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Sample records for 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive

  1. 1,3-Diethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid as an alternative coinitiator for acidic photopolymerizable dental materials.

    PubMed

    Münchow, Eliseu A; Valente, Lisia L; Peralta, Sonia L; Fernández, María Raquel; Lima, Giana da S; Petzhold, Cesar L; Piva, Evandro; Ogliari, Fabrício A

    2013-10-01

    The ethyl-4-dimethylaminobenzoate (EDAB) is widely used as a coinitiator of the camphorquinone (CQ), but in acidic circumstances it might present some instability, reducing the polymerization efficiency of the material. Considering this, new coinitiators are being evaluated. Hence, this study evaluated the kinetic of polymerization (KP), the degree of conversion (DC), and the rate of polymerization (RP ) of experimental resin adhesives containing 1,3-diethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid (TBA) as a coinitiator of the CQ. The experimental monomeric blend was prepared with bisphenol A glycidyl dimethacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and acidic monomers. CQ was added at 1 mol % as photoinitiator. Six groups were formulated: four containing concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2 mol % of TBA, one without coinitiator, and the last one containing 1 mol % of EDAB (control group). The KP and the RP were performed using real-time Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy. The group without coinitiator has not formed a polymer, whereas the addition of TBA resulted in the conversion of monomers in polymer. The DC of the adhesives was as higher as the increase in the TBA content. The group with 2 mol % of TBA presented improved DC and reactivity (RP ) than the other groups and the control one. Hence, the TBA has performed as a coinitiator of the CQ for the radical polymerization of methacrylate resin adhesives and it has improved the DC and the reactivity of the materials. Thus, it is a potential coinitiator for the photopolymerization of dental materials. PMID:23564499

  2. Spectrophotometric method for the determination of sorbic acid in various food samples with iron(III) and 2-thiobarbituric acid as reagents.

    PubMed

    Lau, O W; Luk, S F; Lam, R K

    1989-02-01

    A simple, rapid and accurate spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of sorbic acid in various food samples based on the oxidation of sorbic acid by iron(III) at 100 degrees C to malonaldehyde, which then reacts with 2-thiobarbituric acid to form a reddish brown product. The optimum experimental conditions for colour development have been assessed. Absorbance measurements were made at 529 nm in the presence of 0.4% m/V citric acid. The calibration graph was linear for 0-6 micrograms ml-1 of sorbic acid with a slope of 0.131 A micrograms-1 ml. The recoveries of sorbic acid at concentrations of 164-557 micrograms ml-1 ranged from 96 to 103%. The relative standard deviations of ten replicate determinations of sorbic acid in a synthetic cream soda sample spiked with 573 micrograms ml-1 of sorbic acid and in an onion juice sample containing 82 micrograms ml-1 of sorbic acid were 1.6 and 1.9%, respectively. Interferences from several common food additives can be minimised by extracting sorbic acid with diethyl ether and then back-extracting the acid with sodium hydrogen carbonate. The method has been applied successfully to the determination of sorbic acid in a wide range of food samples including beverages, cake, cake mate, garlic bread sprinkle, onion juice, oyster flavoured sauce and grenadine syrup. PMID:2712320

  3. Fluorometric Determination of a 1,3-Diethyl-2-thiobarbituric Acid-Malondialdehyde Adduct as an Index of Lipid Peroxidation in Plant Materials.

    PubMed

    Suda, I; Furuta, S; Nishiba, Y

    1994-01-01

    A fluorometric method has been developed to measure a 1,3-diethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid (DETBA)-malondialdehyde (MDA) adduct as an index of lipid peroxidation in plant materials. Plant tissue samples were prepared under nitrogen gas and then added to an assay system containing butylated hydroxytoluene. Following the reaction between DETBA and the plant tissue samples, the DETBA-MDA adduct was extracted with ethyl acetate and measured by spectrofluorometry or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a fluorescence detector. The species of influencing substances with spectrofluorometry were fewer and their interfering concentration was higher than that by traditional colorimetry. When this method was applied to plant materials, the detection limits for the DETBA-MDA adduct were 2.5 nmol/g of fresh weight and 0.0625 nmol/g of fresh weight by spectrofluorometry and HPLC with a fluorescence detector, respectively. Using this sensitive, specific and simple fluorometric method, DETBA-MDA adducts ranging from 0.8 to 18.0 pmol/g of fresh weight could easily be detected from vegetables, fruits, and potatoes. PMID:27315698

  4. First outer-sphere 1,3-diethyl-2-thiobarbituric compounds [M(H2O)6](1,3-diethyl-2-thiobarbiturate)2·2H2O (M = Co2+, Ni2+): Crystal structure, spectroscopic and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnev, Nicolay N.; Molokeev, Maxim S.; Lesnikov, Maxim K.; Atuchin, Victor V.

    2016-06-01

    Two new d-element compounds, [Co(H2O)6](Detba)2·2H2O (1) and [Ni(H2O)6](Detba)2·2H2O (2) (HDetba - 1,3-diethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid) were synthesized and characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction analysis, TG-DSC and FT-IR. Structural analysis revealed that (1) and (2) are discrete structures, in which M2+ ion (M = Co, Ni) is six-coordinated by water molecules and it forms an octahedron. The outer-sphere Detba- ions and H2O molecules participate in Osbnd H⋯(O/S) intermolecular hydrogen bonds which form the 2D layer. Thermal decomposition includes the stage of dehydration and the following stage of oxidation of Detba- with a release of CO2, SO2, H2O, NH3 and isocyanate gases.

  5. Rosacea, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Azelaic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Rosacea is a common skin condition thought to be primarily an inflammatory disorder. Neutrophils, in particular, have been implicated in the inflammation associated with rosacea and mediate many of their effects through the release of reactive oxygen species. Recently, the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathophysiology of rosacea has been recognized. Many effective agents for rosacea, including topical azelaic acid and topical metronidazole, have anti-inflammatory properties. in-vitro models have demonstrated the potent antioxidant effects of azelaic acid, providing a potential mechanistic explanation for its efficacy in the treatment of rosacea. PMID:20967185

  6. Reactive solute transport in acidic streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of Ph and concentrations of toxic metals in streams affected by acid mine drainage are the result of the interplay of physical and biogeochemical processes. This paper describes a reactive solute transport model that provides a physically and thermodynamically quantitative interpretation of these profiles. The model combines a transport module that includes advection-dispersion and transient storage with a geochemical speciation module based on MINTEQA2. Input to the model includes stream hydrologic properties derived from tracer-dilution experiments, headwater and lateral inflow concentrations analyzed in field samples, and a thermodynamic database. Simulations reproduced the general features of steady-state patterns of observed pH and concentrations of aluminum and sulfate in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream near Leadville, Colorado. These patterns were altered temporarily by injection of sodium carbonate into the stream. A transient simulation reproduced the observed effects of the base injection.

  7. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  8. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  9. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  10. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  11. AMELIORATION OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE USING REACTIVE MIXTURES IN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The generation and release of acidic drainage from mine wastes is an environmental problem of international scale. The use of zero-valent iron and/or iron mixtures in subsurface Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRB) presents a possible passive alternative for remediating acidic grou...

  12. Reactive Distillation for Esterification of Bio-based Organic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Nathan; Miller, Dennis J.; Asthana, Navinchandra S.; Kolah, Aspi K.; Vu, Dung; Lira, Carl T.

    2008-09-23

    The following is the final report of the three year research program to convert organic acids to their ethyl esters using reactive distillation. This report details the complete technical activities of research completed at Michigan State University for the period of October 1, 2003 to September 30, 2006, covering both reactive distillation research and development and the underlying thermodynamic and kinetic data required for successful and rigorous design of reactive distillation esterification processes. Specifically, this project has led to the development of economical, technically viable processes for ethyl lactate, triethyl citrate and diethyl succinate production, and on a larger scale has added to the overall body of knowledge on applying fermentation based organic acids as platform chemicals in the emerging biorefinery. Organic acid esters constitute an attractive class of biorenewable chemicals that are made from corn or other renewable biomass carbohydrate feedstocks and replace analogous petroleum-based compounds, thus lessening U.S. dependence on foreign petroleum and enhancing overall biorefinery viability through production of value-added chemicals in parallel with biofuels production. Further, many of these ester products are candidates for fuel (particularly biodiesel) components, and thus will serve dual roles as both industrial chemicals and fuel enhancers in the emerging bioeconomy. The technical report from MSU is organized around the ethyl esters of four important biorenewables-based acids: lactic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and propionic acid. Literature background on esterification and reactive distillation has been provided in Section One. Work on lactic acid is covered in Sections Two through Five, citric acid esterification in Sections Six and Seven, succinic acid in Section Eight, and propionic acid in Section Nine. Section Ten covers modeling of ester and organic acid vapor pressure properties using the SPEAD (Step Potential

  13. Reactivity of the cadmium ion in concentrated phosphoric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    De Gyves, J; Gonzales, J; Louis, C; Bessiere, J

    1989-07-01

    The solvation transfer coefficients which characterize the changes of ion reactivity with phosphoric acid concentration have been calculated for cadmium from the constants of the successive chloride complexes, and for silver and diethyldithiophosphate from potentiometric measurements. They evidence the strong desolvation of the cadmium species in concentrated phosphoric acid media, causing a remarkable increase of its reactivity. They allow the results of liquid-liquid extraction, precipitation and flotation reactions to be correctly interpreted and their changes to be foreseen when the reagents are modified. PMID:18964794

  14. Amino acid decarboxylations produced by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls in amino acid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; León, M Mercedes; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-10-15

    The formation of 2-phenylethylamine and phenylacetaldehyde in mixtures of phenylalanine, a lipid oxidation product, and a second amino acid was studied to determine the role of the second amino acid in the degradation of phenylalanine produced by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls. The presence of the second amino acid usually increased the formation of the amine and reduced the formation of the Strecker aldehyde. The reasons for this behaviour seem to be related to the α-amino group and the other functional groups (mainly amino or similar groups) present in the side-chain of the amino acid. These groups are suggested to modify the lipid-derived reactive carbonyl but not the reaction mechanism because the Ea of formation of both 2-phenylethylamine and phenylacetaldehyde remained unchanged in all studied systems. All these results suggest that the amine/aldehyde ratio obtained by amino acid degradation can be modified by adding free amino acids during food formulation. PMID:27173560

  15. Protein reactivity with singlet oxygen: Influence of the solvent exposure of the reactive amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Béatrice; Foley, Sarah; Staicu, Angela; Pascu, Alexandru; Pascu, Mihail; Enescu, Mironel

    2016-06-01

    The singlet oxygen quenching rate constants were measured for three model proteins, bovine serum albumin, β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme. The results were analyzed by comparing them with the corresponding singlet oxygen quenching rate constants for a series of tripeptides with the basic formula GlyAAGly where the central amino acid (AA) was the oxidizable amino acid, tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and histidine. It was found that the reaction rate constant in proteins can be satisfactorily modelled by the sum of the individual contributions of the oxidizable AA residues corrected for the solvent accessible surface area (SASA) effects. The best results were obtained when the SASA of the AA residues were determined by averaging over molecular dynamics simulated trajectories of the proteins. The limits of this geometrical correction of the AA residue reactivity are also discussed. PMID:27045278

  16. Biological reactivity and biomarkers of the neutrophil oxidant, hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, Christine C

    2002-12-27

    Free radicals or reactive oxygen species are thought to contribute to the pathology of many diseases. These include inflammatory conditions, where neutrophils accumulate in large numbers and are stimulated to produce superoxide and other reactive oxidants. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), produced by myeloperoxidase-catalysed oxidation of chloride by hydrogen peroxide, is the major strong oxidant generated by these cells. Neutrophil-mediated injury may also be important in toxicology when an initial insult is followed by an inflammatory response. It is important to characterize the inflammatory component of such injury and the extent to which it involves reactive oxidants. On the one hand, this requires an understanding of how neutrophil oxidants react with cells and tissue constituents. On the other, specific biomarkers are needed so that oxidative damage can be quantified in clinical material and related to disease severity. This presentation considers biologically relevant reactions of HOCl and the biomarker assays that can be applied to probing the pathological role of myeloperoxidase and its products. PMID:12505315

  17. Reactivity of Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin with Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    King, William D.; Fondeur, Fernando F.; Wilmarth, William R.; Pettis, Myra E.

    2005-10-25

    Solid-state infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis have been used to evaluate the reactivity of resorcinol formaldehyde resin with nitric acid and characterize the solid product. Two distinct reactions were identified within the temperature range 25-55 C. The first reaction is primarily associated with resin nitration, while the second involves bulk oxidation and degradation of the polymer network leading to dissolution and off-gassing. The threshold conditions promoting reaction have been identified. Reaction was confirmed with nitric acid concentrations as low as 3 M at 25 C applied temperature and 0.625 M at 66 C. Although a nitrated resin product can be isolated under appropriate experimental conditions, calorimetry testing indicates no significant hazard associated with handling the dry material.

  18. REACTIVITY OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE RESIN WITH NITRIC ACID

    SciTech Connect

    King, W; Fernando Fondeur, F; Bill Wilmarth, B; Myra Pettis, M; Shirley Mccollum, S

    2006-06-14

    Solid-state infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis have been used to evaluate the reactivity of resorcinol formaldehyde resin with nitric acid and characterize the solid product. Two distinct reactions were identified within the temperature range 25-55 C. The first reaction is primarily associated with resin nitration, while the second involves bulk oxidation and degradation of the polymer network leading to dissolution and off-gassing. Reaction was confirmed with nitric acid concentrations as low as 3 M at 25 C applied temperature and 0.625 M at 66 C. Although a nitrated resin product can be isolated under appropriate experimental conditions, calorimetry testing indicates no significant hazard associated with handling the dry material.

  19. Reactivation of a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst by acid washing.

    PubMed

    Galisteo, Francisco Cabello; Mariscal, Rafael; Granados, Manuel López; Fierro, José Luis García; Brettes, Pilar; Salas, Oscar

    2005-05-15

    The catalytic activity of samples taken from an oxidation catalyst mounted on diesel-driven automobiles and aged under road conditions was recovered to a significant extent by washing with a dilute solution of citric acid. The characterization of samples arising from a fresh, a vehicle-aged, and a regenerated catalyst was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Relatively high levels of S and P, in the form of aluminum sulfate and phosphate, respectively, together with contaminant Si were detected in the used catalyst. Washing of the vehicle-aged catalytic oxidation converter revealed high efficiency in the extraction of the main contaminants detected (S and P) by this nondestructive methodology. The results of the experiments reported here should encourage the development of a technology based on this reactivation procedure for the rejuvenation of the catalytic device mounted on diesel exhaust pipes. PMID:15952394

  20. Salicylic acid signaling inhibits apoplastic reactive oxygen species signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are used by plants as signaling molecules during stress and development. Given the amount of possible challenges a plant face from their environment, plants need to activate and prioritize between potentially conflicting defense signaling pathways. Until recently, most studies on signal interactions have focused on phytohormone interaction, such as the antagonistic relationship between salicylic acid (SA)-jasmonic acid and cytokinin-auxin. Results In this study, we report an antagonistic interaction between SA signaling and apoplastic ROS signaling. Treatment with ozone (O3) leads to a ROS burst in the apoplast and induces extensive changes in gene expression and elevation of defense hormones. However, Arabidopsis thaliana dnd1 (defense no death1) exhibited an attenuated response to O3. In addition, the dnd1 mutant displayed constitutive expression of defense genes and spontaneous cell death. To determine the exact process which blocks the apoplastic ROS signaling, double and triple mutants involved in various signaling pathway were generated in dnd1 background. Simultaneous elimination of SA-dependent and SA-independent signaling components from dnd1 restored its responsiveness to O3. Conversely, pre-treatment of plants with SA or using mutants that constitutively activate SA signaling led to an attenuation of changes in gene expression elicited by O3. Conclusions Based upon these findings, we conclude that plants are able to prioritize the response between ROS and SA via an antagonistic action of SA and SA signaling on apoplastic ROS signaling. PMID:24898702

  1. Amine Reactivity with Nanoclusters of Sulfuric Acid and Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, M. V.; Bzdek, B. R.; DePalma, J.

    2011-12-01

    Alkyl amines have emerged as key species in new particle formation and growth. This interest is reinforced by ambient measurements of amines (e.g. Smith et al., 2010) and enhanced levels of nitrogen (e.g. Bzdek et al., 2011) during growth of newly formed particles. An important mechanism of amine uptake is aminium salt formation, either by substituting for ammonium ions that already exist in the particle or by opening new channels for salt formation that are not favorable with ammonia. This presentation will focus on recent experimental and computational work in our group to study amine uptake into charged nanoclusters of sulfuric acid and ammonia. In the experimental work, clusters are produced by electrospray of an ammonium sulfate solution and then drawn into a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer where a specific cluster is isolated and exposed to amine vapor. We find that amine reactivity is dependent on the size, composition and charge of the isolated cluster. For small clusters of either polarity, all ammonium ions reside on the surface and amine substitution occurs with near unit reaction probability. As the cluster size increases, an ammonium ion can be encapsulated in the center of the cluster, which provides a steric hindrance to amine substitution. Negatively charged clusters are more likely to be acidic than positively charged clusters. For acidic clusters, incoming amine molecules first substitute for preexisting ammonium ions and then add to the cluster until a "neutralized" aminium bisulfate composition is reached. Computational studies of these clusters provide fundamental insight into the thermodynamics and kinetics of amine uptake.

  2. Myosin-cross-reactive antigens from four different lactic acid bacteria are fatty acid hydratases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Haiqin; Song, Yuanda; Chen, Yong Q; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The 67 kDa myosin-cross-reactive antigen (MCRA) is a member of the MCRA family of proteins present in a wide range of bacteria and was predicted to have fatty acid isomerase function. We have now characterised the catalytic activity of MCRAs from four LAB stains, including Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG, L. plantarum ST-III, L. acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12. MCRA genes from these strains were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein function was analysed with lipid profiles by GC-MS. The four MCRAs catalysed the conversion of linoleic acid and oleic acid to their respective 10-hydroxy derivatives, which suggests that MCRA proteins catalyse the first step in conjugated linoleic acid production. This is the first report of MCRA from L. rhamnosus with such catalytic function. PMID:22955678

  3. Development of polylactic acid-based materials through reactive modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowlks, Alison Camille

    2009-12-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA)-based systems have shown to be of great potential for the development of materials requiring biobased content, biodegradation, and sufficient properties. The efforts in this study are directed toward addressing the current research need to overcome some of the inherent drawbacks of PLA. To meet this need, reactive extrusion was employed to develop new materials based on PLA by grafting, compounding, and polymer blending. In the first part of this work, maleic anhydride (MA) was grafted onto PLA by reactive extrusion. Two structurally different peroxides were used to initiate grafting and results were reported on the basis of grafting, molecular weight, and thermal behavior. An inverse relationship between degree of grafting and molecular weight was established. It was also found that, regardless of peroxide type, there is an optimum peroxid-to-MA ratio of 0.5:2 that promotes maximum grafting, beyond which degradation reactions become predominant. Overall, it was found that the maleated copolymer (MAPLA) could be used as an interfacial modifier in PLA-based composites. Therefore, MAPLA was incorporated into PLA-talc composites in varying concentrations. The influence of the MAPLA addition on the mechanical and thermal behavior was investigated. When added in an optimum concentration, MAPLA improved the tensile strength and crystallization of the composite. Furthermore, microscopic observation confirmed the compatibilization effect of MAPLA in PLA-talc composites. Vinyltrimethoxysilane was free-radically grafted onto the backbone of PLA and subsequently moisture crosslinked. The effects of monomer, initiator, and catalyst concentration on the degree of crosslinking and the mechanical and thermal properties were investigated. The presence of a small amount of catalyst showed to be a major contributor to the crosslinking formation in the time frame investigated, shown by an increase in gel content and decrease in crystallinity. Furthermore

  4. Reactivity of pyruvic acid and its derivatives towards reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kładna, Aleksandra; Marchlewicz, Mariola; Piechowska, Teresa; Kruk, Irena; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-11-01

    Pyruvic acid and its derivatives occurring in most biological systems are known to exhibit several pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective or anticancer, many of which are suggested to originate from their antioxidant and free radical scavenger activity. The therapeutic potential of these compounds is a matter of particular interest, due to their mechanisms of action, particularly their possible antioxidant behaviour. Here, we report the results of a study of the effect of pyruvic acid (PA), ethyl pyruvate (EP) and sodium pyruvate (SP) on reactions generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anion radicals, hydroxyl radicals and singlet oxygen, and their total antioxidant capacity. Chemiluminescence (CL) and spectrophotometry techniques were employed. The pyruvate analogues studied were found to inhibit the CL signal arising from superoxide anion radicals in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 = 0.0197 ± 0.002 mM for EP and IC50 = 69.2 ± 5.2 mM for PA. These compounds exhibited a dose-dependent decrease in the CL signal of the luminol + H2O2 system over the range 0.5-10 mM with IC50 values of 1.71 ± 0.12 mM for PA, 3.85 ± 0.21 mM for EP and 22.91 ± 1.21 mM for SP. Furthermore, these compounds also inhibited hydroxyl radical-dependent deoxyribose degradation in a dose-dependent manner over the range 0.5-200 mM, with IC50 values of 33.2 ± 0.3 mM for SP, 116.1 ± 6.2 mM for EP and 168.2 ± 6.2 mM for PA. All the examined compounds also showed antioxidant capacity when estimated using the ferric-ferrozine assay. The results suggest that the antioxidant activities of pyruvate derivatives may reflect a direct effect on scavenging ROS and, in part, be responsible for their pharmacological actions. PMID:25754627

  5. Reactive Transport Modeling of Acid Gas Generation and Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    G. Zhahg; N. Spycher; E. Sonnenthal; C. Steefel

    2005-01-25

    Pulvirenti et al. (2004) recently conducted a laboratory evaporation/condensation experiment on a synthetic solution of primarily calcium chloride. This solution represents one potential type of evaporated pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a site proposed for geologic storage of high-level nuclear waste. These authors reported that boiling this solution to near dryness (a concentration factor >75,000 relative to actual pore waters) leads to the generation of acid condensate (pH 4.5) presumably due to volatilization of HCl (and minor HF and/or HNO{sub 3}). To investigate the various processes taking place, including boiling, gas transport, and condensation, their experiment was simulated by modifying an existing multicomponent and multiphase reactive transport code (TOUGHREACT). This code was extended with a Pitzer ion-interaction model to deal with high ionic strength. The model of the experiment was set-up to capture the observed increase in boiling temperature (143 C at {approx}1 bar) resulting from high concentrations of dissolved salts (up to 8 m CaCl{sub 2}). The computed HCI fugacity ({approx} 10{sup -4} bars) generated by boiling under these conditions is not sufficient to lower the pH of the condensate (cooled to 80 and 25 C) down to observed values unless the H{sub 2}O mass fraction in gas is reduced below {approx}10%. This is because the condensate becomes progressively diluted by H{sub 2}O gas condensation. However, when the system is modeled to remove water vapor, the computed pH of instantaneous condensates decreases to {approx}1.7, consistent with the experiment (Figure 1). The results also show that the HCl fugacity increases, and calcite, gypsum, sylvite, halite, MgCl{sub 2}4H{sub 2}O and CaCl{sub 2} precipitate sequentially with increasing concentration factors.

  6. Phase I Metabolic Stability and Electrophilic Reactivity of 2-Phenylaminophenylacetic Acid Derived Compounds.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yi Yun; Tan, Yee Min; Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Ho, Han Kiat

    2016-07-18

    Diclofenac and lumiracoxib are two highly analogous 2-phenylaminophenylacetic acid anti-inflammatory drugs exhibiting occasional dose-limiting hepatotoxicities. Prior data indicate that bioactivation and reactive metabolite formation play roles in the observed toxicity, but the exact chemical influence of the substituents remains elusive. In order to elucidate the role of chemical influence on metabolism related toxicity, metabolic stability and electrophilic reactivity were investigated for a series of structurally related analogues and their resulting metabolites. The resulting analogues embody progressive physiochemical changes through varying halogeno- and aliphatic substituents at two positions and were subjected to in vitro human liver microsomal metabolic stability and cell-based GSH depletion assays (to measure electrophilic reactivity). LC-MS/MS analysis of the GSH trapped reactive intermediates derived from the analogues was then used to identify the putative structures of reactive metabolites. We found that chemical modifications of the structural backbone led to noticeable perturbations of metabolic stability, electrophilic reactivity, and structures and composition of reactive metabolites. With the acquired data, the relationships between stability, reactivity, and toxicity were investigated in an attempt to correlate between Phase I metabolism and in vitro toxicity. A positive correlation was identified between reactivity and in vitro toxicity, indicating that electrophilic reactivity can be an indicator for in vitro toxicity. All in all, the effect of substituents on the structures and reactivity of the metabolites, however subtle the changes, should be taken into consideration during future drug design involving similar chemical features. PMID:27245204

  7. Reactivity of Hontomín carbonate rocks to acidic solution injection: reactive "push-pull" tracer tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gaspari, Francesca; Cabeza, Yoar; Luquot, Linda; Rötting, Tobias; Saaltink, Maarten W.; Carrera, Jesus

    2014-05-01

    Several field tests will be carried out in order to characterize the reservoir for CO2 injection in Hontomín (Burgos, Spain) as part of the Compostilla project of "Fundación Ciudad de la Energía" (CIUDEN). Once injected, the dissolution of the CO2 in the resident brine will increase the acidity of the water and lead to the dissolution of the rocks, constituted mainly by carbonates. This mechanism will cause changes in the aquifer properties such as porosity and permeability. To reproduce the effect of the CO2 injection, a reactive solution with 2% of acetic acid is going to be injected in the reservoir and extracted from the same well (reactive "push-pull" tracer tests) to identify and quantify the geochemical reactions occurring into the aquifer. The reactivity of the rock will allow us also to evaluate the changes of its properties. Previously, theoretical calculations of Damkhöler numbers were done to determine the acid concentrations and injection flow rates needed to generate ramified-wormholes patterns, during theses "push-pull" experiments. The aim of this work is to present the results and a preliminary interpretation of the field tests.

  8. Nanofiltration, bipolar electrodialysis and reactive extraction hybrid system for separation of fumaric acid from fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, Krystyna; Staszak, Katarzyna; Woźniak-Budych, Marta Joanna; Regel-Rosocka, Magdalena; Adamczak, Michalina; Wiśniewski, Maciej; Staniewski, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    A novel approach based on a hybrid system allowing nanofiltration, bipolar electrodialysis and reactive extraction, was proposed to remove fumaric acid from fermentation broth left after bioconversion of glycerol. The fumaric salts can be concentrated in the nanofiltration process to a high yield (80-95% depending on pressure), fumaric acid can be selectively separated from other fermentation components, as well as sodium fumarate can be conversed into the acid form in bipolar electrodialysis process (stack consists of bipolar and anion-exchange membranes). Reactive extraction with quaternary ammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) or alkylphosphine oxides (Cyanex 923) solutions (yield between 60% and 98%) was applied as the final step for fumaric acid recovery from aqueous streams after the membrane techniques. The hybrid system permitting nanofiltration, bipolar electrodialysis and reactive extraction was found effective for recovery of fumaric acid from the fermentation broth. PMID:24983693

  9. Evaluation of the Reactivity of Reillex HPQ in 64 Percent Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, W.J. III

    2001-02-20

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the reactivity of Reillex HPQ in 64 percent nitric acid and to address an accident scenario in which 64 percent nitric acid solution is inadvertently added to an HB-Line ion exchange column containing Reillex HPQ anion exchange resin.

  10. Preorganized Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Acidities and Reactivities.

    PubMed

    Samet, Masoud; Kass, Steven R

    2015-08-01

    Measured DMSO pKa values for a series of rigid tricyclic adamantane-like triols containing 0-3 trifluoromethyl groups (i.e., 3(0)-3(3)) are reported. The three compounds with CF3 substituents are similar or more acidic than acetic acid (pKa = 13.5 (3(1)), 9.5 (3(2)), 7.3 (3(3)) vs 12.6 (HOAc)), and the resulting hydrogen bond network enables a remote γ-trifluoromethyl group to enhance the acidity as well as one located at the α-position. Catalytic abilities of 3(0)-3(3) were also examined. In a nonpolar environment a rate enhancement of up to 100-fold over flexible acyclic analogs was observed presumably due to an entropic advantage of the locked-in structure. Gas-phase acidities are found to correlate with the catalytic activity better than DMSO pKa values and appear to be a better measure of acidities in low dielectric constant media. These trends are reduced or reversed in polar solvents highlighting the importance of the reaction environment. PMID:26140305

  11. Experimental study of the hydrothermal reactivity of organic acids and acid anions: II. Acetic acid, acetate, and valeric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.

    2003-10-01

    Organic acids and acid anions occur in substantial concentrations in many aqueous geologic fluids and are thought to take part in a variety of geochemical processes ranging from the transport of metals in ore-forming fluids to the formation of natural gas to serving as a metabolic energy source for microbes in subsurface habitats. The widespread occurrence of organic acids and their potential role in diverse geologic processes has led to numerous experimental studies of their thermal stability, yet there remain substantial gaps in our knowledge of the factors that control the rates and reaction pathways for the decomposition of these compounds under geologic conditions. In order to address some of these uncertainties, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to examine the behavior of organic acids and acid anions under hydrothermal conditions in the presence of minerals. Reported here are results of experiments where aqueous solutions of acetic acid, sodium acetate, or valeric acid ( n-pentanoic acid) were heated at 325°C, 350 bars in the presence of the mineral assemblages hematite + magnetite + pyrite, pyrite + pyrrhotite + magnetite, and hematite + magnetite. The results indicate that aqueous acetic acid and acetate decompose by a combination of two reaction pathways: decarboxylation and oxidation. Both reactions are promoted by minerals, with hematite catalyzing the oxidation reaction while magnetite catalyzes decarboxylation. The oxidation reaction is much faster, so that oxidation dominates the decomposition of acetic acid and acetate when hematite is present. In contrast to previous reports that acetate decomposed more slowly than acetic acid, we found that acetate decomposed at slightly faster rates than the acid in the presence of minerals. Although longer-chain monocarboxylic acids are generally thought to decompose by decarboxylation, valeric acid appeared to decompose primarily by "deformylation" to 1-butene plus formic acid. Subsequent

  12. Chemical cross-linking with NHS esters: a systematic study on amino acid reactivities.

    PubMed

    Mädler, Stefanie; Bich, Claudia; Touboul, David; Zenobi, Renato

    2009-05-01

    Structure elucidation of tertiary or quaternary protein structures by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (MS) has recently gained importance. To locate the cross-linker modification, dedicated software is applied to analyze the mass or tandem mass spectra (MS/MS). Such software requires information on target amino acids to limit the data analysis time. The most commonly used homobifunctional N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) esters are often described as reactive exclusively towards primary amines, although side reactions with tyrosine and serine have been reported. Our goal was to systematically study the reactivity of NHS esters and derive some general rules for their attack of nucleophilic amino acid side chains in peptides. We therefore studied the cross-linking reactions of synthesized and commercial model peptides with disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS). The first reaction site in all cases was expectedly the alpha-NH(2)-group of the N-terminus or the epsilon-NH(2)-group of lysine. As soon as additional cross-linkers were attached or loops were formed, other amino acids were also involved in the reaction. In addition to the primary amino groups, serine, threonine and tyrosine showed significant reactivity due to the effect of neighboring amino acids by intermediate or permanent Type-1 cross-link formation. The reactivity is highly dependent on the pH and on adjacent amino acids. PMID:19132714

  13. Detection of saccharides by reactive desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) using modified phenylboronic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; Chen, Hao

    2010-01-01

    We have reported previously a method for the detection of sugars via in-situ derivatization with phenylboronic acid PhB(OH)2 using reactive desorption electrospray ionization (DESI, Chen et al., Chem. Commun. (2006) 597-599). The present study describes an improved method that employs modified phenylboronic acids including 3-nitrophenylboronic acid and N-methyl-4-pyridineboronic acid iodide. In contrast to using PhB(OH)2, enhanced sensitivity of using 3-nitrophenylboronic acid was observed due to the stabilization of the resulting boronate ester anion by the electron-withdrawing nitro group and the limit of detections (LODs) for glucose in water using 3-nitrophenylbornic acid and phenylboronic acid were determined to be 0.11 mM and 0.40 mM, respectively. In the case of N-methyl-4-pyridineboronic acid iodide, the corresponding LOD is 6.9 [mu]M and the higher sensitivity obtained is attributed to the efficient ionization of both the reactive DESI reagent and reaction product since the precursor acid with a quaternary ammonium group is pre-charged. In this case, additional important features are found: (i) unlike using phenylboronic acid or 3-nitrophenylbornic acid, the experiment, performed in the positive ion mode, is applicable to neutral and acidic saccharide solutions, facilitating the analysis of biological fluids without the need to adjust pH; (ii) simply by changing the spray solvent from water to acetonitrile, the method can be used for direct glucose analyses of both urine and serum samples via online desalting, due to the low solubility of salts of these biofluids in the sprayed organic solvent; (iii) in comparison with other sugar derivatizing reagents such as the Girard's reagent T, the N-methyl-4-pyridineboronic acid iodide shows higher reactivity in the reactive DESI; and (iv) the ions of saccharide DESI reaction products undergo extensive ring or glycosidic bond cleavage upon CID, a feature that might be useful in the structure elucidation of

  14. Multiscale Reactive Molecular Dynamics for Absolute pK a Predictions and Amino Acid Deprotonation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J Gard; Peng, Yuxing; Silverstein, Daniel W; Swanson, Jessica M J

    2014-07-01

    Accurately calculating a weak acid's pK a from simulations remains a challenging task. We report a multiscale theoretical approach to calculate the free energy profile for acid ionization, resulting in accurate absolute pK a values in addition to insights into the underlying mechanism. Importantly, our approach minimizes empiricism by mapping electronic structure data (QM/MM forces) into a reactive molecular dynamics model capable of extensive sampling. Consequently, the bulk property of interest (the absolute pK a) is the natural consequence of the model, not a parameter used to fit it. This approach is applied to create reactive models of aspartic and glutamic acids. We show that these models predict the correct pK a values and provide ample statistics to probe the molecular mechanism of dissociation. This analysis shows changes in the solvation structure and Zundel-dominated transitions between the protonated acid, contact ion pair, and bulk solvated excess proton. PMID:25061442

  15. Color removal from acid and reactive dye solutions by electrocoagulation and electrocoagulation/adsorption processes.

    PubMed

    Bellebia, S; Kacha, S; Bouberka, Z; Bouyakoub, A Z; Derriche, Z

    2009-04-01

    In this study, electrocoagulation of Marine Blue Erionyl MR (acid dye) and electrocoagulation followed by adsorption of Brilliant Blue Levafix E-BRA (reactive dye) from aqueous solutions were investigated, using aluminum electrodes and granular activated carbon (GAC). In the electrocoagulation and adsorption of dyestuff solutions, the effects of current density, loading charge, pH, conductivity, stirring velocity, contact time, and GAC concentration were examined. The optimum conditions for the electrocoagulation process were identified as loading charges 7.46 and 1.49 F/m3, for a maximum abatement of 200 mg/L reactive and acid dye, respectively. The residual reactive dye concentration was completely removed with 700 mg/L GAC. The results of this investigation provide important data for the development of a combined process to remove significant concentrations of recalcitrant dyes from water, using moderate activated carbon energy and aluminum consumption, and thereby lowering the cost of treatment. PMID:19445327

  16. Radiolytic Modification and Reactivity of Amino Acid Residues Serving as Structural Probes for Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical-mediated protein footprinting is a convenient and sensitive technique for mapping solvent-accessible surfaces of proteins and examining the structure and dynamics of biological assemblies. In this study, the reactivities and tendencies to form easily detectible products for all 20 (common) amino acid side chains along with cystine are directly compared using various standards. Although we have previously reported on the oxidation of many of these residues, this study includes a detailed examination of the less reactive residues and better defines their usefulness in hydroxyl radical-mediated footprinting experiments. All 20 amino amides along with cystine and a few tripeptides were irradiated by -rays, the products were analyzed by electrospray mass spectrometry, and rate constants of modification were measured. The reactivities of amino acid side chains were compared based on their loss of mass spectral signal normalized to the rate of loss for Phe or Pro that were radiolyzed simultaneously to serve as internal standards. In this way, accurate quantitation of relative rates could be assured. A reactivity order of amino acid side chains was obtained as Cys > Met > Trp > Tyr > Phe > cystine > His > Leu, Ile > Arg, Lys, Val > Ser, Thr, Pro > Gln, Glu > Asp, Asn > Ala > Gly. Ala and Gly are far too unreactive to be useful probes in typical experiments and Asp and Asn are unlikely to be useful as well. Although Ser and Thr are more reactive than Pro, which is known to be a useful probe, their oxidation products are not easily detectible. Thus, it appears that 14 of the 20 side chains (plus cystine) are most likely to be useful in typical experiments. Since these residues comprise 65% of the sequence of a typical protein, the footprinting approach provides excellent coverage of the side-chain reactivity for proteins.

  17. Assessment of electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation tests to qualify stainless steel for nitric acid service

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, A.R.; Dillon, J.J.; Peters, A.H.; Clift, T.L.

    1986-12-31

    To minimize the costs and delivery time delays associated with purchasing type 304L stainless steel materials for service in nitric-acid-containing media, an alternative to the current Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant requirement of testing in accordance with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) A 262, Practice C (the boiling nitric acid test), is being sought. A possible candidate is the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test being developed for the nuclear industry and under consideration for acceptance as an ASTM standard. Based on a review of the literature and some limited screening tests, this test, as currently proposed, is not a suitable substitute for the nitric acid test. However, with additional development the EPR test is a likely candidate for providing a quantitative substitute for the current qualitative oxalic acid etching (ASTM A 282, Practice A) often used to accept, but not reject, materials for use in a nitric acid medium.

  18. Experimental Study and Reactive Transport Modeling of Boric Acid Leaching of Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabalan, R. T.; Chiang, K.-T. K.

    2013-07-01

    Borated water leakage through spent fuel pools (SFPs) at pressurized water reactors is a concern because it could cause corrosion of reinforcement steel in the concrete structure, compromise the integrity of the structure, or cause unmonitored releases of contaminated water to the environment. Experimental data indicate that pH is a critical parameter that determines the corrosion susceptibility of rebar in borated water and the degree of concrete degradation by boric acid leaching. In this study, reactive transport modeling of concrete leaching by borated water was performed to provide information on the solution pH in the concrete crack or matrix and the degree of concrete degradation at different locations of an SFP concrete structure exposed to borated water. Simulations up to 100 years were performed using different boric acid concentrations, crack apertures, and solution flow rates. Concrete cylinders were immersed in boric acid solutions for several months and the mineralogical changes and boric acid penetration in the concrete cylinder were evaluated as a function of time. The depths of concrete leaching by boric acid solution derived from the reactive transport simulations were compared with the measured boric acid penetration depth.

  19. Properties of Copolymers of Aspartic Acid and Aliphatic Dicarboxylic Acids Prepared by Reactive Extrusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartic acid may be prepared chemically or by the fermentation of carbohydrates. Currently, low molecular weight polyaspartic acids are prepared commercially by heating aspartic acid at high temperatures (greater than 220 degrees C) for several hours in the solid state. In an effort to develop a ...

  20. Relative kinetic reactivity of boronic acid and boronate ion towards Tiron, 2,2'-biphenol, and propylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eisuke; Miyamoto, Chiaki; Tanaka, Asumi; Iizuka, Kenzo; Iwatsuki, Satoshi; Inamo, Masahiko; Takagi, Hideo D; Ishihara, Koji

    2013-06-21

    Reaction systems of boronic acid (RB(OH2), R = phenyl or 3-fluorophenyl) with diols and no proton ambiguity were elaborately set up, and kinetic measurements were conducted to elucidate the relative reactivities of RB(OH)2 and RB(OH)3(-). In the reactions of phenylboronic and 3-fluorophenylboronic acids with propylene glycol, the reactivity order was: RB(OH)2 > RB(OH)3(-), whereas in the reactions of 3-pyridylboronic acid with Tiron and 2,2'-biphenol, the reactivity of RB(OH)2 was comparable to that of RB(OH)3(-). These results are in contrast to those that have been previously reported, and widely accepted for over thirty years, that concluded that the reactivity of RB(OH)3(-) is several orders of magnitude higher than that of RB(OH)2. The reactivity of Tiron with 3-pyridylboronic acid is affected by the protonation of one of its sulfonate groups. PMID:23625094

  1. Taurine Bromamine: Reactivity of an Endogenous and Exogenous Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Amino Acid Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Bertozo, Luiza De Carvalho; Morgon, Nelson Henrique; De Souza, Aguinaldo Robinson; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias

    2016-01-01

    Taurine bromamine (Tau-NHBr) is produced by the reaction between hypobromous acid (HOBr) and the amino acid taurine. There are increasing number of applications of Tau-NHBr as an anti-inflammatory and microbicidal drug for topical usage. Here, we performed a comprehensive study of the chemical reactivity of Tau-NHBr with endogenous and non-endogenous compounds. Tau-NHBr reactivity was compared with HOBr, hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and taurine chloramine (Tau-NHCl). The second-order rate constants (k2) for the reactions between Tau-NHBr and tryptophan (7.7 × 102 M−1s−1), melatonin (7.3 × 103 M−1s−1), serotonin (2.9 × 103 M−1s−1), dansylglycine (9.5 × 101 M−1s−1), tetramethylbenzidine (6.4 × 102 M−1s−1) and H2O2 (3.9 × M−1s−1) were obtained. Tau-NHBr demonstrated the following selectivity regarding its reactivity with free amino acids: tryptophan > cysteine ~ methionine > tyrosine. The reactivity of Tau-NHBr was strongly affected by the pH of the medium (for instance with dansylglycine: pH 5.0, 1.1 × 104 M−1s−1, pH 7.0, 9.5 × 10 M−1s−1 and pH 9.0, 1.7 × 10 M−1s−1), a property that is related to the formation of the dibromamine form at acidic pH (Tau-NBr2). The formation of singlet oxygen was observed in the reaction between Tau-NHBr and H2O2. Tau-NHBr was also able to react with linoleic acid, but with low efficiency compared with HOBr and HOCl. Compared with HOBr, Tau-NHBr was not able to react with nucleosides. In conclusion, the following reactivity sequence was established: HOBr > HOCl > Tau-NHBr > Tau-NHCl. These findings can be very helpful for researchers interested in biological applications of taurine haloamines. PMID:27110829

  2. Taurine Bromamine: Reactivity of an Endogenous and Exogenous Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Amino Acid Derivative.

    PubMed

    De Carvalho Bertozo, Luiza; Morgon, Nelson Henrique; De Souza, Aguinaldo Robinson; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias

    2016-01-01

    Taurine bromamine (Tau-NHBr) is produced by the reaction between hypobromous acid (HOBr) and the amino acid taurine. There are increasing number of applications of Tau-NHBr as an anti-inflammatory and microbicidal drug for topical usage. Here, we performed a comprehensive study of the chemical reactivity of Tau-NHBr with endogenous and non-endogenous compounds. Tau-NHBr reactivity was compared with HOBr, hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and taurine chloramine (Tau-NHCl). The second-order rate constants (k₂) for the reactions between Tau-NHBr and tryptophan (7.7 × 10² M(-1)s(-1)), melatonin (7.3 × 10³ M(-1)s(-1)), serotonin (2.9 × 10³ M(-1)s(-1)), dansylglycine (9.5 × 10¹ M(-1)s(-1)), tetramethylbenzidine (6.4 × 10² M(-1)s(-1)) and H₂O₂ (3.9 × M(-1)s(-1)) were obtained. Tau-NHBr demonstrated the following selectivity regarding its reactivity with free amino acids: tryptophan > cysteine ~ methionine > tyrosine. The reactivity of Tau-NHBr was strongly affected by the pH of the medium (for instance with dansylglycine: pH 5.0, 1.1 × 10⁴ M(-1)s(-1), pH 7.0, 9.5 × 10 M(-1)s(-1) and pH 9.0, 1.7 × 10 M(-1)s(-1)), a property that is related to the formation of the dibromamine form at acidic pH (Tau-NBr₂). The formation of singlet oxygen was observed in the reaction between Tau-NHBr and H₂O₂. Tau-NHBr was also able to react with linoleic acid, but with low efficiency compared with HOBr and HOCl. Compared with HOBr, Tau-NHBr was not able to react with nucleosides. In conclusion, the following reactivity sequence was established: HOBr > HOCl > Tau-NHBr > Tau-NHCl. These findings can be very helpful for researchers interested in biological applications of taurine haloamines. PMID:27110829

  3. A Simple Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances in Fried Fast Foods.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Alam; Ullah, Fareed

    2016-01-01

    A simple and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) as a marker for lipid peroxidation in fried fast foods. The method uses the reaction of malondialdehyde (MDA) and TBA in the glacial acetic acid medium. The method was precise, sensitive, and highly reproducible for quantitative determination of TBARS. The precision of extractions and analytical procedure was very high as compared to the reported methods. The method was used to determine the TBARS contents in the fried fast foods such as Shami kebab, samosa, fried bread, and potato chips. Shami kebab, samosa, and potato chips have higher amount of TBARS in glacial acetic acid-water extraction system than their corresponding pure glacial acetic acid and vice versa in fried bread samples. The method can successfully be used for the determination of TBARS in other food matrices, especially in quality control of food industries. PMID:27123360

  4. A Simple Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances in Fried Fast Foods

    PubMed Central

    Zeb, Alam; Ullah, Fareed

    2016-01-01

    A simple and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) as a marker for lipid peroxidation in fried fast foods. The method uses the reaction of malondialdehyde (MDA) and TBA in the glacial acetic acid medium. The method was precise, sensitive, and highly reproducible for quantitative determination of TBARS. The precision of extractions and analytical procedure was very high as compared to the reported methods. The method was used to determine the TBARS contents in the fried fast foods such as Shami kebab, samosa, fried bread, and potato chips. Shami kebab, samosa, and potato chips have higher amount of TBARS in glacial acetic acid-water extraction system than their corresponding pure glacial acetic acid and vice versa in fried bread samples. The method can successfully be used for the determination of TBARS in other food matrices, especially in quality control of food industries. PMID:27123360

  5. Reactivity of aminophosphonic acids. Oxidative dephosphonylation of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids by aqueous halogens.

    PubMed

    Drabowicz, Józef; Jordan, Frank; Kudzin, Marcin H; Kudzin, Zbigniew H; Stevens, Christian V; Urbaniak, Paweł

    2016-02-01

    The reactions of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids with bromine-water, chlorine-water and iodine-water were investigated. The formation of phosphoric(v) acid, as a result of a halogen-promoted cleavage of the Cα-P bond, accompanied by nitrogen release, was observed. The dephosphonylation of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids was found to occur quantitatively. In the reactions of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids with other halogen-water reagents investigated by (31)P NMR, scission of the Cα-P bond was also observed, the reaction rates being comparable for bromine and chlorine, but much slower for iodine. PMID:26631424

  6. Reactivity of Biliatresone, a Natural Biliary Toxin, with Glutathione, Histamine, and Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Koo, Kyung A; Waisbourd-Zinman, Orith; Wells, Rebecca G; Pack, Michael; Porter, John R

    2016-02-15

    In our previous work, we identified a natural toxin, biliatresone, from Dysphania glomulifera and D. littoralis, endemic plants associated with outbreaks of biliary atresia in Australian neonatal livestock. Biliatresone is a very rare isoflavonoid with an α-methylene ketone between two phenyls, 1,2-diaryl-2-propenone, along with methylenedioxy, dimethoxyl, and hydroxyl functional groups, that causes extrahepatic biliary toxicity in zebrafish. The toxic core of biliatresone is a methylene in the α-position relative to the ketone of 1,2-diaryl-2-propenone that serves as an electrophilic Michael acceptor. The α-methylene of biliatresone spontaneously conjugated with water and methanol (MeOH), respectively, via Michael addition in a reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) analysis. We here report the reactivity of biliatresone toward glutathione (GSH), several amino acids, and other thiol- or imidazole-containing biomolecules. LC-MS and HPLC analysis of the conjugation reaction showed the reactivity of biliatresone to be in the order histidine > N-acetyl-d-cysteine (D-NAC) = N-acetyl-l-cysteine (L-NAC) > histamine > glutathione ≥ cysteine ≫ glycine > glutamate > phenylalanine, while serine and adenine had no reactivity due to intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the protic solvents. The reactivity of ethyl vinyl ketone (EVK, 1-penten-3-one), an example of a highly reactive α,ß-unsaturated ketone, toward GSH gave a 6.7-fold lower reaction rate constant than that of biliatresone. The reaction rate constant of synthetic 1,2-diaryl-2-propen-1-one (DP), a core structure of the toxic molecule, was 10-fold and 1.5-fold weaker in potency compared to the reaction rate constants of biliatresone and EVK, respectively. These results demostrated that the methylenedioxy, dimethoxyl, and hydroxyl functional groups of biliatresone contribute to the stronger reactivity of the Michael acceptor α-methylene ketone toward nucleophiles compared to that of DP

  7. The first proton sponge-based amino acids: synthesis, acid-base properties and some reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ozeryanskii, Valery A; Gorbacheva, Anastasia Yu; Pozharskii, Alexander F; Vlasenko, Marina P; Tereznikov, Alexander Yu; Chernov'yants, Margarita S

    2015-08-21

    The first hybrid base constructed from 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (proton sponge or DMAN) and glycine, N-methyl-N-(8-dimethylamino-1-naphthyl)aminoacetic acid, was synthesised in high yield and its hydrobromide was structurally characterised and used to determine the acid-base properties via potentiometric titration. It was found that the basic strength of the DMAN-glycine base (pKa = 11.57, H2O) is on the level of amidine amino acids like arginine and creatine and its structure, zwitterionic vs. neutral, based on the spectroscopic (IR, NMR, mass) and theoretical (DFT) approaches has a strong preference to the zwitterionic form. Unlike glycine, the DMAN-glycine zwitterion is N-chiral and is hydrolytically cleaved with the loss of glycolic acid on heating in DMSO. This reaction together with the mild decarboxylative conversion of proton sponge-based amino acids into 2,3-dihydroperimidinium salts under air-oxygen was monitored with the help of the DMAN-alanine amino acid. The newly devised amino acids are unique as they combine fluorescence, strongly basic and redox-active properties. PMID:26159785

  8. Pd(II) coordinated deprotonated diphenyl phosphino amino pyridine: reactivity towards solvent, base, and acid.

    PubMed

    Pratihar, Sanjay; Pegu, Rupa; Guha, Ankur Kanti; Sarma, Bipul

    2014-12-01

    The reactivity and stability of P(III)-N and P(III)≈N bonds will be different towards various solvents, bases, and acids because of their difference in bond strength due to different N-pπ-P-dπ donor bonding. For this, a P≈N containing Pd(II) complex, [Pd(DPAP)2] (C1), was synthesized from the reaction between PdCl2(COD) (COD = 1,4-cyclooctadiene) and 2 equiv. DPAP (diphenyl phosphino amino pyridine) ligand, followed by deprotonation of the N-H proton of the coordinated DPAP. The reactivity and stability of coordinated P≈N in complex C1 were determined in various protic and aprotic solvents, bases, and acids. The inertness of coordinated P=N towards various solvents and bases was observed, whereas protonation occurs at the nitrogen of P=N in the presence of an acid to form P-NH, with the generation of dicationic palladium complexes (C2). The dicationic complex C2 is found to be stable in the presence of bulky monoanionic Sn(IV) reagents, whereas, in the presence of more nucleophilic anions like Br(-) or I(-), dissociation of one DPAP ligand from dicationic Pd(II) complexes C2 leads to the generation of Pd(DPAP)X2 (X = Br(-), I(-)). Finally, the utility of the complexes towards Suzuki coupling of various aryl bromides and aryl or heteraryl boronic acids has been checked. PMID:25312248

  9. Reactivity of alanylalanine diastereoisomers in neutral and acid aqueous solutions: a versatile stereoselectivity.

    PubMed

    Plasson, Raphaël; Tsuji, Maika; Kamata, Masazumi; Asakura, Kouichi

    2011-10-01

    A good comprehension of the reactivity of peptides in aqueous solution is fundamental in prebiotic chemistry, namely for understanding their stability and behavior in primitive oceans. Relying on the stereoselectivity of the involved reactions, there is a huge interest in amino acid derivatives for explaining the spontaneous emergence of homochirality on primitive Earth. The corresponding kinetic and thermodynamic parameters are however still poorly known in the literature. We studied the reactivity of alanylalanine in acidic to neutral conditions as a model system. The hydrolysis into amino acids, the epimerization of the N-terminal residue, and the cyclization into diketopiperazine could be successfully identified and studied. This kinetic investigation highlighted interesting behaviors. Complex mechanisms were observed in very acidic conditions. The relative kinetic stability of the diastereoisomers of the dipeptide is highly dependent of the pH, with the possibility to dynamically destabilize the thermodynamically more stable diastereoisomers. The existence of the cyclization of dipeptides adds complexity to the system. On one hand it brings additional stereoselectivities; on the other hand fast racemization of heterochiral dipeptides is obtained. PMID:21562847

  10. A study on reactive blending of (poly lactic acid) and poly (butylene succinate co adipate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureepukdee, C.; Suttiruengwong, S.; Seadan, M.

    2015-07-01

    This research aims to study the blending of Polylactic acid (PLA) and Polybutylene succinate co adipate (PBSA) in order to understand the role of peroxide in free radical reaction on the compatibilization between these two biodegradable polyesters. Various ratios of PLA/PBSA blends with and without reactive agents were prepared in the twin screw extruder. Two types of peroxides, Di (tert-butylperoxyisopropyl) benzene (DTBP) and 2, 5-Dimethyl-2, 5-(t-butylperoxy) hexane (DTBH), were used with various concentrations to compare. From the torques measurement, DTBP was more reactive with PLA and PBSA than DTBH. PLA and PBSA 80:20, 60:40, 50:50, 40:60, and 20:80% by weight were melt-blended in a twin screw extruder. The reactive polymer blends were also prepared for the same ratios of the blends with addition of 0.08 and 0.1 phr of DTBP. The mechanical, thermal, rheological, and morphological properties were investigated. The impact strengths of the non-reactive blend increased with the increasing in PBSA content. The optimal impact strength was obtained at 40%wt of PBSA with 0.1 phr of DTBP. Adding 0.08 and 0.1 phr of DTBP led to the co continuous phase morphology of PLA/PBSA blends. The per cent crystallinity of PLA increased when blended with PBSA. PBSA might induce the crystallization of PLA.

  11. Direct analysis of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on concrete by reactive-desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, D; Reiller, P E; Lamouroux, C

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of organic ligands such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is today an important challenge due to their ability to increase the mobility of radionuclides and metals. Reactive desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (reactive-DESI-MS) was used for direct analysis of EDTA on concrete samples. EDTA forms complexes and those with Fe(III) ions are among the most thermodynamically favored. This complexing capacity was used to improve the specific detection of EDTA directly on a concrete matrix by doping the solvent spray of DESI with a solution of FeCl3 to selectively create the complex between EDTA and Fe(III). Thus, EDTA sensitivity was largely improved by two orders of magnitude with reactive-DESI-MS experiments thanks to the specific detection of EDTA as a [EDTA-4H+Fe(III)](-) complex. The proof of principle that reactive DESI can be applied to concrete samples to detect EDTA has been demonstrated. Its capacity for semi-quantitative determination and localization of EDTA under ambient conditions and with very little sample preparation, minimizing sample manipulations and solvent volumes, two important conditions for the development of new methodologies in the field of analytical chemistry, has been shown. PMID:25476391

  12. Reactive Force Field for Liquid Hydrazoic Acid with Applications to Detonation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, David; Dubnikova, Faina; van Duin, Adri; Zeiri, Yehuda; Kosloff, Ronnie

    The development of a reactive force field (ReaxFF formalism) for Hydrazoic acid (HN3), a highly sensitive liquid energetic material, is reported. The force field accurately reproduces results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The quality and performance of the force field are examined by detailed comparison with DFT calculations related to uni, bi and trimolecular thermal decomposition routes. Reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations are performed to reveal the initial chemical events governing the detonation chemistry of liquid HN3. The outcome of these simulations compares very well with recent results of tight-binding DFT molecular dynamics and thermodynamic calculations. Based on our RMD simulations, predictions were made for the activation energies and volumes in a broad range of temperatures and initial material compressions. Work Supported by The Center of Excellence for Explosives Detection, Mitigation and Response, Department of Homeland Security.

  13. Unique Reactivity Patterns Catalyzed by Internal Lewis Acid Assisted Hydrogen Bond Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auvil, Tyler Jay

    The advancement of hydrogen bond donor (HBD) organocatalysis has been inhibited by a number of challenges. Conventional HBDs suffer from high catalyst loadings and operate in only limited types of reactions, typically the activation of 1,2- and 1,4-acceptors for nucleophilic attack. One strategy to address the shortcomings of HBD catalysis is to design innovative catalysts with improved reactivity. To this end, boronate ureas have been developed as a new family of enhanced HBD catalysts that enable useful new reactivity patterns. Boronate ureas are easily-accessible, small organic molecules that benefit from improved catalytic abilities plausibly due to internal coordination of the urea carbonyl to a strategically placed Lewis acid. Optimization of the boronate urea scaffold has revealed their enhanced catalytic activity, enabling new directions in HBD catalysis. The discovery of boronate ureas has allowed for the unveiling of new HBD activation modes, providing unique reactivity patterns that are inaccessible with conventional HBD catalysts. Among these reactivity patterns is the activation of strained nitrocyclopropane carboxylates for nucleophilic ring-opening reactions, which affords a swift route to access gamma-amino-alpha-nitroester building blocks. The ring-opening method was highlighted by its utilization in the total synthesis of a CB-1 receptor inverse agonist, which was recently patented by Eli Lilly. Additionally, boronate ureas can elicit carbene-like reactivity from alpha-diazocarbonyl compounds, allowing for organocatalytic heteroatom-hydrogen insertions reactions, the first of their kind. The boronate urea activation of alpha-nitrodiazoesters has permitted the development of an unsymmetric double alpha-arylation process, affording a synthetically challenging motif in a single flask. The alpha-arylation reaction proceeds through a conceptually novel organocatalytic transient N--H insertion process, employing anilines as carbene activators. The use

  14. Reactions and reactivity of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants: differential biological effects of hypochlorous and hypothiocyanous acids.

    PubMed

    Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L

    2012-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is recognised to play important roles both in the immune system and during the development of numerous human pathologies. MPO is released by activated neutrophils, monocytes and some tissue macrophages, where it catalyses the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to hypohalous acids (HOX; X = Cl, Br, SCN) in the presence of halide and pseudo-halide ions. The major reactive species produced by MPO under physiological conditions are hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN), with the ratio of these oxidants critically dependent on the concentration of thiocyanate ions (SCN⁻). The reactivity and selectivity of HOCl and HOSCN for biological targets are markedly different, indicating that SCN⁻ ions have the potential to modulate both the extent and nature of oxidative damage in vivo. This article reviews recent developments in our understanding of the role of SCN⁻ in modulating the formation of MPO-derived oxidants, particularly in respect to the differences in reaction kinetics and targets of HOCl compared to HOSCN and the ability of these two oxidants to induce damage in biological systems. PMID:22348603

  15. Formation rates, stability and reactivity of sulfuric acid - amine clusters predicted by computational chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtén, Theo; Ortega, Ismael; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Loukonen, Ville; Reiman, Heidi; McGrath, Matthew; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    Despite the importance of atmospheric particle formation for both climate and air quality, both experiments and non-empirical models using e.g. sulfuric acid, ammonia and water as condensing vapors have so far been unable to reproduce atmospheric observations using realistic trace gas concentrations. Recent experimental and theoretical evidence has shown that this mystery is likely resolved by amines. Combining first-principles evaporation rates for sulfuric acid - dimethylamine clusters with cluster kinetic modeling, we show that even sub-ppt concentrations of amines, together with atmospherically realistic concentrations of sulfuric acid, result in formation rates close to those observed in the atmosphere. Our simulated cluster formation rates are also close to, though somewhat larger than, those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN for both sulfuric acid - ammonia and sulfuric acid - dimethylamine systems. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the remaining discrepancy for the sulfuric acid - amine particle formation rates is likely caused by steric hindrances to cluster formation (due to alkyl groups of the amine molecules) rather than by significant errors in the evaporation rates. First-principles molecular dynamic and reaction kinetic modeling shed further light on the microscopic physics and chemistry of sulfuric acid - amine clusters. For example, while the number and type of hydrogen bonds in the clusters typically reach their equilibrium values on a picosecond timescale, and the overall bonding patterns predicted by traditional "static" quantum chemical calculations seem to be stable, the individual atoms participating in the hydrogen bonds continuously change at atmospherically realistic temperatures. From a chemical reactivity perspective, we have also discovered a surprising phenomenon: clustering with sulfuric acid molecules slightly increases the activation energy required for the abstraction of alkyl hydrogens from amine molecules. This implies

  16. Multicomponent reactive transport modeling of acid neutralization reactions in mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurjovec, Jasna; Blowes, David W.; Ptacek, Carol J.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2004-11-01

    Multicomponent reactive transport modeling was conducted to analyze and quantify the acid neutralization reactions observed in a column experiment. Experimental results and the experimental procedures have been previously published. The pore water geochemistry was described by dissolution and precipitation reactions involving primary and secondary mineral phases. The initial amounts of the primary phases ankerite-dolomite, siderite, chlorite, and gypsum were constrained by mineralogical analyses of the tailings sample used in the experiment. Secondary gibbsite was incorporated into the model to adequately explain the changes in pH and concentration changes of Al in the column effluent water. The results of the reactive transport modeling show that the pH of the column effluent water can be explained by dissolution reactions of ankerite-dolomite, siderite, chlorite, and secondary gibbsite. The modeling results also show that changes in Eh can be explained by dissolution of ferrihydrite during the experiment. In addition, the modeling results show that the kinetically limited dissolution of chlorite contributes the largest mass of dissolved Mg and Fe (II) in the effluent water, followed by ankerite-dolomite, which contributes substantially less. In summary, reactive transport modeling based on detailed geochemical and mineralogical data was successful to quantitatively describe the changes in pH and major ions in the column effluent.

  17. Lewis Acid Zeolites for Biomass Conversion: Perspectives and Challenges on Reactivity, Synthesis, and Stability.

    PubMed

    Luo, Helen Y; Lewis, Jennifer D; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-06-01

    Zeolites containing Sn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb, or Ta heteroatoms are versatile catalysts for the activation and conversion of oxygenated molecules owing to the unique Lewis acid character of their tetrahedral metal sites. Through fluoride-mediated synthesis, hydrophobic Lewis acid zeolites can behave as water-tolerant catalysts, which has resulted in a recent surge of experimental and computational studies in the field of biomass conversion. However, many open questions still surround these materials, especially relating to the nature of their active sites. This lack of fundamental understanding is exemplified by the many dissonant results that have been described in recent literature reports. In this review, we use a molecular-based approach to provide insight into the relationship between the structure of the metal center and its reactivity toward different substrates, with the ultimate goal of providing a robust framework to understand the properties that have the strongest influence on catalytic performance for the conversion of oxygenates. PMID:27146555

  18. Computationally Efficient Multiscale Reactive Molecular Dynamics to Describe Amino Acid Deprotonation in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangyun; Liang, Ruibin; Voth, Gregory A; Swanson, Jessica M J

    2016-02-01

    An important challenge in the simulation of biomolecular systems is a quantitative description of the protonation and deprotonation process of amino acid residues. Despite the seeming simplicity of adding or removing a positively charged hydrogen nucleus, simulating the actual protonation/deprotonation process is inherently difficult. It requires both the explicit treatment of the excess proton, including its charge defect delocalization and Grotthuss shuttling through inhomogeneous moieties (water and amino residues), and extensive sampling of coupled condensed phase motions. In a recent paper (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2014, 10, 2729-2737), a multiscale approach was developed to map high-level quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) data into a multiscale reactive molecular dynamics (MS-RMD) model in order to describe amino acid deprotonation in bulk water. In this article, we extend the fitting approach (called FitRMD) to create MS-RMD models for ionizable amino acids within proteins. The resulting models are shown to faithfully reproduce the free energy profiles of the reference QM/MM Hamiltonian for PT inside an example protein, the ClC-ec1 H(+)/Cl(-) antiporter. Moreover, we show that the resulting MS-RMD models are computationally efficient enough to then characterize more complex 2-dimensional free energy surfaces due to slow degrees of freedom such as water hydration of internal protein cavities that can be inherently coupled to the excess proton charge translocation. The FitRMD method is thus shown to be an effective way to map ab initio level accuracy into a much more computationally efficient reactive MD method in order to explicitly simulate and quantitatively describe amino acid protonation/deprotonation in proteins. PMID:26734942

  19. Computationally Efficient Multiscale Reactive Molecular Dynamics to Describe Amino Acid Deprotonation in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An important challenge in the simulation of biomolecular systems is a quantitative description of the protonation and deprotonation process of amino acid residues. Despite the seeming simplicity of adding or removing a positively charged hydrogen nucleus, simulating the actual protonation/deprotonation process is inherently difficult. It requires both the explicit treatment of the excess proton, including its charge defect delocalization and Grotthuss shuttling through inhomogeneous moieties (water and amino residues), and extensive sampling of coupled condensed phase motions. In a recent paper (J. Chem. Theory Comput.2014, 10, 2729−273725061442), a multiscale approach was developed to map high-level quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) data into a multiscale reactive molecular dynamics (MS-RMD) model in order to describe amino acid deprotonation in bulk water. In this article, we extend the fitting approach (called FitRMD) to create MS-RMD models for ionizable amino acids within proteins. The resulting models are shown to faithfully reproduce the free energy profiles of the reference QM/MM Hamiltonian for PT inside an example protein, the ClC-ec1 H+/Cl– antiporter. Moreover, we show that the resulting MS-RMD models are computationally efficient enough to then characterize more complex 2-dimensional free energy surfaces due to slow degrees of freedom such as water hydration of internal protein cavities that can be inherently coupled to the excess proton charge translocation. The FitRMD method is thus shown to be an effective way to map ab initio level accuracy into a much more computationally efficient reactive MD method in order to explicitly simulate and quantitatively describe amino acid protonation/deprotonation in proteins. PMID:26734942

  20. Relating physical state and reactivity: humidity dependent ozone uptake on tannic and shikimic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimer, S.; Huisman, A.; Krieger, U.; Lampimäki, M.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.; Ammann, M.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are an important focus of environmental research due to their effect on climate and human health. Recent findings show that organic aerosol particles are capable of forming amorphous solids and semi-solids under atmospheric conditions [1]. Such particles should be highly viscous, leading to low diffusivity within the bulk. This would then slow down eventual chemical reactions in the bulk, thereby increasing the lifetime of the organic compounds involved. First indications of such behavior were recently shown for the reaction of thin protein films with ozone [2]. To investigate the influence of the physical state on the reactivity of atmospherically relevant compounds, the uptake of ozone on two different organics was measured using a coated wall flow tube system. The investigated organic compounds are tannic acid, which is a proxy for atmospheric polyphenolic materials, and shikimic acid, a constituent of biomass burning aerosols. The viscosity of the organic film was adjusted by varying the humidity of the system, assuming a correlation between the two parameters due to water acting as a plasticizer. The investigated humidity range was 0% - 95% RH for tannic and 0% - 92% RH for shikimic acid. It was found that both of the compounds show a long term uptake of ozone which lasts for more than 20 h. The uptake coefficient is clearly humidity dependent and increases by close to two orders of magnitude between driest and wettest conditions. At a given humidity, shikimic acid is the more reactive compound. The measured humidity dependence supports the hypothesis that the uptake coefficient is a strong function of the diffusion coefficient of ozone in the organic film. 1. Virtanen, A., et al., An amorphous solid state of biogenic secondary organic aerosol particles. Nature, 2010. 467(7317): p. 824-827. 2. Shiraiwa, M., et al., Gas uptake and chemical aging of semisolid organic aerosol particles. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the

  1. Convergent functional genomic studies of ω-3 fatty acids in stress reactivity, bipolar disorder and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Le-Niculescu, H; Case, N J; Hulvershorn, L; Patel, S D; Bowker, D; Gupta, J; Bell, R; Edenberg, H J; Tsuang, M T; Kuczenski, R; Geyer, M A; Rodd, Z A; Niculescu, A B

    2011-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids have been proposed as an adjuvant treatment option in psychiatric disorders. Given their other health benefits and their relative lack of toxicity, teratogenicity and side effects, they may be particularly useful in children and in females of child-bearing age, especially during pregnancy and postpartum. A comprehensive mechanistic understanding of their effects is needed. Here we report translational studies demonstrating the phenotypic normalization and gene expression effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids, specifically docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in a stress-reactive knockout mouse model of bipolar disorder and co-morbid alcoholism, using a bioinformatic convergent functional genomics approach integrating animal model and human data to prioritize disease-relevant genes. Additionally, to validate at a behavioral level the novel observed effects on decreasing alcohol consumption, we also tested the effects of DHA in an independent animal model, alcohol-preferring (P) rats, a well-established animal model of alcoholism. Our studies uncover sex differences, brain region-specific effects and blood biomarkers that may underpin the effects of DHA. Of note, DHA modulates some of the same genes targeted by current psychotropic medications, as well as increases myelin-related gene expression. Myelin-related gene expression decrease is a common, if nonspecific, denominator of neuropsychiatric disorders. In conclusion, our work supports the potential utility of omega-3 fatty acids, specifically DHA, for a spectrum of psychiatric disorders such as stress disorders, bipolar disorder, alcoholism and beyond. PMID:22832392

  2. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome in housewives due to a bleach-hydrochloric acid mixture.

    PubMed

    Gorguner, Metin; Aslan, Sahin; Inandi, Tacettin; Cakir, Zeynep

    2004-02-01

    The sudden onset of asthmalike symptoms and persistence of airway reactivity following an acute exposure to an irritant gas or vapor has been termed reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). A mixture of sodium hypochlorite (bleach, 40%) and hydrochloric acid (18%) is commonly used as a household cleaning solution in our region. From this mixture, chlorine gas is produced, which can cause airway damage and ensuing RADS. Here we describe findings of patients with RADS due to this cleaning mixture, and determine factors associated with a favorable outcome. Data were collected retrospectively on 55 symptomatic patients presenting to our emergency department after inhalation exposure to a mixture of bleach and hydrochloric acid. Symptoms, past medical and smoking history, details of the exposure, initial peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and oxygenation, and acute reversibility of airways obstruction were documented. All patients met previously defined criteria for the diagnosis of RADS, but did not undergo methacholine challenge testing and bronchoalveolar lavage or histopathologic study. Fifty patients were followed over the course of 3 mo. The majority of exposures (64%) occurred in the bathroom or kitchen. Only 21 of 55 (38%) patients showed an improvement in PEFR of 15% or greater following two beta(2)-agonist inhalation treatments. In follow-up, 48 patients (87%) improved clinically and functionally (FEV(1)). Seven patients (13%) deteriorated, with ARDS developing in two, one of whom died from respiratory failure. Advanced age, initial low PEFR, exposure in a small enclosed area, use immediately after mixing, and prolonged short- and long-term exposures were associated with a poorer prognosis. This descriptive study is the largest case series in the literature of RADS developing after exposure to a bleach-hydrochloric acid mixture. The optimum acute treatment and long-term outcomes for patients with RADS due to this combination still need to be determined

  3. Reactivity and acidity of Li in LiAlO[sub 2] phases

    SciTech Connect

    Dronskowski, R. )

    1993-01-06

    Nuclear physicists were interested in the [gamma]-modification of LiAlO[sub 2]. Because of its good performance under high neutron and electron radiation, the phase appears to be a promising lithium ceramic suitable as an in situ trituim-breeding material in future fusion reactors. With the help of semiempirical electronic structure calculations, the authors seek to understand why solid [alpha]-LiAlO[sub 2] exchanges Li[sup +] with H[sup +] while in contact with molten benzoic acid but [gamma]-LiAlO[sub 2] does not. After critically examining the structural data for LiAlO[sub 2] modifications, they calculate the binding and both the static and dynamic reactivity and the static and dynamic acidity of [alpha]- and [gamma]-LiAlO[sub 2], with a special interpretative emphasis on the Li ion. The reason for Li being solely extractable in [alpha]-LiAlO[sub 2] is found to arise from (1) a difference in Li electrophilicity between [alpha]- and [gamma]-phase (frontier band argument), (2) a significantly smaller energy for Li binding to its neighboring atoms in [alpha]-compared to [gamma]-phase (thermodynamic argument), and (3) a dramatic difference in energetic behavior upon dislocating a Li atom from its equilibrium position in [alpha]- and [gamma]-phase (kinetic argument). Additionally, the authors show how the movement of a local atomic carrier of reactivity and acidity within a nonequilibrium structure can be easily observed by use of computation. 64 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Evaluating remedial alternatives for an acid mine drainage stream: Application of a reactive transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; Kimball, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    A reactive transport model based on one-dimensional transport and equilibrium chemistry is applied to synoptic data from an acid mine drainage stream. Model inputs include streamflow estimates based on tracer dilution, inflow chemistry based on synoptic sampling, and equilibrium constants describing acid/base, complexation, precipitation/dissolution, and sorption reactions. The dominant features of observed spatial profiles in pH and metal concentration are reproduced along the 3.5-km study reach by simulating the precipitation of Fe(III) and Al solid phases and the sorption of Cu, As, and Pb onto freshly precipitated iron-(III) oxides. Given this quantitative description of existing conditions, additional simulations are conducted to estimate the streamwater quality that could result from two hypothetical remediation plans. Both remediation plans involve the addition of CaCO3 to raise the pH of a small, acidic inflow from ???2.4 to ???7.0. This pH increase results in a reduced metal load that is routed downstream by the reactive transport model, thereby providing an estimate of post-remediation water quality. The first remediation plan assumes a closed system wherein inflow Fe(II) is not oxidized by the treatment system; under the second remediation plan, an open system is assumed, and Fe(II) is oxidized within the treatment system. Both plans increase instream pH and substantially reduce total and dissolved concentrations of Al, As, Cu, and Fe(II+III) at the terminus of the study reach. Dissolved Pb concentrations are reduced by ???18% under the first remediation plan due to sorption onto iron-(III) oxides within the treatment system and stream channel. In contrast, iron(III) oxides are limiting under the second remediation plan, and removal of dissolved Pb occurs primarily within the treatment system. This limitation results in an increase in dissolved Pb concentrations over existing conditions as additional downstream sources of Pb are not attenuated by

  5. Mechanistic Details and Reactivity Descriptors in Oxidation and Acid Catalysis of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Deshlahra, Prashant; Carr, Robert T.; Chai, Song-Hai; Iglesia, Enrique

    2015-02-06

    Acid and redox reaction rates of CH₃OH-O₂ mixtures on polyoxometalate (POM) clusters, together with isotopic, spectroscopic, and theoretical assessments of catalyst properties and reaction pathways, were used to define rigorous descriptors of reactivity and to probe the compositional effects for oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) and dehydration reactions. ³¹P-MAS NMR, transmission electron microscopy and titrations of protons with di-tert-butylpyridine during catalysis showed that POM clusters retained their Keggin structure upon dispersion on SiO₂ and after use in CH₃OH reactions. The effects of CH₃OH and O₂ pressures and of D-substitution on ODH rates show that C-H activation in molecularly adsorbed CH₃OH is the sole kinetically relevant step and leads to reduced centers as intermediates present at low coverages; their concentrations, measured from UV-vis spectra obtained during catalysis, are consistent with the effects of CH₃OH/O₂ ratios predicted from the elementary steps proposed. First-order ODH rate constants depend strongly on the addenda atoms (Mo vs W) but weakly on the central atom (P vs Si) in POM clusters, because C-H activation steps inject electrons into the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMO) of the clusters, which are the d-orbitals at Mo⁶⁺ and W⁶⁺ centers. H-atom addition energies (HAE) at O-atoms in POM clusters represent the relevant theoretical probe of the LUMO energies and of ODH reactivity. The calculated energies of ODH transition states at each O-atom depend linearly on their HAE values with slopes near unity, as predicted for late transition states in which electron transfer and C-H cleavage are essentially complete. HAE values averaged over all accessible O-atoms in POM clusters provide the appropriate reactivity descriptor for oxides whose known structures allow accurate HAE calculations. CH₃OH dehydration proceeds via parallel pathways mediated by late carbenium-ion transition states; effects of

  6. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and products identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-06-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl. radicals with sub-micron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapors and introduced in the reactor where chlorine atoms are produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by GC/MS analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analyses have shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although, the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2 which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids are identified by GC/MS. Formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids are also suspected. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface, but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. Furthermore the identified reaction products are explained by a chemical mechanism showing the pathway of the formation of more functionalized products. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  7. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and product identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl• radicals with submicron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapours and introduced into the reactor, where chlorine atoms were produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analysis has shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2, which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids were identified by GC/MS. The formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids is also suspected. A reaction pathway for the main products and more functionalized species is proposed. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  8. Long-term carbon stabilization through sorption of dissolved aromatic acids to reactive particles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, M. G.; Sanderman, J.; Chadwick, O.; Chorover, J.; Vitousek, P.

    2010-12-01

    Short-range order minerals are highly reactive soil constituents that are found in all soils and in particularly high quantities in volcanic soils. They retain large quantities of soil carbon, thereby acting as a long-term sink for carbon dioxide, but the main source for this carbon accumulation in soil is not yet known. We evaluated the biochemistry of solid and dissolved organic carbon in horizons containing differing short-range ordered mineral concentrations using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, stable isotope measurements and soil column leaching experiments across a well-constrained chronosequence of volcanic soils in Hawai’i. Molecular mixing model results, isotopic and elemental measurements, indicate that the oldest and most persistent C stores across the chronosequence are comprised not of highly microbially processed organic matter (e.g. proteins or lipids), but rather of partially oxidized aromatic plant compounds (up to 62% of the total soil C) preserved through chemical bonding to reactive soil minerals via carboxyl-rich functionalities. NMR spectra obtained from deep soil horizons containing an abundance of SRO minerals, showed strong chemical resemblance to that of DOM derived from plant litter. Solublization and high production rates of recalcitrant DOM controlled substantially by microbial activity were observed in the soil column leaching experiments. When the DOM-rich solution derived from organic horizons was leached through mineral soil horizons, the quantity of DOM sorbed was dependent on the abundance of SRO minerals present in the soil. These results suggest that microbial-driven DOM formation derived from plant litter and the subsequent binding of the aromatic acids in the DOM to reactive mineral surfaces is a dominant source for long-term soil carbon stabilization in these soils. This potentially globally significant carbon sink may be unresponsive to climate change over decadal to centennial timescales due to

  9. Skin testing of gallic acid-based hair dye in paraphenylenediamine/paratoluenediamine-reactive patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yunseok; Lee, Joon Ho; Kwon, Hyok Bu; An, Susun; Lee, Ai-Young

    2016-07-01

    Incidence of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to para-phenylenediamine (PPD)/paratoluenediamine (PTD) hair dyes is increasing. Hair dyes utilizing gallic acid (GA) may be a safe alternative. However, pretesting is recommended. We investigated the contact sensitivity to ingredients of a dye product; GA, monoethanolamine thioglycolate (MT), l-cystein and ferrous sulfate, and an appropriate pretest method in 31 patients reactive to PPD and/or PTD. An open test was performed with the test dye following the patch test. Subsequently, a use test was performed twice, with a 4-week interval. One subject showed a positive reaction to ferrous sulfate in the patch test. Another subject reacted to the first compound alone in the open test. Thirteen subjects manifesting cutaneous lesions from previous regular hair dyeing, showed reactions at the first use of the test dye; and six had reactions with reduced severity at the second test. GA and MT are safe for use in ACD patients reactive to PPD and/or PTD. For predicting contact allergy to hair dyes, the open test appeared to be a better pretest method than the patch test. PMID:26663148

  10. Analysis of acidity production during enhanced reductive dechlorination using a simplified reactive transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, A.; Barry, D. A.; Robinson, C.; Gerhard, J. I.

    2012-07-01

    Build-up of fermentation products and hydrochloric acid at a contaminated site undergoing enhanced reductive dechlorination can result in groundwater acidification. Sub-optimal pH conditions can inhibit microbial activity and lead to reduced dechlorination rates. The extent of acidification likely to occur is site-specific and depends primarily on the extent of fermentation and dechlorination, the geochemical composition of soil and groundwater, and the pH-sensitivity of the active microbial populations. Here, the key chemical and physical mechanisms that control the extent of groundwater acidification in a contaminated site were examined, and the extent to which the remediation efficiency was affected by variations in groundwater pH was evaluated using a simplified process-based reactive-transport model. This model was applied successfully to a well-documented field site and was then employed in a sensitivity analysis to identify the processes likely to significantly influence acidity production and subsequent microbial inhibition. The accumulation of organic acids produced from the fermentation of the injected substrate was the main cause of the pH change. The concentration of dissolved sulphates controlled substrate utilisation efficiency because sulphate-reducing biomass competed with halo-respiring biomass for the fermentation products. It was shown further that increased groundwater velocity increases dilution and reduces the accumulation of acidic products. As a consequence, the flow rate corresponding to the highest remediation efficiency depends on the fermentation and dechlorination rates. The model enables investigation and forecasting of the extent and areal distribution of pH change, providing a means to optimise the application of reductive dechlorination for site remediation.

  11. Reactive oxygen species abrogate the anticarcinogenic effect of eicosapentaenoic acid in Atm-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Ralf; Reichenbach, Janine; Koch, Claudia; Kloess, Stephan; Koehl, Ulrike; Mueller, Klaus; Baer, Patrick; Beermann, Christopher; Boehles, Hansjosef; Zielen, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are able to suppress cell proliferation and inhibit tumor growth. The objective of our study was to investigate the influence of a high dose EPA on the development of the tumor phenotype in ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (Atm)-deficient mice, a genetic cancer model that is associated with increased levels of oxidative stress. We analyzed toxicity, proliferation, cell-cycle progression, and apoptosis of EPA in vitro and latency to tumorigenesis in vivo. Because of the impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the tumor incidence in ataxia telangiectasia (AT), we further analyzed the effect of EPA on the generation of ROS and oxidative DNA damage (ODD). EPA effectively inhibited proliferation, altered cell-cycle progression, and induced apoptosis of tumor cells (AT-4). EPA showed no effect on the latency to tumorigenesis in Atm-deficient mice. EPA treatment was accompanied by a significant increase of ROS and ODD. Our results demonstrate the antiproliferative effect of EPA on tumor cells by alteration of cell-cycle progression and induction of apoptosis in vitro. On the other hand, EPA treatment of Atm-deficient mice led to the formation of ROS and accumulation of ODD that might have abrogated the anticarcinogenic effect caused by EPA. PMID:20574919

  12. Evaluating remedial alternatives for an acid mine drainage stream: application of a reactive transport model.

    PubMed

    Runkel, Robert L; Kimball, Briant A

    2002-03-01

    A reactive transport model based on one-dimensional transport and equilibrium chemistry is applied to synoptic data from an acid mine drainage stream. Model inputs include streamflow estimates based on tracer dilution, inflow chemistry based on synoptic sampling, and equilibrium constants describing acid/base, complexation, precipitation/dissolution, and sorption reactions. The dominant features of observed spatial profiles in pH and metal concentration are reproduced along the 3.5-km study reach by simulating the precipitation of Fe(III) and Al solid phases and the sorption of Cu, As, and Pb onto freshly precipitated iron(III) oxides. Given this quantitative description of existing conditions, additional simulations are conducted to estimate the streamwater quality that could result from two hypothetical remediation plans. Both remediation plans involve the addition of CaCO3 to raise the pH of a small, acidic inflow from approximately 2.4 to approximately 7.0. This pH increase results in a reduced metal load that is routed downstream by the reactive transport model, thereby providing an estimate of post-remediation water quality. The first remediation plan assumes a closed system wherein inflow Fe(II) is not oxidized by the treatment system; under the second remediation plan, an open system is assumed, and Fe(II) is oxidized within the treatment system. Both plans increase instream pH and substantially reduce total and dissolved concentrations of Al, As, Cu, and Fe(II+III) at the terminus of the study reach. Dissolved Pb concentrations are reduced by approximately 18% under the first remediation plan due to sorption onto iron(III) oxides within the treatment system and stream channel. In contrast, iron(III) oxides are limiting under the second remediation plan, and removal of dissolved Pb occurs primarily within the treatment system. This limitation results in an increase in dissolved Pb concentrations over existing conditions as additional downstream sources of

  13. REACTIVITIES OF ACRYLIC AND METHACRYLIC ACIDS IN A NUCLEOPHILIC ADDITION MODEL OF THEIR BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reactivities of derivatives of acrylic and methacrylic acid (AA and MAA) in Michael reactions of nucleophilic addition that have been proposed as the underlying mechanisms for the toxicity of such compounds are evaluated from a study of the mechanism of addition of a nucleoph...

  14. Properties of Starch-Poly(acrylamide-co-2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) Graft Copolymers Prepared by Reactive Extrusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Graft copolymers of starch with acrylamide and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPS) were prepared by reactive extrusion in a twin-screw extruder. The weight ratio of total monomer to starch was fixed at 1:3, while the molar fraction of AMPS in the monomer feed ranged from 0 to 0.119. Mon...

  15. PULMONARY FUNCTION AND BRONCHIAL REACTIVITY IN HUMAN SUBJECTS WITH EXPOSURE TO OZONE AND RESPIRABLE SULFURIC ACID AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-year research study was conducted investigating the effects of individual and sequential exposures to ozone and sulfuric acid aerosol on pulmonary function and bronchial reactivity in human subjects. PHASE I: In healthy smokers and nonsmokers exposed for 4 hours to 98 mic...

  16. Mechanistic and kinetic study on the reactions of coumaric acids with reactive oxygen species: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Garzón, Andrés; Bravo, Iván; Barbero, Antonio J; Albaladejo, José

    2014-10-01

    The mechanism and kinetics of reactions between coumaric acids and a series of reactive oxygen species ((•)OX) was studied through the density functional theory (DFT). H atom abstraction from -OH and -COOH groups and addition to the nonaromatic double bond were the most representative reaction pathways chosen for which free energy barriers and rate constants were calculated within the transition state theory (TST) framework. From these calculations, it was estimated that (•)OH > (•)OCH3 > (•)OOH > (•)OOCH3 is the order of reactivity of (•)OX with any coumaric acid. The highest rate constant was estimated for p-coumaric acid + (•)OH reaction, whereas the rest of the (•)OX species are more reactive with o-coumaric acid. On the basis of the calculated rate constants, H abstraction from a -OH group should be the main mechanism for the reactions involving (•)OCH3, (•)OOH, and (•)OOCH3 radicals. Nevertheless, the addition mechanism, which sometimes is not considered in theoretical studies on reactions of phenolic compounds with electrophilic species, could play a relevant role in the global mechanism of coumaric acid + (•)OH reactions. PMID:25166496

  17. Local reactivity descriptors to predict the strength of Lewis acid sites in alkali cation-exchanged zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Ramesh Ch.; Kinkar Roy, Ram; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2004-05-01

    Lewis acidity of alkali cation-exchanged zeolite is studied using local reactivity descriptors based on hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) concept. The local softness for nucleophilic attack ( sx+), local softness for electrophilic attack ( sx-) and their ratio, which is called `relative electrophilicity' ( sx+/ sx-), are calculated for the exchanged cations and Lewis acidity of the cations is found to decrease in the order: Li + > Na + > K + > Rb + > Cs +. Calculated blue shift of CO vibrational frequency (Δ ν) and interaction energy of CO molecule with alkali cation-exchanged zeolite clusters vary linearly with sx+/ sx- values.

  18. Incorporating Geochemical And Microbial Kinetics In Reactive Transport Models For Generation Of Acid Rock Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, B. J.; Rajaram, H.; Silverstein, J.

    2010-12-01

    diffusion model at the scale of a single rock is developed incorporating the proposed kinetic rate expressions. Simulations of initiation, washout and AMD flows are discussed to gain a better understanding of the role of porosity, effective diffusivity and reactive surface area in generating AMD. Simulations indicate that flow boundary conditions control generation of acid rock drainage as porosity increases.

  19. Reactive transport of gentisic acid in a hematite-coated sand column: Experimental study and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, K.; Rusch, B.; Lassabatere, L.; Hofmann, A.; Humbert, B.

    2010-06-01

    The adsorption of gentisic acid (GA) by hematite nano-particles was examined under static and dynamic conditions by conducting batch and column tests. To simulate natural sediments, the iron oxide was deposited on 10 μm quartz particles. The GA adsorption was described by a surface complexation model fitted to pH-adsorption curves with GA concentrations of 0.1-1 mM in a pH range of 3-10. The surface was described with one type of site ( tbnd FeOH°), while gentisic acid at the surface was described by two surface complexes ( tbnd FeLH 2°, log Kint = 8.9 and tbnd FeLH -, log Kint = -8.2). Modeling was conducted with PHREEQC-2 using the MINTEQ database. From a kinetic point of view, the intrinsic chemical reactions were likely to be the rate-limiting step of sorption (˜10 -3 s -1) while external and internal mass transfer rates (˜10 2 s -1) were much faster. Under flow through conditions (column), adsorption of GA to hematite-coated sand was about 7-times lower than under turbulent mixing (batch). This difference could not be explained by chemical adsorption kinetics as shown by test calculations run with HYDRUS-1D software. Surface complexation model simulations however successfully described the data when the surface area was adjusted, suggesting that under flow conditions the accessibility to the reactive surface sites was reduced. The exact mechanism responsible for the increased mobility of GA could not be determined but some parameters suggested that decreased external mass transfer between solution and surface may play a significant role under flow through conditions.

  20. Correlation between the acid-base properties of the La2O3 catalyst and its methane reactivity.

    PubMed

    Chu, Changqing; Zhao, Yonghui; Li, Shenggang; Sun, Yuhan

    2016-06-28

    Density functional theory and coupled cluster theory calculations were carried out to study the effects of the acid-base properties of the La2O3 catalyst on its catalytic activity in the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) reaction. The La(3+)-O(2-) pair site for CH4 activation is considered as a Lewis acid-Brönsted base pair. Using the Lewis acidity and the Brönsted basicity in the fluoride affinity and proton affinity scales as quantitative measures of the acid-base properties, the energy barrier for CH4 activation at the pair site can be linearly correlated with these acid-base properties. The pair site consisting of a strong Lewis acid La(3+) site and a strong Brönsted base O(2-) site is the most reactive for CH4 activation. In addition, the basicity of the La2O3 catalyst was traditionally measured by temperature-programmed desorption of CO2, but the CO2 chemisorption energy is better regarded as a combined measure of the acid-base properties of the pair site. A linear relationship of superior quality was found between the energy barrier for CH4 activation and the CO2 chemisorption energy, and the pair site favorable for CO2 chemisorption is also more reactive for CH4 activation, leading to the conflicting role of the "basicity" of the La2O3 catalyst in the OCM reaction. The necessity for very high reaction temperatures in the OCM reaction is rationalized by the requirement for the recovery of the most reactive acid-base pair site, which unfortunately also reacts most readily with the byproduct CO2 to form the very stable CO3(2-) species. PMID:27265027

  1. Reactive oxygen species, abscisic acid and ethylene interact to regulate sunflower seed germination.

    PubMed

    El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Sajjad, Yasar; Bazin, Jérémie; Langlade, Nicolas; Cristescu, Simona M; Balzergue, Sandrine; Baudouin, Emmanuel; Bailly, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seed dormancy is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and can be alleviated by incubating dormant embryos in the presence of methylviologen (MV), a ROS-generating compound. Ethylene alleviates sunflower seed dormancy whereas abscisic acid (ABA) represses germination. The purposes of this study were to identify the molecular basis of ROS effect on seed germination and to investigate their possible relationship with hormone signalling pathways. Ethylene treatment provoked ROS generation in embryonic axis whereas ABA had no effect on their production. The beneficial effect of ethylene on germination was lowered in the presence of antioxidant compounds, and MV suppressed the inhibitory effect of ABA. MV treatment did not alter significantly ethylene nor ABA production during seed imbibition. Microarray analysis showed that MV treatment triggered differential expression of 120 probe sets (59 more abundant and 61 less abundant genes), and most of the identified transcripts were related to cell signalling components. Many transcripts less represented in MV-treated seeds were involved in ABA signalling, thus suggesting an interaction between ROS and ABA signalling pathways at the transcriptional level. Altogether, these results shed new light on the crosstalk between ROS and plant hormones in seed germination. PMID:24811898

  2. Decolorization of Reactive Black 39 and Acid Red 360 by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Behzat, Balci

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate decolorization of Reactive Black 39 (RB39) and Acid Red 360 (AR360) by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which was isolated from a non-dye-contaminated activated sludge biomass. In the present study, the effect of various physicochemical parameters, initial dye concentration, temperature, pH, inoculum size and yeast extract concentration as an organic source on decolorization were investigated. P. aeruginosa was able to decolorize 20 mg/L RB39 completely within 144 hours in the presence of 0.5 g/L yeast extract at 25°C. Decolorization efficiencies for AR360 were found to be higher than RB39 under the same conditions. Optimal temperature to decolorize RB39 and AR360 was found to be 30 and 25°C, respectively. The activation energy (Ea) values for decolorization of RB39 and AR360 were found to be 61.89 kJ/mol and 81.18 kJ/mol, respectively. Experience showed that the pH and inoculum size had a considerable effect on decolorization of RB39 and AR360 by P. aeruginosa. PMID:26465295

  3. Soil nitrous acid emissions as a major source of atmospheric reactive nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermel, M.; Oswald, R.; Behrendt, T.; Wu, D.; Su, H.; Cheng, Y.; Breuninger, C.; Moravek, A.; Mougin, E.; Delon, C.; Loubet, B.; Pommerening-Röser, A.; Sörgel, M.; Poeschl, U.; Hoffmann, T.; Andreae, M. O.; Meixner, F. X.; Trebs, I.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is known to be a major source of hydroxyl radicals (OH) in the planetary boundary layer. OH is the major oxidant of the atmosphere and strongly affects its oxidation capacity. However, soil was found to release HONO, which is in equilibrium with soil nitrite (NO2-). These emissions are thought to depend on soil pH and NO2- content and were suggested to be an important contributor to the missing source of atmospheric HONO and OH radicals. The role of total soil-derived HONO in the biogeochemical and atmospheric nitrogen cycles, however, has remained unknown. We investigated a wide range of different soils in laboratory experiments, and found that HONO emissions from soils with high nutrient content and neutral pH can be of the same magnitude as nitric oxide (NO) emissions. Consequently, the co-emission of HONO with NO could substantially enhance the source of atmospheric reactive nitrogen in remote regions, with extensive arable areas. Observed temperature dependencies and obtained activation energies indicate that the HONO emissions are mainly due to microbial nitrification processes. Laboratory sterilization and inhibition experiments with soil samples yield further new insights into underlying processes of soil HONO emissions.

  4. Influence of fulvic acid on the colloidal stability and reactivity of nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haoran; Ahmad, Kito; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Zhongwu; Chen, Guiqiu; He, Qi; Xie, Yankai; Wu, Yanan; Zhao, Feng; Zeng, Yalan

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of fulvic acid (FA) on the colloidal stability and reactivity of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) at pH 5, 7 and 9. The sedimentation behavior of nZVI differed at different pH. A biphasic model was used to describe the two time-dependent settling processes (i.e., a rapid settling followed by a slower settling) and the settling rates were calculated. Generally, the settling of nZVI was more significant at the point of zero charge (pHpzc), which could be varied in the presence of FA due to the adsorption of FA on the nZVI surface. More FA was adsorbed on the nZVI surface at pH 5-7 than pH 9, resulting in the varying sedimentation behavior of nZVI via influencing the electrostatic repulsion among particles. Moreover, it was found that there was a tradeoff between the stabilization and the reactivity of nZVI as affected by the presence of FA. When FA concentration was at a low level, the adsorption of FA on the nZVI surface could enhance the particle stabilization, and thus facilitating the Cr(VI) reduction by providing more available surface sites. However, when the FA concentrations were too high to occupy the active surface sites of nZVI, the Cr(VI) reduction could be decreased even though the FA enhanced the dispersion of nZVI particles. At pH 9, the FA improved the Cr(VI) reduction by nZVI. Given the adsorption of FA on the nZVI surface was insignificant and its effect on the settling behavior of nZVI particles was minimal, it was proposed that the FA formed soluble complexes with the produced Fe(III)/Cr(III) ions, and thus reducing the degree of passivation on the nZVI surface and facilitating the Cr(VI) reduction. PMID:26796746

  5. Reactive oxygen species are involved in gibberellin/abscisic acid signaling in barley aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Tawaratsumida, Tomoya; Kondo, Koji; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2012-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signal molecules for a variety of processes in plants. However, many questions about the roles of ROS in plants remain to be clarified. Here, we report the role of ROS in gibberellin (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone cells. The production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a type of ROS, was induced by GA in aleurone cells but suppressed by ABA. Furthermore, exogenous H2O2 appeared to promote the induction of α-amylases by GA. In contrast, antioxidants suppressed the induction of α-amylases. Therefore, H2O2 seems to function in GA and ABA signaling, and in regulation of α-amylase production, in aleurone cells. To identify the target of H2O2 in GA and ABA signaling, we analyzed the interrelationships between H2O2 and DELLA proteins Slender1 (SLN1), GA-regulated Myb transcription factor (GAmyb), and ABA-responsive protein kinase (PKABA) and their roles in GA and ABA signaling in aleurone cells. In the presence of GA, exogenous H2O2 had little effect on the degradation of SLN1, the primary transcriptional repressor mediating GA signaling, but it promoted the production of the mRNA encoding GAMyb, which acts downstream of SLN1 and involves induction of α-amylase mRNA. Additionally, H2O2 suppressed the production of PKABA mRNA, which is induced by ABA:PKABA represses the production of GAMyb mRNA. From these observations, we concluded that H2O2 released the repression of GAMyb mRNA by PKABA and consequently promoted the production of α-amylase mRNA, thus suggesting that the H2O2 generated by GA in aleurone cells is a signal molecule that antagonizes ABA signaling. PMID:22291200

  6. Reactive uptake of N2O5 by aerosol particles containing mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Badger, Claire L; Griffiths, Paul T; George, Ingrid; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Cox, R Anthony

    2006-06-01

    The kinetics of reactive uptake of N2O5 on submicron aerosol particles containing humic acid and ammonium sulfate has been investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) and aerosol composition using a laminar flow reactor coupled with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) to characterize the aerosol. For single-component humic acid aerosol the uptake coefficient, gamma, was found to increase from 2 to 9 x 10(-4) over the range 25-75% RH. These values are 1-2 orders of magnitude below those typically observed for single-component sulfate aerosols (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2003, 5, 3453-3463;(1) Atmos. Environ. 2000, 34, 2131-2159(2)). For the mixed aerosols, gamma was found to decrease with increasing humic acid mass fraction and increase with increasing RH. For aerosols containing only 6% humic acid by dry mass, a decrease in reactivity of more than a factor of 2 was observed compared with the case for single-component ammonium sulfate. The concentration of liquid water in the aerosol droplets was calculated using the aerosol inorganic model (for the ammonium sulfate component) and a new combined FTIR-DMA system (for the humic acid component). Analysis of the uptake coefficients using the water concentration data shows that the change in reactivity cannot be explained by the change in water content alone. We suggest that, due to its surfactant properties, the main effect of the humic acid is to reduce the mass accommodation coefficient for N2O5 at the aerosol particle surface. This has implications for the use of particle hygroscopicity data for predictions of the rate of N2O5 hydrolysis. PMID:16722713

  7. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome: occurrence after exposure to a refractory ceramic fiber-phosphoric acid binder mixture.

    PubMed

    Forrester, B G

    1997-04-01

    A previously healthy, 47-year-old millwright was exposed to high airborne levels of a refractory ceramic fiber-phosphoric acid binder mixture; after acute bronchospasm, he required hospitalization. During the next 4 years, he had recurrent acute bronchospasm requiring emergency department visits and three hospitalizations. Review of the patient's medical and occupational history and extensive clinical investigation failed to provide alternate explanations for this hyperresponsive airways disease. This is believed to be the first reported case of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) after exposure to a refractory ceramic fiber-phosphoric acid binder mixture. Physicians should be aware of this possibility when examining patients exposed to such materials. PMID:9114842

  8. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, Fe3+ reduction and enzymatic activities in cultures of Ganoderma australe growing on Drimys winteri wood.

    PubMed

    Elissetche, Juan-Pedro; Ferraz, André; Freer, Juanita; Mendonça, Régis; Rodríguez, Jaime

    2006-07-01

    Ganoderma australe is a basidiomycete responsible for a natural process of selective and extensive lignin degradation. Fatty acids, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), Fe3+-reduction and enzymatic activities were monitored in cultures of G. australe growing on Drimys winteri wood chips. Linoleic acid was de novo synthesized, and steadily increased during 12 weeks of cultivation. Part of the unsaturated fatty acids underwent peroxidation as TBARS accumulated with biodegradation time. TBARS accumulation was proportional to the wood weight and component losses. Manganese-dependent peroxidase and lignin peroxidase were not detected in the culture extracts, whereas laccase-induced oxidation of syringaldazine peaked after 2 weeks (104+/-9 micromol oxidized min(-1) kg(-1) of dry wood), subsequently decreasing. On the other hand, nonenzymatic Fe3+-reducing activity increased as a function of cultivation time and could be involved in the initiation of lipid peroxidation. PMID:16790026

  9. Combining Amine-Reactive Cross-Linkers and Photo-Reactive Amino Acids for 3D-Structure Analysis of Proteins and Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lössl, Philip; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    During the last 15 years, the combination of chemical cross-linking and high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) has matured into an alternative approach for analyzing 3D-structures of proteins and protein complexes. Using the distance constraints imposed by the cross-links, models of the protein or protein complex under investigation can be created. The majority of cross-linking studies are currently conducted with homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linkers. We extend this "traditional" cross-linking/MS strategy by adding complementary photo-cross-linking data. For this, the diazirine-containing unnatural amino acids photo-leucine and photo-methionine are incorporated into the proteins and cross-link formation is induced by UV-A irradiation. The advantage of the photo-cross-linking strategy is that it is not restricted to lysine residues and that hydrophobic regions in proteins can be targeted, which is advantageous for investigating membrane proteins. We consider the strategy of combining cross-linkers with orthogonal reactivities and distances to be ideally suited for maximizing the amount of structural information that can be gained from a cross-linking experiment. PMID:26700045

  10. Carnosic Acid Induces Apoptosis Through Reactive Oxygen Species-mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Induction in Human Renal Carcinoma Caki Cells

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyoung-jin; Jung, Kyong-Jin; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Carnosic acid, which is one of extract components of rosemary, has anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anti-cancer effects. However, the anti-cancer effect of carnosic acid in human renal carcinoma cells is unknown. Methods: Flow cytometry analysis was used to examine the effects of carnosic acid on apoptosis, and Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-ase activity assay kit was used to investigate the involvement of caspase activation. To determine protein expression of apoptotic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related proteins, we used Western blotting. Intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using the fluorescent probes 2’, 7’-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCFDA). Results: Carnosic acid induced sub-diploid DNA content, sub-G1, population and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and activated caspase-3. A pan-caspase inhibitor, a benzyloxycarbonylvalyl-alanyl-aspartyl fluoromethyl ketone, markedly reduced apoptosis in carnosic acid-treated cells. Carnosic acid promoted intracellular ROS production, and pretreatment with the ROS scavengers (N-acetyl-L-cysteine and glutathione ethyl ester) inhibited carnosic acid-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, carnosic acid also induced expression of ER stress marker proteins, including activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (CHOP), in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Down-regulation of ATF4 and CHOP by small interfering RNA (siRNA) markedly reduced carnosic acid-induced sub-G1 population and PARP cleavage. In addition, carnosic acid induced apoptosis in human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-361 and human hepatocellular carcinoma SK-HEP1 cells, but not in normal human skin fibroblast cells and normal mouse kidney epithelial TMCK-1 cells. Conclusion: Carnosic acid induced apoptosis through production of ROS and induction of ER stress in human renal carcinoma Caki cells. PMID:25337586

  11. Degradation State, Sources, and Reactivity of Dissolved Organic Matter from an Amino Acid Time Series in an Agricultural Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiasek, S. J.; Pellerin, B. A.; Spencer, R. G.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Hernes, P.

    2015-12-01

    A detailed time series of dissolved amino acids was obtained in an agricultural watershed in the northern Central Valley, California, USA to investigate the roles of hydrologic and seasonal changes on the composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Total hydrolysable amino acid (THAA) concentrations ranged from 0.55 to 9.96 μM (mean 3.76 ± 1.80 μM) and not only peaked with discharge during winter storms, but also remained elevated throughout the irrigation season when discharge was low. Summer irrigation was a critical hydrologic regime for DOM cycling, since it mobilized DOM similar in concentration and reactivity to DOM released during winter storms for an extended period of time, with the largest amino acid contributions to the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pools (3.4 ‒ 3.7 % DOC-AA, 17.4 ‒ 22.5 % DON-AA), the largest proportion of basic amino acids (B/(B+A) = 0.19 ‒ 0.22), and the largest degradation index values (mean 1.37 ± 0.96). The mole percent of non-protein amino acids, commonly considered as an indicator of microbial degradation, decreased with DOM processing and was highest during summer (mean 4.1 ± 1.1%). A lack of correlation between THAA concentrations and UV-Vis absorbance and fluorescence proxies (including "protein-like" fluorophores B and T) indicated that optical properties may be limited in representing amino acid dynamics in this system. A new parameter for DOM processing derived from trends in individual amino acids demonstrated strong potential for inferring the extent of DOM degradation in freshwater systems. The biogeochemical relevance of irrigation practices is heightened by timing, since the additional export of reactive DOM coincides with enhanced downstream DOM processing in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, a critical habitat for endangered species serving as water source for 25 million Californians.

  12. Nucleic acid reactivity: challenges for next-generation semiempirical quantum models.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming; Giese, Timothy J; York, Darrin M

    2015-07-01

    Semiempirical quantum models are routinely used to study mechanisms of RNA catalysis and phosphoryl transfer reactions using combined quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical methods. Herein, we provide a broad assessment of the performance of existing semiempirical quantum models to describe nucleic acid structure and reactivity to quantify their limitations and guide the development of next-generation quantum models with improved accuracy. Neglect of diatomic differential overlap and self-consistent density-functional tight-binding semiempirical models are evaluated against high-level QM benchmark calculations for seven biologically important datasets. The datasets include: proton affinities, polarizabilities, nucleobase dimer interactions, dimethyl phosphate anion, nucleoside sugar and glycosidic torsion conformations, and RNA phosphoryl transfer model reactions. As an additional baseline, comparisons are made with several commonly used density-functional models, including M062X and B3LYP (in some cases with dispersion corrections). The results show that, among the semiempirical models examined, the AM1/d-PhoT model is the most robust at predicting proton affinities. AM1/d-PhoT and DFTB3-3ob/OPhyd reproduce the MP2 potential energy surfaces of 6 associative RNA phosphoryl transfer model reactions reasonably well. Further, a recently developed linear-scaling "modified divide-and-conquer" model exhibits the most accurate results for binding energies of both hydrogen bonded and stacked nucleobase dimers. The semiempirical models considered here are shown to underestimate the isotropic polarizabilities of neutral molecules by approximately 30%. The semiempirical models also fail to adequately describe torsion profiles for the dimethyl phosphate anion, the nucleoside sugar ring puckers, and the rotations about the nucleoside glycosidic bond. The modeling of pentavalent phosphorus, particularly with thio substitutions often used experimentally as mechanistic

  13. Tuning the reactivity of mononuclear nonheme manganese(iv)-oxo complexes by triflic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Junying; Yoon, Heejung; Lee, Yong -Min; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-04-14

    Triflic acid (HOTf)-bound nonheme Mn(IV)-oxo complexes, [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2 (L = N4Py and Bn-TPEN; N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine and Bn-TPEN = N-benzyl-N,N',N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine), were synthesized by adding HOTf to the solutions of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+ complexes and were characterized by various spectroscopies. The one-electron reduction potentials of the MnIV(O) complexes exhibited a significant positive shift upon binding of HOTf. The driving force dependences of electron transfer (ET) from electron donors to the MnIV(O) and MnIV(O)–(HOTf)2 complexes were examined and evaluated in light of the Marcus theory of ET to determine the reorganization energies of ET. The smaller reorganization energies and much more positive reduction potentials of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2 complexes resulted in greatly enhanced oxidation capacity towards one-electron reductants and para-X-substituted-thioanisoles. The reactivities of the Mn(IV)-oxo complexes were markedly enhanced by binding of HOTf, such as a 6.4 × 105-fold increase in the oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reaction (i.e., sulfoxidation). Such a remarkable acceleration in the OAT reaction results from the enhancement of ET from para-X-substituted-thioanisoles to the MnIV(O) complexes as revealed by the unified ET driving force dependence of the rate constants of OAT and ET reactions of [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2. In contrast, deceleration was observed in the rate of H-atom transfer (HAT) reaction of [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2 complexes with 1,4-cyclohexadiene as compared with those of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+ complexes. Thus, the binding of two HOTf molecules to the MnIV(O) moiety resulted in remarkable acceleration of the ET

  14. Tuning the reactivity of mononuclear nonheme manganese(iv)-oxo complexes by triflic acid

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Junying; Yoon, Heejung; Lee, Yong -Min; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-04-14

    Triflic acid (HOTf)-bound nonheme Mn(IV)-oxo complexes, [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2 (L = N4Py and Bn-TPEN; N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine and Bn-TPEN = N-benzyl-N,N',N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine), were synthesized by adding HOTf to the solutions of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+ complexes and were characterized by various spectroscopies. The one-electron reduction potentials of the MnIV(O) complexes exhibited a significant positive shift upon binding of HOTf. The driving force dependences of electron transfer (ET) from electron donors to the MnIV(O) and MnIV(O)–(HOTf)2 complexes were examined and evaluated in light of the Marcus theory of ET to determine the reorganization energies of ET. The smaller reorganization energies and much more positive reduction potentialsmore » of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2 complexes resulted in greatly enhanced oxidation capacity towards one-electron reductants and para-X-substituted-thioanisoles. The reactivities of the Mn(IV)-oxo complexes were markedly enhanced by binding of HOTf, such as a 6.4 × 105-fold increase in the oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reaction (i.e., sulfoxidation). Such a remarkable acceleration in the OAT reaction results from the enhancement of ET from para-X-substituted-thioanisoles to the MnIV(O) complexes as revealed by the unified ET driving force dependence of the rate constants of OAT and ET reactions of [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2. In contrast, deceleration was observed in the rate of H-atom transfer (HAT) reaction of [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2 complexes with 1,4-cyclohexadiene as compared with those of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+ complexes. Thus, the binding of two HOTf molecules to the MnIV(O) moiety resulted in remarkable acceleration of the ET rate when the ET is thermodynamically feasible. When the ET reaction is highly endergonic, the rate of the HAT reaction is decelerated due to the steric effect of the counter anion of HOTf.« less

  15. Nucleic acid reactivity : challenges for next-generation semiempirical quantum models

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming; Giese, Timothy J.; York, Darrin M.

    2016-01-01

    Semiempirical quantum models are routinely used to study mechanisms of RNA catalysis and phosphoryl transfer reactions using combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical methods. Herein, we provide a broad assessment of the performance of existing semiempirical quantum models to describe nucleic acid structure and reactivity in order to quantify their limitations and guide the development of next-generation quantum models with improved accuracy. Neglect of diatomic diffierential overlap (NDDO) and self-consistent density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) semiempirical models are evaluated against high-level quantum mechanical benchmark calculations for seven biologically important data sets. The data sets include: proton affinities, polarizabilities, nucleobase dimer interactions, dimethyl phosphate anion, nucleoside sugar and glycosidic torsion conformations, and RNA phosphoryl transfer model reactions. As an additional baseline, comparisons are made with several commonly used density-functional models, including M062X and B3LYP (in some cases with dispersion corrections). The results show that, among the semiempirical models examined, the AM1/d-PhoT model is the most robust at predicting proton affinities. AM1/d-PhoT and DFTB3-3ob/OPhyd reproduce the MP2 potential energy surfaces of 6 associative RNA phosphoryl transfer model reactions reasonably well. Further, a recently developed linear-scaling “modified divide-and-conquer” model exhibits the most accurate results for binding energies of both hydrogen bonded and stacked nucleobase dimers. The semiempirical models considered here are shown to underestimate the isotropic polarizabilities of neutral molecules by approximately 30%. The semiempirical models also fail to adequately describe torsion profiles within the dimethyl phosphate anion, the nucleoside sugar ring puckers, and the rotations about the nucleoside glycosidic bond. The modeling of pentavalent phosphorus, particularly with thio

  16. Reactivity of Tannic Acid with Common Corrosion Products and Its Influence on the Hydrolysis of Iron in Alkaline Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaén, J. A.; Araúz, E. Y.; Iglesias, J.; Delgado, Y.

    2003-06-01

    To ascertain the role of tannic acid in the anticorrosive protection of steels, the reaction between 5% tannic acid aqueous solutions with lepidocrocite, goethite, superparamagnetic goethite, akaganeite, poorly crystalline maghemite, magnetite and hematite was studied using color changes, infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopy. After three months of interaction with lepidocrocite, the formation of an iron tannate complex was detected by its dark blue color and confirmed by infrared and Mössbauer analysis. Evidence for the chemical transformation was obtained for goethite in nanoparticles and poorly crystalline maghemite after reaction for six months. The other iron compounds do not transform to another oxide or phase upon treatment with the tannic acid solution. These results showed that lepidocrocite is the most reactive phase and that the size and degree of crystallinity have strong influence on the formation of the tannate complexes. The precipitation of iron phases from alkaline solutions of iron (II) sulfate heptahydrate containing different amount of tannic acid and potassium nitrate as oxidative agent was also studied. Mössbauer and infrared results show that in the absence of tannic acid some common rust components are obtained (viz. goethite, superparamagnetic goethite, maghemite and non-stoichiometric magnetite). The presence of 0.1% tannic acid in a low alkalinity solution results in the precipitation of iron oxyhydroxides and some iron tannates. Concentrations of 1% tannic acid are required for the formation of the tannates complexes as main reaction product.

  17. Effect of phenolic acids of microbial origin on production of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria and neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several low-molecular-weight phenolic acids are present in the blood of septic patients at high levels. The microbial origin of the most of phenolic acids in the human body was shown previously, but pathophysiological role of the phenolic acids is not clear. Sepsis is associated with the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both the circulation and the affected organs. In this work the influence of phenolic acids on ROS production in mitochondria and neutrophils was investigated. Methods ROS production in mitochondria and neutrophils was determined by MCLA- and luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. The rate of oxygen consumption by mitochondria was determined polarographically. The difference of electric potentials on the inner mitochondrial membrane was registered using a TPP+-selective electrode. The formation of phenolic metabolites in monocultures by the members of the main groups of the anaerobic human microflora and aerobic pathogenic bacteria was investigated by the method of gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results All phenolic acids had impact on mitochondria and neutrophils, the main producers of ROS in tissues and circulation. Phenolic acids (benzoic and cinnamic acids) producing the pro-oxidant effect on mitochondria inhibited ROS formation in neutrophils. Their effect on mitochondria was abolished by dithiothreitol (DTT). Phenyllactate and p-hydroxyphenyllactate decreased ROS production in both mitochondria and neutrophils. Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli produced in vitro considerable amounts of phenyllactic and p-hydroxyphenyllactic acids, Clostridia s. produced great quantities of phenylpropionic and p-hydroxyphenylpropionic acids, p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid was produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumanii; and benzoic acid, by Serratia marcescens. Conclusions The most potent activators of ROS production in mitochondria are phenolic acids whose effect is mediated via the interaction with thiol

  18. Heterogeneous Chemistry of Lipopolysaccharides with Gas-Phase Nitric Acid: Reactive Sites and Reaction Pathways.

    PubMed

    Trueblood, Jonathan V; Estillore, Armando D; Lee, Christopher; Dowling, Jacqueline A; Prather, Kimberly A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-08-18

    Recent studies have shown that sea spray aerosol (SSA) has a size-dependent, complex composition consisting of biomolecules and biologically derived organic compounds in addition to salts. This additional chemical complexity most likely influences the heterogeneous reactivity of SSA, as these other components will have different reactive sites and reaction pathways. In this study, we focus on the reactivity of a class of particles derived from some of the biological components of sea spray aerosol including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) that undergo heterogeneous chemistry within the reactive sites of the biological molecule. Examples of these reactions and the relevant reactive sites are proposed as follows: R-COONa(s) + HNO3(g) → NaNO3 + R-COOH and R-HPO4Na(s) + HNO3(g) → NaNO3 + R-H2PO4. These reactions may be a heterogeneous pathway not only for sea spray aerosol but also for a variety of other types of atmospheric aerosol as well. PMID:27445084

  19. Characterization of some amino acid derivatives of benzoyl isothiocyanate: Crystal structures and theoretical prediction of their reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odame, Felix; Hosten, Eric C.; Betz, Richard; Lobb, Kevin; Tshentu, Zenixole R.

    2015-11-01

    The reaction of benzoyl isothiocyanate with L-serine, L-proline, D-methionine and L-alanine gave 2-[(benzoylcarbamothioyl)amino]-3-hydroxypropanoic acid (I), 1-(benzoylcarbamothioyl)pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (II), 2-[(benzoylcarbamothioyl)amino]-4-(methylsulfanyl)butanoic acid (III) and 2-[(benzoylcarbamothioyl)amino]propanoic acid (IV), respectively. The compounds have been characterized by IR, NMR, microanalyses and mass spectrometry. The crystal structures of all the compounds have also been discussed. Compound II showed rotamers in solution. DFT calculations of the frontier orbitals of the compounds have been carried out to ascertain the groups that contribute to the HOMO and LUMO, and to study their contribution to the reactivity of these compounds. The calculations indicated that the carboxylic acid group in these compounds is unreactive hence making the conversion to benzimidazoles via cyclization on the carboxylic acids impractical. This has been further confirmed by the reaction of compounds I-IV, respectively, with o-phenylene diamine which was unsuccessful but gave compound V.

  20. Production of carrier-peptide conjugates using chemically reactive unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Travis; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-12-17

    Provided are methods of making carrier polypeptide that include incorporating a first unnatural amino acid into a carrier polypeptide variant, incorporating a second unnatural amino acid into a target polypeptide variant, and reacting the first and second unnatural amino acids to produce the conjugate. Conjugates produced using the provided methods are also provided. In addition, orthogonal translation systems in methylotrophic yeast and methods of using these systems to produce carrier and target polypeptide variants comprising unnatural amino acids are provided.

  1. Production of carrier-peptide conjugates using chemically reactive unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Travis; Schultz, Peter G

    2014-01-28

    Provided are methods of making carrier polypeptide that include incorporating a first unnatural amino acid into a carrier polypeptide variant, incorporating a second unnatural amino acid into a target polypeptide variant, and reacting the first and second unnatural amino acids to produce the conjugate. Conjugates produced using the provided methods are also provided. In addition, orthogonal translation systems in methylotrophic yeast and methods of using these systems to produce carrier and target polypeptide variants comprising unnatural amino acids are provided.

  2. Production of carrier-peptide conjugates using chemically reactive unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Travis; Schultz, Peter G.

    2015-08-18

    Provided are methods of making carrier polypeptide that include incorporating a first unnatural amino acid into a carrier polypeptide variant, incorporating a second unnatural amino acid into a target polypeptide variant, and reacting the first and second unnatural amino acids to produce the conjugate. Conjugates produced using the provided methods are also provided. In addition, orthogonal translation systems in methylotrophic yeast and methods of using these systems to produce carrier and target polypeptide variants comprising unnatural amino acids are provided.

  3. Amino acid residues controlling reactivation of organophosphonyl conjugates of acetylcholinesterase by mono- and bisquaternary oximes

    SciTech Connect

    Ashani, Y.; Radic, Z.; Tsigelny, I.; Vellom, D.C.; Pickering, N.A.

    1995-03-17

    Single and multiple site mutants of recombinant mouse acetyicholinesterase (rMoAChE) were inhibited with racemic 7-(methylethoxyphosphinyloxy)- 1-methylquinolinium iodide (MEPQ) and the resulting mixture of two enantiomers, CH3PR,S(O) (OC2H5)-AChE(EMPR,S AChE), were subjected to reactivation with 2-(hydrox- yiminomethyl) -1 -methylpyridinium methanesulfonate (P2S) and 1- (2-hydroxyiminomethyl- 1` -pyridinium)-3- (4`-carbamoyl-1- pyridinium)-2-oxapropane dichloride (HI-6). Kinetic analysis of the reactivation profiles revealed biphasic behavior with an approximate 1:1 ratio of two presumed reactivatable enantiomeric components. Equilibrium dissociation and kinetic rate constants for reactivation of site-specific mutant enzymes were compared with those obtained for wild-type rMoAChE, tissue-derived Torpedo AChE and human plasma butyrylcholinesterase.

  4. Isoprene Epoxydiols as Precursors to Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation: Acid-Catalyzed Reactive Uptake Studies with Authentic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Zhang, Zhenfa; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Zhang, Haofei; Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Rubitschun, Caitlin L.; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Knipping, Eladio M.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    Isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), formed from the photooxidation of isoprene under low-NOx conditions, have recently been proposed as precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) on the basis of mass spectrometric evidence. In the present study, IEPOX isomers were synthesized in high purity (> 99%) to investigate their potential to form SOA via reactive uptake in a series of controlled dark chamber studies followed by reaction product analyses. IEPOX-derived SOA was substantially observed only in the presence of acidic aerosols, with conservative lower-bound yields of 4.7–6.4% for β-IEPOX and 3.4–5.5% for δ-IEPOX, providing direct evidence for IEPOX isomers as precursors to isoprene SOA. These chamber studies demonstrate that IEPOX uptake explains the formation of known isoprene SOA tracers found in ambient aerosols, including 2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols, dimers, and IEPOX-derived organosulfates. Additionally, we show reactive uptake on the acidified sulfate aerosols supports a previously unreported acid-catalyzed intramolecular rearrangement of IEPOX to cis- and trans-3-methyltetrahydrofuran-3,4-diols (3-MeTHF-3,4-diols) in the particle phase. Analysis of these novel tracer compounds by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) suggests that they contribute to a unique factor resolved from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of AMS organic aerosol spectra collected from low-NOx, isoprene-dominated regions influenced by the presence of acidic aerosols. PMID:22103348

  5. Di- and triarylmethylium ions as probes for the ambident reactivities of carbanions derived from 5-benzylated Meldrum's acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Tan, Yue; Berionni, Guillaume; Ofial, Armin R; Mayr, Herbert

    2014-08-25

    The kinetics of the reactions of carbocations with carbanions 1 derived from 5-benzyl-substituted Meldrum's acids 1-H (Meldrum's acid = 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-4,6-dione) were investigated by UV/Vis spectroscopic methods. Benzhydryl cations Ar2CH(+) added exclusively to C-5 of the Meldrum's acid moiety. As the second-order rate constants (kC) of these reactions in DMSO followed the linear free-energy relationship lg k = sN (N+E), the nucleophile-specific reactivity parameters N and sN for the carbanions 1 could be determined. In contrast, trityl cations Ar3C(+) reacted differently. While tritylium ions of low electrophilicity (E<-2) reacted with 1 through rate-determining β-hydride abstraction, more Lewis acidic tritylium ions initially reacted at the carbonyl oxygen of 1 to form trityl enolates, which subsequently reionized and eventually yielded triarylmethanes and 5-benzylidene Meldrum's acids by hydride transfer. PMID:25099696

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon reaction rates with peroxy-acid treatment: prediction of reactivity using local ionization potential.

    PubMed

    Shoulder, J M; Alderman, N S; Breneman, C M; Nyman, M C

    2013-08-01

    Property-Encoded Surface Translator (PEST) descriptors were found to be correlated with the degradation rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by the peroxy-acid process. Reaction rate constants (k) in hr(-1) for nine PAHs (acenaphthene, anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, fluoranthene, fluorene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene) were determined by a peroxy-acid treatment method that utilized acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and a sulphuric acid catalyst to degrade the polyaromatic structures. Molecular properties of the selected nine PAHs were derived from structures optimized at B3LYP/6-31G(d) and HF/6-31G(d) levels of theory. Properties of adiabatic and vertical ionization potential (IP), highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMO), HOMO/lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap energies and HOMO/singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) gap energies were not correlated with rates of peroxy-acid reaction. PEST descriptors were calculated from B3LYP/6-31G(d) optimized structures and found to have significant levels of correlation with k. PIP Min described the minimum local IP on the surface of the molecule and was found to be related to k. PEST technology appears to be an accurate method in predicting reactivity and could prove to be a valuable asset in building treatment models and in remediation design for PAHs and other organic contaminants in the environment. PMID:23734862

  7. Production of hybrid diesel fuel precursors from carbohydrates and petrochemicals using formic acid as a reactive solvent.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Rauchfuss, Thomas B

    2013-02-01

    We report the one-pot alkylation of mesitylene with carbohydrate-derived 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) as a step toward diesel-range liquids. Using FeCl(3) as a catalyst, HMF is shown to alkylate toluene, xylene, and mesitylene in high yields in CH(2)Cl(2) and MeNO(2) solvents. Efforts to extend this reaction to greener or safer solvents showed that most ether-based solvents are unsatisfactory. Acid catalysts (e.g, p-TsOH) also proved to be ineffective. Using formic acid as a reactive solvent, mesitylene could be alkylated to give mesitylmethylfurfural (MMF) starting from fructose with yields up to approximately 70 %. The reaction of fructose with formic acid in the absence of mesitylene gave rise to low yields of the formate ester of HMF, which indicates the stabilizing effect of replacing the hydroxyl substituent with mesityl. The arene also serves as a second phase into which the product is extracted. Even by using formic acid, the mesitylation of less expensive precursors such as glucose and cellulose proceeded only in modest yields (ca. 20 %). These simpler substrates were found to undergo mesitylation by using hydrogen chloride/formic acid via the intermediate chloromethylfurfural. PMID:23281330

  8. Enhancing the reactivity of bimetallic Bi/Fe(0) by citric acid for remediation of polluted water.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jianyu; Lee, Chung-Seop; Kim, Eun-Ju; Chang, Yoon-Young; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the environmentally benign citric acid (CA) was utilized to improve the aerobic degradation of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) over bismuth modified nanoscale zero-valent iron (Bi/Fe(0)). The characterization results revealed the existence of bismuth covering on the Fe(0) surface under zero-valent state. And, the Bi/Fe(0)-CA+O2 system performed excellent reactivity in degradation of 4-CP due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was confirmed by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. After 30min of reaction, 80% of 4-CP was removed using Bi/Fe(0)-CA+O2 accompanying with high dechlorination rate. The oxidative degradation intermediates were analyzed by HPLC and LC-MS. We found that CA could promote the bismuth-iron system to produce much reactive oxygen species ROS under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions due to its ligand function, which could react with Fe(3+) to form a ligand complex (Fe(III)Cit), accompanying with a considerable production of Fe(2+) and H2O2. This study provides a new strategy for generating ROS on nZVI and suggests its application for the mineralization of many recalcitrant pollutants. PMID:26905611

  9. Graphene oxide induces plasma membrane damage, reactive oxygen species accumulation and fatty acid profiles change in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Yu, Qilin; Liang, Chen; Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Biao; Li, Mingchun

    2016-10-01

    During the past couple of years, graphene nanomaterials were extremely popular among the scientists due to the promising properties in many aspects. Before the materials being well applied, we should first focus on their biosafety and toxicity. In this study, we investigated the toxicity of synthesized graphene oxide (GO) against the model industrial organism Pichia pastoris. We found that the synthesized GO showed dose-dependent toxicity to P. pastoris, through cell membrane damage and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. In response to these cell stresses, cells had normal unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) levels but increased contents of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) with up-regulation of UFA synthesis-related genes on the transcriptional level, which made it overcome the stress under GO attack. Two UFA defective strains (spt23Δ and fad12Δ) were used to demonstrate the results above. Hence, this study suggested a close connection between PUFAs and cell survival against GO. PMID:27376352

  10. Uric acid and transforming growth factor in fructose-induced production of reactive oxygen species in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Madlala, Hlengiwe P; Maarman, Gerald J; Ojuka, Edward

    2016-04-01

    The consumption of fructose, a major constituent of the modern diet, has raised increasing concern about the effects of fructose on health. Research suggests that excessive intake of fructose (>50 g/d) causes hyperuricemia, insulin resistance, mitochondrial dysfunction, de novo lipogenesis by the liver, and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in muscle. In a number of tissues, uric acid has been shown to stimulate the production of ROS via activation of transforming growth factor β1 and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase 4. The role of uric acid in fructose-induced production of ROS in skeletal muscle, however, has not been investigated. This review examines the evidence for fructose-induced production of ROS in skeletal muscle, highlights proposed mechanisms, and identifies gaps in current knowledge. PMID:26946251

  11. Reactivity of partially reduced arylhydroxylamine and nitrosoarene metabolites of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) toward biomass and humic acids.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farrukh; Hughes, Joseph B

    2002-10-15

    Sequential anaerobic/aerobic treatment of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) generally results in the incorporation of residues into biomass and natural organic matter fractions of a system. To better understand the potential contribution of hydroxylamine and nitroso moieties in these reactions, studies were conducted using model systems taking advantage of the biocatalytic-activity of Clostridium acetobutylicum that does not produce aminated TNT derivatives. To evaluate binding to biomass only, systems containing cell-free extracts of C. acetobutylicum and molecular hydrogen as a reductant were employed. At the end of treatment, mass balance studies showed that 10% of the total 14C was associated with an insoluble protein-containing precipitate that could not be extracted with organic solvents. Model reactions were conducted between a mixture of 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene (DHA6NT) and 4-hydroxylamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4HADNT) and 1-thioglycerol to test the involvement of the nitroso-thiol reaction in binding to biomass. It was demonstrated that DHA6NT formed a new and relatively polar product with 1-thioglycerol only in the presence of oxygen. The oxygen requirement confirmed that the nitroso functionality was responsible for the binding reaction. The reactivity of arylhydroxylamino and nitrosoarene functionalities toward International Humic Substance Society (IHSS) peat humic acid was evaluated under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. 4HADNT showed no appreciable reactivity toward peat humic acid. Conversely, the nitrosoarene compound, nitrosobenzene, showed rapid reactivity with peat humic acid (50% removal in 48 h). When tested with two other humic acids (selected on the basis of their protein content), it became apparent that the proteinaceous fraction was responsible at least in part for the nitrosoarene's removal from solution. Furthermore, the pretreatment of the humic acids with a selective thiol derivatizing agent had a considerable effect

  12. REACTIVITY PROFILE OF LIGANDS OF MAMMALIAN RETINOIC ACID RECEPTORS: A PRELIMINARY COREPA ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retinoic acid and associated derivatives comprise a class of endogenous hormones that bind to and activate different families of retinoic acid receptors (RARs, RXRs), and control many aspects of vertebrate development. Identification of potential RAR and RXR ligands is of interes...

  13. Next-generation re-sequencing of genes involved in increased platelet reactivity in diabetic patients on acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Postula, Marek; Janicki, Piotr K; Eyileten, Ceren; Rosiak, Marek; Kaplon-Cieslicka, Agnieszka; Sugino, Shigekazu; Wilimski, Radosław; Kosior, Dariusz A; Opolski, Grzegorz; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Mirowska-Guzel, Dagmara

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether rare missense genetic variants in several genes related to platelet functions and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) response are associated with the platelet reactivity in patients with diabetes type 2 (T2D) on ASA therapy. Fifty eight exons and corresponding introns of eight selected genes, including PTGS1, PTGS2, TXBAS1, PTGIS, ADRA2A, ADRA2B, TXBA2R, and P2RY1 were re-sequenced in 230 DNA samples from T2D patients by using a pooled PCR amplification and next-generation sequencing by Illumina HiSeq2000. The observed non-synonymous variants were confirmed by individual genotyping of 384 DNA samples comprising of the individuals from the original discovery pools and additional verification cohort of 154 ASA-treated T2DM patients. The association between investigated phenotypes (ASA induced changes in platelets reactivity by PFA-100, VerifyNow and serum thromboxane B2 level [sTxB2]), and accumulation of rare missense variants (genetic burden) in investigated genes was tested using statistical collapsing tests. We identified a total of 35 exonic variants, including 3 common missense variants, 15 rare missense variants, and 17 synonymous variants in 8 investigated genes. The rare missense variants exhibited statistically significant difference in the accumulation pattern between a group of patients with increased and normal platelet reactivity based on PFA-100 assay. Our study suggests that genetic burden of the rare functional variants in eight genes may contribute to differences in the platelet reactivity measured with the PFA-100 assay in the T2DM patients treated with ASA. PMID:26599574

  14. Degradation of reactive, acid and basic textile dyes in the presence of ultrasound and rare earths [Lanthanum and Praseodymium].

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pankaj; Goyal, Shikha; Patnala, Prem Kishore

    2014-11-01

    Degradation of five textile dyes, namely Reactive Red 141 (RR 141), Reactive Blue 21 (RB 21), Acid Red 114 (AR 114), Acid Blue 113 (AB 113) and Basic Violet 16 (BV 16) in aqueous solution has been carried out with ultrasound (US) and in combination with rare earth ions (La(3+) and Pr(3+)). Kinetic analysis of the data showed a pseudo-first order degradation reaction for all the dyes. The rate constant (k), half life (t1/2) and the process efficiency (φ) for various processes in degradation of dyes under different experimental conditions have been calculated. The influence of concentrations of dyes (16-40mg/L), pH (5, 7 and 9) and rare earth ion concentration (4, 12 and 20mg/L) on the degradation of dyes have also been studied. The degradation percentage increased with increasing rare earth amount and decreased with increasing concentration of dyes. Both horn and bath type sonicators were used at 20kHz and 250W for degradation. The sonochemical degradation rate of dyes in the presence of rare earths was related to the type of chromophoric groups in the dye molecule. Degradation sequence of dyes was further examined through LCMS and Raman spectroscopic techniques, which confirmed the sonochemical degradation of dyes to non-toxic end products. PMID:24491599

  15. Selective complexation and reactivity of metallic nitride and oxometallic fullerenes with Lewis acids and use as an effective purification method.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Steven; Mackey, Mary A; Pickens, Jane E; Stuart, Melissa A; Confait, Bridget S; Phillips, J Paige

    2009-12-21

    Metallic nitride fullerenes (MNFs) and oxometallic fullerenes (OMFs) react quickly with an array of Lewis acids. Empty-cage fullerenes are largely unreactive under conditions used in this study. The reactivity order is Sc(4)O(2)@I(h)-C(80) > Sc(3)N@C(78) > Sc(3)N@C(68) > Sc(3)N@D(5h)-C(80) > Sc(3)N@I(h)-C(80). Manipulations of Lewis acids, molar ratios, and kinetic differences within the family of OMF and MNF metallofullerenes are demonstrated in a selective precipitation scheme, which can be used either alone for purifying Sc(3)N@I(h)-C(80) or combined with a final high-performance liquid chromatography pass for Sc(4)O(2)@I(h)-C(80), Sc(3)N@D(5h)-C(80), Sc(3)N@C(68), or Sc(3)N@C(78). The purification process is scalable. Analysis of the experimental rate constants versus electrochemical band gap explains the order of reactivity among the OMFs and MNFs. PMID:19911812

  16. Antagonism between lipid-derived reactive carbonyls and phenolic compounds in the Strecker degradation of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Rosa M; Hidalgo, Francisco J; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-03-01

    The Strecker-type degradation of phenylalanine in the presence of 2-pentanal and phenolic compounds was studied to investigate possible interactions that either promote or inhibit the formation of Strecker aldehydes in food products. Phenylacetaldehyde formation was promoted by 2-pentenal and also by o- and p-diphenols, but not by m-diphenols. This is consequence of the ability of phenolic compounds to be converted into reactive carbonyls and produce the Strecker degradation of the amino acid. When 2-pentenal and phenolic compounds were simultaneously present, an antagonism among them was observed. This antagonism is suggested to be a consequence of the ability of phenolic compounds to either react with both 2-pentenal and phenylacetaldehyde, or compete with other carbonyl compounds for the amino acids, a function that is determined by their structure. All these results suggest that carbonyl-phenol reactions may be used to modulate flavor formation produced in food products by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls. PMID:26471665

  17. Ursolic acid isolated from guava leaves inhibits inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Hye; Kim, Jin Nam; Han, Sung Nim; Kim, Hye-Kyeong

    2015-06-01

    Psidium guajava (guava) leaves have been frequently used for the treatment of rheumatism, fever, arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. The purpose of this study was to identify major anti-inflammatory compounds from guava leaf extract. The methanol extract and its hexane-, dichloromethane-, ethylacetate-, n-butanol- and water-soluble phases derived from guava leaves were evaluated to determine their inhibitory activity on nitric oxide (NO) production by RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The methanol extract decreased NO production in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxicity at a concentration range of 0-100 μg/mL. The n-butanol soluble phase was the most potent among the five soluble phases. Four compounds were isolated by reversed-phase HPLC from the n-butanol soluble phase and identified to be avicularin, guaijaverin, leucocyanidin and ursolic acid by their NMR spectra. Among these compounds, ursolic acid inhibited LPS-induced NO production in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxity at a concentration range of 1-10 µM, but the other three compounds had no effect. Ursolic acid also inhibited LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 production. A western blot analysis showed that ursolic acid decreased the LPS-stimulated inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase protein levels. In addition, ursolic acid suppressed the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, as measured by flow cytometry. Taken together, these results identified ursolic acid as a major anti-inflammatory compound in guava leaves. PMID:25753845

  18. Reactivity of Water Soluble Organic Acids with Chloride and Nitrate Particles Investigated by Micro-spectroscopy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; OBrien, R. E.; Kelly, S. T.; Shilling, J. E.; Tivanski, A.; Moffet, R.; Gilles, M. K.; Laskin, A.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric particles often consist of a complex organic and inorganic mixture. Interactions between organic and inorganic species may affect particles' chemical and physical properties thus atmospheric chemistry and climate. Water soluble organic acids (WSOA) can contribute a significant fraction of organic materials in condense phase. Inorganic particles, such as sea salt and mineral dust, are main components in the atmosphere and can undergo complex heterogeneous reactions. For example, depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with WSOA resulting in the release gaseous HCl and formation of organic salts. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where acid displacement reactions are mainly driven by the high volatility and evaporation of HNO3 as particles go through dehydration process. Furthermore, secondary organic material (SOM), which contains a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits a similar reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present field and laboratory studies on the reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA/SOM and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis such as computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), and micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show various potentials of chloride and nitrate depletion by WSOA and SOM. Formation of corresponding organic salts is confirmed and quantified.

  19. The pKa of Brønsted acids controls their reactivity with diazo compounds.

    PubMed

    Fei, Na; Sauter, Basilius; Gillingham, Dennis

    2016-06-14

    We study the O-alkylation of phosphate groups by alkyl diazo compounds in a range of small molecules and biopolymers. We show that the relatively high pKa of phosphate in comparison to the other naturally occurring Brønsted acids can be exploited to control alkylation selectivity. We provide a simple protocol for chemical modification of some of the most important instances of phosphates in natural compounds including in small molecule metabolites, nucleic acids, and peptides. PMID:27212133

  20. Reactivation of an aged commercial three-way catalyst by oxalic and citric acid washing.

    PubMed

    Christou, Stavroula Y; Birgersson, Henrik; Fierro, José L G; Efstathiou, Angelos M

    2006-03-15

    The efficiency of dilute oxalic and citric acid solutions on improving the oxygen storage capacity (OSC) and catalytic activity of a severely aged (83,000 km) commercial three-way catalyst (TWC) has been investigated. Washing procedures applied after optimization of experimental parameters, namely, temperature, flow-rate, and concentration of acid solution, led to significant improvements of OSC and catalytic activity (based on dynamometer test measurements) of the aged TWC. The latterwas made possible due to the removal of significant amounts of various contaminants accumulated on the catalyst surface (e.g., P, S, Pb, Ca, Zn, Si, Fe, Cu, and Ni) during driving conditions, as revealed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. For the first time, it is demonstrated that dilute oxalic acid solution significantly improves the catalytic activity of an aged commercial TWC toward CO, Cx,Hy, and NOx conversions under real exhaust gas conditions (dynamometer tests) by two to eight times in the 250-450 degrees C range and the OSC quantity by up to 50%. Oxalic acid appears to be more efficient than citric acid in removing specifically P- and S-containing compounds from the catalyst surface, whereas citric acid in removing Pb- and Zn-containing compounds, thus uncovering surface active catalytic sites. PMID:16570632

  1. Kinetic dissolution of carbonates and Mn oxides in acidic water: Measurement of in situ field rates and reactive transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.G.; Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of carbonate and Mn oxide dissolution under acidic conditions were examined through the in situ exposure of pure phase samples to acidic ground water in Pinal Creek Basin, Arizona. The average long-term calculated in situ dissolution rates for calcite and dolomite were 1.65??10-7 and 3.64??10-10 mmol/(cm2 s), respectively, which were about 3 orders of magnitude slower than rates derived in laboratory experiments by other investigators. Application of both in situ and lab-derived calcite and dolomite dissolution rates to equilibrium reactive transport simulations of a column experiment did not improve the fit to measured outflow chemistry: at the spatial and temporal scales of the column experiment, the use of an equilibrium model adequately simulated carbonate dissolution in the column. Pyrolusite (MnO2) exposed to acidic ground water for 595 days increased slightly in weight despite thermodynamic conditions that favored dissolution. This result might be related to a recent finding by another investigator that the reductive dissolution of pyrolusite is accompanied by the precipitation of a mixed Mn-Fe oxide species. In PHREEQC reactive transport simulations, the incorporation of Mn kinetics improved the fit between observed and simulated behavior at the column and field scales, although the column-fitted rate for Mn-oxide dissolution was about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the field-fitted rate. Remaining differences between observed and simulated contaminant transport trends at the Pinal Creek site were likely related to factors other than the Mn oxide dissolution rate, such as the concentration of Fe oxide surface sites available for adsorption, the effects of competition among dissolved species for available surface sites, or reactions not included in the model.

  2. Association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and uric acid with the metabolic syndrome components.

    PubMed

    Sah, Santosh Kumar; Khatiwada, Saroj; Pandey, Sunil; Kc, Rajendra; Das, Binod Kumar Lal; Baral, Nirmal; Lamsal, Madhab

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been found to be associated with inflammatory molecules. This study was conducted among 125 MetS patients at B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal to find an association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and serum uric acid with MetS components. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, medical history and blood samples were taken. Estimation of hs-CRP, serum uric acid, blood glucose, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was done. hs-CRP had positive correlation with blood glucose (r = 0.2, p = 0.026) and negative with HDL cholesterol (r = -0.361, p < 0.001). Serum uric acid had positive correlation with waist circumference (r = 0.178, p = 0.047). Patients with elevated hs-CRP and uric acid had higher waist circumference (p = 0.03), diastolic BP (p = 0.002) and lower HDL cholesterol (p = 0.004) than others. Elevated hs-CRP and high uric acid were individually associated with higher odds for low HDL cholesterol (7.992; 1.785-35.774, p = 0.002) and hyperglycemia (2.471; 1.111-5.495, p = 0.029) respectively. Combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid was associated with severity of MetS (p < 0.001) and higher odds for hyperglycemia (8.036; 2.178-29.647, p = 0.001) as compared to individual rise of hs-CRP or uric acid. The present study demonstrates that hs-CRP and serum uric acid are associated with MetS components, and the combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid is associated with the increase in severity of MetS. PMID:27006878

  3. Effects of nitric acid on carbachol reactivity of the airways in normal and allergic sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, W.M.; Kim, C.S.; King, M.M.; Oliver, W. Jr.; Yerger, L.

    1982-01-01

    The airway effects of a 4-hr exposure (via a Plexiglas hood) to 1.6 ppm nitric acid vapor were evaluated in seven normal and seven allergic sheep, i.e., animals that have a history of reacting with bronchospasm to inhalation challenge with Ascaris suum antigen. The nitric acid vapor was generated by ultrasonic nebulization of a 2% nitric acid solution. Airway effects were assessed by measuring the change in specific pulmonary flow resistance before and after a standard inhalation challenge with 2.5% carbachol aerosol. Nitric acid exposure did not produce bronchoconstriction in either group. Pre-exposure increases in specific pulmonary flow resistance after carbachol inhalation were 68% (SD+/- 13%) and 82% (SD+/- 35%) for the normal and allergic sheep, respectively. Within 24 hr, the largest post-exposure increases in specific pulmonary flow resistance for the normal and allergic sheep were 108% (SD+/- 51%(P<.06)) and 175% (SD+/- 87% (p<.02)), respectively. We conclude that a short-term exposure to nitric acid vapor at levels below the industrial threshold limit (2 ppm), produces airway hyperreactivity to aerosolized carbachol in allergic sheep.

  4. Reactivity of soybean lipoxygenase-1 to linoleic acid entrapped in phosphatidylcholine vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Nishiyama, J; Kuninori, T

    1998-08-01

    The linoleic acids embedded in the SUVs of soy-PC, DMPC, and DPPC served as substrate for soybean lipoxygenase-1 (L-1). The initial velocity of the catalytic reaction and the concentration of the substrate showed a hyperbolic relation. The Km values of L-1 for the linoleic acids in soy-PC, DMPC, and DPPC vesicles were 0.07, 0.09, and 0.11 mM, respectively, being comparable with that for Tween-20 micellar linoleic acid. Soy-PC and DMPC competitively inhibited the enzyme with Ki values of 0.20 and 0.13 mM, respectively, whereas DPPC had no effect. DSC analysis revealed the phase separation of linoleic acid and DPPC in vesicles in the temperature range in which the enzyme reaction was carried out. This may account for the lack of inhibitory effect of DPPC on the enzyme. From the temperature dependence of the specific activity of the enzyme, the Ea values of the catalytic reaction were estimated to be 26.7 and 35.3 kJ.mol-1 for soy-PC and DPPC vesicles, respectively. For linoleic acid-DMPC vesicles, a two-phase temperature dependence of the activity across the transition temperature of the mixed vesicles was suggested. PMID:9685717

  5. Kinetics of acid hydrolysis and reactivity of some antibacterial hydrophilic iron(II) imino-complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaker, Ali Mohamed; Nassr, Lobna Abdel-Mohsen Ebaid; Adam, Mohamed Shaker Saied; Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed Abdelhalim

    2015-05-01

    Kinetic study of acid hydrolysis of some hydrophilic Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes with antibacterial properties was performed using spectrophotometry. The Schiff base ligands were derived from sodium 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde-5-sulfonate and glycine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine, DL-methionine, DL-serine, or L-phenylalanine. The reaction was studied in aqueous media under conditions of pseudo-first order kinetics. Moreover, the acid hydrolysis was studied at different temperatures and the activation parameters were calculated. The general rate equation was suggested as follows: rate = k obs [Complex], where k obs = k 2 [H+]. The evaluated rate constants and activation parameters are consistent with the hydrophilicity of the investigated complexes.

  6. Reactivity, Selectivity, and Stability in Sulfenic Acid Detection: A Comparative Study of Nucleophilic and Electrophilic Probes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinayak; Paritala, Hanumantharao; Carroll, Kate S

    2016-05-18

    The comparative reaction efficiencies of currently used nucleophilic and electrophilic probes toward cysteine sulfenic acid have been thoroughly evaluated in two different settings-(i) a small molecule dipeptide based model and (ii) a recombinant protein model. We further evaluated the stability of corresponding thioether and sulfoxide adducts under reducing conditions which are commonly encountered during proteomic protocols and in cell analysis. Powered by the development of new cyclic and linear C-nucleophiles, the unsurpassed efficiency in the capture of sulfenic acid under competitive conditions is achieved and thus holds great promise as highly potent tools for activity-based sulfenome profiling. PMID:27123991

  7. Transient Influx of Nickel in Root Mitochondria Modulates Organic Acid and Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Nickel Hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale*

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Bhavana; Czymmek, Kirk J.; Sparks, Donald L.; Bais, Harsh P.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are important targets of metal toxicity and are also vital for maintaining metal homeostasis. Here, we examined the potential role of mitochondria in homeostasis of nickel in the roots of nickel hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum murale. We evaluated the biochemical basis of nickel tolerance by comparing the role of mitochondria in closely related nickel hyperaccumulator A. murale and non-accumulator Alyssum montanum. Evidence is presented for the rapid and transient influx of nickel in root mitochondria of nickel hyperaccumulator A. murale. In an early response to nickel treatment, substantial nickel influx was observed in mitochondria prior to sequestration in vacuoles in the roots of hyperaccumulator A. murale compared with non-accumulator A. montanum. In addition, the mitochondrial Krebs cycle was modulated to increase synthesis of malic acid and citric acid involvement in nickel hyperaccumulation. Furthermore, malic acid, which is reported to form a complex with nickel in hyperaccumulators, was also found to reduce the reactive oxygen species generation induced by nickel. We propose that the interaction of nickel with mitochondria is imperative in the early steps of nickel uptake in nickel hyperaccumulator plants. Initial uptake of nickel in roots results in biochemical responses in the root mitochondria indicating its vital role in homeostasis of nickel ions in hyperaccumulation. PMID:23322782

  8. Effects of nitrogen dioxide and its acid mist on reactive oxygen species production and antioxidant enzyme activity in Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofang; Hou, Fen; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is one of the most common and harmful air pollutants. To analyze the response of plants to NO2 stress, we investigated the morphological change, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and antioxidant enzyme activity in Arabidopsis thaliana (Col-0) exposed to 1.7, 4, 8.5, and 18.8 mg/m(3) NO2. The results indicate that NO2 exposure affected plant growth and chlorophyll (Chl) content, and increased oxygen free radical (O2(-)) production rate in Arabidopsis shoots. Furthermore, NO2 elevated the levels of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, accompanied by the induction of antioxidant enzyme activities and change of ascorbate (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) contents. Following this, we mimicked nitric acid mist under experimental conditions, and confirmed the antioxidant mechanism of the plant to the stress. Our results imply that NO2 and its acid mist caused pollution risk to plant systems. During the process, increased ROS acted as a signal to induce a defense response, and antioxidant status played an important role in plant protection against NO2/nitric acid mist-caused oxidative damage. PMID:26257351

  9. Acid dew and the role of chemistry in the dry deposition of reactive gases to wetted surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chameides, William L.

    1987-01-01

    A formalism is developed to describe the dry deposition of soluble reactive gases to wetted surfaces in terms of the relevant meteorological conditions, the surface roughness, the total amount of liquid water present on the surface, the rate of accumulation of this water, and the species' solubility and reactivity in the surface water. This formulation is then incorporated into a model designed to simulate the generation of acidic dew from the deposition of HNO3, SO2, S(IV) oxidants, H2O2, and O3. Similar to the observations of dew in the continental U.S., the model generates a dewdrop pH of about 4 by the end of the night; the pH can rapidly fall to toxic levels due to rapid evaporation after sunrise. Relatively low deposition velocities are predicted for the SO2 and O3 because of their lower solubilities and hence larger surface resistances than those of the other oxidants. Because the chemical lifetime of the SO2 in the dew is influenced by the atmospheric levels of H2O2, O3, and SO2, the SO2 deposition velocity is a strong function of these species' atmospheric abundances.

  10. Pathways for oxidation of low density lipoprotein by myeloperoxidase: tyrosyl radical, reactive aldehydes, hypochlorous acid and molecular chlorine.

    PubMed

    Heinecke, J W

    1997-01-01

    Many lines of evidence implicate oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease. The physiologically relevant mechanisms have not been identified, but phagocytic white cells may play an important role because macrophage-rich lesions characterize the disorder. Recent studies have shown that myeloperoxidase, a heme enzyme secreted only by phagocytes, is present in human atherosclerotic tissue. The enzyme is a potent catalyst of LDL oxidation in vitro, it co-localizes with macrophages in lesions, and it generates products that are detectable in atherosclerotic plaque. These findings suggest that myeloperoxidase may promote LDL oxidation in the artery wall. This article reviews the enzyme's ability to generate a range of oxidants, including tyrosyl radical, reactive aldehydes, hypochlorous acid and molecular chlorine. These products have the potential to damage host molecules as well as microbes, suggesting a mechanism that may contribute to atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:9259996

  11. Organic substrates as electron donors in permeable reactive barriers for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kijjanapanich, P; Pakdeerattanamint, K; Lens, P N L; Annachhatre, A P

    2012-12-01

    This research was conducted to select suitable natural organic substrates as potential carbon sources for use as electron donors for biological sulphate reduction in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB). A number of organic substrates were assessed through batch and continuous column experiments under anaerobic conditions with acid mine drainage (AMD) obtained from an abandoned lignite coal mine. To keep the heavy metal concentration at a constant level, the AMD was supplemented with heavy metals whenever necessary. Under anaerobic conditions, sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) converted sulphate into sulphide using the organic substrates as electron donors. The sulphide that was generated precipitated heavy metals as metal sulphides. Organic substrates, which yielded the highest sulphate reduction in batch tests, were selected for continuous column experiments which lasted over 200 days. A mixture of pig-farm wastewater treatment sludge, rice husk and coconut husk chips yielded the best heavy metal (Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn) removal efficiencies of over 90%. PMID:23437664

  12. Removal of reactive dyes from textile wastewater by immobilized chitosan upon grafted Jute fibers with acrylic acid by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mahmoud S.

    2015-10-01

    Jute fibers were grafted with acrylic acid by gamma irradiation technique. Chitosan was immobilized upon the grafted Jute fibers to be used as an adsorbent for waste reactive dye. The treated Jute fibers were characterized by using of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effect of Jute treatment on its thermal stability by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and its mechanical properties were investigated. The adsorption isotherm and the different factors affecting the dye adsorption such as pH and contact time were also studied. It was found that the dye adsorption was enhanced in the low pH range and increased with increasing of the contact time, regardless of temperature change.

  13. Determination of carnosine, anserine, homocarnosine, pentosidine and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances contents in meat from different animal species.

    PubMed

    Peiretti, Pier Giorgio; Medana, Claudio; Visentin, Sonja; Giancotti, Valeria; Zunino, Valentina; Meineri, Giorgia

    2011-06-15

    The aim of this research was to determine the content of the histidinic antioxidants, advanced glycation end products (pentosidine) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in the meat from different animal species. Carnosine, anserine, homocarnosine and pentosidine were quantified by HPLC/MS, while TBARS was determined by photometric measurements. The total CRCs (carnosine+anserine+homocarnosine) content was in the increasing order: beef

  14. Candida albicans erythroascorbate peroxidase regulates intracellular methylglyoxal and reactive oxygen species independently of D-erythroascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Song, Sung-Hyun; Ku, MyungHee; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2015-07-01

    Candida albicans D-erythroascorbate peroxidase (EAPX1), which can catalyze the oxidation of D-erythroascorbic acid (EASC) to water, was observed to be inducible in EAPX1-deficient and EAPX1-overexpressing cells via activity staining. EAPX1-deficient cells have remarkably increased intracellular reactive oxygen species and methylglyoxal independent of the intracellular EASC content. The increased methylglyoxal caused EAPX1-deficient cells to activate catalase-peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase, which led to defects in cell growth, viability, mitochondrial respiration, filamentation and virulence. These findings indicate that EAPX1 mediates cell differentiation and virulence by regulating intracellular methylglyoxal along with oxidative stresses, regardless of endogenous EASC biosynthesis or alternative oxidase expression. PMID:25957768

  15. Evaluation of serum neopterin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in Egyptian patients with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ragab, M; Hassan, H; Zaytoun, T; Refai, W; Rocks, B; Elsammak, M

    2005-01-01

    The present study evaluated serum neopterin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in Egyptian patients with acute coronary artery disease. Thirty-six patients with unstable angina aged (mean ± SD) 61.3±9.4 years, 29 patients with myocardial infarction aged 58.2±8.7 years and 24 sex- and age-matched control subjects were included in the study. Neopterin levels were significantly higher in patients with myocardial infarction and those with unstable angina than in the healthy control group (P<0.001). The serum level of neopterin in the control group (median [range]) was 3.25 nmol/L (1.25 nmol/L to 5.4 nmol/L), whereas in patients with unstable angina and those with myocardial infarction, neopterin levels were 10.4 nmol/L (3.5 nmol/L to 15.2 nmol/L) and 12.6 nmol/L (3.25 nmol/L to 17.8 nmol/L), respectively. Levels of hs-CRP and TBARS were also significantly higher in patients with unstable angina and those with myocardial infarction than in the healthy control group (P<0.01). The medians (ranges) of hs-CRP were 4.8 mg/L (2.5 mg/L to 9.9 mg/L), 12.0 mg/L (4.6 mg/L to 31.0 mg/L) and 12.3 mg/L (7.5 mg/L to 32.1 mg/L) in the control group, patients with unstable angina and those with myocardial infarction, respectively. The means ± SD of TBARS in the control group, patients with unstable angina and those with myocardial infarction were 0.64±0.17 μmol/L, 1.17±0.31 μmol/L and 1.17±0.49 μmol/L, respectively. TBARS positively correlated with hs-CRP and neopterin levels. Furthermore, when both patients and controls were classified according to their smoking status, significantly higher levels of neopterin and TBARS were found in the smokers of each subgroup than in the nonsmokers. In conclusion, the present study found a higher level of neopterin, hs-CRP and TBARS in patients with coronary artery disease. Serum neopterin and hs-CRP positively correlated with the level of TBARS. The authors suggest that

  16. Use of Reactive Transport Modeling to Evaluate Remedial Options for an Acid Mine Drainage Stream, With Emphasis on Prediction Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runkel, R. L.; Kimball, B. A.; Walton-Day, K.; Verplanck, P. L.

    2006-12-01

    Mineral Creek, a headwater stream in Southwestern Colorado, drains a sub-alpine watershed with numerous abandoned mines. A synoptic study conducted in 1999 indicates that the Mineral Creek watershed contributes 60% of the observed copper load for the Upper Animas River. In addition, zinc concentrations observed during the 1999 study exceed toxicity standards along the entire length of Mineral Creek. Given these findings, Mineral Creek is the potential site of future remedial actions to improve stream-water quality. Using the 1999 data, a reactive transport model was used to predict the effects of a small treatment system that neutralizes acidic inflow waters. Model application indicates that the treatment system would significantly improve water quality, producing higher pH values and lower dissolved metal concentrations downstream. Despite this progress, the results of model application may be of limited use for planning remediation, due to the potential uncertainty of model predictions (e.g. errors in the characterization of hydrologic and geochemical processes). An additional study was therefore conducted in 2005 to develop estimates of prediction uncertainty. The 2005 study implemented a paired-synoptic approach in which two synoptics were conducted under similar hydrologic conditions. The first synoptic was similar to the 1999 study in that the overall goal was to characterize stream-water quality under existing (acidic) conditions. The second synoptic study was conducted during a continuous sodium hydroxide injection that was designed to mimic a small treatment system. As in the initial model application, data collected under existing conditions (synoptic 1) will be used to calibrate the reactive transport model. Model inputs will then be modified to reflect the effects of treatment, and predictions of post-remediation water quality will be obtained by model application. The results of this application will then be compared to data from the post

  17. Reactivity of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs) from isoprene and monoterpene ozonolysis toward SO2 and organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipilä, M.; Jokinen, T.; Berndt, T.; Richters, S.; Makkonen, R.; Donahue, N. M.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Kurtén, T.; Paasonen, P.; Sarnela, N.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Rissanen, M. P.; Thornton, J.; Stratmann, F.; Herrmann, H.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Petäjä, T.

    2014-11-01

    Oxidation processes in Earth's atmosphere are tightly connected to many environmental and human health issues and are essential drivers for biogeochemistry. Until the recent discovery of the atmospheric relevance of the reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs) with SO2, atmospheric oxidation processes were thought to be dominated by a few main oxidants: ozone, hydroxyl radicals (OH), nitrate radicals and, e.g. over oceans, halogen atoms such as chlorine. Here, we report results from laboratory experiments at 293 K and atmospheric pressure focusing on sCI formation from the ozonolysis of isoprene and the most abundant monoterpenes (α-pinene and limonene), and subsequent reactions of the resulting sCIs with SO2 producing sulfuric acid (H2SO4). The measured total sCI yields were (0.15 ± 0.07), (0.27 ± 0.12) and (0.58 ± 0.26) for α-pinene, limonene and isoprene, respectively. The ratio between the rate coefficient for the sCI loss (including thermal decomposition and the reaction with water vapour) and the rate coefficient for the reaction of sCI with SO2, k(loss) /k(sCI + SO2), was determined at relative humidities of 10 and 50%. Observed values represent the average reactivity of all sCIs produced from the individual alkene used in the ozonolysis. For the monoterpene-derived sCIs, the relative rate coefficients k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2) were in the range (2.0-2.4) × 1012 molecules cm-3 and nearly independent of the relative humidity. This fact points to a minor importance of the sCI + H2O reaction in the case of the sCI arising from α-pinene and limonene. For the isoprene sCIs, however, the ratio k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2) was strongly dependent on the relative humidity. To explore whether sCIs could have a more general role in atmospheric oxidation, we investigated as an example the reactivity of acetone oxide (sCI from the ozonolysis of 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene) toward small organic acids, i.e. formic and acetic acid. Acetone oxide was found to react faster

  18. Reactivity of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCI) from isoprene and monoterpene ozonolysis toward SO2 and organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipilä, M.; Jokinen, T.; Berndt, T.; Richters, S.; Makkonen, R.; Donahue, N. M.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Kurten, T.; Paasonen, P.; Sarnela, N.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Rissanen, M. P.; Thornton, J.; Stratmann, F.; Herrmann, H.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Petäjä, T.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation processes in Earth's atmosphere are tightly connected to many environmental and human health issues and are essential drivers for biogeochemistry. Until the recent discovery of the atmospheric relevance of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCI), atmospheric oxidation processes were thought to be dominated by few main oxidants: ozone, hydroxyl radicals (OH), nitrate radicals and, e.g. over oceans, halogen atoms such as chlorine. Here, we report results from laboratory experiments at 293 K and atmospheric pressure focusing on sCI formation from the ozonolysis of isoprene and the most abundant monoterpenes (α-pinene and limonene), and subsequent reactions of the resulting sCIs with SO2 producing sulphuric acid (H2SO4). The measured sCI yields were (0.15 ± 0.07), (0.27 ± 0.12) and (0.58 ± 0.26) for the ozonolysis of α-pinene, limonene and isoprene, respectively. The ratio between the rate coefficient for the sCI loss (including thermal decomposition and the reaction with water vapour) and the rate coefficient for the reaction of sCI with SO2, k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2), was determined at relative humidities of 10% and 50%. Observed values represent the average reactivity of all sCIs produced from the individual alkene used in the ozonolysis. For the monoterpene derived sCIs, the relative rate coefficients k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2) were in the range (2.0-2.4) × 1012 molecule cm-3 and nearly independent on the relative humidity. This fact points to a minor importance of the sCI + H2O reaction in the case of the sCI arising from α-pinene and limonene. For the isoprene sCIs, however, the ratio k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2) was strongly dependent on the relative humidity. To explore whether sCIs could have a more general role in atmospheric oxidation, we investigated as an example the reactivity of acetone oxide (sCI from the ozonolysis of 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene) toward small organic acids, i.e. formic and acetic acid. Acetone oxide was found to react faster with the

  19. Reactivity and reaction intermediates for acetic acid adsorbed on CeO2(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Calaza, Florencia C.; Chen, Tsung -Liang; Mullins, David R.; Xu, Ye; Steven H. Overbury

    2015-05-02

    Adsorption and reaction of acetic acid on a CeO2(1 1 1) surface was studied by a combination of ultra-highvacuum based methods including temperature desorption spectroscopy (TPD), soft X-ray photoelectronspectroscopy (sXPS), near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and reflection absorption IRspectroscopy (RAIRS), together with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. TPD shows that thedesorption products are strongly dependent upon the initial oxidation state of the CeO2 surface, includingselectivity between acetone and acetaldehyde products. The combination of sXPS and NEXAFS demon-strate that acetate forms upon adsorption at low temperature and is stable to above 500 K, above whichpoint ketene, acetone and acetic acid desorb. Furthermore, DFT and RAIRS show that below 500 K, bridge bondedacetate coexists with a moiety formed by adsorption of an acetate at an oxygen vacancy, formed bywater desorption.

  20. Cross-metathesis of biosourced fatty acid derivatives: a step further toward improved reactivity.

    PubMed

    Vignon, Paul; Vancompernolle, Tom; Couturier, Jean-Luc; Dubois, Jean-Luc; Mortreux, André; Gauvin, Régis M

    2015-04-13

    The improved catalytic conversion of bioresources, namely unsaturated fatty acid derivatives, is presented. The targeted reaction is ruthenium-catalyzed cross-metathesis with functionalized olefins (α,β-unsaturated esters), that affords shorter diesters. These can be used as biosourced (pre)monomers for the production of polyesters. It is demonstrated that switch from terminal to internal cross-metathesis partners (that is, from methyl acrylate to methyl crotonate) allows use of ppm-level catalyst loadings, while retaining high productivity and selectivity. This was exemplified on a commercial biosourced fatty acid methyl esters mixture, using minimal purification of the substrate, on a 50 g scale. We propose that this improved catalytic behavior is due to the sole presence of more stable alkylidene intermediates, as the notoriously unstable ruthenium methylidene species are not formed using an internal functionalized olefin. PMID:25469823

  1. A classical reactive potential for molecular clusters of sulphuric acid and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson, Jake L.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Ford, Ian J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a two-state empirical valence bond (EVB) potential describing interactions between sulphuric acid and water molecules and designed to model proton transfer between them within a classical dynamical framework. The potential has been developed in order to study the properties of molecular clusters of these species, which are thought to be relevant to atmospheric aerosol nucleation. The particle swarm optimisation method has been used to fit the parameters of the EVB model to density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Features of the parametrised model and DFT data are compared and found to be in satisfactory agreement. In particular, it is found that a single sulphuric acid molecule will donate a proton when clustered with four water molecules at 300 K and that this threshold is temperature dependent.

  2. Reactivity of D-fructose and D-xylose in acidic media in homogeneous phases.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Maxime B; Chagnault, Vincent; Postel, Denis

    2015-05-29

    Chemistry development of renewable resources is a real challenge. Carbohydrates from biomass are complex and their use as substitutes for fossil materials remains difficult (European involvement on the incorporation of 20% raw material of plant origin in 2020). Most of the time, the transformation of these polyhydroxylated structures are carried out in acidic conditions. Recent reviews on this subject describe homogeneous catalytic transformations of pentoses, specifically toward furfural, and also the transformation of biomass-derived sugars in heterogeneous conditions. To complete these informations, the objective of this review is to give an overview of the structural variety described during the treatment of two monosaccharides (D-Fructose and D-xylose) in acidic conditions in homogeneous phases. The reaction mechanisms being not always determined with certainty, we will also provide a brief state of the art regarding this. PMID:25889471

  3. Reactive transport controls on sandy acid sulfate soils and impacts on shallow groundwater quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, S. Ursula; Rate, Andrew W.; Rengel, Zed; Appleyard, Steven; Prommer, Henning; Hinz, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    Disturbance or drainage of potential acid sulfate soils (PASS) can result in the release of acidity and degradation of infrastructure, water resources, and the environment. Soil processes affecting shallow groundwater quality have been investigated using a numerical code that integrates (bio)geochemical processes with water, solute, and gas transport. The patterns of severe and persistent acidification (pH < 4) in the sandy, carbonate-depleted podzols of a coastal plain could be reproduced without calibration, based on oxidation of microcrystalline pyrite after groundwater level decrease and/or residual groundwater acidity, due to slow vertical solute transport rates. The rate of acidification was limited by gas phase diffusion of oxygen and hence was sensitive to soil water retention properties and in some cases also to oxygen consumption by organic matter mineralization. Despite diffusion limitation, the rate of oxidation in sandy soils was rapid once pyrite-bearing horizons were exposed, even to a depth of 7.5 m. Groundwater level movement was thus identified as an important control on acidification, as well as the initial pyrite content. Increase in the rate of Fe(II) oxidation lead to slightly lower pH and greater accumulation of Fe(III) phases, but had little effect on the overall amount of pyrite oxidized. Aluminosilicate (kaolinite) dissolution had a small pH-buffering effect but lead to the release of Al and associated acidity. Simulated dewatering scenarios highlighted the potential of the model for risk assessment of (bio)geochemical impacts on soil and groundwater over a range of temporal and spatial scales.

  4. The reactions of hypochlorous acid, the reactive oxygen species produced by myeloperoxidase, with lipids.

    PubMed

    Spickett, C M; Jerlich, A; Panasenko, O M; Arnhold, J; Pitt, A R; Stelmaszyńska, T; Schaur, R J

    2000-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant enzyme in phagocytes, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. The major oxidant produced by MPO, hypochlorous acid (HOCl), is able to modify a great variety of biomolecules by chlorination and/or oxidation. In this paper the reactions of lipids (preferentially unsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol) with either reagent HOCl or HOCl generated by the MPO-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system are reviewed. One of the major issues has been whether the reaction of HOCl with lipids of low density lipoprotein (LDL) yields predominantly chlorohydrins or lipid hydroperoxides. Electrospray mass spectrometry provided direct evidence that chlorohydrins rather than peroxides are the major products of HOCl- or MPO-treated LDL phosphatidylcholines. Nevertheless lipid peroxidation is a possible alternative reaction of HOCl with polyunsaturated fatty acids if an additional radical source such as pre-formed lipid hydroperoxides is available. In phospholipids carrying a primary amino group such as phosphatidylethanolamine chloramines are the preferred products compared to chlorohydrins. Cholesterol can be converted by HOCl to great variety of oxysterols besides three isomers of chlorohydrins. For the situation in vivo it appears that the type of reaction occurring between HOCl and lipids would very much depend on the circumstances, e.g. the pH and the presence of radical initiators. The biological effects of lipid chlorohydrins are not yet well understood. It has been shown that chlorohydrins of both unsaturated fatty acids as well as of cholesterol may cause lysis of target cells, possibly by disruption of membrane structures. PMID:11996112

  5. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Oxidative Homocoupling of Arylboronic Acids in Water: Ligand Tuned Reactivity and Mechanistic Study.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Deepika; Binnani, Chinky; Rai, Rohit K; Dwivedi, Ambikesh D; Gupta, Kavita; Li, Pei-Zhou; Zhao, Yanli; Singh, Sanjay K

    2016-06-20

    Molecular catalysts based on water-soluble arene-Ru(II) complexes ([Ru]-1-[Ru]-5) containing aniline (L1), 2-methylaniline (L2), 2,6-dimethylaniline (L3), 4-methylaniline (L4), and 4-chloroaniline (L5) were designed for the homocoupling of arylboronic acids in water. These complexes were fully characterized by (1)H, (13)C NMR, mass spectrometry, and elemental analyses. Structural geometry for two of the representative arene-Ru(II) complexes [Ru]-3 and [Ru]-4 was established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Our studies showed that the selectivity toward biaryls products is influenced by the position and the electronic behavior of various substituents of aniline ligand coordinated to ruthenium. Extensive investigations using (1)H NMR, (19)F NMR, and mass spectral studies provided insights into the mechanistic pathway of homocoupling of arylboronic acids, where the identification of important organometallic intermediates, such as σ-aryl/di(σ-aryl) coordinated arene-Ru(II) species, suggested that the reaction proceeds through the formation of crucial di(σ-aryl)-Ru intermediates by the interaction of arylboronic acid with Ru-catalyst to yield biaryl products. PMID:27276384

  6. Sea salt aerosols as a reactive surface for inorganic and organic acidic gases in the Arctic troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, J. W.; Li, W. J.; Zhang, D. Z.; Zhang, J. C.; Lin, Y. T.; Shen, X. J.; Sun, J. Y.; Chen, J. M.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.; Wang, W. X.

    2015-10-01

    Sea salt aerosols (SSA) are dominant particles in the Arctic atmosphere and determine the polar radiative balance. SSA react with acidic pollutants that lead to changes in physical and chemical properties of their surface, which in turn alter their hygroscopic and optical properties. Transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry was used to analyze morphology, composition, size, and mixing state of individual SSA at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, in summertime. Individual fresh SSA contained cubic NaCl coated by certain amounts of MgCl2 and CaSO4. Individual partially aged SSA contained irregular NaCl coated by a mixture of NaNO3, Na2SO4, Mg(NO3)2, and MgSO4. The comparison suggests the hydrophilic MgCl2 coating in fresh SSA likely intrigued the heterogeneous reactions at the beginning of SSA and acidic gases. Individual fully aged SSA normally had Na2SO4 cores and an amorphous coating of NaNO3. Elemental mappings of individual SSA particles revealed that as the particles ageing Cl gradually decreased, the C, N, O, and S content increased. 12C- mapping from nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry indicates that organic matter increased in the aged SSA compared with the fresh SSA. 12C- line scan further shows that organic matter was mainly concentrated on the aged SSA surface. These new findings indicate that this mixture of organic matter and NaNO3 on particle surfaces likely determines their hygroscopic and optical properties. These abundant SSA as reactive surfaces adsorbing inorganic and organic acidic gases can shorten acidic gas lifetime and influence the possible gaseous reactions in the Arctic atmosphere, which need to be incorporated into atmospheric chemical models in the Arctic troposphere.

  7. Enhancing the Attenuation of Acid-Mine Drainage at Davis Mine, Rowe, Massachusetts via Installation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmor, A. M.; Yuretich, R. F.

    2008-12-01

    Acid Mine Drainage affects thousands of streams in the United States, sustaining the need for low-cost passive treatment options. Davis Mine, a 100 years-abandoned FeS2 mine in Western Massachusetts, is representative of the types of mines best suited for passive treatments; fairly remote, abandoned, and discharging moderately affected water (pH <3, Fe >100mg/L, SO42- >500mg/L) and is a good candidate for a 'starting point' of low-cost, low environmental impact remediation. We here report the shifts in pH, SO42-, and Fe following placement of reactive fill (50% CaMg(CO3)2, 25% cow manure, 25% seaweed compost) in a permeable reactive barrier placed below ground mid-way along the acidic effluent's path. Yearlong monitoring of water from 1 multi-level well (with ports in the shallow groundwater, middle groundwater, and bedrock) placed within the tailings pile over a previous year (2003-2004) showed for the three levels, respectively; pH 3.16, 4.24, and 4.04, Fe average concentrations of 4.5 mg/L, 6.5 mg/L, and 3.2 mg/L, and SO42- average concentrations of 235mg/L, 330mg/L, and 292 mg/L. One year (2007-2008) after placement of remediation mix, the three levels now average respectively; pH 4.16, 4.60, and 4.53, Fe concentrations of 0.7 mg/L, 4.8 mg/L, and 1.4 mg/L, and SO42- concentrations of 217 mg/L, 294 mg/L, and 266 mg/L. The most noticeable improvement in pH is seen in the shallow groundwater, consistent with its proximity to the reactive fill depth. Although complex microbial communities have been characterized at the site, uncertainty remains as to whether they are active in this case, and it is possible that these results may be explained solely by neutralization reactions. Results of this study indicate a good likelihood that this low environmental impact remediation could be effective.

  8. Influence of stearic acid coating of the NaCl surface on the reactivity with NO2 under humidity.

    PubMed

    Sobanska, S; Barbillat, J; Moreau, M; Nuns, N; De Waele, I; Petitprez, D; Tobon, Y; Brémard, C

    2015-04-28

    In the atmosphere, sea salt aerosols, containing mainly NaCl, can accumulate fatty acids and undergo heterogeneous chemistry with atmospheric nitrogen oxides. The effect of stearic acid (SA) coating on the reactivity of the NaCl(100) surface with NO2 under humidity was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman mapping and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to highlight processes occurring on NaCl surfaces. The vapor-deposition of SA on the NaCl surface generates heterogeneous coating with discontinuous monolayer islands. The SA molecules with all-trans conformation stick to the NaCl surface through -CO2H groups and are organized in parallel between them and nearly perpendicularly to the surface. The SA coating does not prevent the NaNO3 particle formation when the sample is exposed to NO2 under low humidity conditions. The initial abilities of the NaCl surface coated with SA to pick up NO2 from the gas phase are correlated with the fraction of bare NaCl area evidencing the spatially heterogeneous reactivity of the surface. The role of H2O in the NO2 uptake and the catalytic conversion of NaCl to NaNO3 is shown. Under humidity (RH = 50%), the H2O uptake by NaNO3 particles on the coated-NaCl surface is significantly more important than that adsorbed under analogous conditions without the presence of NaNO3 particles. This unusual water absorption initiates transitions (i) from solid NaNO3 particles to NaNO3 aqueous solution and (ii) from the SA monolayer with well-ordered all trans alkyl chains to the SA gel with completely disordered conformation. This mixed SA/NaNO3 layer on the particle surface may have significant consequences on the hygroscopic properties and reactivity of the sea salt aerosols in the atmosphere. PMID:25824115

  9. Reactive Iron deposition and ground water inflow control neutralization processes in acidic mine lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodau, C.

    2002-12-01

    The controls on the internal neutralization of highly acidified waters by iron sulphide accumulation are yet poorly understood. To elucidate the influence of ground water inflow on neutralization processes, inventories of solid phase iron and sulphur, pore water profiles and rates of ferrous iron and sulphate production and consumption were analyzed in different areas of an acidic mine lake. Ground water inflow had previously been determined by ground water modelling and chamber measurements (Knoll et al., 1999). The investigated sediments adjacent to mine tailings, which were subject to the inflow of groundwater (10-30 L d-1 m-2), were richer in dissolved ferrous iron iron (30 vs. 5 mmol L-1) and sulphate (30 vs. 10 mmol L-1) and showed higher pH values (6 vs. 4) than the sediments in areas of the lake not being influenced by groundwater inflow. Sediments adjacent to the mine tailings also showed higher rates of sulphate reduction and iron sulphide accumulation (Fig. 1). From these data it is suggested that neutralization processes in iron rich, acidic mine lakes neutralization processes primarily occur in areas influenced by the inflow of acid mine groundwater. These waters usually have considerably higher pH values than the surface waters in the lakes due to buffering processes in the tailings. The seepage of this water through the sediment might thus lead to higher pH values and thus to a higher thermodynamic competitiveness of sulfate reduction vs. iron reduction (Blodau and Peiffer 2002). This causes increased neutralization rates. These findings have consequences for remediation measures in highly acidic lakes. In areas influenced by the inflow of mine drainage increases in carbon availability, for example by the deposition of particulate organic matter, should enhance iron sulphide formation rates, whereas in other areas increases in carbon availability would only result in enhanced rates of iron reduction without a lasting gain in alkalinity. Blodau, C

  10. Production and characterization of thermoplastic cassava starch, functionalized poly(lactic acid), and their reactive compatibilized blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detyothin, Sukeewan

    Cassava starch was blended with glycerol using a co-rotating twin-screw extruder (TSE). Thermoplastic cassava starch (TPCS) at a ratio of 70/30 by weight of cassava/glycerol was selected and further blended with other polymers. TPCS sheets made from compression molding had low tensile strength (0.45 +/- 0.05 MPa) and Young's modulus (1.24 +/- 0.58 MPa), but moderate elongation at break (83.0 +/- 0.18.6%), medium level of oxygen permeability, and high water vapor permeability with a very high rate of water absorption. TPCS was blended with poly(lactic acid) (PLA) at various ratios by using a TSE. The blend resins exhibited good properties such as increased thermal stability (Tmax) and crystallinity of PLA, and improved water sensitivity and processability of TPCS. PLA and TPCS exhibited a high interfacial tension between the two phases of 7.9 mJ·m -2, indicating the formation of an incompatible, immiscible blend. SEM micrographs showed a non-homogeneous distribution of TPCS droplets in the PLA continuous phase. TEM micrographs of the blend films made by cast-film extrusion showed coalescence of the TPCS droplets in the PLA continuous phase of the blend, indicating that the compatibility between the polymer pair needs to be improved. A response surface methodology (RSM) design was used to analyze the effects of maleic anhydride (MA) and 2,5-bis(tert-butylperoxy)-2,5-dimethylhexane (Luperox or L101) contents, and TSE screw speed on the degree of grafted MA and number average molecular weight (Mn) of functionalized PLA (PLA-g-MA), a reactive compatibilizer. PLA-g- MA made by reactive extrusion had an array of colors depending on the content of L101 and MA used. New FTIR peaks suggested that MA was grafted onto the PLA backbone and oligomeric MA may occur. Increasing L101 increased the degree of grafting and decreased Mn, but the Mn of the PLA-g-MA's produced with a high amount of L101 was stable during storage. MA exhibited an optimum concentration for maximizing the

  11. Enhancing the natural removal of As in a reactive fluvial confluence receiving acid drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarca, M. I.; Arce, G.; Montecinos, M.; Guerra, P. A.; Pasten, P.

    2014-12-01

    Fluvial confluences are natural reactors that can determine the fate of contaminants in watersheds receiving acid drainage. Hydrological, hydrodynamic and chemical factors determine distinct conditions for the formation of suspended particles of iron and aluminum oxyhydroxides. The chemical and physical properties of these particle assemblages (e.g. particle size, chemical composition) can vary according to inflow mixing ratios, hydrodynamic velocity profiles, and chemical composition of the flows mixing at the confluence. Due to their capacity to sorb metals, it is important to identify the optimal conditions for removing metals from the aqueous phase, particularly arsenic, a contaminant frequently found in acid drainage. We studied a river confluence in the Lluta watershed, located in the arid Chilean Altiplano. We performed field measurements and laboratory studies to find optimal mixing ratio for arsenic sorption onto oxyhydroxide particles at the confluence between the Azufre (pH=2, As=2 mg/L) and the Caracarani river (pH=8, As<0.1 mg/L). As the contribution of the acidic stream increased, the concentration of Fe and Al in the solid phase reached a peak at different pHs. Although the optimal pH for As sorption was ~3, the overall maximum removal of As at the confluence, ocurred for pH~4. This is produced because optimal As sorption does not occur necessarily for the highest concentrations of particles being formed. We propose that fluvial confluences could be engineered to enhance the natural attenuation of contaminants. An analogy between confluences and coagulation-flocculation-sedimentation drinking water plants could be used to engineer such intervention.Acknowledgements: Proyecto Fondecyt 1130936 and Proyecto CONICYT FONDAP 15110020

  12. Reactivity of molybdovanadophosphoric acids: Influence of the presence of vanadium in the primary and secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Casarini, D.; Centi, G.; Lena, V.; Tvaruzkova, Z. ); Jiru, P. )

    1993-10-01

    The catalytic behavior in butadiene and n-butane oxidation of molybdovanadophosphoric acids with vanadium localized inside the primary (oxoanion) and/or the secondary structure is reported. The samples are characterized by infrared, [sup 31]P-NMR, [sup 51]V-NMR, and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopies in order to obtain information on the nature and localization of vanadium in the samples before reaction and the possible changes occurring during the course of the catalytic reaction. In particular, it is shown that vanadium localized initially in the secondary structure can exchange with the molybdenum atoms of the oxoanion during the catalytic reaction. Introduction of vanadium in the molybdophosphoric acid structure enhances the selective formation of maleic anhydride from the butadiene when vanadium is present both inside the oxoanion or localized in the secondary structure (before the catalytic tests), but the maximum in catalytic performance is found for different amounts of vanadium, depending on where the vanadium is localized initially. However, when present in the secondary structure, vanadium also has a negative influence on the activity of the heteropoly acid. On the contrary, in n-butane oxidation, the presence of vanadium enhances the rate of alkane activation due to the different rate-determining step. The presence of V ions also affects the maximum selectivity and yield to maleic anhydride from butane. V ions in the secondary structure are more selective at low conversion, while V ions inside the oxoanion are more selective at higher conversions and thus allow better maximum yields to maleic anhydride. 40 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Exchangeable and secondary mineral reactive pools of aluminium in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils.

    PubMed

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A M; Waite, T David; Collins, Richard N

    2014-07-01

    The use of coastal floodplain sulfidic sediments for agricultural activities has resulted in the environmental degradation of many areas worldwide. The generation of acidity and transport of aluminium (Al) and other metals to adjacent aquatic systems are the main causes of adverse effects. Here, a five-step sequential extraction procedure (SEP) was applied to 30 coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS) from north-eastern New South Wales, Australia. This enabled quantification of the proportion of aluminium present in 'water-soluble', 'exchangeable', 'organically-complexed', 'reducible iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxide/hydroxysulfate-incorporated' and 'amorphous Al mineral' fractions. The first three extractions represented an average of 5% of 'aqua regia' extractable Al and their cumulative concentrations were extremely high, reaching up to 4000 mg·kg(-1). Comparison of Al concentrations in the final two extractions indicated that 'amorphous Al minerals' are quantitatively a much more important sink for the removal of aqueous Al derived from the acidic weathering of these soils than reducible Fe(III) minerals. Correlations were observed between soil pH, dissolved and total organic carbon (DOC and TOC) and Al concentrations in organic carbon-rich CLASS soil horizons. These results suggest that complexation of Al by dissolved organic matter significantly increases soluble Al concentrations at pH values >5.0. As such, present land management practices would benefit with redefinition of an 'optimal' soil from pH ≥5.5 to ~4.8 for the preservation of aquatic environments adjacent to organic-rich CLASS where Al is the sole or principle inorganic contaminant of concern. Furthermore, it was observed that currently-accepted standard procedures (i.e. 1 M KCl extraction) to measure exchangeable Al concentrations in these types of soils severely underestimate exchangeable Al and a more accurate representation may be obtained through the use of 0.2 M CuCl2. PMID:24727041

  14. Malondialdehyde measurement in oxidized foods: evaluation of the spectrophotometric thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) test in various foods.

    PubMed

    Papastergiadis, Antonios; Mubiru, Edward; Van Langenhove, Herman; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2012-09-26

    The ability of the spectrophotometric thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) test to determine malondialdehyde (MDA) in various food matrices was evaluated. MDA was extracted from the foods; the extract reacted with thiobarbituric acid (TBA); and the formed TBA-MDA adduct was measured spectrophotometricaly at 532 nm. In parallel, the TBA-MDA adduct was analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with fluorescence detection. Oils and unprocessed and uncooked meat and fish products did not exhibit any significant difference in the amount of MDA measured by the two methods, indicating that the major substance reacting with TBA and forming an adduct that absorbs at 532 nm was MDA. However, in products such as dry nuts, pork sausages, cooked fish, and gouda cheese, an overestimation of MDA was observed, indicating that TBARS test was unsuitable for accurate determination of MDA. Furthermore, the results in the present work suggest that the overestimation of MDA by the TBARS test as it was applied is related to the interference of other than secondary lipid oxidation products. PMID:22950760

  15. Structure and reactivity of hydroxypropylphosphonic acid epoxidase in fosfomycin biosynthesis by a cation- and flavin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    McLuskey, Karen; Cameron, Scott; Hammerschmidt, Friedrich; Hunter, William N

    2005-10-01

    The biosynthesis of fosfomycin, an oxirane antibiotic in clinical use, involves a unique epoxidation catalyzed by (S)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid epoxidase (HPPE). The reaction is essentially dehydrogenation of a secondary alcohol. A high-resolution crystallographic analysis reveals that the HPPE subunit displays a two-domain combination. The C-terminal or catalytic domain has the cupin fold that binds a divalent cation, whereas the N-terminal domain carries a helix-turn-helix motif with putative DNA-binding helices positioned 34 A apart. The structure of HPPE serves as a model for numerous proteins, of ill-defined function, predicted to be transcription factors but carrying a cupin domain at the C terminus. Structure-reactivity analyses reveal conformational changes near the catalytic center driven by the presence or absence of ligand, that HPPE is a Zn(2+)/Fe(2+)-dependent epoxidase, proof that flavin mononucleotide is required for catalysis, and allow us to propose a simple mechanism that is compatible with previous experimental data. The participation of the redox inert Zn(2+) in the mechanism is surprising and indicates that Lewis acid properties of the metal ions are sufficient to polarize the substrate and, aided by flavin mononucleotide reduction, facilitate the epoxidation. PMID:16186494

  16. Structure and reactivity of hydroxypropylphosphonic acid epoxidase in fosfomycin biosynthesis by a cation- and flavin-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    McLuskey, Karen; Cameron, Scott; Hammerschmidt, Friedrich; Hunter, William N.

    2005-01-01

    The biosynthesis of fosfomycin, an oxirane antibiotic in clinical use, involves a unique epoxidation catalyzed by (S)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid epoxidase (HPPE). The reaction is essentially dehydrogenation of a secondary alcohol. A high-resolution crystallographic analysis reveals that the HPPE subunit displays a two-domain combination. The C-terminal or catalytic domain has the cupin fold that binds a divalent cation, whereas the N-terminal domain carries a helix-turn-helix motif with putative DNA-binding helices positioned 34 Å apart. The structure of HPPE serves as a model for numerous proteins, of ill-defined function, predicted to be transcription factors but carrying a cupin domain at the C terminus. Structure-reactivity analyses reveal conformational changes near the catalytic center driven by the presence or absence of ligand, that HPPE is a Zn2+/Fe2+-dependent epoxidase, proof that flavin mononucleotide is required for catalysis, and allow us to propose a simple mechanism that is compatible with previous experimental data. The participation of the redox inert Zn2+ in the mechanism is surprising and indicates that Lewis acid properties of the metal ions are sufficient to polarize the substrate and, aided by flavin mononucleotide reduction, facilitate the epoxidation. PMID:16186494

  17. Docosahexaenoic acid prevents paraquat-induced reactive oxygen species production in dopaminergic neurons via enhancement of glutathione homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung Jun; Han, Jeongsu; Jang, Yunseon; Kim, Soo Jeong; Park, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kang Sik; Jeong, Soyeon; Shin, Soyeon; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun Young; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2015-01-30

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels are reduced in the substantia nigra area in Parkinson's disease patients and animal models, implicating docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as a potential treatment for preventing Parkinson's disease and suggesting the need for investigations into how DHA might protect against neurotoxin-induced dopaminergic neuron loss. The herbicide paraquat (PQ) induces dopaminergic neuron loss through the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that treatment of dopaminergic SN4741 cells with PQ reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, but pretreatment with DHA ameliorated the toxic effect of PQ. To determine the toxic mechanism of PQ, we measured intracellular ROS content in different organelles with specific dyes. As expected, all types of ROS were increased by PQ treatment, but DHA pretreatment selectively decreased cytosolic hydrogen peroxide content. Furthermore, DHA treatment-induced increases in glutathione reductase and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLm) mRNA expression were positively correlated with glutathione (GSH) content. Consistent with this increase in GCLm mRNA levels, Western blot analysis revealed that DHA pretreatment increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels. These findings indicate that DHA prevents PQ-induced neuronal cell loss by enhancing Nrf2-regulated GSH homeostasis. PMID:25545062

  18. Reactive uptake of N2O5 by aerosols containing dicarboxylic acids. Effect of particle phase, composition, and nitrate content.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul T; Badger, Claire L; Cox, R Anthony; Folkers, Mareike; Henk, Hartmut H; Mentel, Thomas F

    2009-04-30

    Reactive uptake coefficients for loss of N(2)O(5) to micron-size aerosols containing oxalic malonic, succinic, and glutaric acids, and mixtures with ammonium hydrogen sulfate and ammonium sulfate, are presented. The uptake measurements were made using two different systems: atmospheric pressure laminar flow tube reactor (Cambridge) and the Large Indoor Aerosol Chamber at Forschungszentrum Juelich. Generally good agreement is observed for the data recorded using the two techniques. Measured uptake coefficients lie in the range 5 x 10(-4)-3 x 10(-2), dependent on relative humidity, on particle phase, and on particle composition. Uptake to solid particles is generally slow, with observed uptake coefficients less than 1 x 10(-3), while uptake to liquid particles is around an order of magnitude more efficient. These results are rationalized using a numerical model employing explicit treatment of both transport and chemistry. Our results indicate a modest effect of the dicarboxylic acids on uptake and confirm the strong effect of particle phase, liquid water content, and particulate nitrate concentrations. PMID:19385680

  19. Effects of abdominal surgery on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and plasma anti-oxidative capacity in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Mudron, P; Herzog, K; Höltershinken, M; Rehage, J

    2007-10-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to study the effects of surgical stress on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) in dairy cows. Ten Holstein-Friesian dairy cows, mean age 5.26 years, admitted for treatment of left abomasal displacement (omentopexy), were used in our study. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein prior to surgery, immediately and then 15, 30, 60, 90 min, and 2, 5, 10, and 24 h after reposition of abomasum. Surgical stress resulted in a significant increase in plasma cortisol concentrations (P < 0.001) with the highest mean levels 15 min after surgery (32.4 +/- 18.1 microg/l) as well as in serum levels of glucose (P < 0.001) and non-esterified fatty acids (P < 0.001). Similarly, surgery transiently enhanced the plasma levels of TBARS (P < 0.001). The highest TBARS plasma levels (0.91 +/- 0.18 micromol/l) were recognized 60 min after reposition of abomasums. There were no significant differences in FRAP in dairy cows before and after reposition of abomasum. In conclusion, these data indicate that stress reaction caused by surgical correction of left displacement of abomasum can be associated with higher production of TBARS. PMID:17877587

  20. Hyperbaric oxygenation modulates vascular reactivity to angiotensin-(1-7) in diabetic rats: potential role of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids.

    PubMed

    Kibel, Aleksandar; Novak, Sanja; Cosic, Anita; Mihaljevic, Zrinka; Falck, John R; Drenjancevic, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Previously, a facilitating effect of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO₂) on aortic ring responses to angiotensin-(1-7) in healthy rats was reported, with epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) possibly playing an important role. The aim of this study was to assess whether HBO₂ exerts similar effects in diabetic rats and to further explore the role of specific cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in changes induced by HBO₂. Aortic relaxation to angiotensin-(1-7) was significantly higher in HBO₂ diabetic rats compared to control diabetic rats, while HBO₂ had no effect on angiotensin II contraction. N-methylsulphonyl-6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl/hexanamide inhibited the facilitation of angiotensin-(1-7) responses in HBO₂ rats, suggesting an important role of EETs in this modulation. mRNA expression of CYP2J3 and protein expression of CYP2C11 were significantly upregulated in HBO₂ diabetic rats, whereas CYP4A1, CYP4A2 and CYP4A3 mRNA and CYP2J3 protein expression was similar between groups. Mean arterial pressure, ferric reducing ability of plasma and Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances levels and serum angiotensin-(1-7) concentrations were not significantly changed. PMID:25326234

  1. Acid-induced change in ozone-reactive site in indole ring of tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Sueo Yoshimura, Ayuko; Okazaki, Kazuyuki; Fijitani, Noboru; Hattori, Hideki

    2009-03-13

    It is well established that ozone as well as oxygen activated by tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase or indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase cleave the 2,3-C=C bond of the indole ring of tryptophan to produce N-formylkynurenine. In the present study, however, we found that exposure of tryptophan to aqueous ozone at and below pH 4.5 generated a different compound. The compound was identified as kynurenine by high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Exposure of N-formylkynurenine to acidic ozone did not generate a significant amount of kynurenine, indicating that the kynurenine was not produced via N-formylkynurenine. Acidic ozone thus appears to cleave the 1, 2-N-C bond in place of the 2,3-C=C bond of the indole ring, followed by liberation of the 2-C atom. The 1,2-N-C bond and 2,3-C=C bond are likely to undergo changes in their nature of bonding on acidification, enabling ozone to react with the former bond but not with the latter bond.

  2. Direct and indirect inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase by salicylic acid and anthocyanidins reactivates intercellular ROS signaling and allows for synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Scheit, Katrin; Bauer, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Salicylic acid and anthocyanidins are known as plant-derived antioxidants, but also can provoke paradoxically seeming prooxidant effects in vitro. These prooxidant effects are connected to the potential of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins to induce apoptosis selectively in tumor cells in vitro and to inhibit tumor growth in animal models. Several epidemiological studies have shown that salicylic acid and its prodrug acetylsalicylic acid are tumor-preventive for humans. The mechanism of salicylic acid- and anthocyanidin-dependent antitumor effects has remained enigmatic so far. Extracellular apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl signaling pathway specifically induces apoptosis in transformed cells. Tumor cells have acquired resistance against intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Here, we show that salicylic acid and anthocyanidins inactivate tumor cell protective catalase and thus reactive apoptosis-inducing intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling of tumor cells and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis Salicylic acid inhibits catalase directly through its potential to transform compound I of catalase into the inactive compound II. In contrast, anthocyanidins provoke a complex mechanism for catalase inactivation that is initiated by anthocyanidin-mediated inhibition of NO dioxygenase. This allows the formation of extracellular singlet oxygen through the reaction between H(2)O(2) and peroxynitrite, amplification through a caspase8-dependent step and subsequent singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of catalase. The combination of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins allows for a remarkable synergistic effect in apoptosis induction. This effect may be potentially useful to elaborate novel therapeutic approaches and crucial for the interpretation of epidemiological results related to the antitumor effects of secondary plant compounds. PMID

  3. Reactive extraction of lactic acid with trioctylamine/methylene chloride/n-hexane

    SciTech Connect

    Han, D.H.; Hong, W.H.

    1996-04-01

    The trioctylamine (TOA)/methylene chloride (MC)/n-hexane system was used as the extraction agent for the extraction of lactic acid. Curves of equilibrium and hydration were obtained at various temperatures and concentrations of TOA. A modified mass action model was proposed to interpret the equilibrium and the hydration curves. The reaction mechanism and the corresponding parameters which best represent the equilibrium data were estimated, and the concentration of water in the organic phase was predicted by inserting the parameters into the simple mathematical equation of the modified model. The concentration of MC and the change of temperature were important factors for the extraction and the stripping process. The stripping was performed by a simple distillation which was a combination of temperature-swing regeneration and diluent-swing regeneration. The type of inactive diluent has no influence on the stripping. The stripping efficiencies were about 70%.

  4. Reactivity and reaction intermediates for acetic acid adsorbed on CeO2(111)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Calaza, Florencia C.; Chen, Tsung -Liang; Mullins, David R.; Xu, Ye; Steven H. Overbury

    2015-05-02

    Adsorption and reaction of acetic acid on a CeO2(1 1 1) surface was studied by a combination of ultra-highvacuum based methods including temperature desorption spectroscopy (TPD), soft X-ray photoelectronspectroscopy (sXPS), near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and reflection absorption IRspectroscopy (RAIRS), together with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. TPD shows that thedesorption products are strongly dependent upon the initial oxidation state of the CeO2 surface, includingselectivity between acetone and acetaldehyde products. The combination of sXPS and NEXAFS demon-strate that acetate forms upon adsorption at low temperature and is stable to above 500 K, above whichpoint ketene, acetone and acetic acidmore » desorb. Furthermore, DFT and RAIRS show that below 500 K, bridge bondedacetate coexists with a moiety formed by adsorption of an acetate at an oxygen vacancy, formed bywater desorption.« less

  5. Sea salt aerosols as a reactive surface for inorganic and organic acidic gases in the arctic troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, J. W.; Li, W. J.; Zhang, D. Z.; Zhang, J. C.; Lin, Y. T.; Shen, X. J.; Sun, J. Y.; Chen, J. M.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.; Wang, W. X.

    2015-06-01

    Sea salt aerosols (SSA) are dominant particles in the arctic atmosphere and determine the polar radiative balance. SSA react with acidic pollutants that lead to changes of physical and chemical properties of their surface, which in turn alter their hygroscopic and optical properties. Transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry was used to analyze morphology, composition, size, and mixing state of individual SSA at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in summertime. Individual fresh SSA contained cubic NaCl coated by certain amounts of MgCl2 and CaSO4. Individual partially aged SSA contained irregular NaCl coated by a mixture of NaNO3, Na2SO4, Mg(NO3)2, and MgSO4. The comparison suggests the hydrophilic MgCl2 coating in fresh SSA likely intrigued the heterogeneous reactions at the beginning of SSA and acidic gases. Individual fully aged SSA normally had Na2SO4 cores and an amorphous coating of NaNO3. Elemental mappings of individual SSA particles revealed that as the particles ageing Cl gradually decreased but the C, N, O, and S content increased. 12C14N- mapping from nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry indicates that organic matter increased in the aged SSA compared with the fresh SSA. 12C14N- line scans further show that organic matter was mainly concentrated on the aged SSA surface. These new findings indicate that this mixture of organic matter and NaNO3 on particle surfaces determines their hygroscopic and optical properties. These abundant SSA, whose reactive surfaces absorb inorganic and organic acidic gases in the arctic troposphere, need to be incorporated into atmospheric chemical models.

  6. Protective effects of α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid against cardol-induced cell death and reactive oxygen species generation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Murata, Wakae; Tanaka, Toshio; Kubo, Isao; Fujita, Ken-ichi

    2013-06-01

    Cardol (C₁₅:₃), isolated from cashew (Anacardium occidentale L.) nut shell liquid, has been shown to exhibit bactericidal activity against various strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant strains. The maximum level of reactive oxygen species generation was detected at around the minimum bactericidal concentration of cardol, while reactive oxygen species production drastically decreased at doses above the minimum bactericidal concentration. The primary response for bactericidal activity around the bactericidal concentration was noted to primarily originate from oxidative stress such as intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. High doses of cardol (C₁₅:₃) were shown to induce leakage of K⁺ from S. aureus cells, which may be related to the decrease in reactive oxygen species. Antioxidants such as α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid restricted reactive oxygen species generation and restored cellular damage induced by the lipid. Cardol (C₁₅:₃) overdose probably disrupts the native membrane-associated function as it acts as a surfactant. The maximum antibacterial activity of cardols against S. aureus depends on their log P values (partition coefficient in octanol/water) and is related to their similarity to those of anacardic acids isolated from the same source. PMID:23670625

  7. Copolymeric hexyl acrylate-methacrylic acid microspheres - surface vs. bulk reactive carboxyl groups. Coulometric and colorimetric determination and analytical applications for heterogeneous microtitration.

    PubMed

    Stelmach, Emilia; Maksymiuk, Krzysztof; Michalska, Agata

    2016-10-01

    Copolymeric acrylate microspheres were prepared from hexyl acrylate using different amounts of methacrylic acid, resulting in a series of microspheres of gradually changing properties. The distribution of carboxyl groups - between surface and bulk of microspheres was evaluated. Bulk reactive carboxyl groups were determined using reverse coulometric titration with H(+) ions, following hydroxide ions have been generated and allowed to react with microspheres in the first step. It was found that the number of reactive carboxyl groups available in copolymeric microspheres is lower compared to number of methacrylic acid units used for polymerization process. Moreover, there is correlation between the number of groups introduced and found to be reactive in microspheres. On the other hand, the number of surface reactive groups was proportional to the number of groups introduced in course of polymerization. Thus, the surface reactive groups can be used as reagent, in novel heterogeneous microtitration procedure, in which a constant number of microspheres of different carboxyl groups contents is introduced to the sample to react with the analyte. The applicability of novel proposed method was tested on the example of Ni(2+) determination. PMID:27474305

  8. Fatty acids binding to human serum albumin: Changes of reactivity and glycation level of Cysteine-34 free thiol group with methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Pavićević, Ivan D; Jovanović, Vesna B; Takić, Marija M; Penezić, Ana Z; Aćimović, Jelena M; Mandić, Ljuba M

    2014-10-17

    Fatty acids (FAs) binding to human serum albumin (HSA) could lead to the changes of Cys-34 thiol group accessibility and reactivity, i.e. its scavenger capacity and antioxidant property. The influence of saturated, mono and poly unsaturated, and fish oil FAs binding to HSA on the carbonylation level and the reactivity of HSA-SH and HSA modified with methylglyoxal (MG-HSA-SH) was investigated. Changes of thiol group reactivity were followed by determination of pseudo first order rate constant (k') for thiols reaction with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid). HSA changes were monitored using native PAG electrophoresis and fluorescence spectroscopy. For FA/HSA molar ratios screening, qTLC and GC were used. FAs increase thiol group carbonylation levels from 8% to 20%. The k' values obtained for FAs-free HSA-SH and FAs-free MG-HSA-SH are almost equal (7.5×10(-3) and 7.7×10(-3)s(-1), resp.). Binding of all FAs amplify the reactivity (k' values from 14.6×10(-3) to 26.0×10(-3)s(-1)) of HSA-SH group for 2-3.5times in the order: palmitic, docosahexaenoic, fish oil extract, stearic, oleic, myristic and eicosapentaenoic acid, due to HSA conformational changes. FAs-bound MG-HSA-SH samples follow that pattern, but their k' values (from 9.8×10(-3) to 14.3×10(-3)s(-1)) were lower compared to unmodified HSA due to additional conformation changes of HSA molecules during carbonylation. Carbonylation level and reactivity of Cys34 thiol group of unmodified and carbonylated HSA depend on type of FAs bound to HSA, which implies the possibility for modulation of -SH reactivity (scavenger capacity and antioxidant property) by FAs as a supplement. PMID:25451573

  9. Sequential study on reactive blue 29 dye removal from aqueous solution by peroxy acid and single wall carbon nanotubes: experiment and theory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The majority of anthraquinone dye released to the environment come from antrapogenic sources. Several techniques are available for dyes' removal. In this study removal of reactive blue 29 (RB29) by an advanced oxidation process sequenced with single wall carbon nanotubes was investigated. Advanced oxidation process was optimized over a period of 60 minutes by changing the ratio of acetic acid to hydrogen peroxide, the compounds which form peroxy acid. Reduction of 20.2% -56.4% of reactive blue 29 was observed when the ratio of hydrogen peroxide/acetic acid/dye changed from 344/344/1 to 344/344/0.08 at different times (60, 120 and 180 min). The optimum ratio of acetic acid/hydrogen peroxide/dye was found to be 344/344/0.16 over 60 min. The resultant then was introduced for further removal by single wall carbon nanotubes(SWCNTs) as adsorbent. The adsorption of reactive blue 29 onto SWCNTs was also investigated. Langmuir, Freundlich and BET isotherms were determined and the results revealed that the adsorption of RB29 onto SWCNTs was well explained by BET model and changed to Freundlich isotherm when SWCNTs was used after the application of peroxy acid. Kinetic study showed that the equilibrium time for adsorption of RB 29 on to SWCNT is 4 h. Experiments were carried out to investigate adsorption kinetics, adsorbent capacity and the effect of solution pH on the removal of reactive blue29. The pseudo-second order kinetic equation could best describe the sorption kinetics. The most efficient pH for color removal (amongst pH=3, 5 and 8) was pH= 5. Further studies are needed to identify the peroxy acid degradation intermediates and to investigate their effects on SWCNTs. PMID:23369540

  10. Serotonin modulates Arabidopsis root growth via changes in reactive oxygen species and jasmonic acid-ethylene signaling.

    PubMed

    Pelagio-Flores, Ramón; Ruiz-Herrera, León Francisco; López-Bucio, José

    2016-09-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) is a bioactive indoleamine with neurotransmitter function in vertebrates, which represents an emerging signaling molecule in plants, playing key roles in the development and defense. In this study, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and jasmonic acid (JA)-ethylene (Et) signaling in root developmental alterations induced by serotonin was investigated. An Arabidopsis thaliana mutant defective at the RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) locus was resistant to paraquat-induced ROS accumulation in primary roots and showed decreased inhibition or root growth in response to serotonin. A suite of JA- and Et-related mutants including coronatine insensitive1, jasmonic acid resistant1 (jar1), etr1, ein2 and ein3 showed tolerance to serotonin in the inhibition of primary root growth and ROS redistribution within the root tip when compared with wild-type (WT) seedlings. Competence assays between serotonin and AgNO3 , a well-known blocker of Et action, showed that primary root growth in medium supplemented with serotonin was normalized by AgNO3 , whereas roots of eto3, an Et overproducer mutant, were oversensitive to serotonin. Comparison of ROS levels in WT, etr1, jar1 and rcd1 primary root tips using the ROS-specific probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate and confocal imaging showed that serotonin inhibition of primary root growth likely occurs independently of its conversion into melatonin. Our results provide compelling evidence that serotonin affects ROS distribution in roots, involving RCD1 and components of the JA-Et signaling pathways. PMID:26864878

  11. Docosahexaenoic acid prevents paraquat-induced reactive oxygen species production in dopaminergic neurons via enhancement of glutathione homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyoung Jun; Han, Jeongsu; Jang, Yunseon; Kim, Soo Jeong; Park, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kang Sik; Jeong, Soyeon; Shin, Soyeon; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun Young; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • DHA prevents PQ-induced dopaminergic neuronal loss via decreasing of excessive ROS. • DHA increases GR and GCLm derivate GSH pool by enhancement of Nrf2 expression. • Protective mechanism is removal of PQ-induced ROS via DHA-dependent GSH pool. • DHA may be a good preventive strategy for Parkinson’s disease (PD) therapy. - Abstract: Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels are reduced in the substantia nigra area in Parkinson’s disease patients and animal models, implicating docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as a potential treatment for preventing Parkinson’s disease and suggesting the need for investigations into how DHA might protect against neurotoxin-induced dopaminergic neuron loss. The herbicide paraquat (PQ) induces dopaminergic neuron loss through the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that treatment of dopaminergic SN4741 cells with PQ reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, but pretreatment with DHA ameliorated the toxic effect of PQ. To determine the toxic mechanism of PQ, we measured intracellular ROS content in different organelles with specific dyes. As expected, all types of ROS were increased by PQ treatment, but DHA pretreatment selectively decreased cytosolic hydrogen peroxide content. Furthermore, DHA treatment-induced increases in glutathione reductase and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLm) mRNA expression were positively correlated with glutathione (GSH) content. Consistent with this increase in GCLm mRNA levels, Western blot analysis revealed that DHA pretreatment increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels. These findings indicate that DHA prevents PQ-induced neuronal cell loss by enhancing Nrf2-regulated GSH homeostasis.

  12. Generation of reactive oxygen species by a novel berberine–bile acid analog mediates apoptosis in hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingyong; Zhang, Li; Zu, Yuangang; Liu, Tianyu; Zhang, Baoyou; He, Wuna

    2013-04-19

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Anticancer effects of B4, a novel berberine–bile acid analog, were tested. • B4 inhibited cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. • It also stimulated mitochondrial ROS production and membrane depolarization. • Effects of B4 were inhibited by a non-specific ROS scavenger. • Regulation of ROS generation may be a strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma. - Abstract: 2,3-Methenedioxy-9-O-(3′α,7′α-dihydroxy-5′β-cholan-24′-propy-lester) berberine (B4) is a novel berberine–bile acid analog synthesized in our laboratory. Previously, we showed that B4 exerted greater cytotoxicity than berberine in several human cancer cell lines. Therefore, we further evaluated the mechanism governing its anticancer actions in hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells. B4 inhibited the proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells, and stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane depolarization; anti-oxidant capacity was reduced. B4 also induced the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and an increase in poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage products, reflective of caspase-3 activation. Moreover, B4 induced the nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and a rise in DNA fragmentation. Pretreatment with the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) inhibited B4-mediated effects, including cytotoxicity, ROS production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, cytochrome c release, PARP cleavage, and AIF translocation. Our data suggest that B4 induces ROS-triggered caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis pathways in SMMC-7721 cells and that ROS production may be a specific potential strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma.

  13. Islet glutamic acid decarboxylase modified by reactive oxygen species is recognized by antibodies from patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Trigwell, S M; Radford, P M; Page, S R; Loweth, A C; James, R F L; Morgan, N G; Todd, I

    2001-01-01

    The generation of an autoimmune response against islet beta-cells is central to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus, and this response is driven by the stimulation of autoreactive lymphocytes by components of the beta-cells themselves. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the beta-cell destruction which leads to type 1 diabetes and may modify beta-cell components so as to enhance their immunogenicity. We investigated the effects of oxidation reactions catalysed by copper or iron on the major beta-cell autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Lysates of purified rat islets were exposed to copper or iron sulphate with or without hydrogen peroxide or ascorbic acid. Immunostaining showed that these treatments generated high molecular weight covalently linked aggregates containing GAD. These are not formed by intermolecular disulphide bonds between cysteine residues since they cannot be resolved into monomeric form when electrophoresed under extreme reducing conditions. There was no modification of insulin or pro-insulin by ROS. The same oxidative changes to GAD could be induced in viable islet cells treated with copper sulphate and hydrogen peroxide, and thus the modifications are not an artefact of the catalysed oxidation of cell-free lysates. Sera from patients with type 1 diabetes and stiffman syndrome containing GAD antibodies reacted predominantly with the highest molecular weight modified protein band of GAD: normal human sera did not precipitate GAD. Thus, oxidatively modified aggregates of GAD react with serum antibodies of type 1 diabetes patients and some SMS patients: this is consistent with oxidative modifications of autoantigens being relevant to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. PMID:11703367

  14. Islet glutamic acid decarboxylase modified by reactive oxygen species is recognized by antibodies from patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Trigwell, S M; Radford, P M; Page, S R; Loweth, A C; James, R F; Morgan, N G; Todd, I

    2001-11-01

    The generation of an autoimmune response against islet beta-cells is central to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus, and this response is driven by the stimulation of autoreactive lymphocytes by components of the beta-cells themselves. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the beta-cell destruction which leads to type 1 diabetes and may modify beta-cell components so as to enhance their immunogenicity. We investigated the effects of oxidation reactions catalysed by copper or iron on the major beta-cell autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Lysates of purified rat islets were exposed to copper or iron sulphate with or without hydrogen peroxide or ascorbic acid. Immunostaining showed that these treatments generated high molecular weight covalently linked aggregates containing GAD. These are not formed by intermolecular disulphide bonds between cysteine residues since they cannot be resolved into monomeric form when electrophoresed under extreme reducing conditions. There was no modification of insulin or pro-insulin by ROS. The same oxidative changes to GAD could be induced in viable islet cells treated with copper sulphate and hydrogen peroxide, and thus the modifications are not an artefact of the catalysed oxidation of cell-free lysates. Sera from patients with type 1 diabetes and stiffman syndrome containing GAD antibodies reacted predominantly with the highest molecular weight modified protein band of GAD: normal human sera did not precipitate GAD. Thus, oxidatively modified aggregates of GAD react with serum antibodies of type 1 diabetes patients and some SMS patients: this is consistent with oxidative modifications of autoantigens being relevant to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. PMID:11703367

  15. Reactivity of tracheal smooth muscles in albino rats with experimental diabetes mellitus treated with a new complex compound of oxovanadium (IV) and isonicotinic acid hydrazide.

    PubMed

    Khafiz'yanova, R Kh; Minnebaev, M M; Gallyamov, R M; Latypov, R S; Gosmanov, A R; Aleeva, G N

    2003-06-01

    We studied functional properties of tracheal smooth muscle cells in rats with diabetes mellitus. Reactivity of tracheal smooth muscles increased in rats with experimental alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus. A new complex compound of oxovanadium (IV) and isonicotinic acid hydrazide affected reactivity of tracheal smooth muscles in albino rats with experimental type I diabetes mellitus. This new organic vanadium-containing compound reduced contractility of tracheal smooth muscles in rats and potentiated relaxation of smooth muscle cells in the trachea in response to exogenous nitric oxide. PMID:12937677

  16. Halogen bonding from a hard and soft acids and bases perspective: investigation by using density functional theory reactivity indices.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Balazs; Nagels, Nick; Herrebout, Wouter A; De Proft, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Halogen bonds between the trifluoromethyl halides CF(3)Cl, CF(3)Br and CF(3)I, and dimethyl ether, dimethyl sulfide, trimethylamine and trimethyl phosphine were investigated using Pearson's hard and soft acids and bases (HSAB) concept with conceptual DFT reactivity indices, the Ziegler-Rauk-type energy-decomposition analysis, the natural orbital for chemical valence (NOCV) framework and the non-covalent interaction (NCI) index. It is found that the relative importance of electrostatic and orbital (charge transfer) interactions varies as a function of both the donor and acceptor molecules. Hard and soft interactions were distinguished and characterised by atomic charges, electrophilicity and local softness indices. Dual-descriptor plots indicate an orbital σ hole on the halogen similar to the electrostatic σ hole manifested in the molecular electrostatic potential. The predicted high halogen-bond-acceptor affinity of N-heterocyclic carbenes was evidenced in the highest complexation energy for the hitherto unknown CF(3) I·NHC complex. The dominant NOCV orbital represents an electron-density deformation according to a n→σ*-type interaction. The characteristic signal found in the reduced density gradient versus electron-density diagram corresponds to the non-covalent interaction between contact atoms in the NCI plots, which is the manifestation of halogen bonding within the NCI theory. The unexpected C-X bond strengthening observed in several cases was rationalised within the molecular orbital framework. PMID:23169478

  17. Lipid peroxidation measured as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in tissue slices: characterization and comparison with homogenates and microsomes.

    PubMed

    Fraga, C G; Leibovitz, B E; Tappel, A L

    1988-01-01

    Liver slices were used to measure lipid peroxidation induced by bromotrichloromethane, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), or ferrous iron. The responses of liver homogenates and microsomes to oxidative conditions were compared with the response of tissue slices. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated by the production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). As was observed in homogenates and microsomes, TBARS production by liver slices depended upon the amount of tissue, the incubation time, inducer, the amount of inducer, and the presence of antioxidant. Control liver slices incubated at 37 degrees C for 2 h produced 19 nmol of TBARS per g of liver. When slices were incubated in the presence of 1 mM BrCCl3, 1 mM t-BOOH, or 50 microM ferrous iron, TBARS production increased 4.6-, 8.2-, or 6.7-fold over the control value, respectively. Comparable induction of TBARS by liver homogenates and microsomes was observed when these preparations were incubated with the same inducers. Addition of 5 microM butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) prevented the induction of TBARS by 50 microM ferrous iron by liver slices. The results indicate the usefulness of tissue slices to measure lipid peroxidation. The usefulness of tissue slices is emphasized when a number of compounds or tissues are studied and tissue integrity is desired as in toxicological, pharmacological, and nutritional studies where reduced numbers of experimental animals is a relevant issue. PMID:3356355

  18. Dual-syringe reactive electrospinning of cross-linked hyaluronic acid hydrogel nanofibers for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuan; Ghosh, Kaustabh; Li, Bingquan; Sokolov, Jonathan C; Clark, Richard A F; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2006-10-20

    A facile fabrication of a cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel nanofibers by a reactive electrospinning method is described. A thiolated HA derivative, 3,3'-dithiobis(propanoic dihydrazide)-modified HA (HA-DTPH), and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) are selected as the cross-linking system. The cross-linking reaction occurs simultaneously during the electrospinning process using a dual-syringe mixing technique. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) is added into the spinning solution as a viscosity modifier to facilitate the fiber formation and is selectively removed with water after the electrospinning process. The nanofibrous structure of the electrospun HA scaffold is well preserved after hydration with an average fiber diameter of 110 nm. A cell morphology study on fibronectin (FN)-adsorbed HA nanofibrous scaffolds shows that the NIH 3T3 fibroblasts migrate into the scaffold through the nanofibrous network, and demonstrate an elaborate three-dimensional dendritic morphology within the scaffold, which reflects the dimensions of the electrospun HA nanofibers. These results suggest the application of electrospun HA nanofibrous scaffolds as a potential material for wound healing and tissue regeneration. [image: see text] Laser scanning confocal microscopy demonstrates that the NIH3T3 fibroblast develops an extended 3D dendritic morphology within the fibronectin-adsorbed electrospun HA nanofibrous scaffold. PMID:17022092

  19. Long-chain bases, phosphatidic acid, MAPKs, and reactive oxygen species as nodal signal transducers in stress responses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Saucedo-García, Mariana; Gavilanes-Ruíz, Marina; Arce-Cervantes, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Due to their sessile condition, plants have developed sensitive, fast, and effective ways to contend with environmental changes. These mechanisms operate as informational wires conforming extensive and intricate networks that are connected in several points. The responses are designed as pathways orchestrated by molecules that are transducers of protein and non-protein nature. Their chemical nature imposes selective features such as specificity, formation rate, and generation site to the informational routes. Enzymes such as mitogen-activated protein kinases and non-protein, smaller molecules, such as long-chain bases, phosphatidic acid, and reactive oxygen species are recurrent transducers in the pleiotropic responses to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. In this review, we considered these four components as nodal points of converging signaling pathways that start from very diverse stimuli and evoke very different responses. These pleiotropic effects may be explained by the potentiality that every one of these four mediators can be expressed from different sources, cellular location, temporality, or magnitude. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the interplay of these four specific signaling components in Arabidopsis cells, with an emphasis on drought, cold and pathogen stresses. PMID:25763001

  20. In-situ remediation of acid mine drainage using a permeable reactive barrier in Aznalcóllar (Sw Spain).

    PubMed

    Gibert, Oriol; Rötting, Tobias; Cortina, José Luis; de Pablo, Joan; Ayora, Carlos; Carrera, Jesús; Bolzicco, José

    2011-07-15

    Following on the accident occurred in Aznalcóllar in 1998, whereby a huge amount of acid mine drainage and heavy metal-bearing pyritic sludge was released to the Agrio river valley with the subsequent contamination of groundwater, a subsurface permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was installed to mitigate the long-term impacts by the spillage. The PRB material consisted of a mixture of limestone and vegetal compost. A particular characteristic of the Agrio aquifer is its high water flow velocity (0.5-1 m/d), which may pose difficulties in its remediation using PRB technology. The present study reports the 36-month performance of the PRB. Vertical differences in water velocity were observed within the PRB, with the deeper part being slower and more effective in neutralizing pH and removing heavy metals (Zn, Al, Cu). On the other hand, partial sulfate removal appeard to be restricted to the bottom of the PRB, but with no apparent influence on downgradient water quality. The results are finally compared with the other four reported existing PRBs for AMD worldwide. PMID:21601356

  1. Salicylic acid determines differential senescence produced by two Turnip mosaic virus strains involving reactive oxygen species and early transcriptomic changes.

    PubMed

    Manacorda, Carlos Augusto; Mansilla, Carmen; Debat, Humberto Julio; Zavallo, Diego; Sánchez, Flora; Ponz, Fernando; Asurmendi, Sebastián

    2013-12-01

    Losses produced by virus diseases depend mostly on symptom severity. Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) is one of the most damaging and widespread potyvirus infecting members of the family Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis thaliana. We used JPN1 and UK1 TuMV strains to characterize viral infections regarding symptom development, senescence progression, antioxidant response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, and transcriptional profiling. Both isolates, despite accumulating similar viral titers, induced different symptomatology and strong differences in oxidative status. Early differences in several senescence-associated genes linked to the ORE1 and ORS1 regulatory networks as well as persistent divergence in key ROS production and scavenging systems of the plant were detected. However, at a later stage, both strains induced nutrient competition, indicating that senescence rates are influenced by different mechanisms upon viral infections. Analyses of ORE1 and ORS1 levels in infected Brassica juncea plants showed a similar pattern, suggesting a conserved differential response to both strains in Brassicaceae spp. Transcriptional analysis of the ORE1 and ORS1 regulons showed similarities between salicylic acid (SA) response and the early induction triggered by UK1, the most severe strain. By means of SA-defective NahG transgenic plants, we found that differential senescence progression and ROS accumulation between strains rely on an intact SA pathway. PMID:23945002

  2. Potato chip intake increases ascorbic acid levels and decreases reactive oxygen species in SMP30/GNL knockout mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yoshitaka; Sakuma, Rui; Ichisawa, Megumi; Ishihara, Katsuyuki; Kubo, Misako; Handa, Setsuko; Mugita, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Naoki; Koga, Hidenori; Ishigami, Akihito

    2014-09-24

    Potato chips (PC) contain abundant amounts of the free radical scavenger ascorbic acid (AA) due to the rapid dehydration of potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) that occurs during frying. To evaluate the antioxidant activity of PC, this study examined reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in tissues from SMP30/GNL knockout (KO) mice that cannot synthesize AA and determined AA and ROS levels after the animals were fed 20 and 10% PC diets for 7 weeks. Compared with AA-sufficient mice, AA-depleted SMP30/GNL KO mice showed high ROS levels in tissues. SMP30/GNL KO mice fed a PC diet showed high AA and low ROS levels in the brain, heart, lung, testis, soleus muscle, plantaris muscle, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, eyeball, and epididymal fat compared with AA-depleted mice. The data suggest that PC intake increases AA levels and enhances ROS scavenging activity in tissues of SMP30/GNL KO mice, which are a promising model for evaluating the antioxidant activity of foods. PMID:25180784

  3. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids attenuate reactive oxygen species level, mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase activation, and apoptosis in carcinoma cells treated with arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liu; Chen, Chen; Gong, Wei; Li, Yuanjing; Edin, Matthew L; Zeldin, Darryl C; Wang, Dao Wen

    2011-11-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and the cytochrome P450 epoxygenase CYP2J2 promote tumorogenesis in vivo and in vitro via direct stimulation of tumor cell growth and inhibition of tumor cell apoptosis. Herein, we describe a novel mechanism of inhibition of tumor cell apoptosis by EETs. In Tca-8113 cancer cells, the antileukemia drug arsenic trioxide (ATO) led to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), impaired mitochondrial function, and induced apoptosis. 11,12-EET pretreatment increased expression of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase and inhibited ATO-induced apoptosis. 11,12-EET also prevented the ATO-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, caspase-3, and caspase-9. Therefore, 11,12-EET-pretreatment attenuated the ROS generation, loss of mitochondrial function, and caspase activation observed after ATO treatment. Moreover, the CYP2J2-specific inhibitor compound 26 enhanced arsenic cytotoxicity to a clinically relevant concentration of ATO (1-2 μM). Both the thiol-containing antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine, and 11,12-EET reversed the synergistic effect of the two agents. Taken together, these data indicate that 11,12-EET inhibits apoptosis induced by ATO through a mechanism that involves induction of antioxidant proteins and attenuation of ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:21846841

  4. Temporal-Spatial Interaction between Reactive Oxygen Species and Abscisic Acid Regulates Rapid Systemic Acclimation in Plants[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Miller, Gad; Salazar, Carolina; Mondal, Hossain A.; Shulaev, Elena; Cortes, Diego F.; Shuman, Joel L.; Luo, Xiaozhong; Shah, Jyoti; Schlauch, Karen; Shulaev, Vladimir; Mittler, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Being sessile organisms, plants evolved sophisticated acclimation mechanisms to cope with abiotic challenges in their environment. These are activated at the initial site of exposure to stress, as well as in systemic tissues that have not been subjected to stress (termed systemic acquired acclimation [SAA]). Although SAA is thought to play a key role in plant survival during stress, little is known about the signaling mechanisms underlying it. Here, we report that SAA in plants requires at least two different signals: an autopropagating wave of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that rapidly spreads from the initial site of exposure to the entire plant and a stress-specific signal that conveys abiotic stress specificity. We further demonstrate that SAA is stress specific and that a temporal–spatial interaction between ROS and abscisic acid regulates rapid SAA to heat stress in plants. In addition, we demonstrate that the rapid ROS signal is associated with the propagation of electric signals in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our findings unravel some of the basic signaling mechanisms underlying SAA in plants and reveal that signaling events and transcriptome and metabolome reprogramming of systemic tissues in response to abiotic stress occur at a much faster rate than previously envisioned. PMID:24038652

  5. Balloon-Borne Measurements of Total Reactive Nitrogen, Nitric Acid, and Aerosol in the Cold Arctic Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Aimedieu, P.; Matthews, W. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Murcray, D. G.; Hofmann, D. J.; Johnston, P. V.; Iwasaka, Y.; Iwata, A.; Sheldon, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Total reactive nitrogen (NO(Y)) between 15 and 29 km was measured for the first time on board a balloon within the Arctic cold vortex. Observations of HNO3, aerosol, and ozone were made by instruments on the same balloon gondola which was launched from Esrange, Sweden (68 deg N, 20 deg E) on January 23, 1989. The NO(y) mixing ratio was observed to increase very rapidly from 6 ppbv at 18 km altitude to a maximum of 21 ppbv at 21 km, forming a sharp layer with a thickness of about 2 km. A minimum in the NO(y) mixing ratio of 5 ppbv was found at 27 km. The measured HNO3 profile shows broad similarities to that of NO(y). This observation, together with the observed very low column amount of NO2, shows that NO(x) had been almost totally converted to HNO3, and that NO(y) was composed mainly of HNO3. The enhanced aerosol concentration between 19 and 22 km suggests that the maximum abundance of HNO3 trapped in the form of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was about 6 ppbv at 21 km. The sampled air parcels were highly supersaturated with respect to NAT. Although extensive denitrification throughout the stratosphere did not prevail, an indication of denitrification was found at altitudes of 27 and 22 km, and between 18 and 15 km.

  6. Hydrogen Reactivity on Highly-hydroxylated TiO2(110) Surfaces Prepared via Carboxylic Acid Adsorption and Photolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Deskins, N. Aaron; Wang, Zhitao; Henderson, Michael A.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2012-02-27

    Combined scanning tunneling microscopy, temperature-programmed desorption, photo stimulated desorption, and density functional theory studies have probed the formation and reactivity of highly-hydroxylated rutile TiO2(110) surfaces, which were prepared via a novel, photochemical route using trimethyl acetic acid (TMAA) dissociative adsorption and subsequent photolysis at 300 K. Deprotonation of TMAA molecules upon adsorption produces both surface bridging hydroxyls (OHb) and bidentate trimethyl acetate (TMA) species with a saturation coverage of near 0.5 monolayer (ML). Ultra-violet light irradiation selectively removes TMA species, producing a highly-hydroxylated surface with up to ~0.5 ML OHb coverage. At high coverages, the OHb species typically occupy second-nearest neighbor sites along the bridging oxygen row locally forming linear (2×1) structures of different lengths, although the surface is less ordered on a long scale. The annealing of the highly-hydroxylated surface leads to hydroxyl recombination and H2O desorption with ~100% yield, thus ruling out the diffusion of H into the bulk that has been suggested in the literature. In agreement with experimental data, theoretical results show that the recombinative H2O desorption is preferred over both H bulk diffusion and H2 desorption processes.

  7. Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Ju, Tsai-Kai; Huang, Yuan-Li; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Chen, Jiun-Hong; Lee, Hsinyu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKCζ mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway.

  8. beta-aminobutyric acid primes an NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species production during grapevine-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Dubreuil-Maurizi, Carole; Trouvelot, Sophie; Frettinger, Patrick; Pugin, Alain; Wendehenne, David; Poinssot, Benoît

    2010-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the process of priming are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the early signaling events triggered by beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA), a well-known priming-mediated plant resistance inducer. Our results indicate that, in contrast to oligogalacturonides (OG), BABA does not elicit typical defense-related early signaling events nor defense-gene expression in grapevine. However, in OG-elicited cells pretreated with BABA, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and expression of the respiratory-burst oxidase homolog RbohD gene were primed. In response to the causal agent of downy mildew Plasmopara viticola, a stronger ROS production was specifically observed in BABA-treated leaves. This process was correlated with an increased resistance. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI) abolished this primed ROS production and reduced the BABA-induced resistance (BABA-IR). These results suggest that priming of an NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production contributes to BABA-IR in the Vitis-Plasmopara pathosystem. PMID:20615112

  9. Organochlorine insecticides induce NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species in human monocytic cells via phospholipase A2/arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Mangum, Lee C; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Stokes, John V; Matthews, Anberitha T; Lee, Jung Hwa; Chambers, Janice E; Ross, Matthew K

    2015-04-20

    Bioaccumulative organohalogen chemicals, such as organochlorine (OC) insecticides, have been increasingly associated with disease etiology; however, the mechanistic link between chemical exposure and diseases, such as atherosclerosis, cancer, and diabetes, is complex and poorly defined. Systemic oxidative stress stemming from OC exposure might play a vital role in the development of these pathologies. Monocytes are important surveillance cells of the innate immune system that respond to extracellular signals possessing danger-associated molecular patterns by synthesizing oxyradicals, such as superoxide, for the purpose of combating infectious pathogens. We hypothesized that OC chemicals can be toxic to monocytes because of an inappropriate elevation in superoxide-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) capable of causing cellular oxidative damage. Reactive oxyradicals are generated in monocytes in large part by NADPH oxidase (Nox). The present study was conducted to examine the ability of two chlorinated cyclodiene compounds, trans-nonachlor and dieldrin, as well as p,p'-DDE, a chlorinated alicyclic metabolite of DDT, to stimulate Nox activity in a human monocytic cell line and to elucidate the mechanisms for this activation. Human THP-1 monocytes treated with either trans-nonachlor or dieldrin (0.1-10 μM in the culture medium) exhibited elevated levels of intracellular ROS, as evidenced by complementary methods, including flow cytometry analysis using the probe DCFH-DA and hydroethidine-based fluorometric and UPLC-MS assays. In addition, the induced reactive oxygen flux caused by trans-nonachlor was also observed in two other cell lines, murine J774 macrophages and human HL-60 cells. The central role of Nox in OC-mediated oxidative stress was demonstrated by the attenuated superoxide production in OC-exposed monocytes treated with the Nox inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium and VAS-2870. Moreover, monocytes challenged with OCs exhibited increased phospho-p47(phox

  10. Is alpha-lipoic acid a scavenger of reactive oxygen species in vivo? Evidence for its initiation of stress signaling pathways that promote endogenous antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Petersen Shay, Kate; Moreau, Régis F; Smith, Eric J; Hagen, Tory M

    2008-06-01

    The chemical reduction and oxidation (redox) properties of alpha-lipoic acid (LA) suggest that it may have potent antioxidant potential. A significant number of studies now show that LA and its reduced form, dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), directly scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) species and protect cells against a host of insults where oxidative stress is part of the underlying etiology. However, owing to its limited and transient accumulation in tissues following oral intake, the efficacy of nonprotein-bound LA to function as a physiological antioxidant has been questioned. Herein, we review the evidence that the micronutrient functions of LA may be more as an effector of important cellular stress response pathways that ultimately influence endogenous cellular antioxidant levels and reduce proinflammatory mechanisms. This would promote a sustained improvement in cellular resistance to pathologies where oxidative stress is involved, which would not be forthcoming if LA solely acted as a transient ROS scavenger. PMID:18409172

  11. Both the isomerase and chaperone activities of protein disulfide isomerase are required for the reactivation of reduced and denatured acidic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Y; Zhou, Y; Wang, C

    1997-01-01

    The spontaneous reactivation yield of acidic phospholipase A2 (APLA2), a protein containing seven disulfide bonds, after reduction and denaturation in guanidine hydrochloride is very low. Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) markedly increases the reactivation yield and prevents the aggregation of APLA2 during refolding in a redox buffer containing GSH and GSSG. S-methylated PDI (mPDI), with no isomerase but as nearly full chaperone activity as native PDI, has no effect on either the reactivation or aggregation of APLA2. However, the simultaneous presence of PDI and mPDI in molar ratios to APLA2 of 0.1 and 0.9 respectively fully reactivates the denatured enzyme, as does PDI alone at a ratio of 1. At ratios of 0.1 and 0.15 respectively, they completely suppress APLA2 aggregation, as does PDI alone at a ratio of 0.25. Moreover, delayed addition of PDI to the refolding buffer greatly diminished the reactivation yield of APLA2, but this deteriorating effect can be alleviated markedly by the presence of mPDI in the refolding buffer. Without GSSG, mPDI prevents the aggregation of APLA2 during refolding. It is proposed that the in vitro action of PDI as a foldase consists of both isomerase and chaperone activities, and the latter activity can be fully replaced by mPDI. PMID:9034346

  12. Dissolution of beidellite in acidic solutions: Ion exchange reactions and effect of crystal chemistry on smectite reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Valentin; Tertre, Emmanuel; Regnault, Olivier; Descostes, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The dissolution rate of beidellite, a dioctahedral smectite with tetrahedral charge that is a common swelling clay mineral in surface and subsurface natural environments, was studied in acidic solutions at 25 °C under far from equilibrium conditions. A <0.3 μm size fraction of SBId1 beidellite ((Si7.148Al0.852)(Al3.624Mg0.18Fe(III)0.224)O20(OH)4M+0.948) purchased from the Clay Mineral Society was used as the starting material, and experiments were performed in stirred flow-through reactors using HCl solutions with pH values ranging from 1 to 3. Several hydrodynamic conditions were tested using different flow rates with stirred and non-stirred particles. The aqueous Al/Si ratio measured at the outlet of the reactor was followed as a function of time and compared to solid stoichiometry values to assess the mechanisms occurring at the solid/solution interface. The reversible adsorption of Al3+ in the smectite interlayer space was evidenced for pH > 1.1, and the presence of an amorphous Si-enriched layer can be reasonably assumed in some cases from the interpretation of the aqueous concentrations and the characterization of the solid phase (X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy). Beidellite dissolution rates normalized to the sample mass (mol g-1 s-1) were obtained from Si and Al concentrations under steady state dissolution conditions. Calculated rates were compared with those previously reported for montmorillonite in several publications. The beidellite dissolution rates are, on average, ten times lower than those of montmorillonite. This implies that the smectite crystal chemistry (i.e., amount of Al3+ versus Mg2+ or Fe3+ substitution in the structure) has a strong effect on its stability and should be considered in reactive transport models in which the dissolution properties of smectites are taken into account.

  13. LA and ALA prevent glucose intolerance in obese male rats without reducing reactive lipid content, but cause tissue-specific changes in fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Matravadia, Sarthak; Zabielski, Piotr; Chabowski, Adrian; Mutch, David M; Holloway, Graham P

    2016-04-01

    While the cause of Type 2 diabetes remains poorly defined, the accumulation of reactive lipids within white adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and liver have been repeatedly implicated as underlying mechanisms. The ability of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to prevent the development of insulin resistance has gained considerable interest in recent years; however, the mechanisms-of-action remain poorly described. Therefore, we determined the efficacy of diets supplemented with either linoleic acid (LA) or α-linolenic acid (ALA) in preventing insulin resistance and reactive lipid accumulation in key metabolic tissues of the obese Zucker rat. Obese Zucker rats displayed impaired glucose homeostasis and reduced n-3 and n-6 PUFA content in the liver and epididymal white adipose tissue (EWAT). After the 12-wk feeding intervention, both LA- and ALA-supplemented diets prevented whole body glucose and insulin intolerance; however, ALA had a more pronounced effect. These changes occurred in association with n-3 and n-6 accumulation in all tissues studied, albeit to different extents (EWAT > liver > muscle). Triacylglycerol (TAG), diacylglycerol (DAG), ceramide, and sphingolipid accumulation were not attenuated in obese animals supplemented with either LA or ALA, suggesting that preservation of glucose homeostasis occurred independent of changes in reactive lipid content. However, PUFA-supplemented diets differentially altered the fatty acid composition of TAGs, DAGs, and PLs in a tissue-specific manner, suggesting essential fatty acid metabolism differs between tissues. Together, our results indicate that remodeling of the fatty acid composition of various lipid fractions may contribute to the improved glucose tolerance observed in obese rats fed PUFA-supplemented diets. PMID:26764053

  14. Heterogeneous Reactivity of NO2 with Photocatalytic Paints: A Possible Source of Nitrous Acid (HONO) in the Indoor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gligorovski, S.; Bartolomei, V.; Gandolfo, A.; Gomez Alvarez, E.; Kleffmann, J.; Wortham, H.

    2014-12-01

    There is an increasing concern about the indoor air environment, where we spend most of our time. Common methods of improving indoor air quality include controlling pollution sources, increasing ventilation rates or using air purifiers. Photocatalytic remediation technology was suggested as a new possibility to eliminate indoor air pollutants instead of just diluting or disposing them. In the present study, heterogeneous reactions of NO2 were studied on photocatalytic paints containing different size and quantity of TiO2. The heterogeneous reactions were conducted in a photo reactor under simulated atmospheric conditions. The flat pyrex rectangular plates covered with the paint were inserted into the reactor. These plates have been sprayed with the photocatalytic paints at our industrial partner's (ALLIOS) facilities using a high precision procedure that allowed the application of a thin layer of a given thickness of the paint. This allows a homogeneous coverage of the surface with the paint and an accurate determination of the exact amount of paint exposed to gaseous NO2. We demonstrate that the indoor photocatalytic paints which contain TiO2 can substantially reduce the concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2). We show that the efficiency of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) removal increase with the quantity of TiO2 in the range 0 - 7 %. The geometric uptake coefficients increase from 5 · 10-6 to 1.6 · 10-5 under light irradiation of the paints. On the other hand, during the reactions of NO2 with this paint (7 % of TiO2) nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO) are formed. Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important harmful indoor pollutant and its photolysis leads to the formation of highly reactive OH radicals (Gomez Alvarez et al., 2013). Maximum conversion efficiencies of NO2to HONO and NO of 15 % and 33 % were observed at 30 % RH, respectively. Thus, the quantity of TiO2 embedded in the paint is an important parameter regarding the nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2

  15. Correlation Between C-reactive Protein and Non-enzymatic Antioxidants (Albumin, Ferritin, Uric Acid and Bilirubin) in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beciragic, Amela; Resic, Halima; Prohic, Nejra; Karamehic, Jasenko; Smajlovic, Ajdin; Masnic, Fahrudin; Ajanovic, Selma; Coric, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Increased levels of C-Reactive Protein are found in 30-60% on hemodialysis patients and it is closely associated with the progression of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Non enzymatic antioxidants are antioxidants which primarily retain potentially dangerous ions of iron and copper in their inactive form and thereby prevent its participation in the production of free radicals. Aim: The aim of the study was to examine the relationship of CRP and non enzymatic antioxidants (albumin, ferritin, uric acid and bilirubin) i.e. examine the importance of CRP as a serum biomarker in assessing the condition of inflammation and its relationship to antioxidant protection in patients on hemodialysis. Methods: The study was cross-sectional, clinical, comparative and descriptive. The study involved 100 patients (non diabetic) on chronic hemodialysis. The control group consisted of 50 subjects without subjective and objective indicators of chronic renal disease. In all patients, the concentration of CRP as well as concentrations of non enzymatic antioxidants were determined. Results: In the group of hemodialysis patients 60% were men and 40% women. The average age of hemodialysis patients was 54.13 ± 11.8 years and the average age of the control group 41.72 ± 9.8 years. The average duration of hemodialysis treatment was 91.42 ± 76.2 months. In the group of hemodialysis patients statistically significant, negative linear correlation was determined between the concentration of CRP in and albumin concentration (rho = -0.251, p = 0.012) as well as negative, statistics insignificant, linear correlation between serum CRP and the concentration of uric acid (r = -0.077, p = 0.448). Furthermore, the positive, linear correlation was determined between serum CRP and ferritin (r = 0.159, p = 0.114) and positive linear correlation between CRP and total serum bilirubin (r = 0.121, p = 0.230). In the control group was determined a statistically significant

  16. Arachidonic acid stimulates TNFα production in Kupffer cells via a reactive oxygen species-pERK1/2-Egr1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cubero, Francisco Javier; Nieto, Natalia

    2012-07-15

    Kupffer cells are a key source of mediators of alcohol-induced liver damage such as reactive oxygen species, chemokines, growth factors, and eicosanoids. Since diets rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids are a requirement for the development of alcoholic liver disease, we hypothesized that polyunsaturated fatty acids could synergize with ethanol to promote Kupffer cell activation and TNFα production, hence, contributing to liver injury. Primary Kupffer cells from control and from ethanol-fed rats incubated with arachidonic acid showed similar proliferation rates than nontreated cells; however, arachidonic acid induced phenotypic changes, lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxides, and superoxide radical generation. Similar effects occurred in human Kupffer cells. These events were greater in Kupffer cells from ethanol-fed rats, and antioxidants and inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism prevented them. Arachidonic acid treatment increased NADPH oxidase activity. Inhibitors of NADPH oxidase and of arachidonic acid metabolism partially prevented the increase in oxidant stress. Upon arachidonic acid stimulation, there was a rapid and sustained increase in TNFα, which was greater in Kupffer cells from ethanol-fed rats than in Kupffer cells from control rats. Arachidonic acid induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of early growth response-1 (Egr1), and ethanol synergized with arachidonic acid to promote this effect. PD98059, a mitogen extracellular kinase 1/2 inhibitor, and curcumin, an Egr1 inhibitor, blocked the arachidonic acid-mediated upregulation of TNFα in Kupffer cells. This study unveils the mechanism whereby arachidonic acid and ethanol increase TNFα production in Kupffer cells, thus contributing to alcoholic liver disease. PMID:22538404

  17. Excess electron reactivity in amino acid aqueous solution revealed by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation: anion-centered localization and anion-relayed electron transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuxiu; Gao, Liang; Liu, Jinxiang; Yang, Hongfang; Wang, Shoushan; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-10-28

    Studies on the structure, states, and reactivity of excess electrons (EEs) in biological media are of great significance. Although there is information about EE interaction with desolvated biological molecules, solution effects are hardly explored. In this work, we present an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation study on the interaction and reactivity of an EE with glycine in solution. Our simulations reveal two striking results. Firstly, a pre-solvated EE partially localizes on the negatively charged -COO(-) group of the zwitterionic glycine and the remaining part delocalizes over solvent water molecules, forming an anion-centered quasi-localized structure, due to relative alignment of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy levels of potential sites for EE residence in the aqueous solution. Secondly, after a period of anion-centered localization of an EE, the zwitterionic glycine is induced to spontaneously fragment through the cleavage of the N-Cα bond, losing ammonia (deamination), and leaving a ˙CH2-COO(-) anion radical, in good agreement with experimental observations. Introduction of the same groups (-COO(-) or -NH3(+)) in the side chain (taking lysine and aspartic acid as examples) can affect EE localization, with the fragmentation of the backbone part of these amino acids dependent on the properties of the side chain groups. These findings provide insights into EE interaction mechanisms with the backbone parts of amino acids and low energy EE induced fragmentation of amino acids and even peptides and proteins. PMID:26399512

  18. Scavenging of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by the prodrug sulfasalazine and its metabolites 5-aminosalicylic acid and sulfapyridine.

    PubMed

    Couto, Diana; Ribeiro, Daniela; Freitas, Marisa; Gomes, Ana; Lima, José L F C; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2010-01-01

    Sulfasalazine is a prodrug composed by a molecule of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) and sulfapyridine (SP), linked by an azo bond, which has been shown to be effective in the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, as well as of rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. The precise mechanism of action of sulfasalazine and/or its metabolites has not been completely elucidated, though its antioxidant effects are well established and are probably due to its scavenging effects against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS), as well as metal chelating properties, in association to its inhibitory effects over neutrophil oxidative burst. The present work was focused on screening and comparing the potential scavenging activity for an array of ROS (O(2)(•-), H(2)O(2), (1)O(2), ROO(•) and HOCl) and RNS ((•)NO and ONOO(-)), mediated by sulfasalazine and its metabolites 5-ASA and SP, using validated in vitro screening systems. The results showed that both 5-ASA and sulfasalazine were able to scavenge all the tested ROS while SP was practically ineffective in all the assays. For HOCl, (1)O(2), and ROO(•), 5-ASA showed the best scavenging effects. A new and important finding of the present study was the strong scavenging effect of 5-ASA against (1)O(2). 5-ASA was shown to be a strong scavenger of (•)NO and ONOO(-). Sulfasalazine was also able to scavenge these RNS, although with a much lower potency than 5-ASA. SP was unable to scavenge (•)NO in the tested concentrations but was shown to scavenge ONOO(-), with a higher strength when the assay was performed in the presence of 25 mM bicarbonate, suggesting further scavenging of oxidizing carbonate radical. In conclusion, the ROS- and RNS-scavenging effects of sulfasalazine and its metabolites shown in this study may contribute to the anti-inflammatory effects mediated by sulfasalazine through the prevention of the

  19. Recovery of acetic acid from pre-hydrolysis liquor of hardwood kraft-based dissolving pulp production process by reactive extraction with triisooctylamine.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Jahan, M Sarwar; Ahsan, Laboni; Zheng, Linqiang; Ni, Yonghao

    2013-06-01

    Acetic acid was one of the main compositions of the pre-hydrolysis liquor (PHL), which was recovered by reactive extraction with triisooctylamine (TIOA) diluted with decanol. Dilution of TIOA played an important role in extracting acetic acid from the PHL. The recovery of acetic acid from the PHL by TIOA was increased from 10.34% to 66.60% with the dilution of TIOA to 20% by decanol at the HAc to TIOA molar ratio of 1, consequently, the equilibrium distribution coefficient KD increased. The effects of time, temperature and pH on the extraction process were also studied. The extraction process was very fast. The acetic acid extraction decreased from 65.13% to 57.34% with the rise of temperature to 50°C from 20°C. A higher pH increased the dissociation of acetic acid, as a result, decreased acetic acid extraction. The hemicelluloses in the PHL were unaffected on the extraction process of acetic acid. PMID:23619137

  20. From solution to in-cell study of the chemical reactivity of acid sensitive functional groups: a rational approach towards improved cleavable linkers for biospecific endosomal release.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Sylvain A; Leriche, Geoffray; Mosser, Michel; Nothisen, Marc; Muller, Christian D; Remy, Jean-Serge; Wagner, Alain

    2016-06-01

    pH-Sensitive linkers designed to undergo selective hydrolysis at acidic pH compared to physiological pH can be used for the selective release of therapeutics at their site of action. In this paper, the hydrolytic cleavage of a wide variety of molecular structures that have been reported for their use in pH-sensitive delivery systems was examined. A wide variety of hydrolytic stability profiles were found among the panel of tested chemical functionalities. Even within a structural family, a slight modification of the substitution pattern has an unsuspected outcome on the hydrolysis stability. This work led us to establish a first classification of these groups based on their reactivities at pH 5.5 and their relative hydrolysis at pH 5.5 vs. pH 7.4. From this classification, four representative chemical functions were selected and studied in-vitro. The results revealed that only the most reactive functions underwent significant lysosomal cleavage, according to flow cytometry measurements. These last results question the acid-based mechanism of action of known drug release systems and advocate for the importance of an in-depth structure-reactivity study, using a tailored methodology, for the rational design and development of bio-responsive linkers. PMID:27169758

  1. Modification of the liver fatty acids by Hibiscus sabdariffa Linnaeus (Malvaceae) infusion, its possible effect on vascular reactivity in a metabolic syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Torres, Israel; Zúñiga Muñoz, Alejandra; Beltrán-Rodríguez, Ulises; Díaz-Díaz, Eulises; Martínez-Memije, Raúl; Guarner Lans, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Hibiscus sabdariffa Linnaeus (HSL)-fed infusion on the fatty acid (FA) profile in liver of metabolic syndrome (MS) rats and its possible effect on vascular reactivity. Body mass, intra-abdominal fat, triglycerides, insulin, blood pressure, saturated, monounsaturated FA, NEFAs, Δ(9)-, Δ(6)-desaturases and vasoconstriction were increased, while vasorelaxation, polyunsaturated FA, endothelial nitric oxide and [Formula: see text]/[Formula: see text] ratio decreased in MS versus Control, but HSL infusion modified it and increased Δ(5)-desaturase. The results suggest that the alteration in FA liver metabolism in the MS contributes to impaired vascular reactivity, but treatment with of HSL infusion can improve this condition. PMID:23734849

  2. UV Light-Induced Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Antimicrobial Properties of Cellulose Fabric Modified by 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenone Tetracarboxylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Hou, Aiqin; Feng, Guanchen; Zhuo, Jingyuan; Sun, Gang

    2015-12-23

    3,3',4,4'-Benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid (BPTCA) could directly react with hydroxyl groups on cellulose to form ester bonds. The modified cotton fabrics not only provided good wrinkle-free and ultraviolet (UV) protective functions, but also exhibited important photochemical properties such as producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) under UV light exposure. The amounts of the produced hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide were measured, and photochemical reactive mechanism of the BPTCA treated cellulose was discussed. The results reveal that the fabrics possess good washing durability in generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. The cotton fabrics modified with different concentrations of BPTCA and cured at an elevated temperature demonstrated excellent antimicrobial activities, which provided 99.99% antibacterial activities against both E. coli and S. aureus. The advanced materials have potential applications in medical textiles and biological material fields. PMID:26636826

  3. Tuning Lewis acidity using the reactivity of "frustrated Lewis pairs": facile formation of phosphine-boranes and cationic phosphonium-boranes.

    PubMed

    Welch, Gregory C; Cabrera, Lourdes; Chase, Preston A; Hollink, Emily; Masuda, Jason D; Wei, Pingrong; Stephan, Douglas W

    2007-08-21

    The concept of "frustrated Lewis pairs" involves donor and acceptor sites in which steric congestion precludes Lewis acid-base adduct formation. In the case of sterically demanding phosphines and boranes, this lack of self-quenching prompts nucleophilic attack at a carbon para to B followed by fluoride transfer affording zwitterionic phosphonium borates [R(3)P(C(6)F(4))BF(C(6)F(5))(2)] and [R(2)PH(C(6)F(4))BF(C(6)F(5))(2)]. These can be easily transformed into the cationic phosphonium-boranes [R(3)P(C(6)F(4))B(C(6)F(5))(2)](+) and [R(2)PH(C(6)F(4))B(C(6)F(5))(2)](+) or into the neutral phosphino-boranes R(2)P(C(6)F(4))B(C(6)F(5))(2). This new reactivity provides a modular route to a family of boranes in which the steric features about the Lewis acidic center remains constant and yet the variation in substitution provides a facile avenue for the tuning of the Lewis acidity. Employing the Gutmann-Beckett and Childs methods for determining Lewis acid strength, it is demonstrated that the cationic boranes are much more Lewis acidic than B(C(6)F(5))(3), while the acidity of the phosphine-boranes is diminished. PMID:17664977

  4. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from 2-Methyl-3-Buten-2-ol Photooxidation: Evidence of Acid-Catalyzed Reactive Uptake of Epoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haofei; Zhang, Zhenfa; Cui, Tianqu; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Bhathela, Neil A.; Ortega, John; Worton, David; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2014-04-08

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) photooxidation has recently been observed in both field and laboratory studies. Similar to isoprene, MBO-derived SOA increases with elevated aerosol acidity in the absence of nitric oxide; therefore, an epoxide intermediate, (3,3-dimethyloxiran-2-yl)methanol (MBO epoxide) was synthesized and tentatively proposed here to explain this enhancement. In the present study, the potential of the synthetic MBO epoxide to form SOA via reactive uptake was systematically examined. SOA was observed only in the presence of acidic aerosols. Major SOA constituents, 2,3-dihydroxyisopentanol (DHIP) and MBO-derived organosulfate isomers, were chemically characterized in both laboratory-generated SOA and in ambient fine aerosols collected from the BEACHON-RoMBAS field campaign during summer 2011, where MBO emissions are substantial. Our results support epoxides as potential products of MBO photooxidation leading to formation of atmospheric SOA and suggest that reactive uptake of epoxides may generally explain acid enhancement of SOA observed from other biogenic hydrocarbons.

  5. D-Galacturonic Acid: A Highly Reactive Compound in Nonenzymatic Browning. 2. Formation of Amino-Specific Degradation Products.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Steffen; Bornik, Maria-Anna; Kroh, Lothar W

    2015-07-22

    Thermal treatment of aqueous solutions of D-galacturonic acid and L-alanine at pH 3, 5, and 8 led to rapid and more intensive nonenzymatic browning reactions compared to similar solutions of other uronic acids and to Maillard reactions of reducing sugars. The hemiacetal ring structures of uronic acids had a high impact on browning behavior and reaction pathways. Besides reductic acid (1,2-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one), 4,5-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one (DHCP), furan-2-carboxaldehyde, and norfuraneol (4-hydroxy-5-methyl-3-(2H)-furanone) could be detected as typical products of nonenzymatic uronic acid browning reactions. 2-(2-Formyl-1H-pyrrole-1-yl)propanoic acid (FPA) and 1-(1-carboxyethyl)-3-hydroxypyridin-1-ium (HPA) were identified as specific reaction products of uronic acids with amine participation like l-alanine. In contrast, the structurally related D-galacturonic acid methyl ester showed less browning activity and degradation under equal reaction conditions. Pectin-specific degradation products such as 5-formyl-2-furanoic acid and 2-furanoic acid were found but could not be verified for d-galacturonic acid monomers alone. PMID:26111613

  6. Lipid oxidation stability of omega-3- and conjugated linoleic acid-enriched sous vide chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Narciso-Gaytán, C; Shin, D; Sams, A R; Keeton, J T; Miller, R K; Smith, S B; Sánchez-Plata, M X

    2011-02-01

    Lipid oxidation is known to occur rather rapidly in cooked chicken meat containing relatively high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids. To assess the lipid oxidation stability of sous vide chicken meat enriched with n-3 and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) fatty acids, 624 Cobb × Ross broilers were raised during a 6-wk feeding period. The birds were fed diets containing CLA (50% cis-9, trans-11 and 50% trans-10, cis-12 isomers), flaxseed oil (FSO), or menhaden fish oil (MFO), each supplemented with 42 or 200 mg/kg of vitamin E (dl-α-tocopheryl acetate). Breast or thigh meat was vacuum-packed, cooked (74°C), cooled in ice water, and stored at 4.4°C for 0, 5, 10, 15, and 30 d. The lipid oxidation development of the meat was estimated by quantification of malonaldehyde (MDA) values, using the 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances analysis. Fatty acid, nonheme iron, moisture, and fat analyses were performed as well. Results showed that dietary CLA induced deposition of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomers, increased the proportion of saturated fatty acids, and decreased the proportions of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Flaxseed oil induced higher deposition of C18:1, C18:2, C18:3, and C20:4 fatty acids, whereas MFO induced higher deposition of n-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5), and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6; P < 0.05). Meat lipid oxidation stability was affected by the interaction of either dietary oil or vitamin E with storage day. Lower (P < 0.05) MDA values were found in the CLA treatment than in the MFO and FSO treatments. Lower (P < 0.05) MDA values were detected in meat samples from the 200 mg/kg of vitamin E than in meat samples from the 42 mg/kg of vitamin E. Nonheme iron values did not affect (P > 0.05) lipid oxidation development. In conclusion, dietary CLA, FSO, and MFO influenced the fatty acid composition of chicken muscle and the lipid oxidation stability of meat over the storage time. Supranutritional

  7. Polymer/organosilica nanocomposites based on polyimide with benzimidazole linkages and reactive organoclay containing isoleucine amino acid: Synthesis, characterization and morphology properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mallakpour, Shadpour; Dinari, Mohammad

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► A reactive organoclay was formed using L-isoleucine amino acid as a swelling agent. ► Polyimide was synthesized from benzimidazole diamine and pyromellitic dianhydride. ► Imide and benzimidazole groups assured the thermal stability of the nanocomposites. ► Nanocomposite films were prepared by an in situ polymerization reaction. ► The TEM micrographs of nanocomposites revealed well-exfoliated structures. -- Abstract: Polyimide–silica nanocomposites are attractive hybrid architectures that possess excellent mechanical, thermal and chemical properties. But, the dispersion of inorganic domains in the polymer matrix and the compatibility between the organic and inorganic phases are critical factors in these hybrid systems. In this investigation, a reactive organoclay was prepared via ion exchange reaction between protonated form of difunctional L-isoleucine amino acid as a swelling agent and Cloisite Na{sup +} montmorillonite. Amine functional groups of this swelling agent formed an ionic bond with the negatively charged silicates, whereas the remaining acid functional groups were available for further interaction with polymer chains. Then organo-soluble polyimide (PI) have been successfully synthesized from the reaction of 2-(3,5-diaminophenyl)-benzimidazole and pyromellitic dianhydride in N,N-dimethylacetamide. Finally, PI/organoclay nanocomposite films enclosing 1%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 10% of synthesized organoclay were successfully prepared by an in situ polymerization reaction through thermal imidization. The synthesized hybrid materials were subsequently characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis techniques. The PI/organoclay nanocomposite films have good optical transparencies and the mechanical properties were substantially improved by the incorporation of the reactive organoclay.

  8. Adsorption and photocatalysis of nanocrystalline TiO2 particles for Reactive Red 195 removal: effect of humic acids, anions and scavengers.

    PubMed

    Chládková, B; Evgenidou, E; Kvítek, L; Panáček, A; Zbořil, R; Kovář, P; Lambropoulou, D

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, the coupling of adsorption capacity and photocatalytic efficiency of two different industrially produced titania catalysts was investigated and compared. The azo dye Reactive Red 195 was selected as a model compound. The tested catalysts, PK-10 and PK-180, exhibited different adsorption capacities due to their significant difference in their specific surface, but both have proven to be effective photocatalysts for photodegradation of the studied dye. PK-10 exhibited strong adsorption of the studied dye due to its high specific surface area, while the second studied catalyst, PK-180, demonstrated negligible adsorption of Reactive Red 195. The effect of the pH, the concentration of the catalyst and the initial concentration of the dye appear to affect the photocatalytic rate. The effect of the presence of humic acids and inorganic ions was also examined, while the contribution of various reactive species was indirectly evaluated through the addition of various scavengers. To evaluate the extent of mineralisation of the studied dye, total organic carbon (TOC) measurements during the experiment were also conducted. Besides total colour removal, evident reduction of TOC was also achieved using both catalysts. PMID:26054457

  9. Biochemical passive reactors for treatment of acid mine drainage: Effect of hydraulic retention time on changes in efficiency, composition of reactive mixture, and microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Yaneth; Escobar, Maria C; Neculita, Carmen M; Arbeli, Ziv; Roldan, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical passive treatment represents a promising option for the remediation of acid mine drainage. This study determined the effect of three hydraulic retention times (1, 2, and 4 days) on changes in system efficiency, reactive mixture, and microbial activity in bioreactors under upward flow conditions. Bioreactors were sacrificed in the weeks 8, 17 and 36, and the reactive mixture was sampled at the bottom, middle, and top layers. Physicochemical analyses were performed on reactive mixture post-treatment and correlated with sulfate-reducing bacteria and cellulolytic and dehydrogenase activity. All hydraulic retention times were efficient at increasing pH and alkalinity and removing sulfate (>60%) and metals (85-99% for Fe(2+) and 70-100% for Zn(2+)), except for Mn(2+). The longest hydraulic retention time (4 days) increased residual sulfides, deteriorated the quality of treated effluent and negatively impacted sulfate-reducing bacteria. Shortest hydraulic retention time (1 day) washed out biomass and increased input of dissolved oxygen in the reactors, leading to higher redox potential and decreasing metal removal efficiency. Concentrations of iron, zinc and metal sulfides were high in the bottom layer, especially with 2 day of hydraulic retention time. Sulfate-reducing bacteria, cellulolytic and dehydrogenase activity were higher in the middle layer at 4 days of hydraulic retention time. Hydraulic retention time had a strong influence on overall performance of passive reactors. PMID:27016821

  10. Effective remediation of grossly polluted acidic, and metal-rich, spoil heap drainage using a novel, low-cost, permeable reactive barrier in Northumberland, UK.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, A P; Moustafa, M; Orme, P H A; Younger, P L

    2006-09-01

    A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for remediation of coal spoil heap drainage in Northumberland, UK, is described. The drainage has typical chemical characteristics of pH<4, [acidity]>1400 mg/L as CaCO3, [Fe]>300 mg/L, [Mn]>165 mg/L, [Al]>100mg/L and [SO4]>6500 mg/L. During 2 years of operation the PRB has typically removed 50% of the iron and 40% of the sulphate from this subsurface spoil drainage. Bacterial sulphate reduction appears to be a key process of this remediation. Treatment of the effluent from the PRB results in further attenuation; overall reductions in iron and sulphate concentrations are 95% and 67% respectively, and acidity concentration is reduced by an order of magnitude. The mechanisms of attenuation of these, and other, contaminants in the drainage are discussed. Future research and operational objectives for this novel, low-cost, treatment system are also outlined. PMID:16443312

  11. Generation of reactive oxygen species from 5-aminolevulinic acid and Glutamate in cooperation with excited CdSe/ZnS QDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Hong Dinh; Lee, Jee Won; Rhee, Jong Il

    2014-08-01

    CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) can be joined in the reductive pathway involving the electron transfer to an acceptor or in the oxidative pathway involving the hole transfer to a donor. They were exploited in the oxidation reactions of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and glutamate (GLU) for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydroxyl radical (HO●) and superoxide anion (O2 ● -). Fast and highly efficient oxidation reactions of ALA to produce HO● and of GLU to produce O2 ●- were observed in the cooperation of mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-capped CdSe/ZnS QDs under LED irradiation. Fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy were used to evaluate the generation of different forms of ROS. Confocal fluorescent microscopic images of the size and morphology of HeLa cells confirmed the ROS generation from ALA or GLU in cooperation with CdSe/ZnS QDs under LED irradiation.

  12. Unsaturated fatty acids show clear elicitation responses in a modified local lymph node assay with an elicitation phase, and test positive in the direct peptide reactivity assay.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kunihiko; Shinoda, Shinsuke; Hagiwara, Saori; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Itagaki, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Test Guidelines (TG) adopted the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) and guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) as stand-alone skin sensitization test methods. However, unsaturated carbon-carbon double-bond and/or lipid acids afforded false-positive results more frequently in the LLNA compared to those in the GPMT and/or in human subjects. In the current study, oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic, fumaric, maleic, and succinic acid and squalene were tested in a modified LLNA with an elicitation phase (LLNA:DAE), and in a direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) to evaluate their skin-sensitizing potential. Oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic and maleic acid were positive in the LLNA:DAE, of which three, linoleic, linolenic, and maleic acid were positive in the DPRA. Furthermore, the results of the cross-sensitizing tests using four LLNA:DAE-positive chemicals were negative, indicating a chemical-specific elicitation response. In a previous report, the estimated concentration needed to produce a stimulation index of 3 (EC3) of linolenic acid, squalene, and maleic acid in the LLNA was < 10%. Therefore, these chemicals were classified as moderate skin sensitizers in the LLNA. However, the skin-sensitizing potential of all LLNA:DAE-positive chemicals was estimated as weak. These results suggested that oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic, and maleic acid had skin-sensitizing potential, and that the LLNA overestimated the skin-sensitizing potential compared to that estimated by the LLNA:DAE. PMID:26558466

  13. Developing an Acidic Residue Reactive and Sulfoxide-Containing MS-Cleavable Homobifunctional Cross-Linker for Probing Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Craig B; Yu, Clinton; Novitsky, Eric J; Huszagh, Alexander S; Rychnovsky, Scott D; Huang, Lan

    2016-08-16

    Cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) has become a powerful strategy for defining protein-protein interactions and elucidating architectures of large protein complexes. However, one of the inherent challenges in MS analysis of cross-linked peptides is their unambiguous identification. To facilitate this process, we have previously developed a series of amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linkers. These MS-cleavable reagents have allowed us to establish a common robust XL-MS workflow that enables fast and accurate identification of cross-linked peptides using multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)). Although amine-reactive reagents targeting lysine residues have been successful, it remains difficult to characterize protein interaction interfaces with little or no lysine residues. To expand the coverage of protein interaction regions, we present here the development of a new acidic residue-targeting sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable homobifunctional cross-linker, dihydrazide sulfoxide (DHSO). We demonstrate that DHSO cross-linked peptides display the same predictable and characteristic fragmentation pattern during collision induced dissociation as amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linked peptides, thus permitting their simplified analysis and unambiguous identification by MS(n). Additionally, we show that DHSO can provide complementary data to amine-reactive reagents. Collectively, this work not only enlarges the range of the application of XL-MS approaches but also further demonstrates the robustness and applicability of sulfoxide-based MS-cleavability in conjunction with various cross-linking chemistries. PMID:27417384

  14. Developing an Acidic Residue Reactive and Sulfoxide-Containing MS-Cleavable Homobifunctional Cross-Linker for Probing Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) has become a powerful strategy for defining protein–protein interactions and elucidating architectures of large protein complexes. However, one of the inherent challenges in MS analysis of cross-linked peptides is their unambiguous identification. To facilitate this process, we have previously developed a series of amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linkers. These MS-cleavable reagents have allowed us to establish a common robust XL-MS workflow that enables fast and accurate identification of cross-linked peptides using multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MSn). Although amine-reactive reagents targeting lysine residues have been successful, it remains difficult to characterize protein interaction interfaces with little or no lysine residues. To expand the coverage of protein interaction regions, we present here the development of a new acidic residue-targeting sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable homobifunctional cross-linker, dihydrazide sulfoxide (DHSO). We demonstrate that DHSO cross-linked peptides display the same predictable and characteristic fragmentation pattern during collision induced dissociation as amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linked peptides, thus permitting their simplified analysis and unambiguous identification by MSn. Additionally, we show that DHSO can provide complementary data to amine-reactive reagents. Collectively, this work not only enlarges the range of the application of XL-MS approaches but also further demonstrates the robustness and applicability of sulfoxide-based MS-cleavability in conjunction with various cross-linking chemistries. PMID:27417384

  15. Increased arachidonic acid-containing phosphatidylcholine is associated with reactive microglia and astrocytes in the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongmin; Omura, Takao; Masaki, Noritaka; Arima, Hideyuki; Banno, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Ayako; Hanada, Mitsuru; Takei, Shiro; Matsushita, Shoko; Sugiyama, Eiji; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) triggers cellular and molecular changes in the spinal cord. However, little is known about how the polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing phosphatidylcholines (PUFA-PCs) are regulated in the spinal cord after PNI and the association of PUFA-PCs with the non-neuronal cells within in the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we found that arachidonic acid-containing phosphatidylcholine (AA-PC), [PC(16:0/20:4)+K](+), was significantly increased in the ipsilateral ventral and dorsal horns of the spinal cord after sciatic nerve transection, and the increased expression of [PC(16:0/20:4)+K](+) spatiotemporally resembled the increase of reactive microglia and the astrocytes. From the lipidomics point of view, we conclude that [PC(16:0/20:4)+K](+) could be the main phospholipid in the spinal cord influenced by PNI, and the regulation of specific phospholipid molecule in the CNS after PNI is associated with the reactive microglia and astrocytes. PMID:27210057

  16. Increased arachidonic acid-containing phosphatidylcholine is associated with reactive microglia and astrocytes in the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dongmin; Omura, Takao; Masaki, Noritaka; Arima, Hideyuki; Banno, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Ayako; Hanada, Mitsuru; Takei, Shiro; Matsushita, Shoko; Sugiyama, Eiji; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) triggers cellular and molecular changes in the spinal cord. However, little is known about how the polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing phosphatidylcholines (PUFA-PCs) are regulated in the spinal cord after PNI and the association of PUFA-PCs with the non-neuronal cells within in the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we found that arachidonic acid-containing phosphatidylcholine (AA-PC), [PC(16:0/20:4)+K]+, was significantly increased in the ipsilateral ventral and dorsal horns of the spinal cord after sciatic nerve transection, and the increased expression of [PC(16:0/20:4)+K]+ spatiotemporally resembled the increase of reactive microglia and the astrocytes. From the lipidomics point of view, we conclude that [PC(16:0/20:4)+K]+ could be the main phospholipid in the spinal cord influenced by PNI, and the regulation of specific phospholipid molecule in the CNS after PNI is associated with the reactive microglia and astrocytes. PMID:27210057

  17. Efficient Generation and Increased Reactivity in Cationic Gold via Brønsted Acid or Lewis Acid Assisted Activation of an Imidogold Precatalyst

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Brønsted or Lewis acid assisted activation of an imidogold precatalyst (L-Au-Pht, Pht = phthalimide) offers a superior way to generate cationic gold compared with the commonly used silver-based system. It is also broadly applicable for most common gold-catalyzed reactions. For reactions that require milder conditions, milder acids can be used for optimized efficiency. PMID:24956218

  18. Reactive geothermal transport simulation to study the formation mechanism of impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe geothermal field, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Todaka, Noritumi; Akasaka, Chitosi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-03-06

    Two types of fluids are encountered in the Onikobe geothermal reservoir (Japan): One is neutral and the other is acidic. It is hypothesized that acidic fluid might be upwelling along a fault zone from magma and that an impermeable barrier might be present between the acidic and neutral fluid zones. To test such a conceptual model and to study the geochemical behavior due to mixing of the two fluids, reactive geothermal transport simulations under both natural and production conditions were carried out using the code TOUGHREACT. Results indicate Mn-rich smectite precipitates near the mixing front. Precipitation of sphalerite and galena occurs in a similar region as the Mn-rich smectite. Precipitation of these minerals depends on pH and temperature. In addition, quartz, pyrite, and calcite precipitate in the shallow zone resulting in further development of caprock. The changes in porosity and permeability due to precipitation of Mn-rich smectite are small compared with that of quartz, calcite, and pyrite. However, the smectite precipitation is likely to fill open fractures and to form an impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid regions. The simulated mineral assemblage is generally consistent with observations in the Onikobe field. The numerical simulations described here provide useful insight into geochemical behavior and formation of impermeable barriers from fluid mixing. The method presented in this paper may be useful in fundamental analysis of hydrothermal systems and in the exploration of geothermal reservoirs, including chemical evolution, mineral alteration, mineral scaling, and changes in porosity and permeability.

  19. Reactive geothermal transport simulations to study the formation mechanism of an impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe Geothermal Field, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitoshi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-05-01

    Two types of fluids are encountered in the Onikobe geothermal reservoir (Japan): one is neutral and the other is acidic. It is hypothesized that acidic fluid might be upwelling along a fault zone from magma and that an impermeable barrier might be present between the acidic and neutral fluid zones. To test such a conceptual model and to study the geochemical behavior due to mixing of the two fluids, reactive geothermal transport simulations under both natural and production conditions were carried out using the code TOUGHREACT. Results indicate Mn-rich smectite precipitates near the mixing front. Precipitation of sphalerite and galena occurs in a similar region as the Mn-rich smectite. Precipitation of these minerals depends on pH and temperature. In addition, quartz, pyrite, and calcite precipitate in the shallow zone resulting in further development of caprock. The changes in porosity and permeability due to precipitation of Mn-rich smectite are small compared with that of quartz, calcite, and pyrite. However, the smectite precipitation is likely to fill open fractures and to form an impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid regions. The simulated mineral assemblage is generally consistent with observations in the Onikobe field. The numerical simulations described here provide useful insight into geochemical behavior and formation of impermeable barriers from fluid mixing. The method presented in this paper may be useful in fundamental analysis of hydrothermal systems and in the exploration of geothermal reservoirs, including chemical evolution, mineral alteration, mineral scaling, and changes in porosity and permeability.

  20. Halogen-induced organic aerosol (XOA) formation and decarboxylation of carboxylic acids by reactive halogen species - a time-resolved aerosol flow-reactor study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, Johannes; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2013-04-01

    Reactive halogen species (RHS) are released to the atmosphere from various sources like photo-activated sea-salt aerosol and salt lakes. Recent studies (Cai et al., 2006 and 2008, Ofner et al., 2012) indicate that RHS are able to interact with SOA precursors similarly to common atmospheric oxidizing gases like OH radicals and ozone. The reaction of RHS with SOA precursors like terpenes forms so-called halogen-induced organic aerosol (XOA). On the other hand, RHS are also able to change the composition of functional groups, e.g. to initiate the decarboxylation of carboxylic acids (Ofner et al., 2012). The present study uses a 50 cm aerosol flow-reactor, equipped with a solar simulator to investigate the time-resolved evolution and transformation of vibrational features in the mid-infrared region. The aerosol flow-reactor is coupled to a home-made multi-reflection cell (Ofner et al., 2010), integrated into a Bruker IFS 113v FTIR spectrometer. The reactor is operated with an inlet feed (organic compound) and a surrounding feed (reactive halogen species). The moveable inlet of the flow reactor allows us to vary reaction times between a few seconds and up to about 3 minutes. Saturated vapours of different SOA precursors and carboxylic acids were fed into the flow reactor using the moveable inlet. The surrounding feed inside the flow reactor was a mixture of zero air with molecular chlorine as the precursor for the formation of reactive halogen species. Using this setup, the formation of halogen-induced organic aerosol could be monitored with a high time resolution using FTIR spectroscopy. XOA formation is characterized by hydrogen-atom abstraction, carbon-chlorine bond formation and later, even formation of carboxylic acids. Several changes of the entire structure of the organic precursor, caused by the reaction of RHS, are visible. While XOA formation is a very fast process, the decarboxylation of carboxylic acids, induced by RHS is rather slow. However, XOA formation

  1. Evaluation of fatty acid oxidation by reactive oxygen species induced in liquids using atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Atsushi; Fukui, Satoshi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2015-10-01

    We investigated fatty acid oxidation by atmospheric-pressure nonthermal helium plasma using linoleic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid, together with evaluating active species induced in liquids. If the ambient gas contains oxygen, direct plasma such as plasma jets coming into contact with the liquid surface supplies various active species, such as singlet oxygen, ozone, and superoxide anion radicals, to the liquid. The direct plasma easily oxidizes linoleic acid, indicating that fatty acid oxidation will occur in the direct plasma. In contrast, afterglow flow, where the plasma is terminated in a glass tube and does not touch the surface of the liquid sample, supplies mainly superoxide anion radicals. The fact that there was no clear observation of linoleic acid oxidation using the afterglow reveals that it may not affect lipids, even in an atmosphere containing oxygen. The afterglow flow can potentially be used for the sterilization of aqueous solutions using the reduced pH method, in medical and dental applications, because it provides bactericidal activity in the aqueous solution despite containing a smaller amount of active species.

  2. Reactive Sulfur Species-Mediated Activation of the Keap1-Nrf2 Pathway by 1,2-Naphthoquinone through Sulfenic Acids Formation under Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Abiko, Yumi; Ida, Tomoaki; Miura, Takashi; Kakehashi, Hidenao; Ishii, Isao; Nishida, Motohiro; Sawa, Tomohiro; Akaike, Takaaki; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2015-05-18

    Sulfhydration by a hydrogen sulfide anion and electrophile thiolation by reactive sulfur species (RSS) such as persulfides/polysulfides (e.g., R-S-SH/R-S-Sn-H(R)) are unique reactions in electrophilic signaling. Using 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene-4-thioacetate (1,2-NQH2-SAc) as a precursor to 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene-4-thiol (1,2-NQH2-SH) and a generator of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we demonstrate that protein thiols can be modified by a reactive sulfenic acid to form disulfide adducts that undergo rapid cleavage in the presence of glutathione (GSH). As expected, 1,2-NQH2-SAc is rapidly hydrolyzed and partially oxidized to yield 1,2-NQ-SH, resulting in a redox cycling reaction that produces ROS through a chemical disproportionation reaction. The sulfenic acid forms of 1,2-NQ-SH and 1,2-NQH2-SH were detected by derivatization experiments with dimedone. 1,2-NQH2-SOH modified Keap1 at Cys171 to produce a Keap1-S-S-1,2-NQH2 adduct. Subsequent exposure of A431 cells to 1,2-NQ or 1,2-NQH2-SAc caused an extensive chemical modification of cellular proteins in both cases. Protein adduction by 1,2-NQ through a thio ether (C-S-C) bond slowly declined through a GSH-dependent S-transarylation reaction, whereas that originating from 1,2-NQH2-SAc through a disulfide (C-S-S-C) bond was rapidly restored to the free protein thiol in the cells. Under these conditions, 1,2-NQH2-SAc activated Nrf2 and upregulated its target genes, which were enhanced by pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), to deplete cellular GSH. Pretreatment of catalase conjugated with poly(ethylene glycol) suppressed Nrf2 activation by 1,2-NQH2-SAc. These results suggest that RSS-mediated reversible electrophilic signaling takes place through sulfenic acids formation under oxidative stress. PMID:25807370

  3. ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE6 protects Arabidopsis desiccating and germinating seeds from stress and mediates cross talk between reactive oxygen species, abscisic acid, and auxin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changming; Letnik, Ilya; Hacham, Yael; Dobrev, Petre; Ben-Daniel, Bat-Hen; Vanková, Radomíra; Amir, Rachel; Miller, Gad

    2014-09-01

    A seed's ability to properly germinate largely depends on its oxidative poise. The level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is controlled by a large gene network, which includes the gene coding for the hydrogen peroxide-scavenging enzyme, cytosolic ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE6 (APX6), yet its specific function has remained unknown. In this study, we show that seeds lacking APX6 accumulate higher levels of ROS, exhibit increased oxidative damage, and display reduced germination on soil under control conditions and that these effects are further exacerbated under osmotic, salt, or heat stress. In addition, ripening APX6-deficient seeds exposed to heat stress displayed reduced germination vigor. This, together with the increased abundance of APX6 during late stages of maturation, indicates that APX6 activity is critical for the maturation-drying phase. Metabolic profiling revealed an altered activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, changes in amino acid levels, and elevated metabolism of abscisic acid (ABA) and auxin in drying apx6 mutant seeds. Further germination assays showed an impaired response of the apx6 mutants to ABA and to indole-3-acetic acid. Relative suppression of abscisic acid insensitive3 (ABI3) and ABI5 expression, two of the major ABA signaling downstream components controlling dormancy, suggested that an alternative signaling route inhibiting germination was activated. Thus, our study uncovered a new role for APX6, in protecting mature desiccating and germinating seeds from excessive oxidative damage, and suggested that APX6 modulate the ROS signal cross talk with hormone signals to properly execute the germination program in Arabidopsis. PMID:25049361

  4. ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE6 Protects Arabidopsis Desiccating and Germinating Seeds from Stress and Mediates Cross Talk between Reactive Oxygen Species, Abscisic Acid, and Auxin1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changming; Letnik, Ilya; Hacham, Yael; Dobrev, Petre; Ben-Daniel, Bat-Hen; Vanková, Radomíra; Amir, Rachel; Miller, Gad

    2014-01-01

    A seed’s ability to properly germinate largely depends on its oxidative poise. The level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is controlled by a large gene network, which includes the gene coding for the hydrogen peroxide-scavenging enzyme, cytosolic ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE6 (APX6), yet its specific function has remained unknown. In this study, we show that seeds lacking APX6 accumulate higher levels of ROS, exhibit increased oxidative damage, and display reduced germination on soil under control conditions and that these effects are further exacerbated under osmotic, salt, or heat stress. In addition, ripening APX6-deficient seeds exposed to heat stress displayed reduced germination vigor. This, together with the increased abundance of APX6 during late stages of maturation, indicates that APX6 activity is critical for the maturation-drying phase. Metabolic profiling revealed an altered activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, changes in amino acid levels, and elevated metabolism of abscisic acid (ABA) and auxin in drying apx6 mutant seeds. Further germination assays showed an impaired response of the apx6 mutants to ABA and to indole-3-acetic acid. Relative suppression of abscisic acid insensitive3 (ABI3) and ABI5 expression, two of the major ABA signaling downstream components controlling dormancy, suggested that an alternative signaling route inhibiting germination was activated. Thus, our study uncovered a new role for APX6, in protecting mature desiccating and germinating seeds from excessive oxidative damage, and suggested that APX6 modulate the ROS signal cross talk with hormone signals to properly execute the germination program in Arabidopsis. PMID:25049361

  5. Tuning the reactivity of oxygen/sulfur by acidity of the catalyst in Prins cyclization: oxa- versus thia-selectivity.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B V Subba; Venkateswarlu, A; Borkar, Prashant; Yadav, J S; Sridhar, B; Grée, René

    2014-03-21

    An unprecedented oxa- versus thia-selectivity has been observed in Prins cyclization of 6-mercaptohex-3-en-1-ol with aldehydes. In the presence of a stoichiometric amount of strong Lewis or Brønsted acids, the reaction provides the hexahydro-2H-thieno[3,2-c]pyran skeleton predominantly via oxonium-Prins cyclization. In contrast, a catalytic amount of weak Lewis or Brønsted acids provides the hexahydro-2H-thiopyrano[4,3-b]furan preferentially through thionium-Prins cyclization. PMID:24564269

  6. Roles of reactive oxygen species in UVA-induced oxidation of 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid-melanin as studied by differential spectrophotometric method.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shosuke; Kikuta, Marina; Koike, Shota; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; Sarna, Michal; Zadlo, Andrzej; Sarna, Tadeusz; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2016-05-01

    Eumelanin photoprotects pigmented tissues from ultraviolet (UV) damage. However, UVA-induced tanning seems to result from the photooxidation of preexisting melanin and does not contribute to photoprotection. We investigated the mechanism of UVA-induced degradation of 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA)-melanin taking advantage of its solubility in a neutral buffer and using a differential spectrophotometric method to detect subtle changes in its structure. Our methodology is suitable for examining the effects of various agents that interact with reactive oxygen species (ROS) to determine how ROS is involved in the UVA-induced oxidative modifications. The results show that UVA radiation induces the oxidation of DHICA to indole-5,6-quinone-2-carboxylic acid in eumelanin, which is then cleaved to form a photodegraded, pyrrolic moiety and finally to form free pyrrole-2,3,5-tricarboxylic acid. The possible involvement of superoxide radical and singlet oxygen in the oxidation was suggested. The generation and quenching of singlet oxygen by DHICA-melanin was confirmed by direct measurements of singlet oxygen phosphorescence. PMID:26920809

  7. Asymmetric Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivity of Unexpectedly Stable Spiroepoxy-β-Lactones Including Facile Conversion to Tetronic Acids: Application to (+)-Maculalactone A

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Richard J.; Morris, Kay A.; Vallakati, Ravikrishna; Zhang, Wei; Romo, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    A novel class of small spirocyclic heterocycles, spiroepoxy-β-lactones (1,4-dioxaspiro[2.3]-hexan-5-ones), is described that exhibit a number of interesting reactivity patterns. These spiroheterocycles, including an optically active series, are readily synthesized by epoxidation of ketene dimers (4-alkylidene-2-oxetanones) available from homo- or heteroketene dimerization. An analysis of bond lengths in these systems by X-ray crystallography and comparison to data for known spirocycles and those determined computationally, suggest that anomeric effects in these systems may be more pronounced due to their rigidity and may contribute to their surprising stability. The synthetic utility of spiroepoxy-β-lactones was explored and one facile rearrangement identified under several conditions provides a 3-step route from acid chlorides to optically active tetronic acids, ubiquitous heterocycles in bioactive natural products. The addition of various nucleophiles to these spirocycles leads primarily to addition at C5 and C2. The utility of an optically active spiroepoxy-β-lactone was demonstrated in the concise, enantioselective synthesis of the anti-fouling agent, (+)-maculalactone A, which proceeds in 5 steps from hydrocinnamoyl chloride by way of a tetronic acid intermediate. PMID:19453152

  8. Asymmetric synthesis, structure, and reactivity of unexpectedly stable spiroepoxy-beta-lactones including facile conversion to tetronic acids: application to (+)-maculalactone A.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Richard J; Morris, Kay A; Vallakati, Ravikrishna; Zhang, Wei; Romo, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    A novel class of small spirocyclic heterocycles, spiroepoxy-beta-lactones (1,4-dioxaspiro[2.3]-hexan-5-ones), is described that exhibit a number of interesting reactivity patterns. These spiroheterocycles, including an optically active series, are readily synthesized by epoxidation of ketene dimers (4-alkylidene-2-oxetanones) available from homo- or heteroketene dimerization. An analysis of bond lengths in these systems by X-ray crystallography and comparison to data for known spirocycles and those determined computationally suggest that anomeric effects in these systems may be more pronounced due to their rigidity and may contribute to their surprising stability. The synthetic utility of spiroepoxy-beta-lactones was explored, and one facile rearrangement identified under several conditions provides a three-step route from acid chlorides to optically active tetronic acids, ubiquitous heterocycles in bioactive natural products. The addition of various nucleophiles to these spirocycles leads primarily to addition at C5 and C2. The utility of an optically active spiroepoxy-beta-lactone was demonstrated in the concise, enantioselective synthesis of the antifouling agent, (+)-maculalactone A, which proceeds in five steps from hydrocinnamoyl chloride by way of a tetronic acid intermediate. PMID:19453152

  9. Modeling of Toxicity-Relevant Electrophilic Reactivity for Guanine with Epoxides: Estimating the Hard and Soft Acids and Bases (HSAB) Parameter as a Predictor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Chenchen; Ji, Li; Liu, Weiping

    2016-05-16

    According to the electrophilic theory in toxicology, many chemical carcinogens in the environment and/or their active metabolites are electrophiles that exert their effects by forming covalent bonds with nucleophilic DNA centers. The theory of hard and soft acids and bases (HSAB), which states that a toxic electrophile reacts preferentially with a biological macromolecule that has a similar hardness or softness, clarifies the underlying chemistry involved in this critical event. Epoxides are hard electrophiles that are produced endogenously by the enzymatic oxidation of parent chemicals (e.g., alkenes and PAHs). Epoxide ring opening proceeds through a SN2-type mechanism with hard nucleophile DNA sites as the major facilitators of toxic effects. Thus, the quantitative prediction of chemical reactivity would enable a predictive assessment of the molecular potential to exert electrophile-mediated toxicity. In this study, we calculated the activation energies for reactions between epoxides and the guanine N7 site for a diverse set of epoxides, including aliphatic epoxides, substituted styrene oxides, and PAH epoxides, using a state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) method. It is worth noting that these activation energies for diverse epoxides can be further predicted by quantum chemically calculated nucleophilic indices from HSAB theory, which is a less computationally demanding method than the exacting procedure for locating the transition state. More importantly, the good qualitative/quantitative correlations between the chemical reactivity of epoxides and their bioactivity suggest that the developed model based on HSAB theory may aid in the predictive hazard evaluation of epoxides, enabling the early identification of mutagenicity/carcinogenicity-relevant SN2 reactivity. PMID:26929981

  10. Reactivity of pi-complexes of Ti, V, and Nb towards dithioacetic acid: Synthesis and structure of novel metal sulfur-containing complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duraj, Stan A.; Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    1990-01-01

    In order to use sulfur-containing resources economically and with minimal environmental damage, it is important to understand the desulfurization processes. Hydrodesulfurization, for example, is carried out on the surface of a heterogeneous metal sulfide catalyst. Studies of simple, soluble inorganic systems provide information regarding the structure and reactivity of sulfur-containing compounds with metal complexes. Further, consistent with recent trends in materials chemistry, many model compounds warrant further study as catalyst precursors. The reactivity of low-valent organometallic sandwich pi-complexes toward dithiocarboxylic acids is described. For example, treatment of bisbenzene vanadium with CH3CSSH affords a divanadium tetrakis(dithioacetate) complex. The crystallographically determined V-V bond distance, 2.800(2), is nearly the same as the V-V bond distance in a V(mu-nu squared-S2)2V' unit in the mineral patonite (VS4)n. The stability of the V2S4 core in the dimer is demonstrated by evidence of V2S4(+) in the mass spectrum (70 eV, solid probe) of the vanadium dimer. Several other systems relevant to HDS catalysis are also discussed.

  11. Effects of dietary pantethine levels on contents of fatty acids and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in the liver of rats orally administered varying amounts of autoxidized linoleate.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, N; Kishida, T; Hamano, T; Natake, M

    1991-02-01

    The effects of dietary pantethine levels on the contents and compositions of fatty acids and on the levels of lipid peroxides were investigated with rat liver and its S-9 fraction under administration of 0 (non), 0.2 (low dose), and 0.35 ml (high dose) of autoxidized linoleate (AL) per 100 g body weight of the rats per day for 5 days. AL having 800 meq/kg of peroxide value (PV) and 1,700 meq/kg of carbonyl value (CV) was dosed to the rats of each group given drinking water containing 0 mg% (deficient), 6.25 mg% (adequate), and 125 mg% pantethine (excess). In the pantethine-deficient and -adequate groups, the contents of fatty acids both in the liver homogenate and in the S-9 fraction were correspondingly decreased by increasing dose levels of AL, and the decrease was remarkable especially in the pantethine-deficient group, but was not significant in the pantethine-excess group even by a high dose of AL. Particularly, in the high dose of AL, the notable decreases of oleic acid (C18:1) contents in both the liver and the S-9 fraction were observed in rats of the pantethine-deficient and -adequate groups. The thiobarbituric acid (TBA) values in the liver homogenate and the S-9 fraction were increased correspondingly by increasing dose levels of AL, and the increases were repressed in the pantethine-excess group. PMID:1880633

  12. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α ameliorates perfluorododecanoic acid-induced production of reactive oxygen species in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Hongxia; Cui, Ruina; Guo, Xuejiang; Wang, Dazhi; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-06-01

    Perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant known to cause hepatocellular hypertrophy; however, the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity remain poorly understood. In this study, male rats were exposed to 0, 0.05, 0.2 and 0.5 mg/kg/day of PFDoA for 110 days. After two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis, 73 differentially expressed proteins involved in lipid metabolism, inflammation, stress response and other functions were successfully identified. Among them, six significantly changed proteins (CTE1, MTE1, HADHA, ECH1, ALDH2 and CPS1) were found to be regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). The anti-oxidant enzyme activity assays of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and the content of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in the liver implied that PFDoA caused oxidative stress. The mRNA levels of PPARα in rat primary hepatocytes were knocked down by lentivirus-mediated RNAi. Furthermore, targeted protein levels of CTE1 and MTE1 were down-regulated, while those of HADHA, ALDH2 and CPS1 were up-regulated. After PFDoA exposure, however, the targeted protein levels of CTE1 and ALDH2 increased compared with those of the knockdown untreated group. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) content in rat hepatocytes assayed by flow cytometry significantly increased in the PPARα knockdown groups, consistent with the PPARα antagonist GW6471- and agonist WY14643-treated groups. These results strongly suggested that PPARα played an important role in suppressing ROS content in hepatocytes following PFDoA exposure. PMID:26168851

  13. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and volatile compounds in chicken breast meat infused with plant extracts and subjected to electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Rababah, T; Hettiarachchy, N S; Horax, R; Cho, M J; Davis, B; Dickson, J

    2006-06-01

    The effect of irradiation on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and volatile compounds in raw and cooked nonirradiated and irradiated chicken breast meat infused with green tea and grape seed extracts was investigated. Chicken breast meat was vacuum infused with green tea extract (3,000 ppm), grape seed extract (3,000 ppm), or their combination (at a total of 6,000 ppm), irradiated with an electron beam, and stored at 5 degrees C for 12 d. The targeted irradiation dosage was 3.0 kGy and the average absorbed dosage was 3.12 kGy. Values of TBARS and volatile compound contents of raw and cooked chicken meat were determined during the 12-d storage period. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values ranged from 15.5 to 71.4 mg of malondialdehyde/kg for nonirradiated raw chicken and 17.3 to 80.1 mg of malondialdehyde/kg for irradiated raw chicken. Values for cooked chicken ranged from 31.4 to 386.2 and 38.4 to 504.1 mg of malondialdehyde/kg for nonirradiated and irradiated chicken, respectively. Irradiation increased TBARS and hexanal values of controls and meat infused with plant extracts. Hexanal had the highest intensity of volatiles followed by pentanal and other volatiles. Cooking the samples significantly (P < 0.05) increased the amounts of TBARS and volatiles. Addition of plant extracts decreased the amount of TBARS as well as hexanal and pentanal values. Although irradiation increases lipid oxidation, infusion of chicken meat with plant extracts could reduce lipid oxidation caused by irradiation. PMID:16776483

  14. Development of C-reactive protein certified reference material NMIJ CRM 6201-b: optimization of a hydrolysis process to improve the accuracy of amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Megumi; Kinumi, Tomoya; Yoshioka, Mariko; Goto, Mari; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Takatsu, Akiko

    2015-04-01

    To standardize C-reactive protein (CRP) assays, the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) has developed a C-reactive protein solution certified reference material, CRM 6201-b, which is intended for use as a primary reference material to enable the SI-traceable measurement of CRP. This study describes the development process of CRM 6201-b. As a candidate material of the CRM, recombinant human CRP solution was selected because of its higher purity and homogeneity than the purified material from human serum. Gel filtration chromatography was used to examine the homogeneity and stability of the present CRM. The total protein concentration of CRP in the present CRM was determined by amino acid analysis coupled to isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS-AAA). To improve the accuracy of IDMS-AAA, we optimized the hydrolysis process by examining the effect of parameters such as the volume of protein samples taken for hydrolysis, the procedure of sample preparation prior to the hydrolysis, hydrolysis temperature, and hydrolysis time. Under optimized conditions, we conducted two independent approaches in which the following independent hydrolysis and liquid chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (LC-IDMS) were combined: one was vapor-phase acid hydrolysis (130 °C, 24 h) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS) method, and the other was microwave-assisted liquid-phase acid hydrolysis (150 °C, 3 h) and pre-column derivatization liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. The quantitative values of the two different amino acid analyses were in agreement within their uncertainties. The certified value was the weighted mean of the results of the two methods. Uncertainties from the value-assignment method, between-method variance, homogeneity, long-term stability, and short-term stability were taken into account in evaluating the uncertainty for a certified value. The certified value and the

  15. The surface reactivity of a magnesium-aluminium alloy in acidic fluoride solutions studied by electrochemical techniques and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdier, S.; van der Laak, N.; Delalande, S.; Metson, J.; Dalard, F.

    2004-08-01

    The behaviour of the 6% Al magnesium alloy AM60 in aqueous acid fluoride solutions was studied in situ by electrochemical techniques and the surface chemistry of the resulting film was examined by monochromatized XPS. The evolution of the corrosion potential and cyclic voltammograms showed that the aggressiveness of the solutions is mainly driven by their fluoride concentration, the pH having almost no detectable influence. The more concentrated and acidic fluoride solutions led to a higher degree of fluoride coverage of the surface. The surface film is composed of magnesium hydroxide and hydroxyfluoride Mg(OH) 2- xF x which approaches MgF 2 with increasing fluoride concentration in the film. The parameters governing the film evolution and their relation to surface reactions are discussed.

  16. [Nanocerium restores the erythrocytes stability to acid hemolysis by inhibition of oxygen and nitrogen reactive species in old rats].

    PubMed

    Kotsuruba, A V; Kopjak, B S; Sagach, V F; Spivak, N Ja

    2015-01-01

    In experiments in vivo the effect of nanocerium (cerium oxide nanoparticles) on the stability of red blood cells to acid hemolysis, levels of both ROS and RNS generation and H2S pools in plasma and erythrocytes of old rats were investigated. In red blood cells of old rats the proton penetration into the matrix of erythrocytes showed a significant raising and the fate of labile "aging" erythrocytes in old animals compared with adult were up- regulated. These phenomena paralleled with significant up-regulation of ROS and RNS generation. Introduction for 14 days per os to old rats 0.1 mg/kg of nanocerium fully restored resistance of erythrocytes to acid hemolysis by ROS and RNS in both plasma and erythrocytes reduction. Nanocerium decreased the erythrocytes and, conversely, significantly increased the plasma's pools of H2S. PMID:26040029

  17. Profiling fatty acids in vegetable oils by reactive pyrolysis-gas chromatography with dimethyl carbonate and titanium silicate.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Daniele; Baravelli, Valentina; Chiavari, Giuseppe; Prati, Silvia

    2005-12-30

    A novel methodology in on-line pyrolysis-gas chromatography (Py-GC) for the fast analysis of fatty acids in vegetable oils with minimal sample treatment and the use of non-toxic reagents is described. Pyrolysis at 500 degrees C for 10 s of sub-microgram quantity of vegetable oil dissolved in dimethyl carbonate (DMC) and in the presence of nanopowder titanium silicon oxide resulted in the production of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) as unique products. Pyrolysis performed by means of a resistively heated filament pyrolyser interfaced to a GC-MS apparatus enabled the direct analysis of evolved FAMEs. The DMC/Py-GC-MS analysis was tested on soybean, coconut, linseed, walnut and olive oil and the results compared to the classical BF(3)-methanol as reference methodology. The DMC method exhibited a lower precision and was biased towards lower levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in comparison to the BF(3)-methanol method, but was more advantageous in terms of reduced sample treatment, waste generation and risk factors of employed chemicals. PMID:16216255

  18. Laboratory studies of the reactive uptake of biogenic species: Evidence for the direct polymerization of isoprene, terpenes and sesquiterpenes on acidic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Liggio, J.; Mihele, C.; Brook, J.

    2006-12-01

    Numerous studies on heterogeneous reactions have shown that polymerization of semi-volatile and volatile organic compounds occurs in aerosols. To date, most evidence suggests that gaseous hydrocarbon oxidation products containing carbonyl functionality are the prime candidates for these processes. Such processes involve primarily hydration, acetal formation, polymerization and aldol-condensation reactions, resulting in oligomer products of potential significance with respect to secondary organic aerosol formation (SOA). However, little information on the heterogeneous reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons (olefins) is known. Given that biogenic species, many of them unsaturated, make up a considerable portion of hydrocarbons emitted globally, direct reactive uptake of these compounds on aerosols would also potentially be a major source of SOA. In the present study, individual biogenic hydrocarbons were exposed to pre-existing acidic sulfate aerosols within a 2 m3 Teflon reaction chamber under varying relative humidity conditions. An Aerosol Mass Spectrometer was used to quantify any subsequent increase in organic mass as a function of time, and to obtain information regarding the structure of products via aerosol mass spectra. A Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer was used to measure the gas-phase concentrations of isoprene, terpenes (?-pinene, ?-pinene, limonene, and carene) and sesquiterpenes (?-caryophylene and humulene) in the reaction chamber. Results from these experiments show that a significant amount of these compounds are taken up by the acidic aerosols rapidly, in a polymerization process which was highly dependent on the particle acidity. This polymerization mechanism likely involves the oxygenation of the resulting polymers via acid catalyzed hydration. The uptake of the unsaturated hydrocarbons suggests that gas-phase oxidation of biogenics to condensable products is not the only route to SOA. Details of the polymerization and hydration

  19. Reactive metabolites and agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Uetrecht, J P

    1996-01-01

    Central to most hypotheses of the mechanism of idiosyncratic drug-induced blood dyscrasias is the involvement of reactive metabolites. In view of the reactive nature of the majority of such metabolites, it is likely that they are formed by, or in close proximity to the blood cells affected. The major oxidative system of neutrophils generates hypochlorous acid. We have demonstrated that the drugs associated with the highest incidence of agranulocytosis are oxidized to reactive metabolites by hypochlorous acid and/or activated neutrophils. There are many mechanisms by which such reactive metabolites could induce agranulocytosis. In the case of aminopyrine-induced agranulocytosis, most cases appear to involve drug-dependent anti-neutrophil antibodies, and these are likely to be induced by cell membrane antigens modified by the reactive metabolite of aminopyrine. The target of agranulocytosis associated with many other drugs is usually neutrophil precursors and may involve cytotoxicity or a cell-mediated immune reaction induced by a reactive metabolite. In the case of aplastic anaemia, there is evidence in some cases for involvement of cytotoxic T cells, which could either be induced by metabolites generated by neutrophils, or more likely, by reactive metabolites generated by stem cells. PMID:8987247

  20. Design, synthesis, structure, and dehydrogenation reactivity of a water-soluble o-iodoxybenzoic acid derivative bearing a trimethylammonium group.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li-Qian; Dong, Zhi-Lei; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Chi

    2011-12-16

    5-Trimethylammonio-1,3-dioxo-1,3-dihydro-1λ(5)-benzo[d][1,2]iodoxol-1-ol anion (AIBX 1a), an o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) derivative having the trimethylammonium moiety on its phenyl ring, possesses very good solubility in water and distinct oxidative properties from IBX, which is demonstrated in the oxidation of various β-keto esters to the corresponding dehydrogenated products using water as cosolvent. The regeneration of AIBX 1a can be easily realized from the reaction mixture due to its good water solubility. PMID:22082110

  1. [Response of reactive oxygen metabolism in melon chloroplasts to short-term salinity-alkalinity stress regulated by exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Li-xia; Hu, Li-pan; Hu, Xiao-hui; Pan, Xiong-bo; Ren, Wen-qi

    2015-12-01

    The regulatory effect of exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in melon chloroplasts under short-term salinity-alkalinity stress were investigated in melon variety 'Jinhui No. 1', which was cultured with deep flow hydroponics. The result showed that under salinity-alkalinity stress, the photosynthetic pigment content, MDA content, superoxide anion (O₂·) production rate and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) content in chloroplast increased significantly, the contents of antioxidants ascorbic acid (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) increased, and the activities of H⁺-ATPase and H⁺-PPiase were inhibited obviously. With exogenous GABA application, the accumulations of O₂·, MDA and H₂O₂ induced by salinity-alkalinity stress were inhibited. Exogenous GABA alleviated the increase of photosynthetic pigment content, improved the activity of SOD, enzymes of AsA-GSH cycle, total AsA and total GSH while decreased the AsA/DHA ratio and GSH/GSSH ratio. Foliar GABA could enhance the H⁺-ATPase and H⁺-PPiase activities. Our results suggested that the exogenous GABA could accelerate the ROS metabolism in chloroplast, promote the recycle of AsA-GSH, and maintain the permeability of cell membrane to improve the ability of melon chloroplast against salinity-alkalinity stress. PMID:27112014

  2. Synergistic activities of a silver(I) glutamic acid complex and reactive oxygen species (ROS): a novel antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic agent.

    PubMed

    Batarseh, K I; Smith, M A

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic activities of a silver(I) glutamic acid complex with the synergistic concomitant generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were investigated here. The ROS generation system employed was via Fenton chemistry. The antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic activities were investigated on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43300 and Escherichia coli bacteria, and Vero and MCF-7 tumor cell lines, respectively. Antimicrobial activities were conducted by determining minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), while chemotherapeutic efficacies were done by serial dilution using standard techniques to determine the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50). The antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic results obtained were compared with positive control drugs gentamicin, oxacillin, penicillin, streptomycin and cisplatin, a ubiquitously used platinum-based antitumor drug, and with the silver(I) glutamic acid complex and hydrogen peroxide separately. Based on MIC and IC50 values, it was determined that this synergistic approach was very effective at extremely low concentrations, especially when compared with the other drugs evaluated here. This finding might be of great significance regarding metronomic dosing when this synergistic approach is clinically implemented. Since silver at low concentrations exhibits no toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic activities, this might offer an alternative approach for the development of safer silver-based antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic drugs, thereby reducing or even eliminating the toxicity associated with current drugs. Accordingly, the present approach might be integrated into the systemic clinical treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:22680634

  3. Incorporation of amino acids within the surface reactive layers of bioactive glass in vitro: an XPS study.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, T A; Davies, J E

    2000-01-01

    Surface reaction layers grown on bioactive glass (Bioglass), by immersion in either simulated body fluid (SBF) or minimal essential medium (alpha-MEM) for 2, 5, 32 and 72 h, were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Layers grown in alpha-MEM exhibited delamination when observed in SEM. Low resolution XPS analysis detected nitrogen at the surface of the Bioglass exposed to alpha-MEM for 72 h (8 relative at%), whereas insignificant nitrogen was found at the surface of any sample immersed in SBF. XPS depth profiling (argon) showed the presence of nitrogen throughout the depth of the surface layer of the sample incubated in alpha-MEM for 72 h. Deconvolution of the nitrogen envelope in a high resolution XPS spectrum demonstrated nitrogen characteristic of the amine bonds present in amino acids. Carbon concentration also considerably increased over time with exposure to alpha-MEM (24-55%), whereas it remained in the 20-25% range in SBF. These results demonstrate that the amino acids contained in the culture medium were incorporated within the growing calcium phosphate rich surface reaction layer of Bioglass. PMID:15348094

  4. Potential energy profile, structural, vibrational and reactivity descriptors of trans-2-methoxycinnamic acid by FTIR, FT-Raman and quantum chemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Anitha, R.; Thenmozhi, S.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2016-06-01

    The stable conformers of trans-2-methoxycinnamic acid (trans-2MCA) are determined by potential energy profile analysis. The energies of the s-cis and s-trans conformers of trans-2MCA determined by B3LYP/cc-pVTZ method are -612.9788331 Hartrees and -612.9780953 Hartrees, respectively. The vibrational and electronic investigations of the stable s-cis and s-trans conformers of trans-2-methoxycinnamic acid have been carried out extensively with FTIR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The s-cis conformer (I) with a (C16-C17-C18-O19) dihedral angle equal to 0° is found to be more favoured relative to the one s-trans (II) with (C16-C17-C18-O19) = 180°, possibly due to delocalization, hydrogen bonding and steric repulsion effects between the methoxy and acrylic acid groups. The DFT studies are performed with B3LYP method by utilizing 6-311++G** and cc-pVTZ basis sets to determine the structure, thermodynamic properties, vibrational characteristics and chemical shifts of the compound. The total dipole moments of the conformers determined by B3LYP/cc-pVTZ method are 3.35 D and 4.87 D for s-cis and s-trans, respectively. It reveals the higher polarity of s-trans conformer of trans-2MCA molecule. The electronic and steric influence of the methoxy group on the skeletal frequencies has been analysed. The energies of the frontier molecular orbitals and the LUMO-HOMO energy gap have been determined. The MEP of s-cis conformer lie in the range +1.374e × 10-2 to -1.374e × 10-2 while for s-trans it is +1.591e × 10-2 to -1.591e × 10-2. The total electron density of s-cis conformer lie in the range +5.273e × 10-2 to -5.273e × 10-2 while for s-trans it is +5.403e × 10-2 to -5.403e × 10-2. The MEP and total electron density shows that the s-cis conformer is less polar, less reactive and more stable than the s-trans conformer. All the reactivity descriptors of the molecule have been discussed. Intramolecular electronic interactions and their stabilisation energies have analysed

  5. Identifying key controls on the behavior of an acidic-U(VI) plume in the Savannah River Site using reactive transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Bea, Sergio A; Wainwright, Haruko; Spycher, Nicolas; Faybishenko, Boris; Hubbard, Susan S; Denham, Miles E

    2013-08-01

    Acidic low-level waste radioactive waste solutions were discharged to three unlined seepage basins at the F-Area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina, USA, from 1955 through 1989. Despite many years of active remediation, the groundwater remains acidic and contaminated with significant levels of U(VI) and other radionuclides. Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is a desired closure strategy for the site, based on the premise that regional flow of clean background groundwater will eventually neutralize the groundwater acidity, immobilizing U(VI) through adsorption. An in situ treatment system is currently in place to accelerate this in the downgradient portion of the plume and similar measures could be taken upgradient if necessary. Understanding the long-term pH and U(VI) adsorption behavior at the site is critical to assess feasibility of MNA along with the in-situ remediation treatments. This paper presents a reactive transport (RT) model and uncertainty quantification (UQ) analyses to explore key controls on the U(VI)-plume evolution and long-term mobility at this site. Two-dimensional numerical RT simulations are run including the saturated and unsaturated (vadose) zones, U(VI) and H(+) adsorption (surface complexation) onto sediments, dissolution and precipitation of Al and Fe minerals, and key hydrodynamic processes are considered. UQ techniques are applied using a new open-source tool that is part of the developing ASCEM reactive transport modeling and analysis framework to: (1) identify the complex physical and geochemical processes that control the U(VI) plume migration in the pH range where the plume is highly mobile, (2) evaluate those physical and geochemical parameters that are most controlling, and (3) predict the future plume evolution constrained by historical, chemical and hydrological data. The RT simulation results show a good agreement with the observed historical pH and concentrations of U(VI), nitrates

  6. Identifying key controls on the behavior of an acidic-U(VI) plume in the Savannah River Site using reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bea, Sergio A.; Wainwright, Haruko; Spycher, Nicolas; Faybishenko, Boris; Hubbard, Susan S.; Denham, Miles E.

    2013-08-01

    Acidic low-level waste radioactive waste solutions were discharged to three unlined seepage basins at the F-Area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina, USA, from 1955 through 1989. Despite many years of active remediation, the groundwater remains acidic and contaminated with significant levels of U(VI) and other radionuclides. Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is a desired closure strategy for the site, based on the premise that regional flow of clean background groundwater will eventually neutralize the groundwater acidity, immobilizing U(VI) through adsorption. An in situ treatment system is currently in place to accelerate this in the downgradient portion of the plume and similar measures could be taken upgradient if necessary. Understanding the long-term pH and U(VI) adsorption behavior at the site is critical to assess feasibility of MNA along with the in-situ remediation treatments. This paper presents a reactive transport (RT) model and uncertainty quantification (UQ) analyses to explore key controls on the U(VI)-plume evolution and long-term mobility at this site. Two-dimensional numerical RT simulations are run including the saturated and unsaturated (vadose) zones, U(VI) and H+ adsorption (surface complexation) onto sediments, dissolution and precipitation of Al and Fe minerals, and key hydrodynamic processes are considered. UQ techniques are applied using a new open-source tool that is part of the developing ASCEM reactive transport modeling and analysis framework to: (1) identify the complex physical and geochemical processes that control the U(VI) plume migration in the pH range where the plume is highly mobile, (2) evaluate those physical and geochemical parameters that are most controlling, and (3) predict the future plume evolution constrained by historical, chemical and hydrological data. The RT simulation results show a good agreement with the observed historical pH and concentrations of U(VI), nitrates and

  7. Structural Insights into 2,2′-Azino-Bis(3-Ethylbenzothiazoline-6-Sulfonic Acid) (ABTS)-Mediated Degradation of Reactive Blue 21 by Engineered Cyathus bulleri Laccase and Characterization of Degradation Products

    PubMed Central

    Kenzom, T.; Srivastava, P.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes are currently used for the treatment of different reactive dyes which involve use of toxic catalysts. Peroxidases are reported to be effective on such dyes and require hydrogen peroxide and/or metal ions. Cyathus bulleri laccase, expressed in Pichia pastoris, catalyzes efficient degradation (78 to 85%) of reactive azo dyes (reactive black 5, reactive orange 16, and reactive red 198) in the presence of synthetic mediator ABTS [2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)]. This laccase was engineered to degrade effectively reactive blue 21 (RB21), a phthalocyanine dye reported to be decolorized only by peroxidases. The 816-bp segment (toward the C terminus) of the lcc gene was subjected to random mutagenesis and enzyme variants (Lcc35, Lcc61, and Lcc62) were selected based on increased ABTS oxidizing ability. Around 78 to 95% decolorization of RB21 was observed with the ABTS-supplemented Lcc variants in 30 min. Analysis of the degradation products by mass spectrometry indicated the formation of several low-molecular-weight compounds. Mapping the mutations on the modeled structure implicated residues both near and far from the T1 Cu site that affected the catalytic efficiency of the mutant enzymes on ABTS and, in turn, the rate of oxidation of RB21. Several inactive clones were also mapped. The importance of geometry as well as electronic changes on the reactivity of laccases was indicated. PMID:25261507

  8. Aerobic C-H Acetoxylation of 8-Methylquinoline in PdII-Pyridinecarboxylic Acid Systems: Some Structure-Reactivity Relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Daoyong; Zavalij, Peter Y.; Vedernikov, Andrei N.

    2013-09-09

    Catalytic oxidative C–H acetoxylation of 8-methylquinoline as a model substrate with O2 as oxidant was performed using palladium(II) carboxylate catalysts derived from four different pyridinecarboxylic acids able to form palladium(II) chelates of different size. A comparison of the rates of the substrate C–H activation and the O2 activation steps shows that the C–H activation step is rate-limiting, whereas the O2 activation occurs at a much faster rate already at 20 °C. The chelate ring size and the chelate ring strain of the catalytically active species are proposed to be the key factors affecting the rate of the C–H activation.

  9. Red Blood Cell Docosapentaenoic Acid (DPA n-3) is Inversely Associated with Triglycerides and C-reactive Protein (CRP) in Healthy Adults and Dose-Dependently Increases Following n-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Skulas-Ray, Ann C.; Flock, Michael R.; Richter, Chesney K.; Harris, William S.; West, Sheila G.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the long-chain omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in lipid metabolism and inflammation has been extensively studied; however, little is known about the relationship between docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5 n-3) and inflammation and triglycerides (TG). We evaluated whether n-3 DPA content of red blood cells (RBC) was associated with markers of inflammation (interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and C-reactive protein (CRP) and fasting TG prior to n-3 supplementation in two studies (Study 1: n = 115, aged 20–44 years, body mass index (BMI) 20–30 kg/m2, TG = 34–176 mg/dL; Study 2: n = 28, aged 22–65 years, BMI 24–37 kg/m2, TG = 141–339 mg/dL). We also characterized the dose-response effects of n-3 fatty acid supplementation on RBC n-3 DPA after five months of supplementation with fish oil (Study 1: 0, 300, 600, 900, and 1800 mg/day EPA + DHA) and eight weeks of prescription n-3 ethyl esters (Study 2: 0, 850, and 3400 mg/day EPA + DHA). In Study 1, RBC n-3 DPA was inversely correlated with CRP (R2 = 36%, p < 0.001) and with fasting TG (r = −0.30, p = 0.001). The latter finding was replicated in Study 2 (r = −0.33, p = 0.04). In both studies, n-3 supplementation significantly increased RBC n-3 DPA dose-dependently. Relative increases were greater for Study 1, with increases of 29%–61% vs. 14%–26% for Study 2. The associations between RBC n-3 DPA, CRP, and fasting TG may have important implications for the prevention of atherosclerosis and chronic inflammatory diseases and warrant further study. PMID:26247967

  10. Regulation of reactive oxygen species-mediated abscisic acid signaling in guard cells and drought tolerance by glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Munemasa, Shintaro; Muroyama, Daichi; Nagahashi, Hiroki; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Mori, Izumi C.; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) induces stomatal closure in response to drought stress, leading to reduction of transpirational water loss. A thiol tripeptide glutathione (GSH) is an important regulator of cellular redox homeostasis in plants. Although it has been shown that cellular redox state of guard cells controls ABA-mediated stomatal closure, roles of GSH in guard cell ABA signaling were largely unknown. Recently we demonstrated that GSH functions as a negative regulator of ABA signaling in guard cells. In this study we performed more detailed analyses to reveal how GSH regulates guard cell ABA signaling using the GSH-deficient Arabidopsis mutant cad2-1. The cad2-1 mutant exhibited reduced water loss from rosette leaves. Whole-cell current recording using patch clamp technique revealed that the cad2-1 mutation did not affect ABA regulation of S-type anion channels. We found enhanced activation of Ca2+ permeable channels by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in cad2-1 guard cells. The cad2-1 mutant showed enhanced H2O2-induced stomatal closure and significant increase of ROS accumulation in whole leaves in response to ABA. Our findings provide a new understanding of guard cell ABA signaling and a new strategy to improve plant drought tolerance. PMID:24312112

  11. Synthesis, Aqueous Reactivity, and Biological Evaluation of Carboxylic Acid Ester-Functionalized Platinum–Acridine Hybrid Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Leigh A.; Suryadi, Jimmy; West, Tiffany K.; Kucera, Gregory L.; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of platinum–acridine hybrid agents containing carboxylic acid ester groups is described. The most active derivatives and the unmodified parent compounds showed up to 6-fold higher activity in ovarian cancer (OVCAR-3) and breast cancer (MCF-7, MDA-MB-23) cell lines than cisplatin. Inhibition of cell proliferation at nanomolar concentrations was observed in pancreatic (PANC-1) and non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLC, NCI-H460) of 80- and 150-fold, respectively. Introduction of the ester groups did not affect the cytotoxic properties of the hybrids, which form the same monofunctional–intercalative DNA adducts as the parent compounds, as demonstrated in a plasmid unwinding assay. In-line high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-ESMS) shows that the ester moieties undergo platinum-mediated hydrolysis in a chloride concentration-dependent manner to form carboxylate chelates. Potential applications of the chloride-sensitive ester hydrolysis as a self-immolative release mechanism for tumor-selective delivery of platinum–acridines are discussed. PMID:22871158

  12. Effects of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species induced by ammonium dinitramide decomposition in aqueous solutions of deoxyribose nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Steel-Goodwin, L; Kuhlman, K J; Miller, C; Pace, M D; Carmichael, A J

    1997-01-01

    Ammonium dinitramide (ADN), a potential rocket fuel, decomposes in water forming NO2. The chemistry of this ADN-released NO2 in oxygenated biological systems is complex both in the number of potential chemical species and in the number of parallel and consecutive reactions that can theoretically occur. High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) studies revealed ADN fragmented deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA). Damage to DNA standard solutions was caused by at least two major pathways, one arising from reactions of NO2 with oxygen and one arising from a reaction with superoxide (O2-.). The radical species generated when ADN is incubated with standard solutions of DNA, pH 7.5, in the presence of the spin trap agent n-tert-butyl-alpha-nitrone (PBN) was compared with the PBN-radical adducts generated in the presence of ADN and O2-. or of ADN and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The ADN-induced PBN radical adducts increased linearly over the 90-minute study period. The values of peak intensity in the presence of O2-. and in the presence of H2O2, were 828% and 7.08%, respectively, of the ADN-induced radicals alone. The synergistic effect of ADN with O2- may provide an understanding of the sensitivity of the rat blastocyst to aDN at the preimplantation stage of development and the lack of toxicity in in vivo studies in tissues high in catalase. PMID:9142377

  13. Mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species play a vital role in the salicylic acid signaling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shengjun; Yue, Haiyun; Zhou, Jun; Xing, Da

    2015-01-01

    Plant mitochondria constitute a major source of ROS and are proposed to act as signaling organelles in the orchestration of defense response. At present, the signals generated and then integrated by mitochondria are still limited. Here, fluorescence techniques were used to monitor the events of mitochondria in vivo, as well as the induction of mitochondrial signaling by a natural defensive signal chemical salicylic acid (SA). An inhibition of respiration was observed in isolated mitochondria subjected to SA. The cytochrome reductase activity analysis in isolated mitochondria demonstrated that SA might act directly on the complex III in the respiration chain by inhibiting the activity. With this alteration, a quick burst of mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) was stimulated. SA-induced mtROS caused mitochondrial morphology transition in leaf tissue or protoplasts expressing mitochondria-GFP (43C5) and depolarization of membrane potential. However, the application of AsA, an H2O2 scavenger, significantly prevented both events, indicating that both of them are attributable to ROS accumulation. In parallel, SA-induced mtROS up-regulated AOX1a transcript abundance and this induction was correlated with the disease resistance, whereas AsA-pretreatment interdicted this effect. It is concluded that mitochondria play an essential role in the signaling pathway of SA-induced ROS generation, which possibly provided new insight into the SA-mediated biological processes, including plant defense response. PMID:25811367

  14. Mitochondrial-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species Play a Vital Role in the Salicylic Acid Signaling Pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Shengjun; Yue, Haiyun; Zhou, Jun; Xing, Da

    2015-01-01

    Plant mitochondria constitute a major source of ROS and are proposed to act as signaling organelles in the orchestration of defense response. At present, the signals generated and then integrated by mitochondria are still limited. Here, fluorescence techniques were used to monitor the events of mitochondria in vivo, as well as the induction of mitochondrial signaling by a natural defensive signal chemical salicylic acid (SA). An inhibition of respiration was observed in isolated mitochondria subjected to SA. The cytochrome reductase activity analysis in isolated mitochondria demonstrated that SA might act directly on the complex III in the respiration chain by inhibiting the activity. With this alteration, a quick burst of mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) was stimulated. SA-induced mtROS caused mitochondrial morphology transition in leaf tissue or protoplasts expressing mitochondria-GFP (43C5) and depolarization of membrane potential. However, the application of AsA, an H2O2 scavenger, significantly prevented both events, indicating that both of them are attributable to ROS accumulation. In parallel, SA-induced mtROS up-regulated AOX1a transcript abundance and this induction was correlated with the disease resistance, whereas AsA-pretreatment interdicted this effect. It is concluded that mitochondria play an essential role in the signaling pathway of SA-induced ROS generation, which possibly provided new insight into the SA-mediated biological processes, including plant defense response. PMID:25811367

  15. Comparison of enzymatic reactivity of corn stover solids prepared by dilute acid, AFEX™, and ionic liquid pretreatments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pretreatment is essential to realize high product yields from biological conversion of naturally recalcitrant cellulosic biomass, with thermochemical pretreatments often favored for cost and performance. In this study, enzymatic digestion of solids from dilute sulfuric acid (DA), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX™), and ionic liquid (IL) thermochemical pretreatments of corn stover were followed over time for the same range of total enzyme protein loadings to provide comparative data on glucose and xylose yields of monomers and oligomers from the pretreated solids. The composition of pretreated solids and enzyme adsorption on each substrate were also measured to determine. The extent glucose release could be related to these features. Results Corn stover solids from pretreatment by DA, AFEX, and IL were enzymatically digested over a range of low to moderate loadings of commercial cellulase, xylanase, and pectinase enzyme mixtures, the proportions of which had been previously optimized for each pretreatment. Avicel® cellulose, regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC), and beechwood xylan were also subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis as controls. Yields of glucose and xylose and their oligomers were followed for times up to 120 hours, and enzyme adsorption was measured. IL pretreated corn stover displayed the highest initial glucose yields at all enzyme loadings and the highest final yield for a low enzyme loading of 3 mg protein/g glucan in the raw material. However, increasing the enzyme loading to 12 mg/g glucan or more resulted in DA pretreated corn stover attaining the highest longer-term glucose yields. Hydrolyzate from AFEX pretreated corn stover had the highest proportion of xylooligomers, while IL produced the most glucooligomers. However, the amounts of both oligomers dropped with increasing enzyme loadings and hydrolysis times. IL pretreated corn stover had the highest enzyme adsorption capacity. Conclusions Initial hydrolysis yields were highest

  16. Rational design of resorcylic acid lactone analogues as covalent MNK1/2 kinase inhibitors by tuning the reactivity of an enamide Michael acceptor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Chen, Anqi; Joy, Joma; Xavier, Vanessa Joanne; Ong, Esther H Q; Hill, Jeffrey; Chai, Christina L L

    2013-09-01

    Recent biological and computational advances in drug design have led to renewed interest in targeted covalent inhibition as an efficient and practical approach for the development of new drugs. As part of our continuing efforts in the exploration of the therapeutic potential of resorcylic acid lactones (RALs), we report herein the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of conveniently accessible RAL enamide analogues as novel covalent inhibitors of MAP kinase interacting kinases (MNKs). In this study, we have successfully demonstrated that the covalent binding ability of RAL enamides can be tuned by attaching an electron-withdrawing motif, such as an acyl group, to enhance its reactivity toward the cysteine residues at the MNK1/2 binding sites. We have also shown that ¹H NMR spectroscopy is a convenient and effective tool for screening the covalent binding activities of enamides using cysteamine as a mimic of the key cysteine residue in the enzyme, whereas mass spectrometric analysis confirms covalent modification of the kinases. Preliminary optimization of the initial hit led to the discovery of enamides with low micromolar activity in MNK assays. Cancer cell line assays have identified RAL enamides that inhibit the growth of cancer cells with similar potency to the natural product L-783,277. PMID:23929665

  17. Zooming into sub-organellar localization of reactive oxygen species in guard cell chloroplasts during abscisic acid and methyl jasmonate treatments

    PubMed Central

    Leshem, Yehoram; Levine, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of stomata movements is crucial for plants ability to cope with their changing environment. Guard cell’s (GC) water potential directs water flux inside/outside this cell, which eventually is causing the stoma to open or close, respectively. Some of the osmolytes which accumulates in the GC cytoplasm and are known to play a role in stomata opening are sugars, arising from chloroplast starch degradation. During stomata closure, the accumulated osmolytes are removed from the GC cytoplasm. Surprisingly little is known about prevention of starch degradation and forming additional sugars which may interfere with osmotic changes that are necessary for correct closure of stomata.   One of the early events leading to stomata closure is production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various sub-cellular sites and organelles of the stoma. Here we report that ROS production during abscisic acid (ABA) and methyl jasmonate (MJ) stimuli in Arabidopsis GC chloroplasts were more than tripled. Moreover, ROS were detected on the sub-organelle level in compartments that are typically occupied by starch grains. This observation leads us to suspect that ROS function in that particular location is necessary for stomata closure. We therefore hypothesize that these ROS are involved in redox control that lead to the inactivation of starch degradation that takes place in these compartments, thus contributing to the stoma closure in an additional way. PMID:23887496

  18. Arabidopsis OST1 protein kinase mediates the regulation of stomatal aperture by abscisic acid and acts upstream of reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Mustilli, Anna-Chiara; Merlot, Sylvain; Vavasseur, Alain; Fenzi, Francesca; Giraudat, Jérôme

    2002-12-01

    During drought, the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) triggers stomatal closure, thus reducing water loss. Using infrared thermography, we isolated two allelic Arabidopsis mutants (ost1-1 and ost1-2) impaired in the ability to limit their transpiration upon drought. These recessive ost1 mutations disrupted ABA induction of stomatal closure as well as ABA inhibition of light-induced stomatal opening. By contrast, the ost1 mutations did not affect stomatal regulation by light or CO(2), suggesting that OST1 is involved specifically in ABA signaling. The OST1 gene was isolated by positional cloning and was found to be expressed in stomatal guard cells and vascular tissue. In-gel assays indicated that OST1 is an ABA-activated protein kinase related to the Vicia faba ABA-activated protein kinase (AAPK). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were shown recently to be an essential intermediate in guard cell ABA signaling. ABA-induced ROS production was disrupted in ost1 guard cells, whereas applied H(2)O(2) or calcium elicited the same degree of stomatal closure in ost1 as in the wild type. These results suggest that OST1 acts in the interval between ABA perception and ROS production. The relative positions of ost1 and the other ABA-insensitive mutations in the ABA signaling network (abi1-1, abi2-1, and gca2) are discussed. PMID:12468729

  19. Investigation of Propolis’ Effect on Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances and Anti-Oxidant Enzyme Levels of Hippocampus in Diabetic Rats Induced by Streptozotocin

    PubMed Central

    Köksal, Burcu; Emre, Memet Hanifi; Polat, Alaadin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Propolis is an organic resinous viscous substance collected from flower bud and plant sprig by bees. Propolis has a potential treatment agent for oxidative damage caused by diabetes in hippocampus due to its flavonoid and phenolic content. AIM: In this study effect of propolis on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and anti-oxidative enzyme levels of hippocampus in diabetic rats induced by streptozotocin was investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study involved measuring levels of SOD, CAT, GSH-Px and TBARs in hippocampus tissue of STZ-induced diabetic rats (Adult Male Sprague Dawley rats) after applying propolis for one month. The subjects of the study were composed of 51 rats randomly assigned to four groups (Control, STZ, P+STZ and STZ+P). For analysis of data, Kruskal Wallis Test was utilized. RESULTS: The findings of the study showed that there were no significant difference in the levels of TBARS, SOD, CAT and GSH-Px of hippocampus across the groups. CONCLUSION: Propolis application in four-week duration does not have effect on TBARS, SOD, CAT and GSH-Px levels of hippocampus of diabetic rats. These findings mean that more time for observing oxidative harms on hippocampus is needed. PMID:27275196

  20. Abscisic Acid and LATERAL ROOT ORGAN DEFECTIVE/NUMEROUS INFECTIONS AND POLYPHENOLICS Modulate Root Elongation via Reactive Oxygen Species in Medicago truncatula1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chang; Bousquet, Amanda; Harris, Jeanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) modulates root growth in plants grown under normal and stress conditions and can rescue the root growth defects of the Medicago truncatula lateral root-organ defective (latd) mutant. Here, we demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) function downstream of ABA in the regulation of root growth by controlling cell elongation. We also show that the MtLATD/NUMEROUS INFECTIONS AND POLYPHENOLICS (NIP) nitrate transporter is required for ROS homeostasis and cell elongation in roots and that this balance is perturbed in latd mutants, leading to an excess of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide and a corresponding decrease in cell elongation. We found that expression of the superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase genes, MtRbohA and MtRbohC (for respiratory burst oxidase homologs), is increased in latd roots and that inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity pharmacologically can both reduce latd root ROS levels and increase cell length, implicating NADPH oxidase function in latd root growth defects. Finally, we demonstrate that ABA treatment alleviates ectopic ROS accumulation in latd roots, restores MtRbohC expression to wild-type levels, and promotes an increase in cell length. Reducing the expression of MtRbohC using RNA interference leads to increased root elongation in both wild-type and latd roots. These results reveal a mechanism by which the MtLATD/NIP nitrate transporter and ABA modulate root elongation via superoxide generation by the MtRbohC NADPH oxidase. PMID:25192698

  1. Cross-linking of hen egg white lysozyme by microbial transglutaminase under high hydrostatic pressure: localization of reactive amino acid side chains.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Susanne; Schwarzenbolz, Uwe; Henle, Thomas

    2010-12-22

    After incubation of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) with microbial transglutaminase (mTG) under high pressure (400-600 MPa for 30 min at 40 °C), the formation of HEWL oligomers was observed via SDS electrophoresis. At atmospheric pressure, HEWL represents no substrate for mTG. Likewise, enzymatic treatment following a pretreatment with high pressure did not lead to oligomerization. Reactive amino acid side chains were identified by peptide mapping after tryptic digestion using RP-HPLC with ESI-TOF-MS. Isopeptide-containing peptide fragments were found only in HEWL samples simultaneously treated with enzyme and pressure. It was found that mTG exclusively cross-links HEWL under high pressure by formation of an isopeptide between lysine at position 1 and glutamine at position 121 in the peptide chain. Therefore, a pressure-induced partial and reversible unfolding of the protein with exposure of lysine and glutamine side chains has to occur, resulting in a site-directed oligomerization of HEWL by mTG. The enzymatic modification of HEWL by mTG under high pressure offers interesting perspectives for further functionalization reactions. PMID:21087031

  2. Virus-induced gene silencing reveals control of reactive oxygen species accumulation and salt tolerance in tomato by γ-aminobutyric acid metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hexigeduleng; Chen, Xianyang; Lv, Sulian; Jiang, Ping; Feng, Juanjuan; Fan, Pengxiang; Nie, Lingling; Li, Yinxin

    2015-03-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulates in many plant species in response to environmental stress. However, the physiological function of GABA or its metabolic pathway (GABA shunt) in plants remains largely unclear. Here, the genes, including glutamate decarboxylases (SlGADs), GABA transaminases (SlGABA-Ts) and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SlSSADH), controlling three steps of the metabolic pathway of GABA, were studied through virus-induced gene silencing approach in tomato. Silencing of SlGADs (GABA biosynthetic genes) and SlGABA-Ts (GABA catabolic genes) led to increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as salt sensitivity under 200 mm NaCl treatment. Targeted quantitative analysis of metabolites revealed that GABA decreased and increased in the SlGADs- and SlGABA-Ts-silenced plants, respectively, whereas succinate (the final product of GABA metabolism) decreased in both silenced plants. Contrarily, SlSSADH-silenced plants, also defective in GABA degradation process, showed dwarf phenotype, curled leaves and enhanced accumulation of ROS in normal conditions, suggesting the involvement of a bypath for succinic semialdehyde catabolism to γ-hydroxybutyrate as reported previously in Arabidopsis, were less sensitive to salt stress. These results suggest that GABA shunt is involved in salt tolerance of tomato, probably by affecting the homeostasis of metabolites such as succinate and γ-hydroxybutyrate and subsequent ROS accumulation under salt stress. PMID:25074245

  3. Zooming into sub-organellar localization of reactive oxygen species in guard cell chloroplasts during abscisic acid and methyl jasmonate treatments.

    PubMed

    Leshem, Yehoram; Levine, Alex

    2013-10-01

    Regulation of stomata movements is crucial for plants ability to cope with their changing environment. Guard cells' (GC) water potential directs water flux inside/outside this cell, which eventually is causing the stoma to open or close, respectively. Some of the osmolytes which accumulates in the GC cytoplasm and are known to play a role in stomata opening are sugars, arising from chloroplast starch degradation. During stomata closure, the accumulated osmolytes are removed from the GC cytoplasm. Surprisingly little is known about prevention of starch degradation and forming additional sugars which may interfere with osmotic changes that are necessary for correct closure of stomata. One of the early events leading to stomata closure is production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various subcellular sites and organelles of the stoma. Here we report that ROS production during abscisic acid (ABA) and methyl jasmonate (MJ) stimuli in Arabidopsis GC chloroplasts were more than tripled. Moreover, ROS were detected on the suborganelle level in compartments that are typically occupied by starch grains. This observation leads us to suspect that ROS function in that particular location is necessary for stomata closure. We therefore hypothesize that these ROS are involved in redox control that lead to the inactivation of starch degradation that takes place in these compartments, thus contributing to the stoma closure in an additional way. PMID:23887496

  4. Sun-drying diminishes the antioxidative potentials of leaves of Eugenia uniflora against formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances induced in homogenates of rat brain and liver.

    PubMed

    Kade, Ige Joseph; Ibukun, Emmanuel Oluwafemi; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; da Rocha, Joao Batista Teixeira

    2008-08-01

    Extracts from leaves of Pitanga cherry (Eugenia uniflora) are considered to be effective against many diseases, and are therefore used in popular traditional medicines. In the present study, the antioxidative effect of sun-dried (PCS) and air-dried (PCA) ethanolic extracts of Pitanga cherry leaves were investigated. The antioxidant effects were tested by measuring the ability of both PCS and PCA to inhibit the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) induced by prooxidant agents such as iron (II) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in rat brain and liver tissues. The results showed that while PCA significantly (P<0.0001) inhibited the formation of TBARS in both liver and brain tissues homogenates, PCS did not. Further investigation reveals that the phenolic content of the PCS was significantly (P<0.0001) lower compared to PCA. Since phenolics in plants largely contributed to the antioxidative potency of plants, we conclude that air-drying should be employed in the preparation of extracts of Pitanga cherry leaves before it is administered empirically as a traditional medicament, and hence this study serves a public awareness to traditional medical practitioners. PMID:18539016

  5. Limited effect of reactive oxygen species on the composition of susceptible essential amino acids in the midguts of Lymantria dispar caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, Raymond V; Niewiadomski, Julie; Kochmanski, Joseph; Constabel, C Peter

    2012-11-01

    The essential amino acids (EAAs) arginine, histidine, lysine, and methionine, as well as cysteine (semiessential), are believed to be susceptible to reactions with reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems. The decreased availability of these EAAs could harm insect nutrition, since several of them can also be limiting for protein synthesis. However, no in vivo studies have quantified the effect of ROS in the midguts of insect herbivores on EAA composition. This study examined the association between elevated levels of ROS in the midgut fluid of Lymantria dispar caterpillars and the compositions of EAAs (protein-bound + protein-free) in their midgut fluid and frass. Contrary to expectation, the compositions of EAAs were not significantly decreased by ROS in midgut fluid ex vivo when incubated with phenolic compounds. Two in vivo comparisons of low- and high-ROS-producing leaves also showed similar results: there were no significant decreases in the compositions of EAAs in the midgut fluids and/or frass of larvae with elevated levels of ROS in their midguts. In addition, waste nitrogen excretion was not significantly increased from larvae on high-ROS treatments, as would be expected if ROS produced unbalanced EAA compositions. These results suggest that L. dispar larvae are able to tolerate elevated levels of ROS in their midguts without nutritionally significant changes in the compositions of susceptible EAAs in their food. PMID:22961657

  6. Reactive arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive arthritis is a group of conditions that may involve the joints, eyes, and urinary and genital systems. ... The exact cause of reactive arthritis is unknown. It occurs most often in men younger than age 40. It may follow an infection in the urethra ...

  7. In vivo 6-thioguanine-resistant T cells from melanoma patients have public TCR and share TCR beta amino acid sequences with melanoma-reactive T cells

    PubMed Central

    Zuleger, Cindy L.; Macklin, Michael D.; Bostwick, Bret L.; Pei, Qinglin; Newton, Michael A.; Albertini, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    In vivo hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT)-deficient T cells (MT) from melanoma patients are enriched for T cells with in vivo clonal amplifications that traffic between blood and tumor tissues. Melanoma is thus a model cancer to test the hypothesis that in vivo MT from cancer patients can be used as immunological probes for immunogenic tumor antigens. MT were obtained by 6-thioguanine (TG) selection of lymphocytes from peripheral blood and tumor tissues, and wild-type T cells (WT) were obtained analogously without TG selection. cDNA sequences of the T cell receptor beta chains (TRB) were used as unambiguous biomarkers of in vivo clonality and as indicators of T cell specificity. Public TRB were identified in MT from the blood and tumor of different melanoma patients. Such public TRB were not found in normal control MT or WT. As an indicator of T cell specificity for melanoma, the >2600 MT and WT TRB, including the public TRB from melanoma patients, were compared to a literature-derived empirical database of >1270 TRB from melanoma-reactive T cells. Various degrees of similarity, ranging from 100% conservation to 3-amino acid motifs (3-mer), were found between both melanoma patient MT and WT TRBs and the empirical database. The frequency of 3-mer and 4-mer TRB matching to the empirical database was significantly higher in MT compared with WT in the tumor (p=0.0285 and p=0.006, respectively). In summary, in vivo MT from melanoma patients contain public TRB as well as T cells with specificity for characterized melanoma antigens. We conclude that in vivo MT merit study as novel probes for uncharacterized immunogenic antigens in melanoma and other malignancies. PMID:21182840

  8. Combination of Tolfenamic acid and curcumin induces colon cancer cell growth inhibition through modulating specific transcription factors and reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Sankpal, Umesh T.; Nagaraju, Ganji Purnachandra; Gottipolu, Sriharika R.; Hurtado, Myrna; Jordan, Christopher G.; Simecka, Jerry W.; Shoji, Mamoru; El-Rayes, Bassel; Basha, Riyaz

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin (Cur) has been extensively studied in several types of malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC); however its clinical application is greatly affected by low bioavailability. Several strategies to improve the therapeutic response of Cur are being pursued, including its combination with small molecules and drugs. We investigated the therapeutic efficacy of Cur in combination with the small molecule tolfenamic acid (TA) in CRC cell lines. TA has been shown to inhibit the growth of human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, via targeting the transcription factor specificity protein1 (Sp1) and suppressing survivin expression. CRC cell lines HCT116 and HT29 were treated with TA and/or Cur and cell viability was measured 24–72 hours post-treatment. While both agents caused a steady reduction in cell viability, following a clear dose/time-dependent response, the combination of TA+Cur showed higher growth inhibition when compared to either single agent. Effects on apoptosis were determined using flow cytometry (JC-1 staining to measure mitochondrial membrane potential), Western blot analysis (c-PARP expression) and caspase 3/7 activity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were measured by flow cytometry and the translocation of NF-kB into the nucleus was determined using immunofluorescence. Results showed that apoptotic markers and ROS activity were significantly upregulated following combination treatment, when compared to the individual agents. This was accompanied by decreased expression of Sp1, survivin and NF-kB translocation. The combination of TA+Cur was more effective in HCT116 cells than HT29 cells. These results demonstrate that TA may enhance the anti-proliferative efficacy of Cur in CRC cells. PMID:26672603

  9. Effect of dietary Satureja khuzistanica powder on semen characteristics and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances concentration in testicular tissue of Iranian native breeder rooster

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, M. J.; Mohammadzadeh, S.; Kheradmand, A.; Alirezaei, M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of a paucity of information on the effect of Satureja khuzistanica in male chickens, this study was undertaken to determine the influence of dietary S. khuzistanica powder (SKP) on seminal characteristics and testes thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) content in Iranian native breeder rooster. Thirty-six 40-week-old roosters were randomly allotted to 3 equal groups and received either a basal diet without SKP (T1 or control), or a diet containing 20 g/kg (T2) and 40 g/kg (T3) of SKP for 8-week-long experimental period. Semen samples were obtained weekly by abdominal massage to evaluate the seminal characteristics. At the end of the eighth week 18 birds (6 birds per each group) were randomly slaughtered, and sample was taken from right testes for TBARS evaluation. Administration of SKP improved all semen traits, except for sperm concentration. Likewise, TBARS content in SKP treatments did not significantly differ from the control (P>0.05). Seminal volume, live sperm percentage and plasma membrane integrity percentage in SKP-treated groups were higher than the control. Conversely, abnormal sperm percentages reduced in SKP-treated groups (P<0.05). Plasma membrane integrity in experimental treatments was significantly higher than the control in 2nd, 3rd and 7th weeks. However, at 6th and 8th weeks only T3 treatment was significantly different from the control. Notably, there was an increase in total sperm concentration in SKP-treated groups in compared to the control birds. In conclusion, this study indicated that addition of SKP in rooster diet improves sperm quality and also reduces their sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, which may lead to higher fertilization rate. PMID:27175185

  10. Effect of cooking method on carnosine and its homologues, pentosidine and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance contents in beef and turkey meat.

    PubMed

    Peiretti, Pier Giorgio; Medana, Claudio; Visentin, Sonja; Dal Bello, Federica; Meineri, Giorgia

    2012-05-01

    Commercial samples of beef and turkey meat were prepared by commonly used cooking methods with standard cooking times: (1) broiled at 200°C for 10min, (2) broiled at a medium temperature (140°C) for 10min, (3) cooked by microwave (MW) for 3min and then grilled (MW/grill) for 7min, (4) cooked in a domestic microwave oven for 10min, and (5) boiled in water for 10min. The raw and cooked meats were then analysed to determine the carnosine, anserine, homocarnosine, pentosidine, and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) contents. It was observed that boiling beef caused a loss of approximately 50% of the carnosine, probably because of the high water solubility of carnosine and its homologues; cooking by microwave caused a medium loss of the anti-oxidants of approximately 20%; cooking by MW/grill led to a reduction in carnosine of approximately 10%. As far as the anserine and homocarnosine contents were concerned, a greater loss was observed for the boiling method (approximately 70%) while, for the other cooking methods, the value ranged from 30% to 70%. The data oscillate more for the turkey meat: the minimum carnosine decrease was observed in the cases of MW/grill and broiling at high temperature (25%). Analogously, the anserine and homocarnosine contents decreased slightly in the case of MW/grill and broiling at a high temperature (2-7%) and by 10-30% in the other cases. No analysed meat sample showed any traces of pentosidine above the instrumental determination limits. The cooked beef showed an increased TBARS value compared to the raw meat, and the highest values were found when the beef was broiled at a high temperature, cooked by microwave or boiled in water. The TBARS value of the turkey meat decreased for all the cooking methods in comparison to the TBARS value of the fresh meat. PMID:26434266

  11. Arachidonic acid- and prostaglandin E2-induced cerebral vasodilation is mediated by carbon monoxide, independent of reactive oxygen species in piglets

    PubMed Central

    Leffler, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin (PG) E2 stimulate carbon monoxide (CO) production, and AA metabolism is known to be associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study was conducted to address the hypothesis that CO and/or ROS mediate cerebrovascular dilation in newborn pigs. Experiments were performed on anesthetized newborn pigs with closed cranial windows. Different concentrations of AA (10−8-10−6 M), PGE2 (10−8-10−6 M), iloprost (10−8-10−6 M), and their vehicle (artificial cerebrospinal fluid) were given. Piglets with PGE2 and iloprost received indomethacin (5 mg/kg iv) to inhibit cyclooxygenase. AA, PGE2, and iloprost caused concentration-dependent increases in pial arteriolar diameter. The effects of both AA and PGE2 in producing cerebral vascular dilation and associated CO production were blocked by the heme oxygenase inhibitor chromium mesoporphyrin (2 × 10−5 M), but not by the prostacyclin analog, iloprost. ROS inhibitor tempol (SOD mimetic) (1 × 10−5 M) and the H2O2 scavenger catalase (1,000 U/ml) also do not block these vasodilator effects of AA and PGE2. Heme-l-lysinate-induced cerebrovascular dilation and CO production was blocked by chromium mesoporphyrin. Hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase, a combination that is known to generate ROS, caused pial arteriolar dilation and CO production that was inhibited by tempol and catalase. These data suggest that AA- and PGE2-induced cerebral vascular dilation is mediated by CO, independent of ROS. PMID:21984542

  12. Reactive Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with treatment and may cause joint damage. What Research Is Being Conducted on Reactive Arthritis? Researchers continue ... such as methotrexate and sulfasalazine. More information on research is available from the following websites: National Institutes ...

  13. A convenient method for the preparation of barbituric and thiobarbituric acid transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; El-Korashy, Sabry A; Ahmed, Ahmed S

    2008-12-01

    A convenient method for the preparation of barbiturate transition metal complexes: (i) Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Fe(3+), Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) ions with barbituric acid (H(2)L) and (ii) Cr(3+) and Mo(5+) with 2-thiobarbituric acid (H(2)L') was reported and this has enabled seven complexes to be formulated as: [Cr(HL)(2)(OH)(H(2)O)].H(2)O, [Mn(HL)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], [Fe(2)(L)(OH)(3)(H(2)O)(4)].2H(2)O, [Zn(HL)(2)], [Cd(HL)(2)], [Cr(HL')(OH)(2)(H(2)O)].H(2)O and [Mo(HL')(2)]Cl. These new barbiturate complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, magnetic measurements, spectral methods (mid infrared, (1)H NMR, mass, X-ray powder diffraction and UV/vis spectra) and simultaneous thermal analysis (TG and DTG) techniques. The molar conductance measurements proved that, all complexes of barbituric and 2-thiobarbituric acids are non-electrolytes except for [Mo(HL')(2)]Cl. The electronic spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements were used to infer the structures. The IR spectra of the ligands and their complexes are used to identify the mode of coordination. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters such as: E, DeltaH, DeltaS and DeltaG are estimated according to the DTG curves. The two ligands and their complexes have been studied for their possible biological antifungal activity. PMID:18420451

  14. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  15. Mixed effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on the host transcriptome and proteome and their implications for HIV reactivation from latency.

    PubMed

    White, Cory H; Johnston, Harvey E; Moesker, Bastiaan; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Margolis, David M; Richman, Douglas D; Spina, Celsa A; Garbis, Spiros D; Woelk, Christopher H; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda

    2015-11-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) has been assessed in clinical trials as part of a "shock and kill" strategy to cure HIV-infected patients. While it was effective at inducing expression of HIV RNA ("shock"), treatment with SAHA did not result in a reduction of reservoir size ("kill"). We therefore utilized a combined analysis of effects of SAHA on the host transcriptome and proteome to dissect its mechanisms of action that may explain its limited success in "shock and kill" strategies. CD4+ T cells from HIV seronegative donors were treated with 1μM SAHA or its solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for 24h. Protein expression and post-translational modifications were measured with iTRAQ proteomics using ultra high-precision two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Gene expression was assessed by Illumina microarrays. Using limma package in the R computing environment, we identified 185 proteins, 18 phosphorylated forms, 4 acetylated forms and 2982 genes, whose expression was modulated by SAHA. A protein interaction network integrating these 4 data types identified the HIV transcriptional repressor HMGA1 to be upregulated by SAHA at the transcript, protein and acetylated protein levels. Further functional category assessment of proteins and genes modulated by SAHA identified gene ontology terms related to NFκB signaling, protein folding and autophagy, which are all relevant to HIV reactivation. In summary, SAHA modulated numerous host cell transcripts, proteins and post-translational modifications of proteins, which would be expected to have very mixed effects on the induction of HIV-specific transcription and protein function. Proteome profiling highlighted a number of potential counter-regulatory effects of SAHA with respect to viral induction, which transcriptome profiling alone would not have identified. These observations could lead to a more informed selection and design of other HDACi with a more refined targeting profile, and

  16. Effect of Marine-Derived n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on C-Reactive Protein, Interleukin 6 and Tumor Necrosis Factor α: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kelei; Huang, Tao; Zheng, Jusheng; Wu, Kejian; Li, Duo

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies did not draw a consistent conclusion about the effects of marine-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on fasting blood level of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Methods and Findings A comprehensive search of Web of Science, PubMed, Embase and Medline (from 1950 to 2013) and bibliographies of relevant articles was undertaken. Sixty-eight RCTs with a total of 4601 subjects were included in the meta-analysis. Marine-derived n-3 PUFAs supplementation showed a lowering effect on Marine-derived n-3 PUFAs supplementation had a significant lowering effect on TNF-α, IL-6 and CRP in three groups of subjects (subjects with chronic non-autoimmune disease, subjects with chronic autoimmune disease and healthy subjects). A significant negative linear relationship between duration and effect size of marine-derived n-3 PUFAs supplementation on fasting blood levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in subjects with chronic non-autoimmune disease was observed, indicating that longer duration of supplementation could lead to a greater lowering effect. A similar linear relationship was also observed for IL-6 levels in healthy subjects. Restricted cubic spline analysis and subgroup analysis showed that the lowering effect of marine-derived n-3 PUFAs on CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α in subjects with chronic non-autoimmune disease became weakened when body mass index was greater than 30 kg/m2. The effect of marine-derived n-3 PUFAs from dietary intake was only assessed in subjects with chronic non-autoimmune disease, and a significant lowering effect was observed on IL-6, but not on CRP and TNF-α. Conclusions Marine-derived n-3 PUFAs supplementation had a significant lowering effect on CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α level. The lowering effect was most effective in non-obese subjects and consecutive long-term supplementation was recommended. PMID:24505395

  17. Benthic metal fluxes and sediment diagenesis in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage: A laboratory experiment and reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, E.; Ayora, C.; Jiménez-Arias, J. L.; García-Robledo, E.; Papaspyrou, S.; Corzo, A.

    2014-08-01

    Reservoirs are one of the primary water supply sources. Knowledge of the metal fluxes at the water-sediment interfaces of reservoirs is essential for predicting their ecological quality. Redox oscillations in the water column are promoted by stratification; turnover events may significantly alter metal cycling, especially in reservoirs impacted by acid mine drainage (AMD). To study this phenomenon, an experiment was performed under controlled laboratory conditions. Sediment cores from an AMD-affected reservoir were maintained in a tank with reservoir water for approximately two months and subjected to alternating oxic-hypoxic conditions. A detailed metal speciation in solid phases of the sediment was initially performed by sequential extraction, and pore water was analyzed at the end of each redox period. Tank water metals concentrations were systematically monitored throughout the experiment. The experimental results were then used to calibrate a diffusion-reaction model and quantify the reaction rates and sediment-water fluxes. Under oxic conditions, pH, Fe and As concentrations decreased in the tank due to schwertmannite precipitation, whereas the concentrations of Al, Zn, Cu, Ni, and Co increased due to Al(OH)3 and sulfide dissolution. The reverse trends occurred under hypoxic conditions. Under oxic conditions, the fluxes calculated by applying Fick’s first law to experimental concentration gradients contradicted the fluxes expected based on the evolution of the tank water. According to the reactive transport calculations, this discrepancy can be attributed to the coarse resolution of sediment sampling. The one-cm-thick slices failed to capture effectively the notably narrow (1-2 mm) concentration peaks of several elements in the shallow pore water resulting from sulfide and Al(OH)3 dissolution. The diffusion-reaction model, extended to the complete year, computed that between 25% and 50% of the trace metals and less than 10% of the Al that precipitated under

  18. Reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is one of the spondyloarthropathy family of clinical syndromes. The clinical features are those shared by other members of the spondyloarthritis family, though it is distinguished by a clear relationship with a precipitating infection. Susceptibility to reactive arthritis is closely linked with the class 1 HLA allele B27; it is likely that all sub-types pre-dispose to this condition. The link between HLA B27 and infection is mirrored by the development of arthritis in HLA B27-transgenic rats. In this model, arthritis does not develop in animals maintained in a germ-free environment. Infections of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and respiratory tract appear to provoke reactive arthritis and a wide range of pathogens has now been implicated. Although mechanistic parallels may exist, reactive arthritis is distinguished from Lyme disease, rheumatic fever and Whipple's disease by virtue of the distinct clinical features and the link with HLA B27. As in these conditions both antigens and DNA of several micro-organisms have been detected in joint material from patients with reactive arthritis. The role of such disseminated microbial elements in the provocation or maintenance of arthritis remains unclear. HLA B27-restricted T-cell responses to microbial antigens have been demonstrated and these may be important in disease pathogenesis. The importance of dissemination of bacteria from sites of mucosal infection and their deposition in joints has yet to be fully understood. The role of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of reactive arthritis is being explored; in some circumstances, both the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of certain antibiotics appear to be valuable. The term reactive arthritis should be seen as a transitory one, reflecting a concept which may itself be on the verge of replacement, as our understanding of the condition develops. Nevertheless it appropriately describes arthritis that is associated with demonstrable

  19. Effect of synbiotic supplementation and dietary fat sources on broiler performance, serum lipids, muscle fatty acid profile and meat quality.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, H A; Shivazad, M; Mirzapour Rezaei, S S; Karimi Torshizi, M A

    2016-01-01

    A 42-d trial was conducted to investigate the effect of adding a synbiotic supplement to diets containing two different types of fat on performance, blood lipids and fatty acid (FA) composition and oxidative stability of breast and thigh meat in broilers. A total of 800 one-d-old male broiler chickens were randomly assigned into 1 of 8 treatments with 4 replicates of 25 birds per treatment. The experiment consisted of a 4 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments including 4 concentrations of synbiotic (0, 0.5, 1 or 1.5 g/kg diet) and 2 types of fat [sunflower oil (SO) or canola oil (CO)] at an inclusion rate of 50 g/kg diet. Dietary fat type did not affect body weight gain (BWG) or feed conversion ratio (FCR) during the overall experimental period (0-42 d). However, fat type modified serum lipid profile and FA composition and 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) content in breast and thigh meat. The addition of synbiotic to the diet linearly improved overall BWG and FCR and also decreased serum cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. The TBARS value in thigh meat after 30 d of storage at 4°C was linearly decreased as the synbiotic inclusion concentrations in the diets increased. Dietary synbiotic also decreased the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids and increased n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) concentration in thigh meat, whereas the FA profile of breast meat was not affected by synbiotic supplementation. Moreover, the PUFA/SFA ratio in the breast meat was linearly increased when synbiotic was included in the CO-containing diets. In conclusion, the addition of synbiotic to broiler diets had a positive effect on growth performance, blood lipid profile and meat quality. The results also support the use of synbiotic to increase the capacity of canola oil for enhancing PUFA/SFA ratio of breast meat in broilers. PMID:26654967

  20. Associations of obesity with triglycerides and C-reactive protein are attenuated in adults with high red blood cell eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background:N-3 fatty acids are associated with favorable, and obesity with unfavorable, concentrations of chronic disease risk biomarkers.Objective:We examined whether high eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acid intakes, measured as percentages of total red blood cell (RBC) fatty acid...

  1. SURVEY AND SUMMARY: Mutagenic potentials of damaged nucleic acids produced by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species: approaches using synthetic oligonucleotides and nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    DNA and DNA precursors (deoxyribonucleotides) suffer damage by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. They are important mutagens for organisms, due to their endogenous formation. Damaged DNA and nucleotides cause alterations of the genetic information by the mispairing properties of the damaged bases, such as 8-hydroxyguanine (7,8-dihydro- 8-oxoguanine) and 2-hydroxyadenine. Here, the author reviews the mutagenic potentials of damaged bases in DNA and of damaged DNA precursors formed by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, focusing on the results obtained with synthetic oligonucleotides and 2′-deoxyribonucleoside 5′-triphosphates. PMID:12527759

  2. Studies on the optimum conditions using acid-washed zero-valent iron/aluminum mixtures in permeable reactive barriers for the removal of different heavy metal ions from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Han, Weijiang; Fu, Fenglian; Cheng, Zihang; Tang, Bing; Wu, Shijiao

    2016-01-25

    The method of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) is considered as one of the most practicable approaches in treating heavy metals contaminated surface and groundwater. The mixture of acid-washed zero-valent iron (ZVI) and zero-valent aluminum (ZVAl) as reactive medium in PRBs to treat heavy metal wastewater containing Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) was investigated. The performance of column filled with the mixture of acid-washed ZVI and ZVAl was much better than the column filled with ZVI or ZVAl alone. At initial pH 5.4 and flow rates of 1.0 mL/min, the time that the removal efficiencies of Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) were all above 99.5% can keep about 300 h using 80 g/40 g acid-washed ZVI/ZVAl when treating wastewater containing each heavy metal ions (Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+)) concentration of 20.0 mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize ZVI/ZVAl before and after reaction and the reaction mechanism of the heavy metal ions with ZVI/ZVAl was discussed. PMID:26521089

  3. Cement kiln dust (CKD)-filter sand permeable reactive barrier for the removal of Cu(II) and Zn(II) from simulated acidic groundwater.

    PubMed

    Sulaymon, Abbas H; Faisal, Ayad A H; Khaliefa, Qusey M

    2015-10-30

    The hydraulic conductivity and breakthrough curves of copper and zinc contaminants were measured in a set of continuous column experiments for 99 days using cement kiln dust (CKD)-filter sand as the permeable reactive barrier. The results of these experiments proved that the weight ratios of the cement kiln dust-filter sand (10:90 and 20:80) are adequate in preventing the loss of reactivity and hydraulic conductivity and, in turn, avoiding reduction in the groundwater flow. These results reveal a decrease in the hydraulic conductivity, which can be attributed to an accumulation of most of the quantity of the contaminant masses in the first sections of the column bed. Breakthrough curves for the description of the temporal contaminant transport within the barrier were found to be more representative by the Belter-Cussler-Hu and Yan models based on the coefficient of determination and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency. The longevity of the barrier was simulated for the field scale, based on the laboratory column tests and the values verified that cement kiln dust can be effectively used in the future, as the reactive material in permeable reactive barrier technology. These results signify that the longevity of the barrier is directly proportional to its thickness and inversely to the percentage of the CKD used. PMID:25956647

  4. Comparison of Reactive Inkjet Printing and Reactive Sintering to Fabricate Metal Conductive Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheawhom, Soorathep; Foithong, Kamolrat

    2013-05-01

    Two methods to fabricate metal conductive patterns including reactive inkjet printing and reactive sintering were investigated. The silver printed lines were prepared from reactive inkjet printing of silver nitrate and L-ascorbic acid. Alternatively, the silver lines were prepared by the reactive sintering process of ethylene glycol vapor at 250 °C and formic acid vapor at 150 °C. In reactive printing, we investigated the effect of the number of printing cycles and the effect of silver nitrate concentration on the properties of the conductive patterns obtained. In reactive sintering, we investigated the usage of formic acid and ethylene glycol as reducing agents. The effect of reactive sintering time on the properties of the conductive patterns obtained was studied. As compared to reactive inkjet printing, the reactive sintering process gives more smooth and contiguous pattern resulting in lower resistivity. The resistivity of the silver line obtained by ethylene glycol vapor reduction at 250 °C for 30 min was 12 µΩ cm, which is about eight times higher than that of bulk silver. In contrast, the copper lines were fabricated by reactive inkjet printing and reactive sintering using various conditions of formic acid, ethylene glycol and hydrogen atmosphere, the copper lines printed have no conductivity due to the formation of copper oxide.

  5. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  6. Gallic Acid Induces a Reactive Oxygen Species-Provoked c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase-Dependent Apoptosis in Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiu-Yuan; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Liu, Hsiang-Chun; Hsu, Shih-Lan

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic lung disorder characterized by fibroblasts proliferation and extracellular matrix accumulation. Induction of fibroblast apoptosis therefore plays a crucial role in the resolution of this disease. Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid), a common botanic phenolic compound, has been reported to induce apoptosis in tumor cell lines and renal fibroblasts. The present study was undertaken to examine the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in lung fibroblasts apoptosis induced by gallic acid. We found that treatment with gallic acid resulted in activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and protein kinase B (PKB, Akt), but not p38MAPK, in mouse lung fibroblasts. Inhibition of JNK using pharmacologic inhibitor (SP600125) and genetic knockdown (JNK specific siRNA) significantly inhibited p53 accumulation, reduced PUMA and Fas expression, and abolished apoptosis induced by gallic acid. Moreover, treatment with antioxidants (vitamin C, N-acetyl cysteine, and catalase) effectively diminished gallic acid-induced hydrogen peroxide production, JNK and p53 activation, and cell death. These observations imply that gallic acid-mediated hydrogen peroxide formation acts as an initiator of JNK signaling pathways, leading to p53 activation and apoptosis in mouse lung fibroblasts. PMID:23533505

  7. Investigation on the reactivity of α-azidochalcones with carboxylic acids: Formation of α-amido-1,3-diketones and highly substituted 2-(trifluoromethyl)oxazoles.

    PubMed

    Rajaguru, Kandasamy; Mariappan, Arumugam; Suresh, Rajendran; Manivannan, Periasamy; Muthusubramanian, Shanmugam

    2015-01-01

    The reaction of α-azidochalcones with carboxylic acids has been investigated resulting in the formation of α-amido-1,3-diketones under microwave irradiation via in situ formation of 2H-azirine intermediates. An interesting reaction is described wherein, with trifluoroacetic acid at lower temperature, it affords highly substituted 2-(trifluoromethyl)oxazoles. These flexible transformations proceed under solvent free conditions in good to excellent yields without any catalyst. PMID:26664623

  8. Investigation on the reactivity of α-azidochalcones with carboxylic acids: Formation of α-amido-1,3-diketones and highly substituted 2-(trifluoromethyl)oxazoles

    PubMed Central

    Rajaguru, Kandasamy; Mariappan, Arumugam; Suresh, Rajendran; Manivannan, Periasamy

    2015-01-01

    Summary The reaction of α-azidochalcones with carboxylic acids has been investigated resulting in the formation of α-amido-1,3-diketones under microwave irradiation via in situ formation of 2H-azirine intermediates. An interesting reaction is described wherein, with trifluoroacetic acid at lower temperature, it affords highly substituted 2-(trifluoromethyl)oxazoles. These flexible transformations proceed under solvent free conditions in good to excellent yields without any catalyst. PMID:26664623

  9. Understanding the chemically-reactive proteome.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lyn H

    2016-05-24

    The reactivity of amino acid residues in proteins is context-dependent and difficult to predict. Chemical biology can be used to understand the chemical modifications of proteins to help elucidate the nature of the reactive proteome. The resulting insights can be applied to pharmacoproteomics, target identification and molecular pathology. PMID:26726011

  10. Preservation of glutamic acid-iron chelate into montmorillonite to efficiently degrade Reactive Blue 19 in a Fenton system under sunlight irradiation at neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhujian; Wu, Pingxiao; Gong, Beini; Yang, Shanshan; Li, Hailing; Zhu, Ziao; Cui, Lihua

    2016-05-01

    To further enhance the visible light responsive property and the chemical stability of Fe/clay mineral catalysts, glutamic acid-iron chelate intercalated montmorillonite (G-Fe-Mt) was developed. The physiochemical properties of G-Fe-Mt were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), etc. The results showed that glutamic acid-iron chelates were successfully intercalated into the gallery of montmorillonite and the intercalated glutamic acid-iron chelate molecules were well preserved. The product G-Fe-Mt displayed excellent catalytic performance in heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction under sunlight irradiation at acidic and neutral pH values. The chelation and the visible light responsiveness of glutamic acid produce a synergistic effect leading to greatly enhanced sunlight-Fenton reaction catalyzed by the heterogeneous G-Fe-Mt under neutral pH. G-Fe-Mt is a promising catalyst for advanced oxidation processes.

  11. Divergent reactivity in palladium-catalyzed annulation with diarylamines and α,β-unsaturated acids: direct access to substituted 2-quinolinones and indoles.

    PubMed

    Kancherla, Rajesh; Naveen, Togati; Maiti, Debabrata

    2015-06-01

    A palladium-catalyzed CH activation strategy has been successfully employed for exclusive synthesis of a variety of 3-substituted indoles. A [3+3] annulation for synthesizing substituted 2-quinolinones was recently developed by reaction of α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids with diarylamines under acidic conditions. In the present work, an analogous [3+2] annulation is achieved from the same set of starting materials under basic conditions to generate 1,3-disubstituted indoles exclusively. Mechanistic studies revealed an ortho-palladation-π-coordination-β-migratory insertion-β-hydride elimination reaction sequence to be operative under the reaction conditions. PMID:25941155

  12. The 'reactive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista Piccardo, Giovanni; Guarnieri, Luisa

    2010-05-01

    The Ligurian ophiolitic peridotites [South Lanzo, Erro-Tobbio, Internal Ligurides and Corsica] are characterized by the abundance of spinel(Sp) peridotites showing depleted compositions and ranging from Cpx-poor Sp lherzolites to Sp harzburgites. They were recognized in the last decades as refractory residua by MORB-forming partial melting of the asthenosphere, and were similar to abyssal peridotites. Recent structural and compositional studies promoted a better understanding of their structural and compositional features and their genetic processes. In the field these depleted peridotites replace with primary contacts pyroxenite-bearing fertile Sp lherzolites that have been recognized as sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Field relationships evidence that decametric-hectometric bodies of pristine pyroxenite-veined lithospheric Sp lherzolites are preserved as structural remnants within the km-scale masses of depleted peridotites. The depleted peridotites show coarse-grained recrystallized textures and reaction micro-structures indicating pyroxene dissolution and olivine precipitation that have been considered as records of melt/peridotite interaction during reactive diffuse porous flow of undersaturated melts. They show, moreover, contrasting bulk and mineral chemistries that cannot be produced by simple partial melting and melt extraction. In particular, their bulk compositions are depleted in SiO2 and enriched in FeO with respect to refractory residua after any kind of partial melting, as calculated by Niu (1997), indicating that they cannot be formed by simple partial melting and melt extraction processes. Moreover, TiO2 content in Sp is usually significantly higher (up to 0.8-1.0 wt%) than typical TiO2 contents of spinels (usually < 0.1-0.2 wt %) in fertile mantle peridotites and melting refractory residua, indicating that spinel attained element equilibration with a Ti-bearing basaltic melt. The depleted peridotites usually show strongly variable Cpx modal

  13. Generation of biologically active linear and cyclic peptides has revealed a unique fine specificity of rituximab and its possible cross-reactivity with acid sphingomyelinase-like phosphodiesterase 3b precursor.

    PubMed

    Perosa, Federico; Favoino, Elvira; Caragnano, Maria Antonietta; Dammacco, Franco

    2006-02-01

    Heterogeneity of the effector functions displayed by rituximab and other anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) apparently recognizing the same CD20 epitope suggests that additional mechanisms, probably related to mAb fine specificity, are responsible for B-cell depletion. To improve our understanding of rituximab's function, its fine specificity was investigated by means of phage display peptide library (PDPL)-expressing 7-mer cyclic (c7c) or 7-/12-mer linear peptides. Rituximab-specific c7c PDPL-derived clone insert sequences expressed the motif A(S)NPS overlapping the human CD20 170ANPS173. P172 was the most critical for rituximab binding, since its replacement with S172 (of mouse CD20) abolished the reactivity. The WPXWLE motif expressed by the linear PDPL-derived clone insert sequences could only be aligned to the reverse-oriented 161WPXWLE156 of acid sphingomyelinase-like phosphodiesterase 3b precursor (ASMLPD), though linear peptides bearing WPXWLE competed with cyclic ones for rituximab-paratope binding. Anti-CD20 mAb 1F5 only displayed a reactivity profile similar to that of rituximab, which also reacted with ASMLPD-derived peptides. Peptides induced antibodies with specificity and effector functions similar to those of rituximab. Our results show a unique fine specificity of rituximab, define the molecular basis for the lack of rituximab reactivity with mouse CD20 (mCD20), and the potential of targeting CD20 in an active immunotherapy setting. A possible rituximab interaction with ASMLPD is suggested. PMID:16223774

  14. Tannic acid reduces recovery of water-soluble carbon and nitrogen from soil and affects the composition of Bradford-reactive soil protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tannins are plant-derived polyphenolic compounds that precipitate proteins, bind to metals and complex with other compounds and may be particularly important in soil ecosystems. Solutions of tannic acid, or other phenolic compounds, were added to soil samples to determine if they would affect recov...

  15. Reactivity of NaCl with Secondary Organic Acids: An Important Mechanism of the Chloride Depletion in Sea Salt Particles Mixed with Organic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Laskin, A.; Kelly, S.; Gilles, M. K.; Shilling, J. E.; Zelenyuk, A.; Wilson, J. M.; Tivanski, A.

    2012-12-01

    Sea salt particles, one of the major sources of atmospheric aerosols, undergo complex multi-phase reactions and have profound consequences on their physical and chemical properties, thus on climate. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of sea salt chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids. Some studies have also showed that the chloride deficit cannot be fully compensated for this mechanism. We present an important pathway contributing to this chloride depletion: reactions of weak organic acids with sea salt particles. NaCl particles internally mixed with secondary organic materials generated from the reactions of limonene and alpha-pinene with ozone served as surrogates for sea salt particles mixed with organic materials. Chemical imaging analysis of these particles was conducted using complementary techniques including computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), and micro-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). Substantial chloride depletion and formation of organic salts were observed along with distinctive changes in particle morphology after hydration/dehydration processes. The results indicate that secondary organic acids can effectively react with NaCl particles resulting in displacement of chloride and release of gaseous HCl. This is consistent with a recent field study showing chloride depletion in sea salt particles mixed with organic materials which cannot be fully compensated by inorganic acid displacement. Although the formation of the organic salts is not thermodynamically favored in bulk aqueous solution, these reactions are driven by the high volatility and evaporation of gaseous HCl in particles, especially during hydration/dehydration processes. The

  16. Influence of long-term hyper-gravity on the reactivity of succinic acid dehydrogenase and NADPH-diaphorase in the central nervous system of fish: a histochemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anken, R. H.; Rahmann, H.

    In the course of a densitometric evaluation, the histochemically demonstrated reactivity of succinic acid dehydrogenase (SDH) and of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPHD) was determined in different brain nuclei of two teleost fish (cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus, swordtail fish Xiphophorus helleri), which had been kept under 3g hyper-gravity for 8 days. SDH was chosen since it is a rate limiting enzyme of the Krebs cycle and therefore it is regarded as a marker for metabolic and neuronal activity. NADPHD reactivity reflects the activity of nitric oxide synthase. Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous intercellular messenger that has been suggested to play a major role in several different in vivo models of neuronal plasticity including learning. Within particular vestibulum-connected brain centers, significant effects of hyper-gravity were obtained, e.g., in the magnocellular nucleus, a primary vestibular relay ganglion of the brain stem octavolateralis area, in the superior rectus subdivision of the oculomotoric nucleus and within cerebellar eurydendroid cells, which in teleosts possibly resemble the deep cerebellar nucleus of higher vertebrates. Non-vestibulum related nuclei did not respond to hypergravity in a significant way. The effect of hyper-gravity found was much less distinct in adult animals as compared to the circumstances seen in larval fish (Anken et al., Adv. Space Res. 17, 1996), possibly due to a development correlated loss of neuronal plasticity.

  17. [Hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly].

    PubMed

    Maazoun, F; Deschamps, O; Barros-Kogel, E; Ngwem, E; Fauchet, N; Buffet, P; Froissart, A

    2015-11-01

    Hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly is a rare and severe form of chronic malaria. This condition is a common cause of splenomegaly in endemic areas. The pathophysiology of hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly involves an intense immune reaction (predominantly B cell-driven) to repeated/chronic infections with Plasmodium sp. The diagnosis may be difficult, due to a poorly specific clinical presentation (splenomegaly, fatigue, cytopenias), a long delay between residence in a malaria-endemic area and onset of symptoms, and a frequent absence of parasites on conventional thin and thick blood smears. A strongly contributive laboratory parameter is the presence of high levels of total immunoglobulin M. When the diagnostic of hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly is considered, search for anti-Plasmodium antibodies and Plasmodium nucleic acids (genus and species) by PCR is useful. Diagnosis of hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly relies on the simultaneous presence of epidemiological, clinical, biological and follow-up findings. Regression of both splenomegaly and hypersplenism following antimalarial therapy allows the differential diagnosis with splenic lymphoma, a common complication of hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly. Although rare in Western countries, hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly deserves increased medical awareness to reduce the incidence of incorrect diagnosis, to prevent progression to splenic lymphoma and to avoid splenectomy. PMID:26119345

  18. Tropospheric budget of reactive chlorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graedel, T. E.; Keene, W. C.

    1995-03-01

    Reactive chlorine in the lower atmosphere (as distinguished from chlorofluorocarbon-derived chlorine in the stratosphere) is important to considerations of precipitation acidity, corrosion, foliar damage, and chemistry of the marine boundary layer. Many of the chlorine-containing gases are difficult to measure, and natural sources appear to dominate anthropogenic sources for some chemical species. As a consequence, no satisfactory budget for reactive chlorine in the lower atmosphere is available. We have reviewed information on sources; source strengths; measurements in gas, aqueous, and aerosol phases; and chemical processes and from those data derive global budgets for nine reactive chlorine species and for reactive chlorine as a whole. The typical background abundance of reactive chlorine in the lower tropospheric is about 1.5 ppbv. The nine species, CH3 Cl, CH3 CCl3, HCl, CHClF2, Cl2* (thought to be HOCl and/or Cl2), CCl2 = CCl2, CH2 Cl2 , COCl2 , and CHCl3, each contribute at least a few percent to that total. The tropospheric reactive chlorine burden of approximately 8.3 Tg Cl is dominated by CH3 Cl (≈45 %) and CH3 CCl3 (≈25 %) and appears to be increasing by several percent per year. By far the most vigorous chlorine cycling appears to occur among seasalt aerosol, HCl, and Cl2*. The principal sources of reactive chlorine are volatilization from seasalt (enhanced by anthropogenically generated reactants), marine algae, volcanoes, and coal combustion (natural sources being thus quite important to the budget). It is anticipated that the concentrations of tropospheric reactive chlorine will continue to increase in the next several decades, particularly near urban areas in the rapidly developing countries.

  19. The acid-base and redox reactivity of CeO2 nanoparticles: Influence of the Hubbard U term in DFT + U studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boronat, Mercedes; López-Ausens, Tirso; Corma, Avelino

    2016-06-01

    The interaction of small molecules with acid-base and redox centers in small Ce21O42 nanoparticles has been theoretically investigated using the DFT + U approach with the PW91 functional and U = 0.2 and 4 eV, in order to determine the influence of the U value on the trends observed in selected properties describing such interactions. CO adsorption at low coordinated Ce4 + Lewis acid centers, water adsorption and dissociation at acid-base pairs, formation of oxygen vacancy defects by removal of an oxygen atom from the system, and interaction of molecular O2 with such defects have been considered. The largest effect of the value of U is found for the description of the reduced Ce21O41 nanoparticle. In all other cases involving stoichiometric and oxidized Ce21O42 and Ce21O43 systems, the trends in the calculated adsorption and reaction energies, optimized geometries, charge distribution, and vibrational frequencies are quite similar at the three levels considered.

  20. Modification of the mechanical behavior in the glass transition region of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) through catalyzed reactive extrusion with poly(carbonate) (PC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuong, Vu Thanh; Coltelli, Maria-Beatrice; Anguillesi, Irene; Cinelli, Patrizia; Lazzeri, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    In order to improve the thermal stability of PLA based materials the strategy of blending it with poly(carbonate) of bisphenol A (PC), having a higher glass transition temperature, was followed and PLA/PC blends with different compositions, obtained also in the presence of an interchange reaction catalyst, Tetrabutylammonium tetraphenylborate (TBATPB) and triacetin were prepared by melt extrusion. The dynamical mechanical characterization showed an interesting change of the storage modulus behavior in the PLA glass transition region, evident exclusively in the catalyzed blends. In particular, a new peak in the Tanδ trend at a temperature in between the one of PLA and the one of PC was observed only in the blends obtained in the presence of triacetin and TBATPB. The height and maximum temperature of the peak was different after the annealing of samples at 80°C. The data, showing an interesting improvement of thermal stability above the PLA glass transition, were explained keeping into account the formation of PLA-PC copolymer during the reactive extrusion. Furthermore, the glass transition temperature of the copolymer as a function of composition was studied and the obtained trend was discussed by comparing with literature models developed for copolymers.

  1. Suppression of lithium chloride-induced conditioned gaping (a model of nausea-induced behaviour) in rats (using the taste reactivity test) with metoclopramide is enhanced by cannabidiolic acid.

    PubMed

    Rock, E M; Parker, L A

    2013-10-01

    We aimed to determine the potential of various doses of metoclopramide (MCP, a dopamine antagonist) to reduce lithium chloride (LiCl)-induced conditioned gaping (a nausea-induced behaviour) in rats, using the taste reactivity test. We then evaluated whether an ineffective low dose of cannabidiolic acid (CBDA, 0.1 μg/kg, Rock and Parker, 2013), the potent acidic precursor of cannabidiol (CBD, a non-psychoactive component of cannabis) could enhance the anti-nausea effects of an ineffective low dose of MCP. MCP (3.0 mg/kg) reduced conditioned gaping responses. Coadministration of ineffective doses of MCP (0.3 mg/kg) and CBDA (0.1 μg/kg) enhanced the suppression of conditioned gaping, over that of either drug alone, without interfering with conditioned taste avoidance. MCP dose-dependently reduced nausea-induced conditioned gaping in rats. As well, the suppression of conditioned gaping was enhanced when ineffective doses of MCP and CBDA were coadministered. These data suggest that CBDA could be a powerful adjunct treatment to anti-emetic regimens for chemotherapy-induced nausea. PMID:24012649

  2. Reactivity of fluoride dentifrices with artificial caries. III. Quantitative aspects of acquired acid resistance (AAR): F uptake, retention, surface hardening and remineralization.

    PubMed

    White, D J

    1991-01-01

    A pH cycling remineralization/dimineralization model has been used to compare remineralization and acid resistance benefits provided by commercial MFP and NaF dentifrices. Test results show that fluoride dentifrice systems were effective in enhancing lesion remineralization and providing acquired acid resistance (AAR) to carious lesions, with AAR benefits considerably greater in magnitude. Fluoride uptake into the carious lesions was associated with remineralization and AAR benefits. Dentifrices containing the highest levels of soluble ionic fluoride were found most effective in this protocol with MFP dentifrices showing significantly less activity. MFP dentifrice efficacy was enhanced slightly in calcium abrasives. The enhanced activity could be explained by increased levels of background ionic fluoride in the formulations. In contrast to the latter effects, a dual-active NaF+MFP dentifrice in a calcium abrasive system exhibited decreased efficacy relative to a silica abrasive formulation due to incompatibility of free fluoride ion. Comparison of analytical techniques for measurement of AAR in shallow lesions demonstrates that surface microhardness methods match radiographic measures and are thus adequate for ICT measurement of cariogenicity and F remineralization. PMID:1812910

  3. Reactive solute transport in an acidic stream: Experimental pH increase and simulation of controls on pH, aluminum, and iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.; Runkel, R.L.; Kimball, B.A.; McKnight, Diane M.; Bencala, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    Solute transport simulations quantitatively constrained hydrologic and geochemical hypotheses about field observations of a pH modification in an acid mine drainage stream. Carbonate chemistry, the formation of solid phases, and buffering interactions with the stream bed were important factors in explaining the behavior of pH, aluminum, and iron. The precipitation of microcrystalline gibbsite accounted for the behavior of aluminum; precipitation of Fe(OH)3 explained the general pattern of iron solubility. The dynamic experiment revealed limitations on assumptions that reactions were controlled only by equilibrium chemistry. Temporal variation in relative rates of photoreduction and oxidation influenced iron behavior. Kinetic limitations on ferrous iron oxidation and hydrous oxide precipitation and the effects of these limitations on field filtration were evident. Kinetic restraints also characterized interaction between the water column and the stream bed, including sorption and desorption of protons from iron oxides at the sediment-water interface and post-injection dissolution of the precipitated aluminum solid phase.

  4. Preparation and characterization of reactive blends of poly(lactic acid), poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol), and poly(ethylene-co-glycidyl methacrylate)

    SciTech Connect

    Warangkhana, Phromma; Rathanawan, Magaraphan; Jana Sadhan, C.

    2015-05-22

    The ternary blends of poly(lactic acid) (PLA), poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) (EVOH), and poly(ethylene-co-glycidyl methacrylate) (EGMA) were prepared. The role of EGMA as a compatibilizer was evaluated. The weight ratio of PLA:EVOH was 80:20 and the EGMA loadings were varied from 5-20 phr. The blends were characterized as follows: thermal properties by differential scanning calorimetry, morphology by scanning electron microscopy, and mechanical properties by pendulum impact tester, and universal testing machine. The glass transition temperature of PLA blends did not change much when compared with that of PLA. The blends of PLA/EGMA and EVOH/EGMA showed EGMA dispersed droplets where the latter led to poor impact properties. However, the tensile elongation at break and tensile toughness substantially increased upon addition of EGMA to blends of PLA and EVOH. It was noted in tensile test samples that both PLA and EVOH domains fibrillated significantly to produce toughness.

  5. Preparation and characterization of reactive blends of poly(lactic acid), poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol), and poly(ethylene-co-glycidyl methacrylate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warangkhana, Phromma; Jana Sadhan, C.; Rathanawan, Magaraphan

    2015-05-01

    The ternary blends of poly(lactic acid) (PLA), poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) (EVOH), and poly(ethylene-co-glycidyl methacrylate) (EGMA) were prepared. The role of EGMA as a compatibilizer was evaluated. The weight ratio of PLA:EVOH was 80:20 and the EGMA loadings were varied from 5-20 phr. The blends were characterized as follows: thermal properties by differential scanning calorimetry, morphology by scanning electron microscopy, and mechanical properties by pendulum impact tester, and universal testing machine. The glass transition temperature of PLA blends did not change much when compared with that of PLA. The blends of PLA/EGMA and EVOH/EGMA showed EGMA dispersed droplets where the latter led to poor impact properties. However, the tensile elongation at break and tensile toughness substantially increased upon addition of EGMA to blends of PLA and EVOH. It was noted in tensile test samples that both PLA and EVOH domains fibrillated significantly to produce toughness.

  6. Sorption studies of Zn(II) and Cu(II) onto vegetal compost used on reactive mixtures for in situ treatment of acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Oriol; de Pablo, Joan; Cortina, José Luis; Ayora, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    The efficiency of the sulphate reducing bacteria-based in situ treatment of acid mine drainage is often limited by the low degradability of the current carbon sources, typically complex plant-derived materials. In such non-sulphate-reducing conditions, field and laboratory experiences have shown that mechanisms other than sulphide precipitation should be considered in the metal removal, i.e. metal (oxy)hydroxides precipitation, co-precipitation with these precipitates, and sorption onto the organic matter. The focus of the present paper was to present some laboratory data highlighting the Zn and Cu sorption on vegetal compost and to develop a general and simple model for the prediction of their distribution in organic-based passive remediation systems. The model considers two kinds of sorption sites ( succeeds SO(2)H(2)) and the existence of monodentate and bidentate metal-binding reactions, and it assumes that only free M(2+) species can sorb onto the compost surface. The acid-base properties of the compost were studied by means of potentiometric titrations in order to identify the nature of the involved surface functional groups and their density. The distribution coefficient (K(D)) for both Zn and Cu were determined from batch experiments as a function of pH and metal concentration. The model yielded the predominant surface complexes at the experimental conditions, being succeeds SO(2)Zn for Zn and succeeds SO(2)HCu(+) and ( succeeds SO(2)H)(2)Cu for Cu, with log K(M) values of -2.10, 3.36 and 4.65, respectively. The results presented in this study have demonstrated that the proposed model provides a good description of the sorption process of Zn and Cu onto the vegetal compost used in these experiments. PMID:15992854

  7. Real-time detection of noroviruses in surface water by use of a broadly reactive nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Rutjes, Saskia A; van den Berg, Harold H J L; Lodder, Willemijn J; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2006-08-01

    Noroviruses are the most common agents causing outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis. Outbreaks originating from contaminated drinking water and from recreational waters have been described. Due to a lack of cell culture systems, noroviruses are detected mostly by molecular methods. Molecular detection assays for viruses in water are often repressed by inhibitory factors present in the environment, like humic acids and heavy metals. To study the effect of environmental inhibitors on the performance of nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), we developed a real-time norovirus NASBA targeting part of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene. Specificity of the assay was studied with 33 divergent clones that contained part of the targeted RdRp gene of noroviruses from 15 different genogroups. Viral RNA originated from commercial oysters, surface waters, and sewage treatment plants in The Netherlands. Ninety-seven percent of the clones derived from human noroviruses were detected by real-time NASBA. Two clones containing animal noroviruses were not detected by NASBA. We compared the norovirus detection by real-time NASBA with that by conventional reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) with large-volume river water samples and found that inhibitory factors of RT-PCR had little or no effect on the performance of the norovirus NASBA. This consequently resulted in a higher sensitivity of the NASBA assay than of the RT-PCR. We show that by combining an efficient RNA extraction method with real-time NASBA the sensitivity of norovirus detection in water samples increased at least 100 times, which consequently has implications for the outcome of the infectious risk assessment. PMID:16885286

  8. [Effects of particle size of zero-valent iron on the reactivity of activating persulfate and kinetics for the degradation of acid orange 7].

    PubMed

    Li, Huan-xuan; Wan, Jin-quan; Ma, Yong-wen; Huang, Ming-zhiz; Wang, Yan; Chen Yang, Mei

    2014-09-01

    This research described the heterogeneous reactions of persulfate with different particle sizes of zero-valent iron (including 1 mm-ZVI,150 μm-ZVI,50 nm-ZVI) for degradation of acid orange 7(AO7) , and studied the kinetics and intermediate products of AO7 under these systems. The results demonstrated that these three types of ZVI were efficient in promoting the degradation of AO7, the degradation efficiencies of AO7 were 43% , 97% , and 100% within 90 min respectively, in the 1 mm-ZVI,150 μm-ZVI and 50 nm- ZVI systems, respectively. With the results of kinetic fitting models, the pseudo first-order kinetics exhibited better fitting results in the 1 mm-ZVI,150 μm-ZVI systems, while the second-order kinetics exhibited better fitting results in the 50 nm-ZVI system. And the different ZVI types exhibited difference on the AO7 degradation rate constant, which ranged as 50 nm-ZVI > 150 μm-ZVI > 1 mm-ZVI. The iron corrosion products coating on the ZVI after reaction were composed of α-Fe2 O3 and some Fe3O4 in the 1 mm-ZVI system while that consisted of Fe3O4 and α-Fe2O3, FeOOH respectively, in thel50 μm-ZVI and 50 nm-ZVI systems,. Which were identified by scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and Raman spectroscopy. Some intermediate products, including 2-naphthalenol, 2-methylphenol, 4-ethyl- 3-methyl-phenol, isoindole- 1,3-dione and phthalic acid et al. were identified by GC/MS measurement. Both UV-vis absorbance spectra and GC/MS determination indicated that there was difference in degradation paths of AO7 between the three systems. PMID:25518660

  9. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Complements Plasma Epstein-Barr Virus Deoxyribonucleic Acid Prognostication in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Large-Scale Retrospective and Prospective Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Lin-Quan; Li, Chao-Feng; Chen, Qiu-Yan; Zhang, Lu; Lai, Xiao-Ping; He, Yun; Xu, Yun-Xiu-Xiu; Hu, Dong-Peng; Wen, Shi-Hua; Peng, Yu-Tuan; Chen, Wen-Hui; Liu, Huai; Guo, Shan-Shan; Liu, Li-Ting; Li, Jing; Zhang, Jing-Ping; and others

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of combining the assessment of circulating high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) with that of Epstein-Barr virus DNA (EBV DNA) in the pretherapy prognostication of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Patients and Methods: Three independent cohorts of NPC patients (training set of n=3113, internal validation set of n=1556, and prospective validation set of n=1668) were studied. Determinants of disease-free survival, distant metastasis–free survival, and overall survival were assessed by multivariate analysis. Hazard ratios and survival probabilities of the patient groups, segregated by clinical stage (T1-2N0-1M0, T3-4N0-1M0, T1-2N2-3M0, and T3-4N2-3M0) and EBV DNA load (low or high) alone, and also according to hs-CRP level (low or high), were compared. Results: Elevated hs-CRP and EBV DNA levels were significantly correlated with poor disease-free survival, distant metastasis–free survival, and overall survival in both the training and validation sets. Associations were similar and remained significant after excluding patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and chronic hepatitis B. Patients with advanced-stage disease were segregated by high EBV DNA levels and high hs-CRP level into a poorest-risk group, and participants with either high EBV DNA but low hs-CRP level or high hs-CRP but low EBV DNA values had poorer survival compared with the bottom values for both biomarkers. These findings demonstrate a significant improvement in the prognostic ability of conventional advanced NPC staging. Conclusion: Baseline plasma EBV DNA and serum hs-CRP levels were significantly correlated with survival in NPC patients. The combined interpretation of EBV DNA with hs-CRP levels led to refinement of the risks for the patient subsets, with improved risk discrimination in patients with advanced-stage disease.

  10. [Effect of heavy metals on activity of key enzymes of glyoxylate cycle and content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in the germinating soybean Glicine max L.seeds].

    PubMed

    Bezdudnaia, E F; Kaliman, P A

    2008-01-01

    The influence of CoCl2 and CdCl2 on the activity of isocytrate lyase, malate synthase and NAD-malate dehydrogenase in the seed lobes and the composition of malondialdehyde products at early stages of germinating of soybean seeds: after first 24-hours, 72 hours and 96 hours are investigated. It is shown that when germinating in the medium containing no metal salts, isocytrate lyase activity is greatly increased during 96 h and malate synthase is increased after 72 h and is decreased after 96 h of germination period. CoCl2 activated isocytrate lyase activity after 72 hours and decreased malate synthase activity after 96 hours. The lengthening of the primary root under such conditions is noted. CdCl2 inhibited isocytrate lyase activity during first 24 hours and suppressed malate synthase activity after 96 hours. During this process the germ growth is suppressed. CoCl2 increased the composition of malondialdehyde products during each period of germination, and CdCl2 increased malondialdehyde content after 72 and 96 hours. The role of glyoxylate cycle enzymes in transforming fatty acids into carbohydrates and in forming the primary root under the process of germination of seed lobes of soybean is discussed. PMID:18710031

  11. Kinetic measurements of the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide and ozone towards small atmospherically relevant aldehydes, ketones and organic acids in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, L.; Herrmann, H.

    2014-05-01

    Free radical reactions are an important degradation process for organic compounds within the aqueous atmospheric environment. Nevertheless, non-radical oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide and ozone also contribute to the degradation and conversion of these substances (Tilgner and Herrmann, 2010). In this work, kinetic investigations of non-radical reactions were conducted using UV / Vis spectroscopy (dual-beam spectrophotometer and stopped flow technique) and a capillary electrophoresis system applying pseudo-first order kinetics to reactions of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, glyoxylic, pyruvic and glycolic acid as well as methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) with H2O2 and ozone at 298 K. The measurements indicate rather small rate constants at room temperature of k2nd < 3 M-1 s-1 (except for the unsaturated compounds exposed to ozone). Compared to radical reaction rate constants the values are about 10 orders of magnitude smaller (kOH • ~109 M-1 s-1). However, when considering the much larger non-radical oxidant concentrations compared to radical concentrations in urban cloud droplets, calculated first-order conversion rate constants change the picture towards H2O2 reactions becoming more important, especially when compared to the nitrate radical. For some reactions mechanistic suggestions are also given.

  12. Kinetic measurements on the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide and ozone towards small atmospherically relevant aldehydes, ketones and organic acids in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, L.; Herrmann, H.

    2013-10-01

    Within the aqueous atmospheric environment free radical reactions are an important degradation process for organic compounds. Nevertheless, non-radical oxidants like hydrogen peroxide and ozone also contribute to the degradation and conversion of this substance group (Tilgner und Herrmann, 2010). In this work kinetic investigations of non-radical reactions were conducted using UV/Vis spectroscopy (dual-beam spectrophotometer and Stopped Flow technique) and a capillary electrophoresis system applying pseudo-first order kinetics of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, glyoxylic, pyruvic and glycolic acids as well as methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) towards H2O2 and ozone. The measurements indicate rather small rate constants at room temperature of k2nd < 3 M-1 s-1 (except for the unsaturated compounds exposed to ozone). Compared to radical reaction rate constants the values are about 10 orders of magnitude smaller (kOH· ~ 109 M-1 s-1). However, when considering the much larger non-radical oxidant concentrations compared to radical concentrations in urban cloud droplets, calculated turnovers change the picture to more important H2O2 reactions especially when compared to the nitrate radical. For some reactions also mechanistic suggestions are given.

  13. SBA-15-incorporated nanoscale zero-valent iron particles for chromium(VI) removal from groundwater: mechanism, effect of pH, humic acid and sustained reactivity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xia; Yan, Yubo; Li, Jiansheng; Han, Weiqing; Wang, Lianjun

    2014-02-15

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles (NZVIs) were incorporated inside the channels of SBA-15 rods by a "two solvents" reduction technique and used to remove Cr(VI) from groundwater. The resulting NZVIs/SBA-15 composites before and after reaction were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results helped to propose the mechanism of Cr(VI) removal by NZVIs/SBA-15, where Cr(VI) in aqueous was firstly impregnated into the channels of the silica, then adsorbed on the surfaces of the incorporated NZVIs and reduced to Cr(III) directly in the inner pores of the silica. Corrosion products included Fe2O3, FeO(OH), Fe3O4 and Cr2FeO4. Batch experiments revealed that Cr(VI) removal decreased from 99.7% to 92.8% when the initial solution pH increased from 5.5 to 9.0, accompanied by the decrease of the kobs from 0.600 to 0.024 min(-1). Humic acid (HA) had a little effect on the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) by NZVIs/SBA-15 but could decrease the reduction rate. The stable reduction of NZVIs/SBA-15 was observed within six cycles. NZVIs/SBA-15 composites offer a promising alternative material to remove heavy metals from groundwater. PMID:24374562

  14. Using chemical reactivity to provide insights into environmental transformations of priority organic substances: the Fe⁰-mediated reduction of Acid Blue 129.

    PubMed

    Shirin, Salma; Balakrishnan, Vimal K

    2011-12-15

    Sulfonated anthracenedione dyes are medium priority organic compounds targeted for environmental assessment under the Government of Canada's Chemical Management Plan (CMP). Since organic compounds undergo transformations in environmental matrices, understanding these transformations is critical for a proper assessment of their environmental fate. In the current study, we used zero-valent iron (ZVI) to provide insight into reductive transformation processes available to the anthracenedione dye, Acid Blue 129 (AB 129), a dye which is used in the textile industry. At high temperatures, we found that AB 129 was rapidly reduced (within 3 h) after being adsorbed onto the ZVI-surface, whereupon decomposition took place via multiple competitive and consecutive reaction pathways. Reaction products were identified using state-of-the-art accurate mass Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectroscopy (LC-QToF-MS). Five transformation products were identified, including a genotoxic (and thus, potentially carcinogenic) end-product, 2,4,6-trimethylaniline. The same products were found at room temperature, demonstrating that the transformation pathways revealed here could plausibly arise from biological and/or environmental reductions of AB 129. Our results demonstrate the importance of identifying reaction product arising from priority substances as part of the environmental risk assessment process. PMID:22050543

  15. An Easy and Useful Noninvasive Score Based on α-1-acid Glycoprotein and C-Reactive Protein for Diagnosis of Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Omran, Mohamed M; Emran, Tarek M; Farid, Khaled; Eltaweel, Fathy M; Omar, Mona A; Bazeed, Fagr B

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) and develop a predictive score to improve the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). AGP and CRP were measured in serum of 53 HCC patients and 20 liver cirrhosis (LC) patients, in addition to 15 healthy individuals. Area under receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUCs) was used to create a predictive score comprising AGP, CRP, alpha fetoprotein, and albumin. The diagnostic performances of score was determined and compared with AFP alone for the diagnosis of HCC. The combination of AGP, albumin, CRP, and AFP had AUC 0.92 and sensitivity 85% which was higher than AFP alone. The odds ratio of having HCC was 8.4 for AGP, 5.8 for CRP, 12.5 for AFP and 6.5 for albumin. Our score predicted HCC with an OR of 50.6 for HCC. The AUC of score in HCC with single tumor, absent vascular invasion and CLIP score (0-1) were 0.9, 0.9, 0.82, respectively, compared with 0.71, 0.71, 0.68, respectively, for AFP. In conclusion, a non-invasive and simple score based on AGP, CRP, AFP, and albumin could improve the accuracy of HCC diagnosis. PMID:26685049

  16. Comparison of Serum Uric Acid, Bilirubin, and C-Reactive Protein as Prognostic Biomarkers of In-Hospital MACE Between Women and Men With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Stefan; Huseynov, Aydin; Koepp, Johanna; Jabbour, Claude; Behnes, Michael; Becher, Tobias; Renker, Matthias; Lang, Siegfried; Borggrefe, Martin; Lehmann, Ralf; Akin, Ibrahim

    2016-03-01

    Levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), uric acid (UA), and total bilirubin (TB) are associated with coronary artery disease and major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We retrospectively included 1167 patients with STEMI who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention and routine blood sampling. The study cohort consisted of 803 patients (73.1% male, mean age 62.5 ± 13.4 years). In men, the levels of CRP, TB, and UA were significantly higher in the MACE than in the non-MACE group (P < .05). The receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis shows that CRP (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.53-0.66; P = .014) and TB (AUC: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.51-0.65; P = .019) are significantly associated with MACE but not UA (AUC: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.42-0.76; P = .083). Logistic regression revealed CRP (odds ratio [OR] 1.01; 95% CI: 1.00-1.01; P = .006) and TB (OR 2.03; 95% CI: 1.12-3.40; P = .007) as an independent predictor for MACE. In women, none of the biomarkers was associated with MACE by ROC analysis or logistic regression analysis. This study demonstrated that high CRP and TB serum levels have a prognostic association with in-hospital MACE in male patients with STEMI. PMID:26032849

  17. System for reactivating catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  18. Fracture Reactivation in Chemically Reactive Rock Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.; Hooker, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Reactivation of existing fractures is a fundamental process of brittle failure that controls the nucleation of earthquake ruptures, propagation and linkage of hydraulic fractures in oil and gas production, and the evolution of fault and fracture networks and thus of fluid and heat transport in the upper crust. At depths below 2-3 km, and frequently shallower, brittle processes of fracture growth, linkage, and reactivation compete with chemical processes of fracture sealing by mineral precipitation, with precipitation rates similar to fracture opening rates. We recently found rates of fracture opening in tectonically quiescent settings of 10-20 μm/m.y., rates similar to euhedral quartz precipitation under these conditions. The tendency of existing partially or completely cemented fractures to reactivate will vary depending on strain rate, mineral precipitation kinetics, strength contrast between host rock and fracture cement, stress conditions, degree of fracture infill, and fracture network geometry. Natural fractures in quartzite of the Cambrian Eriboll Formation, NW Scotland, exhibit a complex history of fracture formation and reactivation, with reactivation involving both repeated crack-seal opening-mode failure and shear failure of fractures that formed in opening mode. Fractures are partially to completely sealed with crack-seal or euhedral quartz cement or quartz cement fragmented by shear reactivation. Degree of cementation controls the tendency of fractures for later shear reactivation, to interact elastically with adjacent open fractures, and their intersection behavior. Using kinematic, dynamic, and diagenetic criteria, we determine the sequence of opening-mode fracture formation and later shear reactivation. We find that sheared fracture systems of similar orientation display spatially varying sense of slip We attribute these inconsistent directions of shear reactivation to 1) a heterogeneous stress field in this highly fractured rock unit and 2

  19. Oxidative versus Non-oxidative Decarboxylation of Amino Acids: Conditions for the Preferential Formation of Either Strecker Aldehydes or Amines in Amino Acid/Lipid-Derived Reactive Carbonyl Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Rosario; León, M Mercedes; Hidalgo, Francisco J

    2015-09-16

    Comparative formation of both 2-phenylethylamine and phenylacetaldehyde as a consequence of phenylalanine degradation by carbonyl compounds was studied in an attempt to understand if the amine/aldehyde ratio can be changed as a function of reaction conditions. The assayed carbonyl compounds were selected because of the presence in the chain of both electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups and included alkenals, alkadienals, epoxyalkenals, oxoalkenals, and hydroxyalkenals as well as lipid hydroperoxides. The obtained results showed that the 2-phenylethylamine/phenylacetaldehyde ratio depended upon both the carbonyls and the reaction conditions. Thus, it can be increased using electron-donating groups in the chain of the carbonyl compound, small amounts of carbonyl compound, low oxygen content, increasing the pH, or increasing the temperature at pH 6. Opposed conditions (use of electron-withdrawing groups in the chain of the carbonyl compound, large amounts of carbonyl compound, high oxygen contents, low pH values, and increasing temperatures at low pH values) would decrease the 2-phenylethylamine/phenylacetaldehyde ratio, and the formation of aldehydes over amines in amino acid degradations would be favored. PMID:26189462

  20. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications. PMID:24099657

  1. PYR/PYL/RCAR Abscisic Acid Receptors Regulate K+ and Cl− Channels through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Activation of Ca2+ Channels at the Plasma Membrane of Intact Arabidopsis Guard Cells1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yizhou; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Zhang, Ben; Hills, Adrian; Blatt, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of the START family of abscisic acid (ABA) receptors places these proteins at the front of a protein kinase/phosphatase signal cascade that promotes stomatal closure. The connection of these receptors to Ca2+ signals evoked by ABA has proven more difficult to resolve, although it has been implicated by studies of the pyrbactin-insensitive pyr1/pyl1/pyl2/pyl4 quadruple mutant. One difficulty is that flux through plasma membrane Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ release from endomembrane stores coordinately elevate cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in guard cells, and both processes are facilitated by ABA. Here, we describe a method for recording Ca2+ channels at the plasma membrane of intact guard cells of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We have used this method to resolve the loss of ABA-evoked Ca2+ channel activity at the plasma membrane in the pyr1/pyl1/pyl2/pyl4 mutant and show the consequent suppression of [Ca2+]i increases in vivo. The basal activity of Ca2+ channels was not affected in the mutant; raising the concentration of Ca2+ outside was sufficient to promote Ca2+ entry, to inactivate current carried by inward-rectifying K+ channels and to activate current carried by the anion channels, both of which are sensitive to [Ca2+]i elevations. However, the ABA-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) was impaired. Adding the ROS hydrogen peroxide was sufficient to activate the Ca2+ channels and trigger stomatal closure in the mutant. These results offer direct evidence of PYR/PYL/RCAR receptor coupling to the activation by ABA of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels through ROS, thus affecting [Ca2+]i and its regulation of stomatal closure. PMID:23899646

  2. Reactive nitrogen species mediate oxidative stress and astrogliosis provoked by in vivo administration of phytanic acid in cerebellum of adolescent rats: A potential contributing pathomechanism of cerebellar injury in peroxisomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Borges, C G; Canani, C R; Fernandes, C G; Zanatta, Â; Seminotti, B; Ribeiro, C A J; Leipnitz, G; Vargas, C R; Wajner, M

    2015-09-24

    Phytanic acid (Phyt) accumulates in various peroxisomal diseases including Refsum disease (RD) and Zellweger syndrome (ZS). Since the pathogenesis of the neurological symptoms and especially the cerebellar abnormalities in these disorders are poorly known, we investigated the effects of in vivo intracerebral administration of Phyt on a large spectrum of redox homeostasis parameters in the cerebellum of young rats. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, sulfhydryl oxidation, carbonyl content, nitrite and nitrate concentrations, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation, total (tGS) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and the activities of important antioxidant enzymes were determined at different periods after Phyt administration. Immunohistochemical analysis was also carried out in the cerebellum. Phyt significantly increased MDA and nitric oxide (NO) production and decreased GSH levels, without altering tGS, DCFH oxidation, sulfhydryl oxidation, carbonyl content and the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that Phyt caused astrogliosis and protein nitrosative damage in the cerebellum. It was also observed that the NO synthase inhibitor Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) prevented the increase of MDA and NO production as well as the decrease of GSH and the immunohistochemical alterations caused by Phyt, strongly suggesting that reactive nitrogen species (RNS) were involved in these effects. The present data provide in vivo solid evidence that Phyt disrupts redox homeostasis and causes astrogliosis in rat cerebellum probably mediated by RNS production. It is therefore presumed that disequilibrium of redox status may contribute at least in part to the cerebellum alterations characteristic of patients affected by RD and other disorders with Phyt accumulation. PMID:26188285

  3. A STRESS-RESPONSIVE NAC1-Regulated Protein Phosphatase Gene Rice Protein Phosphatase18 Modulates Drought and Oxidative Stress Tolerance through Abscisic Acid-Independent Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging in Rice1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    You, Jun; Zong, Wei; Hu, Honghong; Li, Xianghua; Xiao, Jinghua; Xiong, Lizhong

    2014-01-01

    Plants respond to abiotic stresses through a complexity of signaling pathways, and the dephosphorylation mediated by protein phosphatase (PP) is an important event in this process. We identified a rice (Oryza sativa) PP2C gene, OsPP18, as a STRESS-RESPONSIVE NAC1 (SNAC1)-regulated downstream gene. The ospp18 mutant was more sensitive than wild-type plants to drought stress at both the seedling and panicle development stages. Rice plants with OsPP18 suppressed through artificial microRNA were also hypersensitive to drought stress. Microarray analysis of the mutant revealed that genes encoding reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes were down-regulated in the ospp18 mutant, and the mutant exhibited reduced activities of ROS scavenging enzymes and increased sensitivity to oxidative stresses. Overexpression of OsPP18 in rice led to enhanced osmotic and oxidative stress tolerance. The expression of OsPP18 was induced by drought stress but not induced by abscisic acid (ABA). Although OsPP18 is a typical PP2C with enzymatic activity, it did not interact with SNF1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE2 protein kinases, which function in ABA signaling. Meanwhile, the expression of ABA-responsive genes was not affected in the ospp18 mutant, and the ABA sensitivities of the ospp18 mutant and OsPP18-overexpressing plants were also not altered. Together, these findings suggest that OsPP18 is a unique PP2C gene that is regulated by SNAC1 and confers drought and oxidative stress tolerance by regulating ROS homeostasis through ABA-independent pathways. PMID:25318938

  4. Effect of electron beam irradiation and storage at 5 degrees C on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and carbonyl contents in chicken breast meat infused with antioxidants and selected plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Rababah, Taha; Hettiarachchy, Navam; Horax, Ronny; Eswaranandam, Satchithanandam; Mauromoustakos, Andronikos; Dickson, James; Niebuhr, Steven

    2004-12-29

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of synthetic and natural antioxidants, green tea, commercial grape seed extracts/combinations, and TBHQ, with varying concentrations of lipid oxidation of nonirradiated and irradiated chicken breast meats stored at 5 degrees C for 12 days. Fresh boneless and skinless chicken breast meats were vacuum-infused with varying concentrations of antioxidants: green tea, grape seed extracts alone/in combination, and TBHQ. The irradiation dosage was 3.0 kGy. Carbonyl values of raw chicken meat and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values of raw and cooked chicken meat were determined for 0-12 days at 5 degrees C storage. TBARS values for 0-12 days of storage at 5 degrees C ranged from 1.21 to 7.3 and 1.22 to 8.51 mg malondialdehyde/100 g chicken for nonirradiated and irradiated raw chicken, respectively. TBARS values of cooked chicken ranged from 2.19 to 35.83 and 2.45 to 45.72 mg malondialdehyde/100 g chicken for nonirradiated and irradiated chicken, respectively. Irradiation increased TBARS values of both controls and plant extracts. The carbonyl content in meat lipid ranged from 1.7 to 2.9 and 1.7 to 4.41 micromol acetophenone/10 g of nonirradiated and irradiated chicken meat, respectively, and meat protein ranged from 1.4 to 2.07 and 1.41 to 2.72 micromol/10 g meat. Infusion of chicken meat with selected plant extracts is an effective method to minimize lipid oxidation and volatiles developments caused by irradiation. PMID:15612823

  5. Phenylethynyl reactive diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having a specified general structure is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having a specified general structure is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react with to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  6. Reactive Arthritis Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Of Spondylitis The Heart In Spondyloarthritis Inflammatory vs. Mechanical Back ... Arthritis Symptoms Because there is no specific laboratory test for reactive arthritis, doctors sometimes find it difficult ...

  7. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis.

    PubMed

    Basak, P Y; Turkmen, C

    2001-01-01

    Acquired perforating disorder has been recognized as an uncommon distinct dermatosis in which altered collagen is eliminated through the epidermis. Several disorders accompanied by itching and scratching were reported to be associated with reactive perforating collagenosis. A 67-year-old white woman diagnosed as acquired reactive perforating collagenosis with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and congestive cardiac failure is presented. PMID:11525959

  8. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  9. Reactive Leidenfrost droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raufaste, C.; Bouret, Y.; Celestini, F.

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the reactivity of Leidenfrost droplets with their supporting substrates. Several organic liquids are put into contact with a copper substrate heated above their Leidenfrost temperature. As the liquid evaporates, the gaseous flow cleans the superficial copper oxide formed at the substrate surface and the reaction maintains a native copper spot below the evaporating droplet. The copper spot can reach several times the droplet size for the most reactive organic compounds. This study shows an interesting coupling between the physics of the Leidenfrost effect and the mechanics of reactive flows. Different applications are proposed such as drop motion tracking and vapor flow monitoring.

  10. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-07-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra-articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA-B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised "trigger" infection. The identification and management of "sexually acquired" and "enteric" forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  11. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA‐B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised “trigger” infection. The identification and management of “sexually acquired” and “enteric” forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  12. Stress Reactivity in Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Gehrman, Philip R; Hall, Martica; Barilla, Holly; Buysse, Daniel; Perlis, Michael; Gooneratne, Nalaka; Ross, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether individuals with primary insomnia (PI) are more reactive to stress than good sleepers (GS). PI and GS (n = 20 per group), matched on gender and age, completed three nights of polysomnography. On the stress night, participants received a mild electric shock and were told they could receive additional shocks during the night. Saliva samples were obtained for analysis of cortisol and alpha amylase along with self-report and visual analog scales (VAS). There was very little evidence of increased stress on the stress night, compared to the baseline night. There was also no evidence of greater stress reactivity in the PI group for any sleep or for salivary measures. In the GS group, stress reactivity measured by VAS scales was positively associated with an increase in sleep latency in the experimental night on exploratory analyses. Individuals with PI did not show greater stress reactivity compared to GS. PMID:25126695

  13. Recent changes in anthropogenic reactive nitrogen compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronache, Constantin

    2014-05-01

    Significant anthropogenic perturbations of the nitrogen cycle are the result of rapid population growth, with mounting need for food and energy production. The increase of reactive nitrogen compounds (such as NOx, HNO3, NH3, and N2O) has a significant impact on human health, environment, and climate. NOx emissions contribute to O3 chemistry, aerosol formation and acidic precipitation. Ammonia is a notable atmospheric pollutant that may deteriorate ecosystems and contribute to respiratory problems. It reacts with acidic gases to form aerosols or is deposited back to ecosystems. The application of fertilizers accounts for most of the N2O production, adding to greenhouse gas emissions. We analyze the change of some reactive nitrogen compounds based on observations, in eastern United States. Results show that the control of NOx and SO2 emissions over the last decades caused a significant decrease of acidic deposition. The nitrate deposition is highest in eastern US, while the ammonium ion concentration is highest in central US regions. Overall, the inorganic nitrogen wet deposition from nitrate and ammonium is enhanced in central, and eastern US. Research shows that sensitive ecosystems in northeastern regions exhibit a slow recovery from the accumulated effects of acidic deposition. Given the growing demand for nitrogen in agriculture and industry, we discuss possible pathways to reduce the impact of excess reactive nitrogen on the environment.

  14. Role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fink, Mitchell P

    2002-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species are reactive, partially reduced derivatives of molecular oxygen (O 2 ). Important reactive oxygen species in biologic systems include superoxide radical anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical. Closely related species include the hypohalous acids, particularly hypochlorous acid; chloramine and substituted chloramines; and singlet oxygen. Reactive nitrogen species are derived from the simple diatomic gas, nitric oxide. Peroxynitrite and its protonated form, peroxynitrous acid, are the most significant reactive nitrogen species in biologic systems. A variety of enzymatic and nonenzymatic processes can generate reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in mammalian cells. An extensive body of experimental evidence from studies using animal models supports the view that reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are important in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome. This view is further supported by data from clinical studies that correlate biochemical evidence of reactive oxygen species-mediated or reactive nitrogen species-mediated stress with the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Despite these data, pharmacologic strategies directed at minimizing reactive oxygen species-mediated or reactive nitrogen species-mediated damage have yet to be successfully introduced into clinical practice. The most extensively studied compound in this regard is N -acetylcysteine; unfortunately, clinical trials with this compound in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome have yielded disappointing results. PMID:12205400

  15. Reactive Power Compensator.

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

    1992-07-28

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

  16. Reactive power compensator

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Chen, Mingliang; Andexler, George; Huang, Tony

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  17. Reactivity Studies on a Diazadiphosphapentalene.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jingjing; Li, Yongxin; Ganguly, Rakesh; Kinjo, Rei

    2016-07-11

    The reactivity of diazadiphosphapentalene 1 towards various substrates was investigated. Reaction of 1 with ammonia-borane resulted in transfer hydrogenolysis concomitantly with the cleavage of a P-N bond. By treatment of 1 with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO), oxidation took place at one of the phosphorus atoms of 1, and a P(V) /P(III) mixed-valence derivative was isolated. At the same time, it was demonstrated that only one of the phosphorus atoms in 1 behaves as an electron donor for electrophiles and Lewis acids. The former afforded an intramolecularly coordinated phosphine-phosphenium species, whereas the latter demonstrates the ligand property of 1. UV irradiation induced rearrangement of 1 into another example of another diazadiphosphapentalene. PMID:27283866

  18. Reactive modification of polyesters and their blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chen

    2004-12-01

    the desired rheological and structural characteristics of the final products for potential applications such as low density extrusion foaming or compatibilization of immiscible polymer blends. Important modification conditions through coagents are identified and reaction mechanisms are proposed. A high MW saturated polyester, PET, can also be rheologically modified in extruders through low MW multifunctional anhydride and epoxy compounds by chain extension/branching. Several such modifiers were successfully screened in terms of their reactivity towards PET under controlled reactive extrusion conditions. A dianhydride with medium reactivity was then successfully used in a one-step reactive modification/extrusion foaming process to produce low density foams. A similar process was successfully used to produce small cell size foams from a four component system containing PET, PP and lesser amounts of a low molecular weight multifunctional epoxy compound and an acid functionalized polyolefin, the latter acting as compatibilizers.

  19. Myochrysine Solution Structure and Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, William B.; Zhao, Zheng; Dorsey, John G.; Tepperman, Katherine

    1994-01-01

    We have determined the framework structure of Myochrysine (disodium gold(I)thiomalate) in the solid state and extremely concentrated aqueous solution, previously. It consists of an open chain polymer with linear gold coordination to two thiolates from the thiomalic acid moieties which bridge between pairs of gold atoms providing an Au-S-Au angle of 95°. The question remained: was this structure relevant to the dilute solutions of drugs administered and the still lower concentrations of gold found in the bodies of patients (typically 1 ppm Au in blood and urine or 5 μM in Au). We have provided an answer to that question using extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). EXAFS studies confirm that the polymeric structure with two sulfur atoms per gold atom persists from molar concentrations down to millimolar concentrations. CZE is able to separate and detect Myochrysine at millimolar levels. More importantly, at micromolar levels Myochrysine solutions exhibit identical CZE behavior to that measured at millimolar levels. Thus, aqueous solutions of the drug remain oligomeric at concentrations commensurate with those found in patient blood and urine. The reactivity of Myochrysine with cyanide, a species especially prevalent in smoking patients, was explored using CZE. Cyanide freely replaces thiomalic acid to form [Au(CN)2]- and thiomalic acid via a mixed ligand intermediate. The overall apparent equilibrium constant (Kapp) for the reaction is 6×10-4M-1. Further reaction of [Au(CN)2]- with a large excess of L, where L is cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, or glutathione, shows that these amino acids readily replace cyanide to form [AuL2]-. These species are thus potential metabolites and could possibly be active forms of gold in vivo. That all of these species are readily separated and quantified using CZE demonstrates that capillary electrophoresis is an accessible and powerful tool to add to those used for the study of gold

  20. Phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having the general structure: ##STR1## (wherein X is F, Cl, or NO.sub.2, and Y is CO, SO.sub.2 or C(CF.sub.3).sub.2) is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having the general structure: ##STR2## (wherein R is any aliphatic or aromatic moiety) is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  1. Interactive chemical reactivity exploration.

    PubMed

    Haag, Moritz P; Vaucher, Alain C; Bosson, Maël; Redon, Stéphane; Reiher, Markus

    2014-10-20

    Elucidating chemical reactivity in complex molecular assemblies of a few hundred atoms is, despite the remarkable progress in quantum chemistry, still a major challenge. Black-box search methods to find intermediates and transition-state structures might fail in such situations because of the high-dimensionality of the potential energy surface. Here, we propose the concept of interactive chemical reactivity exploration to effectively introduce the chemist's intuition into the search process. We employ a haptic pointer device with force feedback to allow the operator the direct manipulation of structures in three dimensions along with simultaneous perception of the quantum mechanical response upon structure modification as forces. We elaborate on the details of how such an interactive exploration should proceed and which technical difficulties need to be overcome. All reactivity-exploration concepts developed for this purpose have been implemented in the samson programming environment. PMID:25205397

  2. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1987-02-27

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and thence quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal. 1 fig.

  3. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1989-01-01

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

  4. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1989-12-05

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

  5. Meteorin is upregulated in reactive astrocytes and functions as a negative feedback effector in reactive gliosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Shin; Lee, Soon-Hee; Cha, Jong-Ho; Seo, Ji Hae; Ahn, Bum Ju; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2015-08-01

    Reactive gliosis is a glial response to a wide range of central nervous system insults, which results in cellular and molecular changes to resting glial cells. Despite its fundamental effect on neuropathologies, the identification and characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression profile and functions of the astrocytic neurotrophic factor, meteorin, in the progression of reactive gliosis. A mouse model of photothrombotic ischemia, and a primary astrocyte culture were used in the present study. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were performed to examine the expression levels of meteorin and reactive gliosis markers. Increased expression levels of meteorin were observed in reactive astrocytes in a photothrombotic ischemia mouse model, as well as in cultured astrocytes, which were stimulated by transforming growth factor-β1. Exogenous treatment of the astrocytes with meteorin did not induce janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling, however, silencing the expression of meteorin in the astrocytes resulted in an upregulation of reactive astrocyte markers, including glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100β, indicating that endogenous meteorin is required for the maintenance of astrocytic homeostasis. These results suggested a novel role for meteorin as a negative feedback effector in reactive gliosis. PMID:25873382

  6. Meteorin is upregulated in reactive astrocytes and functions as a negative feedback effector in reactive gliosis

    PubMed Central

    LEE, HYE SHIN; LEE, SOON-HEE; CHA, JONG-HO; SEO, JI HAE; AHN, BUM JU; KIM, KYU-WON

    2015-01-01

    Reactive gliosis is a glial response to a wide range of central nervous system insults, which results in cellular and molecular changes to resting glial cells. Despite its fundamental effect on neuropathologies, the identification and characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression profile and functions of the astrocytic neurotrophic factor, meteorin, in the progression of reactive gliosis. A mouse model of photothrombotic ischemia, and a primary astrocyte culture were used in the present study. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were performed to examine the expression levels of meteorin and reactive gliosis markers. Increased expression levels of meteorin were observed in reactive astrocytes in a photothrombotic ischemia mouse model, as well as in cultured astrocytes, which were stimulated by transforming growth factor-β1. Exogenous treatment of the astrocytes with meteorin did not induce janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling, however, silencing the expression of meteorin in the astrocytes resulted in an upregulation of reactive astrocyte markers, including glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100β, indicating that endogenous meteorin is required for the maintenance of astrocytic homeostasis. These results suggested a novel role for meteorin as a negative feedback effector in reactive gliosis. PMID:25873382

  7. Lung peptidases, including carboxypeptidase, modulate airway reactivity to intravenous bradykinin.

    PubMed

    Chodimella, V; Skidgel, R A; Krowiak, E J; Murlas, C G

    1991-10-01

    We investigated the effect of inhibition of carboxypeptidase, neutral endopeptidase, or angiotensin converting enzyme on airway reactivity to intravenous bradykinin in guinea pigs. Bradykinin reactivity in intact, unanesthetized, spontaneously breathing animals was determined by measuring specific airway resistance in response to increasing doses of intravenous bradykinin or acetylcholine. We found that phosphoramidon and/or captopril (specific antagonists of neutral endopeptidase and angiotensin converting enzyme, respectively) increased airway reactivity to bradykinin, but the combination had no effect on muscarinic reactivity. Although 2-mercaptomethyl-3-guanidinoethylthiopropanoic acid (MGTA, a carboxypeptidase inhibitor) alone did not alter bradykinin reactivity, MGTA in the presence of both phosphoramidon and captopril significantly potentiated bradykinin-induced airway reactivity. In comparison, this did not affect reactivity to acetylcholine. Having found that carboxypeptidase inhibition could augment kinin-induced airway reactivity, we subsequently assayed for and identified carboxypeptidase M activity in guinea pig lung. We found considerable carboxypeptidase M activity in guinea pig lung subcellular fractions, the 100,000 x g membrane pellet having the highest specific activity. Our data indicate that airway reactivity to intravenous bradykinin is modulated by the activity of endogenous neutral endopeptidase, angiotensin converting enzyme, and carboxypeptidase, all of which are present in lung cell membranes. This study also suggests that the influence of carboxypeptidase per se may be substantially enhanced if endogenous pulmonary neutral endopeptidase and angiotensin converting enzyme activities are reduced. PMID:1928964

  8. Modeling Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen is an essential building block of all proteins and thus an essential nutrient for all life. Reactive nitrogen, which is naturally produced via enzymatic reactions, forest fires and lightning, is continually recycled and cascades through air, water, and soil media. Human ...

  9. Reactive power compensating system

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1987-01-01

    The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

  10. Reactive Power Compensating System.

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1985-01-04

    The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

  11. Working Memory and Reactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goo, Jaemyung

    2010-01-01

    The present study explores the relationship between working memory capacity (WMC) and think-alouds, focusing on the issue of reactivity. Two WM span tasks (listening span and operation span) were administered to 42 English-speaking learners of Spanish. Learner performance on reading comprehension and written production was measured under two…

  12. Study and modification of the reactivity of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, P. L., Jr.; Ismail, I. M.; Mahajan, O. P.; Eapen, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    The reactivity to air of polyactylonitrile-based carbon fiber cloth was enhanced by the addition of metals to the cloth. The cloth was oxidized in 54 wt% nitric acid in order to increase the surface area of the cloth and to add carbonyl groups to the surface. Metal addition was then achieved by soaking the cloth in metal acetate solution to effect exchange between the metal carbon and hydrogen on the carbonyl groups. The addition of potassium, sodium, calcium and barium enhanced fiber cloth reactivity to air at 573 K. Extended studies using potassium addition showed that success in enhancing fiber cloth reactivity to air depends on: extent of cloth oxidation in nitric acid, time of exchange in potassium acetate solution and the thoroughness of removing metal acetate from the fiber pore structure following exchange. Cloth reactivity increases essentially linearly with increase in potassium addition via exchange.

  13. Reactivity Network: Secondary Sources for Inorganic Reactivity Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, E. K.

    1989-01-01

    Provides an eclectic annotated bibliography of secondary sources for inorganic reactivity information of interest to reactivity network review authors and to anyone seeking information about simple inorganic reactions in order to develop experiments and demonstrations. Gives 119 sources. (MVL)

  14. Expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 by reactive astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Geisert, E E; Johnson, H G; Binder, L I

    1990-01-01

    After an injury to the central nervous system, a dramatic change in the astrocytes bordering the wound occurs. The most characteristic feature of this process, termed reactive gliosis, is the upregulation of the intermediate filament protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein. In the present study, we show that reactive astrocytes express high levels of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), a protein normally found in the somatodendritic compartment of neurons. When sections of injured brain are double-stained with antibodies directed against MAP-2 and glial fibrillary protein, all of the reactive astrocytes are found to contain MAP-2. The high levels of this protein appear to represent a permanent change in reactive astrocytes. In parallel quantitative studies, an elevated level of MAP-2 in the injured brain is confirmed by an immunoblot analysis of injured and normal white matter. This report demonstrates the direct involvement of a microtubule protein in the process of reactive gliosis. Images PMID:1692628

  15. Quantitative reactivity profiling predicts functional cysteines in proteomes.

    PubMed

    Weerapana, Eranthie; Wang, Chu; Simon, Gabriel M; Richter, Florian; Khare, Sagar; Dillon, Myles B D; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Mowen, Kerri; Baker, David; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2010-12-01

    Cysteine is the most intrinsically nucleophilic amino acid in proteins, where its reactivity is tuned to perform diverse biochemical functions. The absence of a consensus sequence that defines functional cysteines in proteins has hindered their discovery and characterization. Here we describe a proteomics method to profile quantitatively the intrinsic reactivity of cysteine residues en masse directly in native biological systems. Hyper-reactivity was a rare feature among cysteines and it was found to specify a wide range of activities, including nucleophilic and reductive catalysis and sites of oxidative modification. Hyper-reactive cysteines were identified in several proteins of uncharacterized function, including a residue conserved across eukaryotic phylogeny that we show is required for yeast viability and is involved in iron-sulphur protein biogenesis. We also demonstrate that quantitative reactivity profiling can form the basis for screening and functional assignment of cysteines in computationally designed proteins, where it discriminated catalytically active from inactive cysteine hydrolase designs. PMID:21085121

  16. Targeting Reactive Carbonyl Species with Natural Sequestering Agents.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sung Won; Lee, Yoon-Mi; Aldini, Giancarlo; Yeum, Kyung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Reactive carbonyl species generated by the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids and sugars are highly reactive due to their electrophilic nature, and are able to easily react with the nucleophilic sites of proteins as well as DNA causing cellular dysfunction. Levels of reactive carbonyl species and their reaction products have been reported to be elevated in various chronic diseases, including metabolic disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. In an effort to identify sequestering agents for reactive carbonyl species, various analytical techniques such as spectrophotometry, high performance liquid chromatography, western blot, and mass spectrometry have been utilized. In particular, recent advances using a novel high resolution mass spectrometry approach allows screening of complex mixtures such as natural products for their sequestering ability of reactive carbonyl species. To overcome the limited bioavailability and bioefficacy of natural products, new techniques using nanoparticles and nanocarriers may offer a new attractive strategy for increased in vivo utilization and targeted delivery of bioactives. PMID:26927058

  17. Method for preparing hydride configurations and reactive metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Silver, G.L.

    1984-05-18

    A method for preparing reactive metal surfaces, particularly uranium surfaces is disclosed, whereby the metal is immediately reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure. The metal surfaces are first pretreated by exposure to an acid which forms an adherent hydride-bearing composition on the metal surface. Subsequent heating of the pretreated metal at a temperature sufficient to decompose the hydride coating in vacuum or inert gas renders the metal surface instantaneously reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure.

  18. Reactivity of dicoordinated stannylones (Sn0) versus stannylenes (SnII): an investigation using DFT-based reactivity indices.

    PubMed

    Broeckaert, Lies; Frenking, Gernot; Geerlings, Paul; De Proft, Frank

    2013-10-01

    The reactivity of dicoordinated Sn(0) compounds, stannylones, is probed using density functional theory (DFT)-based reactivity indices and compared with the reactivity of dicoordinated Sn(II) compounds, stannylenes. For the former compounds, the influence of different types of electron-donating ligands, such as cyclic and acyclic carbenes, stannylenes and phosphines, on the reactivity of the central Sn atom is analyzed in detail. Sn(0) compounds are found to be relatively soft systems with a high nucleophilicity, and the plots of the Fukui function f(-) for an electrophilic attack consistently predict the highest reactivity on the Sn atom. Next, complexes of dicoordinated Sn compounds with different Lewis acids of variable hardness are computed. In a first part, the double-base character of stannylones is demonstrated in interactions with the hardest Lewis acid H(+). Both the first and second proton affinities (PAs) are high and are well correlated with the atomic charge on the Sn atom, probing its local hardness. These observations are also in line with electrostatic potential plots that demonstrate that the tin atom in Sn(0) compounds bears a higher negative charge in comparison to Sn(II) compounds. Stannylones and stannylenes can be distinguished from each other by the partial charges at Sn and by various reactivity indices. It also becomes clear that there is a smooth transition between the two classes of compounds. We furthermore demonstrate both from DFT-based reactivity indices and from energy decomposition analysis, combined with natural orbitals for chemical valence (EDA-NOCV), that the monocomplexed stannylones are still nucleophilic and as reactive towards a second Lewis acid as towards the first one. The dominating interaction is a strong σ-type interaction from the Sn atom towards the Lewis acid. The interaction energy is higher for complexes with the cation Ag(+) than with the non-charged electrophiles BH(3), BF(3), and AlCl(3). PMID:23946256

  19. PREDICTING CHEMICAL REACTIVITY BY COMPUTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical models for predicting the fate of pollutants in the environment require reactivity parameter values--that it, the physical and chemical constants that govern reactivity. lthough empirical structure-activity relationships have been developed that allow estimation of s...

  20. Advances in reactive surfactants.

    PubMed

    Guyot, A

    2004-05-20

    The study of reactive surfactants and their applications in the synthesis of latexes for waterborne coatings has been recently boosted by two successive European programmes, involving all together eight academic and five industrial laboratories. The most significant results were obtained using surfactants derived from maleic and related anhydrides, or both nonionic and anionic reactive polymeric surfactants. Such surfactants are able to improve the stability of styrenic and acrylic latexes vs. various constraints, such as electrolyte addition, freeze-thawing tests or extraction with alcohol or acetone. The properties of films used in waterborne coatings are also improved in case of water exposure (less water uptake, dimensional stability), as well as improved weatherability, and blocking properties. Formulations for woodstain varnishes, metal coating of printing inks, based on the use of simple polymerizable surfactants, are now in the market. PMID:15072924

  1. Reactive Air Aluminization

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-10-28

    Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

  2. Multifunctional reactive nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatis, Demitrios

    Many multifunctional nanocomposite materials have been developed for use in propellants, explosives, pyrotechnics, and reactive structures. These materials exhibit high reaction rates due to their developed reaction interfacial area. Two applications addressed in this work include nanocomposite powders prepared by arrested reactive milling (ARM) for burn rate modifiers and reactive structures. In burn rate modifiers, addition of reactive nanocomposite powders to aluminized propellants increases the burn rate of aluminum and thus the overall reaction rate of an energetic formulation. Replacing only a small fraction of aluminum by 8Al·MoO3 and 2B·Ti nanocomposite powders enhances the reaction rate with little change to the thermodynamic performance of the formulation; both the rate of pressure rise and maximum pressure measured in the constant volume explosion test increase. For reactive structures, nanocomposite powders with bulk compositions of 8Al·MoO3, 12Al·MoO3, and 8Al·3CuO were prepared by ARM and consolidated using a uniaxial die. Consolidated samples had densities greater than 90% of theoretical maximum density while maintaining their high reactivity. Pellets prepared using 8Al·MoO3 powders were ignited by a CO2 laser. Ignition delays increased at lower laser powers and greater pellet densities. A simplified numerical model describing heating and thermal initiation of the reactive pellets predicted adequately the observed effects of both laser power and pellet density on the measured ignition delays. To investigate the reaction mechanisms in nanocomposite thermites, two types of nanocomposite reactive materials with the same bulk compositions 8Al·MoO3 were prepared by different methods. One of the materials was manufactured by ARM and the other, so called metastable interstitial composite (MIC), by mixing of nano-scaled individual powders. Clear differences in the low-temperature redox reactions, welldetectable by differential scanning calorimetry

  3. Skylab reactivation mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    On July 11, 1979, Skylab impacted the Earth's surface. The debris dispersion area stretched from the South Eastern Indian Ocean across a sparsely populated section of Western Australia. The events leading to the reentry of Skylab are discussed and a final assessment of the Skylab debris impact footprint is presented. Also included are detailed evaluations of the various Skylab systems that were reactivated when control of Skylab was regained in mid-1978 after having been powered down since February 4, 1974.

  4. Anionic derivatives of uracil: fragmentation and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Cole, Callie A; Wang, Zhe-Chen; Snow, Theodore P; Bierbaum, Veronica M

    2014-09-01

    Uracil is an essential biomolecule for terrestrial life, yet its prebiotic formation mechanisms have proven elusive for decades. Meteorites have been shown to contain uracil and the interstellar abundance of aromatic species and nitrogen-containing molecules is well established, providing support for uracil's presence in the interstellar medium (ISM). The ion chemistry of uracil may provide clues to its prebiotic synthesis and role in the origin of life. The fragmentation of biomolecules provides valuable insights into their formation. Previous research focused primarily on the fragmentation and reactivity of cations derived from uracil. In this study, we explore deprotonated uracil-5-carboxylic acid and its anionic fragments to elucidate novel reagents of uracil formation and to characterize the reactivity of uracil's anionic derivatives. The structures of these fragments are identified through theoretical calculations, further fragmentation, experimental acidity bracketing, and reactivity with several detected and potential interstellar species (SO2, OCS, CS2, NO, N2O, CO, NH3, O2, and C2H4). Fragmentation is achieved through collision induced dissociation (CID) in a commercial ion trap mass spectrometer, and all reaction rate constants are measured using a modification of this instrument. Experimental data are supported by theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Lastly, the astrochemical implications of the observed fragmentation and reaction processes are discussed. PMID:25036757

  5. Isolation and Reactivity of Trifluoromethyl Iodonium Salts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The strategic incorporation of the trifluoromethyl (CF3) functionality within therapeutic or agrochemical agents is a proven strategy for altering their associated physicochemical properties (e.g., metabolic stability, lipophilicity, and bioavailability). Electrophilic trifluoromethylation has emerged as an important methodology for installing the CF3 moiety onto an array of molecular architectures, and, in particular, CF3 λ3-iodanes have garnered significant interest because of their unique reactivity and ease of handling. Trifluoromethylations mediated by these hypervalent iodine reagents often require activation through an exogenous Lewis or Brønsted acid; thus, putative intermediates invoked in these transformations are cationic CF3 iodoniums. These iodoniums have, thus far, eluded isolation and investigation of their innate reactivity (which has encouraged speculation that such species cannot be accessed). A more complete understanding of the mechanistic relevance of CF3 iodoniums is paramount for the development of new trifluoromethylative strategies involving λ3-iodanes. Here, we demonstrate that CF3 iodonium salts are readily prepared from common λ3-iodane precursors and exhibit remarkable persistence under ambient conditions. These reagents are competent electrophiles for a variety of trifluoromethylation reactions, and their reactivity is reminiscent of that observed when CF3 iodanes are activated using Lewis acids. As such, our results suggest the mechanistic relevance of CF3 iodonium intermediates in trifluoromethylative processes mediated by λ3-iodanes. The isolation of CF3 iodonium salts also presents the unique opportunity to employ them more generally as mechanistic probes. PMID:27280169

  6. Reactive Functionalized Membranes for Polychlorinated Biphenyl Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Minghui; Ormsbee, Lindell E.; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar

    2014-01-01

    Membranes have been widely used in water remediation (e.g. desalination and heavy metal removal) because of the ability to control membrane pore size and surface charge. The incorporation of nanomaterials into the membranes provides added benefits through increased reactivity with different functionality. In this study, we report the dechlorination of 2-chlorobiphenyl in the aqueous phase by a reactive membrane system. Fe/Pd bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized (in-situ) within polyacrylic acid (PAA) functionalized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes for degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Biphenyl formed in the reduction was further oxidized into hydroxylated biphenyls and benzoic acid by an iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical (OH•) reaction. The formation of magnetite on Fe surface was observed. This combined pathway (reductive/oxidative) could reduce the toxicity of PCBs effectively while eliminating the formation of chlorinated degradation byproducts. The successful manufacturing of full-scale functionalized membranes demonstrates the possibility of applying reactive membranes in practical water treatment. PMID:24954974

  7. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-12-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system.

  8. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system. PMID:23249062

  9. Becoming Reactive by Concretization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prieditis, Armand; Janakiraman, Bhaskar

    1992-01-01

    One way to build a reactive system is to construct an action table indexed by the current situation or stimulus. The action table describes what course of action to pursue for each situation or stimulus. This paper describes an incremental approach to constructing the action table through achieving goals with a hierarchical search system. These hierarchies are generated with transformations called concretizations, which add constraints to a problem and which can reduce the search space. The basic idea is that an action for a state is looked up in the action table and executed whenever the action table has an entry for that state; otherwise, a path is found to the nearest (cost-wise in a graph with costweighted arcs) state that has a mappring from a state in the next highest hierarchy. For each state along the solution path, the successor state in the path is cached in the action table entry for that state. Without caching, the hierarchical search system can logarithmically reduce search. When the table is complete the system no longer searches: it simply reacts by proceeding to the state listed in the table for each state. Since the cached information is specific only to the nearest state in the next highest hierarchy and not the goal, inter-goal transfer of reactivity is possible. To illustrate our approach, we show how an implemented hierarchical search system can completely reactive.

  10. Assessment of sequence homology and cross-reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Aalberse, Rob C. . E-mail: r.aalberse@sanquin.nl

    2005-09-01

    Three aspects of allergenicity assessment and are discussed: IgE immunogenicity, IgE cross-reactivity and T cell cross-reactivity, all with emphasis on in-silico predictability: from amino acid sequence via 3D structure to allergenicity.(1)IgE immunogenicity depends to an overwhelming degree on factors other than the protein itself: the context and history of the protein by the time it reaches the immune system. Without specification of these two factors very few foreign proteins can be claimed to be absolutely non-allergenic. Any antigen may be allergenic, particularly if it avoids activation of TH2-suppressive mechanisms (CD8 cells, TH1 cells, other regulatory T cells and regulatory cytokines). (2)IgE cross-reactivity can be much more reliably assessed by a combination of in-silico homology searches and in vitro IgE antibody assays. The in-silico homology search is unlikely to miss potential cross-reactivity with sequenced allergens. So far, no biologically relevant cross-reactivity at the antibody level has been demonstrated between proteins without easily-demonstrable homology. (3)T cell cross-reactivity is much more difficult to predict compared to B cell cross-reactivity, and its effects are more diverse. Yet, pre-existing cross-reactive T cell activity is likely to influence the outcome not only of the immune response, but also of the effector phase of the allergic reaction.

  11. Elusive roles for reactive astrocytes in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ben Haim, Lucile; Carrillo-de Sauvage, Maria-Angeles; Ceyzériat, Kelly; Escartin, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes play crucial roles in the brain and are involved in the neuroinflammatory response. They become reactive in response to virtually all pathological situations in the brain such as axotomy, ischemia, infection, and neurodegenerative diseases (ND). Astrocyte reactivity was originally characterized by morphological changes (hypertrophy, remodeling of processes) and the overexpression of the intermediate filament glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). However, it is unclear how the normal supportive functions of astrocytes are altered by their reactive state. In ND, in which neuronal dysfunction and astrocyte reactivity take place over several years or decades, the issue is even more complex and highly debated, with several conflicting reports published recently. In this review, we discuss studies addressing the contribution of reactive astrocytes to ND. We describe the molecular triggers leading to astrocyte reactivity during ND, examine how some key astrocyte functions may be enhanced or altered during the disease process, and discuss how astrocyte reactivity may globally affect ND progression. Finally we will consider the anticipated developments in this important field. With this review, we aim to show that the detailed study of reactive astrocytes may open new perspectives for ND. PMID:26283915

  12. Bacterial responses to reactive chlorine species.

    PubMed

    Gray, Michael J; Wholey, Wei-Yun; Jakob, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), the active ingredient of household bleach, is the most common disinfectant in medical, industrial, and domestic use and plays an important role in microbial killing in the innate immune system. Given the critical importance of the antimicrobial properties of chlorine to public health, it is surprising how little is known about the ways in which bacteria sense and respond to reactive chlorine species (RCS). Although the literature on bacterial responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enormous, work addressing bacterial responses to RCS has begun only recently. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies now provide new insights into how bacteria mount defenses against this important class of antimicrobial compounds. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, emphasizing the overlaps between RCS stress responses and other more well-characterized bacterial defense systems, and identify outstanding questions that represent productive avenues for future research. PMID:23768204

  13. Surface reactivity of pyrite and related sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Riley; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Pyrite, FeS 2, commonly referred to as "Fool's gold" is the most common sulfide in the Earth's surface region. Not only is the mineral ubiquitous, but the reactivity of pyrite is of central importance in a devastating environmental issue known as acid mine drainage (AMD) and in beneficial commercial processes such as mineral benefaction, which can range from the desulfurization of coal to the isolation of copper or gold ores. Pyrite has even been postulated to be a key constituent of a prebiotic iron-sulfur world existing at the high pressure and temperature conditions common to hydrothermal vents at the oceanic floor. The development of an atomic level picture of the structure and reactivity of pyrite is paramount to understanding the chemistry of this mineral in these wide-ranging environments. This contribution focuses on research carried out over the past three decades that has used modern surface science tools to understand the reactivity of pyrite surfaces. An understanding of the reactivity of the pyrite surfaces has benefited from studies using a wide range of experimental techniques that range from vacuum-based experiments utilizing electron and photon spectroscopies, and probe microscopy to in situ studies using infra-red spectroscopy. Synchrotron-based techniques that include photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy have played a large role in both these environments. These techniques have perhaps been the most useful in establishing the structure of the pristine pyrite surface. Related iron sulfides are also briefly introduced in this review including pyrrhotite (Fe xS 1- x) and the dimorph of pyrite, marcasite. The surface reactivity of these sulfides exhibit both similarities and differences to pyrite, and help to bring forward the unique activity of pyrite in both environmentally and technologically important conditions.

  14. Multisurface Adiabatic Reactive Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Tibor; Yosa Reyes, Juvenal; Meuwly, Markus

    2014-04-01

    Adiabatic reactive molecular dynamics (ARMD) simulation method is a surface-crossing algorithm for modeling chemical reactions in classical molecular dynamics simulations using empirical force fields. As the ARMD Hamiltonian is time dependent during crossing, it allows only approximate energy conservation. In the current work, the range of applicability of conventional ARMD is explored, and a new multisurface ARMD (MS-ARMD) method is presented, implemented in CHARMM and applied to the vibrationally induced photodissociation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in the gas phase. For this, an accurate global potential energy surface (PES) involving 12 H2SO4 and 4 H2O + SO3 force fields fitted to MP2/6-311G++(2d,2p) reference energies is employed. The MS-ARMD simulations conserve total energy and feature both intramolecular H-transfer reactions and water elimination. An analytical treatment of the dynamics in the crossing region finds that conventional ARMD can approximately conserve total energy for limiting cases. In one of them, the reduced mass of the system is large, which often occurs for simulations of solvated biomolecular systems. On the other hand, MS-ARMD is a general approach for modeling chemical reactions including gas-phase, homogeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic catalytic reactions while conserving total energy in atomistic simulations. PMID:26580356

  15. Characterizing Reactive Flow Paths in Fractured Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenning, Q. C.; Huerta, N. J.; Hesse, M. A.; Bryant, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration can be a viable method for reducing anthropogenic CO2 flux into the atmosphere. However, the technology must be economically feasible and pose acceptable risk to stakeholders. One key risk is CO2 leakage out of the storage reservoir. Potential driving forces for leakage are the overpressure due to CO2 injection and the buoyancy of free phase CO2. Potential hazards of leakage are contamination of Underground Sources of Drinking Water or the atmosphere and would be deemed an unacceptable risk. Wells potentially provide a fast path for leakage from the reservoir. While the well's cement casing is reactive with CO2 and CO2-saturated brine, the low cement matrix permeability and slow diffusion rate make it unlikely that CO2 will escape through a properly constructed wellbore. However, highly permeable fractures with micrometer scale apertures can occur in cement casings. Reactions that occur in the flow in these fractures can either be self-limiting or self-enhancing. Therefore, understanding the reactive flow is critical to understanding of leakage evolution through these fractures. The goal of our work is to characterize the modification of the flow paths in the fracture due to reaction with acidic brine. With this aim we have characterized both the initial flow path of un-reactive flow and the final flow path after introduction of low-pH acid along the same fracture. Class H cement cores 3-6 cm in length and 2.5 cm diameter are created and a single natural and unique fracture is produced in each core using the Brazilian method. Our experimental fluid is injected at a constant rate into the cement core housed in a Hassler Cell under confining pressure. A solution of red dye and deionized water is pumped through the fracture to stain the un-reactive flow paths. Deionized water is then pumped through the core to limit diffusion of the dye into non-flowing portions of the fracture. After staining the initial flow path, low pH water due to

  16. Genomic Analysis of Reactive Astrogliosis

    PubMed Central

    Zamanian, JL; Xu, L; Foo, LC; Nouri, N; Zhou, L; Giffard, RG; Barres, BA

    2012-01-01

    Reactive astrogliosis is characterized by a profound change in astrocyte phenotype in response to all CNS injuries and diseases. To better understand the reactive astrocyte state, we used Affymetrix GeneChip arrays to profile gene expression in populations of reactive astrocytes isolated at various time points after induction using two mouse injury models, ischemic stroke and neuroinflammation. We find reactive gliosis consists of a rapid, but quickly attenuated induction of gene expression after insult and identify two induced genes, Lcn2 and Serpina3n, as strong markers of reactive astrocytes. Strikingly, reactive astrocyte phenotype strongly depended on the type of inducing injury. Although there is a core set of genes that is up-regulated in reactive astrocytes from both injury models, at least 50% of the altered gene expression is specific to a given injury type. Reactive astrocytes in ischemia exhibited a molecular phenotype that suggests that they may be beneficial or protective, whereas reactive astrocytes induced by LPS exhibited a phenotype that suggests that they may be detrimental. These findings demonstrate that, despite well established commonalities, astrocyte reactive gliosis is a highly heterogeneous state in which astrocyte activities are altered to respond to the specific injury. This raises the question of how many subtypes of reactive astrocytes exist. Our findings provide transcriptome databases for two subtypes of reactive astrocytes that will be highly useful in generating new and testable hypotheses of their function, as well as for providing new markers to detect different types of reactive astrocytes in human neurological diseases. PMID:22553043

  17. Nitrous acid (HONO) observations during the Uintah Basin Wintertime Ozone Studies (UBWOS) and the Wintertime Investigation of Transport, Emission, and Reactivity (WINTER) study: sources, measurements interferences, and implications beyond.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Alvarez, S. L.; Bates, T. S.; Brown, S. S.; Edwards, P.; Flynn, J. H., III; De Gouw, J. A.; Johnson, J. E.; Lee, B. H.; Lefer, B. L.; Liggio, J.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Quinn, P.; Stutz, J.; Thornton, J. A.; Tsai, J. Y.; Wentzell, J. J. B.; Wild, R. J.; Yuan, B.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has highlighted HONO as a strong daytime source of OH radicals though a general lack of consensus exists with respect to the sources and overall impact of HONO photolysis on daytime radical budgets. Improvements in atmospheric HOx and NOx budgets, and therefore daytime HONO constraints, are necessary to improve air quality control strategies in adversely affected regions. In this presentation HONO measurements made using multiple collocated instruments during the UBWOS 2013 and 2014 field studies will be discussed. These results suggest that our ability to measure HONO is heavily dependent on our understanding of sampling artifacts, measurement interferences, and background determinations. We also present mid-latitude tropospheric observations of HO2NO2, as high as 1.5 ppbv, that coincide with the observed maxima in daytime HONO. These coinciding observations of both HONO and HO2NO2 will be presented with a particular emphasis on potential vertical gradients, surface chemistry, and daytime budgets. Results of this work may be relevant to interpretation of HONO observations in a range of environments from clean arctic to relatively polluted urban summertime regions. Measurements of HONO from the Wintertime Investigation of Transport, Emission, and Reactivity (WINTER) project in 2015 will be shown for comparison.

  18. Ambident reactivities of pyridone anions.

    PubMed

    Breugst, Martin; Mayr, Herbert

    2010-11-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of the ambident 2- and 4-pyridone anions with benzhydrylium ions (diarylcarbenium ions) and structurally related Michael acceptors have been studied in DMSO, CH(3)CN, and water. No significant changes of the rate constants were found when the counterion was varied (Li(+), K(+), NBu(4)(+)) or the solvent was changed from DMSO to CH(3)CN, whereas a large decrease of nucleophilicity was observed in aqueous solution. The second-order rate constants (log k(2)) correlated linearly with the electrophilicity parameters E of the electrophiles according to the correlation log k(2) = s(N + E) (Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. Engl. 1994, 33, 938-957), allowing us to determine the nucleophilicity parameters N and s for the pyridone anions. The reactions of the 2- and 4-pyridone anions with stabilized amino-substituted benzhydrylium ions and Michael acceptors are reversible and yield the thermodynamically more stable N-substituted pyridones exclusively. In contrast, highly reactive benzhydrylium ions (4,4'-dimethylbenzhydrylium ion), which react with diffusion control, give mixtures arising from N- and O-attack with the 2-pyridone anion and only O-substituted products with the 4-pyridone anion. For some reactions, rate and equilibrium constants were determined in DMSO, which showed that the 2-pyridone anion is a 2-4 times stronger nucleophile, but a 100 times stronger Lewis base than the 4-pyridone anion. Quantum chemical calculations at MP2/6-311+G(2d,p) level of theory showed that N-attack is thermodynamically favored over O-attack, but the attack at oxygen is intrinsically favored. Marcus theory was employed to develop a consistent scheme which rationalizes the manifold of regioselectivities previously reported for the reactions of these anions with electrophiles. In particular, Kornblum's rationalization of the silver ion effect, one of the main pillars of the hard and soft acid/base concept of ambident reactivity, has been revised. Ag(+) does not

  19. Controlling Material Reactivity Using Architecture.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kyle T; Zhu, Cheng; Duoss, Eric B; Gash, Alexander E; Kolesky, David B; Kuntz, Joshua D; Lewis, Jennifer A; Spadaccini, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    3D-printing methods are used to generate reactive material architectures. Several geometric parameters are observed to influence the resultant flame propagation velocity, indicating that the architecture can be utilized to control reactivity. Two different architectures, channels and hurdles, are generated, and thin films of thermite are deposited onto the surface. The architecture offers an additional route to control, at will, the energy release rate in reactive composite materials. PMID:26669517

  20. [Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costa, R; Orriols, R

    2005-01-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome, better known as RADS, was described as a clinical entity consisting in the appearance of bronchial asthma due to massive toxic inhalation. The term was coined and recognised for the first time in 1985. Since then different publications have verified new cases as well as different causal agents. It usually arises from an accident at the work place and in closed or poorly ventilated spaces, where high concentrations of irritant products are inhaled in the form of gas, smoke or vapour. In the following minutes or hours symptoms of bronchial obstruction appear in an acute form, with bronchial hyperresponsiveness persisting for months or years. The affected patients do not show a recurrence of symptoms following exposure to non-toxic doses of the same agent that started the symptoms. This is why diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations as it is not reproducible through a provocation test. PMID:15915173

  1. On 'reactivity' versus 'tolerance'.

    PubMed

    Zinkernagel, Rolf M

    2004-08-01

    In Burnet's review on 'The impact of ideas on immunology' he considers himself an observer of nature using biochemical and molecular analysis for more detailed understanding, a description that applies also to me. I use three examples--repertoire selection of T cells, rules of immune reactivity versus non-reactivity and immunological memory--to illustrate the difficulties we all have in probing nature's immunological secrets and in critically testing immunologists' ideas. At one end of the spectrum of biological research one may argue everything is possible and therefore all results are correct, if correctly measured. But perhaps it is more important to always ask again and again what is frequent and enhances survival versus what is rare and an exception. At the same time one must keep in mind that special situations and special tricks may well be applied for medical benefits, although they may have little impact on physiology and species survival. I will attempt to use disease in virus-infected mice to obtain some answers to what I consider to be important immunological questions with the hope of improving the ratio of answers that are right for the right experimental reasons versus those that are right for the wrong reasons. Some of these experiments falsify hypotheses, previous experiments and interpretations and therefore are particularly important in correcting misleading concepts. They should help to find out which half of immunological ideas and truths in immunological text books written today are likely to be wrong. Ideas are important in immunology, but are often rather demagogically handled and therefore may cost us very dearly indeed. Evaluating immunity to infections and tumours in vivo should help prevent us from getting lost in immunology. PMID:15283843

  2. C,O-dialkylation of Meldrum's acid: synthesis and reactivity of 1,3,7,7-tetramethyl-4H,10H-6,8,9-trioxa-2-thiabenz[f]azulen-5-one.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Chad A; Selegue, John P; Dosunmu, Eniolami; Tice, Nathan C; Parkin, Sean

    2003-09-19

    Reaction of Meldrum's acid with 3,4-bis(chloromethyl)-2,5-dimethylthiophene (1) or 3,4-bis(bromomethyl)-2,5-dimethylthiophene (2) produces the kinetically favored C,O-dialkylation product, 1,3,7,7-tetramethyl-4H,10H-6,8,9-trioxa-2-thiabenz[f]azulen-5-one (4). Recrystallization of 4 from refluxing methanol results in the methanolysis product 5-(4-methoxymethyl-2,5-dimethylthiophen-3-ylmethyl)-2,2-dimethyl[1,3]dioxane-4,6-dione (5). Attempts to isomerize 4 to the thermodynamically favored C,C-dialkylation product, 1,3-dimethyl-5,6-dihydro-4H-cyclopenta[c]thiophene(2-spiro-5)2,2-dimethyl-4,6-dione (8), result in the formation of 1,3-dimethyl-7,8-dihydro-4H-thieno[3,4-c]oxepin-6-one (6). The transformation occurs via a retro-Diels-Alder elimination of acetone followed by hydrolysis and decarboxylation of the resulting ketene. The ketene is trapped by tert-butyl alcohol, furnishing 1,3-dimethyl-6-oxo-7,8-dihydro-4H,6H-thieno[3,4-c]oxepine-7-carboxylic acid tert-butyl ester (7). All compounds are characterized spectroscopically as well as by X-ray crystallography of products 4-7. PMID:12968900

  3. Reactive oxygen species and anti-proteinases.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Tooba; Zia, Mohammad Khalid; Ali, Syed Saqib; Rehman, Ahmed Abdur; Ahsan, Haseeb; Khan, Fahim Halim

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause damage to macromolecules such as proteins, lipids and DNA and alters their structure and function. When generated outside the cell, ROS can induce damage to anti-proteinases. Anti-proteinases are proteins that are involved in the control and regulation of proteolytic enzymes. The damage caused to anti-proteinase barrier disturbs the proteinase-anti-proteinases balance and uncontrolled proteolysis at the site of injury promotes tissue damage. Studies have shown that ROS damages anti-proteinase shield of the body by inactivating key members such as alpha-2-macroglobulin, alpha-1-antitrypsin. Hypochlorous acid inactivates α-1-antitrypsin by oxidizing a critical reactive methionine residue. Superoxide and hypochlorous acid are physiological inactivators of alpha-2-macroglobulin. The damage to anti-proteinase barrier induced by ROS is a hallmark of diseases such as atherosclerosis, emphysema and rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, understanding the behaviour of ROS-induced damage to anti-proteinases may helps us in development of strategies that could control these inflammatory reactions and diseases. PMID:26699123

  4. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J; Li, Fangxing; Tufon, Christopher; Isemonger, Alan

    2008-07-01

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would reduce

  5. Humic acid in drinking well water induces inflammation through reactive oxygen species generation and activation of nuclear factor-κB/activator protein-1 signaling pathways: A possible role in atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Senthil Kumar, K.J.; Chen, Chih-Sheng; Cho, Hsin-Ju; Lin, Shu-Wei; Shen, Pei-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Lu, Fung-Jou; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2014-01-15

    Humic acid (HA) has been implicated as one of the etiological factors in the peripheral vasculopathy of blackfoot disease (BFD) in Taiwan. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of BFD are not well defined. In this study, we used an in vitro and in vivo model, in which HA (25–200 μg/mL) activated macrophages to produce pro-inflammatory molecules by activating their transcriptional factors. HA exposure induced NO and PGE{sub 2} production followed by induction of iNOS and COX-2 through NF-κB/AP-1 transactivation in macrophages. In addition, the production of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased by HA. Moreover, HA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were down-regulated by the NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and Tanshinone, respectively. Furthermore, generations of ROS and nitrotyrosine, as well as activation of the AKT and MAPKs signaling cascades were observed after HA exposure. Specifically, HA-induced NF-κB activation was mediated by ROS and AKT, and that HA-induced AP-1 activation was mediated by JNK and ERK. Notably, HA-mediated AKT, JNK, and ERK activation was ROS-independent. The inflammatory potential of HA was correlated with increased expression of HO-1 and Nrf2. Furthermore, an in vivo study confirms that mice exposed to HA, the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. This report marks the first confirmation that environmental exposure of HA induces inflammation in macrophages, which may be one of the main causes of early atherogenesis in blackfoot disease. - Highlights: • Humic acid (HA) induce pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators in macrophages. • HA-induced inflammation is mediated by ROS and NF-κB/AP-1 signaling pathways. • The inflammatory potential of HA correlated with activation of Nrf2/HO-1 genes. • HA exposure to mice increased pro-inflammatory cytokines production in vivo. • HA may be one of the main causes of early

  6. Hydrothermal reactivity of saponite.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, G.

    1983-01-01

    The nature and extent of the reactions of synthetic Fe-free saponite have been investigated under experimental hydrothermal conditions as a first step towards understanding saponite reactivity under relatively simple conditions. Saponite crystallizes from amorphous gel of ideal saponite composition within 7 days at 300o-550oC under P = 1 kbar. Reactions subsequent to this initial crystallization depend on reaction T and interlayer cations. Saponite is found to react hydrothermally, over a period of 200 days, at T down to 400oC, at least 150oC lower than previously reported, but showed no signs of reaction below 400oC. At 450oC, a mixture of talc/saponite and saponite/phlogopite clays forms from K-saponite via intracrystalline layer transformations, while above 450oC the initial K-saponite dissolves, with talc and phlogopite forming as discrete phases. After 200 days reactions at 400-450oC were not complete, so that given sufficient time to reach equilibrium, a lower hydrothermal stability limit for saponite is possible. Further study of the Fe-bearing saponite system will be required before experimental results can be applied to natural systems.-D.F.B.

  7. Integrated reactive absorption process for synthesis of fatty esters.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Anton Alexandru; Bildea, Costin Sorin

    2011-01-01

    Reactive separations using green catalysts offer great opportunities for manufacturing fatty esters, involved in specialty chemicals and biodiesel production. Integrating reaction and separation into one unit provides key benefits such as: simplified operation, no waste, reduced capital investment and low operating costs. This work presents a novel heat-integrated reactive absorption process that eliminates all conventional catalyst related operations, efficiently uses the raw materials and equipment, and considerably reduces the energy requirements for biodiesel production--85% lower as compared to the base case. Rigorous simulations based on experimental results were carried out using Aspen Plus and Dynamics. Despite the high degree of integration, the process is well controllable using an efficient control structure proposed in this work. The main results are provided for a plant producing 10 ktpy fatty acid methyl esters from methanol and waste vegetable oil with high free fatty acids content, using sulfated zirconia as solid acid catalyst. PMID:20855198

  8. Humic acid in drinking well water induces inflammation through reactive oxygen species generation and activation of nuclear factor-κB/activator protein-1 signaling pathways: a possible role in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Senthil Kumar, K J; Chen, Chih-Sheng; Cho, Hsin-Ju; Lin, Shu-Wei; Shen, Pei-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Lu, Fung-Jou; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2014-01-15

    Humic acid (HA) has been implicated as one of the etiological factors in the peripheral vasculopathy of blackfoot disease (BFD) in Taiwan. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of BFD are not well defined. In this study, we used an in vitro and in vivo model, in which HA (25-200μg/mL) activated macrophages to produce pro-inflammatory molecules by activating their transcriptional factors. HA exposure induced NO and PGE2 production followed by induction of iNOS and COX-2 through NF-κB/AP-1 transactivation in macrophages. In addition, the production of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased by HA. Moreover, HA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were down-regulated by the NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and Tanshinone, respectively. Furthermore, generations of ROS and nitrotyrosine, as well as activation of the AKT and MAPKs signaling cascades were observed after HA exposure. Specifically, HA-induced NF-κB activation was mediated by ROS and AKT, and that HA-induced AP-1 activation was mediated by JNK and ERK. Notably, HA-mediated AKT, JNK, and ERK activation was ROS-independent. The inflammatory potential of HA was correlated with increased expression of HO-1 and Nrf2. Furthermore, an in vivo study confirms that mice exposed to HA, the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. This report marks the first confirmation that environmental exposure of HA induces inflammation in macrophages, which may be one of the main causes of early atherogenesis in blackfoot disease. PMID:24239652

  9. Kinetics of reactive wetting

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.

    2000-04-14

    The importance of interfacial processes in materials joining has a long history. A significant amount of work has suggested that processes collateral to wetting can affect the extent of wetting and moderate or retard wetting rate. Even very small additions of a constituent, known to react with the substrate, cause pronounced improvement in wetting and are exploited in braze alloys, especially those used for joining to ceramics. In the following a model will be constructed for the wetting kinetics of a small droplet of metal containing a constituent that diffuses to the wetting line and chemically reacts with a flat, smooth substrate. The model is similar to that of Voitovitch et al. and Mortensen et al. but incorporates chemical reaction kinetics such that the result contains both diffusion and reaction kinetics. The model is constructed in the circular cylinder coordinate system, satisfies the diffusion equation under conditions of slow flow, and considers diffusion and reaction at the wetting line to be processes in series. This is done by solving the diffusion equation with proper initial and boundary conditions, computing the diffusive flux at the wetting line, and equating this to both the convective flux and reaction flux. This procedure is similar to equating the current flowing in components of a series circuit. The wetting rate will be computed versus time for a variety of diffusion and reaction conditions. A transition is observed from nonlinear (diffusive) to linear (reactive) behavior as the control parameters (such as the diffusion coefficient) are modified. This is in agreement with experimental observations. The adequacy of the slow flow condition, used in this type of analysis, is discussed and an amended procedure is suggested.

  10. Reactive-infiltration instability in radial geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzki, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    A planar dissolution front propagating through a homogeneous porous matrix is unstable with respect to small variations in local permeability; regions of high permeability dissolve faster because of enhanced transport of reactants, which leads to increased rippling of the front. This phenomenon, usually referred to known as reactive-infiltration instability is an important mechanism for pattern development in geology, with a range of morphologies and scales, from cave systems running for hundreds of miles to laboratory acidization on the scale of centimeters. In general, this instability is characterized by two length scales: the diffusive length (D/v) and the reactant penetration length (v/r), where v is the Darcy velocity, D - the diffusion constant and r - the dissolution rate. If the latter scale is much smaller than the former one can adopt the so-called thin front limit, where the interface is treated as a discontinuity in porosity, with a completely dissolved phase on one side and an undissolved phase on the other. Linear stability analysis for this case has been carried out by Chadam et al. [1], and the corresponding dispersion relation shows that long wavelengths are unstable, whereas short wavelengths are stabilized by diffusion. In their derivation, Chadam et al. have considered a linear geometry with a uniform pressure gradient applied along one of the directions. However, in many cases (e.g. in the acidization techniques used in oil industry) the reactive fluids are injected through a well and thus the relevant geometry is radial rather than linear. Motivated by this, we have carried out the linear stability analysis of the reactive-infiltration problem in radial geometry, with the fluid injection at the centre of the system. We stay within the thin-front limit and derive the corresponding dispersion relation, which shows the stable regions for both the long-wavelength and short-wavelength modes, and the unstable region in between. Next, we study how

  11. The diffusion-active permeable reactive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Alex O.; Rittmann, Bruce E.

    2010-03-01

    Using the biogeochemical model CCBATCH, which we expanded to include transport processes, we study a novel approach for the treatment of aquifers contaminated with toxic concentrations of metals, the diffusion-active permeable reactive barrier (DAPRB), which is based on generation of sulfide by Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) as the groundwater moves through a layered treatment zone. In the DAPRB, layers of low conductivity (low-K) containing reactive materials are intercalated between layers of high conductivity (high-K) that transport the groundwater across the barrier. Because diffusion dominates transport in the reactive layers, microbial communities can take advantage there of the chemical-gradient mechanism for protection from toxicants. The ideal sulfidic DAPRB design includes particulate organic matter (POM) and solid sulfate mineral inside the reactive (low-K) layer. This leads to sulfate reduction and the formation of sulfide ligands that complex with toxic metals, such as Zn 2+ in the high-K layer. We perform a theoretical biogeochemical analysis of the ideal configuration of a DAPRB for treatment of Zn-contaminated groundwater. Our analysis using the expanded CCBATCH confirms the gradient-resistance mechanism for bio-protection, with the ZnS bio-sink forming at the intersection of the Zn and sulfide plumes inside the high-K layers of the DAPRB. The detailed DAPRB analysis also shows that total alkalinity and pH distributions are representative footprints of the two key biogeochemical processes taking place, sulfidogenesis and Zn immobilization as sulfide mineral. This is so because these two reactions consume or produce acidic hydrogen and alkalinity. Additionally, because Zn immobilization is due to ZnS mineral precipitation, the ZnS mineral distribution is a good indicator for the bio-sink. Bio-sinks are located for the most part within the high-K layers, and their exact position depends on the relative magnitude of metal and sulfide fluxes. Finally

  12. Adolescents’ Emotional Reactivity across Relationship Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Emily C.; Buehler, Cheryl; Blair, Bethany L.

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents’ emotional reactivity in family, close friendships, and romantic relationships was examined in a community-based sample of 416 two-parent families. Six waves of annual data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Emotional reactivity to interparental conflict during early adolescence was associated prospectively with adolescents’ reactivity to conflict in friendships and romantic relationships during middle adolescence. Close friendship reactivity partially explained the prospective association between reactivity to interparental conflict and romantic relationship reactivity. The association between perceived emotional reactivity and relationship conflict was stronger for girls than boys. Results have important developmental implications regarding adolescents’ emotional reactivity across salient interpersonal contexts during adolescence. PMID:22545839

  13. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  14. Kinetics of Reactive Wetting

    SciTech Connect

    YOST, FREDERICK G.

    1999-09-09

    for a variety of diffusion and reaction conditions. A transition is observed from nonlinear (diffusive) to linear (reactive) behavior as the control parameters (such as the diffusion coefficient) are modified. This is in agreement with experimental observations. The adequacy of the slow flow condition, used in this type of analysis, is discussed and an amended procedure is suggested.

  15. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  16. Synchronous reactive programming in Ptolemy

    SciTech Connect

    Boulanger, F.; Vidal-Naquet, G.

    1996-12-31

    Synchronous reactive languages allow a high level deterministic description of reactive systems such as control-command systems. Their well defined mathematical semantics makes it possible to check formal properties on the control of a system. In previous work, we developed an object-oriented execution model for synchronous reactive modules. This model is implemented as a set of tools and a C++ class library, and allows us to use object-oriented methodologies and tools for the design of complex applications with both transformational and reactive parts. Among these design tools, the Ptolemy system stands as an object-oriented framework that supports various execution models, or {open_quotes}domains{close_quotes}. We are currently working on a translator from the output format of the Lustre and Esterel compilers to the Ptolemy language. Since no existing domain matches the reactive synchronous execution model, we also plan to develop a SEC (Synchronous Execution and Communication) domain. Such a domain will provide support for the execution of synchronous modules in Ptolemy. One of the most interesting features of Ptolemy is the communication between domains. Therefore we discuss the interface of the SEC domain to other domains to determine the meaning of communications between them. The main goal is to allow the use of synchronous reactive modules for the control of the behavior of data-flow or discrete event processes.

  17. Reactivity of Gold Complexes towards Elementary Organometallic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Joost, Maximilian; Amgoune, Abderrahmane; Bourissou, Didier

    2015-12-01

    For a while, the reactivity of gold complexes was largely dominated by their Lewis acid behavior. In contrast to the other transition metals, the elementary steps of organometallic chemistry-oxidative addition, reductive elimination, transmetallation, migratory insertion-have scarcely been studied in the case of gold or even remained unprecedented until recently. However, within the last few years, the ability of gold complexes to undergo these fundamental reactions has been unambiguously demonstrated, and the reactivity of gold complexes was shown to extend well beyond π-activation. In this Review, the main achievements described in this area are presented in a historical context. Particular emphasis is set on mechanistic studies and structure determination of key intermediates. The electronic and structural parameters delineating the reactivity of gold complexes are discussed, as well as the remaining challenges. PMID:26768342

  18. Quantitative reactivity profiling predicts functional cysteines in proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Weerapana, Eranthie; Wang, Chu; Simon, Gabriel M.; Richter, Florian; Khare, Sagar; Dillon, Myles B.D.; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Mowen, Kerri; Baker, David; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2010-01-01

    Cysteine is the most intrinsically nucleophilic amino acid in proteins, where its reactivity is tuned to perform diverse biochemical functions. The absence of a consensus sequence that defines functional cysteines in proteins has hindered their discovery and characterization. Here, we describe a proteomics method to quantitatively profile the intrinsic reactivity of cysteine residues en masse directly in native biological systems. Hyperreactivity was a rare feature among cysteines and found to specify a wide range of activities, including nucleophilic and reductive catalysis and sites of oxidative modification. Hyperreactive cysteines were identified in several proteins of uncharacterized function, including a residue conserved across eukaryotic phylogeny that we show is required for yeast viability and involved in iron-sulfur protein biogenesis. Finally, we demonstrate that quantitative reactivity profiling can also form the basis for screening and functional assignment of cysteines in computationally designed proteins, where it discriminated catalytically active from inactive cysteine hydrolase designs. PMID:21085121

  19. Oleochemical synthesis of an acid cleavable hydrophobe for surfactant use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reaction between epoxidized methyl oleate and the multifunctional carboxylic acid, levulinic acid, is shown to give two products of differing chemical reactivity. A branched alpha-hydroxy ester product which is acid stable, and a ketal product, which shows acid cleavability can be formed. The ...

  20. Statistical mechanical treatment of reactive solvent extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukhezo, M.; Dunne, L. J.; Reuben, B. G.; Verrall, M. S.

    1997-07-01

    A statistical mechanical lattice model of a reactive solvent extraction process involving two phase liquid-liquid ion exchange is presented. It is applied to literature data on the extraction of alipathic carboxylic acids by quaternary ammonium salts. The Helmholtz free energy of the system is constructed and minimised subject to the constraints of mass balance and electroneutrality. The equations defining the equilibrium conditions have been solved numerically for a range of interaction parameters and hence the equilibrium concentrations of the various partitioned species are obtained. These interaction parameters are compared with experiment. The intuitive notion that the extent of partition is dominated by electrostatic solute-extractant interactions is shown to neglect various other interactions that may, in some systems, be important.

  1. Reactivity of hair cystine in microemulsion media.

    PubMed

    Erra, P; Solans, C; Azemar, N; Parra, J L; Touraud, D; Clausse, M

    1990-04-01

    Synopsis Reduction of keratin cystine by thioglycolic acid incorporated in microemulsions of the water/sodium dodecilsulphate/n-pentanol/n-dodecane system has been determined. The results obtained have been interpreted in relation to the properties of the reaction media. Microemulsions with constant oil-to-surface active mixture weight ratios (R(o/s)) and different concentrations of water were chosen as reaction media. At low water concentrations a steep increase in reactivity with the increase of water was observed at all values of R(o/s). However it was more pronounced the higher the oil content. A relation between maximum cysteine formation and percolative behaviour of the microemulsion was found at high R(o/s) values. PMID:19456961

  2. Reactivity to nicotine cues over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

    PubMed

    LaRowe, Steven D; Saladin, Michael E; Carpenter, Matthew J; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P

    2007-12-01

    The present study investigated whether reactivity to nicotine-related cues would attenuate across four experimental sessions held 1 week apart. Participants were nineteen non-treatment seeking, nicotine-dependent males. Cue reactivity sessions were performed in an outpatient research center using in vivo cues consisting of standardized smoking-related paraphernalia (e.g., cigarettes) and neutral comparison paraphernalia (e.g., pencils). Craving ratings were collected before and after both cue presentations while physiological measures (heart rate, skin conductance) were collected before and during the cue presentations. Although craving levels decreased across sessions, smoking-related cues consistently evoked significantly greater increases in craving relative to neutral cues over all four experimental sessions. Skin conductance was higher in response to smoking cues, though this effect was not as robust as that observed for craving. Results suggest that, under the described experimental parameters, craving can be reliably elicited over repeated cue reactivity sessions. PMID:17537583

  3. NUCLEOPHILIC ADDITION TO ACTIVATED DOUBLE BONDS: PREDICTION OF REACTIVITY FROM THE LAPLACIAN OF CHARGE DENSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reactivities of a series of molecules in a Michael addition reaction are analyzed on the basis of properties expressed in the Laplacian of the charge density distribution. he charge densities of structurally optimized acrylic acid (AA), methacrylic acid (MAA), acrylonitrile (...

  4. Tropomyosin lysine reactivities and relationship to coiled-coil structure.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock-DeGregori, S E; Lewis, S F; Chou, T M

    1985-06-18

    We have carried out a detailed analysis of tropomyosin structure using lysines as specific probes for the protein surface in regions of the molecule that have not been investigated by other methods. We have measured the relative reactivities of lysines in rabbit skeletal muscle alpha, alpha-tropomyosin with acetic anhydride using a competitive labeling procedure. We have identified 37 of 39 lysines and find that they range 20-fold in reactivity. The observed reactivities are related to the coiled-coil model of the tropomyosin molecule [Crick, F.H.C. (1953) Acta Crystallogr. 6, 689-697; McLachlan, A.D., Stewart, M., & Smillie, L.B. (1975) J. Mol. Biol. 98, 281-291] and other available chemical and physical information about the structure. In most cases, the observed lysine reactivities can be explained by allowable interactions with neighboring amino acid side chains on the same or facing alpha-helix. However, we found no correlation between reactivity and helical position of a given lysine. For example, lysines in the outer helical positions included lysines of low as well as high reactivity, indicating that they vary widely in their accessibility to solvent and that the coiled coil is heterogeneous along its length. Furthermore, the middle of the molecule (residues 126-182) that is susceptible to proteolysis and known to be the least stable region of the protein also contains some of the least and most reactive lysines. We have discussed the implications of our results on our understanding the structures of tropomyosin and other coiled-coil proteins as well as globular proteins containing helical regions. PMID:3927977

  5. Unprecedented synergistic effects between weak Lewis and Brønsted acids in Prins cyclization.

    PubMed

    Borkar, Prashant; van de Weghe, Pierre; Reddy, B V Subba; Yadav, J S; Grée, René

    2012-09-25

    Novel synergistic effects between Lewis and Brønsted acids in Prins cyclization are reported. Non-reactive Lewis acids and non-reactive Brønsted acids, which failed to perform Prins cyclization when used alone, have shown remarkable synergistic effects when used in combination to perform the reaction successfully. PMID:22885680

  6. Acid-functionalized polyolefin materials and their use in acid-promoted chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Tian, Chengcheng; Bauer, John Christopher; Dai, Sheng

    2016-06-07

    An acid-functionalized polyolefin material that can be used as an acid catalyst in a wide range of acid-promoted chemical reactions, wherein the acid-functionalized polyolefin material includes a polyolefin backbone on which acid groups are appended. Also described is a method for the preparation of the acid catalyst in which a precursor polyolefin is subjected to ionizing radiation (e.g., electron beam irradiation) of sufficient power and the irradiated precursor polyolefin reacted with at least one vinyl monomer having an acid group thereon. Further described is a method for conducting an acid-promoted chemical reaction, wherein an acid-reactive organic precursor is contacted in liquid form with a solid heterogeneous acid catalyst comprising a polyolefin backbone of at least 1 micron in one dimension and having carboxylic acid groups and either sulfonic acid or phosphoric acid groups appended thereto.

  7. Influence of microemulsion structure on cystine reactivity with keratin fibres.

    PubMed

    Solans, C; Parra, J L; Erra, P; Azemar, N; Clausse, M; Touraud, D

    1987-10-01

    Summary The activity of thioglycolic acid, incorporated in a microemulsion, towards cystine residues present in keratin proteins has been investigated. In an attempt to relate the structural state of the microemulsions to cystine reactivity, an appropriate model system showing a large microemulsion domain with diverse structures was chosen. The realm of preferentially hydrocarbon-continuous microemulsion-type media was found to induce the highest activity. PMID:19456980

  8. Characterization and reactivity of sodium aluminoborosilicate glass fiber surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz Rivera, Lymaris; Bakaev, Victor A.; Banerjee, Joy; Mueller, Karl T.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2016-05-01

    Multicomponent complex oxides, such as sodium aluminoborosilicate glass fibers, are important materials used for thermal insulation in buildings and homes. Although the surface properties of single oxides, such as silica, have been extensively studied, less is known about the distribution of reactive sites at the surface of multicomponent oxides. Here, we investigated the reactivity of sodium aluminoborosilicate glass fiber surfaces for better understanding of their interface chemistry and bonding with acrylic polymers. Acetic acid (with and without a 13C enrichment) was used as a probe representative of the carboxylic functional groups in many acrylic polymers and adhesives. Inverse gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer (IGC-MS), and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), were used to characterize the fiber surface reactions and surface chemical structure. In this way, we discovered that both sodium ions in the glass surface, as well as sodium carbonate salts that formed on the surface due to the intrinsic reactivity of this glass in humid air, are primary sites of interaction with the carboxylic acid. Surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of sodium carbonates on these surfaces. Computer simulations of the interactions between the reactive sites on the glass fiber surface with acetic acid were performed to evaluate energetically favorable reactions. The adsorption reactions with sodium in the glass structure provide adhesive bonding sites, whereas the reaction with the sodium carbonate consumes the acid to form sodium-carboxylate, H2O and CO2 without any contribution to chemical bonding at the interface.

  9. DETERMINATION OF SPECIFIC NEUTRONIC REACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Dessauer, G.

    1960-05-10

    A method is given for production-line determination of the specific neutronic reactivity of such objects as individual nuclear fuel or neutron absorber elements and is notable for rapidity and apparatus simplicity. The object is incorporated in a slightly sub-critical chain fission reactive assembly having a discrete neutron source, thereby establishing a K/sub eff/ within the crucial range of 0.95 to 0.995. The range was found to afford, uniquely, flux- transient damped response in a niatter of seconds simultaneously with acceptable analytical sensitivity. The resulting neutron flux measured at a situs spaced from both object and source within the assembly serves as a calibrable indication of said reactivity.

  10. Deleterious effects of reactive metabolites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A number of drugs have been withdrawn from the market or severely restricted in their use because of unexpected toxicities that become apparent only after the launch of new drug entities. Circumstantial evidence suggests that, in most cases, reactive metabolites are responsible for these unexpected toxicities. In this review, a general overview of the types of reactive metabolites and the consequences of their formation are presented. The current approaches to evaluate bioactivation potential of new compounds with particular emphasis on the advantages and limitation of these procedures will be discussed. Reasonable reasons for the excellent safety record of certain drugs susceptible to bioactivation will also be explored and should provide valuable guidance in the use of reactive-metabolite assessments when nominating drug candidates for development. This will, in turn, help us to design and bring safer drugs to the market. PMID:20972370

  11. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  12. Reactivity of Various Compound Classes Towards the Folin-Ciocalteu Reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Richard B.; Everette, Jace D.; Bryant, Quinton M.; Green, Ashlee M.; Abbey, Yvonne A.; Wangila, Grant W.

    2010-04-01

    The Folin-Ciocalteu assay has been used for over 80 years for the detection and quantitation of phenols. A modification of it, called the Lowry assay, is used for the quantitation of proteins. It has been commonly reported that the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent, which is a complex mixture containing sodium molybdate and sodium tungstate, is reactive towards other antioxidants besides phenols. However, until now, no one has done experiments to test this hypothesis. In our study, we tested the reactivity of the reagent towards over 70 compounds. Compound classes included phenols, thiols, vitamins, amino acids, proteins, nucleotide bases, unsaturated fatty acids, carbohydrates, organic acids, inorganic ions, aldehydes and ketones. All phenols, proteins and thiols tested were reactive towards the reagent. Other compounds which showed reactivity included guanine, glyceraldehyde, dihydroxyacetone, tyrosine, tryptophan, cysteine, ascorbic acid, Trolox, retinoic acid, pyridoxine, Fe+2, Mn+2, I- and SO3-2. In summary, our study showed that the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent is significantly reactive towards other compounds besides phenols. Therefore, it should be seen as a measure of total antioxidant capacity rather than phenolic content. It would be useful as a general antioxidant assay for measuring antioxidant capacities of compounds of biomedical interest.

  13. PROCEEDINGS: MULTIPOLLUTANT SORBENT REACTIVITY WORKSHOP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a compilation of technical papers and visual aids presented by representatives of industry, academia, and government agencies at a workshop on multipollutant sorbent reactivity that was held at EPA's Environmental Research Center in Research Triangle Park, NC, on Ju...

  14. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  15. Emotional Reactivity and Psychological Distress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Rosen, Karen H.; Stith, Sandra M.

    2002-01-01

    This article reports on an empirical test of Bowen's hypothesized relationships between differentiation of self and psychological symptoms, and examines further evidence for the construct validity of a newly developed instrument, the Behavioral and Emotional Reactivity Index (BERI). Finds an indirect relationship between emotional reactivity…

  16. Improving TCO-Conjugated Antibody Reactivity for Bioorthogonal Pretargeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Tina Tingyi

    Cancer remains a major cause of death because of its unpredictable progression. Utilizing bioorthogonal chemistry between trans-cyclooctene (TCO) and tetrazine to target imaging agents to tumors in two subsequent steps offers a more versatile platform for molecular imaging. This is accomplished by pretargeting TCO-modified primary antibody to cell surface biomarkers, followed by delivery of tetrazine-modified imaging probes. In previous work, it has been established that TCO-tetrazine chemistry can be applied to in vivo imaging, resulting in precise tumor detection. However, most TCO modifications on an antibody are not reactive because they are buried within hydrophobic domains. To expose and improve the reactivity, Rahim et al. incorporated a polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker through a two-step reaction with DBCO-azide, which successfully maintained 100% TCO functionality. In this project, various types of linkers were studied to improve the reactivity in a single step. Three primary types of linkers were studied: hydrophilic PEG chains, hydrophobic short linkers, and amphiphilic linkers. Our results show that PEG chain alone can only maintain 40% TCO reactivity. Unexpectedly, a short alkyl chain (valeric acid) provided superior results, with 60% TCO reactivity. Lengthening the alkyl chain did not improve results further. Finally, an amphiphilic linker containing valeric acid and PEG performed worse than either linker type alone, at ˜30% functionality. We conclude that our previous 100% functional TCO result obtained with the two-step coupling may have stemmed from generation of the DBCO/azide cycloaddition product. Future work will explore factors such as rigidity of linker structure, polarity, or charges.

  17. Studies on Dyeing Process Variables for Salt Free Reactive Dyeing of Glycine Modified Cationized Cotton Muslin Fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Ashis Kumar; Kar, Tapas Ranjan; Mukhopadhyay, Asis; Shome, Debashis; Konar, Adwaita

    2015-04-01

    Bleached cotton muslin fabric with or without pre-oxidized with NaIO4 (oxy-cotton) was chemically modified with glycine (amino acid) by pad dry calendar process to investigate the changes in textile properties and its dyeability with reactive dye. This glycine modified cotton incorporates new functional groups producing -NH3 + or -C=NH+ -ion (cationic groups) in acid bath to obtain cationized cotton making it amenable to a newer route of salt free reactive dyeing in acid bath. In the present work the process variables of reactive dyeing in the salt free acid bath for dyeing of amine (glycine) modified cationized cotton were studied and optimized. The present study also includes thorough investigation of changes in important textile related properties and dyeability with reactive dye after such chemical modifications. Between oxidized and unoxidized cotton muslin fabric, unoxidized cotton fabric shows better reactive dye uptake in both conventional alkaline bath dyeing and nonconventional salt free acid bath dyeing particularly for high exhaustion class of reactive dye with acceptable level of colour fastness and overall balance of other textile related properties. Moreover, application of dye fixing agent further improves surface colour depth (K/S) of the glycine treated cotton fabric for HE brand of reactive dyes. Corresponding reaction mechanisms for such modifications were supported by FTIR spectroscopy. Finally unoxidized cotton and pre-oxidized cotton further treated with glycine (amino acid) provide a new route of acid bath salt free reactive dyeing showing much higher dye uptake and higher degree of surface cover with amino acid residue anchored to modified cotton.

  18. Induction of depression-related behaviors by reactivation of chronic Toxoplasma gondii infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Motamed Elsayed; Ihara, Fumiaki; Fereig, Ragab M; Nishimura, Maki; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2016-02-01

    Although Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection is relevant to many psychiatric disorders, the fundamental mechanisms of its neurobiological correlation with depression are poorly understood. Here, we show that reactivation of chronic infection by an immunosuppressive regimen caused induction of depressive-like behaviors without obvious sickness symptoms. However, the depression-related behaviors in T. gondii-infected mice, specifically, reduced sucrose preference and increased immobility in the forced-swim test were observed at the reactivation stage, but not in the chronic infection. Interestingly, reactivation of T. gondii was associated with production of interferon-gamma and activation of brain indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase, which converts tryptophan to kynurenine and makes it unavailable for serotonin synthesis. Furthermore, serotonin turnover to its major metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, was also enhanced at the reactivation stage. Thus, enhanced tryptophan catabolic shunt and serotonin turnover may be implicated in development of depressive-like behaviors in mice with reactivated T. gondii. PMID:26554725

  19. Astrocyte reactivity and reactive astrogliosis: costs and benefits.

    PubMed

    Pekny, Milos; Pekna, Marcela

    2014-10-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the central nervous system (CNS) that provide nutrients, recycle neurotransmitters, as well as fulfill a wide range of other homeostasis maintaining functions. During the past two decades, astrocytes emerged also as increasingly important regulators of neuronal functions including the generation of new nerve cells and structural as well as functional synapse remodeling. Reactive gliosis or reactive astrogliosis is a term coined for the morphological and functional changes seen in astroglial cells/astrocytes responding to CNS injury and other neurological diseases. Whereas this defensive reaction of astrocytes is conceivably aimed at handling the acute stress, limiting tissue damage, and restoring homeostasis, it may also inhibit adaptive neural plasticity mechanisms underlying recovery of function. Understanding the multifaceted roles of astrocytes in the healthy and diseased CNS will undoubtedly contribute to the development of treatment strategies that will, in a context-dependent manner and at appropriate time points, modulate reactive astrogliosis to promote brain repair and reduce the neurological impairment. PMID:25287860

  20. Synthesis and analysis of reactive nanocomposites prepared arrested reactive milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbrajkar, Swati M.

    Different types of reactive nanocomposites have been synthesized by Arrested Reactive Milling (ARM). The technical approach was to increase the interface area available for heterogeneous reaction between solid fuel and oxidizer components. Using aluminum as the main fuel and different metal oxides as oxidizers, highly energetic reactive nanocomposites with different degrees of structural refinement were synthesized. Specifically, stoichiometric Al-MoO 3, Al-CuO, and Al-NaNO3 material systems were studied in detail. The correlation of heterogeneous exothermic reactions occurring in the nanocomposite powders upon their heating at low rates and ignition events observed for the same powders heated rapidly was of interest. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and heated filament ignition experiments were used to quantify the ignition kinetics and related reaction mechanisms. Fuel rich Al-MoO3 nanocomposites were also synthesized using ARM. Optimum composition and milling parameters were identified for fuel-rich compositions. Analysis of exothermic reactions in Al-MoO3 system showed that kinetics of such reactions could not be determined by isoconversion processing and respective activation energies could not be meaningfully found as functions of reaction progress. Instead, detailed DSC measurements at different heating rates are required to enable one in developing a multi-step kinetic model to describe such reactions adequately.

  1. Character of Humic Substances as a Predictor for Goethite Nanoparticle Reactivity and Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Vindedahl, Amanda M; Stemig, Melissa S; Arnold, William A; Penn, R Lee

    2016-02-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is ubiquitous in surface water and groundwater and interacts strongly with mineral surfaces. The details of these interactions, as well as their impacts on mineral surface reactivity, are not well understood. In this work, both the reactivity and aggregation of goethite (α-FeOOH) nanoparticles were quantified in the presence of well-characterized humic substances. Results from monitoring the kinetics of reductive degradation of 4-chloronitrobenzene (4-ClNB) by Fe(II) adsorbed onto the goethite nanoparticles with and without added humic substances demonstrates that, in all cases, humic substances suppressed Fe(II)-goethite reactivity. The ranking of the standards from the least to most inhibitive was Pahokee Peat humic acid, Elliot Soil humic acid, Suwannee River humic acid, Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid I, Suwannee River fulvic acid II, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid. Correlations between eight characteristics (molecular weight, carboxyl concentration, and carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, aliphatic, heteroaliphatic, and aromatic content) and 4-ClNB degradation rate constants were observed. Faster kinetic rates of reductive degradation were observed with increased molecular weight and nitrogen, carbon, and aromatic content, and slower rates were observed with increased carboxyl concentration and oxygen, heteroaliphatic, and aliphatic content. With these correlations, improved predictions of the reactivity of Fe(II)-goethite with pollutants based on properties of the humic substances are possible. PMID:26790005

  2. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? C-Reactive Protein Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: CRP Formal name: C-Reactive Protein Related tests: ESR , Complement , Procalcitonin , ANA , Rheumatoid Factor ...

  3. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2015-07-14

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  4. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2013-12-31

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  5. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    DOEpatents

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2016-06-28

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  6. Utilization of acid tars

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, A.F.; Denisova, T.L.; Aminov, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    Freshly produced acid tar (FPAT), obtained as refinery waste in treating petroleum oils with sulfuric acid and oleum, contains 80% or more sulfuric acid. Of such tars, pond acid tars, which contain up to 80% neutral petroleum products and sulfonated resins, are more stable, and have found applications in the production of binders for paving materials. In this article the authors are presenting results obtained in a study of the composition and reactivity of FPAT and its stability in storage in blends with asphalts obtained in deasphalting operations, and the possibility of using the FPAT in road construction has been examined. In this work, wastes were used which were obtained in treating the oils T-750, KhF-12, I-8A, and MS-14. Data on the change in group chemical composition of FPAT are shown, and the acidity, viscosity, needle penetration, and softening point of acid tars obtained from different grades of oils are plotted as functions of the storage time. It is also shown that the fresh and hardened FPATs differ in their solubilities in various solvents.

  7. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination. PMID:26227050

  8. Perceptual basis for reactive teleoperation.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y. S.; Ewing, T. F.; Boyle, J. M.; Yule, T. J.

    2001-08-28

    To enhance task performance in partially structured environment, enhancement of teleoperation was proposed by introducing autonomous behaviors. Such autonomy is implemented based on reactive robotic architecture, where reactive motor agents that directly couples sensory inputs and motor actions become the building blocks. To this end, presented in this paper is a perceptual basis for the motor agents. The perceptual basis consists of perceptual agents that extracts environmental information from a structured light vision system and provide action oriented perception for the corresponding motor agents. Rather than performing general scene reconstruction, a perceptual agent directly provides the motion reference for the motor behavior. Various sensory mechanisms--sensor fission, fusion, and fashion--becomes basic building blocks of the perception process. Since perception is a process deeply intertwined with the motor actions, active perception may also incorporate motor behaviors as an integral perceptual process.

  9. Reactive behavior, learning, and anticipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Steven D.; Ballard, Dana H.

    1989-01-01

    Reactive systems always act, thinking only long enough to 'look up' the action to execute. Traditional planning systems think a lot, and act only after generating fairly precise plans. Each represents an endpoint on a spectrum. It is argued that primitive forms of reasoning, like anticipation, play an important role in reducing the cost of learning and that the decision to act or think should be based on the uncertainty associated with the utility of executing an action in a particular situation. An architecture for an adaptable reactive system is presented and it is shown how it can be augmented with a simple anticipation mechanism that can substantially reduce the cost and time of learning.

  10. Melioidosis: reactivation during radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jegasothy, B.V.; Goslen, J.B.; Salvatore, M.A.

    1980-05-01

    Melioidosis is caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei, a gram-negative, motile bacillus which is a naturally occurring soil saprophyte. The organism is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Philippines, Australia, and parts of Central and South America. Most human disease occurs from infection acquired in these countries. Infection with P pseudomallei may produce no apparent clinical disease. Acute pneumonitis or septicemia may result from inhalation of the organism, and inoculation into sites of trauma may cause localized skin abscesses, or the disease may remain latent and be reactivated months or years later by trauma, burns, or pneumococcal pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis, influenza, or bronchogenic carcinoma. The last is probably the commonest form of melioidosis seen in the United States. We present the first case of reactivation of melioidosis after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the lung, again emphasizing the need to consider melioidosis in a septic patient with a history of travel, especially to Southeast Asia.

  11. Functional Reactive Polymer Electrospun Matrix.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Vipul; Ho, Dominic; Ho, Diwei; Galabura, Yuriy; Yasin, Faizah; Gong, Peijun; Ye, Weike; Singh, Ruhani; Munshi, Alaa; Saunders, Martin; Woodward, Robert C; St Pierre, Timothy; Wood, Fiona M; Fear, Mark; Lorenser, Dirk; Sampson, David D; Zdyrko, Bogdan; Luzinov, Igor; Smith, Nicole M; Iyer, K Swaminathan

    2016-02-01

    Synthetic multifunctional electrospun composites are a new class of hybrid materials with many potential applications. However, the lack of an efficient, reactive large-area substrate has been one of the major limitations in the development of these materials as advanced functional platforms. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of electrospun poly(glycidyl methacrylate) films as a highly versatile platform for the development of functional nanostructured materials anchored to a surface. The utility of this platform as a reactive substrate is demonstrated by grafting poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) to incorporate stimuli-responsive properties. Additionally, we demonstrate that functional nanocomposites can be fabricated using this platform with properties for sensing, fluorescence imaging, and magneto-responsiveness. PMID:26780245

  12. Chemical reactivity in solid-state pharmaceuticals: formulation implications.

    PubMed

    Byrn, S R; Xu, W; Newman, A W

    2001-05-16

    Solid-state reactions that occur in drug substances and formulations include solid-state phase transformations, dehydration/desolvation, and chemical reactions. Chemical reactivity is the focus of this chapter. Of particular interest are cases where the drug-substance may be unstable or react with excipients in the formulation. Water absorption can enhance molecular mobility of solids and lead to solid-state reactivity. Mobility can be measured using various methods including glass transition (T(g)) measurements, solid-state NMR, and X-ray crystallography. Solid-state reactions of drug substances can include oxidation, cyclization, hydrolysis, and deamidation. Oxidation studies of vitamin A, peptides (DL-Ala-DL-Met, N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe methyl ester, and Met-enkaphalin acetate salt), and steroids (hydrocortisone and prednisolone derivatives) are discussed. Cyclization reactions of crystalline and amorphous angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (spirapril hydrochloride, quinapril hydrochloride, and moexipril) are presented which investigate mobility and chemical reactivity. Examples of drug-excipient interactions, such as transacylation, the Maillard browning reaction, and acid base reactions are discussed for a variety of compounds including aspirin, fluoxitine, and ibuprofen. Once solid-state reactions are understood in a pharmaceutical system, the necessary steps can be taken to prevent reactivity and improve the stability of drug substances and products. PMID:11325479

  13. Glial Reactivity in Resistance to Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Danielle M.; Keefe, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    Neurotoxic regimens of methamphetamine (METH) result in reactive microglia and astrocytes in striatum. Prior data indicate that rats with partial dopamine (DA) loss resulting from prior exposure to METH are resistant to further decreases in striatal DA when re-exposed to METH 30 days later. Such resistant animals also do not show an activated microglia phenotype, suggesting a relation between microglial activation and METH-induced neurotoxicity. To date, the astrocyte response in such resistance has not been examined. Thus, this study examined glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and CD11b protein expression in striata of animals administered saline or a neurotoxic regimen of METH on postnatal days 60 and/or 90 (Saline:Saline, Saline:METH, METH:Saline, METH:METH). Consistent with previous work, animals experiencing acute toxicity (Saline:METH) showed both activated microglia and astocytes, whereas those resistant to the acute toxicity (METH:METH) did not show activated microglia. Interestingly, GFAP expression remained elevated in rats exposed to METH at PND60 (METH:Saline), and was not elevated further in resistant rats treated for the second time with METH (METH:METH). These data suggest that astrocytes remain reactive up to 30 days post-METH exposure. Additionally, these data indicate that astrocyte reactivity does not reflect acute, METH-induced DA terminal toxicity, whereas microglial reactivity does. PMID:23414433

  14. Engineering of Pyranose Dehydrogenase for Increased Oxygen Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Krondorfer, Iris; Lipp, Katharina; Brugger, Dagmar; Staudigl, Petra; Sygmund, Christoph; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens K.

    2014-01-01

    Pyranose dehydrogenase (PDH), a member of the GMC family of flavoproteins, shows a very broad sugar substrate specificity but is limited to a narrow range of electron acceptors and reacts extremely slowly with dioxygen as acceptor. The use of substituted quinones or (organo)metals as electron acceptors is undesirable for many production processes, especially of food ingredients. To improve the oxygen reactivity, site-saturation mutagenesis libraries of twelve amino acids around the active site of Agaricus meleagris PDH were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We established high-throughput screening assays for oxygen reactivity and standard dehydrogenase activity using an indirect Amplex Red/horseradish peroxidase and a DCIP/D-glucose based approach. The low number of active clones confirmed the catalytic role of H512 and H556. Only one position was found to display increased oxygen reactivity. Histidine 103, carrying the covalently linked FAD cofactor in the wild-type, was substituted by tyrosine, phenylalanine, tryptophan and methionine. Variant H103Y was produced in Pichia pastoris and characterized and revealed a five-fold increase of the oxygen reactivity. PMID:24614932

  15. Integrating planning and reactive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenschein, Stanley J.; Kaelbling, Leslie Pack

    1989-01-01

    Artificial intelligence research on planning is concerned with designing control systems that choose actions by manipulating explicit descriptions of the world state, the goal to be achieved, and the effects of elementary operations available to the system. Because planning shifts much of the burden of reasoning to the machine, it holds great appeal as a high-level programming method. Experience shows, however, that it cannot be used indiscriminately because even moderately rich languages for describing goals, states, and the elementary operators lead to computational inefficiencies that render the approach unsuitable for realistic applications. This inadequacy has spawned a recent wave of research on reactive control or situated activity in which control systems are modeled as reacting directly to the current situation rather than as reasoning about the future effects of alternative action sequences. While this research has confronted the issue of run-time tractability head on, in many cases it has done so by sacrificing the advantages of declarative planning techniques. Ways in which the two approaches can be unified are discussed. The authors begin by modeling reactive control systems as state machines that map a stream of sensory inputs to a stream of control outputs. These machines can be decomposed into two continuously active subsystems: the planner and the execution module. The planner computes a plan, which can be seen as a set of bits that control the behavior of the execution module. An important element of this work is the formulation of a precise semantic interpretation for the inputs and outputs of the planning system. They show that the distinction between planned and reactive behavior is largely in the eye of the beholder: systems that seem to compute explicit plans can be redescribed in situation-action terms and vice versa. They also discuss practical programming techniques that allow the advantages of declarative programming and guaranteed

  16. Uric acid protects erythrocytes from ozone-induced changes

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.; Smith, R.C.

    1987-08-01

    Uric acid effectively reduced hemolysis and methemoglobin formation in bovine and swine erythrocytes bubbled with ozone in vitro. In bovine erythrocytes, formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive material was inhibited by uric acid, but there was little immediate protection for the swine cells. Antioxidant protection was due to preferential degradation of the uric acid by ozone. These results provide evidence to support the hypothesis that in plasma, uric acid can provide antioxidant protection for erythrocytes.

  17. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-11-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids and quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (< 0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanic emissions.

  18. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-07-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids to quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (<0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanics.

  19. Reactivity of metal catalysts in glucose-fructose conversion.

    PubMed

    Loerbroks, Claudia; van Rijn, Jeaphianne; Ruby, Marc-Philipp; Tong, Qiong; Schüth, Ferdi; Thiel, Walter

    2014-09-15

    A joint experimental and computational study on the glucose-fructose conversion in water is reported. The reactivity of different metal catalysts (CrCl3, AlCl3, CuCl2, FeCl3, and MgCl2) was analyzed. Experimentally, CrCl3 and AlCl3 achieved the best glucose conversion rates, CuCl2 and FeCl3 were only mediocre catalysts, and MgCl2 was inactive. To explain these differences in reactivity, DFT calculations were performed for various metal complexes. The computed mechanism consists of two proton transfers and a hydrogen-atom transfer; the latter was the rate-determining step for all catalysts. The computational results were consistent with the experimental findings and rationalized the observed differences in the behavior of the metal catalysts. To be an efficient catalyst, a metal complex should satisfy the following criteria: moderate Brønsted and Lewis acidity (pKa = 4-6), coordination with either water or weaker σ donors, energetically low-lying unoccupied orbitals, compact transition-state structures, and the ability for complexation of glucose. Thus, the reactivity of the metal catalysts in water is governed by many factors, not just the Lewis acidity. PMID:25156402

  20. Blood radicals: reactive nitrogen species, reactive oxygen species, transition metal ions, and the vascular system.

    PubMed

    Darley-Usmar, V; Halliwell, B

    1996-05-01

    Free radicals, such as superoxide, hydroxyl and nitric oxide, and other "reactive species", such as hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid and peroxynitrite, are formed in vivo. Some of these molecules, e.g. superoxide and nitric oxide, can be physiologically useful, but they can also cause damage under certain circumstances. Excess production of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS, RNS), their production in inappropriate relative amounts (especially superoxide and NO) or deficiencies in antioxidant defences may result in pathological stress to cells and tissues. This oxidative stress can have multiple effects. It can induce defence systems, and render tissues more resistant to subsequent insult. If oxidative stress is excessive or if defence and repair responses are inadequate, cell injury can be caused by such mechanisms as oxidative damage to essential proteins, lipid peroxidation, DNA strand breakage and base modification, and rises in the concentration of intracellular "free" Ca(2+). Considerable evidence supports the view that oxidative damage involving both ROS and RNS is an important contributor to the development of atherosclerosis. Peroxynitrite (derived by reaction of superoxide with nitric oxide) and transition metal ions (perhaps released by injury to the vessel wall) may contribute to lipid peroxidation in atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:8860419

  1. Flaxseed oil increases aortic reactivity to phenylephrine through reactive oxygen species and the cyclooxygenase-2 pathway in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Flaxseed oil has the highest concentration of omega-3 α-linolenic acid, which has been associated with cardiovascular benefit. However, the mechanism underlying the vascular effects induced through flaxseed oil is not well known. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the effects of flaxseed oil on vascular function in isolated rat aortic rings. Methods Wistar rats were treated daily with flaxseed oil or a control (mineral oil) intramuscular (i.m.) for fifteen days. Isolated aortic segments were used to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression, superoxide anion levels and vascular reactivity experiments. Results Flaxseed oil treatment increased the vasoconstrictor response of aortic rings to phenylephrine. Endothelium removal increased the response to phenylephrine in aortic segments isolated from both groups, but the effect was smaller in the treated group. L-NAME incubation similarly increased the phenylephrine response in segments from both groups. The TXA2 synthase inhibitor furegrelate, the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS 398, the TP receptor antagonist SQ 29.548, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger apocynin, the superoxide anion scavengers tiron and the phospholipase A2 inhibitor dexamethasone partially reversed the flaxseed oil-induced increase in reactivity to phenylephrine. Conclusions These findings suggest that flaxseed oil treatment increased vascular reactivity to phenylephrine through an increase in ROS production and COX-2-derived TXA2 production. The results obtained in the present study provide new insight into the effects of flaxseed oil treatment (i.m.) on vascular function. PMID:24993607

  2. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  3. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  4. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  5. Anomeric Reactivity-Based One-Pot Synthesis of Heparin-Like Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Tülay

    2008-01-01

    A highly efficient one-pot methodology is described for the synthesis of heparin and heparan sulfate oligosaccharides utilizing thioglycosides with well defined reactivity as building blocks. l-idopyranosyl and d-glucopyranosyl thioglycosides 5 and 10 were used as donors due to low reactivity of uronic acids as the glycosyl donors in the one-pot synthesis. The formation of uronic acids by a selective oxidation at C-6 was performed after assembly of the oligosaccharides. The efficiency of this strategy with the flexibility for sulfate incorporation was demonstrated in the representative synthesis of disaccharides 17, 18, tetrasaccharide 23 and pentasaccharide 26. PMID:17914818

  6. Reactive Nitrogen Species Reactivities with Nitrones: Theoretical and Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Kevin M.; Rockenbauer, Antal; Villamena, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitrogen dioxide (•NO2), peroxynitrite (ONOO–), and nitrosoperoxycarbonate (ONOOCO2–) are among the most damaging species present in biological systems due to their ability to cause modification of key biomolecular systems through oxidation, nitrosylation and nitration. Nitrone spin traps are known to react with free radicals and non-radicals via electrophilic and nucleophilic addition reactions, and have been employed as reagents to detect radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and as pharmacological agents against oxidative stress-mediated injury. This study examines the reactivity of cyclic nitrones such as 5,5-dimethylpyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) with, •NO2, ONOO–, ONOOCO2–, SNAP and SIN-1 using EPR. The thermochemistries of nitrone reactivity with RNS, and isotropic hfsc's of the addition products were also calculated at the PCM(water)/B3LYP/6-31+G**//B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory with and without explicit water molecules in order to rationalize the nature of the observed EPR spectra. Spin trapping of other RNS such as azide (•N3), nitrogen trioxide (•NO3), amino (•NH2) radicals, and nitroxyl (HNO) were also theoretically and experimentally investigated by EPR spin trapping and mass spectrometry. This study also shows other spin traps such as AMPO, EMPO and DEPMPO can react with radical and non-radical RNS, thus, making spin traps suitable probes as well as antioxidants against RNS mediated oxidative damage. PMID:22775566

  7. Bis(mesitoyl)phosphinic acid: photo-triggered release of metaphosphorous acid in solution.

    PubMed

    Fast, David E; Zalibera, Michal; Lauer, Andrea; Eibel, Anna; Schweigert, Caroline; Kelterer, Anne-Marie; Spichty, Martin; Neshchadin, Dmytro; Voll, Dominik; Ernst, Hanna; Liang, Yu; Dietliker, Kurt; Unterreiner, Andreas-Neil; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Grützmacher, Hansjörg; Gescheidt, Georg

    2016-08-01

    Bis(mesitoyl)phosphinic acid and its sodium salt display a unique photo-induced reactivity: both derivatives stepwise release two mesitoyl radicals and, remarkably, metaphosphorous acid (previously postulated as transient species in the gas phase), providing a new phosphorus-based reagent. PMID:27431207

  8. Optimal Production of 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-hexadecenoic Acid from Palmitoleic Acid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hydroxylation of unsaturated fatty acids by bacterial strains is one type of value-adding bioconversion process. This process generates new hydroxy fatty acids (HFA) carrying special properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity compared with normal fatty acids. Among microbial strains te...

  9. Reactive composite compositions and mat barriers

    DOEpatents

    Langton, Christine A.; Narasimhan, Rajendran; Karraker, David G.

    2001-01-01

    A hazardous material storage area has a reactive multi-layer composite mat which lines an opening into which a reactive backfill and hazardous material are placed. A water-inhibiting cap may cover the hazardous material storage area. The reactive multi-layer composite mat has a backing onto which is placed an active layer which will neutralize or stabilize hazardous waste and a fronting layer so that the active layer is between the fronting and backing layers. The reactive backfill has a reactive agent which can stabilize or neutralize hazardous material and inhibit the movement of the hazardous material through the hazardous material storage area.

  10. Study on Reactive Automatic Compensation System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhe, Sun; Qingyang, Liang; Peiqing, Luo; Chenfei, Zhang

    At present, low-voltage side of transformer is public in urban distribution network, as inductive load of household appliances is increasing, the power factor decreased, this lead to a large loss of public transformer low voltage side, the supply voltage indicators can not meet user's requirements. Therefore, the design of reactive power compensation system has become another popular research. This paper introduces the principle of reactive power compensation, analyzes key technologies of reactive power compensation, design an overall program of reactive power automatic compensation system to conquer various deficiencies of reactive power automatic compensation equipment.

  11. Sulfenic acid chemistry, detection and cellular lifetime☆

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vinayak; Carroll, Kate S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species-mediated cysteine sulfenic acid modification has emerged as an important regulatory mechanism in cell signaling. The stability of sulfenic acid in proteins is dictated by the local microenvironment and ability of antioxidants to reduce this modification. Several techniques for detecting this cysteine modification have been developed, including direct and in situ methods. Scope of review This review presents a historical discussion of sulfenic acid chemistry and highlights key examples of this modification in proteins. A comprehensive survey of available detection techniques with advantages and limitations is discussed. Finally, issues pertaining to rates of sulfenic acid formation, reduction, and chemical trapping methods are also covered. Major conclusions Early chemical models of sulfenic acid yielded important insights into the unique reactivity of this species. Subsequent pioneering studies led to the characterization of sulfenic acid formation in proteins. In parallel, the discovery of oxidant-mediated cell signaling pathways and pathological oxidative stress has led to significant interest in methods to detect these modifications. Advanced methods allow for direct chemical trapping of protein sulfenic acids directly in cells and tissues. At the same time, many sulfenic acids are short-lived and the reactivity of current probes must be improved to sample these species, while at the same time, preserving their chemical selectivity. Inhibitors with binding scaffolds can be rationally designed to target sulfenic acid modifications in specific proteins. General significance Ever increasing roles for protein sulfenic acids have been uncovered in physiology and pathology. A more complete understanding of sulfenic acid-mediated regulatory mechanisms will continue to require rigorous and new chemical insights. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Current methods to study reactive oxygen species - pros and cons and

  12. The reactivity of the thiol groups of calf thymus deoxyribonucleohistone

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, J.E.; Walker, I.O.

    1974-01-01

    The reactivities of the two cysteine thiol groups of calf thymus F3 histone were investigated using 5,5′-dithiobis-[2- nitrobenzoic acid], (DTNB). In isolated histone, both thiol groups were available for reaction. However, analysis of reaction profiles of native deoxyribonucleohistone, (DNH), in various solvent conditions, together with gel electrophoresis studies of DNH modified with DTNB, showed that only one of the thiol groups is normally modified by the reagent. If NaCl is present (above 1.OM) the other thiol group can also be modified. The reactivities of both groups were largely independent of the degree of DNH supercoiling and of the binding of F3 to the DNA. PMID:4472380

  13. Sensing and Tactile Artificial Muscles from Reactive Materials

    PubMed Central

    Conzuelo, Laura Valero; Arias-Pardilla, Joaquín; Cauich-Rodríguez, Juan V.; Smit, Mascha Afra; Otero, Toribio Fernández

    2010-01-01

    Films of conducting polymers can be oxidized and reduced in a reversible way. Any intermediate oxidation state determines an electrochemical equilibrium. Chemical or physical variables acting on the film may modify the equilibrium potential, so that the film acts as a sensor of the variable. The working potential of polypyrrole/DBSA (Dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid) films, oxidized or reduced under constant currents, changes as a function of the working conditions: electrolyte concentration, temperature or mechanical stress. During oxidation, the reactive material is a sensor of the ambient, the consumed electrical energy being the sensing magnitude. Devices based on any of the electrochemical properties of conducting polymers must act simultaneously as sensors of the working conditions. Artificial muscles, as electrochemical actuators constituted by reactive materials, respond to the ambient conditions during actuation. In this way, they can be used as actuators, sensing the surrounding conditions during actuation. Actuating and sensing signals are simultaneously included by the same two connecting wires. PMID:22319265

  14. Biochemical reactivity of melatonin with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Reiter, R J; Tan, D X; Manchester, L C; Qi, W

    2001-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), an endogenously produced indole found throughout the animal kingdom, was recently reported, using a variety of techniques, to be a scavenger of a number of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species both in vitro and in vivo. Initially, melatonin was discovered to directly scavenge the high toxic hydroxyl radical (*OH). The methods used to prove the interaction of melatonin with the *OH included the generation of the radical using Fenton reagents or the ultraviolet photolysis of hydrogen peroxide (H202) with the use of spin-trapping agents, followed by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis followed by ESR, and several spectrofluorometric and chemical (salicylate trapping in vivo) methodologies. One product of the reaction of melatonin with the *OH was identified as cyclic 3-hydroxymelatonin (3-OHM) using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical (HPLC-EC) detection, electron ionization mass spectrometry (EIMS), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and COSY 1H NMR. Cyclic 3-OHM appears in the urine of humans and other mammals and in rat urine its concentration increases when melatonin is given exogenously or after an imposed oxidative stress (exposure to ionizing radiation). Urinary cyclic 3-OHM levels are believed to be a biomarker (footprint molecule) of in vivo *OH production and its scavenging by melatonin. Although the data are less complete, besides the *OH, melatonin in cell-free systems has been shown to directly scavenge H2O2, singlet oxygen (1O2) and nitric oxide (NO*), with little or no ability to scavenge the superoxide anion radical (O2*-) In vitro, melatonin also directly detoxifies the peroxynitrite anion (ONOO-) and/or peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH), or the activated form of this molecule, ONOOH*; the product of the latter interaction is proposed to be 6-OHM. How these in vitro findings relate to the in vivo antioxidant actions of melatonin remains to be

  15. Comparative reactivity of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants with mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Rayner, Benjamin S; Love, Dominic T; Hawkins, Clare L

    2014-06-01

    Myeloperoxidase is an important heme enzyme released by activated leukocytes that catalyzes the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with halide and pseudo-halide ions to form various hypohalous acids. Hypohalous acids are chemical oxidants that have potent antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties and, as such, play key roles in the human immune system. However, increasing evidence supports an alternative role for myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants in the development of disease. Excessive production of hypohalous acids, particularly during chronic inflammation, leads to the initiation and accumulation of cellular damage that has been implicated in many human pathologies including atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative disease, lung disease, arthritis, inflammatory cancers, and kidney disease. This has sparked a significant interest in developing a greater understanding of the mechanisms involved in myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant-induced mammalian cell damage. This article reviews recent developments in our understanding of the cellular reactivity of hypochlorous acid, hypobromous acid, and hypothiocyanous acid, the major oxidants produced by myeloperoxidase under physiological conditions. PMID:24632382

  16. Reactive nitrogen deposition to South East Asian rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Marco, Chiara F.; Phillips, Gavin J.; Thomas, Rick; Tang, Sim; Nemitz, Eiko; Sutton, Mark A.; Fowler, David; Lim, Sei F.

    2010-05-01

    The supply of reactive nitrogen (N) to global terrestrial ecosystems has doubled since the 1960s as a consequence of human activities, such as fertilizer application and production of nitrogen oxides by fossil-fuel burning. The deposition of atmospheric N species constitutes a major nutrient input to the biosphere. Tropical forests have been undergoing a radical land use change by increasing cultivation of sugar cane and oil palms and the remaining forests are increasingly affected by anthropogenic activities. Yet, quantifications of atmospheric nitrogen deposition to tropical forests, and nitrogen cycling under near-pristine and polluted conditions are rare. The OP3 project ("Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a Southeast Asian Tropical Rainforest") was conceived to study how emissions of reactive trace gases from a tropical rain forest mediate the regional scale production and processing of oxidants and particles, and to better understand the impact of these processes on local, regional and global scale atmospheric composition, chemistry and climate. As part of this study we have measured reactive, nitrogen containing trace gas (ammonia, nitric acid) and the associated aerosol components (ammonium, nitrate) at monthly time resolution using a simple filter / denuder for 16 months. These measurements were made at the Bukit Atur Global Atmospheric Watch tower near Danum Valley in the Malaysian state of Sabah, Borneo. In addition, the same compounds were measured at hourly time-resolution during an intensive measurement period, with a combination of a wet-chemistry system based on denuders and steam jet aerosol collectors and an aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), providing additional information on the temporal controls. During this period, concentrations and fluxes of NO, NO2 and N2O were also measured. The measurements are used for inferential dry deposition modelling and combined with wet deposition data from the South East Asian Acid

  17. Valpromide Inhibits Lytic Cycle Reactivation of Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gorres, Kelly L.; Daigle, Derek; Mohanram, Sudharshan; McInerney, Grace E.; Lyons, Danielle E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) from latency into the lytic phase of its life cycle allows the virus to spread among cells and between hosts. Valproic acid (VPA) inhibits initiation of the lytic cycle in EBV-infected B lymphoma cells. While VPA blocks viral lytic gene expression, it induces expression of many cellular genes, because it is a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Here we show, using derivatives of VPA, that blockade of EBV reactivation is separable from HDAC inhibition. Valpromide (VPM), an amide derivative of valproic acid that is not an HDAC inhibitor, prevented expression of two EBV genes, BZLF1 and BRLF1, that mediate lytic reactivation. VPM also inhibited expression of a viral late gene, but not early genes, when BZLF1 was exogenously expressed. Unlike VPA, VPM did not activate lytic expression of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Expression of cellular immediate-early genes, such as FOS and EGR1, is kinetically upstream of the EBV lytic cycle. VPM did not activate expression of these cellular immediate-early genes but decreased their level of expression when induced by butyrate, an HDAC inhibitor. VPM did not alter expression of several other cellular immediate-early genes, including STAT3, which were induced by the HDAC inhibitors in cells refractory to lytic induction. Therefore, VPM selectively inhibits both viral and cellular gene expression. VPA and VPM represent a new class of antiviral agents. The mechanism by which VPA and VPM block EBV reactivation may be related to their anticonvulsant activity. PMID:26933051

  18. Serial follow-up of repeat voluntary blood donors reactive for anti-HCV ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, N.; Tulsiani, Sunita; Desai, Priti; Shah, Ripal; Mathur, Ankit; Harimoorthy, V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Voluntary non-remunerated repeat blood donors are perceived to be safer than the first time blood donors. This study was planned for follow-up of previous hepatitis C virus (HCV) test results of anti-HCV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) reactive repeat blood donors. The aim was to suggest a protocol for re-entry of the blood donors who are confirmed HCV negative by nucleic acid test (NAT) and recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA). A group of repeat voluntary donors were followed retrospectively who became reactive on a cross sectional study and showed HCV reactivity while donating blood regularly. Material and Methods: A total of 51,023 voluntary non remunerated blood donors were screened for anti-HCV ELISA routinely. If anybody showed positivity, they were tested by two ELISA kits (screening and confirmatory) and then confirmed infection status by NAT and or RIBA. The previous HCV test results of repeat donors reactive by anti-HCV ELISA were looked back from the records. Data of donors who were repeat reactive with single ELISA kit (in the present study) were analyzed separately from those reactive with two ELISA kits (in the present study). Results: In this study, 140 (0.27%) donors who were reactive by anti HCV ELISA were included. Out of them, 35 were repeat voluntary donors and 16 (11.43%) were reactive with single ELISA kit. All 16 donors were reactive by single ELISA kit occasionally in previous donations. Their present ELISA positive donations were negative for HCV NAT and RIBA. A total of 19 (13.57%) donors were reactive with two ELISA kits. In their previous donations, the donors who were reactive even once with two ELISA kits were consistently reactive by the same two ELISA kits in their next donations also. Conclusion: Donor sample reactive by only single ELISA kit may not be considered as infectious for disposal as they were negative by NAT and or RIBA. One time ELISA positivity was found probably due to ELISA kit specificity and

  19. Integrating planning and reactive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, David E.; Myers, Karen L.

    1994-10-01

    Our research is developing persistent agents that can achieve complex tasks in dynamic and uncertain environments. We refer to such agents as taskable, reactive agents. An agent of this type requires a number of capabilities. The ability to execute complex tasks necessitates the use of strategic plans for accomplishing tasks; hence, the agent must be able to synthesize new plans at run time. The dynamic nature of the environment requires that the agent be able to deal with unpredictable changes in its world. As such, agents must be able to react to unanticipated events by taking appropriate actions in a timely manner, while continuing activities that support current goals. The unpredictability of the world could lead to failure of plans generated for individual tasks. Agents must have the ability to recover from failures by adapting their activities to the new situation, or replanning if the world changes sufficiently. Finally, the agent should be able to perform in the face of uncertainty. The Cypress system, described here, provides a framework for creating taskable, reactive agents. Several features distinguish our approach: (1) the generation and execution of complex plans with parallel actions; (2) the integration of goal-driven and event driven activities during execution; (3) the use of evidential reasoning for dealing with uncertainty; and (4) the use of replanning to handle run-time execution problems. Our model for a taskable, reactive agent has two main intelligent components, an executor and a planner. The two components share a library of possible actions that the system can take. The library encompasses a full range of action representations, including plans, planning operators, and executable procedures such as predefined standard operating procedures (SOP's). These three classes of actions span multiple levels of abstraction.

  20. Integrating planning and reactive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, David E.; Myers, Karen L.

    1994-01-01

    Our research is developing persistent agents that can achieve complex tasks in dynamic and uncertain environments. We refer to such agents as taskable, reactive agents. An agent of this type requires a number of capabilities. The ability to execute complex tasks necessitates the use of strategic plans for accomplishing tasks; hence, the agent must be able to synthesize new plans at run time. The dynamic nature of the environment requires that the agent be able to deal with unpredictable changes in its world. As such, agents must be able to react to unanticipated events by taking appropriate actions in a timely manner, while continuing activities that support current goals. The unpredictability of the world could lead to failure of plans generated for individual tasks. Agents must have the ability to recover from failures by adapting their activities to the new situation, or replanning if the world changes sufficiently. Finally, the agent should be able to perform in the face of uncertainty. The Cypress system, described here, provides a framework for creating taskable, reactive agents. Several features distinguish our approach: (1) the generation and execution of complex plans with parallel actions; (2) the integration of goal-driven and event driven activities during execution; (3) the use of evidential reasoning for dealing with uncertainty; and (4) the use of replanning to handle run-time execution problems. Our model for a taskable, reactive agent has two main intelligent components, an executor and a planner. The two components share a library of possible actions that the system can take. The library encompasses a full range of action representations, including plans, planning operators, and executable procedures such as predefined standard operating procedures (SOP's). These three classes of actions span multiple levels of abstraction.

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species and Cellular Oxygen Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Timothy P; Pan, Yi; Simon, M. Celeste

    2008-01-01

    Many organisms activate adaptive transcriptional programs to help them cope with decreased oxygen levels, or hypoxia, in their environment. These responses are triggered by various oxygen sensing systems in bacteria, yeast and metazoans. In metazoans, the hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) mediate the adaptive transcriptional response to hypoxia by upregulating genes involved in maintaining bioenergetic homeostasis. The HIFs in turn are regulated by HIF-specific prolyl hydroxlase activity, which is sensitive to cellular oxygen levels and other factors such as tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Establishing a role for ROS in cellular oxygen sensing has been challenging since ROS are intrinsically unstable and difficult to measure. However, recent advances in fluorescence energy transfer resonance (FRET)-based methods for measuring ROS are alleviating some of the previous difficulties associated with dyes and luminescent chemicals. In addition, new genetic models have demonstrated that functional mitochondrial electron transport and associated ROS production during hypoxia are required for HIF stabilization in mammalian cells. Current efforts are directed at how ROS mediate prolyl hydroxylase activity and hypoxic HIF stabilization. Progress in understanding this process has been enhanced by the development of the FRET-based ROS probe, an vivo prolyl hydroxylase reporter and various genetic models harboring mutations in components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. PMID:17893032

  2. Reactive Oxygen Species and Neutrophil Function.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, Christine C; Kettle, Anthony J; Hampton, Mark B

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophils are essential for killing bacteria and other microorganisms, and they also have a significant role in regulating the inflammatory response. Stimulated neutrophils activate their NADPH oxidase (NOX2) to generate large amounts of superoxide, which acts as a precursor of hydrogen peroxide and other reactive oxygen species that are generated by their heme enzyme myeloperoxidase. When neutrophils engulf bacteria they enclose them in small vesicles (phagosomes) into which superoxide is released by activated NOX2 on the internalized neutrophil membrane. The superoxide dismutates to hydrogen peroxide, which is used by myeloperoxidase to generate other oxidants, including the highly microbicidal species hypochlorous acid. NOX activation occurs at other sites in the cell, where it is considered to have a regulatory function. Neutrophils also release oxidants, which can modify extracellular targets and affect the function of neighboring cells. We discuss the identity and chemical properties of the specific oxidants produced by neutrophils in different situations, and what is known about oxidative mechanisms of microbial killing, inflammatory tissue damage, and signaling. PMID:27050287

  3. Reactive oxygen species as glomerular autacoids.

    PubMed

    Baud, L; Fouqueray, B; Philippe, C; Ardaillou, R

    1992-04-01

    There is considerable evidence suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS; superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, hypochlorous acid) are implicated in the pathogenesis of toxic, ischemic, and immunologically mediated glomerular injury. The capacity of glomerular cells, especially mesangial cells, to generate ROS in response to several stimuli suggests that these autacoids may play a role in models of glomerular injury that are independent of infiltrating polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes. The mechanisms whereby ROS formation results in morphologic lesions and in modifications of glomerular permeability, blood flow, and filtration rate have been inferred from in vitro studies. They involve direct and indirect injury to resident cells (mesangiolysis) and glomerular basement membrane (in concert with metalloproteases) and alteration of both the release and binding of vasoactive substances, such as bioactive lipids (e.g., prostaglandin E2, prostacyclin, thromboxane), cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor alpha), and possibly endothelium-derived relaxing factor. The importance of such processes appears to be modulated by the intrinsic antioxidant defenses of the glomeruli. Further studies are needed to address the role of ROS in human glomerular diseases. PMID:1600128

  4. Arsenic, reactive oxygen, and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ellinsworth, David C

    2015-06-01

    Human exposure to drinking water contaminated with arsenic is a serious global health concern and predisposes to cardiovascular disease states, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and microvascular disease. The most sensitive target of arsenic toxicity in the vasculature is the endothelium, and incubation of these cells with low concentrations of arsenite, a naturally occurring and highly toxic inorganic form of arsenic, rapidly induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation via activation of a specific NADPH oxidase (Nox2). Arsenite also induces ROS accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells, but this is relatively delayed because, depending on the vessel from which they originate, these cells often lack Nox2 and/or its essential regulatory cytosolic subunits. The net effect of such activity is attenuation of endothelium-dependent conduit artery dilation via superoxide anion-mediated scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) and inhibition and downregulation of endothelial NO synthase, events that are temporally matched to the accumulation of oxidants across the vessel wall. By contrast, ROS induced by the more toxic organic trivalent arsenic metabolites (monomethylarsonous and dimethylarsinous acids) may originate from sources other than Nox2. As such, the mechanisms through which vascular oxidative stress develops in vivo under continuous exposure to all three of these potent arsenicals are unknown. This review is a comprehensive analysis of the mechanisms that mediate arsenic effects associated with Nox2 activation, ROS activity, and endothelial dysfunction, and also considers future avenues of research into what is a relatively poorly understood topic with major implications for human health. PMID:25788710

  5. ESTIMATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid esters from molecular structure. The energy differences between the initial state and the transition state for a molecule of interest are factored into internal and external...

  6. Short communication: Reactivity of diacetyl with cleaning and sanitizing agents.

    PubMed

    Rincon-Delgadillo, M I; Lopez-Hernandez, A; Rankin, S A

    2013-01-01

    Diacetyl is used to impart a buttery flavor to numerous food products such as sour cream, cottage cheese, vegetable oil-based spreads, baked goods, and beverages. Recent studies have linked exposure to high concentrations of diacetyl and the onset of bronchiolitis obliterans. Due to the reported risks that diacetyl may pose, many food companies have altered practices to reduce worker exposure to diacetyl, including the use of personal respirators, improved air handling systems, and adequate cleaning practices. Commonly used cleaning and sanitizing agents may be reactive with diacetyl; however, the efficacy of these chemicals has not been studied in detail and remains unclear. The objective of this work was to study the reaction chemistry of diacetyl with common industrial cleaning and sanitizing chemicals. The reactions were assessed at equimolar concentrations and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Peroxyacetic acid was most reactive with diacetyl (95% reduction in diacetyl), followed by sodium hypochlorite (76% reduction), and hydrogen peroxide (26% reduction). Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) did not react with diacetyl. Acetic acid was detected as the main product of reactions of diacetyl with peroxyacetic acid, sodium hypochlorite, and hydrogen peroxide. 1,1-Dichloro-2-propanone and 1,1,1-trichloropropanone were also identified as volatile reaction products in the sodium hypochlorite reactions. PMID:23063162

  7. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  8. Geophysical Characterization and Reactive Transport Modeling to Quantify Plume Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, S. S.; Wainwright, H.; Bea, S. A.; Spycher, N.; Li, L.; Sassen, D.; Chen, J.

    2012-12-01

    Predictions of subsurface contaminant plume mobility and remediation often fail due to the inability to tractably characterize heterogeneous flow-and-transport properties and monitor critical geochemical transitions over plume-relevant scales. This study presents two recently developed strategies to quantify and predict states and processes across scales that govern plume behavior. Development of both strategies takes advantage of multi-scale and disparate datasets and has involved the use of reactive transport models, geophysical methods, and stochastic integration approaches. The first approach, called reactive facies, exploits coupled physiochemical heterogeneity to characterize subsurface flow and transport properties that impact plume sorption and thus mobility. We develop and test the reactive facies concept within uranium contaminated Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments that underlie the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site, F-Area, South Carolina. Through analysis of field data (core samples, geophysical well logs, and cross-hole ground penetrating radar and seismic datasets) coupled with laboratory sorption studies, we have identified two reactive facies that have unique distributions of mineralogy, texture, porosity, hydraulic conductivity and geophysical attributes. We develop and use facies-based relationships with geophysical data in a Bayesian framework to spatially distribute reactive facies and their associated transport properties and uncertainties along local and plume-scale geophysical transects. To illustrate the value of reactive facies, we used the geophysically-obtained reactive facies properties to parameterize reactive transport models and simulate the migration of an acidic-U(VI) plume through the 2D domains. Modeling results suggest that each identified reactive facies exerts control on plume evolution, highlighting the usefulness of the reactive facies concept and approach for spatially distributing properties that control flow and

  9. Fluoropolymer and aluminum piezoelectric reactives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesheski, Robert S.; Groven, Lori J.; Son, Steven

    2012-03-01

    The ability to sensitize a nanoaluminum/piezoelectric polymer composite has been studied using two fluoropolymer systems (THV220A and FC-2175). Reactive composite samples of the nanoaluminum/polymer were made into thin sheets and their ability to store energy and exhibit piezoelectric properties was measured. Also, initial drop weight impact tests were performed on the samples and results showed the piezoelectric energetic composites failed to ignite at a given impact energy unless sensitized. When a DC voltage was applied to the sample, the materials ignited at the same impact energy where previous ignition failed. Results indicate that the reactive composites may have been sensitized by storing the applied charge. The application of a DC voltage may also have an effect on the piezoelectric properties of the energetic composites similar to the way poling techniques work. Further work is planned to investigate what parameters are inducing the sensitization of the material. A better understanding could lead to applications where switching or tuning the sensitization of an energetic material is beneficial.

  10. Extensive CD4 and CD8 T Cell Cross-Reactivity between Alphaherpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lichen; Laing, Kerry J; Dong, Lichun; Russell, Ronnie M; Barlow, Russell S; Haas, Juergen G; Ramchandani, Meena S; Johnston, Christine; Buus, Soren; Redwood, Alec J; White, Katie D; Mallal, Simon A; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Posavad, Christine M; Wald, Anna; Koelle, David M

    2016-03-01

    The Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily includes HSV types 1 and 2 and the sequence-divergent pathogen varicella zoster virus (VZV). T cells, controlled by TCR and HLA molecules that tolerate limited epitope amino acid variation, might cross-react between these microbes. We show that memory PBMC expansion with either HSV or VZV enriches for CD4 T cell lines that recognize the other agent at the whole-virus, protein, and peptide levels, consistent with bidirectional cross-reactivity. HSV-specific CD4 T cells recovered from HSV-seronegative persons can be explained, in part, by such VZV cross-reactivity. HSV-1-reactive CD8 T cells also cross-react with VZV-infected cells, full-length VZV proteins, and VZV peptides, as well as kill VZV-infected dermal fibroblasts. Mono- and cross-reactive CD8 T cells use distinct TCRB CDR3 sequences. Cross-reactivity to VZV is reconstituted by cloning and expressing TCRA/TCRB receptors from T cells that are initially isolated using HSV reagents. Overall, we define 13 novel CD4 and CD8 HSV-VZV cross-reactive epitopes and strongly imply additional cross-reactive peptide sets. Viral proteins can harbor both CD4 and CD8 HSV/VZV cross-reactive epitopes. Quantitative estimates of HSV/VZV cross-reactivity for both CD4 and CD8 T cells vary from 10 to 50%. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that host herpesvirus immune history may influence the pathogenesis and clinical outcome of subsequent infections or vaccinations for related pathogens and that cross-reactive epitopes and TCRs may be useful for multi-alphaherpesvirus vaccine design and adoptive cellular therapy. PMID:26810224

  11. Selected Drugs with Reported Secondary Cell-Differentiating Capacity Prime Latent HIV-1 Infection for Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Shishido, Takao; Wolschendorf, Frank; Duverger, Alexandra; Wagner, Frederic; Kappes, John; Jones, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Reactivation of latent HIV-1 infection is considered our best therapeutic means to eliminate the latent HIV-1 reservoir. Past therapeutic attempts to systemically trigger HIV-1 reactivation using single drugs were unsuccessful. We thus sought to identify drug combinations consisting of one component that would lower the HIV-1 reactivation threshold and a synergistic activator. With aclacinomycin and dactinomycin, we initially identified two FDA-approved drugs that primed latent HIV-1 infection in T cell lines and in primary T cells for reactivation and facilitated complete reactivation at the population level. This effect was correlated not with the reported primary drug effects but with the cell-differentiating capacity of the drugs. We thus tested other cell-differentiating drugs/compounds such as cytarabine and aphidicolin and found that they also primed latent HIV-1 infection for reactivation. This finding extends the therapeutic promise of N′-N′-hexamethylene-bisacetamide (HMBA), another cell-differentiating agent that has been reported to trigger HIV-1 reactivation, into the group of FDA-approved drugs. To this end, it is also noteworthy that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a polar compound that was initially developed as a second-generation cell-differentiating agent using HMBA as a structural template and which is now marketed as the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat, also has been reported to trigger HIV-1 reactivation. Our findings suggest that drugs with primary or secondary cell-differentiating capacity should be revisited as HIV-1-reactivating agents as some could potentially be repositioned as candidate drugs to be included in an induction therapy to trigger HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:22696646

  12. Selected drugs with reported secondary cell-differentiating capacity prime latent HIV-1 infection for reactivation.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Takao; Wolschendorf, Frank; Duverger, Alexandra; Wagner, Frederic; Kappes, John; Jones, Jennifer; Kutsch, Olaf

    2012-09-01

    Reactivation of latent HIV-1 infection is considered our best therapeutic means to eliminate the latent HIV-1 reservoir. Past therapeutic attempts to systemically trigger HIV-1 reactivation using single drugs were unsuccessful. We thus sought to identify drug combinations consisting of one component that would lower the HIV-1 reactivation threshold and a synergistic activator. With aclacinomycin and dactinomycin, we initially identified two FDA-approved drugs that primed latent HIV-1 infection in T cell lines and in primary T cells for reactivation and facilitated complete reactivation at the population level. This effect was correlated not with the reported primary drug effects but with the cell-differentiating capacity of the drugs. We thus tested other cell-differentiating drugs/compounds such as cytarabine and aphidicolin and found that they also primed latent HIV-1 infection for reactivation. This finding extends the therapeutic promise of N'-N'-hexamethylene-bisacetamide (HMBA), another cell-differentiating agent that has been reported to trigger HIV-1 reactivation, into the group of FDA-approved drugs. To this end, it is also noteworthy that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a polar compound that was initially developed as a second-generation cell-differentiating agent using HMBA as a structural template and which is now marketed as the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat, also has been reported to trigger HIV-1 reactivation. Our findings suggest that drugs with primary or secondary cell-differentiating capacity should be revisited as HIV-1-reactivating agents as some could potentially be repositioned as candidate drugs to be included in an induction therapy to trigger HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:22696646

  13. New NIR Calibration Models Speed Biomass Composition and Reactivity Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    Obtaining accurate chemical composition and reactivity (measures of carbohydrate release and yield) information for biomass feedstocks in a timely manner is necessary for the commercialization of biofuels. This highlight describes NREL's work to use near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and partial least squares multivariate analysis to develop calibration models to predict the feedstock composition and the release and yield of soluble carbohydrates generated by a bench-scale dilute acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis assay. This highlight is being developed for the September 2015 Alliance S&T Board meeting.

  14. Method for preparing hydride configurations and reactive metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Silver, Gary L.

    1988-08-16

    A method for preparing highly hydrogen-reactive surfaces on metals which normally require substantial heating, high pressures, or an extended induction period, which involves pretreatment of said surfaces with either a non-oxidizing acid or hydrogen gas to form a hydrogen-bearing coating on said surfaces, and subsequently heating said coated metal in the absence of moisture and oxygen for a period sufficient to decompose said coating and cooling said metal to room temperature. Surfaces so treated will react almost instantaneously with hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure. The method is particularly applicable to uranium, thorium, and lanthanide metals.

  15. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

    2013-04-30

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  16. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M.; Weihs, Timothy P.; Grzyb, Justin A.

    2016-07-05

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  17. Detection of Pesticides and Pesticide Metabolites Using the Cross Reactivity of Enzyme Immunoassays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Aga, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassay is an important environmental analysis method that may be used to identify many pesticide analytes in water samples. Because of similarities in chemical structure between various members of a pesticide class, there often may be an unwanted response that is characterized by a percentage of cross reactivity. Also, there may be cross reactivity caused by degradation products of the target analyte that may be present in the sample. In this paper, the concept of cross reactivity caused by degradation products or by nontarget analytes is explored as a tool for identification of metabolites or structurally similar compounds not previously known to be present in water samples. Two examples are examined in this paper from various water quality studies. They are alachlor and its metabolite, alachlor ethane sulfonic acid, and atrazine and its class members, prometryn and propazine. A method for using cross reactivity for the detection of these compounds is explained in this paper.

  18. Remote Electronic Effects by Ether Protecting Groups Fine-Tune Glycosyl Donor Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Heuckendorff, Mads; Poulsen, Lulu Teressa; Jensen, Henrik H

    2016-06-17

    It was established that para-substituted benzyl ether protecting groups affect the reactivity of glycosyl donors of the thioglycoside type with the N-iodosuccinimide/triflic acid promoter system. Having electron donating p-methoxybenzyl ether (PMB) groups increased the reactivity of the donor in comparison to having electron withdrawing p-chloro (PClB) or p-cyanobenzyl ether (PCNB) protecting groups, which decreased the reactivity of the glycosyl donor relative to the parent benzyl ether (Bn) protected glycosyl donor. These findings were used to perform the first armed-disarmed coupling between two benzylated glucosyl donors by tuning their reactivity. In addition, the present work describes a highly efficient palladium catalyzed multiple cyanation and methoxylation of p-chlorobenzyl protected thioglycosides. The results of this paper regarding both the different electron withdrawing properties of various benzyl ethers and the efficient and multiple protecting group transformations are applicable in general organic chemistry and not restricted to carbohydrate chemistry. PMID:27224456

  19. Phenylethynyl endcapping reagents and reactive diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A phenylethynyl composition which can be used to endcap nucleophilic species is employed in the production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers exclusively. These phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers display unique thermal characteristics, as exemplified by the model compound, 4-phenoxy 4'-phenylethynylbenzophenone, which is relatively stable at 200 C, but reacts at 350 C. In addition, a reactive diluent was prepared which decreases the melt viscosity of the phenylethynyl terminated oligomers and subsequently reacts therewith to increase density of the resulting thermoset. The novelty of this invention resides in the phenylethynyl composition used to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent was also employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to increase the crosslink density of the resulting thermoset. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  20. Attributional bias and reactive aggression.

    PubMed

    Hudley, C; Friday, J

    1996-01-01

    This article looks at a cognitive behavioral intervention designed to reduce minority youths' (Latino and African-American boys) levels of reactive peer-directed aggression. The BrainPower Program trains aggressive boys to recognize accidental causation in ambiguous interactions with peers. The objective of this research is to evaluate the effectiveness of this attribution retraining program in reducing levels of reactive, peer-directed aggression. This research hypothesizes that aggressive young boys' tendency to attribute hostile intentions to others in ambiguous social interactions causes display of inappropriate, peer-directed aggression. A reduction in attributional bias should produce a decrease in reactive physical and verbal aggression directed toward peers. A 12-session, attributional intervention has been designed to reduce aggressive students' tendency to infer hostile intentions in peers following ambiguous peer provocations. The program trains boys to (1) accurately perceive and categorize the available social cues in interactions with peers, (2) attribute negative outcomes of ambiguous causality to accidental or uncontrollable causes, and (3) generate behaviors appropriate to these retrained attributions. African-American and Latino male elementary-school students (N = 384), in grades four-six, served as subjects in one of three groups: experimental attribution retraining program, attention training, and no-attention control group. Three broad categories of outcome data were collected: teacher and administrator reports of behavior, independent observations of behavior, and self-reports from participating students. Process measures to assess implementation fidelity include videotaped training sessions, observations of intervention sessions, student attendance records, and weekly team meetings. The baseline data indicated that students who were evenly distributed across the four sites were not significantly different on the baseline indicators: student

  1. Dicarboxylic acids generated by thermal alteration of kerogen and humic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kaplan, I. R.

    1987-01-01

    Significant amounts (up to 2 percent of organic geopolymers) of low-molecular-weight (LMW) dicarboxylic acids (C2-C10) have been detected during thermal alteration (270 C, 2 h) of kerogens and humic acids isolated from young or ancient lithified sediments. Their distribution is characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid followed by succinic, fumaric, and methylsuccinic acids. These acids are probably released by the breakdown of macromolecular structures, which have incorporated biogenic organic compounds, including diacids, during early digenesis in sediments. Because of their reactivity, LMW diacids may play geochemically important roles under natural conditions.

  2. POPCORN FLAVORING EFFECTS ON REACTIVITY OF RAT AIRWAYS IN VIVO AND IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Zaccone, Eric J.; Thompson, Janet A.; Ponnoth, Dovenia S.; Cumpston, Amy M.; Goldsmith, W. Travis; Jackson, Mark C.; Kashon, Michael L.; Frazer, David G.; Hubbs, Ann F.; Shimko, Michael J.; Fedan, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    “Popcorn workers’ lung” is an obstructive pulmonary disease produced by inhalation of volatile artificial butter flavorings. In rats, inhalation of diacetyl, a major component of butter flavoring, and inhalation of a diacetyl substitute, 2,3-pentanedione, produce similar damage to airway epithelium. The effects of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione and mixtures of diacetyl, acetic acid, and acetoin, all components of butter flavoring, on pulmonary function and airway reactivity to methacholine (MCh) were investigated. Lung resistance (RL) and dynamic compliance (Cdyn) were negligibly changed 18 h after a 6-h inhalation exposure to diacetyl or 2,3-pentanedione (100–360 ppm). Reactivity to MCh was not markedly changed after diacetyl, but was modestly decreased after 2,3-pentanedione inhalation. Inhaled diacetyl exerted essentially no effect on reactivity to mucosally applied MCh, but 2,3-pentanedione (320 and 360 ppm) increased reactivity to MCh in the isolated, perfused trachea preparation (IPT). In IPT, diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione (≥3 mM) applied to the serosal and mucosal surfaces of intact and epithelium-denuded tracheas initiated transient contractions followed by relaxations. Inhaled acetoin (150 ppm) exerted no effect on pulmonary function and airway reactivity in vivo; acetic acid (27 ppm) produced hyperreactivity to MCh; and exposure to diacetyl + acetoin + acetic acid (250 + 150 + 27 ppm) led to a diacetyl-like reduction in reactivity. Data suggest that the effects of 2,3-pentanedione on airway reactivity are greater than those of diacetyl, and that flavorings are airway smooth muscle relaxants and constrictors, thus indicating a complex mechanism. PMID:23941636

  3. EFFECTS OF NITRIC ACID ON CRITICALITY SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, B.

    2011-08-18

    As nitric acid molarity is increased, there are two competing phenomena affecting the reactivity of the system. First, there is interaction between each of the 10 wells in the basket-like insert. As the molarity of the nitric acid solution is increased (it moves from 100% water to 100% HNO{sub 3}), the hydrogen atom density decreases by about 80%. However, it remains a relatively efficient moderator. The moderating ratio of nitric acid is about 90% that of water. As the media between the wells is changed from 100% water to 100% nitric acid, the density of the media increases by 50%. A higher density typically leads to a better reflector. However, when the macroscopic scattering cross sections are considered, nitric acid is a much worse reflector than water. The effectiveness of nitric acid as a reflector is about 40% that of water. Since the media between the wells become a worse reflector and still remains an effective moderator, interaction between the wells increases. This phenomenon will cause reactivity to increase as nitric acid molarity increases. The seond phenomenon is due to the moderating ratio changing in the high concentration fissile-nitric acid solution in the 10 wells. Since the wells contain relatively small volumes of high concentration solutions, a small decrease in moderating power has a large effect on reactivity. This is due to the fact that neutrons are more likely to escape the high concentration fissile solution before causing another fission event. The result of this phenomenon is that as nitric acid molarity increases, reactivity decreases. Recent studies have shown that the second phenomenon is indeed the dominating force in determining reactivity changes in relation to nitric acid molarity changes. When considering the system as a whole, as nitric acid molarity increases, reactivity decreases.

  4. Rhenium(V)-oxo corrolazines: isolating redox-active ligand reactivity.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Jan Paulo T; Siegler, Maxime A; Goldberg, David P

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of the first example of a third-row metallocorrolazine characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction is reported. This Re(V)(O) porphyrinoid complex shows an exclusively ligand-based reactivity with strong acids and oxidizing agents. The one-electron oxidized π-radical-cation complex is capable of H-atom abstraction. PMID:26507380

  5. Automatic Processing of Reactive Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1985-01-01

    A series of process modeling computer codes were examined. The codes use finite element techniques to determine the time-dependent process parameters operative during nonisothermal reactive flows such as can occur in reaction injection molding or composites fabrication. The use of these analytical codes to perform experimental control functions is examined; since the models can determine the state of all variables everywhere in the system, they can be used in a manner similar to currently available experimental probes. A small but well instrumented reaction vessel in which fiber-reinforced plaques are cured using computer control and data acquisition was used. The finite element codes were also extended to treat this particular process.

  6. Reactivation tuberculosis: role of surveillance.

    PubMed

    DiNardo, Andrew R; Guy, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    The incidence and death rates from tuberculosis (TB) have declined through concerted efforts in the diagnosis and treatment of active disease. Despite this, 9.6 million new cases and 1.1 million deaths in 2014 are unacceptably high. To decrease the rates of TB further, the huge number of persons with latent TB infection (LTBI) from whom new cases will arise has to be addressed with a sense of priority. Identifying the highest risk groups and providing effective treatment has been shown to decrease active TB. Further research to refine the predictors of reactivation and shorter effective treatments are urgently needed. Implementing intensified case finding, testing and treatment for LTBI will require continued investment in health care capacity at multiple levels. PMID:27042967

  7. Regulatory Analysis of Reactivity Transients

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, Carl E.; Clifford, Paul M.; Geelhood, Kenneth J.; Voglewede, John C.

    2009-08-01

    This paper will describe modifications made to the FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN fuel performance codes and models that impact reactivity initiated accident (RIA) analyses. The modified models include an upper bound empirical and best estimate release models for fast transients, and a revised fuel failure model that accounts for ductile and brittle failure. Because experimental data exists for discrete test conditions, the codes and models are used to interpolate and to some extent, to extrapolate these test conditions. An upper bound empirical model for release is used to establish new recommended release fractions for long-lived and short lived (radioactive) isotopes for RIA events in Regulatory Guide 1.183. A best estimate release model is used in FRAPTRAN 1.4 based on grain boundary gas concentrations from FRAPCON-3.4 to predict release for RIA events. Code and model predictions will be compared to failure and release data from RIA tests to demonstrate accuracy.

  8. Buckybomb: Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Fileti, Eudes Eterno; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-03-01

    Energetic materials, such as explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, are widely used in civilian and military applications. Nanoscale explosives represent a special group because of the high density of energetic covalent bonds. The reactive molecular dynamics (ReaxFF) study of nitrofullerene decomposition reported here provides a detailed chemical mechanism of explosion of a nanoscale carbon material. Upon initial heating, C60(NO2)12 disintegrates, increasing temperature and pressure by thousands of Kelvins and bars within tens of picoseconds. The explosion starts with NO2 group isomerization into C-O-N-O, followed by emission of NO molecules and formation of CO groups on the buckyball surface. NO oxidizes into NO2, and C60 falls apart, liberating CO2. At the highest temperatures, CO2 gives rise to diatomic carbon. The study shows that the initiation temperature and released energy depend strongly on the chemical composition and density of the material. PMID:26262672

  9. Immune reactivity to food coloring.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, Aristo; Vojdani, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    Artificial food dyes are made from petroleum and have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the enhancement of the color of processed foods. They are widely used in the food and pharmaceutical industries to increase the appeal and acceptability of their products. Synthetic food colorants can achieve hues not possible for natural colorants and are cheaper, more easily available, and last longer. However, since the use of artificial food coloring has become widespread, many allergic and other immune reactive disorders have increasingly been reported. During the past 50 y, the amount of synthetic dye used in foods has increased by 500%. Simultaneously, an alarming rise has occurred in behavioral problems in children, such as aggression, attention deficit disorder (ADD), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The ingestion of food delivers the greatest foreign antigenic load that challenges the immune system. Artificial colors can also be absorbed via the skin through cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. The molecules of synthetic colorants are small, and the immune system finds it difficult to defend the body against them. They can also bond to food or body proteins and, thus, are able to act in stealth mode to circumvent and disrupt the immune system. The consumption of synthetic food colors, and their ability to bind with body proteins, can have significant immunological consequences. This consumption can activate the inflammatory cascade, can result in the induction of intestinal permeability to large antigenic molecules, and could lead to cross-reactivities, autoimmunities, and even neurobehavioral disorders. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recently found a 41% increase in diagnoses of ADHD in boys of high-school age during the past decade. More shocking is the legal amount of artificial colorants allowed by the FDA in the foods, drugs, and cosmetics that we consume and use every day. The consuming public is largely

  10. Profiling Reactive Metabolites via Chemical Trapping and Targeted Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae Won; Lee, Gihoon; Coukos, John S; Moellering, Raymond E

    2016-07-01

    Metabolomic profiling studies aim to provide a comprehensive, quantitative, and dynamic portrait of the endogenous metabolites in a biological system. While contemporary technologies permit routine profiling of many metabolites, intrinsically labile metabolites are often improperly measured or omitted from studies due to unwanted chemical transformations that occur during sample preparation or mass spectrometric analysis. The primary glycolytic metabolite 1,3-bisphosphoglyceric acid (1,3-BPG) typifies this class of metabolites, and, despite its central position in metabolism, has largely eluded analysis in profiling studies. Here we take advantage of the reactive acylphosphate group in 1,3-BPG to chemically trap the metabolite with hydroxylamine during metabolite isolation, enabling quantitative analysis by targeted LC-MS/MS. This approach is compatible with complex cellular metabolome, permits specific detection of the reactive (1,3-) instead of nonreactive (2,3-) BPG isomer, and has enabled direct analysis of dynamic 1,3-BPG levels resulting from perturbations to glucose processing. These studies confirmed that standard metabolomic methods misrepresent cellular 1,3-BPG levels in response to altered glucose metabolism and underscore the potential for chemical trapping to be used for other classes of reactive metabolites. PMID:27314642

  11. Colorimetric detection of catalytic reactivity of nanoparticles in complex matrices.

    PubMed

    Corredor, Charlie; Borysiak, Mark D; Wolfer, Jay; Westerhoff, Paul; Posner, Jonathan D

    2015-03-17

    There is a need for new methodologies to quickly assess the presence and reactivity of nanoparticles (NPs) in commercial, environmental, and biological samples since current detection techniques require expensive and complex analytical instrumentation. Here, we investigate a simple and portable colorimetric detection assay that assesses the surface reactivity of NPs, which can be used to detect the presence of NPs, in complex matrices (e.g., environmental waters, serum, urine, and in dissolved organic matter) at as low as part per billion (ppb) or ng/mL concentration levels. Surface redox reactivity is a key emerging property related to potential toxicity of NPs with living cells, and is used in our assays as a key surrogate for the presence of NPs and a first tier analytical strategy toward assessing NP exposures. We detect a wide range of metal (e.g., Ag and Au) and oxide (e.g., CeO2, SiO2, VO2) NPs with a diameter range of 5 to 400 nm and multiple capping agents (tannic acid (TA), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), branched polyethylenimine (BPEI), polyethylene glycol (PEG)). This method is sufficiently sensitive (ppb levels) to measure concentrations typically used in toxicological studies, and uses inexpensive, commercially available reagents. PMID:25635807

  12. Reactive oxygen species at phospholipid bilayers: distribution, mobility and permeation.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rodrigo M

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in biochemical processes such as redox signaling, aging, carcinogenesis and neurodegeneration. Although biomembranes are targets for reactive oxygen species attack, little is known about the role of their specific interactions. Here, molecular dynamics simulations were employed to determine the distribution, mobility and residence times of various reactive oxygen species at the membrane-water interface. Simulations showed that molecular oxygen (O2) accumulated at the membrane interior. The applicability of this result to singlet oxygen ((1)O2) was discussed. Conversely, superoxide (O2(-)) radicals and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) remained at the aqueous phase. Both hydroxyl (HO) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals were able to penetrate deep into the lipid headgroups region. Due to membrane fluidity and disorder, these radicals had access to potential peroxidation sites along the lipid hydrocarbon chains, without having to overcome the permeation free energy barrier. Strikingly, HO2 radicals were an order of magnitude more concentrated in the headgroups region than in water, implying a large shift in the acid-base equilibrium between HO2 and O2(-). In comparison with O2, both HO and HO2 radicals had lower lateral mobility at the membrane. Simulations revealed that there were intermittent interruptions in the H-bond network around the HO radicals at the headgroups region. This effect is expected to be unfavorable for the H-transfer mechanism involved in HO diffusion. The implications for lipid peroxidation and for the effectiveness of membrane antioxidants were evaluated. PMID:24095673

  13. Polyamines are traps for reactive intermediates in furan metabolism.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lisa A; Phillips, Martin B; Lu, Ding; Sullivan, Mathilde M

    2011-11-21

    Furan is toxic and carcinogenic in rodents. Because of the large potential for human exposure, furan is classified as a possible human carcinogen. The detailed mechanism by which furan causes toxicity and cancer is not yet known. Since furan toxicity requires cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxidation of furan, we have characterized the urinary and hepatocyte metabolites of furan to gain insight into the chemical nature of the reactive intermediate. Previous studies in hepatocytes indicated that furan is oxidized to the reactive α,β-unsaturated dialdehyde, cis-2-butene-1,4-dial (BDA), which reacts with glutathione (GSH) to form 2-(S-glutathionyl)succinaldehyde (GSH-BDA). This intermediate forms pyrrole cross-links with cellular amines such as lysine and glutamine. In this article, we demonstrate that GSH-BDA also forms cross-links with ornithine, putrescine, and spermidine when furan is incubated with rat hepatocytes. The relative levels of these metabolites are not completely explained by hepatocellular levels of the amines or by their reactivity with GSH-BDA. Mercapturic acid derivatives of the spermidine cross-links were detected in the urine of furan-treated rats, which indicates that this metabolic pathway occurs in vivo. Their detection in furan-treated hepatocytes and in urine from furan-treated rats indicates that polyamines may play an important role in the toxicity of furan. PMID:21842885