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Sample records for 2-way crossover study

  1. [Cross-over studies].

    PubMed

    Bonten, Tobias N; Siegerink, Bob; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2013-01-01

    Randomized, parallel group clinical trials often require large groups of patients; this is expensive and takes time. A randomized cross-over trial can be an efficient and more affordable alternative. A cross-over design can be used to study chronic disorders in which treatments have temporary effects. Participants receive all treatments in consecutive periods and outcomes are measured after every period. In general, only a quarter of the total group size is needed for cross-over studies compared with parallel group studies. Results can be affected by period-effects and carry-over-effects, which can be prevented through randomization and a wash-out period of sufficient length. The dropping-out of participants has more negative consequences for cross-over studies than for parallel group studies.

  2. Crossover studies with survival outcomes.

    PubMed

    Buyze, Jozefien; Goetghebeur, Els

    2013-12-01

    Crossover designs are well known to have major advantages when comparing the effect of two treatments which do not interact. With a right-censored survival endpoint, however, this design is quickly abandoned in favour of the more costly parallel design. Motivated by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention studies which lacked power, we evaluate what may be gained in this setting and compare parallel with crossover designs. In a heterogeneous population, we find and explain a substantial increase in power for the crossover study using a non-parametric logrank test. With frailties in a proportional hazards model, crossover designs equally lead to substantially smaller variance for the subject-specific hazard ratio (HR), while the population-averaged HR sees negligible gain. Its efficiency benefit is recovered when the population-averaged HR is reconstructed from estimated subject-specific hazard rates. We derive the time point for treatment crossover that optimizes efficiency and end with the analysis of two recent HIV prevention trials. We find that a Cellulose sulphate trial could have hardly gained efficiency from a crossover design, while a Nonoxynol-9 trial stood to gain substantial power. We conclude that there is a role for effective crossover designs in important classes of survival problems.

  3. Influence analysis on crossover design experiment in bioequivalence studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yufen; Ke, Bo-Shiang

    2014-01-01

    Crossover designs are commonly used in bioequivalence studies. However, the results can be affected by some outlying observations, which may lead to the wrong decision on bioequivalence. Therefore, it is essential to investigate the influence of aberrant observations. Chow and Tse in 1990 discussed this issue by considering the methods based on the likelihood distance and estimates distance. Perturbation theory provides a useful tool for the sensitivity analysis on statistical models. Hence, in this paper, we develop the influence functions via the perturbation scheme proposed by Hampel as an alternative approach on the influence analysis for a crossover design experiment. Moreover, the comparisons between the proposed approach and the method proposed by Chow and Tse are investigated. Two real data examples are provided to illustrate the results of these approaches. Our proposed influence functions show excellent performance on the identification of outlier/influential observations and are suitable for use with small sample size crossover designs commonly used in bioequivalence studies.

  4. Academic Crossover Study: Community Colleges, Fall 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.

    In fall 1981, a study was conducted in Hawaii's community colleges to determine the course-taking patterns of different groups of student majors (e.g., the proportion of the liberal arts major's academic load that is taken in the humanities, natural sciences, etc.), and the client-serving patterns of different subject disciplines (e.g., the…

  5. Residuals and outliers in replicate design crossover studies.

    PubMed

    Schall, Robert; Endrenyi, Laszlo; Ring, Arne

    2010-07-01

    Outliers in bioequivalence trials may arise through various mechanisms, requiring different interpretation and handling of such data points. For example, regulatory authorities might permit exclusion from analysis of outliers caused by product or process failure, while exclusion of outliers caused by subject-by-treatment interaction generally is not acceptable. In standard 2 x 2 crossover studies it is not possible to distinguish between relevant types of outliers based on statistical criteria alone. However, in replicate design (2-treatment, 4-period) crossover studies three types of outliers can be distinguished: (i) Subject outliers are usually unproblematic, at least regarding the analysis of bioequivalence, and may require no further action; (ii) Subject-by-formulation outliers may affect the outcome of the bioequivalence test but generally cannot simply be removed from analysis; and (iii) Removal of single-data-point outliers from analysis may be justified in certain cases. As a very simple but effective diagnostic tool for the identification and classification of outliers in replicate design crossover studies we propose to calculate and plot three types of residual corresponding to the three different types of outliers that can be distinguished. The residuals are obtained from four mutually orthogonal linear contrasts of the four data points associated with each subject. If preferred, outlier tests can be applied to the resulting sets of residuals after suitable standardization.

  6. Persistent User Bias in Case-Crossover Studies in Pharmacoepidemiology.

    PubMed

    Hallas, Jesper; Pottegård, Anton; Wang, Shirley; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Gagne, Joshua J

    2016-10-25

    Studying the effect of chronic medication exposure by means of a case-crossover design may result in an upward-biased odds ratio. In this study, our aim was to assess the occurrence of this bias and to evaluate whether it is remedied by including a control group (the case-time-control design). Using Danish data resources from 1995-2012, we conducted case-crossover and case-time-control analyses for 3 medications (statins, insulin, and thyroxine) in relation to 3 outcomes (retinal detachment, wrist fracture, and ischemic stroke), all with assumed null associations. Controls were matched on age, sex, and index date, and exposure over the preceding 12 months was ascertained. For retinal detachment, the case-crossover odds ratio was 1.60 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.42, 1.80) for statins, 1.40 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.92) for thyroxine, and 1.53 (95% CI: 1.04, 2.24) for insulin. Estimates for the retinal detachment controls were similar, leading to near-null case-time-control estimates for all 3 medication classes. For wrist fracture and stroke, the odds ratios were higher for cases than for controls, and case-time-control odds ratios were consistently above unity, thus implying significant residual bias. In case-crossover studies of medications, contamination by persistent users confers a moderate bias upward, which is partly remedied by using a control group. The optimal strategy for dealing with this problem is currently unknown.

  7. The case-crossover study design in pharmacoepidemiology.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Joseph A 'Chris'; Suissa, Samy

    2009-02-01

    In the study of the association of transient drug exposures with acute outcomes, the case-crossover design is an efficient alternative to the case-control approach. This design based exclusively on the case series uses within-subject comparisons of drug exposures over time to estimate the rate ratio of the outcome associated with the drug under study. This design inherently removes the biasing effects of unmeasured, time-invariant confounding factors from the estimated rate ratio, but is sensitive to several assumptions. We illustrated the case-crossover design and explored its sensitivity using data from 4028 cases of gastrointestinal bleeding from the General Practice Research Database in assessing the effects of the drug warfarin. We compared the use of different time window lengths to assess exposure and considered the use of a case-time-control design to account for exposure time trends. The case-crossover approach found no excess risk of bleeding with warfarin exposure [rate ratio 0.98; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.74-1.28] using a 1-month time window. When we restricted the analysis to subjects with truly transient drug exposure, defined by 1 to 3 prescriptions in the previous year, the rate ratio was 2.59 (95% CI: 1.42-4.74). To consider the longer 1-year exposure time window, the case-time-control approach was used and resulted in a rate ratio of 1.72 (95% CI: 1.08-2.43). In conclusion, the case-crossover design is potentially a powerful approach to assess the risk of drugs. This design is, however, highly sensitive to assumptions about intermittency of drug use and the length of the exposure time window, as demonstrated with the example of bleeding associated with warfarin use.

  8. Meige syndrome: double-blind crossover study of sodium valproate.

    PubMed Central

    Snoek, J W; van Weerden, T W; Teelken, A W; van den Burg, W; Lakke, J P

    1987-01-01

    A double-blind crossover study of sodium valproate and placebo was conducted in five patients with Meige syndrome. CSF neurotransmitter studies were performed at the end of each treatment period. GABA levels were not influenced by the administration of sodium valproate. An increase in HVA levels was observed in every patient, which may reflect an increase in central dopaminergic activity. This finding may explain the trend towards clinical deterioration which was observed during treatment with sodium valproate. Sodium valproate appears to be ineffective in Meige syndrome. PMID:3121795

  9. Optimal adaptive sequential designs for crossover bioequivalence studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jialin; Audet, Charles; DiLiberti, Charles E; Hauck, Walter W; Montague, Timothy H; Parr, Alan F; Potvin, Diane; Schuirmann, Donald J

    2016-01-01

    In prior works, this group demonstrated the feasibility of valid adaptive sequential designs for crossover bioequivalence studies. In this paper, we extend the prior work to optimize adaptive sequential designs over a range of geometric mean test/reference ratios (GMRs) of 70-143% within each of two ranges of intra-subject coefficient of variation (10-30% and 30-55%). These designs also introduce a futility decision for stopping the study after the first stage if there is sufficiently low likelihood of meeting bioequivalence criteria if the second stage were completed, as well as an upper limit on total study size. The optimized designs exhibited substantially improved performance characteristics over our previous adaptive sequential designs. Even though the optimized designs avoided undue inflation of type I error and maintained power at ≥ 80%, their average sample sizes were similar to or less than those of conventional single stage designs.

  10. Sequential design approaches for bioequivalence studies with crossover designs.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Diane; DiLiberti, Charles E; Hauck, Walter W; Parr, Alan F; Schuirmann, Donald J; Smith, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    The planning of bioequivalence (BE) studies, as for any clinical trial, requires a priori specification of an effect size for the determination of power and an assumption about the variance. The specified effect size may be overly optimistic, leading to an underpowered study. The assumed variance can be either too small or too large, leading, respectively, to studies that are underpowered or overly large. There has been much work in the clinical trials field on various types of sequential designs that include sample size reestimation after the trial is started, but these have seen only little use in BE studies. The purpose of this work was to validate at least one such method for crossover design BE studies. Specifically, we considered sample size reestimation for a two-stage trial based on the variance estimated from the first stage. We identified two methods based on Pocock's method for group sequential trials that met our requirement for at most negligible increase in type I error rate.

  11. Blinded placebo crossover study of gabapentin in primary orthostatic tremor.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Julian P; Edwards, Dylan J; Walters, Susan E; Byrnes, Michelle L; Thickbroom, Gary W; Stell, Rick; Mastaglia, Frank L

    2006-07-01

    Primary orthostatic tremor (OT) is a rare but disabling condition characterized by leg tremor and feelings of instability during stance. Previous studies have reported a reduction in OT symptoms with gabapentin treatment. In this study, we report on the benefits of gabapentin treatment in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of 6 OT patients. First, the maximally effective gabapentin dosage (600-2,700 mg/day) for each patient was determined during an initial dose-titration phase. Patients were then studied 7 days after drug withdrawal and again after two 2-week periods of treatment with either gabapentin or placebo, using force platform posturography to quantify postural sway and tremor. Other medications for OT were continued unchanged. Symptomatic response was assessed by a patient-rated severity scale and quality of life (QOL) questionnaire. All patients reported an increase in symptoms during the washout phase and symptom reduction (50%-75%) during gabapentin treatment. Tremor amplitude was reduced to 79% +/- 11% and sway area to 71% +/- 11% of the placebo state. QOL improved in all patients, no adverse drug effects were noted, and symptomatic benefit was maintained at follow-up (mean = 19 months). The findings confirm that gabapentin is an effective treatment for OT, reducing both tremor and postural instability and improving quality of life, and support its use as add-on or first-line therapy for OT.

  12. Crossover versus parallel designs: dose-escalation design comparisons for first-in-human studies.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhiwu; Hosmane, Balakrishna; Locke, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We study the statistical efficiency for rising-dose designs in the context of first-in-human studies. Specifically, we identify a class of crossover designs that are appealing in terms of both subject safety and statistical efficiency and, for a three-period, two-panel design in such a class, we compare its A-efficiency relative to the corresponding parallel designs and optimal/efficient crossover designs, respectively, under various plausible models. In the meantime, we also evaluate the impact of inclusion of baseline measurements as a covariate in the statistical analysis, for both crossover and parallel studies.

  13. A Pilot Study on Culottes versus Crossover Single Stenting for True Coronary Bifurcation Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linlin; Zhong, Wenliang; Luo, Yukun; Chen, Lianglong

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to compare clinical and angiographic outcomes of planned culottes technique with that of provisional crossover single stenting in the treatment of true coronary bifurcation lesions (CBL) with drug-eluting stent (DES). Methods True CBL patients (n = 104) were randomly assigned to either the provisional stenting of the side branch (crossover group) or the culottes group. Additional side branch (SB) stenting in the crossover group was required if there was thrombolysis in myocardial infarction flow ≤ 1 flow). The primary end point was the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at nine months, including cardiac death, myocardial infarction, target lesion/vessel revascularization and in-stent thrombosis. The secondary end point was angiographic in-segment restenosis at nine months. Results The rate of MACE at nine months was similar between the crossover and culottes groups (7.7% vs. 7.7%, p = 1.000). Additional SB stenting in the crossover group was required in 3.8% of patients. There was one procedural occlusion of SB in the crossover group. At nine months, the rate of in-segment restenosis was similar in the parent main vessel (0% vs. 1.9%, p = 1.000), main branch (1.9% vs. 7.7%, p = 0.363) and SB (17.3% vs. 9.6%, p = 0.250) between the crossover and culottes groups, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrated that there is no significant difference in cumulative MACE or in-segment restenosis between crossover and culottes groups. Larger randomized clinical trials are warranted to re-evaluate the outcomes of the provisional crossover stenting versus the culottes stenting techniques utilizing DES for true CBL. PMID:27471358

  14. An end to crossover designs for studies on the effect of sugar substitutes on caries?

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, K K

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials and laboratory studies involving the administration of oral health treatments and foods have benefited from the observance of the so-called crossover study design. Field experience and a growing number of laboratory experiments have shown, however, that 'blind' reliance on crossover designs may in some instances lead to unexpected results and erroneous conclusions. Some dietary substances, antibiotic agents, and even fluoride applications may have long-term effects that call into question the appropriateness of the washout periods between treatments. Studies have also been conducted on compounds that have turned out to display synergistic effects. When long-term and synergistic effects are simultaneously present in trials involving a crossover design, difficulties may arise in the interpretation of results. This communication uses as an example the long-term clinical and microbiological effects of xylitol and suggests that inclusion of the crossover practice in clinical trials should be separately and carefully contemplated in each instance.

  15. Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Pem Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells using various types of Nafion membranes as the solid polymer electrolyte have been studied. The rate of fuel crossover and electrical performance has been measured for cells with Nafion membranes of various thicknesses and equivalent weights. The crossover rate is found to decrease with increasing thickness and applied current. The dependence of crossover rate on current density can be understood in terms of a simple linear diffusion model which suggests that the crossover rate can be influenced by the electrode structure in addition to the membrane. The studies suggest that Nafion EW 1500 is a very promising alternate to Nafion EW 1100 for direct methanol fuel cells.

  16. Design evaluation and optimisation in crossover pharmacokinetic studies analysed by nonlinear mixed effects models.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thu Thuy; Bazzoli, Caroline; Mentré, France

    2012-05-20

    Bioequivalence or interaction trials are commonly studied in crossover design and can be analysed by nonlinear mixed effects models as an alternative to noncompartmental approach. We propose an extension of the population Fisher information matrix in nonlinear mixed effects models to design crossover pharmacokinetic trials, using a linearisation of the model around the random effect expectation, including within-subject variability and discrete covariates fixed or changing between periods. We use the expected standard errors of treatment effect to compute the power for the Wald test of comparison or equivalence and the number of subjects needed for a given power. We perform various simulations mimicking crossover two-period trials to show the relevance of these developments. We then apply these developments to design a crossover pharmacokinetic study of amoxicillin in piglets and implement them in the new version 3.2 of the r function PFIM.

  17. Empirical power and sample size calculations for cluster-randomized and cluster-randomized crossover studies.

    PubMed

    Reich, Nicholas G; Myers, Jessica A; Obeng, Daniel; Milstone, Aaron M; Perl, Trish M

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the number of studies using a cluster-randomized design has grown dramatically. In addition, the cluster-randomized crossover design has been touted as a methodological advance that can increase efficiency of cluster-randomized studies in certain situations. While the cluster-randomized crossover trial has become a popular tool, standards of design, analysis, reporting and implementation have not been established for this emergent design. We address one particular aspect of cluster-randomized and cluster-randomized crossover trial design: estimating statistical power. We present a general framework for estimating power via simulation in cluster-randomized studies with or without one or more crossover periods. We have implemented this framework in the clusterPower software package for R, freely available online from the Comprehensive R Archive Network. Our simulation framework is easy to implement and users may customize the methods used for data analysis. We give four examples of using the software in practice. The clusterPower package could play an important role in the design of future cluster-randomized and cluster-randomized crossover studies. This work is the first to establish a universal method for calculating power for both cluster-randomized and cluster-randomized clinical trials. More research is needed to develop standardized and recommended methodology for cluster-randomized crossover studies.

  18. Splitter imperfections in annular split-flow thin separation channels: experimental study of nonspecific crossover.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen; Decker, Keith; Nakamura, Masayuki; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Moore, Lee R; Zborowski, Maciej

    2003-12-01

    The separation performance of a split-flow thin (SPLITT) separation device depends on uniformity of channel thickness and the precise placement of the flow splitters at fixed distances between the channel walls. The observation of nonspecific crossover, that is, the transport of sample materials across the channel thickness without the influence of an applied field, has routinely been taken to indicate the presence of irregularities in splitter shape or placement. Computational fluid dynamics software may be used to predict the influence of splitter imperfections on nonspecific crossover, where it is assumed that sample transport is by convection alone. A previous study has shown how small inlet splitter imperfections can account for the relatively low levels of nonspecific crossover observed with typical annular SPLITT devices. This study, however, could not distinguish between the possible sources of nonspecific crossover; hydrodynamic lift or shear-induced diffusion could have contributed. To confirm the validity of the computational approach, a series of experiments has been carried out on a channel having a deliberately and severely bent splitter. Nonspecific crossover was measured for a range of inlet and outlet flow rate ratios, with the bent splitter placed at both the channel inlet and outlet. The severity of the splitter distortion was sufficient to produce significant nonspecific crossover over a wide range of flow conditions. Good agreement was found between experiment and prediction based on computational fluid dynamics, with experiment generally showing only slightly higher crossover than prediction. The quantitative agreement for this extreme case suggests that the contribution to nonspecific crossover due to geometrical imperfections can be well described using computational fluid dynamics.

  19. Computational approach to the study of thermal spin crossover phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Rudavskyi, Andrii; Broer, Ria; Sousa, Carmen

    2014-05-14

    The key parameters associated to the thermally induced spin crossover process have been calculated for a series of Fe(II) complexes with mono-, bi-, and tridentate ligands. Combination of density functional theory calculations for the geometries and for normal vibrational modes, and highly correlated wave function methods for the energies, allows us to accurately compute the entropy variation associated to the spin transition and the zero-point corrected energy difference between the low- and high-spin states. From these values, the transition temperature, T{sub 1/2}, is estimated for different compounds.

  20. Analysis of cross-over studies with missing data.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, Gerd K

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses some aspects of the analysis of cross-over trials with missing or incomplete data. A literature review on the topic reveals that many proposals provide correct results under the missing completely at random assumption while only some consider the more general missing at random situation. It is argued that mixed-effects models have a role in this context to recover some of the missing intra-subject from the inter-subject information, in particular when missingness is ignorable. Eventually, sensitivity analyses to deal with more general missingness mechanisms are presented.

  1. Crossover versus Stabilometric Platform for the Treatment of Balance Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease: A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Frazzitta, G.; Bossio, F.; Maestri, R.; Palamara, G.; Bera, R.; Ferrazzoli, D.

    2015-01-01

    Balance dysfunctions are a major challenge in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies have shown that rehabilitation can play a role in their treatment. In this study, we have compared the efficacy of two different devices for balance training: stabilometric platform and crossover. We have enrolled 60 PD patients randomly assigned to two groups. The first one (stabilometric group) performed a 4-week cycle of balance training, using the stabilometric platform, whereas the second one (crossover group) performed a 4-week cycle of balance training, using the crossover. The outcome measures used were Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II, Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG), and Six Minutes Walking Test (6MWT). Results showed that TUG, BBS, and UPDRS II improved in both groups. There was not difference in the efficacy of the two balance treatments. Patients in both groups improved also the meters walked in the 6MWT at the end of rehabilitation, but the improvement was better for patients performing crossover training. Our results show that the crossover and the stabilometric platform have the same effect on balance dysfunction of Parkinsonian patients, while crossover gets better results on the walking capacity. PMID:26583142

  2. Crossover versus Stabilometric Platform for the Treatment of Balance Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease: A Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Frazzitta, G; Bossio, F; Maestri, R; Palamara, G; Bera, R; Ferrazzoli, D

    2015-01-01

    Balance dysfunctions are a major challenge in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies have shown that rehabilitation can play a role in their treatment. In this study, we have compared the efficacy of two different devices for balance training: stabilometric platform and crossover. We have enrolled 60 PD patients randomly assigned to two groups. The first one (stabilometric group) performed a 4-week cycle of balance training, using the stabilometric platform, whereas the second one (crossover group) performed a 4-week cycle of balance training, using the crossover. The outcome measures used were Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II, Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG), and Six Minutes Walking Test (6MWT). Results showed that TUG, BBS, and UPDRS II improved in both groups. There was not difference in the efficacy of the two balance treatments. Patients in both groups improved also the meters walked in the 6MWT at the end of rehabilitation, but the improvement was better for patients performing crossover training. Our results show that the crossover and the stabilometric platform have the same effect on balance dysfunction of Parkinsonian patients, while crossover gets better results on the walking capacity.

  3. A Crossover Study of Risperidone in Children, Adolescents and Adults with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellings, Jessica A.; Zarcone, Jennifer R.; Reese, R. Matthew; Valdovinos, Maria G.; Marquis, Janet G.; Fleming, Kandace K.; Schroeder, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    Risperidone has shown safety and efficacy for aggressive and destructive behaviors in short-term studies. This longer-duration study includes a broad sample. Forty subjects, aged 8-56 years (mean=22), all with mental retardation and 36 with autism spectrum disorders participated in this 22-week crossover study, with 24 weeks of open maintenance…

  4. Power to detect clinically relevant carry-over in a series of cross-over studies.

    PubMed

    Putt, Mary E

    2006-08-15

    The potential for carry-over effects is an important consideration in the design of any cross-over study, and can cause an investigator to abandon the design altogether. In cross-over studies, carry-over is the lingering effect of a treatment into the subsequent period. Carry-over effects are differences in the extent of the carry-over between the treatments under consideration. It is well known that the test for carry-over effects in individual studies has low power. Empirical evidence of carry-over effects, or the absence of carry-over effects, could be useful for investigators considering the design. Here we develop methods for expressing the power to detect carry-over as a function of the power to detect a clinically relevant treatment effect. Our results suggest that for two-treatment, two-period cross-over studies the power to detect clinically relevant carry-over effects is often less than 15 per cent, and the number of studies needed to differentiate this effect from the type I error rate of 10 per cent is prohibitive. For the three-treatment three-period cross-over design, the power to detect carry-over effects was larger than for the two-period study, but still approached the type I error rate in a number of cases. Unequivocal conclusions about the absence of carry-over effects based on collections of hypothesis tests appear unlikely. Similar findings are presented for bioequivalence studies. For bioequivalence studies, small carry-over effects (e.g. 12.5 per cent of the treatment effect) can seriously inflate the type I error rate, particularly when the power to detect equivalence is high.

  5. Studying the thermal/non-thermal crossover in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes work performed under contract NAS5-32584 for Phase 3 of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) from 1 November 1993 through 1 November 1994. We have made spectral observations of the hard x-ray and gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emissions from solar flares using the Burst and Transit Source Experiment (BASTE) on CGRO. These measurements of their spectrum and time profile provided valuable information on the fundamental flare processes of energy release, particle acceleration, and energy transport. Our scientific objective was to study both the thermal and non-thermal sources of solar flare hard x-ray and gamma-ray emission.

  6. Theoretical study of the crossover into hydrodynamic regime in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Derek; Yudhistira, Indra; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang; Adam, Shaffique

    Experiments on graphene have recently succeeded in entering the hydrodynamic regime, as demonstrated by successful observations of strong violation of Wiedemann-Franz law, the Gurzhi effect and electronic Poiseuille flow. It is known that electronic systems enter the hydrodynamic regime when electron-electron scattering dominates over electron-impurity and electron-phonon scattering. However, a quantitative study of this transition from the Fermi liquid to hydrodynamic regime is still lacking. In view of this, we quantitatively analyze the electron-electron, electron-impurity and electron-phonon scattering rates as a function of temperature, charge doping and disorder (charge puddle) strength. This yields a quantitative understanding of the onset of hydrodynamic electronic behavior in graphene samples. This work is supported by the National Research Foundation of Singapore under its Fellowship program (NRF-NRFF2012-01) and by the Singapore Ministry of Education and Yale-NUS College through Grant No. R-607-265-01312.

  7. Extraction bradycardia: a pilot case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Significant vasovagal reaction is one of the untoward events in the course of simple extractions. The present study then aimed to record the patients’ heart rate during the extraction procedure. Materials and methods Informed consents were obtained in advance. Patients were placed in the dental chair and their heart rate was measured before /and prior to the anesthetic injection, during, and after dental extraction on a pulse oxymeter device. Data were analyzed using paired t-test. Results Sixty one patients were included. The mean heart rates of these patients prior, during, and after extraction were 88, 86 and 81, respectively. Two by two comparisons showed a significant decrease in the mean heart rate during extraction compared to the baseline and also after extraction compared to both before and during extraction (p < 0.05 for all three). Conclusions Despite the presence of sufficient local anesthesia and performing the extraction with the least trauma, a significant decrease in heart rate is evident. PMID:24456612

  8. A randomized crossover study of web-based media literacy to prevent smoking.

    PubMed

    Shensa, Ariel; Phelps-Tschang, Jane; Miller, Elizabeth; Primack, Brian A

    2016-02-01

    Feasibly implemented Web-based smoking media literacy (SML) programs have been associated with improving SML skills among adolescents. However, prior evaluations have generally had weak experimental designs. We aimed to examine program efficacy using a more rigorous crossover design. Seventy-two ninth grade students completed a Web-based SML program based on health behavior theory and implemented using a two-group two-period crossover design. Students were randomly assigned by classroom to receive media literacy or control interventions in different sequences. They were assessed three times, at baseline (T0), an initial follow-up after the first intervention (T1) and a second follow-up after the second intervention (T2). Crossover analysis using analysis of variance demonstrated significant intervention coefficients, indicating that the SML condition was superior to control for the primary outcome of total SML (F = 11.99; P < 0.001) and for seven of the nine individual SML items. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses conducted using non-parametric methods. There were changes in some exploratory theory-based outcomes including attitudes and normative beliefs but not others. In conclusion, while strength of the design of this study supports and extends prior findings around effectiveness of SML programs, influences on theory-based mediators of smoking should be further explored.

  9. Pindolol augmentation in aggressive schizophrenic patients: a double-blind crossover randomized study.

    PubMed

    Caspi, N; Modai, I; Barak, P; Waisbourd, A; Zbarsky, H; Hirschmann, S; Ritsner, M

    2001-03-01

    Treatment of aggression in schizophrenic patients is a major challenge. We sought to examine the efficacy of augmentation of antipsychotic treatment with pindolol in the amelioration of aggression. Thirty male inpatients meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia, aged 20-65 years involved in four or more aggressive incidents in the two previous months, were enrolled in a double-blind crossover study. Aggression was evaluated per incident, with the Overt Aggression Scale (OAS). Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was administered at baseline, crossover and at endpoint. Patients received either pindolol or placebo augmentation 5 mg x three times a day until crossover, then switched. No significant differences were found in the PANSS scores between the placebo and pindolol treatments. OAS scores were significantly reduced for number of aggressive incidents towards objects and other persons during pindolol treatment (0.59 versus 1.46, F = 6.09, P < 0.02; 1.96 versus 3.23, F = 4.17, P < 0.05, respectively). Similar results were obtained for severity of incidents (0.89 versus 3.58, F = 19.42, P < 0.0001; 2.89 versus 6.85, F = 10.11, P < 0.004, respectively). Pindolol, with its dual beta and 5-HT1A blocking effect ameliorated both number and severity of aggressive acts. Influence on severity may be associated with a 5-HT1A antagonistic effect.

  10. A randomized crossover study of web-based media literacy to prevent smoking

    PubMed Central

    Shensa, Ariel; Phelps-Tschang, Jane; Miller, Elizabeth; Primack, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Feasibly implemented Web-based smoking media literacy (SML) programs have been associated with improving SML skills among adolescents. However, prior evaluations have generally had weak experimental designs. We aimed to examine program efficacy using a more rigorous crossover design. Seventy-two ninth grade students completed a Web-based SML program based on health behavior theory and implemented using a two-group two-period crossover design. Students were randomly assigned by classroom to receive media literacy or control interventions in different sequences. They were assessed three times, at baseline (T0), an initial follow-up after the first intervention (T1) and a second follow-up after the second intervention (T2). Crossover analysis using analysis of variance demonstrated significant intervention coefficients, indicating that the SML condition was superior to control for the primary outcome of total SML (F = 11.99; P < 0.001) and for seven of the nine individual SML items. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses conducted using non-parametric methods. There were changes in some exploratory theory-based outcomes including attitudes and normative beliefs but not others. In conclusion, while strength of the design of this study supports and extends prior findings around effectiveness of SML programs, influences on theory-based mediators of smoking should be further explored. PMID:26675176

  11. Melatonin improves sleep in children with epilepsy: randomized, double-blind cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sejal V; Horn, Paul S; Simakajornboon, Narong; Beebe, Dean W; Holland, Katherine; Byars, Anna W; Glauser, Tracy A

    2015-01-01

    Objective Insomnia, especially maintenance insomnia is widely prevalent in epilepsy. Although melatonin is commonly used, limited data address its efficacy. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to identify the effects of melatonin on sleep and seizure control in children with epilepsy. Methods Eleven pre-pubertal, developmentally normal children aged 6–11 years with epilepsy were randomized by software algorithm to receive placebo or 9 mg sustained release melatonin for 4 weeks, followed by a 1-week washout and 4-week crossover condition. The pharmacy performed blinding; patients, parents and study staff other than a statistician were blinded. Primary outcomes were sleep onset latency and wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO) measured on polysomnography. Secondary outcomes included seizure frequency, epileptiform spike density per hour of sleep on EEG and reaction time measures on psychomotor vigilance task. Statistical tests appropriate for cross-over designs were used for analysis. Results Data were analyzed from ten subjects who completed the study. Melatonin decreased sleep latency (Mean difference (MD): 11.4 min, p= 0.02) and WASO (MD 22 min, p=0.04) as compared to placebo. No worsening of spike density or seizure frequency was seen. Additionally, Slow-wave sleep duration and REM latency were increased with melatonin and REM sleep duration was decreased. These changes were statistically significant. Worsening of headache was noted in one subject with migraine on melatonin. Conclusion Sustained-release melatonin resulted in statistically significant decreases in sleep latency and WASO. No clear effects on seizures were observed but the study was too small to allow any conclusions to be drawn in this regard. PMID:25862116

  12. An Exercise Program to Prevent Falls in Institutionalized Elderly with Cognitive Deficits: A Crossover Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Karen; Gianan, Faith V; Pang, Lorrin

    2013-01-01

    Falls are the leading cause of injury among older adults in the United States, with the institutionalized elderly at elevated risk for injury and death. Physical weakness and mental frailty, prevalent in institutionalized elderly, are major risk factors for falls. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a program that addresses both the physical and mental aspects of exercise to reduce falls in institutionalized elderly. Twenty-seven volunteer subjects residing in an assisted living facility participated in the 24 week randomized crossover study. After demographic, fall history, and mental status examinations, subjects were randomly assigned first to ten weeks of either an exercise class or a control group, followed by a four week “washout period” of no activity, then cross assigned to ten weeks as either a control group or exercise class, respectively. Falls as well as mental status changes were monitored during the study. After adjusting for differences in baseline risk between the control and treatment groups, and for potential residual effects of the treatment during the crossover phase, a statistically significant (P = .025) reduction in falls was found during treatment compared to the control periods. No change in mental status was seen. This small, pilot study shows that exercise programs, which emphasize mental strengthening as well as physical fitness, have the potential to reduce falls among mentally impaired, institutionalized seniors. PMID:24251085

  13. Crossover behavior in interface depinning.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y J; Zapperi, Stefano; Sethna, James P

    2015-08-01

    We study the crossover scaling behavior of the height-height correlation function in interface depinning in random media. We analyze experimental data from a fracture experiment and simulate an elastic line model with nonlinear couplings and disorder. Both exhibit a crossover between two different universality classes. For the experiment, we fit a functional form to the universal crossover scaling function. For the model, we vary the system size and the strength of the nonlinear term and describe the crossover between the two universality classes with a multiparameter scaling function. Our method provides a general strategy to extract scaling properties in depinning systems exhibiting crossover phenomena.

  14. The antiplaque efficacy of propolis-based herbal toothpaste: A crossover clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Nagesh; Bapat, Salil; Asawa, Kailash; Tak, Mridula; Chaturvedi, Pulkit; Gupta, Vivek V.; George, Pradeep P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In recent years, herbal products have been suggested as an economic, safe and probably effective alternative for prevention and control of various oral diseases. But still there are some products which need to be evaluated. Of lately, Propolis is one such product. To assess and compare the efficacy of herbal dentifrice containing Propolis with Miswak and Colgate total toothpastes in controlling plaque formation. Materials and Methods: A double blind, randomized, crossover study design was conducted among thirty healthy dental students. After oral prophylaxis all subjects were given a washout product for one week period. Subjects were then made to brush with (washout product) for 1 minute followed by 1 minute brushing with assigned test product. The baseline MGMPI plaque scores were recorded. Subjects were then refrained from oral hygiene for 24 hours, and were recalled to be re-disclosed and re-measured for plaque formation. This procedure was repeated according to crossover design after a washout period of (2 week). Statistical tests used were Krukalwallis and Wilcoxon sign rank test. Results: There was a significant difference in 24 hour score between the test products evaluated. When the change from baseline to 24 hours was analyzed, the test product Propolis resulted in a consistently and significantly (p < 0.05) lower MGMPI mean scores than the Colgate Total and Miswak toothpastes. Conclusion: Propolis was found to be safe and effective in reducing plaque accumulation when compared to Miswak and Colgate total toothpaste. PMID:26283831

  15. Study of the fast photoswitching of spin crossover nanoparticles outside and inside their thermal hysteresis loop

    SciTech Connect

    Galle, G.; Degert, J.; Freysz, E.; Etrillard, C.; Letard, J.-F.; Guillaume, F.

    2013-02-11

    We have studied the low spin to high spin phase transition induced by nanosecond laser pulses outside and within the thermal hysteresis loop of the [Fe(Htrz){sub 2} trz](BF{sub 4}){sub 2}-H{sub 2}O spin crossover nanoparticles. We demonstrate that, whatever the temperature of the compound, the photo-switching is achieved in less than 12.5 ns. Outside the hysteresis loop, the photo-induced high spin state remains up to 100 {mu}s and then relaxes. Within the thermal hysteresis loop, the photo-induced high spin state remains as long as the temperature of the sample is kept within the thermal loop. A Raman study indicates that the photo-switching can be completed using single laser pulse excitation.

  16. Crossover Control Study of the Effect of Personal Care Products Containing Triclosan on the Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Poole, Angela C; Pischel, Lauren; Ley, Catherine; Suh, Gina; Goodrich, Julia K; Haggerty, Thomas D; Ley, Ruth E; Parsonnet, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Commonly prescribed antibiotics are known to alter human microbiota. We hypothesized that triclosan and triclocarban, components of many household and personal care products (HPCPs), may alter the oral and gut microbiota, with potential consequences for metabolic function and weight. In a double-blind, randomized, crossover study, participants were given triclosan- and triclocarban (TCS)-containing or non-triclosan/triclocarban (nTCS)-containing HPCPs for 4 months and then switched to the other products for an additional 4 months. Blood, stool, gingival plaque, and urine samples and weight data were obtained at baseline and at regular intervals throughout the study period. Blood samples were analyzed for metabolic and endocrine markers and urine samples for triclosan. The microbiome in stool and oral samples was then analyzed. Although there was a significant difference in the amount of triclosan in the urine between the TCS and nTCS phases, no differences were found in microbiome composition, metabolic or endocrine markers, or weight. Though this study was limited by the small sample size and imprecise administration of HPCPs, triclosan at physiologic levels from exposure to HPCPs does not appear to have a significant or important impact on human oral or gut microbiome structure or on a panel of metabolic markers. IMPORTANCE Triclosan and triclocarban are commonly used commercial microbicides found in toothpastes and soaps. It is unknown what effects these chemicals have on the human microbiome or on endocrine function. From this randomized crossover study, it appears that routine personal care use of triclosan and triclocarban neither exerts a major influence on microbial communities in the gut and mouth nor alters markers of endocrine function in humans.

  17. Crossover Control Study of the Effect of Personal Care Products Containing Triclosan on the Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Angela C.; Pischel, Lauren; Ley, Catherine; Suh, Gina; Goodrich, Julia K.; Haggerty, Thomas D.; Ley, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Commonly prescribed antibiotics are known to alter human microbiota. We hypothesized that triclosan and triclocarban, components of many household and personal care products (HPCPs), may alter the oral and gut microbiota, with potential consequences for metabolic function and weight. In a double-blind, randomized, crossover study, participants were given triclosan- and triclocarban (TCS)-containing or non-triclosan/triclocarban (nTCS)-containing HPCPs for 4 months and then switched to the other products for an additional 4 months. Blood, stool, gingival plaque, and urine samples and weight data were obtained at baseline and at regular intervals throughout the study period. Blood samples were analyzed for metabolic and endocrine markers and urine samples for triclosan. The microbiome in stool and oral samples was then analyzed. Although there was a significant difference in the amount of triclosan in the urine between the TCS and nTCS phases, no differences were found in microbiome composition, metabolic or endocrine markers, or weight. Though this study was limited by the small sample size and imprecise administration of HPCPs, triclosan at physiologic levels from exposure to HPCPs does not appear to have a significant or important impact on human oral or gut microbiome structure or on a panel of metabolic markers. IMPORTANCE Triclosan and triclocarban are commonly used commercial microbicides found in toothpastes and soaps. It is unknown what effects these chemicals have on the human microbiome or on endocrine function. From this randomized crossover study, it appears that routine personal care use of triclosan and triclocarban neither exerts a major influence on microbial communities in the gut and mouth nor alters markers of endocrine function in humans. PMID:27303746

  18. A Prospective Randomized Crossover Study on the Comparison of Cotton Versus Waterproof Cast Liners

    PubMed Central

    Guillen, Philip T.; Fuller, Corey B.; Riedel, Barth B.; Wongworawat, Montri D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many fractures are treated with casting which can cause complications likely from inability to wash the extremity. Gore-Tex-based waterproof cast liner has been compared with cotton liner and shown to be superior in physician and patient scoring but also has high cost and difficult application. The purpose of this study is to compare newer generation waterproof liners with traditional cotton liner. It is the first study to compare this new waterproof liner and cotton liner in a crossover model, allowing patients to swim in the pool with the cast. Methods: Twenty patients (ages 3-30) with upper extremity injuries were randomized to waterproof-liner or cotton-liner casts made of fiberglass. Patients would switch cast liners halfway between their treatments to fulfill crossover criteria. All fractures were within a 2-week period from original incident. At each clinic visit, patients evaluated comfort parameters through questionnaires, and physicians rated skin condition. Patients were also asked which cast liner they preferred at the end of the study. Results: There were no unscheduled cast changes. The waterproof-liner group had better scores for odor (P = .041), sweat (P = .016), and overall physician-rated score (P = .038). There was no significant difference in other patient-rated parameters. Seventy-five percent of patients preferred waterproof casting to the cotton liner. Conclusions: This new waterproof cast liner, compared with cotton cast liner, had better odor, sweat, and overall physician scores. The waterproof liners allow patients to rinse casts daily, and the majority of patients prefer waterproof to cotton liner. PMID:27418889

  19. Additional results for 'Sequential design approaches for bioequivalence studies with crossover designs'.

    PubMed

    Montague, Timothy H; Potvin, Diane; Diliberti, Charles E; Hauck, Walter W; Parr, Alan F; Schuirmann, Donald J

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, this group published a paper on approaches for two-stage crossover bioequivalence (BE) studies that allowed for the reestimation of the second-stage sample size based on the variance estimated from the first-stage results. The sequential methods considered used an assumed GMR of 0.95 as part of the method for determining power and sample size. This note adds results for an assumed GMR = 0.90. Two of the methods recommended for GMR = 0.95 in the earlier paper have some unacceptable increases in Type I error rate when the GMR is changed to 0.90. If a sponsor wants to assume 0.90 for the GMR, Method D is recommended. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Does Granisetron Eliminate the Gag Reflex? A Crossover, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander Barenboim, Silvina; Dvoyris, Vladislav; Kaufman, Eliezer

    2009-01-01

    Although gagging is a frequent problem that, when severe, can jeopardize the dental procedure, no single protocol is used to alleviate this phenomenon. Selective 5-HT3 antagonists, such as granisetron, may attenuate gagging. In this study, granisetron and placebo were administered intravenously, in a crossover, double-blind manner, to 25 healthy volunteers in 2 different sessions. Gagging levels were recorded before and after administration, as were BP, pulse, and O2 saturation. Recorded results were analyzed with the use of tests for nonparametric values (P = .05). A significant increase in the depth of swab insertion was noted after administration of both placebo and drug. The increase in drug effectiveness correlated with decreased body weight. The true efficacy of granisetron in gagger patients with this treatment protocol has yet to be fully established, although it has been theorized that an increased dosage of granisetron may have a better effect. PMID:19562886

  1. Randomised, double blind, crossover challenge study of allergenicity of peanut oils in subjects allergic to peanuts.

    PubMed Central

    Hourihane, J. O.; Bedwani, S. J.; Dean, T. P.; Warner, J. O.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the in vivo allergenicity of two grades of peanut oil for a large group of subjects with proved allergy to peanuts. DESIGN: Double blind, crossover food challenge with crude peanut oil and refined peanut oil. SETTING: Dedicated clinical investigation unit in a university hospital. SUBJECTS: 60 subjects allergic to peanuts; allergy was confirmed by challenge tests. OUTCOME MEASURES: Allergic reaction to the tested peanut oils. RESULTS: None of the 60 subjects reacted to the refined oil; six (10%) reacted to the crude oil. Supervised peanut challenge caused considerably less severe reactions than subjects had reported previously. CONCLUSIONS: Crude peanut oil caused allergic reactions in 10% of allergic subjects studied and should continue to be avoided. Refined peanut oil did not pose a risk to any of the subjects. It would be reasonable to recommend a change in labelling to distinguish refined from crude peanut oil. PMID:9133891

  2. Effectiveness of Mentha piperita in the Treatment of Infantile Colic: A Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Alves, João Guilherme Bezerra; de Brito, Rita de Cássia Coelho Moraes; Cavalcanti, Telma Samila

    2012-01-01

    Background. Infantile colic is a distressing and common condition for which there is no proven standard treatment. Objective. To compare the efficacy of Mentha piperita with simethicone in treatment for infantile colic. Methods. A double-blind crossover study was performed with 30 infants attending IMIP, Recife, Brazil. They were randomized to use Mentha piperita or simethicone in the treatment of infantile colic during 7 days with each drug. Primary outcomes were mother_s opinion about responses to the treatment, number of daily episodes of colic, and time spent crying, measured by a chronometer. Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests were used to compare the results. This study was previously approved by the Ethical Committee in Research at IMIP. Results. At baseline daily episodes of infantile colic was 3.9 (±1.1) and the mean crying time per day was 192 minutes (±51.6). At the end of the study daily episodes of colic fell to 1.6 (±0.6) and the crying duration decreased to 111 (±28) minutes. All mothers reported decrease of frequency and duration of the episodes of infantile colic and there were no differences between responses to Mentha piperita and simethicone. Conclusions. These findings suggest that Mentha piperita may be used to help control infantile colic. However, these results must be repeated by others studies.

  3. Piroxicam immediate release formulations: A fasting randomized open-label crossover bioequivalence study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Sally A; El-Bedaiwy, Heba M

    2014-11-01

    Piroxicam is a NSAID with analgesic and antipyretic properties, used for the treatment of rheumatoid diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioequivalence of two brands of piroxicam capsules (20 mg) in 24 Egyptian volunteers. The in vivo study was established according to a single-center, randomized, single-dose, laboratory-blinded, 2-period, 2-sequence, crossover study with a washout period of 3 weeks. Under fasting conditions, 24 healthy male volunteers were randomly selected to receive a single oral dose of one capsule (20 mg) of either test or reference product. Plasma samples were obtained over a 144-hour interval and analyzed for piroxicam by HPLC with UV detection. The pharmacokinetic parameters Cmax , tmax , AUC0-t , AUC0-∞ , Vd /F, Cl/F, and t1/2 were determined from plasma concentration-time profiles. The 90% confidence intervals for the ratio of log transformed values of Cmax , AUC0-t , and AUC0-∞ of the two treatments were within the acceptable range (0.8-1.25) for bioequivalence. From PK perspectives, the two piroxicam formulations were considered bioequivalent, based on the rate and extent of absorption. No adverse events occurred or were reported after a single 20-mg piroxicam and both formulations were well-tolerated.

  4. Efficacy of intravenous nicorandil for fractional flow reserve assessment: study protocol for a crossover randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Takeshi; Kitahara, Hideki; Fujimoto, Yoshihide; Nakayama, Takashi; Sugimoto, Kazumasa; Hanaoka, Hideki; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nicorandil has vasodilatory effects on both the epicardial coronary arteries and the coronary microvasculature, thereby increasing coronary blood flow. Intravenous administration of nicorandil can be applicable for fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurement as a hyperaemic agent and a possible alternative to adenosine. However, the effectiveness of intravenous nicorandil infusion for FFR measurement is largely unclear. Methods and analysis This crossover randomised study is being performed to investigate the efficacy of intravenous administration of nicorandil for FFR measurement. Patients with an intermediate coronary artery stenosis who satisfy the eligibility criteria undergo FFR measurement with a consecutive randomised order of patient-blind infusions of continuous intravenous administration of adenosine and a single bolus intravenous administration of nicorandil. The primary end point of the study is the agreement between the FFR values obtained by the intravenous nicorandil and those obtained by the intravenous adenosine. Recruitment of this trial started in November 2015 and will end in March 2017, or until a total of 50 participants have been recruited. Ethics and dissemination The protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board at Chiba University Hospital. Study findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number UMIN000019309; Pre-results. PMID:27872119

  5. Synthetic food colourings and 'hyperactivity': a double-blind crossover study.

    PubMed

    Rowe, K S

    1988-04-01

    Of 220 children referred for suspected 'hyperactivity', 55 were subjected to a 6 week trial of the Feingold diet. Forty (72.7%) demonstrated improved behaviour and 26 (47.3%) remained improved following liberalization of the diet over a period of 3-6 months. The parents of 14 children claimed that a particular cluster of behaviours was associated with the ingestion of foods containing synthetic colourings. A double-blind crossover study, employing a single-subject repeated measures design was conducted, using eight of these children. Subjects were maintained on a diet free from synthetic additives and were challenged daily for 18 weeks with either placebo (during lead-in and washout periods) or 50 mg of either tartrazine or carmoisine, each for 2 separate weeks. Two significant reactors were identified whose behavioural pattern featured extreme irritability, restlessness and sleep disturbance. One of the reactors did not have inattention as a feature. The findings raise the issue of whether the strict criteria for inclusion in studies concerned with 'hyperactivity' based on 'attention deficit disorder' may miss children who indicate behavioural changes associated with the ingestion of food colourings. Moreover, for further studies, the need to construct a behavioural rating instrument specifically validated for dye challenge is suggested.

  6. Air Pollution and Emergency Department Visits for Depression: A Multicity Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Szyszkowicz, Mieczysław; Kousha, Termeh; Kingsbury, Mila; Colman, Ian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between ambient air pollution and emergency department (ED) visits for depression. METHODS Health data were retrieved from the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System. ED visits for depression were retrieved from the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System using the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), Tenth revision codes; ICD-10: F32 (mild depressive episode) and ICD-10: F33 (recurrent depressive disorder). A case-crossover design was employed for this study. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios. RESULTS For females, exposure to ozone was associated with increased risk of an ED visit for depression between 1 and 7 days after exposure, for males, between 1 and 5, and 8 days after exposure, with odds ratios ranging between 1.02 and 1.03. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that, as hypothesized, there is a positive association between exposure to air pollution and ED visits for depression. PMID:27597809

  7. First principles study of thermal conductivity cross-over in nanostructured zinc-chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Katre, Ankita; Madsen, Georg K. H.; Togo, Atsushi; Tanaka, Isao

    2015-01-28

    Systematic first principles studies of zinc-chalcogenides have been performed to understand their thermal transport behaviour. We have applied the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation to calculate the thermal conductivity of ZnS, ZnSe, and ZnTe. We find a thermal conductivity cross-over between ZnS and ZnSe at nanostructure sizes around 0.1–0.2 μm and explain this in terms of the different contributions of phonon modes in these materials. We study the effect of nanostructuring using both the diffusive boundary scattering and confined mean free path limit and discuss the variations in the results. Furthermore, we show the strong influence of isotope scattering on the thermal conductivity. The calculated thermal conductivity is found to be strongly dependent on the volume and we explain the observed differences between local density and generalized gradient approximation calculations. We compare further calculated thermal properties, such as the thermal expansion coefficient, to experiment to validate our approach.

  8. Topical Administration of Pirfenidone Increases Healing of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Randomized Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Janka-Zires, Marcela; Almeda-Valdes, Paloma; Uribe-Wiechers, Ana Cecilia; Juárez-Comboni, Sonia Citlali; López-Gutiérrez, Joel; Escobar-Jiménez, Jarod Jazek; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Only 30 percent of chronic diabetic foot ulcers heal after 20 weeks of standard treatment. Pirfenidone is a drug with biological, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical pirfenidone added to conventional treatment in noninfected chronic diabetic foot ulcers. This was a randomized crossover study. Group 1 received topical pirfenidone plus conventional treatment for 8 weeks; after this period, they were switched to receive conventional treatment only for 8 more weeks. In group 2, the order of the treatments was the opposite. The end points were complete ulcer healing and size reduction. Final data were obtained from 35 ulcers in 24 patients. Fifty-two percent of ulcers treated with pirfenidone healed before 8 weeks versus 14.3% treated with conventional treatment only (P = 0.025). Between 8 and 16 weeks, 30.8% ulcers that received pirfenidone healed versus 0% with conventional treatment (P = 0.081). By week 8, the reduction in ulcer size was 100% [73-100] with pirfenidone versus 57.5% with conventional treatment [28.9-74] (P = 0.011). By week 16, the reduction was 93% [42.7-100] with pirfenidone and 21.8% [8-77.5] with conventional treatment (P = 0.050). The addition of topical pirfenidone to conventional treatment significantly improves the healing of chronic diabetic noninfected foot ulcers.

  9. A randomized cross-over study comparing cabergoline and quinagolide in the treatment of hyperprolactinemic patients.

    PubMed

    De Luis, D A; Becerra, A; Lahera, M; Botella, J I; Valero; Varela, C

    2000-01-01

    Quinagolide (QUI) and cabergoline (CAB) are dopamine agonists recently introduced for the treatment of hyperprolactinemia. In the present study, these drugs have been compared in terms of effectiveness and tolerability. Twenty patients (18 females and 2 males) with hyperprolactinemia (8 with microprolactinomas, 6 with idiopathic hyperprolactinemia and 6 with empty sella turcica syndrome) were treated with oral QUI (75 microg once daily) and CAB (0,5 mg twice weekly), in a randomized cross-over trial with placebo between both drugs. Each drug was administered for 12 weeks, separated by other 12 weeks with placebo. PRL levels decreased with both drugs at 2 or 4 weeks of starting the treatment, without differences between both drugs at weeks 4, 8 and 12. At week 12, normal PRL levels (<20 ng/ml) were attained in 90% patients with CAB and only in 75% patients with QUI (p<0.05). After discontinuation of treatment, significant increase in serum PRL was higher after QUI withdrawal than after CAB. Clinical efficacy of both treatments was similar in terms of improvement amenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, galactorrhea, and impotence. All patients completed both cycles of treatment, and the most frequent side-effects were nausea, headache and dizziness, without significant differences between CAB (30%) and QUI (55%). Our study indicates that, at the doses employed here, CAB showed a high percentage of patients with normal PRL at the end of treatment and long-lasting efficacy in the levels of PRL. Clinical response and side-effects were similar in both drugs.

  10. The effects of ankle supports on gait in adults: A randomized cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Keene, David J; Willett, Keith; Lamb, Sarah E

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to compare the effects of different ankle supports used after ankle injury/surgery on temporo-spatial gait characteristics. We conducted a randomized cross-over study including adult participants with no previous lower limb or neurological pathology, who underwent gait analysis on an electronic walkway in three different ankle supports, Tubigrip(®), a stirrup brace and a walker boot. The 18 participants were an average age of 42 (SD 13, range 24-62) years and 14 (88%) were female. Compared to Tubigrip(®), gait in the walker boot was slower (-0.19 m/s, 95%CI -0.23 to -0.16, P < 0.001), step length asymmetry was 10% (95%CI 9-12, P < 0.001) worse, single support time asymmetry was 5% (95%CI 3-7, P < 0.001) worse and participants also adopted a wider step width (4.1 cm, 95%CI 3.7-4.5, P < 0.001). There were no important differences in gait between the Tubigrip(®) and stirrup brace. The findings of this study suggest that there is a limit to the degree of normal walking characteristics in a walker boot in the absence of lower limb impairment. Further research is required to directly compare the effects of these ankle supports in clinical populations.

  11. Randomized crossover trial studying the effect of music on examination anxiety.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hui-Ling; Chen, Pin-Wen; Chen, Chia-Jung; Chang, Hui-Kuan; Peng, Tai-Chu; Chang, Fwu-Mei

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of lento music on examination anxiety among nursing students. A randomized crossover classroom-based trial was conducted. Thirty-eight students with a mean age of 19.4 years (SD = .54) were randomly assigned to either a music/silence or a silence/music group sequence. The students in the music group were given a 40-min group-based music intervention in a classroom, whereas the students in the silence group received the regular test without music. Using paired t-tests, there were no significant different in pretest scores for state anxiety, examination anxiety, finger temperature and pulse rate between the two conditions. Nonetheless, the findings indicated that music intervention did effectively decrease examination anxiety and state anxiety as well as reducing pulse rate and increasing higher finger temperature (p = 0.05 to 0.001). In addition, significant differences were detected between the pretest and posttest measures for silence (p = 0.001). The results suggest that lento music is effective at anxiety reduction. This study provides evidence for nursing faculty and clinical educators to foster nursing students' mastering over the anxiety of examination by using lento music.

  12. Topical Administration of Pirfenidone Increases Healing of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Randomized Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Janka-Zires, Marcela; Uribe-Wiechers, Ana Cecilia; Juárez-Comboni, Sonia Citlali; López-Gutiérrez, Joel; Escobar-Jiménez, Jarod Jazek; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Only 30 percent of chronic diabetic foot ulcers heal after 20 weeks of standard treatment. Pirfenidone is a drug with biological, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical pirfenidone added to conventional treatment in noninfected chronic diabetic foot ulcers. This was a randomized crossover study. Group 1 received topical pirfenidone plus conventional treatment for 8 weeks; after this period, they were switched to receive conventional treatment only for 8 more weeks. In group 2, the order of the treatments was the opposite. The end points were complete ulcer healing and size reduction. Final data were obtained from 35 ulcers in 24 patients. Fifty-two percent of ulcers treated with pirfenidone healed before 8 weeks versus 14.3% treated with conventional treatment only (P = 0.025). Between 8 and 16 weeks, 30.8% ulcers that received pirfenidone healed versus 0% with conventional treatment (P = 0.081). By week 8, the reduction in ulcer size was 100% [73–100] with pirfenidone versus 57.5% with conventional treatment [28.9–74] (P = 0.011). By week 16, the reduction was 93% [42.7–100] with pirfenidone and 21.8% [8–77.5] with conventional treatment (P = 0.050). The addition of topical pirfenidone to conventional treatment significantly improves the healing of chronic diabetic noninfected foot ulcers. PMID:27478849

  13. Study on nature of crossover phenomena with application to gearbox fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xingxing; Li, Shunming; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) is a robust tool for uncovering long-range correlations hidden in the non-stationary data. Recently, crossover properties of the scaling-law curve obtained by DFA have been applied to diagnose gearbox faults. However, the nature of the crossover phenomena has not been well- explained. In this paper, an explanation for the nature of crossover phenomena is specifically given, which is conducive to discovering novel features for gearbox fault diagnosis. Firstly, an explicit exposition of the crossover phenomena is provided by analyzing the gearbox vibration signal. Secondly, the nature of crossover phenomena is specifically disclosed. Thirdly, the features with clear physical meaning are proposed to describe operating conditions of a gearbox. Then, to overcome the deficiency of feature extraction through visual observation, a piecewise-linear regression model is utilized to extract the features automatically. Lastly, several combinations of these features are used to classify the fault types. As a consequence, the proposed novel features are verified that they can well- distinguish the gearbox operating conditions with different fault types and severities, and deliver a better performance than the existing method depending on the sensitive index (SI).

  14. Quantitative study of ruthenium cross-over in direct methanol fuel cells during early operation hours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoekel, A.; Melke, J.; Bruns, M.; Wippermann, K.; Kuppler, F.; Roth, C.

    2016-01-01

    In direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), ruthenium cross-over is an important degradation phenomenon. The loss of ruthenium from the anode, its transport through the membrane and its deposition onto the cathode are detrimental to the fuel cell performance and limit the fuel cell's lifetime. Here we present a quantitative study on the fraction of ruthenium being transferred from the anode to the cathode during early operation hours (0-100 h) of a DMFC. Already during fabrication of the MEA ruthenium is transferred to the cathode. In our pristine MEAs about 0.024 wt% Ru could be found in the cathode catalyst. The cell potential during operation seems to have only a minor influence on the dissolution process. In contrast, the operation time appears to be much more important. Our data hint at two dissolution processes: a fast process dominating the first hours of operation and a slower process, which is responsible for the ongoing ruthenium transfer during the fuel cell lifetime. After 2 h held at open circuit conditions the Ru content of the cathode side was 10 times higher than in the pristine MEA. In contrast, the slower process increased that amount only by a factor of two over the course of another 100 h.

  15. Alcohol Abuse and Suicide Attempt in Iran: A Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Behrooz; Malakouti, Seyed Kazem; Nojomi, Marzieh; Leo, Diego De; Saeed, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use and its disorders are associated with increased risk of suicidal behaviors Research has shown that 6-8% of those who use alcohol have a history of suicide attempt. Given the prohibition of alcohol use legally, the increased alcohol consumption, and the lack of strong evidence in favor of its use associated with suicide in Iran, this study was conducted to determine the link between suicide attempt and alcohol abuse. The case-crossover method was used in this research. Out of 305 referrals to the emergency room due to a suicide attempt, 100 reported drinking alcohol up to six hours before their attempt. Paired Matching and Usual Frequency were employed to analyze the data with STATA 12.0. The probability of attempting suicide up to six hours after drinking alcohol appeared increased by 27 times (95% CI: 8.1-60.4). Separate analysis for each of these hours from the first to the sixth hour after alcohol use was also performed. Fifty percent of attempted suicides happened one hour after alcohol use. Relative risk for the first and second hour was 10% and 5% respectively. Alcohol use is a strong proximal risk factor for attempted suicide among Iranian subjects. Prevention of alcohol use should be considered in setting up of the national Suicide attempt prevention program. PMID:26925903

  16. Tramadol premedication in operative extraction of the mandibular third molar: a placebo-controlled crossover study.

    PubMed

    Kanto, Dunja; Salo, Matti; Happonen, Risto-Pekka; Vahlberg, Tero; Kanto, Jussi

    2005-02-01

    Anxiolytic drugs are widely used for premedication in oral surgery. Since anxiety is usually associated with the fear of pain, we tested the effects of the analgesic tramadol in premedication before operative extraction of the mandibular third molar under local anesthesia. In a double-blind crossover study, 20 patients were randomized to receive 100 mg oral tramadol or placebo 1 h before operation. Anxiety, nausea, dryness of the mouth, pain and discomfort were recorded before administration of the drug, immediately before and after operation, and 0.5, 1, and 2 h postoperatively using ungraded 0-100 mm VAS scales. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured at the same times; vigilance was tested using the Maddox Wing Test and sensorimotor performance using the Trieger Dot Test; hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO2) was measured using a pulse oximeter. In addition, SpO2 and heart rate were recorded continuously in nine patients using a pulse oximeter connected to a computer. The surgeon assessed the quality of operating conditions on the VAS scale. Tramadol delayed and decreased the need of analgesics on the day of operation (p < 0.05). The operating conditions were better in patients on tramadol premedication than in those on placebo during the first operation (p < 0.05), but no differences were seen in patient well-being between treatments. The second operation was less stressful than the first. Tramadol is recommended only with special indications for premedication of patients undergoing third molar extraction under local anesthesia.

  17. Effect of Exercise Intensity on Spontaneous Physical Activity Energy Expenditure in Overweight Boys: A Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Paravidino, Vitor Barreto; Mediano, Mauro Felippe Felix; Hoffman, Daniel J.; Sichieri, Rosely

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the effect of different exercise intensities on spontaneous physical activity energy expenditure in overweight adolescents. Methods A crossover study was developed with a control session, followed by moderate and vigorous exercise sessions, with six days of monitoring each. Twenty-four adolescents, 11–13 years old, male and overweight were selected. Spontaneous physical activity energy expenditure was assessed by accelerometers. Linear mixed effects models were used to evaluate the differences per session across time. Results Energy expenditure during the 1st hour was different between all three sessions, with averages of 82, 286 and 343 kcal to the control, moderate and vigorous sessions, respectively (p <0.001). The same pattern of difference in energy expenditure between the sessions remained after 24 hours (704 vs 970 vs 1056 kcal, p <0.001). However, energy expenditure during the six days indicates compensation from second to the sixth day, although small differences remained at the end of the 6-day period (5102 vs 5193 vs 5271 kcal, p <0.001). Conclusions A single aerobic session seems to modify the spontaneous physical activities in overweight adolescents but still keeping the vigorous session with higher total energy expenditure during the follow-up period. Despite the observed compensatory effect, the greater energy expenditure observed in both moderate and vigorous exercise sessions indicates that physical activity should be recommended to promote an increased energy expenditure in adolescents. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 02272088 PMID:26771742

  18. Recent Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, the effects of methanol crossover and airflow rates on the cathode potential of an operating direct methanol fuel cell are explored. Techniques for quantifying methanol crossover in a fuel cell and for separating the electrical performance of each electrode in a fuel cell are discussed. The effect of methanol concentration on cathode potential has been determined to be significant. The cathode is found to be mass transfer limited when operating on low flow rate air and high concentrations of methanol. Improvements in cathode structure and operation at low methanol concentration have been shown to result in improved cell performance.

  19. Effect of bread gluten content on gastrointestinal function: a crossover MRI study on healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Coletta, Marina; Gates, Fred K; Marciani, Luca; Shiwani, Henna; Major, Giles; Hoad, Caroline L; Chaddock, Gemma; Gowland, Penny A; Spiller, Robin C

    2016-01-14

    Gluten is a crucial functional component of bread, but the effect of increasing gluten content on gastrointestinal (GI) function remains uncertain. Our aim was to investigate the effect of increasing gluten content on GI function and symptoms in healthy participants using the unique capabilities of MRI. A total of twelve healthy participants completed this randomised, mechanistic, open-label, three-way crossover study. On days 1 and 2 they consumed either gluten-free bread (GFB), or normal gluten content bread (NGCB) or added gluten content bread (AGCB). The same bread was consumed on day 3, and MRI scans were performed every 60 min from fasting baseline up to 360 min after eating. The appearance of the gastric chime in the images was assessed using a visual heterogeneity score. Gastric volumes, the small bowel water content (SBWC), colonic volumes and colonic gas content and GI symptoms were measured. Fasting transverse colonic volume after the 2-d preload was significantly higher after GFB compared with NGCB and AGCB with a dose-dependent response (289 (SEM 96) v. 212 (SEM 74) v. 179 (SEM 87) ml, respectively; P=0·02). The intragastric chyme heterogeneity score was higher for the bread with increased gluten (AGCB 6 (interquartile range (IQR) 0·5) compared with GFB 3 (IQR 0·5); P=0·003). However, gastric half-emptying time was not different between breads nor were study day GI symptoms, postprandial SBWC, colonic volume and gas content. This MRI study showed novel mechanistic insights in the GI responses to different breads, which are poorly understood notwithstanding the importance of this staple food.

  20. A Case-Crossover Study of Heat Exposure and Injury Risk in Outdoor Agricultural Workers

    PubMed Central

    Bonauto, David K.; Sheppard, Lianne; Busch-Isaksen, Tania; Calkins, Miriam; Adams, Darrin; Lieblich, Max; Fenske, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent research suggests that heat exposure may increase the risk of traumatic injuries. Published heat-related epidemiological studies have relied upon exposure data from individual weather stations. Objective To evaluate the association between heat exposure and traumatic injuries in outdoor agricultural workers exposed to ambient heat and internal heat generated by physical activity using modeled ambient exposure data. Methods A case-crossover study using time-stratified referent selection among 12,213 outdoor agricultural workers with new Washington State Fund workers’ compensation traumatic injury claims between 2000 and 2012 was conducted. Maximum daily Humidex exposures, derived from modeled meteorological data, were assigned to latitudes and longitudes of injury locations on injury and referent dates. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios of injury for a priori daily maximum Humidex categories. Results The mean of within-stratum (injury day and corresponding referent days) standard deviations of daily maximum Humidex was 4.8. The traumatic injury odds ratio was 1.14 (95% confidence interval 1.06, 1.22), 1.15 (95% confidence interval 1.06, 1.25), and 1.10 (95% confidence interval 1.01, 1.20) for daily maximum Humidex of 25–29, 30–33, and ≥34, respectively, compared to < 25, adjusted for self-reported duration of employment. Stronger associations were observed during cherry harvest duties in the June and July time period, compared to all duties over the entire study period. Conclusions Agricultural workers laboring in warm conditions are at risk for heat-related traumatic injuries. Combined heat-related illness and injury prevention efforts should be considered in high-risk populations exposed to warm ambient conditions in the setting of physical exertion. PMID:27716794

  1. Visual Rehabilitation in Chronic Cerebral Blindness: A Randomized Controlled Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Elshout, Joris A.; van Asten, Freekje; Hoyng, Carel B.; Bergsma, Douwe P.; van den Berg, Albert V.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of patients suffering from cerebral blindness following stroke is a topic of much recent interest. Several types of treatment are under investigation, such as substitution with prisms and compensation training of saccades. A third approach, aimed at vision restitution is controversial, as a proper controlled study design is missing. In the current study, 27 chronic stroke patients with homonymous visual field defects were trained at home with a visual training device. We used a discrimination task for two types of stimuli: a static point stimulus and a new optic flow-discontinuity stimulus. Using a randomized controlled crossover design, each patient received two successive training rounds, one with high contrast stimuli in their affected hemifield (test) and one round with low-contrast stimuli in their intact hemifield (control). Goldmann and Humphrey perimetry were performed at the start of the study and following each training round. In addition, reading performance was measured. Goldmann perimetry revealed a statistically significant reduction of the visual field defect after the test training, but not after the control training or after no intervention. For both training rounds combined, Humphrey perimetry revealed that the effect of a directed training (sensitivity change in trained hemifield) exceeded that of an undirected training (sensitivity change in untrained hemifield). The interaction between trained and tested hemifield was just above the threshold of significance (p = 0.058). Interestingly, reduction of the field defect assessed by Goldmann perimetry increases with the difference between defect size as measured by Humphrey and Goldmann perimetry prior to training. Moreover, improvement of visual sensitivity measured by Humphrey perimetry increases with the fraction of non-responsive elements (i.e., more relative field loss) in Humphrey perimetry prior to training. Reading speed revealed a significant improvement after training. Our

  2. A randomised cross-over pharmacokinetic bioavailability study of synthetic versus kiwifruit-derived vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Carr, Anitra C; Bozonet, Stephanie M; Vissers, Margreet C M

    2013-11-11

    Kiwifruit are a rich source of vitamin C and also contain numerous phytochemicals, such as flavonoids, which may influence the bioavailability of kiwifruit-derived vitamin C. The aim of this study was to compare the relative bioavailability of synthetic versus kiwifruit-derived vitamin C using a randomised cross-over pharmacokinetic study design. Nine non-smoking males (aged 18-35 years) received either a chewable tablet (200 mg vitamin C) or the equivalent dose from gold kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis var. Sungold). Fasting blood and urine were collected half hourly to hourly over the eight hours following intervention. The ascorbate content of the plasma and urine was determined using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Plasma ascorbate levels increased from 0.5 h after the intervention (P = 0.008). No significant differences in the plasma time-concentration curves were observed between the two interventions (P = 0.645). An estimate of the total increase in plasma ascorbate indicated complete uptake of the ingested vitamin C tablet and kiwifruit-derived vitamin C. There was an increase in urinary ascorbate excretion, relative to urinary creatinine, from two hours post intervention (P < 0.001). There was also a significant difference between the two interventions, with enhanced ascorbate excretion observed in the kiwifruit group (P = 0.016). Urinary excretion was calculated as ~40% and ~50% of the ingested dose from the vitamin C tablet and kiwifruit arms, respectively. Overall, our pharmacokinetic study has shown comparable relative bioavailability of kiwifruit-derived vitamin C and synthetic vitamin C.

  3. A Randomized Crossover Study of Web-Based Media Literacy to Prevent Smoking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shensa, Ariel; Phelps-Tschang, Jane; Miller, Elizabeth; Primack, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Feasibly implemented Web-based smoking media literacy (SML) programs have been associated with improving SML skills among adolescents. However, prior evaluations have generally had weak experimental designs. We aimed to examine program efficacy using a more rigorous crossover design. Seventy-two ninth grade students completed a Web-based SML…

  4. Distinct age and self-rated health crossover mortality effects for African Americans: Evidence from a national cohort study.

    PubMed

    Roth, David L; Skarupski, Kimberly A; Crews, Deidra C; Howard, Virginia J; Locher, Julie L

    2016-05-01

    The predictive effects of age and self-rated health (SRH) on all-cause mortality are known to differ across race and ethnic groups. African American adults have higher mortality rates than Whites at younger ages, but this mortality disparity diminishes with advancing age and may "crossover" at about 75-80 years of age, when African Americans may show lower mortality rates. This pattern of findings reflects a lower overall association between age and mortality for African Americans than for Whites, and health-related mechanisms are typically cited as the reason for this age-based crossover mortality effect. However, a lower association between poor SRH and mortality has also been found for African Americans than for Whites, and it is not known if the reduced age and SRH associations with mortality for African Americans reflect independent or overlapping mechanisms. This study examined these two mortality predictors simultaneously in a large epidemiological study of 12,181 African Americans and 17,436 Whites. Participants were 45 or more years of age when they enrolled in the national REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study between 2003 and 2007. Consistent with previous studies, African Americans had poorer SRH than Whites even after adjusting for demographic and health history covariates. Survival analysis models indicated statistically significant and independent race*age, race*SRH, and age*SRH interaction effects on all-cause mortality over an average 9-year follow-up period. Advanced age and poorer SRH were both weaker mortality risk factors for African Americans than for Whites. These two effects were distinct and presumably tapped different causal mechanisms. This calls into question the health-related explanation for the age-based mortality crossover effect and suggests that other mechanisms, including behavioral, social, and cultural factors, should be considered in efforts to better understand the age-based mortality

  5. Eating dark and milk chocolate: a randomized crossover study of effects on appetite and energy intake

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, L B; Astrup, A

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effect of dark and milk chocolate on appetite sensations and energy intake at an ad libitum test meal in healthy, normal-weight men. Subjects/methods: A total of 16 young, healthy, normal-weight men participated in a randomized, crossover study. Test meals were 100 g of either milk (2285 kJ) or dark chocolate (2502 kJ). Visual-analogue scales were used to record appetite sensations before and after the test meal was consumed and subsequently every 30 min for 5 h. An ad libitum meal was served 2 h after the test meal had been consumed. Results: The participants felt more satiated, less hungry, and had lower ratings of prospective food consumption after consumption of the dark chocolate than after the milk chocolate. Ratings of the desire to eat something sweet, fatty or savoury were all lower after consumption of the dark chocolate. Energy intake at the ad libitum meal was 17% lower after consumption of the dark chocolate than after the milk chocolate (P=0.002). If the energy provided by the chocolate is included in the calculation, the energy intake after consumption of the dark chocolate was still 8% lower than after the milk chocolate (P=0.01). The dark chocolate load resulted in an overall energy difference of −584 kJ (95% confidence interval (−1027;−141)) during the test period. Conclusion: In the present study, dark chocolate promotes satiety, lowers the desire to eat something sweet, and suppresses energy intake compared with milk chocolate. PMID:23455041

  6. Rapid weather changes are associated with increased ischemic stroke risk: a case-crossover study.

    PubMed

    Rakers, Florian; Schiffner, Rene; Rupprecht, Sven; Brandstädt, Antje; Witte, Otto W; Walther, Mario; Schlattmann, Peter; Schwab, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Observational studies focusing on absolute meteorological values suggest an association between meteorological parameters and stroke risk but these results are inconsistent and conflicting. Since changes in weather can provoke atrial fibrillation, we examined the association between rapid weather changes and stroke risk in 1694 patients with determinable onset of stroke symptoms in a case-crossover study in central Germany. Days one to three before stroke onset were classified as hazard periods and day seven as the respective control period. Risk of ischemic stroke in relation to 24 h differences in mean ambient temperature, relative humidity and atmospheric pressure was determined. The association between temperature and stroke risk appears to be close to linear with an increase in stroke risk of 11 % (odds ratio 1.11, 95 % confidence interval 1.01-1.22) for each 2.9 °C temperature decrease over 24 h. In individuals with a higher cardiovascular risk, stroke risk increased by 30 % (1.30, 1.06-1.61). Risk for cardioembolic strokes increased by 26 % (1.26, 1.06-1.50). Rapid positive or negative changes in relative humidity (>5 %) and atmospheric pressure (>10 hPa) increased stroke risk by a maximum of 30 % (1.30, 1.02-1.66) and 63 % (1.63, 1.10-2.42). In individuals with a higher cardiovascular risk, rapid changes in atmospheric pressure were associated with a four-times higher stroke risk (4.56, 1.26-16.43). Our results suggest that rapid decreases in ambient temperature and rapid changes in relative humidity and atmospheric pressure increase stroke risk under temperate climate conditions. Individuals with a high cardiovascular risk profile seem to be at greater risk.

  7. A case-crossover study of alcohol consumption, meals and the risk of road traffic crashes

    PubMed Central

    Di Bartolomeo, Stefano; Valent, Francesca; Sbrojavacca, Rodolfo; Marchetti, Riccardo; Barbone, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    Background The case-crossover (CC) design has proved effective to investigate the association between alcohol use and injuries in general, but has never been applied to study alcohol use and road traffic crashes (RTCs) specifically. This study aims at investigating the association between alcohol and meal consumption and the risk of RTCs using intrapersonal comparisons of subjects while driving. Methods Drivers admitted to an Italian emergency room (ER) after RTCs in 2007 were interviewed about personal, vehicle, and crash characteristics as well as hourly patterns of driving, and alcohol and food intake in the 24 hours before the crash. The odds ratio (OR) of a RTC was estimated through a CC, matched pair interval approach. Alcohol and meal consumption 6 and 2 hours before the RTC (case exposure window) were compared with exposures in earlier control windows of analogous length. Results Of 574 patients enrolled, 326 (56.8%) reported previous driving from 6 to 18 hours before the RTC and were eligible for analysis. The ORs (mutually adjusted) were 2.25 (95%CI 1.11-4.57) for alcohol and 0.94 (0.47-1.88) for meals. OR for alcohol was already increased at low (1-2 units) doses - 2.17 (1.03-4.57) and the trend of increase for each unit was significant - 1.64 (95%CI 1.05-2.57). In drivers at fault the OR for alcohol was 21.22 (2.31-194.79). The OR estimate for meal consumption seemed to increase in case of previous sleep deprivation, 2.06 (0.25-17.00). Conclusion Each single unit of acute alcohol consumption increases the risk of RTCs, in contrast with the 'legal' threshold allowed in some countries. Meal consumption is not associated with RTCs, but its combined effects with sleepiness need further elucidation. PMID:19723319

  8. Relevant and Irrelevant Fear in Flooding - A Crossover Study of Phobic Patients - Republished Article.

    PubMed

    Watson, J P; Marks, I M

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the role of relevant vs irrelevant fear cues in the flooding of phobic patients. Six specific phobics and 10 agoraphobics were treated in a balanced crossover design. Eight patients had eight sessions of imaginal flooding concerned with their phobias followed by eight imaginal sessions concerned with situations which are normally frightening to anybody. Another eight patients had the same two treatments in the reverse order. The combined effects of both treatments after 16 sessions resulted in significant improvement on clinical, attitudinal, and heart-rate measures. Improvement was maintained at six months follow-up. Eight sessions by each treatment alone also produced significant improvement on clinical and attitudinal measures. Irrelevant fear also produced significant improvement in heart-rate and skin-conductance measures. The two treatments did not differ significantly from each other in their effects, except that irrelevant fear produced significantly more improvement than did relevant flooding in subjective anxiety during phobic imagery. The two treatments had significantly different prognostic correlates. Heightened physiological activity at the start of treatment predicted a good outcome to relevant flooding but not to irrelevant fear. High subjective anxiety during imagery before treatment predicted poor outcome to irrelevant fear. High anxiety during treatment sessions predicted good outcome to irrelevant fear, but did not correlate with outcome to relevant flooding. The experience of relevant and irrelevant fear in fantasy reduced phobic anxiety and avoidance to a similar extent, but appeared to do so through different mechanisms. These mechanisms need not be mutually exclusive and might be additive.

  9. Triggering of stroke by ambient temperature variation: A case-crossover study in Maputo, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Joana; Damasceno, Albertino; Carrilho, Carla; Lobo, Vitória; Lopes, Hélder; Madede, Tavares; Pravinrai, Pius; Silva-Matos, Carla; Diogo, Domingos; Azevedo, Ana; Lunet, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The effect of ambient temperature as a stroke trigger is likely to differ by type of stroke and to depend on non-transient exposures that influence the risk of this outcome. We aimed to quantify the association between ambient temperature variation and stroke, according to clinical characteristics of the events, and other risk factors for stroke. Methods We conducted a case-crossover study based on a 1-year registry of the hospital admissions due to newly occurring ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke events in Maputo, Mozambique's capital city (N = 593). The case-period was defined as the 7 days before the stroke event, which was compared to two control periods (14–21 days and 21–28 days before the event). We computed humidity- and precipitation-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) using conditional logistic regression. Results An association between minimum temperature declines higher than 2.4 °C in any two consecutive days in the previous week and the occurrence of stroke was observed only for first events (OR = 1.43, 95%CI: 1.15–1.76). Stronger and statistically significant associations were observed for hemorrhagic stroke (OR = 1.50, 95%CI: 1.07–2.09) and among subjects not exposed to risk factors, including smoking, high serum cholesterol or atrial fibrillation. No differences in the effect of temperature were found according to the patients’ vital status 28 days after the event. Conclusions First stroke events, especially of the hemorrhagic type, were triggered by declines in the minimum temperature between consecutive days of the preceding week. PMID:25559679

  10. Effects of tongue cleaning on bacterial flora in tongue coating and dental plaque: a crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effects of tongue cleaning on reconstruction of bacterial flora in dental plaque and tongue coating itself are obscure. We assessed changes in the amounts of total bacteria as well as Fusobacterium nucleatum in tongue coating and dental plaque specimens obtained with and without tongue cleaning. Methods We conducted a randomized examiner-blind crossover study using 30 volunteers (average 23.7 ± 3.2 years old) without periodontitis. After dividing randomly into 2 groups, 1 group was instructed to clean the tongue, while the other did not. On days 1 (baseline), 3, and 10, tongue coating and dental plaque samples were collected after recording tongue coating score (Winkel tongue coating index: WTCI). After a washout period of 3 weeks, the same examinations were performed with the subjects allocated to the alternate group. Genomic DNA was purified from the samples and applied to SYBR® Green-based real-time PCR to quantify the amounts of total bacteria and F. nucleatum. Results After 3 days, the WTCI score recovered to baseline, though the amount of total bacteria in tongue coating was significantly lower as compared to the baseline. In plaque samples, the bacterial amounts on day 3 and 10 were significantly lower than the baseline with and without tongue cleaning. Principal component analysis showed that variations of bacterial amounts in the tongue coating and dental plaque samples were independent from each other. Furthermore, we found a strong association between amounts of total bacteria and F. nucleatum in specimens both. Conclusions Tongue cleaning reduced the amount of bacteria in tongue coating. However, the cleaning had no obvious contribution to inhibit dental plaque formation. Furthermore, recovery of the total bacterial amount induced an increase in F. nucleatum in both tongue coating and dental plaque. Thus, it is recommended that tongue cleaning and tooth brushing should both be performed for promoting oral health. PMID:24423407

  11. Estimation in AB/BA crossover trials with application to bioequivalence studies with incomplete and complete data designs.

    PubMed

    Jaki, Thomas; Pallmann, Philip; Wolfsegger, Martin J

    2013-12-30

    Crossover studies are frequently used in clinical research as they allow within-subject comparisons instead of the between-subject evaluation of parallel group designs. Estimation of interesting parameters from such designs is, however, not trivial. We provide three methods for estimating treatment effects and associated standard errors from an AB/BA crossover trial. Assuming at least asymptotic normality, we can obtain the confidence intervals for single parameters as well as for differences or ratios of treatment effects. The latter is particularly useful in a pharmacokinetic context to establish bioequivalence using area under the concentration versus time curves (AUCs). In this work, we will illustrate how Fieller-type confidence intervals can be constructed for the ratio of AUCs estimated using a noncompartmental approach in a sparse sampling setting from a two-treatment, two-period, two-sequence crossover trial. In particular, we will discuss a flexible batch design, which includes traditional serial sampling and complete data designs as special cases. Via simulation, we show that the proposed intervals have nominal coverage and keep the type I error even for small sample sizes. Moreover, we illustrate the methodology in a real data example.

  12. Real-time mass spectrometric study of the methanol crossover in a direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.T.; Wasmus, S.; Savinell, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    The products of methanol crossover through the acid-doped polybenzimidazole polymer electrolyte membrane (PBI PEM) to the cathode of a prototype direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) were analyzed using multipurpose electrochemical mass spectrometry (MPEMS) coupled to the cathode exhaust gas outlet. It was found that the methanol crossing over reacts almost quantitatively to CO{sub 2} at the cathode with the platinum of the cathode acting as a heterogeneous catalyst. The cathode open-circuit potential is inversely proportional to the amount of CO{sub 2} formed. A poisoning effect on the oxygen reduction also was found. Methods for the estimation of the methanol crossover rate at operating fuel cells are suggested.

  13. Double blind cross-over study of a new appetite suppressant AN 448.

    PubMed

    Haugen, H N

    1975-01-01

    The effects of a new appetite suppressant, AN 448, and a placebo have been compared in 30 obese individuals using a fully randomized double-blind cross-over design. 1 mg of AN 448 t.i.d. produced a significant degree of appetite suppression and a mean weight loss of more than 4 kg per individual over a 6 week period. Side effects were few and no haematological, renal or hepatic damage was observed.

  14. Short Daily versus Conventional Hemodialysis for Hypertensive Patients: A Randomized Cross-Over Study

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Deborah L.; Ruzicka, Marcel; Hebert, Paul; Fergusson, Dean; Touyz, Rhian M.; Burns, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment of end stage renal disease patients with short daily hemodialysis has been associated with an improvement in blood pressure. It is unclear from these studies if anti-hypertensive management had been optimized prior to starting short daily hemodialysis. Also, the potential mechanism(s) of blood pressure improvement remain to be fully elucidated. Study Design, Setting and Participants We undertook a randomized cross-over trial in adult hypertensive patients with ESRD treated with conventional hemodialysis to determine: 1) if short-daily hemodialysis is associated with a reduction in systolic blood pressure after a 3-month blood pressure optimization period and; 2) the potential mechanism(s) of blood pressure reduction. Blood pressure was measured using Canadian Hypertension Education Program guidelines. Extracellular fluid volume (ECFV) was assessed with bioimpedance. Serum catecholamines were used to assess the sympathetic nervous system. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (T-BARS) were used as markers of inflammation and oxidative stress respectively. Results After a 3-month run-in phase in which systolic blood pressure improved, there was no significant difference in pre-dialysis systolic pressure between short-daily and conventional hemodialysis (p = 0.39). However, similar blood pressures were achieved on fewer anti-hypertensive medications with short daily hemodialysis compared to conventional hemodialysis (p = 0.01). Short daily hemodialysis, compared to conventional hemodialysis, was not associated with a difference in dry weight or ECFV (p = 0.77). Sympathetic nervous system activity as assessed by plasma epinephrine (p = 1.0) and norepinephrine (p = 0.52) was also not different. Markers of inflammation (p = 0.42) and oxidative stress (p = 0.83) were also similar between the two treatment arms. Conclusions Patients treated with short daily, compared to conventional hemodialysis

  15. Flooding and Emergency Room Visits for Gastrointestinal Illness in Massachusetts: A Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Timothy J.; Lin, Cynthia J.; Jagai, Jyotsna S.; Hilborn, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Floods and other severe weather events are anticipated to increase as a result of global climate change. Floods can lead to outbreaks of gastroenteritis and other infectious diseases due to disruption of sewage and water infrastructure and impacts on sanitation and hygiene. Floods have also been indirectly associated with outbreaks through population displacement and crowding. Methods We conducted a case-crossover study to investigate the association between flooding and emergency room visits for gastrointestinal illness (ER-GI) in Massachusetts for the years 2003 through 2007. We obtained ER-GI visits from the State of Massachusetts and records of floods from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association’s Storm Events Database. ER-GI visits were considered exposed if a flood occurred in the town of residence within three hazard periods of the visit: 0–4 days; 5–9 days; and 10–14 days. A time-stratified bi-directional design was used for control selection, matching on day of the week with two weeks lead or lag time from the ER-GI visit. Fixed effect logistic regression models were used to estimate the risk of ER-GI visits following the flood. Results and Conclusions A total of 270,457 ER-GI visits and 129 floods occurred in Massachusetts over the study period. Across all counties, flooding was associated with an increased risk for ER-GI in the 0–4 day period after flooding (Odds Ratio: 1.08; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.03–1.12); but not the 5–9 days (Odds Ratio: 0.995; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.955–1.04) or the 10–14 days after (Odds Ratio: 0.966, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.927–1.01). Similar results were observed for different definitions of ER-GI. The effect differed across counties, suggesting local differences in the risk and impact of flooding. Statewide, across the study period, an estimated 7% of ER-GI visits in the 0–4 days after a flood event were attributable to flooding. PMID:25329916

  16. The effects of experimentally manipulated social status on acute eating behavior: A randomized, crossover pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cardel, M I; Johnson, S L; Beck, J; Dhurandhar, E; Keita, A D; Tomczik, A C; Pavela, G; Huo, T; Janicke, D M; Muller, K; Piff, P K; Peters, J C; Hill, J O; Allison, D B

    2016-08-01

    Both subjective and objectively measured social status has been associated with multiple health outcomes, including weight status, but the mechanism for this relationship remains unclear. Experimental studies may help identify the causal mechanisms underlying low social standing as a pathway for obesity. Our objective was to investigate the effects of experimentally manipulated social status on ad libitum acute dietary intakes and stress-related outcomes as potential mechanisms relating social status and weight. This was a pilot feasibility, randomized, crossover study in Hispanic young adults (n=9; age 19-25; 67% female; BMI ≥18.5 and ≤30kg/m(2)). At visit 1, participants consumed a standardized breakfast and were randomized to a high social status position (HIGH) or low social status position (LOW) in a rigged game of Monopoly™. The rules for the game differed substantially in terms of degree of 'privilege' depending on randomization to HIGH or LOW. Following Monopoly™, participants were given an ad libitum buffet meal and energy intakes (kcal) were estimated by pre- and post-weighing foods consumed. Stress-related markers were measured at baseline, after the game of Monopoly™, and after lunch. Visit 2 used the same standardized protocol; however, participants were exposed to the opposite social status condition. When compared to HIGH, participants in LOW consumed 130 more calories (p=0.07) and a significantly higher proportion of their daily calorie needs in the ad libitum buffet meal (39% in LOW versus 31% in HIGH; p=0.04). In LOW, participants reported decreased feelings of pride and powerfulness following Monopoly™ (p=0.05) and after their lunch meal (p=0.08). Relative to HIGH, participants in LOW demonstrated higher heart rates following Monopoly™ (p=0.06), but this relationship was not significant once lunch was consumed (p=0.31). Our pilot data suggest a possible causal relationship between experimentally manipulated low social status and

  17. Measuring the effect of enhanced cleaning in a UK hospital: a prospective cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    Dancer, Stephanie J; White, Liza F; Lamb, Jim; Girvan, E Kirsty; Robertson, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Background Increasing hospital-acquired infections have generated much attention over the last decade. There is evidence that hygienic cleaning has a role in the control of hospital-acquired infections. This study aimed to evaluate the potential impact of one additional cleaner by using microbiological standards based on aerobic colony counts and the presence of Staphylococcus aureus including meticillin-resistant S. aureus. Methods We introduced an additional cleaner into two matched wards from Monday to Friday, with each ward receiving enhanced cleaning for six months in a cross-over design. Ten hand-touch sites on both wards were screened weekly using standardised methods and patients were monitored for meticillin-resistant S. aureus infection throughout the year-long study. Patient and environmental meticillin-resistant S. aureus isolates were characterised using molecular methods in order to investigate temporal and clonal relationships. Results Enhanced cleaning was associated with a 32.5% reduction in levels of microbial contamination at hand-touch sites when wards received enhanced cleaning (P < 0.0001: 95% CI 20.2%, 42.9%). Near-patient sites (lockers, overbed tables and beds) were more frequently contaminated with meticillin-resistant S. aureus/S. aureus than sites further from the patient (P = 0.065). Genotyping identified indistinguishable strains from both hand-touch sites and patients. There was a 26.6% reduction in new meticillin-resistant S. aureus infections on the wards receiving extra cleaning, despite higher meticillin-resistant S. aureus patient-days and bed occupancy rates during enhanced cleaning periods (P = 0.032: 95% CI 7.7%, 92.3%). Adjusting for meticillin-resistant S. aureus patient-days and based upon nine new meticillin-resistant S. aureus infections seen during routine cleaning, we expected 13 new infections during enhanced cleaning periods rather than the four that actually occurred. Clusters of new meticillin-resistant S. aureus

  18. Mechanism of Action of Bimatoprost, Latanoprost, and Travoprost in Healthy Subjects: A Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, K. Sheng; Nau, Cherie B.; O’Byrne, Megan M.; Hodge, David O.; Toris, Carol B.; McLaren, Jay W.; Johnson, Douglas H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To study the effects of 3 prostaglandin analogs, bimatoprost, latanoprost, and travoprost, on aqueous dynamics in the same subjects and to compare techniques of assessing outflow facility. Design Experimental study (double-masked, placebo-controlled, randomized paired comparison, 4-period crossover). Participants Thirty healthy adult subjects. Methods Bimatoprost, latanoprost, travoprost, or a placebo was administered to the left eye once a day in the evening for 7 days, after a minimum 4-week washout period between each session. Tonographic outflow facility was measured by Schiøtz tonography and pneumatonography on day 7. On day 8, the aqueous humor flow rate and fluorophotometric outflow facility were measured by fluorophotometry. Uveoscleral outflow was calculated from the aqueous humor flow rate and outflow facility using the Goldmann equation. Main Outcome Measures Facility of outflow, aqueous humor flow rate, intraocular pressure (IOP), and calculation of uveoscleral outflow. Results All medications lowered IOP relative to a placebo. None of the drugs affected aqueous humor production. All medications increased outflow facility compared with placebo when measured by Schiøtz and 2-minute pneumatonography (P≤0.02); the apparent increase of outflow facility measured with fluorophotometry and 4-minute pneumatonography did not reach statistical significance. In contrast, uveoscleral outflow was significantly increased by all medications when calculated from 4-minute pneumatonography data, and fluorophotometry and Schiøtz data at higher episcleral venous pressures. The apparent increase found with 2-minute pneumatonography did not reach statistical significance. These differing results in the same patients indicate that differences in measurement techniques, and not differences in mechanism of action, explain previous conflicting published reports on the mechanism of action of the prostaglandins. Conclusions Bimatoprost, latanoprost, and travoprost

  19. Simultaneous transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation mitigates simulator sickness symptoms in healthy adults: a crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Flight simulators have been used to train pilots to experience and recognize spatial disorientation, a condition in which pilots incorrectly perceive the position, location, and movement of their aircrafts. However, during or after simulator training, simulator sickness (SS) may develop. Spatial disorientation and SS share common symptoms and signs and may involve a similar mechanism of dys-synchronization of neural inputs from the vestibular, visual, and proprioceptive systems. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), a maneuver used for pain control, was found to influence autonomic cardiovascular responses and enhance visuospatial abilities, postural control, and cognitive function. The purpose of present study was to investigate the protective effects of TENS on SS. Methods Fifteen healthy young men (age: 28.6 ± 0.9 years, height: 172.5 ± 1.4 cm, body weight: 69.3 ± 1.3 kg, body mass index: 23.4 ± 1.8 kg/m2) participated in this within-subject crossover study. SS was induced by a flight simulator. TENS treatment involved 30 minutes simultaneous electrical stimulation of the posterior neck and the right Zusanli acupoint. Each subject completed 4 sessions (control, SS, TENS, and TENS + SS) in a randomized order. Outcome indicators included SS symptom severity and cognitive function, evaluated with the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) and d2 test of attention, respectively. Sleepiness was rated using the Visual Analogue Scales for Sleepiness Symptoms (VAS-SS). Autonomic and stress responses were evaluated by heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV) and salivary stress biomarkers (salivary alpha-amylase activity and salivary cortisol concentration). Results Simulator exposure increased SS symptoms (SSQ and VAS-SS scores) and decreased the task response speed and concentration. The heart rate, salivary stress biomarker levels, and the sympathetic parameter of HRV increased with simulator exposure, but

  20. Cross-over studies underestimate energy compensation: The example of sucrose-versus sucralose-containing drinks.

    PubMed

    Gadah, Nouf S; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M; Rogers, Peter J

    2016-12-01

    The vast majority of preload-test-meal studies that have investigated the effects on energy intake of disguised nutrient or other food/drink ingredient manipulations have used a cross-over design. We argue that this design may underestimate the effect of the manipulation due to carry-over effects. To test this we conducted comparable cross-over (n = 69) and parallel-groups (n = 48) studies testing the effects of sucrose versus low-calorie sweetener (sucralose) in a drink preload on test-meal energy intake. The parallel-groups study included a baseline day in which only the test meal was consumed. Energy intake in that meal was used to control for individual differences in energy intake in the analysis of the effects of sucrose versus sucralose on energy intake on the test day. Consistent with our prediction, the effect of consuming sucrose on subsequent energy intake was greater when measured in the parallel-groups study than in the cross-over study (respectively 64% versus 36% compensation for the 162 kcal difference in energy content of the sucrose and sucralose drinks). We also included a water comparison group in the parallel-groups study (n = 24) and found that test-meal energy intake did not differ significantly between the water and sucralose conditions. Together, these results confirm that consumption of sucrose in a drink reduces subsequent energy intake, but by less than the energy content of the drink, whilst drink sweetness does not increase food energy intake. Crucially, though, the studies demonstrate that study design affects estimated energy compensation.

  1. BCS-BEC crossover in two dimensions: A quantum Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Bertaina, G.

    2012-09-26

    We investigate the crossover from Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superfluidity to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in a two-dimensional Fermi gas at T= 0 using the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo method. We calculate the equation of state and the gap parameter as a function of the interaction strength, observing large deviations compared to mean-field predictions. In the BEC regime our results show the important role of dimer-dimer and atom-dimer interaction effects that are completely neglected in the mean-field picture. We also consider the highly polarized gas and the competition between a polaronic and a molecular picture.

  2. Salacia Extract Improves Postprandial Glucose and Insulin Response: A Randomized Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled, Crossover Study in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Jeykodi, Shankaranarayanan; Deshpande, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-five healthy subjects were randomly assigned to different doses of Salacia chinensis extract (200 mg, 300 mg, and 500 mg SCE) capsules and compared with placebo. It is a placebo controlled randomized crossover design study. Subjects were given oral sucrose solution along with capsules and plasma glucose and insulin responses were analyzed. Blood samples were collected at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 180 minutes after administration. AUC insulin significantly lowered after ingestion of SCE. No significant adverse events were observed. Reducing glucose and insulin is very important in reducing postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:27803937

  3. Comparison of four case-crossover study designs to analyze the association between air pollution exposure and acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Collart, Philippe; Coppieters, Yves; Mercier, Gwenaelle; Massamba Kubuta, Victoria; Leveque, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The case-crossover design is frequently used for analyzing the acute health effects of air pollution. Nevertheless, only a few studies compared different methods for selecting control periods. In this study, the bidirectional method and three time-stratified methods were used to estimate the association between air pollution and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Charleroi, Belgium, during 1999-2008. The strongest associations between air pollution and AMI were observed for PM10 and NO(2) during the warm period, OR = 1.095 (95 % CI: 1.003-1.169) and OR = 1.120 (95 % CI: 1.001-1.255), respectively. The results of this study reinforce the evidence of the acute effects of air pollution on AMI, especially during the warm season. This study suggests that the different methods of case-crossover study design are suitable to studying the association between acute events and air pollution. The temperature-stratified design is useful to exclude temperature as a potential confounder.

  4. First-principles study of iron spin crossover in the new hexagonal aluminous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Han

    2017-01-01

    The new hexagonal aluminous (NAL) phase, chemical formula A B2C6O12 (A = Na+, K+, Ca2 +; B = Mg2 +, Fe2 +, Fe3 +; C = Al3 +, Si4 +, Fe3 +), is considered a major component (˜20 vol%) of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) under the lower-mantle condition. As MORB can be transported back into the Earth's lower mantle via subduction, a thorough knowledge of the NAL phase is essential to fully understand the fate of subducted MORB and its role in mantle dynamics and heterogeneity. In this Rapid Communication, the complicated spin crossover of the Fe-bearing NAL phase is revealed by a series of local density approximation + self-consistent Hubbard U (LDA+Us c) calculations. Only the ferric iron (Fe3 +) substituting Al/Si in the octahedral (C ) site undergoes a crossover from the high-spin (HS) to the low-spin (LS) state at ˜40 GPa, while iron substituting Mg in the trigonal-prismatic (B ) site remains in the HS state, regardless of its oxidation state (Fe2 + or Fe3 +). The volume/elastic anomalies and the iron nuclear quadrupole splittings determined by calculations are in great agreement with room-temperature experiments. The calculations further predict that the HS-LS transition pressure of the NAL phase barely increases with temperature due to the three nearly degenerate LS states of Fe3 +, suggesting that the elastic anomalies of this mineral can occur at the top lower mantle.

  5. Study of spin crossover nanoparticles thermal hysteresis using FORC diagrams on an Ising-like model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atitoaie, Alexandru; Tanasa, Radu; Stancu, Alexandru; Enachescu, Cristian

    2014-11-01

    Recent developments in the synthesis and characterization of spin crossover (SCO) nanoparticles and their prospects of switching at molecular level turned these bistable compounds into possible candidates for replacing the materials used in recording media industry for development of solid state pressure and temperature sensors or for bringing contributions in engineering. Compared to bulk samples with the same chemical structure, SCO nanoparticles display different characteristics of the hysteretic and relaxation properties like the shift of the transition temperature towards lower values along with decrease of the hysteresis width with nanoparticles size. Using an Ising-like model with specific boundary conditions within a Monte Carlo procedure, we here reproduce most of the hysteretic properties of SCO nanoparticles by considering the interaction between spin crossover edge molecules and embedding surfactant molecules and we propose a complex analysis concerning the effect of the interactions and sizes during the thermal transition in systems of SCO nanoparticles by using the First Order Reversal Curves diagram method and by comparison with similar effects in mixed crystal systems.

  6. Mechanistic studies of photoinduced spin crossover and electron transfer in inorganic complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenkai; Gaffney, Kelly J

    2015-04-21

    Electronic excited-state phenomena provide a compelling intersection of fundamental and applied research interests in the chemical sciences. This holds true for coordination chemistry, where harnessing the strong optical absorption and photocatalytic activity of compounds depends on our ability to control fundamental physical and chemical phenomena associated with the nonadiabatic dynamics of electronic excited states. The central events of excited-state chemistry can critically influence the dynamics of electronic excited states, including internal conversion (transitions between distinct electronic states) and intersystem crossing (transitions between electronic states with different spin multiplicities), events governed by nonadiabatic interactions between electronic states in close proximity to conical intersections, as well as solvation and electron transfer. The diversity of electronic and nuclear dynamics also makes the robust interpretation of experimental measurements challenging. Developments in theory, simulation, and experiment can all help address the interpretation and understanding of chemical dynamics in organometallic and coordination chemistry. Synthesis presents the opportunity to chemically engineer the strength and symmetry of the metal-ligand interactions. This chemical control can be exploited to understand the influence of electronic ground state properties on electronic excited-state dynamics. New time-resolved experimental methods and the insightful exploitation of established methods have an important role in understanding, and ideally controlling, the photophysics and photochemistry of transition metal complexes. Techniques that can disentangle the coupled motion of electrons and nuclear dynamics warrant emphasis. We present a review of electron localization dynamics in charge transfer excited states and the dynamics of photoinitiated spin crossover dynamics. Both electron localization and spin crossover have been investigated by

  7. Thermal hysteresis kinetic effects of spin crossover nanoparticulated systems studied by FORC diagram method on an Ising-like model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atitoaie, Alexandru; Stoleriu, Laurentiu; Tanasa, Radu; Stancu, Alexandru; Enachescu, Cristian

    2016-04-01

    The scientific community is manifesting a high research interest on spin crossover compounds and their recently synthesized nanoparticles, due to their various appealing properties, such as the bistability between a diamagnetic low spin state and a paramagnetic high spin state (HS), inter-switchable by temperature or pressure changes, light irradiation or magnetic field. The utility of these compounds showing hysteresis covers a broad area of applications, from the development of more efficient designs of temperature and pressure sensors to automotive and aeronautic industries and even a new type of molecular actuators. We are proposing in this work a study regarding the kinetic effects and the distribution of reversible and irreversible components on the thermal hysteresis of spin crossover nanoparticulated systems. We are considering here tridimensional systems with different sizes and also systems of nanoparticles with a Gaussian size distribution. The correlations between the kinetics of the thermal hysteresis, the distributions of sizes and intermolecular interactions and the transition temperature distributions were established by using the FORC (First Order Reversal Curves) method using a Monte Carlo technique within an Ising-like system.

  8. Experimental study of crossover from capillary to viscous fingering for supercritical CO2-water displacement in a homogeneous pore network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Changyong; Wei, Ning; Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W; Li, Xiaochun; Bonneville, Alain

    2013-01-02

    Carbon sequestration in saline aquifers involves displacing brine from the pore space by supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)). The displacement process is considered unstable due to the unfavorable viscosity ratio between the invading scCO(2) and the resident brine. The mechanisms that affect scCO(2)-water displacement under reservoir conditions (41 °C, 9 MPa) were investigated in a homogeneous micromodel. A large range of injection rates, expressed as the dimensionless capillary number (Ca), was studied in two sets of experiments: discontinuous-rate injection, where the micromodel was saturated with water before each injection rate was imposed, and continuous-rate injection, where the rate was increased after quasi-steady conditions were reached for a certain rate. For the discontinuous-rate experiments, capillary fingering and viscous fingering are the dominant mechanisms for low (logCa ≤ -6.61) and high injection rates (logCa ≥ -5.21), respectively. Crossover from capillary to viscous fingering was observed for logCa = -5.91 to -5.21, resulting in a large decrease in scCO(2) saturation. The discontinuous-rate experimental results confirmed the decrease in nonwetting fluid saturation during crossover from capillary to viscous fingering predicted by numerical simulations by Lenormand et al. (J. Fluid Mech.1988, 189, 165-187). Capillary fingering was the dominant mechanism for all injection rates in the continuous-rate experiment, resulting in monotonic increase in scCO(2) saturation.

  9. The effect of intermittent training in hypobaric hypoxia on sea-level exercise: a cross-over study in humans.

    PubMed

    Hendriksen, Ingrid J M; Meeuwsen, Ted

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of intermittent training in a hypobaric chamber on physical exercise at sea level. Over a 10 day period, 16 male triathletes trained for 2 h each day on a cycle ergometer placed in a hypobaric chamber. Training intensity was at 60%-70% of the heart rate reserve. There were 8 subjects who trained at a simulated altitude of 2,500 m, the other 8 trained at sea level. A year later, a cross-over study took place. Baseline measurements were made on a cycle ergometer at sea level, which included an incremental test until exhaustion and a Wingate Anaerobic Test. Altogether, 12 subjects completed the cross-over study. At 9 days after training in hypoxia, significant increases were seen in maximal power output (.W(max))(5.2%), anaerobic mean power (4.1%), and anaerobic peak power (3.8%). A non-significant increase in maximal oxygen uptake (.VO(2max)) of 1.9% was observed. At 9 days after training at sea level, no significant changes were seen in .W(max)(2.1%), .VO(2max) (2.0%), anaerobic mean power (0.2%) and anaerobic peak power (0.2%). When comparing the results of the two training regimes, the anaerobic mean power was the only variable that showed a significantly larger increase as a result of training at altitude. And, although the differences in percentage change between the two training protocols were not significant, they were substantial for as well as for anaerobic peak power. The results of this study indicate that intermittent hypobaric training can improve the anaerobic energy supplying system, and also, to a lesser extent, the aerobic system. It can be concluded that the overall results of the cross-over study showed predominantly improvements in the anaerobic metabolism at variance with the previous study of our own group, where the relative .VO(2max) and .W(max) increased by 7%.

  10. Theoretical modeling of spin crossover in metal-organic frameworks: [Fe(pz)2Pt(CN)4] as a case study.

    PubMed

    Cirera, Jordi; Babin, Volodymyr; Paesani, Francesco

    2014-10-20

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with spin-crossover behavior are promising materials for applications in memory storage and sensing devices. A key parameter that characterizes these materials is the transition temperature T1/2, defined as the temperature with equal populations of low-spin and high-spin species. In this study, we describe the development, implementation, and application of a novel hybrid Monte Carlo/molecular dynamics method that builds upon the Ligand Field Molecular Mechanics approach and enables the modeling of spin-crossover properties in bulk materials. The new methodology is applied to the study of a spin-crossover MOF with molecular formula [Fe(pz)2Pt(CN)4] (pz = pyrazine). The total magnetic moment of the material is determined as a function of the temperature from direct calculations of the relative equilibrium populations of both low-spin and high-spin states of each Fe(II) center of the framework. The T1/2 value, calculated from the temperature dependence of the magnetization curve, is in good agreement with the available experimental data. A comparison between the spin-crossover behavior of the isolated secondary building block of the framework and the bulk material is presented, which reveals the origin of the different spin-crossover properties of the isolated molecular system and corresponding MOF structure.

  11. An evaluation of video instruction for an electric toothbrush. Comparative single-brushing cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; Renton-Harper, P; Warren, P; Newcombe, R G

    1999-05-01

    Instructions on the use of electric toothbrushes are usually derived from the written and/or diagrammatic leaflets provided with the device or perhaps less often instruction from a professional. Videos are now widely used for information transfer and the direction of physical activities. The aim of this study was to determine whether video instruction in the use of an electric toothbrush could promote efficient use of the device. The 2-min video demonstrated the use of an oscillating, rotating electric toothbrush used by a hygienist for 15 s in each buccal and lingual quadrant. A voice-over directed the observer to follow the hygienist's movements. The study was planned as a 2-phase, single-examiner blind, randomised, cross-over study accepting there would be confounding of the 2nd period by carry-over from the 1st. A group of 24 healthy volunteers participated who had average oral hygiene and never used an electric toothbrush. 12 subjects received the video first (VN) and 12 subjects the instructional leaflet with the device (NV). Single brushings were performed after suspending tooth cleaning for 48 h. Plaque was scored before and after brushing. A 2-week washout period was permitted before the crossover. In period 1, plaque removal with the video was overall significantly greater than with written instructions. The effects for posterior teeth were greater than anterior and comparison between groups for posterior minus anterior differences were highly significant in favour of the VN group. In period 2, the effect of period was dominant with both groups achieving greater plaque removal in period 2 than period 1. Plaque removal by group VN remained considerably greater than group NV Despite the confounding influences of carry-over in this particular design of study, the results support the idea that video instruction for electric toothbrushes could be a simple and efficient way of improving plaque removal by these devices. The methodology needs to be verified in a

  12. Classical to quantum crossover of the cyclotron resonance in graphene: a study of the strength of intraband absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlita, M.; Crassee, I.; Faugeras, C.; Kuzmenko, A. B.; Fromm, F.; Ostler, M.; Seyller, Th; Martinez, G.; Polini, M.; Potemski, M.

    2012-09-01

    We report on absolute magneto-transmission experiments on highly doped quasi-free-standing epitaxial graphene targeting the classical-to-quantum crossover of the cyclotron resonance. This study allows us to directly extract the carrier density and also other relevant quantities such as the quasiparticle velocity and the Drude weight, which is precisely measured from the strength of the cyclotron resonance. We find that the Drude weight is renormalized with respect to its non-interacting (or random phase approximation) value and that the renormalization is tied to the quasiparticle velocity enhancement. This finding is in agreement with recent theoretical predictions, which attribute the renormalization of the Drude weight in graphene to the interplay between broken Galilean invariance and electron-electron interactions.

  13. Route Infrastructure and the Risk of Injuries to Bicyclists: A Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Harris, M. Anne; Reynolds, Conor C. O.; Winters, Meghan; Babul, Shelina; Chipman, Mary; Cusimano, Michael D.; Brubacher, Jeff R.; Hunte, Garth; Friedman, Steven M.; Monro, Melody; Shen, Hui; Vernich, Lee; Cripton, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We compared cycling injury risks of 14 route types and other route infrastructure features. Methods. We recruited 690 city residents injured while cycling in Toronto or Vancouver, Canada. A case-crossover design compared route infrastructure at each injury site to that of a randomly selected control site from the same trip. Results. Of 14 route types, cycle tracks had the lowest risk (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.02, 0.54), about one ninth the risk of the reference: major streets with parked cars and no bike infrastructure. Risks on major streets were lower without parked cars (adjusted OR = 0.63; 95% CI = 0.41, 0.96) and with bike lanes (adjusted OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.29, 1.01). Local streets also had lower risks (adjusted OR = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.31, 0.84). Other infrastructure characteristics were associated with increased risks: streetcar or train tracks (adjusted OR = 3.0; 95% CI = 1.8, 5.1), downhill grades (adjusted OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.7, 3.1), and construction (adjusted OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.3, 2.9). Conclusions. The lower risks on quiet streets and with bike-specific infrastructure along busy streets support the route-design approach used in many northern European countries. Transportation infrastructure with lower bicycling injury risks merits public health support to reduce injuries and promote cycling. PMID:23078480

  14. Acute blood pressure response in hypertensive elderly women immediately after water aerobics exercise: A crossover study.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Raphael Martins; Vilaça-Alves, José; Noleto, Marcelo Vasconcelos; Silva, Juliana Sá; Costa, Andressa Moura; Silva, Christoffer Novais Farias; Póvoa, Thaís Inácio Rolim; Lehnen, Alexandre Machado

    2017-01-01

    Water aerobics exercise is widely recommended for elderly people. However, little is known about the acute effects on hemodynamic variables. Thus, we assessed the effects of a water aerobic session on blood pressure in hypertensive elderly women. Fifty hypertensive elderly women aged 67.8 ± 4.1 years, 1.5 ± 0.6 m high and BMI 28.6 ± 3.9 kg/m(2), participated in a crossover clinical trial. The experiment consisted of a 45-minute water aerobics session (70%-75% HRmax adjusted for the aquatic environment) (ES) and a control session (no exercise for 45 minutes) (CS). Heart rate was monitored using a heart rate monitor and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) measurements were taken using a semi-automatic monitor before and immediately after the sessions, and at 10, 20 and 30 minutes thereafter. It was using a generalized estimating equation (GEE) with Bonferroni's post-hoc test (p < 0.05). At the end of the experimental session, ES showed a rise in SBP of 17.4 mmHg (14.3%, p < 0.001) and DBP of 5.4 mmHg (7.8%, p < 0.001) compared to CS. At 10 minutes after exercise, BP declined in ES by a greater magnitude than in CS (SBP 7.5 mmHg, 6.2%, p = 0.005 and DBP 3.8 mmHg, 5.5%, p = 0.013). At 20 minutes after exercise and thereafter, SBP and DBP were similar in both ES and CS. In conclusion, BP returned to control levels within 10-20 minutes remaining unchanged until 30 minutes after exercise, and post-exercise hypotension was not observed. Besides, BP changed after exercise was a safe rise of small magnitude for hypertensive people.

  15. Risk of injury after alcohol consumption: a case-crossover study in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Borges, Guilherme; Cherpitel, Cheryl; Mittleman, Murray

    2004-03-01

    This paper reports a case-crossover analysis in a sample of 961 patients who consulted the emergency department (ED) due to an injury in Santa Clara, California, and in Pachuca, Mexico. In the analysis in which usual alcohol consumption during the last 12 months served as the control value, the estimated relative risk of injury in the hour after alcohol consumption, as compared with no alcohol consumption during that time, was 4.33 (CI, 3.55-5.27). After controlling for alcohol use in the 1-h period before injury, the relative risks for consecutive 1-h periods (2-6 h) before the injury were not significantly greater than one, indicating that the induction time was less than 1 h. The relative risk varied greatly depending on race-ethnicity and acculturation among the Hispanics in Santa Clara, with Mexicans in Pachuca showing the highest risk and the high acculturation group in Santa Clara showing the lowest risk. Violence-related injuries were associated with higher relative risk. Relative risk also varied depending on the presence of alcohol dependence and usual frequency of drunkenness: patients with alcohol dependence and patients with high frequency of usual drunkenness had lower risks than patients without alcohol dependence and with lower self-reported episodes of drunkenness in the last year. When blood alcohol content at ED admission was used instead of self-reported alcohol consumption, similar results were obtained. These findings have important public health consequences. Each episode of alcohol consumption results in an increase in the short-term risk for an injury, especially for a violence-related injury. Patients with the lowest usual involvement with alcohol are subject to a higher elevation in their risk for an injury immediately after alcohol consumption compared to patients who drink more heavily.

  16. How air pollution influences clinical management of respiratory diseases. A case-crossover study in Milan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Environmental pollution is a known risk factor for multiple diseases and furthermore increases rate of hospitalisations. We investigated the correlation between emergency room admissions (ERAs) of the general population for respiratory diseases and the environmental pollutant levels in Milan, a metropolis in northern Italy. Methods We collected data from 45770 ERAs for respiratory diseases. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to investigate the association between air pollution levels and ERAs for acute respiratory conditions. The effects of air pollutants were investigated at lag 0 to lag 5, lag 0–2 and lag 3–5 in both single and multi-pollutant models, adjusted for daily weather variables. Results An increase in ozone (O3) levels at lag 3–5 was associated with a 78% increase in the number of ERAs for asthma, especially during the warm season. Exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) proved to be a risk factor for pneumonia at lag 0–2 and in the warm season increased the risk of ERA by 66%. A significant association was found between ERAs for COPD exacerbation and levels of sulphur dioxide (SO2), CO, nitrate dioxide (NO2), and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5). The multipollutant model that includes all pollutants showed a significant association between CO (26%) and ERA for upper respiratory tract diseases at lag 0–2. For chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations, only CO (OR 1.19) showed a significant association. Conclusions Exposure to environmental pollution, even at typical low levels, can increase the risk of ERA for acute respiratory diseases and exacerbation of obstructive lung diseases in the general population. PMID:23078274

  17. Urban air pollution and emergency room admissions for respiratory symptoms: a case-crossover study in Palermo, Italy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Air pollution from vehicular traffic has been associated with respiratory diseases. In Palermo, the largest metropolitan area in Sicily, urban air pollution is mainly addressed to traffic-related pollution because of lack of industrial settlements, and the presence of a temperate climate that contribute to the limited use of domestic heating plants. This study aimed to investigate the association between traffic-related air pollution and emergency room admissions for acute respiratory symptoms. Methods From January 2004 through December 2007, air pollutant concentrations and emergency room visits were collected for a case-crossover study conducted in Palermo, Sicily. Risk estimates of short-term exposures to particulate matter and gaseous ambient pollutants including carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide were calculated by using a conditional logistic regression analysis. Results Emergency departments provided data on 48,519 visits for respiratory symptoms. Adjusted case-crossover analyses revealed stronger effects in the warm season for the most part of the pollutants considered, with a positive association for PM10 (odds ratio = 1.039, 95% confidence interval: 1.020 - 1.059), SO2 (OR = 1.068, 95% CI: 1.014 - 1.126), nitrogen dioxide (NO2: OR = 1.043, 95% CI: 1.021 - 1.065), and CO (OR = 1.128, 95% CI: 1.074 - 1.184), especially among females (according to an increase of 10 μg/m3 in PM10, NO2, SO2, and 1 mg/m3 in CO exposure). A positive association was observed either in warm or in cold season only for PM10. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, in our setting, exposure to ambient levels of air pollution is an important determinant of emergency room (ER) visits for acute respiratory symptoms, particularly during the warm season. ER admittance may be considered a good proxy to evaluate the adverse effects of air pollution on respiratory health. PMID:21489245

  18. Becoming a crossover-competent DSB.

    PubMed

    Lake, Cathleen M; Hawley, R Scott

    2016-06-01

    The proper execution of meiotic recombination (or crossing over) is essential for chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division, and thus this process is regulated by multiple, and often elaborate, mechanisms. Meiotic recombination begins with the programmed induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), of which only a subset are selected to be repaired into crossovers. This crossover selection process is carried out by a number of pro-crossover proteins that regulate the fashion in which DSBs are repaired. Here, we highlight recent studies regarding the process of DSB fate selection by a family of pro-crossover proteins known as the Zip-3 homologs.

  19. Risk of injury after alcohol consumption from case-crossover studies in five countries from the America’s

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Guilherme; Orozco, Ricardo; Monteiro, Maristela; Cherpitel, Cheryl; Then, Eddy Pérez; López, Víctor A.; Bassier-Paltoo, Marcia; Weil A., Donald; de Bradshaw, Aldacira M

    2012-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to: 1) provide relative risk (RR) estimates between acute alcohol use and injuries from emergency departments in the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Guyana, Nicaragua and Panama, and 2) test whether the RR differs if two control periods for the estimates were used. Design Case-crossover methodology was used to obtain estimates of the RR of having an injury within six hours after drinking alcohol, using a pair-matching design with control periods of the same time of day the day prior to injury, and the same time of day and day of week the week prior to injury. Setting Emergency departments(EDs). Participants 2,503 injured patients from EDs were interviewed between 2010–2011, with a response rate of 92.6%. Measurements Number of drinks consumed within six hours prior to the injury and in the two control periods. Findings The RR of injury after drinking alcohol was 4.38 (95% confidence interval CI= 3.29–5.84) using as the control period the prior week, and 5.35 (CI=3.50–8.17) using as a control period the prior day. The RR was 5.08 (CI=4.15–6.23) in multiple matching. Those drinking 1–2 drinks had a RR of 4.85 (CI=3.12–7.54); those drinking 3–5 a RR of 5.00 (CI =3.47–7.18); those drinking 6–15 a RR of 4.54 (CI=3.36–6.14); and those drinking 16 or more a RR of 10.42 (CI=4.38–24.79). Conclusions As in other countries, alcohol drinking is a trigger for an injury in all five countries. The use of more than one control period give further strength to these findings from case-crossover analysis. PMID:22775508

  20. Effects of Risperidone on Aberrant Behavior of Persons with Developmental Disabilities: I. A Double-Blind Crossover Study Using Multiple Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarcone, Jennifer R.; Hellings, Jessica A.; Crandall, Kurt; Reese, R. Matthew; Marquis, Janet; Fleming, Kandace; Shores, Richard; Williams, Dean; Schroeder, Stephen R.

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of the atypical antipsychotic risperidone was evaluated in the treatment of aberrant behavior (e.g., aggression, self-injury) in 20 individuals with developmental disabilities. The study, a double-blind crossover design, identified 50 percent of participants as responders. Naturalistic observations of five participants showed that…

  1. The feasibility of using a double blind experimental cross-over design to study interventions for sick building syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tamblyn, R M; Menzies, R I; Tamblyn, R T; Farant, J P; Hanley, J

    1992-06-01

    Methodological problems have limited scientific investigation of the causes of and solutions for sick building syndrome. The feasibility of using an experimental double blind cross-over study to resolve many of these methodological problems was assessed in a pilot study. The experimental intervention was to vary the amount of outdoor air from 10 cubic feet per minute per person (cfmpp) to 20 cfmpp or 50 cfmpp by central manipulation of the building heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system. Over 6 consecutive study weeks, 2 trials of rates were administered in random order. Study subjects and investigators of the study were blinded to intervention sequence. Unblinding, office environment rating and symptom occurrence were measured weekly. Of 305 eligible workers, 254 participated. Problems were encountered in delivering the lowest dose of ventilation due to building leakage. The prevalence of symptoms diminished steadily over the 6 study weeks, time trends which could be controlled by recommended design modifications. Blinding to the intervention was successfully maintained. Weekly non-response did not introduce a response bias but reduced the number of subjects available for analysis by one-third for each trial. We conclude that this design, with certain modifications, is feasible to evaluate many proposed interventions for sick building syndrome.

  2. Aorto-Uni-Iliac Stent Grafts with and without Crossover Femorofemoral Bypass for Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Parallel Observational Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Elkassaby, Mohammed; Alawy, Mahmoud; Ali, Mohamed Zaki; Tawfick, Wael A.; Sultan, Sherif

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the safety and efficacy of primary aorto-uni-iliac (AUI) endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) without fem-fem crossover in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and concomitant aortoiliac occlusive disease. 537 EVARs were implemented between 2002 and 2015 in University Hospital Galway, a tertiary referral center for aortic surgery and EVAR. We executed a parallel observational comparative study between 34 patients with AUI with femorofemoral crossover (group A) and six patients treated with AUI but without the crossover (group B). Group B patients presented with infrarenal AAAs with associated total occlusion of one iliac axis and high comorbidities. Technical success was 97% (n = 33) in group A and 85% (n = 5) in group B (P = 0.31). Primary and assisted clinical success at 24 months were 88% (n = 30) and 12% (n = 4), respectively, in group A, and 85% (n = 5) and 15% (n = 1), respectively, in group B (P = 0.125). Reintervention rate was 10% (n = 3) in group A and 0% in group B (P = 0.084). No incidence of postoperative critical lower limb ischemia or amputations occurred in the follow-up period. AUI without crossover bypass is a viable option in selected cases. PMID:26770825

  3. A Case Study of Controlling Crossover in a Selection Hyper-heuristic Framework Using the Multidimensional Knapsack Problem.

    PubMed

    Drake, John H; Özcan, Ender; Burke, Edmund K

    2016-01-01

    Hyper-heuristics are high-level methodologies for solving complex problems that operate on a search space of heuristics. In a selection hyper-heuristic framework, a heuristic is chosen from an existing set of low-level heuristics and applied to the current solution to produce a new solution at each point in the search. The use of crossover low-level heuristics is possible in an increasing number of general-purpose hyper-heuristic tools such as HyFlex and Hyperion. However, little work has been undertaken to assess how best to utilise it. Since a single-point search hyper-heuristic operates on a single candidate solution, and two candidate solutions are required for crossover, a mechanism is required to control the choice of the other solution. The frameworks we propose maintain a list of potential solutions for use in crossover. We investigate the use of such lists at two conceptual levels. First, crossover is controlled at the hyper-heuristic level where no problem-specific information is required. Second, it is controlled at the problem domain level where problem-specific information is used to produce good-quality solutions to use in crossover. A number of selection hyper-heuristics are compared using these frameworks over three benchmark libraries with varying properties for an NP-hard optimisation problem: the multidimensional 0-1 knapsack problem. It is shown that allowing crossover to be managed at the domain level outperforms managing crossover at the hyper-heuristic level in this problem domain.

  4. β-Glucan and Dark Chocolate: A Randomized Crossover Study on Short-Term Satiety and Energy Intake

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Asli; Dasgin, Halil; Ayaz, Aylin; Buyuktuncer, Zehra; Besler, H. Tanju

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aims of this study were to adapt a traditional recipe into a healthier form by adding 3 g of oat β-glucan, substituting milk chocolate to dark chocolate with 70% cocoa, and to examine the effect of these alterations on short-term satiety and energy intake. Materials and Methods: Study subjects (n = 25) were tested in a randomized, crossover design with four products closely matched for energy content. Four different versions of a traditional recipe including milk chocolate-control (CON), oat β-glucan (B-GLU), dark chocolate (DARK) or oat β-glucan and dark chocolate (B-GLU + DARK) were given to subjects on different test days. After subjects were asked to report visual analog scale (VAS) scores on sensory outcomes and related satiety for four hours ad libitum, lunch was served and energy intake of individuals was measured. Results: VAS scores indicated that none of the test foods exerted an improved effect on satiety feelings. However, energy intake of individuals during ad libitum lunch was significantly lower in dark chocolate groups (CON: 849.46 ± 47.45 kcal versus DARK: 677.69 ± 48.45 kcal and B-GLU + DARK: 691.08 ± 47.45 kcal, p = 0.014). Conclusion: The study demonstrated that substituting dark chocolate for milk chocolate is more effective in inducing satiety during subsequent food intake in healthy subjects. PMID:25251294

  5. Salivary Oxytocin Concentrations in Males following Intranasal Administration of Oxytocin: A Double-Blind, Cross-Over Study

    PubMed Central

    Daughters, Katie; Manstead, Antony S. R.; Hubble, Kelly; Rees, Aled; Thapar, Anita; van Goozen, Stephanie H. M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of intranasal oxytocin (OT) in research has become increasingly important over the past decade. Although researchers have acknowledged a need for further investigation of the physiological effects of intranasal administration, few studies have actually done so. In the present double-blind cross-over study we investigated the longevity of a single 24 IU dose of intranasal OT measured in saliva in 40 healthy adult males. Salivary OT concentrations were significantly higher in the OT condition, compared to placebo. This significant difference lasted until the end of testing, approximately 108 minutes after administration, and peaked at 30 minutes. Results showed significant individual differences in response to intranasal OT administration. To our knowledge this is the largest and first all-male within-subjects design study to demonstrate the impact of intranasal OT on salivary OT concentrations. The results are consistent with previous research in suggesting that salivary OT is a valid matrix for OT measurement. The results also suggest that the post-administration ‘wait-time’ prior to starting experimental tasks could be reduced to 30 minutes, from the 45 minutes typically used, thereby enabling testing during peak OT concentrations. Further research is needed to ascertain whether OT concentrations after intranasal administration follow similar patterns in females, and different age groups. PMID:26669935

  6. Effects of SuperUlam on Supporting Concentration and Mood: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Udani, Jay K

    2013-01-01

    Background. SuperUlam is a proprietary blend of natural ingredients aimed at supporting brain health. We aimed to evaluate the effect of SuperUlam on attention and mood in healthy adults. Methods. Twenty healthy individuals aged 35–65 were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Study duration was 3 weeks and consisted of 3 visits. Measurement of cognitive function included computer-based testing of reaction time, complex attention, working memory, sustained attention, and executive functioning. Mood testing was performed via the profile of mood states (POMS) survey and the Chalder fatigue scale. Results. Cognitive function testing demonstrated a significant improvement from baseline in executive functioning, cognitive flexibility, reaction time, and working memory in the product group only (P < 0.05). When comparing the study product to placebo, the data demonstrated a significant decrease in tension, depression, and anger (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the product and placebo in the other measures of mood, including vigor, fatigue, confusion, and total mood disturbance. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions. Supplementation with SuperUlam is safe to consume with potential benefits to cognitive function and mood. PMID:24371452

  7. Kinesio Taping Does Not Alter Quadriceps Isokinetic Strength and Power in Healthy Nonathletic Men: A Prospective Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Korman, Paweł; Straburzyńska-Lupa, Anna; Rutkowski, Radosław; Gruszczyński, Jakub; Lewandowski, Jacek; Straburzyński-Lupa, Marcin; Łochyński, Dawid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The effects of Kinesio Taping (KT) on muscular performance remain largely unclear. This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of KT on the maximum concentric and eccentric quadriceps isokinetic strength. Study Design. This is a single-blinded, placebo crossover, repeated measures study. Methods. Maximum isokinetic concentric/eccentric extension torque, work, and power were assessed by an isokinetic dynamometer without taping (NT) and with KT or placebo taping (PT) in 17 healthy young men. Repeated measures one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analyses. Results. Testing concentric contractions at 60°/s or 180°/s isokinetic speed, no significant differences in peak torque (Nm), total work (J), or mean power (W) were noted among the application modes under different conditions. Testing eccentric contractions at 30°/s or 60°/s isokinetic speed, no significant differences in mentioned parameters were noted, respectively. KT on the quadriceps neither decreased nor increased muscle strength in the participants. Conclusion. KT application onto the skin overlying the quadriceps muscle does not enhance the strength or power of knee extensors in healthy men. PMID:26819953

  8. Gaseous Air Pollution and the Risk for Stroke Admissions: A Case-Crossover Study in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fangfang; Luo, Yanxia; Tan, Peng; Xu, Qin; Tao, Lixin; Guo, Jin; Zhang, Feng; Xie, Xueqin; Guo, Xiuhua

    2017-01-01

    Background: Though increasing evidence supports association between gaseous air pollution and stroke, it remains unclear whether the effects differ in season, sex and age. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of gaseous air pollution with stroke admissions in Beijing, 2013–2014 in different subgroups. Methods: Case-crossover design and conditional logistic regression were used to perform the analyses. We examined the exposure-response relationship between air pollution and stroke. Stratified analyses were performed in different seasons, sex, and age groups. Results: There were 147,624 stroke admissions during the study period. In the whole study period, percent changes of stroke admissions were 0.82% (95% CI: 0.52% to 1.13%) and 0.73% (95% CI: 0.44% to 1.03%) per 10 μg/m3 increase in the same day conentration of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The positive associations were higher in warm seasons and with patients >65 years (p < 0.05). Contrary effects of carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone on stroke admissions were observed in different seasons. Conclusions: NO2 and SO2 were positively associated with stroke admissions, with stronger effects in warm seasons and with patients >65 years. The associations of CO and ozone with stroke admissions differed across seasons. PMID:28216595

  9. Naturalistic conversation improves daytime motorway driving performance under a benzodiazepine: a randomised, crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Moták, Ladislav; Bayssac, Laëtitia; Taillard, Jacques; Sagaspe, Patricia; Huet, Nathalie; Terrier, Patrice; Philip, Pierre; Daurat, Agnès

    2014-06-01

    The adverse effects of benzodiazepines on driving are widely recognised. The aims of this study were both to determine the impact of naturalistic conversation on the driving ability of drivers under a benzodiazepine, and to measure the accuracy of drivers' assessments of the joint effects of the benzodiazepine and conversation. Sixteen healthy male participants (29.69 ± 3.30 years) underwent a randomised, crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with the benzodiazepine lorazepam (2mg). They drove 200 km (125 miles) on a motorway in the morning. We measured two driving ability-related variables (i.e., lane-keeping performance), and collected a set of self-assessed variables (i.e., self-assessment of driving performance) during two 10-min sequences of interest (no conversation vs. conversation). An analysis of variance revealed an interaction whereby lane-keeping performance under lorazepam was worse in the no-conversation condition than in the conversation condition. No such difference was detected under placebo. Pearson's correlation coefficients revealed that self-assessments were (i) not at all predictive of lane-keeping when performed before the drive, but (ii) moderately predictive of lane-keeping performance when performed during or after the drive. We conclude that conversation with a passenger may contribute to safer lane-keeping when driving under a benzodiazepine. Moreover, a degree of awareness may be attained after some experience of driving under the influence of this type of medication.

  10. Comparative palatability of two veterinary dewormers (Milpro® and Milbemax®): a blinded randomised crossover cat study

    PubMed Central

    Bernachon, N.; McGahie, D.; Corvaisier, D.; Benizeau, E.; Crastes, N.; Chaix, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The combination of milbemycin oxime–praziquantel is widely used against the most common tapeworms and roundworms affecting cats. New veterinary presentations of this combination have recently been approved. Objective The objective of this study was to compare the palatability of two products using this combination, Milpro® and Milbemax®. Methods In all, 20 adult cats and 20 kittens were offered each product according to a randomisation table using a blinded crossover design. Prehension from the bowl, prehension from the hand and total consumption were assessed. Results Both presentations were very well tolerated in adult cats and kittens. Total prehension in adult cats and kittens was 100 and 45 per cent, respectively, for Milpro®, and 95 and 30 per cent, respectively, for Milbemax®. The percentages of adult cats and kittens which swallowed the pill after taking it into their mouth (total spontaneous consumption) were respectively 40 and 45 per cent for Milpro®, and 35 and 20 per cent for Milbemax®. Conclusion In this study, both presentations were highly attractive to cats and their respective coatings successfully covered the unpleasant odour of praziquantel, which usually repels cats. These results indicate that the palatability of Milpro® is at least as good as Milbemax® and both tablets are well accepted by adult cats and kittens. PMID:26392882

  11. Airborne Pollen Concentrations and Emergency Room Visits for Myocardial Infarction: A Multicity Case-Crossover Study in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Weichenthal, Scott; Lavigne, Eric; Villeneuve, Paul J; Reeves, François

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have examined the acute cardiovascular effects of airborne allergens. We conducted a case-crossover study to evaluate the relationship between airborne allergen concentrations and emergency room visits for myocardial infarction (MI) in Ontario, Canada. In total, 17,960 cases of MI were identified between the months of April and October during the years 2004-2011. Daily mean aeroallergen concentrations (pollen and mold spores) were assigned to case and control periods using central-site monitors in each city along with daily measurements of meteorological data and air pollution (nitrogen dioxide and ozone). Odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals were estimated using conditional logistic regression models adjusting for time-varying covariates. Risk of MI was 5.5% higher (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.4, 7.6) on days in the highest tertile of total pollen concentrations compared with days in the lowest tertile, and a significant concentration-response trend was observed (P < 0.001). Higher MI risk was limited to same-day pollen concentrations, with the largest risks being observed during May (odds ratio = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.35) and June (odds ratio = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.22), when tree and grass pollen are most common. Mold spore concentrations were not associated with MI. Our findings suggest that airborne pollen might represent a previously unidentified environmental risk factor for myocardial infarction.

  12. Improvement in critical thinking dispositions of undergraduate nursing students through problem-based learning: a crossover-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dehong; Zhang, Yaqing; Xu, Yun; Wu, Juemin; Wang, Caifeng

    2013-10-01

    Critical thinking (CT) is important to nursing education and practice. Although there is evidence that active learning approaches, such as problem-based learning (PBL), are effective in developing CT dispositions, the findings are inconclusive. This study examines the effect of PBL on the development of CT dispositions in nursing students using a crossover-experimental study in a course offered to nursing students in China. All students were randomly assigned to two parallel groups, with one group receiving PBL and the other receiving lecture-based learning (LBL) as a control. The CT Dispositions Inventory-Chinese Version was administered before and after the semester-long course. Data were collected at three time points. No significant differences between groups were noted in overall and sub-scale scores at baseline; however, pronounced differences in overall posttest scores existed between the PBL and LBL groups. Thus, PBL learning significantly enhanced the CT dispositions of nursing students enrolled in Medical-Surgical Nursing II.

  13. A randomized, crossover pharmacokinetic study comparing generic tacrolimus vs. the reference formulation in subpopulations of kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Bloom, R D; Trofe-Clark, J; Wiland, A; Alloway, R R

    2013-01-01

    An exploratory, post hoc analysis was performed using data from a prospective, multicenter, open-label, randomized, two-period (14 d per period), two-sequence, crossover, steady-state pharmacokinetic study comparing generic tacrolimus (Sandoz) vs. reference tacrolimus in stable renal transplant patients receiving their pre-study twice-daily dose. Pharmacokinetic parameters were compared in 68 patients according to gender, African American ethnicity, the presence or absence of diabetes, and use of steroids. The ratios of tacrolimus AUC0-12 h , Cmax , and C12 with generic vs. reference tacrolimus were calculated using the geometric mean (GM) of dose-normalized values at days 14 and 28. Mean (SD) tacrolimus dose at baseline was 5.7 (4.2) mg/d. There were no consistent differences in dose-normalized AUC0-12 h , C12 , Cmax, or tmax between the generic and reference preparations within subpopulations. The 90% confidence intervals (CI) for the ratios of dose-normalized AUC0-12 h and C12 with generic vs. reference tacrolimus were within 80-125% for all subpopulations, as were 90% CIs for Cmax other than for females, African Americans, and non-diabetics, which is not unexpected given the wide variability of tacrolimus Cmax and the small subpopulation sizes. These exploratory results suggest that this generic tacrolimus preparation would be expected to offer comparable bioavailability to the reference drug in these patient subpopulations.

  14. Deep mineral water accelerates recovery after dehydrating aerobic exercise: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effect of deep mineral water (DMW) with moderate mineralization on the recovery of physical performance after prolonged dehydrating aerobic exercise in the heat was studied in nine healthy, physically active (VO2max = 45.8 ± 8.4 mL kg−1 min−1) women aged 24.0 ± 3.7 years. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover human study to evaluate the effect of ingestion of natural mineral water extracted from a depth of 689 m on recovery from prolonged fatiguing aerobic running conducted at 30°C. Results Mean body weight decreased by 2.6–2.8% following dehydrating exercise. VO2max was 9% higher after 4 h of recovery after rehydrating with DMW compared with plain water. Leg muscle power recovered better during the slow phase of recovery and was significantly higher after 48 h of recovery after rehydrating with DMW compared with plain water. Conclusions DMW with moderate mineralization was more effective in inducing recovery of aerobic capacity and leg muscle power compared with plain water following prolonged dehydrating aerobic running exercise. PMID:25002835

  15. A randomised, open-label, crossover study of the dopamine agonist, pramipexole, in patients with sleep bruxism.

    PubMed

    Cahlin, Birgitta Johansson; Hedner, Jan; Dahlström, Lars

    2017-02-01

    Sleep bruxism bears several similarities to restless legs syndrome, and a link to changes in central dopamine activity has been considered in both conditions. The dopamine agonist pramipexole is currently indicated for the symptomatic treatment of restless legs. The effect of pramipexole on sleep bruxism was investigated in subjects with 'probable bruxism' recruited at the Orofacial Pain Clinic. Thirteen patients underwent polysomnographic recordings, including bilateral masseter electromyographic activity. Following habituation to the recording equipment, a baseline registration was used to confirm bruxism [total episodes per hour, mean 11.3 (6.3)]. Following randomisation, subjects received no treatment or pramipexole titrated from 0.09 to 0.54 mg, o.d., for 3 weeks according to a crossover procedure. A polysomnographic-electromyographic registration was performed at the end of each period. Pramipexole was associated with more frequent awakenings and a reduction in rapid eye movement sleep (both P ≤ 0.02). Sleep apnea decreased marginally after pramipexole (apnea-hypopnea index 17.1 compared with control 21.5, P ≤ 0.05). The number of bruxism episodes, phasic, tonic and mixed per hour, remained unchanged after pramipexole [total episodes per hour 12.7 (8.5) and 9.8 (5.2) during pramipexole and control conditions, respectively]. It is concluded, from this pilot study, that sleep bruxism is not affected by the dopaminergic agent, pramipexole.

  16. Role of mobile phones in motor vehicle crashes resulting in hospital attendance: a case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    McEvoy, Suzanne P; Stevenson, Mark R; McCartt, Anne T; Woodward, Mark; Haworth, Claire; Palamara, Peter; Cercarelli, Rina

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To explore the effect of drivers' use of mobile (cell) phones on road safety. Design A case-crossover study. Setting Perth, Western Australia. Participants 456 drivers aged ≥ 17 years who owned or used mobile phones and had been involved in road crashes necessitating hospital attendance between April 2002 and July 2004. Main outcome measure Driver's use of mobile phone at estimated time of crash and on trips at the same time of day in the week before the crash. Interviews with drivers in hospital and phone company's records of phone use. Results Driver's use of a mobile phone up to 10 minutes before a crash was associated with a fourfold increased likelihood of crashing (odds ratio 4.1, 95% confidence interval 2.2 to 7.7, P < 0.001). Risk was raised irrespective of whether or not a hands-free device was used (hands-free: 3.8, 1.8 to 8.0, P < 0.001; hand held: 4.9, 1.6 to 15.5, P = 0.003). Increased risk was similar in men and women and in drivers aged ≥ 30 and < 30 years. A third (n = 21) of calls before crashes and on trips during the previous week were reportedly on hand held phones. Conclusions When drivers use a mobile phone there is an increased likelihood of a crash resulting in injury. Using a hands-free phone is not any safer. PMID:16012176

  17. The Effect of Aromatherapy Abdominal Massage on Alleviating Menstrual Pain in Nursing Students: A Prospective Randomized Cross-Over Study

    PubMed Central

    Marzouk, Tyseer M. F.; El-Nemer, Amina M. R.; Baraka, Hany N.

    2013-01-01

    Dysmenorrhea is a common cause of sickness absenteeism from both classes and work. This study investigated the effect of aromatherapy massage on a group of nursing students who are suffering of primary dysmenorrhea. A randomized blind clinical trial of crossover design was used. In the first treatment phase, group 1 (n = 48) received aromatherapy abdominal massage once daily for seven days prior to menstruation using the essential oils (cinnamon, clove, rose, and lavender in a base of almond oil). Group 2 (n = 47) received the same intervention but with placebo oil (almond oil). In the second treatment phase, the two groups switched to alternate regimen. Level and duration of pain and the amount of menstrual bleeding were evaluated at the baseline and after each treatment phase. During both treatment phases, the level and duration of menstrual pain and the amount of menstrual bleeding were significantly lower in the aromatherapy group than in the placebo group. These results suggests that aromatherapy is effective in alleviating menstrual pain, its duration and excessive menstrual bleeding. Aromatherapy can be provided as a nonpharmacological pain relief measure and as a part of nursing care given to girls suffering of dysmenorrhea, or excessive menstrual bleeding. PMID:23662151

  18. Heparin versus low molecular weight heparin K 2165 in chronic hemodialysis patients: a randomized cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Borm, J J; Krediet, R; Sturk, A; ten Cate, J W

    1986-01-01

    Ten patients on chronic intermittent hemodialysis treatment received either unfractionated heparin or low molecular weight (LMW) heparin K 2165 in a single-blinded randomized cross-over study to assess: effects on hemostasis and ex vivo platelet functions, and effectiveness, i.e. prevention of fibrin formation in the extracorporeal circuit. The 20 dialysis treatments were without untoward side effects, for both drugs used. The variation in the plasma anti-Xa activities was significantly less during K 2165 treatment than during heparinization. No differences between the drugs were observed regarding the Ivy bleeding time, platelet count and platelet aggregation (spontaneous, and induced by ADP and collagen). Plasma platelet factor 4 levels did not increase under K 2165 to such an extent as under heparin. Both drugs did not influence the plasma levels of beta-thromboglobulin, thromboxane B2 and platelet serotonin content. K 2165 did not affect platelet adhesion to collagen, in contrast to heparin which substantially inhibited platelet adhesion. Under both treatments, 4 minor clots were observed in 4 artificial kidneys, despite plasma anti-Xa levels in between 0.19 and 0.46 U/ml. K 2165 may therefore be considered as effective an anticoagulant as heparin, with less effects on ex vivo platelet functions.

  19. Gaseous air pollution and acute myocardial infarction mortality in Hong Kong: A time-stratified case-crossover study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hualiang; An, Qingzhu; Luo, Chao; Pun, Vivian C.; Chan, Chi Sing; Tian, Linwei

    2013-09-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a common disease with serious consequences in mortality and morbidity. An association between gaseous air pollution and AMI has been suggested, but the epidemiological evidence is still limited. For the study period 1998-2010, daily counts of AMI deaths were collected, as well as daily air pollution data including concentrations of particulates (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) were also obtained. The associations between gaseous air pollutants and AMI mortality were estimated using time-stratified case-crossover analyses. NO2 and SO2 were found to be significantly associated with increased AMI mortality. The odds ratios (ORs) were 1.0455 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.017-1.0748) and 1.0256 (95% CI: 1.0027-1.0489) for an interquartile range (IQR) increase in the current day's NO2 and SO2 concentration, respectively, and this association persisted in 2-pollutant models; and no association was observed for CO and O3. It is likely that exposure to elevated ambient NO2 and SO2 air pollution contributed to increased AMI mortality.

  20. MRI-related static magnetic stray fields and postural body sway: a double-blind randomized crossover study.

    PubMed

    van Nierop, Lotte E; Slottje, Pauline; Kingma, Herman; Kromhout, Hans

    2013-07-01

    We assessed postural body sway performance after exposure to movement induced time-varying magnetic fields in the static magnetic stray field in front of a 7 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Using a double blind randomized crossover design, 30 healthy volunteers performed two balance tasks (i.e., standing with eyes closed and feet in parallel and then in tandem position) after standardized head movements in a sham, low exposure (on average 0.24 T static magnetic stray field and 0.49 T·s(-1) time-varying magnetic field) and high exposure condition (0.37 T and 0.70 T·s(-1)). Personal exposure to static magnetic stray fields and time-varying magnetic fields was measured with a personal dosimeter. Postural body sway was expressed in sway path, area, and velocity. Mixed-effects model regression analysis showed that postural body sway in the parallel task was negatively affected (P < 0.05) by exposure on all three measures. The tandem task revealed the same trend, but did not reach statistical significance. Further studies are needed to investigate the possibility of independent or synergetic effects of static magnetic stray field and time-varying magnetic field exposure. In addition, practical safety implications of these findings, e.g., for surgeons and others working near magnetic resonance imaging scanners need to be investigated.

  1. Effect on lipoprotein profile of replacing butter with margarine in a low fat diet: randomised crossover study with hypercholesterolaemic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, A.; Mann, J.; Sutherland, W.; Duncan, A.; Skeaff, M.; Frampton, C.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the effect on lipid and lipoprotein concentrations when butter or an unsaturated margarine is used for cooking or spreading in a reduced fat diet. DESIGN--Randomised crossover study with two intervention periods of six weeks' duration separated by a five week washout. SETTING--Community setting in New Zealand. SUBJECTS--49 volunteers with polygenic hypercholesterolaemia and baseline total cholesterol concentration in the range 5.5-7.9 mmol/l. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Concentrations of total and low density lipoprotein, Lp(a) lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein, apolipoprotein B 100, and apolipoprotein A I. RESULTS--Concentrations of low density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B were about 10% lower with margarine than with butter. Lp(a) lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations were similar with the two diets. CONCLUSION--Despite concerns about adverse effects on lipoproteins of trans fatty acids in margarines, the use of unsaturated margarine rather than butter by hypercholesterolaemic people is associated with a lipoprotein profile that would be expected to reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:8616303

  2. Dynamic crossovers and activated regimes in a narrow distribution poly(n-butyl acrylate): an ESR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreozzi, Laura; Autiero, Ciro; Faetti, Massimo; Giordano, Marco; Zulli, Fabio

    2006-07-01

    The rotational dynamics of the spin probe cholestane dissolved in a narrow distribution poly(n-butyl acrylate) sample has been investigated via electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The measurements were carried out in a wide temperature range: different dynamic regions have been recognized, and the coupling of the probe dynamics to the α and secondary relaxations has been revealed. In particular, the coupling with the structural relaxation is ruled by two fractionary Vogel-Fulcher laws (VF). The crossover from one VF region to the other occurs at the temperature TC = 1.17Tg, signalling the onset of the cooperativity in the dynamics and confirming a behaviour previously observed in ESR studies carried out on polymeric glass-formers. Furthermore, in this work we discuss the activated regime at the highest temperatures and show that the activation energy does not depend on the length of the polymer main- and side-chains, while its onset temperature linearly depends on the chain length.

  3. Association between flood and the morbidity of bacillary dysentery in Zibo City, China: a symmetric bidirectional case-crossover study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feifei; Ding, Guoyong; Liu, Zhidong; Zhang, Caixia; Jiang, Baofa

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between daily morbidity of bacillary dysentery and flood in 2007 in Zibo City, China, using a symmetric bidirectional case-crossover study. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) on the basis of multivariate model and stratified analysis at different lagged days were calculated to estimate the risk of flood on bacillary dysentery. A total of 902 notified bacillary dysentery cases were identified during the study period. The median of case distribution was 7-year-old and biased to children. Multivariable analysis showed that flood was associated with an increased risk of bacillary dysentery, with the largest OR of 1.849 (95 % CI 1.229-2.780) at 2-day lag. Gender-specific analysis showed that there was a significant association between flood and bacillary dysentery among males only (ORs >1 from lag 1 to lag 5), with the strongest lagged effect at 2-day lag (OR = 2.820, 95 % CI 1.629-4.881), and the result of age-specific indicated that youngsters had a slightly larger risk to develop flood-related bacillary dysentery than older people at one shorter lagged day (OR = 2.000, 95 % CI 1.128-3.546 in youngsters at lag 2; OR = 1.879, 95 % CI 1.069-3.305 in older people at lag 3). Our study has confirmed that there is a positive association between flood and the risk of bacillary dysentery in selected study area. Males and youngsters may be the vulnerable and high-risk populations to develop the flood-related bacillary dysentery. Results from this study will provide recommendations to make available strategies for government to deal with negative health outcomes due to floods.

  4. Association between flood and the morbidity of bacillary dysentery in Zibo City, China: a symmetric bidirectional case-crossover study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feifei; Ding, Guoyong; Liu, Zhidong; Zhang, Caixia; Jiang, Baofa

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between daily morbidity of bacillary dysentery and flood in 2007 in Zibo City, China, using a symmetric bidirectional case-crossover study. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) on the basis of multivariate model and stratified analysis at different lagged days were calculated to estimate the risk of flood on bacillary dysentery. A total of 902 notified bacillary dysentery cases were identified during the study period. The median of case distribution was 7-year-old and biased to children. Multivariable analysis showed that flood was associated with an increased risk of bacillary dysentery, with the largest OR of 1.849 (95 % CI 1.229-2.780) at 2-day lag. Gender-specific analysis showed that there was a significant association between flood and bacillary dysentery among males only (ORs >1 from lag 1 to lag 5), with the strongest lagged effect at 2-day lag (OR = 2.820, 95 % CI 1.629-4.881), and the result of age-specific indicated that youngsters had a slightly larger risk to develop flood-related bacillary dysentery than older people at one shorter lagged day (OR = 2.000, 95 % CI 1.128-3.546 in youngsters at lag 2; OR = 1.879, 95 % CI 1.069-3.305 in older people at lag 3). Our study has confirmed that there is a positive association between flood and the risk of bacillary dysentery in selected study area. Males and youngsters may be the vulnerable and high-risk populations to develop the flood-related bacillary dysentery. Results from this study will provide recommendations to make available strategies for government to deal with negative health outcomes due to floods.

  5. The impact of airborne particulate matter on pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia among Jinan children: a case-crossover study.

    PubMed

    Lv, Chenguang; Wang, Xianfeng; Pang, Na; Wang, Lanzhong; Wang, Yuping; Xu, Tengfei; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Tianran; Li, Wei

    2016-12-14

    This study aims to examine the effect of short-term changes in the concentration of particulate matter ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5) and ≤ 10 µm (PM10) on pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia in Jinan, China. It explored confoundings factos of weather, season, and chemical pollutants. Information on pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia in 2014 was extracted from the database of Jinan Qilu Hospital. The relative risk of pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia was assessed using a case-crossover approach, controlling weather variables, day of the week, and seasonality. The single-pollutant model demonstrated that increased risk of pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia was significantly associated with elevated PM2.5 concentrations the day before hospital admission and elevated PM10 concentrations two days before hospital admission. An increment of 10 μg/m(3) in PM2.5 and PM10 were correlated with a 6% (95% CI 1.02-1.10) and 4% (95% CI 1.00-1.08) rise in number of admissions for pneumonia, respectively. In two pollutant models, PM2.5 and PM10 remained significant after inclusion of sulfur dioxide or nitrogen dioxide but not carbon monoxide. This study demonstrated short-term exposure to atmospheric particulate matter (PM2.5/PM10) may be an important determinant of pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia in Jinan, China. This study demonstrated short-term exposure to atmospheric particulate matter (PM2.5/PM10) may be an important determinant of pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia in Jinan, China and suggested the relevance of pollutant exposure levels and their effects. As a specific group, children are sensitive to airborne particulate matter. This study estimated the short-term effects attribute to other air pollutants to provide references for relevant studies.

  6. Comparison of different exposure settings in a case--crossover study on air pollution and daily mortality: counterintuitive results.

    PubMed

    Zauli Sajani, Stefano; Hänninen, Otto; Marchesi, Stefano; Lauriola, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Because of practical problems associated with measurement of personal exposures to air pollutants in larger populations, almost all epidemiological studies assign exposures based on fixed-site ambient air monitoring stations. In the presence of multiple monitoring stations at different locations, the selection of them may affect the observed epidemiological concentration--response (C-R) relationships. In this paper, we quantify these impacts in an observational ecologic case--crossover study of air pollution and mortality. The associations of daily concentrations of PM(10), O(3), and NO(2) with daily all-cause non-violent mortality were investigated using conditional logistic regression to estimate percent increase in the risk of dying for an increase of 10 μg/m(3) in the previous day air pollutant concentrations (lag 1). The study area covers the six main cities in the central-western part of Emilia-Romagna region (population of 1.1 million). We used four approaches to assign exposure to air pollutants for each individual considered in the study: nearest background station; city average of all stations available; average of all stations in a macro-area covering three cities and average of all six cities in the study area (50 × 150 km(2)). Odds ratios generally increased enlarging the spatial dimension of the exposure definition and were highest for six city-average exposure definition. The effect is especially evident for PM(10), and similar for NO(2), whereas for ozone, we did not find any change in the C-R estimates. Within a geographically homogeneous region, the spatial aggregation of monitoring station data leads to higher and more robust risk estimates for PM(10) and NO(2), even if monitor-to-monitor correlations showed a light decrease with distance. We suggest that the larger aggregation improves the representativity of the exposure estimates by decreasing exposure misclassification, which is more profound when using individual stations vs regional

  7. Airway and serum adipokines after allergen and diesel exposure in a controlled human crossover study of atopic adults.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marabeth M; Hirota, Jeremy A; Sood, Akshay; Teschke, Kay; Carlsten, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Adipokines are mediators released from adipose tissue. These proteins are regarded as active elements of systemic and pulmonary inflammation, whose dysregulation can alter an individual's risk of developing allergic lung diseases. Despite this knowledge, adipokine responses to inhaled stimuli are poorly understood. We sought to measure serum and lung adiponectin, leptin, and resistin in an atopic adult study population following exposure to allergen and diesel exhaust (DE). Two types of lung samples including bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and bronchial wash (BW), and a time course of serum samples, were collected from the 18 subjects who participated in the randomized, double-blinded controlled human study. The two crossover exposure triads in this study were inhaled DE and filtered air each followed by instilled allergen or saline. Serum and lung adipokine responses to these exposures were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Allergen significantly increased adiponectin and leptin in BAL, and adiponectin in the BW 48 hours after exposure. Serum leptin and resistin responses were not differentially affected by exposure, but varied over time. Coexposure with DE and allergen revealed significant correlations between the adiponectin/leptin ratio and FEV1 changes and airway responsiveness measures. Changes in lung and serum adipokines in response to allergen exposure were identified in the context of a controlled exposure study. Coexposure identified a potentially protective role of adiponectin in the lung. This response was not observed in those with baseline airway hyper-responsiveness, or after allergen exposure alone. The clinical relevance of this potentially adaptive adipokine pattern warrants further study.

  8. Effects of oral phentolamine, taken before sleep, on nocturnal erectile activity: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Hatzichristou, D G; Apostolidis, A; Tzortzis, V; Hatzimouratidis, K; Kouvelas, D

    2001-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of oral phentolamine, administered before sleep, on nocturnal penile erectile activity of men with mild to moderate erectile dysfunction (ED). We studied five patients with mild to moderate ED (mean age 34.8 +/- 8.13 and mean duration of ED 31.8 +/- 23.5 months), in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. All patients received oral phentolamine (Vasomax) at a dose of 40 mg and placebo for three consecutive nights respectively and were submitted to nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity monitoring (NPTR) with the Rigiscan device. NPTR parameters of the two 3-night recordings were evaluated and compared. Administration of oral phentolamine before sleep was associated with a statistically significant increase in the number of erectile events with rigidity > or = 60% lasting > or = 10 min (P = 0.02), as well as the rigidity activity units (RAU) value per hour sleep, both at the base (P = 0.023) and the tip of the penis (P = 0.019). The number of events as measured by Rigiscan software (20% change in circumference), as well as tumescence activity units (TAU)/h values did not show any statistical difference. No adverse effects were recorded. It is concluded that oral phentolamine administered before sleep enhanced NPTR parameters associated with the quality of the erectile events. Such results provide a pathway for the development of a prevention strategy for ED. Future studies will elucidate whether vasoactive agents taken on a regular basis before sleep, can prevent ED in men at risk, protecting also minimally and moderately impotent patients to become moderately and severely impotent respectively.

  9. Caffeine improves endurance in 75-yr-old citizens: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Norager, C B; Jensen, M B; Madsen, M R; Laurberg, S

    2005-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of caffeine on physical performance in healthy citizens aged > or =70 yr. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was conducted in 15 men and 15 women recruited by their general practitioner. Participants abstained from caffeine for 48 h and were randomized to receive one capsule of placebo and then caffeine (6 mg/kg) or caffeine and then placebo with 1 wk in between. One hour after intervention, we measured reaction and movement times, postural stability, walking speed, cycling at 65% of expected maximal heart rate, perceived effort during cycling, maximal isometric arm flexion strength, and endurance. Analysis was by intention to treat, and P < 0.05 was regarded as significant. Caffeine increased cycling endurance by 25% [95% confidence interval (CI): 13-38; P = 0.0001] and isometric arm flexion endurance by 54% (95% CI: 29-83; P = 0.0001). Caffeine also reduced the rating of perceived exertion after 5 min of cycling by 11% (95% CI: 5-17; P = 0.002) and postural stability with eyes open by 25% (95% CI: 2-53; P = 0.03). Caffeine ingestion did not affect muscle strength, walking speed, reaction, and movement times. At the end of the study, 46% of participants correctly identified when they received caffeine and placebo. Caffeine increased exercise endurance in healthy citizens aged > or =70 yr, but the participants' reasons for stopping the test may have varied between subjects, as the cycling test was done at approximately 55% of maximal oxygen consumption. Further studies are required to investigate whether caffeine can be utilized to improve the physical performance of elderly citizens.

  10. Effects of almond and pistachio consumption on gut microbiota composition in a randomised cross-over human feeding study.

    PubMed

    Ukhanova, Maria; Wang, Xiaoyu; Baer, David J; Novotny, Janet A; Fredborg, Marlene; Mai, Volker

    2014-06-28

    The modification of microbiota composition to a 'beneficial' one is a promising approach for improving intestinal as well as overall health. Natural fibres and phytochemicals that reach the proximal colon, such as those present in various nuts, provide substrates for the maintenance of healthy and diverse microbiota. The effects of increased consumption of specific nuts, which are rich in fibre as well as various phytonutrients, on human gut microbiota composition have not been investigated to date. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of almond and pistachio consumption on human gut microbiota composition. We characterised microbiota in faecal samples collected from volunteers in two separate randomised, controlled, cross-over feeding studies (n 18 for the almond feeding study and n 16 for the pistachio feeding study) with 0, 1·5 or 3 servings/d of the respective nuts for 18 d. Gut microbiota composition was analysed using a 16S rRNA-based approach for bacteria and an internal transcribed spacer region sequencing approach for fungi. The 16S rRNA sequence analysis of 528 028 sequence reads, retained after removing low-quality and short-length reads, revealed various operational taxonomic units that appeared to be affected by nut consumption. The effect of pistachio consumption on gut microbiota composition was much stronger than that of almond consumption and included an increase in the number of potentially beneficial butyrate-producing bacteria. Although the numbers of bifidobacteria were not affected by the consumption of either nut, pistachio consumption appeared to decrease the number of lactic acid bacteria (P< 0·05). Increasing the consumption of almonds or pistachios appears to be an effective means of modifying gut microbiota composition.

  11. The Effects of Coarse Particles on Daily Mortality: A Case-Crossover Study in a Subtropical City, Taipei, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Meng-Hsuan; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have examined the effects of air pollution on daily mortality over the past two decades. However, information on the relationship between levels of coarse particles (PM2.5–10) and daily mortality is relatively sparse due to the limited availability of monitoring data. Furthermore, the results are inconsistent. In the current study, the association between coarse particle levels and daily mortality in Taipei, Taiwan’s largest city, which has a subtropical climate, was undertaken for the period 2006–2008 using a time-stratified case-crossover analysis. For the single pollutant model (without adjustment for other pollutants), PM2.5–10 showed statistically significant association with total mortality both on warm and cool days, with an interquartile range increase associated with a 11% (95% CI = 6%–17%) and 4% (95% CI = 1%–7%) rise in number of total deaths, respectively. In two-pollutant models, PM2.5–10 remained significant effects on total mortality after the inclusion of SO2 and O3 both on warm and cool days. We observed no significant associations between PM2.5–10 and daily mortality from respiratory diseases both on warm and cool days. For daily mortality from circulatory diseases, the effect of PM2.5–10 remained significant when SO2 or O3 was added in the regression model both on warm and cool days. Future studies of this type in cities with varying climates and cultures are needed. PMID:27011197

  12. Efficacy comparison between simple mixed-dilution and simple mid-dilution on-line hemodiafiltration techniques: a crossover study.

    PubMed

    Susantitaphong, Paweena; Tiranathanagul, Khajohn; Katavetin, Pisut; Hanwiwatwong, Orawadee; Wittayalertpanya, Supeecha; Praditpornsilpa, Kearkiat; Tungsanga, Kriang; Eiam-Ong, Somchai

    2012-12-01

    Mid-dilution and mixed-dilution on-line hemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) techniques are innovated to overcome the limitations of two standard techniques including predilution and postdilution. Unfortunately, the head-to-head comparisons between these two novel techniques in the same study are still limited. Moreover, the original mid-dilution and mixed-dilution OL-HDF need special dialyzers and special machines. In the present study, simple mid-dilution and simple mixed-dilution OL-HDF were settled with the aim for clinical use in general hemodialysis (HD) centers. The efficacies of uremic toxins removal between both modalities were measured and compared. This prospective randomized crossover study was conducted on 12 stable HD patients undergoing simple mixed-dilution and simple mid-dilution OL-HDF techniques. HD prescriptions were similar in both techniques. The dialysis efficacies were determined by calculating small- (urea, creatinine, and phosphate) and middle-molecule (beta-2 microglobulin [β2M]) removal. Moreover, potential complications such as high transmembrane pressure (TMP) and protein loss were also observed. Simple mixed-dilution OL-HDF provided significantly greater clearances of urea, creatinine, and β2M when compared with the simple mid-dilution OL-HDF techniques. Phosphate clearances in both techniques were comparable. In addition, TMP and dialysate albumin loss were not different. There were no intradialytic complications in both techniques. Simple mixed-dilution OL-HDF could provide greater efficacy for small- and middle-molecule clearances and acceptable potential risks, while phosphate removal is comparable.

  13. Effects of American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) on neurocognitive function: an acute, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Ossoukhova, Anastasia; Owen, Lauren; Ibarra, Alvin; Pipingas, Andrew; He, Kan; Roller, Marc; Stough, Con

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Over the last decade, Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) has been shown to improve aspects of human cognitive function. American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) has a distinct ginsenoside profile from P. ginseng, promising cognitive enhancing properties in preclinical studies and benefits processes linked to human cognition. Objectives The availability of a highly standardised extract of P. quinquefolius (Cereboost™) led us to evaluate its neurocognitive properties in humans for the first time. Methods This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial (N = 32, healthy young adults) assessed the acute mood, neurocognitive and glycaemic effects of three doses (100, 200 400 mg) of Cereboost™ (P. quinquefolius standardised to 10.65% ginsenosides). Participants' mood, cognitive function and blood glucose were measured 1, 3 and 6 h following administration. Results There was a significant improvement of working memory (WM) performance associated with P. quinquefolius. Corsi block performance was improved by all doses at all testing times. There were differential effects of all doses on other WM tasks which were maintained across the testing day. Choice reaction time accuracy and ‘calmness’ were significantly improved by 100 mg. There were no changes in blood glucose levels. Conclusions This preliminary study has identified robust working memory enhancement following administration of American ginseng. These effects are distinct from those of Asian ginseng and suggest that psychopharmacological properties depend critically on ginsenoside profiles. These results have ramifications for the psychopharmacology of herbal extracts and merit further study using different dosing regimens and in populations where cognition is fragile. PMID:20676609

  14. L-lysine as adjunctive treatment in patients with schizophrenia: a single-blinded, randomized, cross-over pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that the brain's nitric oxide (NO) signalling system may be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and could thus constitute a novel treatment target. The study was designed to investigate the benefit of L-lysine, an amino acid that interferes with NO production, as an add-on treatment for schizophrenia. Methods L-lysine, 6 g/day, was administered to 10 patients with schizophrenia as an adjunctive to their conventional antipsychotic medication. The study was designed as a single-blinded, cross-over study where patients were randomly assigned to initial treatment with either L-lysine or placebo and screened at baseline, after four weeks when treatment was crossed over, and after eight weeks. Results L-lysine treatment caused a significant increase in blood concentration of L-lysine and was well tolerated. A significant decrease in positive symptom severity, measured by the Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), was detected. A certain decrease in score was also observed during placebo treatment and the effects on PANSS could not unequivocally be assigned to the L-lysine treatment. Furthermore, performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test was significantly improved compared to baseline, an effect probably biased by training. Subjective reports from three of the patients indicated decreased symptom severity and enhanced cognitive functioning. Conclusions Four-week L-lysine treatment of 6 g/day caused a significant increase in blood concentration of L-lysine that was well tolerated. Patients showed a significant decrease in positive symptoms as assessed by PANSS in addition to self-reported symptom improvement by three patients. The NO-signalling pathway is an interesting, potentially new treatment target for schizophrenia; however, the effects of L-lysine need further evaluation to decide the amino acid's potentially beneficial effects on symptom severity in schizophrenia. Trial registration NCT00996242 PMID

  15. Modulation of Protein Fermentation Does Not Affect Fecal Water Toxicity: A Randomized Cross-Over Study in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Windey, Karen; De Preter, Vicky; Louat, Thierry; Schuit, Frans; Herman, Jean; Vansant, Greet; Verbeke, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Objective Protein fermentation results in production of metabolites such as ammonia, amines and indolic, phenolic and sulfur-containing compounds. In vitro studies suggest that these metabolites might be toxic. However, human and animal studies do not consistently support these findings. We modified protein fermentation in healthy subjects to assess the effects on colonic metabolism and parameters of gut health, and to identify metabolites associated with toxicity. Design After a 2-week run-in period with normal protein intake (NP), 20 healthy subjects followed an isocaloric high protein (HP) and low protein (LP) diet for 2 weeks in a cross-over design. Protein fermentation was estimated from urinary p-cresol excretion. Fecal metabolite profiles were analyzed using GC-MS and compared using cluster analysis. DGGE was used to analyze microbiota composition. Fecal water genotoxicity and cytotoxicity were determined using the Comet assay and the WST-1-assay, respectively, and were related to the metabolite profiles. Results Dietary protein intake was significantly higher during the HP diet compared to the NP and LP diet. Urinary p-cresol excretion correlated positively with protein intake. Fecal water cytotoxicity correlated negatively with protein fermentation, while fecal water genotoxicity was not correlated with protein fermentation. Heptanal, 3-methyl-2-butanone, dimethyl disulfide and 2-propenyl ester of acetic acid are associated with genotoxicity and indole, 1-octanol, heptanal, 2,4-dithiapentane, allyl-isothiocyanate, 1-methyl-4-(1-methylethenyl)-benzene, propionic acid, octanoic acid, nonanoic acid and decanoic acid with cytotoxicity. Conclusion This study does not support a role of protein fermentation in gut toxicity. The identified metabolites can provide new insight into colonic health. Trial Registration ClinicalTrial.gov NCT01280513 PMID:23285019

  16. Effect of Peripheral Electrical Stimulation (PES) on Nocturnal Blood Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Crossover Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Catalogna, Merav; Doenyas-Barak, Keren; Sagi, Roi; Abu-Hamad, Ramzia; Nevo, Uri; Efrati, Shai

    2016-01-01

    Background Regulation of hepatic glucose production has been a target for antidiabetic drug development, due to its major contribution to glucose homeostasis. Previous pre-clinical study demonstrated that peripheral electrical stimulation (PES) may stimulate glucose utilization and improve hepatic insulin sensitivity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate safety, tolerability, and the glucose-lowering effect of this approach in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods Twelve patients with T2DM were recruited for an open label, interventional, randomized trial. Eleven patients underwent, in a crossover design, an active, and a no-intervention control periods, separated with a two-week washout phase. During the active period, the patients received a daily lower extremity PES treatment (1.33Hz/16Hz burst mode), for 14 days. Study endpoints included changes in glucose levels, number of hypoglycemic episodes, and other potential side effects. Endpoints were analyzed based on continuous glucose meter readings, and laboratory evaluation. Results We found that during the active period, the most significant effect was on nocturnal glucose control (P < 0.0004), as well as on pre-meal mean glucose levels (P < 0.02). The mean daily glucose levels were also decreased although it did not reach clinical significance (P = 0.07). A reduction in serum cortisol (P < 0.01) but not in insulin was also detected after 2 weeks of treatment. No adverse events were recorded. Conclusions These results indicate that repeated PES treatment, even for a very short duration, can improve blood glucose control, possibly by suppressing hepatic glucose production. This effect may be mediated via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis modulation. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02727790 PMID:27997608

  17. The Effects of Particulate Matter Sources on Daily Mortality: A Case-Crossover Study of Barcelona, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Aurelio; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Amato, Fulvio; Pey, Jorge; Pérez, Noemí; Sunyer, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dozens of studies link acute exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution with premature mortality and morbidity, but questions remain about which species and sources in the vast PM mixture are responsible for the observed health effects. Although a few studies exist on the effects of species and sources in U.S. cities, European cities—which have a higher proportion of diesel engines and denser urban populations—have not been well characterized. Information on the effects of specific sources could aid in targeting pollution control and in articulating the biological mechanisms of PM. Objectives: Our study examined the effects of various PM sources on daily mortality for 2003 through 2007 in Barcelona, a densely populated city in the northeast corner of Spain. Methods: Source apportionment for PM ≤ 2.5 μm and ≤ 10 µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5 and PM10) using positive matrix factorization identified eight different factors. Case-crossover regression analysis was used to estimate the effects of each factor. Results: Several sources of PM2.5, including vehicle exhaust, fuel oil combustion, secondary nitrate/organics, minerals, secondary sulfate/organics, and road dust, had statistically significant associations (p < 0.05) with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Also, in some cases relative risks for a respective interquartile range increase in concentration were higher for specific sources than for total PM2.5 mass. Conclusions: These results along with those from our multisource models suggest that traffic, sulfate from shipping and long-range transport, and construction dust are important contributors to the adverse health effects linked to PM. PMID:21846610

  18. Evaluation of mint efficacy regarding dysmenorrhea in comparison with mefenamic acid: A double blinded randomized crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Seyedeh Zahra; Asl, Horieh Rezvani; Poorolajal, Jalal; Panah, Mohammad Hosseini; Oliaei, Seyedeh Reyhaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Menthol is the most important active material in mint and different mechanisms have been suggested for the way mint functions, most of which emphasize its analgesic effect owing to the presence of a group of temporary protein receptors. This study investigates the efficacy of peppermint capsule in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea, in comparison with Mefenamic Acid and placebo. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, double-blinded, crossover study and was conducted on 127 girl students studying in Hamadan University of Medical Sciences who had experienced primary dysmenorrhea. Each participant was asked to take one of the drugs including Mefenamic Acid and Mint, starting from the first menstruation for 3 days. At the end of each period, a questionnaire was used to gather information; through the volunteer herself, pain intensity was recorded according to visual analog scale (VAS), duration of pain according to COX questionnaire, and bleeding amount according to pictorial blood loss assessment chart (PBAC) chart (Hygham). Results: Average pain intensity and duration of pain were significantly lower after intake of Mefenamic Acid and Mint (P < 0.05). Average bleeding was significantly lower in those taking Mefenamic Acid capsule than in those taking peppermint extract (P < 0.05). Nausea and diarrhea were lower in the mint group than in Mefenamic Acid group. But analgesic usage was lower in Mefenamic Acid group than in peppermint group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: While the bleeding amount did not significantly change, pain and its severity and all the clinical signs and symptoms decreased after taking peppermint extract. Because the side effect of herbal drugs is lower than other medicinal drugs, using mint is advised for treating dysmenorrhea symptoms. PMID:27563318

  19. Blood versus urine ketone monitoring in a pediatric cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes: a crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Goffinet, Line; Barrea, Thierry; Beauloye, Véronique; Lysy, Philippe A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of our study was to determine the influence of routine ketone monitoring on hyperglycemic events (HE) and ketosis in youngsters with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods: Our single-site, controlled and randomized study was conducted on children and adolescents with T1D outside of remission phase. During two crossover periods of 6 months, patients (n = 22) experiencing HE tested ketones alternatively with a blood ketone meter or urine ketone test strips and gave their opinion on screening methods after completion of clinical trial. Moreover, we evaluated levels of awareness of ketone production in a series of 58 patients and sometimes parents via a multiple-choice questionnaire. Results: Based on self-monitoring data, patients experienced a mean of 4.8 HE/month (range 0–9.3). Patients performed accurate ketone tests more frequently during urine (46%) than during blood-testing (29%) periods (p < 0.05); while globally, 50% of ketone tests were inaccurate (i.e. without HE). Ketosis occurred significantly more often during urine (46.4%) than during blood (14.8%) monitoring (p = 0.01), although no episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) were noticed. Duration of hyperglycemia was not different whether patients measured ketones or not, suggesting that ketone monitoring did not affect correction of glycemia. Patients evaluated blood monitoring more frequently as being practical, reliable, and useful compared with urine testing. Scores in the awareness questionnaire were globally low (36.8%) without difference between patients and their parents. Conclusions: Although our study shows differences in outcomes (e.g. accurate use, detection of ketosis) of urine versus blood ketone monitoring, these did not affect the occurrence of HE. Whereas ketone monitoring is part of standardized diabetes education, its implementation in daily routine remains difficult, partly because patient awareness about mechanisms of ketosis is lacking. PMID:28203360

  20. Forest Fire Smoke Exposures and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests in Melbourne, Australia: A Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Straney, Lahn D.; Erbas, Bircan; Abramson, Michael J.; Keywood, Melita; Smith, Karen; Sim, Malcolm R.; Glass, Deborah C.; Del Monaco, Anthony; Haikerwal, Anjali; Tonkin, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Millions of people can potentially be exposed to smoke from forest fires, making this an important public health problem in many countries. Objective In this study we aimed to measure the association between out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and forest fire smoke exposures in a large city during a severe forest fire season, and estimate the number of excess OHCAs due to the fire smoke. Methods We investigated the association between particulate matter (PM) and other air pollutants and OHCA using a case-crossover study of adults (≥ 35 years of age) in Melbourne, Australia. Conditional logistic regression models were used to derive estimates of the percent change in the rate of OHCA associated with an interquartile range (IQR) increase in exposure. From July 2006 through June 2007, OHCA data were collected from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry. Hourly air pollution concentrations and meteorological data were obtained from a central monitoring site. Results There were 2,046 OHCAs with presumed cardiac etiology during our study period. Among men during the fire season, greater increases in OHCA were observed with IQR increases in the 48-hr lagged PM with diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) (8.05%; 95% CI: 2.30, 14.13%; IQR = 6.1 μg/m3) or ≤ 10 μm (PM10) (11.1%; 95% CI: 1.55, 21.48%; IQR = 13.7 μg/m3) and carbon monoxide (35.7%; 95% CI: 8.98, 68.92%; IQR = 0.3 ppm). There was no significant association between the rate of OHCA and air pollutants among women. One hundred seventy-four “fire-hours” (i.e., hours in which Melbourne’s air quality was affected by forest fire smoke) were identified during 12 days of the 2006/2007 fire season, and 23.9 (95% CI: 3.1, 40.2) excess OHCAs were estimated to occur due to elevations in PM2.5 during these fire-hours. Conclusions This study found an association between exposure to forest fire smoke and an increase in the rate of OHCA. These findings have implications for public health messages to raise

  1. Emergency room visits for acute gastrointestinal illness following flooding: A case-crossover study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change may alter the frequency of precipitation and flooding which can increase fecal-oral transmission of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) through contact with contaminated items or water. Few studies have quantified the risk associated with flood events in the Unite...

  2. Piagetian Formal Operational Tasks: A Crossover Study of Learning Effect and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Anton E.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The general purposes of this study were to analyze responses on five Piagetian formal operational tasks in a test-retest situation to determine the extent to which taking a pretest effected scores on posttests and to determine task and examiner reliabilities. Significant test score gains on Piagetian tasks appeared to result from test-retest…

  3. Bacterial contamination of surgical scrub suits worn outside the operating theatre: a randomised crossover study.

    PubMed

    Hee, H I; Lee, S; Chia, S N; Lu, Q S; Liew, A P Q; Ng, A

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the bacterial contamination of surgical scrub suits worn outside the operating theatre. We randomised 16 anaesthetists on separate occasions into one of 3 groups: restricted to the operating theatre only; theatre and surgical wards; and theatre and departmental office. For each group, sample fabric pieces attached to the chest, waist and hip areas of each suit were removed at 150 min intervals between 08:30 and 16:00 on the day of study, and sent for microbiological assessment. Mean bacterial counts increased significantly over the course of the working day (p = 0.036), and were lower in the chest compared to the hip (p = 0.007) and waist areas (p = 0.016). The mean (SD) bacterial counts, expressed as colony-forming units per cm(2) at 16:00 on the day of study, were 25.2 (43.5) for those restricted to theatre and 18.5 (25.9) and 17.9 (31.0) for those allowed out to visit the ward and office, respectively (p = 0.370). We conclude that visits to ward and office did not significantly increase bacterial contamination of scrub suits.

  4. Carotenoids are more bioavailable from papaya than from tomato and carrot in humans: a randomised cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    Schweiggert, Ralf M.; Kopec, Rachel E.; Villalobos-Gutierrez, Maria G.; Högel, Josef; Quesada, Silvia; Esquivel, Patricia; Schwartz, Steven J.; Carle, Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    Carrot, tomato and papaya represent important dietary sources of β-carotene and lycopene. The main objective of the present study was to compare the bioavailability of carotenoids from these food sources in healthy human subjects. A total of sixteen participants were recruited for a randomised cross-over study. Test meals containing raw carrots, tomatoes and papayas were adjusted to deliver an equal amount of β-carotene and lycopene. For the evaluation of bioavailability, TAG-rich lipoprotein (TRL) fractions containing newly absorbed carotenoids were analysed over 9.5 h after test meal consumption. The bioavailability of β-carotene from papayas was approximately three times higher than that from carrots and tomatoes, whereas differences in the bioavailability of β-carotene from carrots and tomatoes were insignificant. Retinyl esters appeared in the TRL fractions at a significantly higher concentration after the consumption of the papaya test meal. Similarly, lycopene was approximately 2.6 times more bioavailable from papayas than from tomatoes. Furthermore, the bioavailability of β-cryptoxanthin from papayas was shown to be 2.9 and 2.3 times higher than that of the other papaya carotenoids β-carotene and lycopene, respectively. The morphology of chromoplasts and the physical deposition form of carotenoids were hypothesised to play a major role in the differences observed in the bioavailability of carotenoids from the foods investigated. Particularly, the liquid-crystalline deposition of β-carotene and the storage of lycopene in very small crystalloids in papayas were found to be associated with their high bioavailability. In conclusion, papaya was shown to provide highly bioavailable β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin and lycopene and may represent a readily available dietary source of provitamin A for reducing the incidence of vitamin A deficiencies in many subtropical and tropical developing countries. PMID:23931131

  5. Air Pollution and Subtypes, Severity and Vulnerability to Ischemic Stroke—A Population Based Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, Ravi; Pearson, Tim; Beevers, Sean D.; Campbell, Michael J.; Wolfe, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Few studies have examined the association between air pollutants and ischemic stroke subtypes. We examined acute effects of outdoor air pollutants (PM10, NO2, O3, CO, SO2) on subtypes and severity of incident ischemic stroke and investigated if pre-existing risk factors increased susceptibility. Methods We used a time stratified case-crossover study and stroke cases from the South London Stroke Register set up to capture all incident cases of first ever stroke occurring amongst residents in a geographically defined area. The Oxford clinical and TOAST etiological classifications were used to classify subtypes. A pragmatic clinical classification system was used to assess severity. Air pollution concentrations from the nearest background air pollution monitoring stations to patients’ residential postcode centroids were used. Lags from 0 to 6 days were investigated. Results There were 2590 incident cases of ischemic stroke (1995–2006). While there were associations at various lag times with several pollutants, overall, there was no consistent pattern between exposure and risk of ischemic stroke subtypes or severity. The possible exception was the association between NO2 exposure and small vessel disease stroke—adjusted odds ratio of 1.51 (1.12–2.02) associated with an inter-quartile range increase in the lag 0–6 day average for NO2. There were no clear associations in relation to pre-existing risk factors. Conclusions Overall, we found little consistent evidence of association between air pollutants and ischemic stroke subtypes and severity. There was however a suggestion that increasing NO2 exposure might be associated with higher risk of stroke caused by cerebrovascular small vessel disease. PMID:27362783

  6. Randomized crossover study of the efficacy and safety of sevelamer hydrochloride and lanthanum carbonate in Japanese patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Satoshi; Sato, Kazuto; Murata, Yaeko; Kinoshita, Yasumichi

    2012-08-01

    Insufficient control of serum calcium and phosphate levels in patients undergoing hemodialysis is associated with increased mortality. As commonly used calcium-containing phosphate binders can cause arterial calcification, newly developed calcium-free phosphate binders, such as sevelamer hydrochloride (SH) and lanthanum carbonate (LC), have received much attention. We assessed the efficacy and safety of SH and LC treatment in Japanese patients undergoing hemodialysis in a prospective randomized open blinded endpoint (PROBE) crossover study. Forty-two patients were randomized to receive SH or LC for 13 weeks, with the dosages adjusted every 2 weeks, followed by treatment with the other drug for another 13 weeks. The average daily doses of SH and LC were 2971 ± 1464 mg and 945 ± 449 mg, respectively. The mean dosage ratio of SH to LC was 3.05, which was maintained throughout the treatment period. SH and LC were similarly effective at controlling serum calcium and phosphate levels in the majority of patients (78-93%). A few serious adverse events (AEs) involving the biliary system occurred during the LC treatment period, but they were not considered to be treatment-induced. Although the incidence of constipation, the most common treatment-related AE, was higher during the SH period (27% vs. 5%; P < 0.05), no difference was observed in total treatment-related AEs. This study demonstrates that SH and LC are comparable treatments for controlling serum phosphate and calcium levels, and that both compounds are safe and well-tolerated in Japanese patients undergoing hemodialysis.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of fixed-dose combination of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, lamivudine, and efavirenz: results of a randomized, crossover, bioequivalence study.

    PubMed

    Abhyankar, Dhiraj; Shedage, Ashish; Gole, Milind; Raut, Preeti

    2016-06-17

    The objective of this study was to assess the bioequivalence between a fixed-dose combination of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/lamivudine/efavirenz 300/300/600 mg and the individual innovator products. A randomized, balanced, open-label, two-sequence, two-treatment, two-period, single dose, crossover study in 48 healthy adults was conducted. Dosing was separated by a washout period of 32 days. Twenty-seven blood samples were collected in each period from pre-dose to 72 h post-dose. The data of 45 subjects were analyzed for pharmacokinetics and safety. Ninety percent CIs of geometric mean ratio on Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0-inf for tenofovir and lamivudine and on Cmax and AUC0-72 for efavirenz were within the acceptance criteria (80-125%). For tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, the Tmax, Kel, and t1/2 values for the test and reference products were 1.02 versus 0.91 h, 0.04 versus 0.04/h, 18.67 versus 18.46 h, respectively. For lamivudine, the Tmax, Kel, and t1/2 values were: 1.38 versus 1.30 h, 0.21 versus 0.19/h, 3.44 versus 3.91 h, respectively. For efavirenz, the Tmax values for the test and reference products were 3.71 and 3.65 h, respectively. Both the treatments were well tolerated. Our findings suggest that the tested formulation is bioequivalent to the innovators' formulations, and both treatments were well tolerated.

  8. Inter-Individual Variability in the Adaptive Responses to Endurance and Sprint Interval Training: A Randomized Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Rotundo, Mario P.; Whittall, Jonathan P.; Scribbans, Trisha D.; Graham, Ryan B.; Gurd, Brendon J.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the adaptive response to both endurance (END) and sprint interval training (SIT) in a group of twenty-one recreationally active adults. All participants completed three weeks (four days/ week) of both END (30 minutes at ~65% VO2peak work rate (WR) and SIT (eight, 20-second intervals at ~170% VO2peak WR separated by 10 seconds of active rest) following a randomized crossover study design with a three-month washout period between training interventions. While a main effect of training was observed for VO2peak, lactate threshold, and submaximal heart rate (HR), considerable variability was observed in the individual responses to both END and SIT. No significant positive relationships were observed between END and SIT for individual changes in any variable. Non-responses were determined using two times the typical error (TE) of measurement for VO2peak (0.107 L/min), lactate threshold (15.7 W), and submaximal HR (10.7bpm). Non-responders in VO2peak, lactate threshold, and submaximal HR were observed following both END and SIT, however, the individual patterns of response differed following END and SIT. Interestingly, all individuals responded in at least one variable when exposed to both END and SIT. These results suggest that the individual response to exercise training is highly variable following different training protocols and that the incidence of non-response to exercise training may be reduced by changing the training stimulus for non-responders to three weeks of END or SIT. PMID:27936084

  9. Red ginseng relieves the effects of alcohol consumption and hangover symptoms in healthy men: a randomized crossover study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Hyang; Kwak, Jung Hyun; Jeon, Gayoung; Lee, Jong-Won; Seo, Jang-Ho; Lee, Hoon-Sang; Lee, Jong Ho

    2014-03-01

    Heavy drinking causes hangover symptoms, because the action of alcohol dehydrogenase forms acetaldehyde, which is metabolized by acetaldehyde dehydrogenase into acetate. Red ginseng shows positive effects on alcohol metabolism in animal studies. We investigated the effects of red ginseng on relieving alcohol and hangover symptoms in 25 healthy men in a randomized crossover study. At each visit (0, 1, and 2 weeks), the subjects drank 100 mL whiskey (40% alcohol) and either 100 mL water or 100 mL of a 0.321 mg mL(-1) red ginseng anti-hangover drink (RGD). We took blood samples periodically until 240 min after alcohol consumption, and we investigated the blood profiles, alcohol levels, and acetaldehyde levels. We also measured anthropometric parameters, expiratory air-alcohol levels, and hangover symptoms. The plasma alcohol concentrations within the RGD group were significantly lower than those within the placebo group after 30 min (p = 0.002), 45 min (p = 0.016), and 60 min (p = 0.009); the areas under the response curves revealed a positive effect of RGD (p = 0.051). Furthermore, the expiratory alcohol concentration was significantly lower after 30 min (p = 0.005) and 60 min (p = 0.065), and the areas under the response curves (p = 0.058) likewise revealed a positive effect of RGD. The plasma acetaldehyde level was significantly elevated at 120 min (p = 0.020), but the areas under the response curves showed a similar trend (p = 0.054). While the plasma acetaldehyde concentration slightly increased, the RGD showed positive effects on hangover symptoms. Considering the reduction of plasma alcohol levels, expiratory concentrations, and hangover severity, we conclude that red ginseng relieves the symptoms of alcohol hangover.

  10. A randomised, double- blind, cross-over study investigating the prebiotic effect of agave fructans in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Ramnani, P; Costabile, A; Bustillo, A G R; Gibson, G R

    2015-01-01

    This placebo-controlled, randomised, double-blind, cross-over human feeding study aimed to determine the prebiotic effect of agave fructans. A total of thirty-eight volunteers completed this trial. The treatment consisted of 3 weeks' supplementation with 5 g/d of prebiotic agave fructan (Predilife) or equivalent placebo (maltodextrin), followed by a 2-week washout period following which subjects were crossed over to alternate the treatment arm for 3 weeks followed by a 2-week washout. Faecal samples were collected at baseline, on the last day of treatment (days 22 and 58) and washout (days 36 and 72), respectively. Changes in faecal bacterial populations, SCFA and secretory IgA were assessed using fluorescent in situ hybridisation, GC and ELISA, respectively. Bowel movements, stool consistencies, abdominal comfort and mood changes were evaluated by a recorded daily questionnaire. In parallel, the effect of agave fructans on different regions of the colon using a three-stage continuous culture simulator was studied. Predilife significantly increased faecal bifidobacteria (log10 9·6 (sd 0·4)) and lactobacilli (log10 7·7 (sd 0·8)) compared with placebo (log10 9·2 (sd 0·4); P = 0·00) (log10 7·4 (sd 0·7); P = 0·000), respectively. No change was observed for other bacterial groups tested, SCFA, secretory IgA, and PGE2 concentrations between the treatment and placebo. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that bacterial communities were randomly dispersed and no significant differences were observed between Predilife and placebo treatments. The in vitro models showed similar increases in bifidobacterial and lactobacilli populations to that observed with the in vivo trial. To conclude, agave fructans are well tolerated in healthy human subjects and increased bifidobacteria and lactobacilli numbers in vitro and in vivo but did not influence other products of fermentation.

  11. Effect of combined treatment with immunoadsorption and membrane filtration on plasma coagulation--Results of a randomized controlled crossover study.

    PubMed

    Biesenbach, Peter; Eskandary, Farsad; Ay, Cihan; Wiegele, Marion; Derfler, Kurt; Schaden, Eva; Haslacher, Helmuth; Oberbauer, Rainer; Böhmig, Georg A

    2016-02-01

    The combined use of immunoadsorption (IA) and membrane filtration (MF) may markedly enhance removal of IgM and complement component C1q, supporting its use as an element of recipient desensitization in antibody-incompatible transplantation. However, coagulation factor removal may contribute to altered hemostasis, posing a risk of bleeding in the perioperative setting. This secondary endpoint analysis of standard coagulation assays and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM®) was performed in the context of a randomized controlled crossover study designed to assess the effect of combined IA (GAM-146-peptide) and MF on levels of ABO antigen-specific IgM. Fourteen patients with autoimmune disorders were randomized to a single treatment with IA+MF followed by IA alone, or vice versa. MF was found to markedly enhance fibrinogen depletion (57% vs. 28% median decrease after IA alone, P < 0.001), whereby four patients showed post-treatment fibrinogen concentrations below 100 mg dL(-1). In support of a critical contribution of fibrinogen depletion to impaired coagulation, extrinsically activated ROTEM(®) analysis revealed a marked reduction in fibrinogen-dependent clot formation upon IA+MF (59% median decrease in FIBTEM mean clot firmness (MCF) as compared to 24% after IA alone, P < 0.001). Moreover, the addition of MF led to a substantial prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time, possibly due to depletion of macromolecular coagulation factors contributing to intrinsically activated coagulation. Our study demonstrates substantial effects of combined IA+MF on clot formation, which may be mainly attributable to fibrinogen depletion. We suggest that the use of combined apheresis in the setting of transplant surgery may necessitate a careful monitoring of coagulation.

  12. A randomised, crossover study on an electronic vapour product, a nicotine inhalator and a conventional cigarette. Part A: Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Walele, Tanvir; Sharma, Girish; Savioz, Rebecca; Martin, Claire; Williams, Josie

    2016-02-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of nicotine delivered by an Electronic Vapour Product (EVP) was characterised in a 2-part study in smokers. The study was designed as a randomised, controlled, four-way crossover trial. Part 1 compared an unflavoured e-liquid (UF2.0%) and a flavoured e-liquid (FL2.0%) to a conventional cigarette (CC; JPS Silver King Size, 0.6 mg) and a licensed nicotine inhalator (Nicorette(®); 15 mg). Part 2 compared e-liquids with increasing nicotine concentrations (0%, 0.4%, 0.9%, 2.0%). Subjects used each different product for a daily use session. In Part 1, maximum plasma nicotine concentration (Cmax) for UF2.0%, FL2.0%, Nicorette(®) and CC was 3.6, 2.5, 2.5 and 21.2 ng/mL, respectively. The time to maximum plasma nicotine concentration (Tmax) was longer for the EVP (UF2.0%, 9.0 min; FL2.0%, 10.0 min) and the nicotine inhalator (13.0 min) compared to CC (3.0 min). In Part 2, EVP with 0%, 0.4%, 0.9% and 2.0% nicotine produced Cmax values of 0.6, 1.0, 1.9 and 3.6 ng/mL, respectively. At the maximum nicotine concentration of 2% as prescribed by the European Tobacco Directive, the EVP achieved nicotine delivery that was comparable to the inhalator. EVPs thus offer a potential alternative to nicotine inhalator devices for those finding it difficult to quit smoking.

  13. Topical Effect of a Medically Prescribed Pediatric Antibiotic on Dental Biofilm: A Cross-Over, In Situ Study

    PubMed Central

    Pierro, Viviane Santos da Silva; Ferreira, Dennis de Carvalho; de Jesus, Hugo Emiliano; Rosado, Alexandre Soares; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the possible topical effect of a broad-spectrum antibiotic on dental biofilm formed in situ in the absence or presence of sucrose. Methods A crossover study was conducted in three phases of 14 days each, during which 11 volunteers wore palatal devices containing 6 enamel blocks covered with meshes to allow biofilm formation. Dental blocks were extraorally submitted to a 20% sucrose solution at three different frequencies of exposure (0, 3 and 8 times/day), and to a suspension of amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium (A/CP) or a placebo (P) suspension at an 8-hour time interval application regimen. On the 14th day of each phase, biofilms were collected for microbiological (conventional culture) and molecular (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis – DGGE) analyses. Results In the absence of sucrose exposure (SE) and at the 3-time daily frequency, dental biofilms treated with A/CP showed lower total biofilm weight and lower counts of total microbiota than the ones treated with P (p>0.05). A/CP presented higher counts of Candida spp. when compared with P in the presence of SE, especially at the 8-time daily frequency (p<0.05). Considering the DGGE analysis, the mean number of bands was higher for P (p>0.05), regardless of SE. However, DGGE profiles demonstrated large interindividual variability. Conclusion Both conventional culture and DGGE have demonstrated some differences on total microbiota of dental biofilms when exposed to the A/CP or P suspensions, mainly in the absence of sucrose, which suggests a possible topical effect of the sugar-free A/CP suspension on dental biofilm. PMID:23383224

  14. Is Zolpidem Associated with Increased Risk of Fractures in the Elderly with Sleep Disorders? A Nationwide Case Cross-Over Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Fang-Ying; Chen, Hung-An; Yin, Yun-Ju; Lee, Hua-Chin; Chu, William Cheng-Chung; Yeh, Hui-Wen; Chiang, Wei-Shan; Yeh, Chia-Lun; Huang, Hui-Ling; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background We conducted a study using a case-crossover design to clarify the risk of acute effects of zolpidem and benzodiazepine on all-sites of fractures in the elderly. Design of study Case-crossover design. Methods and Materials Elderly enrollees (n = 6010) in Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database with zolpidem or benzodiazepine use were analyzed for the risk of developing fractures. Results After adjusting for medications such as antipsychotics, antidepressants, and diuretics, or comorbidities such as hypertension, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and depression, neither zolpidem nor benzodiazepine was found to be associated with increased risk in all-sites fractures. Subjects without depression were found to have an increased risk of fractures. Diazepam is the only benzodiazepine with increased risk of fractures after adjusting for medications and comorbidities. Hip and spine were particular sites for increased fracture risk, but following adjustment for comorbidities, the associations were found to be insignificant. Conclusion Neither zolpidem nor benzodiazepine was associated with increased risk of all-site fractures in this case cross-over study after adjusting for medications or comorbidities in elderly individuals with insomnia. Clinicians should balance the benefits and risks for prescribing zolpidem or benzodiazepine in the elderly accordingly. PMID:26716836

  15. Acceptability of Mini-Tablets in Young Children: Results from Three Prospective Cross-over Studies.

    PubMed

    Klingmann, Viviane

    2017-02-01

    To ensure optimal, reliable treatment, it is necessary to investigate the efficacy, safety and the optimal dose of drug substances and to develop suitable age-specific pharmaceutical formulations for the different paediatric age groups due to a lack of evidence-based therapeutic options for children. While WHO recommends the use of solid dosage forms in general, European Medicines Agency (EMA) requires evidence for the suitability of these dosage forms in the targeted age group. This review aims to summarize and discuss the data obtained in acceptability studies on the suitability of coated and uncoated mini-tablets in children of different ages in comparison to a sweet syrup considered as gold standard. The predefined outcome parameters 'acceptability' and 'capability to swallow' of the two different mini-tablet formulations (uncoated and film-coated) were statistically significantly higher than that of the syrup.

  16. Effect of Insulin Feedback on Closed-Loop Glucose Control: A Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Jessica L.; Sherr, Jennifer L.; Cengiz, Eda; Carria, Lori; Roy, Anirban; Voskanyan, Gayane; Tamborlane, William V.; Weinzimer, Stuart A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Closed-loop (CL) insulin delivery systems utilizing proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers have demonstrated susceptibility to late postprandial hypoglycemia because of delays between insulin delivery and blood glucose (BG) response. An insulin feedback (IFB) modification to the PID algorithm has been introduced to mitigate this risk. We examined the effect of IFB on CL BG control. Methods Using the Medtronic ePID CL system, four subjects were studied for 24 h on PID control and 24 h during a separate admission with the IFB modification (PID + IFB). Target glucose was 120 mg/dl; meals were served at 8:00 AM, 1:00 PM, and 6:00 PM and were identical for both admissions. No premeal manual boluses were given. Reference BG excursions, defined as incremental glucose rise from premeal to peak, and postprandial BG area under the curve (AUC; 0–5 h) were compared. Results are reported as mean ± standard deviation. Results The PID + IFB control resulted in higher mean BG levels compared with PID alone (153 ± 54 versus 133 ± 56 mg/dl; p < .0001). Postmeal BG excursions (114 ± 28 versus 114 ± 47 mg/dl) and AUCs (285 ± 102 versus 255 ± 129 mg/dl/h) were similar under both conditions. Total insulin delivery averaged 57 ± 20 U with PID versus 45 ± 13 U with PID + IFB (p = .18). Notably, eight hypoglycemic events (BG < 60 mg/dl) occurred during PID control versus none during PID + IFB. Conclusions Addition of IFB to the PID controller markedly reduced the occurrence of hypoglycemia without increasing meal-related glucose excursions. Higher average BG levels may be attributable to differences in the determination of system gain (Kp) in this study. The prevention of postprandial hypoglycemia suggests that the PID + IFB algorithm may allow for lower target glucose selection and improved overall glycemic control. PMID:23063039

  17. Comparison of minimalist footwear strategies for simulating barefoot running: a randomized crossover study.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Karsten; Argubi-Wollesen, Andreas; Reer, Rüdiger; Zech, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Possible benefits of barefoot running have been widely discussed in recent years. Uncertainty exists about which footwear strategy adequately simulates barefoot running kinematics. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of athletic footwear with different minimalist strategies on running kinematics. Thirty-five distance runners (22 males, 13 females, 27.9 ± 6.2 years, 179.2 ± 8.4 cm, 73.4 ± 12.1 kg, 24.9 ± 10.9 km x week(-1)) performed a treadmill protocol at three running velocities (2.22, 2.78 and 3.33 m x s(-1)) using four footwear conditions: barefoot, uncushioned minimalist shoes, cushioned minimalist shoes, and standard running shoes. 3D kinematic analysis was performed to determine ankle and knee angles at initial foot-ground contact, rate of rear-foot strikes, stride frequency and step length. Ankle angle at foot strike, step length and stride frequency were significantly influenced by footwear conditions (p<0.001) at all running velocities. Posthoc pairwise comparisons showed significant differences (p<0.001) between running barefoot and all shod situations as well as between the uncushioned minimalistic shoe and both cushioned shoe conditions. The rate of rear-foot strikes was lowest during barefoot running (58.6% at 3.33 m x s(-1)), followed by running with uncushioned minimalist shoes (62.9%), cushioned minimalist (88.6%) and standard shoes (94.3%). Aside from showing the influence of shod conditions on running kinematics, this study helps to elucidate differences between footwear marked as minimalist shoes and their ability to mimic barefoot running adequately. These findings have implications on the use of footwear applied in future research debating the topic of barefoot or minimalist shoe running.

  18. A randomized, controlled, crossover study in patients with mild and moderate asthma undergoing treatment with traditional Chinese acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Hong Jin; Azevedo, Raymundo Soares; Braga, Alfésio Luís Ferreira; Martins, Lourdes Conceição; Saraiva-Romanholo, Beatriz M; de Arruda Martins, Milton; Lin, Chin An

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to verify the effects of acupuncture as an adjuvant treatment for the control of asthma. METHODS: This was a randomized, controlled, crossover trial conducted at the Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo. A total of 74 patients with mild/moderate, persistent asthma were randomized into two therapeutic groups: Group A – 31 patients underwent 10 real weekly acupuncture sessions, followed by a 3-week washout period and 10 sham weekly acupuncture sessions; and Group B - 43 patients underwent 10 sham weekly acupuncture sessions, followed by a 3-week washout period and 10 real weekly acupuncture sessions. Patients used short- and long-acting β-2 agonists and inhaled corticosteroids when necessary. Prior to treatment and after each period of 10 treatment sessions, the patients were evaluated for spirometry, induced sputum cell count, exhaled nitric oxide (NO) and with the Short Form 36 (SF-36) and Questionnaire on Quality of Life-Asthma (QQLA) questionnaires. Daily peak flow and symptom diaries were registered. The level of significance adopted was 5% (α=0.05). RESULTS: In Group B, after real acupuncture, there was a decrease in eosinophils (p=0.035) and neutrophils (p=0.047), an increase in macrophages (p=0.001) and an improvement in peak flow (p=0.01). After sham acupuncture treatment, patients experienced less coughing (p=0.037), wheezing (p=0.013) and dyspnea (p=0.014); similarly, after real acupuncture, patients reported less coughing (p=0.040), wheezing (p=0.012), dyspnea (p<0.001) and nocturnal awakening episodes (p=0.009). In Group A, there was less use of rescue medication (p=0.043). After the sham procedure, patients in Group A experienced less coughing (p=0.007), wheezing (p=0.037), dyspnea (p<0.001) and use of rescue medication (p<0.001) and after real acupuncture, these patients showed improvements in functional capacity (p=0.004), physical aspects (p=0.002), general health status (p<0

  19. Cytokine Changes following Acute Ethanol Intoxication in Healthy Men: A Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Skulberg, Andreas; Skulberg, Knut Ragnvald; Aass, Hans Christian D.; Bramness, Jørgen G.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol is a known modulator of the innate immune system. Owing to the absence of human studies, alcohol's effect on circulating cytokine profile remains unclear. We investigated the effect of acute high dose alcohol consumption on systemic cytokine release. After an overnight fasting, alcohol-experienced healthy male volunteers (N = 20) aged 25–45 years were given oral ethanol in the form of vodka (4.28 mL/kg) which they drank over a period of 30 minutes reaching peak blood alcohol concentration of 0.12% (SD 0.028). Blood samples were obtained prior to alcohol intake as well as 2, 7, and 12 hours thereafter. Serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and TNF-α were determined by the multibead-based assay. Baseline cytokine levels were not related to BMI, hepatic parameters, electrolytes, glucose, or morning cortisol levels. Within 2 hours of alcohol intake, levels of IL-1Ra were elevated and remained so throughout the assessment period (p for trend = 0.015). In contrast, the levels of the chemokine MCP-1 dropped acutely followed by steadily increasing levels during the observation period (p < 0.001). The impact of sustained elevated levels of MCP-1 even after the clearance of blood alcohol content deserves attention. PMID:28090151

  20. Ambient Ozone Concentrations and the Risk of Perforated and Nonperforated Appendicitis: A Multicity Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanyingoh, Divine; Dixon, Elijah; Johnson, Markey; Wheeler, Amanda J.; Myers, Robert P.; Bertazzon, Stefania; Saini, Vineet; Madsen, Karen; Ghosh, Subrata; Villeneuve, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Environmental determinants of appendicitis are poorly understood. Past work suggests that air pollution may increase the risk of appendicitis. Objectives: We investigated whether ambient ground-level ozone (O3) concentrations were associated with appendicitis and whether these associations varied between perforated and nonperforated appendicitis. Methods: We based this time-stratified case-crossover study on 35,811 patients hospitalized with appendicitis from 2004 to 2008 in 12 Canadian cities. Data from a national network of fixed-site monitors were used to calculate daily maximum O3 concentrations for each city. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate city-specific odds ratios (ORs) relative to an interquartile range (IQR) increase in O3 adjusted for temperature and relative humidity. A random-effects meta-analysis was used to derive a pooled risk estimate. Stratified analyses were used to estimate associations separately for perforated and nonperforated appendicitis. Results: Overall, a 16-ppb increase in the 7-day cumulative average daily maximum O3 concentration was associated with all appendicitis cases across the 12 cities (pooled OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.13). The association was stronger among patients presenting with perforated appendicitis for the 7-day average (pooled OR = 1.22; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.36) when compared with the corresponding estimate for nonperforated appendicitis [7-day average (pooled OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.09)]. Heterogeneity was not statistically significant across cities for either perforated or nonperforated appendicitis (p > 0.20). Conclusions: Higher levels of ambient O3 exposure may increase the risk of perforated appendicitis. PMID:23842601

  1. Bean and rice meals reduce postprandial glycemic response in adults with type 2 diabetes: a cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Around the world, beans and rice are commonly consumed together as a meal. With type 2 diabetes increasing, the effect of this traditional diet pattern on glycemic response has not been studied fully. Methods We evaluated the glycemic response of bean and rice traditional meals compared to rice alone in adults with type 2 diabetes. Seventeen men and women with type 2 diabetes controlled by metformin (n = 14) or diet/exercise (n = 3) aged 35–70 years participated in the randomized 4 × 4 crossover trial. The white long grain rice control, pinto beans/rice, black beans/rice, red kidney beans/rice test meals, matched for 50 grams of available carbohydrate, were consumed at breakfast after a 12 hour fast. Capillary blood glucose concentrations at baseline and at 30 minute intervals up to 180 minutes postprandial were collected. MANOVA for repeated measures established glucose differences between treatments. Paired t tests identified differences between bean types and the rice control following a significant MANOVA. Results Postprandial net glucose values were significantly lower for the three bean/rice treatments in contrast to the rice control at 90, 120 and 150 minutes. Incremental area under the curve values were significantly lower for the pinto and black bean/rice meals compared to rice alone, but not for kidney beans. Conclusions Pinto, dark red kidney and black beans with rice attenuate the glycemic response compared to rice alone. Promotion of traditional foods may provide non-pharmaceutical management of type 2 diabetes and improve dietary adherence with cultural groups. Trial registration Clinical Trials number NCT01241253 PMID:22494488

  2. Combined effects of aerobic exercise and l-arginine ingestion on blood pressure in normotensive postmenopausal women: A crossover study.

    PubMed

    Puga, Guilherme M; de P Novais, Iane; Katsanos, Christos S; Zanesco, Angelina

    2016-04-15

    After menopause the incidence of cardiovascular diseases increases in women. A decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability has been pointed out to play a major role in this phenomenon. Since it is believed that l-arginine administration could improve NO bioavailability, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of acute l-arginine administration associated with aerobic exercise on blood pressure (BP), redox state and inflammatory biomarkers in normotensive postmenopausal women (NPW). Sixteen volunteers (57±6yr) were subjected to four experimental sessions (crossover design): arginine+exercise (A-E); arginine (ARG); exercise+placebo (EXE); control (CON). Each session was initiated with either 9g of l-arginine ingestion (ARG or A-E days), placebo (EXE day), or nothing (CON day). The participants performed 30min of aerobic exercise (A-E and EXE days) or sitting rest (CON and ARG days). Blood samples were collected before each session and 45min after the intervention. Office BP and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) were evaluated. NO/cGMP pathway, redox state and inflammatory biomarkers were measured. Systolic BP decreased during the 24-hour in A-E and EXE sessions. However, diastolic BP reduced only in A-E session. No changes were found in the biomarkers concentrations. In conclusion, the association was effective in lowering diastolic BP in NPW. Additionally, physical exercise alone promoted a long lasting effect on systolic BP measured by ABPM in this population, although this beneficial effect was not associated with changes in the cardio-inflammatory biomarkers. Possibly, other factors such as neural influences could be mediating this effect.

  3. A cross-over study with the two novel dopaminergic drugs cabergoline and quinagolide in hyperprolactinemic patients.

    PubMed

    Giusti, M; Porcella, E; Carraro, A; Cuttica, M; Valenti, S; Giordano, G

    1994-01-01

    Cabergoline and quinagolide, two new dopamine agonist drugs with long-lasting activity, are currently under investigation for the treatment of hyperprolactinemia. At present, studies comparing these drugs for tolerability and efficacy in the same patients are lacking. It was our aim to make such a comparison in an open randomized cross-over trial. Cabergoline (0.5 mg twice weekly) and quinagolide (75 micrograms once daily) were given orally. Each drug was administered for 12 weeks. Treatment with the second drug was started after the recurrence of hyperprolactinemia. Twelve women with hyperprolactinemia due to idiopathic disease (n = 6), microprolactinoma (n = 5) or postsurgical empty sella (n = 1) were evaluated. Six women were amenorrheic and 6 were oligomenorrheic. Ten had spontaneous or provoked galactorrhea. Baseline characteristics (age, clinical signs and PRL levels) of patients initially allocated to the two treatment groups were similar. Nine patients completed both treatment cycles and PRL levels were lower under cabergoline (10.7 +/- 3.7 micrograms/L) than under quinagolide (25.0 +/- 7.7 micrograms/L; p < 0.05). One patient discontinued cabergoline because of dryness of the eyes after having completed the quinagolide cycle and 2 patients initially treated with cabergoline discontinued quinagolide because of gastrointestinal symptoms. After completion of the first treatment cycle, the time of recurrence of hyperprolactinemia was significantly longer after cabergoline (14 +/- 7 weeks) than after quinagolide (5 +/- 1 weeks; p < 0.05). At week 12, normal PRL levels (< 20 micrograms/L) were observed in 10 and 6 women during cabergoline and quinagolide, respectively. Only one case was resistant to both drugs. The clinical effects of the two treatments were similar.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Tablet computers with mobile electronic medical records enhance clinical routine and promote bedside time: a controlled prospective crossover study.

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, Robert; Duhm, Julian; Hupperts, Hagen; Brandt, Stephan A

    2015-03-01

    Demographic changes require physicians to deliver needed services with fewer resources. Neurology as an interdisciplinary domain involves complex diagnostic procedures and time-consuming data handling. Tablet PCs might streamline clinical workflow through mobile access to patient data. This study examined the impact of tablets running an electronic medical record on ward round performance. We hypothesised that tablet use should reduce ward round time and decrease the time needed to check medical records thereby increasing physicians' bedside availability. Nine resident neurologists participated in a controlled prospective crossover trial over 14 weeks. In the experimental condition, tablets were used in addition to the established medical record. In the control condition, physicians used established systems only. The combined primary outcome measure included changes in total ward round time and relative time shifts between associated work processes. The secondary outcome measure was physicians' time required to check a medical record vs. physicians' bedside time. There was a significant main effect on the primary outcome measure (p = 0.01). Tablet use accelerated preparing (p = 0.004) and post-processing (p < 0.001) of ward rounds. Time for conducting ward rounds was unaffected (p = 0.19). Checking medical records was faster with tablets (p = 0.001) increasing physicians' bedside time (p < 0.001). Tablet use led to significant time savings during preparing and post-processing of ward rounds. It was further associated with time savings during checking medical data and an increase in physicians' bedside time. Tablets may facilitate clinical data handling and promote workflow.

  5. A High Protein Diet Has No Harmful Effects: A One-Year Crossover Study in Resistance-Trained Males

    PubMed Central

    Ellerbroek, Anya; Silver, Tobin; Vargas, Leonel; Tamayo, Armando; Buehn, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of a high protein diet over a one-year period. Fourteen healthy resistance-trained men completed the study (mean ± SD; age 26.3 ± 3.9 yr; height 178.5 ± 8.4 cm; and average years of training 8.9 ± 3.4 yr). In a randomized crossover design, subjects consumed their habitual or normal diet for 2 months and 4 months and alternated that with a higher protein diet (>3 g/kg/d) for 2 months and 4 months. Thus, on average, each subject was on their normal diet for 6 months and a higher protein diet for 6 months. Body composition was assessed via the Bod Pod®. Each subject provided approximately 100–168 daily dietary self-reports. During the subjects' normal eating phase, they consumed (mean ± SD) 29.94 ± 5.65 kcals/kg/day and 2.51 ± 0.69 g/kg/day of protein. This significantly increased (p < 0.05) during the high protein phase to 34.37 ± 5.88 kcals/kg/day and 3.32 ± 0.87 g/kg/day of protein. Our investigation discovered that, in resistance-trained men that consumed a high protein diet (~2.51–3.32 g/kg/d) for one year, there were no harmful effects on measures of blood lipids as well as liver and kidney function. In addition, despite the total increase in energy intake during the high protein phase, subjects did not experience an increase in fat mass. PMID:27807480

  6. A two-way cross-over bioequivalence study comparing two products of diclofenac sodium suppositories in healthy human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mazen; Otoom, Sameer; Najib, Naji; Sallam, El-Sayed

    2004-12-01

    This report presents the results of two treatment cross-over investigations on 20 healthy male volunteers to assess the bioequivalence of two suppository products of diclofenac sodium. The study was carried out under US Food and Drug Administration Guidelines. The two products were voltaren (100 mg) suppository (Ciba-Giegy), as a reference product, and Inflaban (100 mg) suppository (The Arab Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Company, Ltd. "APM"), as a test product. Both products were administered rectally as a single dose (100 mg) separated by a one-week wash-out period. Following drug administration, blood samples were collected over 12 hr, and serum harvested from the blood was analyzed for diclofenac sodium using a sensitive and specific high performance liquid chromatographic assay. The results of this investigation indicated that there were no statistically significant differences between the two products in either the mean concentration-time profiles or in the obtained pharmacokinetic parameters, including area under the serum concentration-time curve for 12 hr (AUC(0-12h)), lag time between product administration and first appearance of the drug in serum (T(lag)), peak serum concentration (C(max)), and time to reach this peak serum concentration (T(max)). Concerning the relative extent of absorption, assessed by the AUC ratio (Inflaban/Voltaren) for 12 hr, the average value was found to be 1.00+/-0.09 with a 95% confidence limits (C.L.) of 0.82-1.18. Thus, these findings clearly indicate that the two products are bioequivalent in terms of rate and extent of drug absorption.

  7. Estimated personal soot exposure is associated with acute myocardial infarction onset in a case-crossover study.

    PubMed

    von Klot, Stephanie; Cyrys, Josef; Hoek, Gerard; Kühnel, Brigitte; Pitz, Mike; Kuhn, Ulrike; Kuch, Bernhard; Meisinger, Christa; Hörmann, Allmut; Wichmann, H-Erich; Peters, Annette

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigates the association of estimated personal exposure to traffic-related air pollution and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Cases of AMI were interviewed in the Augsburg KORA Myocardial Infarction Registry from February 1999 through December 2003, and 960 AMI survivors were included in the analyses. The time-varying component of daily personal soot exposure (the temporally variable contribution due to the daily area level of exposure and daily personal activities) was estimated using a linear combination of estimated mean ambient soot concentration, time spent outdoors, and time spent in traffic. The association of soot exposure with AMI onset was estimated in a case-crossover analysis controlling for temperature and day of the week using conditional logistic regression analyses. Estimated personal soot exposure was associated with AMI (relative risk, 1.30 per 1.1 m(-1) × 10(-5) [95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.55]). Estimated ambient soot and measured ambient PM(2.5) particulate matter 2.5 µm and smaller in aerodynamic diameter were not significantly associated with AMI onset. Our results suggest that an increase in risk of AMI in association with personal soot exposure may be in great part due to the contribution of personal soot from individual times spent in traffic and individual times spent outdoors. As a consequence, estimates calculated based on measurements at urban background stations may be underestimations. Health effects of traffic-related air pollution may need to be updated, taking into account individual time spent in traffic and outdoors, to adequately protect the public.

  8. Effects of nitrazepam on nocturnal scratching in adults with atopic dermatitis: a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study.

    PubMed

    Ebata, T; Izumi, H; Aizawa, H; Kamide, R; Niimura, M

    1998-04-01

    We investigated the effect of nitrazepam on nocturnal scratching in 10 adult out-patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) using a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover method. Patients were given either nitrazepam (Benzalin tablets containing 5 mg nitrazepam) or a placebo on 3 successive nights, with a washout interval of 4 days. We used an infrared video camera to identify bouts of scratching lasting more than 5 s. These were counted and the duration of all the bouts of scratching (total scratching time, TST) was calculated. The percentage of TST to total recording time (TST%) was used as an index of nocturnal scratching. The frequency with which bouts of scratching (bouts/h) occurred was reduced by 10 mg nitrazepam (7.7 +/- 3.6 with nitrazepam vs. 9.6 +/- 3.6 with placebo, P < 0.05). However, the mean duration (s/bout) of the bouts of scratching was longer with 10 mg nitrazepam (32.3 +/- 23.4 with nitrazepam vs. 19.1 +/- 10.0 with placebo, P < 0.05). As a result, there was no significant difference between TST% (6.5 +/- 4.2 with nitrazepam vs. 5.4 +/- 3.8 with placebo, not significant). All the above values are mean +/- SD. The degree of itching and the condition of the AD did not change during the 2 weeks of the study. We conclude that taking 10 mg nitrazepam is not an effective way of reducing the total duration of nocturnal scratching in AD patients, although it decreases the frequency with which bouts of nocturnal scratching occur.

  9. A case-crossover study of transient risk factors for occupational acute hand injury

    PubMed Central

    Sorock, G; Lombardi, D; Hauser, R; Eisen, E; Herrick, R; Mittleman, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: Workers with acute hand injuries account for over 1 000 000 emergency department visits annually in the United States. Aims: To determine potential transient risk factors for occupational acute hand injury. Methods: Subjects were recruited from 23 occupational health clinics in five northeastern states in the USA. In a telephone interview, subjects were asked to report the occurrence of seven potential risk factors within a 90-minute time period before an acute hand injury. Each case also provided control information on exposures during the month before the injury. The self-matched feature of the study design controlled for stable between-person confounders. Results: A total of 1166 subjects were interviewed (891 men, 275 women), with a mean age (SD) of 37.2 years (11.4). The median time interval between injury and interview was 1.3 days. Sixty three per cent of subjects had a laceration. The relative risk of a hand injury was increased when working with equipment, tools, or work pieces not performing as expected (11.0, 95% CI 9.4 to 12.8), or when using a different work method to do a task (10.5, 95% CI 8.7 to 12.7). Other transient factors in decreasing order of relative risk were doing an unusual task, being distracted, and being rushed. Wearing gloves reduced the relative risk by 60% (0.4, 95% CI 0.3 to 0.5). Occupational category, job experience, and safety training were found to alter several of these effects. Conclusion: The results suggest the importance of these transient, potentially modifiable factors in the aetiology of acute hand injury at work. Attempts to modify these exposures by various strategies may reduce the incidence of acute hand injury at work. PMID:15031387

  10. Mössbauer spectroscopic study on spin crossover coordination polymer Fe(3-Clpy)2[Pd(CN)4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Takafumi; Sekiya, Madoka; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Takahashi, Masashi

    2016-12-01

    57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopic results on the alternatively prepared spin crossover coordination polymer Fe(3-Clpy)2Pd(CN)4 sample I agree with those of SQUID data. Mössbauer specrum at RT shows two diffrent doublets which correspond to the HS1(inner doublet) and HS2(outer doublet). The intensity of the HS1 doublet decreases on cooling to 78 K at the expense of a new one featuring the LS singlet. Almost 100 % of HS1 change to LS singlet due to iron(II) ions coordinated by four N atoms of cyano groups and two N atoms of 3-Clpy ligand in the sample I. The SQUID data of the sample I prepared by a new direct contact method are different from those of the already reported Fe(3-Clpy)2Pd(CN)4 sample. The differences of the SQUID data are associated with particle size effects in molecule spin crossover samples.

  11. Efficacy and safety of prolonged-release melatonin in insomnia patients with diabetes: a randomized, double-blind, crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Garfinkel, Doron; Zorin, Mariana; Wainstein, Julio; Matas, Zipora; Laudon, Moshe; Zisapel, Nava

    2011-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a major comorbidity in insomnia patients. The efficacy and safety of prolonged-release melatonin 2 mg in the treatment of glucose, lipid metabolism, and sleep was studied in 36 type 2 diabetic patients with insomnia (11 men, 25 women, age 46–77 years). Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, crossover study, the subjects were treated for 3 weeks (period 1) with prolonged-release melatonin or placebo, followed by a one-week washout period, and then crossed over for another 3 weeks (period 2) of treatment with the other preparation. All tablets were taken 2 hours before bedtime for a period of 3 weeks. In an extension period of 5 months, prolonged-release melatonin was given nightly to all patients in an open-label design. Sleep was objectively monitored in a subgroup of 22 patients using wrist actigraphy. Fasting glucose, fructosamine, insulin, C-peptide, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and some antioxidants, as well as glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels were measured at baseline and at the end of the study. All concomitant medications were continued throughout the study. Results: No significant changes in serum glucose, fructosamine, insulin, C-peptide, antioxidant levels or blood chemistry were observed after 3 weeks of prolonged-release melatonin treatment. Sleep efficiency, wake time after sleep onset, and number of awakenings improved significantly with prolonged-release melatonin as compared with placebo. Following 5 months of prolonged-release melatonin treatment, mean HbA1c (±standard deviation) was significantly lower than at baseline (9.13% ± 1.55% versus 8.47% ± 1.67%, respectively, P = 0.005). Conclusion: Short-term use of prolonged-release melatonin improves sleep maintenance in type 2 diabetic patients with insomnia without affecting glucose and lipid metabolism. Long-term prolonged-release melatonin administration has a beneficial effect on HbA1c, suggesting

  12. The pharmacodynamic equivalence of levothyroxine and liothyronine. A randomized, double blind, cross-over study in thyroidectomized patients

    PubMed Central

    Celi, Francesco S.; Zemskova, Marina; Linderman, Joyce D.; Babar, Nabeel I.; Skarulis, Monica C.; Csako, Gyorgy; Wesley, Robert; Costello, Rene; Penzak, Scott R.; Pucino, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Summary Context The substitution of liothyronine (l-T3) for levothyroxine (l-T4) is commonly employed during thyroid hormone (TH) withdrawal in preparation for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on thyroid cancer patients. Presently, only limited data are available on the l-T3 for l-T4 therapeutic substitution. Objective To characterize the pharmcodynamic equivalence of l-T3 and l-T4. Design Randomized, double-blind, cross-over intervention study. Setting NIH Clinical Center. Patients 10 thyroidectomized patients. Interventions Study participants were treated with l-T3 or l-T4 with a target TSH ≥0.5≤1.5 mU/l for at least 30 days before undergoing inpatient testing. Following testing, subjects crossed-over according to the same scheme. Main outcome measures Area under the serum concentration-time curve of TSH from 0 to 60 minutes (AUC 0-60) and peak TSH serum concentration (Cmax) following thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulation test, total l-T4 and l-T3 dose (mcg/kg), and l-T4/l-T3 ratio. Results No difference was observed for time 0 TSH values between l-T3 and l-T4 replacement phases (1.48± 0.77 vs. 1.21± 0.62 mU/l, p=0.293) at average daily doses of 40.3±11.3 mcg lT-3 and 115.2±38.5 mcg lT-4, l-T3: l-T4 ratio 0.36±0.06. TRH stimulation test resulted in similar l-T3 vs.l-T4 TSH responses with AUC 0-60 of 326.1 (95% CI 232.6-457.1) and 247.1 (95% CI 153.8-397.1) mU*min /l (p=0.285); and Cmax of 6.83 (95% CI 4.88-9.55) and 5.23 (95% CI 3.31-8.3) mU/l (p=0.383). Conclusions This is the first study addressing the equivalency between l-T3 and l-T4 therapy measured by baseline and TRH-stimulated TSH. The therapeutic substitution of l-T3 for l-T4 was achieved at approximately 1:3 ratio. PMID:20447070

  13. Effects of indacaterol versus tiotropium on exercise tolerance in patients with moderate COPD: a pilot randomized crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Berton, Danilo Cortozi; dos Santos, Álvaro Huber; Bohn, Ivo; de Lima, Rodrigo Quevedo; Breda, Vanderléia; Teixeira, Paulo José Zimermann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To compare a once-daily long-acting β2 agonist (indacaterol 150 µg) with a once-daily long-acting anticholinergic (tiotropium 5 µg) in terms of their effects on exercise endurance (limit of tolerance, Tlim) in patients with moderate COPD. Secondary endpoints were their effects on lung hyperinflation, exercise-related dyspnea, and daily-life dyspnea. Methods: This was a randomized, single-blind, crossover pilot study involving 20 patients (mean age, 60.9 ± 10.0 years; mean FEV1, 69 ± 7% of predicted). Spirometric parameters, Transition Dyspnea Index scores, Tlim, and exertional dyspnea were compared after three weeks of each treatment (with a one-week washout period between treatments). Results: Nineteen patients completed the study (one having been excluded because of COPD exacerbation). Improvement in Tlim from baseline tended to be greater after treatment with tiotropium than after treatment with indacaterol (96 ± 163 s vs. 8 ± 82 s; p = 0.06). Tlim significantly improved from baseline after treatment with tiotropium (having increased from 396 ± 319 s to 493 ± 347 s; p = 0.010) but not after treatment with indacaterol (having increased from 393 ± 246 to 401 ± 254 s; p = 0.678). There were no differences between the two treatments regarding improvements in Borg dyspnea scores and lung hyperinflation at "isotime" and peak exercise. There were also no significant differences between treatments regarding Transition Dyspnea Index scores (1.5 ± 2.1 vs. 0.9 ± 2.3; p = 0.39). Conclusions: In patients with moderate COPD, tiotropium tends to improve Tlim in comparison with indacaterol. No significant differences were observed between the two treatments regarding their effects on lung hyperinflation, exercise-related dyspnea, and daily-life dyspnea. Future studies, including a larger number of patients, are required in order to confirm our findings and explore mechanistic explanations. (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01693003 [http

  14. Intake of kale suppresses postprandial increases in plasma glucose: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Sumio; Suzuki, Asahi; Kurokawa, Mihoko; Hasumi, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Kale (Brassica oleracea var. acephala), a vegetable in the family Brassicaceae, has beneficial effects on health, including hypoglycemic effects. In our previous study with a limited number of subjects, intake of kale-containing food at a dose of 14 g decreased postprandial plasma glucose levels. In the present study, the effective dose of kale-containing food was investigated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. The trial was conducted on 42 Japanese subjects aged 21–64 years with fasting plasma glucose levels of ≤125 mg/dl and 30-min postprandial plasma glucose levels of 140–187 mg/dl. The subjects consumed placebo or kale-containing food [7 or 14 g; low-dose (active-L) or high-dose (active-H) kale, respectively] together with a high-carbohydrate meal. At 30–120 min after the test meal intake, the plasma levels of glucose and insulin were determined. The postprandial plasma glucose levels in subjects with intake of active-L or active-H were significantly lower than those in subjects with intake of placebo, with the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax; 163±24 mg/dl for active-L and 162±23 mg/dl for active-H compared with 176±26 mg/dl for placebo [values presented as means ± standard deviation (SD); P<0.01]. The area under the plasma glucose concentration-time curve for 0–2 h (AUC0–2 h) values (means ± SD) were significantly lower for active-L (268±43 mg/h/dl) and active-H (266±42 mg/h/dl) than for the placebo (284±43 mg/h/dl; P<0.05). No significant differences were identified in the postprandial plasma insulin levels between the three conditions. No adverse events associated with intake of either dose of kale were observed. Our findings suggest that intake of kale suppresses postprandial increases in plasma glucose levels at a single dose of 7 g, and that a dose as high as 14 g is safe. PMID:27882216

  15. Intake of kale suppresses postprandial increases in plasma glucose: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Sumio; Suzuki, Asahi; Kurokawa, Mihoko; Hasumi, Keiji

    2016-11-01

    Kale (Brassica oleracea var. acephala), a vegetable in the family Brassicaceae, has beneficial effects on health, including hypoglycemic effects. In our previous study with a limited number of subjects, intake of kale-containing food at a dose of 14 g decreased postprandial plasma glucose levels. In the present study, the effective dose of kale-containing food was investigated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. The trial was conducted on 42 Japanese subjects aged 21-64 years with fasting plasma glucose levels of ≤125 mg/dl and 30-min postprandial plasma glucose levels of 140-187 mg/dl. The subjects consumed placebo or kale-containing food [7 or 14 g; low-dose (active-L) or high-dose (active-H) kale, respectively] together with a high-carbohydrate meal. At 30-120 min after the test meal intake, the plasma levels of glucose and insulin were determined. The postprandial plasma glucose levels in subjects with intake of active-L or active-H were significantly lower than those in subjects with intake of placebo, with the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax; 163±24 mg/dl for active-L and 162±23 mg/dl for active-H compared with 176±26 mg/dl for placebo [values presented as means ± standard deviation (SD); P<0.01]. The area under the plasma glucose concentration-time curve for 0-2 h (AUC0-2 h) values (means ± SD) were significantly lower for active-L (268±43 mg/h/dl) and active-H (266±42 mg/h/dl) than for the placebo (284±43 mg/h/dl; P<0.05). No significant differences were identified in the postprandial plasma insulin levels between the three conditions. No adverse events associated with intake of either dose of kale were observed. Our findings suggest that intake of kale suppresses postprandial increases in plasma glucose levels at a single dose of 7 g, and that a dose as high as 14 g is safe.

  16. Elastic Tape Improved Shoulder Joint Position Sense in Chronic Hemiparetic Subjects: A Randomized Sham-Controlled Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Matheus Bragança; Desloovere, Kaat; Russo, Thiago Luiz

    2017-01-01

    Background Elastic tape has been widely used in clinical practice in order to improve upper limb (UL) sensibility. However, there is little evidence that supports this type of intervention in stroke patients. Objective To verify the effect of elastic tape, applied to the paretic shoulder, on joint position sense (JPS) during abduction and flexion in subjects with chronic hemiparesis compared to sham tape (non-elastic tape). Furthermore, to verify if this potential effect is correlated to shoulder subluxation measurements and sensorimotor impairment. Methods A crossover and sham-controlled study was conducted with post-stroke patients who were randomly allocated into two groups: 1) those who received Sham Tape (ST) first and after one month they received Elastic Tape (ET); 2) those who received Elastic Tape (ET) first and after one month they received Sham Tape (ST). The JPS was evaluated using a dynamometer. The absolute error for shoulder abduction and flexion at 30° and 60° was calculated. Sensorimotor impairment was determined by Fugl-Meyer, and shoulder subluxation was measured using a caliper. Results Thirteen hemiparetic subjects (average time since stroke 75.23 months) participated in the study. At baseline (before interventions), the groups were not different for abduction at 30° (p = 0.805; p = 0.951), and 60° (p = 0.509; p = 0.799), or flexion at 30° (p = 0.872; p = 0.897) and 60° (p = 0.853; p = 0.970). For the ET group, differences between pre and post-elastic tape for abduction at 30° (p<0.010) and 60° (p<0.010), and flexion at 30° p<0.010) and 60° (p<0.010) were observed. For the ST group, differences were also observed between pre and post-elastic tape for abduction at 30° (p<0.010) and 60° (p<0.010), and flexion at 30° (p<0.010,) and 60° (p<0.010). Potential effects were only correlated with shoulder subluxation during abduction at 30° (p = 0.001, r = -0.92) and 60° (p = 0.020, r = -0.75). Conclusion Elastic tape improved shoulder

  17. Relationship of Buckling and Knee Injury to Pain Exacerbation in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Web-Based Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Zobel, Isabelle; Erfani, Tahereh; Bennell, Kim L; Makovey, Joanna; Metcalf, Ben; March, Lyn; Zhang, Yuqing; Eckstein, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most frequent causes of limited mobility and diminished quality of life. Pain is the main symptom that drives individuals with knee OA to seek medical care and a recognized antecedent to disability and eventually joint replacement. Evidence shows that patients with symptomatic OA experience fluctuations in pain severity. Mechanical insults to the knee such as injury and buckling may contribute to pain exacerbation. Objective Our objective was to examine whether knee injury and buckling (giving way) are triggers for exacerbation of pain in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Methods We conducted a case-crossover study, a novel methodology in which participants with symptomatic radiographic knee OA who have had knee pain exacerbations were used as their own control (self-matched design), with all data collected via the Internet. Participants were asked to log-on to the study website and complete an online questionnaire at baseline and then at regular 10-day intervals for 3 months (control periods)—a total of 10 questionnaires. They were also instructed to go to the website and complete pain exacerbation questionnaires when they experienced an isolated incident of knee pain exacerbation (case periods). A pain exacerbation “case” period was defined as an increase of ≥2 compared to baseline. At each contact the pain exacerbation was designated a case period, and at all other regular 10-day contacts (control periods) participants were asked about knee injuries during the previous 7 days and knee buckling during the previous 2 days. The relationship of knee injury and buckling to the risk of pain exacerbation was examined using conditional logistic regression models. Results The analysis included 157 participants (66% women, mean age: 62 years, mean BMI: 29.5 kg/m2). Sustaining a knee injury was associated with experiencing a pain exacerbation (odds ratio [OR] 10.2, 95% CI 5.4, 19.3) compared with no injury. Knee

  18. Is there a synergic effect of propafenone associated with atrial overdrive pacing for atrial arrhythmia prevention? A randomised crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Garrigue, S; Barold, S; Cazeau, S; Hocini, M; Jais, P; Haissaguerre, M; Clementy, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the effect of adding propafenone to atrial overdrive for the prevention of atrial arrhythmia episodes in patients with DDD pacemakers.
DESIGN—22 patients (8 female, 14 male, mean (SD) age 67 (9) years, range 48 to 77) with DDD pacemakers and frequent paroxysmal atrial arrhythmia episodes were evaluated in a randomised crossover study.
SETTING—University hospital.
METHODS—Atrial overdrive was defined as a paced rate of 10 paced beats/min above the mean ventricular rate stored for the last 24 hours in the pacemaker memory function. The protocol consisted of two phases of one month each. The first phase consisted of atrial overdrive alone, while in the second phase, propafenone (600 mg/day) was added to atrial overdrive (atrial overdrive + propafenone). All 22 patients underwent the two phases in random order.
RESULTS—Mean ventricular rate was 72 (8) beats/min with atrial overdrive v 73 (6) with atrial overdrive + propafenone (NS). With atrial overdrive, 14 patients (64.6%) had no recorded atrial arrhythmia v 15 (68.2%) with atrial overdrive + propafenone (NS). There was no statistical difference between the atrial overdrive and atrial overdrive + propafenone phases with regard to the number of atrial arrhythmia episodes (14 (27) v 13 (28)), their total duration (30 (78) v 29 (63) h), and their maximum duration (41 (72) v 31 (58) min). However, in the brady-tachy subgroup with persistent atrial arrhythmias, atrial overdrive + propafenone produced a shorter mean cumulative duration of atrial arrhythmia than atrial overdrive (104 (115) v 178 (149) h, p = 0.04), with a significant decrease in the number of atrial arrhythmia episodes (134 (98) v 102 (83), p = 0.05). The proportion of asymptomatic atrial arrhythmia episodes increased only in the AV block group during atrial overdrive + propafenone (p = 0.03). Three patients had atrial arrhythmias during atrial overdrive + propafenone but not

  19. Melatonin treatment effects on adolescent students' sleep timing and sleepiness in a placebo-controlled crossover study.

    PubMed

    Eckerberg, Berndt; Lowden, Arne; Nagai, Roberta; Akerstedt, Torbjörn

    2012-11-01

    During the last few decades, the incidence of sleep-onset insomnia, due to delay of circadian phase, has increased substantially among adolescents all over the world. We wanted to investigate whether a small dose of melatonin given daily, administered in the afternoon, could advance the sleep timing in teenagers. Twenty-one students, aged 14-19 yrs, with sleep-onset difficulties during school weeks were recruited. The study was a randomized, double blind, placebo (PL)-controlled crossover trial, lasting 5 wks. During the first 6 d in wks 2 and 4, the students received either PL or melatonin (1 mg) capsules between 16:30 and 18:00 h. During the first 6 d of wk 5, all students received melatonin. Wks 1 and 3 were capsule-free. In the last evening of each week and the following morning, the students produced saliva samples at home for later melatonin analysis. The samples were produced the same time each week, as late as possible in the evening and as early as possible in the morning. Both the student and one parent received automatic mobile text messages 15 min before saliva sampling times and capsule intake at agreed times. Diaries with registration of presumed sleep, subjective sleepiness during the day (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale, KSS) and times for capsule intake and saliva samplings were completed each day. Primary analysis over 5 wks gave significant results for melatonin, sleep and KSS. Post hoc analysis showed that reported sleep-onset times were advanced after melatonin school weeks compared with PL school weeks (p < .005) and that sleep length was longer (p < .05). After the last melatonin school week, the students fell asleep 68 min earlier and slept 62 min longer each night compared with the baseline week. Morning melatonin values in saliva diminished compared with PL (p < .001) and evening values increased (p < .001), indicating a possible sleep phase advance. Compared with PL school weeks, the students reported less wake up (p < .05), less school

  20. Erratum to: Extracranial contamination in the INVOS 5100C versus the FORE-SIGHT ELITE cerebral oximeter: a prospective observational crossover study in volunteers.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Steven; Murphy, Glenn; Shear, Torin; Patel, Aashka; Simpson, Andrew; Szokol, Joseph; Avram, Michael J; Vender, Jeffery

    2016-04-01

    In the article entitled: "Extracranial contamination in the INVOS 5100C versus the FORE-SIGHT ELITE cerebral oximeter: a prospective observational crossover study in volunteers" published in the January 2016 issue of theJournal, Can J Anesth 2016; 63: 24-30, in the second column of page 29, the second to last sentence of the first paragraph should read: "Another study by Sorenson et al. examined 15 healthy males under different physiologic conditions". The publisher apologizes most sincerely for this error.

  1. Design, analysis, and presentation of crossover trials

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Edward J; Chan, An-Wen; Wu, Ping; Vail, Andy; Guyatt, Gordon H; Altman, Douglas G

    2009-01-01

    Objective Although crossover trials enjoy wide use, standards for analysis and reporting have not been established. We reviewed methodological aspects and quality of reporting in a representative sample of published crossover trials. Methods We searched MEDLINE for December 2000 and identified all randomized crossover trials. We abstracted data independently, in duplicate, on 14 design criteria, 13 analysis criteria, and 14 criteria assessing the data presentation. Results We identified 526 randomized controlled trials, of which 116 were crossover trials. Trials were drug efficacy (48%), pharmacokinetic (28%), and nonpharmacologic (30%). The median sample size was 15 (interquartile range 8–38). Most (72%) trials used 2 treatments and had 2 periods (64%). Few trials reported allocation concealment (17%) or sequence generation (7%). Only 20% of trials reported a sample size calculation and only 31% of these considered pairing of data in the calculation. Carry-over issues were addressed in 29% of trial's methods. Most trials reported and defended a washout period (70%). Almost all trials (93%) tested for treatment effects using paired data and also presented details on by-group results (95%). Only 29% presented CIs or SE so that data could be entered into a meta-analysis. Conclusion Reports of crossover trials frequently omit important methodological issues in design, analysis, and presentation. Guidelines for the conduct and reporting of crossover trials might improve the conduct and reporting of studies using this important trial design. PMID:19405975

  2. The Effects of Milnacipran on Sleep Disturbance in Fibromyalgia: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Two-Way Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mansoor; Aamir, Rozina; Jishi, Zahra; Scharf, Martin B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the effects of milnacipran on polysomnographic (PSG) measures of sleep and subjective complaints in patients with fibromyalgia and disturbed sleep. Methods: This was a single-site, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-period crossover PSG study. Eligible subjects (aged 28–72 y) were randomized (1:1) to milnacipran (100 mg/d) or placebo for crossover period 1, and vice versa for period 2. Each crossover period comprised a dose-escalation and dose-maintenance phase, with a 2-w taper/washout between periods. In-laboratory PSGs were collected at baseline, and at the end of each treatment period. The primary endpoints were the difference in PSG-recorded wake after sleep onset (WASO), number of awakenings after sleep onset (NAASO), and sleep efficiency (SE) between 4 w of maintenance treatment with milnacipran and placebo. Other PSG measures, subject-rated sleep, fatigue, physical functioning, and pain were assessed. Post hoc analysis was performed in subjects showing at least 25% reduction in pain from baseline in the Brief Pain Inventory Score (responders). Results: Of 19 subjects randomized, 15 completed both periods. Subjects treated with milnacipran showed no significant improvements in WASO and NAASO, but showed reduced SE (p = 0.049). Milnacipran did not show significant improvement in other PSG parameters or subjective endpoints. Two thirds of completers met responder criteria and additionally showed a significant improvement in daily effect of pain (p = 0.043) and subjective sleep quality (p = 0.040). Conclusion: The data suggest that milnacipran is not sedating in most patients with fibromyalgia and improvements in sleep are likely a result of pain improvement. Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT01234675 Citation: Ahmed M, Aamir R, Jishi Z, Scharf MB. The effects of milnacipran on sleep disturbance in fibromyalgia: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-way crossover study. J Clin Sleep

  3. Effect of meal composition on postprandial lipid concentrations and lipoprotein particle numbers: A randomized cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Meena; Jaffery, Manall; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Franklin, Brian; Oliver, Jonathan; Mitchell, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Background It is unclear how high-protein (HP) and high-monounsaturated fat (HMF) meals affect postprandial blood lipids and lipoprotein particle numbers (LPN). Purpose To compare a HP versus a HMF meal on postprandial lipid and LPN responses. Methods Twenty-four participants (age: 36.3±15.0 years; body mass index: 23.6±2.0 kg/m2; 45.8% female) were fed a HP (31.9% energy from protein) and a HMF (35.2% fat and 20.7% monounsaturated fat) meal in a randomized cross-over trial design. Energy and carbohydrate content were the same across meals. Blood samples were drawn in the fasting state and 3 hour postprandial state, and assessed for lipids and LPN. Results Repeated measures analysis showed a significant (p<0.05) treatment by time interaction effect for triglycerides (TG), the primary variable, total high-density lipoprotein particles (T-HDLP) and T-HDLP minus large-buoyant high-density lipoprotein 2b (T-HDLP—LB-HDL2b). HP versus HMF condition led to significantly lower TG at 120 (geometric mean: 90.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 76.4–106.3) vs. 146.5 (124.2–172.9) mg/dL) and 180 (101.4 (83.1–123.8) vs. 148.7 (121.9–181.4) mg/dL) min and higher T-HDLP at 120 (mean difference: 297.3 (95% CI: 48.6–545.9) nmol/L) and 180 (291.6 (15.8–567.5) nmol/L) min. The difference in T-HDLP by condition was due to the significantly higher small-dense HDLP (T-HDLP—LB-HDL2b) during HP versus HMF condition at 120 (mean difference: 452.6 (95% CI: 177.4–727.9) nmol/L) and 180 (496.8 (263.1–730.6) nmol/L) min. Area under the curve analysis showed that HP versus HMF condition led to significantly lower TG, non-HDLP, and very-low-density lipoprotein particles (VLDLP) responses but significantly less favorable responses in LB-HDL2b particles, T-HDLP—LB-HDL2b, and LB-HDL2b/T-HDLP ratio. Conclusion The HP meal led to lower TG, non-HDLP, and VLDLP but less favorable LB-HDL2b, small-dense HDLP, and LB-HDL2b/T-HDLP ratio responses versus a HMF meal. Further studies are

  4. A matched crossover design for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Simon, Laura J; Chinchilli, Vernon M

    2007-09-01

    Two design principles are used frequently in clinical trials: 1) A subject is "matched" or "paired" with a similar subject to reduce the chance that other variables obscure the primary comparison of interest. 2) A subject serves as his/her own control by "crossing over" from one treatment to another during the course of an experiment. There are situations in which it may be advantageous to use the two design principles - crossing over and matching - simultaneously. That is, it may be advantageous to conduct a "paired crossover design," in which each subject, while paired with a similar subject, crosses over and receives each experimental treatment. In this paper, we describe two clinical trials conducted by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's Asthma Clinical Research Network that used a paired 2x2 crossover design. The Beta Adrenergic Response by GEnotype (BARGE) Study compared the effects of regular use of inhaled albuterol on mildly asthmatic patients with different genotypes at the 16th position of the beta-agonist receptor gene. The Smoking Modulates Outcomes of Glucocorticoid (SMOG) Therapy in Asthma Study evaluated the hypothesis that smoking reduces the response to inhaled corticosteroids. For such paired crossover designs, the primary parameter of interest is typically the treatment-by-pairing interaction term. In evaluating the relative efficiency of the paired 2x2 crossover design to two independent crossover designs with respect to this interaction term, we show that the paired 2x2 crossover design is more efficient if the correlations between the paired members on the same treatments are greater than their correlations on different treatments. This condition should hold in most circumstances, and therefore the paired crossover design deserves serious consideration for any clinical trial in which the crossing over and matching of subjects is deemed simultaneously beneficial.

  5. Spin-crossover molecule based thermoelectric junction

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Dibyajyoti; Parida, Prakash; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-05-11

    Using ab-initio numerical methods, we explore the spin-dependent transport and thermoelectric properties of a spin-crossover molecule (i.e., iron complex of 2-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-(1H-tetrazole-5-yl)pyridine) based nano-junction. We demonstrate a large magnetoresistance, efficient conductance-switching, and spin-filter activity in this molecule-based two-terminal device. The spin-crossover process also modulates the thermoelectric entities. It can efficiently switch the magnitude as well as spin-polarization of the thermocurrent. We find that thermocurrent is changed by ∼4 orders of magnitude upon spin-crossover. Moreover, it also substantially affects the thermopower and consequently, the device shows extremely efficient spin-crossover magnetothermopower generation. Furthermore, by tuning the chemical potential of electrodes into a certain range, a pure spin-thermopower can be achieved for the high-spin state. Finally, the reasonably large values of figure-of-merit in the presence and absence of phonon demonstrate a large heat-to-voltage conversion efficiency of the device. We believe that our study will pave an alternative way of tuning the transport and thermoelectric properties through the spin-crossover process and can have potential applications in generation of spin-dependent current, information storage, and processing.

  6. Effects on Occupants of Enhanced Particle Filtration in a non-problem office environment: A Double-Blind Crossover Intervention Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mendell, M.J.; Fisk, W.J.; Petersen, M.; Hines, C.J.; Faulkner, D.; Deddens, J.A.; Dong, M.X.; Ruder, A.M.; Sullivan, D.; Boenigner, M.F.

    1998-06-15

    Workers in indoor environments often complain of symptoms, such as eye and nose irritation, headache, and fatigue, which improve away from work. Exposures causing such complaints, sometimes referred to as sick building syndrome, generally have not been identified. Evidence suggests these worker symptoms are related to chemical, microbiological, physical, and psychosocial exposures not well characterized by current methods. Most research in this area has involved cross-sectional studies, which are limited in their abilities to show causal connections. Experimental studies have also been conducted which, by changing one factor at a time to isolate its effects, can demonstrate benefits of an environmental intervention even before exposures or mechanisms are understood. This study was prompted by evidence that particulate contaminants may be related to acute occupant symptoms and discomfort. The objective was to assess, with a double-blind, double crossover intervention design, whether improved removal of small airborne particles by enhanced central filtration would reduce symptoms and discomfort.

  7. Pancreatic enzyme supplementation as acid-resistant microspheres versus enteric-coated granules in cystic fibrosis. A double placebo-controlled cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, W; Heilmann, C; Garne, S

    1987-01-01

    In order to compare the efficacy of pancreatic enzyme supplementation as pH-sensitive enteric-coated microspheres Pancrease to that of conventional supplementation with enteric-coated Pancreatin in cystic fibrosis, a double blind cross-over study was conducted. Eleven patients under 12 years of age received each of the enzyme preparations for four weeks. Treatment efficacy was evaluated by means of a symptom score card recording stool frequency, consistency, colour, odour, abdominal cramps and appetite as well as a 3 days fat absorption test. Weight increments were recorded 3 months before the study when patients were on Pancreatin, and 3 months after the study when patients were on Pancrease. In eight of the patients fat absorption was improved on Pancrease, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. However, the patients experienced significantly less dyspeptic symptoms, decreased stool frequency, better appetite and increments in weight were significantly higher on Pancrease compared to Pancreatin.

  8. Stress Crossover in Newlywed Marriage: A Longitudinal and Dyadic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Lisa A.; Karney, Benjamin R.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of stress and marital quality often assess stress as an intrapersonal phenomenon, examining how spouses' stress may influence their own relationship well-being. Yet spouses' stress also may influence partners' relationship evaluations, a phenomenon referred to as stress crossover. This study examined stress crossover, and conditions that…

  9. A Case-Crossover Study between Fine Particulate Matter Elemental Composition and Emergency Admission with Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhijun; Zhou, Yuqing; Lu, Yao; Duan, Yizhu; Tang, Xiaohong; Deng, Qihong; Yuan, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Background It is generally understood that Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) can cause high blood pressure. However, it remains unclear whether there is a relationship between the elemental composition of PM2.5 and cardiovascular disease in emergency department patients. Methods Crossover design for time stratified cases and conditional logistic regression were used to analyze the correlation between emergency admissions for cerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, TIA (Transient ischemic attack), coronary heart disease and PM2.5, concentrations of chemical element compositions, and Particulate Matter 10 (PM10) in Changsha city. Results When the temperature, atmosphere pressure, maximum wind speed, NO2 and SO2 were adjusted, the OR (Odd Ratio) of cerebral hemorrhage was 1.177 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.006-1.376, p = 0.04] with every10 μg/m3 increase of PM2.5. PM10 was unrelated to cardiovascular emergencies (p > 0.05). In addition, with each additional IQR (Interquartile Range) increase of Ni, Zn and Pb concentrations in PM2.5, the values of OR were 1.826 (95% CI: 1.031-3.233), 1.568 (95% CI: 1.015-2.423) and 1.682 (95% CI: 1.010-2.800), respectively. Conclusions Concentration rises of nickel, zinc and lead elements for PM2.5 in Changsha city were related to the increase of emergency admissions with cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:28115809

  10. Investigations of botanicals on food intake, satiety, weight loss, and oxidative stress: a study protocol of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Stephen D.; Shuster, Jonathan; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-01-01

    Background Botanicals represent an important and underexplored source of potential new therapies that may facilitate caloric restriction and thereby produce long-term weight loss. In particular, one promising botanical that may reduce food intake and body weight by affecting neuroendocrine pathways related to satiety is Garcinia cambogia (Garcinia cambogia Desr.)-derived (−)-hydroxycitric acid (HCA). Methods and Design The objective of this article is to describe the protocol of a clinical trial designed to directly test the effect that Garcinia cambogia-derived HCA has on food intake, satiety, weight loss, and oxidative stress levels, and to serve as a model for similar trials. A total of 48 healthy, overweight and obese individuals (body mass index; BMI range = 25.0 – 39.9) between the ages of 50 to 70 will participate in this double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study designed to examine the effects of two doses of Garcinia cambogia-derived HCA on food intake, satiety, weight loss, and oxidative stress levels. This trial will take place at the University of Florida (UF)’s Aging and Rehabilitation Research Center (ARRC) and UF Clinical Research Center (CRC). Food intake represents the primary outcome measure and is calculated based on the total calories consumed at breakfast, lunch, and dinner meals during each test meal day at the CRC. This study can be completed with far fewer subjects than a parallel design. Discussion Of the numerous botanical compounds, the compound Garcinia cambogia-derived HCA was selected for testing in the present study because of its potential to safely reduce food intake, body weight, and oxidative stress levels. We will review potential mechanisms of action and safety parameters throughout this clinical trial, which is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under NCT01238887. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier: NCT01238887). PMID:22088584

  11. Analgesic activity of fixed dose combinations of paracetamol with diclofenac sodium and paracetamol with tramadol on different pain models in healthy volunteers - A randomized double blind crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Sachidanand; Shah, Rima; Sharma, D C

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate and compare the analgesic activity of fixed dose combinations (FDC) of Paracetamol with Diclofenac sodium and Paracetamol with Tramadol on different human pain models in healthy human volunteers. Materials and Methods: A randomized double blind crossover study was carried out in 30 healthy human volunteers using three pain models; cold-water stress test, radiant heat method, and BP cuff inflation method. The subjects were randomized into two groups of 15 each, group A received FDC of Paracetamol 500 mg with Diclofenac sodium 50 mg and group B was given a FDC of Paracetamol 375 mg and Tramadol 50 mg. All the volunteers were tested on three pain models. Observations for pain tolerance were recorded at baseline and at the interval of 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after drug administration. Crossover was done after a washout period of 7 days. The results of both the study periods were analyzed using an independent t-test. Results: Mean age of the participants was 23±1 years and the male:female ratio was 2:1. In the radiant heat method, paracetamol with tramadol combination treatment showed a significant increase in pain tolerance at 2 hours and 3 hours (P 0.028 and 0.055 respectively) compared to paracetamol with diclofenac combination. Other two pain models did not show any significant difference in the study groups. Conclusion: Paracetamol with tramadol combination was more effective than paracetamol with diclofenac sodium combination on the radiant heat model. In human pain models, there is an incomplete understanding of mechanisms and activated pathways are not precisely determined that needs further evaluation. PMID:23225925

  12. A prospective, randomized crossover study comparing direct inspection by light microscopy versus projected images for teaching of hematopathology to medical students.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Aaron M; McPhail, Ellen D; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Schroeder, Georgene; Wolanskyj, Alexandra P

    2014-01-01

    Instruction in hematopathology at Mayo Medical School has evolved from instructor-guided direct inspection under the light microscope (laboratory method), to photomicrographs of glass slides with classroom projection (projection method). These methods have not been compared directly to date. Forty-one second-year medical students participated in this pilot study, a prospective, randomized, crossover study measuring educational performance during a hematology pathophysiology course. The students were randomized to one of two groups. All students received the same didactic lectures in the classroom and subsequent case-based review of peripheral blood smears using either laboratory or projection methods, on day one with a crossover to the other method on day two. Pre- and post-test examinations centered on morphology recognition measured educational performance on each day, followed by a questionnaire identifying the student's favored method. There was no significant difference in the pre-test and post-test scores between the two teaching methods (rank-sum P = 0.43). Students overwhelmingly preferred the projection method and perceived it as superior (76%), although post-test scores were not significantly different. Student's recommended method was split with 50% favoring the projection method, 43% favoring a combined approach, and 23% noting logistical challenges to the laboratory. In this study, the laboratory and projection method were equivalent in terms of educational performance for hematopathology among medicals students. A classroom-based approach such as the projection method is favored, given the large class sizes in undergraduate medical education, as well as the ergonomic challenges and additional resources required for large group instruction in a laboratory setting.

  13. Comparative effects of atenolol and clonidine on polygraphically recorded sleep in hypertensive men: a randomized, double-blind, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Danchin, N; Genton, P; Atlas, P; Anconina, J; Leclere, J; Cherrier, F

    1995-01-01

    The effects on sleep of atenolol and clonidine were compared in 8 hypertensive men (mean age 46.9 years, range 16-56 years) without prior history of sleep disturbances. Polygraphic sleep recordings were performed at baseline (NO) and after a single oral dose of atenolol (100 mg) or clonidine (0.15 mg) at 6:00 pm at a 48-hour interval in a double-blind randomized crossover protocol. Both medications lowered arterial pressure to a similar extent. The subjective quality of sleep was judged satisfactory after both medications, the number of patients reporting dreams decreased from 5 (NO) to 1 after each treatment night. Total sleep time decreased slightly but not significantly after atenolol (440 +/- 63 min vs 474 +/- 47 min at baseline). Sleep latency was not affected after atenolol but significantly decreased after clonidine (16.9 +/- 21.6 vs 28.6 +/- 16.6 at baseline, p < 0.02). Although rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep time decreased after atenolol (71 +/- 30 min vs 95 +/- 30 min at baseline, p < 0.05), the percentage of REM sleep was unchanged (22 +/- 7% vs 23 +/- 5%). In contrast, clonidine strikingly reduced both REM sleep time (54 +/- 28 min vs 95 +/- 30 min at baseline, p < 0.002) and percentage of REM sleep (14 +/- 6% vs 23 +/- 5%, p < 0.0005). Thus atenolol tends to decrease total sleep time but does not affect the normal architecture of sleep, clonidine has a marked hypnotic effect, similar to that of some sedative medications and significantly reduces REM sleep.

  14. Intranasal Glucagon for Treatment of Insulin-Induced Hypoglycemia in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: A Randomized Crossover Noninferiority Study

    PubMed Central

    Rickels, Michael R.; Ruedy, Katrina J.; Piché, Claude A.; Dulude, Hélène; Sherr, Jennifer L.; Tamborlane, William V.; Bethin, Kathleen E.; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Wadwa, R. Paul; Ahmann, Andrew J.; Haller, Michael J.; Nathan, Brandon M.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Meng, Linyan; Beck, Roy W.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Treatment of severe hypoglycemia with loss of consciousness or seizure outside of the hospital setting is presently limited to intramuscular glucagon requiring reconstitution immediately prior to injection, a process prone to error or omission. A needle-free intranasal glucagon preparation was compared with intramuscular glucagon for treatment of insulin-induced hypoglycemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS At eight clinical centers, a randomized crossover noninferiority trial was conducted involving 75 adults with type 1 diabetes (mean age, 33 ± 12 years; median diabetes duration, 18 years) to compare intranasal (3 mg) versus intramuscular (1 mg) glucagon for treatment of hypoglycemia induced by intravenous insulin. Success was defined as an increase in plasma glucose to ≥70 mg/dL or ≥20 mg/dL from the glucose nadir within 30 min after receiving glucagon. RESULTS Mean plasma glucose at time of glucagon administration was 48 ± 8 and 49 ± 8 mg/dL at the intranasal and intramuscular visits, respectively. Success criteria were met at all but one intranasal visit and at all intramuscular visits (98.7% vs. 100%; difference 1.3%, upper end of 1-sided 97.5% CI 4.0%). Mean time to success was 16 min for intranasal and 13 min for intramuscular (P < 0.001). Head/facial discomfort was reported during 25% of intranasal and 9% of intramuscular dosing visits; nausea (with or without vomiting) occurred with 35% and 38% of visits, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Intranasal glucagon was highly effective in treating insulin-induced hypoglycemia in adults with type 1 diabetes. Although the trial was conducted in a controlled setting, the results are applicable to real-world management of severe hypoglycemia, which occurs owing to excessive therapeutic insulin relative to the impaired or absent endogenous glucagon response. PMID:26681725

  15. EP3/FP dual receptor agonist ONO-9054 administered morning or evening to patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension: results of a randomised crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Michael S; Rowe-Rendleman, Cheryl; Ahmed, Ike; Ross, Douglas T; Fujii, Akifumi; Ouchi, Takafumi; Quach, Christine; Wood, Andrew; Ward, Caroline L

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims The novel prostaglandin E (EP) 3 and prostaglandin F (FP) receptor agonist ONO-9054 is effective in lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with ocular hypertension and open-angle glaucoma when administered once daily. This study compares the effects of morning (AM) versus evening (PM) dosing of ONO-9054 on tolerability and IOP lowering. Methods This was a single-centre, randomised, double-masked, two-sequence, placebo-controlled crossover study in 12 subjects with bilateral primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Two 14-day crossover regimens were separated by a 2-week washout: ONO-9054 (1 drop to each eye) in the morning (07:00) and vehicle in the evening (19:00) and vice versa. IOP was measured multiple times during select days. Ocular examinations also evaluated safety and tolerability. Results Mild ocular hyperaemia, reported by six subjects with PM dosing, was the most frequent adverse event. Mild to moderate dryness was also slightly more frequent after PM dosing. Maximum IOP reduction from baseline occurred on day 2 with decreases from baseline of −7.4 mm Hg (−30.8%) for AM dosing and −9.1 mm Hg, (−38.0%) for PM dosing; after 14 days, mean reduction in IOP was −6.8 mm Hg (−28.6%) for AM dosing and −7.5 mm Hg (−31.0%) for PM dosing. Conclusions PM dosing of ONO-0954 was associated with a slightly increased frequency of mild hyperaemia and mild to moderate dryness. Both dosing schedules provided sustained reduction in IOP. Trial registration number NCT01670266. PMID:26453641

  16. Bioequivalence study of two formulations of enalapril, at a single oral dose of 20 mg (tablets): A randomized, two-way, open-label, crossover study in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Portolés, Antonio; Terleira, Ana; Almeida, Susana; García-Arenillas, Mar; Caturla, Mari-Cruz; Filipe, August; Vargas, Emilio

    2004-01-01

    Background: Enalapril maleate is the monoethyl ester prodrug of enalapril- at, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor indicated in the management of essential and renovascular hypertension, and in the treatment of congestive heart failure and in asymptomatic patients with left ventricular dysfunction and an ejection fraction of ≥35%. Enalapril has little pharmacologic activity until hydrolyzed in vivo to enalaprilat. Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the bioavailability and tolerability of 2 commercial brands (test and reference formulations) of enalapril tablets (20 mg), described as the rate and extent of absorption of the active moiety, to assess their bioequivalence. Methods: This single-dose, randomized, 2-way, open-label, crossover study in healthy volunteers aged 18 to 40 years was conducted at the Clinical Pharmacology Study Unit, Hospital Clínico San Carlos (Madrid, Spain). Subjects were randomized to receive (under fasting conditions) either the test or reference formulation of enalapril (20-mg tablet) at study period 1 and the opposite formulation at study period 2. Study periods were separated by a washout period of at least 7 days. During each study period, 15 plasma extractions were made to determine enalapril and enalaprilat plasma concentrations and to calculate the pharmacokinetic (PK) properties (maximal plasma drug concentration [Cmax], time to Cmax [Tmax], area under the plasma concentration-time curve [AUC] to the last measurable concentration [AUCt], AUC from time 0 to infinity [AUC0−∞], mean residence time, and elimination half-life [tl2]) of both. Physical examination, subject interview, laboratory analyses, electrocardiogram, and blood pressure (BP) were used to assess tolerability. Results: Twenty-four subjects were included in the study (12 men, 12 women; mean [SD] age, 22.8 [2.2] years [range, 19–30 years]). Of these, 1 subject (4.2%) withdrew from the study for personal reasons; thus, PK and statistical

  17. Experimental study of crossover from capillary to viscous fingering for supercritical CO2 - water displacement in a homogeneous pore network

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Changyong; Wei, Ning; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Li, Xiaochun; Bonneville, Alain

    2012-06-05

    Carbon sequestration in saline aquifers involves displacing resident brine from the pore space by supercritical CO2 (scCO2 ). The displacement process is considered unstable due to the unfavorable viscosity ratio (logM < 0). The unstable mechanisms that affect scCO2 - water displacement under reservoir conditions (i.e., 41 °C, 9 MPa) were investigated in a homogeneous micromodel. A wide range of injection rates (logCa = -7.61~-4.73) was studied in two sets of experiments: discontinuous-rate injection, where the micromodel was first cleaned and saturated with water before each injection rate was imposed, and continuous-rate injection, where the rate was increased after quasi-steady conditions were reached for a certain rate. For the discontinuous-rate experiments, capillary fingering and viscous fingering are the dominant mechanisms for low (logCa <= -6.61) and high injection rates (logCa >= -5.21), respectively. Crossover from capillary to viscous fingering was observed for logCa = -5.91~-5.21, resulting in a large decrease in scCO2 saturation. The discontinuous-rate experimental results confirmed the decrease in nonwetting fluid saturation during crossover from capillary to viscous fingering predicted by numerical simulations by Lenormand et al. (1988).1 Capillary fingering was the only mechanism that dominates all injection rates in the continuous-rate experiment, and resulted in monotonic increase in scCO2 saturation.

  18. Inhibition of sweet chemosensory receptors alters insulin responses during glucose ingestion in healthy adults: a randomized crossover interventional study.

    PubMed

    Karimian Azari, Elnaz; Smith, Kathleen R; Yi, Fanchao; Osborne, Timothy F; Bizzotto, Roberto; Mari, Andrea; Pratley, Richard E; Kyriazis, George A

    2017-04-01

    Background: Glucose is a natural ligand for sweet taste receptors (STRs) that are expressed on the tongue and in the gastrointestinal tract. Whether STRs directly contribute to the regulation of glucose homeostasis in response to glucose ingestion is unclear.Objective: We sought to determine the metabolic effects of the pharmacologic inhibition of STRs in response to an oral glucose load in healthy lean participants.Design: Ten healthy lean participants with a body mass index (in kg/m(2)) of 22.4 ± 0.8 were subjected to an oral-glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) on 4 separate days with the use of a randomized crossover design. Ten minutes before the 75-g OGTT, participants consumed a preload solution of either 300 parts per million (ppm) saccharin or water with or without the addition of 500 ppm lactisole, a human-specific inhibitor of STRs. When present, lactisole was included in both the preload and OGTT solutions. We assessed plasma responses of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2, gastric inhibitory peptide, acetaminophen, and 3-O-methylglucose. With the use of mathematical modeling, we estimated gastric emptying, glucose absorption, β-cell function, insulin sensitivity and clearance, and the portal insulin:glucagon ratio.Results: The addition of lactisole to the OGTT caused increases in the plasma responses of insulin (P = 0.012), C-peptide (P = 0.004), and the insulin secretory rate (P = 0.020) compared with the control OGTT. The addition of lactisole also caused a slight reduction in the insulin sensitivity index independent of prior saccharin consumption (P < 0.025). The ingestion of saccharin before the OGTT did not alter any of the measured variables but eliminated the effects of lactisole on the OGTT.Conclusion: The pharmacologic inhibition of STRs in the gastrointestinal tract alters insulin responses during an oral glucose challenge in lean healthy participants. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT

  19. Efficacy of ethanol-based hand foams using clinically relevant amounts: a cross-over controlled study among healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Foams containing 62% ethanol are used for hand decontamination in many countries. A long drying time may reduce the compliance of healthcare workers in applying the recommended amount of foam. Therefore, we have investigated the correlation between the applied amount and drying time, and the bactericidal efficacy of ethanol foams. Methods In a first part of tests, four foams (Alcare plus, Avagard Foam, Bode test foam, Purell Instant Hand Sanitizer) containing 62% ethanol, which is commonly used in U.S. hospitals, were applied to 14 volunteers in a total of seven variations, to measure drying times. In a second part of tests, the efficacy of the established amount of foam for a 30 s application time of two foams (Alcare plus, Purell Instant Hand Sanitizer) and water was compared to the EN 1500 standard of 2 × 3 mL applications of 2-propanol 60% (v/v), on hands artificially contaminated with Escherichia coli. Each application used a cross-over design against the reference alcohol with 15 volunteers. Results The mean weight of the applied foam varied between 1.78 and 3.09 g, and the mean duration to dryness was between 37 s and 103 s. The correlation between the amount of foam applied and time until hands felt dry was highly significant (p < 0.001; Pearson's correlation coefficient: 0.724; 95% confidence interval: 0.52-0.93). By linear correlation, 1.6 g gave an intercept of a 30 s application time. Application of 1.6 g of Purell Instant Hand Sanitizer (mean log10-reduction: 3.05 ± 0.45) and Alcare plus (3.58 ± 0.71) was significantly less effective than the reference disinfection (4.83 ± 0.89 and 4.60 ± 0.59, respectively; p < 0.001). Application of 1.6 g of water gave a mean log10-reduction of 2.39 ± 0.57. Conclusions When using 62% ethanol foams, the time required for dryness often exceeds the recommended 30 s. Therefore, only a small volume is likely to be applied in clinical practice. Small amounts, however, failed to meet the efficacy

  20. Numerical simulation of bromine crossover behavior in flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yaobin; Cheng, Shijian; Chu, Dandan; Li, Xin

    2017-03-01

    Br2 and HBr has its own series of advantages as the positive electrolyte solution, so some batteries select the Br2/Br- as the positive electrolyte solution, such as sodium polysulfide/bromine flow battery, zinc/bromine flow battery, vanadium/ bromine flow batteries and hydrogen/bromine flow batteries. But the crossover benavior of bromine occurs in these batteries too, resulting in cross-contamination, capacity loss and affecting battery's performance. In this work, we build numerical models to study the influence of bromine crossover phenomenon on the three forms of bromine crossover, the concentration of electrolyte on the cathode side and the flow rate of the negative side in the quinone bromine flow battery, to find the main models affecting the bromine crossover and the impact of bromine crossover on battery performance. It was found that the three ways of crossover through the membranes was mainly by diffusion. By reducing the concentration of positive electrolyte solution, the bromine crossover can be reduced and Coulomb Efficiency can be improved. Rising the flow rate of the electrolyte solution on the negative side and reducing the differential between positive side's pressure and negative side's pressure can also reduce the amount of bromine crossover to improve Coulomb efficiency in the battery.

  1. Altered Crossover Distribution and Frequency in Spermatocytes of Infertile Men with Azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Ren, He; Ferguson, Kyle; Kirkpatrick, Gordon; Vinning, Tanya; Chow, Victor; Ma, Sai

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair to facilitate the exchange of DNA at crossover sites along the chromosomes. The frequency and distribution of crossover formation are tightly regulated to ensure the proper progression of meiosis. Using immunofluorescence techniques, our group and others have studied the meiotic proteins in spermatocytes of infertile men, showing that this population displays a reduced frequency of crossovers compared to fertile men. An insufficient number of crossovers is thought to promote chromosome missegregation, in which case the faulty cell may face meiotic arrest or contribute to the production of aneuploid sperm. Increasing evidence in model organisms has suggested that the distribution of crossovers may also be important for proper chromosome segregation. In normal males, crossovers are shown to be rare near centromeres and telomeres, while frequent in subtelomeric regions. Our study aims to characterize the crossover distribution in infertile men with non-obstructive (NOA) and obstructive azoospermia (OA) along chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. Eight of the 16 NOA men and five of the 21 OA men in our study displayed reduced crossover frequency compared to control fertile men. Seven NOA men and nine OA men showed altered crossover distributions on at least one of the chromosome arms studied compared to controls. We found that although both NOA and OA men displayed altered crossover distributions, NOA men may be at a higher risk of suffering both altered crossover frequencies and distributions compared to OA men. Our data also suggests that infertile men display an increase in crossover formation in regions where they are normally inhibited, specifically near centromeres and telomeres. Finally, we demonstrated a decrease in crossovers near subtelomeres, as well as increased average crossover distance to telomeres in infertile men. As telomere-guided mechanisms are speculated to play a role in crossover formation in subtelomeres, future

  2. Experience and challenges presented by a multicenter crossover study of combination analgesic therapy for the treatment of painful HIV-associated polyneuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Taylor; Miyahara, Sachiko; Lee, Anthony; Evans, Scott; Bastow, Barbara; Simpson, David; Gilron, Ian; Dworkin, Robert; Daar, Eric S.; Wieclaw, Linda; Clifford, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is limited evidence for efficacy of analgesics as monotherapy for neuropathic pain associated with HIV-associated polyneuropathies, in spite of demonstrated efficacy in other neuropathic pain conditions. We evaluated the tolerability and analgesic efficacy of duloxetine, methadone, and the combination of duloxetine-methadone compared to placebo. Design This study was a phase II, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, four-period crossover multi-center study of analgesic therapy for patients with at least moderate neuropathic pain due to HIV-associated polyneuropathy. Duloxetine, methadone, combination duloxetine-methadone, and placebo were administered in four different possible sequences. The primary outcome measure was mean pain intensity (MPI) measured daily in a study-supplied pain diary. Results A total of 15 patients were enrolled from 8 study sites and 8 patients completed the entire trial. Study treatments failed to show statistically significant change in MPI compared to placebo. Adverse events were frequent and associated with high rates of drug discontinuation and study drop-out. Conclusions Challenges with participant recruitment and poor retention precluded trial completion to its planned targets, limiting our evaluation of the analgesic efficacy of the study treatments. Challenges to successful completion of this study and lessons learned are discussed. PMID:23565581

  3. What's Mine Is Yours: The Crossover of Day-Specific Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Angela; Sonnentag, Sabine; Niessen, Cornelia; Unger, Dana

    2012-01-01

    This diary study examines the daily crossover of self-esteem within working couples. By integrating self-esteem research into the crossover framework, we hypothesized that the day-specific self-esteem experienced by one partner after work crosses over to the other partner. Furthermore, we proposed that this daily crossover process is moderated by…

  4. Is saliva suitable as a biological fluid in relative bioavailability studies? Analysis of its performance in a 4 x 2 replicate crossover design.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, M Esperanza; Fagiolino, Pietro; de Buschiazzo, Perla M; Volonté, M Guillermina

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of saliva as a biological fluid in relative bioavailability (RBA) studies, with the focus on the statistical design and data variability. A randomized, open-label, four periods and two sequences (4 × 2) crossover RBA study in saliva of two phenytoin (PHT) 100 mg immediate-release capsules was performed. PHT is a narrow therapeutic index drug that has been widely used for epilepsy treatment for many years. Published information regarding its bioavailability is available, but plasma assessed. This study was designed and performed using saliva as the biological fluid and the simplest conditions that produce coherent results with previously published plasma studies. Pharmacokinetic parameters (C (max), T (max), AUC(0-t ), AUC(0-inf), C (max)/AUC(0-t ), K (e), and t (1/2)) for each volunteer at each period were calculated. Four different BE calculations were performed: individual bioequivalence, by the method of moments, and three average bioequivalence with data averaged over the two administrations and with data of periods 1-2 and 3-4. ANOVA calculation showed no significant subject-by-formulation interaction, period and sequence effects. The intra-subject variabilities were at least 20-fold lower than the inter-subject ones for C (max), AUC(0-t ) and AUC(0-inf). In all four BE calculations, the 90% CIs for the T/R ratios of studied pharmacokinetics parameters fell within the 80-125% range proposed by most regulatory agencies.

  5. Whole-grain wheat breakfast cereal has a prebiotic effect on the human gut microbiota: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Costabile, Adele; Klinder, Annett; Fava, Francesca; Napolitano, Aurora; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Leonard, Clare; Gibson, Glenn R; Tuohy, Kieran M

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an inverse association between dietary intake of whole grains and the risk of chronic disease. This may be related to the ability to mediate a prebiotic modulation of gut microbiota. However, no studies have been conducted on the microbiota modulatory capability of whole-grain (WG) cereals. In the present study, the impact of WG wheat on the human intestinal microbiota compared to wheat bran (WB) was determined. A double-blind, randomised, crossover study was carried out in thirty-one volunteers who were randomised into two groups and consumed daily 48 g breakfast cereals, either WG or WB, in two 3-week study periods, separated by a 2-week washout period. Numbers of faecal bifidobacteria and lactobacilli (the target genera for prebiotic intake), were significantly higher upon WG ingestion compared with WB. Ingestion of both breakfast cereals resulted in a significant increase in ferulic acid concentrations in blood but no discernible difference in faeces or urine. No significant differences in faecal SCFA, fasting blood glucose, insulin, total cholesterol (TC), TAG or HDL-cholesterol were observed upon ingestion of WG compared with WB. However, a significant reduction in TC was observed in volunteers in the top quartile of TC concentrations upon ingestion of either cereal. No adverse intestinal symptoms were reported and WB ingestion increased stool frequency. Daily consumption of WG wheat exerted a pronounced prebiotic effect on the human gut microbiota composition. This prebiotic activity may contribute towards the beneficial physiological effects of WG wheat.

  6. BounceBack™ capsules for reduction of DOMS after eccentric exercise: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Udani, Jay K; Singh, Betsy B; Singh, Vijay J; Sandoval, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Background Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is muscle pain and discomfort experienced approximately one to three days after exercise. DOMS is thought to be a result of microscopic muscle fiber tears that occur more commonly after eccentric exercise rather than concentric exercise. This study sought to test the efficacy of a proprietary dietary supplement, BounceBack™, to alleviate the severity of DOMS after standardized eccentric exercise. Methods The study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Ten healthy community-dwelling untrained subjects, ranging in age from 18–45 years, were enrolled. Mean differences within and between groups were assessed inferentially at each data collection time-point using t-tests for all outcome measures. Results In this controlled pilot study, intake of BounceBack™ capsules for 30 days resulted in a significant reduction in standardized measures of pain and tenderness post-eccentric exercise compared to the placebo group. There were trends towards reductions in plasma indicators of inflammation (high sensitivity C-reactive protein) and muscle damage (creatine phosphokinase and myoglobin). Conclusion BounceBack™ capsules were able to significantly reduce standardized measures of pain and tenderness at several post-eccentric exercise time points in comparison to placebo. The differences in the serological markers of DOMS, while not statistically significant, appear to support the clinical findings. The product appears to have a good safety profile and further study with a larger sample size is warranted based on the current results. PMID:19500355

  7. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of sertraline (Zoloft) for the treatment of hot flashes in women with early stage breast cancer taking tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Kimmick, Gretchen G; Lovato, James; McQuellon, Richard; Robinson, Emily; Muss, Hyman B

    2006-01-01

    We observed the relief of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors taking tamoxifen and treated with sertraline for depression. Our objective was to assess the effect of sertraline on the frequency and severity of hot flashes, mood status, and health-related quality of life. We used a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study using 6 weeks of sertraline (50 mg each morning) versus placebo. Study participants were 62 breast cancer survivors from an oncology clinic in a tertiary care center on adjuvant tamoxifen reporting bothersome hot flashes. Patients were asked to keep a daily hot flash diary to record hot flash frequency and severity, from which hot flash scores (frequency x severity) were calculated. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies depression scale and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy--Breast (FACT-B) (at baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks) were used to assess mood and quality of life. Sixty-two women were accrued. Forty-seven women (median age 53.9 years, range 36.6-77.1 years; 89% postmenopausal; 85.5% Caucasian) completed the first 6 weeks and 39 completed 12 weeks. The baseline daily hot flash frequency and score were 5.8 (standard deviation 4.1) and 11.5 (14.0), respectively. At the end of the first 6 weeks, hot flash frequency decreased by 50% in 36% of those taking sertraline compared to 27% taking placebo. In the crossover analysis, sertraline was significantly more effective than placebo: women crossing from placebo to sertraline had a decrease (-0.9 and -1.7) in hot flash frequency and score, whereas those crossing from sertraline to placebo had an increase (1.5 and 3.4) in hot flash frequency and score (p = 0.03 and 0.03). Forty-eight percent preferred the sertraline period, 11% preferred the placebo period, and 41% had no preference (p = 0.006). Measures of depression and quality of life were within normal range and did not change significantly within treatment groups. Sertraline decreases hot flashes in breast cancer

  8. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to evaluate analgesic activity of Terminalia chebula in healthy human volunteers using a mechanical pain model

    PubMed Central

    Pokuri, Venkata Kishan; Kumar, Chiranjeevi Uday; Pingali, Usharani

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: To evaluate analgesic activity and safety of single oral dose (1000 mg) of Terminalia chebula using a mechanical pain model in healthy human volunteers. Material and Methods: Twelve healthy volunteers were randomized to receive either single oral dose of 2 capsules of T. chebula 500 mg each or identical placebo capsules in a double-blinded manner. Mechanical pain was assessed using Ugo basile analgesy meter (Randall–Selitto test) before and 3 h after administration of test drug. The parameters evaluated were pain threshold force and time; pain tolerance force and time. A washout period of 1-week was given for crossover between active drug and placebo. Results: Terminalia chebula significantly increased the mean percentage change for pain threshold force and time, and pain tolerance force and time compared to placebo (P < 0.001). The mean percentage change for pain threshold force and time (20.8% and 21.0%) was increased more than that of pain tolerance force and time (13.4% and 13.4%). No adverse drug reaction was reported with either of the study medications during the study period. Conclusion: T. chebula significantly increased pain threshold and pain tolerance compared to placebo. Both the study medications were well tolerated. Further multiple dose studies may be needed to establish the analgesic efficacy of the drug in patients suffering from osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and other painful conditions. PMID:27625480

  9. Photobiomodulation Therapy Improves Performance and Accelerates Recovery of High-Level Rugby Players in Field Test: A Randomized, Crossover, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Henrique D; Vanin, Adriane A; Miranda, Eduardo F; Tomazoni, Shaiane S; Johnson, Douglas S; Albuquerque-Pontes, Gianna M; Aleixo, Ivo de O; Grandinetti, Vanessa Dos S; Casalechi, Heliodora L; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso C; Leal, Ernesto Cesar P

    2016-12-01

    Pinto, HD, Vanin, AA, Miranda, EF, Tomazoni, SS, Johnson, DS, Albuquerque-Pontes, GM, de Oliveira Aleixo Junior, I, Grandinetti, VdS, Casalechi, HL, de Tarso Camillo de Carvalho, P, and Pinto Leal Junior. Photobiomodulation therapy improves performance and accelerates recovery of high-level rugby players in field test: A randomized, crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3329-3338, 2016-Although growing evidence supports the use of photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) for performance and recovery enhancement, there have only been laboratory-controlled studies. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the effects of PBMT in performance and recovery of high-level rugby players during an anaerobic field test. Twelve male high-level rugby athletes were recruited in this randomized, crossover, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. No interventions were performed before the Bangsbo sprint test (BST) at familiarization phase (week 1); at weeks 2 and 3, pre-exercise PBMT or placebo were randomly applied to each athlete. Photobiomodulation therapy irradiation was performed at 17 sites of each lower limb, employing a cluster with 12 diodes (4 laser diodes of 905 nm, 4 light emitting diodes [LEDs] of 875 nm, and 4 LEDs of 640 nm, 30 J per site, manufactured by Multi Radiance Medical). Average time of sprints, best time of sprints, and fatigue index were obtained from BST. Blood lactate levels were assessed at baseline, and at 3, 10, 30, and 60 minutes after BST. Athletes' perceived fatigue was also assessed through a questionnaire. Photobiomodulation therapy significantly (p ≤ 0.05) improved the average time of sprints and fatigue index in BST. Photobiomodulation therapy significantly decreased percentage of change in blood lactate levels (p ≤ 0.05) and perceived fatigue (p ≤ 0.05). Pre-exercise PBMT with the combination of super-pulsed laser (low-level laser), red LEDs, and infrared LEDs can enhance performance

  10. A Time-Stratified Case-Crossover Study of Ambient Ozone Exposure and Emergency Department Visits for Specific Respiratory Diagnoses in California (2005–2008)

    PubMed Central

    Malig, Brian J.; Pearson, Dharshani L.; Chang, Yun Brenda; Broadwin, Rachel; Basu, Rupa; Green, Rochelle S.; Ostro, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies have explored ozone’s connection to asthma and total respiratory emergency department visits (EDVs) but have neglected other specific respiratory diagnoses despite hypotheses relating ozone to respiratory infections and allergic responses. Objective: We examined relationships between ozone and EDVs for respiratory visits, including specifically acute respiratory infections (ARI), asthma, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and upper respiratory tract inflammation (URTI). Methods: We conducted a multi-site time-stratified case-crossover study of ozone exposures for approximately 3.7 million respiratory EDVs from 2005 through 2008 among California residents living within 20 km of an ozone monitor. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate associations by climate zone. Random effects meta-analysis was then applied to estimate pooled excess risks (ER). Effect modification by season, distance from the monitor and individual demographic characteristics (i.e., age, race/ethnicity, sex, and payment method), and confounding by other gaseous air pollutants were also investigated. Meta-regression was utilized to explore how climate zone–level meteorological, demographic, and regional differences influenced estimates. Results: We observed ozone-associated increases in all respiratory, asthma, and ARI visits, which were slightly larger in the warm season [asthma ER per 10-ppb increase in mean of same and previous 3 days ozone exposure (lag03) = 2.7%, 95% CI: 1.5, 3.9; ARI ERlag03 = 1.4%, 95% CI: 0.8, 1.9]. EDVs for pneumonia, COPD, and URTI were also significantly associated with ozone exposure over the whole year, but typically more consistently so during the warm season. Conclusions: Short-term ozone exposures among California residents living near an ozone monitor were positively associated with EDVs for asthma, ARI, pneumonia, COPD, and URTI from 2005 through 2008. Those associations were typically larger and more

  11. Comparison of patient-ventilator asynchrony during pressure support ventilation and proportional assist ventilation modes in surgical Intensive Care Unit: A randomized crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Parshotam Lal; Kaur, Gaganjot; Katyal, Sunil; Gupta, Ruchi; Sandhu, Preetveen; Gautam, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Background: The patient-ventilator asynchrony is almost observed in all modes of ventilation, and this asynchrony affects lung mechanics adversely resulting in deleterious outcome. Innovations and advances in ventilator technology have been trying to overcome this problem by designing newer modes of ventilation. Pressure support ventilation (PSV) is a commonly used flow-cycled mode where a constant pressure is delivered by ventilator. Proportional assist ventilation (PAV) is a new dynamic inspiratory pressure assistance and is supposed to be better than PSV for synchrony and tolerance, but reports are still controversial. Moreover, most of these studies are conducted in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with respiratory failure; the results of these studies may not be applicable to surgical patients. Thus, we proposed to do compare these two modes in surgical Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients as a randomized crossover study. Aims: Comparison of patient-ventilator asynchrony between PSV and PAV plus (PAV+) in surgical patients while weaning. Subjects and Methods: After approval by the Hospital Ethics Committee, we enrolled twenty patients from surgical ICU of tertiary care institute. The patients were ventilated with pressure support mode (PSV) and PAV+ for 12 h as a crossover from one mode to another after 6 h while weaning. Results: Average age and weight of patients were 41.80 ± 15.20 years (mean ± standard deviation [SD]) and 66.50 ± 12.47 (mean ± SD) kg, respectively. Comparing the asynchronies between the two modes, the mean number of total asynchronous recorded breaths in PSV was 7.05 ± 0.83 and 4.35 ± 5.62, respectively, during sleep and awake state, while the same were 6.75 ± 112.24 and 10.85 ± 11.33 in PAV+. Conclusion: Both PSV and PAV+ modes of ventilation performed similarly for patient-ventilator synchrony in surgical patients. In surgical patients with acute respiratory failure, dynamic inspiratory pressure assistance modalities

  12. Absence of a significant pharmacokinetic interaction between atorvastatin and fenofibrate: a randomized, crossover, study of a fixed-dose formulation in healthy Mexican subjects

    PubMed Central

    Patiño-Rodríguez, Omar; Martínez-Medina, Rosa María; Torres-Roque, Irma; Martínez-Delgado, Maricela; Mares-García, América Susana; Escobedo-Moratilla, Abraham; Covarrubias-Pinedo, Amador; Arzola-Paniagua, Angélica; Herrera-Torres, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Several clinical trials have substantiated the efficacy of the co-administration of statins like atorvastatin (ATO) and fibrates. Without information currently available about the interaction between the two drugs, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted to investigate the effect when both drugs were co-administered. The purpose of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic profile of tablets containing ATO 20 mg, or the combination of ATO 20 mg with fenofibrate (FNO) 160 mg administered to healthy Mexican volunteers. This was a randomized, two-period, two-sequence, crossover study; 36 eligible subjects aged between 20–50 years were included. Blood samples were collected up to 96 h after dosing, and pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained by non-compartmental analysis. Adverse events were evaluated based on subject interviews and physical examinations. Area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and maximum plasma drug concentration (Cmax) were measured for ATO as the reference and ATO and FNO as the test product for bioequivalence design. The estimation computed (90% confidence intervals) for ATO and FNO combination versus ATO for Cmax, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞, were 102,09, 125,95, and 120,97%, respectively. These results suggest that ATO and FNO have no relevant clinical-pharmacokinetic drug interaction. PMID:25688207

  13. The Tulip GT® airway versus the facemask and Guedel airway: a randomised, controlled, cross-over study by Basic Life Support-trained airway providers in anaesthetised patients.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, A; Robinson, P N; Hasan, M

    2016-03-01

    We performed a randomised, controlled, cross-over study of lung ventilation by Basic Life Support-trained providers using either the Tulip GT® airway or a facemask with a Guedel airway in 60 anaesthetised patients. Successful ventilation was achieved if the provider produced an end-tidal CO2 > 3.5 kPa and a tidal volume > 250 ml in two of the first three breaths, within 60 sec and within two attempts. Fifty-seven (95%) providers achieved successful ventilation using the Tulip GT compared with 35 (58%) using the facemask (p < 0.0001). Comparing the Tulip GT and facemask, the mean (SD) end-tidal CO2 was 5.0 (0.7) kPa vs 2.5 (1.5) kPa, tidal volume was 494 (175) ml vs 286 (186) ml and peak inspiratory pressure was 18.3 (3.4) cmH2 O vs 13.6 (7) cmH2 O respectively (all p < 0.0001). Forty-seven (78%) users favoured the Tulip GT airway. These results are similar to a previous manikin study using the same protocol, suggesting a close correlation between human and manikin studies for this airway device. We conclude that the Tulip GT should be considered as an adjunct to airway management both within and outside hospitals when ventilation is being undertaken by Basic Life Support-trained airway providers.

  14. Caffeine counteracts impairments in task-oriented psychomotor performance induced by chlorpheniramine: a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Wan; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Shin, Hee-Young; Kim, Jae-Min; Shin, Il-Seon; Kim, Jong-Keun; Kang, Gaeun; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of chlorpheniramine on psychomotor performance and the counteracting effects of caffeine on those sedative antihistamine actions. Sixteen healthy young men participated in this study. Using a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design, each subject was administered one of the following conditions in a random order with a one-week interval: 'placebo-placebo', '4 mg of chlorpheniramine-placebo', 'placebo-200 mg of caffeine' or '4 mg of chlorpheniramine-200 mg of caffeine'. Before and after the treatments, psychomotor functions were assessed using a battery of tests. Additionally, subjective responses were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Psychomotor performance changed over time in different ways according to the combination of study medications. In the 'chlorpheniramine-placebo' condition, reaction times of the compensatory tracking task were significantly impaired compared with the other three conditions. In addition, the number of omission errors of the continuous performance test were significantly greater compared with the 'placebo-caffeine' condition. However, the response pattern of the 'chlorpheniramine-caffeine' condition was not significantly different from that of the 'placebo-placebo' condition. Changes of VAS for sleepiness were significantly greater in the 'chlorpheniramine-placebo' condition compared with the other three conditions. In conclusion, chlorpheniramine significantly increases subjective sleepiness and objectively impairs psychomotor performance. However, caffeine counteracts these sedative effects and psychomotor impairments.

  15. A randomised, crossover study on an electronic vapour product, a nicotine inhalator and a conventional cigarette. Part B: Safety and subjective effects.

    PubMed

    Walele, Tanvir; Sharma, Girish; Savioz, Rebecca; Martin, Claire; Williams, Josie

    2016-02-01

    An Electronic Vapour Product (EVP) has been evaluated for short-term safety parameters and subjective effects in a 2-part study, in smokers. Part 1 compared the EVP with unflavoured (UF) and flavoured (FL) e-liquid at 2.0% nicotine to a conventional cigarette (CC; JPS Silver King Size, 0.6 mg) and a licensed nicotine inhalator (Nicorette(®), 15 mg). Part 2 assessed the effect of increasing concentrations of nicotine in the e-liquid used with the EVP (0%, 0.4%, 0.9%, 2.0%). The study was designed as a randomised, controlled, crossover trial. Outcomes included adverse events (AEs), vital signs, exhaled carbon monoxide (CO), clinical laboratory parameters, smoking urges and withdrawal symptoms. In both study parts, only mild non-serious AEs were reported. No major differences were observed in AEs between the EVPs and Nicorette(®). Exhaled CO levels only increased for CC. All products appeared to decrease smoking urges and nicotine withdrawal symptom scores to a similar extent. The EVP had a similar short-term safety profile to Nicorette(®) and relieved smoking urges and nicotine withdrawal symptoms to a similar extent as Nicorette(®) and CC. Unlike nicotine replacement therapies, the EVP may offer an alternative for those finding it difficult to quit the behavioural and sensorial aspects of smoking.

  16. Lubiprostone decreases the small bowel transit time by capsule endoscopy: an exploratory, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled 3-way crossover study.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Mizue; Inamori, Masahiko; Endo, Hiroki; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Kanoshima, Kenji; Inoh, Yumi; Fujita, Yuji; Umezawa, Shotaro; Fuyuki, Akiko; Uchiyama, Shiori; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Sakai, Eiji; Iida, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Takashi; Futagami, Seiji; Kusakabe, Akihiko; Maeda, Shin; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of lubiprostone for bowel preparation and as a propulsive agent in small bowel endoscopy. Six healthy male volunteers participated in this randomized, 3-way crossover study. The subjects received a 24 μg tablet of lubiprostone 60 minutes prior to the capsule ingestion for capsule endoscopy (CE) and a placebo tablet 30 minutes before the capsule ingestion (L-P regimen), a placebo tablet 60 minutes prior to CE and a 24 μg tablet of lubiprostone 30 minutes prior to CE (P-L regimen), or a placebo tablet 60 minutes prior to r CE and a placebo tablet again 30 minutes prior to CE (P-P regimen). The quality of the capsule endoscopic images and the amount of water in the small bowel were assessed on 5-point scale. The median SBTT was 178.5 (117-407) minutes in the P-P regimen, 122.5 (27-282) minutes in the L-P regimen, and 110.5 (11-331) minutes in the P-L regimen (P = 0.042). This study showed that the use of lubiprostone significantly decreased the SBTT. We also confirmed that lubiprostone was effective for inducing water secretion into the small bowel during CE.

  17. Relative Bioavailabilities of Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate and d-Amphetamine in Healthy Adults in an Open-Label, Randomized, Crossover Study After Mixing Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate With Food or Drink

    PubMed Central

    Ermer, James; Corcoran, Mary; Lasseter, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Background: This open-label, crossover study examined lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) and d-amphetamine pharmacokinetics in healthy adults after administration of an intact LDX capsule or after the capsule was emptied into orange juice or yogurt and the contents consumed. Methods: Healthy adult volunteers (N = 30) were administered a 70-mg LDX capsule or the contents of a 70-mg capsule mixed with yogurt or orange juice using a 3-way crossover design. Blood samples were collected serially for up to 96 hours after dose. Pharmacokinetic endpoints included maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the plasma concentration versus time curve from zero to infinity (AUC0–∞) or to last assessment (AUClast). Relative LDX and d-amphetamine bioavailabilities from the contents of a 70-mg LDX capsule mixed with orange juice or yogurt were compared with those from the intact LDX capsule using bioequivalence-testing procedures. Results: Geometric least squares mean ratios (90% confidence intervals [CIs]) for d-amphetamine (active moiety) were within the prespecified bioequivalence range (0.80–1.25) when the contents of a 70-mg LDX capsule were mixed with orange juice [Cmax: 0.971 (0.945, 0.998); AUC0–∞: 0.986 (0.955, 1.019); AUClast: 0.970 (0.937, 1.004)] or yogurt [Cmax: 0.970 (0.944, 0.997); AUC0–∞: 0.945 (0.915, 0.976); AUClast: 0.944 (0.912, 0.977)]. Geometric least squares mean ratios (90% CIs) for LDX (inactive prodrug) were below the accepted range when the contents of a 70-mg LDX capsule were mixed with orange juice [Cmax: 0.641 (0.582, 0.707); AUC0–∞: 0.716 (0.647, 0.792); AUClast: 0.708 (0.655, 0.766)]; the lower 90% CI for Cmax [0.828 (0.752, 0.912)] was below the accepted range when the contents of a 70-mg LDX capsule were mixed with yogurt. Conclusions: Relative bioavailability of d-amphetamine (the active moiety) did not differ across administrations, which suggests that emptying an LDX capsule into orange juice or yogurt and consuming it

  18. RCT of the effect of berryfruit polyphenolic cultivar extract in mild steroid-naive asthma: a cross-over, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Power, Sharon; Williams, Mathew; Semprini, Alex; Munro, Claire; Caswell-Smith, Rachel; Pilcher, Janine; Holliday, Mark; Fingleton, James; Harper, Jacquie; Hurst, Roger; Weatherall, Mark; Beasley, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Objective There is preclinical evidence that consumption of berryfruit extract may reduce chronic airways inflammation and modify airway remodelling in allergen-induced models of lung inflammation. We investigated the effect of berryfruit extract on the fractional expired nitric oxide (FeNO), a biomarker of eosinophilic airways inflammation, in adults with steroid-naïve asthma. Design Randomised placebo-controlled cross-over double-blind trial. Setting Single-centre community-based trial. Participants 28 steroid-naïve mild asthmatics with Feno >40 ppb, of whom 25 completed both study interventions. Interventions Participants were randomised to receive, according to the cross-over design, 100 mg berryfruit polyphenolic extract (BFPE) or placebo for 4 weeks, with a 4-week washout period between the interventions. Primary outcome measure The primary outcome variable was FeNO at 4 weeks, analysed by a mixed linear model, with a random effect for participant and baseline FeNo as a covariate. Results The mean (SD) natural logarithm transformed (ln) FeNO after 4 weeks of treatment for the BFPE and placebo groups was 4.28 (0.47) and 4.22 (0.47), respectively. The paired change from baseline mean (SD) BFPE minus placebo ln FeNO was −0.03 (0.39), N=25. The mixed linear model estimate, with baseline covariate adjustment, difference in ln FeNO, was −0.002 (95% CI −0.15 to 0.14), p=0.98. This is equivalent to a ratio of geometric mean FeNO of 1.0 (95% CI 0.86 to 1.15). Conclusions In steroid-naïve participants with mild asthma and elevated FeNO, there was no effect of BFPE on FeNO, a biomarker of eosinophilic airways inflammation. Caution is required in the extrapolation of apparent benefit in murine models of lung eosinophilia to clinical efficacy in patients with asthma. Trial registration number ANZCTR: 12613000451707; Results. PMID:28320793

  19. Effects of N-acetylcysteine, oral glutathione (GSH) and a novel sublingual form of GSH on oxidative stress markers: A comparative crossover study.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Bernard; Vicenzi, Morgane; Garrel, Catherine; Denis, Frédéric M

    2015-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is critical to fight against oxidative stress. Its very low bioavailability limits the interest of a supplementation. The purpose of this study was to compare the bioavailability, the effect on oxidative stress markers and the safety of a new sublingual form of GSH with two commonly used dietary supplements, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and oral GSH. The study was a three-week randomized crossover trial. 20 Volunteers with metabolic syndrome were enrolled. GSH levels and several oxidative stress markers were determined at different times during each 21-days period. Compared to oral GSH group, an increase of total and reduced GSH levels in plasma and a higher GSH/GSSG ratio (p=0.003) was observed in sublingual GSH group. After 3 weeks of administration, there was a significant increase of vitamin E level in plasma only in sublingual GSH group (0.83 µmol/g; p=0.04). Our results demonstrate the superiority of a new sublingual form of GSH over the oral GSH form and NAC in terms of GSH supplementation.

  20. Efficacy of naproxen with or without esomeprazole for pain and inflammation in patients after bilateral third molar extractions: A double blinded crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Weckwerth, Giovana M.; Simoneti, Luis F.; Zupelari-Gonçalves, Paulo; Calvo, Adriana M.; Brozoski, Daniel T.; Dionísio, Thiago J.; Torres, Elza A.; Lauris, José-Roberto P.; Faria, Flávio-Augusto C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Using a double-blinded randomized crossover design, this study aimed to evaluate acute postoperative pain management, swelling and trismus in 46 volunteers undergoing extractions of the two lower third molars, in similar positions, at two different appointments who consumed a tablet of either NE (naproxen 500 mg + esomepraz ole 20 mg) or only naproxen (500 mg) every 12 hours for 4 days. Material and Methods Parameters were analyzed: self-reported pain intensity using a visual analog scale (VAS) pre- and postoperative mouth opening; incidence, type and severity of adverse reactions; total quantity consumed of rescue medication; and pre- and postoperative swelling. Results Female volunteers reported significantly more postoperative pain at 1, 1.5, 2, 3 and 4hrs after surgery while also taking their first rescue medication at a time significantly earlier when consuming NE when compared to naproxen (3.7hrs and 6.7hrs). Conversely, no differences were found between each drug group in males. Conclusions In conclusion, throughout the entire study, pain was mild after using either drug in both men and women with pain scores on average well below 40mm (VAS), although in women naproxen improved acute postoperative pain management when compared to NE. Key words:Oral surgery, third molar, pain, naproxen, esomeprazole, NSAIDs. PMID:27918744

  1. Short-term effects of fine particulate air pollution on emergency room visits for cardiac arrhythmias: a case-crossover study in Taipei.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hui-Fen; Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Weng, Hsu-Huei; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether there was an association between fine particles (PM₂.₅) levels and number of emergency room (ER) visits for cardiac arrhythmias in Taipei, Taiwan. ER visits for cardiac arrhythmias and ambient air pollution data for Taipei were obtained for the period 2006-2010. The relative risk (RR) of ER visits was estimated using a case-crossover approach, controlling for weather variables, day of the week, seasonality, and long-term time trends. For the single-pollutant model (without adjustment for other pollutants), increased numbers of ER cardiac arrhythmia visits were significantly associated with PM₂.₅ on both warm days (>23°C) and cool days (< 23°C), with an interquartile range rise associated with a 10% (95% CI = -15%) and 4% (95% CI = 0-8%) elevation in number of ER visits for cardiac arrhythmias, respectively. In the two-pollutant models, PM₂.₅ levels remained significant after inclusion of sulfur dioxide (SO₂) or ozone (O₃) on both warm and cool days. This study provides evidence that higher levels of PM₂.₅ increase the risk of number of ER visits for cardiac arrhythmias.

  2. Randomized 5-treatment crossover study to assess the effects of external heat on serum fentanyl concentrations during treatment with transdermal fentanyl systems.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kenneth T; Sathyan, Gayatri; Richarz, Ute; Natarajan, Jaya; Vandenbossche, Joris

    2012-08-01

    This randomized, open-label, 5-treatment, 5-sequence crossover study was designed to evaluate the effects of a heating pad on serum fentanyl concentrations with reservoir and matrix transdermal fentanyl systems. Subjects were randomized to 1 of 5 treatment sequences, receiving 5 fentanyl treatments (1 per period) for 36 hours: 25 µg/h reservoir without heat, 25 µg/h reservoir with heat, 25 µg/h matrix without heat, 25 µg/h matrix with heat, and a 50 µg/h reservoir without heat. The 25 µg/h systems with heat had a heating pad applied from 0 to 10 and 26 to 36 hours post application. Washout periods between treatments were 5 to 14 days. Naltrexone was given to block the opioid effects of fentanyl. Study results indicate that external heat had a similar effect on both matrix and reservoir systems, with heat applied during the first 10 hours of treatment increasing fentanyl exposure by approximately 61% to 81% at 10 hours (observed serum concentration at 10 hours) and overall exposure (area under the curve from 0 to 10 hours) by approximately 120% to 184%, but had minimal effect from 26 to 36 hours. The increased exposure observed with heat in both 25 µg/h systems, between 0 and 10 hours, was higher than that obtained with the 50 µg/h reservoir system applied without heat.

  3. The amelioration of plasma lipids by Korean traditional confectionery in middle-aged women: A cross-over study with western cookie

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sun Hee; Kim, Mijeong; Woo, Minji; Noh, Jeong Sook; Lee, JaeHwan; Chung, Lana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to examine whether plasma lipid profiles are affected differently by snack kinds with equal calorific values. SUBJECTS/METHODS We compared a Korean traditional confectionery (dasik) with Western confectionery (cookie) in this regard. Controlled cross-over study consisted of two 3-week snack intake phases and for separating, a 2-week washout period (3–2–3) was carried out with 30 healthy women aged between 40-59 years old. Brown rice based Korean traditional confectionery and wheat flour based Western confectionery were used. The participants consumed either dasik or cookie every day for 3 weeks, providing 93 kcal a day. RESULTS The total cholesterol (TC) in the dasik group had decreased significantly after 3 weeks (P < 0.05). Furthermore, in the dasik group, reduction in TC and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol were greater than those in the cookie group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Prioritizing functional snacks like dasik improves plasma lipid profiles; this may be useful information for individuals who cannot refrain from snacking. PMID:27909556

  4. 24 CFR 3285.701 - Electrical crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....701 Electrical crossovers. Multi-section homes with electrical wiring in more than one section require crossover connections to join all sections of the home. The crossover must be designed in accordance with... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrical crossovers....

  5. Exchangeability in the case-crossover design.

    PubMed

    Mittleman, Murray A; Mostofsky, Elizabeth

    2014-10-01

    In cohort and case-control studies, confounding that arises as a result of differences in the distribution of determinants of the outcome between exposure groups leading to non-exchangeability are addressed by restriction, matching or with statistical models. In case-only studies, this issue is addressed by comparing each individual with his/herself. Although case-only designs use self-matching and only include individuals who develop the outcome of interest, issues of non-exchangeability are identical to those that arise in traditional case-control and cohort studies. In this review, we describe one type of case-only design, the case-crossover design, and discuss how the concept of exchangeability can be used to understand issues of confounding, carryover effects, period effects and selection bias in case-crossover studies.

  6. Efficacy of a Nasal Spray from Citrus limon and Cydonia oblonga for the Treatment of Hay Fever Symptoms-A Randomized, Placebo Controlled Cross-Over Study.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, A; Klein, S D; Gründemann, C; Garcia-Käufer, M; Wolf, U; Huber, R

    2016-09-01

    Nasal spray from lemon and quince (LQNS) is used to treat hay fever symptoms and has been shown to inhibit histamine release from mast cells in vitro. Forty-three patients with grass pollen allergy (GPA) were randomized to be treated either with placebo or LQNS for one week, respectively, in a cross-over study. At baseline and after the respective treatments patients were provoked with grass pollen allergen. Outcome parameters were nasal flow measured with rhinomanometry (primary), a nasal symptom score, histamine in the nasal mucus and tolerability. In the per protocol population absolute inspiratory nasal flow 10 and 20 min after provocation was higher with LQNS compared to placebo (-37 ± 87 mL/s; p = 0.027 and -44 ± 85 mL/s; p = 0.022). The nasal symptom score showed a trend (3.3 ± 1.8 in the placebo and 2.8 ± 1.5 in the LQNS group; p = 0.070) in favor of LQNS; the histamine concentration was not significantly different between the groups. Tolerability of both, LQNS and placebo, was rated as very good. LQNS seems to have an anti-allergic effect in patients with GPA. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Study design and methods for a randomized crossover trial substituting brown rice for white rice on diabetes risk factors in India.

    PubMed

    Wedick, Nicole M; Sudha, Vasudevan; Spiegelman, Donna; Bai, Mookambika Ramya; Malik, Vasanti S; Venkatachalam, Siva Sankari; Parthasarathy, Vijayalaksmi; Vaidya, Ruchi; Nagarajan, Lakshmipriya; Arumugam, Kokila; Jones, Clara; Campos, Hannia; Krishnaswamy, Kamala; Willett, Walter; Hu, Frank B; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    India has the second largest number of people with diabetes in the world following China. Evidence indicates that consumption of whole grains can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. This article describes the study design and methods of a trial in progress evaluating the effects of substituting whole grain brown rice for polished (refined) white rice on biomarkers of diabetes risk (glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, inflammation). This is a randomized controlled clinical trial with a crossover design conducted in Chennai, India among overweight but otherwise healthy volunteers aged 25-65 y with a body mass index ≥23 kg/m(2) and habitual rice consumption ≥200 g/day. The feasibility and cultural appropriateness of this type of intervention in the local environment will also be examined. If the intervention is efficacious, the findings can be incorporated into national-level policies which could include the provision of brown rice as an option or replacement for white rice in government institutions and food programs. This relatively simple dietary intervention has the potential to substantially diminish the burden of diabetes in Asia and elsewhere.

  8. Temperature- and pressure-dependent structural study of {Fe(pmd)2[Ag(CN)2]2}n spin-crossover compound by neutron Laue diffraction.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Velamazán, José Alberto; Cañadillas-Delgado, Laura; Castro, Miguel; McIntyre, Garry J; Real, José Antonio

    2014-06-01

    The effect of pressure (up to 0.17 GPa) on the spin-crossover compound {Fe(pmd)2[Ag(CN)2]2}n [orthorhombic isomer (II), pmd = pyrimidine] has been investigated by temperature- and pressure-dependent neutron Laue diffraction and magnetometry. The cooperative high-spin ↔ low-spin transition, centred at ca 180 K at ambient pressure, is shifted to higher temperatures as pressure is applied, showing a moderate sensitivity of the compound to pressure, since the spin transition is displaced by ca 140 K GPa(-1). The space-group symmetry (orthorhombic Pccn) remains unchanged over the pressure-temperature (P-T) range studied. The main structural consequence of the high-spin to low-spin transition is the contraction of the distorted octahedral [FeN6] chromophores, being more marked in the axial positions (occupied by the pmd units), than in the equatorial positions (occupied by four [Ag(CN)2](-) bridging ligands).

  9. Synthesis of Nanocrystals and Particle Size Effects Studies on the Thermally Induced Spin Transition of the Model Spin Crossover Compound [Fe(phen)2(NCS)2].

    PubMed

    Valverde-Muñoz, Francisco Javier; Gaspar, Ana B; Shylin, Sergii I; Ksenofontov, Vadim; Real, José A

    2015-08-17

    Surfactant-free nanocrystals of the model spin-crossover compound [Fe(phen)2(NCS)2] (phen: 1,10-phenanthroline) have been synthesized applying the reverse micelle technique. The morphology of the nanocrystals, characterized by scanning electronic microscopy, corresponds to rhombohedric platelets with dimensions ranging from 203 × 203 × 106 nm to 142 × 142 × 74 nm. Variation of the concentration of the Fe(BF4)2·6H2O salt in the synthesis has been found to have little influence on the crystallite size. In contrast, the solvent-surfactant ratio (ω) is critical for a good particle growth. The spin transition of the nanocrystals has been characterized by magnetic susceptibility measurements and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The nanocrystals undergo an abrupt and more cooperative spin transition in comparison with the bulk compound. The spin transition is centered in the interval of temperature of 175-185 K and is accompanied by 8 K of thermal hysteresis width. The crystallite quality more than the crystallite size is responsible for the higher cooperativity. The magnetic properties of the nanocrystals embedded in organic polymers such as polyethylene glycol, nujol, glycerol, and triton have been studied as well. The spin transition in the nanocrystals is affected by the polymer coating. The abrupt and first-order spin transition transforms into a more continuous spin transition as a result of the chemical pressure asserted by the organic polymers on the Fe(II) centers.

  10. Topical diclofenac does not affect the antiplatelet properties of aspirin as compared to the intermediate effects of oral diclofenac: A prospective, randomized, complete crossover study.

    PubMed

    Rowcliffe, M; Nezami, B; Westphal, E S; Rainka, M; Janda, M; Bates, V; Gengo, F

    2016-04-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) adversely interact with aspirin, diminishing its antiplatelet effect and potentially placing patients at an increased risk for recurrent thrombotic events. This crossover study aimed to determine whether the topical NSAID diclofenac epolamine 1.3% patch or oral diclofenac 50 mg interfered with the antiplatelet effects of aspirin 325 mg. Twelve healthy men and women aged 18-50 were included. Participants were randomized into 5 treatment arms: aspirin, diclofenac potassium 50 mg, diclofenac patch, diclofenac potassium plus ASA 325 mg, and diclofenac patch plus aspirin. Platelet responsiveness was determined using whole-blood impedance aggregation (WBA) to collagen 1 μg/mL and arachidonic acid (AA) 0.5 mM and was sampled every 2 hours. No significant difference in platelet function was observed following the diclofenac patch and aspirin vs aspirin alone. Oral diclofenac produced a mixed effect with significant reduction in platelet inhibition at hour 2 and hour 8 following aspirin administration. Topical diclofenac does not significantly interfere with the antiplatelet effects of aspirin and may be a safer alternative to the oral formulation.

  11. Muscle Activation of Vastus Medialis Oblique and Vastus Lateralis in Sling-Based Exercises in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Cross-Over Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Huang, Wei-Syuan; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To examine what changes are caused in the activity of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) at the time of sling-based exercises in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) and compare the muscular activations in patients with PFPS among the sling-based exercises. Methods. This was a cross-over study. Sling-based open and closed kinetic knee extension and hip adduction exercises were designed for PFPS, and electromyography was applied to record maximal voluntary contraction during the exercises. The VMO and VL activations and VMO : VL ratios for the three exercises were analyzed and compared. Results. Thirty male (age = 21.19 ± 0.68 y) and 30 female (age = 21.12 ± 0.74 y) patients with PFPS were recruited. VMO activations during the sling-based open and closed kinetic knee extension exercises were significantly higher (P = 0.04 and P = 0.001) than those during hip adduction exercises and VMO : VL ratio for the sling-based closed kinetic knee extension and hip adduction exercises approximated to 1. Conclusions. The sling-based closed kinetic knee extension exercise produced the highest VMO activation. It also had an appropriate VMO : VL ratio similar to sling-based hip adduction exercise and had beneficial effects on PFPS. PMID:26504480

  12. Effect of Oral Coadministration of Ascorbic Acid with Ling Zhi Preparation on Pharmacokinetics of Ganoderic Acid A in Healthy Male Subjects: A Randomized Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Tawasri, Patcharanee; Ampasavate, Chadarat; Tharatha, Somsak

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-phase crossover study was to determine the effect of ascorbic acid on pharmacokinetics of ganoderic acid A, an important biologically active triterpenoid compound with anticancer activities, following oral administration of water extract of fruiting bodies of Ling Zhi in 12 healthy male subjects. Each subject was randomized to receive either one of the two regimens: (1) a single dose of 3,000 mg of the Ling Zhi preparation or (2) a single dose of 3,000 mg of the Ling Zhi preparation in combination with 2,500 mg of ascorbic acid. After a washout period of at least two weeks, subjects were switched to receive the alternate regimen. Blood samples were collected in each phase immediately before dosing and at specific time points for 8 hours after dosing. Plasma ganoderic acid A concentrations were quantified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The pharmacokinetic parameters analyzed were maximal plasma concentration (Cmax), time to reach peak concentration (Tmax), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), and half-life (t1/2). An oral coadministration of ascorbic acid with Ling Zhi preparation did not significantly alter the pharmacokinetic parameters of ganoderic acid A in healthy male subjects. PMID:27747224

  13. Scale Invariance in 2D BCS-BEC Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensarma, Rajdeep; Taylor, Edward; Randeria, Mohit

    2013-03-01

    In 2D BCS-BEC crossover, the frequency of the breathing mode in a harmonic trap, as well as the lower edge of the radio frequency spectroscopy response, show remarkable scale-invariance throughout the crossover regime, i.e. they are independent of the coupling constant. Using functional integral methods, we study the behaviour of these quantities in the 2D BCS-BEC crossover and comment on the possible reasons for this scale independence. RS was supported by DAE, Govt. of India. MR was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1006532. ET was supported by NSERC and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

  14. The Analgesic Effect of Oxytocin in Humans: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Cross-Over Study Using Laser-Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Paloyelis, Y; Krahé, C; Maltezos, S; Williams, S C; Howard, M A; Fotopoulou, A

    2016-04-01

    Oxytocin is a neuropeptide regulating social-affiliative and reproductive behaviour in mammals. Despite robust preclinical evidence for the antinociceptive effects and mechanisms of action of exogenous oxytocin, human studies have produced mixed results regarding the analgesic role of oxytocin and are yet to show a specific modulation of neural processes involved in pain perception. In the present study, we investigated the analgesic effects of 40 IU of intranasal oxytocin in 13 healthy male volunteers using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design and brief radiant heat pulses generated by an infrared laser that selectively activate Aδ- and C-fibre nerve endings in the epidermis, at the same time as recording the ensuing laser-evoked potentials (LEPs). We predicted that oxytocin would reduce subjective pain ratings and attenuate the amplitude of the N1, N2 and P2 components. We observed that oxytocin attenuated perceived pain intensity and the local peak amplitude of the N1 and N2 (but not of P2) LEPs, and increased the latency of the N2 component. Importantly, for the first time, the present study reports an association between the analgesic effect of oxytocin (reduction in subjective pain ratings) and the oxytocin-induced modulation of cortical activity after noxious stimulation (attenuation of the N2 LEP). These effects indicate that oxytocin modulates neural processes contributing to pain perception. The present study reports preliminary evidence that is consistent with electrophysiological studies in rodents showing that oxytocin specifically modulates Aδ/C-fibre nociceptive afferent signalling at the spinal level and provides further specificity to evidence obtained in humans indicating that oxytocin may be modulating pain experience by modulating activity in the cortical areas involved in pain processing.

  15. Effects of Ayurvedic Oil-Dripping Treatment with Sesame Oil vs. with Warm Water on Sleep: A Randomized Single-Blinded Crossover Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Ayurvedic oil-dripping treatment (Shirodhara) is often used for treating sleep problems. However, few properly designed studies have been conducted, and the quantitative effect of Shirodhara is unclear. This study sought to quantitatively evaluate the effect of sesame oil Shirodhara (SOS) against warm water Shirodhara (WWS) on improving sleep quality and quality of life (QOL) among persons reporting sleep problems. Methods: This randomized, single-blinded, crossover study recruited 20 participants. Each participant received seven 30-minute sessions within 2 weeks with either liquid. The washout period was at least 2 months. The Shirodhara procedure was conducted by a robotic oil-drip system. The outcomes were assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) for sleep quality, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) for daytime sleepiness, World Health Organization Quality of Life 26 (WHO-QOL26) for QOL, and a sleep monitor instrument for objective sleep measures. Changes between baseline and follow-up periods were compared between the two types of Shirodhara. Analysis was performed with generalized estimating equations. Results: Of 20 participants, 15 completed the study. SOS improved sleep quality, as measured by PSQI. The SOS score was 1.83 points lower (95% confidence interval [CI], −3.37 to −0.30) at 2-week follow-up and 1.73 points lower (95% CI, −3.84 to 0.38) than WWS at 6-week follow-up. Although marginally significant, SOS also improved QOL by 0.22 points at 2-week follow-up and 0.19 points at 6-week follow-up compared with WWS. After SOS, no beneficial effects were observed on daytime sleepiness or objective sleep measures. Conclusions: This pilot study demonstrated that SOS may be a safe potential treatment to improve sleep quality and QOL in persons with sleep problems. PMID:26669255

  16. Comparison of the urinary excretion of quercetin glycosides from red onion and aglycone from dietary supplements in healthy subjects: a randomized, single-blinded, cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuanlu; Williamson, Gary

    2015-05-01

    Some intervention studies have shown that quercetin supplementation can regulate certain biomarkers, but it is not clear how the doses given relate to dietary quercetin (e.g. from onion). We conducted a two-period, two-sequence crossover study to compare the bioavailability of quercetin when administered in the form of a fresh red onion meal (naturally glycosylated quercetin) or dietary supplement (aglycone quercetin) under fasting conditions. Six healthy, non-smoking, adult males with BMI 22.7 ± 4.0 kg m(-2) and age 35.3 ± 12.3 y were grouped to take the two study meals in random order. In each of the 2 study periods, one serving of onion soup (made from 100 g fresh red onion, providing 156.3 ± 3.4 μmol (47 mg) quercetin) or a single dose of a quercetin dihydrate tablet (1800 ± 150 μmol (544 mg) of quercetin) were administered following 3 d washout. Urine samples were collected up to 24 h, and after enzyme deconjugation, quercetin was quantified by LC-MS. The 24 h urinary excretion of quercetin (1.69 ± 0.79 μmol) from red onion in soup was not significantly different to that (1.17 ± 0.44 μmol) for the quercetin supplement tablet (P = 0.065, paired t-test). This means that, in practice, 166 mg of quercetin supplement would be comparable to about 10 mg of quercetin aglycone equivalents from onion. These data allow intervention studies on quercetin giving either food or supplements to be more effectively compared.

  17. Analgesic and antihyperalgesic effects of melatonin in a human inflammatory pain model: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-arm crossover study.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lars P H; Gögenur, Ismail; Fenger, Andreas Q; Petersen, Marian C; Rosenberg, Jacob; Werner, Mads U

    2015-11-01

    Antinociceptive effects of melatonin have been documented in a wide range of experimental animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic, antihyperalgesic, and anti-inflammatory properties of melatonin using a validated burn injury (BI) model in healthy male volunteers. The design was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-arm crossover study. Each volunteer participated in 3 identical study sessions with intravenous administration of placebo, melatonin 10 mg, or melatonin 100 mg. Sixty minutes after bolus injection of study medication, a BI was induced by a computerized contact thermode (47.0°C, 420 seconds, 5.0 × 2.5 cm). Pain ratings during the BI and quantitative sensory testing at baseline and at 1, 2, 4, and 6 hours after the BI were performed. Quantitative sensory testing included assessments of secondary hyperalgesia areas, mechanical and thermal thresholds in the BI area, and pressure algometry. Furthermore, markers of inflammation, skin-reflectance spectrophotometry, and high-resolution ultrasonography were applied to measure skin erythema and dermal thickness in the BI area. Pain during the BI and secondary hyperalgesia areas were defined as primary outcomes. Twenty-nine volunteers were randomized and completed the study. While the BI induced large secondary hyperalgesia areas and significantly increased the markers of inflammation, no significant effects of melatonin were observed with respect to primary or secondary outcomes, compared with placebo. The administration of melatonin was not associated with any adverse effects. Melatonin did not demonstrate any analgesic, antihyperalgesic, or anti-inflammatory properties in the BI model.

  18. Effects of ultrafine particles on the allergic inflammation in the lung of asthmatics: results of a double-blinded randomized cross-over clinical pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) might aggravate the allergic inflammation of the lung in asthmatics. Methods We exposed 12 allergic asthmatics in two subgroups in a double-blinded randomized cross-over design, first to freshly generated ultrafine carbon particles (64 μg/m3; 6.1 ± 0.4 × 105 particles/cm3 for 2 h) and then to filtered air or vice versa with a 28-day recovery period in-between. Eighteen hours after each exposure, grass pollen was instilled into a lung lobe via bronchoscopy. Another 24 hours later, inflammatory cells were collected by means of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). (Trial registration: NCT00527462) Results For the entire study group, inhalation of UFP by itself had no significant effect on the allergen induced inflammatory response measured with total cell count as compared to exposure with filtered air (p = 0.188). However, the subgroup of subjects, which inhaled UFP during the first exposure, exhibited a significant increase in total BAL cells (p = 0.021), eosinophils (p = 0.031) and monocytes (p = 0.013) after filtered air exposure and subsequent allergen challenge 28 days later. Additionally, the potential of BAL cells to generate oxidant radicals was significantly elevated at that time point. The subgroup that was exposed first to filtered air and 28 days later to UFP did not reveal differences between sessions. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that pre-allergen exposure to UFP had no acute effect on the allergic inflammation. However, the subgroup analysis lead to the speculation that inhaled UFP particles might have a long-term effect on the inflammatory course in asthmatic patients. This should be reconfirmed in further studies with an appropriate study design and sufficient number of subjects. PMID:25204642

  19. An Open-Label Randomized Crossover Trial of Lyophilized Black Raspberries on Postprandial Inflammation in Older Overweight Males: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sardo, Christine L; Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Apseloff, Glen; Harris, Robin B; Roe, Denise J; Stoner, Gary D; Jacobs, Elizabeth T

    2016-01-01

    This study was a 14-day, outpatient, open-label randomized crossover trial of lyophilized black raspberries (BRBs) in older overweight or obese males to determine whether BRB consumption affects postprandial inflammation associated with consumption of a high-fat high-calorie (HFHC) meal. Ten study participants consumed 45 g/d of lyophilized BRBs for 4 days, followed by a HFHC breakfast plus BRBs on day 6 or consumed the HFHC breakfast on day 6 without previous consumption of BRBs and then crossed over to the other treatment after a 2-day washout period. Blood samples were obtained before and 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 hours after consumption of the HFHC breakfast. The primary study outcomes were changes in area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) for interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). The secondary outcomes were safety and tolerability of lyophilized BRB powder. The chronology and values of measured serum concentrations for IL-6, TNF-α, and CRP were consistent with those described previously by other investigators. The AUC of serum IL-6 was lowered significantly (P = 0.03, n = 10) with BRB consumption (34.3 ± 7.6 pg·mL⁻¹·h⁻¹ compared with 42.4 ± 17.9 pg·mL⁻¹·h⁻¹ for consumption of the HFHC meal alone). However, no significant differences (change in AUC) were calculated for serum CRP and TNF-α. The findings of this pilot study suggest that consumption of lyophilized BRBs may attenuate postprandial inflammation in overweight or obese males consuming a HFHC meal. Further investigation of BRBs is warranted to better elucidate their inflammomodulatory potential.

  20. Asperger syndrome and anxiety disorders (PAsSA) treatment trial: a study protocol of a pilot, multicentre, single-blind, randomised crossover trial of group cognitive behavioural therapy

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Peter E; Murphy, Glynis H; Wilson, Edward; Shepstone, Lee; Fowler, David; Heavens, David; Malovic, Aida; Russell, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A number of studies have established that children, adolescents and adults with Asperger syndrome (AS) and high functioning autism (HFA) have significant problems with anxiety. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for anxiety in a variety of clinical populations. There is a growing interest in exploring the effectiveness of CBT for people with AS who have mental health problems, but currently there are no known clinical trials involving adults with AS or HFA. Studies with children who have AS have reported some success. The current study aims to examine whether modified group CBT for clinically significant anxiety in an AS population is likely to be efficacious. Methods and analysis This study is a randomised, single-blind crossover trial. At least 36 individuals will be recruited and randomised into a treatment arm or a waiting-list control arm. During treatment, individuals will receive 3 sessions of individual CBT, followed by 21 sessions of group CBT. Primary outcome measures focus on anxiety. Secondary outcome measures focus on everyday social and psychiatric functioning, additional measures of anxiety and fear, depression, health-related quality of life and treatment cost. Assessments will be administered at pregroup and postgroup and at follow-up by researchers who are blinded to group allocation. The trial aims to find out whether or not psychological treatments for anxiety can be adapted and used to successfully treat the anxiety experienced by people with AS. Furthermore, we aim to determine whether this intervention represents good value for money. Ethics and dissemination The trial received a favourable ethical opinion from a National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee. All participants provided written informed consent. Findings will be shared with all trial participants, and the general public, as well as the scientific community. Trial Registration ISRCTN 30265294 (DOI: 10.1186/ISRCTN30265294), UKCRN

  1. Impact of acute administration of escitalopram on the processing of emotional and neutral images: a randomized crossover fMRI study of healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Outhred, Tim; Das, Pritha; Felmingham, Kim L.; Bryant, Richard A.; Nathan, Pradeep J.; Malhi, Gin S.; Kemp, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute neural effects of antidepressant medication on emotion processing biases may provide the foundation on which clinical outcomes are based. Along with effects on positive and negative stimuli, acute effects on neutral stimuli may also relate to anti-depressant efficacy, yet these effects are still to be investigated. The present study therefore examined the impact of a single dose of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram (20 mg) on positive, negative and neutral stimuli using pharmaco-fMRI. Methods Within a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover design, healthy women completed 2 sessions of treatment administration and fMRI scanning separated by a 1-week washout period. Results We enrolled 36 women in our study. When participants were administered escitalopram relative to placebo, left amygdala activity was increased and right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) activity was decreased during presentation of positive pictures (potentiation of positive emotion processing). In contrast, escitalopram was associated with decreased left amygdala and increased right IFG activity during presentation of negative pictures (attenuation of negative emotion processing). In addition, escitalopram decreased right IFG activity during the processing of neutral stimuli, akin to the effects on positive stimuli (decrease in negative appraisal). Limitations Although we used a women-only sample to reduce heterogeneity, our results may not generalize to men. Potential unblinding, which was related to the subjective occurrence of side effects, occurred in the study; however, manipulation check analyses demonstrated that results were not impacted. Conclusion These novel findings demonstrate that a single dose of the commonly prescribed escitalopram facilitates a positive information processing bias. These findings provide an important lead for better understanding effects of antidepressant medication. PMID:24690370

  2. Area-specific modulation of neural activation comparing escitalopram and citalopram revealed by pharmaco-fMRI: a randomized cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Windischberger, Christian; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Holik, Alexander; Spindelegger, Christoph; Stein, Patrycja; Moser, Ulrike; Gerstl, Florian; Fink, Martin; Moser, Ewald; Kasper, Siegfried

    2010-01-15

    Area-specific and stimulation-dependent changes of human brain activation by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are an important issue for improved understanding of treatment mechanisms, given the frequent prescription of these drugs in depression and anxiety disorders. The aim of this neuroimaging study was to investigate differences in BOLD-signal caused by administration of the SSRIs escitalopram and citalopram using pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging (pharmaco-fMRI). Eighteen healthy subjects participated in a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study in cross-over repeated measures design. Each volunteer performed facial emotional discrimination and a sensorimotor control paradigm during three scanning sessions. Citalopram (20 mg/d), escitalopram (10 mg/d) and placebo were administered for 10 days each with a drug-free period of at least 21 days. Significant pharmacological effects on BOLD-signal were found in the amygdala, medial frontal gyrus, parahippocampal, fusiform and middle temporal gyri. Post-hoc t-tests revealed decreased BOLD-signal in the right amygdala and left parahippocampal gyrus in both pharmacological conditions, compared to placebo. Escitalopram, compared to citalopram, induced a decrease of BOLD-signal in the medial frontal gyrus and an increase in the right fusiform and left parahippocampal gyri. Drug effects were concentrated in brain regions with dense serotonergic projections. Both escitalopram and citalopram attenuated BOLD-signal in the amygdala and parahippocampal cortex to emotionally significant stimuli compared to control stimuli. We believe that reduced reactivity in the medial frontal gyrus found for escitalopram compared to citalopram administration might explain the response differences between study drugs as demonstrated in previous clinical trials.

  3. Timing of hypertonic saline and airway clearance techniques in adults with cystic fibrosis during pulmonary exacerbation: pilot data from a randomised crossover study

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Katherine; Moran, Fidelma; Tunney, Michael M; Elborn, J Stuart; Bradbury, Ian; Downey, Damian G; Rendall, Jackie; Bradley, Judy M

    2017-01-01

    Background Streamlining the timing of treatments in cystic fibrosis (CF) is important to optimise adherence while ensuring efficacy. The optimal timing of treatment with hypertonic saline (HTS) and airway clearance techniques (ACT) is unknown. Objectives This study hypothesised that HTS before ACT would be more effective than HTS during ACT as measured by Lung Clearance Index (LCI). Methods Adults with CF providing written informed consent were randomised to a crossover trial of HTS before ACT or HTS during ACT on consecutive days. ACT treatment consisted of Acapella Duet. Patients completed LCI and spirometry at baseline and 90 min post treatment. Mean difference (MD) and 95% CIs were reported. Results 13 subjects completed the study (mean (SD) age 33 (12) years, forced expiratory volume in 1second % (FEV1%) predicted 51% (22), LCI (no. turnovers) 14 (4)). Comparing the two treatments (HTS before ACT vs HTS during ACT), the change from baseline to 90 min post treatment in LCI (MD (95% CI) −0.02 (−0.63 to 0.59)) and FEV1% predicted (MD (95% CI) −0.25 (−2.50 to 1.99)) was not significant. There was no difference in sputum weight (MD (95% CI) −3.0 (−14.9 to 8.9)), patient perceived ease of clearance (MD (95% CI) 0.4 (−0.6 to 1.3) or satisfaction (MD (95% CI) 0.4 (−0.6 to 1.5)). The time taken for HTS during ACT was significantly shorter (MD (95% CI) 14.7 (9.8 to 19.6)). Conclusions In this pilot study, HTS before ACT was no more effective than HTS during ACT as measured by LCI. Trial registration number NCT01753869; Pre-results. PMID:28123751

  4. Do formulation differences alter abuse liability of methylphenidate? A placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, crossover study in recreational drug users.

    PubMed

    Parasrampuria, Dolly A; Schoedel, Kerri A; Schuller, Reinhard; Silber, Steven A; Ciccone, Patrick E; Gu, Joan; Sellers, Edward M

    2007-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine if the abuse liability of methylphenidate is governed by formulation differences that affect rates of drug delivery. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover study, subjects with a history of recreational drug use received single oral doses of placebo, 60 mg of immediate-release methylphenidate (IR) and 108 mg of extended-release methylphenidate (osmotic release oral system [OROS]). Over 24 hours after dosing, blood was collected to determine plasma concentrations of methylphenidate, and subjects completed subjective assessments of abuse liability (Addiction Research Center Inventory, Drug Rating Questionnaire-Subject, and Subjective Drug Value). The abuse-related subjective effects of IR and OROS methylphenidate were statistically significantly different from placebo, confirming the overall validity of the study. Although a higher dose of OROS methylphenidate was used compared with IR methylphenidate (108 mg vs 60 mg), subjective effects were consistently lower for OROS compared with IR methylphenidate (statistically significant for 3 of 6 measures of positive effects), particularly at early time points. In general, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic parameters were correlated from a poor to modest degree, with greater correlations observed for IR methylphenidate. In addition, a post hoc "qualification" method was developed, which demonstrated that pharmacological qualification might improve the assessment of subjective effects. Although requiring epidemiological confirmation, the results suggest that OROS methylphenidate, with its characteristic slow ascending plasma concentration profile, may have lower abuse potential. This conclusion is reflected by lower subjective responses during early hours as compared with the IR formulation with its rapid drug delivery and accompanying greater subjective effects.

  5. Early Functional Postoperative Therapy of Distal Radius Fracture with a Dynamic Orthosis: Results of a Prospective Randomized Cross-Over Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Stuby, Fabian M.; Döbele, Stefan; Schäffer, Susanne-Dorothea; Mueller, Simon; Ateschrang, Atesch

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study was conducted according to GCP criteria as a prospective randomized cross-over study. The primary goal of the study was to determine clinical findings and patient satisfaction with postoperative treatment. 29 patients with a distal radius fracture that was surgically stabilized from volar and who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled over a 12-month period. Each patient randomly received either a dorsal plaster splint or a vacuum-fit flexible but blocked orthosis applied postoperatively in the operating theatre to achieve postoperative immobilization. After one week all patients were crossed over to the complementary device maintaining the immobilization until end of week 2. After week 2 both groups were allowed to exercise wrist mobility with a physiotherapist, in the orthosis group the device was deblocked, thus allowing limited wrist mobility. After week 4 the devices were removed in both groups. Follow-up exams were performed after postoperative weeks 1, 2, 4 and 12. Results and Discussion Results were determined after week 1 and 2 using SF 36 and a personally compiled questionnaire; after weeks 4 and 12 with a clinical check-up, calculation of ROM and the DASH Score. Comparison of the two groups showed a significant difference in ROM for volar flexion after 4 weeks, but no significant differences in DASH Score, duration of disability or x-ray findings. With regard to satisfaction with comfort and hygiene, patients were significantly more satisfied with the dynamic orthosis, and 23 of the 29 patients would prefer the flexible vacuum orthosis in future. Trial Registration German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS) DRKS00006097 PMID:25822197

  6. A randomised crossover simulation study comparing the impact of chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear substance personal protection equipment on the performance of advanced life support interventions.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, J; Arlidge, J; Garnham, F; Ahmad, I

    2017-03-02

    Recent incidents involving chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear substances have stressed the importance of sufficient personal protection equipment for medical first-responders. Modern lightweight, battery-independent, suit ensembles may prove superior to the current protective suit used in the UK. This study compared the powered respiratory protective suit (PRPS ensemble) with a lightweight suit consisting of a SARATOGA(®) Multipurpose CBRN Protective Coverall Polyprotect 12 in conjunction with the Avon C50 Respirator/Avon CBRNF12CE filter canister and butyl rubber protective gloves (Polyprotect 12 ensemble). Thirty anaesthetists carried out a standardised resuscitation scenario either unprotected (control) or wearing the PRPS or Polyprotect 12 ensembles in a randomised, crossover simulation study. Treatment times for five simulated advanced life support interventions (application of monitoring; bag/mask ventilation; tracheal intubation; drug and fluid administration; and external pacing) were measured. Wearer comfort was also assessed for the two protective suits by questionnaire. All participants accomplished the treatment objectives of all study arms without adverse events. Total mean (SD) completion time for the five interventions was significantly longer for the PRPS compared with the Polyprotect 12 ensemble (204 (53) s vs. 149 (36) s, respectively; p < 0.0001). Participants rated mobility, noise, heat, vision, dexterity and speech intelligibility significantly better in the Polyprotect 12 ensemble compared with the PRPS ensemble. The combination of a lightweight Polyprotect 12 suit and an Avon C50 air-purifying respirator is preferable to the powered respiratory protective suit during simulated emergency life support, due to a combination of shorter task completion times and improved mobility, communication and dexterity.

  7. A multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multiple-crossover study of Fentanyl Pectin Nasal Spray (FPNS) in the treatment of breakthrough cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Portenoy, Russell K; Burton, Allen W; Gabrail, Nashat; Taylor, Donald

    2010-12-01

    This randomized, double-blind, crossover study assessed the efficacy and tolerability of a new rapid onset nasal fentanyl formulation (Fentanyl Pectin Nasal Spray; FPNS) for breakthrough cancer pain (BTCP). Eighty-three of 114 patients experiencing one to four BTCP episodes/day while taking ≥60 mg/day of oral morphine or equivalent successfully identified an effective dose of FPNS during a titration phase and entered a double-blind phase in which 10 BTCP episodes were treated with this effective dose (7) or placebo (3). Compared with placebo, FPNS significantly improved mean summed pain intensity difference (SPID) from 10 min (P<0.05) until 60 min (P<0.0001), including the primary endpoint at 30 min (P<0.0001). FPNS significantly improved pain intensity (PI) scores as early as 5 min (P<0.05); pain intensity difference (PID) from 10 min (P<0.01); and pain relief (PR) scores from 10 min (P<0.001). More patients showed a clinically meaningful (≥ 2-point reduction in PI) pain reduction from 10 min onward (P ≤ 0.01) and 90.6% of the FPNS-treated versus 80.0% of placebo-treated BTCP episodes did not require rescue medication (P<0.001). Approximately 70% of patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the convenience and ease of use of FPNS. Only 5.3% of patients withdrew from treatment due to adverse events, no significant nasal effects were reported, and 87% of patients elected to continue open-label treatment post-study. In this short-term study, FPNS was safe, well tolerated, and rapidly efficacious for BTCP.

  8. Effects of hydrolysed casein, intact casein and intact whey protein on energy expenditure and appetite regulation: a randomised, controlled, cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Bendtsen, Line Q; Lorenzen, Janne K; Gomes, Sisse; Liaset, Bjørn; Holst, Jens J; Ritz, Christian; Reitelseder, Søren; Sjödin, Anders; Astrup, Arne

    2014-10-28

    Casein and whey differ in amino acid composition and in the rate of absorption; however, the absorption rate of casein can be increased to mimic that of whey by exogenous hydrolysis. The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of hydrolysed casein (HC), intact casein (IC) and intact whey (IW) on energy expenditure (EE) and appetite regulation, and thereby to investigate the influence of amino acid composition and the rate of absorption. In the present randomised cross-over study, twenty-four overweight and moderately obese young men and women consumed three isoenergetic dietary treatments that varied in protein source. The study was conducted in a respiration chamber, where EE, substrate oxidation and subjective appetite were measured over 24 h at three independent visits. Moreover, blood and urine samples were collected from the participants. The results showed no differences in 24 h and postprandial EE or appetite regulation. However, lipid oxidation, estimated from the respiratory quotient (RQ), was found to be higher after consumption of IW than after consumption of HC during daytime (P= 0·014) as well as during the time after the breakfast meal (P= 0·008) when the food was provided. Likewise, NEFA concentrations were found to be higher after consumption of IW than after consumption of HC and IC (P< 0·01). However, there was no overall difference in the concentration of insulin or glucagon-like peptide 1. In conclusion, dietary treatments when served as high-protein mixed meals induced similar effects on EE and appetite regulation, except for lipid oxidation, where RQ values suggest that it is higher after consumption of IW than after consumption of HC.

  9. Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate in College Students with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPaul, George J.; Weyandt, Lisa L.; Rossi, Joseph S.; Vilardo, Brigid A.; O'Dell, Sean M.; Carson, Kristen M.; Verdi, Genevieve; Swentosky, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate stimulant medication on symptoms and functioning for college students with ADHD using double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Method: Participants included 24 college students with ADHD and 26 college students without psychopathology. Lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) was examined for ADHD participants over five…

  10. Effect of sex, age and genetics on crossover interference in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiying; Shen, Botong; Jiang, Jicai; Li, Jinquan; Ma, Li

    2016-01-01

    Crossovers generated by homologous recombination ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis. Crossover interference results in chiasmata being more evenly distributed along chromosomes, but the mechanism underlying crossover interference remains elusive. Based on large pedigrees of Holstein and Jersey cattle with genotype data, we extracted three-generation families, including 147,327 male and 71,687 female meioses in Holstein, and 108,163 male and 37,008 female meioses in Jersey, respectively. We identified crossovers in these meioses and fitted the Housworth-Stahl “interference-escape” model to study crossover interference patterns in the cattle genome. Our result reveals that the degree of crossover interference is stronger in females than in males. We found evidence for inter-chromosomal variation in the level of crossover interference, with smaller chromosomes exhibiting stronger interference. In addition, crossover interference levels decreased with maternal age. Finally, sex-specific GWAS analyses identified one locus near the NEK9 gene on chromosome 10 to have a significant effect on crossover interference levels. This locus has been previously associated with recombination rate in cattle. Collectively, this large-scale analysis provided a comprehensive description of crossover interference across chromosome, sex and age groups, identified associated candidate genes, and produced useful insights into the mechanism of crossover interference. PMID:27892966

  11. Short-Term Effects of Coarse Particulate Matter on Hospital Admissions for Cardiovascular Diseases: A Case-Crossover Study in a Tropical City.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chen; Weng, Yi-Hao; Chiu, Ya-Wen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether there was an association between coarse particles (PM2.5-10) levels and frequency of hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Hospital admissions for CVD, including ischemic heart disease (IHD), stroke, congestive heart failure (CHF), and arrhythmias, and ambient air pollution data levels for Kaohsiung were obtained for the period 2006-2010. The relative risk of hospital admissions for CVD was estimated using a case-crossover approach, controlling for weather variables, day of the week, seasonality, and long-term time trends. For the single-pollutant model (without adjustment for other pollutants), increased rates of admissions for CVD were significantly associated with higher coarse PM levels only on cool days (< 25°C), with a 10-μg/m(3) elevation in PM2.5-10 concentrations associated with a 3% (95% CI = 2-4%) rise in IHD admissions, 5% (95% CI = 4-6%) increase in stroke admissions, 3% (95% CI = 1-6%) elevation in CHF admissions, and 3% (95% CI = 0-6%) rise in arrhythmias admissions. No significant associations were found between coarse particle levels and number of hospital admissions for CVD on warm days. In the two-pollutant models, PM2.5-10 levels remained significantly correlated with higher rate of CVD admissions even controlling for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, or ozone on cool days. Compared to the effect estimate associated with a 10-μg/m(3) increase in PM2.5 levels, effect estimates of frequency of CVD-related admissions associated with a 10-μg/m(3) rise in coarse PM levels were weaker. This study provides evidence that higher levels of PM2.5-10 enhance the risk of hospital admissions for CVD.

  12. Effect of catechol-O-methyltransferase polymorphism on response to propranolol therapy in chronic musculoskeletal pain: A randomized, double–blind, placebo-controlled, crossover pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Tchivileva, Inna E.; Lim, Pei Feng; Smith, Shad B.; Slade, Gary D.; Diatchenko, Luda; McLean, Samuel A.; Maixner, William

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Three common haplotypes in the gene encoding catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) have been associated with pain modulation and the risk of developing chronic musculoskeletal pain, namely temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Haplotypes coding for higher enzymatic activity were correlated with lower pain perception. Rodent studies showed that COMT inhibition increases pain sensitivity via β2/3-adrenergic receptors. We hypothesized that the non-selective β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol will reduce clinical and experimental pain in TMD patients in a manner dependent on the subjects’ COMT diplotype. Methods 40 female Caucasian participants meeting the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD were genotyped for COMT polymorphisms and completed a randomized, double–blind, placebo-controlled, two-period crossover pilot study. Each period consisted of a baseline assessment week followed by an intervention week (propranolol or placebo). Changes in clinical pain ratings, psychological status, and responses to heat and pressure stimuli between baseline and intervention weeks were compared across periods. Results The number of patients reporting a reduction in pain intensity rating was greater during propranolol treatment (p=0.014) compared with placebo. Propranolol significantly reduced a composite pain index (p=0.02) but did not decrease other clinical and experimental pain ratings. When stratified by the COMT high activity haplotype, a beneficial effect of propranolol on pain perception was noted in subjects not carrying this haplotype, a diminished benefit was observed in the heterozygotes, and no benefit was noted in the homozygotes. Conclusion COMT haplotypes may serve as genetic predictors of propranolol treatment outcome, identifying a subgroup of TMD patients who will benefit from propranolol therapy. PMID:20216107

  13. Xanthophylls, phytosterols and pre-β1-HDL are differentially affected by fenofibrate and niacin HDL-raising in a cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Niesor, Eric J; Gauthamadasa, Kekulawalage; Silva, R A Gangani D; Suchankova, Gabriela; Kallend, David; Gylling, Helena; Asztalos, Bela; Damonte, Elisabetta; Rossomanno, Simona; Abt, Markus; Davidson, W Sean; Benghozi, Renee

    2013-12-01

    Fenofibrate and extended-release (ER) niacin similarly raise high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration but their effects on levels of potent plasma antioxidant xanthophylls (lutein and zeaxanthin) and phytosterols obtained from dietary sources, and any relationship with plasma lipoproteins and pre-β1-HDL levels, have not been investigated. We studied these parameters in 66 dyslipidemic patients treated for 6 week with fenofibrate (160 mg/day) or ER-niacin (0.5 g/day for 3 week, then 1 g/day) in a cross-over study. Both treatments increased HDL-C (16 %) and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I (7 %) but only fenofibrate increased apoA-II (28 %). Lutein and zeaxanthin levels were unaffected by fenofibrate but inversely correlated with percentage change in apoB and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and positively correlated with end of treatment apoA-II. ApoA-II in isolated HDL in vitro bound more lutein than apoA-I. Xanthophylls were increased by ER-niacin (each ~30 %) without any correlation to lipoprotein or apo levels. Only fenofibrate markedly decreased plasma markers of cholesterol absorption; pre-β1-HDL was significantly decreased by fenofibrate (-19 %, p < 0.0001), with little change (3.4 %) for ER-niacin. Although fenofibrate and ER-niacin similarly increased plasma HDL-C and apoA-I, effects on plasma xanthophylls, phytosterols and pre-β1-HDL differed markedly, suggesting differences in intestinal lipidation of HDL. In addition, the in vitro investigations suggest an important role of plasma apoA-II in xanthophyll metabolism.

  14. The effect of lactose-isomaltulose-containing growing-up milks on cognitive performance of Indonesian children: a cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Sekartini, Rini; Wiguna, Tjhin; Bardosono, Saptawati; Novita, Dian; Arsianti, Tiana; Calame, Wim; Schaafsma, Anne

    2013-09-28

    Glycaemic response to dietary carbohydrates might have an impact on cognitive performance. The present study investigated the effects of growing-up milks (GUM) with isomaltulose and extra minerals and vitamins or lower protein content on cognitive parameters in children aged 5–6 years. In a blinded, partly randomised, controlled, cross-over study, four GUM were provided, each taken over 14 d (2 × 200 ml/d): standard (Std) GUM; Std GUM+5 g isomaltulose (Iso-5 GUM); Iso-5 GUM with 26 % less protein (Iso-5 LP GUM); Std GUM with 2·5 g isomaltulose and extra Mg, Zn, Se, D3, B1, B2, B12, folic acid and choline (Iso-2·5 GUM). At test days, when GUM replaced breakfast, repeated (0, 60, 120 and 180 min post-dose) cognitive tasks were performed (picture presentation, simple reaction time, digit vigilance, choice reaction time, spatial and numeric working memory and picture recognition). Task performance of all subjects (n 50) worsened over the morning. Best performance was seen on isomaltulose GUM, most notably at 180 min. Iso-2·5 GUM showed best performance on several parameters of attention and memory, Iso-5 GUM performed best on parameters of memory and Iso-5 LP GUM was positively associated with parameters of attention but less with memory. Std GUM showed only a benefit on one attention and one memory task. Thus, isomaltulose-enriched GUM positively affected parameters of attention and memory at 180 min post-dose when compared with Std GUM. Extra minerals and vitamins seem beneficial, whereas lowering protein content might improve attention in particular.

  15. Effects of Two Different Dietary Patterns on Inflammatory Markers, Advanced Glycation End Products and Lipids in Subjects without Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomised Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoona; Keogh, Jennifer B; Clifton, Peter M

    2017-03-29

    Epidemiological studies suggest that consumption of red and processed meat and refined grains are associated with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome and increased inflammatory and fibrinolytic markers. We hypothesised that a diet high in red and processed meat and refined grains (HMD) would increase inflammatory markers and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) compared with a diet high in dairy, whole grains, nuts and legumes (HWD). We performed a randomised crossover study of two four-week interventions in 51 participants without type 2 diabetes (15 men and 36 women aged 35.1 ± 15.6 years; body mass index: 27.7 ± 6.9 kg/m²). No baseline measurements were performed. Plasma fluorescent AGEs, carboxymethyllysine, glucose, insulin, lipids, hs-CRP, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) were analysed after four weeks on each diet. IL-6, hs-CRP, AGEs and carboxymethyllysine were not different between diets but PAI-1 was higher after the HMD than after HWD ((median and interquartile range) 158, 81 vs. 121, 53 ng/mL p < 0.001). PAI-1 on the HWD diet was inversely correlated with whole grains intake (p = 0.007). PAI-1 was inversely correlated with insulin sensitivity index (r = -0.45; p = 0.001) and positively correlated with serum total cholesterol (r = 0.35; p = 0.012) and serum triglyceride (r = 0.32; p = 0.021) on HMD. This trial was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12614000519651).

  16. Direct bandgap cross-over point of Ge1-ySny grown on Si estimated through temperature-dependent photoluminescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Thomas R.; Ryu, Mee-Yi; Yeo, Yung Kee; Wang, Buguo; Senaratne, C. L.; Kouvetakis, John

    2016-08-01

    Epitaxial Ge1-ySny (y = 0%-7.5%) alloys grown on either Si or Ge-buffered Si substrates by chemical vapor deposition were studied as a function of Sn content using temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL). PL emission peaks from both the direct bandgap (Γ-valley) and the indirect bandgap (L-valley) to the valence band (denoted by ED and EID, respectively) were clearly observed at 125 and 175 K for most Ge1-ySny samples studied. At 300 K, however, all of the samples exhibited dominant ED emission with either very weak or no measureable EID emission. At 10 K, ED is dominant only for Ge1-ySny with y > 0.052. From the PL spectra taken at 125 and 175 K, the unstrained indirect and direct bandgap energies were calculated and are plotted as a function of Sn concentration, the results of which show that the indirect-to-direct bandgap transition occurs at ˜6.7% Sn. It is believed that the true indirect-to-direct bandgap cross-over of unstrained Ge1-ySny might also take place at about the same Sn content at room temperature. This observation suggests that these Ge1-ySny alloys could become very promising direct bandgap semiconductor materials, which will be very useful for the development of various new novel Si- and Ge-based infrared optoelectronic devices that can be fully integrated with current technology on a single Si chip.

  17. A randomized, crossover pharmacodynamic study of immediate-release omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate and delayed-release lansoprazole in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pratha, Vijayalakshmi S; McGraw, Thomas; Tobin, William

    2016-06-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) effectively block gastric acid secretion and are the treatment of choice for heartburn. PPIs differ, however, in onset of action and bioavailability. In this single-center, open-label, three-way crossover study, onset of action of immediate-release omeprazole 20 mg/sodium bicarbonate 1100 mg (IR-OME) and delayed-release (DR) lansoprazole 15 mg was evaluated in 63 healthy fasting adults. Subjects were randomized to once daily IR-OME, or DR-lansoprazole, or no treatment for 7 days. The primary efficacy endpoint was the earliest time where a statistically significant difference was observed between IR-OME and DR-lansoprazole in median intragastric pH scores for three consecutive 5-min intervals on day 7. Secondary endpoints compared effects of active treatments on days 1 and 7 (e.g., time to sustained inhibition, percentage of time with pH >4). A significant difference in median intragastric pH favoring IR-OME was observed on day 7 starting at the 10- to 15-min interval postdosing (P = 0.024) and sustaining through the 115- to 120-min interval (P = 0.017). On day 1, IR-OME achieved sustained inhibition of intragastric acidity significantly faster than DR-lansoprazole. IR-OME maintained pH >4 significantly longer than DR-lansoprazole over a 24-h period (P = 0.007) on day 7. Overall, results of this study demonstrate IR-OME is safe and well tolerated and that treatment with IR-OME results in significantly faster onset of action and better gastric acid suppression at steady state than DR-lansoprazole.

  18. Randomized two-way cross-over bioequivalence study of two amoxicillin formulations and inter-ethnicity pharmacokinetic variation in healthy Malay volunteers.

    PubMed

    Liew, Kai Bin; Loh, Gabriel Onn Kit; Tan, Yvonne Tze Fung; Peh, Kok Khiang

    2014-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a new deproteinization method to extract amoxicillin from human plasma and evaluate the inter-ethnic variation of amoxicillin pharmacokinetics in healthy Malay volunteers. A single-dose, randomized, fasting, two-period, two-treatment, two-sequence crossover, open-label bioequivalence study was conducted in 18 healthy Malay adult male volunteers, with one week washout period. The drug concentration in the sample was analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (UV-vis HPLC). The mean (standard deviation) pharmacokinetic parameter results of Moxilen® were: peak concentration (Cmax ), 6.72 (1.56) µg/mL; area under the concentration-time graph (AUC0-8 ), 17.79 (4.29) µg/mL h; AUC0-∞ , 18.84 (4.62) µg/mL h. Those of YSP Amoxicillin® capsule were: Cmax , 6.69 (1.44) µg/mL; AUC0-8 , 18.69 (3.78) µg/mL h; AUC00-∞ , 19.95 (3.81) µg/mL h. The 90% confidence intervals for the logarithmic transformed Cmax , AUC0-8 and AUC0-∞ of Moxilen® vs YSP Amoxicillin® capsule was between 0.80 and 1.25. Both Cmax and AUC met the predetermined criteria for assuming bioequivalence. Both formulations were well tolerated. The results showed significant inter-ethnicity variation in pharmacokinetics of amoxicillin. The Cmax and AUC of amoxicillin in Malay population were slightly lower compared with other populations.

  19. Cardiovascular responses to the ingestion of sugary drinks using a randomised cross-over study design: Does glucose attenuate the blood pressure-elevating effect of fructose?

    PubMed

    Grasser, Erik K; Dulloo, Abdul; Montani, Jean-Pierre

    2014-07-28

    Overconsumption of sugar-sweetened beverages has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CVD. The objective of the present study was to elucidate acute haemodynamic and microcirculatory responses to the ingestion of sugary drinks made from sucrose, glucose or fructose at concentrations similar to those often found in commercial soft drinks. In a randomised cross-over study design, twelve young healthy human subjects (seven men) ingested 500 ml tap water in which was dissolved 60 g of either sucrose, glucose or fructose, or an amount of fructose equivalent to that present in sucrose (i.e. 30 g fructose). Continuous cardiovascular monitoring was performed for 30 min before and at 60 min after ingestion of sugary drinks, and measurements included beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) and impedance cardiography. Additionally, microvascular endothelial function testing was performed after iontophoresis of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside using laser Doppler flowmetry. Ingestion of fructose (60 or 30 g) increased diastolic and mean BP to a greater extent than the ingestion of 60 g of either glucose or sucrose (P< 0.05). Ingestion of sucrose and glucose increased cardiac output (CO; P< 0.05), index of contractility (P< 0.05) and stroke volume (P< 0.05), but reduced total peripheral resistance (TPR; P< 0.05), which contrasts with the tendency of fructose (60 and 30 g) to increase resistance. Microvascular endothelial function did not differ in response to the ingestion of various sugary drinks. In conclusion, ingestion of fructose, but not sucrose, increases BP in healthy human subjects. Although sucrose comprises glucose and fructose, its changes in TPR and CO are more related to glucose than to fructose.

  20. The effect of high lactose-isomaltulose on cognitive performance of young children. A double blind cross-over design study.

    PubMed

    Taib, Mohd Nasir Mohd; Shariff, Zalilah Mohd; Wesnes, Keith A; Saad, Hazizi Abu; Sariman, Sarina

    2012-02-01

    Changes in blood glucose are hypothesized to influence cognitive performance and these changes can be affected by certain nutrients. This double-blind 4-period cross-over study evaluated the effects of a slow-release modified sucrose (isomaltulose) in combination with a high concentration of lactose on cognitive performance of 5-6 year old children. Thirty children received a standard growing upmilk (Std GUM), reformulated growing up milk (Reform GUM), standard growing up milk with lactose-isomaltulose (Iso GUM), and a standard glucose drink (Glucose). The CDR System, a computerised cognitive assessment system, was used to assess various measures of attention and memory of the children at baseline (T=0), 60 (T=1), 120 (T=2), and 180 (T=3) minutes following the intake of test products. Overall, there was a decline in performance over the morning on almost every cognitive task. Children showed better attention following consumption of Iso GUM compared to Std GUM but attention was not significantly different than Reform GUM and glucose. Also, Iso GUM conferred a beneficial effect over both Reform GUM and glucose on sensitivity index of numeric working memory with no difference observed between Iso GUM and Std GUM. Surprisingly, glucose group showed lowest decline in the sensitivity index of spatial working memory and highest speed in picture recognition, although the latter was significantly better than Reform GUM only. For speed of spatial working memory, Reform GUM had the lowest decline but was significantly different only with Std GUM. There was, however, no significant difference among conditions for continuity of attention, speed of numeric working memory and picture recognition sensitivity. Despite the small sample size, the findings are intriguing as carbohydrate composition seems to influence some aspects of cognitive performance such as attention and memory. However, further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  1. Comparison of the micro- and macro-vascular effects of glimepiride and gliclazide in metformin-treated patients with Type 2 diabetes: a double-blind, crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Dhindsa, Pash; Davis, Karl R; Donnelly, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Aims To compare the metabolic and vascular effects of two sulphonylureas (SU), gliclazide (specific for the pancreatic [SUR1] receptor) and glimepiride (a nonspecific agent that also binds to vascular and cardiac [SUR2] receptors), during chronic administration in metformin-treated patients with Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods A randomized, double-blind, crossover study of gliclazide 80 mg BID and glimepiride 2 mg OD, each for 4 weeks as add-on therapy to metformin, with a 4-week washout period. Patients attended four study mornings after first dose and 4 weeks’ SU treatment for measurements of arterial distensibility (Ax), pressor responsiveness to i.v. angiotensin II (ANGII), and cutaneous microvascular vasodilator responses to iontophoresis of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Results Glycaemic responses were similar (e.g. serum fructosamine was 315 vs 329 µmol l−1 after 4 weeks), and there was no change in augmentation index during treatment with either SU (9.1 vs 9.8 mmHg after 4 weeks [95% confidence interval −8.1, 10.5]). Similarly, there were no differences between treatments in pressor responsiveness (e.g. PD10[dose of agonist required to increase mean BP by 10 mmHg] for ANGII was 1.37 vs 1.68 ng kg−1 min−1[−4.3, 6.9]) or cutaneous microvascular vasodilator responses (peak ACh response 68 ± 36 vs 63 ± 34 perfusion units [−82.7, 79.1]). Conclusions There is no evidence that SUR1-specific and nonspecific SUs have differential effects on arterial distensibility, endothelial function or vasodilator mechanisms in metformin-treated patients with T2DM. PMID:12814458

  2. A randomized crossover clinical study showing that methylphenidate-SODAS improves attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms in adolescents with substance use disorder.

    PubMed

    Szobot, C M; Rohde, L A; Katz, B; Ruaro, P; Schaefer, T; Walcher, M; Bukstein, O; Pechansky, F

    2008-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of a long-acting formulation of methylphenidate (MPH-SODAS) on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in an outpatient sample of adolescents with ADHD and substance use disorders (SUD). Secondary goals were to evaluate the tolerability and impact on drug use of MPH-SODAS. This was a 6-week, single-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study assessing efficacy of escalated doses of MPH-SODAS on ADHD symptoms in 16 adolescents with ADHD/SUD. Participants were randomly allocated to either group A (weeks 1-3 on MPH-SODAS, weeks 4-6 on placebo) or group B (reverse order). The primary outcome measures were the Swanson, Nolan and Pelham Scale, version IV (SNAP-IV) and the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI). We also evaluated the adverse effects of MPH-SODAS using the Barkley Side Effect Rating Scale and subject reports of drug use during the study. The sample consisted of marijuana (N = 16; 100%) and cocaine users (N = 7; 43.8%). Subjects had a significantly greater reduction in SNAP-IV and CGI scores (P < 0.001 for all analyses) during MPH-SODAS treatment compared to placebo. No significant effects for period or sequence were found in analyses with the SNAP-IV and CGI scales. There was no significant effect on drug use. MPH-SODAS was well tolerated but was associated with more severe appetite reduction than placebo (P < 0.001). MPH-SODAS was more effective than placebo in reducing ADHD symptoms in a non-abstinent outpatient sample of adolescents with comorbid SUD. Randomized clinical trials, with larger samples and SUD intervention, are recommended.

  3. Improvement of hypertension, endothelial function and systemic inflammation following short-term supplementation with red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) juice: a randomized crossover pilot study.

    PubMed

    Asgary, S; Afshani, M R; Sahebkar, A; Keshvari, M; Taheri, M; Jahanian, E; Rafieian-Kopaei, M; Malekian, F; Sarrafzadegan, N

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and has a prevalence of about one billion people worldwide. It has been shown that adherence to a diet rich in fruits and vegetables helps in decreasing blood pressure (BP). This study aimed to investigate the effect of raw beet juice (RBJ) and cooked beet (CB) on BP of hypertensive subjects. In this randomized crossover study, 24 hypertensive subjects aged 25-68 years old were divided into two groups. One group took RBJ for 2 weeks and the other group took CB. After 2 weeks of treatment, both groups had a washout for 2 weeks then switched to the alternate treatment. Each participant consumed 250 ml day(-1) of RBJ or 250 g day(-1) of CB each for a period of 2 weeks. Body weight, BP, flow-mediated dilation (FMD), lipid profile and inflammatory parameters were measured at baseline and after each period. According to the results, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were significantly lower and FMD was significantly higher after treatment with RBJ compared with CB (P<0.05). FMD was significantly (P<0.05) increased, but systolic and diastolic BP, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular endothelial adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), hs-CRP, interleukin-6, E-selectin and TNF-α were significantly (P<0.05) decreased with RBJ or CB. Total antioxidant capacity was increased and non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and total cholesterol (TC) were decreased with RBJ but not with CB. Although both forms of beetroot were effective in improving BP, endothelial function and systemic inflammation, the raw beetroot juice had greater antihypertensive effects. Also more improvement was observed in endothelial function and systemic inflammation with RBJ compared with CB.

  4. The Acute Effects of Interval-Type Exercise on Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Subjects: Importance of Interval Length. A Controlled, Counterbalanced, Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Ida; Solomon, Thomas P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Interval-type exercise is effective for improving glycemic control, but the optimal approach is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of the interval length on changes in postprandial glycemic control following a single exercise bout. Twelve subjects with type 2 diabetes completed a cross-over study with three 1-hour interventions performed in a non-randomized but counter-balanced order: 1) Interval walking consisting of repeated cycles of 3 min slow (aiming for 54% of Peak oxygen consumption rate [VO2peak]) and 3 min fast (aiming for 89% of VO2peak) walking (IW3); 2) Interval walking consisting of repeated cycles of 1 min slow and 1 min fast walking (IW1) and 3) No walking (CON). The exercise interventions were matched with regards to walking speed, and VO2 and heart rate was assessed throughout all interventions. A 4-hour liquid mixed meal tolerance test commenced 30 min after each intervention, with blood samples taken regularly. IW3 and IW1 resulted in comparable mean VO2 and heart rates. Overall mean postprandial blood glucose levels were lower after IW3 compared to CON (10.3±3.0 vs. 11.1±3.3 mmol/L; P < 0.05), with no significant differences between IW1 (10.5±2.8 mmol/L) and CON or IW3 and IW1 (P > 0.05 for both). Conversely blood glucose levels at specific time points during the MMTT differed significantly following both IW3 and IW1 as compared to CON. Our findings support the previously found blood glucose lowering effect of IW3 and suggest that reducing the interval length, while keeping the walking speed and time spend on fast and slow walking constant, does not result in additional improvements. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02257190 PMID:27695119

  5. Transient cold pain has no effect on cutaneous vasodilatation induced by capsaicin: a randomized-control-crossover study in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Pud, Dorit; Andersen, Ole Kaeseler; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Yarnitsky, David

    2006-05-01

    Cooling the skin induces sympathetically driven vasoconstriction, along with some vasoparalytic dilatation at lowermost temperatures. Neurogenic inflammation, on the other hand, entails vasodilatation. In the present study, we examined the dynamic vasomotor balance of capsaicin-induced vasodilatation within the area of the induced neurogenic inflammation, with and without superimposed cooling. In a randomized-control-crossover fashion, a sample of 14 healthy volunteers participated in three experiments: (1) exposure to each 0 degrees C cold pain stimulus and a neutral 30 degrees C stimulus (control) for 30 s to the volar forearms by contact thermal thermode (1.6x1.6 cm(2)), (2) injection of 50 microg intradermal capsaicin without cooling and (3) injection of capsaicin followed by application of 0 degrees C cold pain stimulation for 30 s within the area of the secondary hyperalgesia. Repetitive vascular measurements over skin area of 4.0x4.0 cm(2) of blood flux (BF) were acquired before and during the 5 min after stimulation. A marked increase in BF (i.e. vasodilatation) at the location of the cold stimulus in comparison to control (30 degrees C) (F=11.97, p=0.004) within the first 3 min was demonstrated. Two-way repeated-measures ANOVA indicated no interaction between the experimental conditions (capsaicin with or without cold) and time (F=0.934, p=0.454). The cold pain stimulation was found to be insignificant in its influence on BF evoked by capsaicin (F=0.018, p=0.894). The results of our study indicate that (1) transient cooling causes significant vasodilatation, (2) intradermal injection of capsaicin is dominant in inducing vasodilatation, and (3) the cold-pain-evoked vasodilatation has no modulative effect on the capsaicin-evoked cutaneous vasodilatation.

  6. Antipsychotic Drugs and the Risk of Ventricular Arrhythmia and/or Sudden Cardiac Death: A Nation‐wide Case‐Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chi‐Shin; Tsai, Yu‐Ting; Tsai, Hui‐Ju

    2015-01-01

    Background Antipsychotics have been linked to prolongation of the QT interval. However, little is known about the risk of ventricular arrhythmia (VA) and/or sudden cardiac death (SCD) associated with individual antipsychotic drug use. This study was designed to investigate the association between specific antipsychotic drugs and the risk of VA and/or SCD. Methods and Results We conducted a case‐crossover study using a nation‐wide population‐based sample obtained from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 17 718 patients with incident VA and/or SCD were enrolled. Conditional logistic regression models were applied to examine the effects of antipsychotic drug use on the risk of VA/SCD during various case and control time windows of 7, 14, and 28 days. The effect of the potency of a human ether‐à‐go‐go‐related gene (hERG) potassium channel blockade was also assessed. Antipsychotic drug use was associated with a 1.53‐fold increased risk of VA and/or SCD. Antipsychotic drugs with increased risk included clothiapine, haloperidol, prochlorperazine, thioridazine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, and sulpiride. The association was significantly higher among those with short‐term use. Antipsychotics with a high potency of the hERG potassium channel blockade had the highest risk of VA and/or SCD. Conclusion Use of antipsychotic drugs is associated with an increased risk of VA and/or SCD. Careful evaluations of the risks and benefits of antipsychotic treatment are highly recommended. PMID:25713294

  7. Effect of zolpidem on sleep architecture and its next-morning residual effect in insomniac patients: a randomized crossover comparative study with brotizolam.

    PubMed

    Uchimura, Naohisa; Nakajima, Toru; Hayash, Kunihiko; Nose, Iwao; Hashizume, Yuji; Ohyama, Tetsu; Habukawa, Mitsunari; Kotorii, Nozomu; Kuwahara, Hiroo; Maeda, Hisao

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of zolpidem (ZOL) 10 mg orally on the sleep architecture and the next-morning residual effect in patients with non-organic insomnia (ICD-10) as compared to the effect of brotizolam (BTM) 0.25 mg orally, a widely used short-acting benzodiazepine (BZD) hypnotic in Japan, in a randomized, crossover comparative study. Fourteen patients with non-organic insomnia (3 males and 11 females; mean age of 54.9+/-S.D. 8.9 years). First three nights with placebo, middle three nights with either ZOL 10 mg or BTM 0.25 mg, and last three nights again with placebo in each session (a total of two sessions). Primary endpoints were polysomnography findings of sleep stages, sleep parameters, and sleep latency (SL) in the morning to examine calculable sleepiness as a residual effect. Secondary endpoint was sleep quality assessed by self-assessment questionnaire. At 150 min after Tmax, both ZOL and BTM significantly increased stage 2 (S2), and ZOL showed significantly longer slow wave sleep (SWS; stage 3+4) as compared to BTM. Stage wake was significantly increased by ZOL at the first withdrawal night and by BTM at the second withdrawal night. ZOL did not affect SL after rising, whereas BTM showed significantly shorter SL. Both drugs reduced the number of nocturnal awakenings and improved subjective sleep quality. The common adverse drug reaction (ADR) was sleepiness (3 patients) in each treatment. All events were mild. No serious adverse events occurred. ZOL is as effective as BTM in improving subjective sleep quality in patients with psychophysiological insomnia (PPI). ZOL has advantages over BTM in having a unique profile of increasing SWS with less next-morning residual effect.

  8. Self-affinity and Crossover of A Clay Deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, J. O.; Huru Bergene, H.; Hansen, A.; Manificat, G.

    Self-affine dehydrated colloidal deposits on fresh mica surfaces of the synthetic 2:1 smectite clay laponite have been studied by means of Atomic Force Microscopy. AFM images of these prepared assemblies of sol and gel aggregates have been analyzed both by means of standard AFM software, and wavelet methods. The deposited surfaces show an anti-persistent to persistent crossover with a clay concentration dependent crossover length. It is thus concluded that the investigated electrolyte concentrations play a minor role

  9. The Clinical Efficacy of Mometasone Furoate in Multi-Lamellar Emulsion for Eczema: A Double-blinded Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk Han; Lee, Hyun Jong; Park, Chun Wook; Kim, Kyu Han; Lee, Kwang Hoon; Ro, Byung In

    2013-01-01

    Background Topical application of corticosteroids also has an influence on skin barrier impairment. Physiological lipid mixtures, such as multi-lamellar emulsion (MLE) containing a natural lipid component leads to effective recovery of the barrier function. Objective The purpose of this study was to conduct an evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy and skin barrier protection of topical mometasone furoate in MLE. Methods A multi-center randomized, double-blind, controlled study was performed to assess the efficacy and safety of mometasone furoate cream in MLE for Korean patients with eczema. The study group included 175 patients with eczema, who applied either mometasone furoate in MLE cream or methylprednisolone aceponate cream for 2 weeks. Treatment efficacy was evaluated using the physician's global assessment of clinical response (PGA), trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), and visual analogue scale (VAS) for pruritus. Patients were evaluated using these indices at days 4, 8, and 15. Results Comparison of PGA score, TEWL, and VAS score at baseline with those at days 4, 8, and 15 of treatment showed a significant improvement in both groups. Patients who applied mometasone furoate in MLE (74.8%) showed better results (p<0.05) than those who applied methylprednisolone aceponate (47.8%). The TEWL improvement ratio was higher in the mometasone furoate in MLE group than that in the methylprednisolone aceponate group, and VAS improvement was also better in the mometasone furoate in MLE group. Conclusion Mometasone furoate in MLE has a better therapeutic efficacy as well as less skin barrier impairment than methylprednisolone aceponate. PMID:23467551

  10. Are There Side Effects to Watching 3D Movies? A Prospective Crossover Observational Study on Visually Induced Motion Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Solimini, Angelo G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing popularity of commercial movies showing three dimensional (3D) images has raised concern about possible adverse side effects on viewers. Methods and Findings A prospective carryover observational study was designed to assess the effect of exposure (3D vs. 2D movie views) on self reported symptoms of visually induced motion sickness. The standardized Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) was self administered on a convenience sample of 497 healthy adult volunteers before and after the vision of 2D and 3D movies. Viewers reporting some sickness (SSQ total score>15) were 54.8% of the total sample after the 3D movie compared to 14.1% of total sample after the 2D movie. Symptom intensity was 8.8 times higher than baseline after exposure to 3D movie (compared to the increase of 2 times the baseline after the 2D movie). Multivariate modeling of visually induced motion sickness as response variables pointed out the significant effects of exposure to 3D movie, history of car sickness and headache, after adjusting for gender, age, self reported anxiety level, attention to the movie and show time. Conclusions Seeing 3D movies can increase rating of symptoms of nausea, oculomotor and disorientation, especially in women with susceptible visual-vestibular system. Confirmatory studies which include examination of clinical signs on viewers are needed to pursue a conclusive evidence on the 3D vision effects on spectators. PMID:23418530

  11. Effects of chocolate milk consumption on markers of muscle recovery following soccer training: a randomized cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The efficacy of chocolate milk (CM) as a recovery beverage following a period of increased training duration (ITD) was studied in intercollegiate soccer players. Methods 13 subjects completed one week of normal 'baseline' training followed by four days of ITD. After each day of ITD, subjects received either a high-carbohydrate (504 kcal; CHO: 122 g; 2 g Fat) or isocaloric CM (504 kcal; 84 g CHO; 28 g Pro; 7 g Fat) recovery beverage. Serum creatine kinase (CK), myoglobin (Mb), muscle soreness, fatigue ratings and isometric quadriceps force (MVC) were obtained prior to ITD, and following 2- and 4-days of ITD. Performance tests (T-drill, vertical jump) were performed within training sessions. Treatments were administered in a randomly counterbalanced protocol, and subjects repeated the procedures with the alternate beverage following a two-week washout period. Results Mean daily training time and HR increased (p < 0.05) between baseline training and ITD, with no differences between treatments. No treatment*time effects were observed for Mb, muscle soreness, fatigue ratings and MVC. However, serum CK was significantly lower (p < 0.05) following four days of ITD with CM (316.9 ± 188.3 U·L-1) compared to CHO (431.6 ± 310.8 U·L-1). No treatment differences were observed for the performance tests. Conclusions Post-exercise CM provided similar muscle recovery responses to an isocaloric CHO beverage during four-days of ITD. Future studies should investigate if the attenuated CK levels observed with CM have functional significance during more demanding periods of training. PMID:20482784

  12. Objective assessment of drowsiness and reaction time during intermittent Ramadan fasting in young men: a case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ramadan fasting and its attendant lifestyle changes induce changes in the circadian rhythm and in associated physiological and metabolic functions. Previous studies that have assessed psychomotor performance during Ramadan fasting have reported conflicting results. Therefore, we designed this study to objectively assess the effects of intermittent fasting during and outside Ramadan (to control for lifestyle changes) on drowsiness, blink total duration and mean reaction time (MRT) test while controlling for potential confounders. Methods Eight healthy volunteers with a mean age of 25.3 ± 2.9 years and a mean body mass index (BMI) of 23.4 ± 3.2 kg/m2 reported to the sleep laboratory on four occasions for polysomnography (PSG) and drowsiness and psychomotor assessments as follows: 1) adaptation; 2) 4 weeks before Ramadan while performing the Islamic fasting for 1 week (baseline fasting) (BLF); 3) 1 week before Ramadan (non-fasting baseline) (BL); and 4) during the second week of Ramadan while fasting (Ramadan). OPTALERT™ was used to objectively assess daytime drowsiness using the Johns Drowsiness Scale (JDS), and blink total duration and a visual reaction time test were used to assess MRT. Results Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep percentage was significantly lower at BLF (17.7 ± 8.1%) and at Ramadan (18.6 ± 10.7%) compared with BL (25.6 ± 4.8%) (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between JDS scores and blink total duration during the two test periods in BL, BLF and Ramadan. There were no significant changes in MRT during BL, BLF and Ramadan. Conclusions Under controlled conditions of fixed light/dark exposure, caloric intake, sleep/wake schedule and sleep quality, the Islamic intermittent fasting has no impact on drowsiness and vigilance as measured by the JDS, total blink duration and MRT. PMID:23937904

  13. Acute effects of beer on endothelial function and haemodynamics: a single-blind, cross-over study in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Karatzi, Kalliopi; Rontoyanni, Victoria G.; Protogerou, Athanase D.; Georgoulia, Aggeliki; Xenos, Konstantinos; Chrysou, John; Sfikakis, Petros P.; Sidossis, Labros S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Moderate consumption of beer is associated with lower cardiovascular (CV) risk. To explore the underlying mechanisms we studied the acute effects of the constituents of beer (alcohol and antioxidants), on established predictors of CV risk: endothelial function, aortic stiffness, pressure wave reflections and aortic pressure. Research Methods & Proceedures In a randomized, single – blind, cross - over study 17 healthy, non-smoking, volunteers (28.5±5.2 years and 24.4±2.5 BMI) consumed in 3 separate days, at least one week apart: a) 400 ml of beer & 400 ml water, b) 800 ml of dealcoholized beer (same amount of polyphenols), and c) 67 ml of vodka & 733 ml water (same amount of alcohol). Each time aortic stiffness (pulse wave velocity, pressure wave reflections (Aix), aortic and brachial pressure (Sphygmocor device) and endothelial function (brachial flow mediated dilatation) were assessed at fast and 1 and 2 hours postprandial. Results Aortic stiffness was significantly and similarly reduced by all 3 interventions. However, endothelial function was significantly improved only after beer consumption (average of 1.33%, CI 0.15-2.53). Although wave reflections were significantly reduced by all 3 interventions (average of beer: 9.1%, dealcoholized beer: 2.8%, vodka 8.5%, all CI within limits of significance), the reduction was higher after beer consumption compared todealcoholized beer (p=0.018). Pulse pressure amplification (i.e. brachial/aortic) was increased by all 3 test drinks. Conclusions Beer improves acutely parameters of arterial function and structure, in healthy non-smokers. This benefit seems to be mediated by the additive or synergistic effects of alcohol and anti-oxidants and merits further investigation. PMID:23810643

  14. A phenomenological study of hybrid stars in which the crossover transition from quark to hadron makes the EOS stiffer in contrast to the hybrid EOS based on Maxwell condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tong; Li, Cheng-Ming; Zhao, Ya-Peng; Yan, Yan; Luo, Xin-Lian; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we make a phenomenological study of the mass-radii relationship of hybrid stars from the point of view of the smooth crossover phase transition. We find a way to construct stiff hybrid equations of state (EOSs) with soft EOSs of both the quark matter and the hadronic matter. For the hadron phase, we adopt the EOS softened by introducing hyperons that are considered to exist in the core of a neutron star. For the quark phase, we introduce a quark EOS based on the Dyson-Schwinger equation (DSE) that is calculated in our previous work, and it is also a soft EOS. In contrast to the hybrid EOS based on Maxwell condition, we find that the resulting EOS is stiff and the maximum mass of the hybrid stars is still about two times of solar mass. This result indicates the rich possibilities of the crossover model.

  15. Efficacy of Moringa oleifera leaf powder as a hand- washing product: a crossover controlled study among healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Moringa oleifera is a plant found in many tropical and subtropical countries. Many different uses and properties have been attributed to this plant, mainly as a nutritional supplement and as a water purifier. Its antibacterial activity against different pathogens has been described in different in vitro settings. However the potential effect of this plant leaf as a hand washing product has never been studied. The aim of this study is to test the efficacy of this product using an in vivo design with healthy volunteers. Methods The hands of fifteen volunteers were artificially contaminated with Escherichia coli. Moringa oleifera leaf powder was tested as a hand washing product and was compared with reference non-medicated liquid soap using a cross over design following an adaptation of the European Committee for Standardization protocol (EN 1499). In a second part of tests, the efficacy of the established amount of Moringa oleifera leaf powder was compared with an inert powder using the same protocol. Results Application of 2 and 3 g of dried Moringa oleifera leaf powder (mean log10-reduction: 2.44 ± 0.41 and 2.58 ± 0.34, respectively) was significantly less effective than the reference soap (3.00 ± 0.27 and 2.99 ± 0.26, respectively; p < 0.001). Application of the same amounts of Moringa oleifera (2 and 3 g) but using a wet preparation, was also significantly less effective than reference soap (p < 0.003 and p < 0.02, respectively). However there was no significant difference when using 4 g of Moringa oleifera powder in dried or wet preparation (mean log10-reduction: 2.70 ± 0.27 and 2.91 ± 0.11, respectively) compared with reference soap (2.97 ± 0.28). Application of calcium sulphate inert powder was significantly less effective than the 4 g of Moringa oleifera powder (p < 0.01). Conclusion Four grams of Moringa oleifera powder in dried and wet application had the same effect as non-medicated soap

  16. Acute effects of exposure to a traditional rural environment on urban dwellers: a crossover field study in terraced farmland.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juyoung; Park, Bum-Jin; Ohira, Tatsuro; Kagawa, Takahide; Miyazaki, Yoshifumi

    2015-02-05

    Despite an increasing attention and public preference for rural amenities, little evidence is available on the health benefits of a rural environment. In this study, we identified physiological and psychological benefits of exposure to a rural environment using multiparametric methods. Twelve young male adults participated in a 3-day field experiment (mean ± standard deviation age, 22.3 ± 1.3 years). Sleeping environment, diet program, physical activities, and other factors possibly affecting physiological responses were controlled during experiment period. For all participants, salivary cortisol concentration, heart rate variability, and blood pressure were measured at rural and urban field sites. Self-evaluation questionnaires were administered to analyze the psychological states in two different environments. Volatile compounds in the air were also analyzed to investigate air quality. The data were compared between rural and urban environments. The data showed that exposure to a rural environment reduced stress hormone secretion and sympathetic nervous activity and increased parasympathetic nervous activity. Short-term exposure to a rural environment also improved mood states. Our findings indicate that exposure to a rural environment effectively reduced physiological stress and enhanced psychological well-being.

  17. Acute Effects of Exposure to a Traditional Rural Environment on Urban Dwellers: A Crossover Field Study in Terraced Farmland

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juyoung; Park, Bum-Jin; Ohira, Tatsuro; Kagawa, Takahide; Miyazaki, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Despite an increasing attention and public preference for rural amenities, little evidence is available on the health benefits of a rural environment. In this study, we identified physiological and psychological benefits of exposure to a rural environment using multiparametric methods. Twelve young male adults participated in a 3-day field experiment (mean ± standard deviation age, 22.3 ± 1.3 years). Sleeping environment, diet program, physical activities, and other factors possibly affecting physiological responses were controlled during experiment period. For all participants, salivary cortisol concentration, heart rate variability, and blood pressure were measured at rural and urban field sites. Self-evaluation questionnaires were administered to analyze the psychological states in two different environments. Volatile compounds in the air were also analyzed to investigate air quality. The data were compared between rural and urban environments. The data showed that exposure to a rural environment reduced stress hormone secretion and sympathetic nervous activity and increased parasympathetic nervous activity. Short-term exposure to a rural environment also improved mood states. Our findings indicate that exposure to a rural environment effectively reduced physiological stress and enhanced psychological well-being. PMID:25664697

  18. The role of water in protein's behavior: The two dynamical crossovers studied by NMR and FTIR techniques.

    PubMed

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Dugo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    The role the solvent plays in determining the biological activity of proteins is of primary importance. Water is the solvent of life and proteins need at least a water monolayer covering their surface in order to become biologically active. We study how the properties of water and the effect of its coupling with the hydrophilic moieties of proteins govern the regime of protein activity. In particular we follow, by means of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, the thermal evolution of the amide vibrational modes of hydrated lysozyme in the temperature interval 180 K < T < 350 K. In such a way we are able to observe the thermal limit of biological activity characterizing hydrated lysozyme. Finally we focus on the region of lysozyme thermal denaturation by following the evolution of the proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra for 298 K < T < 366 K with the High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning probe. Our data suggest that the hydrogen bond coupling between hydration water and protein hydrophilic groups is crucial in triggering the main mechanisms that define the enzymatic activity of proteins.

  19. The role of water in protein's behavior: The two dynamical crossovers studied by NMR and FTIR techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Dugo, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The role the solvent plays in determining the biological activity of proteins is of primary importance. Water is the solvent of life and proteins need at least a water monolayer covering their surface in order to become biologically active. We study how the properties of water and the effect of its coupling with the hydrophilic moieties of proteins govern the regime of protein activity. In particular we follow, by means of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, the thermal evolution of the amide vibrational modes of hydrated lysozyme in the temperature interval 180 K < T < 350 K. In such a way we are able to observe the thermal limit of biological activity characterizing hydrated lysozyme. Finally we focus on the region of lysozyme thermal denaturation by following the evolution of the proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra for 298 K < T < 366 K with the High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning probe. Our data suggest that the hydrogen bond coupling between hydration water and protein hydrophilic groups is crucial in triggering the main mechanisms that define the enzymatic activity of proteins. PMID:25750698

  20. Effects of L-carnitine supplementation on physical performance and energy metabolism of endurance-trained athletes: a double-blind crossover field study.

    PubMed

    Colombani, P; Wenk, C; Kunz, I; Krähenbühl, S; Kuhnt, M; Arnold, M; Frey-Rindova, P; Frey, W; Langhans, W

    1996-01-01

    A double-blind crossover field study was performed to investigate the effects of acute L-carnitine supplementation on metabolism and performance of endurance-trained athletes during and after a marathon run. Seven male subjects were given supplements of 2 g L-carnitine 2 h before the start of a marathon run and again after 20 km of the run. The plasma concentration of metabolites and hormones was analysed 1 h before, immediately after and 1 h after the run, as well as the next morning after the run. In addition, the respiratory exchange ratio (R) was determined before and at the end of the run, and a submaximal performance test was completed on a treadmill the morning after the run. The administration of L-carnitine was associated with a significant increase in the plasma concentration of all analysed carnitine fractions (i.e. free carnitine, short-chain acylcarnitine, long-chain acylcarnitine, total acid soluble carnitine, total carnitine) but caused no significant change in marathon running time, in R, in the plasma concentrations of carbohydrate metabolites (glucose, lactate, pyruvate), of fat metabolites (free fatty acids, glycerol, beta-hydroxybutyrate), of hormones (insulin, glucagon, cortisol), and of enzyme activities (creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase). Moreover, there was no difference in the result of the submaximal performance test the morning after the run. In conclusion, acute administration of L-carnitine did not affect the metabolism or improve the physical performance of the endurance-trained athletes during the run and did not alter their recovery.

  1. Gesture-Controlled Image Management for Operating Room: A Randomized Crossover Study to Compare Interaction Using Gestures, Mouse, and Third Person Relaying

    PubMed Central

    Dubois-Ferrière, Victor; Budry, Sylvain; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Lovis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this work, we aim at comparing formally three different interaction modes for image manipulation that are usable in a surgery setting: 1) A gesture-controlled approach using Kinect ®; 2) oral instructions to a third part dedicated to manipulate the images; and 3) direct manipulation using a mouse. Materials and Methods Each participant used the radiology image viewer Weasis with the three interaction modes. In a crossover randomized controlled trial participants were attributed block wise to six experimental groups. For each group, the order for testing the three modes was randomly assigned. Nine standardized scenarios were used. Results 30 physicians and senior medical students participated in the experiment. Efficiency, measured as time used to pass the scenario, was best when using the mouse (M = 109.10s, SD = 25.96), followed by gesture-controlled (M = 214.97s, SD = 46.29) and oral instructions (M = 246.33s, SD = 76.50). Satisfaction, measured by a questionnaire, was rated highest in the condition mouse (M = 6.63, SD = 0.56), followed by gesture-controlled (M = 5.77, SD = 0.93) and oral instructions (M = 4.40, SD = 1.71). Differences in efficiency and satisfaction rating were significant. No significant difference in effectiveness, measured with error rates, was found. Discussion The study shows with formal evaluation that the use of gestures is advantageous over instructions to a third person. In particular, the use of gestures is more efficient than verbalizing instructions. The given gestures could be learned easily and reliability of the tested gesture-control system is good. Conclusion Under the premise that mouse cannot be used directly during surgery, gesture-controlled approaches demonstrate to be superior to oral instructions for image manipulation. PMID:27082758

  2. Effects of Arabinoxylan and Resistant Starch on Intestinal Microbiota and Short-Chain Fatty Acids in Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomised Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Mary E.; Dige, Anders; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Agnholt, Jørgen; Bach Knudsen, Knud Erik; Hermansen, Kjeld; Marco, Maria L.; Gregersen, Søren; Dahlerup, Jens F.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the intestinal microbiota has been emphasised as an important contributor to the development of metabolic syndrome. Dietary fibre may exert beneficial effects through modulation of the intestinal microbiota and metabolic end products. We investigated the effects of a diet enriched with two different dietary fibres, arabinoxylan and resistant starch type 2, on the gut microbiome and faecal short-chain fatty acids. Nineteen adults with metabolic syndrome completed this randomised crossover study with two 4-week interventions of a diet enriched with arabinoxylan and resistant starch and a low-fibre Western-style diet. Faecal samples were collected before and at the end of the interventions for fermentative end-product analysis and 16S ribosomal RNA bacterial gene amplification for identification of bacterial taxa. Faecal carbohydrate residues were used to verify compliance. The diet enriched with arabinoxylan and resistant starch resulted in significant reductions in the total species diversity of the faecal-associated intestinal microbiota but also increased the heterogeneity of bacterial communities both between and within subjects. The proportion of Bifidobacterium was increased by arabinoxylan and resistant starch consumption (P<0.001), whereas the proportions of certain bacterial genera associated with dysbiotic intestinal communities were reduced. Furthermore, the total short-chain fatty acids (P<0.01), acetate (P<0.01) and butyrate concentrations (P<0.01) were higher by the end of the diet enriched with arabinoxylan and resistant starch compared with those resulting from the Western-style diet. The concentrations of isobutyrate (P = 0.05) and isovalerate (P = 0.03) decreased in response to the arabinoxylan and resistant starch enriched diet, indicating reduced protein fermentation. In conclusion, arabinoxylan and resistant starch intake changes the microbiome and short-chain fatty acid compositions, with potential beneficial effects on colonic health

  3. Comparison between Steroid Injection and Stretching Exercise on the Scalene of Patients with Upper Extremity Paresthesia: Randomized Cross-Over Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Wook; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Park, Yongbum; Chang, Won Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the therapeutic effects on upper extremity paresthesia of intra-muscular steroid injections into the scalene muscle with those of stretching exercise only. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with upper extremity paresthesia who met the criteria were recruited to participate in this single-blind, crossover study. Fourteen of 20 patients were female. The average age was 45.0±10.5 years and duration of symptom was 12.2±8.7 months. Each participant completed one injection and daily exercise program for 2 weeks. After randomization, half of all patients received ultrasound-guided injection of scalene muscles before exercise, while the other was invested for the other patients. Results After two weeks, there was a significant decrease of the visual analog scale score of treatment effect compared with baseline in both groups (6.90 to 2.85 after injection and 5.65 to 4.05 after stretching exercise, p<0.01). However, injection resulted in greater improvements than stretching exercise (p<0.01). The number of patients with successful treatment, defined as >50% reduction in post-treatment visual analog scale, was 18 of 20 (90.0%) after injection, compared to 5 of 20 (25.0%) after stretching exercise. There were no cases of unintended brachial plexus block after injection. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided steroid injection or stretching exercise of scalene muscles led to reduced upper extremity paresthesia in patients who present with localized tenderness in the scalene muscle without electrodiagnostic test abnormalities, although injection treatment resulted in more improvements. The results suggest that symptoms relief might result from injection into the muscle alone not related to blockade of the brachial plexus. PMID:26847305

  4. A cross-over study of the acute effects of espresso coffee on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Jeremy D; Parry-Strong, Amber; Weatherall, Mark; Carroll, Richard W; Downie, Michelle

    2012-09-01

    The objective was to determine the effect of a single dose of espresso caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or water on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Eighteen participants who were habitual coffee drinkers, were studied using a random-order cross-over design. After a fasting blood sample participants consumed either a double-shot black espresso coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or hot water. The main outcomes were area under the curve (AUC) glucose and insulin, and insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index) during a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) performed one hour later. Other outcomes were change in glucose and insulin and also the insulinogenic index (IGI) and disposition index (DI). AUC glucose was marginally different between beverages (P=.06) being greater following caffeinated coffee than water, mean difference 104 mmol/L/180 min (95% CI 0.1 to 198.1, P=.031), or decaffeinated coffee, mean difference 92.1 mmol/L/180 min (95% CI -1.9 to 186.1, P=.055). There was no difference in AUC insulin (P=.87) or insulin sensitivity (P=.47), nor in change in glucose or insulin over the hour following beverage consumption. There was a marginal difference in IGI between beverages (P=.097) with coffee having a lower incremental increase in insulin/glucose than water (P=.037) though no difference between coffee and decaffeinated coffee (P=.54) and no difference in DI (P=.23). Black espresso coffee in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus results in a marginally greater excursion of glucose during a following OGTT compared with water or decaffeinated coffee. This effect does not appear to be mediated by changes in insulin sensitivity.

  5. No evidence of dehydration with moderate daily coffee intake: a counterbalanced cross-over study in a free-living population.

    PubMed

    Killer, Sophie C; Blannin, Andrew K; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2014-01-01

    It is often suggested that coffee causes dehydration and its consumption should be avoided or significantly reduced to maintain fluid balance. The aim of this study was to directly compare the effects of coffee consumption against water ingestion across a range of validated hydration assessment techniques. In a counterbalanced cross-over design, 50 male coffee drinkers (habitually consuming 3-6 cups per day) participated in two trials, each lasting three consecutive days. In addition to controlled physical activity, food and fluid intake, participants consumed either 4×200 mL of coffee containing 4 mg/kg caffeine (C) or water (W). Total body water (TBW) was calculated pre- and post-trial via ingestion of Deuterium Oxide. Urinary and haematological hydration markers were recorded daily in addition to nude body mass measurement (BM). Plasma was analysed for caffeine to confirm compliance. There were no significant changes in TBW from beginning to end of either trial and no differences between trials (51.5±1.4 vs. 51.4±1.3 kg, for C and W, respectively). No differences were observed between trials across any haematological markers or in 24 h urine volume (2409±660 vs. 2428±669 mL, for C and W, respectively), USG, osmolality or creatinine. Mean urinary Na(+) excretion was higher in C than W (p = 0.02). No significant differences in BM were found between conditions, although a small progressive daily fall was observed within both trials (0.4±0.5 kg; p<0.05). Our data show that there were no significant differences across a wide range of haematological and urinary markers of hydration status between trials. These data suggest that coffee, when consumed in moderation by caffeine habituated males provides similar hydrating qualities to water.

  6. No Evidence of Dehydration with Moderate Daily Coffee Intake: A Counterbalanced Cross-Over Study in a Free-Living Population

    PubMed Central

    Killer, Sophie C.; Blannin, Andrew K.; Jeukendrup, Asker E.

    2014-01-01

    It is often suggested that coffee causes dehydration and its consumption should be avoided or significantly reduced to maintain fluid balance. The aim of this study was to directly compare the effects of coffee consumption against water ingestion across a range of validated hydration assessment techniques. In a counterbalanced cross-over design, 50 male coffee drinkers (habitually consuming 3–6 cups per day) participated in two trials, each lasting three consecutive days. In addition to controlled physical activity, food and fluid intake, participants consumed either 4×200 mL of coffee containing 4 mg/kg caffeine (C) or water (W). Total body water (TBW) was calculated pre- and post-trial via ingestion of Deuterium Oxide. Urinary and haematological hydration markers were recorded daily in addition to nude body mass measurement (BM). Plasma was analysed for caffeine to confirm compliance. There were no significant changes in TBW from beginning to end of either trial and no differences between trials (51.5±1.4 vs. 51.4±1.3 kg, for C and W, respectively). No differences were observed between trials across any haematological markers or in 24 h urine volume (2409±660 vs. 2428±669 mL, for C and W, respectively), USG, osmolality or creatinine. Mean urinary Na+ excretion was higher in C than W (p = 0.02). No significant differences in BM were found between conditions, although a small progressive daily fall was observed within both trials (0.4±0.5 kg; p<0.05). Our data show that there were no significant differences across a wide range of haematological and urinary markers of hydration status between trials. These data suggest that coffee, when consumed in moderation by caffeine habituated males provides similar hydrating qualities to water. PMID:24416202

  7. Articaine and mepivacaine buccal infiltration in securing mandibular first molar pulp anesthesia following mepivacaine inferior alveolar nerve block: A randomized, double-blind crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Gazal, Giath; Alharbi, Abdullah Muteb; Al-Samadani, Khalid HidayatAllah; Kanaa, Mohammad Dib

    2015-01-01

    Aims: A crossover double-blind, randomized study was designed to explore the efficacy of 2% mepivacaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline buccal infiltration and 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline buccal infiltration following 2% mepivacaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for testing pulp anesthesia of mandibular first molar teeth in adult volunteers. Materials and Methods: A total of 23 healthy adult volunteers received two regimens with at least 1-week apart; one with 4% articaine buccal infiltration and 2% mepivacaine IANB (articaine regimen) and another with 2% mepivacaine buccal infiltration supplemented to 2% mepivacaine IANB (mepivacaine regimen). Pulp testing of first molar tooth was electronically measured twice at baseline, then at intervals of 2 min for the first 10 min, then every 5 min until 45 min postinjection. Anesthetic success was considered when two consecutive maximal stimulation on pulp testing readings without sensation were obtained within 10 min and continuously sustained for 45 min postinjection. Results: In total, the number of no sensations to maximum pulp testing for first molar teeth were significantly higher after articaine regimen than mepivacaine during 45 min postinjection (267 vs. 250 episodes, respectively, P < 0.001), however, both articaine and mepivacaine buccal infiltrations are equally effective in securing anesthetic success for first molar pulp anesthesia when supplemented to mepivacaine IANB injections (P > 0.05). Interestingly, volunteers in the articaine regimen provided faster onset and longer duration (means 2.78 min, 42.22 min, respectively) than mepivacaine regimen (means 4.26 min, 40.74 min, respectively) for first molar pulp anesthesia (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Supplementary mepivacaine and articaine buccal infiltrations produced similar successful first molar pulp anesthesia following mepivacaine IANB injections in volunteers. Articaine buccal infiltration produced faster onset and

  8. Open-Label, Randomized, 6-Way Crossover, Single-Dose Study to Determine the Pharmacokinetics of Batefenterol (GSK961081) and Fluticasone Furoate When Administered Alone or in Combination.

    PubMed

    Ambery, Claire; Riddell, Kylie; Daley-Yates, Peter

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the pharmacokinetics of inhaled batefenterol (BAT) and fluticasone furoate (FF) given alone or in combination via ELLIPTA® dry powder inhaler (DPI-E), and BAT monotherapy via DISKUS® DPI (DPI-D). In this open-label, 6-way crossover study, 48 healthy subjects were randomized to 1 of 6 treatment sequences, comprising 6 single-dose treatment regimens: (1) BAT 1200 μg via DPI-D; (2) BAT 1200 μg via DPI-E without a lactose-filled second strip; (3) BAT 1200 μg via DPI-E with a lactose-filled second strip; (4) BAT/FF 1200/300 μg via DPI-E; (5) FF 300 μg via DPI-E with a lactose-filled second strip; and (6) BAT/FF 900/300 μg via DPI-E. Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed using noncompartmental methods. Plasma BAT area under the curve (AUC) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ) were similar for all treatments containing BAT 1200 μg (geometric least-squares means [GLSM] ratio, 0.90-1.06). Plasma FF AUC and Cmax were reduced following BAT/FF 1200/300 μg and 900/300 μg versus FF 300 μg monotherapy (GLSM ratio, 0.62-0.77). BAT 1200 μg administered via DPI-E, alone or in combination with FF, resulted in similar systemic exposure versus BAT administered by DPI-D. FF exposure was reduced when administered in combination with BAT compared with FF alone.

  9. Post-Exercise Hypotension and Its Mechanisms Differ after Morning and Evening Exercise: A Randomized Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Junior, Natan D.; Tinucci, Tais; Casarini, Dulce E.; Cipolla-Neto, José

    2015-01-01

    Post-exercise hypotension (PEH), calculated by the difference between post and pre-exercise values, it is greater after exercise performed in the evening than the morning. However, the hypotensive effect of morning exercise may be masked by the morning circadian increase in blood pressure. This study investigated PEH and its hemodynamic and autonomic mechanisms after sessions of aerobic exercise performed in the morning and evening, controlling for responses observed after control sessions performed at the same times of day. Sixteen pre-hypertensive men underwent four sessions (random order): two conducted in the morning (7:30am) and two in the evening (5pm). At each time of day, subjects underwent an exercise (cycling, 45 min, 50%VO2peak) and a control (sitting rest) session. Measurements were taken pre- and post-interventions in all the sessions. The net effects of exercise were calculated for each time of day by [(post-pre exercise)-(post-pre control)] and were compared by paired t-test (P<0.05). Exercise hypotensive net effects (e.g., decreasing systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure) occurred at both times of day, but systolic blood pressure reductions were greater after morning exercise (-7±3 vs. -3±4 mmHg, P<0.05). Exercise decreased cardiac output only in the morning (-460±771 ml/min, P<0.05), while it decreased stroke volume similarly at both times of day and increased heart rate less in the morning than in the evening (+7±5 vs. +10±5 bpm, P<0.05). Only evening exercise increased sympathovagal balance (+1.5±1.6, P<0.05) and calf blood flow responses to reactive hyperemia (+120±179 vs. -70±188 U, P<0.05). In conclusion, PEH occurs after exercise conducted at both times of day, but the systolic hypotensive effect is greater after morning exercise when circadian variations are considered. This greater effect is accompanied by a reduction of cardiac output due to a smaller increase in heart rate and cardiac sympathovagal balance. PMID:26186444

  10. The BCS-BEC Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Meera M.

    2015-09-01

    This chapter presents the crossover from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) state of weakly correlated pairs of fermions to the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of diatomic molecules in the atomic Fermi gas. Our aim is to provide a pedagogical review of the BCS-BEC crossover, with an emphasis on the basic concepts, particularly those that are not generally known or are difficult to find in the literature. We shall not attempt to give an exhaustive survey of current research in the limited space here; where possible, we will direct the reader to more extensive reviews.

  11. Tunneling above the crossover temperature.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Barcia, Sonia; Flores, Jesús R; Kästner, Johannes

    2014-01-09

    Quantum mechanical tunneling of atoms plays a significant role in many chemical reactions. The crossover temperature between classical and quantum movement is a convenient preliminary indication of the importance of tunneling for a particular reaction. Here we show, using instanton theory, that quantum tunneling is possible significantly above this crossover temperature for specific forms of the potential energy surface. We demonstrate the effect on an analytic potential as well as a chemical system. While protons move asynchronously along a Grotthuss chain in the classical high-temperature range, the onset of tunneling results in a synchronization of their movement.

  12. Microelectronic superconducting crossover and coil

    DOEpatents

    Wellstood, Frederick C.; Kingston, John J.; Clarke, John

    1994-01-01

    A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T.sub.c superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO.sub.3 ; and a third high T.sub.c superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps and which can be opened to the atmosphere between depositions.

  13. Microelectronic superconducting crossover and coil

    DOEpatents

    Wellstood, F.C.; Kingston, J.J.; Clarke, J.

    1994-03-01

    A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T[sub c] superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO[sub 3]; and a third high T[sub c] superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps and which can be opened to the atmosphere between depositions. 13 figures.

  14. Explicit feedback to enhance the effect of an interim assessment: a cross-over study on learning effect and gender difference.

    PubMed

    Olde Bekkink, Marleen; Donders, Rogier; van Muijen, Goos N P; de Waal, Rob M W; Ruiter, Dirk J

    2012-11-01

    In a previous study we demonstrated by a prospective controlled design that an interim assessment during an ongoing small group work (SGW) session resulted in a higher score in the course examination. As this reflects the so-called testing effect, which is supposed to be enhanced by feedback, we investigated whether feedback following an interim assessment would have an effect on the score of the course exam, and whether the effect is influenced by the gender of the student. During a General Pathology bachelor course all 386 (bio) medical students took an interim assessment on the topics cell damage (first week) and tumour pathology (fourth week). The intervention consisted of immediate detailed oral feedback on the content of the questions of the interim assessment by the tutor, including the rationale of the correct and incorrect answers. It concerned a prospective randomized study using a cross-over design. Outcome measures were: (1) the difference in the normalized scores (1-10) of the course examination multiple choice questions related to the two topics, (2) effect of gender, and (3) gender-specific scores on formal examination. The effect of feedback was estimated as half the difference in the outcome between the two conditions. Mixed-model analysis was used whereby the SGW group was taken as the study target. The scores of the questions on cell damage amounted to 7.70 (SD 1.59) in the group without and 7.78 (SD 1.39) in the group with feedback, and 6.73 (SD 1.51) and 6.77 (SD 1.60), respectively, for those on tumour pathology. No statistically significant effect of feedback was found: 0.02 on a scale of 1-10 (95 % CI: -0.20; 0.25). There were no significant interactions of feedback with gender. Female students scored 0.43 points higher on the formal examination in comparison with their male colleagues. No additional effect of immediate explicit feedback following an interim assessment during an SGW session in an ongoing bachelor course could be

  15. RAPID KNEE-EXTENSIONS TO INCREASE QUADRICEPS MUSCLE ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: A RANDOMIZED CROSS-OVER STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Wilquin, Lousia; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Bandholm, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background Inhibition of the quadriceps muscle and reduced knee-extension strength is common shortly following total knee arthroplasty (weeks to months), due to reduced voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle. In healthy subjects, strength training with heavy loads is known to increase agonist muscle activity, especially if the exercise is conducted using rapid muscle contractions. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine if patients with total knee arthroplasty could perform rapid knee-extensions using a 10 RM load four to eight weeks after surgery, and the degree to which rapid knee-extensions were associated with greater voluntary quadriceps muscle activity during an experimental strength training session, compared to that elicited using slow knee-extensions. Study Design A randomized cross-over study. Methods Twenty-four patients (age 66.5) 4-8 weeks post total knee arthroplasty randomly performed one set of five rapid, and one set of five slow knee-extensions with the operated leg, using a load of their 10 repetition maximum, while surface electromyography recordings were obtained from the vastus medialis and lateralis of the quadriceps muscle. Results Data from 23 of the 24 included patients were analyzed. Muscle activity was significantly higher during rapid knee-extensions (120.2% [10th-90th percentile: 98.3-149.1]) compared to slow knee-extensions (106.0% [88.8-140.8]) for the vastus lateralis (p<0.01), but not for the vastus medialis (120.8% [90.4-134.0]) and (121.8% [93.0-133.0]) (p = 0.17), respectively. Slow and rapid knee-extensions were performed at a median angular velocity of 19.7 degrees/sec (13.7-24.4) and 51.4 degrees/sec (28.9-63.1), respectively Conclusion Four to eight weeks after their total knee arthroplasty, the patients in the present study were able to conduct rapid knee-extensions according to the experimental protocol with an approximately doubled angular velocity compared to slow knee-extensions. This was associated with

  16. An open-label, single-dose, crossover study of the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of two oral formulations of 1-octanol in patients with essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Nahab, Fatta B; Wittevrongel, Loretta; Ippolito, Dominic; Toro, Camilo; Grimes, George J; Starling, Judith; Potti, Gopal; Haubenberger, Dietrich; Bowen, Daniel; Buchwald, Peter; Dong, Chuanhui; Kalowitz, Daniel; Hallett, Mark

    2011-10-01

    Existing therapeutic options for management of essential tremor are frequently limited by poor efficacy and adverse effects. Likely the most potent tremor suppressant used is ethanol, although its use is prohibitive due to a brief therapeutic window, and the obvious implications of excessive alcohol use. Longer-chain alcohols have been shown to suppress tremor in harmaline animal models, and appear to be safe and well tolerated in 2 prior studies in humans. Here we report on the findings of a phase I/II study of 1-octanol designed to explore pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety. The most significant finding was the identification of octanoic acid as the product of rapid 1-octanol metabolism. Furthermore, the temporal profile of efficacy closely matches the plasma concentration of octanoic acid. Therefore, these findings identify a novel class of compound (e.g., carboxylic acids) with tremor suppressive properties in ET. Administration of 1-octanol also appears to be safe based on various measures collected. Essential tremor (ET) is the most common tremor disorder, with tremors occurring during static posturing or movement. These tremors are known to briefly improve in many cases after alcohol (ethanol) consumption. Two previous studies of a longer chain alcohol, 1-octanol, have demonstrated longer duration tremor-suppressive effects without the occurrence of intoxication. The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of 1-octanol and its primary metabolite octanoic acid using two formulations, along with additional safety and efficacy measures. Participants with proven ethanol-responsive ET were recruited into 1 of 2 parts: (part A) a dose escalation study (1-64 mg/kg; n = 4), and (part B) a fixed dose (64 mg/kg; n = 10) balanced, open-label crossover design. Two participants in part B then completed an exploratory part C evaluating 128 mg/kg.Plasma samples were collected at 10 intervals during a 6-hour period postingestion. Efficacy was

  17. Consistency of response to sumatriptan/naproxen sodium in a randomized placebo-controlled, cross-over study for the acute treatment of migraine in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Winner, Paul; Linder, Steven; Hershey, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    A multi-centered, randomized, placebo-controlled, early intervention, cross-over study was conducted to evaluate the consistency of response of sumatriptan/naproxen sodium 85/500 mg (S/NS) over 4 attacks in the acute treatment of migraine in adolescents. Inclusion of subjects was dependent on their age of 12-17 years, frequency, and history of migraine headaches (1-8 per month) over the previous 6 months prior to screening and generally healthy males and females of non-childbearing potential that were not on excluded medications. Subjects were instructed to treat within 1 hour of pain onset, including when the pain was still mild. Subjects were randomized in a double-blind fashion using a computer-generated randomization list in which the study drug was prepared prior to study start, and subjects were allocated to a number in sequential order for each site. Each site was allocated number blocks in sets of 10 depending of the rate of enrollment. The objective of this study was to examine the efficacy of S/NS vs placebo in the primary end-points of pain-free response at 2 hours (2hPF), 24-hour sustained pain-free response (24hPF), and pain-free response at 2 hours with early intervention (2hPFE) calculated as percentage out of all attacks. In the study, 94 subjects treated 347 attacks in total: treating 277 with S/NS and 70 with placebo. Compared with placebo, S/NS produced higher 2hPF rates (S/NS 37%, placebo 18%; P < .004), and 2hPFE with rates (S/NS 32%, 18% placebo; P < .03). Compared with placebo, 24hPF rates were S/NS 86%, placebo 78%, P < .17, which were higher than placebo but not clinically significant. 2hPF was reported in at least 2 of the 3 migraines treated with S/NS in 40.4% of subjects. 24hPF was reported in at least 2 of the 3 migraine treated with S/NS in 86.2% subjects. Adverse reactions were generally low and comparable between S/NS and placebo.

  18. A mobile application improves therapy-adherence rates in elderly patients undergoing rehabilitation: A crossover design study comparing documentation via iPad with paper-based control.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Alexander; Brandl, Christopher; Miron-Shatz, Talya; Schlick, Christopher; Neumann, Till; Kribben, Andreas; Meister, Sven; Diamantidis, Clarissa Jonas; Albrecht, Urs-Vito; Horn, Peter; Becker, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Medication adherence is crucial for success in the management of patients with chronic conditions. This study analyzes whether a mobile application on a tablet aimed at supporting drug intake and vital sign parameter documentation affects adherence in elderly patients.Patients with coronary heart disease and no prior knowledge of tablet computers were recruited. They received a personal introduction to the mobile application Medication Plan, installed on an Apple iPad. The study was conducted using a crossover design with 3 sequences: initial phase, interventional phase (28 days of using the app system), and comparative phase (28 days of using a paper diary). Users experienced the interventional and comparative phases alternately.A total of 24 patients (12 males; mean age 73.8 years) were enrolled in the study. The mean for subjectively assessed adherence (A14-scale; 5-point Likert scale, from "never" to "very often" which results in a score from 0 to 56) before the study was 50.0 (SD = 3.44). After both interventions there was a significant increase, which was more pronounced after the interventional phase (54.0; SD = 2.01) than after the comparative phase (52.6; SD = 2.49) (for all pairs after both interventions, P <0.001). Neither medical conditions nor the number of drug intake (amount and frequency of drug taking) per day affected subjective adherence. Logging data showed a significantly stronger adherence for the medication app than the paper system for both blood pressure recordings (P <0.001) and medication intake (P = 0.033). The majority of participants (n = 22) stated that they would like to use the medication app in their daily lives and would not need further assistance with the app.A mobile app for medication adherence increased objectively and subjectively measured adherence in elderly users undergoing rehabilitation. The findings have promising clinical implications: digital tools can assist chronic disease patients achieve adherence to

  19. Hydrogen sulfide and traffic-related air pollutants in association with increased mortality: a case-crossover study in Reykjavik, Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Finnbjornsdottir, Ragnhildur Gudrun; Elvarsson, Bjarki Thor; Gislason, Thorarinn; Rafnsson, Vilhjalmur

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To study the association between daily mortality and short-term increases in air pollutants, both traffic-related and the geothermal source-specific hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Design Population-based, time stratified case-crossover. A lag time to 4 days was considered. Seasonal, gender and age stratification were calculated. Also, the best-fit lag when introducing H2S >7 µg/m3 was selected by the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Setting The population of the greater Reykjavik area (n=181 558) during 2003–2009. Participants Cases were defined as individuals living in the Reykjavik capital area, 18 years or older (N=138 657), who died due to all natural causes (ICD-10 codes A00-R99) other than injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes, or cardiovascular disease (ICD-10 codes I00-I99) during the study period. Main outcome measure Percentage increases in risk of death (IR%) following an interquartile range increase in pollutants. Results The total number of deaths due to all natural causes was 7679 and due to cardiovascular diseases was 3033. The interquartile range increased concentrations of H2S (2.6 µg/m3) were associated with daily all natural cause mortality in the Reykjavik capital area. The IR% was statistically significant during the summer season (lag 1: IR%=5.05, 95% CI 0.61 to 9.68; lag 2: IR%=5.09, 95% CI 0.44 to 9.97), among males (lag 0: IR%=2.26, 95% CI 0.23 to 4.44), and among the elderly (lag 0: IR%=1.94, 95% CI 0.12 to 1.04; lag 1: IR%=1.99, 95% CI 0.21 to 1.04), when adjusted for traffic-related pollutants and meteorological variables. The traffic-related pollutants were generally not associated with statistical significant IR%s. Conclusions The results suggest that ambient H2S air pollution may increase mortality in Reykjavik, Iceland. To the best of our knowledge, ambient H2S exposure has not previously been associated with increased mortality in population-based studies and therefore the results

  20. Mössbauer effect study of the temperature and pressure dependence of the singlet-quintet intersystem crossing dynamics in an iron(II) spin crossover complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P.; Spiering, H.; Gütlich, P.

    1988-02-01

    The lineshapes of Mössbauer spectra of the iron(II) spin crossover complex [Fe(6-mepy)3 tren] (PF6)2 are affected by the dynamics of the HS⇌LS equilibrium. The lineshapes are reproduced with a stochastic two-state-relaxation-model yielding rate constants similar to those determined for related complexes in solution. Application of an external pressure of 150 MPa increases the relaxation rate.

  1. Efficacy of a Mandibular Advancement Appliance on Sleep Disordered Breathing in Children: A Study Protocol of a Crossover Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Ghassan; Galland, Barbara; Robertson, Christopher J.; Farella, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sleep-Disordered Breathing (SDB) varies from habitual snoring to partial or complete obstruction of the upper airway and can be found in up to 10% of children. SDB can significantly affect children's wellbeing, as it can cause growth disorders, educational and behavioral problems, and even life-threatening conditions, such as cardiorespiratory failure. Adenotonsillectomy represents the primary treatment for pediatric SDB where adeno-tonsillar hypertrophy is indicated. For those with craniofacial anomalies, or for whom adenotonsillectomy or other treatment modalities have failed, or surgery is contra-indicated, mandibular advancement splints (MAS) may represent a viable treatment option. Whilst the efficacy of these appliances has been consistently demonstrated in adults, there is little information about their effectiveness in children. Aims: To determine the efficacy of mandibular advancement appliances for the management of SDB and related health problems in children. Methods/design: The study will be designed as a single-blind crossover randomized controlled trial with administration of both an “Active MAS” (Twin-block) and a “Sham MAS.” Eligible participants will be children aged 8–12 years whose parents report they snore ≥3 nights per week. Sixteen children will enter the full study after confirming other inclusion criteria, particularly Skeletal class I or class II confirmed by lateral cephalometric radiograph. Each child will be randomly assigned to either a treatment sequence starting with the Active or the Sham MAS. Participants will wear the appliances for 3 weeks separated by a 2-week washout period. For each participant, home-based polysomnographic data will be collected four times; once before and once after each treatment period. The Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI) will represent the main outcome variable. Secondary outcomes will include, snoring frequency, masseter muscle activity, sleep symptoms, quality of life, daytime

  2. Effect of Extended-Release Dexmethylphenidate and Mixed Amphetamine Salts on Sleep: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Crossover Study in Youth with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Santisteban, J. A.; Stein, M. A.; Bergmame, L.; Gruber, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to determine the dose-response effects of extended-release (ER) dexmethylphenidate (d-MPH) and ER mixed amphetamine salts (MAS) on objective measures of sleep. Methods This was an 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, two period, crossover study of youth with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as confirmed by the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders for School-Age Children–Present and Lifetime version (K-SADS-PL). Children aged 10–17 years were recruited from clinical practice, colleague referrals, and flyers. Participants were randomized to initially receive either d-MPH or MAS. During each 4-week drug period, children received three dose levels (10, 20, and 25/30 mg) in ascending order, with placebo substituted for active medication in a randomized fashion during 1 week of the study. After 4 weeks, participants were switched to the alternative medication for another 4 weeks of treatment. The main outcome measure was sleep duration as measured by actigraphy. Children, parents, and researchers were blinded to drug, dose, and placebo status. Results Sixty-five participants met the inclusion criteria and were enrolled in the study. Of these, 37 participants with sufficient sleep data for analysis were included. Sleep schedule measures showed a significant effect for dose on sleep start time (F(1,36) = 6.284; p < 0.05), with a significantly later sleep start time when children were receiving 20- or 30-mg doses, compared with placebo (p < 0.05). A significant dose effect was found on actual sleep duration (F(1,36) = 8.112; p < 0.05), with significantly shorter actual sleep duration for subjects receiving 30 mg compared with those receiving placebo (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences on sleep duration or sleep schedule between the two stimulant medications. The trial is complete and closed to follow-up. Conclusions Higher stimulant doses were associated with reduced sleep duration and later sleep

  3. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic comparison of two "pegylated" interferon alpha-2 formulations in healthy male volunteers: a randomized, crossover, double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Interferon (IFN) alpha conjugation to polyethylene glycol (PEG) results in a better pharmacokinetic profile and efficacy. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety properties of a new, locally developed, 40-kDa PEG-IFN alpha-2b preparation with a reference, commercially available PEG-IFN alpha-2a in healthy male volunteers. Methods A randomized, crossover, double-blind study with a 3-weeks washout period, was done. A single 180 micrograms PEG-IFN alpha-2 dose was administered subcutaneously in both groups. Sixteen apparently healthy male subjects were included. Serum PEG-IFN concentration was measured during 336 hours by an enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Other clinical and laboratory variables were used as pharmacodynamic and safety criteria. Results The pharmacokinetic comparison by EIA yielded a high similitude between the formulations. In spite of a high subject variability, the parameters' mean were very close (in all cases p > 0.05): AUC: 53623 vs. 44311 pg.h/mL; Cmax: 333 vs. 271 pg/mL; Tmax: 54 vs. 55 h; half-life (t1/2): 72.4 vs. 64.8 h; terminal elimination rate (lambda): 0.011 vs. 0.014 h-1; mean residence time (MRT): 135 vs. 123 h for reference and study preparations, respectively. There were no significant differences with respect to the pharmacodynamic variables either: serum neopterin and beta-2 microglobulin levels, stimulation of 2'5' oligoadenylate synthetase expression, and serum IFN antiviral activity. A strong Spearman's rank order correlation (p < 0.01) between the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic concentration-time curves was observed. Both products caused similar leukocyte counts diminution and had similar safety profiles. The most frequent adverse reactions were leukopenia, fever, thrombocytopenia, transaminases increase and asthenia, mostly mild. Conclusions Both formulations are fully comparable from the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and safety profiles. Efficacy trials can be carried

  4. The effects of anatabine on non-invasive indicators of muscle damage: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anatabine (ANA), a minor tobacco alkaloid found in the Solanaceae family of plants, may exhibit anti-inflammatory activity, which may be useful to aid in recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to examine the effects of ANA supplementation on the recovery of isometric strength and selected non-invasive indicators of muscle damage. Methods A double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover design was used to study eighteen men (mean ± SD age = 22.2 ± 3.1 yrs; body mass = 80.3 ± 15.7 kg) who participated in two randomly-ordered conditions separated by a washout period. The ANA condition consisted of consuming 6–12 mg anatabine per day for 10 days, while testing took place during days 7–10. The placebo (PLA) condition was identical except that the PLA supplement contained no ANA. Maximal voluntary isometric peak torque (PT) of the forearm flexors, arm circumference, hanging joint angle, and subjective pain ratings were measured before (PRE), immediately after (POST), and 24, 48, and 72 h after six sets of 10 maximal, eccentric isokinetic forearm flexion muscle actions. Resting heart rate and blood pressure were measured at PRE and 72 h in each condition. Results For PT, hanging joint angle, arm circumference, and subjective pain ratings, there were no condition x time (p > 0.05) interactions, there were no main effects for condition (p > 0.05), but there were main effects for time (p < 0.001). There were no condition x time (p > 0.05) interactions and no main effects for condition (p > 0.05) or time (p > 0.05) for blood pressure or resting heart rate. Conclusions ANA supplementation had no effect on the recovery of muscle strength, hanging joint angle, arm swelling, or subjective pain ratings after a bout of maximal eccentric exercise in the forearm flexors. Therefore, ANA may not be beneficial for those seeking to improve recovery from heavy eccentric

  5. Can wheat germ have a beneficial effect on human health? A study protocol for a randomised crossover controlled trial to evaluate its health effects

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Rosário, André; Pinheiro, Helder; Calhau, Conceição; Azevedo, Luís Filipe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of mortality worldwide and diet is an important contributor to CVD risk. Thus, several food derivatives are being investigated for their beneficial impact on reducing cardiometabolic risk factors, either in risk groups or in healthy population as a preventive measure. Wheat germ is a food by-product with high nutritional value, especially as a concentrated source of dietary fibre and essential fatty acids, but its incorporation into the diet has been rare up to now. Previous studies do not clarify the hypothesised potential causal relationship between the consumption of wheat germ and benefits for human health. Methods and analysis We are conducting a randomised, double-blinded, crossover, placebo-controlled clinical trial designed to assess the physiological effects of daily consumption of wheat germ-enriched bread (containing 6 g of wheat germ) compared with non-enriched bread, over a 4-week period with a 15-week follow-up, in a healthy human population. A total of 55 participants (healthy volunteers, aged 18–60) have been recruited from the Porto metropolitan area in northern Portugal. Our aim is to evaluate the health effects of wheat germ on blood cholesterol and triglycerides, postprandial glycaemic response, gastrointestinal function and discomfort, and changes in intestinal microbiota and insulin resistance as secondary outcomes. The study follows the best practices for evaluating health claims in food according to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) scientific opinion, namely random allocation, double blinding, reporting methods to measure and maximise compliance, and validated outcomes with beneficial physiological effects as recommended by EFSA. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the Health Ethics Committee of São João Hospital Centre (156-15) and the Ethics Committee of Faculty of Medicine of the University of Porto (PCEDCSS-FMUP07/2015). Results will be

  6. Situation-specific factors predicting nonadherence to methadone maintenance treatment: a cross-sectional study using the case-crossover design in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jing; Xu, Huifang; Lau, Joseph T F; Chen, Long; Wang, Zixin; Hao, Chun; Hao, Yuantao

    2014-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is a key risk reduction measure for controlling HIV transmission among drug users. Studies using traditional methods exist to distinguish between drop outs and nondrop outs. However, many nondrop outs use MMT discontinuously and no study has identified situation-specific factors predicting their showing or not showing up. This study used a case-crossover design comparing situation-specific factors appearing on the last episode of attendance versus those of the last episode of nonattendance. A total of 133 participants were recruited from two MMT clinics in Guangzhou, China. Participants were asked separately whether various situation-specific factors existed in the last episodes of nonattendance and attendance of MMT. Matched odds ratios (ORs) based on conditional logistic regression analysis were presented. The results showed that the participants attended the MMT clinics on average for 25 days in the last month. Situation-specific factors significantly predicting nonattendance included: (1) physical and mental health status: in illness (OR = 33.0, P < 0.001), in a bad mood (OR = 7.5, P < 0.001), and occurrence of an unhappy event (OR = 18.0, P < 0.001); (2) other engagement: work engagement (OR = 40.0, P < 0.001), trip to other places (OR = 83.0, P < 0.001), and social activities (OR = 10.0, P = 0.012); (3) interpersonal relationship: conflicts with family (OR = 19.0, P = 0.004); and (4) structural situational factors: financial difficulty (OR = 19.0, P = 0.004) and worrying about police arrest (OR = 12.0, P = 0.003). Other factors such as interaction with drug users and heroin use were marginally significant, while reduced methadone dosage was nonsignificant. Interventions to improve MMT adherence need to consider situation-specific factors. Ancillary psychosocial services should be integrated with current MMT; MMT should also provide more flexible services to the clients. Furthermore, efforts should be taken to build up

  7. Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Tommy; Granfeldt, Yvonne; Ahrén, Bo; Branell, Ulla-Carin; Pålsson, Gunvor; Hansson, Anita; Söderström, Margareta; Lindeberg, Staffan

    2009-01-01

    Background Our aim was to compare the effects of a Paleolithic ('Old Stone Age') diet and a diabetes diet as generally recommended on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin. Methods In a randomized cross-over study, 13 patients with type 2 diabetes, 3 women and 10 men, were instructed to eat a Paleolithic diet based on lean meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, root vegetables, eggs and nuts; and a Diabetes diet designed in accordance with dietary guidelines during two consecutive 3-month periods. Outcome variables included changes in weight, waist circumference, serum lipids, C-reactive protein, blood pressure, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), and areas under the curve for plasma glucose and plasma insulin in the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Dietary intake was evaluated by use of 4-day weighed food records. Results Study participants had on average a diabetes duration of 9 years, a mean HbA1c of 6,6% units by Mono-S standard and were usually treated with metformin alone (3 subjects) or metformin in combination with a sulfonylurea (3 subjects) or a thiazolidinedione (3 subjects). Mean average dose of metformin was 1031 mg per day. Compared to the diabetes diet, the Paleolithic diet resulted in lower mean values of HbA1c (-0.4% units, p = 0.01), triacylglycerol (-0.4 mmol/L, p = 0.003), diastolic blood pressure (-4 mmHg, p = 0.03), weight (-3 kg, p = 0.01), BMI (-1 kg/m2, p = 0.04) and waist circumference (-4 cm, p = 0.02), and higher mean values of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (+0.08 mmol/L, p = 0.03). The Paleolithic diet was mainly lower in cereals and dairy products, and higher in fruits, vegetables, meat and eggs, as compared with the Diabetes diet. Further, the Paleolithic diet was lower in total energy, energy density, carbohydrate, dietary glycemic load, saturated fatty acids and calcium, and higher in unsaturated fatty acids, dietary cholesterol and several vitamins. Dietary GI was slightly

  8. Differential Effects of Red Meat/Refined Grain Diet and Dairy/Chicken/Nuts/Whole Grain Diet on Glucose, Insulin and Triglyceride in a Randomized Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoona; Keogh, Jennifer B; Clifton, Peter M

    2016-10-30

    Epidemiological studies suggest that a diet high in processed meat, with a high glycemic index is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. It is not clear if this is due to altered insulin sensitivity or an enhanced postprandial glucose. We aimed to compare the acute metabolic response of two different types of meals after ingestion of the matching diet for four weeks. The study was a randomized, crossover acute meal study. Volunteers consumed either a red meat/refined grain meal or a dairy/chicken/nuts/wholegrain meal after four weeks of the matching diet. After a three-week washout period and four weeks of the alternate diet, they consumed the matching meal. The diets differed with respect to both protein and carbohydrate sources. Blood samples were taken for 180 min for the measurement of glucose, insulin, C-peptide and triglyceride. Fifty-one participants (age: 35.1 ± 15.6 years; body mass index: 27.7 ± 6.9 kg/m², 17 with normal and 34 with impaired glucose tolerance) completed two meal tests. The area under the curve (p < 0.001) and incremental area under the curve (p = 0.001) for insulin was significantly higher after the red meat/refined grain diet than after the dairy/chicken/nuts/whole grain diet. There was an interaction between meal and glucose tolerance group (p < 0.05) in the area under the curve (AUC) and the incremental area under the curve (iAUC) of glucose; the red meat/refined grain diet increased glucose relative to the dairy/chicken/nuts/whole grain diet only in the normal group (+2.5 mmol/L/3 h). The red meat/refined grain diet increased glucose and insulin responses compared with the dairy/chicken/nuts/whole grain diet. This meal pattern would increase pancreatic stress long term and may account for the increased risk of type 2 diabetes with this diet.

  9. Differential Effects of Red Meat/Refined Grain Diet and Dairy/Chicken/Nuts/Whole Grain Diet on Glucose, Insulin and Triglyceride in a Randomized Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoona; Keogh, Jennifer B.; Clifton, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that a diet high in processed meat, with a high glycemic index is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. It is not clear if this is due to altered insulin sensitivity or an enhanced postprandial glucose. We aimed to compare the acute metabolic response of two different types of meals after ingestion of the matching diet for four weeks. The study was a randomized, crossover acute meal study. Volunteers consumed either a red meat/refined grain meal or a dairy/chicken/nuts/wholegrain meal after four weeks of the matching diet. After a three-week washout period and four weeks of the alternate diet, they consumed the matching meal. The diets differed with respect to both protein and carbohydrate sources. Blood samples were taken for 180 min for the measurement of glucose, insulin, C-peptide and triglyceride. Fifty-one participants (age: 35.1 ± 15.6 years; body mass index: 27.7 ± 6.9 kg/m2, 17 with normal and 34 with impaired glucose tolerance) completed two meal tests. The area under the curve (p < 0.001) and incremental area under the curve (p = 0.001) for insulin was significantly higher after the red meat/refined grain diet than after the dairy/chicken/nuts/whole grain diet. There was an interaction between meal and glucose tolerance group (p < 0.05) in the area under the curve (AUC) and the incremental area under the curve (iAUC) of glucose; the red meat/refined grain diet increased glucose relative to the dairy/chicken/nuts/whole grain diet only in the normal group (+2.5 mmol/L/3 h). The red meat/refined grain diet increased glucose and insulin responses compared with the dairy/chicken/nuts/whole grain diet. This meal pattern would increase pancreatic stress long term and may account for the increased risk of type 2 diabetes with this diet. PMID:27809219

  10. 30 CFR 57.11013 - Conveyor crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conveyor crossovers. 57.11013 Section 57.11013... Escapeways Travelways-Surface and Underground § 57.11013 Conveyor crossovers. Crossovers shall be provided where it is necessary to cross conveyors....

  11. 30 CFR 57.11013 - Conveyor crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conveyor crossovers. 57.11013 Section 57.11013... Escapeways Travelways-Surface and Underground § 57.11013 Conveyor crossovers. Crossovers shall be provided where it is necessary to cross conveyors....

  12. 30 CFR 56.11013 - Conveyor crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conveyor crossovers. 56.11013 Section 56.11013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Conveyor crossovers. Crossovers shall be provided where it is necessary to cross conveyors....

  13. 30 CFR 57.11013 - Conveyor crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conveyor crossovers. 57.11013 Section 57.11013... Escapeways Travelways-Surface and Underground § 57.11013 Conveyor crossovers. Crossovers shall be provided where it is necessary to cross conveyors....

  14. 30 CFR 56.11013 - Conveyor crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conveyor crossovers. 56.11013 Section 56.11013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Conveyor crossovers. Crossovers shall be provided where it is necessary to cross conveyors....

  15. 30 CFR 56.11013 - Conveyor crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conveyor crossovers. 56.11013 Section 56.11013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Conveyor crossovers. Crossovers shall be provided where it is necessary to cross conveyors....

  16. 30 CFR 57.11013 - Conveyor crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conveyor crossovers. 57.11013 Section 57.11013... Escapeways Travelways-Surface and Underground § 57.11013 Conveyor crossovers. Crossovers shall be provided where it is necessary to cross conveyors....

  17. 30 CFR 56.11013 - Conveyor crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conveyor crossovers. 56.11013 Section 56.11013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Conveyor crossovers. Crossovers shall be provided where it is necessary to cross conveyors....

  18. 30 CFR 56.11013 - Conveyor crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conveyor crossovers. 56.11013 Section 56.11013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Conveyor crossovers. Crossovers shall be provided where it is necessary to cross conveyors....

  19. 30 CFR 57.11013 - Conveyor crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conveyor crossovers. 57.11013 Section 57.11013... Escapeways Travelways-Surface and Underground § 57.11013 Conveyor crossovers. Crossovers shall be provided where it is necessary to cross conveyors....

  20. Effect of dietary heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 (SBL88™) on sleep: a non-randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled, and crossover pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nakakita, Y; Tsuchimoto, N; Takata, Y; Nakamura, T

    2016-09-01

    We previously reported that dietary heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 affects sleep rhythms in mice. The present study evaluated the effect of consumption of heat-killed SBC8803 on sleep architecture in humans. A non-randomised, placebo-controlled, double blind, and crossover pilot study was conducted using volunteers who scored at a slightly high level (i.e. ≥6) on the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS). Male subjects (n=17; age 41-69 y) consumed placebo or SBC8803 capsules (25 mg/day of heat-killed SBC8803) for 10 days. Electroencephalograms (EEG) were recorded using a mobile, one-channel system, providing objective data on sleep. Subjects' sleep journals and administration of the AIS provided subjective data on sleep. Three subjects were excluded from the statistical analysis. Analysis of the remaining 14 volunteers revealed no significant differences between placebo and SBC8803 consumption in either the AIS or the sleep EEG. The sleep journals revealed an improvement in 'waking' for the SBC8803 consumption periods (P=0.047), and there was a marginally significant effect on 'drowsiness during the following day' (P=0.067). Effects on the EEG delta power value (μV(2)/min) were revealed by a stratified analysis based on age, AIS, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Specifically, effects were found among subjects in their 40s who consumed the SBC8803 capsules (P=0.049) and among subjects with a BDI score less than the all-subjects average (13.3) (P=0.045). A marginally significant effect was found among subjects with an AIS score less than the all-subjects average (11.6) (P=0.065). The delta power value of 5 subjects with both BDI and AIS scores less than the average increased significantly (P=0.017). While the number of subjects was limited, a beneficial effect on sleep due to consumption of heat-killed L. brevis SBC8803 was found in subjects with slightly challenged sleep.

  1. The effect of meal frequency in a reduced-energy regimen on the gastrointestinal and appetite hormones in patients with type 2 diabetes: A randomised crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Belinova, Lenka; Kahleova, Hana; Oliyarnyk, Olena; Kazdova, Ludmila; Hill, Martin; Pelikanova, Terezie

    2017-01-01

    Background Appetite and gastrointestinal hormones (GIHs) participate in energy homeostasis, feeding behavior and regulation of body weight. We demonstrated previously the superior effect of a hypocaloric diet regimen with lower meal frequency (B2) on body weight, hepatic fat content, insulin sensitivity and feelings of hunger compared to the same diet divided into six smaller meals a day (A6). Studies with isoenergetic diet regimens indicate that lower meal frequency should also have an effect on fasting and postprandial responses of GIHs. The aim of this secondary analysis was to explore the effect of two hypocaloric diet regimens on fasting levels of appetite and GIHs and on their postprandial responses after a standard meal. It was hypothesized that lower meal frequency in a reduced-energy regimen leading to greater body weight reduction and reduced hunger would be associated with decreased plasma concentrations of GIHs: gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1(GLP-1), peptide YY(PYY), pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and leptin and increased plasma concentration of ghrelin. The postprandial response of satiety hormones (GLP-1, PYY and PP) and postprandial suppression of ghrelin will be improved. Methods In a randomized crossover study, 54 patients suffering from type 2 diabetes (T2D) underwent both regimens. The concentrations of GLP-1, GIP, PP, PYY, amylin, leptin and ghrelin were determined using multiplex immunoanalyses. Results Fasting leptin and GIP decreased in response to both regimens with no difference between the treatments (p = 0.37 and p = 0.83, respectively). Fasting ghrelin decreased in A6 and increased in B2 (with difference between regimens p = 0.023). Fasting PP increased in B2with no significant difference between regimens (p = 0.17). Neither GLP-1 nor PYY did change in either regimen. The decrease in body weight correlated negatively with changes in fasting ghrelin (r = -0.4, p<0.043) and the postprandial reduction of ghrelin

  2. A crossover pilot study evaluating the functional outcomes of two different types of robotic movement training in chronic stroke survivors using the arm exoskeleton BONES

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To date, the limited degrees of freedom (DOF) of most robotic training devices hinders them from providing functional training following stroke. We developed a 6-DOF exoskeleton (“BONES”) that allows movement of the upper limb to assist in rehabilitation. The objectives of this pilot study were to evaluate the impact of training with BONES on function of the affected upper limb, and to assess whether multijoint functional robotic training would translate into greater gains in arm function than single joint robotic training also conducted with BONES. Methods Twenty subjects with mild to moderate chronic stroke participated in this crossover study. Each subject experienced multijoint functional training and single joint training three sessions per week, for four weeks, with the order of presentation randomized. The primary outcome measure was the change in Box and Block Test (BBT). The secondary outcome measures were the changes in Fugl-Meyer Arm Motor Scale (FMA), Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), Motor Activity Log (MAL), and quantitative measures of strength and speed of reaching. These measures were assessed at baseline, after each training period, and at a 3-month follow-up evaluation session. Results Training with the robotic exoskeleton resulted in significant improvements in the BBT, FMA, WMFT, MAL, shoulder and elbow strength, and reaching speed (p < 0.05); these improvements were sustained at the 3 month follow-up. When comparing the effect of type of training on the gains obtained, no significant difference was noted between multijoint functional and single joint robotic training programs. However, for the BBT, WMFT and MAL, inequality of carryover effects were noted; subsequent analysis on the change in score between the baseline and first period of training again revealed no difference in the gains obtained between the types of training. Conclusions Training with the 6 DOF arm exoskeleton improved motor function after chronic stroke

  3. Impact of a Telenursing service on satisfaction and health outcomes of children with inflammatory rheumatic diseases and their families: a crossover randomized trial study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric rheumatic diseases have a significant impact on children’s quality of life and family functioning. Disease control and management of the symptoms are important to minimize disability and pain. Specialist clinical nurses play a key role in supporting medical teams, recognizing poor disease control and the need for treatment changes, providing a resource to patients on treatment options and access to additional support and advice, and identifying best practices to achieve optimal outcomes for patients and their families. This highlights the importance of investigating follow-up telenursing (TN) consultations with experienced, specialist clinical nurses in rheumatology to provide this support to children and their families. Methods/Design This randomized crossover, experimental longitudinal study will compare the effects of standard care against a novel telenursing consultation on children’s and family outcomes. It will examine children below 16 years old, recently diagnosed with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, who attend the pediatric rheumatology outpatient clinic of a tertiary referral hospital in western Switzerland, and one of their parents. The telenursing consultation, at least once a month, by a qualified, experienced, specialist nurse in pediatric rheumatology will consist of providing affective support, health information, and aid to decision-making. Cox’s Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior serves as the theoretical framework for this study. The primary outcome measure is satisfaction and this will be assessed using mixed methods (quantitative and qualitative data). Secondary outcome measures include disease activity, quality of life, adherence to treatment, use of the telenursing service, and cost. We plan to enroll 56 children. Discussion The telenursing consultation is designed to support parents and children/adolescents during the course of the disease with regular follow-up. This project is novel because it is based

  4. Fine-Scale Crossover Rate Variation on the Caenorhabditis elegans X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Max R.; Rockman, Matthew V.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination creates genotypic diversity within species. Recombination rates vary substantially across taxa, and the distribution of crossovers can differ significantly among populations and between sexes. Crossover locations within species have been found to vary by chromosome and by position within chromosomes, where most crossover events occur in small regions known as recombination hotspots. However, several species appear to lack hotspots despite significant crossover heterogeneity. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was previously found to have the least fine-scale variation in crossover distribution among organisms studied to date. It is unclear whether this pattern extends to the X chromosome given its unique compaction through the pachytene stage of meiotic prophase in hermaphrodites. We generated 798 recombinant nested near-isogenic lines (NILs) with crossovers in a 1.41 Mb region on the left arm of the X chromosome to determine if its recombination landscape is similar to that of the autosomes. We find that the fine-scale variation in crossover rate is lower than that of other model species, and is inconsistent with hotspots. The relationship of genomic features to crossover rate is dependent on scale, with GC content, histone modifications, and nucleosome occupancy being negatively associated with crossovers. We also find that the abundances of 4- to 6-bp DNA motifs significantly explain crossover density. These results are consistent with recombination occurring at unevenly distributed sites of open chromatin. PMID:27172189

  5. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, smoldering multiple myeloma, and curcumin: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over 4g study and an open-label 8g extension study.

    PubMed

    Golombick, Terry; Diamond, Terrence H; Manoharan, Arumugam; Ramakrishna, Rajeev

    2012-05-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) represent useful models for studying multiple myeloma precursor disease, and for developing early intervention strategies. Administering a 4g dose of curcumin, we performed a randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study, followed by an open-label extension study using an 8g dose to assess the effect of curcumin on FLC response and bone turnover in patients with MGUS and SMM. 36 patients (19 MGUS and 17 SMM) were randomised into two groups: one received 4g curcumin and the other 4g placebo, crossing over at 3 months. At completion of the 4g arm, all patients were given the option of entering an open-label, 8g dose extension study. Blood and urine samples were collected at specified intervals for specific marker analyses. Group values are expressed as mean ± 1 SD. Data from different time intervals within groups were compared using Student's paired t-test. 25 patients completed the 4g cross-over study and 18 the 8g extension study. Curcumin therapy decreased the free light-chain ratio (rFLC), reduced the difference between clonal and nonclonal light-chain (dFLC) and involved free light-chain (iFLC). uDPYD, a marker of bone resorption, decreased in the curcumin arm and increased on the placebo arm. Serum creatinine levels tended to diminish on curcumin therapy. These findings suggest that curcumin might have the potential to slow the disease process in patients with MGUS and SMM.

  6. Towards accurate estimates of the spin-state energetics of spin-crossover complexes within density functional theory: a comparative case study of cobalt(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Alfredo; Krivokapic, Itana; Hauser, Andreas; Lawson Daku, Latévi Max

    2013-03-21

    We report a detailed DFT study of the energetic and structural properties of the spin-crossover Co(ii) complex [Co(tpy)(2)](2+) (tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) in the low-spin (LS) and the high-spin (HS) states, using several generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functionals. In either spin-state, the results obtained with the functionals are consistent with one another and in good agreement with available experimental data. Although the different functionals correctly predict the LS state as the electronic ground state of [Co(tpy)(2)](2+), they give estimates of the HS-LS zero-point energy difference which strongly depend on the functional used. This dependency on the functional was also reported for the DFT estimates of the zero-point energy difference in the HS complex [Co(bpy)(3)](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) [A. Vargas, A. Hauser and L. M. Lawson Daku, J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2009, 5, 97]. The comparison of the and estimates showed that all functionals correctly predict an increase of the zero-point energy difference upon the bpy → tpy ligand substitution, which furthermore weakly depends on the functionals, amounting to . From these results and basic thermodynamic considerations, we establish that, despite their limitations, current DFT methods can be applied to the accurate determination of the spin-state energetics of complexes of a transition metal ion, or of these complexes in different environments, provided that the spin-state energetics is accurately known in one case. Thus, making use of the availability of a highly accurate ab initio estimate of the HS-LS energy difference in the complex [Co(NCH)(6)](2+) [L. M. Lawson Daku, F. Aquilante, T. W. Robinson and A. Hauser, J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2012, 8, 4216], we obtain for [Co(tpy)(2)](2+) and [Co(bpy)(3)](2+) best estimates of and , in good agreement with the known magnetic behaviour of the two complexes.

  7. Bioavailability of cyanide after consumption of a single meal of foods containing high levels of cyanogenic glycosides: a crossover study in humans.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Klaus; Buhrke, Thorsten; Lampen, Alfonso

    2016-03-01

    The acute toxicity of cyanide is determined by its peak levels reached in the body. Compared to the ingestion of free cyanide, lower peak levels may be expected after consumption of foods containing cyanogenic glycosides with the same equivalent dose of cyanide. This is due to possible delayed and/or incomplete release of cyanide from the cyanogenic glycosides depending on many factors. Data on bioavailability of cyanide after consumption of foods containing high levels of cyanogenic glycosides as presented herein were necessary to allow a meaningful risk assessment for these foods. A crossover study was carried out in 12 healthy adults who consumed persipan paste (equivalent total cyanide: 68 mg/kg), linseed (220 mg/kg), bitter apricot kernels (about 3250 mg/kg), and fresh cassava roots (76-150 mg/kg), with each "meal" containing equivalents of 6.8 mg cyanide. Cyanide levels were determined in whole blood using a GC-MS method with K(13)C(15)N as internal standard. Mean levels of cyanide at the different time points were highest after consumption of cassava (15.4 µM, after 37.5 min) and bitter apricot kernels (14.3 µM, after 20 min), followed by linseed (5.7 µM, after 40 min) and 100 g persipan (1.3 µM, after 105 min). The double dose of 13.6 mg cyanide eaten with 200 g persipan paste resulted in a mean peak level of 2.9 µM (after 150 min). An acute reference dose of 0.075 mg/kg body weight was derived being valid for a single application/meal of cyanides or hydrocyanic acid as well as of unprocessed foods with cyanogenic glycosides also containing the accompanying intact β-glucosidase. For some of these foods, this approach may be overly conservative due to delayed release of cyanide, as demonstrated for linseed. In case of missing or inactivated β-glucosidase, the hazard potential is much lower.

  8. A Web-Based Telehealth Training Platform Incorporating Automated Nonverbal Behavior Feedback for Teaching Communication Skills to Medical Students: A Randomized Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background In the interests of patient health outcomes, it is important for medical students to develop clinical communication skills. We previously proposed a telehealth communication skills training platform (EQClinic) with automated nonverbal behavior feedback for medical students, and it was able to improve medical students’ awareness of their nonverbal communication. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of EQClinic to improve clinical communication skills of medical students. Methods We conducted a 2-group randomized crossover trial between February and June 2016. Participants were second-year medical students enrolled in a clinical communication skills course at an Australian university. Students were randomly allocated to complete online EQClinic training during weeks 1–5 (group A) or to complete EQClinic training during weeks 8–11 (group B). EQClinic delivered an automated visual presentation of students’ nonverbal behavior coupled with human feedback from a standardized patient (SP). All students were offered two opportunities to complete face-to-face consultations with SPs. The two face-to-face consultations were conducted in weeks 6–7 and 12–13 for both groups, and were rated by tutors who were blinded to group allocation. Student-Patient Observed Communication Assessment (SOCA) was collected by blinded assessors (n=28) at 2 time points and also by an SP (n=83). Tutor-rated clinical communications skill in face-to-face consultations was the primary outcome and was assessed with the SOCA. We used t tests to examine the students’ performance during face-to-face consultations pre- and postexposure to EQClinic. Results We randomly allocated 268 medical students to the 2 groups (group A: n=133; group B: n=135). SOCA communication skills measures (score range 4–16) from the first face-to-face consultation were significantly higher for students in group A who had completed EQClinic training and reviewed the nonverbal behavior

  9. Efficacy of a new once daily hydromorphone formulation in comparison with twice daily administration in chronic pain: a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Nold, Gudrun Edelgard; Maritz, Martina Alice; Schwittay, Andreas; Schumann, Claudia; Rey, Hélène

    2016-05-01

    Objective Efficacy and safety of a novel multiple-unit hydromorphone once daily (HOD) was compared to an established hydromorphone twice daily (HTD) regimen in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic pain. Design and methods The results from a randomized, double-blind, multicenter, cross-over trial in patients (n = 37) with chronic malignant or non-malignant pain are reported. The primary efficacy parameter was current pain on 0-100 mm VAS assessed four times daily and prior to intake of rescue medication (immediate-release hydromorphone) throughout the last 5 days with each treatment (after an 8 day build-up period to avoid carry-over effects). Total daily dose of hydromorphone (TDD: 8-32 mg/day) was kept stable during the double-blind treatment phase. Results The difference observed in mean current pain (-0.92 mm VAS) over the 5 day assessment period between HOD and HTD (28.44 mm vs. 29.36 mm VAS) was found to lack clinical relevance, as the 95% CI (-4.10 to 2.28 mm VAS) did not exceed the prespecified limit for non-inferiority of 9 mm VAS. Results from the full analysis set were consistent with per protocol data confirming robustness, as did the data for 12 h recalled pain assessed at 08:00 h and 20:00 h, showing no significant differences between once and twice daily medication. Both treatments produced effective and stable pain control with only minor day-to-day and intra-day fluctuations. Switching between treatments was suitable, considering both efficacy and safety, as no relevant or significant differences in adverse events were seen (25.0% HOD, 24.3% HTD). Most frequently typical side-effects of opioid therapy were observed, such as nausea, vomiting and headache. Conclusion Although this study was of short duration and included a limited number of patients, the results confirm that the new HOD is as effective and safe as the established HTD.

  10. Ranolazine versus placebo in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and persistent chest pain or dyspnea despite optimal medical and revascularization therapy: randomized, double-blind crossover pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Shammas, Nicolas W; Shammas, Gail A; Keyes, Kathleen; Duske, Shawna; Kelly, Ryan; Jerin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) may continue to experience persistent chest pain and/or dyspnea despite pharmacologic therapy and revascularization. We hypothesized that ranolazine would reduce anginal symptoms or dyspnea in optimally treated ICM patients. Methods In this randomized, double-blind, crossover-design pilot study, 28 patients with ICM (ejection fraction less or equal 40%) were included after providing informed consent. A total of 24 patients completed both placebo and ranolazine treatments and were analyzed. All patients were on treatment with a beta blocker, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (or angiotensin receptor blocker), and at least one additional antianginal drug. After randomization, patients received up to 1,000 mg ranolazine orally twice a day, as tolerated, versus placebo. The primary end point was change in angina as assessed by the Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ), or in dyspnea as assessed by the Rose Dyspnea Scale (RDS). Change in the RDS and SAQ score from baseline was compared, for ranolazine and placebo, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test or paired t-test. Results Patients had the following demographic and clinical variables: mean age of 71.5 years; male (82.1%); prior coronary bypass surgery (67.9%); prior coronary percutaneous intervention (85.7%); prior myocardial infarction (82.1%); diabetes (67.9%); and mean ejection fraction of 33.1%. No statistical difference was seen between baseline RDS score and that after placebo or ranolazine (n=20) (P≥0.05). There was however, an improvement in anginal frequency (8/10 patients) (P=0.058), quality of life (8/10 patients) (P=0.048), and mean score of all components of the SAQ questionnaire (n=10) (P=0.047) with ranolazine compared with placebo. Conclusion In optimally treated ICM patients with continued chest pain or dyspnea, ranolazine possibly had a positive impact on quality of life, a reduction in anginal frequency, and an overall improvement in the

  11. Prophylactic tolperisone for post-exercise muscle soreness causes reduced isometric force--a double-blind randomized crossover control study.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Prem; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Madeleine, Pascal; Svensson, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The role of tolperisone hydrochloride, a centrally acting muscle relaxant in relieving painful muscle spasm is recently being discussed. The present study hypothesizes that the prophylactic use of tolperisone hydrochloride may effectively relieve post-exercise muscle soreness, based on the spasm theory of exercise pain. Twenty male volunteers, aged 25.2 +/- 0.82 years (mean +/- SEM) participated in 10 sessions in which they received oral treatment with placebo or the centrally acting muscle relaxant tolperisone hydrochloride (150 mg) three times daily for 8 days, in randomized crossover double-blind design. Time course assessments were made for pressure pain threshold, Likert's pain score (0-5), pain areas, range of abduction, isometric force, and electromyography (EMG) root mean square (RMS) during maximum voluntary isometric force on day 1 and 6, immediately after an eccentric exercise of first dorsal interosseous muscle, and 24 and 48 h after the exercise. Treatment with placebo or tolperisone hydrochloride was initiated immediately after the assessments on the first day baseline assessments. On the sixth day baseline investigations were repeated and then the subjects performed six bouts of standardized intense eccentric exercise of first dorsal interosseous muscle for provocation of post-exercise muscle soreness (PEMS). Perceived intensity of warmth, tiredness, soreness and pain during the exercise bouts were recorded on a 10 cm visual analogue pain scale. VAS scores and pressure pain thresholds did not differ between tolperisone and placebo treatment. All VAS scores increased during the exercise bouts 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 as compared to bout 1. Increased pain scores and pain areas were reported immediately after, 24 and 48 h after exercise. Pressure pain thresholds were reduced at 24 and 48 h after the exercise in the exercised hand. Range of abduction of the index finger was reduced immediately after the exercise and was still reduced at 24 h as compared to the

  12. Random-effects linear modeling and sample size tables for two special crossover designs of average bioequivalence studies: the four-period, two-sequence, two-formulation and six-period, three-sequence, three-formulation designs.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Francisco J; Berg, Michel J; Krebill, Ron; Welty, Timothy; Gidal, Barry E; Alloway, Rita; Privitera, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Due to concern and debate in the epilepsy medical community and to the current interest of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in revising approaches to the approval of generic drugs, the FDA is currently supporting ongoing bioequivalence studies of antiepileptic drugs, the EQUIGEN studies. During the design of these crossover studies, the researchers could not find commercial or non-commercial statistical software that quickly allowed computation of sample sizes for their designs, particularly software implementing the FDA requirement of using random-effects linear models for the analyses of bioequivalence studies. This article presents tables for sample-size evaluations of average bioequivalence studies based on the two crossover designs used in the EQUIGEN studies: the four-period, two-sequence, two-formulation design, and the six-period, three-sequence, three-formulation design. Sample-size computations assume that random-effects linear models are used in bioequivalence analyses with crossover designs. Random-effects linear models have been traditionally viewed by many pharmacologists and clinical researchers as just mathematical devices to analyze repeated-measures data. In contrast, a modern view of these models attributes an important mathematical role in theoretical formulations in personalized medicine to them, because these models not only have parameters that represent average patients, but also have parameters that represent individual patients. Moreover, the notation and language of random-effects linear models have evolved over the years. Thus, another goal of this article is to provide a presentation of the statistical modeling of data from bioequivalence studies that highlights the modern view of these models, with special emphasis on power analyses and sample-size computations.

  13. [Case-crossover design: Basic essentials and applications].

    PubMed

    Carracedo-Martínez, Eduardo; Tobías, Aurelio; Saez, Marc; Taracido, Margarita; Figueiras, Adolfo

    2009-01-01

    Case-crossover analysis is an observational epidemiological design that was proposed by Maclure in 1991 to assess whether a given intermittent or unusual exposure may have triggered an immediate short-term, acute event. The present article outlines the basics of case-crossover designs, as well as their applications and limitations. The case-crossover design is based on exclusively selecting case subjects. To calculate relative risk, exposure during the period of time prior to the event (case period) is compared against the same subject's exposure during one or more control periods. This method is only appropriate when the exposures are transient in time and have acute short-term effects. For exposures in which there is no trend, a unidirectional approach is the most frequent and consists of selecting one or more control periods prior to the case period. When the exposure displays a time trend (e.g., air pollution), a unidirectional approach will yield biased estimates, and therefore bidirectional case-crossover designs are used, which select control time intervals preceding and subsequent to that of the event. The case-crossover design is being increasingly used across a wide range of fields, including factors triggering traffic, occupational and domestic accidents and acute myocardial infarction, and those involved in air pollution and health and pharmacoepidemiology, among others. Insofar as data-analysis is concerned, case-crossover designs can generally be regarded as matched case-control studies and consequently conditional logistic regression can be applied. Lastly, this study analyzes practical examples of distinct applications of the case-crossover design.

  14. Dimensional crossover in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Matthew P.; Chatterjee, Rusha; Si, Jixin; Jankó, Boldizsár; Kuno, Masaru

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor nanostructure syntheses provide unprecedented control over electronic quantum confinement and have led to extensive investigations of their size- and shape-dependent optical/electrical properties. Notably, spectroscopic measurements show that optical bandgaps of one-dimensional CdSe nanowires are substantially (approximately 100 meV) lower than their zero-dimensional counterparts for equivalent diameters spanning 5-10 nm. But what, exactly, dictates the dimensional crossover of a semiconductor's electronic structure? Here we probe the one-dimensional to zero-dimensional transition of CdSe using single nanowire/nanorod absorption spectroscopy. We find that carrier electrostatic interactions play a fundamental role in establishing dimensional crossover. Moreover, the critical length at which this transition occurs is governed by the aspect ratio-dependent interplay between carrier confinement and dielectric contrast/confinement energies.

  15. Dimensional crossover in semiconductor nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Matthew P.; Chatterjee, Rusha; Si, Jixin; Jankó, Boldizsár; Kuno, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor nanostructure syntheses provide unprecedented control over electronic quantum confinement and have led to extensive investigations of their size- and shape-dependent optical/electrical properties. Notably, spectroscopic measurements show that optical bandgaps of one-dimensional CdSe nanowires are substantially (approximately 100 meV) lower than their zero-dimensional counterparts for equivalent diameters spanning 5–10 nm. But what, exactly, dictates the dimensional crossover of a semiconductor's electronic structure? Here we probe the one-dimensional to zero-dimensional transition of CdSe using single nanowire/nanorod absorption spectroscopy. We find that carrier electrostatic interactions play a fundamental role in establishing dimensional crossover. Moreover, the critical length at which this transition occurs is governed by the aspect ratio-dependent interplay between carrier confinement and dielectric contrast/confinement energies. PMID:27577091

  16. Mechanochemical effect in the iron(III) spin crossover complex [Fe(3-MeO-salenEt2]PF6 as studied by heat capacity calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Sorai, Michio; Burriel, Ramón; Westrum, Edgar F; Hendrickson, David N

    2008-04-10

    Magnetic and thermal properties of the iron(III) spin crossover complex [Fe(3MeO-salenEt)(2)]PF(6) are very sensitive to mechanochemical perturbations. Heat capacities for unperturbed and differently perturbed samples were precisely determined by adiabatic calorimetry at temperatures in the 10-300 K range. The unperturbed compound shows a cooperative spin crossover transition at 162.31 K, presenting a hysteresis of 2.8 K. The anomalous enthalpy and entropy contents of the transition were evaluated to be Delta(trs)H = 5.94 kJ mol(-1) and Delta(trs)S = 36.7 J K(-1) mol(-1), respectively. By mechanochemical treatments, (1) the phase transition temperature was lowered by 1.14 K, (2) the enthalpy and entropy gains at the phase transition due to the spin crossover phenomenon were diminished to Delta(trs)H = 4.94 kJ mol(-1) and Delta(trs)S = 31.1 J K(-1) mol(-1), and (3) the lattice heat capacities were larger than those of the unperturbed sample over the whole temperature range. In spite of different mechanical perturbations (grinding with a mortar and pestle and grinding in a ball-mill), two sets of heat capacity measurements provided basically the same results. The mechanochemical perturbation exerts its effect more strongly on the low-spin state than on the high-spin state. It shows a substantial increase of the number of iron(III) ions in the high-spin state below the transition temperature. The heat capacities of the diamagnetic cobalt(III) analogue [Co(3MeO-salenEt)(2)]PF(6) also were measured. The lattice heat capacity of the iron compounds has been estimated from either the measurements on the cobalt complex using a corresponding states law or the effective frequency distribution method. These estimations have been used for the evaluation of the transition anomaly.

  17. Crossover of marital dissatisfaction during military downsizing among Russian army officers and their spouses.

    PubMed

    Westman, Mina; Vinokur, Amiram D; Hamilton, V Lee; Roziner, Ilan

    2004-10-01

    This study examined mechanisms of strain crossover within couples and the moderating role of gender. Data were collected at a time of military downsizing from a sample of 1,250 Russian army officers and their spouses. The authors tested a model that incorporated 3 mechanisms for the crossover of marital dissatisfaction among dual-earner couples. The model provided support for 2 suggested crossover mechanisms: direct reactions of crossover and indirect mediated effects through social undermining. Strong evidence was also provided for gender asymmetry in the crossover process. Marital dissatisfaction crossed over from husbands to wives but not vice versa, and social undermining behavior played a role in the process of crossover of marital dissatisfaction for husbands but not for wives.

  18. Crossover behavior in driven cascades.

    PubMed

    Burridge, James

    2013-09-01

    We propose a model which explains how power-law crossover behavior can arise in a system which is capable of experiencing cascading failure. In our model the susceptibility of the system to cascades is described by a single number, the propagation power, which measures the ease with which cascades propagate. Physically, such a number could represent the density of unstable material in a system, its internal connectivity, or the mean susceptibility of its component parts to failure. We assume that the propagation power follows an upward drifting Brownian motion between cascades, and drops discontinuously each time a cascade occurs. Cascades are described by a continuous state branching process with distributional properties determined by the value of the propagation power when they occur. In common with many cascading models, pure power-law behavior is exhibited at a critical level of propagation power, and the mean cascade size diverges. This divergence constrains large systems to the subcritical region. We show that as a result, crossover behavior appears in the cascade distribution when an average is performed over the distribution of propagation power. We are able to analytically determine the exponents before and after the crossover.

  19. Effects of low-dose treatment with felodipine versus fosinopril in Chinese patients with nonischemic heart failure and normal blood pressure: A double-blind, randomized, crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mei-Shu; Chan, K.Arnold; Wang, Chih-Hao; Chang, Nen-Chang

    2004-01-01

    Background: Two second-generation calcium channel blockers, felodipine and amlodipine besylate, have been associated with similar high mortality rates in patients with ischemic heart failure (HF) but not in patients with nonischemic causes of HF. In patients with nonischemic HF, amlodipine might have a beneficial effect on survival. However, no difference in mortality rates was found between felodipine and placebo in a nonischemic HF group. Felodipine 10 mg/d was used in 1 large study, a dose considered high for nonischemic HF usually associated with normal blood pressure (BP). Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 12-week, low-dose treatment with felodipine versus those of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, fosinopril sodium, in patients with nonischemic HF and normal BP. Methods: This double-blind, randomized, crossover trial was conducted at Taipei Medical University Hospital (Taipei, Taiwan). Patients aged ≥ 18 years with angiographically proved, nonischemic HF and normal BP who were being treated with an optimal regimen of digitalis and diuretics were enrolled. After a 2-week run-in period, patients were randomized to first receive 12 weeks of treatment with felodipine tablets (2.5 mg/d) or fosinopril tablets (7.5 mg/d) and, after a 2-week washout period, were crossed over to the opposite treatment. Efficacy analysis was performed before (baseline) and after treatment and included symptomatic assessment using a 7-grade clinical scale; 2-dimensional echocardiography (2-D echo); exercise tests; and neurohumoral data, including plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone, and 24-hour urinary epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) measurements. The primary end point was death due to HF, and the secondary end point was hospital admission due to worsening HF. Compliance was measured using a pill count at the end of each treatment period. Results: We enrolled 33 patients. One developed worsening HF during the run-in period and was

  20. Pharmacokinetics and Bioequivalence of Two Formulations of Febuxostat 40-Mg and 80-Mg Tablets: A Randomized, Open-Label, 4-Way Crossover Study in Healthy Chinese Male Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhu; Nan, Feng; Miao, Jia; Chen, Zhihui; Li, Mei; Liang, Maozhi

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of febuxostat in healthy Chinese male volunteers and evaluate whether the two formulations of febuxostat 40-mg and 80-mg tablets are bioequivalent. A randomized, open-label, 4-way crossover study was conducted in healthy Chinese male volunteers under fasting conditions. 24 eligible subjects were randomized in a 1:1:1:1 ratio to receive a single dose of test or reference formulation of febuxostat 40-mg or 80-mg tablet. The washout period between each administration was 1 week. Plasma febuxostat was quantified by a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. Tolerability was evaluated by monitoring adverse events, physical examinations, 12-lead ECG and laboratory tests. After single-dosing of 1 tablet of 40-mg febuxostat, the pharmacokinetic parameters of test and reference formulations were: Tmax 1.22±0.87 and 1.85±1.03 h, Cmax 1689.16±461.31 and 1613.80±608.43 ng·mL-1, AUC0-t 5139.87±1349.28 and 5517.91±2024.26 ng·mL-1·h, AUC0−∞ 5263.06±1339.16 and 5640.48±2040.22 ng·mL-1·h, t1/2 4.82±2.61 and 4.85±1.78 h, respectively. After single-dosing of 1 tablet of 80-mg febuxostat, the pharmacokinetic parameters of test and reference formulations were: Tmax 1.71±1.21 and 2.23±1.55 h, Cmax 2744.47±1157.44 and 2998.17±1200.13 ng·mL-1, AUC0-t 9634.03±2768.25 and 10467.95±3501.65 ng·mL-1·h, AUC0−∞ 9834.32±2730.51 and 10626.63±3504.08 ng·mL-1·h, t1/2 6.25±2.44 and 5.46±1.65 h, respectively. For single-dosing of 1 tablet of 40-mg febuxostat, 90% CIs for the test/reference ratio of AUC0-t, AUC0−∞ and Cmax were 89.79 to 102.55, 90.14 to 102.56 and 93.99 to 129.63, respectively. For single-dosing of 1 tablet of 80-mg febuxostat, 90% CIs for the test/reference ratio of AUC0-t, AUC0−∞ and Cmax were 86.67 to 100.00, 87.50 to 100.51 and 79.48 to 105.99, respectively. This single dose study revealed similar pharmacokinetic properties in

  1. The BCS Bose crossover theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, S. K.; de Llano, M.; Sevilla, F. J.; Solís, M. A.; Valencia, J. J.

    2007-03-01

    We contrast four distinct versions of the BCS-Bose statistical crossover theory according to the form assumed for the electron-number equation that accompanies the BCS gap equation. The four versions correspond to explicitly accounting for two-hole-(2h) as well as two-electron-(2e) Cooper pairs (CPs), or both in equal proportions, or only either kind. This follows from a recent generalization of the Bose-Einstein condensation (GBEC) statistical theory that includes not boson-boson interactions but rather 2e- and also (without loss of generality) 2h-CPs interacting with unpaired electrons and holes in a single-band model that is easily converted into a two-band model. The GBEC theory is essentially an extension of the Friedberg-Lee 1989 BEC theory of superconductors that excludes 2h-CPs. It can thus recover, when the numbers of 2h- and 2e-CPs in both BE-condensed and non-condensed states are separately equal, the BCS gap equation for all temperatures and couplings as well as the zero-temperature BCS (rigorous-upper-bound) condensation energy for all couplings. But ignoring either 2h- or 2e-CPs it can do neither. In particular, only half the BCS condensation energy is obtained in the two crossover versions ignoring either kind of CPs. We show how critical temperatures Tc from the original BCS-Bose crossover theory in 2D require unphysically large couplings for the Cooper/BCS model interaction to differ significantly from the Tcs of ordinary BCS theory (where the number equation is substituted by the assumption that the chemical potential equals the Fermi energy).

  2. Effects of crossover hydrogen on platinum dissolution and agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tommy T. H.; Rogers, Erin; Young, Alan P.; Ye, Siyu; Colbow, Vesna; Wessel, Silvia

    2011-10-01

    The durability of catalysts in the polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is identified as a critical limiting factor for wide commercialization of fuel cells. Even though much progress has been made in understanding the degradation mechanisms, the phenomena of Pt dissolution and agglomeration and their contributing factors are not fully understood. In the present investigation, the effects of crossover hydrogen on Pt degradation are studied using an accelerated stress test (AST). The end-of-test (EOT) membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEAs) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning-electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). The results provided mechanistic understanding of Pt dissolution and agglomeration: Pt growth and agglomeration were found to be less severe with more crossover hydrogen due likely to the chemical reduction of Pt oxides by crossover hydrogen and the subsequently decrease in the amount of Pt ions formed via the oxide pathway.

  3. Self-affine crossover length in a layered silicate deposit.

    PubMed

    Fossum, J O; Bergene, H H; Hansen, Alex; O'Rourke, B; Manificat, G

    2004-03-01

    Self-affine dehydrated colloidal deposits on fresh mica surfaces of the synthetic layered silicate 2:1 smectite clay laponite have been studied by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM images of these prepared assemblies of sol and gel aggregates have been analyzed both by means of standard AFM Fourier software and a wavelet method. The deposited surfaces show a persistence to antipersistent crossover with a clay concentration dependent crossover length. It is concluded that the crossover length is associated with aggregate size, and further that the persistent roughness at small length scales signals near compact clusters of fractal dimension three, whereas the antipersistent roughness at large length scales signals a sedimentation process.

  4. Self-affine crossover length in a layered silicate deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, J. O.; Bergene, H. H.; Hansen, Alex; O'Rourke, B.; Manificat, G.

    2004-03-01

    Self-affine dehydrated colloidal deposits on fresh mica surfaces of the synthetic layered silicate 2:1 smectite clay laponite have been studied by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM images of these prepared assemblies of sol and gel aggregates have been analyzed both by means of standard AFM Fourier software and a wavelet method. The deposited surfaces show a persistence to antipersistent crossover with a clay concentration dependent crossover length. It is concluded that the crossover length is associated with aggregate size, and further that the persistent roughness at small length scales signals near compact clusters of fractal dimension three, whereas the antipersistent roughness at large length scales signals a sedimentation process.

  5. Dimensional crossover of the dephasing time in disordered mesoscopic rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiber, M.; Yevtushenko, O. M.; Marquardt, F.; von Delft, J.; Lerner, I. V.

    2009-11-01

    We study dephasing by electron interactions in a small disordered quasi-one-dimensional (1D) ring weakly coupled to leads. We use an influence functional for quantum Nyquist noise to describe the crossover for the dephasing time τφ(T) from diffusive or ergodic 1D (τφ-1∝T2/3,T1) to zero-dimensional (0D) behavior (τφ-1∝T2) as T drops below the Thouless energy. The crossover to 0D, predicted earlier for two-dimensional and three-dimensional systems, has so far eluded experimental observation. The ring geometry holds promise of meeting this long-standing challenge, since the crossover manifests itself not only in the smooth part of the magnetoconductivity but also in the amplitude of Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations. This allows signatures of dephasing in the ring to be cleanly extracted by filtering out those of the leads.

  6. Hypnosis and Local Anesthesia for Dental Pain Relief-Alternative or Adjunct Therapy?-A Randomized, Clinical-Experimental Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Thomas Gerhard; Wolf, Dominik; Callaway, Angelika; Below, Dagna; d'Hoedt, Bernd; Willershausen, Brita; Daubländer, Monika

    2016-01-01

    This prospective randomized clinical crossover trial was designed to compare hypnosis and local anesthesia for experimental dental pain relief. Pain thresholds of the dental pulp were determined. A targeted standardized pain stimulus was applied and rated on the Visual Analogue Scale (0-10). The pain threshold was lower under hypnosis (58.3 ± 17.3, p < .001), maximal (80.0) under local anesthesia. The pain stimulus was scored higher under hypnosis (3.9 ± 3.8) than with local anesthesia (0.0, p < .001). Local anesthesia was superior to hypnosis and is a safe and effective method for pain relief in dentistry. Hypnosis seems to produce similar effects observed under sedation. It can be used in addition to local anesthesia and in individual cases as an alternative for pain control in dentistry.

  7. A Cross-Over Experimental Design for Testing Audiovisual Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolovitch, Harold D.; Bordeleau, Pierre

    This paper contains a description of the cross-over type of experimental design as well as a case study of its use in field testing audiovisual materials related to teaching handicapped children. Increased efficiency is an advantage of the cross-over design, while difficulty in selecting similar format audiovisual materials for field testing is a…

  8. Spillover and Crossover of Exhaustion and Life Satisfaction among Dual-Earner Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demerouti, Evangelia; Bakker, Arnold B.; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.

    2005-01-01

    This study integrates spillover research of stress transferring from work to home and crossover research of strains transferring from one spouse to another. A spillover and crossover model was tested among 191 (couples of) dual-earner parents. For both males and females, it was hypothesized that (self-reported and partners' rating of)…

  9. Multiferroic crossover in perovskite oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, L.; Cui, X. Y.; Ringer, S. P.; Stampfl, C.

    2016-04-01

    The coexistence of ferroelectricity and magnetism in A B O3 perovskite oxides is rare, a phenomenon that has become known as the ferroelectric "d0 rule." Recently, the perovskite BiCoO3 has been shown experimentally to be isostructural with PbTiO3, while simultaneously the d6Co3 + ion has a high-spin ground state with C -type antiferromagnetic ordering. It has been suggested that the hybridization of Bi 6 s states with the O 2 p valence band stabilizes the polar phase, however, we have recently demonstrated that Co3 + ions in the perovskite structure can facilitate a ferroelectric distortion via the Co 3 d -O 2 p covalent interaction [L. Weston, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 247601 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.247601]. In this paper, using accurate hybrid density functional calculations, we investigate the atomic, electronic, and magnetic structure of BiCoO3 to elucidate the origin of the multiferroic state. To begin with, we perform a more general first-principles investigation of the role of d electrons in affecting the tendency for perovskite materials to exhibit a ferroelectric distortion; this is achieved via a qualitative trend study in artificial cubic and tetragonal La B O3 perovskites. We choose La as the A cation so as to remove the effects of Bi 6 s hybridization. The lattice instability is identified by the softening of phonon modes in the cubic phase, as well as by the energy lowering associated with a ferroelectric distortion. For the La B O3 series, where B is a d0-d8 cation from the 3 d block, the trend study reveals that increasing the d orbital occupation initially removes the tendency for a polar distortion, as expected. However, for high-spin d5-d7 and d8 cations a strong ferroelectric instability is recovered. This effect is explained in terms of increased pseudo-Jahn-Teller (PJT) p -d vibronic coupling. The PJT effect is described by the competition between a stabilizing force (K0) that favors the cubic phase, and a vibronic term that

  10. Photoinduced 2-way electron transfer in composites of metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Navendu; Paul, Sneha; Samanta, Anunay

    2016-07-01

    In order to explore the potential of nanocomposites comprising semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoclusters (NCs) in photovoltaic and catalytic applications, the interaction between CdTe QDs and gold NCs, Au10 and Au25, stabilized by histidine, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutathione, is studied by an ultrafast transient absorption (TA) technique. Temporal and spectral studies of the transients reveal photoinduced 2-way electron transfer between the two constituents of the nanocomposites, where Au NCs, which generally act as electron donors when used as photosensitizers, perform the role of the efficient electron acceptor. Interestingly, it is found that the electron transfer dynamics in these composites is governed not by the distance of separation of the constituents but by the nature of the surface capping ligands. Despite a large separation between the QDs and NCs in a giant BSA-capped system, a higher electron transfer rate in this composite suggests that unlike other smaller capping agents, which act more like insulators, BSA allows much better electron conduction, as indicated previously.In order to explore the potential of nanocomposites comprising semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoclusters (NCs) in photovoltaic and catalytic applications, the interaction between CdTe QDs and gold NCs, Au10 and Au25, stabilized by histidine, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutathione, is studied by an ultrafast transient absorption (TA) technique. Temporal and spectral studies of the transients reveal photoinduced 2-way electron transfer between the two constituents of the nanocomposites, where Au NCs, which generally act as electron donors when used as photosensitizers, perform the role of the efficient electron acceptor. Interestingly, it is found that the electron transfer dynamics in these composites is governed not by the distance of separation of the constituents but by the nature of the surface capping ligands. Despite a large separation

  11. 24 CFR 3285.701 - Electrical crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electrical crossovers. 3285.701... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Electrical Systems and Equipment § 3285.701 Electrical crossovers. Multi-section homes with electrical wiring in more than one section...

  12. 24 CFR 3285.701 - Electrical crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electrical crossovers. 3285.701... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Electrical Systems and Equipment § 3285.701 Electrical crossovers. Multi-section homes with electrical wiring in more than one section...

  13. 24 CFR 3285.701 - Electrical crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electrical crossovers. 3285.701... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Electrical Systems and Equipment § 3285.701 Electrical crossovers. Multi-section homes with electrical wiring in more than one section...

  14. 24 CFR 3285.701 - Electrical crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electrical crossovers. 3285.701... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Electrical Systems and Equipment § 3285.701 Electrical crossovers. Multi-section homes with electrical wiring in more than one section...

  15. Methods for adjusting for bias due to crossover in oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Ishak, K Jack; Proskorovsky, Irina; Korytowsky, Beata; Sandin, Rickard; Faivre, Sandrine; Valle, Juan

    2014-06-01

    Trials of new oncology treatments often involve a crossover element in their design that allows patients receiving the control treatment to crossover to receive the experimental treatment at disease progression or when sufficient evidence about the efficacy of the new treatment is achieved. Crossover leads to contamination of the initial randomized groups due to a mixing of the effects of the control and experimental treatments in the reference group. This is further complicated by the fact that crossover is often a very selective process whereby patients who switch treatment have a different prognosis than those who do not. Standard statistical techniques, including those that attempt to account for the treatment switch, cannot fully adjust for the bias introduced by crossover. Specialized methods such as rank-preserving structural failure time (RPSFT) models and inverse probability of censoring weighted (IPCW) analyses are designed to deal with selective treatment switching and have been increasingly applied to adjust for crossover. We provide an overview of the crossover problem and highlight circumstances under which it is likely to cause bias. We then describe the RPSFT and IPCW methods and explain how these methods adjust for the bias, highlighting the assumptions invoked in the process. Our aim is to facilitate understanding of these complex methods using a case study to support explanations. We also discuss the implications of crossover adjustment on cost-effectiveness results.

  16. Effect of Pregabalin on Cardiovascular Responses to Exercise and Postexercise Pain and Fatigue in Fibromyalgia: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Crossover Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrea T.; Light, Kathleen C.; Bateman, Lucinda; Hughen, Ronald W.; Vanhaitsma, Timothy A.; Light, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Pregabalin, an approved treatment for fibromyalgia (FM), has been shown to decrease sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity and inhibit sympathetically maintained pain, but its effects on exercise responses have not been reported. Methods. Using a randomized double-blind crossover design, we assessed the effect of 5 weeks of pregabalin (versus placebo) on acute cardiovascular and subjective responses to moderate exercise in 19 FM patients. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) during exercise and ratings of pain, physical fatigue, and mental fatigue before, during, and for 48 hours after exercise were compared in patients on pregabalin versus placebo and also versus 18 healthy controls. Results. On placebo, exercise RPE and BP were significantly higher in FM patients than controls (p < 0.04). Pregabalin responders (n = 12, defined by patient satisfaction and symptom changes) had significantly lower exercise BP, HR, and RPE on pregabalin versus placebo (p < 0.03) and no longer differed from controls (p > 0.26). Cardiovascular responses of nonresponders (n = 7) were not altered by pregabalin. In responders, pregabalin improved ratings of fatigue and pain (p < 0.04), but negative effects on pain and fatigue were seen in nonresponders. Conclusions. These preliminary findings suggest that pregabalin may normalize cardiovascular and subjective responses to exercise in many FM patients. PMID:27026828

  17. Vibrational spectrum of the spin crossover complex [Fe(phen)(2)(NCS)(2)] studied by IR and Raman spectroscopy, nuclear inelastic scattering and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Ronayne, Kate L; Paulsen, Hauke; Höfer, Andreas; Dennis, Andrew C; Wolny, Juliusz A; Chumakov, Aleksandr I; Schünemann, Volker; Winkler, Heiner; Spiering, Hartmut; Bousseksou, Azzedine; Gütlich, Philipp; Trautwein, Alfred X; McGarvey, John J

    2006-10-28

    The vibrational modes of the low-spin and high-spin isomers of the spin crossover complex [Fe(phen)(2)(NCS)(2)] (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) have been measured by IR and Raman spectroscopy and by nuclear inelastic scattering. The vibrational frequencies and normal modes and the IR and Raman intensities have been calculated by density functional methods. The vibrational entropy difference between the two isomers, DeltaS(vib), which is--together with the electronic entropy difference DeltaS(el)--the driving force for the spin-transition, has been determined from the measured and from the calculated frequencies. The calculated difference (DeltaS(vib) = 57-70 J mol(-1) K(-1), depending on the method) is in qualitative agreement with experimental values (20-36 J mol(-1) K(-1)). Only the low energy vibrational modes (20% of the 147 modes of the free molecule) contribute to the entropy difference and about three quarters of the vibrational entropy difference are due to the 15 modes of the central FeN(6) octahedron.

  18. Rupatadine does not potentiate the CNS depressant effects of lorazepam: randomized, double-blind, crossover, repeated dose, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    García-Gea, Consuelo; Ballester, Maria Rosa; Martínez, Juan; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Donado, Esther; Izquierdo, Iñaki; Barbanoj, Manuel-José

    2010-01-01

    AIM The main objective was to assess whether benzodiazepine intake when rupatadine plasma concentrations were at steady-state would increase the CNS depressant effects. Rupatadine is a new H1-antihistamine which also inhibits platelet activating factor (PAF) release and has been shown to be clinically effective at doses of 10 mg. METHODS Sixteen healthy young volunteers took part in a crossover, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial comprising two experimental periods (repeated administration for 7 days of rupatadine 10 mg or placebo as single oral daily doses, separated by a washout of 14 days). On days 5 and 7, according to a fully balanced design, a single oral dose of lorazepam 2 mg or placebo was added. CNS effects were evaluated on these days by seven objective tests of psychomotor performance and eight subjective visual analogue scales (VAS) at pre-dose and several times after drug intake. Four treatment conditions were evaluated: placebo, rupatadine 10 mg, lorazepam 2 mg and rupatadine 10 mg + lorazepam 2 mg. RESULTS Significant CNS effects, either impairment of psychomotor performance or subjective sedation, were observed when lorazepam was administered, either alone or in combination with steady state concentrations of rupatadine. No significant differences were found between these two conditions. In addition, rupatadine was not different from placebo. All treatments were well tolerated. CONCLUSION Repeated doses of rupatadine (10 mg orally) did not enhance the CNS depressant effects of lorazepam (2 mg orally, single dose) either in objective psychomotor tasks or in subjective evaluations. PMID:20565458

  19. Biases in Attentional Orientation and Magnitude Estimation Explain Crossover: Neglect is a Disorder of Both

    PubMed Central

    Mennemeier, Mark; Pierce, Christopher A.; Chatterjee, Anjan; Anderson, Britt; Jewell, George; Dowler, Rachael; Woods, Adam J.; Glenn, Tannahill; Mark, Victor W.

    2015-01-01

    Crossover refers to a pattern of performance on the line bisection test in which short lines are bisected on the side opposite the true center of long lines. Although most patients with spatial neglect demonstrate crossover, contemporary theories of neglect cannot explain it. In contrast, we show that blending the psychophysical construct of magnitude estimation with neglect theory not only explains crossover, but also addresses a quantitative feature of neglect that is independent of spatial deficits. We report a prospective validation study of the orientation/estimation hypothesis of crossover. Forty subjects (17 patients with and without neglect following unilateral brain injury and 23 normal controls) completed four experiments that examined crossover using line bisection, line bisection with cueing, and reproducing line lengths from both memory and a standard. Replicating earlier findings, all except one subject group exhibited crossover on the standard line bisection test, all groups showed a spontaneous preference to orient attention to one end of the lines, and all groups overestimated the length of short lines and underestimated long lines. Biases in attentional orientation and magnitude estimation are exaggerated in patients with neglect. The truly novel finding of this study occurred when, after removing the line from the bisection task, the direction of crossover was completely reversed in all subject groups depending on where attention was oriented. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis of crossover: (1) crossover is a normal component of performance on line bisection; (2) crossover results from the interplay of biases in attentional orientation and magnitude estimation; and (3) attentional orientation predicts the direction of crossover, whereas a disorder of magnitude estimation, not previously emphasized in neglect, accounts for the quantitative changes in length estimation that make crossover more obvious in neglect subjects

  20. Biases in attentional orientation and magnitude estimation explain crossover: neglect is a disorder of both.

    PubMed

    Mennemeier, Mark; Pierce, Christopher A; Chatterjee, Anjan; Anderson, Britt; Jewell, George; Dowler, Rachael; Woods, Adam J; Glenn, Tannahill; Mark, Victor W

    2005-08-01

    Crossover refers to a pattern of performance on the line bisection test in which short lines are bisected on the side opposite the true center of long lines. Although most patients with spatial neglect demonstrate crossover, contemporary theories of neglect cannot explain it. In contrast, we show that blending the psychophysical construct of magnitude estimation with neglect theory not only explains crossover, but also addresses a quantitative feature of neglect that is independent of spatial deficits. We report a prospective validation study of the orientation/estimation hypothesis of crossover. Forty subjects (17 patients with and without neglect following unilateral brain injury and 23 normal controls) completed four experiments that examined crossover using line bisection, line bisection with cueing, and reproducing line lengths from both memory and a standard. Replicating earlier findings, all except one subject group exhibited crossover on the standard line bisection test, all groups showed a spontaneous preference to orient attention to one end of the lines, and all groups overestimated the length of short lines and underestimated long lines. Biases in attentional orientation and magnitude estimation are exaggerated in patients with neglect. The truly novel finding of this study occurred when, after removing the line from the bisection task, the direction of crossover was completely reversed in all subject groups depending on where attention was oriented. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis of crossover: (1) crossover is a normal component of performance on line bisection; (2) crossover results from the interplay of biases in attentional orientation and magnitude estimation; and (3) attentional orientation predicts the direction of crossover, whereas a disorder of magnitude estimation, not previously emphasized in neglect, accounts for the quantitative changes in length estimation that make crossover more obvious in neglect subjects

  1. Structural, thermal, and magnetic study of solvation processes in spin-crossover [Fe(bpp)(2)][Cr(L)(ox)(2)](2).nH(2)O complexes.

    PubMed

    Clemente-León, Miguel; Coronado, Eugenio; Giménez-López, M Carmen; Romero, Francisco M

    2007-12-24

    The influence of lattice water in the magnetic properties of spin-crossover [Fe(bpp)2]X2.nH2O salts [bpp = 2,6-bis(pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine] is well-documented. In most cases, it stabilizes the low-spin state compared to the anhydrous compound. In other cases, it is rather the contrary. Unraveling this mystery implies the study of the microscopic changes that accompany the loss of water. This might be difficult from an experimental point of view. Our strategy is to focus on some salts that undergo a nonreversible dehydration-hydration process without loss of crystallinity. By comparison of the structural and magnetic properties of original and rehydrated samples, several rules concerning the role of water at the microscopic level can be deduced. This paper reports on the crystal structure, thermal studies, and magnetic properties of [Fe(bpp)2][Cr(bpy)(ox)2]2.2H2O (1), [Fe(bpp)2][Cr(phen)(ox)2]2.0.5H2O.0.5MeOH (2), and [Fe(bpp)2][Cr(phen)(ox)2]2.5.5H2O.2.5MeOH (3). Salt 1 contains both high-spin (HS) and low-spin (LS) Fe2+ cations in a 1:1 ratio. Dehydration yields the anhydrous spin-crossover compound with T1/2 downward arrow = 353 K and T1/2 upward arrow = 369 K. Rehydration affords the dihydrate [Fe(bpp)2][Cr(bpy)(ox)2]2.2H2O (1r) with 100% HS Fe2+ sites. Salt 2 also contains both HS and LS Fe2+ cations in a 1:1 ratio. Dehydration yields the anhydrous spin-crossover compound with T1/2 downward arrow = 343 K and T1/2 upward arrow = 348 K. Rehydration affords [Fe(bpp)2][Cr(phen)(ox)2]2.0.5H2O (2r) with 72% Fe2+ sites in the LS configuration. The structural, magnetic, and thermal properties of these rehydrated compounds 1r and 2r are also discussed. Finally, 1 has been dehydrated and resolvated with MeOH to give [Fe(bpp)2][Cr(bpy)(ox)2]2.MeOH (1s) with 33% HS Fe2+ sites. The influence of the guest solvent in the Fe2+ spin state can anticipate the future applications of these compounds in solvent sensing.

  2. Bioequivalence of two lansoprazole delayed release capsules 30 mg in healthy male volunteers under fasting, fed and fasting-applesauce conditions: a partial replicate crossover study design to estimate the pharmacokinetics of highly variable drugs.

    PubMed

    Thota, S; Khan, S M; Tippabhotla, S K; Battula, R; Gadiko, C; Vobalaboina, V

    2013-11-01

    An open-label, 2-treatment, 3-sequence, 3-period, single-dose, partial replicate crossover studies under fasting (n=48), fed (n=60) and fasting-applesauce (n=48) (sprinkled on one table spoonful of applesauce) modalities were conducted in healthy adult male volunteers to evaluate bioequivalence between 2 formulations of lansoprazole delayed release capsules 30 mg. In all the 3 studies, as per randomization, either test or reference formulations were administered in a crossover manner with a required washout period of at least 7 days. Blood samples were collected adequately (0-24 h) to determine lansoprazole plasma concentrations using a validated LC-MS/MS analytical method. To characterize the pharmacokinetic parameters (Cmax, AUC0-t, AUC0-∞, Tmax, Kel and T1/2) of lansoprazole, non-compartmental analysis and ANOVA was applied on ln-transformed values. The bioequivalence was tested based on within-subject variability of the reference formulation. In fasting and fed studies (within-subject variability>30%) bioequivalence was evaluated with scaled average bioequivalence, hence for the pharmacokinetic parameters Cmax, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞, the 95% upper confidence bound for (μT-μR)2-θσ2 WR was ≤0, and the point estimates (test-to-reference ratio) were within the regulatory acceptance limit 80.00-125.00%. In fasting-applesauce study (within-subject variability<30%) bioequivalence was evaluated with average bioequivalence, the 90% CI of ln-transformed data of Cmax, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞ were within the regulatory acceptance limit 80.00-125.00%. Based on these aforesaid statistical inferences, it was concluded that the test formulation is bioequivalent to reference formulation.

  3. Ambient Particulate Matter (PM2.5/PM10) Exposure and Emergency Department Visits for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Chaoyang District, Beijing, China During 2014: A Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Qi, Weipeng; Yao, Wei; Wang, Mei; Chen, Yiyong; Zhou, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiology studies have shown a consistently increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) correlated with particulate matter (PM) exposure. However, little is known about the association with specific AMI subtypes. In this work, we investigated the association between short-term PM exposure and emergency department visits (EDVs) for AMI, ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Methods We based this case-crossover study on 2749 patients from Chaoyang District hospitalized with AMI in Anzhen Hospital during 2014. Meteorological and air pollution data were collected during this period. We used a time-stratified case-crossover design with lag model, adjusted for meteorological conditions and/or other gaseous pollutants, to estimate risk of EDVs for AMI, STEMI, and NSTEMI. We conducted stratified analyses by gender, age, season, and comorbid conditions to examine potential effect modification. Results We found that each 10 µg/m3 increment of PM2.5 concentration (1-day lagged) was associated with an increased risk of EDVs for STEMI (OR 1.05; 95% CI, 1.00–1.11). We found no association of PM2.5 concentration with overall AMI or NSTEMI. No effect modification was found when stratified by gender, season, or comorbid conditions, even though the effect size was larger in patients who were male, smokers, and comorbid with hypertension. Patients aged ≥65 years showed a significantly increased risk of STEMI associated with PM2.5 in the previous day than those aged <65 years. Conclusions Our study indicated a transient effect of short-term PM2.5 exposure on EDVs for STEMI. Patients aged ≥65 years appeared to be particularly susceptible. Our findings suggest that studies of the association between PM exposure and AMI should consider AMI subtypes, lag times, and individual characteristics. PMID:27064131

  4. Neutrino dynamics below the electroweak crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2016-07-12

    We estimate the thermal masses and damping rates of active (m< eV) and sterile (M∼ GeV) neutrinos with thermal momenta k∼3T at temperatures below the electroweak crossover (5 GeV 130 GeV remains an option. Our differential rates are tabulated in a form suitable for studies of specific scenarios with given neutrino Yukawa matrices.

  5. High-Resolution Mapping of Crossover and Non-crossover Recombination Events by Whole-Genome Re-sequencing of an Avian Pedigree.

    PubMed

    Smeds, Linnéa; Mugal, Carina F; Qvarnström, Anna; Ellegren, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Recombination is an engine of genetic diversity and therefore constitutes a key process in evolutionary biology and genetics. While the outcome of crossover recombination can readily be detected as shuffled alleles by following the inheritance of markers in pedigreed families, the more precise location of both crossover and non-crossover recombination events has been difficult to pinpoint. As a consequence, we lack a detailed portrait of the recombination landscape for most organisms and knowledge on how this landscape impacts on sequence evolution at a local scale. To localize recombination events with high resolution in an avian system, we performed whole-genome re-sequencing at high coverage of a complete three-generation collared flycatcher pedigree. We identified 325 crossovers at a median resolution of 1.4 kb, with 86% of the events localized to <10 kb intervals. Observed crossover rates were in excellent agreement with data from linkage mapping, were 52% higher in male (3.56 cM/Mb) than in female meiosis (2.28 cM/Mb), and increased towards chromosome ends in male but not female meiosis. Crossover events were non-randomly distributed in the genome with several distinct hot-spots and a concentration to genic regions, with the highest density in promoters and CpG islands. We further identified 267 non-crossovers, whose location was significantly associated with crossover locations. We detected a significant transmission bias (0.18) in favour of 'strong' (G, C) over 'weak' (A, T) alleles at non-crossover events, providing direct evidence for the process of GC-biased gene conversion in an avian system. The approach taken in this study should be applicable to any species and would thereby help to provide a more comprehensive portray of the recombination landscape across organism groups.

  6. High-Resolution Mapping of Crossover and Non-crossover Recombination Events by Whole-Genome Re-sequencing of an Avian Pedigree

    PubMed Central

    Qvarnström, Anna; Ellegren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Recombination is an engine of genetic diversity and therefore constitutes a key process in evolutionary biology and genetics. While the outcome of crossover recombination can readily be detected as shuffled alleles by following the inheritance of markers in pedigreed families, the more precise location of both crossover and non-crossover recombination events has been difficult to pinpoint. As a consequence, we lack a detailed portrait of the recombination landscape for most organisms and knowledge on how this landscape impacts on sequence evolution at a local scale. To localize recombination events with high resolution in an avian system, we performed whole-genome re-sequencing at high coverage of a complete three-generation collared flycatcher pedigree. We identified 325 crossovers at a median resolution of 1.4 kb, with 86% of the events localized to <10 kb intervals. Observed crossover rates were in excellent agreement with data from linkage mapping, were 52% higher in male (3.56 cM/Mb) than in female meiosis (2.28 cM/Mb), and increased towards chromosome ends in male but not female meiosis. Crossover events were non-randomly distributed in the genome with several distinct hot-spots and a concentration to genic regions, with the highest density in promoters and CpG islands. We further identified 267 non-crossovers, whose location was significantly associated with crossover locations. We detected a significant transmission bias (0.18) in favour of ‘strong’ (G, C) over ‘weak’ (A, T) alleles at non-crossover events, providing direct evidence for the process of GC-biased gene conversion in an avian system. The approach taken in this study should be applicable to any species and would thereby help to provide a more comprehensive portray of the recombination landscape across organism groups. PMID:27219623

  7. Evaluation of the efficacy, acceptability and palatability of calcium montmorillonite clay used to reduce aflatoxin B1 dietary exposure in a crossover study in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Awuor, Abigael O; Yard, Ellen; Daniel, Johnni H; Martin, Collen; Bii, Christine; Romoser, Amelia; Oyugi, Elvis; Elmore, Sarah; Amwayi, Samwel; Vulule, John; Zitomer, Nicholas C; Rybak, Michael E; Phillips, Timothy D; Montgomery, Joel M; Lewis, Lauren S

    2017-01-01

    Acute aflatoxin exposure can cause death and disease (aflatoxicosis) in humans. Aflatoxicosis fatality rates have been documented to be as high as 40% in Kenya. The inclusion in the diet of calcium silicate 100 (ACCS100), a calcium montmorillonite clay, may reduce aflatoxin bioavailability, thus potentially decreasing the risk of aflatoxicosis. We investigated the efficacy, acceptability and palatability of ACCS100 in a population in Kenya with recurring aflatoxicosis outbreaks. Healthy adult participants were enrolled in this double-blinded, crossover clinical trial in 2014. Following informed consent, participants (n = 50) were randomised to receive either ACCS100 (3 g day(-1)) or placebo (3 g day(-1)) for 7 days. Treatments were switched following a 5-day washout period. Urine samples were collected daily and assessed for urinary aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). Blood samples were collected at the beginning and end of the trial and assessed for aflatoxin B1-lysine adducts from serum albumin (AFB1-lys). AFM1 concentrations in urine were significantly reduced while taking ACCS100 compared with calcium carbonate placebo (β = 0.49, 95% confidence limit = 0.32-0.75). The 20-day interval included both the placebo and ACCS100 treatments as well as a washout period. There were no statistically significant differences in reported taste, aftertaste, appearance, colour or texture by treatment. There were no statistically significant differences in self-reported adverse events by treatment. Most participants would be willing to take ACCS100 (98%) and give it to their children (98%). ACCS100 was effective, acceptable and palatable. More work is needed to test ACCS100 among vulnerable populations and to determine if it remains effective at the levels of aflatoxin exposure that induce aflatoxicosis.

  8. Suppressive therapy versus episodic therapy with oral valacyclovir for recurrent herpes labialis: efficacy and tolerability in an open-label, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stanley C

    2007-04-01

    Oral valacyclovir's efficacy and tolerability as suppressive therapy versus episodic therapy were compared for recurrent herpes labialis (RHL). Subjects with a history of at least 3 RHL episodes in the past year were randomized to receive 6 months of oral valacyclovir episodic therapy at the first sign of prodrome (two 2-g doses separated by 12 hours) and 6 months of oral valacyclovir suppressive therapy (1 g once daily) for 6 months in open-label, crossover fashion. The mean +/- SE number of recurrences per 120 days of follow-up (primary endpoint) was lower with suppressive therapy (0.30 +/- 0.41) than episodic therapy (0.71 +/- 0.79) (P < .005). The probability of remaining recurrence free over 6 months was significantly higher with suppressive therapy than episodic therapy. The median time to first recurrence was 81 days with episodic therapy and was not calculable (> 180 days) for suppressive therapy (P = 0.021). Data for secondary efficacy endpoints (pain severity score, mean duration of recurrences, maximal total lesion area) showed approximately a 30% to 50% reduction in mean values with suppressive therapy compared with episodic therapy, but results were statistically significantly different between the regimens for pain severity only. The percentage of subjects with at least one adverse event over 6 months of treatment that was considered to be drug related was 3% with suppressive therapy and 6% with episodic therapy. Suppressive therapy with oral valacyclovir was more effective than episodic therapy with oral valacyclovir in reducing the frequency of recurrences of herpes labialis and prolonging the time to first recurrence and was also similarly well-tolerated.

  9. Ambient fine particulate air pollution triggers ST-elevation myocardial infarction, but not non-ST elevation myocardial infarction: a case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We and others have shown that increases in particulate air pollutant (PM) concentrations in the previous hours and days have been associated with increased risks of myocardial infarction, but little is known about the relationships between air pollution and specific subsets of myocardial infarction, such as ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Methods Using data from acute coronary syndrome patients with STEMI (n = 338) and NSTEMI (n = 339) and case-crossover methods, we estimated the risk of STEMI and NSTEMI associated with increased ambient fine particle (<2.5 um) concentrations, ultrafine particle (10-100 nm) number concentrations, and accumulation mode particle (100-500 nm) number concentrations in the previous few hours and days. Results We found a significant 18% increase in the risk of STEMI associated with each 7.1 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 concentration in the previous hour prior to acute coronary syndrome onset, with smaller, non-significantly increased risks associated with increased fine particle concentrations in the previous 3, 12, and 24 hours. We found no pattern with NSTEMI. Estimates of the risk of STEMI associated with interquartile range increases in ultrafine particle and accumulation mode particle number concentrations in the previous 1 to 96 hours were all greater than 1.0, but not statistically significant. Patients with pre-existing hypertension had a significantly greater risk of STEMI associated with increased fine particle concentration in the previous hour than patients without hypertension. Conclusions Increased fine particle concentrations in the hour prior to acute coronary syndrome onset were associated with an increased risk of STEMI, but not NSTEMI. Patients with pre-existing hypertension and other cardiovascular disease appeared particularly susceptible. Further investigation into mechanisms by which PM can preferentially trigger STEMI over NSTEMI

  10. Vulnerability to heat-related mortality in Latin America: a case-crossover study in São Paulo, Brazil, Santiago, Chile and Mexico City, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Michelle L; O’Neill, Marie S; Ranjit, Nalini; Borja-Aburto, Victor H; Cifuentes, Luis A; Gouveia, Nelson C

    2008-01-01

    Background Factors affecting vulnerability to heat-related mortality are not well understood. Identifying susceptible populations is of particular importance given anticipated rising temperatures from climatic change. Methods We investigated heat-related mortality for three Latin American cities (Mexico City, Mexico; São Paulo, Brazil; Santiago, Chile) using a case-crossover approach for 754 291 deaths from 1998 to 2002. We considered lagged exposures, confounding by air pollution, cause of death and susceptibilities by educational attainment, age and sex. Results Same and previous day apparent temperature were most strongly associated with mortality risk. Effect estimates remained positive though lowered after adjustment for ozone or PM10. Susceptibility increased with age in all cities. The increase in mortality risk for those ≥65 comparing the 95th and 75th percentiles of same-day apparent temperature was 2.69% (95% CI: −2.06 to 7.88%) for Santiago, 6.51% (95% CI: 3.57–9.52%) for São Paulo and 3.22% (95% CI: 0.93–5.57%) for Mexico City. Patterns of vulnerability by education and sex differed across communities. Effect estimates were higher for women than men in Mexico City, and higher for men elsewhere, although results by sex were not appreciably different for any city. In São Paulo, those with less education were more susceptible, whereas no distinct patterns by education were observed in the other cities. Conclusions Elevated temperatures are associated with mortality risk in these Latin American cities, with the strongest associations in São Paulo, the hottest city. The elderly are an important population for targeted prevention measures, but vulnerability by sex and education differed by city. PMID:18511489

  11. The choice in meiosis - defining the factors that influence crossover or non-crossover formation.

    PubMed

    Youds, Jillian L; Boulton, Simon J

    2011-02-15

    Meiotic crossovers are essential for ensuring correct chromosome segregation as well as for creating new combinations of alleles for natural selection to take place. During meiosis, excess meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs) are generated; a subset of these breaks are repaired to form crossovers, whereas the remainder are repaired as non-crossovers. What determines where meiotic DSBs are created and whether a crossover or non-crossover will be formed at any particular DSB remains largely unclear. Nevertheless, several recent papers have revealed important insights into the factors that control the decision between crossover and non-crossover formation in meiosis, including DNA elements that determine the positioning of meiotic DSBs, and the generation and processing of recombination intermediates. In this review, we focus on the factors that influence DSB positioning, the proteins required for the formation of recombination intermediates and how the processing of these structures generates either a crossover or non-crossover in various organisms. A discussion of crossover interference, assurance and homeostasis, which influence crossing over on a chromosome-wide and genome-wide scale - in addition to current models for the generation of interference - is also included. This Commentary aims to highlight recent advances in our understanding of the factors that promote or prevent meiotic crossing over.

  12. Crossover critical phenomena in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrowicka Wyczalkowska, Anna Judyta

    In fluids the effects of critical density fluctuations remain significant over a large range of temperatures and densities. The nonanalytical behavior observed in real fluids in the vicinity of the critical point is well described by renormalization-group theory. This theory accounts properly for the influence of the critical fluctuations in density which are entirely neglected by the classical equations. Specifically, fluids asymptotically close to the critical point belong to the universality class of the 3-dimensional Ising model and their behavior near the critical point is governed by scaling laws with critical exponents appropriate for this universality class. The validity of the asymptotic power laws is, however, restricted to a very small region near the critical point. An approach to deal with the nonasymptotic behavior of fluids including the crossover from Ising behavior in the immediate vicinity of the critical point to classical behavior far away from the critical point has been developed by Chen and coworkers and is further improved in this thesis. This approach is based on earlier work of Nicoll and coworkers and it leads to a transformation of a classical Landau expansion to incorporate the effects of critical fluctuations. Here we show how this transformation applies to real fluids: water and sulfurhexafluoride. Nevertheless, even such a crossover Landau expansion still fails to make a connection with the behavior of the fluid very far away from the critical point like the ideal-gas limit at low densities. We demonstrate how a procedure, earlier developed to include the effects of critical fluctuations into a classical Landau expansion of the Helmholtz-energy density, can also be applied to a closed-form classical equation of state like the equation of van der Waals. One of the consequences of accounting for the presence of the critical fluctuations is a shift in the location of the critical point. The resulting equation incorporates the

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Active Components of Yokukansan, a Traditional Japanese Herbal Medicine after a Single Oral Administration to Healthy Japanese Volunteers: A Cross-Over, Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Munekage, Masaya; Ichikawa, Kengo; Fukudome, Ian; Munekage, Eri; Takezaki, Yuka; Matsumoto, Takashi; Igarashi, Yasushi; Hanyu, Haruo; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Context Yokukansan (YKS) is a traditional Japanese herbal medicine called kampo medicine in Japan. Its extract comprises seven crude drugs: Atractylodis lanceae rhizoma, Poria, Cnidii rhizoma, Uncariae uncis cum ramulus, Angelicae radix, Bupleuri radix, and Glycyrrhizae radix. YKS is used to treat neurosis, insomnia, as well as behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. Objective To confirm the exposure and pharmacokinetics of the active components of YKS in healthy volunteers. Design, Setting, and Participants A randomized, open-label, 3-arm, 3-period, crossover trial was conducted on 21 healthy Japanese volunteers at the Kochi Medical University between May 2012 and November 2012. Interventions Single oral administration of YKS (2.5 g, 5.0 g, or 7.5 g/day) during each period. Main Outcome Measure Plasma concentrations of three active compounds in YKS, namely 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), geissoschizine methyl ether (GM), and hirsuteine (HTE). Results The mean maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) of GM and HTE increased dose-dependently (ranges: 0.650–1.98 ng/mL and 0.138–0.450 ng/mL, respectively). The times to maximum plasma concentration after drug administration (tmax) were 0.500 h for GM and 0.975–1.00 h for HTE. The apparent elimination half-lives (t1/2) were 1.72–1.95 h for GM and 2.47–3.03 h for HTE. These data indicate the rapid absorption and elimination of GM and HTE. On the other hand, the Cmax, tmax, and t1/2 of GA were 57.7–108 ng/mL, 8.00–8.01 h, and 9.39–12.3 h, respectively. Conclusion We demonstrated that pharmacologically active components of YKS are detected in humans. Further, we determined the pharmacokinetics of GM, HTE, and GA. This information will be useful to elucidate the pharmacological effects of YKS. Trial Registration Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center JAPIC CTI-121811 PMID:26151135

  14. CYP2D6 inhibition by fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine in a crossover study: intraindividual variability and plasma concentration correlations.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, C L; Lam, Y W; Simpson, J; Ereshefsky, L

    2000-01-01

    The authors report the CYP2D6 inhibitory effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine in an open-label, multiple-dose, crossover design. Twelve CYP2D6 extensive metabolizers were phenotyped, using the dextromethorphan/dextrorphan (DM/DX) urinary ratio, before and after administration of fluoxetine 60 mg (loading dose strategy), paroxetine 20 mg, sertraline 100 mg, and venlafaxine 150 mg. Paroxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine sequences were randomized with 2-week washouts between treatments; fluoxetine was the last antidepressant (AD) administered. Comparing within groups, baseline DM/DX ratios (0.017) were significantly lower than DM/DX ratios after treatment (DM/DXAD) with fluoxetine (0.313, p < 0.0001) and paroxetine (0.601, p < 0.0001) but not for sertraline (0.026, p = 0.066) or venlafaxine (0.023, p = 0.485). Between groups, DM/DXAD ratios were significantly higher for fluoxetine and paroxetine compared to sertraline and venlafaxine. No differences between DM/DXAD ratios were found for fluoxetine and paroxetine although more subjects phenocopied to PM status after receiving the latter (42% vs. 83%; chi 2 = 4.44, p = 0.049, df = 1). Similarly, no differences between DM/DXAD ratios were found for sertraline and venlafaxine. Of note, the DM/DXAD for 1 subject was much lower after treatment with paroxetine (0.058) compared to fluoxetine (0.490), while another subject exhibited a much lower ratio after treatment with fluoxetine (0.095) compared to paroxetine (0.397). Significant correlations between AD plasma concentration and DM/DXAD were found for paroxetine (r2 = 0.404, p = 0.026) and sertraline (r2 = 0.64, p = 0.002) but not fluoxetine or venlafaxine. In addition, DM/DXAD correlated with baseline isoenzyme activity for paroxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine groups. These results demonstrate the potent, but variable, CYP2D6 inhibition of fluoxetine and paroxetine compared to sertraline and venlafaxine. CYP2D6 inhibition may be related, in

  15. An open-label, phase 2, single centre, randomized, crossover design bioequivalence study of AndroForte 5 testosterone cream and Testogel 1% testosterone gel in hypogonadal men: study LP101.

    PubMed

    Wittert, G A; Harrison, R W; Buckley, M J; Wlodarczyk, J

    2016-01-01

    We compared a novel 5% testosterone (T) cream (AndroForte 5, Lawley Pharmaceuticals, Australia) with a 1% T gel (Testogel, Besins Healthcare, Australia). Using an open-label crossover design, subjects were randomized to one of two treatment sequences using either the T gel or T cream first in a 1 : 1 ratio. Each treatment period was 30 days with a 7-14 days washout period between them. On Days 1 and 30 of each treatment period blood was sampled at -15, -5 min, 0, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12 and 16 h post study drug administration. Sixteen men with established androgen deficiency aged between 29 and 73 years, who had undertaken a washout from prior testosterone therapy participated in the study. One subject failed to complete both arms and another was excluded post-completion because of a major protocol violation. Bioequivalence was established based on key pharmacokinetic (PK) variables: AUC, C(avg), C(max), T(max), % fluctuation (with and without baseline correction) for the two formulations of testosterone on Day 1 and Day 30. The ratio and 90% CI of AUC 0.99 (0.86-1.14), C(max) 1.02 (0.84-1.24) and C(avg) 0.99 (0.86-1.14) for T cream/T gel were within the predetermined bio-equivalence criteria of 80% to 125% at Day 30. There were no statistically significant differences between secondary biochemical markers: serum dihydrotestosterone (DHT), oestradiol (E2), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), luteinizing hormone (LH) and (FSH). The two testosterone formulations were shown to be bioequivalent.

  16. The Misguided Ethics of Crossover Trials

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vinay; Grady, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Crossover is increasingly favored in trials of cancer therapies; even those that seek to establish the basic efficacy of novel drugs. Crossover is done in part for trial recruitment, but also out of a sense of doing the right thing—offering the investigational agent to more patients. In this paper, we argue that this ethical feeling—that crossover is a preferred trial choice—is misguided. In seeking to sate the desires of participants, we might undermine a trial’s ability to answer a meaningful clinical question. When a trial is incapable of answering a question, it becomes unethical. Using a crossover strategy in oncology clinical trials can make trials less ethical, not more. L’enfer est plein de bonnes volontés et désirs (Hell is full of good wishes and desires)--Saint Bernard of Clairvaux (c.1150) PMID:24365533

  17. Skating crossovers on a motorized flywheel: a preliminary experimental design to test effect on speed and on crossovers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aynsley M; Krause, David A; Stuart, Michael J; Montelpare, William J; Sorenson, Matthew C; Link, Andrew A; Gaz, Daniel V; Twardowski, Casey P; Larson, Dirk R; Stuart, Michael B

    2013-12-01

    Ice hockey requires frequent skater crossovers to execute turns. Our investigation aimed to determine the effectiveness of training crossovers on a motorized, polyethylene high-resistance flywheel. We hypothesized that high school hockey players training on the flywheel would perform as well as their peers training on ice. Participants were 23 male high-school hockey players (age 15-19 years). The study used an experimental prospective design to compare players who trained for 9 sessions on the 22-foot flywheel with players who trained for 9 sessions on a similarly sized on-ice circle. Both groups were compared with control subjects who were randomly selected from the same participant pool as those training on ice. All players were tested before and after their 3-week training regimens, and control subjects were asked to not practice crossovers between testing. Group 1 trained in a hockey training facility housing the flywheel, and group 2 trained in the ice hockey arena where testing occurred. Primary outcome measures tested in both directions were: (a) speed (time in seconds) required to skate crossovers for 3 laps of a marked face-off circle, (b) cadence of skating crossovers on the similarly sized circles, and (c) a repeat interval speed test, which measures anaerobic power. No significant changes were found between groups in on-ice testing before and after training. Among the group 1 players, 7 of 8 believed they benefited from flywheel training. Group 2 players, who trained on ice, did not improve performance significantly over group 1 players. Despite the fact that no significant on-ice changes in performance were observed in objective measures, players who trained on the flywheel subjectively reported that the flywheel is an effective cost-effective alternative to training on ice. This is a relevant finding when placed in context with limited availability of on-ice training.

  18. An exploratory, randomized, parallel-group, open-label, relative bioavailability study with an additional two-period crossover food-effect study exploring the pharmacokinetics of two novel formulations of pexmetinib (ARRY-614)

    PubMed Central

    Wollenberg, Lance A; Corson, Donald T; Nugent, Courtney A; Peterson, Farran L; Ptaszynski, Ann M; Arrigo, Alisha; Mannila, Coralee G; Litwiler, Kevin S; Bell, Stacie J

    2015-01-01

    Background Pexmetinib (ARRY-614) is a dual inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and Tie2 signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes. Previous clinical experience in a Phase I dose-escalation study of myelodysplastic syndrome patients using pexmetinib administered as neat powder-in-capsule (PIC) exhibited high variability in pharmacokinetics and excessive pill burden, prompting an effort to improve the formulation of pexmetinib. Methods A relative bioavailability assessment encompassed three parallel treatment cohorts of unique subjects comparing the two new formulations (12 subjects per cohort), a liquid oral suspension (LOS) and liquid-filled capsule (LFC) and the current clinical PIC formulation (six subjects) in a fasted state. The food-effect assessment was conducted as a crossover of the LOS and LFC formulations administered under fed and fasted conditions. Subjects were divided into two groups of equal size to evaluate potential period effects on the food-effect assessment. Results The geometric mean values of the total plasma exposures based upon area-under-the-curve to the last quantifiable sample (AUClast) of pexmetinib were approximately four- and twofold higher after administration of the LFC and LOS formulations, respectively, than after the PIC formulation, when the formulations were administered in the fasted state. When the LFC formulation was administered in the fed state, pexmetinib AUClast decreased by <5% compared with the fasted state. After administration of the LOS formulation in the fed state, pexmetinib AUClast was 34% greater than observed in the fasted state. Conclusion These results suggest that the LFC formulation of pexmetinib may achieve greater exposures with lower doses due to the greater bioavailability compared to the PIC, and remain unaffected by coadministration with food. PMID:26491375

  19. Effect of gas composition on Ru dissolution and crossover in polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tommy T. H.; Jia, Nengyou; Colbow, Vesna; Wessel, Silvia; Dutta, Monica

    Pt-Ru-based anodes are commonly used in polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) to provide improved CO tolerance for reformate fuel applications. However, Ru crossover from the anode to the cathode has been identified as a critical durability problem that has severe performance implications. In the present study, an anode accelerated stress test (AST) was used to simulate potential spikes that occur during fuel cell start-ups and shutdowns to induce Ru crossover. The effects of fuel gas composition, namely hydrogen and carbon dioxide concentrations, on Ru dissolution and crossover were investigated. The cell performance losses were correlated with the degree of Ru crossover as determined by the changes in cathode cyclic voltammetry (CV) characteristics and neutron activation analysis (NAA). It was found that higher hydrogen concentration in the fuel accelerated Ru crossover and that the presence of carbon dioxide hindered Ru crossover. In particular, the injection of 20 vol.% carbon dioxide during potential cycling resulted in very minor Ru crossover, which showed essentially identical performance losses and CV characteristic changes as a fuel cell composed of a Ru-free anode. The experimental results suggest that the Ru species in our Pt-Ru metal oxide catalysts need to go through a reduction step by hydrogen before dissolution. The presence of carbon dioxide may play a role in hindering the reduction step.

  20. Effect of the dietary supplement Meltdown on catecholamine secretion, markers of lipolysis, and metabolic rate in men and women: a randomized, placebo controlled, cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    Bloomer, Richard J; Canale, Robert E; Blankenship, Megan M; Hammond, Kelley G; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H; Schilling, Brian K

    2009-01-01

    Background We have recently reported that the dietary supplement Meltdown® increases plasma norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EPI), glycerol, free fatty acids (FFA), and metabolic rate in men. However, in that investigation measurements ceased at 90 minutes post ingestion, with values for blood borne variables peaking at this time. It was the purpose of the present investigation to extend the time course of measurement to 6 hours, and to include women within the design to determine if sex differences to treatment exist. Methods Ten men (24 ± 4 yrs) and 10 women (22 ± 2 yrs) ingested Meltdown® or a placebo, using a randomized, cross-over design with one week separating conditions. Blood samples were collected immediately before supplementation and at one hour intervals through 6 hours post ingestion. A standard meal was provided after the hour 3 collection. Samples were assayed for EPI, NE, glycerol, and FFA. Five minute breath samples were collected at each time for measurement of metabolic rate and substrate utilization. Area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded at all times. Data were also analyzed using a 2 (sex) × 2 (condition) × 7 (time) repeated measures analysis of variance, with Tukey post hoc testing. Results No sex × condition interactions were noted for AUC for any variable (p > 0.05). Hence, AUC data are collapsed across men and women. AUC was greater for Meltdown® compared to placebo for EPI (367 ± 58 pg·mL-1·6 hr-1 vs. 183 ± 27 pg·mL-1·6 hr-1; p = 0.01), NE (2345 ± 205 pg·mL-1·6 hr-1 vs. 1659 ± 184 pg·mL-1·6 hr-1; p = 0.02), glycerol (79 ± 8 μg·mL-1·6 hr-1 vs. 59 ± 6 μg·mL-1·6 hr-1; p = 0.03), FFA (2.46 ± 0.64 mmol·L-1·6 hr-1 vs. 1.57 ± 0.42 mmol·L-1·6 hr-1; p = 0.05), and kilocalorie expenditure (439 ± 26 kcal·6 hrs-1 vs. 380 ± 14 kcal·6 hrs-1; p = 0.02). No effect was noted for substrate utilization (p = 0.39). Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.0001; 1

  1. Compensatory changes in energy balance during dapagliflozin treatment in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomised double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial (ENERGIZE)—study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Surya Panicker; Sprung, Victoria S; Roberts, Carl; Harrold, Jo A; Halford, Jason C G; Stancak, Andrej; Boyland, Emma J; Kemp, Graham J; Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Wilding, John P H

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are effective blood-glucose-lowering medications with beneficial effects on body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, observed weight loss is less than that predicted from quantified glycosuria, suggesting a compensatory increase in energy intake or a decrease in energy expenditure. Studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) have suggested most body weight change is due to loss of adipose tissue, but organ-specific changes in fat content (eg, liver, skeletal muscle) have not been determined. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, we aim to study the compensatory changes in energy intake, eating behaviour and energy expenditure accompanying use of the SGLT2 inhibitor, dapagliflozin. Additionally, we aim to quantify changes in fat distribution using MRI, in liver fat using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and in central nervous system (CNS) responses to food images using blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI). Methods and analysis This outpatient study will evaluate the effect of dapagliflozin (10 mg), compared with placebo, on food intake and energy expenditure at 7 days and 12 weeks. 52 patients with T2DM will be randomised to dapagliflozin or placebo for short-term and long-term trial interventions in a within participants, crossover design. The primary outcome is the difference in energy intake during a test meal between dapagliflozin and placebo. Intake data are collected automatically using a customised programme operating a universal eating monitor (UEM). Secondary outcomes include (1) measures of appetite regulation including rate of eating, satiety quotient, appetite ratings (between and within meals), changes in CNS responses to food images measured using BOLD-fMRI, (2) measures of energy expenditure and (3) changes in body composition including changes in liver fat and abdominal

  2. Crossover behavior in hydrogen sensing mechanism for palladium ultrathin films.

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, S. B.; Ramanathan, M.; Skudlarek, G.; Wang, H. H.; Illinois Math and Science Academy

    2010-01-01

    Palladium has been extensively studied as a material for hydrogen sensors because of the simplicity of its reversible resistance change when exposed to hydrogen gas. Various palladium films and nanostructures have been used, and different responses have been observed with these diverse morphologies. In some cases, such as with nanowires, the resistance will decrease, whereas in others, such as with thick films, the resistance will increase. Each of these mechanisms has been explored for several palladium structures, but the crossover between them has not been systematically investigated. Here we report on a study aimed at deciphering the nanostructure-property relationships of ultrathin palladium films used as hydrogen gas sensors. The crossover in these films is observed at a thickness of {approx} 5 nm. Ramifications for future sensor developments are discussed.

  3. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to establish the bifidogenic effect of a very-long-chain inulin extracted from globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus) in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Costabile, Adele; Kolida, Sofia; Klinder, Annett; Gietl, Eva; Bäuerlein, Michael; Frohberg, Claus; Landschütze, Volker; Gibson, Glenn R

    2010-10-01

    There is growing interest in the use of inulins as substrates for the selective growth of beneficial gut bacteria such as bifidobacteria and lactobacilli because recent studies have established that their prebiotic effect is linked to several health benefits. In the present study, the impact of a very-long-chain inulin (VLCI), derived from globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus), on the human intestinal microbiota compared with maltodextrin was determined. A double-blind, cross-over study was carried out in thirty-two healthy adults who were randomised into two groups and consumed 10 g/d of either VLCI or maltodextrin, for two 3-week study periods, separated by a 3-week washout period. Numbers of faecal bifidobacteria and lactobacilli were significantly higher upon VLCI ingestion compared with the placebo. Additionally, levels of Atopobium group significantly increased, while Bacteroides-Prevotella numbers were significantly reduced. No significant changes in faecal SCFA concentrations were observed. There were no adverse gastrointestinal symptoms apart from a significant increase in mild and moderate bloating upon VLCI ingestion. These observations were also confirmed by in vitro gas production measurements. In conclusion, daily consumption of VLCI extracted from globe artichoke exerted a pronounced prebiotic effect on the human faecal microbiota composition and was well tolerated by all volunteers.

  4. An acute, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study of 320 mg and 640 mg doses of a special extract of Bacopa monnieri (CDRI 08) on sustained cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Downey, Luke A; Kean, James; Nemeh, Fiona; Lau, Angela; Poll, Alex; Gregory, Rebecca; Murray, Margaret; Rourke, Johanna; Patak, Brigit; Pase, Matthew P; Zangara, Andrea; Lomas, Justine; Scholey, Andrew; Stough, Con

    2013-09-01

    Standardized extracts of the traditional Ayurvedic medicine Bacopa monnieri (BM) (Brahmi) have been recently shown to have cognitive enhancing effects in chronic administration studies. Pre-clinical work has also identified a number of acute anxiolytic, nootropic, and cardiovascular effects of BM. There has, however, been little research on the acute effects of BM on cognitive function. The current study aimed to assess the acute effects of a specific extract of BM (KeenMind®-CDRI 08) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in normal healthy participants who completed a cognitively demanding series of tests. Twenty-four healthy volunteers completed six repetitions of the Cognitive Demand Battery (CDB) after consuming a placebo, 320 mg BM or 640 mg of BM in a cross-over design and provided cardiovascular and mood assessments before and after treatment. Change from baseline scores indicated that the 320 mg dose of BM improved performance at the first, second, and fourth repetition post-dosing on the CDB, and the treatments had no effect upon cardiovascular activity or in attenuating task-induced ratings of stress and fatigue. It was concluded that assessment of an earlier pharmacological window and use of less memory-specific cognitive tests together with more temporally sensitive measures of brain activity may improve our understanding of the acute neurocognitive properties of BM.

  5. Evaluation of the Immediate Effect of Auricular Acupuncture on Pain and Electromyographic Activity of the Upper Trapezius Muscle in Patients with Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Sham-Controlled, Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Andréia Cristina de Oliveira; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida; dos Santos, Douglas Meira; Melo, Nivea Cristina De; Gomes, Cid André Fidelis de Paula; Amorim, César Ferreira; Politti, Fabiano

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of the present study was to assess the immediate effects of auricular acupuncture (AA) on the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the upper trapezius muscle and pain in nonspecific neck pain (NS-NP) patients. Twelve patients with NS-NP (NS-NP group) and 12 healthy subjects (HS Group) were enrolled in a randomized, single-blinded, crossover study. Each subject received a single session of AA and sham AA (SAA). Surface EMG activity was measured in the upper trapezius muscle at different “step contractions” of isometric shoulder elevation (15%, 20%, 25%, and 30% MVC). The outcome measure in patients with NS-NP was based on the numerical pain rating scale (NRS). AA treatment led to a significant decrease in EMG activity in both groups (NS-NP group: p = 0.0001; HS group: p < 0.0001—ANOVA test). This was not the case for the SAA treatment (NS-NP group: p = 0.71; HS group: p < 0.54). Significant decreases (p < 0.001) in the NRS were found for both treatments (AA and SAA). This study demonstrated the immediate effect of auricular acupuncture on the electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle but the effect of this intervention on pain symptoms in patients with nonspecific neck pain was inconclusive. PMID:26451155

  6. Tuning the quantum critical crossover in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Ganpathy

    2005-03-01

    Quantum dots with large Thouless number g embody a regime where both disorder and interactions can be treated nonperturbatively using large-N techniques (with N=g) and quantum phase transitions can be studied. Here we focus on dots where the noninteracting Hamiltonian is drawn from a crossover ensemble between two symmetry classes, where the crossover parameter introduces a new, tunable energy scale independent of and much smaller than the Thouless energy. We show that the quantum critical regime, dominated by collective critical fluctuations, can be accessed at the new energy scale. The nonperturbative physics of this regime can only be described by the large-N approach, as we illustrate with two experimentally relevant examples. G. Murthy, PRB 70, 153304 (2004). G. Murthy, R. Shankar, D. Herman, and H. Mathur, PRB 69, 075321 (2004)

  7. Chiral relaxation time at the crossover of quantum chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggieri, M.; Peng, G. X.; Chernodub, M.

    2016-09-01

    We study microscopic processes responsible for chirality flips in the thermal bath of quantum chromodynamics at finite temperature and zero baryon chemical potential. We focus on the temperature range where the crossover from chirally broken phase to quark-gluon plasma takes place, namely, T ≃(150 ,200 ) MeV . The processes we consider are quark-quark scatterings mediated by collective excitations with the quantum number of pions and σ meson; hence we refer to these processes simply as one-pion (one-σ ) exchanges. We use a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model to compute equilibrium properties of the thermal bath, as well as the relevant scattering kernel to be used in the collision integral to estimate the chiral relaxation time τ . We find τ ≃0.1 ÷1 fm /c around the chiral crossover.

  8. Isospin Dependent Pairing Interactions and BCS-BEC crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Sagawa, H.; Margueron, J.; Hagino, K.

    2008-11-11

    We propose new types of density dependent contact pairing interaction which reproduce the pairing gaps in symmetric and neutron matters obtained by a microscopic treatment based on the realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction. The BCS-BEC crossover of neutrons pairs in symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matters is studied by using these contact interactions. It is shown that the bare and screened pairing interactions lead to different features of the BCS-BEC crossover in symmetric nuclear matter. We perform Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) calculations for semi-magic Calcium, Nickel, Tin and Lead isotopes and N = 20, 28, 50 and 82 isotones using these density-dependent pairing interactions. Our calculations well account for the experimental data for the neutron number dependence of binding energy, two neutrons separation energy, and odd-even mass staggering of these isotopes. Especially the interaction IS+IV Bare without the medium polarization effect gives satisfactory results for all the isotopes.

  9. Assestment of correlations and crossover scale in electroseismic time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Vargas, L.; Ramírez-Rojas, A.; Angulo-Brown, F.

    2009-04-01

    Evaluating complex fluctuations in electroseismic time series is an important task not only for earthquake prediction but also for understanding complex processes related to earthquake preparation. Previous studies have reported alterations, as the emergence of correlated dynamics in geoelectric potentials prior to an important earthquake (EQ). In this work, we apply the detrended fluctuation analysis and introduce a statistical procedure to characterize the presence of crossovers in scaling exponents, to analyze the fluctuations of geoelectric time series monitored in two sites located in Mexico. We find a complex behavior characterized by the presence of a crossover in the correlation exponents in the vicinity of a M=7.4 EQ occurred on Sept. 14, 1995. Finally, we apply the t-student test to evaluate the level of significance between short and large scaling exponents.

  10. Hot Neutron Stars with Hadron-Quark Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kota; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki

    2016-12-01

    The effects of the hadron-quark crossover on the bulk properties of cold and hot neutron stars (NSs) are studied. We suggested a new phenomenological equation of state (EOS), which interpolates the two phases at around 3 times the nuclear matter density (ρ0), and found that the cold NSs with the gravitational mass larger than 2M⊙ can be sustained. This is in sharp contrast to the case of the first-order hadron-quark transition where the quark matter inevitably leads to soft EOS. The interpolated EOS is also generalized to the supernova matter at finite temperature to describe the hot NSs at birth. The hadron-quark crossover is found to decrease the central temperature of the hot NSs under isentropic condition due to the color degrees of freedom.

  11. Thermodynamics of ultracold Bose gases at a dimensional crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labouvie, Ralf; Vogler, Andreas; Guarrera, Vera; Ott, Herwig

    2013-05-01

    We have studied the thermodynamics of ultracold Bose gases in the crossover from a three-dimensional to a one-dimensional regime. In our experiment, we use a focused electron-beam to probe in situ atomic density distributions with high temporal and spatial resolution. Starting with a Bose-Einstein-Condensate in a single beam optical dipole trap we can create one-dimensional systems by loading the atoms in a two-dimensional blue-detuned optical lattice. With increasing strength of the lattices we go from a three-dimensional into a one-dimensional system. Furthermore we tune the interaction strengths of the one-dimensional quantum-gases from weak (quasi-condensate) to strong (Tonks-Girardeau). By measuring the density profiles and applying an inverse Abel-Transformation we extract the equation of states of these systems and characterize the crossover from the three-dimensional to the one-dimensional regime.

  12. Dynamical Crossover in Complex Networks near the Percolation Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Fumiya; Yakubo, Kousuke

    2011-10-01

    The return probability P0(t) of random walkers is investigated numerically for several scale-free fractal networks. Our results show that P0(t) is proportional to t-ds/2 with the non-integer spectral dimension ds as in the case of non-scale free fractal networks. We also study how the diffusion process is affected by the structural crossover from a fractal to a small-world architecture in a network near the percolation transition. It is elucidated that the corresponding dynamical crossover is scaled only by the unique characteristic time tξ regardless of whether the network is scale free or not. In addition, the scaling relation ds= 2Df/dw is found to be valid even for scale-free fractal networks, where Df and dw are the fractal and the walk dimensions. These results suggest that qualitative properties of P0(t) are irrelevant to the scale-free nature of networks.

  13. Effect of dietary prebiotic supplementation on advanced glycation, insulin resistance and inflammatory biomarkers in adults with pre-diabetes: a study protocol for a double-blind placebo-controlled randomised crossover clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) contribute to the development of vascular complications of diabetes and have been recently implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes. Since AGEs are generated within foodstuffs upon food processing, it is increasingly recognised that the modern diet is replete with AGEs. AGEs are thought to stimulate chronic low-grade inflammation and promote oxidative stress and have been linked to the development of insulin resistance. Simple therapeutic strategies targeted at attenuating the progression of chronic low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance are urgently required to prevent or slow the development of type 2 diabetes in susceptible individuals. Dietary modulation of the human colonic microbiota has been shown to confer a number of health benefits to the host, but its effect on advanced glycation is unknown. The aim of this article is to describe the methodology of a double-blind placebo-controlled randomised crossover trial designed to determine the effect of 12 week consumption of a prebiotic dietary supplement on the advanced glycation pathway, insulin sensitivity and chronic low-grade inflammation in adults with pre-diabetes. Methods/Design Thirty adults with pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance or Impaired Fasting Glucose) aged between 40–60 years will be randomly assigned to receive either 10 grams of prebiotic (inulin/oligofructose) daily or 10 grams placebo (maltodextrin) daily for 12 weeks. After a 2-week washout period, study subjects will crossover to receive the alternative dietary treatment for 12 weeks. The primary outcome is the difference in markers of the advanced glycation pathway carboxymethyllysine (CML) and methylglyoxal (MG) between experimental and control treatments. Secondary outcomes include HbA1c, insulin sensitivity, lipid levels, blood pressure, serum glutathione, adiponectin, IL-6, E-selectin, myeloperoxidase, C-reactive protein, Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4), soluble receptor

  14. Light- and thermal-induced spin crossover in [Fe(abpt)2(N(CN)2)2]. Synthesis, structure, magnetic properties, and high-spin<-->low spin relaxation studies.

    PubMed

    Moliner, N; Gaspar, A B; Muñoz, M C; Niel, V; Cano, J; Real, J A

    2001-07-30

    [Fe(abpt)2(N(CN)2)2] (abpt = 4-amino-3,5-bis(pyridin-2-yl)-1,2,4-triazole) represents the first example of an iron(II) spin-crossover compound containing dicyanamide ligand, [N(CN)(2)](-), as a counterion. It shows an incomplete two-step spin transition with around 37% of HS molecules trapped in the low-temperature region when standard cooling or warming modes, i.e., 1-2 K min(-)(1), were used. The temperature, T(1/2) approximately 86 K, at which 50% of the conversion takes place, is one of the lowest temperatures observed for an iron(II) spin-crossover compound. Quenching experiments at low temperatures have shown that the incomplete character of the conversion is a consequence of slow kinetics. The quenched HS state relaxes back to the LS state displaying noticeable deviation from a single-exponential law. The rate of relaxation was evaluated in the range of temperatures 10-60 K. In the upper limit of temperatures, where thermal activation predominates, the activation energy and the pre-exponential parameter were estimated as E(a) approximately 280 cm(-)(1) and A(HL) approximately 10 s(-)(1), respectively. The lowest value of k(HL) around 1.2 x 10(-)(4) s(-)(1) (T = 10 K) was obtained in the region of temperatures where tunneling predominates. A quantitative light induced excited spin state trapping (LIESST) effect was observed, and the HS --> LS relaxation in the range of temperatures 5-52.5 K was studied. From the Arrhenius plot the two above-mentioned characteristic regimes, thermal-activated (E(a) approximately 431 cm(-)(1) and A(HL) approximately 144 s(-)(1)) and tunneling (k(HL) approximately 1.7 x 10(-)(6) s(-)(1) at 5 K), were characterized. The crystal structure was solved at room temperature. It crystallizes in the triclinic P_1 space group, and the unit cell contains a centrosymmetric mononuclear unit. Each iron atom is in a distorted octahedral environment with bond distances Fe-N(1) = 2.216(2) A, Fe-N(2) = 2.121(2) A, and Fe-N(3) = 2.160(2) A for the

  15. An evaluation of the cognitive and mood effects of an energy shot over a 6h period in volunteers: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Wesnes, Keith A; Barrett, Marilyn L; Udani, Jay K

    2013-08-01

    Energy drinks are widely available mostly containing glucose, and several have been demonstrated to improve alertness and cognitive function; these effects generally being identified 30-60min after administration. The present study assessed whether an energy shot without carbohydrates would affect major aspects of cognitive function and also mood in volunteers over a 6h time period. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled,crossover study compared the acute effects of the energy shot with a matching placebo in 94 healthy volunteers. Cognitive function was assessed with a widely used set of automated tests of attention and memory. Mood was assessed with the Bond-Lader, Beck Anxiety Index, Beck Depression Index, Chalder Fatigue Scales (CFS), and the POMS. The volunteers were requested to limit their sleep to between 3 and 6h the night before each testing day. Compared to the placebo, the energy shot significantly improved 6 validated composite cognitive function measures from the CDR System as well as self-rated alertness; the benefits on 4 of the cognitive measures still remaining at 6h. The overall effect sizes of the performance improvements were in the small to medium range and thus notable in this field. In conclusion, an energy shot can significantly improve important aspects of cognitive function for up to 6h compared to placebo in partially sleep-deprived healthy volunteers.

  16. Effects of luseogliflozin, a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, on 24-h glucose variability assessed by continuous glucose monitoring in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, R; Osonoi, T; Kanada, S; Jinnouchi, H; Sugio, K; Omiya, H; Ubukata, M; Sakai, S; Samukawa, Y

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of luseogliflozin on 24-h glucose levels, assessed by continuous glucose monitoring, and on pharmacodynamic variables measured throughout the day. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 37 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with diet and exercise were randomized into two groups. Patients in each group first received luseogliflozin then placebo for 7 days each, or vice versa. After 7 days of treatment, the mean 24-h glucose level was significantly lower with luseogliflozin than with placebo [mean (95% confidence interval) 145.9 (134.4-157.5) mg/dl vs 168.5 (156.9-180.0) mg/dl; p < 0.001]. The proportion of time spent with glucose levels ≥70 to ≤180 mg/dl was significantly greater with luseogliflozin than with placebo [median (interquartile range) 83.2 (67.7-96.5)% vs 71.9 (46.9-83.3)%; p < 0.001] without inducing hypoglycaemia. The decrease in glucose levels was accompanied by reductions in serum insulin levels throughout the day.

  17. Consumption of low-fat dairy foods for 6 months improves insulin resistance without adversely affecting lipids or bodyweight in healthy adults: a randomized free-living cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Given the highly debated role of dairy food consumption in modulating biomarkers of metabolic syndrome, this study was conducted to examine the influence of long-term (6 month) dairy consumption on metabolic parameters in healthy volunteers under free-living conditions without energy restriction. Methods Twenty-three healthy subjects completed a randomized, crossover trial of 12 months. Participants consumed their habitual diets and were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: a high dairy supplemented group instructed to consume 4 servings of dairy per day (HD); or a low dairy supplemented group limited to no more than 2 servings of dairy per day (LD). Baseline, midpoint, and endpoint metabolic responses were examined. Results Endpoint measurements of body weight and composition, energy expenditure, blood pressure, blood glucose, and blood lipid and lipoprotein responses did not differ (p > 0.05) between the LD and HD groups. HD consumption improved (p < 0.05) plasma insulin (-9%) and insulin resistance (-11%, p = 0.03) as estimated by HOMA-IR compared with the LD group. Conclusions Study results suggest that high dairy consumption (4 servings/d) may improve insulin resistance without negatively impacting bodyweight or lipid status under free-living conditions. Trial registration Trial registration: NCT01761955 PMID:23638799

  18. Time-dependent couplings and crossover length scales in nonequilibrium surface roughening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradas, Marc; López, Juan M.; Hernández-Machado, A.

    2007-07-01

    We show that time-dependent couplings may lead to nontrivial scaling properties of the surface fluctuations of the asymptotic regime in nonequilibrium kinetic roughening models. Three typical situations are studied. In the case of a crossover between two different rough regimes, the time-dependent coupling may result in anomalous scaling for scales above the crossover length. In a different setting, for a crossover from a rough to either a flat or damping regime, the time-dependent crossover length may conspire to produce a rough surface, although the most relevant term tends to flatten the surface. In addition, our analysis sheds light into an existing debate in the problem of spontaneous imbibition, where time-dependent couplings naturally arise in theoretical models and experiments.

  19. Hyperon puzzle, hadron-quark crossover and massive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kota; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Bulk properties of cold and hot neutron stars are studied on the basis of the hadron-quark crossover picture where a smooth transition from the hadronic phase to the quark phase takes place at finite baryon density. By using a phenomenological equation of state (EOS) "CRover", which interpolates the two phases at around 3 times the nuclear matter density (ρ0, it is found that the cold NSs with the gravitational mass larger than 2M_{odot} can be sustained. This is in sharp contrast to the case of the first-order hadron-quark transition. The radii of the cold NSs with the CRover EOS are in the narrow range (12.5 ± 0.5) km which is insensitive to the NS masses. Due to the stiffening of the EOS induced by the hadron-quark crossover, the central density of the NSs is at most 4 ρ0 and the hyperon-mixing barely occurs inside the NS core. This constitutes a solution of the long-standing hyperon puzzle. The effect of color superconductivity (CSC) on the NS structures is also examined with the hadron-quark crossover. For the typical strength of the diquark attraction, a slight softening of the EOS due to two-flavor CSC (2SC) takes place and the maximum mass is reduced by about 0.2M_{odot}. The CRover EOS is generalized to the supernova matter at finite temperature to describe the hot NSs at birth. The hadron-quark crossover is found to decrease the central temperature of the hot NSs under isentropic condition. The gravitational energy release and the spin-up rate during the contraction from the hot NS to the cold NS are also estimated.

  20. Effects of Enteric-coated Lactoferrin Tablets Containing Lactobacillus brevis subsp. coagulans on Fecal Properties, Defecation Frequency and Intestinal Microbiota of Japanese Women with a Tendency for Constipation: a Randomized Placebo-controlled Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Noriyuki; MURAKOSHI, Michiaki; ONO, Tomoji; MORISHITA, Satoru; KOIDE, Misao; BAE, Min Jung; TOTSUKA, Mamoru; SHIMIZU, Makoto; SUGIYAMA, Keikichi; NISHINO, Hoyoku; IIDA, Norio

    2013-01-01

    The effects of oral administration of enteric-coated tablets containing lactoferrin (LF; 100 mg/tablet) and heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis subsp. coagulans FREM BP-4693 (LB; 6×109 bacteria/tablet) on fecal properties were examined in 32 Japanese women (20–60 years of age) with a tendency for constipation (defecation frequency at equal to or less than 10 times/2 weeks) by a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design. A significant increase in defecation days per week was obserbed in the subjects who ingested the tablets containing LF and LB compared with the placebo group. The number of bifidobacteria in feces also significantly increased compared with the placebo group. In an in vitro study, LF and tryptic hydrolysate of LF, but not peptic hydrolysate of LF, upregulated the growth of Bifidobacterium longum ATCC15707 when added to the culture. These results demonstrate the capability of the enteric-coated tablets containing LF and LB in improving intestinal function and suggest that they have a growth promoting function for bifidobacteria. PMID:24936358

  1. A randomized, rater-blinded, crossover study comparing the clinical efficacy of Ritalin(®) LA (methylphenidate) treatment in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder under different breakfast conditions over 2 weeks.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Eberhard; Fleischhaker, Christian; Hennighausen, Klaus; Heiser, Philip; Haessler, Frank; Linder, Martin; Stollhoff, Kirsten; Warnke, Andreas; Baier, Monika; Klatt, Jan

    2010-11-01

    Several extended-release methylphenidate medications are available for treatment of children with ADHD. Pharmacokinetic investigations suggest that the serum levels of methylphenidate are partially altered when the medication is taken without breakfast. Clinical data comparing different breakfast situations are missing. In this study, different breakfast compositions and their influence on treatment with Ritalin LA are investigated. A total of 150 patients were enrolled in a rater-blinded, randomized crossover trial that compared a minimal breakfast with a standard breakfast in patients under stable treatment with Ritalin LA. Ratings for clinical efficacy were carried out after 1 week by teachers and parents (FBB-ADHS), as well as physicians (CGI). Additionally, a math test was administered to the patients. Of the total patients, 144 finished the trial with a breakfast compliance of 93%. All of the clinical rating scales showed consistently no difference between the two breakfast conditions. Non-inferiority of minimal breakfast versus standard breakfast was shown to be statistically significant (FBB-AHDS(Teacher): 0.97 with minimal breakfast, 1.01 with standard breakfast, P < 0.0001). The clinical efficacy of Ritalin LA is not influenced by breakfast and works independently of food intake.

  2. In vitro and in vivo antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacities of an antioxidant-rich fruit and berry juice blend. Results of a pilot and randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Gitte S; Wu, Xianli; Patterson, Kelly M; Barnes, Janelle; Carter, Steve G; Scherwitz, Larry; Beaman, Robert; Endres, John R; Schauss, Alexander G

    2008-09-24

    This study investigated the in vitro and in vivo antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of a juice blend (JB), MonaVie Active, containing a mixture of fruits and berries with known antioxidant activity, including acai, a palm fruit, as the predominant ingredient. The phytochemical antioxidants in the JB are primarily in the form of anthocyanins, predominantly cyanidin 3-rutoside, cyanidin 3-diglycoside, and cyanidin 3-glucoside. The cell-based antioxidant protection of erythrocytes (CAP-e) assay demonstrated that antioxidants in the JB penetrated and protected cells from oxidative damage ( p < 0.001), whereas polymorphonuclear cells showed reduced formation of reactive oxygen species ( p < 0.003) and reduced migration toward three different pro-inflammatory chemoattractants: fmlp ( p < 0.001), leukotriene B4 ( p < 0.05), and IL-8 ( p < 0.03). A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover trial with 12 healthy subjects examined the JB's antioxidant activity in vivo. Blood samples at baseline, 1 h, and 2 h following consumption of the JB or placebo were tested for antioxidant capacity using several antioxidant assays and the TBARS assay, a measure of lipid peroxidation. A within subject comparison showed an increase in serum antioxidants at 1 h ( p < 0.03) and 2 h ( p < 0.015), as well as inhibition of lipid peroxidation at 2 h ( p < 0.01) postconsumption.

  3. Automatic identification of vessel crossovers in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, L.; Barreira, N.; Penedo, M. G.; Cancela, B.

    2015-02-01

    Crossovers and bifurcations are interest points of the retinal vascular tree useful to diagnose diseases. Specifically, detecting these interest points and identifying which of them are crossings will give us the opportunity to search for arteriovenous nicking, this is, an alteration of the vessel tree where an artery is crossed by a vein and the former compresses the later. These formations are a clear indicative of hypertension, among other medical problems. There are several studies that have attempted to define an accurate and reliable method to detect and classify these relevant points. In this article, we propose a new method to identify crossovers. Our approach is based on segmenting the vascular tree and analyzing the surrounding area of each interest point. The minimal path between vessel points in this area is computed in order to identify the connected vessel segments and, as a result, to distinguish between bifurcations and crossovers. Our method was tested using retinographies from public databases DRIVE and VICAVR, obtaining an accuracy of 90%.

  4. Case-crossover design and its implementation in R.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongheng

    2016-09-01

    Case-crossover design is a variation of case-control design that it employs persons' history periods as controls. Case-crossover design can be viewed as the hybrid of case-control study and crossover design. Characteristic confounding that is constant within one person can be well controlled with this method. The relative risk and odds ratio, as well as their 95% confidence intervals (CIs), can be estimated using Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel method. R codes for the calculation are provided in the main text. Readers may adapt these codes to their own task. Conditional logistic regression model is another way to estimate odds ratio of the exposure. Furthermore, it allows for incorporation of other time-varying covariates that are not constant within subjects. The model fitting per se is not technically difficult because there is well developed statistical package. However, it is challenging to convert original dataset obtained from case report form to that suitable to be passed to clogit() function. R code for this task is provided and explained in the text.

  5. Analysis of Crossovers in the Interbeat Sequences of Elderly Individuals and Heart Failure Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Diosdado, A.; del Río Correa, J. L.

    2006-09-01

    Many physical and biological systems exhibit complex behavior characterized by long-range power-law correlations. Detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) is a scaling analysis method that provides a scaling parameter to represent the correlation properties of a signal. The study of interbeat sequences with the DFA method has revealed the presence of crossovers associated with physiological aging and heart with failure; the hinges present in the crossover region from both the elderly healthy individuals and the patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are in opposite directions. The interbeat sequences of healthy young persons do not show crossovers. In this paper we study interbeat time series of healthy young and elderly persons and patients with CHF. We use the DFA-m method, where m refers to the order of the polynomial function used for the fitting. For instance, DFA-2 filters linear trends and DFA-3 filters quadratic trends. We found that the presence of the crossovers and the direction of the hinges are conserved when we apply the DFA method for different values of m. Therefore we conclude that the DFA-m method is a reliable method to accurately quantify correlations in interbeat time series even if there are polynomial trends. We can characterize the crossovers and we can conclude that the crossovers are not a result of the trends; they are part of the system dynamics.

  6. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to assess the efficacy of tadalafil (Cialis[reg]) in the treatment of erectile dysfunction following three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy for prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Incrocci, Luca . E-mail: l.incrocci@erasmusmc.nl; Slagter, Cleo; Slob, A. Koos; Hop, Wim C.J.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction after three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy (3DCRT) for prostatic carcinoma is reported in as many as 64% of those patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of the oral drug tadalafil (Cialis (registered) ) in patients with erectile dysfunction after radiotherapy for prostatic carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 358) who completed radiotherapy at least 12 months before the study were approached by mail. All patients had been treated by 3DCRT; 60 patients were included and entered a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study lasting 12 weeks. They received 20 mg of tadalafil or placebo for 6 weeks. Drug or placebo was taken on demand at patient's discretion, with no restrictions regarding the consumption of alcohol or food, at least once a week and no more than once daily. At 6 weeks patients crossed over to the alternative treatment. Data were collected using the Sexual Encounter Profile (SEP) and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaires. Side effects were also recorded. Results: Mean age at study entry was 69 years. All patients completed the study. For almost all questions of the IIEF questionnaire there was a significant increase in mean scores from baseline with tadalafil, but not with placebo. Sixty-seven percent of the patients reported an improvement of erectile function with tadalafil (placebo: 20%), and 48% reported successful intercourse with tadalafil (placebo: 9%) (p < 0.0001). Side effects were mild or moderate. Conclusions: Tadalafil is an effective treatment for erectile dysfunction after 3DCRT for prostatic carcinoma with successful intercourse reported in almost 50% of the patients, and it is well tolerated.

  7. The dynamical crossover in attractive colloidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Mallamace, Domenico; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2013-12-07

    We study the dynamical arrest in an adhesive hard-sphere colloidal system. We examine a micellar suspension of the Pluronic-L64 surfactant in the temperature (T) and volume fraction (ϕ) phase diagram. According to mode-coupling theory (MCT), this system is characterized by a cusp-like singularity and two glassy phases: an attractive glass (AG) phase and a repulsive glass (RG) phase. The T − ϕ phase diagram of this system as confirmed by a previous series of scattering data also exhibits a Percolation Threshold (PT) line, a reentrant behavior (AG-liquid-RG), and a glass-to-glass transition. The AG phase can be generated out of the liquid phase by using T and ϕ as control parameters. We utilize viscosity and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. NMR data confirm all the characteristic properties of the colloidal system phase diagram and give evidence of the onset of a fractal-like percolating structure at a precise threshold. The MCT scaling laws used to study the shear viscosity as a function of ϕ and T show in both cases a fragile-to-strong liquid glass-forming dynamic crossover (FSC) located near the percolation threshold where the clustering process is fully developed. These results suggest a larger thermodynamic generality for this phenomenon, which is usually studied only as a function of the temperature. We also find that the critical values of the control parameters, coincident with the PT line, define the locus of the FSC. In the region between the FSC and the glass transition lines the system dynamics are dominated by clustering effects. We thus demonstrate that it is possible, using the conceptual framework provided by extended mode-coupling theory, to describe the way a system approaches dynamic arrest, taking into account both cage and hopping effects.

  8. The Design of Cluster Randomized Crossover Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rietbergen, Charlotte; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2011-01-01

    The inefficiency induced by between-cluster variation in cluster randomized (CR) trials can be reduced by implementing a crossover (CO) design. In a simple CO trial, each subject receives each treatment in random order. A powerful characteristic of this design is that each subject serves as its own control. In a CR CO trial, clusters of subjects…

  9. Cedarwood: cross-over pressure research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to determine the cross-over pressure for cedarwood oil in carbon dioxide. A closed stirrer reactor with an in-line loop connected to the injector of a GC was used to measure the concentration of cedarwood oil in the carbon dioxide. Both neat cedarwood oil as ...

  10. Effect of supplementation of fermented milk drink containing probiotic Lactobacillus casei Shirota on the concentrations of aflatoxin biomarkers among employees of Universiti Putra Malaysia: a randomised, double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Mohd Redzwan, Sabran; Abd Mutalib, Mohd Sokhini; Wang, Jia-Sheng; Ahmad, Zuraini; Kang, Min-Su; Abdul Rahman, Nurul 'Aqilah; Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Elham; Jamaluddin, Rosita

    2016-01-14

    Human exposure to aflatoxin is through the diet, and probiotics are able to bind aflatoxin and prevent its absorption in the small intestine. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a fermented milk drink containing Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) (probiotic drink) to prevent aflatoxin absorption and reduce serum aflatoxin B1-lysine adduct (AFB1-lys) and urinary aflatoxin M1 concentrations. The present study was a randomised, double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled study with two 4-week intervention phases. In all, seventy-one subjects recruited from the screening stage were divided into two groups--the Yellow group and the Blue group. In the 1st phase, one group received probiotic drinks twice a day and the other group received placebo drinks. Blood and urine samples were collected at baseline, 2nd and 4th week of the intervention. After a 2-week wash-out period, the treatments were switched between the groups, and blood and urine samples were collected at the 6th, 8th and 10th week (2nd phase) of the intervention. No significant differences in aflatoxin biomarker concentrations were observed during the intervention. A within-group analysis was further carried out. Aflatoxin biomarker concentrations were not significantly different in the Yellow group. Nevertheless, ANOVA for repeated measurements indicated that AFB1-lys concentrations were significantly different (P=0·035) with the probiotic intervention in the Blue group. The 2nd week AFB1-lys concentrations (5·14 (SD 2·15) pg/mg albumin (ALB)) were significantly reduced (P=0·048) compared with the baseline (6·24 (SD 3·42) pg/mg ALB). Besides, the 4th week AFB1-lys concentrations were significantly lower (P<0·05) with probiotic supplementation than with the placebo. Based on these findings, a longer intervention study is warranted to investigate the effects of continuous LcS consumption to prevent dietary aflatoxin exposure.

  11. A synergistic effect of a daily supplement for 1 month of 200 mg magnesium plus 50 mg vitamin B6 for the relief of anxiety-related premenstrual symptoms: a randomized, double-blind, crossover study.

    PubMed

    De Souza, M C; Walker, A F; Robinson, P A; Bolland, K

    2000-03-01

    To investigate single and combined effects of daily dietary supplementation with 50 mg of vitamin B6 and 200 mg magnesium (as MgO) for one cycle for the relief of mild premenstrual symptoms, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design was used. Forty-four women with an average age of 32 years took part in the study. Each woman was randomly assigned, according to a Latin square design, to take consecutively all four of the following treatments daily for one menstrual cycle: (1) 200 mg Mg, (2) 50 mg vitamin B6, (3) 200 mg Mg + 50 mg vitamin B6 and (4) placebo. Throughout the study, each volunteer kept a daily record of symptoms using a 5-point ordinal scale in a menstrual diary of 30 symptoms. Symptoms were grouped into six categories: anxiety, craving, depression, hydration, other, and total. Urinary magnesium output for 24 hours was estimated using the Mg/creatinine concentration ratio. ANOVA showed no overall difference between individual treatments, but predefined treatment comparisons using factorial contrasts in ANOVA showed a significant effect of 200 mg/day Mg + 50 mg/day vitamin B6 on reducing anxiety-related premenstrual symptoms (nervous tension, mood swings, irritability, or anxiety) (p = 0.040). Urinary Mg output was not affected by treatment. A small synergistic effect of a daily dietary supplementation with a combination of Mg + vitamin B6 in the reduction of mild premenstrual anxiety-related symptoms was demonstrated during treatment of 44 women for one menstrual cycle. In view of the modest effect found, further studies are needed before making general recommendations for the treatment of premenstrual symptoms. The study indicated that absorption from MgO was poor and daily supplementation for longer than 1 month is necessary for tissue repletion.

  12. Effect of a fermented dietary supplement containing chromium and zinc on metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Mi; Wolf, Petra; Hauner, Hans; Skurk, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background For the increasing development of type 2 diabetes dietary habits play an important role. In this regard, dietary supplements are of growing interest to influence the progression of this disease. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a cascade-fermented dietary supplement based on fruits, nuts, and vegetables fortified with chromium and zinc on metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods This was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, intervention study under free-living conditions using a cross-over design. Thirty-six patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled and randomized either to receive a cascade-fermented dietary supplement enriched with chromium (100 µg/d) and zinc (15 mg/d) or a placebo similar in taste but without supplements, over a period of 12 weeks. After a wash-out period of 12 weeks, the patients received the other test product. The main outcome variable was the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Other outcome variables were fasting blood glucose, fructosamine, and lipid parameters. Results Thirty-one patients completed the study. HbA1c showed no relevant changes during both treatment periods, nor was there a relevant difference between the two treatments (HbA1c: p=0.48). The same results were found for fructosamine and fasting glucose (fructosamine: p=0.9; fasting glucose: p=0.31). In addition, there was no effect on lipid metabolism. Conclusion This intervention study does not provide evidence that a cascade-fermented plant-based dietary supplement enriched with a combination of chromium and zinc improves glucose metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus under free-living conditions. PMID:27343205

  13. Cognition-induced modulation of serotonin in the orbitofrontal cortex: a controlled cross-over PET study of a delayed match-to-sample task using the 5-HT2a receptor antagonist [18F]altanserin.

    PubMed

    Hautzel, Hubertus; Müller, Hans-Wilhelm; Herzog, Hans; Grandt, Rüdiger

    2011-10-01

    Behavioral and cellular studies indicate that serotonin interacting with the 5-HT2a receptor (5-HT2aR) is involved in cognitive processes supporting working memory (WM). However, 5-HT receptor neuroimaging studies directly relating WM-induced neuronal activations to concomitant changes in the availability of 5-HT receptors as a functional measure for serotonin release are lacking. This controlled cross-over PET study aimed to identify brain regions with WM-induced changes in the binding potential (BP(nd)) of the 5-HT2aR antagonist [(18)F]altanserin. Ten young males underwent a delayed match-to-sample task using photographs of faces and a control task. The BP(nd)s for both conditions were calculated by applying Ichise's noninvasive plot. Statistics were performed with the SPM toolbox statistical nonparametric mapping (SnPM3) particularly suited for analyzing whole-brain PET data in an exploratory way. A higher BP(nd) for [(18)F]altanserin during WM versus control was found in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) pointing towards an increased [(18)F]altanserin/5-HT2aR interaction in OFC while BP(nd) decreases during WM were not found. Furthermore, no BP(nd) changes in regions known from functional neuroimaging studies to be more specifically involved in WM were identified. These findings may suggest that the increased [(18)F]altanserin BP(nd) under WM challenge and hence the increased availability of 5-HT2aR reflects a decrease in local OFC serotonin. As the OFC plays a prominent role in decision-making and supports cognitive processes related to the central executive functions of WM it might be modulated by the serotoninergic system via the 5-HT2aR in order to support and optimize basic cognitive functions.

  14. Critical Crossover Functions for Simple Fluids: Towards the Crossover Modelling Uniqueness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrabos, Yves; Lecoutre, Carole; Marre, Samuel; LeNeindre, Bernard; Hahn, Inseob

    2016-11-01

    Based on a single non-universal temperature scaling factor present in a simple fluid case, a detailed analysis of non-universal parameters involved in different critical-to-classical crossover models is given. For the infinite limit of the cutoff wave number, a set of three scaling-parameters is defined for each model such that it shows all the shapes of the theoretical crossover functions overlap on the mean crossover function shapes close to the non-trivial fixed point. The analysis of corresponding links between their fluid-dependent parameters opens a route to define a parametric model of crossover equation-of-state, closely satisfying the universal features calculated from the Ising-like limit in the massive renormalization scheme.

  15. Effects of Silexan on the Serotonin-1A Receptor and Microstructure of the Human Brain: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Cross-Over Study with Molecular and Structural Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Baldinger, Pia; Höflich, Anna S.; Mitterhauser, Markus; Hahn, Andreas; Rami-Mark, Christina; Spies, Marie; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, Silexan, a patented active substance comprised of an essential oil produced from Lavandula angustifolia flowers, has been authorized in Germany as a medicinal product for the treatment of states of restlessness related to anxious mood. Its efficacy has been shown in several forms of anxiety disorders. Findings from preclinical and clinical studies attribute a major role to the serotonin-1A receptor in the pathogenesis and treatment of anxiety. Methods: To elucidate the effect of Silexan on serotonin-1A receptor binding, 17 healthy men underwent 2 positron emission tomography measurements using the radioligand [carbonyl-11C]WAY-100635 following the daily intake of 160mg Silexan or placebo for a minimum of 8 weeks (randomized, double-blind, cross-over design). Additionally, structural magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed to determine potential effects on gray matter microstructure. Results: Serotonin-1A receptor binding potential was shown to be significantly reduced following the intake of Silexan compared with placebo in 2 large clusters encompassing the temporal gyrus, the fusiform gyrus and the hippocampus on one hand as well as the insula and anterior cingulate cortex on the other hand. No effects of Silexan on gray matter volume could be detected in this investigation. Conclusion: This positron emission tomography study proposes an involvement of the serotonin-1A receptor in the anxiolytic effects of Silexan. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register as ISRCTN30885829 (http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/). PMID:25522403

  16. No difference in acute effects of supplemental v. dietary calcium on blood pressure and microvascular function in obese women challenged with a high-fat meal: a cross-over randomised study.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Thaís da Silva; Leal, Priscila Mansur; Antunes, Vanessa Parada; Sanjuliani, Antonio Felipe; Klein, Márcia Regina Simas Torres

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that supplemental Ca (SC) increases the risk of cardiovascular events, whereas dietary Ca (DC) decreases the risk of cardiovascular events. Although frequently consumed with meals, it remains unclear whether Ca can mitigate or aggravate the deleterious effects of a high-fat meal on cardiovascular risk factors. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of SC or DC on blood pressure (BP) and microvascular function (MVF) in the postprandial period in obese women challenged with a high-fat meal. In this cross-over controlled trial, sixteen obese women aged 20-50 years were randomly assigned to receive three test meals (2908 kJ (695 kcal); 48 % fat): high DC (HDCM; 547 mg DC), high SC (HSCM; 500 mg SC-calcium carbonate) and low Ca (LCM; 42 mg DC). BP was continuously evaluated from 15 min before to 120 min after meals by digital photoplethysmography. Before and 120 min after meals, participants underwent evaluation of serum Ca and microvascular flow after postocclusive reactive hyperaemia (PORH) by laser speckle contrast imaging. Ionised serum Ca rose significantly only after HSCM. Systolic BP increased after the three meals, whereas diastolic BP increased after LCM and HDCM. Hyperaemia peak, hyperaemia amplitude and AUC evaluated after PORH decreased with LCM. After HDCM, there was a reduction in hyperaemia peak and hyperaemia amplitude, whereas HSCM decreased only hyperaemia peak. However, comparative analyses of the effects of three test meals on serum Ca, BP and MVF revealed no significant meal×time interaction. This study suggests that in obese women SC and DC do not interfere with the effects of a high-fat meal on BP and MVF.

  17. The effects of Nordic school meals on concentration and school performance in 8- to 11-year-old children in the OPUS School Meal Study: a cluster-randomised, controlled, cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Louise B; Dyssegaard, Camilla B; Damsgaard, Camilla T; Petersen, Rikke A; Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; Hjorth, Mads F; Andersen, Rikke; Tetens, Inge; Ritz, Christian; Astrup, Arne; Lauritzen, Lotte; Michaelsen, Kim F; Egelund, Niels

    2015-04-28

    It is widely assumed that nutrition can improve school performance in children; however, evidence remains limited and inconclusive. In the present study, we investigated whether serving healthy school meals influenced concentration and school performance of 8- to 11-year-old Danish children. The OPUS (Optimal well-being, development and health for Danish children through a healthy New Nordic Diet) School Meal Study was a cluster-randomised, controlled, cross-over trial comparing a healthy school meal programme with the usual packed lunch from home (control) each for 3 months (NCT 01457794). The d2 test of attention, the Learning Rating Scale (LRS) and standard tests on reading and mathematics proficiency were administered at baseline and at the end of each study period. Intervention effects were evaluated using hierarchical mixed models. The school meal intervention did not influence concentration performance (CP; primary outcome, n 693) or processing speed; however, the decrease in error percentage was 0·18 points smaller (P<0·001) in the intervention period than in the control period (medians: baseline 2·03%; intervention 1·46%; control 1·37%). In contrast, the intervention increased reading speed (0·7 sentence, P=0·009) and the number of correct sentences (1·8 sentences, P<0·001), which corresponded to 11 and 25%, respectively, of the effect of one school year. The percentage of correct sentences also improved (P<0·001), indicating that the number correct improved relatively more than reading speed. There was no effect on overall math performance or outcomes from the LRS. In conclusion, school meals did not affect CP, but improved reading performance, which is a complex cognitive activity that involves inference, and increased errors related to impulsivity and inattention. These findings are worth examining in future trials.

  18. A new rapidly absorbed paediatric paracetamol suspension. A six-way crossover pharmacokinetic study comparingthe rate and extent of paracetamol absorption from a new paracetamol suspension with two marketed paediatric formulations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen; Collaku, Agron; Heaslip, Louise; Yue, Yong; Starkey, Yan-Yan; Clarke, Geoffrey; Kronfeld, Nick

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the rate and extent of paracetamol absorption from the new Paracetamol pediatric suspension (PPS) with two marketed paracetamol suspensions: Children's panadol (CP) and Panodil baby & infant (PBI). The study also assessed the effect on paracetamol absorption of light-calorie, low-fat food consumed 2 h before dosing. Twenty eight male adult volunteers received a single oral dose of 1000 mg of paracetamol from each of three treatments, in both fasted and fed states according to a randomized, single-center, open-label, six-way crossover study design. PPS was bioequivalent to both CP and PBI for AUC(0-10 h), AUC(0-inf) and C(max) in both fasted and fed state. However, PPS had greater rate of paracetamol absorption and a faster speed of onset. T(max) for PPS was significantly shorter than for PBI in both fasted (p = 0.0005) and fed state (p = 0.0001). Median T(max) for PPS was also 10 min shorter than CP in fasted state. Time to reach minimum effective concentration (MEC) for PPS was significantly shorter than CP and PBI. Early paracetamol exposure of PPS was significantly higher than that of the two existing paracetamol products. Food had a significant effect in the early exposure and onset of therapeutic level of paracetamol from PPS. AUC(0-30 min) was significantly higher and time to reach plasma paracetamol at MEC level was significantly shorter than in the fasted state.

  19. Duration of slip-resistant shoe usage and the rate of slipping in limited-service restaurants: results from a prospective and crossover study.

    PubMed

    Verma, Santosh K; Zhao, Zhe; Courtney, Theodore K; Chang, Wen-Ruey; Lombardi, David A; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Brennan, Melanye J; Perry, Melissa J

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that slip-resistant shoes may have a positive effect on reducing the risk of slips and falls, a leading cause of injury at work. Few studies, however, have examined how duration of shoe usage affects their slip-resistance properties. This study examined the association between the duration of slip-resistant shoes usage and the self-reported rate of slipping in limited-service restaurant workers. A total of 475 workers from 36 limited-service restaurants in the USA were recruited to participate in a 12-week prospective study of workplace slipping. Of the 475 participants, 83 reported changing to a new pair of shoes at least once during the 12-week follow-up. The results show that slip-resistant shoes worn for less than six months were moderately more effective than those worn for more than six months. Changing to a new pair of shoes among those wearing slip-resistant shoes at baseline was associated with a 55% reduction in the rate of slipping (RR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.23-0.89). Further research is needed to develop criteria for the replacement of slip-resistant shoes.

  20. Green tea extract decreases starch digestion and absorption from a test meal in humans: a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study.

    PubMed

    Lochocka, Klaudia; Bajerska, Joanna; Glapa, Aleksandra; Fidler-Witon, Ewa; Nowak, Jan K; Szczapa, Tomasz; Grebowiec, Philip; Lisowska, Aleksandra; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw

    2015-07-30

    Green tea is known worldwide for its beneficial effects on human health. However, objective data evaluating this influence in humans is scarce. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of green tea extract (GTE) on starch digestion and absorption. The study comprised of 28 healthy volunteers, aged 19 to 28 years. In all subjects, a starch (13)C breath test was performed twice. Subjects randomly ingested naturally (13)C-abundant cornflakes during the GTE test (GTE 4 g) or placebo test. The cumulative percentage dose recovery (CPDR) was significantly lower for the GTE test than for the placebo test (median [interquartile range]: 11.4% [5.5-15.5] vs. 16.1% [12.7-19.5]; p = 0.003). Likewise, CPDR expressed per hour was considerably lower in each point of the measurement. In conclusion, a single dose of green tea extract taken with a test meal decreases starch digestion and absorption.

  1. A randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled cross-over study to determine the gastrointestinal effects of consumption of arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides enriched bread in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prebiotics are food ingredients, usually non-digestible oligosaccharides, that are selectively fermented by populations of beneficial gut bacteria. Endoxylanases, altering the naturally present cereal arabinoxylans, are commonly used in the bread industry to improve dough and bread characteristics. Recently, an in situ method has been developed to produce arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides (AXOS) at high levels in breads through the use of a thermophilic endoxylanase. AXOS have demonstrated potentially prebiotic properties in that they have been observed to lead to beneficial shifts in the microbiota in vitro and in murine, poultry and human studies. Methods A double-blind, placebo controlled human intervention study was undertaken with 40 healthy adult volunteers to assess the impact of consumption of breads with in situ produced AXOS (containing 2.2 g AXOS) compared to non-endoxylanase treated breads. Volatile fatty acid concentrations in faeces were assessed and fluorescence in situ hybridisation was used to assess changes in gut microbial groups. Secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) levels in saliva were also measured. Results Consumption of AXOS-enriched breads led to increased faecal butyrate and a trend for reduced iso-valerate and fatty acids associated with protein fermentation. Faecal levels of bifidobacteria increased following initial control breads and remained elevated throughout the study. Lactobacilli levels were elevated following both placebo and AXOS-breads. No changes in salivary secretory IgA levels were observed during the study. Furthermore, no adverse effects on gastrointestinal symptoms were reported during AXOS-bread intake. Conclusions AXOS-breads led to a potentially beneficial shift in fermentation end products and are well tolerated. PMID:22657950

  2. A randomized double-blind crossover trial of deep brain stimulation of the subcallosal cingulate gyrus in patients with treatment-resistant depression: a pilot study of relapse prevention

    PubMed Central

    Puigdemont, Dolors; Portella, Maria J.; Pérez-Egea, Rosario; Molet, Joan; Gironell, Alexandre; de Diego-Adeliño, Javier; Martín, Anna; Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Àlvarez, Enric; Artigas, Francesc; Pérez, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, antidepressant drugs show limited efficacy, leaving a large number of patients experiencing severe and persistent symptoms of major depression. Previous open-label clinical trials have reported significant sustained improvements with deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subcallosal cingulate gyrus (SCG) in patients with severe, chronic treatment-resistant depression (TRD). This study aimed to confirm the efficacy and measure the impact of discontinuation of the electrical stimulation. Methods We conducted a 6-month double-blind, randomized, sham-controlled crossover study in implanted patients with previous severe TRD who experienced full remission after chronic stimulation. After more than 3 months of stable remission, patients were randomly assigned to 2 treatment arms: the ON–OFF arm, which involved active electrode stimulation for 3 months followed by sham stimulation for 3 months, and the OFF–ON arm, which involved sham stimulation for 3 months followed by active stimulation for 3 months. The primary outcome measure was the difference in the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) total score between sham and active stimulation. Results We enrolled 5 patients in our trial. A Friedman repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed a significant effect of treatment (χ21 = 5.0, p = 0.025) in patients with higher depression scores during sham stimulation. At the end of active stimulation, depression was remitted in 4 of 5 patients and none of them had experienced a relapse, whereas at the end of sham stimulation, 2 patients remained in remission, 2 relapsed and 1 showed a progressive worsening without reaching relapse criteria. Limitations The small sample size limited the statistical power and external validity. Conclusion These preliminary findings indicate that DBS of the SCG is an effective and safe treatment for severe forms of TRD and that continuous electrical stimulation is required to maintain therapeutic effects

  3. Increased gut hormones and insulin sensitivity index following a 3-d intervention with a barley kernel-based product: a randomised cross-over study in healthy middle-aged subjects.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Anne C; Johansson-Boll, Elin V; Björck, Inger M E

    2015-09-28

    Certain purified indigestible carbohydrates such as inulin have been shown to stimulate gut-derived hormones involved in glycaemic regulation and appetite regulation, and to counteract systemic inflammation through a gut microbiota-mediated mechanism. Less is known about the properties of indigestible carbohydrates intrinsic to food. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility to affect release of endogenous gut hormones and ameliorate appetite control and glycaemic control by ingestion of a whole-grain cereal food product rich in NSP and resistant starch in healthy humans. In all, twenty middle-aged subjects were provided with a barley kernel-based bread (BB) or a reference white wheat bread during 3 consecutive days, respectively, in a randomised cross-over design study. At a standardised breakfast the following day (day 4), blood was collected for the analysis of blood (b) glucose regulation, gastrointestinal hormones, markers of inflammation and markers of colonic fermentation; 3 d of intervention with BB increased gut hormones in plasma (p) the next morning at fasting (p-glucagon-like peptide-1; 56%) and postprandially (p-glucagon-like peptide-2; 13% and p-peptide YY; 18%). Breath H₂ excretion and fasting serum (s) SCFA concentrations were increased (363 and 18%, respectively), and b-glucose (22%) and s-insulin responses (17%) were decreased after BB intervention. Insulin sensitivity index (ISI(composite)) was also improved (25%) after BB. In conclusion, 3 d of intervention with BB increased systemic levels of gut hormones involved in appetite regulation, metabolic control and maintenance of gut barrier function, as well as improved markers of glucose homoeostasis in middle-aged subjects, altogether relevant for the prevention of obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

  4. An open-label, multicenter, randomized, crossover study comparing sildenafil citrate and tadalafil for treating erectile dysfunction in Chinese men naïve to phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wen-Jun; Li, Hong-Jun; Dai, Yu-Tian; He, Xue-You; Huang, Yi-Ran; Liu, Ji-Hong; Sorsaburu, Sebastian; Ji, Chen; Jin, Jian-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The study was to compare treatment preference, efficacy, and tolerability of sildenafil citrate (sildenafil) and tadalafil for treating erectile dysfunction (ED) in Chinese men naοve to phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor therapies. This multicenter, randomized, open-label, crossover study evaluated whether Chinese men with ED preferred 20-mg tadalafil or 100-mg sildenafil. After a 4 weeks baseline assessment, 383 eligible patients were randomized to sequential 20-mg tadalafil per 100-mg sildenafil or vice versa for 8 weeks respectively and then chose which treatment they preferred to take during the 8 weeks extension. Primary efficacy was measured by Question 1 of the PDE5 Inhibitor Treatment Preference Questionnaire (PITPQ). Secondary efficacy was analyzed by PITPQ Question 2, the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) erectile function (EF) domain, sexual encounter profile (SEP) Questions 2 and 3, and the Drug Attributes Questionnaire. Three hundred and fifty men (91%) completed the randomized treatment phase. Two hundred and forty-two per 350 (69.1%) patients preferred 20-mg tadalafil, and 108/350 (30.9%) preferred 100-mg sildenafil (P < 0.001) as their treatment in the 8 weeks extension. Ninety-two per 242 (38%) patients strongly preferred tadalafil and 37/108 (34.3%) strongly the preferred sildenafil. The SEP2 (penetration), SEP3 (successful intercourse), and IIEF-EF domain scores were improved in both tadalafil and sildenafil treatment groups. For patients who preferred tadalafil, getting an erection long after taking the medication was the most reported reason for tadalafil preference. The only treatment-emergent adverse event reported by > 2% of men was headache. After tadalafil and sildenafil treatments, more Chinese men with ED naοve to PDE5 inhibitor preferred tadalafil. Both sildenafil and tadalafil treatments were effective and safe.

  5. Biased agonism of the μ-opioid receptor by TRV130 increases analgesia and reduces on-target adverse effects versus morphine: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Soergel, David G; Subach, Ruth Ann; Burnham, Nancy; Lark, Michael W; James, Ian E; Sadler, Brian M; Skobieranda, Franck; Violin, Jonathan D; Webster, Lynn R

    2014-09-01

    Opioids provide powerful analgesia but also efficacy-limiting adverse effects, including severe nausea, vomiting, and respiratory depression, by activating μ-opioid receptors. Preclinical models suggest that differential activation of signaling pathways downstream of these receptors dissociates analgesia from adverse effects; however, this has not yet translated to a treatment with an improved therapeutic index. Thirty healthy men received single intravenous injections of the biased ligand TRV130 (1.5, 3, or 4.5mg), placebo, or morphine (10mg) in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. Primary objectives were to measure safety and tolerability (adverse events, vital signs, electrocardiography, clinical laboratory values), and analgesia (cold pain test) versus placebo. Other measures included respiratory drive (minute volume after induced hypercapnia), subjective drug effects, and pharmacokinetics. Compared to morphine, TRV130 (3, 4.5mg) elicited higher peak analgesia (105, 116 seconds latency vs 75 seconds for morphine, P<.02), with faster onset and similar duration of action. More subjects doubled latency or achieved maximum latency (180 seconds) with TRV130 (3, 4.5mg). Respiratory drive reduction was greater after morphine than any TRV130 dose (-15.9 for morphine versus -7.3, -7.6, and -9.4 h*L/min, P<.05). More subjects experienced severe nausea after morphine (n=7) than TRV130 1.5 or 3mg (n=0, 1), but not 4.5mg (n=9). TRV130 was generally well tolerated, and exposure was dose proportional. Thus, in this study, TRV130 produced greater analgesia than morphine at doses with less reduction in respiratory drive and less severe nausea. This demonstrates early clinical translation of ligand bias as an important new concept in receptor-targeted pharmacotherapy.

  6. An acute, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study of 320 mg and 640 mg doses of Bacopa monnieri (CDRI 08) on multitasking stress reactivity and mood.

    PubMed

    Benson, Sarah; Downey, Luke A; Stough, Con; Wetherell, Mark; Zangara, Andrea; Scholey, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    Little research exists in humans concerning the anxiolytic, antidepressant, sedative, and adaptogenic actions the traditional Ayurvedic medicine Bacopa monnieri (BM) possesses in addition to its documented cognitive-enhancing effects. Preclinical work has identified a number of acute anxiolytic, nootropic, and adaptogenic effects of BM that may also co-occur in humans. The current double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study assessed the acute effects of a specific extract of BM (KeenMind® - CDRI 08) in normal healthy participants during completion of a multitasking framework (MTF). Seventeen healthy volunteers completed the MTF, at baseline, then 1 h and 2 h after consuming a placebo, 320 mg BM and 640 mg of BM. Treatments were separated by a 7-day washout with order determined by Latin Square. Outcome measures included cognitive outcomes from the MTF, with mood and salivary cortisol measured before and after each completion of the MTF. Change from baseline scores indicated positive cognitive effects, notably at both 1 h post and 2 h post BM consumption on the Letter Search and Stroop tasks, suggesting an earlier nootropic effect of BM than previously investigated. There were also some positive mood effects and reduction in cortisol levels, pointing to a physiological mechanism for stress reduction associated with BM consumption. It was concluded that acute BM supplementation produced some adaptogenic and nootropic effects that need to be replicated in a larger sample and in isolation from stressful cognitive tests in order to quantify the magnitude of these effects. The study was registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12612000834853).

  7. Quercetin reduces systolic blood pressure and plasma oxidised low-density lipoprotein concentrations in overweight subjects with a high-cardiovascular disease risk phenotype: a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Egert, Sarah; Bosy-Westphal, Anja; Seiberl, Jasmin; Kürbitz, Claudia; Settler, Uta; Plachta-Danielzik, Sandra; Wagner, Anika E; Frank, Jan; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Rimbach, Gerald; Wolffram, Siegfried; Müller, Manfred J

    2009-10-01

    Regular consumption of flavonoids may reduce the risk for CVD. However, the effects of individual flavonoids, for example, quercetin, remain unclear. The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of quercetin supplementation on blood pressure, lipid metabolism, markers of oxidative stress, inflammation, and body composition in an at-risk population of ninety-three overweight or obese subjects aged 25-65 years with metabolic syndrome traits. Subjects were randomised to receive 150 mg quercetin/d in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over trial with 6-week treatment periods separated by a 5-week washout period. Mean fasting plasma quercetin concentrations increased from 71 to 269 nmol/l (P < 0.001) during quercetin treatment. In contrast to placebo, quercetin decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP) by 2.6 mmHg (P < 0.01) in the entire study group, by 2.9 mmHg (P < 0.01) in the subgroup of hypertensive subjects and by 3.7 mmHg (P < 0.001) in the subgroup of younger adults aged 25-50 years. Quercetin decreased serum HDL-cholesterol concentrations (P < 0.001), while total cholesterol, TAG and the LDL:HDL-cholesterol and TAG:HDL-cholesterol ratios were unaltered. Quercetin significantly decreased plasma concentrations of atherogenic oxidised LDL, but did not affect TNF-alpha and C-reactive protein when compared with placebo. Quercetin supplementation had no effects on nutritional status. Blood parameters of liver and kidney function, haematology and serum electrolytes did not reveal any adverse effects of quercetin. In conclusion, quercetin reduced SBP and plasma oxidised LDL concentrations in overweight subjects with a high-CVD risk phenotype. Our findings provide further evidence that quercetin may provide protection against CVD.

  8. Probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum 299v increases iron absorption from an iron-supplemented fruit drink: a double-isotope cross-over single-blind study in women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Michael; Önning, Gunilla; Berggren, Anna; Hulthén, Lena

    2015-10-28

    Iron deficiency is common, especially among young women. Adding probiotics to foods could be one way to increase iron absorption. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that non-haem iron absorption from a fruit drink is improved by adding Lactobacillus plantarum 299v (Lp299v). Iron absorption was studied in healthy women of reproductive age using a single-blind cross-over design in two trials applying the double-isotope (55Fe and 59Fe) technique. In Trial 1, iron absorption from a fruit drink containing 109 colony-forming units (CFU) Lp299v was compared with that from a control drink without Lp299v. Trial 2 had the same design but 1010 CFU were used. The test and control drinks contained approximately 5 mg of iron as ferrous lactate and were labelled with 59Fe (B) and 55Fe (A), respectively, and consumed on 4 consecutive days in the order AABB. Retention of the isotopes was measured with whole-body counting and in blood. Mean iron absorption from the drink containing 109 CFU Lp299v (28·6(sd 12·5) %) was significantly higher than from the control drink (18·5(sd 5·8) %), n 10, P<0·028). The fruit drink with 1010 CFU Lp299v gave a mean iron absorption of 29·1(sd 17·0) %, whereas the control drink gave an absorption of (20·1(sd 6·4) %) (n 11, P<0·080). The difference in iron absorption between the 109 CFU Lp299v and the 1010 CFU Lp299v drinks was not significant (P=0·941). In conclusion, intake of probiotics can increase iron absorption by approximately 50 % from a fruit drink having an already relatively high iron bioavailability.

  9. Evaluation of personalised, one-to-one interaction using Montessori-type activities as a treatment of challenging behaviours in people with dementia: the study protocol of a crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The agitated behaviours that accompany dementia (e.g. pacing, aggression, calling out) are stressful to both nursing home residents and their carers and are difficult to treat. Behaviours stemming from pain, major depression or psychosis benefit from treatment with analgesics, antidepressants or antipsychotics. In other cases, psychotropic medications have limited efficacy but are used very widely. Therefore, increasingly more attention has been paid to nonpharmacological interventions which are associated with fewer risks. The aim of the current study is to test if personalised one-to-one interaction activities based on Montessori principles will reduce the frequency of behavioural symptoms of dementia significantly more than a relevant control condition. Methods/Design We will conduct a controlled trial with randomised cross-over between conditions. Persons with moderate to severe dementia and associated behavioural problems living in aged care facilities will be included in the study. Consented, willing participants will be assigned in random order to Montessori or control blocks for two weeks then switched to the other condition. Montessori activities derive from the principles espoused by Maria Montessori and subsequent educational theorists to promote engagement in learning, namely task breakdown, guided repetition, progression in difficulty from simple to complex, and the careful matching of demands to levels of competence. The control intervention consists of conversation or reading from and looking at pictures in a newspaper to control for non-specific benefits of one-to-one interaction. Presence of target behaviour will be noted as well as level of engagement and type of affect displayed. Secondary measures also include the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory and information on time and funds spend to prepare the activities. Discussion If our results show that use of Montessori activities is effective in treating challenging behaviours in

  10. Effects of tomato- and soy-rich diets on the IGF-I hormonal network: a crossover study of postmenopausal women at high risk for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, John M; Olivo-Marston, Susan; Vitolins, Mara Z; Bittoni, Marisa; Reeves, Katherine W; Degraffinreid, Cecilia R; Schwartz, Steven J; Clinton, Steven K; Paskett, Electra D

    2011-05-01

    To determine whether dietary modifications with tomato products and/or a soy supplement affected circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and other markers of cell signaling in postmenopausal women at risk for developing breast cancer. Eligible and consented postmenopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer were enrolled in a 26-week, two-arm (tomato and soy, 10 weeks each) longitudinal dietary intervention study in which each woman served as her own control. Changes in biochemical endpoints including IGF-I, IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3, estradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), C-peptide, and insulin were measured for each intervention arm. Carotenoid and isoflavone levels were measured to assess adherence. Significant increases in carotenoid and isoflavone levels during the tomato and soy study arms, respectively, suggested that women were adherent to both arms of the intervention. The tomato-rich diet had little effect on cell-signaling biomarkers previously associated with breast cancer risk. However, results of the soy intervention showed that concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 increased by 21.6 and 154.7 μmol/L, respectively (P = 0.001 for both) and SHBG decreased by 5.4 μmol/L (P < 0.001) after consumption of the soy protein supplement. Increased soy protein intake may lead to small, but significant, increases in IGF-I and IGFBP-3. Soy consumption also led to a significant decrease in SHBG, which has been hypothesized to promote, rather than prevent, cancer growth. Previous epidemiologic studies, however, have confirmed protective effect of soy on breast cancer. Additional investigation about the effect of soy on breast cancer risk and its mechanism of action is warranted.

  11. Perioperative Bromelain Therapy after Wisdom Teeth Extraction - A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blinded, Three-Armed, Cross-Over Dose-Finding Study.

    PubMed

    Bormann, Kai-Hendrik; Weber, Kristina; Kloppenburg, Heike; Koch, Armin; Meiser, Peter; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius

    2016-12-01

    Reduction in postoperative edema and inflammatory reactions is the key to the posttraumatic regeneration process. Use of bromelain is well established in this indication, but there is some controversy with regard to the optimal dosing of this drug. The aim of our study was therefore to investigate the efficacy of dosage-dependent therapy with bromelain in patients after wisdom teeth extraction by comparing the registered dosage 1000 FIP (Fédération Internationale Pharmaceutique) against higher dosages of 3000 FIP and 4500 FIP. A total of 75 patients were randomized to one of the three dosage arms, and 68 of these patients were finally analyzed in the modified intention-to-treat population. Patients involved underwent two surgery sessions: one study period being conducted under treatment with bromelain and the other with placebo. Postoperative swelling determined by a 3D face scanning system was defined as the primary endpoint; further efficacy parameters were maximum swelling, pain, difficulty in swallowing, and use of analgesics. A superiority of treatment with 3000 FIP and 4500 FIP versus 1000 FIP could not be demonstrated. The analysis of pooled bromelain treatments versus placebo did, however, show a clear trend in favor of bromelain for all assessments. Adverse events did not occur more frequently under bromelain therapy compared with placebo. This study thus clearly supports the clinical relevance of treatment of postoperative conditions with bromelain, and the recommended daily dose was sufficiently effective in this trial and indication. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Comparison of the effect of naproxen, etodolac and diclofenac on postoperative sequels following third molar surgery: A randomised, double-blind, crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Akbulut, Nihat; Atakan, Cemal; Çölok, Gülümser

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) diclofenac potassium, etodolac and naproxen sodium in relation to pain, swelling and trismus following impacted third molar surgery. Study Design: The study was a randomized and a double-blinded study which included 42 healthy young individuals with impacted third molars and bone retention. Patients were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n: 14) to which diclofenac potassium, naproxen sodium and etodolac were administered orally an hour before the operation. Impacted third molars were surgically extracted with local anaesthesia. Visual analog scales (VAS) were used to assess the pain in the 6th, 12th hours and on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 5th, and 7th days postoperatively. Swelling was evaluated using ultrasound (US) and mouth opening (trismus) was measured with a composing stick pre and post operatively on the 2nd and 7th days respectively. Results: Regarding pain alleviation, diclofenac potassium was better than naproxen sodium and naproxen sodium was better than etodolac but these differences were not statistically significant. US measurements showed that the swelling on postoperative 2nd day was significantly lowest with diclofenac potassium as compared to others (p= 0.027) while naproxen sodium and etodolac acted similarly (p=0.747). No difference was noted regarding trismus in any of the groups. Conclusions: NSAIDs (diclofenac, naproxen and etodolac) are somehow similarly effective for controlling pain and trismus following extraction of mandibular third molars but diclofenac potassium surpasses others in reduction of swelling. Key words:Diclofenac potassium, naproxen sodium, etodolac, impacted third molar surgery, pain, swelling, trismus. PMID:24316711

  13. Green tea extract decreases starch digestion and absorption from a test meal in humans: a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Lochocka, Klaudia; Bajerska, Joanna; Glapa, Aleksandra; Fidler-Witon, Ewa; Nowak, Jan K.; Szczapa, Tomasz; Grebowiec, Philip; Lisowska, Aleksandra; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw

    2015-01-01

    Green tea is known worldwide for its beneficial effects on human health. However, objective data evaluating this influence in humans is scarce. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of green tea extract (GTE) on starch digestion and absorption. The study comprised of 28 healthy volunteers, aged 19 to 28 years. In all subjects, a starch 13C breath test was performed twice. Subjects randomly ingested naturally 13C-abundant cornflakes during the GTE test (GTE 4 g) or placebo test. The cumulative percentage dose recovery (CPDR) was significantly lower for the GTE test than for the placebo test (median [interquartile range]: 11.4% [5.5–15.5] vs. 16.1% [12.7–19.5]; p = 0.003). Likewise, CPDR expressed per hour was considerably lower in each point of the measurement. In conclusion, a single dose of green tea extract taken with a test meal decreases starch digestion and absorption. PMID:26226166

  14. Evaluation of the effect of food and age on the pharmacokinetics of oral netupitant and palonosetron in healthy subjects: A randomized, open-label, crossover phase 1 study.

    PubMed

    Calcagnile, Selma; Lanzarotti, Corinna; Gutacker, Michaela; Jakob-Rodamer, Verena; Peter Kammerer, Klaus; Timmer, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Antiemetic treatment compliance is important to prevent chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, a feared chemotherapy side effect. NEPA, a new oral fixed combination of netupitant, a highly selective NK1 receptor antagonist (RA), and palonosetron, a second-generation 5-HT3 RA, targets dual antiemetic pathways with a single dose. This study investigated the effect of food intake and age on NEPA pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety. In this open-label, single-center, randomized, phase 1 study, 24 adults (18-45 years) received NEPA in a fed or fasted state during the first treatment period and in the alternative state in the next treatment period. Twelve elderly subjects (≥65 years) received NEPA in a fasted state. Blood samples were taken for netupitant and palonosetron PK analysis. In the fed condition, netupitant plasma exposure increased, whereas palonosetron PK parameters were not affected. Furthermore, elderly subjects showed increased netupitant and palonosetron exposure compared with adults. All adverse events were mild/moderate, with constipation and headache the most common. Although food intake and age altered NEPA PK, dose adjustments were not needed, as netupitant and palonosetron exposure increases did not lead to safety concerns in healthy subjects.

  15. Double-blind, single-dose, cross-over study of the effects of pramipexole, pergolide, and placebo on rest tremor and UPDRS part III in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Navan, Prithiva; Findley, Leslie J; Jeffs, Jim A R; Pearce, Ronald K B; Bain, Peter G

    2003-02-01

    Tremor is one of the cardinal signs of Parkinson's disease (PD) but its response to antiparkinsonian medication is variable. It has been postulated that pramipexole may have a stronger antiparkinsonian tremor effect than pergolide, another direct acting dopamine agonist medication, possibly because the former has preferential affinity for the dopamine D3 receptor. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the effects of a single oral dose of either pramipexole (Pr) or pergolide (Pe) or placebo (Pl) on parkinsonian tremor and the motor (part III) subsection of the UPDRS. Ten patients (6 men, 4 women), mean age 65.3 years, mean duration from diagnosis of 2.6 years, with tremor dominant PD were recruited. On three separate occasions a single dose of pramipexole (salt) 500 microg, pergolide 500 microg or placebo were administered in random order to each patient, who were pretreated with domperidone and had their antiparkinsonian medication withheld from midnight before study. After each medication patients were assessed at baseline and then every 30 min for 4 hr using a 0 to 10 tremor rating scale and the UPDRS (part III) in a double-blind protocol. Adverse effects were systematically recorded. The results demonstrate that 500 microg of either pramipexole or pergolide reduced PD rest tremor scores to a similar degree, which at peak effect was significantly greater than placebo (respectively Pe v Pl: P < 0.006, Pr v Pl: P < 0.033). The two active drugs also had weaker beneficial effects on the UPDRS part III. Pergolide, however, was significantly more likely than pramipexole to cause nausea (P = 0.005) or vomiting (P = 0.014).

  16. Cross-over: a generalizable phenomenon necessary for secondary intraneural ganglion cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Robert J; Amrami, Kimberly K; Wang, Huan; Kliot, Michel; Carmichael, Stephen W

    2008-03-01

    The appearances of intraneural ganglion cysts are being elucidated. We previously introduced the cross-over phenomenon to explain how a fibular (peroneal) or tibial intraneural ganglion cyst arising from the superior tibiofibular joint could give rise to multiple cysts: cyst fluid ascending up the primarily affected nerve could reach the level of the sciatic nerve, fill its common epineurial sheath and s