regulates a variety of genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism, also regulates the expression of PDK4. Treatment of rat hepatoma cells as well as human primary hepatocytes with FXR agonists stimulates the expression of PDK4 to levels comparable to those obtained with glucocorticoids. In addition, treatment of mice with an FXR agonist significantly increased hepatic PDK4 expression, while concomitantly decreasing plasma triglyceride levels. Thus, activation of FXR may suppress glycolysis and enhance oxidation of fatty acids via inactivation of the PDC by increasing PDK4 expression.

  3. Tyrosine phosphorylation of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 is important for cancer metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hitosugi, Taro; Fan, Jun; Chung, Tae-Wook; Lythgoe, Katherine; Wang, Xu; Xie, Jianxin; Ge, Qingyuan; Gu, Ting-Lei; Polakiewicz, Roberto D.; Roesel, Johannes L.; Chen, Zhuo (Georgia); Boggon, Titus J.; Lonial, Sagar; Fu, Haian; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Kang, Sumin; Chen, Jing

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Many tumor cells rely on aerobic glycolysis instead of oxidative phosphorylation for their continued proliferation and survival. Myc and HIF-1 are believed to promote such a metabolic switch by, in part, upregulating gene expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase 1 (PDHK1), which phosphorylates and inactivates mitochondrial PDH and consequently pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). Here we report that tyrosine phosphorylation enhances PDHK1 kinase activity by promoting ATP and PDC binding. Functional PDC can form in mitochondria outside of matrix in some cancer cells and PDHK1 is commonly tyrosine phosphorylated in human cancers by diverse oncogenic tyrosine kinases localized to different mitochondrial compartments. Expression of phosphorylation-deficient, catalytic hypomorph PDHK1 mutants in cancer cells leads to decreased cell proliferation under hypoxia and increased oxidative phosphorylation with enhanced mitochondrial utilization of pyruvate, and reduced tumor growth in xenograft nude mice. Together, tyrosine phosphorylation activates PDHK1 to promote the Warburg effect and tumor growth. PMID:22195962

  4. Peroxisomal NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase is required for Arabidopsis stomatal movement.

    PubMed

    Leterrier, Marina; Barroso, Juan B; Valderrama, Raquel; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Chaki, Mounira; Luque, Francisco; Viñegla, Benjamin; Palma, José M; Corpas, Francisco J

    2016-03-01

    Peroxisomes are subcellular organelles characterized by a simple morphological structure but have a complex biochemical machinery involved in signaling processes through molecules such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO). Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) is an essential component in cell redox homeostasis, and its regeneration is critical for reductive biosynthesis and detoxification pathways. Plants have several NADPH-generating dehydrogenases, with NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH) being one of these enzymes. Arabidopsis contains three genes that encode for cytosolic, mitochondrial/chloroplastic, and peroxisomal NADP-ICDH isozymes although the specific function of each of these remains largely unknown. Using two T-DNA insertion lines of the peroxisomal NADP-ICDH designated as picdh-1 and picdh-2, the data show that the peroxisomal NADP-ICDH is involved in stomatal movements, suggesting that peroxisomes are a new element in the signaling network of guard cells. PMID:25894616

  5. Structural basis of substrate specificity of bifunctional isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase/phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Susan P.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Bryan, Cassie M.; Stein, Adam J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.; Stewart, Lance J.; Zheng, Jimin; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase/phosphatase (AceK) regulates entry into the glyoxylate bypass by reversibly phosphorylating isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH). Based on the recent complex structure of AceK-ICDH from E. coli, we have classified the structures of homodimeric NADP+-ICDHs to rationalize and predict which organisms likely contain substrates for AceK. One example is Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp). Here we report a crystal structure of Bp-ICDH which exhibits the necessary structural elements required for AceK recognition. Kinetic analyses provided further confirmation that Bp-ICDH is a substrate for AceK. We conclude that the highly stringent AceK binding sites on ICDH are maintained only in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:21870819

  6. THE HEME BINDING PROPERTIES OF GLYCERALDEHYDE-3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE

    PubMed Central

    Hannibal, Luciana; Collins, Daniel; Brassard, Julie; Chakravarti, Ritu; Vempati, Rajesh; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Dawson, John H.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2012-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a glycolytic enzyme that also functions in transcriptional regulation, oxidative stress, vesicular trafficking, and apoptosis. Because GAPDH is required for cellular heme insertion into inducible nitric oxide synthase (Chakravarti et al, PNAS 2010, 107(42):18004-9), we extensively characterized the heme binding properties of GAPDH. Substoichiometric amounts of ferric heme bound to GAPDH (1 heme per GAPDH tetramer) to form a low-spin complex with UV-visible maxima at 362, 418 and 537 nm, and when reduced to ferrous gave maxima at 424, 527 and 559 nm. Ferric heme association and dissociation rate constants at 10 °C were kon =17,800 M−1s−1 and koff1 = 7.0 × 10−3 s−1; koff2 = 3.3 × 10−4 s−1 respectively, giving approximate affinities of 19–390 nM. Ferrous heme bound more poorly to GAPDH and dissociated with a koff = 4.2 × 10−3 s−1. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), resonance Raman (rR) and EPR spectroscopic data on the ferric, ferrous, and ferrous-CO complexes of GAPDH showed that the heme is bis-ligated with His as the proximal ligand. The distal ligand in ferric complex was not displaced by CN− or N3− but in ferrous complex was displaceable by CO at a rate of 1.75 s−1 (for [CO]>0.2 mM). Studies with heme analogs revealed selectivity toward the coordinating metal and porphyrin ring structure. GAPDH-heme was isolated from bacteria induced to express rabbit GAPDH in the presence of δ-amino levulinic acid. Our finding of heme binding to GAPDH expands the protein’s potential roles. The strength, selectivity, reversibility, and redox sensitivity of heme binding to GAPDH is consistent with it performing heme sensing or heme chaperone-like functions in cells. PMID:22957700

  7. Modulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity in cultured hepatocytes by glucagon and n-octanoate.

    PubMed Central

    Fatania, H R; Vary, T C; Randle, P J

    1986-01-01

    The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase in extracts of mitochondria from rat hepatocytes cultured for 21 h in medium 199 was increased 2.5-fold by the presence of 55 nM-glucagon and 1 mM-sodium n-octanoate in the culture medium. The change was comparable with that induced in vivo by 48 h starvation. The potential contribution of branched-chain complex to estimates of PDH-complex activity in rat liver mitochondria has been defined. PMID:3707545

  8. [Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient tumors--a novel mechanism of tumor formation].

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a heterotetrameric enzyme complex participating in the Krebs cycle and electron transfer of oxidative phosphorylation. These tumors, discovered during the past 15 years, often occur in young patients and include 15% of paragangliomas, 7% of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), and <1% of renal cell carcinomas and pituitary adenomas. SDH-deficient tumors have lost SDH complex activity via bi-allelic genomic losses or epigenetic silencing. This deficiency is oncogenic, activating pseudohypoxia signaling. SDH deficiency has to be suspected in the above-cited tumor types presenting at a young age. Immunohistochemical testing of tumor tissue for SDHB loss is diagnostic. PMID:26749909

  9. Expression of Drosophila melanogaster xanthine dehydrogenase in Aspergillus nidulans and some properties of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Benjamin; Lowe, David J; Smith, Andrew T; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Demais, Stephane; Bray, Robert C

    2002-01-01

    Recent crystal structures of xanthine dehydrogenase, xanthine oxidase and related enzymes have paved the way for a detailed structural and functional analysis of these enzymes. One problem encountered when working with these proteins, especially with recombinant protein, is that the preparations tend to be heterogeneous, with only a fraction of the enzyme molecules being active. This is due to the incompleteness of post-translational modification, which for this protein is a complex, and incompletely understood, process involving incorporation of the Mo and Fe/S centres. The enzyme has been expressed previously in both Drosophila and insect cells using baculovirus. The insect cell system has been exploited by Iwasaki et al. [Iwasaki, Okamoto, Nishino, Mizushima and Hori (2000) J. Biochem (Tokyo) 127, 771-778], but, for the rat enzyme, yields a complex mixture of enzyme forms, containing around 10% of functional enzyme. The expression of Drosophila melanogaster xanthine dehydrogenase in Aspergillus nidulans is described. The purified protein has been analysed both functionally and spectroscopically. Its specific activity is indistinguishable from that of the enzyme purified from fruit flies [Doyle, Burke, Chovnick, Dutton, Whittle and Bray (1996) Eur. J. Biochem. 239, 782-795], and it appears to be more active than recombinant xanthine dehydrogenase produced with the baculovirus system. EPR spectra of the recombinant Drosophila enzyme are reported, including parameters for the Fe/S centres. Only a very weak "Fe/SIII" signal (g(1,2,3), 2.057, 1.930, 1.858) was observed, in contrast to the strong analogous signal reported for the enzyme from baculovirus. Since this signal appears to be associated with incomplete post-translational modification, this is consistent with relatively more complete cofactor incorporation in the Aspergillus-produced enzyme. Thus we have developed a recombinant expression system for D. melanogaster xanthine dehydrogenase, which can be used

  10. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  11. Enantiocomplementary Yarrowia lipolytica Oxidoreductases: Alcohol Dehydrogenase 2 and Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Napora-Wijata, Kamila; Strohmeier, Gernot A.; Sonavane, Manoj N.; Avi, Manuela; Robins, Karen; Winkler, Margit

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes of the non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica seem to be tailor-made for the conversion of lipophilic substrates. Herein, we cloned and overexpressed the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase ADH2 from Yarrowia lipolytica in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was characterized in vitro. The substrate scope for YlADH2 mediated oxidation and reduction was investigated spectrophotometrically and the enzyme showed a broader substrate range than its homolog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A preference for secondary compared to primary alcohols in oxidation direction was observed for YlADH2. 2-Octanone was investigated in reduction mode in detail. Remarkably, YlADH2 displays perfect (S)-selectivity and together with a highly (R)-selective short chain dehydrogenase/ reductase from Yarrowia lipolytica it is possible to access both enantiomers of 2-octanol in >99% ee with Yarrowia lipolytica oxidoreductases. PMID:24970175

  12. Antimicrobial Cellobiose Dehydrogenase-Chitosan Particles.

    PubMed

    Tegl, Gregor; Thallinger, Barbara; Beer, Bianca; Sygmund, Christoph; Ludwig, Roland; Rollett, Alexandra; Nyanhongo, Gibson S; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-01-13

    Increasing prevalence of chronic wounds and microbial infection constitute a severe health challenge. The situation is further complicated by emerging multidrug resistance making the treatment of infections increasingly difficult. Here, a novel antimicrobial system based on in situ release of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) immobilized on chitosan (CTS) particles is described. Covalent immobilization using carbodiimide coupling lead to a higher amount of protein immobilized on CTS (104 μg CDH/mg CTS) when compared to noncovalent immobilization, which, however, showed highest recovery of CDH activity (0.01 U/mg CTS). The CDH-CTS in situ generated H2O2 completely inhibited growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus over a period of 24 h. This resilient antimicrobial system represents a novel strategy for preventing infection with potential application in counteracting microbial colonization of chronic wounds. PMID:26672396

  13. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Monkenbusch, M.; Stadler, A. Biehl, R.; Richter, D.; Ollivier, J.; Zamponi, M.

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D{sub 2}O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains.

  14. Stability of immobilized yeast alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ooshima, H.; Genko, Y.; Harano, Y.

    1981-12-01

    The effects of substrate on stabilities of native (NA) and three kinds of immobilized yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (IMA), namely PGA (the carrier; porous glass), SEA (agarose gel) prepared covalently, and AMA (anion-exchange resin) prepared ionically, were studied. The following results were obtained. 1) The deactivations of NA and IMA free from the substrate or in the presence of ethanol obey the first-order kinetics, whereas, in the presence of butyraldehyde, their deactivation behaviors are explained on the basis of coexistence of two components of YADHs, namely the labile E1 and the comparatively stable E2, with different first-order deactivation constants. (2) A few attempts for stabilization of IMA were carried out from the viewpoint of the effects of crosslinkages among the subunits of YADH for PGA and the multibonding between the carrier and enzyme for SEA. The former is effective for the stabilization, whereas the latter is not. (Refs. 19).

  15. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; Weretilnyk, E.A.; Weigel, P.

    1986-04-01

    Betaine is synthesized in spinach chloroplasts via the pathway Choline ..-->.. Betaine Aldehyde ..-->.. Betaine; the second step is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The subcellular distribution of BADH was determined in leaf protoplast lysates; BADH isozymes were separated by 6-9% native PAGE. The chloroplast stromal fraction contains a single BADH isozyme (number1) that accounts for > 80% of the total protoplast activity; the extrachloroplastic fraction has a minor isozyme (number2) which migrates more slowly than number1. Both isozymes appear specific for betaine aldehyde, are more active with NAD than NADP, and show a ca. 3-fold activity increase in salinized leaves. The phenotype of a natural variant of isozyme number1 suggests that the enzyme is a dimer.

  16. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Monkenbusch, M; Stadler, A; Biehl, R; Ollivier, J; Zamponi, M; Richter, D

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D2O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains. PMID:26298156

  17. Purification and properties of L-mandelate dehydrogenase and comparison with other membrane-bound dehydrogenases from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Hoey, M E; Allison, N; Scott, A J; Fewson, C A

    1987-12-15

    L-Mandelate dehydrogenase was purified from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus by Triton X-100 extraction from a 'wall + membrane' fraction, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel, (NH4)2SO4 fractionation and gel filtration followed by further ion-exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme was partially characterized with respect to its subunit Mr (44,000), pH optimum (7.5), pI value (4.2), substrate specificity and susceptibility to various potential inhibitors including thiol-blocking reagents. FMN was identified as the non-covalently bound cofactor. The properties of L-mandelate dehydrogenase are compared with those of D-mandelate dehydrogenase, D-lactate dehydrogenase and L-lactate dehydrogenase from A. calcoaceticus. PMID:3325042

  18. Purification and properties of L-mandelate dehydrogenase and comparison with other membrane-bound dehydrogenases from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed Central

    Hoey, M E; Allison, N; Scott, A J; Fewson, C A

    1987-01-01

    L-Mandelate dehydrogenase was purified from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus by Triton X-100 extraction from a 'wall + membrane' fraction, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel, (NH4)2SO4 fractionation and gel filtration followed by further ion-exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme was partially characterized with respect to its subunit Mr (44,000), pH optimum (7.5), pI value (4.2), substrate specificity and susceptibility to various potential inhibitors including thiol-blocking reagents. FMN was identified as the non-covalently bound cofactor. The properties of L-mandelate dehydrogenase are compared with those of D-mandelate dehydrogenase, D-lactate dehydrogenase and L-lactate dehydrogenase from A. calcoaceticus. PMID:3325042

  19. Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase causing excessive acetaldehyde production from ethanol by oral streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, Sylvia I.; Jin, Ling; Gasparovich, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol consumption and poor oral hygiene are risk factors for oral and oesophageal cancers. Although oral streptococci have been found to produce excessive acetaldehyde from ethanol, little is known about the mechanism by which this carcinogen is produced. By screening 52 strains of diverse oral streptococcal species, we identified Streptococcus gordonii V2016 that produced the most acetaldehyde from ethanol. We then constructed gene deletion mutants in this strain and analysed them for alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenases by zymograms. The results showed that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol and ethanol, respectively. Two additional dehydrogenases, S-AdhA and TdhA, were identified with specificities to the secondary alcohol 2-propanol and threonine, respectively, but not to ethanol. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase even though its adhE gene encodes a putative bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Mutants with adhE deletion showed greater tolerance to ethanol in comparison with the wild-type and mutant with adhA or adhB deletion, indicating that AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Analysis of 19 additional strains of S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. oralis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis showed expressions of up to three alcohol dehydrogenases, but none showed detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, except one strain that showed a novel ALDH. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase may contribute to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by certain oral streptococci. PMID:23637459

  20. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin-Dependent Enzymes Revealed by Crystal Structure of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Sidhu, Sukdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2003-01-01

    The biologically active derivative of vitamin B1; thiamin pyrophosphate; is used as cofactor by many enzymes that perform a wide range of catalytic functions in the pathways of energy production. In alpha2beta2-heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, the first catalytic component enzyme of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, this cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha)-C(=0) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, the second catalytic component of the complex. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites have puzzled researchers from earlier functional studies of this enzyme. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of action of this enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the holoform of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.958, resolution. We propose a kinetic model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme through the concerted approx. 2A, shuttle-like motion of the heterodimers. The similarity of thiamin pyrophosphate binding in human pyruvate dehydrogenase and other functionally related enzymes suggests this newly defined mechanism of shuttle-like motion of domains to be common for the family of thiamin pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes.

  1. URF6, Last Unidentified Reading Frame of Human mtDNA, Codes for an NADH Dehydrogenase Subunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chomyn, Anne; Cleeter, Michael W. J.; Ragan, C. Ian; Riley, Marcia; Doolittle, Russell F.; Attardi, Giuseppe

    1986-10-01

    The polypeptide encoded in URF6, the last unassigned reading frame of human mitochondrial DNA, has been identified with antibodies to peptides predicted from the DNA sequence. Antibodies prepared against highly purified respiratory chain NADH dehydrogenase from beef heart or against the cytoplasmically synthesized 49-kilodalton iron-sulfur subunit isolated from this enzyme complex, when added to a deoxycholate or a Triton X-100 mitochondrial lysate of HeLa cells, specifically precipitated the URF6 product together with the six other URF products previously identified as subunits of NADH dehydrogenase. These results strongly point to the URF6 product as being another subunit of this enzyme complex. Thus, almost 60% of the protein coding capacity of mammalian mitochondrial DNA is utilized for the assembly of the first enzyme complex of the respiratory chain. The absence of such information in yeast mitochondrial DNA dramatizes the variability in gene content of different mitochondrial genomes.

  2. Membrane-Associated Quinoprotein Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, James A.; Bergmann, David J.; Boyd, Jeffery M.; Kunz, Ryan C.; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2001-01-01

    A membrane-associated, dye-linked formaldehyde dehydrogenase (DL-FalDH) was isolated from the obligate methylotroph Methylococcus capsulatus Bath. The enzyme was the major formaldehyde-oxidizing enzyme in cells cultured in high (above 1 μmol of Cu per mg of cell protein) copper medium and expressing the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase. Soluble NAD(P)+-linked formaldehyde oxidation was the major activity in cells cultured in low-copper medium and expressing the soluble methane monooxygenase (Tate and Dalton, Microbiology 145:159–167, 1999; Vorholt et al., J. Bacteriol. 180:5351–5356, 1998). The membrane-associated enzyme is a homotetramer with a subunit molecular mass of 49,500 Da. UV-visible absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance, and electrospray mass spectrometry suggest the redox cofactor of the DL-FalDH is pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), with a PQQ-to-subunit stochiometry of approximately 1:1. The enzyme was specific for formaldehyde, oxidizing formaldehyde to formate, and utilized the cytochrome b559/569 complex as the physiological electron acceptor. PMID:11698372

  3. Membrane-associated quinoprotein formaldehyde dehydrogenase from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath.

    PubMed

    Zahn, J A; Bergmann, D J; Boyd, J M; Kunz, R C; DiSpirito, A A

    2001-12-01

    A membrane-associated, dye-linked formaldehyde dehydrogenase (DL-FalDH) was isolated from the obligate methylotroph Methylococcus capsulatus Bath. The enzyme was the major formaldehyde-oxidizing enzyme in cells cultured in high (above 1 micromol of Cu per mg of cell protein) copper medium and expressing the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase. Soluble NAD(P)(+)-linked formaldehyde oxidation was the major activity in cells cultured in low-copper medium and expressing the soluble methane monooxygenase (Tate and Dalton, Microbiology 145:159-167, 1999; Vorholt et al., J. Bacteriol. 180:5351-5356, 1998). The membrane-associated enzyme is a homotetramer with a subunit molecular mass of 49,500 Da. UV-visible absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance, and electrospray mass spectrometry suggest the redox cofactor of the DL-FalDH is pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), with a PQQ-to-subunit stochiometry of approximately 1:1. The enzyme was specific for formaldehyde, oxidizing formaldehyde to formate, and utilized the cytochrome b(559/569) complex as the physiological electron acceptor. PMID:11698372

  4. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bzik, D J; Fox, B A; Gonyer, K

    1993-05-01

    A Plasmodium falciparum gene is described which encodes lactate dehydrogenase activity (P. falciparum LDH). The P. falciparum LDH gene contains no introns and is present in a single copy on chromosome 13. P. falciparum LDH was expressed in all asexual blood stages as a 1.6-kb mRNA. The predicted 316 amino acid protein coding region of P. falciparum LDH was inserted into the prokaryotic expression vector pKK223-3 and a 33-kDa protein having LDH activity was synthesized in Escherichia coli. P. falciparum LDH primary structure displays high amino acid similarity (50-57%) to vertebrate and bacterial LDH, but lacks the amino terminal extension observed in all vertebrate LDH. The majority of amino acid residues implicated in substrate and coenzyme binding and catalysis of other LDH are well conserved in P. falciparum LDH. However, several notable differences in amino acid composition were observed. P. falciparum LDH contained several distinctive single amino acid insertions and deletions compared to other LDH enzymes, and most remarkably, it contained a novel insertion of 5 amino acids within the conserved mobile loop region near arginine residue 109, a residue which is known to make contact with pyruvate in the ternary complex of other LDH. These results suggest that novel features of P. falciparum LDH primary structure may be correlated with previously characterized and distinctive kinetic, biochemical, immunochemical, and electrophoretic properties of P. falciparum LDH. PMID:8515777

  5. Green tea polyphenols modulate insulin secretion by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Kwagh, Jae; Doliba, Nicolai M; Qin, Wei; Najafi, Habiba; Collins, Heather W; Matschinsky, Franz M; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2006-04-14

    Insulin secretion by pancreatic beta-cells is stimulated by glucose, amino acids, and other metabolic fuels. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) has been shown to play a regulatory role in this process. The importance of GDH was underscored by features of hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia syndrome, where a dominant mutation causes the loss of inhibition by GTP and ATP. Here we report the effects of green tea polyphenols on GDH and insulin secretion. Of the four compounds tested, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate were found to inhibit GDH with nanomolar ED(50) values and were therefore found to be as potent as the physiologically important inhibitor GTP. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that EGCG inhibits BCH-stimulated insulin secretion, a process that is mediated by GDH, under conditions where GDH is no longer inhibited by high energy metabolites. EGCG does not affect glucose-stimulated insulin secretion under high energy conditions where GDH is probably fully inhibited. We have further shown that these compounds act in an allosteric manner independent of their antioxidant activity and that the beta-cell stimulatory effects are directly correlated with glutamine oxidation. These results demonstrate that EGCG, much like the activator of GDH (BCH), can facilitate dissecting the complex regulation of insulin secretion by pharmacologically modulating the effects of GDH. PMID:16476731

  6. Succinate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Pediatric and Adult Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Belinsky, Martin G.; Rink, Lori; von Mehren, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in adults are generally driven by somatic gain-of-function mutations in KIT or PDGFRA, and biological therapies targeted to these receptor tyrosine kinases comprise part of the treatment regimen for metastatic and inoperable GISTs. A minority (10–15%) of GISTs in adults, along with ∼85% of pediatric GISTs, lacks oncogenic mutations in KIT and PDGFRA. Not surprisingly these wild type (WT) GISTs respond poorly to kinase inhibitor therapy. A subset of WT GISTs shares a set of distinguishing clinical and pathological features, and a flurry of recent reports has convincingly demonstrated shared molecular characteristics. These GISTs have a distinct transcriptional profile including over-expression of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, and exhibit deficiency in the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) enzyme complex. The latter is often but not always linked to bi-allelic inactivation of SDH subunit genes, particularly SDHA. This review will summarize the molecular, pathological, and clinical connections that link this group of SDH-deficient neoplasms, and offer a view toward understanding the underlying biology of the disease and the therapeutic challenges implicit to this biology. PMID:23730622

  7. In vivo relationship between monoamine oxidase type B and alcohol dehydrogenase: effects of ethanol and phenylethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Aliyu, S.U.; Upahi, L.

    1988-01-01

    The role of acute ethanol and phenylethylamine on the brain and platelet monoamine oxidase activities, hepatic cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase, redox state and motor behavior were studied in male rats. Ethanol on its own decreased the redox couple ratio, as well as, alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the liver while at the same time it increased brain and platelet monoamine oxidase activity due to lower Km with no change in Vmax. The elevation in both brain and platelet MAO activity was associated with ethanol-induced hypomotility in the rats. Co-administration of phenylethylamine and ethanol to the animals, caused antagonism of the ethanol-induced effects described above. The effects of phenylethylamine alone, on the above mentioned biochemical and behavioral indices, are more complex. Phenylethylamine on its own, like ethanol, caused reduction of the cytosolic redox, ratio and elevation of monoamine oxidase activity in the brain and platelets. However, in contrast to ethanol, this monoamine produced hypermotility and activation of the hepatic cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the animals.

  8. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and Its Deficiency in Mutants of Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Ihnen, Ernel D.; Demain, Arnold L.

    1969-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of a group of taxonomically related glutamate-excreting bacteria which utilize glucose both by the Embden-Meyerhof and the pentose phosphate pathways, the latter sequence accounting for 10 to 38% of the glucose metabolized. Some of the properties of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in crude extracts of C. glutamicum were studied. The enzyme was rapidly inactivated by dilution in tris (hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-hydrochloride buffer. This inactivation was prevented by the presence of 0.45 m NaCl. Mg++ was required for enzyme activity, but Mn++, Ca++, Sr++, and Ba++ were equally effective. Growth of the organism under differing conditions did not markedly affect the specific activity of the enzyme. A generally applicable method for detecting colonies deficient in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was developed. Mutants so obtained were found to be auxotrophic for tryptophan. Upon reversion of the tryptophan requirement, the revertants still retained the property of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Neither the mutants nor the revertants could grow as rapidly as the parent culture in glucose, in gluconate, or in a complex medium. PMID:5788701

  9. Complete amino acid sequence and characterization of the reaction mechanism of a glucosamine-induced novel alcohol dehydrogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter (tumefaciens).

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Ryoko; Kubota, Humie; Hosoki, Tomoko; Ikehara, Kenji; Tanaka, Mieko

    2002-02-15

    A glucosamine-induced novel alcohol dehydrogenase has been isolated from Agrobacterium radiobacter (tumefaciens) and its fundamental properties have been characterized. The enzyme catalyzes NAD-dependent dehydrogenation of aliphatic alcohols and amino alcohols. In this work, the complete amino acid sequence of the alcohol dehydrogenase was determined by PCR method using genomic DNA of A. radiobacter as template. The enzyme comprises 336 amino acids and has a molecular mass of 36 kDa. The primary structure of the enzyme demonstrates a high homology to structures of alcohol dehydrogenases from Shinorhizobium meliloti (83% identity, 90% positive) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (65% identity, 76% positive). The two Zn(2+) ion binding sites, both the active site and another site that contributed to stabilization of the enzyme, are conserved in those enzymes. Sequences analysis of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenase family using a hypothetical phylogenetic tree indicates that these three enzymes form a new group distinct from other members of the Zn-containing long-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family. The physicochemical properties of alcohol dehydrogenase from A. radiobacter were characterized as follows. (1) Stereospecificity of the hydride transfer from ethanol to NADH was categorized as pro-R type by NMR spectra of NADH formed in the enzymatic reaction using ethanol-D(6) was used as substrate. (2) Optimal pH for all alcohols with no amino group examined was pH 8.5 (of the C(2)-C(6) alcohols, n-amyl alcohol demonstrated the highest activity). Conversely, glucosaminitol was optimally dehydrogenated at pH 10.0. (3) The rate-determining step of the dehydrogenase for ethanol is deprotonation of the enzyme-NAD-Zn-OHCH(2)CH(3) complex to enzyme-NAD-Zn-O(-)CH(2)CH(3) complex and that for glucosaminitol is H(2)O addition to enzyme-Zn-NADH complex. PMID:11831851

  10. Evolutionary origins of retinoid active short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases of SDR16C family.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Olga V; Chang, Chenbei; Berlett, Michael C; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2015-06-01

    Vertebrate enzymes that belong to the 16C family of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR16C) were shown to play an essential role in the control of retinoic acid (RA) levels during development. To trace the evolution of enzymatic function of SDR16C family, and to examine the origins of the pathway for RA biosynthesis from vitamin A, we identified putative SDR16C enzymes through the extensive search of available genome sequencing data in a subset of species representing major metazoan phyla. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that enzymes from protostome, non-chordate deuterostome and invertebrate chordate species are found in three clades of SDR16C family containing retinoid active enzymes, which are retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10), retinol dehydrogenases E2 (RDHE2) and RDHE2-similar, and dehydrogenase reductase (SDR family) member 3 (DHRS3). For the initial functional analysis, we cloned RDH10- and RDHE2-related enzymes from the early developmental stages of a non-chordate deuterostome, green sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, and an invertebrate chordate, sea squirt Ciona intestinalis. In situ hybridization revealed that these proteins are expressed in a pattern relevant to development, while assays performed on proteins expressed in mammalian cell culture showed that they possess retinol-oxidizing activity as their vertebrate homologs. The existence of invertebrate homologs of DHRS3 was inferred from the analysis of phylogeny and cofactor-binding residues characteristic of preference for NADP(H). The presence of invertebrate homologs in the DHRS3 group of SDR16C is interesting in light of the complex mutually activating interaction, which we have recently described for human RDH10 and DHRS3 enzymes. Further functional analysis of these homologs will establish whether this interaction evolved to control retinoid homeostasis only in vertebrates, or is also conserved in pre-vertebrates. PMID:25451586

  11. Drosophila melanogaster alcohol dehydrogenase: mechanism of aldehyde oxidation and dismutation.

    PubMed

    Winberg, J O; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-02-01

    Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) catalyses the oxidation of both alcohols and aldehydes. In the latter case, the oxidation is followed by a reduction of the aldehyde, i.e. a dismutation reaction. At high pH, dismutation is accompanied by a small release of NADH, which is not observed at neutral pH. Previously it has been emphasized that kinetic coefficients obtained by measuring the increase in A340, i.e. the release of NADH at high pH is not a direct measure of the aldehyde oxidation reaction and these values cannot be compared with those for alcohol dehydrogenation. In this article we demonstrate that this is not entirely true, and that the coefficients phiB and phiAB, where B is the aldehyde and A is NAD+, are the same for a dismutation reaction and a simple aldehyde dehydrogenase reaction. Thus the substrate specificity of the aldehyde oxidation reaction can be determined by simply measuring the NADH release. The coefficients for oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions (phi0d and phiAd respectively) are complex and involve the constants for the dismutation reaction. However, dead-end inhibitors can be used to determine the quantitative contribution of the kinetic constants for the aldehyde oxidation and reduction pathways to the phi0d and phiAd coefficients. The combination of dead-end and product inhibitors can be used to determine the reaction mechanism for the aldehyde oxidation pathway. Previously, we showed that with Drosophila Adh, the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes followed a strictly compulsory ordered pathway, although aldehydes and ketones formed binary complexes with the enzyme. This raised the question regarding the reaction mechanism for the oxidation of aldehydes, i.e. whether a random ordered pathway was followed. In the present work, the mechanism for the oxidation of different aldehydes and the accompanying dismutation reaction with the slow alleloenzyme (AdhS) from Drosophila melanogaster has been studied. To obtain

  12. Drosophila melanogaster alcohol dehydrogenase: mechanism of aldehyde oxidation and dismutation.

    PubMed Central

    Winberg, J O; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-01-01

    Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) catalyses the oxidation of both alcohols and aldehydes. In the latter case, the oxidation is followed by a reduction of the aldehyde, i.e. a dismutation reaction. At high pH, dismutation is accompanied by a small release of NADH, which is not observed at neutral pH. Previously it has been emphasized that kinetic coefficients obtained by measuring the increase in A340, i.e. the release of NADH at high pH is not a direct measure of the aldehyde oxidation reaction and these values cannot be compared with those for alcohol dehydrogenation. In this article we demonstrate that this is not entirely true, and that the coefficients phiB and phiAB, where B is the aldehyde and A is NAD+, are the same for a dismutation reaction and a simple aldehyde dehydrogenase reaction. Thus the substrate specificity of the aldehyde oxidation reaction can be determined by simply measuring the NADH release. The coefficients for oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions (phi0d and phiAd respectively) are complex and involve the constants for the dismutation reaction. However, dead-end inhibitors can be used to determine the quantitative contribution of the kinetic constants for the aldehyde oxidation and reduction pathways to the phi0d and phiAd coefficients. The combination of dead-end and product inhibitors can be used to determine the reaction mechanism for the aldehyde oxidation pathway. Previously, we showed that with Drosophila Adh, the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes followed a strictly compulsory ordered pathway, although aldehydes and ketones formed binary complexes with the enzyme. This raised the question regarding the reaction mechanism for the oxidation of aldehydes, i.e. whether a random ordered pathway was followed. In the present work, the mechanism for the oxidation of different aldehydes and the accompanying dismutation reaction with the slow alleloenzyme (AdhS) from Drosophila melanogaster has been studied. To obtain

  13. ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASES EXPRESSION DURING POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT: LIVER VS. LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment, and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Although the lung can be a major target for aldehyde toxicity, development of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), which detoxify aldehydes, in lung has be...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... not by hormone test. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2003 Mar;58(3):323-31. Citation on PubMed Pang S, ... dehydrogenase deficiency. Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2001 Mar;30(1):81-99, vi-vii. Review. Citation ...

  15. Quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase from ethanol-grown Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Groen, B; Frank, J; Duine, J A

    1984-01-01

    Cell-free extracts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, grown on ethanol, showed dye-linked alcohol dehydrogenase activities. The enzyme responsible for this activity was purified to homogeneity. It appeared to contain two molecules of pyrroloquinoline quinone per enzyme molecule. In many respects, it resembled other quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.99.8), having a substrate specificity intermediate between that of methanol dehydrogenases and ethanol dehydrogenases in this group. On the other hand, it also showed dissimilarities: the enzyme was found to be a monomer (Mr 101 000), to need only one molecule of the suicide substrate cyclopropanol to become fully inactivated, and to have a different aromatic amino acid composition. PMID:6439190

  16. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  20. N-acylethanolamines as novel alcohol dehydrogenase 3 substrates.

    PubMed

    Ivkovic, Milena; Dempsey, Daniel R; Handa, Sumit; Hilton, Joshua H; Lowe, Edward W; Merkler, David J

    2011-02-15

    N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) are members of the fatty acid amide family. The NAEs have been proposed to serve as metabolic precursors to N-acylglycines (NAGs). The sequential oxidation of the NAEs by an alcohol dehydrogenase and an aldehyde dehydrogenase would yield the N-acylglycinals and/or the NAGs. Alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3) is one enzyme that might catalyze this reaction. To define a potential role for ADH3 in NAE catabolism, we synthesized a set of NAEs and evaluated these as ADH3 substrates. NAEs were oxidized by ADH3, yielding the N-acylglycinals as the product. The (V/K)(app) values for the NAEs included here were low relative to cinnamyl alcohol. Our data show that the NAEs can serve as alcohol dehydrogenase substrates. PMID:21144815

  1. Aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitors from the mushroom Clitocybe clavipes.

    PubMed

    Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Miyazawa, Toshiyuki; Kume, Hiroko; Arimoto, Yasushi; Inakuma, Takahiro

    2002-11-01

    Five fatty acid derivatives including three novel compounds were isolated from the mushroom Clitocybe clavipe. Their structures were elucidated by spectral analyses. These compounds inhibited aldehyde dehydrogenase in vitro. PMID:12444711

  2. Purification and properties of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Methanococcus vannielii.

    PubMed Central

    DeMoll, E; Grahame, D A; Harnly, J M; Tsai, L; Stadtman, T C

    1987-01-01

    Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase was purified to homogeneity from Methanococcus vannielii grown with formate as the sole carbon source. The enzyme is composed of subunits with molecular weights of 89,000 and 21,000 in an alpha 2 beta 2 oligomeric structure. The native molecular weight of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, determined by gel electrophoresis, is 220,000. The enzyme from M. vannielii contains 2 g-atoms of nickel per mol of enzyme. Except for its relatively high pH optimum of 10.5 and its slightly greater net positive charge, the enzyme from M. vannielii closely resembles carbon monoxide dehydrogenase isolated previously from acetate-grown Methanosarcina barkeri. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from M. vannielii constitutes 0.2% of the soluble protein of the cell. By comparison the enzyme comprises 5% of the soluble protein in acetate-grown cells of M. barkeri and approximately 1% in methanol-grown cells. Images PMID:3624199

  3. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  7. Mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase (stomach alcohol dehydrogenase): structure, origin, and correlation with enzymology.

    PubMed Central

    Parés, X; Cederlund, E; Moreno, A; Hjelmqvist, L; Farrés, J; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    The structure of a mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase has been determined by peptide analysis of the protein isolated from rat stomach. The structure indicates that the enzyme constitutes a separate alcohol dehydrogenase class, in agreement with the distinct enzymatic properties; the class IV enzyme is somewhat closer to class I (the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenase; approximately 68% residue identities) than to the other classes (II, III, and V; approximately 60% residue identities), suggesting that class IV might have originated through duplication of an early vertebrate class I gene. The activity of the class IV protein toward ethanol is even higher than that of the classical liver enzyme. Both Km and kcat values are high, the latter being the highest of any class characterized so far. Structurally, these properties are correlated with replacements at the active site, affecting both substrate and coenzyme binding. In particular, Ala-294 (instead of valine) results in increased space in the middle section of the substrate cleft, Gly-47 (instead of a basic residue) results in decreased charge interactions with the coenzyme pyrophosphate, and Tyr-363 (instead of a basic residue) may also affect coenzyme binding. In combination, these exchanges are compatible with a promotion of the off dissociation and an increased turnover rate. In contrast, residues at the inner part of the substrate cleft are bulky, accounting for low activity toward secondary alcohols and cyclohexanol. Exchanges at positions 259-261 involve minor shifts in glycine residues at a reverse turn in the coenzyme-binding fold. Clearly, class IV is distinct in structure, ethanol turnover, stomach expression, and possible emergence from class I. PMID:8127901

  8. Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases.

    PubMed

    Smilda, T; Kamminga, A H; Reinders, P; Baron, W; van Hylckama Vlieg, J E; Beintema, J J

    2001-05-01

    Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenases and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) are presented. Like alcohol dehydrogenases from other Drosophila species, the enzyme from D. simulans is more active on secondary than on primary alcohols, although ethanol is its only known physiological substrate. Several secondary alcohols were used to determine the kinetic parameters kcat and Km. The results of these experiments indicate that the substrate-binding region of the enzyme allows optimal binding of a short ethyl side-chain in a small binding pocket, and of a propyl or butyl side-chain in large binding pocket, with stereospecificity for R(-) alcohols. At a high concentration of R(-) alcohols substrate activation occurs. The kcat and Km values determined under these conditions are about two-fold, and two orders of magnitude, respectively, higher than those at low substrate concentrations. Sequence alignment of several SDRs of known, and unknown three-dimensional structures, indicate the presence of several conserved residues in addition to those involved in the catalyzed reactions. Structural roles of these conserved residues could be derived from observations made on superpositioned structures of several SDRs with known structures. Several residues are conserved in tetrameric SDRs, but not in dimeric ones. Two halohydrin-halide-lyases show significant homology with SDRs in the catalytic domains of these enzymes, but they do not have the structural features required for binding NAD+. Probably these lyases descend from an SDR, which has lost the capability to bind NAD+, but the enzyme reaction mechanisms may still be similar. PMID:11443349

  9. Bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) in chlorophyte algal mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Henze, Katrin; Martin, William; Riveros-Rosas, Hector; González-Halphen, Diego

    2003-09-01

    Protein profiles of mitochondria isolated from the heterotrophic chlorophyte Polytomella sp. grown on ethanol at pH 6.0 and pH 3.7 were analyzed by Blue Native and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Steady-state levels of oxidative phosphorylation complexes were influenced by external pH. Levels of an abundant, soluble, mitochondrial protein of 85 kDa and its corresponding mRNA increased at pH 6.0 relative to pH 3.7. N-terminal and internal sequencing of the 85 kDa mitochondrial protein together with the corresponding cDNA identified it as a bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) with strong similarity to homologues from eubacteria and amitochondriate protists. A mitochondrial targeting sequence of 27 amino acids precedes the N-terminus of the mature mitochondrial protein. A gene encoding an ADHE homologue was also identified in the genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a photosynthetic relative of Polytomella. ADHE reveals a complex picture of sequence similarity among homologues. The lack of ADHE from archaebacteria indicates a eubacterial origin for the eukaryotic enzyme. Among eukaryotes, ADHE has hitherto been characteristic of anaerobes since it is essential to cytosolic energy metabolism of amitochondriate protists such as Giardia intestinalis and Entamoeba histolytica. Its abundance and expression pattern suggest an important role for ADHE in mitochondrial metabolism of Polytomella under the conditions studied. The current data are compatible with the view that Polytomella ADHE could be involved either in ethanol production or assimilation, or both, depending upon environmental conditions. Presence of ADHE in an oxygen-respiring algal mitochondrion and co-expression at ambient oxygen levels with respiratory chain components is unexpected with respect to the view that eukaryotes acquired ADHE genes specifically as an adaptation to an anaerobic lifestyle. PMID:14756315

  10. Induced fit and the catalytic mechanism of isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Susana; Miller, Stephen P; Carrondo, Maria A; Dean, Anthony M; Matias, Pedro M

    2012-09-11

    NADP(+) dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH; EC 1.1.1.42) belongs to a large family of α-hydroxyacid oxidative β-decarboxylases that catalyze similar three-step reactions, with dehydrogenation to an oxaloacid intermediate preceding β-decarboxylation to an enol intermediate followed by tautomerization to the final α-ketone product. A comprehensive view of the induced fit needed for catalysis is revealed on comparing the first "fully closed" crystal structures of a pseudo-Michaelis complex of wild-type Escherichia coli IDH (EcoIDH) and the "fully closed" reaction product complex of the K100M mutant with previously obtained "quasi-closed" and "open" conformations. Conserved catalytic residues, binding the nicotinamide ring of NADP(+) and the metal-bound substrate, move as rigid bodies during domain closure by a hinge motion that spans the central β-sheet in each monomer. Interactions established between Thr105 and Ser113, which flank the "phosphorylation loop", and the nicotinamide mononucleotide moiety of NADP(+) establish productive coenzyme binding. Electrostatic interactions of a Lys100-Leu103-Asn115-Glu336 tetrad play a pivotal role in assembling a catalytically competent active site. As predicted, Lys230* is positioned to deprotonate/reprotonate the α-hydroxyl in both reaction steps and Tyr160 moves into position to protonate C3 following β-decarboxylation. A proton relay from the catalytic triad Tyr160-Asp307-Lys230* connects the α-hydroxyl of isocitrate to the bulk solvent to complete the picture of the catalytic mechanism. PMID:22891681

  11. Structural Basis of Cooperativity in Human UDP-Glucose Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Rajakannan, Venkatachalam; Lee, Hui-Sun; Chong, Seon-Ha; Ryu, Han-Bong; Bae, Ji-Young; Whang, Eun-Young; Huh, Jae-Wan; Cho, Sung-Woo; Kang, Lin-Woo; Choe, Han; Robinson, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Background UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) is the sole enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronic acid. The product is used in xenobiotic glucuronidation in hepatocytes and in the production of proteoglycans that are involved in promoting normal cellular growth and migration. Overproduction of proteoglycans has been implicated in the progression of certain epithelial cancers, while inhibition of UGDH diminished tumor angiogenesis in vivo. A better understanding of the conformational changes occurring during the UGDH reaction cycle will pave the way for inhibitor design and potential cancer therapeutics. Methodology Previously, the substrate-bound of UGDH was determined to be a symmetrical hexamer and this regular symmetry is disrupted on binding the inhibitor, UDP-α-D-xylose. Here, we have solved an alternate crystal structure of human UGDH (hUGDH) in complex with UDP-glucose at 2.8 Å resolution. Surprisingly, the quaternary structure of this substrate-bound protein complex consists of the open homohexamer that was previously observed for inhibitor-bound hUGDH, indicating that this conformation is relevant for deciphering elements of the normal reaction cycle. Conclusion In all subunits of the present open structure, Thr131 has translocated into the active site occupying the volume vacated by the absent active water and partially disordered NAD+ molecule. This conformation suggests a mechanism by which the enzyme may exchange NADH for NAD+ and repolarize the catalytic water bound to Asp280 while protecting the reaction intermediates. The structure also indicates how the subunits may communicate with each other through two reaction state sensors in this highly cooperative enzyme. PMID:21984906

  12. Human liver aldehyde dehydrogenase: coenzyme binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kosley, L.L.; Pietruszko, R.

    1987-05-01

    The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NAD to mitochondrial (E2) and cytoplasmin(E1) aldehyde dehydrogenase was measured by gel filtration and sedimentation techniques. The binding data for NAD and (E1) yielded linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 25 (+/- 8) uM and the stoichiometry of 2 mol of NAD bound per mol of E1. The binding data for NAD and (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. The binding of NADH to E2 was measured via fluorescence enhancement; this could not be done with E1 because there was no signal. The dissociation constant for E2 by this technique was 0.7 (+/- 0.4) uM and stoichiometry of 1.0 was obtained. The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NADH to (E1) and (E2) was also measured by the sedimentation technique. The binding data for (E1) and NADH gave linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 13 (+/- 6) uM and the stoichiometry of 2.0. The binding data for NADH to (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. With (E1), the dissociation constants for both NAD and NADH are similar to those determined kinetically, but the stoichiometry is only half of that found by stopped flow technique. With (E2) the dissociation constant by fluorometric procedure was 2 orders of magnitude less than that from catalytic reaction.

  13. Targeting isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takeo; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; DiNardo, Courtney D; Atkins, Johnique T; Janku, Filip

    2016-05-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an essential enzyme for cellular respiration in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Recurrent mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 are prevalent in several cancers including glioma, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cholangiocarcinoma and chondrosarcoma. The mutated IDH1 and IDH2 proteins have a gain-of-function, neomorphic activity, catalyzing the reduction of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) by NADPH. Cancer-associated IDH mutations block normal cellular differentiation and promote tumorigenesis via the abnormal production of the oncometabolite 2-HG. High levels of 2-HG have been shown to inhibit α-KG dependent dioxygenases, including histone and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) demethylases, which play a key role in regulating the epigenetic state of cells. Current targeted inhibitors of IDH1 (AG120, IDH305), IDH2 (AG221), and pan-IDH1/2 (AG881) selectively inhibit mutant IDH protein and induce cell differentiation in in vitro and in vivo models. Preliminary results from phase I clinical trials with IDH inhibitors in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies have demonstrated an objective response rate ranging from 31% to 40% with durable responses (>1 year) observed. Furthermore, the IDH inhibitors have demonstrated early signals of activity in solid tumors with IDH mutations, including cholangiocarcinomas and low grade gliomas. PMID:27355333

  14. SAXS fingerprints of aldehyde dehydrogenase oligomers.

    PubMed

    Tanner, John J

    2015-12-01

    Enzymes of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily catalyze the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids. ALDHs are important in detoxification of aldehydes, amino acid metabolism, embryogenesis and development, neurotransmission, oxidative stress, and cancer. Mutations in genes encoding ALDHs cause metabolic disorders, including alcohol flush reaction (ALDH2), Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (ALDH3A2), hyperprolinemia type II (ALDH4A1), γ-hydroxybutyric aciduria (ALDH5A1), methylmalonic aciduria (ALDH6A1), pyridoxine dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1), and hyperammonemia (ALDH18A1). We previously reported crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses of ALDHs exhibiting dimeric, tetrameric, and hexameric oligomeric states (Luo et al., Biochemistry 54 (2015) 5513-5522; Luo et al., J. Mol. Biol. 425 (2013) 3106-3120). Herein I provide the SAXS curves, radii of gyration, and distance distribution functions for the three types of ALDH oligomer. The SAXS curves and associated analysis provide diagnostic fingerprints that allow rapid identification of the type of ALDH oligomer that is present in solution. The data sets provided here serve as a benchmark for characterizing oligomerization of ALDHs. PMID:26693506

  15. Eucalypt NADP-Dependent Isocitrate Dehydrogenase1

    PubMed Central

    Boiffin, Vincent; Hodges, Michael; Gálvez, Susana; Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola; Gadal, Pierre; Martin, Francis

    1998-01-01

    NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH) activity is increased in roots of Eucalyptus globulus subsp. bicostata ex Maiden Kirkp. during colonization by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius Coker and Couch. To investigate the regulation of the enzyme expression, a cDNA (EgIcdh) encoding the NADP-ICDH was isolated from a cDNA library of E. globulus-P. tinctorius ectomycorrhizae. The putative polypeptide sequence of EgIcdh showed a high amino acid similarity with plant NADP-ICDHs. Because the deduced EgICDH protein lacks an amino-terminal targeting sequence and shows highest similarity to plant cytosolic ICDHs, it probably represents a cytoplasmic isoform. RNA analysis showed that the steady-state level of EgIcdh transcripts was enhanced nearly 2-fold in ectomycorrhizal roots compared with nonmycorrhizal roots. Increased accumulation of NADP-ICDH transcripts occurred as early as 2 d after contact and likely led to the observed increased enzyme activity. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that NADP-ICDH was preferentially accumulated in the epidermis and stele parenchyma of nonmycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal lateral roots. The putative role of cytosolic NADP-ICDH in ectomycorrhizae is discussed. PMID:9662536

  16. Aggregation states of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, S. A.; Hazlett, T. L.; Brunet, J. E.; Jameson, D. M.

    1998-01-01

    The oligomeric state of fluorescein-labeled mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (L-malate NAD+ oxidoreductase; mMDH; EC 1.1.1.37), as a function of protein concentration, has been examined using steady-state and dynamic polarization methodologies. A "global" rotational relaxation time of 103 +/- 7 ns was found for micromolar concentrations of mMDH-fluorescein, which is consistent with the reported size and shape of mMDH. Dilution of the mMDH-fluorescein conjugates, prepared using a phosphate buffer protocol, to nanomolar concentrations had no significant effect on the rotational relaxation time of the adduct, indicating that the dimer-monomer dissociation constant for mMDH is below 10(-9) M. In contrast to reports in the literature suggesting a pH-dependent dissociation of mMDH, the oligomeric state of this mMDH-fluorescein preparation remained unchanged between pH 5.0 and 8.0. Application of hydrostatic pressure up to 2.5 kilobars was ineffective in dissociating the mMDH dimer. However, the mMDH dimer was completely dissociated in 1.5 M guanidinium hydrochloride. Dilution of a mMDH-fluorescein conjugate, prepared using a Tris buffer protocol, did show dissociation, which can be attributed to aggregates present in these preparations. These results are considered in light of the disparities in the literature concerning the properties of the mMDH dimer-monomer equilibrium. PMID:9792106

  17. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2: New Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Gross, Eric R.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-01-01

    A family of detoxifying enzymes called aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) has been a subject of recent interest, as its role in detoxifying aldehydes that accumulate through metabolism and to which we are exposed from the environment has been elucidated. Although the human genome has 19 ALDH genes, one ALDH emerges as a particularly important enzyme in a variety of human pathologies. This ALDH, ALDH2, is located in the mitochondrial matrix with much known about its role in ethanol metabolism. Less known is a new body of research to be discussed in this review, suggesting that ALDH2 dysfunction may contribute to a variety of human diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and cancer. Recent studies suggest that ALDH2 dysfunction is also associated with Fanconi anemia, pain, osteoporosis, and the process of aging. Furthermore, an ALDH2 inactivating mutation (termed ALDH2*2) is the most common single point mutation in humans, and epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between this inactivating mutation and increased propensity for common human pathologies. These data together with studies in animal models and the use of new pharmacological tools that activate ALDH2 depict a new picture related to ALDH2 as a critical health-promoting enzyme. PMID:24382882

  18. Iodination of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jean O.; Harris, J. Ieuan

    1970-01-01

    1. A high degree of homology in the positions of tyrosine residues in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase from lobster and pig muscle, and from yeast, prompted an examination of the reactivity of tyrosine residues in the enzyme. 2. Iodination of the enzyme from lobster muscle with low concentrations of potassium tri-[125I]-iodide led to the identification of tyrosine residues of differing reactivity. Tyrosine-46 appeared to be the most reactive in the native enzyme. 3. When the monocarboxymethylated enzyme was briefly treated with small amounts of iodine, iodination could be confined almost entirely to tyrosine-46 in the lobster enzyme; tyrosine-39 or tyrosine-42, or both, were also beginning to react. 4. These three tyrosine residues were also those that reacted most readily in the carboxymethylated pig and yeast enzymes. 5. The difficulties in attaining specific reaction of the native enzyme are considered. 6. The differences between our results and those of other workers are discussed. ImagesPLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:5530750

  19. Inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    PubMed

    Brozic, P; Lanisnik Risner, T; Gobec, S

    2008-01-01

    Carcinogenesis of hormone-related cancers involves hormone-stimulated cell proliferation, which increases the number of cell divisions and the opportunity for random genetic errors. In target tissues, steroid hormones are interconverted between their potent, high affinity forms for their respective receptors and their inactive, low affinity forms. One group of enzymes responsible for these interconversions are the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, which regulate ligand access to steroid receptors and thus act at a pre-receptor level. As part of this group, the 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases catalyze either oxidation of hydroxyl groups or reduction of keto groups at steroid position C17. The thoroughly characterized 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activates the less active estrone to estradiol, a potent ligand for estrogen receptors. This isoform is expressed in gonads, where it affects circulating levels of estradiol, and in peripheral tissue, where it regulates ligand occupancy of estrogen receptors. Inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 are thus highly interesting potential therapeutic agents for the control of estrogen-dependent diseases such as endometriosis, as well as breast and ovarian cancers. Here, we present the review on the recent development of inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 published and patented since the previous review of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitors of Poirier (Curr. Med. Chem., 2003, 10, 453). These inhibitors are divided into two separate groups according to their chemical structures: steroidal and non-steroidal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibitors. Their estrogenic/ proliferative activities and selectivities over other 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases that are involved in local regulation of estrogen action (types 2, 7 and 12) are also presented. PMID:18220769

  20. Succinate Dehydrogenase Loss in Familial Paraganglioma: Biochemistry, Genetics, and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Her, Yeng F.; Maher, L. James

    2015-01-01

    It is counterintuitive that metabolic defects reducing ATP production can cause, rather than protect from, cancer. Yet this is precisely the case for familial paraganglioma, a form of neuroendocrine malignancy caused by loss of succinate dehydrogenase in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Here we review biochemical, genetic, and epigenetic considerations in succinate dehydrogenase loss and present leading models and mysteries associated with this fascinating and important tumor. PMID:26294907

  1. Role of threonine dehydrogenase in Escherichia coli threonine degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, R; Kapoor, V; Newman, E B

    1977-01-01

    Threonine was used as nitrogen source by Escherichia coli K-12 through a pathway beginning with the enzyme threonine dehydrogenase. The 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate formed was converted to glycine, and the glycine was converted to serine, which acted as the actual nitrogen donor. The enzyme formed under anaerobic conditions and known as threonine deaminase (biodegradative) is less widespread than threonine dehydrogenase and may be involved in energy metabolism rather than in threonine degradation per se. PMID:334738

  2. Catalytic mechanism of Zn2+-dependent polyol dehydrogenases: kinetic comparison of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase with wild-type and Glu154→Cys forms of yeast xylitol dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Klimacek, Mario; Hellmer, Heidemarie; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Co-ordination of catalytic Zn2+ in sorbitol/xylitol dehydrogenases of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily involves direct or water-mediated interactions from a glutamic acid residue, which substitutes a homologous cysteine ligand in alcohol dehydrogenases of the yeast and liver type. Glu154 of xylitol dehydrogenase from the yeast Galactocandida mastotermitis (termed GmXDH) was mutated to a cysteine residue (E154C) to revert this replacement. In spite of their variable Zn2+ content (0.10–0.40 atom/subunit), purified preparations of E154C exhibited a constant catalytic Zn2+ centre activity (kcat) of 1.19±0.03 s−1 and did not require exogenous Zn2+ for activity or stability. E154C retained 0.019±0.003% and 0.74±0.03% of wild-type catalytic efficiency (kcat/Ksorbitol=7800±700 M−1· s−1) and kcat (=161±4 s−1) for NAD+-dependent oxidation of sorbitol at 25 °C respectively. The pH profile of kcat/Ksorbitol for E154C decreased below an apparent pK of 9.1±0.3, reflecting a shift in pK by about +1.7–1.9 pH units compared with the corresponding pH profiles for GmXDH and sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase (termed slSDH). The difference in pK for profiles determined in 1H2O and 2H2O solvent was similar and unusually small for all three enzymes (≈+0.2 log units), suggesting that the observed pK in the binary enzyme–NAD+ complexes could be due to Zn2+-bound water. Under conditions eliminating their different pH-dependences, wild-type and mutant GmXDH displayed similar primary and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects of 1.7±0.2 (E154C, 1.7±0.1) and 1.9±0.3 (E154C, 2.4±0.2) on kcat/Ksorbitol respectively. Transient kinetic studies of NAD+ reduction and proton release during sorbitol oxidation by slSDH at pH 8.2 show that two protons are lost with a rate constant of 687±12 s−1 in the pre-steady state, which features a turnover of 0.9±0.1 enzyme equivalents as NADH was produced with a rate constant of 409±3 s−1. The

  3. Retinol dehydrogenase 10 but not retinol/sterol dehydrogenase(s) regulates the expression of retinoic acid-responsive genes in human transgenic skin raft culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Ah; Belyaeva, Olga V; Wu, Lizhi; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2011-04-15

    Retinoic acid is essential for skin growth and differentiation, and its concentration in skin is controlled tightly. In humans, four different members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily of proteins were proposed to catalyze the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of retinoic acid (the oxidation of retinol to retinaldehyde). Epidermis contains at least three of these enzymes, but their relative importance for retinoic acid biosynthesis and regulation of gene expression during growth and differentiation of epidermis is not known. Here, we investigated the effect of the four human SDRs on retinoic acid biosynthesis, and their impact on growth and differentiation of keratinocytes using organotypic skin raft culture model of human epidermis. The results of this study demonstrate that ectopic expression of retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10, SDR16C4) in skin rafts dramatically increases proliferation and inhibits differentiation of keratinocytes, consistent with the increased steady-state levels of retinoic acid and activation of retinoic acid-inducible genes in RDH10 rafts. In contrast, SDRs with dual retinol/sterol substrate specificity, namely retinol dehydrogenase 4 (RoDH4, SDR9C8), RoDH-like 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (RL-HSD, SDR9C6), and RDH-like SDR (RDHL, SDR9C4) do not affect the expression of retinoic acid-inducible genes but alter the expression levels of several components of extracellular matrix. These results reveal essential differences in the metabolic contribution of RDH10 versus retinol/sterol dehydrogenases to retinoic acid biosynthesis and provide the first evidence that non-retinoid metabolic products of retinol/sterol dehydrogenases affect gene expression in human epidermis. PMID:21345790

  4. Retinol Dehydrogenase 10 but Not Retinol/Sterol Dehydrogenase(s) Regulates the Expression of Retinoic Acid-responsive Genes in Human Transgenic Skin Raft Culture*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Ah; Belyaeva, Olga V.; Wu, Lizhi; Kedishvili, Natalia Y.

    2011-01-01

    Retinoic acid is essential for skin growth and differentiation, and its concentration in skin is controlled tightly. In humans, four different members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily of proteins were proposed to catalyze the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of retinoic acid (the oxidation of retinol to retinaldehyde). Epidermis contains at least three of these enzymes, but their relative importance for retinoic acid biosynthesis and regulation of gene expression during growth and differentiation of epidermis is not known. Here, we investigated the effect of the four human SDRs on retinoic acid biosynthesis, and their impact on growth and differentiation of keratinocytes using organotypic skin raft culture model of human epidermis. The results of this study demonstrate that ectopic expression of retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10, SDR16C4) in skin rafts dramatically increases proliferation and inhibits differentiation of keratinocytes, consistent with the increased steady-state levels of retinoic acid and activation of retinoic acid-inducible genes in RDH10 rafts. In contrast, SDRs with dual retinol/sterol substrate specificity, namely retinol dehydrogenase 4 (RoDH4, SDR9C8), RoDH-like 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (RL-HSD, SDR9C6), and RDH-like SDR (RDHL, SDR9C4) do not affect the expression of retinoic acid-inducible genes but alter the expression levels of several components of extracellular matrix. These results reveal essential differences in the metabolic contribution of RDH10 versus retinol/sterol dehydrogenases to retinoic acid biosynthesis and provide the first evidence that non-retinoid metabolic products of retinol/sterol dehydrogenases affect gene expression in human epidermis. PMID:21345790

  5. Light modulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by photosynthetic electron flow in pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Akamba, L.M.; Anderson, L.E.

    1981-02-01

    Light activation of NADP-linked glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) and light inactivation of glucose-6-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) appear to be modulated within pea leaf chloroplasts by mediators which are reduced by photosynthetic electron flow from the photosystem I reaction center. Dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea inhibition of this modulation can be completely reversed by ascorbate plus 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol in broken chloroplasts, but not in intact chloroplasts. Intact chloroplasts are impermeable to 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol at pH 7.5. Studies on the effect of light in reconstituted chloroplasts with photosystem I-enriched particles in the place of whole thylakoids revealed that photosystem I participants in the light modulation of NADP-linked glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase and of glucose-6-P dehydrogenase.

  6. An update on the role of mitochondrial α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase in oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2012-01-01

    The activity of mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) is severely reduced in human pathologies where oxidative stress is traditionally thought to play an important role, such as familial and sporadic forms of Alzheimer's disease and other age-related neurodegenerative diseases. This minireview is focused on substantial data that were accumulated over the last 2 decades to support the concept that KGDHC can be a primary mitochondrial target of oxidative stress and at the same time a key contributor to it by producing reactive oxygen species. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Mitochondrial function’. PMID:22820180

  7. The Mitochondrial Chaperone TRAP1 Promotes Neoplastic Growth by Inhibiting Succinate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sciacovelli, Marco; Guzzo, Giulia; Morello, Virginia; Frezza, Christian; Zheng, Liang; Nannini, Nazarena; Calabrese, Fiorella; Laudiero, Gabriella; Esposito, Franca; Landriscina, Matteo; Defilippi, Paola; Bernardi, Paolo; Rasola, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Summary We report that the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1, which is induced in most tumor types, is required for neoplastic growth and confers transforming potential to noncancerous cells. TRAP1 binds to and inhibits succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), the complex II of the respiratory chain. The respiratory downregulation elicited by TRAP1 interaction with SDH promotes tumorigenesis by priming the succinate-dependent stabilization of the proneoplastic transcription factor HIF1α independently of hypoxic conditions. These findings provide a mechanistic clue to explain the switch to aerobic glycolysis of tumors and identify TRAP1 as a promising antineoplastic target. PMID:23747254

  8. Molecular Recognition Analyzed by Docking Simulations: The Aspartate Receptor and Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, Barry L.; Koshland, Daniel E., Jr.

    1993-02-01

    Protein docking protocols are used for the prediction of both small molecule binding to DNA and protein macromolecules and of complexes between macromolecules. These protocols are becoming increasingly automated and powerful tools for computer-aided drug design. We review the basic methodologies and strategies used for analyzing molecular recognition by computer docking algorithms and discuss recent experiments in which (i) substrate and substrate analogues are docked to the active site of isocitrate dehydrogenase and (ii) maltose binding protein is docked to the extracellular domain of the receptor, which signals maltose chemotaxis.

  9. Requirement of de novo synthesis of the OdhI protein in penicillin-induced glutamate production by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongpill; Fukuda, Hirohisa; Hirasawa, Takashi; Nagahisa, Keisuke; Nagai, Kazuo; Wachi, Masaaki; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    We found that penicillin-induced glutamate production by Corynebacterium glutamicum is inhibited when a de novo protein synthesis inhibitor, chloramphenicol, is added simultaneously with penicillin. When chloramphenicol was added 4 h after penicillin addition, glutamate production was essentially unaffected. (3)H-Leucine incorporation experiments revealed that protein synthesis continued for 1 h after penicillin addition and then gradually decreased. These results suggest that de novo protein synthesis within 4 h of penicillin treatment is required for the induction of glutamate production. To identify the protein(s) necessary for penicillin-induced glutamate production, proteome analysis of penicillin-treated C. glutamicum cells was performed with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Of more than 500 proteins detected, the amount of 13 proteins, including OdhI (an inhibitory protein for 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex), significantly increased upon penicillin treatment. Artificial overexpression of the odhI gene resulted in the decreased specific activity of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex and increased glutamate production without any triggers. These results suggest that the de novo synthesis of OdhI is the necessary factor for penicillin-induced glutamate overproduction by C. glutamicum. Moreover, continuous glutamate production was achieved by overexpression of odhI without any triggers. Thus, the odhI-overexpressing strain of C. glutamicum can be useful for efficient glutamate production. PMID:19956942

  10. Chloroplast NDH: A different enzyme with a structure similar to that of respiratory NADH dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2016-07-01

    Eleven genes encoding chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like (NDH) complex have been discovered in plastid genomes on the basis of their homology with genes encoding respiratory complex I. Despite this structural similarity, chloroplast NDH and its evolutionary origin NDH-1 in cyanobacteria accept electrons from ferredoxin (Fd), indicating that chloroplast NDH is an Fd-dependent plastoquinone (PQ) reductase rather than an NAD(P)H dehydrogenase. In Arabidopsis thaliana, chloroplast NDH interacts with photosystem I (PSI); this interaction is needed to stabilize NDH, especially under high light. On the basis of these distinct characters of chloroplast and cyanobacterial NDH, it can be distinguished as a photosynthetic NDH from respiratory complex I. In fact, chloroplast NDH forms part of the machinery of photosynthesis by mediating the minor pathway of PSI cyclic electron transport. Along with the antimycin A-sensitive main pathway of PSI cyclic electron transport, chloroplast NDH compensates the ATP/NADPH production ratio in the light reactions of photosynthesis. In this review, I revisit the original concept of chloroplast NDH on the basis of its similarity to respiratory complex I and thus introduce current progress in the field to researchers focusing on respiratory complex I. I summarize recent progress on the basis of structure and function. Finally, I introduce the results of our examination of the process of assembly of chloroplast NDH. Although the process requires many plant-specific non-subunit factors, the core processes of assembly are conserved between chloroplast NDH and respiratory complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26519774

  11. Stringency of substrate specificity of Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Boernke, W. E.; Millard, C. S.; Stevens, P. W.; Kakar, S. N.; Stevens, F. J.; Donnelly, M. I.; Nebraska Wesleyan Univ.

    1995-09-10

    Malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase are members of the structurally and functionally homologous family of 2-ketoacid dehydrogenases. Both enzymes display high specificity for their respective keto substrates, oxaloacetate and pyruvate. Closer analysis of their specificity, however, reveals that the specificity of malate dehydrogenase is much stricter and less malleable than that of lactate dehydrogenase. Site-specific mutagenesis of the two enzymes in an attempt to reverse their specificity has met with contrary results. Conversion of a specific active-site glutamine to arginine in lactate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus generated an enzyme that displayed activity toward oxaloacetate equal to that of the native enzyme toward pyruvate (H. M. Wilks et al. (1988) Science 242, 1541-1544). We have constructed a series of mutants in the mobile, active site loop of the Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase that incorporate the complementary change, conversion of arginine 81 to glutamine, to evaluate the role of charge distribution and conformational flexibility within this loop in defining the substrate specificity of these enzymes. Mutants incorporating the change R81Q all had reversed specificity, displaying much higher activity toward pyruvate than to the natural substrate, oxaloacetate. In contrast to the mutated lactate dehydrogenase, these reversed-specificity mutants were much less active than the native enzyme. Secondary mutations within the loop of the E. coli enzyme (A80N, A80P, A80P/M85E/D86T) had either no or only moderately beneficial effects on the activity of the mutant enzyme toward pyruvate. The mutation A80P, which can be expected to reduce the overall flexibility of the loop, modestly improved activity toward pyruvate. The possible physiological relevance of the stringent specificity of malate dehydrogenase was investigated. In normal strains of E. coli, fermentative metabolism was not affected by expression of the mutant

  12. Structural Studies of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvate in the presence of Mg(2+) and thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) followed by the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The three-dimensional structure of human E1 is elucidated using the methods of macromolecular X-ray crystallography. The structure is an alpha, alpha', beta and beta' tetramer with the protein units being in the tetrahedral arrangement. Each 361-residue alpha-subunit and 329-residue beta-subunit is composed of a beta-sheet core surrounded by alpha-helical domains. Each subunit is in extensive contact with all the three subunits involving TPP and magnesium cofactors, and potassium ions. The two binding sites for TPP are at the alpha-beta' and alpha'-beta interfaces, each involving a magnesium ion and Phe6l, His63, Tyr89, and Met200 from the alpha-subunit (or alpha'-subunit), and Met81 Phe85, His128 from the beta-subunit (or beta'-subunit). K+ ions are nestled between two beta-sheets and the end of an alpha-helix in each beta-subunit, where they are coordinated by four carbonyl oxygen groups from Ile12, Ala160, Asp163, and Asnl65, and a water molecule. The catalytic C2 carbon of thiazolium ring in this structure forms a 3.2 A contact with a water molecule involved in a series of H-bonds with other water molecules, and indirectly with amino acids including those involved in the catalysis and regulation of the enzyme.

  13. Succinate dehydrogenase gene mutations in cardiac paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Victoria L; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M; Magoon, Bindiya T; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L; Audibert, Jennifer L; Adams, Karen T; Rosing, Douglas R; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G; Horvath, Keith A; Pacak, Karel

    2015-06-15

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least 1/3 of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in 1 of 17 genes. Although these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for <0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of 15 patients with cardiac paragangliomas was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic workup, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 patients (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen patients (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; 1 additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to co-morbidities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, the investigators extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. PMID:25896150

  14. The Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hadj-Saïd, Jessica; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Léger, Christophe; Fourmond, Vincent; Dementin, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Ni-containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases (CODHs) catalyze the reversible conversion between CO and CO₂and are involved in energy conservation and carbon fixation. These homodimeric enzymes house two NiFeS active sites (C-clusters) and three accessory [4Fe-4S] clusters. The Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Dv) genome contains a two-gene CODH operon coding for a CODH (cooS) and a maturation protein (cooC) involved in nickel insertion in the active site. According to the literature, the question of the precise function of CooC as a chaperone folding the C-cluster in a form which accommodates free nickel or as a mere nickel donor is not resolved. Here, we report the biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of two recombinant forms of the CODH, produced in the absence and in the presence of CooC, designated CooS and CooS(C), respectively. CooS contains no nickel and cannot be activated, supporting the idea that the role of CooC is to fold the C-cluster so that it can bind nickel. As expected, CooS(C) is Ni-loaded, reversibly converts CO and CO₂, displays the typical Cred1 and Cred2 EPR signatures of the C-cluster and activates in the presence of methyl viologen and CO in an autocatalytic process. However, Ni-loaded CooS(C) reaches maximum activity only upon reductive treatment in the presence of exogenous nickel, a phenomenon that had not been observed before. Surprisingly, the enzyme displays the Cred1 and Cred2 signatures whether it has been activated or not, showing that this activation process of the Ni-loaded Dv CODH is not associated with structural changes at the active site. PMID:26255854

  15. A novel cofactor-binding mode in bacterial IMP dehydrogenases explains inhibitor selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-09

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes with different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. As a result, these findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization.

  16. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cellular responses to oxidative/electrophilic stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Chen, Ying; Jackson, Brian C; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single-celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors such as dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an "aldehyde scavenger" during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Upregulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity, and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation), and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane, and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that contributes significantly to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, highlighting the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23195683

  17. Mechanism of Thermal Adaptation in the Lactate Dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huo-Lei; Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Chang, Eric; Deng, Hua; Callender, Robert

    2015-12-10

    The mechanism of thermal adaptation of enzyme function at the molecular level is poorly understood but is thought to lie within the structure of the protein or its dynamics. Our previous work on pig heart lactate dehydrogenase (phLDH) has determined very high resolution structures of the active site, via isotope edited IR studies, and has characterized its dynamical nature, via laser-induced temperature jump (T-jump) relaxation spectroscopy on the Michaelis complex. These particular probes are quite powerful at getting at the interplay between structure and dynamics in adaptation. Hence, we extend these studies to the psychrophilic protein cgLDH (Champsocephalus gunnari; 0 °C) and the extreme thermophile tmLDH (Thermotoga maritima LDH; 80 °C) for comparison to the mesophile phLDH (38-39 °C). Instead of the native substrate pyruvate, we utilize oxamate as a nonreactive substrate mimic for experimental reasons. Using isotope edited IR spectroscopy, we find small differences in the substate composition that arise from the detailed bonding patterns of oxamate within the active site of the three proteins; however, we find these differences insufficient to explain the mechanism of thermal adaptation. On the other hand, T-jump studies of reduced β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) emission reveal that the most important parameter affecting thermal adaptation appears to be enzyme control of the specific kinetics and dynamics of protein motions that lie along the catalytic pathway. The relaxation rate of the motions scale as cgLDH > phLDH > tmLDH in a way that faithfully matches kcat of the three isozymes. PMID:26556099

  18. Maize cytokinin dehydrogenase isozymes are localized predominantly to the vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Zalabák, David; Johnová, Patricie; Plíhal, Ondřej; Šenková, Karolina; Šamajová, Olga; Jiskrová, Eva; Novák, Ondřej; Jackson, David; Mohanty, Amitabh; Galuszka, Petr

    2016-07-01

    The maize genome encompasses 13 genes encoding for cytokinin dehydrogenase isozymes (CKXs). These enzymes are responsible for irreversible degradation of cytokinin plant hormones and thus, contribute regulating their levels. Here, we focus on the unique aspect of CKXs: their diverse subcellular distribution, important in regulating cytokinin homeostasis. Maize CKXs were tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and transiently expressed in maize protoplasts. Most of the isoforms, namely ZmCKX1, ZmCKX2, ZmCKX4a, ZmCKX5, ZmCKX6, ZmCKX8, ZmCKX9, and ZmCKX12, were associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) several hours after transformation. GFP-fused CKXs were observed to accumulate in putative prevacuolar compartments. To gain more information about the spatiotemporal localization of the above isoforms, we prepared stable expression lines of all ZmCKX-GFP fusions in Arabidopsis thaliana Ler suspension culture. All the ER-associated isoforms except ZmCKX1 and ZmCKX9 were found to be targeted primarily to vacuoles, suggesting that ER-localization is a transition point in the intracellular secretory pathway and vacuoles serve as these isoforms' final destination. ZmCKX9 showed an ER-like localization pattern similar to those observed in the transient maize assay. Apoplastic localization of ZmCKX1 was further confirmed and ZmCKX10 showed cytosolic/nuclear localization due to the absence of the signal peptide sequence as previously reported. Additionally, we prepared GFP-fused N-terminal signal deletion mutants of ZmCKX2 and ZmCKX9 and clearly demonstrated that the localization pattern of these mutant forms was cytosolic/nuclear. This study provides the first complex model for spatiotemporal localization of the key enzymes of the cytokinin degradation/catabolism in monocotyledonous plants. PMID:27031423

  19. Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kramm, Anneke; Kisiela, Michael; Schulz, Rüdiger; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    The short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) represent a large superfamily of enzymes, most of which are NAD(H)-dependent or NADP(H)-dependent oxidoreductases. They display a wide substrate spectrum, including steroids, alcohols, sugars, aromatic compounds, and xenobiotics. On the basis of characteristic sequence motifs, the SDRs are subdivided into two main (classical and extended) and three smaller (divergent, intermediate, and complex) families. Despite low residue identities in pairwise comparisons, the three-dimensional structure among the SDRs is conserved and shows a typical Rossmann fold. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach to determine whether and which SDRs are present in cyanobacteria, microorganisms that played an important role in our ecosystem as the first oxygen producers. Cyanobacterial SDRs could indeed be identified, and were clustered according to the SDR classification system. Furthermore, because of the early availability of its genome sequence and the easy application of transformation methods, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, one of the most important cyanobacterial strains, was chosen as the model organism for this phylum. Synechocystis sp. SDRs were further analysed with bioinformatics tools, such as hidden Markov models (HMMs). It became evident that several cyanobacterial SDRs show remarkable sequence identities with SDRs in other organisms. These so-called 'homologous' proteins exist in plants, model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis  elegans, and even in humans. As sequence identities of up to 60% were found between Synechocystis and humans, it was concluded that SDRs seemed to have been well conserved during evolution, even after dramatic terrestrial changes such as the conversion of the early reducing atmosphere to an oxidizing one by cyanobacteria. PMID:22251568

  20. Vascular Bioactivation of Nitroglycerin by Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Barbara S.; Gorren, Antonius C. F.; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Wenzl, M. Verena; Furdui, Cristina M.; Poole, Leslie B.; Mayer, Bernd; Gruber, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) catalyzes the bioactivation of nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) in blood vessels, resulting in vasodilation by nitric oxide (NO) or a related species. Because the mechanism of this reaction is still unclear we determined the three-dimensional structures of wild-type (WT) ALDH2 and of a triple mutant of the protein that exhibits low denitration activity (E268Q/C301S/C303S) in complex with GTN. The structure of the triple mutant showed that GTN binds to the active site via polar contacts to the oxyanion hole and to residues 268 and 301 as well as by van der Waals interactions to hydrophobic residues of the catalytic pocket. The structure of the GTN-soaked wild-type protein revealed a thionitrate adduct to Cys-302 as the first reaction intermediate, which was also found by mass spectrometry (MS) experiments. In addition, the MS data identified sulfinic acid as the irreversibly inactivated enzyme species. Assuming that the structures of the triple mutant and wild-type ALDH2 reflect binding of GTN to the catalytic site and the first reaction step, respectively, superposition of the two structures indicates that denitration of GTN is initiated by nucleophilic attack of Cys-302 at one of the terminal nitrate groups, resulting in formation of the observed thionitrate intermediate and release of 1,2-glyceryl dinitrate. Our results shed light on the molecular mechanism of the GTN denitration reaction and provide useful information on the structural requirements for high affinity binding of organic nitrates to the catalytic site of ALDH2. PMID:22988236

  1. MAPPING OF SUCCINATE DEHYDROGENASE LOSSES IN 2258 EPITHELIAL NEOPLASMS

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Markku; Sarlomo-Rikala, Maarit; Cue, Peter Mc.; Czapiewski, Piotr; Langfor, Renata; Waloszczyk, Piotr; Wazny, Krzysztof; Biernat, Wojciech; Lasota, Jerzy; Wang, Zengfeng

    2013-01-01

    Losses in the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex characterize 20–30% of extra-adrenal paragangliomas and 7–8% of gastric GISTs, and rare renal cell carcinomas. This loss is reflected as lack of the normally ubiquitous immunohistochemical expression of the SDH subunit B (SDHB). In paragangliomas, SDHB loss correlates with homozygous loss of any of the SDH subunits, typically by loss-of-function mutations. The occurrence of SDHB losses in other epithelial malignancies is unknown. In this study, we immunohistochemically examined 2258 epithelial, mostly malignant neoplasms including common carcinomas of all sites. Among renal cell carcinomas, SDHB loss was observed in 4 of 711 cases (0.6%) including a patient with an SDHB-deficient GIST. Histologically the SDHB-negative renal carcinomas varied. There was one clear cell carcinoma with a high nuclear grade, one papillary carcinoma type 2, one unclassified carcinoma with a glandular pattern, and one oncocytoid low-grade carcinoma as previously described for SDHB-negative renal carcinoma. None of these patients was known to have paragangliomas or had loss of SDHA expression in the tumor. Three of these patients had metastases at presentation (2 in the adrenal, one in the retroperitoneal lymph nodes). There were no cases with SDHB-loss among 64 renal oncocytomas. SDHB-losses were not seen in other carcinomas, except in one prostatic adenocarcinoma (1/57), one lymphoepithelial carcinoma of the stomach, and one (1/40) seminoma. Based on this study, SDHB-losses occur in 0.6% of renal cell carcinomas and extremely rarely in other carcinomas. Some of these renal carcinomas may be clinically aggressive. The clinical significance and molecular genetics of these SDHB-negative tumors requires further study. PMID:23531856

  2. Mitochondria Increase Three-Fold and Mitochondrial Proteins and Lipid Change Dramatically in Postmeristematic Cells in Young Wheat Leaves Grown in Elevated CO2.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, E. J.; Williams, M.; Harwood, J. L.; Lindsay, J. G.; Leaver, C. J.; Leech, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    A dramatic stimulation in mitochondrial biogenesis during the very early stages of leaf development was observed in young wheat plants (Triticum aestivum cv Hereward) grown in elevated CO2 (650 [mu]L L-1). An almost 3-fold increase in the number of mitochondria was observed in the very young leaf cells at the base of the first leaf of a 7-d-old wheat plant. In the same cells large increases in the accumulation of a mitochondrial chaperonin protein and the mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex were detected by immunolabeling. Furthermore, the basal segment also shows a large increase in the rate of radiolabeling of diphosphatidylglycerol, a lipid confined to the inner mitochondrial membrane. This dramatic response in very young leaf cells to elevated CO2 suggests that the numerous documented positive effects of elevated CO2 on wheat leaf development are initiated as early as 12 h postmitosis. PMID:12228485

  3. Assessment of toxicity using dehydrogenases activity and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Matyja, Konrad; Małachowska-Jutsz, Anna; Mazur, Anna K; Grabas, Kazimierz

    2016-07-01

    Dehydrogenase activity is frequently used to assess the general condition of microorganisms in soil and activated sludge. Many studies have investigated the inhibition of dehydrogenase activity by various compounds, including heavy metal ions. However, the time after which the measurements are carried out is often chosen arbitrarily. Thus, it can be difficult to estimate how the toxic effects of compounds vary during the reaction and when the maximum of the effect would be reached. Hence, the aim of this study was to create simple and useful mathematical model describing changes in dehydrogenase activity during exposure to substances that inactivate enzymes. Our model is based on the Lagergrens pseudo-first-order equation, the rate of chemical reactions, enzyme activity, and inactivation and was created to describe short-term changes in dehydrogenase activity. The main assumption of our model is that toxic substances cause irreversible inactivation of enzyme units. The model is able to predict the maximum direct toxic effect (MDTE) and the time to reach this maximum (TMDTE). In order to validate our model, we present two examples: inactivation of dehydrogenase in microorganisms in soil and activated sludge. The model was applied successfully for cadmium and copper ions. Our results indicate that the predicted MDTE and TMDTE are more appropriate than EC50 and IC50 for toxicity assessments, except for long exposure times. PMID:27021434

  4. Characterization and purification of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Methanosarcina barkeri.

    PubMed Central

    Krzycki, J A; Zeikus, J G

    1984-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-dependent production of H2, CO2, and CH4 was detected in crude cell extracts of acetate-grown Methanosarcina barkeri. This metabolic transformation was associated with an active methyl viologen-linked CO dehydrogenase activity (5 to 10 U/mg of protein). Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity was inhibited 85% by 10 microM KCN and was rapidly inactivated by O2. The enzyme was nearly homogeneous after 20-fold purification, indicating that a significant proportion of soluble cell protein was CO dehydrogenase (ca. 5%). The native purified enzyme displayed a molecular weight of 232,000 and a two-subunit composition of 92,000 and 18,000 daltons. The enzyme was shown to contain nickel by isolation of radioactive CO dehydrogenase from cells grown in 63Ni. Analysis of enzyme kinetic properties revealed an apparent Km of 5 mM for CO and a Vmax of 1,300 U/mg of protein. The spectral properties of the enzyme were similar to those published for CO dehydrogenase from acetogenic anaerobes. The physiological functions of the enzyme are discussed. Images PMID:6425262

  5. Dehydrogenase activity of forest soils depends on the assay used

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszek, Kazimierz; Długa, Joanna; Socha, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Dehydrogenases are exclusively intracellular enzymes, which play an important role in the initial stages of oxidation of soil organic matter. One of the most frequently used methods to estimate dehydrogenase activity in soil is based on the use of triphenyltetrazolium chloride as an artificial electron acceptor. The purpose of this study was to compare the activity of dehydrogenases of forest soils with varied physicochemical properties using different triphenyltetrazolium chloride assays. The determination was carried out using the original procedure by Casida et al., a modification of the procedure which involves the use of Ca(OH)2 instead of CaCO3, the Thalmann method, and the assay by Casida et al. without addition of buffer or any salt. Soil dehydrogenase activity depended on the assay used. Dehydrogenase determined by the Casida et al. method without addition of buffer or any salt correlated with the pH values of soils. The autoclaved strongly acidic samples of control soils showed high concentrations of triphenylformazan, probably due to chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride. There is, therefore, a need for a sterilization method other than autoclaving, ie a process that results in significant changes in soil properties, thus helping to increase the chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride.

  6. Evaluation of NAD(P)-Dependent Dehydrogenase Activities in Neutrophilic Granulocytes by the Bioluminescent Method.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, A A

    2015-09-01

    Bioluminescent method for measurements of the neutrophilic NAD(P)-dependent dehydrogenases (lactate dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase, NADP-dependent decarboxylating malate dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, and glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase) is developed. The sensitivity of the method allows minimization of the volume of biological material for measurements to 104 neutrophils per analysis. The method is tried in patients with diffuse purulent peritonitis. Low levels of NADPH synthesis enzymes and high levels of enzymes determining the substrate flow by the Krebs cycle found in these patients can lead to attenuation of functional activity of cells. PMID:26468025

  7. Interaction of Glutaric Aciduria Type 1-Related glutaryl-CoA Dehydrogenase with Mitochondrial Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schmiesing, Jessica; Schlüter, Hartmut; Ullrich, Kurt; Braulke, Thomas; Mühlhausen, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) is an inherited neurometabolic disorder caused by mutations in the GCDH gene encoding glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH), which forms homo- and heteromeric complexes in the mitochondrial matrix. GA1 patients are prone to the development of encephalopathic crises which lead to an irreversible disabling dystonic movement disorder. The clinical and biochemical manifestations of GA1 vary considerably and lack correlations to the genotype. Using an affinity chromatography approach we report here for the first time on the identification of mitochondrial proteins interacting directly with GCDH. Among others, dihydrolipoamide S-succinyltransferase (DLST) involved in the formation of glutaryl-CoA, and the β-subunit of the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETFB) serving as electron acceptor, were identified as GCDH binding partners. We have adapted the yellow fluorescent protein-based fragment complementation assay and visualized the oligomerization of GCDH as well as its direct interaction with DLST and ETFB in mitochondria of living cells. These data suggest that GCDH is a constituent of multimeric mitochondrial dehydrogenase complexes, and the characterization of their interrelated functions may provide new insights into the regulation of lysine oxidation and the pathophysiology of GA1. PMID:24498361

  8. Biochemical and structural characterization of the apicoplast dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Larissa M.; Biddau, Marco; Byron, Olwyn; Müller, Sylke

    2014-01-01

    PDC (pyruvate dehydrogenase complex) is a multi-enzyme complex comprising an E1 (pyruvate decarboxylase), an E2 (dihydrolipomide acetyltransferase) and an E3 (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase). PDC catalyses the decarboxylation of pyruvate and forms acetyl-CoA and NADH. In the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the single PDC is located exclusively in the apicoplast. Plasmodium PDC is essential for parasite survival in the mosquito vector and for late liver stage development in the human host, suggesting its suitability as a target for intervention strategies against malaria. Here, PfaE3 (P. falciparum apicoplast E3) was recombinantly expressed and characterized. Biochemical parameters were comparable with those determined for E3 from other organisms. A homology model for PfaE3 reveals an extra anti-parallel β-strand at the position where human E3BP (E3-binding protein) interacts with E3; a parasite-specific feature that may be exploitable for drug discovery against PDC. To assess the biological role of Pfae3, it was deleted from P. falciparum and although the mutants are viable, they displayed a highly synchronous growth phenotype during intra-erythrocytic development. The mutants also showed changes in the expression of some mitochondrial and antioxidant proteins suggesting that deletion of Pfae3 impacts on the parasite's metabolic function with downstream effects on the parasite's redox homoeostasis and cell cycle. PMID:25387830

  9. Active site dynamics in the zinc-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Patrick J.; Britton, K. Linda; Fisher, Martin; Esclapez, Julia; Pire, Carmen; Bonete, Maria Jose; Ferrer, Juan; Rice, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Despite being the subject of intensive investigations, many aspects of the mechanism of the zinc-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenase (MDR) superfamily remain contentious. We have determined the high-resolution structures of a series of binary and ternary complexes of glucose dehydrogenase, an MDR enzyme from Haloferax mediterranei. In stark contrast to the textbook MDR mechanism in which the zinc ion is proposed to remain stationary and attached to a common set of protein ligands, analysis of these structures reveals that in each complex, there are dramatic differences in the nature of the zinc ligation. These changes arise as a direct consequence of linked movements of the zinc ion, a zinc-bound bound water molecule, and the substrate during progression through the reaction. These results provide evidence for the molecular basis of proton traffic during catalysis, a structural explanation for pentacoordinate zinc ion intermediates, a unifying view for the observed patterns of metal ligation in the MDR family, and highlight the importance of dynamic fluctuations at the metal center in changing the electrostatic potential in the active site, thereby influencing the proton traffic and hydride transfer events. PMID:19131516

  10. Multiplex Fluorescent Immunoassay for Detection of Mice Infected with Lactate Dehydrogenase Elevating Virus

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Veronica; Myles, Matthew H

    2013-01-01

    Commercially available diagnostic tools for the detection of lactate dehydrogenase elevating virus (LDV) infection have been restricted to measurement of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity levels and detection of the viral genome by RT-PCR assays. Serologic diagnosis of LDV infection has not been widely adopted due to the belief that the formation of antigen–antibody complexes and B-cell polyclonal activation may confound interpretation of results. In the current study, we inoculated BALB/c, C57BL/6, and Swiss Webster mice with LDV to compare the diagnostic reliability of a commercially available multiplex fluorescent immunoassay for the detection of antiLDV antibodies with that of the LDH enzyme assay. The serologic assay was vastly more sensitive and specific than was the LDH enzyme assay. Moreover, the serologic assay detected antiviral antibodies throughout the 3-mo time course of this study. These results suggest that antigen–antibody complex formation and polyclonal B-cell activation had little effect on assay performance. PMID:23849407

  11. Aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities in lactobacilli and streptococci.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Guillermo Hugo; Bergamini, Carina Viviana; Hynes, Erica Rut

    2016-01-01

    Aminotransferases and glutamate dehydrogenase are two main types of enzymes involved in the initial steps of amino acid catabolism, which plays a key role in the cheese flavor development. In the present work, glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferase activities were screened in twenty one strains of lactic acid bacteria of dairy interest, either cheese-isolated or commercial starters, including fifteen mesophilic lactobacilli, four thermophilic lactobacilli, and two streptococci. The strains of Streptococcus thermophilus showed the highest glutamate dehydrogenase activity, which was significantly elevated compared with the lactobacilli. Aspartate aminotransferase prevailed in most strains tested, while the levels and specificity of other aminotransferases were highly strain- and species-dependent. The knowledge of enzymatic profiles of these starter and cheese-isolated cultures is helpful in proposing appropriate combinations of strains for improved or increased cheese flavor. PMID:27266631

  12. Reversible inactivation of CO dehydrogenase with thiol compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kreß, Oliver; Gnida, Manuel; Pelzmann, Astrid M.; Marx, Christian; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Meyer, Ortwin

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Rather large thiols (e.g. coenzyme A) can reach the active site of CO dehydrogenase. • CO- and H{sub 2}-oxidizing activity of CO dehydrogenase is inhibited by thiols. • Inhibition by thiols was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. • Thiols coordinate the Cu ion in the [CuSMo(=O)OH] active site as a third ligand. - Abstract: Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CO dehydrogenase) from Oligotropha carboxidovorans is a structurally characterized member of the molybdenum hydroxylase enzyme family. It catalyzes the oxidation of CO (CO + H{sub 2}O → CO{sub 2} + 2e{sup −} + 2H{sup +}) which proceeds at a unique [CuSMo(=O)OH] metal cluster. Because of changing activities of CO dehydrogenase, particularly in subcellular fractions, we speculated whether the enzyme would be subject to regulation by thiols (RSH). Here we establish inhibition of CO dehydrogenase by thiols and report the corresponding K{sub i}-values (mM): L-cysteine (5.2), D-cysteine (9.7), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (8.2), D,L-homocysteine (25.8), L-cysteine–glycine (2.0), dithiothreitol (4.1), coenzyme A (8.3), and 2-mercaptoethanol (9.3). Inhibition of the enzyme was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of thiol-inhibited CO dehydrogenase revealed a bimetallic site in which the RSH coordinates to the Cu-ion as a third ligand ([Mo{sup VI}(=O)OH{sub (2)}SCu{sup I}(SR)S-Cys]) leaving the redox state of the Cu(I) and the Mo(VI) unchanged. Collectively, our findings establish a regulation of CO dehydrogenase activity by thiols in vitro. They also corroborate the hypothesis that CO interacts with the Cu-ion first. The result that thiol compounds much larger than CO can freely travel through the substrate channel leading to the bimetallic cluster challenges previous concepts involving chaperone function and is of importance for an understanding how the sulfuration step in

  13. Isolation of human lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme X by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Kolk, A H; van Kuyk, L; Boettcher, B

    1978-01-01

    Human isoenzyme LDH-X (lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme X) was isolated from seminal fluid of frozen semen samples by affinity chromatography by using oxamate-Sepharose and AMP-Sepharose. In the presence of 1.6 mM-NAD+, isoenzyme LDH-X does not bind to AMP-Sepharose, whereas the other lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes do. This is the crucial point in the isolation of isoenzyme LDH-X from the other isoenzymes. The purified human isoenzyme LDH-X had a specific activity of 146 units/mg of protein. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:213050

  14. Prostaglandin dehydrogenase and the initiation of labor.

    PubMed

    Challis, J R; Patel, F A; Pomini, F

    1999-01-01

    In summary, these studies have suggested that prostaglandin dehydrogenase may have a central role to play in the mechanisms which determine biologically active prostaglandin concentrations within human fetal membranes and placenta at the time of labor, at term or preterm. Moreover, our studies indicate that the regulation of PGDH may by multifactorial (figure 3). In certain regions of the membranes, we suggest that PGDH expression may be influenced by levels of anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In other regions of the membranes, we suggest that PGDH may be regulated at a transcriptional level by competing activities of progesterone and cortisol. The action of progesterone could be effected through systemically-derived steroid, or by locally synthesized steroid, acting in a paracrine and/or autocrine fashion. The effects of cortisol in placenta must be due to glucocorticoid derived from the maternal or fetal compartment, since the placenta lacks the hydroxylases required for endogenous cortisol production. However, metabolism of cortisol by 11 beta-HSD-2 reduces the potency of this glucocorticoid in placental tissue. In chorion however, cortisol may be formed locally, from cortisone, in addition to its being derived from the maternal circulation and/or from the amniotic fluid. Our current studies do not allow us to delineate whether the effects of progesterone and cortisol on PGDH are exerted through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) or progesterone receptor (PR) or both. It is possible that through pregnancy, PGDH activity is maintained by progesterone acting either through low levels of PR in membranes, or, more likely, acting through GR. At term, elevated levels of cortisol compete with and displace progesterone from GR, resulting in inhibition of PGDH transcription and activity. In this way, local withdrawal of progesterone action would be effected within human intrauterine tissues, without requiring changes in systemic, circulating progesterone

  15. Purification and properties of branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase phosphatase from bovine kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Damuni, Z; Merryfield, M L; Humphreys, J S; Reed, L J

    1984-01-01

    Branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) phosphatase was purified about 8000-fold from extracts of bovine kidney mitochondria. The highly purified phosphatase exhibited a molecular weight of approximately 460,000, as estimated by gel-permeation chromatography. Another form of the phosphatase, with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 230,000, was also detected under conditions of high dilution. In contrast to pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase, BCKDH phosphatase was active in the absence of divalent cations. BCKDH phosphatase was inactive toward 32P-labeled phosphorylase a, but exhibited approximately 10% maximal activity with 32P-labeled pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. BCKDH phosphatase activity was inhibited by GTP, GDP, ATP, ADP, UTP, UDP, CTP, and CDP. Half-maximal inhibition occurred at about 60, 200, 200, 400, 100, 250, 250, and 400 microM, respectively. These inhibitions were reversed completely by 2 mM Mg2+. GTP was replaceable by guanosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imido)triphosphate. GMP, AMP, UMP, CMP, NAD, and NADH showed little effect, if any, on BCKDH phosphatase activity at concentrations up to 1 mM. Heparin showed half-maximal inhibition at 2 micrograms/ml. This inhibition was only partially (30%) reversed by 2 mM Mg2+. CoA and various acyl-CoA compounds exhibited half-maximal inhibition at 150-300 microM. These inhibitions were not reversed by 2 mM Mg2+. BCKDH phosphatase activity was stimulated 1.5- to 3-fold by protamine, poly(L-lysine), and poly(L-arginine) at 3.6 micrograms/ml. PMID:6589597

  16. Cosubstrate-induced dynamics of D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Paithankar, Karthik S; Feller, Claudia; Kuettner, E Bartholomeus; Keim, Antje; Grunow, Marlis; Sträter, Norbert

    2007-11-01

    D-3-Hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida belongs to the family of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases. We have determined X-ray structures of the D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida, which was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, in three different crystal forms to resolutions between 1.9 and 2.1 A. The so-called substrate-binding loop (residues 187-210) was partially disordered in several subunits, in both the presence and absence of NAD(+). However, in two subunits, this loop was completely defined in an open conformation in the apoenzyme and in a closed conformation in the complex structure with NAD(+). Structural comparisons indicated that the loop moves as a rigid body by about 46 degrees . However, the two small alpha-helices (alphaFG1 and alphaFG2) of the loop also re-orientated slightly during the conformational change. Probably, the interactions of Val185, Thr187 and Leu189 with the cosubstrate induced the conformational change. A model of the binding mode of the substrate D-3-hydroxybutyrate indicated that the loop in the closed conformation, as a result of NAD(+) binding, is positioned competent for catalysis. Gln193 is the only residue of the substrate-binding loop that interacts directly with the substrate. A translation, libration and screw (TLS) analysis of the rigid body movement of the loop in the crystal showed significant librational displacements, describing the coordinated movement of the substrate-binding loop in the crystal. NAD(+) binding increased the flexibility of the substrate-binding loop and shifted the equilibrium between the open and closed forms towards the closed form. The finding that all NAD(+) -bound subunits are present in the closed form and all NAD(+) -free subunits in the open form indicates that the loop closure is induced by cosubstrate binding alone. This mechanism may contribute to the sequential binding of cosubstrate followed by substrate. PMID:17958702

  17. Mutant alcohol dehydrogenase leads to improved ethanol tolerance in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Parks, Jerry M; Smolin, Nikolai; Yang, Shihui; Land, Miriam L; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Bhandiwad, Ashwini; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Raman, Babu; Shao, Xiongjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Smith, Jeremy C; Keller, Martin; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic, obligately anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium that is a candidate microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into ethanol through consolidated bioprocessing. Ethanol intolerance is an important metric in terms of process economics, and tolerance has often been described as a complex and likely multigenic trait for which complex gene interactions come into play. Here, we resequence the genome of an ethanol-tolerant mutant, show that the tolerant phenotype is primarily due to a mutated bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase gene (adhE), hypothesize based on structural analysis that cofactor specificity may be affected, and confirm this hypothesis using enzyme assays. Biochemical assays confirm a complete loss of NADH-dependent activity with concomitant acquisition of NADPH-dependent activity, which likely affects electron flow in the mutant. The simplicity of the genetic basis for the ethanol-tolerant phenotype observed here informs rational engineering of mutant microbial strains for cellulosic ethanol production.

  18. Clostridium acidurici Electron-Bifurcating Formate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuning; Huang, Haiyan; Kahnt, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Cell extracts of uric acid-grown Clostridium acidurici catalyzed the coupled reduction of NAD+ and ferredoxin with formate at a specific activity of 1.3 U/mg. The enzyme complex catalyzing the electron-bifurcating reaction was purified 130-fold and found to be composed of four subunits encoded by the gene cluster hylCBA-fdhF2. PMID:23872566

  19. NADP+-Preferring d-Lactate Dehydrogenase from Sporolactobacillus inulinus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lingfeng; Xu, Xiaoling; Wang, Limin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxy acid dehydrogenases, including l- and d-lactate dehydrogenases (L-LDH and D-LDH), are responsible for the stereospecific conversion of 2-keto acids to 2-hydroxyacids and extensively used in a wide range of biotechnological applications. A common feature of LDHs is their high specificity for NAD+ as a cofactor. An LDH that could effectively use NADPH as a coenzyme could be an alternative enzymatic system for regeneration of the oxidized, phosphorylated cofactor. In this study, a d-lactate dehydrogenase from a Sporolactobacillus inulinus strain was found to use both NADH and NADPH with high efficiencies and with a preference for NADPH as its coenzyme, which is different from the coenzyme utilization of all previously reported LDHs. The biochemical properties of the D-LDH enzyme were determined by X-ray crystal structural characterization and in vivo and in vitro enzymatic activity analyses. The residue Asn174 was demonstrated to be critical for NADPH utilization. Characterization of the biochemical properties of this enzyme will contribute to understanding of the catalytic mechanism and provide referential information for shifting the coenzyme utilization specificity of 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. PMID:26150461

  20. KINETIC PROPERTIES OF MALIC DEHYDROGENASE FROM THREE CULTIVARS OF RICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Temperature induced changes in the kinetics of the enzyme malic dehydrogenase (MON) were investigated in three cultivars of rice(Oryza sativa L.). Cultivars, included IR74, SWAT2, and N22. Plants were grown in a controlled environment chamber for 29 days, at 31 degrees C day/25 d...

  1. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2010-09-01

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as rad OH and ONOO -. In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  2. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system. 862.1380 Section 862.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  3. Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Mat-Jan, F; Alam, K Y; Clark, D P

    1989-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative NAD-linked lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) have been isolated. These mutants showed no growth defects under anaerobic conditions unless present together with a defect in pyruvate formate lyase (pfl). Double mutants (pfl ldh) were unable to grow anaerobically on glucose or other sugars even when supplemented with acetate, whereas pfl mutants can do so. The ldh mutation was found to map at 30.5 min on the E. coli chromosome. The ldh mutant FMJ39 showed no detectable lactate dehydrogenase activity and produced no lactic acid from glucose under anaerobic conditions as estimated by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. We also found that in wild-type strains the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase was conjointly induced by anaerobic conditions and an acidic pH. Despite previous findings that phosphate concentrations affect the proportion of lactic acid produced during fermentation, we were unable to find any intrinsic effect of phosphate on lactate dehydrogenase activity, apart from the buffering effect of this ion. PMID:2644194

  4. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1445 Lactate...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1445 Lactate...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... step that metabolizes groups of fats called medium-chain fatty acids and short-chain fatty acids. Mutations in the HADH gene lead ... a shortage of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids cannot be metabolized ...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1445 Lactate...

  10. Molecular cloning of gluconobacter oxydans DSM 2003 xylitol dehydrogenase gene

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, H. Mir Mohammad; Ahmadi, R.; Aghaabdollahian, S.; Mofid, M.R.; Ghaemi, Y.; Abedi, D.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the widespread applications of xylitol dehydrogenase, an enzyme used for the production of xylitol, the present study was designed for the cloning of xylitol dehydrogenase gene from Glcunobacter oxydans DSM 2003. After extraction of genomic DNA from this bacterium, xylitol dehydrogenase gene was replicated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplified product was entered into pTZ57R cloning vector by T/A cloning method and transformation was performed by heat shocking of the E. coli XL1-blue competent cells. Following plasmid preparation, the cloned gene was digested out and ligated into the expression vector pET-22b(+). Electrophoresis of PCR product showed a 789 bp band. Recombinant plasmid (rpTZ57R) was then constructed. This plasmid was double digested with XhoI and EcoRI resulting in 800 bp and 2900 bp bands. The obtained insert was ligated into pET-22b(+) vector and its orientation was confirmed with XhoI and BamHI restriction enzymes. In conclusion, in the present study the recombinant expression vector containing xylitol dehydrogenase gene has been constructed and can be used for the production of this enzyme in high quantities. PMID:22110522

  11. Succinate dehydrogenase is the regulator of respiration in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Travis; Weinrick, Brian; Vilchèze, Catherine; Berney, Michael; Tufariello, Joanne; Cook, Gregory M; Jacobs, William R

    2014-11-01

    In chronic infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli are thought to enter a metabolic program that provides sufficient energy for maintenance of the protonmotive force, but is insufficient to meet the demands of cellular growth. We sought to understand this metabolic downshift genetically by targeting succinate dehydrogenase, the enzyme which couples the growth processes controlled by the TCA cycle with the energy production resulting from the electron transport chain. M. tuberculosis contains two operons which are predicted to encode succinate dehydrogenase enzymes (sdh-1 and sdh-2); we found that deletion of Sdh1 contributes to an inability to survive long term stationary phase. Stable isotope labeling and mass spectrometry revealed that Sdh1 functions as a succinate dehydrogenase during aerobic growth, and that Sdh2 is dispensable for this catalysis, but partially overlapping activities ensure that the loss of one enzyme can incompletely compensate for loss of the other. Deletion of Sdh1 disturbs the rate of respiration via the mycobacterial electron transport chain, resulting in an increased proportion of reduced electron carrier (menaquinol) which leads to increased oxygen consumption. The loss of respiratory control leads to an inability to recover from stationary phase. We propose a model in which succinate dehydrogenase is a governor of cellular respiration in the adaptation to low oxygen environments. PMID:25412183

  12. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  13. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  14. Disequilibrium in the malate dehydrogenase reaction in rat liver mitochondria in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Heath, D. F.; Phillips, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    1. When [2-14C]pyruvate is injected into rats the C3-position of liver glutamate becomes more heavily labelled than the C2-position, thus establishing that oxaloacetate and fumarate are not in equilibrium in rat liver mitochondria in vivo. The amount of disequilibrium was shown to be simply related to the value that the C3-label/C2-label ratio would have were no label recycled. This ratio, z, was calculated for post-absorptive rats in environmental temperatures of 20° and 30°C from determinations of the distribution of label within glutamate 1, 3 and 10min after intravenous injection of [2-14C]pyruvate. The values of z (best estimate and range) were 1.65 (1.60–1.69) in rats at 20°C and 2.43 (2.23–2.63) in rats at 30°C. These values of z imply the following rates of interconversion in mitochondria of fumarate and oxaloacetate (in terms of the oxaloacetate→citrate flux, R) in rats at 20°C: [Formula: see text] and in rats at 30°C: [Formula: see text] 2. The kinetic parameters of malate dehydrogenase and fumarate hydratase and the intramitochondrial concentrations of NAD+ and NADH under (as far as could be judged) conditions in vivo were collated. From them and the best estimates of R now available were calculated the rates of interconversion of fumarate, malate and oxaloacetate required to give the found values of z. These rates showed that the fumarate hydratase reaction was nearly in equilibrium, but that the malate dehydrogenase reaction was considerably out of equilibrium. The calculations also led to the following conclusions. 3. In livers of rats at 20° and 30°C mitochondrial malate concentrations were respectively about 5 and 1.5 times mean cellular concentrations. 4. Mitochondrial oxaloacetate concentrations were less than 0.2 of the mean cellular concentrations. They were also only 0.65 and 0.55 of the equilibrium concentrations for the malate dehydrogenase reaction in rats at 20° and 30°C respectively. 5. Malate dehydrogenase activity was low

  15. Spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błońska, Ewa; Lasota, Jarosław

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity (DH) in forest soils using geostatistics. We have studied variability soil dehydrogenase and their relationship with variability of some physic-chemical properties. Two study areas (A and B) were set up in southern Poland in the Zlotoryja Forest District. Study areas were covered by different types of vegetation (A- broadleaf forest with beech, ash and sycamore), B- coniferous forest with Norway spruce). The soils were classified as Dystric Cambisols (WRB 2006). The samples for laboratory testing were collected from 49 places on each areas. 15 cm of surface horizon of soil were taken (with previously removed litter). Dehydrogenase activity was marked with Lenhard's method according to the Casida procedure. Soil pH, nitrogen (N) and soil organic carbon (C) content (by LECO CNS 2000 carbon analyzer) was marked. C/N ratio was calculated. Particle size composition was determined using laser diffraction. Statistical analysis were performed using STATISTICA 10 software. Geostatistical analysis and mapping were done by application of GS 9+ (Gamma Design) and Surfer 11 (Golden Software). The activity of DH ranged between 5,02 and 71,20 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1 on the A area and between 0,94 and 16,47 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1. Differences in spatial variability of the analised features were noted. The variability of dehydrogenase activity on the A study area was described by an exponential model, whereas on the B study area the spatial correlation has not been noted. The relationship of dehydrogenase activity with the remaining parameters of soil was noted only in the case of A study area. The variability of organic carbon content on the A and B study areas were described by an exponential model. The variability of nitrogen content on both areas were described by an spherical model.

  16. Structure of a highly NADP+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Navdeep S; Delbaere, Louis T J; Sheldrick, George M

    2011-10-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase catalyzes the first oxidative and decarboxylation steps in the citric acid cycle. It also lies at a crucial bifurcation point between CO2-generating steps in the cycle and carbon-conserving steps in the glyoxylate bypass. Hence, the enzyme is a focus of regulation. The bacterial enzyme is typically dependent on the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. The monomeric enzyme from Corynebacterium glutamicum is highly specific towards this coenzyme and the substrate isocitrate while retaining a high overall efficiency. Here, a 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the enzyme in complex with its coenzyme and the cofactor Mg2+ is reported. Coenzyme specificity is mediated by interactions with the negatively charged 2'-phosphate group, which is surrounded by the side chains of two arginines, one histidine and, via a water, one lysine residue, forming ion pairs and hydrogen bonds. Comparison with a previous apoenzyme structure indicates that the binding site is essentially preconfigured for coenzyme binding. In a second enzyme molecule in the asymmetric unit negatively charged aspartate and glutamate residues from a symmetry-related enzyme molecule interact with the positively charged arginines, abolishing coenzyme binding. The holoenzyme from C. glutamicum displays a 36° interdomain hinge-opening movement relative to the only previous holoenzyme structure of the monomeric enzyme: that from Azotobacter vinelandii. As a result, the active site is not blocked by the bound coenzyme as in the closed conformation of the latter, but is accessible to the substrate isocitrate. However, the substrate-binding site is disrupted in the open conformation. Hinge points could be pinpointed for the two molecules in the same crystal, which show a 13° hinge-bending movement relative to each other. One of the two pairs of hinge residues is intimately flanked on both sides by the isocitrate-binding site. This suggests that binding of a relatively

  17. Methanoarchaeal sulfolactate dehydrogenase: prototype of a new family of NADH-dependent enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Adriana; Madern, Dominique; Zaccaï, Giuseppe; Vellieux, Frédéric MD

    2004-01-01

    The crystal structure of the sulfolactate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic and methanogenic archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii was solved at 2.5 Å resolution (PDB id. 1RFM). The asymmetric unit contains a tetramer of tight dimers. This structure, complexed with NADH, does not contain a cofactor-binding domain with ‘Rossmann-fold' topology. Instead, the tertiary and quaternary structures indicate a novel fold. The NADH is bound in an extended conformation in each active site, in a manner that explains the pro-S specificity. Cofactor binding involves residues belonging to both subunits within the tight dimers, which are therefore the smallest enzymatically active units. The protein was found to be a homodimer in solution by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and small-angle neutron scattering. Various compounds were tested as putative substrates. The results indicate the existence of a substrate discrimination mechanism, which involves electrostatic interactions. Based on sequence homology and phylogenetic analyses, several other enzymes were classified as belonging to this novel family of homologous (S)-2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. PMID:15014443

  18. Mechanistic Study of Manganese-Substituted Glycerol Dehydrogenase Using a Kinetic and Thermodynamic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Baishan; Niu, Jin; Ren, Hong; Guo, Yingxia; Wang, Shizhen

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic insights regarding the activity enhancement of dehydrogenase by metal ion substitution were investigated by a simple method using a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. By profiling the binding energy of both the substrate and product, the metal ion's role in catalysis enhancement was revealed. Glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) from Klebsiella pneumoniae sp., which demonstrated an improvement in activity by the substitution of a zinc ion with a manganese ion, was used as a model for the mechanistic study of metal ion substitution. A kinetic model based on an ordered Bi-Bi mechanism was proposed considering the noncompetitive product inhibition of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) and the competitive product inhibition of NADH. By obtaining preliminary kinetic parameters of substrate and product inhibition, the number of estimated parameters was reduced from 10 to 4 for a nonlinear regression-based kinetic parameter estimation. The simulated values of time-concentration curves fit the experimental values well, with an average relative error of 11.5% and 12.7% for Mn-GDH and GDH, respectively. A comparison of the binding energy of enzyme ternary complex for Mn-GDH and GDH derived from kinetic parameters indicated that metal ion substitution accelerated the release of dioxyacetone. The metal ion's role in catalysis enhancement was explicated. PMID:24896258

  19. Structure and Mechanism of Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana: INSIGHTS ON LEUCINE AND ALIPHATIC GLUCOSINOLATE BIOSYNTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Goo; Nwumeh, Ronald; Jez, Joseph M

    2016-06-24

    Isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) and 3-(2'-methylthio)ethylmalate dehydrogenase catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of different β-hydroxyacids in the leucine- and methionine-derived glucosinolate biosynthesis pathways, respectively, in plants. Evolution of the glucosinolate biosynthetic enzyme from IPMDH results from a single amino acid substitution that alters substrate specificity. Here, we present the x-ray crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana IPMDH2 (AtIPMDH2) in complex with either isopropylmalate and Mg(2+) or NAD(+) These structures reveal conformational changes that occur upon ligand binding and provide insight on the active site of the enzyme. The x-ray structures and kinetic analysis of site-directed mutants are consistent with a chemical mechanism in which Lys-232 activates a water molecule for catalysis. Structural analysis of the AtIPMDH2 K232M mutant and isothermal titration calorimetry supports a key role of Lys-232 in the reaction mechanism. This study suggests that IPMDH-like enzymes in both leucine and glucosinolate biosynthesis pathways use a common mechanism and that members of the β-hydroxyacid reductive decarboxylase family employ different active site features for similar reactions. PMID:27137927

  20. Crystal structure and thermodynamic properties of d-lactate dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus jensenii.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangwoo; Gu, Sol-A; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2014-07-01

    The thermostable d-lactate dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus jensenii (Ljd-LDH) is a key enzyme in the production of the d-form of lactic acid from pyruvate concomitant with the oxidation of NADH to NAD(+). The polymers of d-lactic acid are used as biodegradable bioplastics. The crystal structures of Ljd-LDH and in complex with NAD(+) were determined at 2.13 and 2.60Å resolutions, respectively. The Ljd-LDH monomer consists of the N-terminal substrate-binding domain and the C-terminal NAD-binding domain. The Ljd-LDH forms a homodimeric structure, and the C-terminal NAD-binding domain mostly enables the dimerization of the enzyme. The NAD cofactor is bound to the GxGxxG NAD-binding motif located between the two domains. Structural comparisons of Ljd-LDH with other d-LDHs reveal that Ljd-LDH has unique amino acid residues at the linker region, which indicates that the open-close dynamics of Ljd-LDH might be different from that of other d-LDHs. Moreover, thermostability experiments showed that the T50(10) value of Ljd-LDH (54.5°C) was much higher than the commercially available d-lactate dehydrogenase (42.7°C). In addition, Ljd-LDH has at least a 7°C higher denaturation temperature compared to commercially available d-LDHs. PMID:24794195

  1. Review of succinate dehydrogenase-deficient renal cell carcinoma with focus on clinical and pathobiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, N; Yorita, K; Nagasaki, M; Harada, Y; Ohe, C; Jeruc, J; Raspollini, M R; Michal, M; Hes, O; Amin, M B

    2016-03-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-deficient renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was first identified in 2004 and has been integrated into the 2016 WHO classification of RCC. Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is an enzyme complex composed of four protein subunits (SDHA, SDHB, SDHC and SDHD). The tumor which presents this enzyme mutation accounts for 0.05 to 0.2% of all renal carcinomas. Multiple tumors may occur in approximately 30% of affected patients. SDHB-deficient RCC is the most frequent, and the tumor histologically consists of cuboidal cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm, vacuolization, flocculent intracytoplasmic inclusion and indistinct cell borders. Ultrastructurally, the tumor contains abundant mitochondria. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells are positive for SDHA, but negative for SDHB in SDHB-, SDHC- and SDHD-deficient RCCs. However, SDHA-deficient RCC shows negativity for both SDHA and SDHB. In molecular genetic analyses, a germline mutation in the SDHB, SDHC or SDHD gene (in keeping with most patients having germline mutations in an SDH gene) has been identified in patients with or without a family history of renal tumors, paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma or gastrointestinal stromal tumor. While most tumors are low grade, some tumors may behave in an aggressive fashion, particularly if they are high nuclear grade, and have coagulative necrosis or sarcomatoid differentiation. PMID:27179267

  2. Myocardial steatosis and necrosis in atria and ventricles of rats given pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Huw Bowen; Reens, Jaimini; Johnson, Elizabeth; Brocklehurst, Simon; Slater, Ian

    2014-12-01

    Pharmaceutical therapies for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) include plasma glucose lowering by enhancing glucose utilization. The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex is important in controlling the balance between glucose and fatty acid substrate oxidation. Administration of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitors (PDHKIs) to rats effectively lowers plasma glucose but results in myocardial steatosis that in some instances is associated primarily with atrial and to a lesser degree with ventricular pathology. Induction of myocardial steatosis is not dose-dependent, varies from minimal to moderate severity, and is either of multifocal or diffuse distribution. Ventricular histopathology was restricted to few myocardial degenerative fibers, while that in the atrium/atria was of either acute or chronic appearance with the former showing myocardial degeneration/necrosis, acute myocarditis, edema, endothelial activation (rounding up), endocarditis, and thrombosis associated with moderate myocardial steatosis and the latter with myocardial loss, replacement fibrosis, and no apparent or minimal association with steatosis. The evidence from these evaluations indicate that excessive intramyocardial accumulation of lipid may be either primarily adverse or represents an indicator of other adversely affected cellular processes. PMID:24742628

  3. Phosphorylation Status of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Distinguishes Metabolic Phenotypes of Cultured Rat Brain Astrocytes and Neurons

    PubMed Central

    HALIM, NADER D.; McFATE, THOMAS; MOHYELDIN, AHMED; OKAGAKI, PETER; KOROTCHKINA, LIOUBOV G; PATEL, MULCHAND S; JEOUNG, NAM HO; HARRIS, ROBERT A.; SCHELL, MICHAEL J.; VERMA, AJAY

    2010-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in nervous tissue has been proposed to occur in a compartmentalized manner with astrocytes contributing largely to glycolysis and neurons being the primary site of glucose oxidation. However, mammalian astrocytes and neurons both contain mitochondria and it remains unclear why in culture neurons oxidize glucose, lactate, and pyruvate to a much larger extent than astrocytes. The objective of this study was to determine whether pyruvate metabolism is differentially regulated in cultured neurons vs. astrocytes. Expression of all components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC), the rate-limiting step for pyruvate entry into the Krebs cycle, was determined in cultured astrocytes and neurons. In addition, regulation of PDC enzymatic activity in the two cell types via protein phosphorylation was examined. We show that all components of the PDC are expressed in both cell types in culture but that PDC activity is kept strongly inhibited in astrocytes through phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase alpha subunit (PDHα). In contrast, neuronal PDC operates close to maximal levels with much lower levels of phosphorlyated PDHα. Dephosphorylation of astrocytic PDHα restores PDC activity and lowers lactate production. Our findings suggest that the glucose metabolism of astrocytes and neurons may be far more flexible than previously believed. PMID:20544852