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Sample records for 2-photon calcium imaging

  1. Imaging horse tendons using multimodal 2-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sivaguru, Mayandi; Eichorst, John Paul; Durgam, Sushmitha; Fried, Glenn A; Stewart, Allison A; Stewart, Matthew C

    2014-03-15

    Injuries and damage to tendons plague both human and equine athletes. At the site of injuries, various cells congregate to repair and re-structure the collagen. Treatments for collagen injury range from simple procedures such as icing and pharmaceutical treatments to more complex surgeries and the implantation of stem cells. Regardless of the treatment, the level of mechanical stimulation incurred by the recovering tendon is crucial. However, for a given tendon injury, it is not known precisely how much of a load should be applied for an effective recovery. Both too much and too little loading of the tendon could be detrimental during recovery. A mapping of the complex local environment imparted to any cell present at the site of a tendon injury may however, convey fundamental insights related to their decision making as a function of applied load. Therefore, fundamentally knowing how cells translate mechanical cues from their external environment into signals regulating their functions during repair is crucial to more effectively treat these types of injuries. In this paper, we studied systems of tendons with a variety of 2-photon-based imaging techniques to examine the local mechanical environment of cells in both normal and injured tendons. These tendons were chemically treated to instigate various extents of injury and in some cases, were injected with stem cells. The results related by each imaging technique distinguish with high contrast and resolution multiple morphologies of the cells' nuclei and the alignment of the collagen during injury. The incorporation of 2-photon FLIM into this study probed new features in the local environment of the nuclei that were not apparent with steady-state imaging. Overall, this paper focuses on horse tendon injury pattern and analysis with different 2-photon confocal modalities useful for wide variety of application in damaged tissues. PMID:23871762

  2. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  3. Calcium source (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  4. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human body. Bones, like other tissues in the body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their ...

  5. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo imaging of the microvasculature with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinman, Joe; Koletar, Margaret; Stefanovic, Bojana; Sled, John G.

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluates 2-Photon fluorescence microscopy of in vivo and ex vivo cleared samples for visualizing cortical vasculature. Four mice brains were imaged with in vivo 2PFM. Mice were then perfused with a FITC gel and cleared in fructose. The same regions imaged in vivo were imaged ex vivo. Vessels were segmented automatically in both images using an in-house developed algorithm that accounts for the anisotropic and spatially varying PSF ex vivo. Through non-linear warping, the ex vivo image and tracing were aligned to the in vivo image. The corresponding vessels were identified through a local search algorithm. This enabled comparison of identical vessels in vivo/ex vivo. A similar process was conducted on the in vivo tracing to determine the percentage of vessels perfused. Of all the vessels identified over the four brains in vivo, 98% were present ex vivo. There was a trend towards reduced vessel diameter ex vivo by 12.7%, and the shrinkage varied between specimens (0% to 26%). Large diameter surface vessels, through a process termed 'shadowing', attenuated in vivo signal from deeper cortical vessels by 40% at 300 μm below the cortical surface, which does not occur ex vivo. In summary, though there is a mean diameter shrinkage ex vivo, ex vivo imaging has a reduced shadowing artifact. Additionally, since imaging depths are only limited by the working distance of the microscope objective, ex vivo imaging is more suitable for imaging large portions of the brain.

  6. Supraresolution imaging in brain slices using stimulated-emission depletion 2-photon laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Takasaki, Kevin T.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) has allowed unprecedented fluorescent imaging of neuronal structure and function within neural tissue. However, the resolution of this approach is poor compared to that of conventional confocal microscopy. Here we demonstrate supraresolution 2PLSM within brain slices. Imaging beyond the diffraction limit is accomplished by using near-infrared (NIR) lasers for both pulsed 2-photon excitation and continuous wave stimulation emission depletion (STED). Furthermore, we demonstrate that Alexa Fluor-594, a bright fluorophore commonly used for both live cell and fixed tissue fluorescence imaging, is suitable for STED 2PLSM. STED 2PLSM supraresolution microscopy achieves approximately 3 fold improvement in resolution in the radial direction over conventional 2PLSM, revealing greater detail in the structure of dendritic spines located ~100 microns below the surface of brain slices. Further improvements in resolution are theoretically achievable, suggesting that STED 2PLSM will permit nanoscale imaging of neuronal structures located in relatively intact brain tissue. PMID:19709626

  7. Calcium imaging of infrared-stimulated activity in rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Cayce, Jonathan Matthew; Bouchard, Matthew B; Chernov, Mykyta M; Chen, Brenda R; Grosberg, Lauren E; Jansen, E Duco; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2014-04-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a promising neurostimulation technique that can activate neural tissue with high spatial precision and without the need for exogenous agents. However, little is understood about how infrared light interacts with neural tissue on a cellular level, particularly within the living brain. In this study, we use calcium sensitive dye imaging on macroscopic and microscopic scales to explore the spatiotemporal effects of INS on cortical calcium dynamics. The INS-evoked calcium signal that was observed exhibited a fast and slow component suggesting activation of multiple cellular mechanisms. The slow component of the evoked signal exhibited wave-like properties suggesting network activation, and was verified to originate from astrocytes through pharmacology and 2-photon imaging. We also provide evidence that the fast calcium signal may have been evoked through modulation of glutamate transients. This study demonstrates that pulsed infrared light can induce intracellular calcium modulations in both astrocytes and neurons, providing new insights into the mechanisms of action of INS in the brain. PMID:24674600

  8. Calcium imaging of infrared-stimulated activity in rodent brain

    PubMed Central

    Cayce, Jonathan Matthew; Bouchard, Matthew B.; Chernov, Mykyta M.; Chen, Brenda R.; Grosberg, Lauren E.; Jansen, E. Duco; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Summary Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a promising neurostimulation technique that can activate neural tissue with high spatial precision and without the need for exogenous agents. However, little is understood about how infrared light interacts with neural tissue on a cellular level, particularly within the living brain. In this study, we use calcium sensitive dye imaging on macroscopic and microscopic scales to explore the spatiotemporal effects of INS on cortical calcium dynamics. The INS-evoked calcium signal that was observed exhibited a fast and slow component suggesting activation of multiple cellular mechanisms. The slow component of the evoked signal exhibited wave-like properties suggesting network activation, and was verified to originate from astrocytes through pharmacology and 2-photon imaging. We also provide evidence that the fast calcium signal may have been evoked through modulation of glutamate transients. This study demonstrates that pulsed infrared light can induce intracellular calcium modulations in both astrocytes and neurons, providing new insights into the mechanisms of action of INS in the brain. PMID:24674600

  9. Intravital imaging of the effects of 5-fluorouracil on the murine liver microenvironment using 2-photon laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    OKIGAMI, MASATO; TANAKA, KOJI; INOUE, YASUHIRO; SAIGUSA, SUSUMU; OKUGAWA, YOSHINAGA; TOIYAMA, YUJI; MOHRI, YASUHIKO; KUSUNOKI, MASATO

    2016-01-01

    5-fluorouracil (5FU) is often used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. 5FU improves the median overall and disease-free survival rates and reduces recurrence rates in patients who have undergone curative surgical resection. However, in the adjuvant setting, whether 5FU eradicates clinically undetectable micrometastases in target organs such as the liver, or whether 5-FU inhibits the adhesion of circulating tumor cells has not yet been established. In the present study, 5FU was administered following the inoculation of red fluorescent protein-expressing HT29 cells into green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic nude mice to examine its inhibitory effect. 2-photon laser scanning microscopy was performed at selected time points for time-series imaging of liver metastasis of GFP-transgenic mice. The cell number in vessels was quantified to evaluate the response of the tumor microenvironment to chemotherapy. HT29 cells were visualized in hepatic sinusoids at the single-cell level. A total of 2 hours after the injection (early stage), time-series imaging revealed that the number of caught tumor cells gradually reduced over time. In the 5FU treatment group, no significant difference was observed in the cell number in the early stage. One week after the injection (late stage), a difference in morphology was observed. The results of the present study indicated that 5FU eradicated clinically undetectable micrometastases in liver tissues by acting as a cytotoxic agent opposed to preventing adhesion. The present study indicated that time-series intravital 2-photon laser scanning microscopic imaging of metastatic tumor xenografts may facilitate the screening and evaluation of novel chemotherapeutic agents with less interindividual variability. PMID:27073493

  10. Spatiotemporal Rank Filtering Improves Image Quality Compared to Frame Averaging in 2-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pinkard, Henry; Corbin, Kaitlin; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2016-01-01

    Live imaging of biological specimens using optical microscopy is limited by tradeoffs between spatial and temporal resolution, depth into intact samples, and phototoxicity. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM), the gold standard for imaging turbid samples in vivo, has conventionally constructed images with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) generated by sequential raster scans of the focal plane and temporal integration of the collected signals. Here, we describe spatiotemporal rank filtering, a nonlinear alternative to temporal integration, which makes more efficient use of collected photons by selectively reducing noise in 2P-LSM images during acquisition. This results in much higher SNR while preserving image edges and fine details. Practically, this allows for at least a four fold decrease in collection times, a substantial improvement for time-course imaging in biological systems. PMID:26938064

  11. Spatiotemporal Rank Filtering Improves Image Quality Compared to Frame Averaging in 2-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pinkard, Henry; Corbin, Kaitlin; Krummel, Matthew F

    2016-01-01

    Live imaging of biological specimens using optical microscopy is limited by tradeoffs between spatial and temporal resolution, depth into intact samples, and phototoxicity. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM), the gold standard for imaging turbid samples in vivo, has conventionally constructed images with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) generated by sequential raster scans of the focal plane and temporal integration of the collected signals. Here, we describe spatiotemporal rank filtering, a nonlinear alternative to temporal integration, which makes more efficient use of collected photons by selectively reducing noise in 2P-LSM images during acquisition. This results in much higher SNR while preserving image edges and fine details. Practically, this allows for at least a four fold decrease in collection times, a substantial improvement for time-course imaging in biological systems. PMID:26938064

  12. 2-Photon Characterization of Optical Proteolytic Beacons for Imaging Changes in Matrix-Metalloprotease Activity in a Mouse Model of Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Haskett, Darren G.; Maestas, David; Howerton, Stephen J.; Smith, Tyler; Ardila, D. Catalina; Doetschman, Tom; Utzinger, Urs; McGrath, Dominic; McIntyre, J. Oliver; Vande Geest, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a multifactorial disease that is a leading cause of death in developed countries. Matrix-metalloproteases (MMPs) are part of the disease process, however, assessing their role in disease initiation and progression has been difficult and animal models have become essential. Combining Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) proteolytic beacons activated in the presence of MMPs with 2-photon microscopy allows for a novel method of evaluating MMP activity within the extracellular matrix (ECM). Single and 2-photon spectra for proteolytic beacons were determined in vitro. Ex vivo experiments using the apolipoprotein E knockout angiotensin II-infused mouse model of aneurysm imaged ECM architecture simultaneously with the MMP-activated FRET beacons. 2-photon spectra of the two-color proteolytic beacons showed peaks for the individual fluorophores that enable imaging of MMP activity through proteolytic cleavage. Ex vivo imaging of the beacons within the ECM revealed both microstructure and MMP activity. 2-photon imaging of the beacons in aneurysmal tissue showed an increase in proteolytic cleavage within the ECM (p < 0.001), thus indicating an increase in MMP activity. Our data suggest that FRET-based proteolytic beacons show promise in assessing MMP activity within the ECM and will therefore allow future studies to identify the heterogeneous distribution of simultaneous ECM remodeling and protease activity in aneurysmal disease. PMID:26903264

  13. 2-Photon Characterization of Optical Proteolytic Beacons for Imaging Changes in Matrix-Metalloprotease Activity in a Mouse Model of Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Haskett, Darren G; Maestas, David; Howerton, Stephen J; Smith, Tyler; Ardila, D Catalina; Doetschman, Tom; Utzinger, Urs; McGrath, Dominic; McIntyre, J Oliver; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2016-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a multifactorial disease that is a leading cause of death in developed countries. Matrix-metalloproteases (MMPs) are part of the disease process, however, assessing their role in disease initiation and progression has been difficult and animal models have become essential. Combining Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) proteolytic beacons activated in the presence of MMPs with 2-photon microscopy allows for a novel method of evaluating MMP activity within the extracellular matrix (ECM). Single and 2-photon spectra for proteolytic beacons were determined in vitro. Ex vivo experiments using the apolipoprotein E knockout angiotensin II-infused mouse model of aneurysm imaged ECM architecture simultaneously with the MMP-activated FRET beacons. 2-photon spectra of the two-color proteolytic beacons showed peaks for the individual fluorophores that enable imaging of MMP activity through proteolytic cleavage. Ex vivo imaging of the beacons within the ECM revealed both microstructure and MMP activity. 2-photon imaging of the beacons in aneurysmal tissue showed an increase in proteolytic cleavage within the ECM (p<0.001), thus indicating an increase in MMP activity. Our data suggest that FRET-based proteolytic beacons show promise in assessing MMP activity within the ECM and will therefore allow future studies to identify the heterogeneous distribution of simultaneous ECM remodeling and protease activity in aneurysmal disease. PMID:26903264

  14. Calcium Imaging of Sonoporation of Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabens, David; Aehle, Matthew; Steyer, Grant; Kourennyi, Dmitri; Deng, Cheri X.

    2006-05-01

    Ultrasound mediated delivery of compounds is a relatively recent development in drug delivery and gene transfection techniques. Due to the lack of methods for real-time monitoring of sonoporation at the cellular level, the efficiency of drug/gene delivery and sonoporation associated side effects, such as the loss of cell viability and enhanced apoptosis, have been studied only through post US exposure analyses, requiring days for cell incubation. Furthermore, because microporation appears to be transient in nature, it was not possible to correlate transfection with microporation on an individual cellular basis. By studying the role of calcium in the cell and using fluorescent calcium imaging to study sonoporation it is possible to quantify both cell porosity and sonoporation side effects. Since both post sonoporation cell survival and delivery efficiency are related to the dynamic process of the cell membrane poration, calcium imaging of sonoporation will provide important knowledge to obtain improved understanding of sonoporation mechanism. Our experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of calcium imaging of sonoporation in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. We have measured the changes in the intracellular calcium concentration using Fura-2, a fluorescent probe, which indicate influx or flow of Calcium across the cell membrane. Analysis of data identified key aspects in the dynamic sonoporation process including the formation of pores in the cell membrane, and the relative temporal duration of the pores and their resealing. These observations are obtained through the analysis of the rate the calcium concentration changes within the cells, making it possible to visualize membrane opening and repair in real-time through such changes in the intracellular calcium concentration.

  15. A comparison of manual neuronal reconstruction from biocytin histology or 2-photon imaging: morphometry and computer modeling

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, Arne V.; Grabuschnig, Stefan; Legenstein, Robert; Sjöström, P. Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Accurate 3D reconstruction of neurons is vital for applications linking anatomy and physiology. Reconstructions are typically created using Neurolucida after biocytin histology (BH). An alternative inexpensive and fast method is to use freeware such as Neuromantic to reconstruct from fluorescence imaging (FI) stacks acquired using 2-photon laser-scanning microscopy during physiological recording. We compare these two methods with respect to morphometry, cell classification, and multicompartmental modeling in the NEURON simulation environment. Quantitative morphological analysis of the same cells reconstructed using both methods reveals that whilst biocytin reconstructions facilitate tracing of more distal collaterals, both methods are comparable in representing the overall morphology: automated clustering of reconstructions from both methods successfully separates neocortical basket cells from pyramidal cells but not BH from FI reconstructions. BH reconstructions suffer more from tissue shrinkage and compression artifacts than FI reconstructions do. FI reconstructions, on the other hand, consistently have larger process diameters. Consequently, significant differences in NEURON modeling of excitatory post-synaptic potential (EPSP) forward propagation are seen between the two methods, with FI reconstructions exhibiting smaller depolarizations. Simulated action potential backpropagation (bAP), however, is indistinguishable between reconstructions obtained with the two methods. In our hands, BH reconstructions are necessary for NEURON modeling and detailed morphological tracing, and thus remain state of the art, although they are more labor intensive, more expensive, and suffer from a higher failure rate due to the occasional poor outcome of histological processing. However, for a subset of anatomical applications such as cell type identification, FI reconstructions are superior, because of indistinguishable classification performance with greater ease of use

  16. Functional Calcium Imaging in Developing Cortical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dawitz, Julia; Kroon, Tim; Hjorth, J.J. Johannes; Meredith, Rhiannon M.

    2011-01-01

    , synaptogenesis and plasticity (Rakic & Komuro, 1995; Spitzer et al., 2004) are of critical importance for the correct development and maturation of the cortical circuitry. In this JoVE video, we demonstrate the methods used to image spontaneous activity in developing cortical networks. Calcium-sensitive indicators, such as Fura 2-AM ester diffuse across the cell membrane where intracellular esterase activity cleaves the AM esters to leave the cell-impermeant form of indicator dye. The impermeant form of indicator has carboxylic acid groups which are able to then detect and bind calcium ions intracellularly.. The fluorescence of the calcium-sensitive dye is transiently altered upon binding to calcium. Single or multi-photon imaging techniques are used to measure the change in photons being emitted from the dye, and thus indicate an alteration in intracellular calcium. Furthermore, these calcium-dependent indicators can be combined with other fluorescent markers to investigate cell types within the active network. PMID:22041662

  17. Denoising Two-Photon Calcium Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Wasim Q.; Schummers, James; Sur, Mriganka; Brown, Emery N.

    2011-01-01

    Two-photon calcium imaging is now an important tool for in vivo imaging of biological systems. By enabling neuronal population imaging with subcellular resolution, this modality offers an approach for gaining a fundamental understanding of brain anatomy and physiology. Proper analysis of calcium imaging data requires denoising, that is separating the signal from complex physiological noise. To analyze two-photon brain imaging data, we present a signal plus colored noise model in which the signal is represented as harmonic regression and the correlated noise is represented as an order autoregressive process. We provide an efficient cyclic descent algorithm to compute approximate maximum likelihood parameter estimates by combing a weighted least-squares procedure with the Burg algorithm. We use Akaike information criterion to guide selection of the harmonic regression and the autoregressive model orders. Our flexible yet parsimonious modeling approach reliably separates stimulus-evoked fluorescence response from background activity and noise, assesses goodness of fit, and estimates confidence intervals and signal-to-noise ratio. This refined separation leads to appreciably enhanced image contrast for individual cells including clear delineation of subcellular details and network activity. The application of our approach to in vivo imaging data recorded in the ferret primary visual cortex demonstrates that our method yields substantially denoised signal estimates. We also provide a general Volterra series framework for deriving this and other signal plus correlated noise models for imaging. This approach to analyzing two-photon calcium imaging data may be readily adapted to other computational biology problems which apply correlated noise models. PMID:21687727

  18. Immunohistochemical and Calcium Imaging Methods in Wholemount Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sargoy, Allison; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C.; De Sevilla Müller, Luis Pérez

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the tools, reagents, and the practical steps that are needed for: 1) successful preparation of wholemount retinas for immunohistochemistry and, 2) calcium imaging for the study of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) mediated calcium signaling in retinal ganglion cells. The calcium imaging method we describe circumvents issues concerning non-specific loading of displaced amacrine cells in the ganglion cell layer. PMID:25349920

  19. Intravital autofluorescence 2-photon microscopy of murine intestinal mucosa with ultra-broadband femtosecond laser pulse excitation: image quality, photodamage, and inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Antje; Krapf, Lisa; Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina; Koop, Norbert; Vogel, Alfred; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2015-11-01

    Ultra-broadband excitation with ultrashort pulses may enable simultaneous excitation of multiple endogenous fluorophores in vital tissue. Imaging living gut mucosa by autofluorescence 2-photon microscopy with more than 150 nm broad excitation at an 800-nm central wavelength from a sub-10 fs titanium-sapphire (Ti:sapphire) laser with a dielectric mirror based prechirp was compared to the excitation with 220 fs pulses of a tunable Ti:sapphire laser at 730 and 800 nm wavelengths. Excitation efficiency, image quality, and photochemical damage were evaluated. At similar excitation fluxes, the same image brightness was achieved with both lasers. As expected, with ultra-broadband pulses, fluorescence from NAD(P)H, flavines, and lipoproteins was observed simultaneously. However, nonlinear photodamage apparent as hyperfluorescence with functional and structural alterations of the tissue occurred earlier when the laser power was adjusted to the same image brightness. After only a few minutes, the immigration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes into the epithelium and degranulation of these cells, a sign of inflammation, was observed. Photodamage is promoted by the higher peak irradiances and/or by nonoptimal excitation of autofluorescence at the longer wavelength. We conclude that excitation with a tunable narrow bandwidth laser is preferable to ultra-broadband excitation for autofluorescence-based 2-photon microscopy, unless the spectral phase can be controlled to optimize excitation conditions.

  20. Functional calcium imaging in zebrafish lateral-line hair cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q X; He, X J; Wong, H C; Kindt, K S

    2016-01-01

    Sensory hair-cell development, function, and regeneration are fundamental processes that are challenging to study in mammalian systems. Zebrafish are an excellent alternative model to study hair cells because they have an external auxiliary organ called the lateral line. The hair cells of the lateral line are easily accessible, which makes them suitable for live, function-based fluorescence imaging. In this chapter, we describe methods to perform functional calcium imaging in zebrafish lateral-line hair cells. We compare genetically encoded calcium indicators that have been used previously to measure calcium in lateral-line hair cells. We also outline equipment required for calcium imaging and compare different imaging systems. Lastly, we discuss how to set up optimal imaging parameters and how to process and visualize calcium signals. Overall, using these methods, in vivo calcium imaging is a powerful tool to examine sensory hair-cell function in an intact organism. PMID:27263415

  1. moco: Fast Motion Correction for Calcium Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dubbs, Alexander; Guevara, James; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Motion correction is the first step in a pipeline of algorithms to analyze calcium imaging videos and extract biologically relevant information, for example the network structure of the neurons therein. Fast motion correction is especially critical for closed-loop activity triggered stimulation experiments, where accurate detection and targeting of specific cells in necessary. We introduce a novel motion-correction algorithm which uses a Fourier-transform approach, and a combination of judicious downsampling and the accelerated computation of many L 2 norms using dynamic programming and two-dimensional, fft-accelerated convolutions, to enhance its efficiency. Its accuracy is comparable to that of established community-used algorithms, and it is more stable to large translational motions. It is programmed in Java and is compatible with ImageJ. PMID:26909035

  2. moco: Fast Motion Correction for Calcium Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dubbs, Alexander; Guevara, James; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Motion correction is the first step in a pipeline of algorithms to analyze calcium imaging videos and extract biologically relevant information, for example the network structure of the neurons therein. Fast motion correction is especially critical for closed-loop activity triggered stimulation experiments, where accurate detection and targeting of specific cells in necessary. We introduce a novel motion-correction algorithm which uses a Fourier-transform approach, and a combination of judicious downsampling and the accelerated computation of many L2 norms using dynamic programming and two-dimensional, fft-accelerated convolutions, to enhance its efficiency. Its accuracy is comparable to that of established community-used algorithms, and it is more stable to large translational motions. It is programmed in Java and is compatible with ImageJ. PMID:26909035

  3. Imaging Calcium in Drosophila at Egg Activation.

    PubMed

    Derrick, Christopher J; York-Andersen, Anna H; Weil, Timothy T

    2016-01-01

    Egg activation is a universal process that includes a series of events to allow the fertilized egg to complete meiosis and initiate embryonic development. One aspect of egg activation, conserved across all organisms examined, is a change in the intracellular concentration of calcium (Ca(2+)) often termed a 'Ca(2+) wave'. While the speed and number of oscillations of the Ca(2+) wave varies between species, the change in intracellular Ca(2+) is key in bringing about essential events for embryonic development. These changes include resumption of the cell cycle, mRNA regulation, cortical granule exocytosis, and rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. In the mature Drosophila egg, activation occurs in the female oviduct prior to fertilization, initiating a series of Ca(2+)-dependent events. Here we present a protocol for imaging the Ca(2+) wave in Drosophila. This approach provides a manipulable model system to interrogate the mechanism of the Ca(2+) wave and the downstream changes associated with it. PMID:27584955

  4. In vivo Calcium Imaging of Evoked Calcium Waves in the Embryonic Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yuryev, Mikhail; Pellegrino, Christophe; Jokinen, Ville; Andriichuk, Liliia; Khirug, Stanislav; Khiroug, Leonard; Rivera, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of intracellular calcium fluxes are instrumental in the proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neuronal cells. Knowledge thus far of the relationship between these calcium changes and physiological processes in the developing brain has derived principally from ex vivo and in vitro experiments. Here, we present a new method to image intracellular calcium flux in the cerebral cortex of live rodent embryos, whilst attached to the dam through the umbilical cord. Using this approach we demonstrate induction of calcium waves by laser stimulation. These waves are sensitive to ATP-receptor blockade and are significantly increased by pharmacological facilitation of intracellular-calcium release. This approach is the closest to physiological conditions yet achieved for imaging of calcium in the embryonic brain and as such opens new avenues for the study of prenatal brain development. Furthermore, the developed method could open the possibilities of preclinical translational studies in embryos particularly important for developmentally related diseases such as schizophrenia and autism. PMID:26778965

  5. Live Imaging of Calcium Dynamics during Axon Degeneration Reveals Two Functionally Distinct Phases of Calcium Influx

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Yuya; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is a key regulator of axon degeneration caused by trauma and disease, but its specific spatial and temporal dynamics in injured axons remain unclear. To clarify the function of calcium in axon degeneration, we observed calcium dynamics in single injured neurons in live zebrafish larvae and tested the temporal requirement for calcium in zebrafish neurons and cultured mouse DRG neurons. Using laser axotomy to induce Wallerian degeneration (WD) in zebrafish peripheral sensory axons, we monitored calcium dynamics from injury to fragmentation, revealing two stereotyped phases of axonal calcium influx. First, axotomy triggered a transient local calcium wave originating at the injury site. This initial calcium wave only disrupted mitochondria near the injury site and was not altered by expression of the protective WD slow (WldS) protein. Inducing multiple waves with additional axotomies did not change the kinetics of degeneration. In contrast, a second phase of calcium influx occurring minutes before fragmentation spread as a wave throughout the axon, entered mitochondria, and was abolished by WldS expression. In live zebrafish, chelating calcium after the first wave, but before the second wave, delayed the progress of fragmentation. In cultured DRG neurons, chelating calcium early in the process of WD did not alter degeneration, but chelating calcium late in WD delayed fragmentation. We propose that a terminal calcium wave is a key instructive component of the axon degeneration program. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Axon degeneration resulting from trauma or neurodegenerative disease can cause devastating deficits in neural function. Understanding the molecular and cellular events that execute axon degeneration is essential for developing treatments to address these conditions. Calcium is known to contribute to axon degeneration, but its temporal requirements in this process have been unclear. Live calcium imaging in severed zebrafish neurons and temporally controlled

  6. Concurrent Imaging of Synaptic Vesicle Recycling and Calcium Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haiyan; Foss, Sarah M.; Dobryy, Yuriy L.; Park, C. Kevin; Hires, Samuel Andrew; Shaner, Nathan C.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Osborne, Leslie C.; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission involves the calcium dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-shifted reporter of vesicle recycling based on a vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1-mOrange2 (VGLUT1-mOr2), and a presynaptically localized green calcium indicator, synaptophysin-GCaMP3 (SyGCaMP3) with a large dynamic range. The fluorescence of VGLUT1-mOr2 is quenched by the low pH of synaptic vesicles. Exocytosis upon electrical stimulation exposes the luminal mOr2 to the neutral extracellular pH and relieves fluorescence quenching. Reacidification of the vesicle upon endocytosis again reduces fluorescence intensity. Changes in fluorescence intensity thus monitor synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis, as demonstrated previously for the green VGLUT1-pHluorin. To monitor changes in calcium, we fused the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin to the recently improved calcium indicator GCaMP3. SyGCaMP3 is targeted to presynaptic varicosities, and exhibits changes in fluorescence in response to electrical stimulation consistent with changes in calcium concentration. Using real time imaging of both reporters expressed in the same synapses, we determine the time course of changes in VGLUT1 recycling in relation to changes in presynaptic calcium concentration. Inhibition of P/Q- and N-type calcium channels reduces calcium levels, as well as the rate of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and the fraction of vesicles released. PMID:22065946

  7. Simultaneous Electrophysiological Recording and Calcium Imaging of Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Robert P.; Allen, Charles N.

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous electrophysiological and fluorescent imaging recording methods were used to study the role of changes of membrane potential or current in regulating the intracellular calcium concentration. Changing environmental conditions, such as the light-dark cycle, can modify neuronal and neural network activity and the expression of a family of circadian clock genes within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the location of the master circadian clock in the mammalian brain. Excitatory synaptic transmission leads to an increase in the postsynaptic Ca2+ concentration that is believed to activate the signaling pathways that shifts the rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes. Hypothalamic slices containing the SCN were patch clamped using microelectrodes filled with an internal solution containing the calcium indicator bis-fura-2. After a seal was formed between the microelectrode and the SCN neuronal membrane, the membrane was ruptured using gentle suction and the calcium probe diffused into the neuron filling both the soma and dendrites. Quantitative ratiometric measurements of the intracellular calcium concentration were recorded simultaneously with membrane potential or current. Using these methods it is possible to study the role of changes of the intracellular calcium concentration produced by synaptic activity and action potential firing of individual neurons. In this presentation we demonstrate the methods to simultaneously record electrophysiological activity along with intracellular calcium from individual SCN neurons maintained in brain slices. PMID:24335611

  8. Simultaneous Sodium and Calcium Imaging from Dendrites and Axons

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dynamic calcium imaging is a major technique of neuroscientists. It can reveal information about the location of various calcium channels and calcium permeable receptors, the time course, magnitude, and location of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) changes, and indirectly, the occurrence of action potentials. Dynamic sodium imaging, a less exploited technique, can reveal analogous information related to sodium signaling. In some cases, like the examination of AMPA and NMDA receptor signaling, measurements of both [Ca2+]i and [Na+]i changes in the same preparation may provide more information than separate measurements. To this end, we developed a technique to simultaneously measure both signals at high speed and sufficient sensitivity to detect localized physiologic events. This approach has advantages over sequential imaging because the preparation may not respond identically in different trials. We designed custom dichroic and emission filters to allow the separate detection of the fluorescence of sodium and calcium indicators loaded together into a single neuron in a brain slice from the hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats. We then used high-intensity light emitting diodes (LEDs) to alternately excite the two indicators at the appropriate wavelengths. These pulses were synchronized with the frames of a CCD camera running at 500 Hz. Software then separated the data streams to provide independent sodium and calcium signals. With this system we could detect [Ca2+]i and [Na+]i changes from single action potentials in axons and synaptically evoked signals in dendrites, both with submicron resolution and a good signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). PMID:26730401

  9. Spike Inference from Calcium Imaging Using Sequential Monte Carlo Methods

    PubMed Central

    Vogelstein, Joshua T.; Watson, Brendon O.; Packer, Adam M.; Yuste, Rafael; Jedynak, Bruno; Paninski, Liam

    2009-01-01

    Abstract As recent advances in calcium sensing technologies facilitate simultaneously imaging action potentials in neuronal populations, complementary analytical tools must also be developed to maximize the utility of this experimental paradigm. Although the observations here are fluorescence movies, the signals of interest—spike trains and/or time varying intracellular calcium concentrations—are hidden. Inferring these hidden signals is often problematic due to noise, nonlinearities, slow imaging rate, and unknown biophysical parameters. We overcome these difficulties by developing sequential Monte Carlo methods (particle filters) based on biophysical models of spiking, calcium dynamics, and fluorescence. We show that even in simple cases, the particle filters outperform the optimal linear (i.e., Wiener) filter, both by obtaining better estimates and by providing error bars. We then relax a number of our model assumptions to incorporate nonlinear saturation of the fluorescence signal, as well external stimulus and spike history dependence (e.g., refractoriness) of the spike trains. Using both simulations and in vitro fluorescence observations, we demonstrate temporal superresolution by inferring when within a frame each spike occurs. Furthermore, the model parameters may be estimated using expectation maximization with only a very limited amount of data (e.g., ∼5–10 s or 5–40 spikes), without the requirement of any simultaneous electrophysiology or imaging experiments. PMID:19619479

  10. Benchmarking Spike Rate Inference in Population Calcium Imaging.

    PubMed

    Theis, Lucas; Berens, Philipp; Froudarakis, Emmanouil; Reimer, Jacob; Román Rosón, Miroslav; Baden, Tom; Euler, Thomas; Tolias, Andreas S; Bethge, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental challenge in calcium imaging has been to infer spike rates of neurons from the measured noisy fluorescence traces. We systematically evaluate different spike inference algorithms on a large benchmark dataset (>100,000 spikes) recorded from varying neural tissue (V1 and retina) using different calcium indicators (OGB-1 and GCaMP6). In addition, we introduce a new algorithm based on supervised learning in flexible probabilistic models and find that it performs better than other published techniques. Importantly, it outperforms other algorithms even when applied to entirely new datasets for which no simultaneously recorded data is available. Future data acquired in new experimental conditions can be used to further improve the spike prediction accuracy and generalization performance of the model. Finally, we show that comparing algorithms on artificial data is not informative about performance on real data, suggesting that benchmarking different methods with real-world datasets may greatly facilitate future algorithmic developments in neuroscience. PMID:27151639

  11. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements are carbonate and citrate. Calcium carbonate is inexpensive, but is absorbed best when taken ... antacid products, such as Tums® and Rolaids®, contain calcium carbonate. Each pill or chew provides 200–400 mg ...

  12. Sensitive red protein calcium indicators for imaging neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Hod; Mohar, Boaz; Sun, Yi; Narayan, Sujatha; Gordus, Andrew; Hasseman, Jeremy P; Tsegaye, Getahun; Holt, Graham T; Hu, Amy; Walpita, Deepika; Patel, Ronak; Macklin, John J; Bargmann, Cornelia I; Ahrens, Misha B; Schreiter, Eric R; Jayaraman, Vivek; Looger, Loren L; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) allow measurement of activity in large populations of neurons and in small neuronal compartments, over times of milliseconds to months. Although GFP-based GECIs are widely used for in vivo neurophysiology, GECIs with red-shifted excitation and emission spectra have advantages for in vivo imaging because of reduced scattering and absorption in tissue, and a consequent reduction in phototoxicity. However, current red GECIs are inferior to the state-of-the-art GFP-based GCaMP6 indicators for detecting and quantifying neural activity. Here we present improved red GECIs based on mRuby (jRCaMP1a, b) and mApple (jRGECO1a), with sensitivity comparable to GCaMP6. We characterized the performance of the new red GECIs in cultured neurons and in mouse, Drosophila, zebrafish and C. elegans in vivo. Red GECIs facilitate deep-tissue imaging, dual-color imaging together with GFP-based reporters, and the use of optogenetics in combination with calcium imaging. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12727.001 PMID:27011354

  13. Sensitive red protein calcium indicators for imaging neural activity.

    PubMed

    Dana, Hod; Mohar, Boaz; Sun, Yi; Narayan, Sujatha; Gordus, Andrew; Hasseman, Jeremy P; Tsegaye, Getahun; Holt, Graham T; Hu, Amy; Walpita, Deepika; Patel, Ronak; Macklin, John J; Bargmann, Cornelia I; Ahrens, Misha B; Schreiter, Eric R; Jayaraman, Vivek; Looger, Loren L; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) allow measurement of activity in large populations of neurons and in small neuronal compartments, over times of milliseconds to months. Although GFP-based GECIs are widely used for in vivo neurophysiology, GECIs with red-shifted excitation and emission spectra have advantages for in vivo imaging because of reduced scattering and absorption in tissue, and a consequent reduction in phototoxicity. However, current red GECIs are inferior to the state-of-the-art GFP-based GCaMP6 indicators for detecting and quantifying neural activity. Here we present improved red GECIs based on mRuby (jRCaMP1a, b) and mApple (jRGECO1a), with sensitivity comparable to GCaMP6. We characterized the performance of the new red GECIs in cultured neurons and in mouse, Drosophila, zebrafish and C. elegans in vivo. Red GECIs facilitate deep-tissue imaging, dual-color imaging together with GFP-based reporters, and the use of optogenetics in combination with calcium imaging. PMID:27011354

  14. Asante Calcium Green and Asante Calcium Red--novel calcium indicators for two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Karolina; Hille, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    For a comprehensive understanding of cellular processes and potential dysfunctions therein, an analysis of the ubiquitous intracellular second messenger calcium is of particular interest. This study examined the suitability of the novel Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dyes Asante Calcium Red (ACR) and Asante Calcium Green (ACG) for two-photon (2P)-excited time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Both dyes displayed sufficient 2P fluorescence excitation in a range of 720-900 nm. In vitro, ACR and ACG exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay behavior and the two decay time components in the ns-range could be attributed to the Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound dye species. The amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay time changed in a Ca(2+)-dependent way, unraveling in vitro dissociation constants K(D) of 114 nM and 15 nM for ACR and ACG, respectively. In the presence of bovine serum albumin, the absorption and steady-state fluorescence behavior of ACR was altered and its biexponential fluorescence decay showed about 5-times longer decay time components indicating dye-protein interactions. Since no ester derivative of ACG was commercially available, only ACR was evaluated for 2P-excited fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) in living cells of American cockroach salivary glands. In living cells, ACR also exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay with clearly resolvable short (0.56 ns) and long (2.44 ns) decay time components attributable to the Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound ACR species. From the amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay times, an in situ K(D) of 180 nM was determined. Thus, quantitative [Ca(2+)]i recordings were realized, unraveling a reversible dopamine-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation from 21 nM to 590 nM in salivary duct cells. It was concluded that ACR is a promising new Ca(2+) indicator dye for 2P-FLIM recordings applicable in diverse biological systems. PMID:25140519

  15. Asante Calcium Green and Asante Calcium Red—Novel Calcium Indicators for Two-Photon Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Karolina; Hille, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    For a comprehensive understanding of cellular processes and potential dysfunctions therein, an analysis of the ubiquitous intracellular second messenger calcium is of particular interest. This study examined the suitability of the novel Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dyes Asante Calcium Red (ACR) and Asante Calcium Green (ACG) for two-photon (2P)-excited time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Both dyes displayed sufficient 2P fluorescence excitation in a range of 720–900 nm. In vitro, ACR and ACG exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay behavior and the two decay time components in the ns-range could be attributed to the Ca2+-free and Ca2+-bound dye species. The amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay time changed in a Ca2+-dependent way, unraveling in vitro dissociation constants KD of 114 nM and 15 nM for ACR and ACG, respectively. In the presence of bovine serum albumin, the absorption and steady-state fluorescence behavior of ACR was altered and its biexponential fluorescence decay showed about 5-times longer decay time components indicating dye-protein interactions. Since no ester derivative of ACG was commercially available, only ACR was evaluated for 2P-excited fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) in living cells of American cockroach salivary glands. In living cells, ACR also exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay with clearly resolvable short (0.56 ns) and long (2.44 ns) decay time components attributable to the Ca2+-free and Ca2+-bound ACR species. From the amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay times, an in situ KD of 180 nM was determined. Thus, quantitative [Ca2+]i recordings were realized, unraveling a reversible dopamine-induced [Ca2+]i elevation from 21 nM to 590 nM in salivary duct cells. It was concluded that ACR is a promising new Ca2+ indicator dye for 2P-FLIM recordings applicable in diverse biological systems. PMID:25140519

  16. Development of a calcium-sensing receptor molecular imaging agent

    PubMed Central

    Yusof, Adlina Mohd; Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Zhang, Xiaoli; Saji, Motoyasu; Ringel, Matthew D.; Tweedle, Michael F.; Phay, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed by parathyroid cells and thyroid C-cells (from which medullary thyroid carcinoma [MTC] is derived). A molecular imaging agent localizing to the CaSR could improve the detection of parathyroids and MTC preoperatively or intraoperatively. We synthesized a novel compound containing a fluorine residue for potential future labeling and demonstrated that the compound inhibited CaSR function in vitro. Methods We synthesized compound M, a derivative of a known calcilytic compound, Calhex-231. Human embryonic kidney cells transfected with green-fluorescent protein-tagged CaSR or control vector were preincubated with compound M before the addition of calcium. Immunoblotting for total mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK: ERK1/2), activated MAPK (phosphorylated ERK1/2), and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase was performed. Results Synthesis of compound M was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Inhibition of the MAPK signaling pathway by compound M was demonstrated in a dose-dependent manner by a decrease in phosphorylated ERK1/2 with no change in total ERK1/2 levels. Compound M inhibited MAPK signaling slightly better than the parent compound. Conclusion We have developed a novel molecule which demonstrates functional inhibition of CaSR and has a favorable structure for labeling. This compound appears to be appropriate for further development as a molecular imaging tool to enhance the surgical treatment of parathyroid disease and MTC. PMID:24238055

  17. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them ... in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as canned sardines and ...

  18. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  19. Calcium imaging with genetically encoded indicators in behaving primates.

    PubMed

    Seidemann, Eyal; Chen, Yuzhi; Bai, Yoon; Chen, Spencer C; Mehta, Preeti; Kajs, Bridget L; Geisler, Wilson S; Zemelman, Boris V

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the neural basis of behaviour requires studying brain activity in behaving subjects using complementary techniques that measure neural responses at multiple spatial scales, and developing computational tools for understanding the mapping between these measurements. Here we report the first results of widefield imaging of genetically encoded calcium indicator (GCaMP6f) signals from V1 of behaving macaques. This technique provides a robust readout of visual population responses at the columnar scale over multiple mm(2) and over several months. To determine the quantitative relation between the widefield GCaMP signals and the locally pooled spiking activity, we developed a computational model that sums the responses of V1 neurons characterized by prior single unit measurements. The measured tuning properties of the GCaMP signals to stimulus contrast, orientation and spatial position closely match the predictions of the model, suggesting that widefield GCaMP signals are linearly related to the summed local spiking activity. PMID:27441501

  20. Direct Imaging of Hippocampal Epileptiform Calcium Motifs Following Kainic Acid Administration in Freely Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Berdyyeva, Tamara K.; Frady, E. Paxon; Nassi, Jonathan J.; Aluisio, Leah; Cherkas, Yauheniya; Otte, Stephani; Wyatt, Ryan M.; Dugovic, Christine; Ghosh, Kunal K.; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Lovenberg, Timothy; Bonaventure, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to abnormally high calcium concentrations is thought to be a core mechanism underlying hippocampal damage in epileptic patients; however, no prior study has characterized calcium activity during seizures in the live, intact hippocampus. We have directly investigated this possibility by combining whole-brain electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements with microendoscopic calcium imaging of pyramidal cells in the CA1 hippocampal region of freely behaving mice treated with the pro-convulsant kainic acid (KA). We observed that KA administration led to systematic patterns of epileptiform calcium activity: a series of large-scale, intensifying flashes of increased calcium fluorescence concurrent with a cluster of low-amplitude EEG waveforms. This was accompanied by a steady increase in cellular calcium levels (>5 fold increase relative to the baseline), followed by an intense spreading calcium wave characterized by a 218% increase in global mean intensity of calcium fluorescence (n = 8, range [114–349%], p < 10−4; t-test). The wave had no consistent EEG phenotype and occurred before the onset of motor convulsions. Similar changes in calcium activity were also observed in animals treated with 2 different proconvulsant agents, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), suggesting the measured changes in calcium dynamics are a signature of seizure activity rather than a KA-specific pathology. Additionally, despite reducing the behavioral severity of KA-induced seizures, the anticonvulsant drug valproate (VA, 300 mg/kg) did not modify the observed abnormalities in calcium dynamics. These results confirm the presence of pathological calcium activity preceding convulsive motor seizures and support calcium as a candidate signaling molecule in a pathway connecting seizures to subsequent cellular damage. Integrating in vivo calcium imaging with traditional assessment of seizures could potentially increase translatability of pharmacological

  1. Live cell calcium imaging of dissociated vomeronasal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Angeldeep; Dey, Sandeepa; Stowers, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neurons in the vomeronasal organ (VNO) are thought to mediate a specialized olfactory response. Currently, very little is known about the identity of stimulating ligands or their cognate receptors that initiate neural activation. Each sensory neuron is thought to express 1 of approximately 250 variants of Vmn1Rs, Vmn2Rs (A, B, or D), or FPRs which enables it to be tuned to a subset of ligands (Touhara and Vosshall, Annu Rev Physiol 71:307-332, 2009). The logic of how different sources of native odors or purified ligands are detected by this complex sensory repertoire remains mostly unknown. Here, we describe a method to compare and analyze the response of VNO sensory neurons to multiple stimuli using conventional calcium imaging. This method differs from other olfactory imaging approaches in that we dissociate the tightly packed sensory epithelium into individual single cells. The advantages of this approach include (1) the use of a relatively simple approach and inexpensive microscopy, (2) comparative analysis of several hundreds of neurons to multiple stimuli with single-cell resolution, and (3) the possibility of isolating single cells of interest to further analyze by molecular biology techniques including in situ RNA hybridization, immunofluorescence, or creating single-cell cDNA libraries (Malnic et al., Cell 96:713-723, 1999). PMID:24014362

  2. Calcium Imaging of AM Dyes Following Prolonged Incubation in Acute Neuronal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Morley, John W.; Tapson, Jonathan; Breen, Paul P.; van Schaik, André

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-imaging is a sensitive method for monitoring calcium dynamics during neuronal activity. As intracellular calcium concentration is correlated to physiological and pathophysiological activity of neurons, calcium imaging with fluorescent indicators is one of the most commonly used techniques in neuroscience today. Current methodologies for loading calcium dyes into the tissue require prolonged incubation time (45–150 min), in addition to dissection and recovery time after the slicing procedure. This prolonged incubation curtails experimental time, as tissue is typically maintained for 6–8 hours after slicing. Using a recently introduced recovery chamber that extends the viability of acute brain slices to more than 24 hours, we tested the effectiveness of calcium AM staining following long incubation periods post cell loading and its impact on the functional properties of calcium signals in acute brain slices and wholemount retinae. We show that calcium dyes remain within cells and are fully functional >24 hours after loading. Moreover, the calcium dynamics recorded >24 hrs were similar to the calcium signals recorded in fresh tissue that was incubated for <4 hrs. These results indicate that long exposure of calcium AM dyes to the intracellular cytoplasm did not alter the intracellular calcium concentration, the functional range of the dye or viability of the neurons. This data extends our previous work showing that a custom recovery chamber can extend the viability of neuronal tissue, and reliable data for both electrophysiology and imaging can be obtained >24hrs after dissection. These methods will not only extend experimental time for those using acute neuronal tissue, but also may reduce the number of animals required to complete experimental goals. PMID:27183102

  3. Calcium imaging with genetically encoded indicators in behaving primates

    PubMed Central

    Seidemann, Eyal; Chen, Yuzhi; Bai, Yoon; Chen, Spencer C; Mehta, Preeti; Kajs, Bridget L; Geisler, Wilson S; Zemelman, Boris V

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the neural basis of behaviour requires studying brain activity in behaving subjects using complementary techniques that measure neural responses at multiple spatial scales, and developing computational tools for understanding the mapping between these measurements. Here we report the first results of widefield imaging of genetically encoded calcium indicator (GCaMP6f) signals from V1 of behaving macaques. This technique provides a robust readout of visual population responses at the columnar scale over multiple mm2 and over several months. To determine the quantitative relation between the widefield GCaMP signals and the locally pooled spiking activity, we developed a computational model that sums the responses of V1 neurons characterized by prior single unit measurements. The measured tuning properties of the GCaMP signals to stimulus contrast, orientation and spatial position closely match the predictions of the model, suggesting that widefield GCaMP signals are linearly related to the summed local spiking activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16178.001 PMID:27441501

  4. Reconstruction of burst activity from calcium imaging of neuronal population via Lq minimization and interval screening

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Tingwei; Lv, Xiaohua; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Calcium imaging is becoming an increasingly popular technology to indirectly measure activity patterns in local neuronal networks. Based on the dependence of calcium fluorescence on neuronal spiking, two-photon calcium imaging affords single-cell resolution of neuronal population activity. However, it is still difficult to reconstruct neuronal activity from complex calcium fluorescence traces, particularly for traces contaminated by noise. Here, we describe a robust and efficient neuronal-activity reconstruction method that utilizes Lq minimization and interval screening (IS), which we refer to as LqIS. The simulation results show that LqIS performs satisfactorily in terms of both accuracy and speed of reconstruction. Reconstruction of simulation and experimental data also shows that LqIS has advantages in terms of the recall rate, precision rate, and timing error. Finally, LqIS is demonstrated to effectively reconstruct neuronal burst activity from calcium fluorescence traces recorded from large-size neuronal population. PMID:27375930

  5. Fast Calcium Imaging with Optical Sectioning via HiLo Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Marcel A; Ronzitti, Emiliano; Sternberg, Jenna R; Wyart, Claire; Emiliani, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Imaging intracellular calcium concentration via reporters that change their fluorescence properties upon binding of calcium, referred to as calcium imaging, has revolutionized our way to probe neuronal activity non-invasively. To reach neurons densely located deep in the tissue, optical sectioning at high rate of acquisition is necessary but difficult to achieve in a cost effective manner. Here we implement an accessible solution relying on HiLo microscopy to provide robust optical sectioning with a high frame rate in vivo. We show that large calcium signals can be recorded from dense neuronal populations at high acquisition rates. We quantify the optical sectioning capabilities and demonstrate the benefits of HiLo microscopy compared to wide-field microscopy for calcium imaging and 3D reconstruction. We apply HiLo microscopy to functional calcium imaging at 100 frames per second deep in biological tissues. This approach enables us to discriminate neuronal activity of motor neurons from different depths in the spinal cord of zebrafish embryos. We observe distinct time courses of calcium signals in somata and axons. We show that our method enables to remove large fluctuations of the background fluorescence. All together our setup can be implemented to provide efficient optical sectioning in vivo at low cost on a wide range of existing microscopes. PMID:26625116

  6. Fast Calcium Imaging with Optical Sectioning via HiLo Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Jenna R.; Wyart, Claire; Emiliani, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Imaging intracellular calcium concentration via reporters that change their fluorescence properties upon binding of calcium, referred to as calcium imaging, has revolutionized our way to probe neuronal activity non-invasively. To reach neurons densely located deep in the tissue, optical sectioning at high rate of acquisition is necessary but difficult to achieve in a cost effective manner. Here we implement an accessible solution relying on HiLo microscopy to provide robust optical sectioning with a high frame rate in vivo. We show that large calcium signals can be recorded from dense neuronal populations at high acquisition rates. We quantify the optical sectioning capabilities and demonstrate the benefits of HiLo microscopy compared to wide-field microscopy for calcium imaging and 3D reconstruction. We apply HiLo microscopy to functional calcium imaging at 100 frames per second deep in biological tissues. This approach enables us to discriminate neuronal activity of motor neurons from different depths in the spinal cord of zebrafish embryos. We observe distinct time courses of calcium signals in somata and axons. We show that our method enables to remove large fluctuations of the background fluorescence. All together our setup can be implemented to provide efficient optical sectioning in vivo at low cost on a wide range of existing microscopes. PMID:26625116

  7. Continuous Fluorescence Imaging of Intracellular Calcium by Use of Ion-Selective Nanospheres with Adjustable Spectra.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenye; Qin, Yu; Jiang, Dechen; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-08-10

    Continuous fluorescence imaging of intracellular ions in various spectral ranges is important for biological studies. In this paper, fluorescent calcium-selective nanospheres, including calix[4]arene-functionalized bodipy (CBDP) or 9-(diethylamino)-5-[(2-octyldecyl)imino]benzo[a]phenoxazine (ETH 5350) as the chromoionophore, were prepared to demonstrate intracellular calcium imaging in visible or near-IR regions, respectively. The fluorescence of the nanospheres was controlled by the chromoionophore, and thus the spectral range for detection was adjustable by choosing the proper chromoionophore. The response time of the nanospheres to calcium was typically 1 s, which allowed accurate measurement of intracellular calcium. These nanospheres were loaded into cells through free endocytosis and exhibited fluorescence for 24 h, and their intensity was correlated with the elevation of intracellular calcium upon stimulation. The successful demonstration of calcium imaging by use of ion-selective nanospheres within two spectral ranges in 24 h supported that these nanospheres could be applied for continuous imaging of intracellular ions with adjustable spectra. PMID:27408988

  8. Non-rigid estimation of cell motion in calcium time-lapse images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachi, Siham; Lucumi Moreno, Edinson; Desmet, An-Sofie; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Fleming, Ronan M. T.

    2016-03-01

    Calcium imaging is a widely used technique in neuroscience permitting the simultaneous monitoring of electro- physiological activity of hundreds of neurons at single cell resolution. Identification of neuronal activity requires rapid and reliable image analysis techniques, especially when neurons fire and move simultaneously over time. Traditionally, image segmentation is performed to extract individual neurons in the first frame of a calcium sequence. Thereafter, the mean intensity is calculated from the same region of interest in each frame to infer calcium signals. However, when cells move, deform and fire, this segmentation on its own generates artefacts and therefore biased neuronal activity. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop a more efficient cell tracking technique. We hereby present a novel vision-based cell tracking scheme using a thin-plate spline deformable model. The thin-plate spline warping is based on control points detected using the Fast from Accelerated Segment Test descriptor and tracked using the Lucas-Kanade optical flow. Our method is able to track neurons in calcium time-series, even when there are large changes in intensity, such as during a firing event. The robustness and efficiency of the proposed approach is validated on real calcium time-lapse images of a neuronal population.

  9. Direct Imaging of ER Calcium with Targeted-Esterase Induced Dye Loading (TED)

    PubMed Central

    Samtleben, Samira; Jaepel, Juliane; Fecher, Caroline; Andreska, Thomas; Rehberg, Markus; Blum, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Visualization of calcium dynamics is important to understand the role of calcium in cell physiology. To examine calcium dynamics, synthetic fluorescent Ca2+ indictors have become popular. Here we demonstrate TED (= targeted-esterase induced dye loading), a method to improve the release of Ca2+ indicator dyes in the ER lumen of different cell types. To date, TED was used in cell lines, glial cells, and neurons in vitro. TED bases on efficient, recombinant targeting of a high carboxylesterase activity to the ER lumen using vector-constructs that express Carboxylesterases (CES). The latest TED vectors contain a core element of CES2 fused to a red fluorescent protein, thus enabling simultaneous two-color imaging. The dynamics of free calcium in the ER are imaged in one color, while the corresponding ER structure appears in red. At the beginning of the procedure, cells are transduced with a lentivirus. Subsequently, the infected cells are seeded on coverslips to finally enable live cell imaging. Then, living cells are incubated with the acetoxymethyl ester (AM-ester) form of low-affinity Ca2+ indicators, for instance Fluo5N-AM, Mag-Fluo4-AM, or Mag-Fura2-AM. The esterase activity in the ER cleaves off hydrophobic side chains from the AM form of the Ca2+ indicator and a hydrophilic fluorescent dye/Ca2+ complex is formed and trapped in the ER lumen. After dye loading, the cells are analyzed at an inverted confocal laser scanning microscope. Cells are continuously perfused with Ringer-like solutions and the ER calcium dynamics are directly visualized by time-lapse imaging. Calcium release from the ER is identified by a decrease in fluorescence intensity in regions of interest, whereas the refilling of the ER calcium store produces an increase in fluorescence intensity. Finally, the change in fluorescent intensity over time is determined by calculation of ΔF/F0. PMID:23685703

  10. Direct imaging of ER calcium with targeted-esterase induced dye loading (TED).

    PubMed

    Samtleben, Samira; Jaepel, Juliane; Fecher, Caroline; Andreska, Thomas; Rehberg, Markus; Blum, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Visualization of calcium dynamics is important to understand the role of calcium in cell physiology. To examine calcium dynamics, synthetic fluorescent Ca(2+) indictors have become popular. Here we demonstrate TED (= targeted-esterase induced dye loading), a method to improve the release of Ca(2+) indicator dyes in the ER lumen of different cell types. To date, TED was used in cell lines, glial cells, and neurons in vitro. TED bases on efficient, recombinant targeting of a high carboxylesterase activity to the ER lumen using vector-constructs that express Carboxylesterases (CES). The latest TED vectors contain a core element of CES2 fused to a red fluorescent protein, thus enabling simultaneous two-color imaging. The dynamics of free calcium in the ER are imaged in one color, while the corresponding ER structure appears in red. At the beginning of the procedure, cells are transduced with a lentivirus. Subsequently, the infected cells are seeded on coverslips to finally enable live cell imaging. Then, living cells are incubated with the acetoxymethyl ester (AM-ester) form of low-affinity Ca(2+) indicators, for instance Fluo5N-AM, Mag-Fluo4-AM, or Mag-Fura2-AM. The esterase activity in the ER cleaves off hydrophobic side chains from the AM form of the Ca(2+) indicator and a hydrophilic fluorescent dye/Ca(2+) complex is formed and trapped in the ER lumen. After dye loading, the cells are analyzed at an inverted confocal laser scanning microscope. Cells are continuously perfused with Ringer-like solutions and the ER calcium dynamics are directly visualized by time-lapse imaging. Calcium release from the ER is identified by a decrease in fluorescence intensity in regions of interest, whereas the refilling of the ER calcium store produces an increase in fluorescence intensity. Finally, the change in fluorescent intensity over time is determined by calculation of ΔF/F0. PMID:23685703

  11. Investigation of mechanosensation in C. elegans using light field calcium imaging.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Michael; Elmi, Muna; Pawar, Vijay; Srinivasan, Mandayam A

    2016-07-01

    We describe a new experimental approach to investigate touch sensation in the model organism C. elegans using light field deconvolution microscopy. By combining fast volumetric image acquisition with controlled indentation of the organism using a high sensitivity force transducer, we are able to simultaneously measure activity in multiple touch receptor neurons expressing the calcium ion indicator GCaMP6s. By varying the applied mechanical stimulus we show how this method can be used to quantify touch sensitivity in C. elegans. We describe some of the challenges of performing light field calcium imaging in moving samples and demonstrate that they can be overcome by simple data processing. PMID:27446713

  12. Investigation of mechanosensation in C. elegans using light field calcium imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Michael; Elmi, Muna; Pawar, Vijay; Srinivasan, Mandayam A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new experimental approach to investigate touch sensation in the model organism C. elegans using light field deconvolution microscopy. By combining fast volumetric image acquisition with controlled indentation of the organism using a high sensitivity force transducer, we are able to simultaneously measure activity in multiple touch receptor neurons expressing the calcium ion indicator GCaMP6s. By varying the applied mechanical stimulus we show how this method can be used to quantify touch sensitivity in C. elegans. We describe some of the challenges of performing light field calcium imaging in moving samples and demonstrate that they can be overcome by simple data processing. PMID:27446713

  13. The "crowned dens" revisited: imaging findings in calcium crystal deposition diseases around the odontoid.

    PubMed

    Viana, Sergio L; Fernandes, João L; De Araújo Coimbra, Pablo P; De Mendonça, José L F; Freitas, Flávia M O; De Carvalho Barbosa Viana, Maria A

    2010-10-01

    The so-called "crowned dens" is a peculiar manifestation of calcium crystal deposition diseases, either caused by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate or caused by calcium hydroxiapatite crystals, characterized by the presence of calcific deposits around the odontoid, often showing a crown-like configuration on imaging. It has protean clinical and radiological pictures, and care should be taken to avoid misinterpretation and diagnostic errors. Although asymptomatic in many patients, this entity may present as a predominantly algic or febrile condition, and in some cases, signs of compression of the spinal cord may be the major complaint. The detection of calcifications in the periodontoid tissues is the key to the diagnosis, erosive osseous changes, and variably calcified soft-tissue masses being occasionally associated. Computed tomography is the most important imaging study to be performed in this setting. PMID:19344369

  14. Combining Microfluidics, Optogenetics and Calcium Imaging to Study Neuronal Communication In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Renault, Renaud; Sukenik, Nirit; Descroix, Stéphanie; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Peyrin, Jean-Michel; Bottani, Samuel; Monceau, Pascal; Moses, Elisha; Vignes, Maéva

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report the combination of microfluidics, optogenetics and calcium imaging as a cheap and convenient platform to study synaptic communication between neuronal populations in vitro. We first show that Calcium Orange indicator is compatible in vitro with a commonly used Channelrhodopsine-2 (ChR2) variant, as standard calcium imaging conditions did not alter significantly the activity of transduced cultures of rodent primary neurons. A fast, robust and scalable process for micro-chip fabrication was developed in parallel to build micro-compartmented cultures. Coupling optical fibers to each micro-compartment allowed for the independent control of ChR2 activation in the different populations without crosstalk. By analyzing the post-stimuli activity across the different populations, we finally show how this platform can be used to evaluate quantitatively the effective connectivity between connected neuronal populations. PMID:25901914

  15. Fine spatiotemporal activity in contracting myometrium revealed by motion-corrected calcium imaging

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Fiona C; Shmygol, Anatoly; Richardson, Magnus J E

    2014-01-01

    Successful childbirth depends on the occurrence of precisely coordinated uterine contractions during labour. Calcium indicator fluorescence imaging is one of the main techniques for investigating the mechanisms governing this physiological process and its pathologies. The effective spatiotemporal resolution of calcium signals is, however, limited by the motion of contracting tissue: structures of interest in the order of microns can move over a hundred times their width during a contraction. The simultaneous changes in local intensity and tissue configuration make motion tracking a non-trivial problem in image analysis and confound many of the standard techniques. This paper presents a method that tracks local motion throughout the tissue and allows for the almost complete removal of motion artefacts. This provides a stabilized calcium signal down to a pixel resolution, which, for the data examined, is in the order of a few microns. As a byproduct of image stabilization, a complete kinematic description of the contraction–relaxation cycle is also obtained. This contains novel information about the mechanical response of the tissue, such as the identification of a characteristic length scale, in the order of 40–50 μm, below which tissue motion is homogeneous. Applied to our data, we illustrate that the method allows for analyses of calcium dynamics in contracting myometrium in unprecedented spatiotemporal detail. Additionally, we use the kinematics of tissue motion to compare calcium signals at the subcellular level and local contractile motion. The computer code used is provided in a freely modifiable form and has potential applicability to in vivo calcium imaging of neural tissue, as well as other smooth muscle tissue. PMID:25085893

  16. Exploiting the multiplicative nature of fluoroscopic image stochastic noise to enhance calcium imaging recording quality.

    PubMed

    Esposti, Federico; Ripamonti, Maddalena; Signorini, Maria G

    2009-01-01

    One of the main problems that affect fluoroscopic imaging is the difficulty in coupling the recorded activity with the morphological information. The comprehension of fluorescence events in relationship with the internal structure of the cell can be very difficult. At this purpose, we developed a new method able to maximize the fluoroscopic movie quality. The method (Maximum Intensity Enhancement, MIE) works as follow: considering all the frames that compose the fluoroscopic movie, the algorithm extracts, for each pixel of the matrix, the maximal brightness value assumed along all the frames. Such values are collected in a maximum intensity matrix. Then, the method provides the projection of the target molecule oscillations which are present in the DeltaF/F(0) movie onto the maximum intensity matrix. This is done by creating a RGB movie and by assigning to the normalized (DeltaF/F(0)) activity a single channel and by reproducing the maximum intensity matrix on all the frames by using the remaining color channels. The application of such a method to fluoroscopic calcium imaging of astrocyte cultures demonstrated a meaningful enhancement in the possibility to discern the internal and external structure of cells. PMID:19964305

  17. Classification of calcium in intravascular OCT images for the purpose of intervention planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, Ronny; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Ray, Soumya; Prabhu, David; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    The presence of extensive calcification is a primary concern when planning and implementing a vascular percutaneous intervention such as stenting. If the balloon does not expand, the interventionalist must blindly apply high balloon pressure, use an atherectomy device, or abort the procedure. As part of a project to determine the ability of Intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography (IVOCT) to aid intervention planning, we developed a method for automatic classification of calcium in coronary IVOCT images. We developed an approach where plaque texture is modeled by the joint probability distribution of a bank of filter responses where the filter bank was chosen to reflect the qualitative characteristics of the calcium. This distribution is represented by the frequency histogram of filter response cluster centers. The trained algorithm was evaluated on independent ex-vivo image data accurately labeled using registered 3D microscopic cryo-image data which was used as ground truth. In this study, regions for extraction of sub-images (SI's) were selected by experts to include calcium, fibrous, or lipid tissues. We manually optimized algorithm parameters such as choice of filter bank, size of the dictionary, etc. Splitting samples into training and testing data, we achieved 5-fold cross validation calcium classification with F1 score of 93.7+/-2.7% with recall of >=89% and a precision of >=97% in this scenario with admittedly selective data. The automated algorithm performed in close-to-real-time (2.6 seconds per frame) suggesting possible on-line use. This promising preliminary study indicates that computational IVOCT might automatically identify calcium in IVOCT coronary artery images.

  18. Detection of calcium waves in mice heart tissue with multispot two-photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mauro, C.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Alfieri, D.; Borile, G.; Urbani, A.; Mongillo, M.; Pavone, F. S.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the characterization and use of a Multispot Multiphoton Microscope, to investigate calcium dy- namics at intracellular level. We apply this technique to obtain a time resolution of a few milliseconds, even in full frame images at 512x512 pixels, in order to get the most information on the evolution and propagation of ionic calcium waves across adjacent cells in an intact cardiac tissue. Further we report on the progress of development of a Random Access microscope for very high speed all optical electrophysiological signal acquisition in cell networks. Our study opens the way to the investigation of arrhythmogenic disease in animal models at cellular level.

  19. Intracellular calcium in cardiac myocytes: calcium transients measured using fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Cannell, M B; Berlin, J R; Lederer, W J

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of Ca2+ in voltage-clamped cardiac myocytes under resting conditions and during the Ca2+ transient. We find that the resting Ca2+ level in a quiescent rat myocyte bathed in 1 mM extracellular Ca is relatively low (between 60 and 100 nM) and uniform. At the peak of the Ca2+ transient, Ca2+ can rise to a level as high as 600 nM to 1.0 microM. Furthermore, the magnitude of the Ca2+ transient is dependent on the size of the membrane depolarization. There is good agreement between measurements made using video imaging and those made using a photomultiplier tube for the value of intracellular Ca2+ at the peak of the Ca2+ transient and for the subsequent slow changes in intracellular Ca2+. On repolarization, intracellular Ca2+ falls with a half-time of approximately 100 ms. The uniform distribution of Ca2+ reported in the Ca2+ images of myocytes at rest and at the peak of the Ca2+ transient under normal conditions is in contrast to what is observed during "Ca2+ overload" when subcellular regions of elevated Ca2+ are observed to propagate along the cell. Thus, the measurement of [Ca2+]i in cardiac myocytes with fura-2 has already yielded important new information that was not available using other techniques to measure [Ca2+]i in cardiac ventricular muscle. PMID:3505361

  20. Inference of neuronal network spike dynamics and topology from calcium imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Lütcke, Henry; Gerhard, Felipe; Zenke, Friedemann; Gerstner, Wulfram; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2013-01-01

    Two-photon calcium imaging enables functional analysis of neuronal circuits by inferring action potential (AP) occurrence (“spike trains”) from cellular fluorescence signals. It remains unclear how experimental parameters such as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and acquisition rate affect spike inference and whether additional information about network structure can be extracted. Here we present a simulation framework for quantitatively assessing how well spike dynamics and network topology can be inferred from noisy calcium imaging data. For simulated AP-evoked calcium transients in neocortical pyramidal cells, we analyzed the quality of spike inference as a function of SNR and data acquisition rate using a recently introduced peeling algorithm. Given experimentally attainable values of SNR and acquisition rate, neural spike trains could be reconstructed accurately and with up to millisecond precision. We then applied statistical neuronal network models to explore how remaining uncertainties in spike inference affect estimates of network connectivity and topological features of network organization. We define the experimental conditions suitable for inferring whether the network has a scale-free structure and determine how well hub neurons can be identified. Our findings provide a benchmark for future calcium imaging studies that aim to reliably infer neuronal network properties. PMID:24399936

  1. Quantitative imaging of subcellular calcium stores in mammalian LLC-PK1 epithelial cells undergoing mitosis by SIMS ion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Subhash

    2005-09-01

    Quantitative 3-D total calcium gradients, representing subcellular stored calcium, were imaged with a CAMECA IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope in cryogenically prepared frozen freeze-dried LLC-PK1 cells captured in interphase and various stages of mitosis. 39K and 23Na concentrations were also measured in the same cells. Correlative optical (or SEM) and SIMS analysis of cells revealed a redistribution of the interphase Golgi calcium store in prophase and prometaphase cells. In metaphase cells, simultaneous SIMS imaging of total calcium in both the spindle and the non-spindle cytoplasm of individual cells revealed a gradual and dynamic alignment of calcium stores in both half-spindles prior to the onset of anaphase. The anaphase cells revealed the highest local total calcium concentrations in the spindle regions behind the daughter chromosomes and the lowest in the central spindle region. The pericentriolar material in telophase cells contained calcium stores. Quantitatively, a typical metaphase cell with well-aligned calcium stores in the spindle region contained 1.1 mM total calcium in each half-spindle, 0.8 mM total calcium in the non-spindle cytoplasm, and 0.5mM total calcium in the chromosomes. At the submicron scale, the distribution of total calcium was heterogeneous in the chromosomes, metaphase spindle, and non-spindle cytoplasm. An increased binding of calcium to chromosomes is not a physiological requirement for chromosomal condensation in mitosis, since interphase nuclei and mitotic chromosomes contained comparable total calcium concentrations measured per unit volume. A significant reduction of total calcium in the non-spindle cytoplasm was observed in the metaphase, anaphase, and telophase cells, which is indicative of the limited storage of the releasable calcium pool in these specific stages of mitosis. Direct total calcium measurements in subcellular regions confirmed that both the spindle and the non-spindle cytoplasm of metaphase cells contained inositol

  2. Combined analysis of intracellular calcium with dual excitation fluorescence photometry and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttenweiler, Dietmar; Wojciechowski, Reinhold; Makabe, Makoto; Veigel, Claudia; Fink, Rainer H.

    1995-10-01

    We have developed an integrated microscopy system combining fast dual-excitation fluorescence photometry and digital image analysis with high spatial resolution, based mainly on standard components. With the combination of these well-established techniques in one setup it is possible to monitor intracellular calcium with both sufficiently high temporal and high spatial resolution on the same preparation for many biological applications. Our system consists of a commercially available dual-excitation photometric system, an attached ICCD camera, and a frame grabber board. With this integrated setup one can easily switch between the fast photometric mode and the imaging mode. We used the system to record Fura-2 calcium images (340/380 nm ratios), which were correlated with the faster spot measurements and were analyzed by means of image processing. As an example for its application we reconstructed caffeine-induced calcium transient released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of isolated and permeabilized skeletal muscle fiber preparations. Such a combined technique will also be important for cellular studies using other fluorescence indicators. Additionally, the described system has an external trigger facility that enables combination with other cell physiological methods, e.g., electrophysiological techniques.

  3. Live imaging of calcium spikes during double fertilization in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hamamura, Yuki; Nishimaki, Moe; Takeuchi, Hidenori; Geitmann, Anja; Kurihara, Daisuke; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+ waves and oscillation are key signalling elements during the fertilization process of animals, and are involved, for example, in egg activation. In the unique double fertilization process in flowering plants, both the egg cell and the neighbouring central cell fuse with a sperm cell each. Here we succeeded in imaging cytosolic Ca2+ in these two cells, and in the two synergid cells that accompany the gametes during semi-in vivo double fertilization. Following pollen tube discharge and plasmogamy, the egg and central cells displayed transient Ca2+ spikes, but not oscillations. Only the events in the egg cell correlated with the plasmogamy. In contrast, the synergid cells displayed Ca2+ oscillations on pollen tube arrival. The two synergid cells showed distinct Ca2+ dynamics depending on their respective roles in tube reception. These Ca2+ dynamics in the female gametophyte seem to represent highly specific signatures that coordinate successful double fertilization in the flowering plants. PMID:25146889

  4. Confocal imaging of ionised calcium in living plant cells.

    PubMed

    Williams, D A; Cody, S H; Gehring, C A; Parish, R W; Harris, P J

    1990-04-01

    Laser-scanning confocal microscopy has been used in conjunction with Fluo-3, a highly fluorescent visible wavelength probe for Ca2+, to visualize Ca2(+)-dynamics in the function of living plant cells. This combination has overcome many of the problems that have limited the use of fluorescence imaging techniques in the study of the role of cations (Ca2+ and H+) in plant cell physiology and enables these processes to be studied in single cells within intact plant tissue preparations. Maize coleoptiles respond to application of ionophores and plant growth hormones with elevations in cytosolic Ca2+ that can be resolved with a high degree of spatial resolution and can be interpreted quantitatively. PMID:2113832

  5. Imaging extracellular waves of glutamate during calcium signaling in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, B; Parpura, V; Haydon, P G

    2000-03-01

    A growing body of evidence proposes that glial cells have the potential to play a role as modulators of neuronal activity and synaptic transmission by releasing the neurotransmitter glutamate (Arague et al., 1999). We explore the spatial nature of glutamate release from astrocytes with an enzyme-linked assay system and CCD imaging technology. In the presence of glutamate, L-glutamic dehydrogenase (GDH) reduces NAD(+) to NADH, a product that fluoresces when excited with UV light. Theoretically, provided that GDH and NAD(+) are present in the bathing saline, the release of glutamate from stimulated astrocytes can be optically detected by monitoring the accumulation of NADH. Indeed, stimuli that induce a wave of elevated calcium among astrocytes produced a corresponding spread of extracellular NADH fluorescence. Treatment of cultures either with thapsigargin, to deplete internal calcium stores, or with the membrane-permeant calcium chelator BAPTA AM significantly decreased the accumulation of NADH, demonstrating that this fluorometric assay effectively monitors calcium-dependent glutamate release. With a temporal resolution of 500 msec and spatial resolution of approximately 20 micrometer, discrete regions of glutamate release were not reliably resolved. The wave of glutamate release that underlies the NADH fluorescence propagated at an average speed of approximately 26 micrometer/sec, correlating with the rate of calcium wave progression (10-30 micrometer/sec), and caused a localized accumulation of glutamate in the range of 1-100 microM. Further analysis of the fluorescence accumulation clearly demonstrated that glutamate is released in a regenerative manner, with subsequent cells that are involved in the calcium wave releasing additional glutamate. PMID:10684881

  6. Imaging calcium carbonate distribution in human sweat pore in vivo using nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueqin; Gasecka, Alicja; Formanek, Florian; Galey, Jean-Baptiste; Rigneault, Hervé

    2015-03-01

    Nonlinear microscopies, including two-photon excited autofluorescence (TPEF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), were used to study individual human sweat pore morphology and topically applied antiperspirant salt penetration inside sweat pore, in vivo on human palms. Sweat pore inner morphology in vivo was imaged up to the depth of 100 μm by TPEF microscopy. The 3D penetration and distribution of "in situ calcium carbonate" (isCC), an antiperspirant salt model, was investigated using CARS microscopy.

  7. Agarose Microchambers for Long-term Calcium Imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Turek, Michal; Besseling, Judith; Bringmann, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Behavior is controlled by the nervous system. Calcium imaging is a straightforward method in the transparent nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to measure the activity of neurons during various behaviors. To correlate neural activity with behavior, the animal should not be immobilized but should be able to move. Many behavioral changes occur during long time scales and require recording over many hours of behavior. This also makes it necessary to culture the worms in the presence of food. How can worms be cultured and their neural activity imaged over long time scales? Agarose Microchamber Imaging (AMI) was previously developed to culture and observe small larvae and has now been adapted to study all life stages from early L1 until the adult stage of C. elegans. AMI can be performed on various life stages of C. elegans. Long-term calcium imaging is achieved without immobilizing the animals by using short externally triggered exposures combined with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera recording. Zooming out or scanning can scale up this method to image up to 40 worms in parallel. Thus, a method is described to image behavior and neural activity over long time scales in all life stages of C. elegans. PMID:26132740

  8. Agarose Microchambers for Long-term Calcium Imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Turek, Michal; Besseling, Judith; Bringmann, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Behavior is controlled by the nervous system. Calcium imaging is a straightforward method in the transparent nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to measure the activity of neurons during various behaviors. To correlate neural activity with behavior, the animal should not be immobilized but should be able to move. Many behavioral changes occur during long time scales and require recording over many hours of behavior. This also makes it necessary to culture the worms in the presence of food. How can worms be cultured and their neural activity imaged over long time scales? Agarose Microchamber Imaging (AMI) was previously developed to culture and observe small larvae and has now been adapted to study all life stages from early L1 until the adult stage of C. elegans. AMI can be performed on various life stages of C. elegans. Long-term calcium imaging is achieved without immobilizing the animals by using short externally triggered exposures combined with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera recording. Zooming out or scanning can scale up this method to image up to 40 worms in parallel. Thus, a method is described to image behavior and neural activity over long time scales in all life stages of C. elegans. PMID:26132740

  9. Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Jeffrey; Shipley, Frederick; Linder, Ashley; Plummer, George; Liu, Mochi; Setru, Sagar; Shaevitz, Joshua; Leifer, Andrew

    The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals is needed to provide new insights into how populations of neurons generate animal behavior. Acquiring this data, however, is challenging because it is difficult to track and image individual neurons as an animal deforms its posture and moves many body lengths. Here, we present an instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from the majority of neurons in the head of a freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal's position, posture, and locomotion. 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s are recorded at 6 head-volumes/s using spinning disk confocal microscopy. At the same time, we record low magnification images of the animal to measure the animals behavior and track its head as it moves. We develop a time independent neuronal matching algorithm that uses non-rigid point set registration and machine learning to correctly match neurons across time. Using this method, we are able to observe calcium transients from up to 90 neurons for over 4 min and correlate the neural activity with the animal's behavior.

  10. High-speed in vivo calcium imaging reveals neuronal network activity with near-millisecond precision.

    PubMed

    Grewe, Benjamin F; Langer, Dominik; Kasper, Hansjörg; Kampa, Björn M; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2010-05-01

    Two-photon calcium imaging of neuronal populations enables optical recording of spiking activity in living animals, but standard laser scanners are too slow to accurately determine spike times. Here we report in vivo imaging in mouse neocortex with greatly improved temporal resolution using random-access scanning with acousto-optic deflectors. We obtained fluorescence measurements from 34-91 layer 2/3 neurons at a 180-490 Hz sampling rate. We detected single action potential-evoked calcium transients with signal-to-noise ratios of 2-5 and determined spike times with near-millisecond precision and 5-15 ms confidence intervals. An automated 'peeling' algorithm enabled reconstruction of complex spike trains from fluorescence traces up to 20-30 Hz frequency, uncovering spatiotemporal trial-to-trial variability of sensory responses in barrel cortex and visual cortex. By revealing spike sequences in neuronal populations on a fast time scale, high-speed calcium imaging will facilitate optical studies of information processing in brain microcircuits. PMID:20400966

  11. Imaging atrial arrhythmic intracellular calcium in intact heart

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenjun; Santulli, Gaetano; Guo, Xiaoxiao; Gao, Melanie; Chen, Bi-Xing; Marks, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in intracellular Ca2+ signaling have been proposed to play an essential role in the pathophysiology of atrial arrhythmias. However, a direct observation of intracellular Ca2+ in atrial myocytes during atrial arrhythmias is lacking. Here, we have developed an ex vivo model of simultaneous Ca2+ imaging and electrocardiographic recording in cardiac atria. Using this system we were able to record atrial arrhythmic intracellular Ca2+ activities. Our results indicate that atrial arrhythmias can be tightly linked to intracellular Ca2+ waves and Ca2+ alternans. Moreover, we applied this strategy to analyze Ca2+ signals in the hearts of WT and knock-in mice harboring a ‘leaky’ type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2-R2474S). We showed that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ leak increases the susceptibility to Ca2+ alternans and Ca2+ waves increasing the incidence of atrial arrhythmias. Reduction of SR Ca2+ leak via RyR2 by acute treatment with S107 reduced both Ca2+ alternans and Ca2+ waves, and prevented atrial arrhythmias. PMID:24041536

  12. Optical Imaging of Voltage and Calcium in Cardiac Cells & Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Herron, Todd J.; Lee, Peter; Jalife, José

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac optical mapping has proven to be a powerful technology for studying cardiovascular function and disease. The development and scientific impact of this methodology are well documented. Because of its relevance in cardiac research, this imaging technology advances at a rapid pace. Here we review technological and scientific developments during the past several years and look also towards the future. First we explore key components of a modern optical mapping setup, focusing on 1) new camera technologies, 2) powerful light-emitting-diodes (from ultraviolet to red) for illumination, 3) improved optical filter technology, 4) new synthetic and optogenetic fluorescent probes, 5) optical mapping with motion and contraction, 6) new multi-parametric optical mapping techniques and 7) photon scattering effects in thick tissue preparations. We then look at recent optical mapping studies in single cells, cardiomyocyte monolayers, atria and whole hearts. Finally, we briefly look into the possible future roles of optical mapping in the development of regenerative cardiac research, cardiac cell therapies, and molecular genetic advances. PMID:22343556

  13. Physiological and morphological characterization of honeybee olfactory neurons combining electrophysiology, calcium imaging and confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Galizia, C G; Kimmerle, B

    2004-01-01

    The insect antennal lobe is the first brain structure to process olfactory information. Like the vertebrate olfactory bulb the antennal lobe is substructured in olfactory glomeruli. In insects, glomeruli can be morphologically identified, and have characteristic olfactory response profiles. Local neurons interconnect glomeruli, and output (projection) neurons project to higher-order brain centres. The relationship between their elaborate morphology and their physiology is not understood. We recorded electrophysiologically from antennal lobe neurons, and iontophoretically injected a calcium-sensitive dye. We then measured their spatio-temporal calcium responses to a variety of odours. Finally, we confocally reconstructed the neurons, and identified the innervated glomeruli. An increase or decrease in spiking frequency corresponded to an intracellular calcium increase or decrease in the cell. While intracellular recordings generally lasted between 10 and 30 min, calcium imaging was stable for up to 2 h, allowing a more detailed physiological analysis. The responses indicate that heterogeneous local neurons get input in the glomerulus in which they branch most strongly. In many cases, the physiological response properties of the cells corresponded to the known response profile of the innervated glomerulus. In other words, the large variety of response profiles generally found when comparing antennal lobe neurons is reduced to a more predictable response profile when the innervated glomerulus is known. PMID:14639486

  14. Chromaffin cell calcium signal and morphology study based on multispectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hongxiu; Wei, Shunhui; Qu, Anlian; Zhou, Zhuan

    1998-09-01

    Increasing or decreasing the internal calcium concentration can promote or prevent programmed cell death (PCD). We therefore performed a Ca2+ imaging study using Ca2+ indicator dye fura-2 and a sensitive cooled-CCD camera with a 12 bit resolution. Monochromatic beams of light with a wavelength of 345,380 nm were isolated from light emitted by a xenon lamp using a monochromator. The concentration of free calcium can be directly calculated from the ratio of two fluorescence values taken at two appropriately selected wavelength. Fluorescent light emitted from the cells was capture using a camera system. The cell morphology study is based on multispectral scanning, with smear images provided as three monochromatic images by illumination with light of 610,535 and 470 nm wavelengths. The nuclear characteristic parameters extracted from individual nuclei by system are nuclear area, nuclear diameter, nuclear density vector. The results of the restoration of images and the performance of a primitive logic for the detection of nuclei with PCD proved the usefulness of the system and the advantages of using multispectral images in the restoration and detection procedures.

  15. Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jeffrey P; Shipley, Frederick B; Linder, Ashley N; Plummer, George S; Liu, Mochi; Setru, Sagar U; Shaevitz, Joshua W; Leifer, Andrew M

    2016-02-23

    The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals is needed to provide new insights into how populations of neurons generate animal behavior. We present an instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from the majority of neurons in the head of a freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal's position, posture, and locomotion. This instrument provides whole-brain imaging with cellular resolution in an unrestrained and behaving animal. We use spinning-disk confocal microscopy to capture 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s at 6 head-volumes/s. A suite of three cameras monitor neuronal fluorescence and the animal's position and orientation. Custom software tracks the 3D position of the animal's head in real time and two feedback loops adjust a motorized stage and objective to keep the animal's head within the field of view as the animal roams freely. We observe calcium transients from up to 77 neurons for over 4 min and correlate this activity with the animal's behavior. We characterize noise in the system due to animal motion and show that, across worms, multiple neurons show significant correlations with modes of behavior corresponding to forward, backward, and turning locomotion. PMID:26712014

  16. Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jeffrey P.; Shipley, Frederick B.; Linder, Ashley N.; Plummer, George S.; Liu, Mochi; Setru, Sagar U.; Shaevitz, Joshua W.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals is needed to provide new insights into how populations of neurons generate animal behavior. We present an instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from the majority of neurons in the head of a freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal’s position, posture, and locomotion. This instrument provides whole-brain imaging with cellular resolution in an unrestrained and behaving animal. We use spinning-disk confocal microscopy to capture 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s at 6 head-volumes/s. A suite of three cameras monitor neuronal fluorescence and the animal’s position and orientation. Custom software tracks the 3D position of the animal’s head in real time and two feedback loops adjust a motorized stage and objective to keep the animal’s head within the field of view as the animal roams freely. We observe calcium transients from up to 77 neurons for over 4 min and correlate this activity with the animal’s behavior. We characterize noise in the system due to animal motion and show that, across worms, multiple neurons show significant correlations with modes of behavior corresponding to forward, backward, and turning locomotion. PMID:26712014

  17. Calcium imaging of neural circuits with extended depth-of-field light-sheet microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Quirin, Sean; Vladimirov, Nikita; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Peterka, Darcy S.; Yuste, Rafael; Ahrens, Misha B.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the volumetric imaging speed of light-sheet microscopy will improve its ability to detect fast changes in neural activity. Here, a system is introduced for brain-wide imaging of neural activity in the larval zebrafish by coupling structured illumination with cubic phase extended depth-of-field (EDoF) pupil encoding. This microscope enables faster light-sheet imaging and facilitates arbitrary plane scanning—removing constraints on acquisition speed, alignment tolerances, and physical motion near the sample. The usefulness of this method is demonstrated by performing multi-plane calcium imaging in the fish brain with a 416 × 832 × 160 µm field of view at 33 Hz. The optomotor response behavior of the zebrafish is monitored at high speeds, and time-locked correlations of neuronal activity are resolved across its brain. PMID:26974063

  18. Calcium Imaging of Neuronal Activity in Free-Swimming Larval Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Muto, Akira; Kawakami, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Visualization of neuronal activity during animal behavior is a critical step in understanding how the brain generates behavior. In the model vertebrate zebrafish, imaging of the brain has been done mostly by using immobilized fish. Here, we describe a novel method to image neuronal activity of the larval zebrafish brain during prey capture behavior. We expressed a genetically encoded fluorescent calcium indicator, GCaMP, in the optic tectum of the midbrain using the Gal4-UAS system. Tectal activity was then imaged in unrestrained larvae during prey perception. Since larval zebrafish swim only intermittently, detection of the neuronal activity is possible between swimming bouts. Our method makes functional brain imaging under natural behavioral conditions feasible and will greatly benefit the study of neuronal activities that evoke animal behaviors. PMID:27464819

  19. Optical imaging of neuronal activity in tissue labeled by retrograde transport of Calcium Green Dextran.

    PubMed

    McPherson, D R; McClellan, A D; O'Donovan, M J

    1997-05-01

    In many neurophysiological studies it is desirable to simultaneously record the activity of a large number of neurons. This is particularly true in the study of vertebrate motor systems that generate rhythmic behaviors, such as the pattern generator for locomotion in vertebrate spinal cord. Optical imaging of neurons labeled with appropriate fluorescent dyes, in which fluorescence is activity-dependent, provides a means to record the activity of many neurons at the same time, while also providing fine spatial resolution of the position and morphology of active neurons. Voltage-sensitive dyes have been explored for this purpose and have the advantage of rapid response to transmembrane voltage changes. However, voltage-sensitive dyes bleach readily, which results in phototoxic damage and limits the time that labeled neurons can be imaged. In addition, the signal-to-noise ratio is typically small, so that averaging of responses is usually required. As an alternative to voltage-sensitive dyes, calcium-sensitive dyes can exhibit large changes in fluorescence. Most neurons contain voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels, and numerous reports indicate that neuronal activity is accompanied by increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration. In this protocol we describe a method to use retrograde transport of the dextran conjugate of a calcium-sensitive dye (Calcium Green Dextran) to label selectively populations of brain and spinal interneurons in a primitive vertebrate (lamprey), for subsequent video-rate imaging of changes in intracellular fluorescence during neuronal activity. Although described with specific reference to lampreys, the technique has also been applied to embryonic chick spinal cord and larval zebrafish preparations and should be easily adaptable to other systems. The most significant novel feature of the protocol is the use of retrograde axonal transport to selectively fill neurons that have known axonal trajectories. Using lampreys, we have obtained activity

  20. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  1. Genetically encoded calcium indicators for multi-color neural activity imaging and combination with optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Akerboom, Jasper; Carreras Calderón, Nicole; Tian, Lin; Wabnig, Sebastian; Prigge, Matthias; Tolö, Johan; Gordus, Andrew; Orger, Michael B.; Severi, Kristen E.; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Pulver, Stefan R.; Wardill, Trevor J.; Fischer, Elisabeth; Schüler, Christina; Chen, Tsai-Wen; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Bargmann, Cornelia I.; Kim, Douglas S.; Kügler, Sebastian; Lagnado, Leon; Hegemann, Peter; Gottschalk, Alexander; Schreiter, Eric R.; Looger, Loren L.

    2013-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) are powerful tools for systems neuroscience. Here we describe red, single-wavelength GECIs, “RCaMPs,” engineered from circular permutation of the thermostable red fluorescent protein mRuby. High-resolution crystal structures of mRuby, the red sensor RCaMP, and the recently published red GECI R-GECO1 give insight into the chromophore environments of the Ca2+-bound state of the sensors and the engineered protein domain interfaces of the different indicators. We characterized the biophysical properties and performance of RCaMP sensors in vitro and in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila larvae, and larval zebrafish. Further, we demonstrate 2-color calcium imaging both within the same cell (registering mitochondrial and somatic [Ca2+]) and between two populations of cells: neurons and astrocytes. Finally, we perform integrated optogenetics experiments, wherein neural activation via channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) or a red-shifted variant, and activity imaging via RCaMP or GCaMP, are conducted simultaneously, with the ChR2/RCaMP pair providing independently addressable spectral channels. Using this paradigm, we measure calcium responses of naturalistic and ChR2-evoked muscle contractions in vivo in crawling C. elegans. We systematically compare the RCaMP sensors to R-GECO1, in terms of action potential-evoked fluorescence increases in neurons, photobleaching, and photoswitching. R-GECO1 displays higher Ca2+ affinity and larger dynamic range than RCaMP, but exhibits significant photoactivation with blue and green light, suggesting that integrated channelrhodopsin-based optogenetics using R-GECO1 may be subject to artifact. Finally, we create and test blue, cyan, and yellow variants engineered from GCaMP by rational design. This engineered set of chromatic variants facilitates new experiments in functional imaging and optogenetics. PMID:23459413

  2. Measuring Physiological Responses of Drosophila Sensory Neurons to Lipid Pheromones Using Live Calcium Imaging.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Shruti; Calvert, Meredith E K; Yew, Joanne Y

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals, insects such as Drosophila have multiple taste organs. The chemosensory neurons on the legs, proboscis, wings and ovipositor of Drosophila express gustatory receptors(1,2), ion channels(3-6), and ionotropic receptors(7) that are involved in the detection of volatile and non-volatile sensory cues. These neurons directly contact tastants such as food, noxious substances and pheromones and therefore influence many complex behaviors such as feeding, egg-laying and mating. Electrode recordings and calcium imaging have been widely used in insects to quantify the neuronal responses evoked by these tastants. However, electrophysiology requires specialized equipment and obtaining measurements from a single taste sensillum can be technically challenging depending on the cell-type, size, and position. In addition, single neuron resolution in Drosophila can be difficult to achieve since taste sensilla house more than one type of chemosensory neuron. The live calcium imaging method described here allows responses of single gustatory neurons in live flies to be measured. This method is especially suitable for imaging neuronal responses to lipid pheromones and other ligand types that have low solubility in water-based solvents. PMID:27168110

  3. Ultrasmall Nanoplatforms as Calcium-Responsive Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Moussaron, Albert; Vibhute, Sandip; Bianchi, Andrea; Gündüz, Serhat; Kotb, Shady; Sancey, Lucie; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Rizzitelli, Silvia; Crémillieux, Yannick; Lux, Francois; Logothetis, Nikos K; Tillement, Olivier; Angelovski, Goran

    2015-10-01

    The preparation of ultrasmall and rigid platforms (USRPs) that are covalently coupled to macrocycle-based, calcium-responsive/smart contrast agents (SCAs), and the initial in vitro and in vivo validation of the resulting nanosized probes (SCA-USRPs) by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is reported. The synthetic procedure is robust, allowing preparation of the SCA-USRPs on a multigram scale. The resulting platforms display the desired MRI activity—i.e., longitudinal relaxivity increases almost twice at 7 T magnetic field strength upon saturation with Ca(2+). Cell viability is probed with the MTT assay using HEK-293 cells, which show good tolerance for lower contrast agent concentrations over longer periods of time. On intravenous administration of SCA-USRPs in living mice, MRI studies indicate their rapid accumulation in the renal pelvis and parenchyma. Importantly, the MRI signal increases in both kidney compartments when CaCl2 is also administrated. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiments confirm accumulation of SCA-USRPs in the renal cortex. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first studies which demonstrate calcium-sensitive MRI signal changes in vivo. Continuing contrast agent and MRI protocol optimizations should lead to wider application of these responsive probes and development of superior functional methods for monitoring calcium-dependent physiological and pathological processes in a dynamic manner. PMID:26179212

  4. Measuring and Modeling Sonoporation Dynamics in Mammalian Cells via Calcium Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumon, R. E.; Parikh, P.; Sabens, D.; Aehle, M.; Kourennyi, D.; Deng, C. X.

    2007-05-01

    In this study, calcium imaging via the fluorescent indicator Fura-2 is used to characterize the sonoporation of Chinese Hamster Ovarian (CHO) cells in the presence of Optison™ microbubbles. Evolution of the calcium concentration within cells is determined from real-time fluorescence intensity measurements before, during, and after exposure to a 1 MHz ultrasound tone burst (0.2 s, 0.45 MPa). To relate microscopic sonoporation parameters to the measurements, an analytical model that includes sonoporation and plasma membrane transport is developed, assuming rapid mixing (uniform spatial distribution) in the cell. Fitting the measured data to the model provides estimated values for the poration area as a function of poration relaxation rate as well as plasma membrane pump and leakage rates. A modified compartment model that includes the effects of sonoporation, buffering proteins, and transport across the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria is also investigated. Numerical 3solutions of this model show a variety of behaviors for the calcium dynamics of the cell.

  5. CaRuby-Nano: a novel high affinity calcium probe for dual color imaging

    PubMed Central

    Collot, Mayeul; Wilms, Christian D; Bentkhayet, Asma; Marcaggi, Païkan; Couchman, Kiri; Charpak, Serge; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Häusser, Michael; Feltz, Anne; Mallet, Jean-Maurice

    2015-01-01

    The great demand for long-wavelength and high signal-to-noise Ca2+ indicators has led us to develop CaRuby-Nano, a new functionalizable red calcium indicator with nanomolar affinity for use in cell biology and neuroscience research. In addition, we generated CaRuby-Nano dextran conjugates and an AM-ester variant for bulk loading of tissue. We tested the new indicator using in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrating the high sensitivity of CaRuby-Nano as well as its power in dual color imaging experiments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05808.001 PMID:25824291

  6. Spatiotemporal Effects of Sonoporation Measured by Real-Time Calcium Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kumon, R. E.; Aehle, M.; Sabens, D.; Parikh, P.; Han, Y. W.; Kourennyi, D.; Deng, C. X.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effects of sonoporation, spatiotemporal evolution of ultrasound-induced changes in intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) was determined using real time fura-2AM fluorescence imaging. Monolayers of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to 1-MHz ultrasound tone burst (0.2 s, 0.45 MPa) in the presence of Optison™ microbubbles. At extracellular [Ca2+]o of 0.9 mM, ultrasound application generated both non-oscillating and oscillating (periods 12–30 s) transients (changes of [Ca2+]i in time) with durations of 100–180 s. Immediate [Ca2+]i transients after ultrasound application were induced by ultrasound-mediated microbubble–cell interactions. In some cases, the immediately-affected cells did not return to pre-ultrasound equilibrium [Ca2+]i levels, thereby indicating irreversible membrane damage. Spatial evolution of [Ca2+]i in different cells formed a calcium wave and was observed to propagate outward from the immediately-affected cells at 7–20 μm/s over a distance greater than 200 μm, causing delayed transients in cells to occur sometimes 60 s or more after ultrasound application. In calcium-free solution, ultrasound-affected cells did not recover, consistent with the requirement of extracellular Ca2+ for cell membrane recovery subsequent to sonoporation. In summary, ultrasound application in the presence of Optison™ microbubbles can generate transient [Ca2+]i changes and oscillations at a focal site and in surrounding cells via calcium waves that last longer than the ultrasound duration and spread beyond the focal site. These results demonstrate the complexity of downstream effects of sonoporation beyond the initial pore formation and subsequent diffusion-related transport through the cellular membrane. PMID:19010589

  7. Spatiotemporal dynamics of rhythmic spinal interneurons measured with two-photon calcium imaging and coherence analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Alex C; Dietz, Shelby B; Zhong, Guisheng; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M; Webb, Watt W

    2010-12-01

    In rhythmic neural circuits, a neuron often fires action potentials with a constant phase to the rhythm, a timing relationship that can be functionally significant. To characterize these phase preferences in a large-scale, cell type-specific manner, we adapted multitaper coherence analysis for two-photon calcium imaging. Analysis of simulated data showed that coherence is a simple and robust measure of rhythmicity for calcium imaging data. When applied to the neonatal mouse hindlimb spinal locomotor network, the phase relationships between peak activity of >1,000 ventral spinal interneurons and motor output were characterized. Most interneurons showed rhythmic activity that was coherent and in phase with the ipsilateral motor output during fictive locomotion. The phase distributions of two genetically identified classes of interneurons were distinct from the ensemble population and from each other. There was no obvious spatial clustering of interneurons with similar phase preferences. Together, these results suggest that cell type, not neighboring neuron activity, is a better indicator of an interneuron's response during fictive locomotion. The ability to measure the phase preferences of many neurons with cell type and spatial information should be widely applicable for studying other rhythmic neural circuits. PMID:20861442

  8. A High-Throughput Automated Microfluidic Platform for Calcium Imaging of Taste Sensing.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsing; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Chihchen

    2016-01-01

    The human enteroendocrine L cell line NCI-H716, expressing taste receptors and taste signaling elements, constitutes a unique model for the studies of cellular responses to glucose, appetite regulation, gastrointestinal motility, and insulin secretion. Targeting these gut taste receptors may provide novel treatments for diabetes and obesity. However, NCI-H716 cells are cultured in suspension and tend to form multicellular aggregates, preventing high-throughput calcium imaging due to interferences caused by laborious immobilization and stimulus delivery procedures. Here, we have developed an automated microfluidic platform that is capable of trapping more than 500 single cells into microwells with a loading efficiency of 77% within two minutes, delivering multiple chemical stimuli and performing calcium imaging with enhanced spatial and temporal resolutions when compared to bath perfusion systems. Results revealed the presence of heterogeneity in cellular responses to the type, concentration, and order of applied sweet and bitter stimuli. Sucralose and denatonium benzoate elicited robust increases in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. However, glucose evoked a rapid elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) followed by reduced responses to subsequent glucose stimulation. Using Gymnema sylvestre as a blocking agent for the sweet taste receptor confirmed that different taste receptors were utilized for sweet and bitter tastes. This automated microfluidic platform is cost-effective, easy to fabricate and operate, and may be generally applicable for high-throughput and high-content single-cell analysis and drug screening. PMID:27399663

  9. Calcium-induced alterations in mitochondrial morphology quantified in situ with optical scatter imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Boustany, Nada N; Drezek, Rebekah; Thakor, Nitish V

    2002-01-01

    Optical scatter imaging (OSI), a technique we developed recently, was used to measure the ratio of wide-to-narrow angle scatter (OSIR) within endothelial cells subjected to calcium overload (1.6 mM) after permeabilization by ionomycin. Within a few minutes of calcium overload, the mitochondria, which started as elongated organelles, rounded up into spherically shaped particles. This change in morphology was accompanied by a statistically significant 14% increase in OSIR in the cells' cytoplasm. Mitochondrial rounding and OSIR increase were suppressed by cyclosporin A (25 microM), implying that the observed geometrical and scattering changes were directly attributable to the mitochondrial permeability transition. The angular scattering properties of a long mitochondrion rounding up were approximated by numerical simulations of light scatter from an ellipsoid rounding up into a sphere. The simulations predicted a relative increase in OSIR comparable to that measured experimentally for the case where the shape transition takes place with little or no volume increase. The simulations also suggested that mitochondrial refractive index changes could not account for the OSIR changes observed. Our data show that changes in OSIR correlate with mitochondrial morphology change in situ. OSI provides a new tool for subcellular imaging and complements other microscopy methods, such as fluorescence. PMID:12202392

  10. In vivo photoacoustic neuronal imaging of odor-evoked calcium signals in the drosophila brain (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruiying; Rao, Bin; Rong, Haoyang; Raman, Baranidharan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Neural scientists can benefit greatly from imaging tools that can penetrate thick brain tissue. Compared with traditional optical microscopy methods, photoacoustic imaging can beat the optical diffusion limit and achieve such deep tissue imaging with high spatial resolution. In this study, we used an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope to image the odor-evoked neuronal activities in a drosophila model. Drosophila brain neurons stably express GCaMP5G, a calcium-sensitive fluorescent protein whose optical absorption coefficient changes with calcium influx during action potentials. We recorded an ~20% odor-evoked fractional photoacoustic signal increase at all depths of the drosophila brain in vivo, with and without removal of the brain cuticle, at a recording rate of 1 kHz. Our results were confirmed by concurrent fluorescent recordings. Furthermore, by performing fast 2D scanning, we imaged the antenna lobe region, which is of particular interest in neuroscience, at a volumetric rate of ~1 Hz with a sub-neuron resolution of 3 μm. Unlike optical imaging, which requires surgical removal of the scattering brain cuticle, our photoacoustic system can image through the cuticle and measure neuronal signals of the whole drosophila brain without invasive surgery, enabling minimal disturbance to the animal's behaviors. In conclusion, we have demonstrated photoacoustic imaging of calcium signals in drosophila brains for the first time. Utilizing the deep imaging capability of photoacoustic tomography, our methods could potentially be extended to in vivo imaging of neuronal activities from deep brains in other animal models.

  11. Multi-modal in vivo imaging of brain blood oxygenation, blood flow and neural calcium dynamics during acute seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringuette, Dene; Jeffrey, Melanie A.; Carlen, Peter L.; Levi, Ofer

    2016-03-01

    Dysfunction of the vascular endothelium has been implicated in the development of epilepsy. To better understand the relation between vascular function and seizure and provide a foundation for interpreting results from functional imaging in chronic disease models, we investigate the relationship between intracellular calcium dynamics and local cerebral blood flow and blood oxygen saturation during acute seizure-like events and pharmacological seizure rescue. To probe the relation between the aforementioned physiological markers in an acute model of epilepsy in rats, we integrated three different optical modalities together with electrophysiological recordings: Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) was used to study changes in flow speeds, Intrinsic optical signal imaging (IOSI) was used to monitor changes in oxygenated, de-oxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentration, and Calcium-sensitive dye imaging was used to monitor intracellular calcium dynamics. We designed a dedicated cortical flow chamber to remove superficial blood and dye resulting from the injection procedure, which reduced spurious artifacts. The near infrared light used for IOSI and LSCI was delivered via a light pipe integrated with the flow chamber to minimize the effect of fluid surface movement on illumination stability. Calcium-sensitive dye was injected via a glass electrode used for recording the local field potential. Our system allowed us to observe and correlate increases in intracellular calcium, blood flow and blood volume during seizure-like events and provide a quantitative analysis of neurovascular coupling changes associated with seizure rescue via injection of an anti-convulsive agent.

  12. Multispot two-photon imaging of mice heart tissue detecting calcium waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mauro, C.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Alfieri, D.; Borile, G.; Mongillo, M.; Pavone, F. S.

    2012-06-01

    High rate, full field image acquisition in multiphoton imaging is achievable by parallelization of the excitation and of the detection paths. Via a Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) which splits a pulsed laser, and a spatial resolved descanned detection path, a new approach to microscopy has been developed. By exploiting the three operating mode, single beam, 16 beamlets or 64 beamlets, the best experimental conditions can be found by adapting the power per beamlet. This Multiphoton Multispot system (MCube) has been characterized in thick tissue samples, and subsequently used for the first time for Ca2+ imaging of acute heart slices. A test sample with fixed mice heart slices with embedded sub-resolution fluorescent beads has been used to test the capability of optical axial resolution up to ~200 microns in depth. Radial and axial resolutions of 0.6 microns and 3 microns have been respectively obtained with a 40X water immersion objective, getting close to the theoretical limit. Then images of heart slices cardiomyocites, loaded with Fluo4-AM have been acquired. The formation of Ca2+ waves during electrostimulated beating has been observed, and the possibility of easily acquire full frame images at 15 Hz (16 beamlets) has been demonstrated, towards the in vivo study of time resolved cellular dynamics and arrhythmia trigger mechanisms in particular. A very high speed two-photon Random Access system for in vivo electrophysiological studies, towards the correlation of voltage and calcium signals in arrhythmia phenomena, is now under developing at Light4tech.

  13. In Vivo Functional Brain Imaging Approach Based on Bioluminescent Calcium Indicator GFP-aequorin.

    PubMed

    Lark, Arianna R; Kitamoto, Toshihiro; Martin, Jean-René

    2016-01-01

    Functional in vivo imaging has become a powerful approach to study the function and physiology of brain cells and structures of interest. Recently a new method of Ca(2+)-imaging using the bioluminescent reporter GFP-aequorin (GA) has been developed. This new technique relies on the fusion of the GFP and aequorin genes, producing a molecule capable of binding calcium and - with the addition of its cofactor coelenterazine - emitting bright light that can be monitored through a photon collector. Transgenic lines carrying the GFP-aequorin gene have been generated for both mice and Drosophila. In Drosophila, the GFP-aequorin gene has been placed under the control of the GAL4/UAS binary expression system allowing for targeted expression and imaging within the brain. This method has subsequently been shown to be capable of detecting both inward Ca(2+)-transients and Ca(2+)-released from inner stores. Most importantly it allows for a greater duration in continuous recording, imaging at greater depths within the brain, and recording at high temporal resolutions (up to 8.3 msec). Here we present the basic method for using bioluminescent imaging to record and analyze Ca(2+)-activity within the mushroom bodies, a structure central to learning and memory in the fly brain. PMID:26779599

  14. A Low Affinity GCaMP3 Variant (GCaMPer) for Imaging the Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Store

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Mark J.; Baldwin, Heather A.; Werley, Christopher A.; Boccardo, Stefano; Whitaker, Leslie R.; Yan, Xiaokang; Holt, Graham T.; Schreiter, Eric R.; Looger, Loren L.; Cohen, Adam E.; Kim, Douglas S.; Harvey, Brandon K.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis is critical for cellular functions and is disrupted in diverse pathologies including neurodegeneration and cardiovascular disease. Owing to the high concentration of calcium within the ER, studying this subcellular compartment requires tools that are optimized for these conditions. To develop a single-fluorophore genetically encoded calcium indicator for this organelle, we targeted a low affinity variant of GCaMP3 to the ER lumen (GCaMPer (10.19)). A set of viral vectors was constructed to express GCaMPer in human neuroblastoma cells, rat primary cortical neurons, and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We observed dynamic changes in GCaMPer (10.19) fluorescence in response to pharmacologic manipulations of the ER calcium store. Additionally, periodic calcium efflux from the ER was observed during spontaneous beating of cardiomyocytes. GCaMPer (10.19) has utility in imaging ER calcium in living cells and providing insight into luminal calcium dynamics under physiologic and pathologic states. PMID:26451944

  15. A highly sensitive fluorescent indicator dye for calcium imaging of neural activity in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Mayumi; Takeuchi, Atsuya; Hashizume, Miki; Kitamura, Kazuo; Kano, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium imaging of individual neurons is widely used for monitoring their activity in vitro and in vivo. Synthetic fluorescent calcium indicator dyes are commonly used, but the resulting calcium signals sometimes suffer from a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Therefore, it is difficult to detect signals caused by single action potentials (APs) particularly from neurons in vivo. Here we showed that a recently developed calcium indicator dye, Cal-520, is sufficiently sensitive to reliably detect single APs both in vitro and in vivo. In neocortical neurons, calcium signals were linearly correlated with the number of APs, and the SNR was > 6 for in vitro slice preparations and > 1.6 for in vivo anesthetised mice. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, dendritic calcium transients evoked by climbing fiber inputs were clearly observed in anesthetised mice with a high SNR and fast decay time. These characteristics of Cal-520 are a great advantage over those of Oregon Green BAPTA-1, the most commonly used calcium indicator dye, for monitoring the activity of individual neurons both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24405482

  16. Calcium Imaging of Neuronal Activity in Drosophila Can Identify Anticonvulsive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Anne K.; Fan, Yuen Ngan; Masullo, Laura; Baines, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Although there are now a number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) available, approximately one-third of epilepsy patients respond poorly to drug intervention. The reasons for this are complex, but are probably reflective of the increasing number of identified mutations that predispose individuals to this disease. Thus, there is a clear requirement for the development of novel treatments to address this unmet clinical need. The existence of gene mutations that mimic a seizure-like behaviour in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, offers the possibility to exploit the powerful genetics of this insect to identify novel cellular targets to facilitate design of more effective AEDs. In this study we use neuronal expression of GCaMP, a potent calcium reporter, to image neuronal activity using a non-invasive and rapid method. Expression in motoneurons in the isolated CNS of third instar larvae shows waves of calcium-activity that pass between segments of the ventral nerve cord. Time between calcium peaks, in the same neurons, between adjacent segments usually show a temporal separation of greater than 200 ms. Exposure to proconvulsants (picrotoxin or 4-aminopyridine) reduces separation to below 200 ms showing increased synchrony of activity across adjacent segments. Increased synchrony, characteristic of epilepsy, is similarly observed in genetic seizure mutants: bangsenseless1 (bss1) and paralyticK1270T (paraK1270T). Exposure of bss1 to clinically-used antiepileptic drugs (phenytoin or gabapentin) significantly reduces synchrony. In this study we use the measure of synchronicity to evaluate the effectiveness of known and novel anticonvulsive compounds (antipain, isethionate, etopiside rapamycin and dipyramidole) to reduce seizure-like CNS activity. We further show that such compounds also reduce the Drosophila voltage-gated persistent Na+ current (INaP) in an identified motoneuron (aCC). Our combined assays provide a rapid and reliable method to screen unknown compounds

  17. Dual energy x-ray imaging and scoring of coronary calcium: physics-based digital phantom and clinical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bo; Wen, Di; Nye, Katelyn; Gilkeson, Robert C.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) as assessed with CT calcium score is the best biomarker of coronary artery disease. Dual energy x-ray provides an inexpensive, low radiation-dose alternative. A two shot system (GE Revolution-XRd) is used, raw images are processed with a custom algorithm, and a coronary calcium image (DECCI) is created, similar to the bone image, but optimized for CAC visualization, not lung visualization. In this report, we developed a physicsbased, digital-phantom containing heart, lung, CAC, spine, ribs, pulmonary artery, and adipose elements, examined effects on DECCI, suggested physics-inspired algorithms to improve CAC contrast, and evaluated the correlation between CT calcium scores and a proposed DE calcium score. In simulation experiment, Beam hardening from increasing adipose thickness (2cm to 8cm) reduced Cg by 19% and 27% in 120kVp and 60kVp images, but only reduced Cg by <7% in DECCI. If a pulmonary artery moves or pulsates with blood filling between exposures, it can give rise to a significantly confounding PA signal in DECCI similar in amplitude to CAC. Observations suggest modifications to DECCI processing, which can further improve CAC contrast by a factor of 2 in clinical exams. The DE score had the best correlation with "CT mass score" among three commonly used CT scores. Results suggest that DE x-ray is a promising tool for imaging and scoring CAC, and there still remains opportunity for further DECCI processing improvements.

  18. Inferring Neuronal Dynamics from Calcium Imaging Data Using Biophysical Models and Bayesian Inference

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati, Vahid; Kirmse, Knut; Marković, Dimitrije; Holthoff, Knut; Kiebel, Stefan J.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium imaging has been used as a promising technique to monitor the dynamic activity of neuronal populations. However, the calcium trace is temporally smeared which restricts the extraction of quantities of interest such as spike trains of individual neurons. To address this issue, spike reconstruction algorithms have been introduced. One limitation of such reconstructions is that the underlying models are not informed about the biophysics of spike and burst generations. Such existing prior knowledge might be useful for constraining the possible solutions of spikes. Here we describe, in a novel Bayesian approach, how principled knowledge about neuronal dynamics can be employed to infer biophysical variables and parameters from fluorescence traces. By using both synthetic and in vitro recorded fluorescence traces, we demonstrate that the new approach is able to reconstruct different repetitive spiking and/or bursting patterns with accurate single spike resolution. Furthermore, we show that the high inference precision of the new approach is preserved even if the fluorescence trace is rather noisy or if the fluorescence transients show slow rise kinetics lasting several hundred milliseconds, and inhomogeneous rise and decay times. In addition, we discuss the use of the new approach for inferring parameter changes, e.g. due to a pharmacological intervention, as well as for inferring complex characteristics of immature neuronal circuits. PMID:26894748

  19. Calcium (Ca2+) waves data calibration and analysis using image processing techniques

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Calcium (Ca2+) propagates within tissues serving as an important information carrier. In particular, cilia beat frequency in oviduct cells is partially regulated by Ca2+ changes. Thus, measuring the calcium density and characterizing the traveling wave plays a key role in understanding biological phenomena. However, current methods to measure propagation velocities and other wave characteristics involve several manual or time-consuming procedures. This limits the amount of information that can be extracted, and the statistical quality of the analysis. Results Our work provides a framework based on image processing procedures that enables a fast, automatic and robust characterization of data from two-filter fluorescence Ca2+ experiments. We calculate the mean velocity of the wave-front, and use theoretical models to extract meaningful parameters like wave amplitude, decay rate and time of excitation. Conclusions Measurements done by different operators showed a high degree of reproducibility. This framework is also extended to a single filter fluorescence experiments, allowing higher sampling rates, and thus an increased accuracy in velocity measurements. PMID:23679062

  20. Image-based Modeling of Biofilm-induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, J. M.; Rothman, A.; Jackson, B.; Klapper, I.; Cunningham, A. B.; Gerlach, R.

    2013-12-01

    Pore scale biological processes in the subsurface environment are important to understand in relation to many engineering applications including environmental contaminant remediation, geologic carbon sequestration, and petroleum production. Specifically, biofilm induced calcium carbonate precipitation has been identified as an attractive option to reduce permeability in a lasting way in the subsurface. This technology may be able to replace typical cement-based grouting in some circumstances; however, pore-scale processes must be better understood for it to be applied in a controlled manor. The work presented will focus on efforts to observe biofilm growth and ureolysis-induced mineral precipitation in micro-fabricated flow cells combined with finite element modelling as a tool to predict local chemical gradients of interest (see figure). We have been able to observe this phenomenon over time using a novel model organism that is able to hydrolyse urea and express a fluorescent protein allowing for non-invasive observation over time with confocal microscopy. The results of this study show the likely existence of a wide range of local saturation indices even in a small (1 cm length scale) experimental system. Interestingly, the locations of high predicted index do not correspond to the locations of higher precipitation density, highlighting the need for further understanding. Figure 1 - A micro-fabricated flow cell containing biofilm-induced calcium carbonate precipitation. (A) Experimental results: Active biofilm is in green and dark circles are calcium carbonate crystals. Note the channeling behavior in the top of the image, leaving a large hydraulically inactive area in the biofilm mass. (B) Finite element model: The prediction of relative saturation of calcium carbonate (as calcite). Fluid enters the system at a low saturation state (blue) but areas of high supersaturation (red) are predicted within the hydraulically inactive area in the biofilm. If only effluent

  1. Calcium Imaging of Basal Forebrain Activity during Innate and Learned Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Thomas C.; Pinto, Lucas; Brock, Julien R.; Dan, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays crucial roles in arousal, attention, and memory, and its impairment is associated with a variety of cognitive deficits. The BF consists of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons. Electrical or optogenetic stimulation of BF cholinergic neurons enhances cortical processing and behavioral performance, but the natural activity of these cells during behavior is only beginning to be characterized. Even less is known about GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. Here, we performed microendoscopic calcium imaging of BF neurons as mice engaged in spontaneous behaviors in their home cages (innate) or performed a go/no-go auditory discrimination task (learned). Cholinergic neurons were consistently excited during movement, including running and licking, but GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons exhibited diverse responses. All cell types were activated by overt punishment, either inside or outside of the discrimination task. These findings reveal functional similarities and distinctions between BF cell types during both spontaneous and task-related behaviors. PMID:27242444

  2. Model-free reconstruction of excitatory neuronal connectivity from calcium imaging signals.

    PubMed

    Stetter, Olav; Battaglia, Demian; Soriano, Jordi; Geisel, Theo

    2012-01-01

    A systematic assessment of global neural network connectivity through direct electrophysiological assays has remained technically infeasible, even in simpler systems like dissociated neuronal cultures. We introduce an improved algorithmic approach based on Transfer Entropy to reconstruct structural connectivity from network activity monitored through calcium imaging. We focus in this study on the inference of excitatory synaptic links. Based on information theory, our method requires no prior assumptions on the statistics of neuronal firing and neuronal connections. The performance of our algorithm is benchmarked on surrogate time series of calcium fluorescence generated by the simulated dynamics of a network with known ground-truth topology. We find that the functional network topology revealed by Transfer Entropy depends qualitatively on the time-dependent dynamic state of the network (bursting or non-bursting). Thus by conditioning with respect to the global mean activity, we improve the performance of our method. This allows us to focus the analysis to specific dynamical regimes of the network in which the inferred functional connectivity is shaped by monosynaptic excitatory connections, rather than by collective synchrony. Our method can discriminate between actual causal influences between neurons and spurious non-causal correlations due to light scattering artifacts, which inherently affect the quality of fluorescence imaging. Compared to other reconstruction strategies such as cross-correlation or Granger Causality methods, our method based on improved Transfer Entropy is remarkably more accurate. In particular, it provides a good estimation of the excitatory network clustering coefficient, allowing for discrimination between weakly and strongly clustered topologies. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of our method to analyses of real recordings of in vitro disinhibited cortical cultures where we suggest that excitatory connections are characterized

  3. Optimization of a GCaMP calcium indicator for neural activity imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akerboom, Jasper; Chen, Tsai-Wen; Wardill, Trevor J.; Tian, Lin; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Mutlu, Sevinç; Calderón, Nicole Carreras; Esposti, Federico; Borghuis, Bart G.; Sun, Xiaonan Richard; Gordus, Andrew; Orger, Michael B.; Portugues, Ruben; Engert, Florian; Macklin, John J.; Filosa, Alessandro; Aggarwal, Aman; Kerr, Rex; Takagi, Ryousuke; Kracun, Sebastian; Shigetomi, Eiji; Khakh, Baljit S.; Baier, Herwig; Lagnado, Leon; Wang, Samuel S.-H.; Bargmann, Cornelia I.; Kimmel, Bruce E.; Jayaraman, Vivek; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S.; Schreiter, Eric R.; Looger, Loren L.

    2012-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) are powerful tools for systems neuroscience. Recent efforts in protein engineering have significantly increased the performance of GECIs. The state-of-the art single-wavelength GECI, GCaMP3, has been deployed in a number of model organisms and can reliably detect three or more action potentials (APs) in short bursts in several systems in vivo. Through protein structure determination, targeted mutagenesis, high-throughput screening, and a battery of in vitro assays, we have increased the dynamic range of GCaMP3 by several-fold, creating a family of “GCaMP5” sensors. We tested GCaMP5s in several systems: cultured neurons and astrocytes, mouse retina, and in vivo in Caenorhabditis chemosensory neurons, Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction and adult antennal lobe, zebrafish retina and tectum, and mouse visual cortex. Signal-to-noise ratio was improved by at least 2–3-fold. In the visual cortex, two GCaMP5 variants detected twice as many visual stimulus-responsive cells as GCaMP3. By combining in vivo imaging with electrophysiology we show that GCaMP5 fluorescence provides a more reliable measure of neuronal activity than its predecessor GCaMP3. GCaMP5 allows more sensitive detection of neural activity in vivo and may find widespread applications for cellular imaging in general. PMID:23035093

  4. Imaging of calcium wave propagation in guinea-pig ventricular cell pairs by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, T; Minamikawa, T; Kawachi, H; Fujita, S

    1991-08-01

    We describe here the use of a confocal laser scanning microscope for imaging fast dynamic changes of the intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) in isolated ventricular cell pairs. The scanning apparatus of our system, paired galvanometer mirrors, can perform narrow band scanning of an area of interest at a high temporal resolution of less than 70 msec per image. The actual [Ca2+]i is obtained directly through the fluorescence intensity of injected fluo-3, which responds to changes of [Ca2+]i in optically sectioned unit volumes of the cell. Images of the calcium wave obtained during propagation between paired cells revealed that the wavefront is constant in shape and propagates at constant velocity without any delay at the cell-to-cell junction. The confocal laser scanning microscope with depth-discriminating ability is a valuable tool for taking pictures of the sequence of biological events in living cells. PMID:1782671

  5. Synthesis and characterization of bioresorbable calcium phosphosilicate nanocomposite particles for fluorescence imaging and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Thomas T.

    Organically doped calcium phosphosilicate nanoparticles (CPSNPs) were developed and characterized, driven by the need for non-toxic vectors for drug delivery and fluorescence biological imaging applications. In particular, advancement in drug delivery for the chemotherapeutic treatment of cancers is required to increase drug efficacy and improve patient quality of life. Additionally, brighter and more photostable fluorophores are needed to meet demands for improved sensitivity and experimental diversity, which may lead to improvements in early detection of solid tumors and advancement in understanding of biological processes. A literature survey on the state of the field for nanoparticle based biological fluorescence imaging and drug delivery is presented in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 focuses on the characterization techniques used in this work. The development and optical characterization of 20-40 nm diameter, citrate functionalized Cy3 amidite doped calcium phosphosilicate nanoparticles (Cy3 CPSNPs) for in vitro fluorescence imaging is outlined in Chapters 3 and 4, respectively. In particular, sodium citrate was used to functionalize the surface and provide electrosteric dispersion of these particles. CPSNPs stabilized with sodium citrate routinely exhibited highly negative zeta potentials greater than -25 mV in magnitude. Furthermore, the fluorescence quantum yield of the encapsulated fluorophore was improved by more than 4.5-fold when compared to the unencapsulated dye. The bioimaging and drug delivery capability of CPSNPs was explored. Cy3 CPSNPs dissolved quickly in the acidic environment experienced during endocytosis, releasing the encapsulated fluorophore. This is consistent with solution phase experiments that show the particles are dissolved at pH 5. CPSNPs loaded with fluorescein and a hydrophobic growth inhibitor, ceramide C6, proved the ability to simultaneously image and delivery of the hydrophobic drug to cells in vitro. Chapter 5 examined the colloidal

  6. Coronary artery calcium quantification from contrast enhanced CT using gemstone spectral imaging and material decomposition.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Tobias A; Stehli, Julia; Dougoud, Svetlana; Sah, Bert-Ram; Bull, Sacha; Clerc, Olivier F; Possner, Mathias; Buechel, Ronny R; Gaemperli, Oliver; Kaufmann, Philipp A

    2014-10-01

    To explore the feasibility of coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement from low-dose contrast enhanced coronary CT angiography (CCTA) as this may obviate the need for an unenhanced CT scan. 52 patients underwent unenhanced cardiac CT and prospectively ECG triggered contrast enhanced CCTA (Discovery HD 750, GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA). The latter was acquired in single-source dual-energy mode [gemstone spectral imaging (GSI)]. Virtual unenhanced images were generated from GSI CCTA by monochromatic image reconstruction of 70 keV allowing selective iodine material suppression. CAC scores from virtual unenhanced CT were compared to standard unenhanced CT including a linear regression model. After iodine subtraction from the contrast enhanced CCTA the attenuation in the ascending aorta decreased significantly from 359 ± 61 to 54 ± 8 HU (P < 0.001), the latter comparing well to the value of 64 ± 55 HU found in the standard unenhanced CT (P = ns) confirming successful iodine subtraction. After introducing linear regression formula the mean values for Agatston, Volume and Mass scores of virtual unenhanced CT were 187 ± 321, 72 ± 114 mm(3), and 27 ± 46 mg/cm(3), comparing well to the values from standard unenhanced CT (187 ± 309, 72 ± 110 mm(3), and 27 ± 45 mg/cm(3)) yielding an excellent correlation (r = 0.96, r = 0.96, r = 0.92; P < 0.001). Mean estimated radiation dose revealed 0.83 ± 0.02 mSv from the unenhanced CT and 1.70 ± 0.53 mSv from the contrast enhanced CCTA. Single-source dual-energy scanning with GSI allows CAC quantification from low dose contrast enhanced CCTA by virtual iodine contrast subtraction. PMID:24993390

  7. Imaging of drug loading distributions in individual microspheres of calcium silicate hydrate - an X-ray spectromicroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Wu, Jin; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2015-04-01

    Imaging is one of the most direct and ideal ways to track drug loading distributions in drug carriers on the molecular level, which will facilitate the optimization of drug carriers and drug loading capacities. Herein, we report the mapping of an individual mesoporous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) microsphere before and after the loading of ibuprofen (IBU) and the interactions between drug carriers and drug molecules simultaneously by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Nanoscaled X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy clearly indicates that IBU is bonded to calcium and silicate sites via carboxylic acid groups. More importantly, STXM has been successfully used to determine the absolute thickness of IBU, revealing its distribution in the CSH microsphere.Imaging is one of the most direct and ideal ways to track drug loading distributions in drug carriers on the molecular level, which will facilitate the optimization of drug carriers and drug loading capacities. Herein, we report the mapping of an individual mesoporous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) microsphere before and after the loading of ibuprofen (IBU) and the interactions between drug carriers and drug molecules simultaneously by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Nanoscaled X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy clearly indicates that IBU is bonded to calcium and silicate sites via carboxylic acid groups. More importantly, STXM has been successfully used to determine the absolute thickness of IBU, revealing its distribution in the CSH microsphere. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07471h

  8. LFP-guided targeting of a cortical barrel column for in vivo two-photon calcium imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon-Hyuk; Shin, Hee-Sup; Lee, Kwang-Hyung; Chung, Sooyoung

    2015-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy of bulk-loaded functional dyes is an outstanding physiological technique that enables simultaneous functional mapping of hundreds of brain cells in vivo at single-cell resolution. However, precise targeting of a specific cortical location is not easy due to its fine dimensionality. To enable precise targeting, intrinsic-signal optical imaging is often additionally performed. However, the intrinsic-signal optical imaging is not only time-consuming but also ineffective in ensuring precision. Here, we propose an alternative method for precise targeting based on local field potential (LFP) recording, a conventional electrophysiological method. The heart of this method lies in use of the same glass pipette to record LFPs and to eject calcium dye. After confirming the target area by LFP using a glass pipette, the calcium dye is ejected from the same pipette without a time delay or spatial adjustment. As a result, the calcium dye is loaded into the same ensemble of brain cells from which the LFP was obtained. As a validation of the proposed LFP-based method, we targeted and successfully loaded calcium dye into layer 2/3 of a mouse barrel column. PMID:26511063

  9. LFP-guided targeting of a cortical barrel column for in vivo two-photon calcium imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joon-Hyuk; Shin, Hee-Sup; Lee, Kwang-Hyung; Chung, Sooyoung

    2015-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy of bulk-loaded functional dyes is an outstanding physiological technique that enables simultaneous functional mapping of hundreds of brain cells in vivo at single-cell resolution. However, precise targeting of a specific cortical location is not easy due to its fine dimensionality. To enable precise targeting, intrinsic-signal optical imaging is often additionally performed. However, the intrinsic-signal optical imaging is not only time-consuming but also ineffective in ensuring precision. Here, we propose an alternative method for precise targeting based on local field potential (LFP) recording, a conventional electrophysiological method. The heart of this method lies in use of the same glass pipette to record LFPs and to eject calcium dye. After confirming the target area by LFP using a glass pipette, the calcium dye is ejected from the same pipette without a time delay or spatial adjustment. As a result, the calcium dye is loaded into the same ensemble of brain cells from which the LFP was obtained. As a validation of the proposed LFP-based method, we targeted and successfully loaded calcium dye into layer 2/3 of a mouse barrel column. PMID:26511063

  10. Identification of neuronal network properties from the spectral analysis of calcium imaging signals in neuronal cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tibau, Elisenda; Valencia, Miguel; Soriano, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal networks in vitro are prominent systems to study the development of connections in living neuronal networks and the interplay between connectivity, activity and function. These cultured networks show a rich spontaneous activity that evolves concurrently with the connectivity of the underlying network. In this work we monitor the development of neuronal cultures, and record their activity using calcium fluorescence imaging. We use spectral analysis to characterize global dynamical and structural traits of the neuronal cultures. We first observe that the power spectrum can be used as a signature of the state of the network, for instance when inhibition is active or silent, as well as a measure of the network's connectivity strength. Second, the power spectrum identifies prominent developmental changes in the network such as GABAA switch. And third, the analysis of the spatial distribution of the spectral density, in experiments with a controlled disintegration of the network through CNQX, an AMPA-glutamate receptor antagonist in excitatory neurons, reveals the existence of communities of strongly connected, highly active neurons that display synchronous oscillations. Our work illustrates the interest of spectral analysis for the study of in vitro networks, and its potential use as a network-state indicator, for instance to compare healthy and diseased neuronal networks. PMID:24385953

  11. An automated multi-modal object analysis approach to coronary calcium scoring of adaptive heart isolated MSCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Ferns, Gordon; Giles, John; Lewis, Emma

    2012-02-01

    Inter- and intra- observer variability is a problem often faced when an expert or observer is tasked with assessing the severity of a disease. This issue is keenly felt in coronary calcium scoring of patients suffering from atherosclerosis where in clinical practice, the observer must identify firstly the presence, followed by the location of candidate calcified plaques found within the coronary arteries that may prevent oxygenated blood flow to the heart muscle. This can be challenging for a human observer as it is difficult to differentiate calcified plaques that are located in the coronary arteries from those found in surrounding anatomy such as the mitral valve or pericardium. The inclusion or exclusion of false positive or true positive calcified plaques respectively will alter the patient calcium score incorrectly, thus leading to the possibility of incorrect treatment prescription. In addition to the benefits to scoring accuracy, the use of fast, low dose multi-slice CT imaging to perform the cardiac scan is capable of acquiring the entire heart within a single breath hold. Thus exposing the patient to lower radiation dose, which for a progressive disease such as atherosclerosis where multiple scans may be required, is beneficial to their health. Presented here is a fully automated method for calcium scoring using both the traditional Agatston method, as well as the Volume scoring method. Elimination of the unwanted regions of the cardiac image slices such as lungs, ribs, and vertebrae is carried out using adaptive heart isolation. Such regions cannot contain calcified plaques but can be of a similar intensity and their removal will aid detection. Removal of both the ascending and descending aortas, as they contain clinical insignificant plaques, is necessary before the final calcium scores are calculated and examined against ground truth scores of three averaged expert observer results. The results presented here are intended to show the requirement and

  12. Calcium imaging of inner ear hair cells within the cochlear epithelium of mice using two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Tao; Gao, Simon S.; Saggau, Peter; Oghalai, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Mice are an excellent model for studying mammalian hearing and transgenic mouse models of human hearing, loss are commonly available. However, the mouse cochlea is substantially smaller than other animal models routinely used to study cochlear physiology. This makes study of their hair cells difficult. We develop a novel methodology to optically image calcium within living hair cells left undisturbed within the excised mouse cochlea. Fresh cochleae are harvested, left intact within their otic capsule bone, and fixed in a recording chamber. The bone overlying the cochlear epithelium is opened and Reissner's membrane is incised. A fluorescent calcium indicator is applied to the preparation. A custom-built upright two-photon microscope was used to image the preparation using 3-D scanning. We are able to image about one third of a cochlear turn simultaneously, in either the apical or basal regions. Within one hour of animal sacrifice, we find that outer hair cells demonstrate increased fluorescence compared with surrounding supporting cells. This methodology is then used to visualize hair cell calcium changes during mechanotransduction over a region of the epithelium. Because the epithelium is left within the cochlea, dissection trauma is minimized and artifactual changes in hair cell physiology are expected to be reduced.

  13. Calcium imaging of inner ear hair cells within the cochlear epithelium of mice using two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Tao; Gao, Simon S.; Saggau, Peter; Oghalai, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Mice are an excellent model for studying mammalian hearing and transgenic mouse models of human hearing, loss are commonly available. However, the mouse cochlea is substantially smaller than other animal models routinely used to study cochlear physiology. This makes study of their hair cells difficult. We develop a novel methodology to optically image calcium within living hair cells left undisturbed within the excised mouse cochlea. Fresh cochleae are harvested, left intact within their otic capsule bone, and fixed in a recording chamber. The bone overlying the cochlear epithelium is opened and Reissner’s membrane is incised. A fluorescent calcium indicator is applied to the preparation. A custom-built upright two-photon microscope was used to image the preparation using 3-D scanning. We are able to image about one third of a cochlear turn simultaneously, in either the apical or basal regions. Within one hour of animal sacrifice, we find that outer hair cells demonstrate increased fluorescence compared with surrounding supporting cells. This methodology is then used to visualize hair cell calcium changes during mechanotransduction over a region of the epithelium. Because the epithelium is left within the cochlea, dissection trauma is minimized and artifactual changes in hair cell physiology are expected to be reduced. PMID:20210449

  14. Molecular imaging of in vivo calcium ion expression in area postrema of total sleep deprived rats: Implications for cardiovascular regulation by TOF-SIMS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Fu-Der; Chen, Li-You; Ling, Yong-Chien; Chen, Bo-Jung; Wu, Un-In; Chang, Hung-Ming

    2010-05-01

    Excessive calcium influx in chemosensitive neurons of area postrema (AP) is detrimental for sympathetic activation and participates in the disruption of cardiovascular activities. Since total sleep deprivation (TSD) is a stressful condition known to harm the cardiovascular function, the present study is aimed to determine whether the in vivo calcium expression in AP would significantly alter following TSD by the use of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and calretinin (a specific calcium sensor protein in AP neurons) immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that in normal rats, the calcium intensity was estimated to be 0.5 × 10 5 at m/ z 40.08. However, following TSD, the intensity for calcium ions was greatly increased to 1.2 × 10 5. Molecular imaging revealed that after TSD, various strongly expressed calcium signals were distributed throughout AP with clear identified profiles instead of randomly scattered within this region in normal rats. Immunohistochemical staining corresponded well with ionic image in which a majority of calcium-enriched gathering co-localized with calretinin positive neurons. The functional significance of TSD-induced calcium augmentation was demonstrated by increased heart rate and mean arterial pressure, clinical markers for cardiovascular dysfunction. Considering AP-mediated sympathetic activation is important for cardiovascular regulation, exaggerated calcium influx in AP would render this neurocircuitry more vulnerable to over-excitation, which might serve as the underlying mechanism for the development of TSD-relevant cardiovascular deficiency.

  15. Imaging activity in astrocytes and neurons with genetically encoded calcium indicators following in utero electroporation.

    PubMed

    Gee, J Michael; Gibbons, Meredith B; Taheri, Marsa; Palumbos, Sierra; Morris, S Craig; Smeal, Roy M; Flynn, Katherine F; Economo, Michael N; Cizek, Christian G; Capecchi, Mario R; Tvrdik, Petr; Wilcox, Karen S; White, John A

    2015-01-01

    Complex interactions between networks of astrocytes and neurons are beginning to be appreciated, but remain poorly understood. Transgenic mice expressing fluorescent protein reporters of cellular activity, such as the GCaMP family of genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs), have been used to explore network behavior. However, in some cases, it may be desirable to use long-established rat models that closely mimic particular aspects of human conditions such as Parkinson's disease and the development of epilepsy following status epilepticus. Methods for expressing reporter proteins in the rat brain are relatively limited. Transgenic rat technologies exist but are fairly immature. Viral-mediated expression is robust but unstable, requires invasive injections, and only works well for fairly small genes (<5 kb). In utero electroporation (IUE) offers a valuable alternative. IUE is a proven method for transfecting populations of astrocytes and neurons in the rat brain without the strict limitations on transgene size. We built a toolset of IUE plasmids carrying GCaMP variants 3, 6s, or 6f driven by CAG and targeted to the cytosol or the plasma membrane. Because low baseline fluorescence of GCaMP can hinder identification of transfected cells, we included the option of co-expressing a cytosolic tdTomato protein. A binary system consisting of a plasmid carrying a piggyBac inverted terminal repeat (ITR)-flanked CAG-GCaMP-IRES-tdTomato cassette and a separate plasmid encoding for expression of piggyBac transposase was employed to stably express GCaMP and tdTomato. The plasmids were co-electroporated on embryonic days 13.5-14.5 and astrocytic and neuronal activity was subsequently imaged in acute or cultured brain slices prepared from the cortex or hippocampus. Large spontaneous transients were detected in slices obtained from rats of varying ages up to 127 days. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of this toolset for interrogating astrocytic and neuronal activity

  16. Calcium and voltage imaging in arrhythmia models by high-speed microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mauro, C.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Alfieri, D.; Borile, G.; Urbani, A.; Mongillo, M.; Pavone, F. S.

    2014-03-01

    Alterations in intracellular cardiomyocyte calcium handling have a key role in initiating and sustaining arrhythmias. Arrhythmogenic calcium leak from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) can be attributed to all means by which calcium exits the SR store in an abnormal fashion. Abnormal SR calcium exit maymanifest as intracellular Ca2+ sparks and/or Ca2+ waves. Ca2+ signaling in arrhythmogenesis has been mainly studied in isolated cardiomyocytes and given that the extracellular matrix influences both Ca2+ and membrane potential dynamics in the intact heart and underlies environmentally mediated changes, understanding how Ca2+ and voltage are regulated in the intact heart will represent a tremendous advancement in the understanding of arrhythmogenic mechanisms. Using novel high-speed multiphoton microscopy techinques, such as multispot and random access, we investigated animal models with inherited and acquired arrhythmias to assess the role of Ca2+ and voltage signals as arrhythmia triggers in cell and subcellular components of the intact heart and correlate these with electrophysiology.

  17. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  18. A fully automated multi-modal computer aided diagnosis approach to coronary calcium scoring of MSCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Ferns, Gordon; Giles, John; Lewis, Emma

    2012-03-01

    Inter- and intra- observer variability is a problem often faced when an expert or observer is tasked with assessing the severity of a disease. This issue is keenly felt in coronary calcium scoring of patients suffering from atherosclerosis where in clinical practice, the observer must identify firstly the presence, followed by the location of candidate calcified plaques found within the coronary arteries that may prevent oxygenated blood flow to the heart muscle. However, it can be difficult for a human observer to differentiate calcified plaques that are located in the coronary arteries from those found in surrounding anatomy such as the mitral valve or pericardium. In addition to the benefits to scoring accuracy, the use of fast, low dose multi-slice CT imaging to perform the cardiac scan is capable of acquiring the entire heart within a single breath hold. Thus exposing the patient to lower radiation dose, which for a progressive disease such as atherosclerosis where multiple scans may be required, is beneficial to their health. Presented here is a fully automated method for calcium scoring using both the traditional Agatston method, as well as the volume scoring method. Elimination of the unwanted regions of the cardiac image slices such as lungs, ribs, and vertebrae is carried out using adaptive heart isolation. Such regions cannot contain calcified plaques but can be of a similar intensity and their removal will aid detection. Removal of both the ascending and descending aortas, as they contain clinical insignificant plaques, is necessary before the final calcium scores are calculated and examined against ground truth scores of three averaged expert observer results. The results presented here are intended to show the feasibility and requirement for an automated scoring method to reduce the subjectivity and reproducibility error inherent with manual clinical calcium scoring.

  19. A comparative approach of four different image registration techniques for quantitative assessment of coronary artery calcium lesions using intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Araki, Tadashi; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Dey, Nilanjan; Chakraborty, Sayan; Saba, Luca; Kumar, Dinesh; Godia, Elisa Cuadrado; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Gupta, Ajay; Radeva, Petia; Laird, John R; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S

    2015-02-01

    In IVUS imaging, constant linear velocity and a constant angular velocity of 1800 rev/min causes displacement of the calcium in subsequent image frames. To overcome this error in intravascular ultrasound video, IVUS image frames must be registered prior to the lesion quantification. This paper presents a comprehensive comparison of four registration methods, namely: Rigid, Affine, B-Splines and Demons on five set of calcium lesion quantification parameters namely: (i) the mean lesion area, (ii) mean lesion arc, (iii) mean lesion span, (iv) mean lesion length, and (v) mean lesion distance from catheter. Using our IRB approved data of 100 patient volumes, our results shows that all four registrations showed a decrease in five calcium lesion parameters as follows: for Rigid registration, the values were: 4.92%, 5.84%, 5.89%, 5.27%, and 4.57%, respectively, for Affine registration the values were: 6.06%, 6.51%, 7.28%, 6.50%, and 5.94%, respectively, for B-Splines registration the values were: 7.35%, 8.03%, 9.54%, 8.18%, and 7.62%, respectively, and for Demons registration the five parameters were 7.32%, 8.02%, 10.11%, 7.94%, and 8.92% respectively. The relative overlap of identified lesions decreased by 5.91% in case of Rigid registration, 6.23% in case of Affine registration, 4.48% for Demons registration, whereas it increased by 3.05% in case of B-Splines registration. Rigid and Affine transformation-based registration took only 0.1936 and 0.2893 s per frame, respectively. Demons and B-Splines framework took only 0.5705 and 0.9405 s per frame, respectively, which were significantly slower than Rigid and Affine transformation based image registration. PMID:25523233

  20. Modeling of the Calcium/Phosphorus Mass ratio for Breast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, N.; Koukou, V.; Michail, C.; Sotiropoulou, P.; Kalyvas, N.; Kandarakis, I.; Nikiforidis, G.; Fountos, G.

    2015-09-01

    Breast microcalcifications are mainly composed of calcite (CaCO3), calcium oxalate (CaC2O4) and apatite (a calcium-phosphate mineral form). Any pathologic alteration (carcinogenesis) of the breast may produce apatite. In the present simulation study, an analytical model was implemented in order to distinguish malignant and non-malignant lesions. The Calcium/Phosphorus (Ca/P) mass ratio and the standard deviation (SD) of the calcifications were calculated. The size of the calcifications ranged from 100 to 1000 μm, in 50 μm increments. The simulation was performed for hydroxyapatite, calcite and calcium oxalate calcifications. The optimum pair of energies for all calcifications was 22keV and 50keV. Hydroxyapatite and calcite calcifications were sufficiently characterized through their distinct confidence interval (99.7%, 3SD) values for calcifications sizes above 500 μm, while the corresponding sizes for hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate characterization were found above 250 μm. Initial computer simulation results indicate that the proposed method can be used in breast cancer diagnosis, reducing the need for invasive methods, such as biopsies.

  1. Dynamic structure and protein expression of the live embryonic heart captured by 2-photon light sheet microscopy and retrospective registration

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Vikas; Truong, Thai V.; Trinh, Le A.; Holland, Daniel B.; Liebling, Michael; Fraser, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    We present an imaging and image reconstruction pipeline that captures the dynamic three-dimensional beating motion of the live embryonic zebrafish heart at subcellular resolution. Live, intact zebrafish embryos were imaged using 2-photon light sheet microscopy, which offers deep and fast imaging at 70 frames per second, and the individual optical sections were assembled into a full 4D reconstruction of the beating heart using an optimized retrospective image registration algorithm. This imaging and reconstruction platform permitted us to visualize protein expression patterns at endogenous concentrations in zebrafish gene trap lines. PMID:26114028

  2. Imaging activity in astrocytes and neurons with genetically encoded calcium indicators following in utero electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Gee, J. Michael; Gibbons, Meredith B.; Taheri, Marsa; Palumbos, Sierra; Morris, S. Craig; Smeal, Roy M.; Flynn, Katherine F.; Economo, Michael N.; Cizek, Christian G.; Capecchi, Mario R.; Tvrdik, Petr; Wilcox, Karen S.; White, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Complex interactions between networks of astrocytes and neurons are beginning to be appreciated, but remain poorly understood. Transgenic mice expressing fluorescent protein reporters of cellular activity, such as the GCaMP family of genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs), have been used to explore network behavior. However, in some cases, it may be desirable to use long-established rat models that closely mimic particular aspects of human conditions such as Parkinson's disease and the development of epilepsy following status epilepticus. Methods for expressing reporter proteins in the rat brain are relatively limited. Transgenic rat technologies exist but are fairly immature. Viral-mediated expression is robust but unstable, requires invasive injections, and only works well for fairly small genes (<5 kb). In utero electroporation (IUE) offers a valuable alternative. IUE is a proven method for transfecting populations of astrocytes and neurons in the rat brain without the strict limitations on transgene size. We built a toolset of IUE plasmids carrying GCaMP variants 3, 6s, or 6f driven by CAG and targeted to the cytosol or the plasma membrane. Because low baseline fluorescence of GCaMP can hinder identification of transfected cells, we included the option of co-expressing a cytosolic tdTomato protein. A binary system consisting of a plasmid carrying a piggyBac inverted terminal repeat (ITR)-flanked CAG-GCaMP-IRES-tdTomato cassette and a separate plasmid encoding for expression of piggyBac transposase was employed to stably express GCaMP and tdTomato. The plasmids were co-electroporated on embryonic days 13.5–14.5 and astrocytic and neuronal activity was subsequently imaged in acute or cultured brain slices prepared from the cortex or hippocampus. Large spontaneous transients were detected in slices obtained from rats of varying ages up to 127 days. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of this toolset for interrogating astrocytic and neuronal

  3. Single-channel Analysis and Calcium Imaging in the Podocytes of the Freshly Isolated Glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Ilatovskaya, Daria V.; Palygin, Oleg; Levchenko, Vladislav; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Podocytes (renal glomerular epithelial cells) are known to regulate glomerular permeability and maintain glomerular structure; a key role for these cells in the pathogenesis of various renal diseases has been established since podocyte injury leads to proteinuria and foot process effacement. It was previously reported that various endogenous agents may cause a dramatic overload in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in podocytes, presumably leading to albuminuria, and this likely occurs via calcium-conducting ion channels. Therefore, it appeared important to study calcium handling in the podocytes both under normal conditions and in various pathological states. However, available experimental approaches have remained somewhat limited to cultured and transfected cells. Although they represent a good basic model for such studies, they are essentially extracted from the native environment of the glomerulus. Here we describe the methodology of studying podocytes as a part of the freshly isolated whole glomerulus. This preparation retains the functional potential of the podocytes, which are still attached to the capillaries; therefore, podocytes remain in the environment that conserves the major parts of the glomeruli filtration apparatus. The present manuscript elaborates on two experimental approaches that allow 1) real-time detection of calcium concentration changes with the help of ratiometric confocal fluorescence microscopy, and 2) the recording of the single ion channels activity in the podocytes of the freshly isolated glomeruli. These methodologies utilize the advantages of the native environment of the glomerulus that enable researchers to resolve acute changes in the intracellular calcium handling in response to applications of various agents, measure basal concentration of calcium within the cells (for instance, to evaluate disease progression), and assess and manipulate calcium conductance at the level of single ion channels. PMID:26167808

  4. Single-channel Analysis and Calcium Imaging in the Podocytes of the Freshly Isolated Glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Ilatovskaya, Daria V; Palygin, Oleg; Levchenko, Vladislav; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Podocytes (renal glomerular epithelial cells) are known to regulate glomerular permeability and maintain glomerular structure; a key role for these cells in the pathogenesis of various renal diseases has been established since podocyte injury leads to proteinuria and foot process effacement. It was previously reported that various endogenous agents may cause a dramatic overload in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in podocytes, presumably leading to albuminuria, and this likely occurs via calcium-conducting ion channels. Therefore, it appeared important to study calcium handling in the podocytes both under normal conditions and in various pathological states. However, available experimental approaches have remained somewhat limited to cultured and transfected cells. Although they represent a good basic model for such studies, they are essentially extracted from the native environment of the glomerulus. Here we describe the methodology of studying podocytes as a part of the freshly isolated whole glomerulus. This preparation retains the functional potential of the podocytes, which are still attached to the capillaries; therefore, podocytes remain in the environment that conserves the major parts of the glomeruli filtration apparatus. The present manuscript elaborates on two experimental approaches that allow 1) real-time detection of calcium concentration changes with the help of ratiometric confocal fluorescence microscopy, and 2) the recording of the single ion channels activity in the podocytes of the freshly isolated glomeruli. These methodologies utilize the advantages of the native environment of the glomerulus that enable researchers to resolve acute changes in the intracellular calcium handling in response to applications of various agents, measure basal concentration of calcium within the cells (for instance, to evaluate disease progression), and assess and manipulate calcium conductance at the level of single ion channels. PMID:26167808

  5. Combined system for high-time-resolution dual-excitation fluorescence photometry and fluorescence imaging of calcium transients in single normal and diseased skeletal muscle fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttenweiler, Dietmar; Wojciechowski, Reinhold; Makabe, Makoto; Veigel, Claudia; Fink, Rainer H.

    1994-12-01

    Fast photometric measurements and video-imaging of fluorescent indicators both are powerful tools in measuring the intracellular free calcium concentration of muscle and many other cells. as photometric systems yield a high temporal resolution, calcium imaging systems have high spatial but significantly reduced temporal resolution. Therefore we have developed an integrated system combining both methods and based mostly on standard components. As a common, sensitive Ca2+- indicator we used the fluorescent probe Fura-2, which is alternatingly excited for ratio measurements at 340/380 nm. We used a commercially available dual excitation photometric system (OSP-3; Olympus) for attaching a CCD-camera and a frame grabber board. To achieve the synchronization we had to design circuitries for external triggering, synchronization and accurate control of the filter changer, which we added to the system. Additionally, the software for a triggered image acquisition was developed. With this integrated setup one can easily switch between the fast photometric mode (ratio frequency 100 Hz) and the imaging mode (ratio frequency 4.17 Hz). The calcium images are correlated with the 25 times faster spot measurements and are analyzed by means of image processing. With this combined system we study release and uptake of calcium ions of normal and diseased skeletal muscle from mdx mice. Such a system will also be important for other cellular studies in which fluorescence indicators are used to monitor similar time dependent alterations as well as changes in cellular distributions of calcium.

  6. An improved method for patch clamp recording and calcium imaging of neurons in the intact dorsal root ganglion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hayar, Abdallah; Gu, Chunping; Al-Chaer, Elie D.

    2008-01-01

    The properties of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons have been mostly investigated in culture of dissociated cells, and it is uncertain whether these cells maintain the electrophysiological properties of the intact DRG neurons. Few attempts have been made to record from DRG neurons in the intact ganglion using the patch clamp technique. In this study, rat DRGs were dissected and incubated for at least 1 hour at 37°C in collagenase (10 mg/ml). We used oblique epi-illumination to visualize DRG neurons and perform patch clamp recordings. All DRG neurons exhibited strong delayed rectifier potassium current and a high threshold for spike generation (−15 mV) that rendered the cells very weakly excitable, generating only one action potential upon strong current injection (>300 pA). It is therefore possible that cultured DRG neurons, commonly used in studies of pain processing, may be hyperexcitable because they acquired "neuropathic" properties due to the injury induced by their dissociation. Electrical stimulation of the attached root produced an antidromic spike in the soma that could be blocked by intracellular hyperpolarization or high frequency stimulation. Imaging intracellular calcium concentration with Oregon Green BAPTA-1 indicates that antidromic stimulation caused a long-lasting increase in intracellular calcium concentration mostly near the cell membrane. This study describes a simple approach to examine the electrophysiological and pharmacological properties and intracellular calcium signaling in DRG neurons in the intact ganglion where the effects of somatic spike invasion can be studied as well. PMID:18588915

  7. Two-photon calcium imaging from motion-sensitive neurons in head-fixed Drosophila during optomotor walking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Seelig, Johannes D.; Chiappe, M. Eugenia; Lott, Gus K.; Dutta, Anirban; Osborne, Jason E.; Reiser, Michael B.; Jayaraman, Vivek

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila melanogster is a model organism rich in genetic tools to manipulate and identify neural circuits involved in specific behaviors. Here we present a novel technique for two-photon calcium imaging in the central brain of head-fixed Drosophila walking on an air-supported ball. The ball’s motion is tracked at high resolution and can be treated as a proxy for the fly’s own movements. We used the genetically encoded calcium sensor, GCaMP3.0, to record from important elements of the motion-processing pathway, the horizontal-system (HS) lobula plate tangential cells (LPTCs) in the fly optic lobe. We presented motion stimuli to the tethered fly and found that calcium transients in HS-neurons correlated with robust optomotor behavior during walking. Our technique allows an entirely new set of questions to be addressed by monitoring behavior and physiology in identified neurons in a powerful genetic model organism with an extensive repertoire of walking behaviors. PMID:20526346

  8. Calcium rubies: a family of red-emitting functionalizable indicators suitable for two-photon Ca2+ imaging.

    PubMed

    Collot, Mayeul; Loukou, Christina; Yakovlev, Aleksey V; Wilms, Christian D; Li, Dongdong; Evrard, Alexis; Zamaleeva, Alsu; Bourdieu, Laurent; Léger, Jean-François; Ropert, Nicole; Eilers, Jens; Oheim, Martin; Feltz, Anne; Mallet, Jean-Maurice

    2012-09-12

    We designed Calcium Rubies, a family of functionalizable BAPTA-based red-fluorescent calcium (Ca(2+)) indicators as new tools for biological Ca(2+) imaging. The specificity of this Ca(2+)-indicator family is its side arm, attached on the ethylene glycol bridge that allows coupling the indicator to various groups while leaving open the possibility of aromatic substitutions on the BAPTA core for tuning the Ca(2+)-binding affinity. Using this possibility we now synthesize and characterize three different CaRubies with affinities between 3 and 22 μM. Their long excitation and emission wavelengths (peaks at 586/604 nm) allow their use in otherwise challenging multicolor experiments, e.g., when combining Ca(2+) uncaging or optogenetic stimulation with Ca(2+) imaging in cells expressing fluorescent proteins. We illustrate this capacity by the detection of Ca(2+) transients evoked by blue light in cultured astrocytes expressing CatCh, a light-sensitive Ca(2+)-translocating channelrhodopsin linked to yellow fluorescent protein. Using time-correlated single-photon counting, we measured fluorescence lifetimes for all CaRubies and demonstrate a 10-fold increase in the average lifetime upon Ca(2+) chelation. Since only the fluorescence quantum yield but not the absorbance of the CaRubies is Ca(2+)-dependent, calibrated two-photon fluorescence excitation measurements of absolute Ca(2+) concentrations are feasible. PMID:22816677

  9. A compact acousto-optic lens for 2D and 3D femtosecond based 2-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkby, Paul A.; Naga Srinivas, N.K.M.; Silver, R. Angus

    2010-01-01

    We describe a high speed 3D Acousto-Optic Lens Microscope (AOLM) for femtosecond 2-photon imaging. By optimizing the design of the 4 AO Deflectors (AODs) and by deriving new control algorithms, we have developed a compact spherical AOL with a low temporal dispersion that enables 2-photon imaging at 10-fold lower power than previously reported. We show that the AOLM can perform high speed 2D raster-scan imaging (>150 Hz) without scan rate dependent astigmatism. It can deflect and focus a laser beam in a 3D random access sequence at 30 kHz and has an extended focusing range (>137 μm; 40X 0.8NA objective). These features are likely to make the AOLM a useful tool for studying fast physiological processes distributed in 3D space PMID:20588506

  10. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... at both ionized calcium and calcium attached to proteins. You may need to have a separate ionized calcium test if you have factors that increase or decrease total calcium levels. These may include abnormal blood levels ...

  11. Comparison of the amyloid pore forming properties of rat and human Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptide 1-42: Calcium imaging data.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Flores, Alessandra; Boutemeur, Sonia; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    The data here consists of calcium imaging of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with the calcium-sensitive dye Fluo-4AM and then incubated with nanomolar concentrations of either human or rat Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide Aβ1-42. These data are both of a qualitative (fluorescence micrographs) and semi-quantitative nature (estimation of intracellular calcium concentrations of cells probed by Aβ1-42 peptides vs. control untreated cells). Since rat Aβ1-42 differs from its human counterpart at only three amino acid positions, this comparative study is a good assessment of the specificity of the amyloid pore forming assay. The interpretation of this dataset is presented in the accompanying study "Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides" [1]. PMID:26909380

  12. Major translocation of calcium upon epidermal barrier insult: imaging and quantification via FLIM/Fourier vector analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Susana; Barry, Nicholas P.; Kirschner, Nina; Meyer, Wilfried; Mauro, Theodora M.; Moll, Ingrid; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Calcium controls an array of key events in keratinocytes and epidermis: localized changes in Ca2+ concentrations and their regulation are therefore especially important to assess when observing epidermal barrier homeostasis and repair, neonatal barrier establishment, in differentiation, signaling, cell adhesion, and in various pathological states. Yet, tissue- and cellular Ca2+ concentrations in physiologic and diseased states are only partially known, and difficult to measure. Prior observations on the Ca2+ distribution in skin were based on Ca2+ precipitation followed by electron microscopy, or proton-induced X-ray emission. Neither cellular and/or subcellular localization could be determined through these approaches. In cells in vitro, fluorescent dyes have been used extensively for ratiometric measurements of static and dynamic Ca2+ concentrations, also assessing organelle Ca2+ concentrations. For lack of better methods, these findings together build the basis for the current view of the role of Ca2+ in epidermis, their limitations notwithstanding. Here we report a method using Calcium Green 5N as the calcium sensor and the phasor-plot approach to separate raw lifetime components. Thus, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) enables us to quantitatively assess and visualize dynamic changes of Ca2+ at light-microscopic resolution in ex vivo biopsies of unfixed epidermis, in close to in vivo conditions. Comparing undisturbed epidermis with epidermis following a barrier insult revealed major shifts, and more importantly, a mobilization of high amounts of Ca2+ shortly following barrier disruption, from intracellular stores. These results partially contradict the conventional view, where barrier insults abrogate a Ca2+ gradient towards the stratum granulosum. Ca2+ FLIM overcomes prior limitations in the observation of epidermal Ca2+ dynamics, and will allow further insights into basic epidermal physiology. PMID:21193994

  13. An integrative approach for analyzing hundreds of neurons in task performing mice using wide-field calcium imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Ali I.; Gritton, Howard J.; Tseng, Hua-an; Bucklin, Mark E.; Yao, Zhaojie; Han, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Advances in neurotechnology have been integral to the investigation of neural circuit function in systems neuroscience. Recent improvements in high performance fluorescent sensors and scientific CMOS cameras enables optical imaging of neural networks at a much larger scale. While exciting technical advances demonstrate the potential of this technique, further improvement in data acquisition and analysis, especially those that allow effective processing of increasingly larger datasets, would greatly promote the application of optical imaging in systems neuroscience. Here we demonstrate the ability of wide-field imaging to capture the concurrent dynamic activity from hundreds to thousands of neurons over millimeters of brain tissue in behaving mice. This system allows the visualization of morphological details at a higher spatial resolution than has been previously achieved using similar functional imaging modalities. To analyze the expansive data sets, we developed software to facilitate rapid downstream data processing. Using this system, we show that a large fraction of anatomically distinct hippocampal neurons respond to discrete environmental stimuli associated with classical conditioning, and that the observed temporal dynamics of transient calcium signals are sufficient for exploring certain spatiotemporal features of large neural networks. PMID:26854041

  14. Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlying mechanism of calcium oscillations through the power of mathematical modeling. We also summarize recent findings on the role of calcium entry through store-operated channels in sustaining calcium oscillations and in the mechanism by which calcium oscillations couple to downstream effectors. PMID:21421924

  15. Wide-field and two-photon imaging of brain activity with voltage- and calcium-sensitive dyes

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Ryota; Baker, Bradley J.; Jin, Lei; Garaschuk, Olga; Konnerth, Arthur; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Zecevic, Dejan

    2009-01-01

    This review presents three examples of using voltage- or calcium-sensitive dyes to image the activity of the brain. Our aim is to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method with particular reference to its application to the study of the brainstem. Two of the examples use wide-field (one-photon) imaging; the third uses two-photon scanning microscopy. Because the measurements have limited signal-to-noise ratio, the paper also discusses the methodological aspects that are critical for optimizing the signal. The three examples are the following. (i) An intracellularly injected voltage-sensitive dye was used to monitor membrane potential in the dendrites of neurons in in vitro preparations. These experiments were directed at understanding how individual neurons convert complex synaptic inputs into the output spike train. (ii) An extracellular, bath application of a voltage-sensitive dye was used to monitor population signals from different parts of the dorsal brainstem. We describe recordings made during respiratory activity. The population signals indicated four different regions with distinct activity correlated with inspiration. (iii) Calcium-sensitive dyes can be used to label many individual cells in the mammalian brain. This approach, combined with two-photon microscopy, made it possible to follow the spike activity in an in vitro brainstem preparation during fictive respiratory rhythms. The organic voltage- and ion-sensitive dyes used today indiscriminatively stain all of the cell types in the preparation. A major effort is underway to develop fluorescent protein sensors of activity for selectively staining individual cell types. PMID:19651647

  16. Multifunctional Eu3+/Gd3+ dual-doped calcium phosphate vesicle-like nanospheres for sustained drug release and imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Huang, Peng; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Wu, Jin; Cui, Da-Xiang

    2012-09-01

    A facile room-temperature solution method is reported for the preparation of multifunctional Eu(3+) and Gd(3+) dual-doped calcium phosphate (CaP) (Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP) vesicle-like nanospheres in the presence of an amphiphilic block copolymer polylactide-block-monomethoxy(polyethyleneglycol) (PLA-mPEG). The photoluminescent (PL) and magnetic multifunctions of CaP vesicle-like nanospheres are realized by dual-doping with Eu(3+)/Gd(3+) ions. Under the excitation at 393 nm, Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP vesicle-like nanospheres exhibit a strong near-infrared (NIR) emission at 700 nm, and the PL intensity can be adjusted by varying Eu(3+) and Gd(3+) concentrations. Furthermore, Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP vesicle-like nanospheres can be used as the drug nanocarrier and have a high drug loading capacity and ultralong sustained drug release using ibuprofen as a model drug. The drug release from the drug delivery system of Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP vesicle-like nanospheres can sustain for a very long period of time (more than 80 days). The as-prepared Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP vesicle-like nanospheres exhibit essentially inappreciable toxicity to the cells in vitro. The noninvasive visualization of nude mice with subcutaneous injection indicates that the Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP vesicle-like nanospheres are suitable for in vivo bio-imaging. In vivo imaging tests using the subcutaneous injection model of nude mice indicate that Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP vesicle-like nanospheres can be used as an imaging agent for the NIR luminescence imaging. Thus, the Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-CaP vesicle-like nanospheres are promising for applications in the biomedical fields such as multifunctional drug delivery systems and tissue engineering scaffolds with bio-imaging guidance. PMID:22721725

  17. Imaging calcium signals in vivo: a powerful tool in physiology and pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Russell, James T

    2011-01-01

    The design and engineering of organic fluorescent Ca2+ indicators approximately 30 years ago opened the door for imaging cellular Ca2+ signals with a high degree of temporal and spatial resolution. Over this time, Ca2+ imaging has revolutionized our approaches for tissue-level spatiotemporal analysis of functional organization and has matured into a powerful tool for in situ imaging of cellular activity in the living animal. In vivo Ca2+ imaging with temporal resolution at the millisecond range and spatial resolution at micrometer range has been achieved through novel designs of Ca2+ sensors, development of modern microscopes and powerful imaging techniques such as two-photon microscopy. Imaging Ca2+ signals in ensembles of cells within tissue in 3D allows for analysis of integrated cellular function, which, in the case of the brain, enables recording activity patterns in local circuits. The recent development of miniaturized compact, fibre-optic-based, mechanically flexible microendoscopes capable of two-photon microscopy opens the door for imaging activity in awake, behaving animals. This development is poised to open a new chapter in physiological experiments and for pharmacological approaches in the development of novel therapies. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Imaging. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-8BJP has previously published an Imaging in Pharmacology themed section, edited by A Davenport and C Daly. To view this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2010.159.issue-4 PMID:20718728

  18. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  19. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... best treatment for the most common type of kidney stone , which is made of calcium. This type of ... the kidneys into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production ...

  20. Evolving Role of Molecular Imaging with (18)F-Sodium Fluoride PET as a Biomarker for Calcium Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Raynor, William; Houshmand, Sina; Gholami, Saeid; Emamzadehfard, Sahra; Rajapakse, Chamith S; Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Werner, Thomas J; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul F; Baker, Joshua F; Alavi, Abass

    2016-08-01

    (18)F-sodium fluoride (NaF) as an imaging tracer portrays calcium metabolic activity either in the osseous structures or in soft tissue. Currently, clinical use of NaF-PET is confined to detecting metastasis to the bone, but this approach reveals indirect evidence for disease activity and will have limited use in the future in favor of more direct approaches that visualize cancer cells in the read marrow where they reside. This has proven to be the case with FDG-PET imaging in most cancers. However, a variety of studies support the application of NaF-PET to assess benign osseous diseases. In particular, bone turnover can be measured from NaF uptake to diagnose osteoporosis. Several studies have evaluated the efficacy of bisphosphonates and their lasting effects as treatment for osteoporosis using bone turnover measured by NaF-PET. Additionally, NaF uptake in vessels tracks calcification in the plaques at the molecular level, which is relevant to coronary artery disease. Also, NaF-PET imaging of diseased joints is able to project disease progression in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Further studies suggest potential use of NaF-PET in domains such as back pain, osteosarcoma, stress-related fracture, and bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw. The critical role of NaF-PET in disease detection and characterization of many musculoskeletal disorders has been clearly demonstrated in the literature, and these methods will become more widespread in the future. The data from PET imaging are quantitative in nature, and as such, it adds a major dimension to assessing disease activity. PMID:27301549

  1. Three-Dimensional Distribution of Sensory Stimulation-Evoked Neuronal Activity of Spinal Dorsal Horn Neurons Analyzed by In Vivo Calcium Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Wataru; Uta, Daisuke; Furue, Hidemasa; Ito, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    The spinal dorsal horn comprises heterogeneous populations of interneurons and projection neurons, which form neuronal circuits crucial for processing of primary sensory information. Although electrophysiological analyses have uncovered sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity of various spinal dorsal horn neurons, monitoring these activities from large ensembles of neurons is needed to obtain a comprehensive view of the spinal dorsal horn circuitry. In the present study, we established in vivo calcium imaging of multiple spinal dorsal horn neurons by using a two-photon microscope and extracted three-dimensional neuronal activity maps of these neurons in response to cutaneous sensory stimulation. For calcium imaging, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based calcium indicator protein, Yellow Cameleon, which is insensitive to motion artifacts of living animals was introduced into spinal dorsal horn neurons by in utero electroporation. In vivo calcium imaging following pinch, brush, and heat stimulation suggests that laminar distribution of sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity in the spinal dorsal horn largely corresponds to that of primary afferent inputs. In addition, cutaneous pinch stimulation elicited activities of neurons in the spinal cord at least until 2 spinal segments away from the central projection field of primary sensory neurons responsible for the stimulated skin point. These results provide a clue to understand neuronal processing of sensory information in the spinal dorsal horn. PMID:25100083

  2. Lipid-Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles for Delivery to the Lymphatic System and SPECT/CT Imaging of Lymph Node Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yu-Cheng; Xu, Zhenghong; Guley, Kevin; Yuan, Hong; Huang, Leaf

    2014-01-01

    A lipid/calcium/phosphate (LCP) nanoparticle (NP) formulation (particle diameter ~25 nm) with superior siRNA delivery efficiency was developed and reported previously. Here, we describe the successful formulation of 111In into LCP for SPECT/CT imaging. Imaging and biodistribution studies showed that, polyethylene glycol grafted 111In-LCP preferentially accumulated in the lymph nodes at ~70% ID/g in both C57BL/6 and nude mice when the improved surface coating method was used. Both the liver and spleen accumulated only ~25% ID/g. Larger LCP (diameter ~67 nm) was less lymphotropic. These results indicate that 25 nm LCP was able to penetrate into tissues, enter the lymphatic system, and accumulate in the lymph nodes via lymphatic drainage due to 1) small size, 2) a well-PEGylated lipid surface, and 3) a slightly negative surface charge. The capability of intravenously injected 111In-LCP to visualize an enlarged, tumor-loaded sentinel lymph node was demonstrated using a 4T1 breast cancer lymph node metastasis model. Systemic gene delivery to the lymph nodes after IV injection was demonstrated by the expression of red fluorescent protein cDNA. The potential of using LCP for lymphatic drug delivery is discussed. PMID:24613050

  3. Ion microscopic imaging of calcium transport in the intestinal tissue of vitamin D-deficient and vitamin D-replete chickens: A sup 44 Ca stable isotope study

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Fullmer, C.S.; Smith, C.A.; Wasserman, R.H.; Morrison, G.H. )

    1990-08-01

    The intestinal absorption of calcium includes at least three definable steps; transfer across the microvillar membrane, movement through the cytosolic compartment, and energy-dependent extrusion into the lamina propria, Tracing the movement of calcium through the epithelium has been hampered by lack of suitable techniques and, in this study, advantage was taken of ion microscopy in conjunction with cryosectioning and use of the stable isotope 44Ca to visualize calcium in transit during the absorptive process. The effect of vitamin D, required for optimal calcium absorption, was investigated. Twenty millimolar 44Ca was injected into the duodenal lumen in situ of vitamin D-deficient and vitamin D-replete chickens. At 2.5, 5.0, and 20.0 min after injection, duodenal tissue was obtained and processed for ion microscopic imaging. At 2.5 min. 44Ca was seen to be concentrated in the region subjacent to the microvillar membrane in tissue from both groups. At 5.0 and 20.0 min, a similar pattern of localization was evident in D-deficient tissues. In D-replete tissues, the distribution of 44Ca became more homogenous, indicating that vitamin D increased the rate of transfer of Ca2+ from the apical to the basolateral membrane, a function previously ascribed to the vitamin D-induced calcium-binding protein (28-kDa calbindin-D). Quantitative aspects of the calcium absorptive process were determined in parallel experiments with the radionuclide 47Ca. Complementary information on the localization of the naturally occurring isotopes of calcium (40Ca) and potassium (39K) is also described.

  4. Calcium Imaging of Living Astrocytes in the Mouse Spinal Cord following Sensory Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cirillo, Giovanni; De Luca, Daniele; Papa, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytic Ca2+ dynamics have been extensively studied in ex vivo models; however, the recent development of two-photon microscopy and astrocyte-specific labeling has allowed the study of Ca2+ signaling in living central nervous system. Ca2+ waves in astrocytes have been described in cultured cells and slice preparations, but evidence for astrocytic activation during sensory activity is lacking. There are currently few methods to image living spinal cord: breathing and heart-beating artifacts have impeded the widespread application of this technique. We here imaged the living spinal cord by two-photon microscopy in C57BL6/J mice. Through pressurized injection, we specifically loaded spinal astrocytes using the red fluorescent dye sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) and imaged astrocytic Ca2+ levels with Oregon-Green BAPTA-1 (OGB). Then, we studied astrocytic Ca2+ levels at rest and after right electrical hind paw stimulation. Sensory stimulation significantly increased astrocytic Ca2+ levels within the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord compared to rest. In conclusion, in vivo morphofunctional imaging of living astrocytes in spinal cord revealed that astrocytes actively participate to sensory stimulation. PMID:23091738

  5. Asymmetric neural coding revealed by in vivo calcium imaging in the honey bee brain.

    PubMed

    Rigosi, Elisa; Haase, Albrecht; Rath, Lisa; Anfora, Gianfranco; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Szyszka, Paul

    2015-03-22

    Left-right asymmetries are common properties of nervous systems. Although lateralized sensory processing has been well studied, information is lacking about how asymmetries are represented at the level of neural coding. Using in vivo functional imaging, we identified a population-level left-right asymmetry in the honey bee's primary olfactory centre, the antennal lobe (AL). When both antennae were stimulated via a frontal odour source, the inter-odour distances between neural response patterns were higher in the right than in the left AL. Behavioural data correlated with the brain imaging results: bees with only their right antenna were better in discriminating a target odour in a cross-adaptation paradigm. We hypothesize that the differences in neural odour representations in the two brain sides serve to increase coding capacity by parallel processing. PMID:25673679

  6. Asymmetric neural coding revealed by in vivo calcium imaging in the honey bee brain

    PubMed Central

    Rigosi, Elisa; Haase, Albrecht; Rath, Lisa; Anfora, Gianfranco; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Szyszka, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Left–right asymmetries are common properties of nervous systems. Although lateralized sensory processing has been well studied, information is lacking about how asymmetries are represented at the level of neural coding. Using in vivo functional imaging, we identified a population-level left–right asymmetry in the honey bee's primary olfactory centre, the antennal lobe (AL). When both antennae were stimulated via a frontal odour source, the inter-odour distances between neural response patterns were higher in the right than in the left AL. Behavioural data correlated with the brain imaging results: bees with only their right antenna were better in discriminating a target odour in a cross-adaptation paradigm. We hypothesize that the differences in neural odour representations in the two brain sides serve to increase coding capacity by parallel processing. PMID:25673679

  7. Nanoparticle PEBBLE Sensors for Quantitative Nanomolar Imaging of Intracellular Free Calcium Ions

    PubMed Central

    Si, Di; Epstein, Tamir; Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+ is a universal second messenger and plays a major role in intracellular signaling, metabolism and a wide range of cellular processes. To date, one of the most successful approaches for intracellular Ca2+ measurement involves introduction of optically sensitive Ca2+ indicators into living cells, combined with digital imaging microscopy. However, the use of free Ca2+ indicators for intracellular sensing and imaging has several limitations, such as nonratiometric measurement for the most sensitive indicators, cytotoxicity of the indicators, interference from non-specific binding caused by cellular biomacromolecules, challenging calibration and unwanted sequestration of the indicator molecules. These problems are minimized when the Ca2+ indicators are encapsulated inside porous and inert polyacrylamide nanoparticles. We present PEBBLE nanosensors encapsulated with rhodamine based Ca2+ fluorescence indicators. The here presented rhod-2 containing PEBBLEs show a stable sensing range at near-neutral pH (pH 6–9). Due to the protection of the PEBBLE matrix, the interference of protein non-specific binding to the indicator is minimal. The rhod-2 PEBBLEs give a nanomolar dynamic sensing range for both in-solution (Kd = 478 nM) and intracellular (Kd = 293 nM) measurements. These nanosensors are a useful quantitative tool for the measurement and imaging of the cytosolic nanomolar free Ca2+ levels. PMID:22122409

  8. Calcium imaging of sleep–wake related neuronal activity in the dorsal pons

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Julia; Pinto, Lucas; Dan, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal pons has long been implicated in the generation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, but the underlying circuit mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using cell-type-specific microendoscopic Ca2+ imaging in and near the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, we found that many glutamatergic neurons are maximally active during REM sleep (REM-max), while the majority of GABAergic neurons are maximally active during wakefulness (wake-max). Furthermore, the activity of glutamatergic neurons exhibits a medio-lateral spatial gradient, with medially located neurons more selectively active during REM sleep. PMID:26911837

  9. Super-resolution 2-photon microscopy reveals that the morphology of each dendritic spine correlates with diffusive but not synaptic properties

    PubMed Central

    Takasaki, Kevin; Sabatini, Bernardo L.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of dendritic spines suggests a specialized function in compartmentalizing synaptic signals near active synapses. Indeed, theoretical and experimental analyses indicate that the diffusive resistance of the spine neck is sufficient to effectively compartmentalize some signaling molecules in a spine for the duration of their activated lifetime. Here we describe the application of 2-photon microscopy combined with stimulated emission depletion (STED-2P) to the biophysical study of the relationship between synaptic signals and spine morphology, demonstrating the utility of combining STED-2P with modern optical and electrophysiological techniques. Morphological determinants of fluorescence recovery time were identified and evaluated within the context of a simple compartmental model describing diffusive transfer between spine and dendrite. Correlations between the neck geometry and the amplitude of synaptic potentials and calcium transients evoked by 2-photon glutamate uncaging were also investigated. PMID:24847215

  10. Imaging the recruitment and loss of proteins and lipids at single sites of calcium-triggered exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Adam J; Sochacki, Kem A; Taraska, Justin W

    2016-08-01

    How and when the dozens of molecules that control exocytosis assemble in living cells to regulate the fusion of a vesicle with the plasma membrane is unknown. Here we image with two-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy the local changes of 27 proteins at single dense-core vesicles undergoing calcium-triggered fusion. We identify two broad dynamic behaviors of exocytic molecules. First, proteins enriched at exocytic sites are associated with DCVs long before exocytosis, and near the time of membrane fusion, they diffuse away. These proteins include Rab3 and Rab27, rabphilin3a, munc18a, tomosyn, and CAPS. Second, we observe a group of classical endocytic proteins and lipids, including dynamins, amphiphysin, syndapin, endophilin, and PIP2, which are rapidly and transiently recruited to the exocytic site near the time of membrane fusion. Dynamin mutants unable to bind amphiphysin were not recruited, indicating that amphiphysin is involved in localizing dynamin to the fusion site. Expression of mutant dynamins and knockdown of endogenous dynamin altered the rate of cargo release from single vesicles. Our data reveal the dynamics of many key proteins involved in exocytosis and identify a rapidly recruited dynamin/PIP2/BAR assembly that regulates the exocytic fusion pore of dense-core vesicles in cultured endocrine beta cells. PMID:27307587

  11. Excited-state structural dynamics of a dual-emission calmodulin-green fluorescent protein sensor for calcium ion imaging.

    PubMed

    Oscar, Breland G; Liu, Weimin; Zhao, Yongxin; Tang, Longteng; Wang, Yanli; Campbell, Robert E; Fang, Chong

    2014-07-15

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have played a pivotal role in bioimaging and advancing biomedicine. The versatile fluorescence from engineered, genetically encodable FP variants greatly enhances cellular imaging capabilities, which are dictated by excited-state structural dynamics of the embedded chromophore inside the protein pocket. Visualization of the molecular choreography of the photoexcited chromophore requires a spectroscopic technique capable of resolving atomic motions on the intrinsic timescale of femtosecond to picosecond. We use femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy to study the excited-state conformational dynamics of a recently developed FP-calmodulin biosensor, GEM-GECO1, for calcium ion (Ca(2+)) sensing. This study reveals that, in the absence of Ca(2+), the dominant skeletal motion is a ∼ 170 cm(-1) phenol-ring in-plane rocking that facilitates excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) with a time constant of ∼ 30 ps (6 times slower than wild-type GFP) to reach the green fluorescent state. The functional relevance of the motion is corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations. Upon Ca(2+) binding, this in-plane rocking motion diminishes, and blue emission from a trapped photoexcited neutral chromophore dominates because ESPT is inhibited. Fluorescence properties of site-specific protein mutants lend further support to functional roles of key residues including proline 377 in modulating the H-bonding network and fluorescence outcome. These crucial structural dynamics insights will aid rational design in bioengineering to generate versatile, robust, and more sensitive optical sensors to detect Ca(2+) in physiologically relevant environments. PMID:24987121

  12. Hybrid Calcium Phosphate-Polymeric Micelles Incorporating Gadolinium Chelates for Imaging-Guided Gadolinium Neutron Capture Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mi, Peng; Dewi, Novriana; Yanagie, Hironobu; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Li, Yanmin; Aoki, Ichio; Ono, Koji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Cabral, Horacio; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2015-06-23

    Gadolinium (Gd) chelates-loaded nanocarriers have high potential for achieving magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided Gd neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) of tumors. Herein, we developed calcium phosphate micelles hybridized with PEG-polyanion block copolymers, and incorporated with the clinical MRI contrast agent Gd-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA/CaP). The Gd-DTPA/CaP were nontoxic to cancer cells at the concentration of 100 μM based on Gd-DTPA, while over 50% of the cancer cells were killed by thermal neutron irradiation at this concentration. Moreover, the Gd-DTPA/CaP showed a dramatically increased accumulation of Gd-DTPA in tumors, leading to the selective contrast enhancement of tumor tissues for precise tumor location by MRI. The enhanced tumor-to-blood distribution ratio of Gd-DTPA/CaP resulted in the effective suppression of tumor growth without loss of body weight, indicating the potential of Gd-DTPA/CaP for safe cancer treatment. PMID:26033034

  13. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of calcium signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kelly L; Picaud, Sandrine; Roncali, Emilie; Boisgard, Raphaël; Colasante, Cesare; Stinnakre, Jacques; Tavitian, Bertrand; Brûlet, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Rapid and transient elevations of Ca(2+) within cellular microdomains play a critical role in the regulation of many signal transduction pathways. Described here is a genetic approach for non-invasive detection of localized Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) rises in live animals using bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Transgenic mice conditionally expressing the Ca(2+)-sensitive bioluminescent reporter GFP-aequorin targeted to the mitochondrial matrix were studied in several experimental paradigms. Rapid [Ca(2+)] rises inside the mitochondrial matrix could be readily detected during single-twitch muscle contractions. Whole body patterns of [Ca(2+)] were monitored in freely moving mice and during epileptic seizures. Furthermore, variations in mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] correlated to behavioral components of the sleep/wake cycle were observed during prolonged whole body recordings of newborn mice. This non-invasive imaging technique opens new avenues for the analysis of Ca(2+) signaling whenever whole body information in freely moving animals is desired, in particular during behavioral and developmental studies. PMID:17912353

  14. Live Imaging of Nicotine Induced Calcium Signaling and Neurotransmitter Release Along Ventral Hippocampal Axons.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chongbo; Talmage, David A; Role, Lorna W

    2015-01-01

    Sustained enhancement of axonal signaling and increased neurotransmitter release by the activation of pre-synaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is an important mechanism for neuromodulation by acetylcholine (ACh). The difficulty with access to probing the signaling mechanisms within intact axons and at nerve terminals both in vitro and in vivo has limited progress in the study of the pre-synaptic components of synaptic plasticity. Here we introduce a gene-chimeric preparation of ventral hippocampal (vHipp)-accumbens (nAcc) circuit in vitro that allows direct live imaging to analyze both the pre- and post-synaptic components of transmission while selectively varying the genetic profile of the pre- vs post-synaptic neurons. We demonstrate that projections from vHipp microslices, as pre-synaptic axonal input, form multiple, reliable glutamatergic synapses with post-synaptic targets, the dispersed neurons from nAcc. The pre-synaptic localization of various subtypes of nAChRs are detected and the pre-synaptic nicotinic signaling mediated synaptic transmission are monitored by concurrent electrophysiological recording and live cell imaging. This preparation also provides an informative approach to study the pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms of glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in vitro. PMID:26132461

  15. Live cell imaging using confocal microscopy induces intracellular calcium transients and cell death.

    PubMed

    Knight, Martin M; Roberts, Susan R; Lee, David A; Bader, Dan L

    2003-04-01

    Isolated chondrocytes stained with fluo 4-AM and visualized using standard confocal microscopy techniques exhibited Ca2- transients and oscillations. Decreasing the power of the laser light decreased the percent-age of cells exhibiting these Ca2+ signals. Treatment with the antioxidant ascorbate reduced the Ca2+ response, suggesting that it was mediated by light-induced release of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cell viability 24 h after the 1-h confocal imaging period was approximately 90% for cells that were neither fluorescently stained nor subjected to laser excitation. By contrast, fluorescently stained cells imaged for 1 h exhibited greatly reduced viability. Treatment with ascorbate reduced the level of cell death, suggesting that the effect was mediated by release of exogenous ROS associated with the interaction of light and the fluorochrome. Ca2+ oscillations were not always associated with cell death, suggesting that separate light-sensitive pathways mediate the two processes. Light-activated Ca2+ signaling may trigger alterations in numerous cell processes and thereby represent an important and hitherto overlooked artifact in fluorescent microscopy of viable cells. PMID:12661552

  16. Calcium imaging in populations of olfactory neurons by planar illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Holy, Timothy E

    2014-03-01

    Neurons in the olfactory system display extraordinary functional diversity, which at the level of sensory neurons arises from the expression of one out of several hundred distinct receptor types. To cope with this diversity, one approach is to use techniques that can record sensory responses from many neurons simultaneously. We have developed a form of light-sheet microscopy, called objective-coupled planar illumination (OCPI) microscopy, that is well suited to recording at high signal-to-noise ratios from large neuronal populations. Because OCPI microscopy illuminates the entire field simultaneously, it allows fast imaging without compromising field of view. At current camera speeds, pixels can be acquired more than 100-fold faster than by point-scanning fluorescence microscopy. Here we describe the theory, advantages, and practical implementation of planar illumination and briefly discuss its application to neuronal recording in the mouse vomeronasal organ. We also provide a brief protocol, in which a mouse is pretreated with dye for 1 wk to allow labeling of the sensory neurons before stimulation and imaging. PMID:24591697

  17. Imaging neuronal responses in slice preparations of vomeronasal organ expressing a genetically encoded calcium sensor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Limei; Haga-Yamanaka, Sachiko; Yu, Qingfeng Elden; Qiu, Qiang; Kim, Sangseong; Yu, C Ron

    2011-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects chemosensory signals that carry information about the social, sexual and reproductive status of the individuals within the same species. These intraspecies signals, the pheromones, as well as signals from some predators, activate the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) with high levels of specificity and sensitivity. At least three distinct families of G-protein coupled receptors, V1R, V2R and FPR, are expressed in VNO neurons to mediate the detection of the chemosensory cues. To understand how pheromone information is encoded by the VNO, it is critical to analyze the response profiles of individual VSNs to various stimuli and identify the specific receptors that mediate these responses. The neuroepithelia of VNO are enclosed in a pair of vomer bones. The semi-blind tubular structure of VNO has one open end (the vomeronasal duct) connecting to the nasal cavity. VSNs extend their dendrites to the lumen part of the VNO, where the pheromone cues are in contact with the receptors expressed at the dendritic knobs. The cell bodies of the VSNs form pseudo-stratified layers with V1R and V2R expressed in the apical and basal layers respectively. Several techniques have been utilized to monitor responses of VSNs to sensory stimuli. Among these techniques, acute slice preparation offers several advantages. First, compared to dissociated VSNs, slice preparations maintain the neurons in their native morphology and the dendrites of the cells stay relatively intact. Second, the cell bodies of the VSNs are easily accessible in coronal slice of the VNO to allow electrophysiology studies and imaging experiments as compared to whole epithelium and whole-mount preparations. Third, this method can be combined with molecular cloning techniques to allow receptor identification. Sensory stimulation elicits strong Ca2+ influx in VSNs that is indicative of receptor activation. We thus develop transgenic mice that express G-CaMP2 in the olfactory sensory

  18. Ratiometric imaging of calcium during ischemia-reperfusion injury in isolated mouse hearts using Fura-2

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We present an easily implementable method for measuring Fura-2 fluorescence from isolated mouse hearts using a commercially available switching light source and CCD camera. After calibration, it provides a good estimate of intracellular [Ca2+] with both high spatial and temporal resolutions, permitting study of changes in dispersion of diastolic [Ca2+], Ca2+ transient dynamics, and conduction velocities in mouse hearts. In a proof-of-principle study, we imaged isolated Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts with reversible regional myocardial infarctions. Methods Isolated mouse hearts were perfused in the Landendorff-mode and loaded with Fura-2. Hearts were then paced rapidly and subjected to 15 minutes of regional ischemia by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery, following which the ligation was removed to allow reperfusion for 15 minutes. Fura-2 fluorescence was recorded at regular intervals using a high-speed CCD camera. The two wavelengths of excitation light were interleaved at a rate of 1 KHz with a computer controlled switching light source to illuminate the heart. Results Fura-2 produced consistent Ca2+ transients from different hearts. Ligating the coronary artery rapidly generated a well defined region with a dramatic rise in diastolic Ca2+ without a significant change in transient amplitude; Ca2+ handling normalized during reperfusion. Conduction velocity was reduced by around 50% during ischemia, and did not recover significantly when monitored for 15 minutes following reperfusion. Conclusions Our method of imaging Fura-2 from isolated whole hearts is capable of detecting pathological changes in intracellular Ca2+ levels in cardiac tissue. The persistent change in the conduction velocities indicates that changes to tissue connectivity rather than altered intracellular Ca2+ handling may be underlying the electrical instabilities commonly seen in patients following a myocardial infarction. PMID:22812644

  19. Functional Microarchitecture of the Mouse Dorsal Inferior Colliculus Revealed through In Vivo Two-Photon Calcium Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Barnstedt, Oliver; Keating, Peter; Weissenberger, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) is an obligatory relay for ascending auditory inputs from the brainstem and receives descending input from the auditory cortex. The IC comprises a central nucleus (CNIC), surrounded by several shell regions, but the internal organization of this midbrain nucleus remains incompletely understood. We used two-photon calcium imaging to study the functional microarchitecture of both neurons in the mouse dorsal IC and corticocollicular axons that terminate there. In contrast to previous electrophysiological studies, our approach revealed a clear functional distinction between the CNIC and the dorsal cortex of the IC (DCIC), suggesting that the mouse midbrain is more similar to that of other mammals than previously thought. We found that the DCIC comprises a thin sheet of neurons, sometimes extending barely 100 μm below the pial surface. The sound frequency representation in the DCIC approximated the mouse's full hearing range, whereas dorsal CNIC neurons almost exclusively preferred low frequencies. The response properties of neurons in these two regions were otherwise surprisingly similar, and the frequency tuning of DCIC neurons was only slightly broader than that of CNIC neurons. In several animals, frequency gradients were observed in the DCIC, and a comparable tonotopic arrangement was observed across the boutons of the corticocollicular axons, which form a dense mesh beneath the dorsal surface of the IC. Nevertheless, acoustically responsive corticocollicular boutons were sparse, produced unreliable responses, and were more broadly tuned than DCIC neurons, suggesting that they have a largely modulatory rather than driving influence on auditory midbrain neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Due to its genetic tractability, the mouse is fast becoming the most popular animal model for sensory neuroscience. Nevertheless, many aspects of its neural architecture are still poorly understood. Here, we image the dorsal auditory midbrain and its

  20. In vivo two-photon imaging of axonal dieback, blood flow, and calcium influx with methylprednisolone therapy after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tang, Peifu; Zhang, Yiling; Chen, Chao; Ji, Xinran; Ju, Furong; Liu, Xingyu; Gan, Wen-Biao; He, Zhigang; Zhang, Shengxiang; Li, Wei; Zhang, Lihai

    2015-01-01

    Severe spinal cord injury (SCI) can cause neurological dysfunction and paralysis. However, the early dynamic changes of neurons and their surrounding environment after SCI are poorly understood. Although methylprednisolone (MP) is currently the standard therapeutic agent for treating SCI, its efficacy remains controversial. The purpose of this project was to investigate the early dynamic changes and MP's efficacy on axonal damage, blood flow, and calcium influx into axons in a mouse SCI model. YFP H-line and Thy1-GCaMP transgenic mice were used in this study. Two-photon microscopy was used for imaging of axonal dieback, blood flow, and calcium influx post-injury. We found that MP treatment attenuated progressive damage of axons, increased blood flow, and reduced calcium influx post-injury. Furthermore, microglia/macrophages accumulated in the lesion site after SCI and expressed the proinflammatory mediators iNOS, MCP-1 and IL-1β. MP treatment markedly inhibited the accumulation of microglia/macrophages and reduced the expression of the proinflammatory mediators. MP treatment also improved the recovery of behavioral function post-injury. These findings suggest that MP exerts a neuroprotective effect on SCI treatment by attenuating progressive damage of axons, increasing blood flow, reducing calcium influx, and inhibiting the accumulation of microglia/macrophages after SCI. PMID:25989524

  1. In Vivo Two-Photon Imaging of Axonal Dieback, Blood Flow, and Calcium Influx with Methylprednisolone Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Peifu; Zhang, Yiling; Chen, Chao; Ji, Xinran; Ju, Furong; Liu, Xingyu; Gan, Wen-Biao; He, Zhigang; Zhang, Shengxiang; Li, Wei; Zhang, Lihai

    2015-01-01

    Severe spinal cord injury (SCI) can cause neurological dysfunction and paralysis. However, the early dynamic changes of neurons and their surrounding environment after SCI are poorly understood. Although methylprednisolone (MP) is currently the standard therapeutic agent for treating SCI, its efficacy remains controversial. The purpose of this project was to investigate the early dynamic changes and MP's efficacy on axonal damage, blood flow, and calcium influx into axons in a mouse SCI model. YFP H-line and Thy1-GCaMP transgenic mice were used in this study. Two-photon microscopy was used for imaging of axonal dieback, blood flow, and calcium influx post-injury. We found that MP treatment attenuated progressive damage of axons, increased blood flow, and reduced calcium influx post-injury. Furthermore, microglia/macrophages accumulated in the lesion site after SCI and expressed the proinflammatory mediators iNOS, MCP-1 and IL-1β. MP treatment markedly inhibited the accumulation of microglia/macrophages and reduced the expression of the proinflammatory mediators. MP treatment also improved the recovery of behavioral function post-injury. These findings suggest that MP exerts a neuroprotective effect on SCI treatment by attenuating progressive damage of axons, increasing blood flow, reducing calcium influx, and inhibiting the accumulation of microglia/macrophages after SCI. PMID:25989524

  2. Lead in calcium supplements.

    PubMed Central

    Scelfo, G M; Flegal, A R

    2000-01-01

    Intercalibrated measurements of lead in calcium supplements indicate the importance of rigorous analytical techniques to accurately quantify contaminant exposures in complex matrices. Without such techniques, measurements of lead concentrations in calcium supplements may be either erroneously low, by as much as 50%, or below the detection limit needed for new public health criteria. In this study, we determined the lead content of 136 brands of supplements that were purchased in 1996. The calcium in the products was derived from natural sources (bonemeal, dolomite, or oyster shell) or was synthesized and/or refined (chelated and nonchelated calcium). The dried products were acid digested and analyzed for lead by high resolution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The method's limit of quantitation averaged 0.06 microg/g, with a coefficient of variation of 1.7% and a 90-100% lead recovery of a bonemeal standard reference material. Two-thirds of those calcium supplements failed to meet the 1999 California criteria for acceptable lead levels (1.5 microg/daily dose of calcium) in consumer products. The nonchelated synthesized and/or refined calcium products, specifically antacids and infant formulas, had the lowest lead concentrations, ranging from nondetectable to 2.9 microg Pb/g calcium, and had the largest proportion of brands meeting the new criteria (85% of the antacids and 100% of the infant formulas). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10753088

  3. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production of ... Milk-alkali syndrome Proximal renal tubular acidosis Rickets Sarcoidosis Vitamin D Update Date 5/3/2015 Updated ...

  4. Measurement of Calcium Fluctuations Within the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum of Cultured Smooth Muscle Cells Using FRET-based Confocal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ziomek, Gabriela; van Breemen, Cornelis; Esfandiarei, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of steady-state calcium (Ca(2+)) levels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is vital to their overall health. A significant portion of intracellular Ca(2+) content is found within the SR stores in VSMCs. As the only intracellular organelle with a close association to the surrounding extracellular space through plasma membrane-SR junctions, the SR can be considered to constitute the first line of response to any irregularity in Ca(2+) transients, or stress experienced by the cell. Among its many functions, one of the most important is its role in the transmission of Ca(2+)-regulated signals throughout the cell to induce further cell-wide reactions downstream. The more common use of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) indicators in this regard is overall insufficient for research into the highly dynamic changes to the intraluminal SR Ca(2+) store that have yet to be fully characterized. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the direct and clear measurement of luminal SR Ca(2+). This tool is useful for investigation into the nuanced changes in SR Ca(2+) that have significant subsequent effects on the normal function and health of the cell. Fluctuations in SR Ca(2+) content specifically can provide us with a significant amount of information pertaining to cellular responses to disease or stress conditions experienced by the cell. In this method, a modified version of a SR-targeted Ca(2+) indicator, D1SR, is used to detect Ca(2+) fluctuations in response to the introduction of agents to cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Following incubation with the D1SR indicator, confocal fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based imaging are used to directly observe changes to intraluminal SR Ca(2+) levels under control conditions and with the addition of agonist agents that function to induce intracellular Ca(2+) movement. PMID:27403723

  5. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the human body. It helps build and protect your teeth ... absorb calcium. You can get vitamin D from sunlight exposure to your skin and from your diet. Ask your provider whether ...

  6. Indocyanine green-encapsulating calcium phosphosilicate nanoparticles: Bifunctional theranostic vectors for near infrared diagnostic imaging and photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altinoglu, Erhan I.

    The synthesis, laundering, and properties of calcium phosphosilicate nanoparticles (CPSNPs) that encapsulate the NIR fluorophore indocyanine green (ICG) related to multifunctional fluorescent photosensitization is presented. Imaging with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the well dispersed state of the nanoparticles, the spherical morphology, and the log normal mean particle diameter of 16 nm. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) mapping identified a Ca:P:Si ratio of 1:1.72:0.41 and a homogeneous composition without evidence of an element rich or deficient architecture. Zeta potential of the as-synthesized, citrate-functionalized CPSNPs was -29 +/-3 mV. A theoretical solids loading of 1.9 x 1013 CPSNP/mL was calculated for a standard suspension. The mean ICG content per suspension is 2 x 10 -6 M, which equates to approximately 63 fluorophore molecules encapsulated per CPSNP. For imaging and diagnostic considerations, the doped CPSNPs exhibited significantly greater intensity at the maximum emission wavelength relative to the free constituent fluorophore. The quantum efficiency of the fluorescent agent is 200% greater at 0.053+/-0.003 over the free fluorophore in PBS. Also, photostability based on fluorescence half-life of encapsulated ICG in PBS is 500% longer under typical clinical imaging conditions relative to the free dye. These performance enhancements are attributed to the matrix shielding effect of the NP around the internalized fluorophore molecules. The in vivo emission signal stability from ICG-CPSNPs was compared to the free fluorophore by whole animal NIR imaging. The duration of fluorescent signal from the ICG-CPSPNPs was extended to up to four days post-injection, highlighting the potential for long-term imaging and sensitive tracking applications using ICG when encapsulated within the protective matrix of CPSNPs. The surfaces of the ICG-CPSNPs were covalently bound with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The pharmacokinetic behavior of the

  7. Apoptosis induction-related cytosolic calcium responses revealed by the dual FRET imaging of calcium signals and caspase-3 activation in a single cell.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Akitoshi; Miyauchi, Hiroshi; Kogure, Takako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2015-04-24

    Stimulus-induced changes in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration control cell fate decision, including apoptosis. However, the precise patterns of the cytosolic Ca(2+) signals that are associated with apoptotic induction remain unknown. We have developed a novel genetically encoded sensor of activated caspase-3 that can be applied in combination with a genetically encoded sensor of the Ca(2+) concentration and have established a dual imaging system that enables the imaging of both cytosolic Ca(2+) signals and caspase-3 activation, which is an indicator of apoptosis, in the same cell. Using this system, we identified differences in the cytosolic Ca(2+) signals of apoptotic and surviving DT40 B lymphocytes after B cell receptor (BCR) stimulation. In surviving cells, BCR stimulation evoked larger initial Ca(2+) spikes followed by a larger sustained elevation of the Ca(2+) concentration than those in apoptotic cells; BCR stimulation also resulted in repetitive transient Ca(2+) spikes, which were mediated by the influx of Ca(2+) from the extracellular space. Our results indicate that the observation of both Ca(2+) signals and cells fate in same cell is crucial to gain an accurate understanding of the function of intracellular Ca(2+) signals in apoptotic induction. PMID:25998736

  8. Zolpidem Reduces Hippocampal Neuronal Activity in Freely Behaving Mice: A Large Scale Calcium Imaging Study with Miniaturized Fluorescence Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Berdyyeva, Tamara; Otte, Stephani; Aluisio, Leah; Ziv, Yaniv; Burns, Laurie D.; Dugovic, Christine; Yun, Sujin; Ghosh, Kunal K.; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Lovenberg, Timothy; Bonaventure, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic drugs for cognitive and psychiatric disorders are often characterized by their molecular mechanism of action. Here we demonstrate a new approach to elucidate drug action on large-scale neuronal activity by tracking somatic calcium dynamics in hundreds of CA1 hippocampal neurons of pharmacologically manipulated behaving mice. We used an adeno-associated viral vector to express the calcium sensor GCaMP3 in CA1 pyramidal cells under control of the CaMKII promoter and a miniaturized microscope to observe cellular dynamics. We visualized these dynamics with and without a systemic administration of Zolpidem, a GABAA agonist that is the most commonly prescribed drug for the treatment of insomnia in the United States. Despite growing concerns about the potential adverse effects of Zolpidem on memory and cognition, it remained unclear whether Zolpidem alters neuronal activity in the hippocampus, a brain area critical for cognition and memory. Zolpidem, when delivered at a dose known to induce and prolong sleep, strongly suppressed CA1 calcium signaling. The rate of calcium transients after Zolpidem administration was significantly lower compared to vehicle treatment. To factor out the contribution of changes in locomotor or physiological conditions following Zolpidem treatment, we compared the cellular activity across comparable epochs matched by locomotor and physiological assessments. This analysis revealed significantly depressive effects of Zolpidem regardless of the animal’s state. Individual hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells differed in their responses to Zolpidem with the majority (∼65%) significantly decreasing the rate of calcium transients, and a small subset (3%) showing an unexpected and significant increase. By linking molecular mechanisms with the dynamics of neural circuitry and behavioral states, this approach has the potential to contribute substantially to the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of CNS disorders. PMID:25372144

  9. Calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ehud; Messerli, Franz H

    2004-01-01

    Calcium antagonists were introduced for the treatment of hypertension in the 1980s. Their use was subsequently expanded to additional disorders, such as angina pectoris, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Raynaud phenomenon, pulmonary hypertension, diffuse esophageal spasms, and migraine. Calcium antagonists as a group are heterogeneous and include 3 main classes--phenylalkylamines, benzothiazepines, and dihydropyridines--that differ in their molecular structure, sites and modes of action, and effects on various other cardiovascular functions. Calcium antagonists lower blood pressure mainly through vasodilation and reduction of peripheral resistance. They maintain blood flow to vital organs, and are safe in patients with renal impairment. Unlike diuretics and beta-blockers, calcium antagonists do not impair glucose metabolism or lipid profile and may even attenuate the development of arteriosclerotic lesions. In long-term follow-up, patients treated with calcium antagonists had development of less overt diabetes mellitus than those who were treated with diuretics and beta-blockers. Moreover, calcium antagonists are able to reduce left ventricular mass and are effective in improving anginal pain. Recent prospective randomized studies attested to the beneficial effects of calcium antagonists in hypertensive patients. In comparison with placebo, calcium antagonist-based therapy reduced major cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death significantly in elderly hypertensive patients and in diabetic patients. In several comparative studies in hypertensive patients, treatment with calcium antagonists was equally effective as treatment with diuretics, beta-blockers, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. From these studies, it seems that a calcium antagonist-based regimen is superior to other regimens in preventing stroke, equivalent in preventing ischemic heart disease, and inferior in preventing congestive heart failure

  10. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ... the body on a full or empty stomach. Calcium carbonate is less expensive. It is absorbed better by ...

  11. Calcium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... as thyroid disease , parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , cancer, or malnutrition An ionized calcium test may be ordered when ... albumin , which can result from liver disease or malnutrition , both of which may result from alcoholism or ...

  12. Calcium Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Sarcopenia Skeletal Rare Disorders Data & Publications Facts and Statistics Vitamin D map Fracture Risk Map Hip Fracture ... Training Courses Working Groups Regional Audits Reports Facts and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What ...

  13. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... levels. These may include abnormal blood levels of albumin or immunoglobulins. Normal Results Children: 4.8 to ... 2016:chap 245. Read More Acute kidney failure Albumin - blood (serum) test Bone tumor Calcium blood test ...

  14. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables. PMID:26940168

  15. Calcium orthophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2011-01-01

    The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. This type of materials is of special significance for human beings, because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and antlers) and pathological (i.e., those appearing due to various diseases) calcified tissues of mammals. For example, atherosclerosis results in blood vessel blockage caused by a solid composite of cholesterol with calcium orthophosphates, while dental caries and osteoporosis mean a partial decalcification of teeth and bones, respectively, that results in replacement of a less soluble and harder biological apatite by more soluble and softer calcium hydrogenphosphates. Therefore, the processes of both normal and pathological calcifications are just an in vivo crystallization of calcium orthophosphates. Similarly, dental caries and osteoporosis might be considered an in vivo dissolution of calcium orthophosphates. Thus, calcium orthophosphates hold a great significance for humankind, and in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided. PMID:23507744

  16. Calcium Hydroxylapatite

    PubMed Central

    Yutskovskaya, Yana Alexandrovna; Philip Werschler, WM.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcium hydroxylapatite is one of the most well-studied dermal fillers worldwide and has been extensively used for the correction of moderate-to-severe facial lines and folds and to replenish lost volume. Objectives: To mark the milestone of 10 years of use in the aesthetic field, this review will consider the evolution of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine, provide a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach, and examine how the unique properties of calcium hydroxylapatite provide it with an important place in today’s market. Methods: This article is an up-to-date review of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine along with procedures for its use, including a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach by three expert injectors. Conclusion: Calcium hydroxylapatite is a very effective agent for many areas of facial soft tissue augmentation and is associated with a high and well-established safety profile. Calcium hydroxylapatite combines high elasticity and viscosity with an ability to induce long-term collagen formation making it an ideal agent for a global facial approach. PMID:25610523

  17. Reversibly phototunable TiO{sub 2} photonic crystal modulated by Ag nanoparticles' oxidation/reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jian; Zhou Jinming; Ye Changqing; Li Mingzhu; Wang Jingxia; Jiang Lei; Song Yanlin

    2011-01-10

    We report a reversibly phototunable photonic crystal system whose reflectance at the stop band position can be modulated by alternating UV/visible (UV/Vis) irradiation. The phototunable system consists of Ag nanoparticles and TiO{sub 2} photonic crystal. The stop bands intensity of Ag loaded TiO{sub 2} photonic crystals were found to be dependent on the redox states of Ag nanoparticles. The quasi 'on' and 'off' states of the stop band were reversibly modulated by the Ag nanoparticles' oxidation/reduction through alternating UV/Vis light irradiation.

  18. Quantitative Relation between Coronary Calcium Content and Coronary Flow Reserve as Assessed by Integrated PET-CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Curillova, Zelmira; Yaman, Bettina F.; Dorbala, Sharmila; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Sitek, Arkadius; El Fakhri, Georges; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos; Di Carli, Marcelo F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Coronary artery calcium (CAC) is a marker of atherosclerosis. Whether epicardial calcium reflects more widespread atherosclerosis affecting coronary vascular function is unknown. Methods We evaluated 136 consecutive patients without known coronary disease (age 62 ±12 years, 68 % females) undergoing vasodilator stress 82Rb PET and CAC scoring based on clinical grounds. Patients with normal myocardial perfusion on standard semi-quantitative analysis were included. The Agatston CAC score, rest and stress myocardial blood flow (MBF), coronary flow reserve (CFR) and coronary vascular resistance (CVR) were quantified and analyzed on a per patient and per vascular territory basis. Results Global and regional CAC scores showed modest but significant correlation with hyperemic MBF (r= −0.31 and r= −0.26, p≤0.0002, respectively), CFR (r= −0.28 and r= −0.2, p≤0.001, respectively), and CVR during peak hyperemia (r=0.32 and r= 0.26, p≤0.0002, respectively). There was a modest stepwise decline of mean CFR with increasing CAC score on per patient analysis (1.8 ±0.5 vs 1.7 ±0.5 vs 1.5±0.4, p=0.048 with total CAC= 0, 1-400 and >400 respectively) and per vessel analysis (1.8 ±0.6 vs 1.6 ±0.4 vs 1.5 ±0.5 vs 1.5 ±0.5, p=0.004 with vessel CAC score= 0, 1-100, 101-400 and >400 respectively). In multivariable modeling only body mass index (p=0.005), CAC score (p =0.04) and hypertension (p=0.05) remained predictive. Conclusions In patients without overt CAD, there is a modest but statistically significant inverse relationship between CAC content and coronary vasodilator function, which persists after adjusting for the effect of coronary risk factors. PMID:19387640

  19. Characterization of calcium and zinc spatial distributions at the fibrocartilage zone of bone-tendon junction by synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis combined with backscattered electron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hongbin; Chen, Can; Wang, Zhanwen; Qu, Jin; Xu, Daqi; Wu, Tianding; Cao, Yong; Zhou, Jingyong; Zheng, Cheng; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-09-01

    Tendon attaches to bone through a functionally graded fibrocartilage zone, including uncalcified fibrocartilage (UF), tidemark (TM) and calcified fibrocartilage (CF). This transition zone plays a pivotal role in relaxing load transfer between tendon and bone, and serves as a boundary between otherwise structurally and functionally distinct tissue types. Calcium and zinc are believed to play important roles in the normal growth, mineralization, and repair of the fibrocartilage zone of bone-tendon junction (BTJ). However, spatial distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of BTJ and their distribution-function relationship are not totally understood. Thus, synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-μXRF) in combination with backscattered electron imaging (BEI) was employed to characterize the distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of rabbit patella-patellar tendon complex (PPTC). For the first time, the unique distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were clearly mapped by this method. The distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were inhomogeneous. A significant accumulation of zinc was exhibited in the transition region between UF and CF. The highest zinc content (3.17 times of that of patellar tendon) was found in the TM of fibrocartilage zone. The calcium content began to increase near the TM and increased exponentially across the calcified fibrocartilage region towards the patella. The highest calcium content (43.14 times of that of patellar tendon) was in the transitional zone of calcified fibrocartilage region and the patella, approximately 69 μm from the location with the highest zinc content. This study indicated, for the first time, that there is a differential distribution of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of PPTC. These observations reveal new insights into region-dependent changes across the fibrocartilage zone of

  20. Atomic-scale imaging of albite feldspar, calcium carbonate, rectorite, and bentonite using atomic-force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Barney; Hellmann, Roland; Sikes, C. Steven; Occelli, Mario L.

    1992-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the (010) surface of Amelia albite, the basal and (001) planes of CaCO3 (calcite), and the basal planes of rectorite and bentonite. Atomic scale images of the albite surface show six sided, interconnected en-echelon rings. Fourier transforms of the surface scans reveal two primary nearest neighbor distances of 4.7 and 4.9 +/- 0.5 angstroms. Analysis of the images using a 6 angstroms thick projection of the bulk structure was performed. Close agreement between the projection and the images suggests the surface is very close to an ideal termination of the bulk structure. Images of the calcite basal plane show a hexagonal array of Ca atoms measured to within +/- 0.3 angstroms of the 4.99 angstroms predicted by x-ray diffraction data. Putative images of the (001) plane of carbonate ions, with hexagonal 5 angstroms spacing, are also presented and discussed. Basal plane images of rectorite show hexagonal symmetry with 9.1 +/- 2.5 angstroms spacing, while bentonite results reveal a 4.9 +/- 0.5 angstroms nearest neighbor spacing.

  1. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  2. Get Enough Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  3. Calcium carbonate overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  4. Calcium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for calcium cyanide is included in th

  5. Fast Kinetics of Calcium Signaling and Sensor Design

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shen; Reddish, Florence; Zhuo, You; Yang, Jenny J.

    2015-01-01

    Fast calcium signaling is regulated by numerous calcium channels exhibiting high spatiotemporal profiles which are currently measured by fluorescent calcium sensors. There is still a strong need to improve the kinetics of genetically encoded calcium indicators (sensors) to capture calcium dynamics in the millisecond time frame. In this review, we summarize several major fast calcium signaling pathways and discuss the recent developments and application of genetically encoded calcium indicators to detect these pathways. A new class of genetically encoded calcium indicators designed with site-directed mutagenesis on the surface of beta-barrel fluorescent proteins to form a pentagonal bipyramidal-like calcium binding domain dramatically accelerates calcium binding kinetics. Furthermore, novel genetically encoded calcium indicators with significantly increased fluorescent lifetime change are advantageous in deep-field imaging with high light-scattering and notable morphology change. PMID:26151819

  6. Accurate spike estimation from noisy calcium signals for ultrafast three-dimensional imaging of large neuronal populations in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Deneux, Thomas; Kaszas, Attila; Szalay, Gergely; Katona, Gergely; Lakner, Tamás; Grinvald, Amiram; Rózsa, Balázs; Vanzetta, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Extracting neuronal spiking activity from large-scale two-photon recordings remains challenging, especially in mammals in vivo, where large noises often contaminate the signals. We propose a method, MLspike, which returns the most likely spike train underlying the measured calcium fluorescence. It relies on a physiological model including baseline fluctuations and distinct nonlinearities for synthetic and genetically encoded indicators. Model parameters can be either provided by the user or estimated from the data themselves. MLspike is computationally efficient thanks to its original discretization of probability representations; moreover, it can also return spike probabilities or samples. Benchmarked on extensive simulations and real data from seven different preparations, it outperformed state-of-the-art algorithms. Combined with the finding obtained from systematic data investigation (noise level, spiking rate and so on) that photonic noise is not necessarily the main limiting factor, our method allows spike extraction from large-scale recordings, as demonstrated on acousto-optical three-dimensional recordings of over 1,000 neurons in vivo. PMID:27432255

  7. Accurate spike estimation from noisy calcium signals for ultrafast three-dimensional imaging of large neuronal populations in vivo.

    PubMed

    Deneux, Thomas; Kaszas, Attila; Szalay, Gergely; Katona, Gergely; Lakner, Tamás; Grinvald, Amiram; Rózsa, Balázs; Vanzetta, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Extracting neuronal spiking activity from large-scale two-photon recordings remains challenging, especially in mammals in vivo, where large noises often contaminate the signals. We propose a method, MLspike, which returns the most likely spike train underlying the measured calcium fluorescence. It relies on a physiological model including baseline fluctuations and distinct nonlinearities for synthetic and genetically encoded indicators. Model parameters can be either provided by the user or estimated from the data themselves. MLspike is computationally efficient thanks to its original discretization of probability representations; moreover, it can also return spike probabilities or samples. Benchmarked on extensive simulations and real data from seven different preparations, it outperformed state-of-the-art algorithms. Combined with the finding obtained from systematic data investigation (noise level, spiking rate and so on) that photonic noise is not necessarily the main limiting factor, our method allows spike extraction from large-scale recordings, as demonstrated on acousto-optical three-dimensional recordings of over 1,000 neurons in vivo. PMID:27432255

  8. Calcium imaging of vomeronasal organ response using slice preparations from transgenic mice expressing G-CaMP2.

    PubMed

    Yu, C Ron

    2013-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) in vertebrate animals detects pheromones and interspecies chemical signals. We describe in this chapter a Ca(2+) imaging approach using transgenic mice that express the genetically encoded Ca(2+) sensor G-CaMP2 in VNO tissue. This approach allows us to analyze the complex patterns of the vomeronasal neuron response to large number of chemosensory stimuli. PMID:24014364

  9. Large-Scale Fluorescence Calcium-Imaging Methods for Studies of Long-Term Memory in Behaving Mammals.

    PubMed

    Jercog, Pablo; Rogerson, Thomas; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    During long-term memory formation, cellular and molecular processes reshape how individual neurons respond to specific patterns of synaptic input. It remains poorly understood how such changes impact information processing across networks of mammalian neurons. To observe how networks encode, store, and retrieve information, neuroscientists must track the dynamics of large ensembles of individual cells in behaving animals, over timescales commensurate with long-term memory. Fluorescence Ca(2+)-imaging techniques can monitor hundreds of neurons in behaving mice, opening exciting avenues for studies of learning and memory at the network level. Genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicators allow neurons to be targeted by genetic type or connectivity. Chronic animal preparations permit repeated imaging of neural Ca(2+) dynamics over multiple weeks. Together, these capabilities should enable unprecedented analyses of how ensemble neural codes evolve throughout memory processing and provide new insights into how memories are organized in the brain. PMID:27048190

  10. In vivo single-molecule imaging identifies altered dynamics of calcium channels in dystrophin-mutant C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Hong; Stanciauskas, Ramunas; Stigloher, Christian; Dizon, Kevin K.; Jospin, Maelle; Bessereau, Jean-Louis; Pinaud, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule (SM) fluorescence microscopy allows the imaging of biomolecules in cultured cells with a precision of a few nanometres but has yet to be implemented in living adult animals. Here we used split-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusions and complementation-activated light microscopy (CALM) for subresolution imaging of individual membrane proteins in live Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). In vivo tissue-specific SM tracking of transmembrane CD4 and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCC) was achieved with a precision of 30 nm within neuromuscular synapses and at the surface of muscle cells in normal and dystrophin-mutant worms. Through diffusion analyses, we reveal that dystrophin is involved in modulating the confinement of VDCC within sarcolemmal membrane nanodomains in response to varying tonus of C. elegans body-wall muscles. CALM expands the applications of SM imaging techniques beyond the petri dish and opens the possibility to explore the molecular basis of homeostatic and pathological cellular processes with subresolution precision, directly in live animals. PMID:25232639

  11. An algorithm for automated detection, localization and measurement of local calcium signals from camera-based imaging.

    PubMed

    Ellefsen, Kyle L; Settle, Brett; Parker, Ian; Smith, Ian F

    2014-09-01

    Local Ca(2+) transients such as puffs and sparks form the building blocks of cellular Ca(2+) signaling in numerous cell types. They have traditionally been studied by linescan confocal microscopy, but advances in TIRF microscopy together with improved electron-multiplied CCD (EMCCD) cameras now enable rapid (>500 frames s(-1)) imaging of subcellular Ca(2+) signals with high spatial resolution in two dimensions. This approach yields vastly more information (ca. 1 Gb min(-1)) than linescan imaging, rendering visual identification and analysis of local events imaged both laborious and subject to user bias. Here we describe a routine to rapidly automate identification and analysis of local Ca(2+) events. This features an intuitive graphical user-interfaces and runs under Matlab and the open-source Python software. The underlying algorithm features spatial and temporal noise filtering to reliably detect even small events in the presence of noisy and fluctuating baselines; localizes sites of Ca(2+) release with sub-pixel resolution; facilitates user review and editing of data; and outputs time-sequences of fluorescence ratio signals for identified event sites along with Excel-compatible tables listing amplitudes and kinetics of events. PMID:25047761

  12. In vivo single-molecule imaging identifies altered dynamics of calcium channels in dystrophin-mutant C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Hong; Stanciauskas, Ramunas; Stigloher, Christian; Dizon, Kevin K; Jospin, Maelle; Bessereau, Jean-Louis; Pinaud, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule (SM) fluorescence microscopy allows the imaging of biomolecules in cultured cells with a precision of a few nanometres but has yet to be implemented in living adult animals. Here we used split-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusions and complementation-activated light microscopy (CALM) for subresolution imaging of individual membrane proteins in live Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). In vivo tissue-specific SM tracking of transmembrane CD4 and voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCC) was achieved with a precision of 30 nm within neuromuscular synapses and at the surface of muscle cells in normal and dystrophin-mutant worms. Through diffusion analyses, we reveal that dystrophin is involved in modulating the confinement of VDCC within sarcolemmal membrane nanodomains in response to varying tonus of C. elegans body-wall muscles. CALM expands the applications of SM imaging techniques beyond the petri dish and opens the possibility to explore the molecular basis of homeostatic and pathological cellular processes with subresolution precision, directly in live animals. PMID:25232639

  13. Determining auditory-evoked activities from multiple cells in layer 1 of the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus of mice by in vivo calcium imaging.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tetsufumi; Hirose, Junichi; Murase, Kazuyuki; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2014-11-24

    Layer 1 of the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus (DCIC) is distinguished from other layers by its cytoarchitecture and fiber connections. However, the information of the sound types represented in layer 1 of the DCIC remains unclear because placing electrodes on such thin structures is challenging. In this study, we utilized in vivo calcium imaging to assess auditory-evoked activities in multiple cells in layer 1 of DCIC and to characterize sound stimuli producing strong activity. Most cells examined showed strong responses to broad-band noise and low-frequency tone bursts of high sound intensity. In some cases, we successfully obtained frequency response areas, which are receptive fields to tone frequencies and intensities, and ~30% of these showed V-shape tunings. This is the first systematic study to record auditory responses of cells in layer 1 of DCIC. These results indicate that cells in this area are selective to tones with low frequency, implying the importance of such auditory information in the neural circuitry of layer 1 of DCIC. PMID:25278189

  14. Patch-Clamp Recordings and Calcium Imaging Followed by Single-Cell PCR Reveal the Developmental Profile of 13 Genes in iPSC-Derived Human Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Belinsky, Glenn S.; Rich, Matthew T.; Sirois, Carissa L.; Short, Shaina M.; Pedrosa, Erika; Lachman, Herbert M.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies are typically performed on homogenized biological samples, resulting in contamination from non-neuronal cells. To improve expression profiling of neurons we combined patch recordings with single-cell PCR. Two iPSC lines (healthy subject and 22q11.2 deletion), were differentiated into neurons. Patch electrode recordings were performed on 229 human cells from Day-13 to Day-88, followed by capture and single-cell PCR for 13 genes: ACTB, HPRT, vGLUT1, βTUBIII, COMT, DISC1, GAD1, PAX6, DTNBP1, ERBB4, FOXP1, FOXP2, and GIRK2. Neurons derived from both iPSC lines expressed βTUBIII, fired action potentials, and experienced spontaneous depolarizations (UP states) ~2 weeks before vGLUT1, GAD1 and GIRK2 appeared. Multisite calcium imaging revealed that these UP states were not synchronized among hESC-H9-derived neurons. The expression of FOXP1, FOXP2 and vGLUT1 was lost after 50 days in culture, in contrast to other continuously expressed genes. When gene expression was combined with electrophysiology, two subsets of genes were apparent; those irrelevant to spontaneous depolarizations (including vGLUT1, GIRK2, FOXP2 and DISC1) and those associated with spontaneous depolarizations (GAD1 and ERBB4). The results demonstrate that in the earliest stages of neuron development, it is useful to combine genetic analysis with physiological characterizations, on a cell-to-cell basis. PMID:24157591

  15. ToF-SIMS images and spectra of biomimetic calcium silicate-based cements after storage in solutions simulating the effects of human biological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, A.; Torrisi, V.; Tuccitto, N.; Gandolfi, M. G.; Prati, C.; Licciardello, A.

    2010-01-01

    ToF-SIMS images were obtained from a section of a tooth, obturated by means of a new calcium-silicate based cement (wTCF) after storage for 1 month in a saline solutions (DPBS), in order to simulate the body fluid effects on the obturation. Afterwards, ToF-SIMS spectra were obtained from model samples, prepared by using the same cement paste, after storage for 1 month and 8 months in two different saline solutions (DPBS and HBSS). ToF-SIMS spectra were also obtained from fluorine-free cement (wTC) samples after storage in HBSS for 1 month and 8 months and used for comparison. It was found that the composition of both the saline solution and the cement influenced the composition of the surface of disks and that longer is the storage greater are the differences. Segregation phenomena occur both on the cement obturation of the tooth and on the surface of the disks prepared by using the same cement. Indirect evidences of formation of new crystalline phases are supplied.

  16. In vivo functional calcium imaging of induced or spontaneous activity in the fly brain using a GFP-apoaequorin-based bioluminescent approach.

    PubMed

    Minocci, Daiana; Carbognin, Elena; Murmu, Meena Sriti; Martin, Jean-René

    2013-07-01

    Different optical imaging techniques have been developed to study neuronal activity with the goal of deciphering the neural code underlying neurophysiological functions. Because of several constraints inherent in these techniques as well as difficulties interpreting the results, the majority of these studies have been dedicated more to sensory modalities than to the spontaneous activity of the central brain. Recently, a novel bioluminescence approach based on GFP-aequorin (GA) (GFP: Green fluorescent Protein), has been developed, allowing us to functionally record in-vivo neuronal activity. Taking advantage of the particular characteristics of GA, which does not require light excitation, we report that we can record induced and/or the spontaneous Ca(2+)-activity continuously over long periods. Targeting GA to the mushrooms-bodies (MBs), a structure implicated in learning/memory and sleep, we have shown that GA is sensitive enough to detect odor-induced Ca(2+)-activity in Kenyon cells (KCs). It has been possible to reveal two particular peaks of spontaneous activity during overnight recording in the MBs. Other peaks of spontaneous activity have been recorded in flies expressing GA pan-neurally. Similarly, expression in the glial cells has revealed that these cells exhibit a cell-autonomous Ca(2+)-activity. These results demonstrate that bioluminescence imaging is a useful tool for studying Ca(2+)-activity in neuronal and/or glial cells and for functional mapping of the neurophysiological processes in the fly brain. These findings provide a framework for investigating the biological meaning of spontaneous neuronal activity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 12th European Symposium on Calcium. PMID:23287020

  17. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling. Typically about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and replaced each day. To supply this amount, one would need to consume about 600 mg of calcium, since calcium is not very efficiently absorbed. Calcium ...

  18. Heterogeneous effects of antiepileptic drugs in an in vitro epilepsy model--a functional multineuron calcium imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hongo, Yoshie; Takasu, Keiko; Ikegaya, Yuji; Hasegawa, Minoru; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Ogawa, Koichi

    2015-07-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic brain disease characterised by recurrent seizures. Many studies of this disease have focused on local neuronal activity, such as local field potentials in the brain. In addition, several recent studies have elucidated the collective behavior of individual neurons in a neuronal network that emits epileptic activity. However, little is known about the effects of antiepileptic drugs on neuronal networks during seizure-like events (SLEs) at single-cell resolution. Using functional multineuron Ca(2+) imaging (fMCI), we monitored the activities of multiple neurons in the rat hippocampal CA1 region on treatment with the proconvulsant bicuculline under Mg(2+) -free conditions. Bicuculline induced recurrent synchronous Ca(2+) influx, and the events were correlated with SLEs. Other proconvulsants, such as 4-aminopyridine, pentetrazol, and pilocarpine, also induced synchronous Ca(2+) influx. We found that the antiepileptic drugs phenytoin, flupirtine, and ethosuximide, which have different mechanisms of action, exerted heterogeneous effects on bicuculline-induced synchronous Ca(2+) influx. Phenytoin and flupirtine significantly decreased the peak, the amount of Ca(2+) influx and the duration of synchronous events in parallel with the duration of SLEs, whereas they did not abolish the synchronous events themselves. Ethosuximide increased the duration of synchronous Ca(2+) influx and SLEs. Furthermore, the magnitude of the inhibitory effect of phenytoin on the peak synchronous Ca(2+) influx level differed according to the peak amplitude of the synchronous event in each individual cell. Evaluation of the collective behavior of individual neurons by fMCI seems to be a powerful tool for elucidating the profiles of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:25967117

  19. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  20. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  1. Presynaptic Calcium Signalling in Cerebellar Mossy Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Louiza B.; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive fast Na+ spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers. Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be modulated locally, suggesting that cerebellar glomeruli may be dynamically sub-compartmentalized due to ongoing inhibition mediated by Golgi cells. This could provide a fine-grained control of mossy fibre-granule cell information transfer and synaptic plasticity within a mossy fibre rosette. PMID:20162034

  2. 1- and 2-photon absorption by laser-cooled 85Rb using an optical nanofiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, L.; Daly, M.; Chormaic, S. Nic

    2012-09-01

    The characteristics of a cold cloud of 85Rb can be non-destructively examined using an optical nanofiber. The nanofiber is a submicron-diameter cylindrical waveguide fabricated from commercially-available optical fiber using a heat-and-pull rig. The nanofiber can be used as a 'dark' or 'bright' probe depending on whether laser light is coupled into the nanofiber. We demonstrate the use of an optical nanofiber as an absorption spectroscopy tool for cold atoms. A frequency-scanned probe beam is launched through the nanofiber and the resonant light is absorbed at the waist of the nanofiber by nearby cold 85Rb atoms. We present recent singlephoton absorption results and comment on the role of surface interactions. Future work on 2-photon absorption using excited state electronic transitions in 85Rb is discussed.

  3. Plant Calcium Content: Ready to Remodel

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Punshon, Tracy; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Hirschi, Kendal D.

    2012-01-01

    By identifying the relationship between calcium location in the plant cell and nutrient bioavailability, the plant characteristics leading to maximal calcium absorption by humans can be identified. Knowledge of plant cellular and molecular targets controlling calcium location in plants is emerging. These insights should allow for better strategies for increasing the nutritional content of foods. In particular, the use of preparation-free elemental imaging technologies such as synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microscopy in plant biology may allow researchers to understand the relationship between subcellular location and nutrient bioavailability. These approaches may lead to better strategies for altering the location of calcium within the plant to maximize its absorption from fruits and vegetables. These modified foods could be part of a diet for children and adults identified as at-risk for low calcium intake or absorption with the ultimate goal of decreasing the incidence and severity of inadequate bone mineralization. PMID:23016135

  4. On the solvability of the quantum Rabi model and its 2-photon and two-mode generalizations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yao-Zhong

    2013-10-15

    We study the solvability of the time-independent matrix Schrödinger differential equations of the quantum Rabi model and its 2-photon and two-mode generalizations in Bargmann Hilbert spaces of entire functions. We show that the Rabi model and its 2-photon and two-mode analogs are quasi-exactly solvable. We derive the exact, closed-form expressions for the energies and the allowed model parameters for all the three cases in the solvable subspaces. Up to a normalization factor, the eigenfunctions for these models are given by polynomials whose roots are determined by systems of algebraic equations.

  5. [Do cows drink calcium?].

    PubMed

    Geishauser, T; Lechner, S; Plate, I; Heidemann, B

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how well cows drink the Propeller calcium drink, and it's effect on blood calcium concentration. Drinking was tested in 120 cows right after calving, before cows drank anything else. 60 cows each were offered 20 liters of Propeller calcium drink or 20 liters of water. Cows drank the Propeller as good as water. 72% of all cows drank all 20 liters, 18% drank on average 8.2 liters and 10% drank less than 1 liter. Blood calcium concentration was studied in 16 cows right after calving. Eight cows each were offered 20 liters of Propeller calcium drink or no calcium drink. Blood calcium significantly increased ten minutes after Propeller intake and stayed significantly elevated for 24 hours. Without calcium drink blood calcium levels decreased significantly. Advantages of the new Propeller calcium drink over calcium gels or boli could be that cows now drink calcium themselves and that the Propeller increases blood calcium concentration rapidly and long lasting. PMID:18429501

  6. Calcium and Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your weekly shopping list. Produce Serving Size Estimated Calcium* Collard greens, frozen 8 oz 360 mg ... Oranges 1 whole 55 mg Seafood Serving Size Estimated Calcium* Sardines, canned with bones 3 oz 325 ...

  7. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  8. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  9. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. It is a prescription pain medicine used to relieve symptoms of arthritis . Fenoprofen calcium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  10. Calcium and magnesium disorders.

    PubMed

    Goff, Jesse P

    2014-07-01

    Hypocalcemia is a clinical disorder that can be life threatening to the cow (milk fever) and predisposes the animal to various other metabolic and infectious disorders. Calcium homeostasis is mediated primarily by parathyroid hormone, which stimulates bone calcium resorption and renal calcium reabsorption. Parathyroid hormone stimulates the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to enhance diet calcium absorption. High dietary cation-anion difference interferes with tissue sensitivity to parathyroid hormone. Hypomagnesemia reduces tissue response to parathyroid hormone. PMID:24980727

  11. Calcium and Mitosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  12. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter describes the roles of calcium and vitamin D in bone health. Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling and it also affects bone mass through its impact on the remodeling rate. Typically, about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and ...

  13. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    Bone strength and calcium ... or if your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ... injury. As you age, your body still needs calcium to keep your bones dense and strong. Most experts recommend at least ...

  14. Broadband thermo-optic switch based on a W2 photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Kaiyu; Feng, Xue; Huang, Yidong; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Zhilei; Zhang, Wei

    2013-02-01

    Broadband thermo-optic switch based on an ultra-compact W2 photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) is demonstrated with an integrated titanium/aluminum microheater on its surface. The operating principle relies on shifting a transmission-dip caused by the enhanced coupling between the defect modes in W2 PCW. As a result, broadband switching functionality with larger extinction ratio can be attained. Moreover, microheaters with different width are evaluated by the power consumptions and heating transfer efficiency, and an optimized slab microheater is utilized. Finally, switching functionality with bandwidth up to 24 nm (1557~1581 nm) is measured by the PCW with footprint of only 8μm×17.6 μm, while the extinction ratio is in excess of 15 dB over the entire bandwidth. What's more, the switching speed is obtained by the measurement of alternating current modulation. Response time for this thermo-optic switch is 11.0+/-3.0 μs for rise time and 40.3+/-5.3 μs for fall time, respectively.

  15. Calcium bioavailability from calcium fortified food products.

    PubMed

    Kohls, K

    1991-08-01

    The calcium balance of 12 presumed healthy human young adult subjects was assessed. Subjects consumed a constant laboratory-controlled diet supplemented with one of four calcium-fortified food products: orange juice (OJ), milk (M), experimental pasteurized processed cheese (T), soda (S), or a calcium carbonate plus vitamin D tablet (CC). Study length was 6 weeks with seven-day experimental periods (2-days allowed for adjustment with 5-days combined for purposes of analysis). All urine and fecal samples were collected by the subjects for the duration of the study. Blood samples were drawn at the end of each experimental period. Urine and fecal calcium contents were determined. Blood samples were analyzed for alkaline phosphatase. Results of this study indicate a higher fecal calcium content (mg/day) when subjects consumed CC and T, and when subjects consumed self-selected diets, than when given S, M, or OJ. Urinary calcium excretion was significantly lower when subjects consumed OJ than when they consumed M, T, or their self-selected diets. A significantly larger positive calcium balance was demonstrated when subjects consumed OJ as compared to T. Fecal transmit time did not vary significantly. Serum alkaline phosphatase was significantly lower when subjects consumed T than when they consumed self-selected diets. PMID:1765836

  16. Strontium Substitution for Calcium in Lithogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Blaschko, Sarah D.; Chi, Thomas; Miller, Joe; Flechner, Lawrence; Fakra, Sirine; Kapahi, Pankaj; Kahn, Arnold; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Strontium has chemical similarity to calcium, which enables the replacement of calcium by strontium in biomineralization processes. Incorporating strontium into human bone and teeth has been studied extensively but little research has been performed of the incorporation of strontium into urinary calculi. We used synchrotron based x-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption techniques to examine the presence of strontium in different types of human kidney stones. Materials and Methods Multiple unique human stone samples were obtained via consecutive percutaneous nephrolithotomies/ureteroscopies. A portion of each stone was sent for standard laboratory analysis and a portion was retained for x-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption measurements. X-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption measurements determined the presence, spatial distribution and speciation of strontium in each stone sample. Results Traditional kidney stone analyses identified calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, uric acid and cystine stones. X-ray fluorescence measurements identified strontium in all stone types except pure cystine. X-ray fluorescence elemental mapping of the samples revealed co-localization of calcium and strontium. X-ray absorption measurements of the calcium phosphate stone showed strontium predominately present as strontium apatite. Conclusions Advanced x-ray fluorescence imaging identified strontium in all calcium based stones, present as strontium apatite. This finding may be critical since apatite is thought to be the initial nidus for calcium stone formation. Strontium is not identified by standard laboratory stone analyses. Its substitution for calcium can be reliably identified in stones from multiple calcium based stone formers, which may offer opportunities to gain insight into early events in lithogenesis. PMID:23260568

  17. Diagnostic Phase of Calcium Scoring Scan Applied as the Center of Acquisition Window of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Improves Image Quality in Minimal Acquisition Window Scan (Target CTA Mode) Using the Second Generation 320-Row CT

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Eriko; Kanno, Shigeaki; Ino, Kenji; Tomizawa, Nobuo; Akahane, Masaaki; Torigoe, Rumiko; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare the image quality of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) acquired under two conditions: 75% fixed as the acquisition window center (Group 75%) and the diagnostic phase for calcium scoring scan as the center (CS; Group CS). Methods. 320-row cardiac CT with a minimal acquisition window (scanned using “Target CTA” mode) was performed on 81 patients. In Group 75% (n = 40), CS was obtained and reconstructed at 75% and the center of the CCTA acquisition window was set at 75%. In Group CS (n = 41), CS was obtained at 75% and the diagnostic phase showing minimal artifacts was applied as the center of the CCTA acquisition window. Image quality was evaluated using a four-point scale (4-excellent) and the mean scores were compared between groups. Results. The CCTA scan diagnostic phase occurred significantly earlier in CS (75.7 ± 3.2% vs. 73.6 ± 4.5% for Groups 75% and CS, resp., p = 0.013). The mean Group CS image quality score (3.58 ± 0.63) was also higher than that for Group 75% (3.19 ± 0.66, p < 0.0001). Conclusions. The image quality of CCTA in Target CTA mode was significantly better when the center of acquisition window is adjusted using CS. PMID:26977449

  18. Quantifying Glomerular Permeability of Fluorescent Macromolecules Using 2-Photon Microscopy in Munich Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Ruben M.; Molitoris, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Kidney diseases involving urinary loss of large essential macromolecules, such as serum albumin, have long been thought to be caused by alterations in the permeability barrier comprised of podocytes, vascular endothelial cells, and a basement membrane working in unison. Data from our laboratory using intravital 2-photon microscopy revealed a more permeable glomerular filtration barrier (GFB) than previously thought under physiologic conditions, with retrieval of filtered albumin occurring in an early subset of cells called proximal tubule cells (PTC)1,2,3. Previous techniques used to study renal filtration and establishing the characteristic of the filtration barrier involved micropuncture of the lumen of these early tubular segments with sampling of the fluid content and analysis4. These studies determined albumin concentration in the luminal fluid to be virtually non-existent; corresponding closely to what is normally detected in the urine. However, characterization of dextran polymers with defined sizes by this technique revealed those of a size similar to serum albumin had higher levels in the tubular lumen and urine; suggesting increased permeability5. Herein is a detailed outline of the technique used to directly visualize and quantify glomerular fluorescent albumin permeability in vivo. This method allows for detection of filtered albumin across the filtration barrier into Bowman's space (the initial chamber of urinary filtration); and also allows quantification of albumin reabsorption by proximal tubules and visualization of subsequent albumin transcytosis6. The absence of fluorescent albumin along later tubular segments en route to the bladder highlights the efficiency of the retrieval pathway in the earlier proximal tubule segments. Moreover, when this technique was applied to determine permeability of dextrans having a similar size to albumin virtually identical permeability values were reported2. These observations directly support the need to expand

  19. Correlative In Vivo 2 Photon and Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy of Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Maco, Bohumil; Holtmaat, Anthony; Cantoni, Marco; Kreshuk, Anna; Straehle, Christoph N.; Hamprecht, Fred A.; Knott, Graham W.

    2013-01-01

    Correlating in vivo imaging of neurons and their synaptic connections with electron microscopy combines dynamic and ultrastructural information. Here we describe a semi-automated technique whereby volumes of brain tissue containing axons and dendrites, previously studied in vivo, are subsequently imaged in three dimensions with focused ion beam scanning electron microcopy. These neurites are then identified and reconstructed automatically from the image series using the latest segmentation algorithms. The fast and reliable imaging and reconstruction technique avoids any specific labeling to identify the features of interest in the electron microscope, and optimises their preservation and staining for 3D analysis. PMID:23468982

  20. Two-Photon Processor and SeNeCA: a freely available software package to process data from two-photon calcium imaging at speeds down to several milliseconds per frame.

    PubMed

    Tomek, Jakub; Novak, Ondrej; Syka, Josef

    2013-07-01

    Two-Photon Processor (TPP) is a versatile, ready-to-use, and freely available software package in MATLAB to process data from in vivo two-photon calcium imaging. TPP includes routines to search for cell bodies in full-frame (Search for Neural Cells Accelerated; SeNeCA) and line-scan acquisition, routines for calcium signal calculations, filtering, spike-mining, and routines to construct parametric fields. Searching for somata in artificial in vivo data, our algorithm achieved better performance than human annotators. SeNeCA copes well with uneven background brightness and in-plane motion artifacts, the major problems in simple segmentation methods. In the fast mode, artificial in vivo images with a resolution of 256 × 256 pixels containing ≈ 100 neurons can be processed at a rate up to 175 frames per second (tested on Intel i7, 8 threads, magnetic hard disk drive). This speed of a segmentation algorithm could bring new possibilities into the field of in vivo optophysiology. With such a short latency (down to 5-6 ms on an ordinary personal computer) and using some contemporary optogenetic tools, it will allow experiments in which a control program can continuously evaluate the occurrence of a particular spatial pattern of activity (a possible correlate of memory or cognition) and subsequently inhibit/stimulate the entire area of the circuit or inhibit/stimulate a different part of the neuronal system. TPP will be freely available on our public web site. Similar all-in-one and freely available software has not yet been published. PMID:23576700

  1. Optimal cutoff threshold for calcium quantification in isotropic CT calcium scans by validating against registered intravascular ultrasound with radiofrequency backscatter.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Abinashi; Qian, Zhen; Vazquez, Gustavo; Rinehart, Sarah; Weeks, Michael; Voros, Szilard

    2012-01-01

    3D Computed Tomography (CT) provides noninvasive, low-radiation method of coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement. Conventional CAC images are acquired on multidetector-row CT scanners without contrast, and reconstructed with 3 mm slice thickness. The calcium volume is quantified by registering voxels with attenuation values greater than or equal to 130 Hounsfield Unit (HU). In isotropic CAC images with 0.5 mm slice thickness obtained from 320-detector row CT, the optimal value of attenuation cutoff threshold is unknown. In this paper we find the optimal cutoff threshold for calcium quantification in isotropic CT calcium scans by validating against registered intravascular ultrasound with radiofrequency backscatter (IVUS/VH). From the statistical analysis of calcium data obtained from the images of 9 patients we found a range of optimal thresholds and the conventional threshold of 130 HU was in the range. Further, the optimal values were different for individual patients. PMID:23367046

  2. Differentiation of Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate and Calcium Oxalate Dihydrate Stones Using Quantitative Morphological Information from Micro-Computerized and Clinical Computerized Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xinhui; Qu, Mingliang; Wang, Jia; Trevathan, James; Vrtiska, Terri; Williams, James C.; Krambeck, Amy; Lieske, John; McCollough, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We differentiated calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate kidney stones using micro and clinical computerized tomography images. Materials and Methods A total of 22 calcium oxalate monohydrate and 15 calcium oxalate dihydrate human kidney stones were scanned using a commercial micro-computerized tomography scanner with a pixel size of 7 to 23 μm. Under an institutional review board approved protocol, image data on 10 calcium oxalate monohydrate and 9 calcium oxalate dihydrate stones greater than 5 mm were retrieved from a total of 80 patients who underwent clinical dual energy computerized tomography for clinical indications and had stones available for infrared spectroscopic compositional analysis. Micro and clinical computerized tomography images were processed using in-house software, which quantified stone surface morphology with curvature based calculations. A shape index was generated as a quantitative shape metric to differentiate calcium oxalate monohydrate from calcium oxalate dihydrate stones. Statistical tests were used to test the performance of the shape index. Results On micro-computerized tomography images the shape index of calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate stones significantly differed (ROC curve AUC 0.92, p <0.0001). At the optimal cutoff sensitivity was 0.93 and specificity was 0.91. On clinical computerized tomography images a significant morphological difference was also detected (p = 0.007). AUC, sensitivity and specificity were 0.90, 1 and 0.73, respectively. Conclusions On micro and clinical computerized tomography images a morphological difference was detectable in calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate stones larger than 5 mm. The shape index is a highly promising method that can distinguish calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate stones with reasonable accuracy. PMID:23142201

  3. Lead in calcium supplements.

    PubMed

    Scelfo, G M; Flegal, A R

    2000-04-01

    Intercalibrated measurements of lead in calcium supplements indicate the importance of rigorous analytical techniques to accurately quantify contaminant exposures in complex matrices. Without such techniques, measurements of lead concentrations in calcium supplements may be either erroneously low, by as much as 50%, or below the detection limit needed for new public health criteria. In this study, we determined the lead content of 136 brands of supplements that were purchased in 1996. The calcium in the products was derived from natural sources (bonemeal, dolomite, or oyster shell) or was synthesized and/or refined (chelated and nonchelated calcium). The dried products were acid digested and analyzed for lead by high resolution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The method's limit of quantitation averaged 0.06 microg/g, with a coefficient of variation of 1.7% and a 90-100% lead recovery of a bonemeal standard reference material. Two-thirds of those calcium supplements failed to meet the 1999 California criteria for acceptable lead levels (1.5 microg/daily dose of calcium) in consumer products. The nonchelated synthesized and/or refined calcium products, specifically antacids and infant formulas, had the lowest lead concentrations, ranging from nondetectable to 2.9 microg Pb/g calcium, and had the largest proportion of brands meeting the new criteria (85% of the antacids and 100% of the infant formulas). PMID:10753088

  4. [Calcium and health].

    PubMed

    Ortega Anta, Rosa M; Jiménez Ortega, Ana I; López-Sobaler, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    An adequate intake of calcium is only not limited to avoid the risk of osteoporosis and its benefits in longterm bone health, but also it has been linked to protection against various major diseases, such as hypertension, cancer, kidney stones, insulin resistance, diabetes... and several investigations suggest its importance in preventing and controlling obesity. Studies conducted in Spanish representative samples show that a high percentage of adults and children (> 75%) don't achieve the recommended intake of calcium. Moreover, are growing trends among the population suggesting that calcium intake and dairy consumption (main food source of the mineral) are high, and even excessive, in many individuals. This misconception results in that the calcium intake is increasingly far from the recommended one. The maximum tolerable intake of the mineral is fixed at 2.500 mg/day, but this intake is unusual, and it's more disturbing and frequent, to find intakes below the recommended calcium intakes (1.000 and 1.200 mg/day in adults, men and women, respectively). Data from different studies highlight the risk of an inadequate calcium intake and the damages that may affect the health in a long term. It is not about transmitting indiscriminate guidelines in order to increase the intake of calcium / dairy, but the recommended intakes must be met to achieve both the nutritional and health benefits. Also activities for demystification of misconceptions are need, increasingly frequent, that may impair health population. PMID:25862324

  5. Monitoring the glioma tropism of bone marrow–derived progenitor cells by 2-photon laser scanning microscopy and positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hasenbach, Kathy; Wiehr, Stefan; Herrmann, Caroline; Mannheim, Julia; Cay, Funda; von Kürthy, Gabriele; Bolmont, Tristan; Grathwohl, Stefan A.; Weller, Michael; Lengerke, Claudia; Pichler, Bernd J.; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh

    2012-01-01

    Intracerebral experimental gliomas attract intravenously injected murine or human bone marrow–derived hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells (HPC) in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo, indicating that these progenitor cells might be suitable vehicles for a cell-based delivery of therapeutic molecules to malignant gliomas. With regard to therapeutic application, it is important to investigate cell fates in vivo (i.e., the time-dependent intratumoral and systemic distribution after intravenously injection). Conventional histological analysis has limitations in this regard because longitudinal monitoring is precluded. Here, we used 2-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM), positron emission tomography (PET), and MRI to study the fate of intravenously injected HPC carrying fluorescence, bioluminescence, and PET reporter genes in glioma-bearing mice. Our 2PLSM-based monitoring studies revealed that HPC homing to intracerebral experimental gliomas occurred already within the first 6 h and was most efficient within the first 24 h after intravenous injection. The highest PET signals were detected in intracerebral gliomas, whereas the tracer uptake in other organs, notably spleen, lung, liver, and muscle, remained at background levels. The results have important implications for designing schedules for therapeutic cell-based anti-glioma approaches. Moreover, the PET reporter-based imaging technique will allow noninvasive monitoring of cell fate in future cell-based therapeutic antiglioma approaches. PMID:22298526

  6. Presynaptic calcium currents in squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, R; Steinberg, I Z; Walton, K

    1981-01-01

    A voltage clamp study has been performed in the presynaptic terminal of the squid stellate ganglion. After blockage of the voltage-dependent sodium and potassium conductances, an inward calcium current is demonstrated. Given a step-depolarization pulse, this voltage- and time-dependent conductance has an S-shaped onset. At the "break" of the voltage step, a rapid tail current is observed. From these results a kinetic model is generated which accounts for the experimental results and predicts for the time course and amplitude a possible calcium entry during presynaptic action potentials. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7225510

  7. Visualizing leukocyte trafficking in the living brain with 2-photon intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Saparna; Danne, Karyn J.; Qin, Jim; Cavanagh, Lois L.; Smith, Adrian; Hickey, Michael J.; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Intravital imaging of the superficial brain tissue in mice represents a powerful tool for the dissection of the cellular and molecular cues underlying inflammatory and infectious central nervous system (CNS) diseases. We present here a step-by-step protocol that will enable a non-specialist to set up a two-photon brain-imaging model. The protocol offers a two-part approach that is specifically optimized for imaging leukocytes but can be easily adapted to answer varied CNS-related biological questions. The protocol enables simultaneous visualization of fluorescently labeled immune cells, the pial microvasculature and extracellular structures such as collagen fibers at high spatial and temporal resolution. Intracranial structures are exposed through a cranial window, and physiologic conditions are maintained during extended imaging sessions via continuous superfusion of the brain surface with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF). Experiments typically require 1–2 h of preparation, which is followed by variable periods of immune cell tracking. Our methodology converges the experience of two laboratories over the past 10 years in diseased animal models such as cerebral ischemia, lupus, cerebral malaria, and toxoplasmosis. We exemplify the utility of this protocol by tracking leukocytes in transgenic mice in the pial vessels under steady-state conditions. PMID:23316136

  8. Search for a 2-Photon Exchange in Inclusive DIS on a Transversely Polarized Hydrogen Target at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    De Nardo, L.; Lopez-Ruiz, A.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.

    2009-08-04

    Left-right single-spin asymmetries are measured in inclusive deep inelastic scattering at HERMES, with the goal of searching for a 2-photon exchange signal in the range 0.0041 GeV{sup 2} and Q{sup 2}<1 GeV{sup 2}, and for both electron and positron beams, the asymmetries are found to be consistent with zero showing that within the uncertainties no signal is detected.

  9. The effect of the calcium-antagonist nitrendipine on intracellular calcium concentration in endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, A.; Schomecker, G.; Breitkopf, K.; Dhein, S.; Klaus, W.

    1996-01-01

    1. Nitrendipine induces NO-release from coronary vascular endothelium presumably by activating endothelial NO-synthase. We have investigated whether this effect may be mediated by an influence on the intracellular calcium in endothelial cells. 2. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) were incubated with Fura-2/AM (1 microM) for 30 min and Fura-2 fluorescence was measured at 510 nm in response to chopped excitation with both 340 and 380 nm. The ratio 340/380 nm (known to reflect changes in intracellular calcium) was calculated from these data. 3. Nitrendipine (0.1 to 100 microM) led to a significant, concentration-dependent, monophasic increase in [Ca2+]i in suspended BAEC by 11 +/- 2 nM (0.1 microM), 23 +/- 3 nM (1 microM), 34 +/- 4 nM (10 microM) and by 47 +/- 5 nM (100 microM) from a control levels of 118 +/- 10 nM. 4. This elevation of intracellular calcium was prevented by pretreatment of BAECs with gadolinium (100 microM) or by incubation with calcium free saline solution. In contrast, the application of 0.3 microM thapsigargin did not abolish the nitrendipine-induced calcium signal. In additional experiments it was shown that the nitrendipine-induced NO-release (as measured with the oxy-haemoglobin-method could also be inhibited by gadolinium and was absent in calcium-free solution. 5. Thus, nitrendipine elevates intracellular calcium in suspended BAECs in a concentration-dependent manner. This elevation is mainly due to a gadolinium-sensitive calcium influx from the extracellular space rather than a calcium release from intracellular stores. Images Figure 5 PMID:8864521

  10. Calcium signaling and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Kass, G E; Orrenius, S

    1999-01-01

    The divalent calcium cation Ca(2+) is used as a major signaling molecule during cell signal transduction to regulate energy output, cellular metabolism, and phenotype. The basis to the signaling role of Ca(2+) is an intricate network of cellular channels and transporters that allow a low resting concentration of Ca(2+) in the cytosol of the cell ([Ca(2+)]i) but that are also coupled to major dynamic and rapidly exchanging stores. This enables extracellular signals from hormones and growth factors to be transduced as [Ca(2+)]i spikes that are amplitude and frequency encoded. There is considerable evidence that a number of toxic environmental chemicals target these Ca(2+) signaling processes, alter them, and induce cell death by apoptosis. Two major pathways for apoptosis will be considered. The first one involves Ca(2+)-mediated expression of ligands that bind to and activate death receptors such as CD95 (Fas, APO-1). In the second pathway, Ca(2+) has a direct toxic effect and its primary targets include the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Mitochondria may respond to an apoptotic Ca(2+) signal by the selective release of cytochrome c or through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and opening of an inner mitochondrial membrane pore. Toxic agents such as the environmental pollutant tributyltin or the natural plant product thapsigargin, which deplete the ER Ca(2+) stores, will induce as a direct result of this effect the opening of plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels and an ER stress response. In contrast, under some conditions, Ca(2+) signals may be cytoprotective and antagonize the apoptotic machinery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10229704

  11. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... level based on scientific research evidence. Adequate Intake (AI): This level is established when there is not ... enough calcium from the foods they eat. Infants (AI) 0 to 6 months: 200 milligrams per day ( ...

  12. Get Enough Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Previous section Overview 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of ... Foods and Vitamins 3 of 4 sections Take Action: Vitamin D Get enough vitamin D. Vitamin D ...

  13. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  14. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like with gout, crystals form in the joints. But in calcium ... pyrophosphate arthritis can be misdiagnosed as: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis

  15. Impact of wavefront distortion and scattering on 2-photon microscopy in mammalian brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chaigneau, Emmanuelle; Wright, Amanda J.; Poland, Simon P.; Girkin, John M.; Silver, R. Angus

    2011-01-01

    Two-photon (2P) microscopy is widely used in neuroscience, but the optical properties of brain tissue are poorly understood. We have investigated the effect of brain tissue on the 2P point spread function (PSF2P) by imaging fluorescent beads through living cortical slices. By combining this with measurements of the mean free path of the excitation light, adaptive optics and vector-based modeling that includes phase modulation and scattering, we show that tissue-induced wavefront distortions are the main determinant of enlargement and distortion of the PSF2P at intermediate imaging depths. Furthermore, they generate surrounding lobes that contain more than half of the 2P excitation. These effects reduce the resolution of fine structures and contrast and they, together with scattering, limit 2P excitation. Our results disentangle the contributions of scattering and wavefront distortion in shaping the cortical PSF2P, thereby providing a basis for improved 2P microscopy. PMID:22109156

  16. Regionalized calcium signaling in zebrafish fertilization.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dipika; Kinsey, William H

    2008-01-01

    Fertilization involves an initial, highly localized signal delivered by the sperm, which becomes amplified by a signal transduction cascade to impact the entire oocyte cytoplasm. The zebrafish oocyte presents a unique opportunity to study this process since fertilization always occurs at the micropyle, allowing the investigator to image the earliest steps in the oocyte activation process. The objective of the present study was to characterize the amplification of the sperm-induced calcium transient in the zebrafish oocyte and test the role of Fyn kinase in this process. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that the sperm-induced calcium transient was composed of two elements, one of which was unique to the oocyte cortex and a second, slower transient that occurred in the central cytoplasm of the oocyte. The cortical transient was initiated immediately deep to the micropyle, became amplified at the animal pole, and progressed peripherally through the oocyte cortex. This was followed by a slower transient that occurred in the central cytoplasm of the oocyte. Several lines of evidence indicate that calcium release in these two compartments may be regulated differently. The calcium transient in the oocyte cortex is highly sensitive to inhibition by Fyn-SH2 domain containing fusion proteins, while the central cytoplasmic transient is relatively resistant to this treatment. Oocytes stimulated by injection of a soluble extract prepared from zebrafish sperm respond only with a cortical calcium transient initiated at the micropyle, while oocytes stimulated parthenogenetically by hypotonic shock exhibit a defective cortical transient but a normal transient in the central cytoplasm. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of Fyn kinase and the IP3 receptor reveal that these important signaling components are highly enriched in the oocyte cortex, a factor which may facilitate a faster propagation of the calcium transient in this compartment. In summary, analysis of

  17. An evaluation of the importance of gastric acid secretion in the absorption of dietary calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Bo-Linn, G W; Davis, G R; Buddrus, D J; Morawski, S G; Santa Ana, C; Fordtran, J S

    1984-01-01

    Since calcium solubility is a prerequisite to calcium absorption, and since solubility of calcium is highly pH-dependent, it has been generally assumed that gastric acid secretion and gastric acidity play an important role in the intestinal absorption of calcium from ingested food or calcium salts such as CaCO3. To evaluate this hypothesis, we developed a method wherein net gastrointestinal absorption of calcium can be measured after ingestion of a single meal. A large dose of cimetidine, which markedly reduced gastric acid secretion, had no effect on calcium absorption in normal subjects, and an achlorhydric patient with pernicious anemia absorbed calcium normally. This was true regardless of the major source of dietary calcium (i.e., milk, insoluble calcium carbonate, or soluble calcium citrate). Moreover, calcium absorption after CaCO3 ingestion was the same when intragastric contents were maintained at pH 7.4 (by in vivo titration) as when intragastric pH was 3.0. On the basis of these results, we conclude that gastric acid secretion and gastric acidity do not normally play a role in the absorption of dietary calcium. Other possible mechanisms by which the gastrointestinal tract might solubilize ingested calcium complexes and salts are discussed. Images PMID:6707197

  18. Choice of gauge in 2-photon 1s-2s transition in atomic hydrogen and pseudostate expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shabazz, Abdulalim A.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of gauge choice in multiphoton transitions in connection with the proper choice of the unperturbed wave functions require to insure gauge invariance was considered. J. Bassani, J. J. Forney, and A. Quattropani considered the case of 2-photon 1s-2s transition rate for hydrogen, using gauges vector E x vector r and vector A x vector p. Exactly the same results were obtained for the two gauges, but the findings indicate that the vector E x vector r interaction tends to the final result with a small number of intermediate states and is therefore the one to be used in any approximate calculation. Whether the so-called pseudostate expansion method works equally well with either gauge was tested. To accomplish this task, in addition to researching the problem, the FORTRAN programming was learned and a FORTRAN program was constructed for the calculation of the dimensionless 2-photon transition probability amplitude D(v) for 1s-2s transition in Hydrogen as a function as a function of the incident photon frequency v in gauge vector E x vector p at certain values of v, using the pseudostate method. However, some puzzling unresolved difficulties were experienced in the calculation. Then should the pseudostate calculations prove successful for gauge vector E x vector r the method will be applied to gauge vector A x vector p. If successful, then the problem is complete.

  19. Calcium/Vitamin D Supplementation and Coronary Artery Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Manson, JoAnn E.; Allison, Matthew A.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Langer, Robert D.; Cochrane, Barbara B.; Hendrix, Susan L.; Hsia, Judith; Hunt, Julie R.; Lewis, Cora E.; Margolis, Karen L.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Thomas, Asha M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Coronary artery calcified plaque is a marker for atheromatous plaque burden and predicts future risk of cardiovascular events. The relationship between calcium plus vitamin D supplementation and coronary artery calcium (CAC) has not been previously assessed in a randomized trial setting. We compared coronary artery calcium scores among women randomized to calcium/vitamin D supplementation versus placebo following trial completion. Methods In an ancillary substudy of women randomized to calcium carbonate (1000 mg of elemental calcium daily) plus vitamin D3 (400 IU daily) versus placebo, nested within the Women’s Health Initiative trial of estrogen among women with hysterectomy, we measured CAC with cardiac computed tomography in 754 women aged 50–59 years at randomization. Imaging for CAC was performed at 28 of 40 centers following a mean of 7 years of treatment and scans were read centrally. Coronary artery calcium scores were measured by a central reading center with masking to randomization assignments. Results Post-trial CAC measurements were similar in women randomized to calcium/vitamin D supplementation (calcium/D) and those receiving placebo. The mean CAC score was 91.6 for calcium/D and 100.5 for placebo (rank test p-value=0.74). After adjustment for coronary risk factors, multivariate odds ratios for increasing CAC score cutpoints (CAC >0, ≥10, and ≥100) for calcium/D vs placebo were 0.92 (95% confidence interval, 0.64–1.34), 1.29 (0.88–1.87), and 0.90 (0.56–1.44), respectively. Corresponding odds ratios among women with >50% adherence to study pills and for higher levels of CAC (>300), were similar. Conclusions Treatment with moderate doses of calcium plus vitamin D3 did not appear to alter coronary artery calcified plaque burden among postmenopausal women. PMID:20551849

  20. A large field of view two-photon mesoscope with subcellular resolution for in vivo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sofroniew, Nicholas James; Flickinger, Daniel; King, Jonathan; Svoboda, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is used to map activity across populations of neurons. Microscopes with cellular resolution have small (<1 millimeter) fields of view and cannot simultaneously image activity distributed across multiple brain areas. Typical large field of view microscopes do not resolve single cells, especially in the axial dimension. We developed a 2-photon random access mesoscope (2p-RAM) that allows high-resolution imaging anywhere within a volume spanning multiple brain areas (∅ 5 mm x 1 mm cylinder). 2p-RAM resolution is near diffraction limited (lateral, 0.66 μm, axial 4.09 μm at the center; excitation wavelength = 970 nm; numerical aperture = 0.6) over a large range of excitation wavelengths. A fast three-dimensional scanning system allows efficient sampling of neural activity in arbitrary regions of interest across the entire imaging volume. We illustrate the use of the 2p-RAM by imaging neural activity in multiple, non-contiguous brain areas in transgenic mice expressing protein calcium sensors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14472.001 PMID:27300105

  1. Modelling of calcium phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderin Hidalgo, Lazaro Juan

    This work is a contribution to a large scale joint experimental and theoretical effort to understand the biological properties of silicon doped calcium phosphates undertaken by Queen's University and Millenium Biologix Corp. We have modeled calcium phosphates and silicon doped calcium phosphates in close relation to experiment in order to study possible location of silicon in the lattice. Density functional theory has been used to study the structural and dynamical properties of small systems of calcium phosphates to gain preliminary information on phosphates and the performance of the theoretical methods. The same methods were used to investigate structural and electronic properties of larger scale calcium phosphate systems, while a classical shell model was developed to investigate the dynamical properties of such large and complex systems. In the context of the shell model a method was devised to calculate the dynamical matrix corrected for the long range Coulomb interaction in the long wave length limit. It was necessary also to develop a theoretical expression for the dielectric function in the context of the shell model. Infrared spectra and thermal parameters were calculated based on these methods. We also propose some directions for future research.

  2. Cilioplasm is a cellular compartment for calcium signaling in response to mechanical and chemical stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xingjian; Mohieldin, Ashraf M.; Muntean, Brian S.; Green, Jill A.; Shah, Jagesh V.; Mykytyn, Kirk; Nauli, Surya M.

    2013-01-01

    Primary cilia with a diameter of ~200 nm have been implicated in development and disease. Calcium signaling within a primary cilium has never been directly visualized and has therefore remained a speculation. Fluid-shear stress and dopamine receptor type-5 (DR5) agonist are among the few stimuli that require cilia for intracellular calcium signal transduction. However, it is not known if these stimuli initiate calcium signaling within the cilium, or if the calcium signal originates in the cytoplasm. Using an integrated single-cell imaging technique, we demonstrate for the first time that calcium signaling triggered by fluid-shear stress initiates in the primary cilium and can be distinguished from the subsequent cytosolic calcium response through the ryanodine receptor. Importantly, this flow-induced calcium signaling depends on the ciliary polycystin-2 calcium channel. While DR5-specific agonist induces calcium signaling mainly in the cilioplasm via ciliary CaV1.2, thrombin specifically induces cytosolic calcium signaling through the IP3 receptor. Furthermore, a non-specific calcium ionophore triggers both ciliary and cytosolic calcium responses. We suggest that cilia not only act as sensory organelles but also function as calcium signaling compartments. Cilium-dependent signaling can spread to the cytoplasm or be contained within the cilioplasm. Our study also provides the first model to understand signaling within the cilioplasm of a living cell. PMID:24104765

  3. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  4. [Mitochondria, calcium homeostasis and calcium signaling].

    PubMed

    Zavodnik, I B

    2016-03-01

    Са2+ is a very important and versatile intracellular signal which controls numerous biochemical and physiological (pathophysiological) processes in the cell. Good evidence exists that mitochondria are sensors, decoders and regulators of calcium signaling. Precise regulation of calcium signaling in the cell involves numerous molecular targets, which induce and decode changes of Са2+ concentrations in the cell (pumps, channels, Са2+-binding proteins, Са2+-dependent enzymes, localized in the cytoplasm and organelles). Mitochondrial Са2+ uniporter accumulates excess of Са2+ in mitochondria, while Na+/Са2+- and H+/Са2+-antiporters extrude Са2+ in the cytoplasm. Mitochondrial Са2+ overloading results in formation of mitochondria permeability transition pores which play an important role in cell death under many pathological conditions. Mitochondria regulate Са2+ homeostasis and control important cellular functions such as metabolism, proliferation, survival. Identification of cellular and mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters and understanding their functional mechanisms open up new prospects for their using as therapeutic targets. PMID:27420625

  5. Calcium and olfactory transduction.

    PubMed

    Winegar, B D; Rosick, E R; Schafer, R

    1988-01-01

    1. Inorganic cations, organic calcium antagonists, and calmodulin antagonists were applied to olfactory epithelia of frogs (Rana pipiens) while recording electroolfactogram (EOG) responses. 2. Inorganic cations inhibited EOGs in a rank order, reflecting their calcium channel blocking potency: La3+ greater than Zn2+ greater than Cd2+ greater than Al3+ greater than Ca2+ greater than Sr2+ greater than Co2+ greater than Ba2+ greater than Mg2+. Barium ion significantly enhanced EOGs immediately following application. 3. Diltiazem and verapamil produced dose-dependent EOG inhibition. 4. Calmodulin antagonists inhibited EOGs without correlation to their anti-calmodulin potency. PMID:2904344

  6. Calcium metabolism in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Heer, M; Kamps, N; Biener, C; Korr, C; Boerger, A; Zittermann, A; Stehle, P; Drummer, C

    1999-09-01

    Unloading of weight bearing bones as induced by microgravity or immobilization has significant impacts on the calcium and bone metabolism and is the most likely cause for space osteoporosis. During a 4.5 to 6 month stay in space most of the astronauts develop a reduction in bone mineral density in spine, femoral neck, trochanter, and pelvis of 1%-1.6% measured by Dual Energy X-ray Absorption (DEXA). Dependent on the mission length and the individual turnover rates of the astronauts it can even reach individual losses of up to 14% in the femoral neck. Osteoporosis itself is defined as the deterioration of bone tissue leading to enhanced bone fragility and to a consequent increase in fracture risk. Thinking of long-term missions to Mars or interplanetary missions for years, space osteoporosis is one of the major concerns for manned spaceflight. However, decrease in bone density can be initiated differently. It either can be caused by increases in bone formation and bone resorption resulting in a net bone loss, as obtained in fast looser postmenopausal osteoporosis. On the other hand decrease in bone formation and increase in bone resorption also leads to bone losses as obtained in slow looser postmenopausal osteoporosis or in Anorexia Nervosa patients. Biomarkers of bone turnover measured during several missions indicated that the pattern of space osteoporosis is very similar to the pattern of Anorexia Nervosa patients or slow looser postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, beside unloading, other risk factors for space osteoporosis exist such as stress, nutrition, fluid shifts, dehydration and bone perfusion. Especially nutritional factors may contribute considerably to the development of osteoporosis. From earthbound studies it is known that calcium supplementation in women and men can prevent bone loss of 1% bone per year. Based on these results we studied the calcium intake during several European missions and performed an experiment during the German MIR 97 mission

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Calcium Spikes in Noisy Fluorescent Background

    PubMed Central

    Janicek, Radoslav; Hotka, Matej; Zahradníková, Alexandra; Zahradníková, Alexandra; Zahradník, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular calcium signals are studied by laser-scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy. The required spatio-temporal resolution makes description of calcium signals difficult because of the low signal-to-noise ratio. We designed a new procedure of calcium spike analysis based on their fitting with a model. The accuracy and precision of calcium spike description were tested on synthetic datasets generated either with randomly varied spike parameters and Gaussian noise of constant amplitude, or with constant spike parameters and Gaussian noise of various amplitudes. Statistical analysis was used to evaluate the performance of spike fitting algorithms. The procedure was optimized for reliable estimation of calcium spike parameters and for dismissal of false events. A new algorithm was introduced that corrects the acquisition time of pixels in line-scan images that is in error due to sequential acquisition of individual pixels along the space coordinate. New software was developed in Matlab and provided for general use. It allows interactive dissection of temporal profiles of calcium spikes from x-t images, their fitting with predefined function(s) and acceptance of results on statistical grounds, thus allowing efficient analysis and reliable description of calcium signaling in cardiac myocytes down to the in situ function of ryanodine receptors. PMID:23741324

  8. Mechanically induced intercellular calcium communication in confined endothelial structures.

    PubMed

    Junkin, Michael; Lu, Yi; Long, Juexuan; Deymier, Pierre A; Hoying, James B; Wong, Pak Kin

    2013-03-01

    Calcium signaling in the diverse vascular structures is regulated by a wide range of mechanical and biochemical factors to maintain essential physiological functions of the vasculature. To properly transmit information, the intercellular calcium communication mechanism must be robust against various conditions in the cellular microenvironment. Using plasma lithography geometric confinement, we investigate mechanically induced calcium wave propagation in networks of human umbilical vein endothelial cells organized. Endothelial cell networks with confined architectures were stimulated at the single cell level, including using capacitive force probes. Calcium wave propagation in the network was observed using fluorescence calcium imaging. We show that mechanically induced calcium signaling in the endothelial networks is dynamically regulated against a wide range of probing forces and repeated stimulations. The calcium wave is able to propagate consistently in various dimensions from monolayers to individual cell chains, and in different topologies from linear patterns to cell junctions. Our results reveal that calcium signaling provides a robust mechanism for cell-cell communication in networks of endothelial cells despite the diversity of the microenvironmental inputs and complexity of vascular structures. PMID:23267827

  9. Preparation and properties of calcium oxide from eggshells via calcination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangboriboon, N.; Kunanuruksapong, R.; Sirivat, A.

    2012-12-01

    Duck eggs are one of the most versatile cooking ingredients in which residue eggshells are discarded. Raw duck eggshells were calcined at temperatures between 300 to 900 °C, for 1, 3, and 5 h. Both the raw and calcined duck eggshells were characterized by FTIR, STA, XRD, XRF, TEM, BET, a particle size analyzer, and an impedance analyzer. The proper calcination conditions are: 900 °C and 1 h, yielding calcium oxide with a purity of 99.06 % w/w. The calcium carbonate of the rhombohedral form (CaCO3) transforms completely into the calcium oxide or lime of the face centered cubic form (CaO) at 900 °C, as shown by XRD diffraction patterns. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of the calcium oxide reveal a moderately good dispersion of nearly uniform particles. The calcium oxide has a white color, a spherical shape, high porosity, and narrow particles size distribution. The percentage of ceramic yield of the calcium oxide is 53.53, as measured by STA (TG-DTA-DTG). The calcium oxide has a N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm indicating the meso-porosity range. The dielectric constant and the electrical conductivity of the calcined calcium oxide are 35 and 1:0×10-6(Ω·m)-1, respectively, at the frequency of 500 Hz.

  10. Quantifying bursting neuron activity from calcium signals using blind deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Park, In Jun; Bobkov, Yuriy V; Ache, Barry W; Principe, Jose C

    2013-09-15

    Advances in calcium imaging have enabled studies of the dynamic activity of both individual neurons and neuronal assemblies. However, challenges, such as unknown nonlinearities in the spike-calcium relationship, noise, and the often relatively low temporal resolution of the calcium signal compared to the time-scale of spike generation, restrict the accurate estimation of action potentials from the calcium signal. Complex neuronal discharge, such as the activity demonstrated by bursting and rhythmically active neurons, represents an even greater challenge for reconstructing spike trains based on calcium signals. We propose a method using blind calcium signal deconvolution based on an information-theoretic approach. This model is meant to maximise the output entropy of a nonlinear filter where the nonlinearity is defined by the cumulative distribution function of the spike signal. We tested our maximum entropy (ME) algorithm using bursting olfactory receptor neurons (bORNs) of the lobster olfactory organ. The advantage of the ME algorithm is that the filter can be trained online based only on the statistics of the spike signal, without any assumptions regarding the unknown transfer function characterizing the relation between the spike and calcium signal. We show that the ME method is able to more accurately reconstruct the timing of the first and last spikes of a burst compared to other methods and that it improves the temporal precision fivefold compared to direct timing resolution of calcium signal. PMID:23711821

  11. CALCIUM-INDUCED SUPRAMOLECULAR STRUCTURES IN THE CALCIUM CASEINATE SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular details deciphering the spontaneous calcium-induced protein aggregation process in the calcium caseinate system remain obscure. Understanding this complex process could lead to potential new applications of this important food ingredient. In this work, we studied calcium-induced supra...

  12. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of calcium carbonate and magnesium is commonly found in antacids. These medicines provide heartburn relief. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  13. Calcium Content of Common Foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... 130 Waffle 80 g 47 Meat, fish and eggs Food Serving Size Calcium (mg) Egg 50 g 27 Red meat 120 g 7 ... foods Food Serving Size Calcium (mg) Quiche (cheese, eggs) 200 g 212 Omelette with cheese 120 g ...

  14. Intestinal Stem Cells: Got Calcium?

    PubMed

    Nászai, Máté; Cordero, Julia B

    2016-02-01

    Calcium ions are well-known intracellular signalling molecules. A new study identifies local cytoplasmic calcium as a central integrator of metabolic and proliferative signals in Drosophila intestinal stem cells. PMID:26859268

  15. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Resources and Publications Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  16. Calcium bioaccessibility and uptake by human intestinal like cells following in vitro digestion of casein phosphopeptide-calcium aggregates.

    PubMed

    Perego, Silvia; Del Favero, Elena; De Luca, Paola; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Fiorilli, Amelia; Cantu', Laura; Ferraretto, Anita

    2015-06-01

    Casein phosphopeptides (CPPs), derived by casein proteolysis, can bind calcium ions and keep them in solution. In vitro studies have demonstrated CPP-induced cell calcium uptake, depending on the formation of (CPP + calcium) complexes and on the degree of differentiation of the intestinal cells. With the present study, we address the persistence of the complexes and of the CPP-induced calcium uptake in intestinal like cells after the digestion process, thus examining their eligibility to serve as nutraceuticals. A calcium-preloaded CPP preparation of commercial origin (Ca-CPPs) was subjected to in vitro digestion. The evolution of the supramolecular structure of the Ca-CPP complexes was studied using laser-light and X-ray scattering. The bioactivity of the pre- and post-digestion Ca-CPPs was determined in differentiated Caco2 and HT-29 cells by video imaging experiments using Fura-2. We found that Ca-CPP aggregates keep a complex supramolecular organization upon digestion, despite getting smaller in size and increasing internal calcium dispersion. Concomitantly and most interestingly, digested Ca-CPPs clearly enhance the uptake of calcium ions, especially in Caco2 cells. In contrast, digestion depletes the ability of post-loaded decalcified-CPPs (Ca-dekCPPs), with a weaker internal structure, to induce calcium uptake. The enhanced bioactivity reached upon digestion strongly suggests a recognized role of Ca-CPPs, in the form used here, as nutraceuticals. PMID:25927875

  17. Calcium and phosphorus fluxes during hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate.

    PubMed

    Hou, S H; Zhao, J; Ellman, C F; Hu, J; Griffin, Z; Spiegel, D M; Bourdeau, J E

    1991-08-01

    We evaluated the acute effects of varying dialysate calcium concentration on plasma concentrations and dialyzer fluxes of calcium and phosphorus in adult hemodialysis patients. Seven individuals with stable end-stage renal failure were dialyzed 4 hours, three times weekly. The effects of dialysates containing 1.75, 1.25, or 0.75 mmol/L (70.1, 50.1, or 30.1 mg/L) of calcium were compared. Each patient was studied once at each bath calcium concentration. Compared with the predialysis mean value of 2.27 mmol/L (9.1 mg/dL), plasma total calcium concentration increased, remained constant, or decreased with the 1.75-, 1.25-, or 0.75-mmol/L calcium dialysates, respectively. The 0.75-mmol/L calcium dialysate did not cause signs or symptoms of hypocalcemia (and the plasma calcium concentration did not fall below 1.80 mmol/L [7.2 mg/dL]). Plasma phosphorus concentrations decreased equally from a predialysis mean value of 2.16 mmol/L (6.7 mg/dL), regardless of the dialysate calcium concentration. After 4 hours of treatment with the three different dialysates, the cumulative calcium fluxes were significantly different. With 1.75 mmol/L calcium, mean bodily calcium accumulation was 21.9 mmol (879 mg). With 1.25 mmol/L, there was no net calcium flux. With 0.75 mmol/L, mean patient calcium loss was 5.8 mmol (231 mg). Mean phosphorus removal after 4 hours was 32.5 mmol (1,006 mg) and was unaffected by dialysate calcium concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1867178

  18. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate intakes of vitamin D and calcium are essential preventative measures and essential components of any therapeutic regimen for osteoporosis. Vitamin D is also important for the prevention of falls. Current evidence suggests that a 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of 75 nmol/L (30 ng/ml) or higher ...

  19. High Blood Calcium (Hypercalcemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sarcoidosis • Hormone disorders, such as overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) • A genetic condition called familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia • Kidney ... topics: www.hormone.org (search for PHPT, calcium, hyperthyroidism, or osteoporosis) • MedlinePlus (National Institutes of Health-NIH): ...

  20. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  1. Diet and calcium stones.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J; Norman, R W

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on the dietary modification of urinary risk factors as a means of reducing the likelihood of recurrent stone formation and to develop practical dietary recommendations that might be useful to this end. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE was searched for English-language articles published from 1983 to 1990. Additional references were selected from the bibliographies of identified articles. STUDY SELECTION: Nonrandomized trials and retrospective reviews were included because of a paucity of randomized controlled trials. DATA SYNTHESIS: Information on the dietary intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and fibre and on alcohol and fluid intake was used to develop practical guidelines on dietary modification. CONCLUSION: Dietary modification plays an important role in the reduction of urinary risk factors in patients with calcium stone disease of the urinary tract. As an initial form of prevention attention should be directed toward moderating the intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and alcohol and increasing the intake of fibre and water. Future research should include an assessment of the long-term reduction of dietary and urinary risk factors and the rates of recurrence of calcium stones. PMID:1310430

  2. Calcium biofortification of crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than half of the world's population is deficient in calcium (Ca), iron (Fe), iodine (I), magnesium (Mg), selenium (Se), or zinc (Zn). The consumption of plants, directly or via livestock, containing inadequate concentrations of particular minerals causes these deficiencies. Agronomic and geneti...

  3. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  4. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  5. Clinically relevant concentration of pregabalin has no acute inhibitory effect on excitation of dorsal horn neurons under normal or neuropathic pain conditions: An intracellular calcium-imaging study in spinal cord slices from adult rats.

    PubMed

    Baba, Hiroshi; Petrenko, Andrey B; Fujiwara, Naoshi

    2016-10-01

    Pregabalin is thought to exert its therapeutic effect in neuropathic pain via binding to α2δ-1 subunits of voltage-gated calcium (Ca(2+)) channels. However, the exact analgesic mechanism after its binding to α2δ-1 subunits remains largely unknown. Whether a clinical concentration of pregabalin (≈10μM) can cause acute inhibition of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is controversial. To address this issue, we undertook intracellular Ca(2+)-imaging studies using spinal cord slices with an intact attached L5 dorsal root, and examined if pregabalin acutely inhibits the primary afferent stimulation-evoked excitation of dorsal horn neurons in normal rats and in rats with streptozotocin-induced painful diabetic neuropathy. Under normal conditions, stimulation of a dorsal root evoked Ca(2+) signals predominantly in the superficial dorsal horn. Clinically relevant (10μM) and a very high concentration of pregabalin (100μM) did not affect the intensity or spread of dorsal root stimulation-evoked Ca(2+) signals, whereas an extremely high dose of pregabalin (300μM) slightly but significantly attenuated Ca(2+) signals in normal rats and in diabetic neuropathic (DN) rats. There was no difference between normal rats and DN rats with regard to the extent of signal attenuation at all concentrations tested. These results suggest that the activity of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is not inhibited acutely by clinical doses of pregabalin under normal or DN conditions. It is very unlikely that an acute inhibitory action in the dorsal horn is the main analgesic mechanism of pregabalin in neuropathic pain states. PMID:27543338

  6. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamponi, Gerald Werner

    Voltage Gated Calcium Channels is the first comprehensive book in the calcium channel field, encompassing over thirty years of progress towards our understanding of calcium channel structure, function, regulation, physiology, pharmacology, and genetics. This book balances contributions from many of the leading authorities in the calcium channel field with fresh perspectives from risings stars in the area, taking into account the most recent literature and concepts. This is the only all-encompassing calcium channel book currently available, and is an essential resource for academic researchers at all levels in the areas neuroscience, biophysics, and cardiovascular sciences, as well as to researchers in the drug discovery area.

  7. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  8. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology.

    PubMed

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D; Burton, Rachel A; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  9. Calcium channels in PDGF-stimulated A172 cells open after intracellular calcium release and are not voltage-dependent.

    PubMed

    Szöllösi, J; Feuerstein, B G; Vereb, G; Pershadsingh, H A; Marton, L J

    1991-07-01

    Using laser image cytometry and Indo-1 fluorescence, we investigated the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) of confluent A172 human glioblastoma cells stimulated by the BB homodimer of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB). The shape of the calcium transients and the delay time between stimulation and the beginning of the transient varied considerably. The percentage of responsive cells, the peak [Ca2+]i and the duration of the response were directly related to PDGF-BB dose, while the delay time was inversely related; the maximal response occurred at a PDGF-BB concentration of 20 ng/ml. Studies with EGTA and inorganic calcium-channel blockers (Ni2+, La3+) showed that the increase of [Ca2+]i resulted from initial release of intracellular stores and subsequent calcium influx across the plasma membrane. Opening of calcium channels in the plasma membrane, monitored directly by studying Mn2+ quenching of Indo-1 fluorescence, was stimulated by PDGF-BB and blocked by La3+; the opening occurred 55 +/- 10 s after the initial increase in [Ca2+]i. Therefore, in these tumor cells, intracellular release always occurs before channel opening in the plasma membrane. Depolarization of cells with high extracellular [K+] did not generally induce calcium transients but did decrease calcium influx. L-type calcium-channel blockers (verapamil, nifedipine, and diltiazem) had little or no effect on the calcium influx induced by PDGF-BB. These results indicate that PDGF-BB induces calcium influx by a mechanism independent of voltage-sensitive calcium channels in A172 human glioblastoma cells. PMID:1657394

  10. Nutrition in calcium nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis is a multifactorial disease with a complex pathogenesis due to genetic and environmental factors. The importance of social and health effects of nephrolithiasis is further highlighted by the strong tendency to relapse of the disease. Long-term prospective studies show a peak of disease recurrence within 2–3 years since onset, 40-50% of patients have a recurrence after 5 years and more than 50-60% after 10 years. International nutritional studies demonstrated that nutritional habits are relevant in therapy and prevention approaches of nephrolithiasis. Water, right intake of calcium, low intake of sodium, high levels of urinary citrate are certainly important for the primary and secondary prevention of nephrolithiasis. In this review is discussed how the correction of nutritional mistakes can reduce the incidence of recurrent nephrolithiasis. PMID:23634702

  11. DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM

    DOEpatents

    Barton, J.

    1954-07-27

    This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

  12. Synthesis of calcium superoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rewick, R. T.; Blucher, W. G.; Estacio, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    Efforts to prepare Ca(O2) sub 2 from reactions of calcium compounds with 100% O3 and with O(D-1) atoms generated by photolysis of O3 at 2537 A are described. Samples of Ca(OH) sub 2, CaO, CaO2, Ca metal, and mixtures containing suspected impurities to promote reaction have been treated with excess O3 under static and flow conditions in the presence and absence of UV irradiation. Studies with KO2 suggest that the superoxide anion is stable to radiation at 2537 A but reacts with oxygen atoms generated by the photolysis of O3 to form KO3. Calcium superoxide is expected to behave in an analogous.

  13. Complexometric Determination of Calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) complexes with numerous mineral ions, including calcium and magnesium. This reaction can be used to determine the amount of these minerals in a sample by a complexometric titration. Endpoints in the titration are detected using indicators that change color when they complex with mineral ions. Calmagite and eriochrome black T (EBT) are such indicators that change from blue to pink when they complex with calcium and magnesium. In the titration of a mineral-containing solution with EDTA, the solution turns from pink to blue at the endpoint with either indicator. The pH affects a complexometric EDTA titration in several ways, and must be carefully controlled. A major application of EDTA titration is testing the hardness of water, for which the method described is an official one (Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, Method 2340C; AOAC Method 920.196).

  14. Prebiotics and calcium bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Kevin

    2003-03-01

    A prebiotic substance has been defined as a non-digestible food ingredient that beneficially affects the host by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of one or a limited number of bacteria in the colon. Therefore, compared to probiotics, which introduce exogenous bacteria into the colonic microflora, a prebiotic aims at stimulating the growth of one or a limited number of the potentially health-promoting indigenous micro-organisms, thus modulating the composition of the natural ecosystem. In recent years, increasing attention has been focussed on the possible beneficial effects of prebiotics, such as enhanced resistance to invading pathogens, improved bowel function, anti-colon cancer properties, lipid lowering action, improved calcium bioavailability, amongst others. The objective of this review is to critically assess the available data on the effects of prebiotics on calcium bioavailability, and place it in the context of human physiology and, when possible, explain the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. The review will also try to highlight future areas of research that may help in the evaluation of prebiotics as potential ingredients for functional foods aimed at enhancing calcium bioavailability and protecting against osteoporosis. PMID:12691259

  15. Wind-induced plant motion immediately increases cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, M R; Smith, S M; Trewavas, A J

    1992-01-01

    Wind is one of the most unusual and more dramatic of the environmental signals to modify plant development. Wind-stimulated crops are also known to experience considerable reductions in growth and subsequent yield. There is at present no experimental data to suggest how wind signals are perceived and transduced by plant cells. We have genetically transformed Nicotiana plumbaginifolia to express aequorin and thus produced luminous plants that directly report cytosolic calcium by emitting blue light. With these plants we have found wind stimulation to cause immediate increases in cytosolic calcium and our evidence, based on the use of specific inhibitors, suggests that this calcium is mobilized from organelle sources. Our data further suggest that wind-induced movement of tissues, by mechanically stimulating and stressing constituent plant cells, is responsible for the immediate elevation of cytosolic calcium; increases occur only when the plant tissue is actually in motion. Repeated wind stimulation renders the cells refractory to further calcium signaling but responsiveness is rapidly recovered when stimulation is subsequently diminished. Our data suggest that mechanoperception in plant cells may possibly be transduced through intracellular calcium. Since mechanoperception and transduction are considered crucial to plant morphogenesis, our observations suggest that calcium could be central in the control and generation of plant form. Images PMID:11536497

  16. Broadband transient absorption spectroscopy with 1- and 2-photon excitations: Relaxation paths and cross sections of a triphenylamine dye in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Dobryakov, A. L.; Hecht, S. E-mail: skovale@chemie.hu-berlin.de; Kovalenko, S. A. E-mail: skovale@chemie.hu-berlin.de; Ioffe, I. N.; Granovsky, A. A.

    2015-07-14

    1-photon (382 nm) and 2-photon (752 nm) excitations to the S{sub 1} state are applied to record and compare transient absorption spectra of a push-pull triphenylamine (TrP) dye in solution. After 1-photon excitation, ultrafast vibrational and structural molecular relaxations are detected on a 0.1 ps time scale in nonpolar hexane, while in polar acetonitrile, the spectral evolution is dominated by dipolar solvation. Upon 2-photon excitation, transient spectra in hexane reveal an unexpected growth of stimulated emission (SE) and excited-state absorption (ESA) bands. The behavior is explained by strong population transfer S{sub 1} → S{sub n} due to resonant absorption of a third pump photon. Subsequent S{sub n} → S{sub 1} internal conversion (with τ{sub 1} = 1 ps) prepares a very hot S{sub 1} state which cools down with τ{sub 2} = 13 ps. The pump pulse energy dependence proves the 2-photon origin of the bleach signal. At the same time, SE and ESA are strongly affected by higher-order pump absorptions that should be taken into account in nonlinear fluorescence applications. The 2-photon excitation cross sections σ{sup (2)} = 32 ⋅ 10{sup −50} cm{sup 4} s at 752 nm are evaluated from the bleach signal.

  17. Broadband transient absorption spectroscopy with 1- and 2-photon excitations: Relaxation paths and cross sections of a triphenylamine dye in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, J.; Dobryakov, A. L.; Ioffe, I. N.; Granovsky, A. A.; Hecht, S.; Kovalenko, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    1-photon (382 nm) and 2-photon (752 nm) excitations to the S1 state are applied to record and compare transient absorption spectra of a push-pull triphenylamine (TrP) dye in solution. After 1-photon excitation, ultrafast vibrational and structural molecular relaxations are detected on a 0.1 ps time scale in nonpolar hexane, while in polar acetonitrile, the spectral evolution is dominated by dipolar solvation. Upon 2-photon excitation, transient spectra in hexane reveal an unexpected growth of stimulated emission (SE) and excited-state absorption (ESA) bands. The behavior is explained by strong population transfer S1 → Sn due to resonant absorption of a third pump photon. Subsequent Sn → S1 internal conversion (with τ1 = 1 ps) prepares a very hot S1 state which cools down with τ2 = 13 ps. The pump pulse energy dependence proves the 2-photon origin of the bleach signal. At the same time, SE and ESA are strongly affected by higher-order pump absorptions that should be taken into account in nonlinear fluorescence applications. The 2-photon excitation cross sections σ(2) = 32 ṡ 10-50 cm4 s at 752 nm are evaluated from the bleach signal.

  18. Approaches to measuring calcium in zebrafish: focus on neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Rachel

    2004-05-01

    Calcium ions are known to act as important cellular signals during nervous system development. In vitro studies have provided significant information on the role of calcium signals during neuronal development; however, the function of this messenger in nervous system maturation in vivo remains to be established. The zebrafish has emerged as a valuable model for the study of vertebrate embryogenesis. Fertilisation is external and the rapid growth of the transparent embryo, including development of internal organs, can be observed easily making it well suited for imaging studies. The developing nervous system is relatively simple and has been well characterised, allowing individual neurons to be identified. Using the zebrafish model, both intracellular and intercellular calcium signals throughout embryonic development have been characterised. This review summarises technical approaches to measure calcium signals in developing embryonic and larval zebrafish, and includes recent developments that will facilitate the study of calcium signalling in vivo. The application of calcium imaging techniques to investigate the action of this messenger during embryogenesis in intact zebrafish is illustrated by discussion of their contribution to our understanding of neuronal development in vivo. PMID:15003849

  19. High power broadband mid-infrared supercontinuum fiber laser using a novel chalcogenide AsSe2 photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diouf, Mbaye; Ben Salem, Amine; Cherif, Rim; Wague, Ahmadou; Zghal, Mourad

    2016-05-01

    A high power supercontinuum (SC) based on a new type of chalcogenide AsSe2 material for broadband mid-infrared light source is numerically reported. Ultra-broadband coherent mid-IR SC generation with more than 3 octave-spanning from 1.7 to 14 μm in a novel design of chalcogenide AsSe2 photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is demonstrated. To the best of our knowledge and aiming to properly model the nonlinear propagation, an accurate fit of the Raman response function and the corresponding Raman gain of the novel AsSe2 chalcogenide glass are proposed numerically for the first time. The obtained SC is generated by pumping at 3.9 μm in the anomalous dispersion regime in only 8 mm long fiber. Our study shows that the initially generated SC from 150 fs pulse duration with 8.8 kW peak power exhibits high power proportion of more than 80% for wavelengths beyond 3 μm which is very promising for designing high power SC fiber laser sources in the mid-IR atmospheric windows and the molecular fingerprint region.

  20. Cameleon calcium indicator reports cytoplasmic calcium dynamics in Arabidopsis guard cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. J.; Kwak, J. M.; Chu, S. P.; Llopis, J.; Tsien, R. Y.; Harper, J. F.; Schroeder, J. I.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Cytoplasmic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) acts as a stimulus-induced second messenger in plant cells and multiple signal transduction pathways regulate [Ca2+]cyt in stomatal guard cells. Measuring [Ca2+]cyt in guard cells has previously required loading of calcium-sensitive dyes using invasive and technically difficult micro-injection techniques. To circumvent these problems, we have constitutively expressed the pH-independent, green fluorescent protein-based calcium indicator yellow cameleon 2.1 in Arabidopsis thaliana (Miyawaki et al. 1999; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96, 2135-2140). This yellow cameleon calcium indicator was expressed in guard cells and accumulated predominantly in the cytoplasm. Fluorescence ratio imaging of yellow cameleon 2.1 allowed time-dependent measurements of [Ca2+]cyt in Arabidopsis guard cells. Application of extracellular calcium or the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) induced repetitive [Ca2+]cyt transients in guard cells. [Ca2+]cyt changes could be semi-quantitatively determined following correction of the calibration procedure for chloroplast autofluorescence. Extracellular calcium induced repetitive [Ca2+]cyt transients with peak values of up to approximately 1.5 microM, whereas ABA-induced [Ca2+]cyt transients had peak values up to approximately 0.6 microM. These values are similar to stimulus-induced [Ca2+]cyt changes previously reported in plant cells using ratiometric dyes or aequorin. In some guard cells perfused with low extracellular KCl concentrations, spontaneous calcium transients were observed. As yellow cameleon 2.1 was expressed in all guard cells, [Ca2+]cyt was measured independently in the two guard cells of single stomates for the first time. ABA-induced, calcium-induced or spontaneous [Ca2+]cyt increases were not necessarily synchronized in the two guard cells. Overall, these data demonstrate that that GFP-based cameleon calcium indicators are suitable to measure [Ca2+]cyt changes in guard cells and enable the pattern of [Ca

  1. Calcium Activation Profile In Electrically Stimulated Intact Rat Heart Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, Hugo; Nuydens, Rony; Ver Donck, Luc; Nuyens, Roger; De Brabander, Marc; Borgers, Marcel

    1988-06-01

    Recent advances in fluorescent probe technology and image processing equipment have made available the measurement of calcium in living systems on a real-time basis. We present the use of the calcium indicator Fura-2 in intact normally stimulated rat heart cells for the spatial and dynamic measurement of the calcium excitation profile. After electric stimulation (1 Hz), the activation proceeds from the center of the myocyte toward the periphery. Within two frame times (80 ms), the whole cell is activated. The activation is slightly faster in the center of the cell than in the periphery. The mean recovery time is 200-400 ms. There is no difference along the cell's long axis. The effect of a beta-agonist and of a calcium antagonist is described.

  2. Quantification of Calcium Amount in a New Experimental Model: A Comparison between Ultrasound and Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Kris; Bala, Gezim; Roosens, Bram; Remory, Isabel; Hernot, Sophie; Droogmans, Steven; Cosyns, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Calcification is an important prognostic factor in aortic valve stenosis. However, there is no ultrasound (US) method available to accurately quantify calcification in this setting to date. We aimed to validate a new US method for measuring the amount of calcium in an in vitro model, and compare it to computed tomography (CT), the current imaging gold standard. Materials and Methods An agar phantom (2% agar) was made, containing 9 different amounts of calcium-hydroxyapatite Ca5(PO4)3OH (2 to 50mg). The phantoms were imaged with micro-CT and US (10 MHz probe). The calcium area (areacalcium) and its maximum pixel value (PVmax) were obtained. These values were summed to calculate CT and US calcium scores (∑(areacalcium × PVmax)) and volumes (∑areacalcium). Both US- and CT-calcium scores were compared with the calcium amounts, and with each other. Results Both calcium scores correlated significantly with the calcium amount (R2 = 0.9788, p<0.0001 and R2 = 0.8154, p<0.0001 for CT and US respectively). Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between US and CT for calcium volumes (R2 = 0.7392, p<0.0001) and scores (R2 = 0.7391, p<0.0001). Conclusion We developed a new US method that accurately quantifies the amount of calcium in an in vitro model. Moreover it is strongly correlated with CT. PMID:26859304

  3. Image

    2007-08-31

    The computer side of the IMAGE project consists of a collection of Perl scripts that perform a variety of tasks; scripts are available to insert, update and delete data from the underlying Oracle database, download data from NCBI's Genbank and other sources, and generate data files for download by interested parties. Web scripts make up the tracking interface, and various tools available on the project web-site (image.llnl.gov) that provide a search interface to the database.

  4. Detection, Properties, and Frequency of Local Calcium Release from the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum in Teleost Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Tort, Lluis; Benítez, Raul; Hove-Madsen, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) plays a central role in the regulation of cardiac contraction and rhythm in mammals and humans but its role is controversial in teleosts. Since the zebrafish is an emerging model for studies of cardiovascular function and regeneration we here sought to determine if basic features of SR calcium release are phylogenetically conserved. Confocal calcium imaging was used to detect spontaneous calcium release (calcium sparks and waves) from the SR. Calcium sparks were detected in 16 of 38 trout atrial myocytes and 6 of 15 ventricular cells. The spark amplitude was 1.45±0.03 times the baseline fluorescence and the time to half maximal decay of sparks was 27±3 ms. Spark frequency was 0.88 sparks µm−1 min−1 while calcium waves were 8.5 times less frequent. Inhibition of SR calcium uptake reduced the calcium transient (F/F0) from 1.77±0.17 to 1.12±0.18 (p = 0.002) and abolished calcium sparks and waves. Moreover, elevation of extracellular calcium from 2 to 10 mM promoted early and delayed afterdepolarizations (from 0.6±0.3 min−1 to 8.1±2.0 min−1, p = 0.001), demonstrating the ability of SR calcium release to induce afterdepolarizations in the trout heart. Calcium sparks of similar width and duration were also observed in zebrafish ventricular myocytes. In conclusion, this is the first study to consistently report calcium sparks in teleosts and demonstrate that the basic features of calcium release through the ryanodine receptor are conserved, suggesting that teleost cardiac myocytes is a relevant model to study the functional impact of abnormal SR function. PMID:21897853

  5. [Effect of the dispersion of calcium deposits on allogenic aortic valves durability. Mineralization phases].

    PubMed

    Lis, Grzegorz J; Rokita, Eugeniusz; Podolec, Piotr; Gajda, Mariusz; Sadowski, Jerzy; Cichocki, Tadeusz

    2004-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at comparison of calcium content and calcium dispersion in allogenic aortic valve leaflets removed due to dysfunction, to establish the influence of both parameters on graft durability. Calcification was assessed histochemically (von Kossa) as well as physicochemically using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The morpho-metric data (leaflet area involved in the calcification process) were obtained by computer-assisted image analysis system. The dry weight content of leaflet calcium and phosphorus were assessed by atomic absorptive spectroscopy (AAS) and Ca/P ratio was calculated. Calcium dispersion coefficient (Dc) was established according to the formula: Dc = 1/Ca(c)/Ap, where Ca(c) = calcium dry weight concentration; Ap = percent of leaflet area involved in calcification. We found biphasic correlation between calcium concentration and area involved in calcification. The first one was characterized by rising dispersion of calcium deposits while for the second one saturation with hydroxyapatite of formerly calcified areas was predominant, negatively influencing graft durability. Allograft durability was correlated with calcium dispersion (Dc) (p<0.001), while no significant correlation was found with calcium concentration. Decreased Dc was characteristic for 93.8% of low durability grafts (<11.6 years). Our results suggest that lowered calcium dispersion decreasing allograft lifetime and is a better predictor of allograft durability than the total calcium content. PMID:15724647

  6. [Calcium--essential for everybody].

    PubMed

    Cichosz, Grazyna; Czeczot, Hanna

    2014-06-01

    Calcium regulates majority of metabolic processes within human organism and its optimal intake decreases risk of metabolic illnesses conditioned by diet. Deficiency of calcium results in higher body max index, increase risk of insulin resistance, diabetes type 2 and osteoporosis. Diet delivering full calcium load diminished impendency of hypertension; calcium regulates tension of smooth muscles of blood vessels, limits neurotransmitters activity and also diminish hazardous activity of sodium chloride. Anticancerogenic activity of calcium results from formation insoluble bile acids and fat acids salts, and most of all, from inhibition of intestine mucosa cells hyper proliferation. Due to presence of vitamin D3, CLA, proteins and bioactive peptides emerging from them, milk is more efficient in prophylaxis of diet conditioned illnesses than calcium supplements. Efficiency of milk and dairy products in treatment of obesity, sclerosis and hypertension has been proved by DASH diet. PMID:25095643

  7. Calcium signaling mediates cold sensing in insect tissues

    PubMed Central

    Teets, Nicholas M.; Yi, Shu-Xia; Lee, Richard E.; Denlinger, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to rapidly respond to changes in temperature is a critical adaptation for insects and other ectotherms living in thermally variable environments. In a process called rapid cold hardening (RCH), insects significantly enhance cold tolerance following brief (i.e., minutes to hours) exposure to nonlethal chilling. Although the ecological relevance of RCH is well-established, the underlying physiological mechanisms that trigger RCH are poorly understood. RCH can be elicited in isolated tissues ex vivo, suggesting cold-sensing and downstream hardening pathways are governed by brain-independent signaling mechanisms. We previously provided preliminary evidence that calcium is involved in RCH, and here we firmly establish that calcium signaling mediates cold sensing in insect tissues. In tracheal cells of the freeze-tolerant goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis, chilling to 0 °C evoked a 40% increase in intracellular calcium concentration as determined by live-cell confocal imaging. Downstream of calcium entry, RCH conditions significantly increased the activity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) while reducing phosphorylation of the inhibitory Thr306 residue. Pharmacological inhibitors of calcium entry, calmodulin activation, and CaMKII activity all prevented ex vivo RCH in midgut and salivary gland tissues, indicating that calcium signaling is required for RCH to occur. Similar results were obtained for a freeze-intolerant species, adults of the flesh fly, Sarcophaga bullata, suggesting that calcium-mediated cold sensing is a general feature of insects. Our results imply that insect tissues use calcium signaling to instantly detect decreases in temperature and trigger downstream cold-hardening mechanisms. PMID:23671084

  8. Calcium Kinetics During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Wastney, Meryl E.; OBrien, Kimberly O.; Lane, Helen W.

    1999-01-01

    Bone loss is one of the most detrimental effects of space flight, threatening to limit the duration of human space missions. The ability to understand and counteract this loss will be critical for crew health and safety during and after extended-duration missions. The hypotheses to be tested in this project are that space flight alters calcium homeostasis and bone mineral metabolism, and that calcium homeostasis and bone mineral metabolism will return to baseline within days to weeks of return to Earth. These hypotheses will be evidenced by elevated rates of bone mineral resorption and decreased bone mineral deposition, decreased absorption of dietary calcium, altered calcitropic endocrine profiles, elevated excretion of calcium in urine and feces, and elevated excretion of markers of bone resorption. The second hypothesis will be evidenced by return of indices of calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism to preflight levels within days to weeks of return to Earth. Studies will be conducted on International Space Station astronauts before, during, and after extended-duration flights. Measurements of calcium kinetics, bone mass, and endocrine/biochemical markers of bone and calcium homeostasis will be conducted. Kinetic studies utilizing dual isotope tracer kinetic studies and mathematical modeling techniques will allow for determination of bone calcium deposition, bone calcium resorption, dietary calcium absorption and calcium excretion (both urinary and endogenous fecal excretion). These studies will build upon preliminary work conducted on the Russian Mir space station. The results from this project will be critical for clarifying how microgravity affects bone and calcium homeostasis, and will provide an important control point for assessment of countermeasure efficacy. These results are expected to aid in developing countermeasures for bone loss, both for space crews and for individuals on Earth who have metabolic bone diseases.

  9. Mechanisms of intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Felix

    2003-02-01

    Calcium is absorbed in the mammalian small intestine by two general mechanisms: a transcellular active transport process, located largely in the duodenum and upper jejunum; and a paracellular, passive process that functions throughout the length of the intestine. The transcellular process involves three major steps: entry across the brush border, mediated by a molecular structure termed CaT1, intracellular diffusion, mediated largely by the cytosolic calcium-binding protein (calbindinD(9k) or CaBP); and extrusion, mediated largely by the CaATPase. Chyme travels down the intestinal lumen in approximately 3 h, spending only minutes in the duodenum, but over 2 h in the distal half of the small intestine. When calcium intake is low, transcellular calcium transport accounts for a substantial fraction of the absorbed calcium. When calcium intake is high, transcellular transport accounts for only a minor portion of the absorbed calcium, because of the short sojourn time and because CaT1 and CaBP, both rate-limiting, are downregulated when calcium intake is high. Biosynthesis of CaBP is fully and CaT1 function is approximately 90% vitamin D-dependent. At high calcium intakes CaT1 and CaBP are downregulated because 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), the active vitamin D metabolite, is downregulated. PMID:12520541

  10. Calcium channel blockers and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Nimmrich, V; Eckert, A

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative dementia is mainly caused by Alzheimer's disease and/or cerebrovascular abnormalities. Disturbance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis is central to the pathophysiology of neurodegeneration. In Alzheimer's disease, enhanced calcium load may be brought about by extracellular accumulation of amyloid-β. Recent studies suggest that soluble forms facilitate influx through calcium-conducting ion channels in the plasma membrane, leading to excitotoxic neurodegeneration. Calcium channel blockade attenuates amyloid-β-induced neuronal decline in vitro and is neuroprotective in animal models. Vascular dementia, on the other hand, is caused by cerebral hypoperfusion and may benefit from calcium channel blockade due to relaxation of the cerebral vasculature. Several calcium channel blockers have been tested in clinical trials of dementia and the outcome is heterogeneous. Nimodipine as well as nilvadipine prevent cognitive decline in some trials, whereas other calcium channel blockers failed. In trials with a positive outcome, BP reduction did not seem to play a role in preventing dementia, indicating a direct protecting effect on neurons. An optimization of calcium channel blockers for the treatment of dementia may involve an increase of selectivity for presynaptic calcium channels and an improvement of the affinity to the inactivated state. Novel low molecular weight compounds suitable for proof-of-concept studies are now available. PMID:23638877

  11. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food... GRAS § 184.1187 Calcium alginate. (a) Calcium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-35-0) is the calcium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae. Calcium alginate is prepared...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate... and the DL-racemic mixture of calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate... and the DL- racemic mixture of calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate ((C9H16NO5)2Ca, CAS Reg. No. of the D... calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium pantothenate is prepared synthetically...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate... and the DL-racemic mixture of calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate... and the DL-racemic mixture of calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium...

  17. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    , localized changes in Ca(o)(2+) within the ECF can originate from several mechanisms, including fluxes of calcium ions into or out of cellular or extracellular stores or across epithelium that absorb or secrete Ca(2+). In any event, the CaR and other receptors/sensors for Ca(o)(2+) and probably for other extracellular ions represent versatile regulators of numerous cellular functions and may serve as important therapeutic targets.

  18. Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Catherine, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The theme of this month's issue is "Images"--from early paintings and statuary to computer-generated design. Resources on the theme include Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and others. A page of reproducible activities is also provided. Features include photojournalism, inspirational Web sites, art history, pop art, and myths. (AEF)

  19. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate...

  20. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate...

  1. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate...

  2. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate...

  3. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may be safely used in foods for...

  4. Recent developments in intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Felix

    2009-02-01

    Calcium absorption proceeds by transcellular and paracellular flux, with the latter accounting for most absorbed calcium when calcium intake is adequate. Vitamin D helps regulate transcellular calcium transport by increasing calcium uptake via a luminal calcium channel and by inducing the cytosolic calcium transporting protein, calbindinD(9k). Recent studies utilizing knockout mice have challenged the functional importance of the channel and calbindin. To integrate the new findings with many previous studies, the function of the two molecules must be evaluated in the calcium transport and economy of mice. When calcium intake is high, transcellular calcium transport contributes little to total calcium absorption. Therefore, increasing calcium intake seems the most effective nutritional approach to ensure adequate absorption and prevent bone loss. PMID:19178653

  5. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing features ... maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D Do I Need? Amounts of calcium are given ...

  6. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download PDFs ... helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin D ...

  7. Calcium transporters: From fields to the table

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium transporters regulate calcium fluxes within cells. Plants, like all organisms, contain channels, pumps, and exchangers to carefully modulate intracellular calcium levels. This review presents a summary of the recent advances in cloning and characterizing of these transporters and highlight...

  8. Major Minerals - Calcium, Magnesium, Phosphorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium, magnesium and phosphorus are essential elements critically important for the function of the musculoskeletal system, including the formation and transduction of energy and the maintenance of healthy bone. The major calcium concern for physically active healthy middle-aged adults is to consu...

  9. Calcium Intake: A Lifelong Proposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amschler, Denise H.

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews the current problem of low calcium intake in the United States among all age groups, the role of calcium in the formation and maintenance of bone mass, and major factors influencing absorption. Osteoporosis is discussed, and current recommendations for Recommended Dietary allowance are provided. (Author/MT)

  10. Electrochemical cell with calcium anode

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Hosmer, Pamela K.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1979-01-01

    An electrochemical cell comprising a calcium anode and a suitable cathode in an alkaline electrolyte consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of an hydroxide and a chloride. Specifically disclosed is a mechanically rechargeable calcium/air fuel cell with an aqueous NaOH/NaCl electrolyte.

  11. Calcium and ER stress mediate hepatic apoptosis after burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Song, Juquan; Kulp, Gabriela A.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Cox, Robert A.; Barral, José M.; Herndon, David N.; Boehning, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A hallmark of the disease state following severe burn injury is decreased liver function, which results in gross metabolic derangements that compromise patient survival. The underlying mechanisms leading to hepatocyte dysfunction after burn are essentially unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine the underlying mechanisms leading to hepatocyte dysfunction and apoptosis after burn. Rats were randomized to either control (no burn) or burn (60% total body surface area burn) and sacrificed at various time‐points. Liver was either perfused to isolate primary rat hepatocytes, which were used for in vitro calcium imaging, or liver was harvested and processed for immunohistology, transmission electron microscopy, mitochondrial isolation, mass spectroscopy or Western blotting to determine the hepatic response to burn injury in vivo. We found that thermal injury leads to severely depleted endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium stores and consequent elevated cytosolic calcium concentrations in primary hepatocytes in vitro. Burn‐induced ER calcium depletion caused depressed hepatocyte responsiveness to signalling molecules that regulate hepatic homeostasis, such as vasopressin and the purinergic agonist ATP. In vivo, thermal injury resulted in activation of the ER stress response and major alterations in mitochondrial structure and function – effects which may be mediated by increased calcium release by inositol 1,4,5‐trisphosphate receptors. Our results reveal that thermal injury leads to dramatic hepatic disturbances in calcium homeostasis and resultant ER stress leading to mitochondrial abnormalities contributing to hepatic dysfunction and apoptosis after burn injury. PMID:20141609

  12. In vitro macrophage cytotoxicity of five calcium silicates.

    PubMed Central

    Skaug, V; Davies, R; Gylseth, B

    1984-01-01

    Five calcium silicate minerals (two naturally occurring and three synthetic compounds) with defined morphology and chemical composition were compared for their cytotoxic and lysosomal enzyme releasing effects on unstimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. One synthetic material, a fibrous tobermorite, was cytotoxic towards the cells, and two naturally occurring wollastonites induced selective release of beta-glucuronidase from the cells. Images PMID:6318798

  13. Calcium alone does not fully activate the thin filament for S1 binding to rigor myofibrils.

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, D R; Moss, R L; Greaser, M L

    1996-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contraction is regulated by calcium via troponin and tropomyosin and appears to involve cooperative activation of cross-bridge binding to actin. We studied the regulation of fluorescent myosin subfragment 1 (fS1) binding to rigor myofibrils over a wide range of fS1 and calcium levels using highly sensitive imaging techniques. At low calcium and low fS1, the fluorescence was restricted to the actin-myosin overlap region. At high calcium and very low fS1, the fluorescence was still predominantly in the overlap region. The ratio of nonoverlap to overlap fluorescence intensity showed that increases in the fS1 level resulted in a shift in maximum fluorescence from the overlap to the nonoverlap region at both low and high calcium; this transition occurred at lower fS1 levels in myofibrils with high calcium. At a fixed fS1 level, increases in calcium also resulted in a shift in maximum fluorescence from the overlap region to the nonoverlap region. These results suggest that calcium alone does not fully activate the thin filament for rigor S1 binding and that, even at high calcium, the thin filament is not activated along its entire length. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 11 PMID:8889164

  14. Differential Dendritic Integration of Synaptic Potentials and Calcium in Cerebellar Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Tran-Van-Minh, Alexandra; Abrahamsson, Therése; Cathala, Laurence; DiGregorio, David A

    2016-08-17

    Dendritic voltage integration determines the transformation of synaptic inputs into output firing, while synaptic calcium integration drives plasticity mechanisms thought to underlie memory storage. Dendritic calcium integration has been shown to follow the same synaptic input-output relationship as dendritic voltage, but whether similar operations apply to neurons exhibiting sublinear voltage integration is unknown. We examined the properties and cellular mechanisms of these dendritic operations in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons using dendritic voltage and calcium imaging, in combination with synaptic stimulation or glutamate uncaging. We show that, while synaptic potentials summate sublinearly, concomitant dendritic calcium signals summate either linearly or supralinearly depending on the number of synapses activated. The supralinear dendritic calcium triggers a branch-specific, short-term suppression of neurotransmitter release that alters the pattern of synaptic activation. Thus, differential voltage and calcium integration permits dynamic regulation of neuronal input-output transformations without altering intrinsic nonlinear integration mechanisms. PMID:27537486

  15. Artemisinin Induces Calcium-Dependent Protein Secretion in the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nagamune, Kisaburo; Beatty, Wandy L.; Sibley, L. David

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular calcium controls several crucial cellular events in apicomplexan parasites, including protein secretion, motility, and invasion into and egress from host cells. The plant compound thapsigargin inhibits the sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), resulting in elevated calcium and induction of protein secretion in Toxoplasma gondii. Artemisinins are natural products that show potent and selective activity against parasites, making them useful for the treatment of malaria. While the mechanism of action is uncertain, previous studies have suggested that artemisinin may inhibit SERCA, thus disrupting calcium homeostasis. We cloned the single-copy gene encoding SERCA in T. gondii (TgSERCA) and demonstrate that the protein localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum in the parasite. In extracellular parasites, TgSERCA partially relocalized to the apical pole, a highly active site for regulated secretion of micronemes. TgSERCA complemented a calcium ATPase-defective yeast mutant, and this activity was inhibited by either thapsigargin or artemisinin. Treatment of T. gondii with artemisinin triggered calcium-dependent secretion of microneme proteins, similar to the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin. Artemisinin treatment also altered intracellular calcium in parasites by increasing the periodicity of calcium oscillations and inducing recurrent, strong calcium spikes, as imaged using Fluo-4 labeling. Collectively, these results demonstrate that artemisinin perturbs calcium homeostasis in T. gondii, supporting the idea that Ca2+-ATPases are potential drug targets in parasites. PMID:17766463

  16. Nod Factor Elicits Two Separable Calcium Responses in Medicago truncatula Root Hair Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Sidney L.; Long, Sharon R.

    2003-01-01

    Modulation of intracellular calcium levels plays a key role in the transduction of many biological signals. Here, we characterize early calcium responses of wild-type and mutant Medicago truncatula plants to nodulation factors produced by the bacterial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti using a dual-dye ratiometric imaging technique. When presented with 1 nm Nod factor, root hair cells exhibited only the previously described calcium spiking response initiating 10 min after application. Nod factor (10 nm) elicited an immediate increase in calcium levels that was temporally earlier and spatially distinct from calcium spikes occurring later in the same cell. Nod factor analogs that were structurally related, applied at 10 nm, failed to initiate this calcium flux response. Cells induced to spike with low Nod factor concentrations show a calcium flux response when Nod factor is raised from 1 to 10 nm. Plant mutants previously shown to be deficient for the calcium spiking response (dmi1 and dmi2) exhibited an immediate, truncated calcium flux with 10 nm Nod factor, demonstrating a competence to respond to Nod factor but an impaired ability to generate a full biphasic response. These results demonstrate that the legume root hair cell exhibits two independent calcium responses to Nod factor triggered at different agonist concentrations and suggests an early branch point in the Nod factor signal transduction pathway. PMID:12644650

  17. Calcium preconditioning triggers neuroprotection in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Sean K.; Weatherly, Monique E.; Ware, Lillian; Linn, David M.; Linn, Cindy L.

    2010-01-01

    In the mammalian retina, excitotoxicity has been shown to be involved in apoptotic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and is associated with certain retinal disease states including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and retinal ischemia. Previous studies from this lab (Wehrwein et al., 2004) have demonstrated that acetylcholine (ACh) and nicotine protects against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated adult pig RGCs through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Activation of nAChRs in these RGCs triggers cell survival signaling pathways and inhibits apoptotic enzymes (Asomugha et al., 2010). However, the link between binding of nAChRs and activation of neuroprotective pathways is unknown. In this study, we examine the hypothesis that calcium permeation through nAChR channels is required for ACh-induced neuroprotection against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated pig RGCs. RGCs were isolated from other retinal tissue using a two step panning technique and cultured for 3 days under different conditions. In some studies, calcium imaging experiments were performed using the fluorescent calcium indicator, fluo-4, and demonstrated that calcium permeates the nAChR channels located on pig RGCs. In other studies, the extracellular calcium concentration was altered to determine the effect on nicotine-induced neuroprotection. Results support the hypothesis that calcium is required for nicotine-induced neuroprotection in isolated pig RGCs. Lastly, studies were performed to analyze the effects of preconditioning on glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and neuroprotection. In these studies, a preconditioning dose of calcium was introduced to cells using a variety of mechanisms before a large glutamate insult was applied to cells. Results from these studies support the hypothesis that preconditioning cells with a relatively low level of calcium before an excitotoxic insult leads to neuroprotection. In the future, these results could provide important information

  18. Cellular-resolution population imaging reveals robust sparse coding in the Drosophila Mushroom Body

    PubMed Central

    Honegger, Kyle S.; Campbell, Robert A. A.; Turner, Glenn C.

    2011-01-01

    Sensory stimuli are represented in the brain by the activity of populations of neurons. In most biological systems, studying population coding is challenging since only a tiny proportion of cells can be recorded simultaneously. Here we used 2-photon imaging to record neural activity in the relatively simple Drosophila mushroom body (MB), an area involved in olfactory learning and memory. Using the highly sensitive calcium indicator, GCaMP3, we simultaneously monitored the activity of >100 MB neurons in vivo (about 5% of the total population). The MB is thought to encode odors in sparse patterns of activity, but the code has yet to be explored either on a population level or with a wide variety of stimuli. We therefore imaged responses to odors chosen to evaluate the robustness of sparse representations. Different odors activated distinct patterns of MB neurons, however we found no evidence for spatial organization of neurons by either response probability or odor tuning within the cell body layer. The degree of sparseness was consistent across a wide range of stimuli, from monomolecular odors to artificial blends and even complex natural smells. Sparseness was mainly invariant across concentrations, largely because of the influence of recent odor experience. Finally, in contrast to sensory processing in other systems, no response features distinguished natural stimuli from monomolecular odors. Our results indicate that the fundamental feature of odor processing in the MB is to create sparse stimulus representations in a format that facilitates arbitrary associations between odor and punishment or reward. PMID:21849538

  19. Ultraviolet, Optical and X-Ray Imaging of Selected Cygnus Loop Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danforth, C. W.; Cornett, R. H.; Blair, W. P.; Stecher, T. P.; Levenson, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    During the Astro-1 and Astro-2 Space Shuttle missions in 1990 and 1995, far ultraviolet (FUV) images of five 40 ft diameter fields around the rim of the Cygnus Loop Super Nova Remnants (SNR) were observed with the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT). These fields sample a broad range of SNR conditions including both radiative and non-radiative shocks in various geometries and scales. The UIT B5 band images discussed here sample predominantly ion-C4 lambda 1550 and the 2-photon continuum. Smaller contributions are made by emission lines of ion He-2 lambda 1640 and ion 03 lambda 1666. A unique aspect of the B5 band is its ability to sample the hydrogen 2-photon continuum from regions where the gas is recombining. We present these new FUV images and compare them with optical H-alpha and [ion O13], and ROSAT HRI X-ray images. In non-radiative shocks, existing 2-photon flux measurements from spectra and the H-alpha images suggest we are seeing approximately equal contributions from 2-photon and ion C4 emission. In radiative filaments, however, shock models and our images suggest ion C4 should dominate while spectra of specific locations seem to indicate that 2-photon emission dominates. We surmise that spectral observations on specific bright filaments have decreased locally-observed levels of ion C41 emission due to resonance scattering in that line.

  20. Diffusion in calcium oxide/calcium sulfate pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, K.L.

    1981-10-01

    Diffusion rates in calcium oxide pellets after partial conversion to calcium sulfate were measured. A Wicke-Kallenbach type diffusion cell operated in the pulse-response mode was used to measure effective diffusivity. Cylindrical calcium oxide pellets were formed from the powder using pelletizing pressures of 10,000, 20,000 and 30,000 psi. The pellets were reacted at 325, 500 and 600/sup 0/C with sulfur dioxide and oxygen to form calcium sulfate. The volume of calcium sulfate is 2.7 times that of calcium oxide, so partial pore closure occurs. The diffusivity was measured in the original pellet and in pellets partially reacted to several different conversion levels. The effective diffusivity decreases as conversion decreases and is roughly inversely proportional to pellet porosity squared for low conversions. However, the porosity and diffusion rate do not become zero when the reaction rate approaches zero. Pore closure is, therefore, not the mechanism which limits the ultimate conversion. A large diffusion resistance through the calcium sulfate product layer probably causes the reaction to stop before total conversion. The final conversion obtainable increases as reaction temperature increases and decreases as pelletizing pressure increases.

  1. The activity of calcium in calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochifuji, Yuichiro; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka; Sano, Nobuo

    1995-08-01

    The standard Gibbs energy of reaction Ca (1) + O (mass pct, in Zr) = CaO (s) has been determined as follows by equilibrating molten calcium with solid zirconium in a CaO crucible: Δ G° = -64,300(±700) + 19.8(±3.5) T J/mol (1373 to 1623 K) The activities of calcium in the CaOsatd-Ca- MF2 ( M: Ca, Ba, Mg) and CaOsatd-Ca-NaF systems were measured as a function of calcium composition at high calcium contents at 1473 K on the basis of the standard Gibbs energy. The activities of calcium increase in the order of CaF2, BaF2, and MgF2 at the same calcium fraction of these fluxes. The observed activities are compared with those estimated by using the Temkin model for ionic solutions. Furthermore, the possibility of the removal of tramp elements such as tin, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, and lead from carbon-saturated iron by using calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes is discussed.

  2. The activity of calcium in calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Ochifuji, Yuichiro; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka; Sano, Nobuo

    1995-08-01

    The standard Gibbs energy of reaction Ca (1) + {und O} (mass pct, in Zr) = CaO (s) has been determined as follows by equilibrating molten calcium with solid zirconium in a CaO crucible: {Delta}G{degree} = {minus}64,300({+-}700) + 19.8({+-}3.5)T J/mol (1,373 to 1,623 K). The activities of calcium in the CaO{sub satd.}-Ca-MF{sub 2} (M: Ca, Ba, Mg) and CaO{sub satd.}-Ca-NaF systems were measured as a function of calcium composition at high calcium contents at 1,473 K on the basis of the standard Gibbs energy. The activities of calcium increase in the order of CaF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, and MgF{sub 2} at the same calcium fraction of these fluxes. The observed activities are compared with those estimated by using the Temkin model for ionic solutions. Furthermore, the possibility of the removal of tramp elements such as tin, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, and lead from carbon-saturated iron by using calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes is discussed.

  3. Calcium in Plants

    PubMed Central

    WHITE, PHILIP J.; BROADLEY, MARTIN R.

    2003-01-01

    Calcium is an essential plant nutrient. It is required for various structural roles in the cell wall and membranes, it is a counter‐cation for inorganic and organic anions in the vacuole, and the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) is an obligate intracellular messenger coordinating responses to numerous developmental cues and environmental challenges. This article provides an overview of the nutritional requirements of different plants for Ca, and how this impacts on natural flora and the Ca content of crops. It also reviews recent work on (a) the mechanisms of Ca2+ transport across cellular membranes, (b) understanding the origins and specificity of [Ca2+]cyt signals and (c) characterizing the cellular [Ca2+]cyt‐sensors (such as calmodulin, calcineurin B‐like proteins and calcium‐dependent protein kinases) that allow plant cells to respond appropriately to [Ca2+]cyt signals. PMID:12933363

  4. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bizzozero, Julien Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-10-15

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction.

  5. Sensitivity to calcium intake in calcium stone forming patients.

    PubMed

    Heilberg, I P; Martini, L A; Draibe, S A; Ajzen, H; Ramos, O L; Schor, N

    1996-01-01

    The absorptive or renal origin of hypercalciuria can be discriminated using an acute oral calcium load test (ACLT). Of 86 patients with calcium oxalate kidney stones, 28 (23%) were found to be hypercalciuric (HCa) and 58 (67%) normocalciuric (NCa) on their customary free diet, containing 542 +/- 29 mg/day (mean +/- SE) of calcium. Since the apparently normal 24-hour calcium excretion of many calcium stone formers (CSF) may be due to a combination of high calcium absorption with moderately low calcium intake, all patients were investigated by ACLT. Of 28 HCa patients, 13 (46%) were classified as absorptive (AH) and 15 (54%) as renal hypercalciuria (RH). Of the 58 NCa patients, 38 (65%) presented features of intestinal hyperabsorption and were therefore designated as AH-like, and 20 (35%) as RH-like. To further elucidate the role of dietary calcium in these CSF, a chronic calcium load test (CCLT), consisting of 1 g/day of oral Ca for 7 days, was designed. A positive response to the CCLT was considered to occur when urinary calcium (uCa) was > or = 4 mg/ kg/24 h on the 7th day. Among NCa patients, 29% of AH-like subjects responded to the CCLT and 71% did not; 50% of RH-like subjects also responded and 50% did not. In HCa patients, 85% of AH and 67% of RH subjects maintained uCa > or = 4 mg/kg/24 h after the CCLT and 15% of AH and 23% of RH subjects did not. However, a significant additional increase in mean uCa was not observed among HCa patients. All patients were submitted to a second evaluation of fasting calciuria (Ca/Cr). A modification of this parameter was noticed in 89% of RH-like and 78% of RH patients. In conclusion, these data suggest the presence of subpopulations of patients sensitive or not to calcium intake, regardless of whether the acute response to a calcium overload test suggested AH or RH. The CCLT disclosed dietary hypercalciuria in 21/58 (36%) of previously NCa patients. In these NCa patients, the ACLT may be replaced by the CCLT. The distinction

  6. Influence of dietary calcium on bone calcium utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M.; Roland, D.A. Sr.; Clark, A.J.

    1986-02-01

    In Experiment 1, 10 microCi /sup 45/Ca/day were administered to 125 hens for 10 days. Hens were then allocated to five treatments with calcium levels ranging from .08 to 3.75% of the diet. In Experiment 2, hens with morning oviposition times were randomly allocated to 11 treatments that were periods of time postoviposition ranging from 6 hr to 24 hr, in 2-hr increments (Experiment 2). At the end of each 2-hr period, eggs from 25 hens were removed from the uterus. The 18-, 20-, and 22-hr treatments were replicated three times. In Experiment 3, hens were fed either ad libitum or feed was withheld the last 5 or 6 hr before oviposition. In Experiment 4, hens were fed 10 microCi of /sup 45/Ca for 15 days to label skeletal calcium. Hens were divided into two groups and fed a .08 or 3.75% calcium diet for 2 days. On the second day, 25 hens fed the 3.75% calcium diet were intubated with 7 g of the same diet containing .5 g calcium at 1700, 2100, 0100, 0500, and 0700 hr. The measurements used were egg weight, shell weight, and /sup 45/Ca content of the egg shell. Results indicated a significant linear or quadratic regression of dietary calcium levels on /sup 45/Ca accumulation in eggshells and eggshell weight (Experiment 1). As the calcium level of the diet increased, eggshell weight increased and /sup 45/Ca recovery decreased. Utilization of skeletal calcium for shell formation ranged from 28 to 96%. In Experiment 2, the rate of shell calcification was not constant throughout the calcification process but varied significantly.

  7. Calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in Martian meteorite EETA79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.; Wentworth, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Chips of glassy Lithology C of EETA79001 were studied by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to determine the mineralogy and petrogenesis of the glass that was shown by others to contain trapped Mars-like gases. Calcium carbonite was identified as massive to acicular crystals for which Ca, C, and O were the major elements. Calcium sulfate was identified as prismatic-acicular crystals with Ca and S as the major elements.

  8. Calcium signalling and calcium channels: evolution and general principles.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2014-09-15

    Calcium as a divalent cation was selected early in evolution as a signaling molecule to be used by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Its low cytosolic concentration likely reflects the initial concentration of this ion in the primordial soup/ocean as unicellular organisms were formed. As the concentration of calcium in the ocean subsequently increased, so did the diversity of homeostatic molecules handling calcium. This includes the plasma membrane channels that allowed the calcium entry, as well as extrusion mechanisms, i.e., exchangers and pumps. Further diversification occurred with the evolution of intracellular organelles, in particular the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, which also contain channels, exchanger(s) and pumps to handle the homeostasis of calcium ions. Calcium signalling system, based around coordinated interactions of the above molecular entities, can be activated by the opening of voltage-gated channels, neurotransmitters, second messengers and/or mechanical stimulation, and as such is all-pervading pathway in physiology and pathophysiology of organisms. PMID:24291103

  9. 21 CFR 172.720 - Calcium lactobionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium lactobionate. 172.720 Section 172.720 Food... Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.720 Calcium lactobionate. The food additive calcium lactobionate... additive is the calcium salt of lactobionic acid (4-(β,D-galactosido)-D-gluconic acid) produced by...

  10. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1205 - Calcium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium hydroxide. 184.1205 Section 184.1205 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1205 Calcium hydroxide. (a) Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2, CAS Reg. No. 1305-62-0) is also known as slaked lime or calcium hydrate. It is produced by the hydration...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1187 Calcium alginate. (a) Calcium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-35-0) is the calcium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown...

  13. 21 CFR 172.715 - Calcium lignosulfonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium lignosulfonate. 172.715 Section 172.715... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.715 Calcium lignosulfonate. Calcium lignosulfonate may be safely used in or on food, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Calcium lignosulfonate...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1199 - Calcium gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... acid with lime or calcium carbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium gluconate. 184.1199 Section 184.1199 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1199 Calcium gluconate. (a) Calcium gluconate ( 2Ca, CAS Reg....

  15. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  16. In vitro photoacoustic sensing of calcium dynamics with arsenazo III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, N.; Fowler, R. A.; Allen, A.; Zoldan, J.; Suggs, L.; Emelianov, S.

    2016-07-01

    Imaging of cellular electric potential via calcium-ion sensitive contrast agents is a useful tool, but current techniques lack sufficient depth penetration. We explore contrast-enhanced photoacoustic (PA) imaging, using Arsenazo III dye, to visualize cardiac myocyte depolarization in vitro. Phantom results show strong linearity of PA signal with dye concentration (R 2  >  0.95), and agree spectrally with extinction measurements with varying calcium concentration. Cell studies indicate a significant (>100-fold) increase in PA signal for dye-treated cells, as well as a 10-fold increase in peak-to-peak variation during a 30 s window. This suggests contrast-enhanced PA imaging may have sufficient sensitivity and specificity for depth-resolved visualization of tissue depolarization in real-time.

  17. Calcium and Arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ter Keurs, Henk E. D. J.; Boyden, Penelope A.

    2010-01-01

    Triggered activity in cardiac muscle and intracellular Ca2+ have been linked in the past. However, today not only are there a number of cellular proteins that show clear Ca2+ dependence but also there are a number of arrhythmias whose mechanism appears to be linked to Ca2+-dependent processes. Thus we present a systematic review of the mechanisms of Ca2+ transport (forward excitation-contraction coupling) in the ventricular cell as well as what is known for other cardiac cell types. Second, we review the molecular nature of the proteins that are involved in this process as well as the functional consequences of both normal and abnormal Ca2+ cycling (e.g., Ca2+ waves). Finally, we review what we understand to be the role of Ca2+ cycling in various forms of arrhythmias, that is, those associated with inherited mutations and those that are acquired and resulting from reentrant excitation and/or abnormal impulse generation (e.g., triggered activity). Further solving the nature of these intricate and dynamic interactions promises to be an important area of research for a better recognition and understanding of the nature of Ca2+ and arrhythmias. Our solutions will provide a more complete understanding of the molecular basis for the targeted control of cellular calcium in the treatment and prevention of such. PMID:17429038

  18. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, S.; Kurtzman, N.A. )

    1987-12-01

    Unidirectional {sup 45}Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (J{sup net}{sub Ca}) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed J{sup net}{sub Ca} to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that J{sup net}{sub Ca} was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, J{sup net}{sub Ca} decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, J{sup net}{sub Ca} was similar in magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue {sup 45}Ca content was {approx equal}30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa.

  19. Medical therapy, calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruml, L. A.; Pearle, M. S.; Pak, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The development of diagnostic protocols that identify specific risk factors for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis has led to the formulation of directed medical regimens that are aimed at correcting the underlying metabolic disturbances. Initiation of these treatment programs has reduced markedly the rate of stone formation in the majority of patients who form stones. This article discusses the rationale that underlies the choice of medical therapy for the various pathophysiologic causes of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and the appropriate use of available medications.

  20. Stochastic Modeling of Calcium in 3D Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Mazel, Tomáš; Raymond, Rebecca; Raymond-Stintz, Mary; Jett, Stephen; Wilson, Bridget S.

    2009-01-01

    Release of inflammatory mediators by mast cells in type 1 immediate-hypersensitivity allergic reactions relies on antigen-dependent increases in cytosolic calcium. Here, we used a series of electron microscopy images to build a 3D reconstruction representing a slice through a rat tumor mast cell, which then served as a basis for stochastic modeling of inositol-trisphosphate-mediated calcium responses. The stochastic approach was verified by reaction-diffusion modeling within the same geometry. Local proximity of the endoplasmic reticulum to either the plasma membrane or mitochondria is predicted to differentially impact local inositol trisphosphate receptor transport. The explicit consideration of organelle spatial relationships represents an important step toward building a comprehensive, realistic model of cellular calcium dynamics. PMID:19254531

  1. Virtual Non-Contrast CT Using Dual-Energy Spectral CT: Feasibility of Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inyoung; Yi, Jeong Geun; Park, Jeong Hee; Kim, Sung Mok; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of coronary artery calcium scoring based on three virtual noncontrast-enhanced (VNC) images derived from single-source spectral dual-energy CT (DECT) as compared with true noncontrast-enhanced (TNC) images. Materials and Methods This prospective study was conducted with the approval of our Institutional Review Board. Ninety-seven patients underwent noncontrast CT followed by contrast-enhanced chest CT using single-source spectral DECT. Iodine eliminated VNC images were reconstructed using two kinds of 2-material decomposition algorithms (material density iodine-water pair [MDW], material density iodine-calcium pair [MDC]) and a material suppressed algorithm (material suppressed iodine [MSI]). Two readers independently quantified calcium on VNC and TNC images. The Spearman correlation coefficient test and Bland-Altman method were used for statistical analyses. Results Coronary artery calcium scores from all three VNC images showed excellent correlation with those from the TNC images (Spearman's correlation coefficient [ρ] = 0.94, 0.88, and 0.89 for MDW, MDC, and MSI, respectively; p < 0.001 for all pairs). Measured coronary calcium volumes from VNC images also correlated well with those from TNC images (ρ = 0.92, 0.87, and 0.91 for MDW, MDC, and MSI, respectively; p < 0.001 for all pairs). Among the three VNC images, coronary calcium from MDW correlated best with that from TNC. The coronary artery calcium scores and volumes were significantly lower from the VNC images than from the TNC images (p < 0.001 for all pairs). Conclusion The use of VNC images from contrast-enhanced CT using dual-energy material decomposition/suppression is feasible for coronary calcium scoring. The absolute value from VNC tends to be smaller than that from TNC. PMID:27134521

  2. The calcium-alkali syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Mariangeli; Fenves, Andrew Z; Emmett, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The milk-alkali syndrome was a common cause of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and renal failure in the early 20th century. It was caused by the ingestion of large quantities of milk and absorbable alkali to treat peptic ulcer disease. The syndrome virtually vanished after introduction of histamine-2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors. More recently, a similar condition called the calcium-alkali syndrome has emerged as a common cause of hypercalcemia and alkalosis. It is usually caused by the ingestion of large amounts of calcium carbonate salts to prevent or treat osteoporosis and dyspepsia. We describe a 78-year-old woman who presented with weakness, malaise, and confusion. She was found to have hypercalcemia, acute renal failure, and metabolic alkalosis. Upon further questioning, she reported use of large amounts of calcium carbonate tablets to treat recent heartburn symptoms. Calcium supplements were discontinued, and she was treated with intravenous normal saline. After 5 days, the calcium and bicarbonate levels normalized and renal function returned to baseline. In this article, we review the pathogenesis of the calcium-alkali syndrome as well as the differences between the traditional and modern syndromes. PMID:23543983

  3. Time course of transmitter release calculated from simulations of a calcium diffusion model.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, W M; Zucker, R S

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional presynaptic calcium diffusion model developed to account for characteristics of transmitter release was modified to provide for binding of calcium to a receptor and subsequent triggering of exocytosis. When low affinity (20 microM) and rapid kinetics were assumed for the calcium receptor triggering exocytosis, and stimulus parameters were selected to match those of experiments, the simulations predicted a virtual invariance of the time course of transmitter release to paired stimulation, stimulation with pulses of different amplitude, and stimulation in different calcium solutions. The large temperature sensitivity of experimental release time course was explained by a temperature sensitivity of the model's final rate limiting exocytotic process. Inclusion of calcium tail currents and a saturable buffer with finite binding kinetics resulted in high peak calcium transients near release sites, exceeding 100 microM. Models with a single class of calcium binding site to the secretory trigger molecule failed to produce sufficient synaptic facilitation under this condition. When at least one calcium ion binds to a different site having higher affinity and slow kinetics, facilitation again reaches levels similar to those seen experimentally. It is possible that the neurosecretory trigger molecule reacts with calcium at more than one class of binding site. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:1354503

  4. Spatiotemporal calcium signaling in a Drosophila melanogaster cell line stably expressing a Drosophila muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Cordova, D; Delpech, V Raymond; Sattelle, D B; Rauh, J J

    2003-11-01

    A muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), DM1, expressed in the nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster, has been stably expressed in a Drosophila S2 cell line (S2-DM1) and used to investigate spatiotemporal calcium changes following agonist activation. Carbamylcholine (CCh) and oxotremorine are potent agonists, whereas application of the vertebrate M1 mAChR agonist, McN-A-343, results in a weak response. Activation of S2-DM1 receptors using CCh resulted in an increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) that was biphasic. Two distinct calcium sources were found to contribute to calcium signaling: (1) internal stores that are sensitive to both thapsigargin and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and (2) capacitative calcium entry. Spatiotemporal imaging of individual S2-DM1 cells showed that the CCh-induced [Ca(2+)](i) transient resulted from a homogeneous calcium increase throughout the cell, indicative of calcium release from internal stores. In contrast, ionomycin induced the formation of a "calcium ring" at the cell periphery, consistent with external calcium influx. PMID:12827518

  5. Norepinephrine-induced calcium signaling in astrocytes in the respiratory network of the ventrolateral medulla.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Christian; Negm, Mahmoud; Driehaus, Johannes; Scheller, Anja; Hülsmann, Swen

    2016-06-01

    The neuronal activity in the respiratory network of the ventrolateral medulla strongly depends on a variety of different neuromodulators. Since the respiratory activity generated by neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC) is stabilized by astrocytes, we investigated potential effects of the neuromodulator norepinephrine (NE) on the astrocytic calcium signaling in the ventral respiratory group. In acutely isolated brainstem slices from wild type mice (postnatal day 1-10) we performed calcium imaging experiments using Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 AM as a calcium indicator dye. Astrocytes in the preBötC, which were identified by their unique intracellular calcium rise after the reduction of the extracellular K(+) concentration, showed calcium rises in response to norepinephrine. These calcium signals persisted after blockade of neuronal activity by tetrodotoxin (TTX) indicating that they were independent of neuronal activity. Furthermore, application of the endoplasmic reticulum calcium pump blocker cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) diminished norepinephrine-induced calcium signals. This results could be confirmed using transgenic mice with astrocyte specific expression of GCaMP3. Thus, norepinephrine might, apart from acting directly on neurons, influence and modulate respiratory network activity via the modulation of astroglial calcium signaling. PMID:26514085

  6. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O, where... lactic acid with calcium carbonate or calcium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O, where... lactic acid with calcium carbonate or calcium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O, where x is any... calcium carbonate or calcium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... lactic acid with calcium carbonate or calcium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O,...

  10. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; Orwoll, Shiela; McCarron, David A.

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P < 0.001), elevated parathyroid hormone levels (P < 0.001), reduced calcitonin levels (P < 0.05), unchanged 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) levels, and elevated skull (P < 0.01) and reduced femur bone mineral density. Basal and thrombin-stimulated platelet free calcium (intracellular calcium concentration) were also reduced (P < 0.05). There was a tendency for indirect systolic BP to be reduced in conscious flight animals (P = 0.057). However, mean arterial pressure was elevated (P < 0.001) after anesthesia. Dietary calcium altered all aspects of calcium metabolism (P < 0.001), as well as BP (P < 0.001), but the only interaction with flight was a relatively greater increase in ionized calcium in flight animals fed low- compared with high-calcium diets (P < 0.05). The results indicate that 1) flight-induced disruptions of calcium metabolism are relatively impervious to dietary calcium in the short term, 2) increased ionized calcium did not normalize low-calcium-induced elevations of BP, and 3) parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  11. Differential Calcium Signaling Mediated by Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells and Their Unmyelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Sargoy, Allison; Sun, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC) regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury. PMID:24416240

  12. Increased calcium bioavailability in mice fed genetically engineered plants lacking calcium oxalate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioavailable calcium affects bone formation and calcification. Here we investigate how a single gene mutation altering calcium partitioning in the model forage crop Medicago truncatula affects calcium bioavailability. Previously, the cod5 M. truncatula mutant was identified which contains identical ...

  13. Aging and calcium as an environmental factor.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T

    1985-12-01

    Calcium deficiency is a constant menace to land-abiding animals, including mammals. Humans enjoying exceptional longevity on earth are especially susceptible to calcium deficiency in old age. Low calcium and vitamin D intake, short solar exposure, decreased intestinal absorption, and falling renal function with insufficient 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D biosynthesis all contribute to calcium deficiency, secondary hyperparathyroidism, bone loss and possibly calcium shift from the bone to soft tissue, and from the extracellular to the intracellular compartment, blunting the sharp concentration gap between these compartments. The consequences of calcium deficiency might thus include not only osteoporosis, but also arteriosclerosis and hypertension due to the increase of calcium in the vascular wall, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and senile dementia due to calcium deposition in the central nervous system, and a decrease in cellular function, because of blunting of the difference in extracellular-intracellular calcium, leading to diabetes mellitus, immune deficiency and others (Fig. 6). PMID:2943880

  14. Transport of Calcium Ions into Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaolong; Zhang, Dayong; He, Xiaolan; Huang, Yihong; Shao, Hongbo

    2016-06-01

    To uptake calcium ions of mitochondria is of significant functional connotation for cells, because calcium ions in mitochondria are involved in energy production, regulatory signals transfer, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and even programmed cell death of apoptosis, further playing more roles in plant productivity and quality. Cytoplasmic calcium ions access into outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) from voltage dependent anion-selective channel (VDAC) and were absorbed into inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) by mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU), rapid mitochondrial calcium uptake (RaM) or mitochondrial ryanodine receptor (mRyR). Although both mitochondria and the mechanisms of calcium transport have been extensively studied, but there are still long-standing or even new challenges. Here we review the history and recent discoveries of the mitochondria calcium ions channel complex involved calcium assimilation, and discuss the role of calcium ions into mitochondria. PMID:27252588

  15. Calcium supplement: humanity's double-edged sword.

    PubMed

    Bunyaratavej, Narong; Buranasinsup, Shutipen

    2011-10-01

    The principle aim of the present study is to investigate the dark side of calcium, pollutions in calcium preparation especially lead (Pb), mercury (Hg) and cadmium (Cd). The collected samples were the different calcium salts in the market and 18 preparations which were classified into 3 groups: Calcium carbonate salts, Chelated calcium and natural-raw calcium. All samples were analyzed for lead, cadmium and mercury by inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique, in house method based on AOAC (2005) 999.10 by ICP-MS. The calcium carbonate and the natural-raw calcium in every sample contained lead at 0.023-0.407 mg/kg of calcium powder. Meanwhile, the natural-raw calcium such as oyster, coral and animal bone showed amount of lead at 0.106-0.384 mg/kg with small amounts of mercury and cadmium. The chelated calcium such as calcium gluconate, calcium lactate and calcium citrate are free of lead. PMID:22338928

  16. A vacuole-like compartment concentrates a disordered calcium phase in a key coccolithophorid alga

    PubMed Central

    Sviben, Sanja; Gal, Assaf; Hood, Matthew A.; Bertinetti, Luca; Politi, Yael; Bennet, Mathieu; Krishnamoorthy, Praveen; Schertel, Andreas; Wirth, Richard; Sorrentino, Andrea; Pereiro, Eva; Faivre, Damien; Scheffel, André

    2016-01-01

    Coccoliths are calcitic particles produced inside the cells of unicellular marine algae known as coccolithophores. They are abundant components of sea-floor carbonates, and the stoichiometry of calcium to other elements in fossil coccoliths is widely used to infer past environmental conditions. Here we study cryo-preserved cells of the dominant coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi using state-of-the-art nanoscale imaging and spectroscopy. We identify a compartment, distinct from the coccolith-producing compartment, filled with high concentrations of a disordered form of calcium. Co-localized with calcium are high concentrations of phosphorus and minor concentrations of other cations. The amounts of calcium stored in this reservoir seem to be dynamic and at a certain stage the compartment is in direct contact with the coccolith-producing vesicle, suggesting an active role in coccolith formation. Our findings provide insights into calcium accumulation in this important calcifying organism. PMID:27075521

  17. A vacuole-like compartment concentrates a disordered calcium phase in a key coccolithophorid alga.

    PubMed

    Sviben, Sanja; Gal, Assaf; Hood, Matthew A; Bertinetti, Luca; Politi, Yael; Bennet, Mathieu; Krishnamoorthy, Praveen; Schertel, Andreas; Wirth, Richard; Sorrentino, Andrea; Pereiro, Eva; Faivre, Damien; Scheffel, André

    2016-01-01

    Coccoliths are calcitic particles produced inside the cells of unicellular marine algae known as coccolithophores. They are abundant components of sea-floor carbonates, and the stoichiometry of calcium to other elements in fossil coccoliths is widely used to infer past environmental conditions. Here we study cryo-preserved cells of the dominant coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi using state-of-the-art nanoscale imaging and spectroscopy. We identify a compartment, distinct from the coccolith-producing compartment, filled with high concentrations of a disordered form of calcium. Co-localized with calcium are high concentrations of phosphorus and minor concentrations of other cations. The amounts of calcium stored in this reservoir seem to be dynamic and at a certain stage the compartment is in direct contact with the coccolith-producing vesicle, suggesting an active role in coccolith formation. Our findings provide insights into calcium accumulation in this important calcifying organism. PMID:27075521

  18. Correlated Synaptic Inputs Drive Dendritic Calcium Amplification and Cooperative Plasticity during Clustered Synapse Development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin F H; Soares, Cary; Thivierge, Jean-Philippe; Béïque, Jean-Claude

    2016-02-17

    The mechanisms that instruct the assembly of fine-scale features of synaptic connectivity in neural circuits are only beginning to be understood. Using whole-cell electrophysiology, two-photon calcium imaging, and glutamate uncaging in hippocampal slices, we discovered a functional coupling between NMDA receptor activation and ryanodine-sensitive intracellular calcium release that dominates the spatiotemporal dynamics of activity-dependent calcium signals during synaptogenesis. This developmentally regulated calcium amplification mechanism was tuned to detect and bind spatially clustered and temporally correlated synaptic inputs and enacted a local cooperative plasticity rule between coactive neighboring synapses. Consistent with the hypothesis that synapse maturation is spatially regulated, we observed clustering of synaptic weights in developing dendritic arbors. These results reveal developmental features of NMDA receptor-dependent calcium dynamics and local plasticity rules that are suited to spatially guide synaptic connectivity patterns in emerging neural networks. PMID:26853305

  19. Optimizing calcium selective fluorimetric nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Kisiel, Anna; Kłucińska, Katarzyna; Gniadek, Marianna; Maksymiuk, Krzysztof; Michalska, Agata

    2015-11-01

    Recently it was shown that optical nanosensors based on alternating polymers e.g. poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene) were characterized by a linear dependence of emission intensity on logarithm of concentration over a few of orders of magnitude range. In this work we focus on the material used to prepare calcium selective nanosensors. It is shown that alternating polymer nanosensors offer competitive performance in the absence of calcium ionophore, due to interaction of the nanospheres building blocks with analyte ions. The emission increase corresponds to increase of calcium ions contents in the sample within the range from 10(-4) to 10(-1) M. Further improvement in sensitivity (from 10(-6) to 10(-1) M) and selectivity can be achieved by incorporating calcium ionophore in the nanospheres. The optimal results were obtained for core-shell nanospheres, where the core was prepared from poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) and the outer layer from poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene). Thus obtained chemosensors were showing linear dependence of emission on logarithm of calcium ions concentration within the range from 10(-7) to 10(-1) M. PMID:26452839

  20. Calcium signaling in UV-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dan; Zhang, Su-juan; Li, Yuan-yuan; Qu, Ying; Ren, Zhao-Yu

    2007-05-01

    Hepa1-6 cells were irradiated with UV and incubated for varying periods of time. [Ca 2+] i (intracellular calcium concentration) of UV-irradiated cell was measured by ratio fluorescence imaging system. The comet assay was used to determine DNA damage. During the UVB-irradiation, [Ca 2+] i had an ascending tendency from 0.88 J/m2 to 92.4J/m2. Comet assay instant test indicated that when the irradiation dosage was above 0.88J/m2, DNA damage was observed. Even after approximate 2 h of incubation, DNA damage was still not detected by 0.88J/m2 of UVB irradiation. During UVA-irradiation, the elevation of [Ca 2+] i was not dose-dependent in a range of 1200 J/m2-6000J/m2 and DNA damage was not observed by comet assay. These results suggested that several intracellular UV receptors might induce [Ca 2+] i rising by absorption of the UV energy. Just [Ca 2+] i rising can't induce DNA damage certainly, it is very likely that the breakdown of calcium steady state induces DNA damage.u

  1. Calcium release-activated calcium current in rat mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hoth, M; Penner, R

    1993-06-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of membrane currents and fura-2 measurements of free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were used to study the biophysical properties of a calcium current activated by depletion of intracellular calcium stores in rat peritoneal mast cells. 2. Calcium influx through an inward calcium release-activated calcium current (ICRAC) was induced by three independent mechanisms that result in store depletion: intracellular infusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) or extracellular application of ionomycin (active depletion), and intracellular infusion of calcium chelators (ethylene glycol bis-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA)) to prevent reuptake of leaked-out calcium into the stores (passive depletion). 3. The activation of ICRAC induced by active store depletion has a short delay (4-14 s) following intracellular infusion of InsP3 or extracellular application of ionomycin. It has a monoexponential time course with a time constant of 20-30 s and, depending on the complementary Ca2+ buffer, a mean normalized amplitude (at 0 mV) of 0.6 pA pF-1 (with EGTA) and 1.1 pA pF-1 (with BAPTA). 4. After full activation of ICRAC by InsP3 in the presence of EGTA (10 mM), hyperpolarizing pulses to -100 mV induced an instantaneous inward current that decayed by 64% within 50 ms. This inactivation is probably mediated by [Ca2+]i, since the decrease of inward current in the presence of the fast Ca2+ buffer BAPTA (10 mM) was only 30%. 5. The amplitude of ICRAC was dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration with an apparent dissociation constant (KD) of 3.3 mM. Inward currents were nonsaturating up to -200 mV. 6. The selectivity of ICRAC for Ca2+ was assessed by using fura-2 as the dominant intracellular buffer (at a concentration of 2 mM) and relating the absolute changes in the calcium-sensitive fluorescence (390 nm excitation) with the calcium current integral

  2. Calcium phosphate in catheter encrustation.

    PubMed

    Cox, A J; Harries, J E; Hukins, D W; Kennedy, A P; Sutton, T M

    1987-02-01

    Encrusted catheters from nine female patients were the source of samples of deposits which were examined by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In eight samples the only crystalline phase which could be clearly distinguished by X-ray diffraction was ammonium magnesium orthophosphate hexahydrate, NH4MgPO4 X 6H2O, which occurs naturally as the mineral struvite. However, atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed an appreciable concentration of calcium in all samples. Calcium phosphates have previously been detected in catheter deposits. Infra-red and EXAFS spectra were consistent with the calcium phosphate being present as a poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite. Thus the deposits appear to consist of a mixture of crystalline struvite and a form of hydroxyapatite which is not fully crystalline. PMID:3030487

  3. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review. PMID:26275497

  4. The effect of variable calcium and very low calcium diets on human calcium metabolism. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, J.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of a very low calcium diet, with variable high and low protein intake, on the dynamics of calcium metabolism and the mechanism of calciuretics, are examined. The experiment, using male subjects, was designed to study the role of intestinal calcium absorption on urinary calcium excretion, and the rate of production of endogeneously secreted calcium in the gastrointestinal tract. The study showed an average of 70% fractional absorption rate during very low calcium intake, and that a decrease in renal tubular reabsorption of calcium is responsible for calciuretic effects of high protein intake. The study also indicates that there is a tendency to develop osteoporosis after long periods of low calcium intake, especially with a concurrent high protein intake.

  5. Effect of low-energy laser irradiation on cytokine secretion from skeletal muscle cells: involvement of calcium in the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Fidi; Adamek, Mariusz; Brodie, C.; Shainberg, Asher

    1997-12-01

    Low energy laser irradiation has an effect on Nerve Growth Factor and anti mitotic factors release from rat and mouse skeletal muscle cultures. It was found that there is a transient elevation of intracellular calcium in the myotubes immediately after irradiation. Calcium changes were detected by dynamic video imaging systems and with a photometric system. Pre incubation of the myotubes with photosensitizers enhance the elevation of both cytosolic calcium and cytokines release from the cells after Helium/Neon irradiation with energy of 3-10 J/cm2. These findings can lead to an hypothesis that transient changes in calcium can accelerate cytokines release from the myotubes.

  6. Calcium scoring with dual-energy CT in men and women: an anthropomorphic phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Liu, Songtao; Myers, Kyle; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Zeng, Rongping; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed to quantify and compare the potential impact of gender differences on coronary artery calcium scoring with dual-energy CT. An anthropomorphic thorax phantom with four synthetic heart vessels (diameter 3-4.5 mm: female/male left main and left circumflex artery) were scanned with and without female breast plates. Ten repeat scans were acquired in both single- and dual-energy modes and reconstructed at six reconstruction settings: two slice thicknesses (3 mm, 0.6 mm) and three reconstruction algorithms (FBP, IR3, IR5). Agatston and calcium volume scores were estimated from the reconstructed data using a segmentation-based approach. Total calcium score (summation of four vessels), and male/female calcium scores (summation of male/female vessels scanned in phantom without/with breast plates) were calculated accordingly. Both Agatston and calcium volume scores were found comparable between single- and dual-energy scans (Pearson r= 0.99, p<0.05). The total calcium scores were larger for the thinner slice thickness. Among the scores obtained from the three reconstruction algorithms, FBP yielded the highest and IR5 yielded the lowest scores. The total calcium scores from the phantom without breast plates were significantly larger than those from the phantom with breast plates, and the difference increased with the stronger denoising in iterative algorithm and with thicker slices. Both gender-based anatomical differences and vessel size impacted the calcium scores. The calcium volume scores tended to be underestimated when the vessels were smaller. These findings are valuable for understanding inconsistencies between women and men in calcium scoring, and for standardizing imaging protocols for improved gender-specific calcium scoring.

  7. Calcium binding in pigmented and albino eyes.

    PubMed Central

    Dräger, U C

    1985-01-01

    The localization of calcium binding sites in eyes was determined autoradiographically after extracting endogenous Ca from tissue sections and replacing it with 45Ca. The strongest labeling was associated with pigmented tissues due to the high concentration of melanin, which was shown to bind Ca effectively and in a pH-dependent fashion. The second strongest binding was over the tapetum lucidum of the cat eye, and moderate labeling was associated with eye muscles and epithelium and endothelium of the cornea. The neural retina was generally more lightly labeled than the surrounding tissue of the eye; here the plexiform layers stood out in comparison to the nuclear layers, as did a band located internal to the photoreceptor outer segments. The possibility that the Ca buffering capacity of melanin may represent the common denominator for the various neurological defects found in hypopigmentation mutants is discussed. Images PMID:3863122

  8. Chemical Calcium Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, R. Madelaine; Etzler, Julie C.; Watts, Lora Talley; Lechleiter, James D.

    2008-01-01

    Our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of Ca2+ signaling as well as our appreciation for its ubiquitous role in cellular processes and has been rapidly advanced, in large part, due to the development of fluorescent Ca2+ indicators. In this chapter, we discuss some of the most common chemical Ca2+ indicators that are widely used for the investigation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling. Advantages, limitations and relevant procedures will be presented for each dye including their spectral qualities, dissociation constants, chemical forms, loading methods and equipment for optimal imaging. Chemical indicators that are now available allow for intracellular Ca2+ detection over a very large range (<50 nM to >50 μM). Higher affinity indicators can be used to quantify Ca2+ levels in the cytosol while lower affinity indicators can be optimized for measuring Ca2+ in subcellular compartments with higher concentrations. Indicators can be classified into either single wavelength or ratiometric dyes. Both classes require specific lasers, filters, and/or detection methods that are dependent upon their spectral properties and both classes have advantages and limitations. Single wavelength indicators are generally very bright and optimal for Ca2+ detection when more than one fluorophore is being imaging. Ratiometric indicators can be calibrated very precisely and they minimize the most common problems associated with chemical Ca2+ indicators including uneven dye loading, leakage, photobleaching and changes in cell volume. Recent technical advances that permit in vivo Ca2+ measurements will also be discussed. PMID:18929663

  9. Calcium revisited: part II calcium supplements and their effects

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, Olivier; Burckhardt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Calcium supplements were tested in pregnancy and lactation, in childhood and adolescence, in pre- and postmenopausal women and in elderly persons with various effects on bone density and fracture incidence. They must be properly chosen and adequately used. In this case, the reported minor negative side-effects do not restrict their use. All these aspects are reviewed here. PMID:25328675

  10. Calcium transients in cerebellar granule cell presynaptic terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Regehr, W G; Atluri, P P

    1995-01-01

    Calcium ions act presynaptically to modulate synaptic strength and to trigger neurotransmitter release. Here we detect stimulus-evoked changes in residual free calcium ([Ca2+]i) in rat cerebellar granule cell presynaptic terminals. Granule cell axons, known as parallel fibers, and their associated boutons, were labeled with several calcium indicators. When parallel fibers were extracellularly activated with stimulus trains, calcium accumulated in the terminals, producing changes in the fluorescence of the indicators. During the stimulus train, the fluorescence change per pulse became progressively smaller with the high affinity indicators Fura-2 and calcium green-2 but remained constant with the low affinity dyes BTC and furaptra. In addition, fluorescence transients of high affinity dyes were slower than those of low affinity indicators, which appear to accurately report the time course of calcium transients. Simulations show that differences in the observed transients can be explained by the different affinities and off rates of the fluorophores. The return of [Ca2+]i to resting levels can be approximated by an exponential decay with a time constant of 150 ms. On the basis of the degree of saturation in the response of high affinity dyes observed during trains, we estimate that each action potential increases [Ca2+]i in the terminal by several hundred nanomolar. These findings indicate that in these terminals [Ca2+]i transients are much larger and faster than those observed in larger boutons, such as those at the neuromuscular junction. Such rapid [Ca2+]i dynamics may be found in many of the terminals in the mammalian brain that are similar in size to parallel fiber boutons. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7612860

  11. Synchronous and asynchronous modes of synaptic transmission utilize different calcium sources.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hua; Hubbard, Jeffrey M; Rakela, Benjamin; Linhoff, Michael W; Mandel, Gail; Brehm, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Asynchronous transmission plays a prominent role at certain synapses but lacks the mechanistic insights of its synchronous counterpart. The current view posits that triggering of asynchronous release during repetitive stimulation involves expansion of the same calcium domains underlying synchronous transmission. In this study, live imaging and paired patch clamp recording at the zebrafish neuromuscular synapse reveal contributions by spatially distinct calcium sources. Synchronous release is tied to calcium entry into synaptic boutons via P/Q type calcium channels, whereas asynchronous release is boosted by a propagating intracellular calcium source initiated at off-synaptic locations in the axon and axonal branch points. This secondary calcium source fully accounts for the persistence following termination of the stimulus and sensitivity to slow calcium buffers reported for asynchronous release. The neuromuscular junction and CNS neurons share these features, raising the possibility that secondary calcium sources are common among synapses with prominent asynchronous release. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01206.001. PMID:24368731

  12. Endolymphatic calcium supply for fish otolith growth takes place via the proximal portion of the otocyst.

    PubMed

    Ibsch, M; Anken, R; Beier, M; Rahmann, H

    2004-09-01

    The presence of calcium within the utricle of larval cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus was analysed by means of energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy. Electron-spectroscopic imaging and electron energy loss spectra revealed discrete calcium precipitations that were more numerous in the proximal endolymph than in the distal endolymph, clearly indicating a decreasing proximo-distal gradient. This decreasing proximo-distal gradient was also present within the proximal endolymph between the sensory epithelium and the otolith. Further calcium particles covered the peripheral proteinaceous layer of the otolith. They were especially pronounced at the proximal surface of the otolith indicating that otolithic calcium incorporation takes place here. Other calcium precipitates accumulated at the macular junctions clearly supporting an earlier assumption according to which the endolymph is supplied with calcium via a paracellular pathway. The present results clearly show that the apical region of the macular epithelium is involved in the release of calcium and that the calcium supply of the otoliths takes place via the proximal endolymph. PMID:15300493

  13. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes

    PubMed Central

    Samigullin, Dmitry; Fatikhov, Nijaz; Khaziev, Eduard; Skorinkin, Andrey; Nikolsky, Eugeny; Bukharaeva, Ellya

    2015-01-01

    At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers—which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal—has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca2+ currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 pA and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 μM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity. PMID:25709579

  14. Calcium release from experimental dental materials.

    PubMed

    Okulus, Zuzanna; Buchwald, Tomasz; Voelkel, Adam

    2016-11-01

    The calcium release from calcium phosphate-containing experimental dental restorative materials was examined. The possible correlation of ion release with initial calcium content, solubility and degree of curing (degree of conversion) of examined materials was also investigated. Calcium release was measured with the use of an ion-selective electrode in an aqueous solution. Solubility was established by the weighing method. Raman spectroscopy was applied for the determination of the degree of conversion, while initial calcium content was examined with the use of energy-dispersive spectroscopy. For examined materials, the amount of calcium released was found to be positively correlated with solubility and initial calcium content. It was also found that the degree of conversion does not affect the ability of these experimental composites to release calcium ions. PMID:27524015

  15. DISSOLUTION AND CRYSTALLIZATION OF CALCIUM SULFITE PLATELETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the dissolution and crystallization of calcium sulfite platelets. The rates of calcium sulfite dissolution and crystallization are important in slurry scrubbing processes for flue gas desulfurization. The rates affect the scrubber solution composition, SO2 abs...

  16. Magnesium/Calcium Competition at Excitable Membranes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belzer, Bill; Fry, Panni

    1998-01-01

    Considers some consequences of altering intracellular calcium supply by magnesium concentration changes. Focuses on using this procedure as an exercise with allied health students as they witness therapeutic uses of magnesium and other calcium entry inhibitors. (DDR)

  17. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... can break easily, even without an obvious injury. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium. Eat foods that provide the right amounts of calcium, vitamin D, and protein. This kind of diet will give ...

  18. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  19. Dairy Dilemma: Are You Getting Enough Calcium?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dairy Dilemma Dairy Dilemma Are You Getting Enough Calcium? You may be avoiding dairy products because of ... But dairy products are a major source of calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients that are important ...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... three common methods of manufacture: (1) As a byproduct in the “Lime soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be produced by the calcium hydroxide neutralization of acetic acid. (b) The ingredient meets...

  2. Calcium - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Calcium URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/calcium.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  3. Drosophila wing imaginal discs respond to mechanical injury via slow InsP3R-mediated intercellular calcium waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Simon; Basler, Konrad

    2016-08-01

    Calcium signalling is a highly versatile cellular communication system that modulates basic functions such as cell contractility, essential steps of animal development such as fertilization and higher-order processes such as memory. We probed the function of calcium signalling in Drosophila wing imaginal discs through a combination of ex vivo and in vivo imaging and genetic analysis. Here we discover that wing discs display slow, long-range intercellular calcium waves (ICWs) when mechanically stressed in vivo or cultured ex vivo. These slow imaginal disc intercellular calcium waves (SIDICs) are mediated by the inositol-3-phosphate receptor, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium pump SERCA and the key gap junction component Inx2. The knockdown of genes required for SIDIC formation and propagation negatively affects wing disc recovery after mechanical injury. Our results reveal a role for ICWs in wing disc homoeostasis and highlight the utility of the wing disc as a model for calcium signalling studies.

  4. Drosophila wing imaginal discs respond to mechanical injury via slow InsP3R-mediated intercellular calcium waves.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Simon; Basler, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Calcium signalling is a highly versatile cellular communication system that modulates basic functions such as cell contractility, essential steps of animal development such as fertilization and higher-order processes such as memory. We probed the function of calcium signalling in Drosophila wing imaginal discs through a combination of ex vivo and in vivo imaging and genetic analysis. Here we discover that wing discs display slow, long-range intercellular calcium waves (ICWs) when mechanically stressed in vivo or cultured ex vivo. These slow imaginal disc intercellular calcium waves (SIDICs) are mediated by the inositol-3-phosphate receptor, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium pump SERCA and the key gap junction component Inx2. The knockdown of genes required for SIDIC formation and propagation negatively affects wing disc recovery after mechanical injury. Our results reveal a role for ICWs in wing disc homoeostasis and highlight the utility of the wing disc as a model for calcium signalling studies. PMID:27503836

  5. Drosophila wing imaginal discs respond to mechanical injury via slow InsP3R-mediated intercellular calcium waves

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Simon; Basler, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Calcium signalling is a highly versatile cellular communication system that modulates basic functions such as cell contractility, essential steps of animal development such as fertilization and higher-order processes such as memory. We probed the function of calcium signalling in Drosophila wing imaginal discs through a combination of ex vivo and in vivo imaging and genetic analysis. Here we discover that wing discs display slow, long-range intercellular calcium waves (ICWs) when mechanically stressed in vivo or cultured ex vivo. These slow imaginal disc intercellular calcium waves (SIDICs) are mediated by the inositol-3-phosphate receptor, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium pump SERCA and the key gap junction component Inx2. The knockdown of genes required for SIDIC formation and propagation negatively affects wing disc recovery after mechanical injury. Our results reveal a role for ICWs in wing disc homoeostasis and highlight the utility of the wing disc as a model for calcium signalling studies. PMID:27503836

  6. 21 CFR 184.1210 - Calcium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium oxide. 184.1210 Section 184.1210 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1210 Calcium oxide. (a) Calcium oxide (CaO, CAS Reg. No. 1305-78-8) is also known as lime, quick lime, burnt lime, or calx. It is produced from calcium carbonate, limestone,...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1221 - Calcium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium propionate. 184.1221 Section 184.1221 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1221 Calcium propionate. (a) Calcium propionate (C6H10CaO4, CAS Reg. No. 4075-81-4) is the calcium salt of propionic acid. It occurs as white crystals or...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may...

  9. Calcium-binding proteins and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckingham, K.; Lu, A. Q.; Andruss, B. F.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The known roles for calcium-binding proteins in developmental signaling pathways are reviewed. Current information on the calcium-binding characteristics of three classes of cell-surface developmental signaling proteins (EGF-domain proteins, cadherins and integrins) is presented together with an overview of the intracellular pathways downstream of these surface receptors. The developmental roles delineated to date for the universal intracellular calcium sensor, calmodulin, and its targets, and for calcium-binding regulators of the cytoskeleton are also reviewed.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium stearate. 184.1229 Section 184.1229 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1229 Calcium stearate. (a) Calcium stearate (Ca(C17H35COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 1529-23-0) is the calcium salt of stearic acid derived from edible sources. It is prepared...

  11. Oxalic acid decreases calcium absorption in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, C.M.; Martin, B.R.; Ebner, J.S.; Krueger, C.A.

    1987-11-01

    Calcium absorption from salts and foods intrinsically labeled with /sup 45/Ca was determined in the rat model. Calcium bioavailability was nearly 10 times greater for low oxalate kale, CaCO/sub 3/ and CaCl/sub 2/ than from CaC/sub 2/O/sub 4/ (calcium oxalate) and spinach (high in oxalates). Extrinsic and intrinsic labeling techniques gave a similar assessment of calcium bioavailability from kale but not from spinach.

  12. 21 CFR 184.1210 - Calcium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1210 Calcium oxide. (a) Calcium oxide (CaO, CAS Reg. No. 1305-78-8) is also known as lime, quick lime, burnt lime, or calx. It is produced from calcium carbonate, limestone, or... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium oxide. 184.1210 Section 184.1210 Food...

  13. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  14. Measurement of intracellular calcium gradients in single living cells using optical sectioning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelamarty, Rao V.; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    1992-06-01

    Intracellular free calcium has been recognized as a regulator of many cellular processes and plays a key role in mediating actions of many drugs. To elucidate subcellular spatial calcium changes throughout the cell in three dimensions (3-D), optical sectioning microscopy was applied using digital imaging coupled fluorescence microscopy. The cell was loaded with a fluorescent indicator, fura-2, and a stack of sectional fluorescent images were acquired, digitized and finally stored on-line for post image analysis. Each sectional image was then deconvolved, to remove contaminating light signals from adjacent planes, using the Nearest Neighboring Deconvolution Algorithm (NNDA) and the overall imaging system's empirical Point Spread Function (PSF) that is measured with a 0.25 micrometers fluorescent bead. Using this technique, we measured that the addition of growth factors caused a 2 - 3 fold increase (1) in nuclear calcium compared to cytosolic calcium in blood cells and (2) in both nuclear and cytosolic calcium in liver cells. Such spatial information, which is important in understanding subcellular processes, would not be possible to measure with other methods.

  15. Inhibition of Olfactory Receptor Neuron Input to Olfactory Bulb Glomeruli Mediated by Suppression of Presynaptic Calcium Influx

    PubMed Central

    Wachowiak, Matt; McGann, John P.; Heyward, Philip M.; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam C.; Shipley, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the cellular mechanism underlying presynaptic regulation of olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) input to the mouse olfactory bulb using optical-imaging techniques that selectively report activity in the ORN pre-synaptic terminal. First, we loaded ORNs with calcium-sensitive dye and imaged stimulus-evoked calcium influx in a slice preparation. Single olfactory nerve shocks evoked rapid fluorescence increases that were largely blocked by the N-type calcium channel blocker ω-conotoxin GVIA. Paired shocks revealed a long-lasting suppression of calcium influx with ~40% suppression at 400-ms interstimulus intervals and a recovery time constant of ~450 ms. Blocking activation of postsynaptic olfactory bulb neurons with APV/CNQX reduced this suppression. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen inhibited calcium influx, whereas GABAB antagonists reduced paired-pulse suppression without affecting the response to the conditioning pulse. We also imaged transmitter release directly using a mouse line that expresses synaptopHluorin selectively in ORNs. We found that the relationship between calcium influx and transmitter release was superlinear and that paired-pulse suppression of transmitter release was reduced, but not eliminated, by APV/CNQX and GABAB antagonists. These results demonstrate that primary olfactory input to the CNS can be presynaptically regulated by GABAergic interneurons and show that one major intracellular pathway for this regulation is via the suppression of calcium influx through N-type calcium channels in the pre-synaptic terminal. This mechanism is unique among primary sensory afferents. PMID:15917320

  16. Calcium orthophosphates and human beings

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2012-01-01

    The historical development of a scientific knowledge on calcium orthophosphates from the 1770s until 1940 is described. Many forgotten and poorly known historical facts and approaches have been extracted from old publications and then they have been analyzed, systematized and reconsidered from the modern point of view. The chosen time scale starts with the earliest available studies of 1770s (to the best of my findings, calcium orthophosphates had been unknown before), passes through the entire 19th century and finishes in 1940, because since then the amount of publications on calcium orthophosphates rapidly increases and the subject becomes too broad. Furthermore, since publications of the second half of the 20th century are easily accessible, a substantial amount of them have already been reviewed by other researchers. The reported historical findings clearly demonstrate that the substantial amount of the scientific facts and experimental approaches have been known for very many decades and, in fact, the considerable quantity of relatively recent investigations on calcium orthophosphates is just either a further development of the earlier studies or a rediscovery of the already forgotten knowledge. PMID:23507803

  17. Calcium channels in Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Schein, S J

    1977-01-01

    Reversal of swimming direction in paramecium is dependent on the calcium influx through the excitable-membrane calcium channels. Several mutants of Paramecium aurelia have been selected on the basis of their resistance to the paralyzing effect of barium. The mutants have reduced reversal behavior and are in the same three pawn genes as discovered by Kung (16, 17). Also, in barium solutions, the pawns live longer than the wild-type; however, pwB mutants are more resistant to barium toxicity than pwA mutants. These results suggest that the selection picked up mutants in the calcium channel. Electrophysiological studies demonstrate this point directly, showing defective calcium activation in all pawns, but also defective anomalous rectification in pwB mutants. A model is presented which accounts for the differences between pwA and pwB mutants. It ascribes the depolarization-sensitive "gate" function to the pwA gene product and the "pore" function to the pwB gene product. Additionally, the stability of the channel structure is demonstrated, channel half-life being from five to eight days. PMID:928443

  18. Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Thomas; Furman, Janet

    2016-06-01

    Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) arthropathy, also called pseudogout, is common, and becomes more prevalent as patients age. The presenting symptoms are similar to both gout and septic arthritis but may be treated differently. This article describes a typical patient presentation and management from an emergency medicine and orthopedic surgery standpoint. PMID:27228038

  19. Visualizing Presynaptic Calcium Dynamics and Vesicle Fusion with a Single Genetically Encoded Reporter at Individual Synapses.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Rachel E; Burrone, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission depends on the influx of calcium into the presynaptic compartment, which drives neurotransmitter release. Genetically encoded reporters are widely used tools to understand these processes, particularly pHluorin-based reporters that report vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis through pH dependent changes in fluorescence, and genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) that exhibit changes in fluorescence upon binding to calcium. The recent expansion of the color palette of available indicators has made it possible to image multiple probes simultaneously within a cell. We have constructed a single molecule reporter capable of concurrent imaging of both presynaptic calcium influx and exocytosis, by fusion of sypHy, the vesicle associated protein synaptophysin containing a GFP-based pHluorin sensor, with the red-shifted GECI R-GECO1. Due to the fixed stoichiometry of the two probes, the ratio of the two responses can also be measured, providing an all optical correlate of the calcium dependence of release. Here, we have characterized stimulus-evoked sypHy-RGECO responses of hippocampal synapses in vitro, exploring the effects of different stimulus strengths and frequencies as well as variations in external calcium concentrations. By combining live sypHy-RGECO imaging with post hoc fixation and immunofluorescence, we have also investigated correlations between structural and functional properties of synapses. PMID:27507942

  20. Visualizing Presynaptic Calcium Dynamics and Vesicle Fusion with a Single Genetically Encoded Reporter at Individual Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Rachel E.; Burrone, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission depends on the influx of calcium into the presynaptic compartment, which drives neurotransmitter release. Genetically encoded reporters are widely used tools to understand these processes, particularly pHluorin-based reporters that report vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis through pH dependent changes in fluorescence, and genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) that exhibit changes in fluorescence upon binding to calcium. The recent expansion of the color palette of available indicators has made it possible to image multiple probes simultaneously within a cell. We have constructed a single molecule reporter capable of concurrent imaging of both presynaptic calcium influx and exocytosis, by fusion of sypHy, the vesicle associated protein synaptophysin containing a GFP-based pHluorin sensor, with the red-shifted GECI R-GECO1. Due to the fixed stoichiometry of the two probes, the ratio of the two responses can also be measured, providing an all optical correlate of the calcium dependence of release. Here, we have characterized stimulus-evoked sypHy-RGECO responses of hippocampal synapses in vitro, exploring the effects of different stimulus strengths and frequencies as well as variations in external calcium concentrations. By combining live sypHy-RGECO imaging with post hoc fixation and immunofluorescence, we have also investigated correlations between structural and functional properties of synapses. PMID:27507942

  1. Calcium Kinetics During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; OBrien, K. O.; Abrams, S. A.; Wastney, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    Bone loss during space flight is one of the most critical challenges to astronaut health on space exploration missions. Defining the time course and mechanism of these changes will aid in developing means to counteract bone loss during space flight, and will have relevance for other clinical situations that impair weight-bearing activity. Bone health is a product of the balance between bone formation and bone resorption. Early space research could not clearly identify which of these was the main process altered in bone loss, but identification of the collagen crosslinks in the 1990s made possible a clear understanding that the impact of space flight was greater on bone resorption, with bone formation being unchanged or only slightly decreased. Calcium kinetics data showed that bone resorption was greater during flight than before flight (668 plus or minus 130 vs. 427 plus or minus 153 mg/d, p less than 0.001), and clearly documented that true intestinal calcium absorption was lower during flight than before flight (233 plus or minus 87 vs. 460 plus or minus 47 mg/d, p less than 0.01). Weightlessness had a detrimental effect on the balance in bone turnover: the difference between daily calcium balance during flight (-234 plus or minus 102 mg/d) and calcium balance before flight (63 plus or minus 75 mg/d) approached 300 mg/d (p less than 0.01). These data demonstrate that the bone loss that occurs during space flight is a consequence of increased bone resorption and decreased intestinal calcium absorption. Examining the changes in bone and calcium homeostasis in the initial days and weeks of space flight, as well as at later times on missions longer than 6 months, is critical to understanding the nature of bone adaptation to weightlessness. To increase knowledge of these changes, we studied bone adaptation to space flight on the 16-day Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-107) mission. When the brave and talented crew of Columbia were lost during reentry on the tragic morning

  2. Plant calcium content: Ready to remodel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By identifying the relationship between calcium location in the plant cell and nutrient bioavailability, the plant characteristics leading to maximal calcium absorption by humans can be identified. Knowledge of plant cellular and molecular targets controlling calcium location in plants is emerging. ...

  3. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive calcium carbonate is a fine,...

  4. 21 CFR 573.240 - Calcium periodate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.240 Calcium periodate. The food additive calcium periodate may be safely used in... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium periodate. 573.240 Section 573.240...

  5. 21 CFR 573.240 - Calcium periodate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.240 Calcium periodate. The food additive calcium periodate may be safely used in... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium periodate. 573.240 Section 573.240...

  6. 21 CFR 172.720 - Calcium lactobionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.720 Calcium lactobionate. The food additive calcium lactobionate may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is the calcium salt of...

  7. 21 CFR 172.720 - Calcium lactobionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.720 Calcium lactobionate. The food additive calcium lactobionate... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium lactobionate. 172.720 Section 172.720...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  9. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  10. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  11. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  12. 21 CFR 573.240 - Calcium periodate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.240 Calcium periodate. The food additive calcium periodate may be safely used in... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium periodate. 573.240 Section 573.240...

  13. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate...

  14. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive calcium carbonate is a fine, white, synthetically prepared powder consisting essentially...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1195 - Calcium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium citrate. 582.1195 Section 582.1195 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1195 Calcium citrate. (a) Product. Calcium citrate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  17. 21 CFR 582.6197 - Calcium diacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium diacetate. 582.6197 Section 582.6197 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium diacetate. (a) Product. Calcium diacetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  18. 21 CFR 582.6195 - Calcium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium citrate. 582.6195 Section 582.6195 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium citrate. (a) Product. Calcium citrate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1199 - Calcium gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium gluconate. 582.1199 Section 582.1199 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1199 Calcium gluconate. (a) Product. Calcium gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  2. 21 CFR 582.7187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 582.7187 Section 582.7187 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium alginate. (a) Product. Calcium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1206 - Calcium iodate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium iodate. 184.1206 Section 184.1206 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1206 Calcium iodate. (a) Calcium iodate , also referred to as...

  4. 21 CFR 182.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium sorbate. 182.3225 Section 182.3225 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3225 Calcium sorbate. (a) Product. Calcium sorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  5. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  6. 21 CFR 582.6219 - Calcium phytate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phytate. 582.6219 Section 582.6219 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium phytate. (a) Product. Calcium phytate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  7. 21 CFR 182.6203 - Calcium hexametaphosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium hexametaphosphate. 182.6203 Section 182.6203 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....6203 Calcium hexametaphosphate. (a) Product. Calcium hexametaphosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 21 CFR 582.1205 - Calcium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide. 582.1205 Section 582.1205 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1205 Calcium hydroxide. (a) Product. Calcium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  9. 21 CFR 582.6203 - Calcium hexametaphosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium hexametaphosphate. 582.6203 Section 582.6203 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....6203 Calcium hexametaphosphate. (a) Product. Calcium hexametaphosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 201.70 - Calcium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium labeling. 201.70 Section 201.70 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.70 Calcium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the calcium content...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1210 - Calcium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium oxide. 582.1210 Section 582.1210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1210 Calcium oxide. (a) Product. Calcium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  12. 21 CFR 582.6199 - Calcium gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium gluconate. 582.6199 Section 582.6199 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium gluconate. (a) Product. Calcium gluconate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 582.1207 Section 582.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Product. Calcium lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1230 - Calcium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium sulfate. 184.1230 Section 184.1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1230 Calcium sulfate. (a) Calcium sulfate (CaSO4, CAS Reg. No. 7778-18-9...

  15. 21 CFR 182.6197 - Calcium diacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium diacetate. 182.6197 Section 182.6197 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6197 Calcium diacetate. (a) Product. Calcium diacetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  16. 21 CFR 582.3189 - Calcium ascorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium ascorbate. 582.3189 Section 582.3189 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3189 Calcium ascorbate. (a) Product. Calcium ascorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  17. 21 CFR 582.3221 - Calcium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium propionate. 582.3221 Section 582.3221 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3221 Calcium propionate. (a) Product. Calcium propionate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  18. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  19. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  20. 21 CFR 582.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium sorbate. 582.3225 Section 582.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3225 Calcium sorbate. (a) Product. Calcium sorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  1. 21 CFR 182.3189 - Calcium ascorbate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium ascorbate. 182.3189 Section 182.3189 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium ascorbate. (a) Product. Calcium ascorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  2. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 582.5212 Section 582.5212 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Product. Calcium pantothenate. (b) Conditions of use....

  4. 21 CFR 582.5212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 582.5212 Section 582.5212 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Product. Calcium pantothenate. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 582.5212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 582.5212 Section 582.5212 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Product. Calcium pantothenate. (b) Conditions of use....

  6. 21 CFR 582.5212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 582.5212 Section 582.5212 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Product. Calcium pantothenate. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 582.5212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 582.5212 Section 582.5212 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Product. Calcium pantothenate. (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive calcium carbonate is a fine, white, synthetically prepared powder consisting essentially...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  11. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  12. Abnormalities of serum calcium and magnesium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal hypocalcemia is defined as a total serum calcium concentration of <7 mg/dL or an ionized calcium concentration of <4 mg/dL (1mmol/L). In very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, ionized calcium values of 0.8 to 1 mmol/L are common and not usually associated with clinical symptoms. In larger in...

  13. Characterization of calcium carbonate/chitosan composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, K.E.; Zhang, S.

    1995-12-31

    The crystal growth of calcium carbonate on a chitosan substrate was achieved using a supersaturated calcium carbonate solution, by using various additives, polyacrylic acid (PAA). Polyacrylic acid modified the chitosan-film surface and promoted the nucleation of calcium carbonate crystals.

  14. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  15. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  16. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  17. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  18. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  19. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  20. Calcium supplements: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Reid, I R; Bristow, S M; Bolland, M J

    2015-10-01

    Calcium is an essential element in the diet, but there is continuing controversy regarding its optimal intake, and its role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Most studies show little evidence of a relationship between calcium intake and bone density, or the rate of bone loss. Re-analysis of data from the placebo group from the Auckland Calcium Study demonstrates no relationship between dietary calcium intake and rate of bone loss over 5 years in healthy older women with intakes varying from <400 to >1500 mg day(-1) . Thus, supplements are not needed within this range of intakes to compensate for a demonstrable dietary deficiency, but might be acting as weak anti-resorptive agents via effects on parathyroid hormone and calcitonin. Consistent with this, supplements do acutely reduce bone resorption and produce small short-term effects on bone density, without evidence of a cumulative density benefit. As a result, anti-fracture efficacy remains unproven, with no evidence to support hip fracture prevention (other than in a cohort with severe vitamin D deficiency) and total fracture numbers are reduced by 0-10%, depending on which meta-analysis is considered. Five recent large studies have failed to demonstrate fracture prevention in their primary analyses. This must be balanced against an increase in gastrointestinal side effects (including a doubling of hospital admissions for these problems), a 17% increase in renal calculi and a 20-40% increase in risk of myocardial infarction. Each of these adverse events alone neutralizes any possible benefit in fracture prevention. Thus, calcium supplements appear to have a negative risk-benefit effect, and so should not be used routinely in the prevention or treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:26174589

  1. Calcium preconditioning triggers neuroprotection in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Brandt, S K; Weatherly, M E; Ware, L; Linn, D M; Linn, C L

    2011-01-13

    In the mammalian retina, excitotoxicity has been shown to be involved in apoptotic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and is associated with certain retinal disease states including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and retinal ischemia. Previous studies from this lab [Wehrwein E, Thompson SA, Coulibaly SF, Linn DM, Linn CL (2004) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 45:1531-1543] have demonstrated that acetylcholine (ACh) and nicotine protects against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated adult pig RGCs through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Activation of nAChRs in these RGCs triggers cell survival signaling pathways and inhibits apoptotic enzymes [Asomugha CO, Linn DM, Linn CL (2010) J Neurochem 112:214-226]. However, the link between binding of nAChRs and activation of neuroprotective pathways is unknown. In this study, we examine the hypothesis that calcium permeation through nAChR channels is required for ACh-induced neuroprotection against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in isolated pig RGCs. RGCs were isolated from other retinal tissue using a two step panning technique and cultured for 3 days under different conditions. In some studies, calcium imaging experiments were performed using the fluorescent calcium indicator, fluo-4, and demonstrated that calcium permeates the nAChR channels located on pig RGCs. In other studies, the extracellular calcium concentration was altered to determine the effect on nicotine-induced neuroprotection. Results support the hypothesis that calcium is required for nicotine-induced neuroprotection in isolated pig RGCs. Lastly, studies were performed to analyze the effects of preconditioning on glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and neuroprotection. In these studies, a preconditioning dose of calcium was introduced to cells using a variety of mechanisms before a large glutamate insult was applied to cells. Results from these studies support the hypothesis that preconditioning cells with a relatively low level of calcium before

  2. Mechanism of calcium mitigating membrane fouling in submerged membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanmin; Xia, Jie; Yang, Yang; Wang, Zixing; Yang, Fenglin

    2009-01-01

    Two parallel membrane bioreactors (MBRs) were operated under different calcium dosages (168.5, 27 mg/L) to gain a better understanding of the mechanism of retarding membrane fouling by adding calcium. The results showed that the particle size of sludge flocs increased and the particle size distribution tended to be narrow at the optimum dosage (168.5 mg/L). Calcium was effective in decreasing loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS) in microbial flocs and soluble microbial products (SMP) in the supernatant at the dosage of 168.5 mg/L by strengthening the neutralization and bridging of EPS with flocs. Furthermore, the amount of CODs and CODc decreased in both the mixed liquor and the fouling cake layer on the membrane surface. In order to compare the filtration characteristics of cake layers from the MBRs with the two calcium dosages, the specific cake resistance and the compressibility coefficient were measured. The specific cake resistance from the MBR with optimum dosage (168.5 mg/L) was distinctly lower than that with low dosage (27 mg/L). The compressibility coefficient of the cake layers under two dosages were respectively attained as 0.65, 0.91. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and three-dimensional confocal scanning laser microscope analysis (CLSM) images were utilized to observe the gel layer directly. PMID:19862919

  3. Response of living cells to nanostructured polyelectrolyte matrices studied by means of 1-, 2-photon excitation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaspro, Alberto; Krol, Silke; Silvano, Daniela; Fronte, Paola; Cavalleri, Ornella; Chirico, Giuseppe; Beltrame, Francesco; Ramoino, Paola; Gliozzi, Alessandra

    2003-06-01

    Three-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and two-photon excitation microscopy (TPEM) were used to study the response of cellular systems to fuzzy organized nanostructured polyelectrolytes used both as microcontainers and microcarriers for drug delivery. These nanostructured systems are named Nanocapsules and represent a new class of controllable colloids. CLSM and TPEM uniquely allow to follow the fate of encapsulated living cells and to track the pathway of nanocapsules introduced into cellular systems. For the former situation, it will be shown how living cells can be encapsulated and demonstrated the preservation of the metabolic and duplicating activity. In this case the role of the Nanocapsule is as microcontainer endowed of functionalized surface and of protective ability. The latter situation, is related to feeding living cells with Nanocapsules. This experiment serves in elucidating the comprehension of the potential cytotoxicity and of the ability of Nanocapsules to reach specific targets where active compounds can be released. Cellular systems used within this research are Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Paramecium primaurelia living cells. In the case of encapsulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae living cells, the most relevant result is that, after encapsulation, cells preserve their metabolic activities and they are still able to divide. At this stage is also relevant the utilization of spectroscopic methods like fluorescence lifetime and second harmonic imaging. These hybrid polyelectrolyte-cells can provide a cheap model system in a wide range of biophysical and biotechnological applications, thanks to the tunable properties of the polyelectrolyte shell.

  4. Calcium signalling mediated by the 9 acetylcholine receptor in a cochlear cell line from the immortomouse.

    PubMed

    Jagger, D J; Griesinger, C B; Rivolta, M N; Holley, M C; Ashmore, J F

    2000-08-15

    1. We have investigated the characteristics of the alpha9 acetylcholine receptor (alpha9AChR) expressed in hair cell precursors in an immortalized cell line UB/OC-2 developed from the organ of Corti of the transgenic H-2Kb-tsA58 mouse (the Immortomouse) using both calcium imaging and whole-cell recording. 2. Ratiometric measurements of fura-2 fluorescence revealed an increase of intracellular calcium concentration in cells when challenged with 10 microM ACh. The calcium increase was seen in 66 % of the cells grown at 39 degrees C in differentiated conditions. A sm aller fraction (34%) of cells grown at 33 degrees C in proliferative con ditions responded. 3. Caffeine (10mM) elevated cell calcium. In the ab sence of caffeine, the majority of imaged cells responded only once to A Ch presentations. Pretreatment with caffeine ingibited all calcium respo nses to ACh. 4. In whole-cell tight-seal recordings 10 microM ACh activa ted inward current was dependent on the extracellular calcium concentrat ion with an estimated PCa/PNa of 80 for the alpha9 receptor at physiological calcium levels. 5 . The data indicate that ACh activates a calcium-permeable channel alpha 9AChR in UB/OC-2 cells and that the channel has a significantly higher c alcium permeability than other AChRs. The results indicate that the alp ha9AChR may be able to elevate intracellular calcium levels in hair cell s both directly and via store release. PMID:11011664

  5. Apatite Formation from Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Mixed Amorphous Calcium Phosphate/Amorphous Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Ibsen, Casper J S; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-08-22

    Crystallization from amorphous phases is an emerging pathway for making advanced materials. Biology has made use of amorphous precursor phases for eons and used them to produce structures with remarkable properties. Herein, we show how the design of the amorphous phase greatly influences the nanocrystals formed therefrom. We investigate the transformation of mixed amorphous calcium phosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate phases into bone-like nanocrystalline apatite using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The speciation of phosphate was controlled by pH to favor HPO4 (2-) . In a carbonate free system, the reaction produces anisotropic apatite crystallites with large aspect ratios. The first formed crystallites are highly calcium deficient and hydrogen phosphate rich, consistent with thin octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-like needles. During growth, the crystallites become increasingly stoichiometric, which indicates that the crystallites grow through addition of near-stoichiometric apatite to the OCP-like initial crystals through a process that involves either crystallite fusion/aggregation or Ostwald ripening. The mixed amorphous phases were found to be more stable against phase transformations, hence, the crystallization was inhibited. The resulting crystallites were smaller and less anisotropic. This is rationalized by the idea that a local phosphate-depletion zone formed around the growing crystal until it was surrounded by amorphous calcium carbonate, which stopped the crystallization. PMID:27460160

  6. The preparation of calcium superoxide from calcium peroxide diperoxyhydrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Wood, P. C.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.

    1977-01-01

    There is interest in solid materials containing a high percentage of stored oxygen for use in emergency breathing apparatus for miners and as auxiliary oxygen sources for astronauts. In theory, the amount of available oxygen in calcium superoxide, Ca(O2)2 is higher than in potassium superoxide, KO2, and its availability during use should be unhindered by the formation of a low melting and hydrous coating. The decomposition of solid calcium peroxide diperoxyhydrate, CaO2.2H2O2 has been studied, using an apparatus which allows good control of the critical reaction parameters. Samples have been prepared showing apparent superoxide contents in excess of those previously reported and higher than the theoretical 58.4% expected from a disproportionation reaction.

  7. Calcium signals and calcium channels in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.; Akanbi, K. A.; Farach-Carson, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) channels are present in non-excitable as well as in excitable cells. In bone cells of the osteoblast lineage, Ca2+ channels play fundamental roles in cellular responses to external stimuli including both mechanical forces and hormonal signals. They are also proposed to modulate paracrine signaling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts at local sites of bone remodeling. Calcium signals are characterized by transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with activation of intracellular signaling pathways that control cell behavior and phenotype, including patterns of gene expression. Development of Ca2+ signals is a tightly regulated cellular process that involves the concerted actions of plasma membrane and intracellular Ca2+ channels, along with Ca2+ pumps and exchangers. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge concerning the structure, function, and role of Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ signals in bone cells, focusing on the osteoblast.

  8. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  9. Regulation of Calcium signaling through spatial Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Aman; Ullah, Ghanim; Machaca, Khalid; Jung, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Calcium waves and signals in oocytes are produced and sustained by the release of Ca^2+ from the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) through clustered release channels. Changes in the spatial organization of calcium signaling effectors regulate the spatiotemporal features of the calcium signal as is e.g. observed during oocyte maturation. We report here how specific changes in the clustering of the calcium release channels in conjunction with physiologic alterations of other signaling effectors can affect a) the sensitivity of the signaling machinery to external factors, b) the time course of global intracellular signals and c), the speed and propagation range of intracellular calcium waves.

  10. Target-Cell Contact Activates a Highly Selective Capacitative Calcium Entry Pathway in Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zweifach, Adam

    2000-01-01

    Calcium influx is critical for T cell activation. Evidence has been presented that T cell receptor–stimulated calcium influx in helper T lymphocytes occurs via channels activated as a consequence of depletion of intracellular calcium stores, a mechanism known as capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE). However, two key questions have not been addressed. First, the mechanism of calcium influx in cytotoxic T cells has not been examined. While the T cell receptor–mediated early signals in helper and cytotoxic T cells are similar, the physiology of the cells is strikingly different, raising the possibility that the mechanism of calcium influx is also different. Second, contact of T cells with antigen-presenting cells or targets involves a host of intercellular interactions in addition to those between antigen–MHC and the T cell receptor. The possibility that calcium influx pathways in addition to those activated via the T cell receptor may be activated by contact with relevant cells has not been addressed. We have used imaging techniques to show that target-cell–stimulated calcium influx in CTLs occurs primarily through CCE. We investigated the permeability of the CTL influx pathway for divalent cations, and compared it to the permeability of CCE in Jurkat human leukemic T cells. CCE in CTLs shows a similar ability to discriminate between calcium, barium, and strontium as CCE in Jurkat human leukemic T lymphocytes, where CCE is likely to mediated by Ca2+ release–activated Ca2+ current (CRAC) channels, suggesting that CRAC channels also underlie CCE in CTLs. These results are the first determination of the mechanism of calcium influx in cytotoxic T cells and the first demonstration that cell contact–mediated calcium signals in T cells occur via depletion-activated channels. PMID:10662784

  11. Endotrophic Calcium, Strontium, and Barium Spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus1

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Harold F.; Foster, J. W.

    1966-01-01

    Foerster, Harold F. (The University of Texas, Austin), and J. W. Foster. Endotrophic calcium, strontium, and barium spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus. J. Bacteriol. 91:1333–1345. 1966.—Spores were produced by washed vegetative cells suspended in deionized water supplemented with CaCl2, SrCl2, or BaCl2. Normal, refractile spores were produced in each case; a portion of the barium spores lost refractility and darkened. Thin-section electron micrographs revealed no apparent anatomical differences among the three types of spores. Analyses revealed that the different spore types were enriched specifically in the metal to which they were exposed during sporogenesis. The calcium content of the strontium and the barium spores was very small. From binary equimolar mixtures of the metal salts, endotrophic spores accumulated both metals to nearly the same extent. Viability of the barium spores was considerably less than that of the other two types. Strontium and barium spores were heat-resistant; however, calcium was essential for maximal heat resistance. Significant differences existed in the rates of germination; calcium spores germinated fastest, strontium spores were slower, and barium spores were slowest. Calcium-barium and calcium-strontium spores germinated readily. Endotrophic calcium and strontium spores germinated without the prior heat activation essential for growth spores. Chemical germination of the different metal-type spores with n-dodecylamine took place at the same relative rates as physiological germination. Heat-induced release of dipicolinic acid occurred much faster with barium and strontium spores than with calcium spores. The washed “coat fraction” from disrupted spores contained little of the spore calcium but most of the spore barium. The metal in this fraction was released by dilute acid. The demineralized coats reabsorbed calcium and barium at neutral pH. Images PMID:4956334

  12. Effect of anions or foods on absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium salts in mice by pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yukari; Taira, Zenei

    2013-01-01

    We studied the absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium L-lactate in mice using pharmacokinetics, and reviewed the absolute bioavailability of calcium from three other calcium salts in mice previously studied: calcium chloride, calcium acetate, and calcium ascorbate. The results showed that calcium metabolism is linear between intravenous administration of 15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg, and is not affected by anions. Results after oral calcium administration of 150 mg/kg showed that the intestinal absorption process was significantly different among the four calcium salts. The rank of absolute bioavailability of calcium was calcium ascorbate > calcium L-lactate ≥ calcium acetate > calcium chloride. The mean residence time (MRTab) of calcium from calcium ascorbate (32.2 minutes) in the intestinal tract was much longer than that from calcium L-lactate (9.5 minutes), calcium acetate (15.0 minutes) and calcium chloride (13.6 minutes). Furthermore, the foods di-D-fructo-furanose-1,2′:2,3′-dianhydride, sudachi (Citrus sudachi) juice, and moromi-su (a Japanese vinegar) increased the absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium chloride by 2.46-fold, 2.86-fold, and 1.23-fold, respectively, and prolonged MRTab by 48.5 minutes, 43.1 minutes, and 44.9 minutes, respectively. In conclusion, the prolonged MRTab of calcium in the intestinal tract by anion or food might cause the increased absorbability of calcium.

  13. Stationary digital chest tomosynthesis for coronary artery calcium scoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gongting; Wang, Jiong; Potuzko, Marci; Harman, Allison; Pearce, Caleb; Shan, Jing; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    The coronary artery calcium score (CACS) measures the buildup of calcium on the coronary artery wall and has been shown to be an important predictor of the risk of coronary artery diseases (CAD). Currently CACS is measured using CT, though the relatively high cost and high radiation dose has limited its adoption as a routine screening procedure. Digital Chest Tomosynthesis (DCT), a low dose and low cost alternative to CT, and has been shown to achieve 90% of sensitivity of CT in lung disease screening. However commercial DCT requires long scanning time and cannot be adapted for high resolution gated cardiac imaging, necessary for CACS. The stationary DCT system (s- DCT), developed in our lab, has the potential to significantly shorten the scanning time and enables high resolution cardiac gated imaging. Here we report the preliminary results of using s-DCT to estimate the CACS. A phantom heart model was developed and scanned by the s-DCT system and a clinical CT in a phantom model with realistic coronary calcifications. The adapted fan-beam volume reconstruction (AFVR) method, developed specifically for stationary tomosynthesis systems, is used to obtain high resolution tomosynthesis images. A trained cardiologist segmented out the calcifications and the CACS was obtained. We observed a strong correlation between the tomosynthesis derived CACS and CT CACS (r2 = 0.88). Our results shows s-DCT imaging has the potential to estimate CACS, thus providing a possible low cost and low dose imaging protocol for screening and monitoring CAD.

  14. Substitution of calcium by strontium within selected calcium phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, E.; Hermes, C.; Nolting, H.-F.; Ryczek, J.

    1993-06-01

    Sr incorporation in the molecules of amorphous calcium phosphate, apatitic tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite, octacalcium phosphate and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate was investigated. The concentration of Sr ranged from 225 to 1010 μ g / g, i.e. it overlapped with the physiological range of Sr concentrations in human bone. The leading experimental technique was extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the Sr K edge. Results of these studies demonstrated the following: (1) Sr incorporation in the calcium phosphates is compound-dependent, (2) the coordination of incorporated Sr atoms in the Ca-P molecules is similar to that of Ca atoms, but interatomic distances are ≈0.015 nm larger, (3) in apatitic tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate lattices Sr atoms may occupy selected Ca sites, which was not the case for dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, (4) in the apatite lattice Sr atoms are coordinated by 6 PO 4 tetrahedrals and (5) EXAFS spectra at the K edge of the incorporated Sr may be used to distinguish the structures of amorphous calcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate as well as apatite and its derivatives (apatitic tricalcium phosphate, octacalcium phosphate).

  15. Vegetable Bitterness is Related to Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Tordoff, Michael G.; Sandell, Mari A.

    2009-01-01

    In the U.S. and Europe, most people do not consume the recommended amounts of either calcium or vegetables. We investigated whether there might be a connection; specifically, whether the taste of calcium in vegetables contributes to their bitterness and thus acceptability. We found a strong correlation between the calcium content of 24 vegetables, based on USDA Nutrient Database values, and bitterness, based on the average ratings of 35 people (r = 0.93). Correlations between the content of other nutrients and bitterness were lower and most were not statistically significant. To assess whether it is feasible that humans can detect calcium in vegetables we tested two animal models known to display a calcium appetite. Previous work indicates that calcium solutions are preferentially ingested by PWK/PhJ mice relative to C57BL/6J mice, and by rats deprived of dietary calcium relative to replete controls. In choice tests between collard greens, a high-calcium vegetable, and cabbage, a low-calcium vegetable, the calcium-favoring animals had higher preferences for collard greens than did controls. These observations raise the possibility that the taste of calcium contributes to the bitterness and thus acceptability of vegetables. PMID:19260165

  16. Vegetable bitterness is related to calcium content.

    PubMed

    Tordoff, Michael G; Sandell, Mari A

    2009-04-01

    In the U.S. and Europe, most people do not consume the recommended amounts of either calcium or vegetables. We investigated whether there might be a connection; specifically, whether the taste of calcium in vegetables contributes to their bitterness and thus acceptability. We found a strong correlation between the calcium content of 24 vegetables, based on USDA Nutrient Database values, and bitterness, based on the average ratings of 35 people (r = 0.93). Correlations between the content of other nutrients and bitterness were lower and most were not statistically significant. To assess whether it is feasible that humans can detect calcium in vegetables we tested two animal models known to display a calcium appetite. Previous work indicates that calcium solutions are preferentially ingested by PWK/PhJ mice relative to C57BL/6J mice, and by rats deprived of dietary calcium relative to replete controls. In choice tests between collard greens, a high-calcium vegetable, and cabbage, a low-calcium vegetable, the calcium-favoring animals had higher preferences for collard greens than did controls. These observations raise the possibility that the taste of calcium contributes to the bitterness and thus acceptability of vegetables. PMID:19260165

  17. Seasonal Variations in Mercury's Dayside Calcium Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer on the MESSENGER spacecraft has observed calcium emission in Mercury's exosphere on a near-daily basis since March 2011. During MESSENGER's primary and first extended missions (March 2011 - March 2013) the dayside calcium exosphere was measured over eight Mercury years. We have simulated these data with a Monte Carlo model of exospheric source processes to show that (a) there is a persistent source of energetic calcium located in the dawn equatorial region, (b) there is a seasonal dependence in the calcium source rate, and (c) there are no obvious year-to-year variations in the near-surface dayside calcium exosphere. Although the precise mechanism responsible for ejecting the calcium has not yet been determined, the most likely process is the dissociation of Ca-bearing molecules produced in micrometeoroid impact plumes to form energetic, escaping calcium atoms.

  18. Ways of calcium reabsorption in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Moor, Matthias B; Bonny, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    The role of the kidney in calcium homeostasis has been reshaped from a classic view in which the kidney was regulated by systemic calcitropic hormones such as vitamin D3 or parathyroid hormone to an organ actively taking part in the regulation of calcium handling. With the identification of the intrinsic renal calcium-sensing receptor feedback system, the regulation of paracellular calcium transport involving claudins, and new paracrine regulators such as klotho, the kidney has emerged as a crucial modulator not only of calciuria but also of calcium homeostasis. This review summarizes recent molecular and endocrine contributors to renal calcium handling and highlights the tight link between calcium and sodium reabsorption in the kidney. PMID:27009338

  19. [Effects of different form calcium on growth and tissue calcium level in rats].

    PubMed

    Xu, Q; Yin, S A; Hu, S; Zhao, X; Meng, J; Ge, K Y

    1997-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of calcium deficiency and to look for economic and efficient source of calcium, the effects of calcium carbonate, active calcium and calcium lactate on growth, development and tissue calcium level in rats were compared. Fifty-six 3-week old weaning rats were fed with calcium deficient diet (containing vitamin D 500 IU per kg diet) for 3 weeks, and then were divided into four groups randomly with 14 rats in each group, half male and half female. The diet of control group (A) was the basic diet, while the three experiment diets were supplemented with calcium carbonate (B), active calcium (C) and calcium lactate (D) (3000 mg calcium per kg diet), respectively. The experiment term was 12 weeks. The results showed that the body weight and length of calcium supplemented group were significantly higher than that of control group (P<0.05). Among the calcium supplemented groups, no significant differences were observed except the difference of body length between the group D and the group A in female. Calcium deficiency dramatically hindered the development with reduced dietary intake and decreased food consumption efficiency. The calcium levels in plasma, red blood cells and liver were significantly higher in the supplemented groups than that in the control group (P<0.05), however, there was no difference among the supplemented groups. No significant difference of calcium levels in muscle and heart was observed among all groups. Based on needs for reaching the RDA with additional 400 mg/d from present calcium status in Chinese population, the calcium carbonate is the most economic one and the ideal calcium source for supplementation. PMID:15747462

  20. Precipitation in a lead calcium tin anode

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Gonzalez, Francisco A.; Camurri, Carlos G.; Carrasco, Claudia A.; Colas, Rafael

    2012-02-15

    Samples from a hot rolled sheet of a tin and calcium bearing lead alloy were solution heat treated at 300 Degree-Sign C and cooled down to room temperature at different rates; these samples were left at room temperature to study natural precipitation of CaSn{sub 3} particles. The samples were aged for 45 days before analysing their microstructure, which was carried out in a scanning electron microscope using secondary and backscattered electron detectors. Selected X-ray spectra analyses were conducted to verify the nature of the precipitates. Images were taken at different magnifications in both modes of observation to locate the precipitates and record their position within the images and calculate the distance between them. Differential scanning calorimeter analyses were conducted on selected samples. It was found that the mechanical properties of the material correlate with the minimum average distance between precipitates, which is related to the average cooling rate from solution heat treatment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distance between precipitates in a lead alloy is recorded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relationship between the distance and the cooling rate is established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is found that the strengthening of the alloy depends on the distance between precipitates.

  1. [Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease].

    PubMed

    Koitschev, C; Kaiserling, E; Koitschev, A

    2003-08-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) of the temporomandibular joint is rare. The disorder is characterized by the presence of crystal deposits within the affected joint. The deposition of crystals in adjacent soft tissue may lead to the formation of pseudotumors. This form of the disease is called tophaceous pseudogout and typically affects the temporomandibular joint. It is difficult to differentiate the disease, particularly from malignant tumors, on the clinical and radiographic findings alone. The diagnosis is based on histological identification of the calcium pyrophosphate crystals. We present an unusually advanced case of tophaceous pseudogout of the temporomandibular joint. The etiology, clinical and diagnostic criteria as well as treatment options are discussed on the basis of our own experience and a review of the literature. PMID:12942180

  2. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2012-04-01

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this potential role, microscopic and biochemical comparisons were conducted on the different tissues of Medicago truncatula wild-type and the calcium oxalate defective (cod) 5 which lacks the ability to accumulate prismatic crystals in the cells adjacent to the vascular bundles. Calcium measurements showed that cod5 seeds had more calcium and cod5 pods contained less calcium than the corresponding wild-type tissues. Roots, stems, and leaves from cod5 and wild-type had similar calcium content. Although cod5 was devoid of prismatic crystals, cod5 pods were observed to form druse crystals of calcium oxalate not found in wild-type pods. Taken together these findings suggest a functional role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport to the seeds. Regulating calcium uptake at the roots also appeared to be another point of control in determining seed calcium content. Overall, regulating the long distance transport and partitioning of calcium to the seeds appears to be a complex process with multiple points of control. PMID:22325887

  3. Simulation strategies for calcium microdomains and calcium-regulated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    von Wegner, Frederic; Wieder, Nicolas; Fink, Rainer H A

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present an overview of simulation strategies in the context of subcellular domains where calcium-dependent signaling plays an important role. The presentation follows the spatial and temporal scales involved and represented by each algorithm. As an exemplary cell type, we will mainly cite work done on striated muscle cells, i.e. skeletal and cardiac muscle. For these cells, a wealth of ultrastructural, biophysical and electrophysiological data is at hand. Moreover, these cells also express ubiquitous signaling pathways as they are found in many other cell types and thus, the generalization of the methods and results presented here is straightforward.The models considered comprise the basic calcium signaling machinery as found in most excitable cell types including Ca(2+) ions, diffusible and stationary buffer systems, and calcium regulated calcium release channels. Simulation strategies can be differentiated in stochastic and deterministic algorithms. Historically, deterministic approaches based on the macroscopic reaction rate equations were the first models considered. As experimental methods elucidated highly localized Ca(2+) signaling events occurring in femtoliter volumes, stochastic methods were increasingly considered. However, detailed simulations of single molecule trajectories are rarely performed as the computational cost implied is too large. On the mesoscopic level, Gillespie's algorithm is extensively used in the systems biology community and with increasing frequency also in models of microdomain calcium signaling. To increase computational speed, fast approximations were derived from Gillespie's exact algorithm, most notably the chemical Langevin equation and the τ-leap algorithm. Finally, in order to integrate deterministic and stochastic effects in multiscale simulations, hybrid algorithms are increasingly used. These include stochastic models of ion channels combined with deterministic descriptions of the calcium buffering

  4. Kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate formation from tricalcium aluminate, calcium sulfate and calcium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuerun Zhang, Yu; Shen, Xiaodong Wang, Qianqian; Pan, Zhigang

    2014-01-15

    The formation kinetics of tricalcium aluminate (C{sub 3}A) and calcium sulfate yielding calcium sulfoaluminate (C{sub 4}A{sub 3}$) and the decomposition kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate were investigated by sintering a mixture of synthetic C{sub 3}A and gypsum. The quantitative analysis of the phase composition was performed by X-ray powder diffraction analysis using the Rietveld method. The results showed that the formation reaction 3Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} + CaSO{sub 4} → Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}(SO{sub 4}) + 6CaO was the primary reaction < 1350 °C with and activation energy of 231 ± 42 kJ/mol; while the decomposition reaction 2Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}(SO{sub 4}) + 10CaO → 6Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} + 2SO{sub 2} ↑ + O{sub 2} ↑ primarily occurred beyond 1350 °C with an activation energy of 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. The optimal formation region for C{sub 4}A{sub 3}$ was from 1150 °C to 1350 °C and from 6 h to 1 h, which could provide useful information on the formation of C{sub 4}A{sub 3}$ containing clinkers. The Jander diffusion model was feasible for the formation and decomposition of calcium sulfoaluminate. Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} were the diffusive species in both the formation and decomposition reactions. -- Highlights: •Formation and decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate were studied. •Decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate combined CaO and yielded C{sub 3}A. •Activation energy for formation was 231 ± 42 kJ/mol. •Activation energy for decomposition was 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. •Both the formation and decomposition were controlled by diffusion.

  5. The absence of an early calcium response to heavy-ion radiation in Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Guanghua; Fischer, Bernd E; Voss, Kay-O; Becker, Gudrun; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Kraft, Gerhard; Thiel, Gerhard

    2008-09-01

    Intracellular calcium is an important second messenger that regulates many cell functions. Recent studies have shown that calcium ions can also regulate the cellular responses to ionizing radiation. However, previous data are restricted to cells treated with low-LET radiations (X rays, gamma rays and beta particles). In this work, we investigated the calcium levels in cells exposed to heavy-ion radiation of high LET. The experiments were performed at the single ion hit facility of the GSI heavy-ion microprobe. Using a built-in online calcium imaging system, the intracellular calcium concentrations were examined in HeLa cells and human foreskin fibroblast AG1522-D cells before and after irradiation with 4.8 MeV/nucleon carbon or argon ions. Although the experiment was sensitive enough to detect the calcium response to other known stimuli, no response to heavy-ion radiation was found in these two cell types. We also found that heavy-ion radiation has no impact on calcium oscillation induced by hypoxia stress in fibroblast cells. PMID:18763861

  6. Synthesis, characterization, and mineralization of polyamide-6/calcium lactate composite nanofibers for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Pant, Hem Raj; Risal, Prabodh; Park, Chan Hee; Tijing, Leonard D; Jeong, Yeon Jun; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2013-02-01

    Polyamide-6 nanofibers containing calcium lactate (CL) on their surface were prepared by neutralization of lactic acid (LA) in core-shell structured polyamide-6/LA electrospun fibers. First, simple blending of LA with polyamide-6 solution was used for electrospinning which interestingly formed a thin LA layer around polyamide-6 nanofibers (core-shell structure) and then subsequent conversion of this LA into calcium lactate via neutralization using calcium base. FE-SEM and TEM images revealed that plasticizer capacity of LA led the formation of point-bonded structure due to the formation of shell layer of LA and core of polyamide-6. The bone formation ability of polyamide-6/calcium lactate composite fibers was evaluated by incubating in biomimetic simulated body fluid (SBF). The SBF incubation test confirmed the faster deposition of large amount of calcium phosphate around the composite polyamide-6/calcium lactate fibers compared to pristine polyamide-6. This study demonstrated a simple post electrospinning calcium compound coating technique of polymeric nanofibers for enhancing the bone biocompatibility of polyamide-6 fibers. PMID:23006560

  7. Inhibition of Peripheral Nerve Scarring by Calcium Antagonists, Also Known as Calcium Channel Blockers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jin-Wei; Jiao, Jian-Bao; Liu, Xiao-Feng; Jiang, Yuan-Tao; Yang, Guang; Li, Chun-Yu; Yin, Wei-Tian; Ling, Li

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the impact of calcium channel blockers (verapamil) on the formation of scars in the sciatic nerve anastomosis after peripheral nerve injury. One hundred twenty healthy, male Sprague-Dawley rats were selected and prepared with right sciatic nerve injury for this study. Samples were selected at the fourth and 12th weeks, respectively, after treatment and observations were made on the nerve anastomosis healing and diameter. Image analysis and statistical processing were carried out relating to the results of the study. The diameter of the anastomosis of the treatment group at weeks 4 and 12 was noticeably smaller than the control group (P < 0.05). In the treatment group at week 4, there were many vesicles observed in the fibroblasts' cytosol and in the control group, the fibroblasts exhibited high number of rough endoplasmic reticulum. The collagen content of the nerve scarring at week 12 in the treatment group was apparently less than the control group (P < 0.01). The calcium channel blocker (verapamil) reduced the axon resistance through the anastomosis during nerve regeneration. It can effectively inhibit the formation of scarring from nerve injury. It also provided an excellent microenvironment for the regeneration of nerve fibers. PMID:26488333

  8. —Part I. Interaction of Calcium and Copper-Calcium Alloy with Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikov, Yurii P.; Batukhtin, Victor P.; Shurov, Nikolay I.; Ivanovskii, Leonid E.; Suzdaltsev, Andrey V.

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the interaction between calcium and molten CaCl2 and the solubility of calcium in this melt, depending on the calcium content in the copper-calcium alloy that comes in contact with the molten CaCl2. The negative influence of the dissolved calcium on the current efficiency was verified. The negative effects of moisture and CaO impurities on the calcium current efficiency were demonstrated. The dependence of the current efficiency and the purity of the metal obtained by the electrolysis conditions were studied in a laboratory electrolyzer (20 to 80 A).

  9. The Role of Calcium in Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient that is necessary for many functions in human health. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body with 99% found in teeth and bone. Only 1% is found in serum. The serum calcium level is tightly monitored to remain within normal range by a complex metabolic process. Calcium metabolism involves other nutrients including protein, vitamin D, and phosphorus. Bone formation and maintenance is a lifelong process. Early attention to strong bones in childhood and adulthood will provide more stable bone mass during the aging years. Research has shown that adequate calcium intake can reduce the risk of fractures, osteoporosis, and diabetes in some populations. The dietary requirements of calcium and other collaborative nutrients vary slightly around the world. Lactose intolerance due to lactase deficiency is a common cause of low calcium intake. Strategies will be discussed for addressing this potential barrier to adequate intake. The purpose of this narrative review is a) to examine the role of calcium in human health, b) to compare nutrient requirements for calcium across lifecycle groups and global populations, c) to review relationships between calcium intake, chronic disease risk, and fractures, and d) to discuss strategies to address diet deficiencies and lactose intolerance. PMID:25713787

  10. The role of calcium in human aging.

    PubMed

    Beto, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient that is necessary for many functions in human health. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body with 99% found in teeth and bone. Only 1% is found in serum. The serum calcium level is tightly monitored to remain within normal range by a complex metabolic process. Calcium metabolism involves other nutrients including protein, vitamin D, and phosphorus. Bone formation and maintenance is a lifelong process. Early attention to strong bones in childhood and adulthood will provide more stable bone mass during the aging years. Research has shown that adequate calcium intake can reduce the risk of fractures, osteoporosis, and diabetes in some populations. The dietary requirements of calcium and other collaborative nutrients vary slightly around the world. Lactose intolerance due to lactase deficiency is a common cause of low calcium intake. Strategies will be discussed for addressing this potential barrier to adequate intake. The purpose of this narrative review is a) to examine the role of calcium in human health, b) to compare nutrient requirements for calcium across lifecycle groups and global populations, c) to review relationships between calcium intake, chronic disease risk, and fractures, and d) to discuss strategies to address diet deficiencies and lactose intolerance. PMID:25713787

  11. Rapid screening assay for calcium bioavailability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Luhrsen, K.R.; Hudepohl, G.R.; Smith, K.T.

    1986-03-01

    Calcium bioavailability has been studied by numerous techniques. The authors report here the use of the gamma emitting isotope of calcium (/sup 47/Ca) in a whole body retention assay system. In this system, calcium sources are administered by oral gavage and subsequent counts are determined and corrected for isotopic decay. Unlike iron and zinc retention curves, which exhibit a 2-3 day equilibration period, calcium reaches equilibration after 24 hours. Autoradiographic analysis of the femurs indicate that the newly absorbed calcium is rapidly distributed to the skeletal system. Moreover, the isotope is distributed along the entire bone. Comparisons of calcium bioavailability were made using intrinsic/extrinsic labeled milk from two species i.e. rat and goat as well as CaCO/sub 3/. In addition, extrinsic labeled cow milk was examined. In the rat, the extrinsic labeled calcium from milk was better absorbed than the intrinsic calcium. This was not the case in goat milk or the calcium carbonate which exhibited no significant differences. Chromatographic analysis of the labeled milk indicates a difference in distribution of the /sup 47/Ca. From these data, the authors recommend the use of this assay system in calcium bioavailability studies. The labeling studies and comparisons indicate caution should be used, however, in labeling techniques and species milk comparison.

  12. Assessment of calcium intake by adolescents

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Cristiane Franco; da Silveira, Carla Rosane; Beghetto, Mariur; de Mello, Paula Daniel; de Mello, Elza Daniel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the daily calcium intake of adolescents in schools from Chapecó, Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil, to check if calcium intake is in accordance with the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI), and to investigate variables associated with daily calcium intake. METHODS: Cross-sectional study approved by the Institutional Review Board and developed in 2010. Students of the 8th grade completed questionnaires with personal data and questions about the calcium-rich foods intake frequency. In order to compare students with adequate (1300mg) or inadequate intake of calcium/day (<1300mg), parametric and nonparametric tests were used. RESULTS: A total of 214 students with a mean age of 14.3±1.0 years were enrolled. The median daily calcium intake was 540mg (interquartile range - IQ: 312-829mg) and only 25 students (11.7%) had calcium intake within the recommendations of the DRI for age. Soft drink consumption ≥3 times/week was associated with a lower intake of calcium. CONCLUSIONS: Few students ingested adequate levels of calcium for the age group. It is necessary to develop a program to encourage a greater intake of calcium-rich foods in adolescence. PMID:25119753

  13. The Role of Calcium in Osteoporosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, C. D.; Sanchez, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Calcium requirements may vary throughout the lifespan. During the growth years and up to age 25 to 30, it is important to maximize dietary intake of calcium to maintain positive calcium balance and achieve peak bone mass, thereby possibly decreasing the risk of fracture when bone is subsequently lost. Calcium intake need not be greater than 800 mg/day during the relatively short period of time between the end of bone building and the onset of bone loss (30 to 40 years). Starting at age 40 to 50, both men and women lose bone slowly, but women lose bone more rapidly around the menopause and for about 10 years after. Intestinal calcium absorption and the ability to adapt to low calcium diets are impaired in many postmenopausal women and elderly persons owing to a suspected functional or absolute decrease in the ability of the kidney to produce 1,25(OH)2D2. The bones then become more and more a source of calcium to maintain critical extracellular fluid calcium levels. Excessive dietary intake of protein and fiber may induce significant negative calcium balance and thus increase dietary calcium requirements. Generally, the strongest risk factors for osteoporosis are uncontrollable (e.g., sex, age, and race) or less controllable (e.g., disease and medications). However, several factors such as diet, physical activity, cigarette smoking, and alcohol use are lifestyle related and can be modified to help reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

  14. Calcium Oxalate Stones Are Frequently Found Attached to Randall's Plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlaga, Brian R.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.; Lingeman, James E.

    2007-04-01

    The exact mechanisms of the crystallization processes that occur during the formation of calcium oxalate calculi are controversial. Over six decades ago, Alexander Randall reported on a series of cadaveric renal units in which he observed calcium salt deposits on the tips of the renal papilla. Randall hypothesized that these deposits, eponymously termed Randall's plaque, would be the ideal site for stone formation, and indeed in a number of specimens he noted small stones attached to the papillae. With the recent advent of digital endoscopic imaging and micro computerized tomography (CT) technology, it is now possible to inspect the renal papilla of living, human stone formers and to study the attached stone with greater scrutiny.

  15. Calcium Oxalate Stones Are Frequently Found Attached to Randall's Plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Matlaga, Brian R.

    2007-04-05

    The exact mechanisms of the crystallization processes that occur during the formation of calcium oxalate calculi are controversial. Over six decades ago, Alexander Randall reported on a series of cadaveric renal units in which he observed calcium salt deposits on the tips of the renal papilla. Randall hypothesized that these deposits, eponymously termed Randall's plaque, would be the ideal site for stone formation, and indeed in a number of specimens he noted small stones attached to the papillae. With the recent advent of digital endoscopic imaging and micro computerized tomography (CT) technology, it is now possible to inspect the renal papilla of living, human stone formers and to study the attached stone with greater scrutiny.

  16. Investigating calcium polyphosphate addition to a conventional calcium phosphate cement for bone-interfacing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krausher, Jennifer Lynn

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are of great interest in bone regeneration applications because of their biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and as delivery vehicles for therapeutics; however, delivery applications have been limited by adverse interactions between therapeutics and the cement setting reaction. Amorphous calcium polyphosphate (CPP) yields a biodegradable material with a demonstrated drug delivery capacity following appropriate processing. The incorporation of drug-loaded CPP into a CPC is under consideration as a method of minimizing adverse interactions and extending drug release. This thesis represents the first investigation into the effects of CPP addition on the properties, setting and antibiotic release profile of a conventional apatitic calcium phosphate cement. As-made, gelled and vancomycin-loaded CPP particulate were added to the powder component of a conventional dicalcium phosphate/tetracalcium phosphate CPC. The setting behaviour, set properties and microstructure of the resulting CPP-CPCs were evaluated with setting time testing (Gilmore needle method), pH testing, mechanical testing, SEM imaging, XRD and FTIR analysis. In vitro degradation and elution behaviour were evaluated by monitoring calcium release (atomic absorbance spectroscopy), mechanical strength and vancomycin release (UV-visual spectrophotometry). CPP addition was found to increase the setting time, reduce the mechanical strength and inhibit the conversion of the CPC starting powders to the set apatitic phase. The most likely mechanism for the observed effect of CPP addition was the adsorption of polyphosphate chains on the particle surfaces, which would inhibit the dissolution of the starting powders and the conversion of apatite precursor phases to apatite, leading to reduced mechanical properties. The detrimental effects of CPP were reduced by limiting the CPP fraction to less than a few weight per cent and increasing the size of the CPP particulate. CPP

  17. The Risks and Benefits of Calcium Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Min

    2015-01-01

    The association between calcium supplementation and adverse cardiovascular events has recently become a topic of debate due to the publication of two epidemiological studies and one meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. The reports indicate that there is a significant increase in adverse cardiovascular events following supplementation with calcium; however, a number of experts have raised several issues with these reports such as inconsistencies in attempts to reproduce the findings in other populations and questions concerning the validity of the data due to low compliance, biases in case ascertainment, and/or a lack of adjustment. Additionally, the Auckland Calcium Study, the Women's Health Initiative, and many other studies included in the meta-analysis obtained data from calcium-replete subjects and it is not clear whether the same risk profile would be observed in populations with low calcium intakes. Dietary calcium intake varies widely throughout the world and it is especially low in East Asia, although the risk of cardiovascular events is less prominent in this region. Therefore, clarification is necessary regarding the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular events following calcium supplementation and whether this relationship can be generalized to populations with low calcium intakes. Additionally, the skeletal benefits from calcium supplementation are greater in subjects with low calcium intakes and, therefore, the risk-benefit ratio of calcium supplementation is likely to differ based on the dietary calcium intake and risks of osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases of various populations. Further studies investigating the risk-benefit profiles of calcium supplementation in various populations are required to develop population-specific guidelines for individuals of different genders, ages, ethnicities, and risk profiles around the world. PMID:25827454

  18. Vasopressin regulates renal calcium excretion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hanouna, Guillaume; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Baud, Laurent; Letavernier, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Antidiuretic hormone or arginine vasopressin (AVP) increases water reabsorption in the collecting ducts of the kidney. Three decades ago, experimental models have shown that AVP may increase calcium reabsorption in rat kidney. The objective of this study was to assess whether AVP modulates renal calcium excretion in humans. We analyzed calcium, potassium, and sodium fractional excretion in eight patients affected by insipidus diabetes (nephrogenic or central) under acute vasopressin receptor agonist action and in 10 patients undergoing oral water load test affected or not by inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Synthetic V2 receptor agonist (dDAVP) reduced significantly calcium fractional excretion from 1.71% to 0.58% (P < 0.05) in patients with central diabetes insipidus. In patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (resistant to AVP), calcium fractional excretion did not change significantly after injection (0.48–0.68%, P = NS). In normal subjects undergoing oral water load test, calcium fractional excretion increased significantly from 1.02% to 2.54% (P < 0.05). Patients affected by SIADH had a high calcium fractional excretion at baseline that remained stable during test from 3.30% to 3.33% (P = NS), possibly resulting from a reduced calcium absorption in renal proximal tubule. In both groups, there was a significant correlation between urine output and calcium renal excretion. In humans, dDAVP decreases calcium fractional excretion in the short term. Conversely, water intake, which lowers AVP concentration, increases calcium fractional excretion. The correlation between urine output and calcium excretion suggests that AVP-related antidiuresis increases calcium reabsorption in collecting ducts. PMID:26620256

  19. Individual aggregates of amyloid beta induce temporary calcium influx through the cell membrane of neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Drews, Anna; Flint, Jennie; Shivji, Nadia; Jönsson, Peter; Wirthensohn, David; De Genst, Erwin; Vincke, Cécile; Muyldermans, Serge; Dobson, Chris; Klenerman, David

    2016-01-01

    Local delivery of amyloid beta oligomers from the tip of a nanopipette, controlled over the cell surface, has been used to deliver physiological picomolar oligomer concentrations to primary astrocytes or neurons. Calcium influx was observed when as few as 2000 oligomers were delivered to the cell surface. When the dosing of oligomers was stopped the intracellular calcium returned to basal levels or below. Calcium influx was prevented by the presence in the pipette of the extracellular chaperone clusterin, which is known to selectively bind oligomers, and by the presence a specific nanobody to amyloid beta. These data are consistent with individual oligomers larger than trimers inducing calcium entry as they cross the cell membrane, a result supported by imaging experiments in bilayers, and suggest that the initial molecular event that leads to neuronal damage does not involve any cellular receptors, in contrast to work performed at much higher oligomer concentrations. PMID:27553885

  20. Loss of proliferative calcium dependence: simple in vitro indicator of tumorigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Swierenga, S H; Whitfield, J F; Karasaki, S

    1978-01-01

    The proliferative activities of three lines of "normal" epithelioid rat liver cells and six tumorigenic liver cell lines in the presence of a wide range of calcium concentrations were measured by a simple colony forming assay. The proliferative activities of the normal cells and, to a lesser extent, of the cells of a marginally tumorigenic line were directly proportional to the extracellular calcium concentration. The proliferative activities of the cells of the strongly tumorigenic lines, on the other hand, were either uninfluenced by or inversely proportional to the extracellular calcium concentration. Thus, the proliferative response to the extracellular calcium concentration is a sensitive indicator of the carcinogenic potential of liver cells. Images PMID:282624