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Sample records for 2-year field study

  1. Residue level and dissipation pattern of spiromesifen in cabbage and soil from 2-year field study.

    PubMed

    Siddamallaiah, Lekha; Mohapatra, Soudamini

    2016-03-01

    Spiromesifen is a new class of insecticide used for the control of whiteflies and mites which have developed resistance to the more commonly used neonicotinoids. Dissipation pattern of spiromesifen on cabbage was evaluated over 2 years by conducting supervised field studies as per good agricultural practices. Cabbage and soil samples were extracted and purified using modified QuEChERS method and analyzed through gas chromatography (GC). Confirmatory studies were carried out by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The recoveries of spiromesifen from cabbage and soil were between 85.44 and 103.37% with the relative standard deviation (RSD) between 3.2 and 9.4% (n = 6). The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.003 μg mL(-1) and 0.01 mg kg(-1), respectively. The measurement uncertainties (MUs) were within 9.9-14.9%. Initial residues of spiromesifen on cabbage were 0.640 and 1.549 mg kg(-1) during 2013 and 0.723 and 1.438 mg kg(-1) during 2014 from treatments at standard and double doses of 125 and 250 g active ingredient (a.i.) ha(-1), respectively. Spiromesifen residue dissipation followed first-order rate kinetics, and it degraded within the half-lives of 2.9 and 3.9 days during 2013 and 3.2 and 4.5 days during 2014. The residue levels reached below the maximum residue limit (MRL; 0.02 mg kg(-1)) within 15-17 days at the standard dose and 24-27 days at the double dose. The field soil analyzed at harvest (30 days) was free from spiromesifen residues. Metabolite spiromesifen-enol was not detected in any sample which was confirmed through LC-MS/MS analysis.

  2. Residue level and dissipation pattern of spiromesifen in cabbage and soil from 2-year field study.

    PubMed

    Siddamallaiah, Lekha; Mohapatra, Soudamini

    2016-03-01

    Spiromesifen is a new class of insecticide used for the control of whiteflies and mites which have developed resistance to the more commonly used neonicotinoids. Dissipation pattern of spiromesifen on cabbage was evaluated over 2 years by conducting supervised field studies as per good agricultural practices. Cabbage and soil samples were extracted and purified using modified QuEChERS method and analyzed through gas chromatography (GC). Confirmatory studies were carried out by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The recoveries of spiromesifen from cabbage and soil were between 85.44 and 103.37% with the relative standard deviation (RSD) between 3.2 and 9.4% (n = 6). The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.003 μg mL(-1) and 0.01 mg kg(-1), respectively. The measurement uncertainties (MUs) were within 9.9-14.9%. Initial residues of spiromesifen on cabbage were 0.640 and 1.549 mg kg(-1) during 2013 and 0.723 and 1.438 mg kg(-1) during 2014 from treatments at standard and double doses of 125 and 250 g active ingredient (a.i.) ha(-1), respectively. Spiromesifen residue dissipation followed first-order rate kinetics, and it degraded within the half-lives of 2.9 and 3.9 days during 2013 and 3.2 and 4.5 days during 2014. The residue levels reached below the maximum residue limit (MRL; 0.02 mg kg(-1)) within 15-17 days at the standard dose and 24-27 days at the double dose. The field soil analyzed at harvest (30 days) was free from spiromesifen residues. Metabolite spiromesifen-enol was not detected in any sample which was confirmed through LC-MS/MS analysis. PMID:26869045

  3. Longitudinal 2 years field study of conventional vaccination against highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 in layer hens.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Miriam; Pöppel, Manfred; Fröhlich, Andreas; Breithaupt, Angele; Teifke, Jens; Blohm, Ulrike; Mettenleiter, Thomas; Beer, Martin; Harder, Timm

    2010-10-01

    A licensed, inactivated vaccine based on a low pathogenic avian influenza virus strain (H5N2) was evaluated in layer hens kept under field conditions during a 2-year period. Vaccine efficacy was investigated by specific antibodies and by challenge-contact experiments using highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) H5N1. Basic immunization with two applications induced clinical protection. Virus excretion by vaccinated hens was significantly reduced compared to non-vaccinated controls; transmission to non-vaccinated and vaccinated contact birds was not fully interrupted. Vaccination efficacy is influenced by several factors including antigenic relatedness between vaccine and field strains, but also by species, age and type of commercial uses of the host. Limitations and risks of HPAIV vaccination as silent spread of HPAIV and emergence of escape mutants must be considered a priori and appropriate corrective measures have to be installed. PMID:20727963

  4. A 2-Year Field Study Shows Little Evidence That the Long-Term Planting of Transgenic Insect-Resistant Cotton Affects the Community Structure of Soil Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaogang; Liu, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic insect-resistant cotton has been released into the environment for more than a decade in China to effectively control the cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera) and other Lepidoptera. Because of concerns about undesirable ecological side-effects of transgenic crops, it is important to monitor the potential environmental impact of transgenic insect-resistant cotton after commercial release. Our 2-year study included 1 cotton field where non-transgenic cotton had been planted continuously and 2 other cotton fields where transgenic insect-resistant cotton had been planted for different lengths of time since 1997 and since 2002. In 2 consecutive years (2009 and 2010), we took soil samples from 3 cotton fields at 4 different growth stages (seedling, budding, boll-forming and boll-opening stages), collected soil nematodes from soil with the sugar flotation and centrifugation method and identified the soil nematodes to the genus level. The generic composition, individual densities and diversity indices of the soil nematodes did not differ significantly between the 2 transgenic cotton fields and the non-transgenic cotton field, but significant seasonal variation was found in the individual densities of the principal trophic groups and in the diversity indices of the nematodes in all 3 cotton fields. The study used a comparative perspective to monitor the impact of transgenic insect-resistant cotton grown in typical ‘real world’ conditions. The results of the study suggested that more than 10 years of cultivation of transgenic insect-resistant cotton had no significant effects–adverse or otherwise–on soil nematodes. This study provides a theoretical basis for ongoing environmental impact monitoring of transgenic plants. PMID:23613899

  5. Towards a validation of a cellular biomarker suite in native and transplanted zebra mussels: a 2-year integrative field study of seasonal and pollution-induced variations.

    PubMed

    Guerlet, Edwige; Ledy, Karine; Meyer, Antoinette; Giambérini, Laure

    2007-03-30

    Two of the questions raised in the validation process of biomarkers are their relevance in the identification and discrimination of environmental perturbations, and the influence of seasonal factors on these biological endpoints. Determining the advantages and restrictions associated with the use of native or transplanted animals and comparing their responses is also needed. To obtain this information, a 2-year integrative field study was conducted in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant in northeastern France. A station was located in the reservoir receiving the cooling waters of the plant, and two other sites were studied 2 km upstream and 5 km downstream from the reservoir's discharge in the Moselle river. Elevated temperatures, copper contamination and a 1.4-fold-concentration factor of dissolved salts affected water quality of the reservoir. Native and transplanted zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) were collected monthly and their digestive glands were processed for histochemical determinations of the lysosomal and peroxisomal systems and of the lipofuscin and neutral lipid contents. The responses were quantified using automated image analysis and stereology. Apart from neutral lipid contents, there were no systematic seasonal patterns in mussel populations or from 1 year to another. Principal Component Analyses showed a general higher discrimination potential of biological responses in transplanted organisms compared to native ones. They also pointed out the relationships between the cellular and physiological markers and abiotic factors. The present multiple biomarker integrative approach in transplanted D. polymorpha brings promising elements in their validation process as relevant biomonitoring tools.

  6. Corrosion-induced release of Cu and Zn into rainwater from brass, bronze and their pure metals. A 2-year field study.

    PubMed

    Herting, Gunilla; Goidanich, Sara; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Leygraf, Christofer

    2008-09-01

    A 2-year field study has been conducted in an urban environment to provide annual release rates of copper and zinc from brass (20 wt% Zn) and copper and tin from bronze (6 wt% Sn) compared to sheets of their pure alloy constituents, copper and zinc. Despite relatively low nominal bulk alloy content, substantially more zinc was released from brass compared to copper. Both metals were released at a significantly slower rate from the brass alloy, compared to the pure metals. The proportion of release rates of copper and zinc from the alloy differed significantly from their proportions in the bulk alloy. Bronze showed relatively constant release rates of copper, being similar to that of pure copper sheet. The release of tin from bronze was negligible. The results clearly show that alloys and the pure metals behave very differently when exposed to rainwater. Accordingly, release rates from pure metals cannot be used to predict release rates of individual constituents from their alloys. Generated data are of importance within REACH, the new chemical policy of the European commission, where metal alloys erroneously are being treated as mixtures of chemical substances.

  7. Effects of sediment dredging on nitrogen cycling in Lake Taihu, China: Insight from mass balance based on a 2-year field study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Juhua; Fan, Chengxin; Zhong, Jicheng; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Changhui; Yao, Xiaolong

    2016-02-01

    Sediment dredging can permanently remove pollutants from an aquatic ecosystem, which is considered an effective approach to aquatic ecosystem restoration. In this work, a 2-year field simulation test was carried out to investigate the effect of dredging on nitrogen cycling across the sediment-water interface (SWI) in Lake Taihu, China. The results showed that simulated dredging applied to an area rich in total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) slightly reduced the NH4(+)-N release from sediments while temporarily enhanced the NH4(+)-N release in an area with lower TOC and/or TN (in the first 180 days), although the application had a limited effect on the fluxes of NO2(-)-N and NO3(-)-N in both areas. Further analysis indicated that dredging induced decreases in nitrification, denitrification, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) in sediments, notably by 76.9, 49.0, and 89.9%, respectively, in the TOC and/or TN-rich area. Therefore, dredging slowed down nitrogen cycling rates in sediments but did not increase N loading to overlying water. The main reason for the above phenomenon could be attributed to the removal of the surface sediments enriched with more TOC and/or TN (compared with the bottom sediments). Overall, to minimize internal N pollution, dredging may be more applicable to nutrient-rich sediments.

  8. A model of Earth's magnetic field derived from 2 years of Swarm satellite constellation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Christopher C.; Kotsiaros, Stavros; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    More than 2 years of magnetic field data taken by the three-satellite constellation mission Swarm are used to derive a model of Earth's magnetic field and its time variation. This model is called SIFMplus. In addition to the magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm satellites, explicit advantage is taken of the constellation aspect of Swarm by including East-West magnetic intensity and vector field gradient information from the lower satellite pair. Along-track differences of the magnetic intensity as well as of the vector components provide further information concerning the North-South gradient. The SIFMplus model provides a description of the static lithospheric field that is very similar to models determined from CHAMP data, up to at least spherical harmonic degree n=75. Also the core field part of SIFMplus, with a quadratic time dependence for n ≤ 6 and a linear time dependence for n=7-15, demonstrates the possibility to determine high-quality field models from only 2 years of Swarm data, thanks to the unique constellation aspect of Swarm. To account for the magnetic signature caused by ionospheric electric currents at polar latitudes we co-estimate, together with the model of the core, lithospheric and large-scale magnetospheric fields, a magnetic potential that depends on quasi-dipole latitude and magnetic local time.

  9. Dynamics of difenoconazole and propiconazole residues on pomegranate over 2 years under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Soudamini

    2016-03-01

    Residue dynamics of difenoconazole and propiconazole on pomegranate was studied after application at the recommended and double doses of 125 and 250 g active ingredient (a.i.) ha(-1) during August-October 2012. The study was repeated during the same period in 2013. QuEChERS method, in conjunction with gas chromatography (GC), was used for analysis of the fungicides after carrying out the method validation. The recoveries of the fungicides from pomegranate and soil were between 80.3 and 96.2 %; the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.016 and 0.05 mg kg(-1), respectively. The uncertainties of measurement were between 9.7 and 16.3 %. The initial residue deposits of difenoconazole were 0.875 and 1.205 mg kg(-1) from treatment at the recommended dose and 1.54 and 1.672 mg kg(-1) from treatment at the double dose from the first- and second-year studies. Propiconazole residues were 0.663 and 0.864 mg kg(-1) from recommended dose treatments and 1.474 and 2.045 mg kg(-1) from double dose treatments from the first- and second-year studies. The half-lives of degradation of difenoconazole were 6.4-8.4 days and propiconazole 7.9-8.5 days over the 2 years. Residues of difenoconazole and propiconazole remained on the pomegranate fruit surface and did not move to the edible part (aril). The pre-harvest intervals (PHIs), the time required for the residues to reduce below their respective EU maximum residue limits (MRLs), were 25.4 and 30.8 days for difenoconazole and 33.3 and 43.8 days for propiconazole from treatments at the recommended and double doses, respectively. Keeping in view consumer safety, the longer PHI from the two studies has been selected.

  10. Motor recovery after stroke depends on intact sustained attention: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Robertson, I H; Ridgeway, V; Greenfield, E; Parr, A

    1997-04-01

    The functional recovery of 47 right-brain-damaged stroke patients was studied over a 2-year period. The researchers hypothesized that sustained attention capacity should predict the degree of motor and functional recovery over this period because of a proposed privileged role of sustained attention in learning-based recovery of function. As predicted, significant correlations were found between sustained attention capacity at 2 months and functional status (including the Barthel Index) at 2 years. This relationship was shown to exist independently of 2-month functional status. Furthermore, compared with a left-brain-damaged group of cerebrovascular accident (CVA) patients, the right-brain CVA group did not recover functional ability as well over the 2-year period. This increasing difference in functional status over a 2-year period was mirrored by an emerging difference in sustained attention capacity, in favor of the left-brain CVA group.

  11. Improving Social Competence through Emotion Knowledge in 2-Year-Old Children: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giménez-Dasí, Marta; Fernández-Sánchez, Marta; Quintanilla, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The goal of this study was to determine the efficacy of an educational intervention program to improve emotion knowledge, emotion regulation, and social competence in 2-year-old Spanish children. This study makes two original contributions because there are no validated education programs for such young children and because it…

  12. Sexual abstinence in patients with HIV infection: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Jordan, W C

    1991-12-01

    Thirty-five human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients were followed over a 2-year period. All agreed to abstain from sexual intercourse. This group had a low level of recurring infections. A comparison study of sexually active HIV males is underway.

  13. Auditory sensory memory in 2-year-old children: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Glass, Elisabeth; Sachse, Steffi; von Suchodoletz, Waldemar

    2008-03-26

    Auditory sensory memory is assumed to play an important role in cognitive development, but little is known about it in young children. The aim of this study was to estimate the duration of auditory sensory memory in 2-year-old children. We recorded the mismatch negativity in response to tone stimuli presented with different interstimulus intervals. Our findings suggest that in 2-year-old children the memory representation of the standard tone remains in the sensory memory store for at least 1 s but for less than 2 s. Recording the mismatch negativity with stimuli presented at various interstimulus intervals seems to be a useful method for studying the relationship between auditory sensory memory and normal and disturbed cognitive development.

  14. Natrelle 410 Extra-Full Projection Silicone Breast Implants: 2-Year Results from Two Prospective Studies

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Patricia; Murphy, Diane K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The safety and effectiveness of the Natrelle Style 410 highly cohesive silicone gel breast implant (Allergan, Inc., Irvine, Calif.) in full or moderate height and projection have been shown in a 10-year study. Extra-full projection implants may be an appropriate option for some women undergoing breast reconstruction. Methods: A total of 2795 women received at least one Natrelle 410 extra-full projection implant (X-style) for breast reconstruction in two similarly designed, prospective, multicenter studies. Data collected for 2 years after implantation in these studies were pooled to evaluate complication rates and subject and physician satisfaction. Results: Most subjects (76.0 percent) underwent bilateral reconstruction; a total of 4912 devices were implanted. Complication rates at 2 years were low. The most common complications were asymmetry (4.8 percent) and capsular contracture (3.3 percent). The cumulative risk of reoperation was 21.6 percent by subject and 16.6 percent by device; the most common reasons for reoperation were scarring (n = 97), asymmetry (n = 89), implant malposition (n = 78), and infection (n = 71). Subject and physician satisfaction rates exceeded 90 percent. At 2 years, 97 percent of physicians reported that the shape of the breast reflected the shape of the implant, and that the breast implant had maintained its original position. Conclusions: The safety profile of the Natrelle 410 extra-full projection implant mirrors that of its moderate projection and full projection counterparts. Both physicians and subjects were highly satisfied with the implants 2 years after surgery. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, IV. PMID:26090764

  15. Uric acid in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a 2-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Marcello; Lanzillo, Roberta; Costabile, Teresa; Russo, Cinzia; Carotenuto, Antonio; Sasso, Gabriella; Postiglione, Emanuela; De Luca Picione, Carla; Vastola, Michele; Maniscalco, Giorgia Teresa; Palladino, Raffaele; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) is reduced in multiple sclerosis (MS), and possibly relates to MS outcomes, with lower UA levels in subjects experiencing a relapse or presenting higher disability scores. The present retrospective longitudinal study evaluated UA variations in MS, in relation to clinical relapses, disability progression, and cognitive functions. We included 141 subjects with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) and performed expanded disability status scale (EDSS), symbol digit modalities test (SDMT) and UA evaluation at baseline visit and after 2-year follow-up. Paired t test showed significantly lower UA levels after 2-year follow-up than at baseline (3.987 ± 1.135 and 4.167 ± 1.207 mg/dL, respectively) (p = 0.001). The difference in UA levels between 2-year follow-up and baseline related to EDSS sustained progression (p < 0.001; OR = 0.099), and presented a trend for clinical relapses at logistic regression (p = 0.211; OR = 0.711) and for the time to relapse at Cox regression (p = 0.236; HR = 0.792). Analysis of variance showed reduced baseline UA levels in subjects with impaired SDMT at baseline (p = 0.045; adjusted R(2) = 0.473) and after 2-year follow-up (p = 0.034; adjusted R(2) = 0.470). This is the first study showing a progressive reduction of UA levels during the course of RRMS, suggesting a progressive decrease of antioxidant reserves, in relation to relapse risk, disability progression and cognitive function. PMID:25673130

  16. Remediation of a watershed contaminated by heavy metals: a 2-year field biomonitoring of periphytic biofilms.

    PubMed

    Arini, Adeline; Feurtet-Mazel, Agnès; Morin, Soizic; Maury-Brachet, Régine; Coste, Michel; Delmas, François

    2012-05-15

    This study focuses on an industrial contamination site subjected to remediation processes since 2007 in the Riou-Mort watershed (southwest France). The purpose was to assess the first impacts of remediation on periphytic biofilms, and was performed during two years of biomonitoring. Periphytic biofilms were collected on glass slides immersed 24 days at different sites along the contamination gradient for 12 colonisation cycles. Metal contaminations (Cd and Zn) were analysed in biofilms and the evolution of diatom communities was assessed, integrating teratology quantifications. Despite remediation work initiated at the industrial site, this study demonstrated the persistence of metal contamination in water, as well as in biofilms. In addition, our data, showed that the remediation process was initially marked by an increase in metal contamination in the river, with increasing diatom community shifts. Metal-contaminated biofilms presented decreasing species diversities and were dominated by metal-resistant species such as Eolimna minima, whom abundances increased in 2010 reaching 57.2±10%. No significant decrease in metal accumulation was observed and total Cd content in biofilms collected downstream the industrial site ranged from 772.7±88 in July 2009 to 636.9±20 μg/gDW in July 2010. Results obtained on artificial substrates were compared with those of natural substrates and showed similar diatom communities and abundances of deformed diatoms but lower diversities. This ensured that glass slide subtrates gave a good representation of periphytic biofilm health. Finally, results were compared to studies performed before the remediation process and this did not reveal a decrease of metal accumulation in biofilms nor shifts in taxonomic composition of the communities, rather the remaining dominance of metal resistant species such as E. minima was confirmed.

  17. Learning, Memory, and Executive Function in New MDMA Users: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Daniel; Tkotz, Simon; Koester, Philip; Becker, Benjamin; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne; Daumann, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is associated with changes in neurocognitive performance. Recent studies in laboratory animals have provided additional support for the neurodegeneration hypothesis. However, results from animal research need to be applied to humans with caution. Moreover, several of the studies that examine MDMA users suffer from methodological shortcomings. Therefore, a prospective cohort study was designed in order to overcome these previous methodological shortcomings and to assess the relationship between the continuing use of MDMA and cognitive performance in incipient MDMA users. It was hypothesized that, depending on the amount of MDMA taken, the continued use of MDMA over a 2-year period would lead to further decreases in cognitive performance, especially in visual paired association learning tasks. Ninety-six subjects were assessed, at the second follow-up assessment: 31 of these were non-users, 55 moderate-users, and 10 heavy-users. Separate repeated measures analyses of variance were conducted for each cognitive domain, including attention and information processing speed, episodic memory, and executive functioning. Furthermore, possible confounders including age, general intelligence, cannabis use, alcohol use, use of other concomitant substances, recent medical treatment, participation in sports, level of nutrition, sleep patterns, and subjective well-being were assessed. The Repeated measures analysis of variance (rANOVA) revealed that a marginally significant change in immediate and delayed recall test performances of visual paired associates learning had taken place within the follow-up period of 2 years. No further deterioration in continuing MDMA-users was observed in the second follow-up period. No significant differences with the other neuropsychological tests were noted. It seems that MDMA use can impair visual paired associates learning in new users. However, the groups differed in their use of concomitant use of

  18. Methylene chloride: a 2-year inhalation toxicity and oncogenicity study in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, K.D.; Burek, J.D.; Bell, T.J.; Kociba, R.J.; Rampy, L.W.; McKenna, M.J.

    1988-07-01

    Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 0, 50, 200, or 500 ppm methylene chloride for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 2 years. Blood carboxyhemoglobin levels were elevated in a dose-dependent (less than linear) manner in rats exposed to 50-500 ppm methylene chloride. Histopathologic lesions related to methylene chloride exposure were confined to the liver and mammary tissue of rats. An increased incidence of hepatocellular vacuolization was observed in male and female rats exposed to 500 ppm methylene chloride. Female rats exposed to 500 ppm methylene chloride also had an increased incidence of multinucleated hepatocytes and number of spontaneous benign mammary tumors/tumor-bearing rat (adenomas, fibromas, and fibroadenomas with no progression toward malignancy); the incidence of benign mammary tumors in female rats exposed to 50 or 200 ppm methylene chloride was comparable to historical control values. No increase in the number of any malignant tumor type was observed in rats exposed to concentrations as high as 500 ppm methylene chloride. Additional groups of female rats were exposed to 500 ppm methylene chloride for the first 12 months or the last 12 months of the 24-month study. The response observed in female rats exposed to 500 ppm for the first 12 months was the same as that observed in female rats exposed to 500 ppm for 2 years. Conversely, the response observed in female rats exposed to 500 ppm during the last 12 months of the study was similar to that observed in control animals. Based upon the results of this study, the no-adverse-effect level for chronic inhalation exposure of Sprague-Dawley rats was judged to be 200 ppm methylene chloride.

  19. Learning, Memory, and Executive Function in New MDMA Users: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Daniel; Tkotz, Simon; Koester, Philip; Becker, Benjamin; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne; Daumann, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is associated with changes in neurocognitive performance. Recent studies in laboratory animals have provided additional support for the neurodegeneration hypothesis. However, results from animal research need to be applied to humans with caution. Moreover, several of the studies that examine MDMA users suffer from methodological shortcomings. Therefore, a prospective cohort study was designed in order to overcome these previous methodological shortcomings and to assess the relationship between the continuing use of MDMA and cognitive performance in incipient MDMA users. It was hypothesized that, depending on the amount of MDMA taken, the continued use of MDMA over a 2-year period would lead to further decreases in cognitive performance, especially in visual paired association learning tasks. Ninety-six subjects were assessed, at the second follow-up assessment: 31 of these were non-users, 55 moderate-users, and 10 heavy-users. Separate repeated measures analyses of variance were conducted for each cognitive domain, including attention and information processing speed, episodic memory, and executive functioning. Furthermore, possible confounders including age, general intelligence, cannabis use, alcohol use, use of other concomitant substances, recent medical treatment, participation in sports, level of nutrition, sleep patterns, and subjective well-being were assessed. The Repeated measures analysis of variance (rANOVA) revealed that a marginally significant change in immediate and delayed recall test performances of visual paired associates learning had taken place within the follow-up period of 2 years. No further deterioration in continuing MDMA-users was observed in the second follow-up period. No significant differences with the other neuropsychological tests were noted. It seems that MDMA use can impair visual paired associates learning in new users. However, the groups differed in their use of concomitant use of

  20. Prophylactic strategies in recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis: a 2-year study testing a phytonutrient vs itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Chopra, V; Marotta, F; Kumari, A; Bishier, M P; He, F; Zerbinati, N; Agarwal, C; Naito, Y; Tomella, C; Sharma, A; Solimene, U

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical efficacy of a one week/month treatment with a phytocompound with antimycotic properties (K-712, with following 100 mg composition: 10 mg of oleoresin from Pseudowintera colorata at 30 percent concentration in Polygodial together with trace amounts of Olea europea) in recurrent vulvo-vaginal candidiasis (RVVC), as compared to once a week treatment with an azole drug for 24 months follow up. This prospective randomized study involving 122 women (19 to 63 years old) with a history of proven episodes of RVVC in the prior 12 months. Patients were allocated in two treatment groups of 61 patients each and given A) Itraconazole 200 mg orally once a week or B) 1 tab twice a day of K-712 for one week/month. Each treatment schedule was well tolerated with 19 patients in the azole group complaining of transient mild symptoms (nausea, abdominal discomfort, unpleasant taste), while only 3 patients on K-712 reported slight dyspepsia. The number of relapses was significantly lower in the K-712-treated group as compared to the itraconazole-group (22 vs 39, p less than 0.05). Moreover, the former group showed a significantly decreased number of cases resistant or dose-dependent susceptible as compared to group A (p less than 0.05 vs itraconazole) and the same occurred for the occurrence of non-albicans species (group A 64.1 percent vs group B 31.8 percent, p less than 0.05). The overall mycological cure at the end of the 2-year study showed a comparable benefit between the two groups. From these data it appears that the present antifungal phytonutrient is equally effective as itraconazole in the overall treatment of RVVC over a 2-year follow-up, but yielding a significantly better prophylactic effect and also maintenance benefit with lower relapse rate, antifungal susceptibility and growth of azole-resistant species.

  1. [Influence of sport on isoinertial trunk muscle performance development: a 2 years prospective study].

    PubMed

    Rosset, E Bibbo; Mélot, C; Szpalski, M; Keller, T S; Balagué, F

    2013-07-17

    In this study, we investigate the relationship between either regular sports practice or a non sportive way of life, development of trunk muscle performance and occurrence of lower back pain between male schoolchildren. 93 schoolchildren were recruited, then stratified in 4 groups, according to sport practice or sedentary way of life. Participants were evaluated twice at an interval of 2 years with an interview, a physical examination and an evaluation of trunk muscle performance. We identified that basketball players have significantly better results and perfomance concerning isometric and isoinertial tests of trunk muscles than the other groups. Differences in trunk muscle performance exist following the practice of different types of sport. We can deduce that trunk muscle performance has some sport specificity.

  2. Equipping public health professionals for youth engagement: lessons learned from a 2-year pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Tina Binita; Rempel, Benjamin; Lodge, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence of the positive role that youth engagement programs and policies play in creating resiliency and producing positive outcomes among youth populations, such as delaying or avoiding the onset of risk-taking behaviors. Research also suggests that achieving positive outcomes ideally includes influence from the individual, the family, the school, the community, and the field of public health (available in A Research Report and Recommendations for Ontario Public Health Association). The authors conducted a comprehensive evaluation of a 2-year pilot project designed to increase the application of engagement and resiliency theory, knowledge, and skills among public health professionals engaging students from Grades 6, 7, and 8 (11- to 14-year-olds). Qualitative methods assessed public health satisfaction with training, resources, and networking activities, whereas quantitative methods assessed changes in capacity with respect to youth engagement knowledge, awareness, confidence, and skills. The findings have helped shed light on public health professional needs concerning capacity and confidence to undertake youth engagement work. Key lessons learned about making youth engagement possible and effective for public health professionals are presented. PMID:23271719

  3. Equipping public health professionals for youth engagement: lessons learned from a 2-year pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Tina Binita; Rempel, Benjamin; Lodge, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence of the positive role that youth engagement programs and policies play in creating resiliency and producing positive outcomes among youth populations, such as delaying or avoiding the onset of risk-taking behaviors. Research also suggests that achieving positive outcomes ideally includes influence from the individual, the family, the school, the community, and the field of public health (available in A Research Report and Recommendations for Ontario Public Health Association). The authors conducted a comprehensive evaluation of a 2-year pilot project designed to increase the application of engagement and resiliency theory, knowledge, and skills among public health professionals engaging students from Grades 6, 7, and 8 (11- to 14-year-olds). Qualitative methods assessed public health satisfaction with training, resources, and networking activities, whereas quantitative methods assessed changes in capacity with respect to youth engagement knowledge, awareness, confidence, and skills. The findings have helped shed light on public health professional needs concerning capacity and confidence to undertake youth engagement work. Key lessons learned about making youth engagement possible and effective for public health professionals are presented.

  4. The Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Toddlers: A Population Study of 2-Year-Old Swedish Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nygren, Gudrun; Cederlund, Mats; Sandberg, Eva; Gillstedt, Fredrik; Arvidsson, Thomas; Gillberg, I. Carina; Andersson, Gunilla Westman; Gillberg, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is more common than previously believed. ASD is increasingly diagnosed at very young ages. We report estimated ASD prevalence rates from a population study of 2-year-old children conducted in 2010 in Gothenburg, Sweden. Screening for ASD had been introduced at all child health centers at child age 21/2 years. All…

  5. Suppression of Alcohol Dependence Using Baclofen: A 2-Year Observational Study of 100 Patients

    PubMed Central

    de Beaurepaire, Renaud

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term effects of baclofen in a large cohort of alcohol-dependent patients compliant to baclofen treatment. Methods: A hundred patients with alcohol dependence, resistant to usual treatments, were treated with escalating doses of baclofen (no superior limit). Alcohol consumption (in grams) and craving for alcohol were assessed before treatment and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Assessments were simply based on patients’ statements. The outcome measure was the consumption of alcohol, rated according to the World Health Organization criteria for risk of chronic harm. Results: While all patients were rated “at high risk” at baseline, approximately half of them were rated “at low risk” at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. The sum of patients who were at “low risk” and at “moderate risk” (improved patients) was 84% at 3 months, 70% at 6 months, 63% at 1 year, and 62% at 2 years. The constancy of improvement over the 2-years was remarkable. The average maximal dose of baclofen taken was 147 mg/day. Ninety-two percentage of patients reported that they experienced the craving-suppressing effect of baclofen. Significant relationships were found between the amount in grams of alcohol taken before treatment and the maximal dose of baclofen required, and between the existence of a mental disorder and a lesser effect of baclofen. Conclusion: Baclofen produces an effortless decrease or suppression of alcohol craving when it is prescribed with no superior limit of dose. Potential limitations in the effectiveness of baclofen include the coexistence of a mental disorder, the concomitant use of other psychotropic drugs, a lack of real motivation in patients to stop drinking, and the impossibility to reach the optimal dose of baclofen because of unbearable side-effects (sometimes possibly related to too sharp a protocol of dose escalation). PMID:23316172

  6. Treatment adherence among new triptan users: a 2-year cohort study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The persistence of triptan use among newly prescribed users is low in the United States and European countries. However, triptan refill patterns in Asian primary care practices have not been well described. Methods Data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan were used to conduct a retrospective cohort analysis from 2005 to 2008. All participants were followed for 2 years after receiving a new triptan prescription. Refill and 2-year retention rates of newly prescribed triptans were calculated, and predictors of the first triptan refill and 2-year retention were analyzed. Results Of the 13,951 participants with a new triptan prescription (99.9% sumatriptan), 67.4% were prescribed by a neurologist, 67.4% were prescribed at least one prophylactic agent for migraine. Of them, 34.3% adhered to the newly prescribed triptan at the first refill, 0.01% switched to another triptan, and 40.9% switched to a non-triptan acute migraine medication. The 2-year retention rate was 4.0%. The frequency of headache-related neurologic visits for 1 year before the index date, first prescription of triptan or other acute medications, first triptan prescription by a neurologist, and prophylactic use were associated with higher first refill rates. The frequency of headache-related neurologic visits 1 year before the index date and first triptan prescription by a neurologist were related to higher 2-year retention rates. Diabetes mellitus and first triptan prescription at a local medical clinic were associated with reduced probability of continued triptan use at the first refill and 2 years. Conclusions Similar to Western societies, the refill and 2-year retention rates were low in new users of triptans. Frequency of neurologic visits and triptan prescription by a neurologist were significant predictors of adherence. PMID:25117594

  7. Clinical and biologic factors related to oral implant failure: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Moheng, Patrick; Feryn, Jean-Marc

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate urinary biomarkers of bone formation and resorption as predictive factors for oral implant failure, and to contribute to the knowledge of factors related to oral implant failure. A total of 93 patients between 18 and 85 years old, with an indication of oral implant, were eligible in this 2-year prospective, open, and nonrandomized study. Patients who had bone graft before implantation or presented with prosthetic difficulties (implant-to-crown ratio < 1, and/or unfavorable intermaxillary space) were excluded. All patients received either Frialit-2 (Friadent, Mannheim, Germany), cylinder, or screwed implants or IMZ Twin Plus (Friadent), cylinder implants, with FRIOS (Friadent) titanium coating. Serum osteocalcin, and urinary pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline were measured, together with bone density at implant location. The primary endpoint (implant failure) was the implant removal (radiographic evidence of peri-implant bone loss and/or pockets). Factors related to implant failure were analyzed using multilevel logistic regression models to consider within-patient effects. Of the 93 patients included, 61% were female, and 16% were current smokers. A total of 266 oral implants were placed and analyzed, with a mean number of 3.1 implants by patient. Eleven and 15% of bone locations scored at D1 and D4, respectively, for the Misch bone density scoring. The majority of implants (72%) were placed more than 3 months after tooth extraction, using a Frialit-2 system in 73% of cases. The mean of osteocalcin was 17.3 (+/-9.4) ng/L; those of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline were 33.2 (+/-15.8) and 10.2 (+/-11.9) mmol per creatinine mmol, respectively. At one-year, 95.5% (95% confidence interval 92.5-97.5) of implants have not been removed. One year later, no further implant failed. In both univariate and multivariate analysis, osteocalcin, pyridinoline, and deoxypyridinoline were not significant predictive factors of oral implant

  8. Sluggish Cognitive Tempo and ADHD Inattention as Predictors of Externalizing, Internalizing, and Impairment Domains: A 2-Year Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Bernad, Maria del Mar; Servera, Mateu; Becker, Stephen P; Burns, G Leonard

    2016-05-01

    Although sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) is distinct from attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder inattention (ADHD-IN), few studies have examined whether SCT longitudinally predicts other symptom or impairment dimensions. This study used 4 sources (mothers, fathers, primary teachers, and secondary teachers) and 3 occasions of measurement (first, second, and third grades) with 758 first grade (55 % boys), 718 second grade (54 % boys), and 585 third grade (53 % boys) children from Spain to determine SCT's and ADHD-IN's unique longitudinal relationships with psychopathology, academic impairment, and social impairment over the 1- and 2-year intervals (i.e., first to third grade, second to third grade). For 1- and 2-year intervals using both mothers' and fathers' ratings, higher levels of SCT uniquely predicted higher levels of anxiety, depression, academic impairment, and social impairment whereas higher levels of ADHD-IN uniquely predicted higher levels of ADHD-HI, ODD, and academic impairment. For 1- and 2-year intervals across different primary and secondary teachers (i.e., first/second and third grade ratings were provided by different teachers), higher scores on ADHD-IN uniquely predicted poorer outcomes across domains whereas higher scores on SCT uniquely predicted lower levels of ADHD-HI and ODD for both intervals in addition to higher levels of depression (for primary teachers only), academic impairment (for 1-year interval only), and peer rejection (2-year interval only for primary teachers). Overall, SCT was significantly associated with important outcomes independent of ADHD-IN over 1- and 2-year intervals and across four different raters. This study provides further evidence for distinguishing between SCT and ADHD-IN in home and school settings.

  9. Financial Impact of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation on Patients and Families over 2-years: Results from a Multicenter Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Denzen, Ellen M.; Thao, Viengneesee; Hahn, Theresa; Lee, Stephanie J.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Ammi, Monique; Drexler, Rebecca; Flesch, Susan; James, Heather; Omondi, Nancy; Murphy, Elizabeth; Pederson, Kate; Majhail, Navneet S.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a procedure that can significantly influence the socioeconomic wellbeing of patients, caregivers and their families. Among 30 allogeneic HCT recipients and their caregivers enrolled on a pilot study evaluating the feasibility of studying financial impact of HCT, 16 agreed to participate in the long-term phase, completed a baseline questionnaire and received phone interviews at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months post-HCT. Analyses showed that by 2-years post-HCT, 54% of patients who previously contributed to household earnings had not returned to work and 80% of patients/caregivers reported transplant as having moderate to great impact on household income. However, patients’ level of confidence in their ability to meet household financial obligations increased from baseline to 2-years. A relatively large proportion of patients reported inability to pay for medical care through this time period. Case studies demonstrated patient individual perception of financial impact of HCT varies considerably, regardless of actual income. We demonstrate the feasibility of conducting a study to evaluate financial impact of allogeneic HCT through 2-years post-transplantation. Some patients/caregivers continue to experience significant long-term financial burden after this procedure. Our study lays the foundation for a larger evaluation of patient/caregiver financial burden associated with HCT. PMID:27088381

  10. Treatment Compliance of Adolescents after Attempted Suicide: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Craig D.; Cortell, Ranon; Wagner, Barry M.

    2008-01-01

    The study investigates compliance with mental health treatments among suicidal adolescents. Results show that child psychopathology and parental attitudes toward treatment plays an important part in increasing compliance with mental health treatment for adolescent suicide attempters.

  11. Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders in 2-Year-Olds: A Study of Community Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsello, Christina M.; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Stahmer, Aubyn C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Longitudinal research studies have demonstrated that experienced clinicians using standardized assessment measures can make a reliable diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in children under age 3. Limited data are available regarding the sensitivity and specificity of these measures in community settings. The aims of this…

  12. Pubertal Timing and Substance Use in Middle Adolescence: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Koivisto, Anna-Maija; Marttunen, Mauri; Frojd, Sari

    2011-01-01

    Earlier research has associated early puberty with emotional and behavioral symptoms particularly among girls, while among boys, findings have been contradictory as to whether risks are associated with early or late pubertal timing. We studied the association between pubertal timing and substance use behaviors in middle adolescence in a 2-year…

  13. The Development of Falling Intonation in Young Children with Cochlear Implants: A 2-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, David P.; Ertmer, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development of intonation in 12 cochlear implant (CI) recipients. In a previously reported study of the first year of CI use, children who were implanted late (after 24 months) acquired intonation more rapidly than the younger participants. The older children's advantage is plausibly owing to their greater maturity.…

  14. Development of Orthographic Knowledge in German-Speaking Children: A 2-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ise, Elena; Arnoldi, Carolin Judith; Schulte-Körne, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that children develop orthographic knowledge from the very beginning of literacy acquisition. This study investigated the development of German-speaking children's orthographic knowledge with a nonword choice task. One nonword in each pair contained a frequent consonant doublet ("zommul") and the other…

  15. Re-defining one's occupational self 2 years after breast cancer: a case study.

    PubMed

    Newman, Robin M

    2013-01-01

    Margaret*, a 56 year-old Caucasian Stage III breast cancer survivor, participated in a 5 week occupational therapy pilot program, called Take Action. This program was designed for breast cancer survivors who self-reported changes in cognitive function following completion of chemotherapy. The goals of the program were to improve participants' knowledge and use of strategies to enhance occupational performance and to improve satisfaction and performance of meaningful daily activities or occupations. Through a client-centered and evidence-based approach, this case study highlights the importance of incorporating the survivors' sense of self into an occupation-based intervention. Occupational therapists play an important role in facilitating exploration of sense of self in the survivorship phase of care to support occupational performance in self care, productivity, work, leisure and social participation. This case study highlights the important work of redefining oneself in the survivorship phase of care. (*denotes name change). PMID:24004739

  16. Involvement in bullying and suicidal ideation in middle adolescence: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Hanna-Kaisa; Väänänen, Juha; Helminen, Mika; Fröjd, Sari; Marttunen, Mauri; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu

    2013-02-01

    The objective of the study was to ascertain whether involvement in bullying increases the risk for subsequent suicidal ideation. A total of 2,070 Finnish girls and boys aged 15 were surveyed in the ninth grade (age 15) in schools, and followed up 2 years later in the Adolescent Mental Health Cohort Study. Involvement in bullying was elicited at age 15 by two questions focusing on being a bully and being a victim of bullying. Suicidal ideation was elicited by one item of the short Beck Depression Inventory at age 17. Baseline depressive symptoms and externalizing symptoms, age and sex were controlled for. Statistical analyses were carried out using cross-tabulations with Chi-square/Fisher's exact test and logistic regression. Suicidal ideation at age 17 was 3-4 times more prevalent among those who had been involved in bullying at age 15 than among those not involved. Suicidal ideation at age 17 was most prevalent among former victims of bullying. Being a victim of bullying at age 15 continued to predict subsequent suicidal ideation when depressive and externalizing symptoms were controlled for. Being a bully at age 15 also persisted as borderline significantly predictive of suicidal ideation when baseline symptoms were controlled for. Findings indicate adolescent victims and perpetrators of bullying alike are at long-term risk for suicidal ideation. PMID:23053774

  17. Involvement in bullying and suicidal ideation in middle adolescence: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Hanna-Kaisa; Väänänen, Juha; Helminen, Mika; Fröjd, Sari; Marttunen, Mauri; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu

    2013-02-01

    The objective of the study was to ascertain whether involvement in bullying increases the risk for subsequent suicidal ideation. A total of 2,070 Finnish girls and boys aged 15 were surveyed in the ninth grade (age 15) in schools, and followed up 2 years later in the Adolescent Mental Health Cohort Study. Involvement in bullying was elicited at age 15 by two questions focusing on being a bully and being a victim of bullying. Suicidal ideation was elicited by one item of the short Beck Depression Inventory at age 17. Baseline depressive symptoms and externalizing symptoms, age and sex were controlled for. Statistical analyses were carried out using cross-tabulations with Chi-square/Fisher's exact test and logistic regression. Suicidal ideation at age 17 was 3-4 times more prevalent among those who had been involved in bullying at age 15 than among those not involved. Suicidal ideation at age 17 was most prevalent among former victims of bullying. Being a victim of bullying at age 15 continued to predict subsequent suicidal ideation when depressive and externalizing symptoms were controlled for. Being a bully at age 15 also persisted as borderline significantly predictive of suicidal ideation when baseline symptoms were controlled for. Findings indicate adolescent victims and perpetrators of bullying alike are at long-term risk for suicidal ideation.

  18. Acinetobacter Infections among Adult Patients in Qatar: A 2-Year Hospital-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Al Samawi, Musaed Saad; Khan, Fahmi Yousef; Eldeeb, Yasser; Almaslamani, Muna; Alkhal, Abdullatif; Alsoub, Hussam; Ghadban, Wissam; Howady, Faraj; Hashim, Samar

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study was conducted at Hamad General Hospital, Qatar, to describe the demographic data, clinical features underlying diseases, antimicrobial susceptibility, and outcome of A. baumannii infection. It involved all adult patients 15 years of age or older who were managed at Hamad General Hospital for A. baumannii infection from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013. We identified a total of 239 patients with A. baumannii infection, of which 182 (76.2%) were males. The mean age was 49.10 ± 19.57 years. The majority of the episodes (25.1%) occurred in elderly patients (≥65 years) and the most commonly identified site of A. baumannii infection was the respiratory tract, 117 (48.9%). Most episodes of infection, 231 (96.7%), were hospital-acquired and high rate of nosocomial infections occurred in the medical intensive care unit, 66 (28.6%). All patients had underlying medical conditions. Maximum resistance was seen to cefotaxime, 147 (58.3%), and minimum resistance was seen to colistin, 2 (1.4%). Of the 239 isolates, 102 (42.7%) were susceptible and 137 (57.3%) were multidrug-resistant. The in-hospital mortality in our study was 31%. Male gender, multidrug resistance, and septic shock were found to be independent mortality predictors. PMID:27433169

  19. Anaphylaxis in an emergency department: a 2-year study in a tertiary-care hospital.

    PubMed

    Piromrat, Kanika; Chinratanapisit, Sasawan; Trathong, Sommai

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of anaphylaxis in the emergency department of a tertiary-care hospital, describe the clinical features and the management of the patients and determine those with mild manifestations. A retrospective study was conducted from 2005 to 2006 using anaphylaxis-related ICD-10 terms. Two different sets of criteria for the diagnosis of anaphylaxis were applied, first the criteria previously accepted by emergency practice, followed by the recent criteria set forth at the 2005 international meeting. Sixty-four patients fulfilled the previous criteria with an average incidence of 52.5 per 100,000 patients per year with a shift towards females in 2006. The most common presentations were cutaneous, followed by respiratory symptoms. Food allergy was the most common cause, especially prawn. After applying the recent criteria, 13 patients (20.4%) were excluded, which reduced the incidence to 42.2 per 100,000 patients per year. Long term follow up is suggested for the possible or mild cases that were re-categorized.

  20. Sustained efficacy of risedronate in men with primary and secondary osteoporosis: results of a 2-year study.

    PubMed

    Ringe, Johann D; Farahmand, Parvis; Faber, Herbert; Dorst, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of treatment with risedronate 5 mg daily relative to control in men with primary or secondary osteoporosis over 2 years. Osteoporosis is a common condition in men that can have serious clinical consequences. In an earlier interim report, we found that 1 year of risedronate therapy resulted in significant increases in bone mineral density (BMD) and a significant reduction in vertebral fractures compared to control in men with osteoporosis. We conducted an open-label, prospective, match-control trial on men with primary or secondary osteoporosis in a single center, outpatient setting. Men with primary or secondary osteoporosis, as defined by a baseline lumbar spine BMD T-score < or = -2.5 and a baseline femoral neck BMD T-score < or = 2.0, were eligible for this study. Patients who had been treated with bisphosphonates or fluoride within the last 12 months were excluded. A total of 316 men were randomized to risedronate (n = 158) or control (n = 158). Patients were stratified by the presence of prevalent vertebral fractures at baseline and case by case allocated to either daily treatment with risedronate 5 mg daily plus calcium (1,000 mg) and vitamin D (800 IU) or to a control group (daily alfacalcidol (1 microg) plus calcium (500 mg) for those with prevalent vertebral fractures; daily vitamin D (800 IU) plus calcium (1,200 mg) for those without previous vertebral fractures). Primary study end points were identified prior to study initiation as the incidence of new vertebral fractures and changes in BMD at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total hip. Other end points included incidence of nonvertebral fractures and change in body height and back pain. Compared to control, the incidence of new vertebral fractures was significantly reduced in the risedronate 5 mg daily group at 2 years [14/152 (9.2%) for risedronate vs. 35/148 (23.6%) for control (61% risk reduction; P = 0.0026)]. Treatment with risedronate 5 mg daily

  1. Progression of fibromyalgia: results from a 2-year observational fibromyalgia and chronic pain study in the US

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Edgar H; McElroy, Heather J; Udall, Margarita; Masters, Elizabeth T; Mann, Rachael M; Schaefer, Caroline P; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Clair, Andrew G; Hopps, Markay; Daniel, Shoshana R; Mease, Philip; Silverman, Stuart L; Staud, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Background A previous fibromyalgia (FM) research reports that 20%–47% of diagnosed patients may not meet the study definition of FM 1–2 years after diagnosis. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of the progression of FM in a geographically diverse cohort over a 2-year time period. Methods This cohort study followed 226 subjects recruited online to assess FM and chronic widespread pain (CWP) diagnosis stability over time. At enrollment (baseline), subjects provided informed consent, completed an online questionnaire consisting of the London Fibromyalgia Epidemiology Study Screening Questionnaire to screen for CWP (bilateral pain above/below waist lasting ≥1 week in the past 3 months), visited a site for physician evaluation for FM, and completed a questionnaire with validated patient-reported outcome instruments. Subjects were classified into mutually exclusive groups: FM+CWP+ (screened positive for CWP and received physician diagnosis of FM), FM−CWP+ (screened positive for CWP but did not receive physician diagnosis of FM), and FM−CWP− (screened negative for CWP). Approximately 2 years later (follow-up), subjects were reassessed at the same study site and completed a questionnaire with the same patient-reported outcomes. Results Seventy-six FM+CWP+ subjects completed assessments at both time points; 56 (73.7%) met the FM study definition at follow-up. Twenty subjects no longer met the FM study definition (eleven became FM−CWP− and nine became FM−CWP+). Ten subjects (two from FM−CWP− and eight from FM−CWP+) transitioned into the FM+CWP+ group at follow-up; they reported more tender points and pain interference with sleep and worse physical function at baseline compared with subjects who did not transition to FM+CWP+. Most (76.7%) of the subjects who transitioned into/out of FM+CWP+ experienced changes in CWP, number of positive tender points, or both. Conclusion The results suggest that some FM+CWP+ patients experience

  2. Effect of exacerbations on quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a 2 year follow up study

    PubMed Central

    Miravitlles, M; Ferrer, M; Pont, A; Zalacain, R; Alvarez-Sala, J; Masa, F; Verea, H; Murio, C; Ros, F; Vidal, R

    2004-01-01

    Background: A study was undertaken to evaluate exacerbations and their impact on the health related quality of life (HRQL) of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: A 2 year follow up study was performed in 336 patients with COPD of mean (SD) age 66 (8.2) years and mean (SD) forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) 33 (8)% predicted. Spirometric tests, questions regarding exacerbations of COPD, and HRQL measurements (St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and SF-12 Health Survey) were conducted at 6 month intervals. Results: A total of 1015 exacerbations were recorded, and 103 (30.7%) patients required at least one hospital admission during the study. After adjustment for baseline characteristics and season of assessment, frequent exacerbations had a negative effect on HRQL in patients with moderate COPD (FEV1 35–50% predicted); the change in SGRQ total score of moderate patients with ⩾3 exacerbations was almost two points per year greater (worse) than those with <3 exacerbations during the follow up (p = 0.042). For patients with severe COPD (FEV1 <35% predicted) exacerbations had no effect on HRQL. The change in SGRQ total score of patients admitted to hospital was almost 2 points per year greater (worse) than patients not admitted, but this effect failed to show statistical significance in any severity group. There was a significant and independent seasonal effect on HRQL since SGRQ total scores were, on average, 3 points better in measurements performed in spring/summer than in those measured in the winter (p<0.001). Conclusions: Frequent exacerbations significantly impair HRQL of patients with moderate COPD. A significant and independent effect of seasonality was also observed. PMID:15115864

  3. Disordered eating behaviors and body image in a longitudinal pilot study of adolescent girls: what happens 2 years later?

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Paola; Penelo, Eva; Raich, Rosa M

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the prospective association of risk factors for eating and body image disturbances after a 2-year follow-up in a community sample of Spanish adolescent girls. The participants included 128 Spanish girls aged 12-14, who took part in a 28-month prospective study. Aspects assessed were eating attitudes (Eating Attitudes Test), influence of the body shape model (questionnaire on influences of the aesthetic body shape model), extreme weight-control behaviors (Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire), body image (Body Image Questionnaire) and Body Mass Index (BMI). BMI, extreme weight-control behaviors and body image problems emerged as potential predictors of an increase in eating disturbances. An increased influence of the thinness model was significantly associated with reduced body satisfaction and body image problems. Preventive programs are needed to contribute reducing the impact of sociocultural influences with regard to thinness, the use of extreme weight-control behaviors and overweight in adolescents.

  4. Parental height and child growth from birth to 2 years in the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study.

    PubMed

    Garza, Cutberto; Borghi, Elaine; Onyango, Adelheid W; de Onis, Mercedes

    2013-09-01

    Linear growth from birth to 2 years of children enrolled in the World Health Organization Multicentre Growth Reference Study was similar despite substantial parental height differences among the six study sites. Within-site variability in child length attributable to parental height was estimated by repeated measures analysis of variance using generalized linear models. This approach was also used to examine relationships among selected traits (e.g. breastfeeding duration and child morbidity) and linear growth between 6 and 24 months of age. Differences in intergenerational adult heights were evaluated within sites by comparing mid-parental heights (average of the mother's and father's heights) to the children's predicted adult height. Mid-parental height consistently accounted for greater proportions of observed variability in attained child length than did either paternal or maternal height alone. The proportion of variability explained by mid-parental height ranged from 11% in Ghana to 21% in India. The average proportion of between-child variability accounted for by mid-parental height was 16% and the analogous within-child estimate was 6%. In the Norwegian and US samples, no significant differences were observed between mid-parental and children's predicted adult heights. For the other sites, predicted adult heights exceeded mid-parental heights by 6.2-7.8 cm. To the extent that adult height is predicted by height at age 2 years, these results support the expectation that significant community-wide advances in stature are attainable within one generation when care and nutrition approximate international recommendations, notwithstanding adverse conditions likely experienced by the previous generation.

  5. The effects of early headgear treatment on dental arches and craniofacial morphology: a report of a 2 year randomized study.

    PubMed

    Mäntysaari, Raimo; Kantomaa, Tuomo; Pirttiniemi, Pertti; Pykäläinen, Aila

    2004-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of early headgear treatment on dental arches and craniofacial morphology in children in the early mixed dentition. The total study group comprised 68 children of both sexes (40 boys and 28 girls) aged 7.6 years [standard deviation (SD) 0.3]. The children, who had a Class II tendency in occlusion and moderate crowding of the dental arches, were randomly divided into two groups of equal size, matched according to gender. In the headgear (HG) group, treatment was initiated immediately. The mean treatment time was 16 months. In the second group, which served as the control, only interceptive procedures were performed during the follow-up period. The records, which included dental casts and lateral cephalograms, were obtained after follow-up periods of 1 and 2 years. The lengths and the widths of the maxillary and mandibular dental arches were significantly increased in the HG group after the 2 year follow-up period. The mean increase in lower arch length and width was 2.4 mm (SD 1.7) and 2.2 mm (SD 1.2), respectively. On average, the space gain in the lower arch was half that of the upper arch. No significant changes were found in the arch dimensions of the control group. Maxillary growth restraint and labial tilting of the incisors were the most significant cephalometric findings in the HG group when compared with the controls. The use of headgear in the early mixed dentition is effective in the treatment of moderate crowding. It is noteworthy that significant space gain in the dimensions of the lower arch can be achieved by headgear application to the upper first molars.

  6. Prospective study of cognitive function in children receiving whole-brain radiotherapy and chemotherapy: 2-year results

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, R.J.; Sutton, L.N.; Atkins, T.E.; Radcliffe, J.; Bunin, G.R.; D'Angio, G.; Siegel, K.R.; Schut, L. )

    1989-05-01

    As survival rates have risen for children with malignant primary brain tumors, so has the concern that many survivors have significant permanent cognitive deficits. Cranial irradiation (CRT) has been implicated as the major cause for cognitive dysfunction. To clarify the etiology, incidence, and severity of intellectual compromise in children with brain tumors after CRT, a prospective study was undertaken comparing the neuropsychological outcome in 18 consecutive children with malignant brain tumors treated with CRT to outcome in 14 children harboring brain tumors in similar sites in the nervous system who had not received CRT. Children with cortical or subcortical brain tumors were not eligible for study. Neuropsychological testing was performed after surgery prior to radiotherapy, after radiotherapy, and at 1- and 2-year intervals thereafter. Children who had received CRT had a mean full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) of 105 at diagnosis which fell to 91 by Year 2. Similar declines were noted in their performance intelligence quotient (IQ) and verbal IQ. After CRT, patients demonstrated a statistically significant decline from baseline in FSIQ (p less than 0.02) and verbal IQ (p less than 0.04). Children who had not received CRT did not demonstrate a fall in any cognitive parameter over time. The decline between baseline testing and testing performed at Year 2 in patients who had CRT was inversely correlated with age (p less than 0.02), as younger children demonstrated the greatest loss of intelligence. Children less than 7 years of age at diagnosis had a mean decline in FSIQ of 25 points 2 years posttreatment. No other clinical parameter correlated with the overall IQ or decline in IQ. After CRT, children demonstrated a wide range of dysfunction including deficits in fine motor, visual-motor, and visual-spatial skills and memory difficulties.

  7. Acute Chikungunya and persistent musculoskeletal pain following the 2006 Indian epidemic: a 2-year prospective rural community study.

    PubMed

    Chopra, A; Anuradha, V; Ghorpade, R; Saluja, M

    2012-05-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) data from population studies are sparse. During the 2006 epidemic, 509 clinical cases (43% attack rate) were identified in a village survey (West India); laboratory investigations demonstrated normal blood cell counts, elevated acute-phase reactants [erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 (IL-6)] and excluded malaria and dengue. Acute CHIKV was characterized by high fever, severe peripheral polyarthralgias, axial myalgias and intense fatigue in over 90% of cases; skin rash (34%) and headache (19%) were uncommon. There were 49% and 62% of survey cases seropositive for IgM (rapid assay) and IgG (immunofluorescence) anti-CHIKV antibodies, respectively. Sixty-five percent of cases recovered within 4 weeks. None of the cases died. Of the population, 4·1% and 1·6% suffered from persistent rheumatic pains, predominantly non-specific, at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Chronic inflammatory arthritis was uncommon (0·3% at 1 year) although serum IL-6 often remained elevated in chronic cases. A larger population study is required to describe post-CHIKV rheumatism and its prognosis.

  8. Differences in predictors of traditional and cyber-bullying: a 2-year longitudinal study in Korean school children.

    PubMed

    Yang, Su-Jin; Stewart, Robert; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Dewey, Michael E; Maskey, Sean; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2013-05-01

    Traditional bullying has received considerable research but the emerging phenomenon of cyber-bullying much less so. Our study aims to investigate environmental and psychological factors associated with traditional and cyber-bullying. In a school-based 2-year prospective survey, information was collected on 1,344 children aged 10 including bullying behavior/experience, depression, anxiety, coping strategies, self-esteem, and psychopathology. Parents reported demographic data, general health, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms. These were investigated in relation to traditional and cyber-bullying perpetration and victimization at age 12. Male gender and depressive symptoms were associated with all types of bullying behavior and experience. Living with a single parent was associated with perpetration of traditional bullying while higher ADHD symptoms were associated with victimization from this. Lower academic achievement and lower self esteem were associated with cyber-bullying perpetration and victimization, and anxiety symptoms with cyber-bullying perpetration. After adjustment, previous bullying perpetration was associated with victimization from cyber-bullying but not other outcomes. Cyber-bullying has differences in predictors from traditional bullying and intervention programmes need to take these into consideration. PMID:23640732

  9. Differences in predictors of traditional and cyber-bullying: a 2-year longitudinal study in Korean school children.

    PubMed

    Yang, Su-Jin; Stewart, Robert; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Dewey, Michael E; Maskey, Sean; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2013-05-01

    Traditional bullying has received considerable research but the emerging phenomenon of cyber-bullying much less so. Our study aims to investigate environmental and psychological factors associated with traditional and cyber-bullying. In a school-based 2-year prospective survey, information was collected on 1,344 children aged 10 including bullying behavior/experience, depression, anxiety, coping strategies, self-esteem, and psychopathology. Parents reported demographic data, general health, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms. These were investigated in relation to traditional and cyber-bullying perpetration and victimization at age 12. Male gender and depressive symptoms were associated with all types of bullying behavior and experience. Living with a single parent was associated with perpetration of traditional bullying while higher ADHD symptoms were associated with victimization from this. Lower academic achievement and lower self esteem were associated with cyber-bullying perpetration and victimization, and anxiety symptoms with cyber-bullying perpetration. After adjustment, previous bullying perpetration was associated with victimization from cyber-bullying but not other outcomes. Cyber-bullying has differences in predictors from traditional bullying and intervention programmes need to take these into consideration.

  10. Instructional Faculty and Staff in Public 2-year Colleges. Statistical Analysis Report. 1993 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:93).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, James C.

    Drawing on data from the 1993 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty, this analysis sought to differentiate instructional faculty and staff at public two-year colleges by age (under 35 vs. 55-64) and by years of experience in the current job (under 10 years vs. 20 or more years). The report examines differences by primary teaching field,…

  11. Associations between weather conditions and clinical symptoms in patients with hip osteoarthritis: a 2-year cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dorleijn, Desirée M J; Luijsterburg, Pim A J; Burdorf, Alex; Rozendaal, Rianne M; Verhaar, Jan A N; Bos, Pieter K; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study was to assess whether there is an association between ambient weather conditions and patients' clinical symptoms in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA). The design was a cohort study with a 2-year follow-up and 3-monthly measurements and prospectively collected data on weather variables. The study population consisted of 222 primary care patients with hip OA. Weather variables included temperature, wind speed, total amount of sun hours, precipitation, barometric pressure, and relative humidity. The primary outcomes were severity of hip pain and hip disability as measured with the Western Ontario and McMasters University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain and function subscales. Associations between hip pain and hip disability and the weather variables were assessed using crude and multivariate adjusted linear mixed-model analysis for repeated measurements. On the day of questionnaire completion, mean relative humidity was associated with WOMAC pain (estimate 0.1; 95% confidence interval=0.0-0.2; P=.02). Relative humidity contributed < or = 1% to the explained within-patient variance and between-patient variance of the WOMAC pain score. Mean barometric pressure was associated with WOMAC function (estimate 0.1; 95% confidence interval=0.0-0.1; P=.02). Barometric pressure contributed < or = 1% to the explained within-patient variance and between-patient variance of the WOMAC function score. The other weather variables were not associated with the WOMAC pain or function score. Our results support the general opinion of OA patients that barometric pressure and relative humidity influence perceived OA symptoms. However, the contribution of these weather variables (< or = 1%) to the severity of OA symptoms is not considered to be clinically relevant.

  12. Effects of galantamine in a 2-year, randomized, placebo-controlled study in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hager, Klaus; Baseman, Alan S; Nye, Jeffrey S; Brashear, H Robert; Han, John; Sano, Mary; Davis, Bonnie; Richards, Henry M

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently available treatments for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) can produce mild improvements in cognitive function, behavior, and activities of daily living in patients, but their influence on long-term survival is not well established. This study was designed to assess patient survival and drug efficacy following a 2-year galantamine treatment in patients with mild to moderately severe AD. Methods In this multicenter, double-blind study, patients were randomized 1:1 to receive galantamine or placebo. One primary end point was safety; mortality was assessed. An independent Data Safety Monitoring Board monitored mortality for the total deaths reaching prespecified numbers, using a time-to-event method and a Cox-regression model. The primary efficacy end point was cognitive change from baseline to month 24, as measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score, analyzed using intent-to-treat analysis with the ‘last observation carried forward’ approach, in an analysis of covariance model. Results In all, 1,024 galantamine- and 1,021 placebo-treated patients received study drug, with mean age ~73 years, and mean (standard deviation [SD]) baseline MMSE score of 19 (4.08). A total of 32% of patients (661/2,045) completed the study, 27% (554/2,045) withdrew, and 41% (830/2,045) did not complete the study and were discontinued due to a Data Safety Monitoring Board-recommended early study termination. The mortality rate was significantly lower in the galantamine group versus placebo (hazard ratio [HR] =0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.37; 0.89) (P=0.011). Cognitive impairment, based on the mean (SD) change in MMSE scores from baseline to month 24, significantly worsened in the placebo (−2.14 [4.34]) compared with the galantamine group (−1.41 [4.05]) (P<0.001). Functional impairment, based on mean (SD) change in the Disability Assessment in Dementia score (secondary end point), at month 24 significantly worsened in the placebo (−10.81 [18

  13. Minimally Invasive Periodontal Treatment Using the Er,Cr: YSGG Laser. A 2-year Retrospective Preliminary Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Bret; Sung, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) using the erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser (Waterlase MD, Biolase, Irvine, CA) to treat moderate to advanced periodontal disease is presented as an alternative to conventional therapies. To date, there are few short- or long-term studies to demonstrate the effects of this laser in treating and maintaining periodontal health. Electronic clinical records from 16 patients – total of 126 teeth, with pocket depths ranging from 4 mm to 9 mm – were treated with the same protocol using the Er,Cr:YSGG laser. The mean baseline probing depths (PD) were 5 mm and clinical attachment levels (CAL) were 5 mm in the 4 - 6 mm pretreated laser group. The mean baseline probing depths were 7.5 and 7.6 mm for PD and CAL respectfully in the 7 – 9 mm pretreatment laser group. At the 2 year mark, the average PD was 3.2 ± 1.1 mm for the 4-6 mm pocket group and the 7-9 mm pocket group had a mean PD of 3.7 ± 1.2 mm. mean CAL was 3.1 ± 1.1 mm for the 4-6 mm group and 3.6 ± 1.2 for the 7-9 mm group with an overall reduction of 1.9 mm and 4.0 mm respectively. At one and two years, both groups remained stable with PD comparable to the three-month gains. The CAL measurements at one and two years were also comparable to the three-month gains. PMID:22615717

  14. Biologic resurfacing of the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joint: case studies with a 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Brigido, Stephen A; Troiano, Michael; Schoenhaus, Harold

    2009-10-01

    The goal of biologic resurfacing is to provide a smooth joint surface with a low coefficient of friction, which allows the joint to function with near normal biomechanics, as well as provide intermittent pressure, to the subchondral and cancellous bone. This unique combination often results in the formation of a "neocartilage-like" structure that can reduce pain and restore biomechanics. As well as giving a brief history of cutis arthroplasty, this article describes cases in which the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joint underwent biologic resurfacing, with a 2-year postoperative follow up.

  15. Developmental milestones record - 2 years

    MedlinePlus

    Growth milestones for children - 2 years; Normal childhood growth milestones - 2 years; Childhood growth milestones - 2 years ... cause for concern if not seen by 2 years.) Can run with better coordination . (May still have ...

  16. Quality of life after laparoscopic gastric banding: Prospective study (152 cases) with a follow-up of 2 years.

    PubMed

    Champault, Axèle; Duwat, Olivier; Polliand, Claude; Rizk, Nabil; Champault, Gérard G

    2006-06-01

    To evaluate influence of laparoscopic gastric banding (LGB) on quality of life (QOL) in patients with morbid obesity. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding is a popular bariatric operation in Europe. The objectives of surgical therapy in patients with morbid obesity are reduction of body weight, and a positive influence on the obesity-related comorbidity as well the concomitant psychologic and social restrictions of these patients. In a prospective clinical trial, development of the individual patient QOL was analyzed, after LGB in patients with morbid obesity. From October 1999 to January 2001, 152 patients [119 women, 33 men, mean age 38.4 y (range 24 to 62), mean body mass index 44.3 (range 38 to 63)] underwent evaluation for LGB according the following protocol: history of obesity; concise counseling of patients and relative on nonsurgical treatment alternatives, risk of surgery, psychologic testing, questionnaire for eating habits, necessity of lifestyle change after surgery; medical evaluation including endocrinologic and nutritionist work-up, upper GI endoscopy, evaluation of QOL using the Gastro Intestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI). Decision for surgery was a multidisciplinary consensus. This group was follow-up at least 2 years, focusing on weight loss and QOL. Mean operative time was 82 minutes; mean hospital stay was 2.3 days and the mean follow-up period was 34 months. The BMI dropped from 44.3 to 29.6 kg/m and all comorbid conditions improved markedly: diabetes melitus resolved in 71% of the patients, hypertension in 33%, and sleep apnea in 90%. However, 26 patients (17%) had late complications requiring reoperation. Preoperative global GIQLI score was 95 (range 56 to 140), significant different of the healthy volunteers score (120) (70 to 140) P < 0.001. Correlated with weight loss (percentage loss of overweight and BMI), the global score of the group increased to 100 at 3 months, 104 at 6, 111 at 1 year to reach 119 at 2 years which is no

  17. Vertical profiles of aerosol and black carbon in the Arctic: a seasonal phenomenology along 2 years (2011-2012) of field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Luca; Cappelletti, David; Busetto, Maurizio; Mazzola, Mauro; Lupi, Angelo; Lanconelli, Christian; Becagli, Silvia; Traversi, Rita; Caiazzo, Laura; Giardi, Fabio; Moroni, Beatrice; Crocchianti, Stefano; Fierz, Martin; Močnik, Griša; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Perrone, Maria G.; Maturilli, Marion; Vitale, Vito; Udisti, Roberto; Bolzacchini, Ezio

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a systematic study of vertical profiles of aerosol number size distribution and black carbon (BC) concentrations conducted in the Arctic, over Ny-Ålesund (Svalbard). The campaign lasted 2 years (2011-2012) and resulted in 200 vertical profiles measured by means of a tethered balloon (up to 1200 m a.g.l.) during the spring and summer seasons. In addition, chemical analysis of filter samples, aerosol size distribution and a full set of meteorological parameters were determined at ground. The collected experimental data allowed a classification of the vertical profiles into different typologies, which allowed us to describe the seasonal phenomenology of vertical aerosol properties in the Arctic. During spring, four main types of profiles were found and their behavior was related to the main aerosol and atmospheric dynamics occurring at the measuring site. Background conditions generated homogenous profiles. Transport events caused an increase of aerosol concentration with altitude. High Arctic haze pollution trapped below thermal inversions promoted a decrease of aerosol concentration with altitude. Finally, ground-based plumes of locally formed secondary aerosol determined profiles with decreasing aerosol concentration located at different altitude as a function of size. During the summer season, the impact from shipping caused aerosol and BC pollution plumes to be constrained close to the ground, indicating that increasing shipping emissions in the Arctic could bring anthropogenic aerosol and BC in the Arctic summer, affecting the climate.

  18. Iron-Folic Acid Supplementation During Pregnancy Reduces the Risk of Stunting in Children Less Than 2 Years of Age: A Retrospective Cohort Study from Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Nisar, Yasir Bin; Dibley, Michael J.; Aguayo, Victor M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of antenatal iron-folic acid (IFA) supplementation on child stunting in Nepalese children age <2 years. A retrospective cohort study design was used, in which a pooled cohort of 5235 most recent live births 2 years prior to interview from three Nepal Demographic and Health Surveys (2001, 2006 and 2011) was analysed. The primary outcome was stunting in children age <2 years. The main exposure variable was antenatal IFA supplementation. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis was performed. In our sample, 31% and 10% of Nepalese children age <2 years were stunted and severely stunted, respectively. The adjusted relative risk of being stunted was 14% lower in children whose mothers used IFA supplements compared to those whose mothers did not use (aRR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.77–0.97). Additionally, the adjusted relative risk of being stunted was significantly reduced by 23% when antenatal IFA supplementation was started ≤6 months with ≥90 IFA supplements used during pregnancy (aRR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.64–0.92). Antenatal IFA supplementation significantly reduced the risk of stunting in Nepalese children age <2 years. The greatest impact on the risk reduction of child stunting was when IFA supplements were started ≤6 months with ≥90 supplements were used. PMID:26828515

  19. Iron-Folic Acid Supplementation During Pregnancy Reduces the Risk of Stunting in Children Less Than 2 Years of Age: A Retrospective Cohort Study from Nepal.

    PubMed

    Nisar, Yasir Bin; Dibley, Michael J; Aguayo, Victor M

    2016-01-27

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of antenatal iron-folic acid (IFA) supplementation on child stunting in Nepalese children age <2 years. A retrospective cohort study design was used, in which a pooled cohort of 5235 most recent live births 2 years prior to interview from three Nepal Demographic and Health Surveys (2001, 2006 and 2011) was analysed. The primary outcome was stunting in children age <2 years. The main exposure variable was antenatal IFA supplementation. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis was performed. In our sample, 31% and 10% of Nepalese children age <2 years were stunted and severely stunted, respectively. The adjusted relative risk of being stunted was 14% lower in children whose mothers used IFA supplements compared to those whose mothers did not use (aRR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.77-0.97). Additionally, the adjusted relative risk of being stunted was significantly reduced by 23% when antenatal IFA supplementation was started ≤6 months with ≥90 IFA supplements used during pregnancy (aRR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.64-0.92). Antenatal IFA supplementation significantly reduced the risk of stunting in Nepalese children age <2 years. The greatest impact on the risk reduction of child stunting was when IFA supplements were started ≤6 months with ≥90 supplements were used.

  20. Continuity, Comorbidity and Longitudinal Associations between Depression and Antisocial Behaviour in Middle Adolescence: A 2-Year Prospective Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritakallio, Minna; Koivisto, Anna-Maija; von der Pahlen, Bettina; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Marttunen, Mauri; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated continuity, comorbidity and longitudinal associations between depression Beck depression inventory (RBDI) and antisocial behaviour Youth self-report (YSR) in middle adolescence. Data were used from a community sample of 2070 adolescents who participated in a 2-year prospective follow-up study. The results indicate that both…

  1. P-Nitrobenzoic acid alpha2u nephropathy in 13-week studies is not associated with renal carcinogenesis in 2-year feed studies.

    PubMed

    Williams, K D; Dunnick, J; Horton, J; Greenwell, A; Eldridge, S R; Elwell, M; Sills, R C

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the renal toxicity and carcinogenicity of p-nitrobenzoic acid in F344 rats. Dose levels in 13-week and 2-year studies ranged from 630-10,000 ppm and 1,250-5,000 ppm, respectively. At 13 weeks, renal lesions included minimal to mild hyaline droplet accumulation in male rats and karyomegaly in male and female rats. At 2 years, renal lesions included proximal tubule epithelial cell hyperplasia in male rats and oncocytic hyperplasia in high-dose male and female rats, and a decreased severity of nephropathy in males and females. The hvaline droplets in renal tubular epithelial cells of male rats at 13 weeks were morphologically similar to those described in alpha2u-globulin nephropathy. Using immunohistochemical methods, alpha2u-globulin accumulation was associated with the hyaline droplets. In addition, at 13 weeks, cell proliferation as detected by PCNA immunohistochemistry was significantly increased in males exposed to 5,000 and 10,000 ppm when compared to controls. Cytotoxicity associated with alpha2U-globulin nephropathy such as single-cell necrosis of the P2 segment epithelium or accumulation of granular casts in the outer medulla did not occur in the 13-week study. In addition, chronic treatment related nephrotoxic lesions attributed to accumulation of alpha2u-globulin such as linear foci of mineralization within the renal papilla, hyperplasia of the renal pelvis urothelium and kidney tumors were not observed. Although there was histologic evidence of alpha2u-globulin accumulation in male rats at 13 weeks, the minimal severity of nephropathy suggests that the degree of cytotoxicity was below the threshold, which would contribute to the development of renal tumors at 2 years.

  2. The impact of cognitive reserve in the outcome of first-episode psychoses: 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Amoretti, S; Bernardo, M; Bonnin, C M; Bioque, M; Cabrera, B; Mezquida, G; Solé, B; Vieta, E; Torrent, C

    2016-10-01

    The concept of cognitive reserve (CR) suggests that the premorbid intelligence quotient (IQ), years of education and leisure activities provide more efficient cognitive networks and therefore allow a better management of some conditions associated to cognitive impairment. Fifty-two DSM-IV diagnosed FEP subjects were matched with 41 healthy controls by age, gender and parental socio-economic status. All subjects were assessed clinically, neuropsychologically and functionally at baseline and after a two-year follow-up. To assess CR at baseline, three proxies have been integrated: premorbid IQ, years of education-occupation and leisure activities. Higher CR was associated with better cognitive, functional and clinical outcomes at baseline. The CR proxy was able to predict working memory, attention, executive functioning, verbal memory and global composite cognitive score accounting for 48.9%, 19.1%, 16.9%, 10.8% and 14.9% respectively of the variance at two-year follow-up. CR was also significantly predictive of PANSS negative scale score (12.5%), FAST global score (13.4%) and GAF (13%) at two-year follow-up. In addition, CR behaved as a mediator of working memory (B=4.123) and executive function (B=3.298) at baseline and of working memory (B=5.034) at 2-year follow-up. An additional analysis was performed, in order to test whether this mediation could be attributed mainly to the premorbid IQ. We obtained that this measure was not enough by itself to explain this mediation. CR may contribute to neuropsychological and functional outcome. Specific programs addressed to improve cognition and functioning conducted at the early stages of the illness may be helpful in order to prevent cognitive and functional decline.

  3. The impact of cognitive reserve in the outcome of first-episode psychoses: 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Amoretti, S; Bernardo, M; Bonnin, C M; Bioque, M; Cabrera, B; Mezquida, G; Solé, B; Vieta, E; Torrent, C

    2016-10-01

    The concept of cognitive reserve (CR) suggests that the premorbid intelligence quotient (IQ), years of education and leisure activities provide more efficient cognitive networks and therefore allow a better management of some conditions associated to cognitive impairment. Fifty-two DSM-IV diagnosed FEP subjects were matched with 41 healthy controls by age, gender and parental socio-economic status. All subjects were assessed clinically, neuropsychologically and functionally at baseline and after a two-year follow-up. To assess CR at baseline, three proxies have been integrated: premorbid IQ, years of education-occupation and leisure activities. Higher CR was associated with better cognitive, functional and clinical outcomes at baseline. The CR proxy was able to predict working memory, attention, executive functioning, verbal memory and global composite cognitive score accounting for 48.9%, 19.1%, 16.9%, 10.8% and 14.9% respectively of the variance at two-year follow-up. CR was also significantly predictive of PANSS negative scale score (12.5%), FAST global score (13.4%) and GAF (13%) at two-year follow-up. In addition, CR behaved as a mediator of working memory (B=4.123) and executive function (B=3.298) at baseline and of working memory (B=5.034) at 2-year follow-up. An additional analysis was performed, in order to test whether this mediation could be attributed mainly to the premorbid IQ. We obtained that this measure was not enough by itself to explain this mediation. CR may contribute to neuropsychological and functional outcome. Specific programs addressed to improve cognition and functioning conducted at the early stages of the illness may be helpful in order to prevent cognitive and functional decline. PMID:27511320

  4. The Role of Pictures and Gestures as a Support Mechanism for Novel Word Learning: A Training Study with 2-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapalková, Svetlana; Polišenská, Kamila; Süssová, Martina

    2016-01-01

    A training study examined novel word learning in 2-year-old children and assessed two nonverbal mechanisms, pictures and gestures, which are commonly used as communication support. The aim was to (1) compare these two support mechanisms and measure their effects on expressive word learning and (2) to investigate these effects on word production…

  5. Do Deviant Peer Associations Mediate the Contributions of Self-Esteem to Problem Behavior During Early Adolescence? A 2-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBois, David L.; Silverthorn, Naida

    2004-01-01

    We investigated deviant peer associations as a mediator of the influences of general and peer-oriented self-esteem on problem behavior using data from a 2-year longitudinal study of 350 young adolescents. Measures of problem behavior included substance use (alcohol use, smoking) and antisocial behavior (fighting, stealing). Using latent growth…

  6. Exploring the Relationship between Autistic-Like Traits and ADHD Behaviors in Early Childhood: Findings from a Community Twin Study of 2-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronald, Angelica; Edelson, Lisa R.; Asherson, Philip; Saudino, Kimberly J.

    2010-01-01

    Behaviors characteristic of autism and ADHD emerge in early childhood, yet research investigating their comorbidity has focused on older children. This study aimed to explore the nature of the relationship between autistic-like traits and ADHD behaviors in a community sample of 2-year-olds. Twins from the Boston University Twin Project (N = 312…

  7. A retrospective study of radiographic abnormalities in the repositories of 2-year-old Thoroughbred in-training sales in Japan

    PubMed Central

    MIYAKOSHI, Daisuke; SENBA, Hiroyuki; SHIKICHI, Mitsumori; MAEDA, Masaya; SHIBATA, Ryo; MISUMI, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the influence of radiographic abnormalities of 2-year-old Thoroughbred horses that were listed at in-training sales in Japan, on whether they started to race or not at 2–3 years of age. Radiographs of 850 2-year-old Thoroughbreds in the in-training sales repository from 2007 to 2010 were reviewed, and 26 categories of radiographic abnormalities were found. Forty-three horses (5.1%, 43/850) did not start a race at 2–3 years of age. In accordance with the racing results for this age category, as determined by Fisher’s exact test and multiple logistic regression analysis, none of the radiographic abnormalities were significantly related to failure to start a race. At 2 years of age, 198 horses (23.3%, 198/850) did not start a race. Horses with enlargement of the proximal sesamoid bones in the fore (9 of 19 horses) and hind limbs (5 of 9 horses) did not start a race at the age of 2 years, and fewer of these horses (fore, P=0.021; hind, P=0.030) started a race at the age of 2 years compared with the population of horses without these radiographic abnormalities. These results suggest that identification of radiographic enlargement of the proximal sesamoid bones during training sales could derail the racing debut of horses at the age of 2 years. However, this might not necessarily indicate a poor prognosis and resulting in retirement from racing at 2–3 years of age. PMID:27330400

  8. Trait and State Attributes of Insight in First Episodes of Early-Onset Schizophrenia and Other Psychoses: A 2-Year Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Parellada, Mara; Boada, Leticia; Fraguas, David; Reig, Santiago; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Moreno, Dolores; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Otero, Soraya; Rapado-Castro, Marta; Graell, Montserrat; Baeza, Inmaculada; Arango, Celso

    2011-01-01

    Background: Increasing evidence supports the important role of illness state and individual characteristics in insight. Methods: Insight, as measured with the Scale to Assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder, over the first 2 years of early-onset first-episode psychosis and its correlations with clinical, socio-demographic, cognitive, and structural brain variables are studied. Results: (1) insight at 2 years is poorer in schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs) than in subjects with other psychoses; (2) the more severe the psychosis, the worse the insight. In SSD, depressive symptoms, poorer baseline executive functioning, lower IQ, longer duration of untreated psychosis (DUP), and poorer premorbid infancy adjustment are associated with poorer insight; frontal and parietal gray matter (GM) reductions at baseline correlate with worse insight into having psychotic symptoms at 2 years; (3) insight into having a mental disorder (Scale to Assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder [SUMD]1) at 1 year, DUP, and baseline IQ are the most consistent variables explaining different aspects of insight at 2 years in SSD patients. IQ and SUMD1 at 1 year, together with left frontal and parietal GM volumes, explain 80% of the variance of insight into having specific psychotic symptoms in SSD patients (adjusted R2 = 0.795, F = 15.576, P < .001). Conclusion: Insight is a complex phenomenon that depends both on severity of psychopathology and also on disease and subject characteristics, such as past adjustment, IQ, DUP, cognitive functioning, frontal and parietal GM volumes, and age, gender, and ethnicity. PMID:20884756

  9. Diurnal Cortisol Secretion at Home and in Child Care: A Prospective Study of 2-Year-Old Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouellet-Morin, Isabelle; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boivin, Michel; Meaney, Michael; Kramer, Michael; Cote, Sylvana M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous studies indicate that children may experience disrupted cortisol secretion in child care. The extent to which this is a transient or long-term disruption is not known, as most studies have relied on cross-sectional designs, and age-heterogeneous small sample sizes. This study aims to (a) compare cortisol secretion measured at…

  10. The Role of Behavioral Self-Regulation in Learning to Read: A 2-Year Longitudinal Study of Icelandic Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birgisdóttir, Freyja; Gestsdóttir, Steinunn; Thorsdóttir, Fanney

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: Research suggests that behavioral self-regulation skills are critical for early school success, including success in literacy, but few studies have explored the relations that behavioral self-regulation may have with different components of early literacy development. The present study investigated the longitudinal contribution…

  11. The Predictive Relationship between Temperament, School Adjustment, and Academic Achievement: A 2-Year Longitudinal Study of Children At-Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hendawi, Maha

    2010-01-01

    Individual differences in temperament can be a risk or a protective factor for a child, especially for children at-risk who possess single or multiple risk factors that may interfere with their educational success and affect their healthy development and their life-long outcomes. This research study examined the concurrent and longitudinal…

  12. Self-Regulation in Children Born with Extremely Low Birth Weight at 2 Years Old: A Comparison Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Lisa N.; Cuskelly, Monica; Gray, Peter H.; O'Callaghan, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Survival rates for children born with extremely low birth weight (ELBW) are increasing; however, many of these children experience later problems with learning. This study adopted an integrated approach to these problems, involving the self-regulatory tasks of inhibition and delay of gratification and relevant individual factors including…

  13. Acoustic evidence for the development of gestural coordination in the speech of 2-year-olds: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Goodell, E W; Studdert-Kennedy, M

    1993-08-01

    Studies of child phonology have often assumed that young children first master a repertoire of phonemes and then build their lexicon by forming combinations of these abstract, contrastive units. However, evidence from children's systematic errors suggests that children first build a repertoire of words as integral sequences of gestures and then gradually differentiate these sequences into their gestural and segmental components. Recently, experimental support for this position has been found in the acoustic records of the speech of 3-, 5-, and 7-year-old children, suggesting that even in older children some phonemes have not yet fully segregated as units of gestural organization and control. The present longitudinal study extends this work to younger children (22- and 32-month-olds). Results demonstrate clear differences in the duration and coordination of gestures between children and adults, and a clear shift toward the patterns of adult speakers during roughly the third year of life. Details of the child-adult differences and developmental changes vary from one aspect of an utterance to another. PMID:8377484

  14. 2-year study of chemical composition of bulk deposition in a south China coastal city: comparison with east Asian cities.

    PubMed

    Wai, K M; Tanner, P A; Tam, C W F

    2005-09-01

    Using the emission strengths of the precursor gases, the nature of soil in China, the ventilation power and half value rainout region length, the nss-SO42-, NO3-, Ca2+, and NH4+ concentrations, and pH of rainwater at Hong Kong and other cities of China and Japan are compared and rationalized. The chemical composition of Hong Kong bulk deposition from 1998 to 2000 is taken from our collection and analysis of 156 daily samples. The volume-weighted average (VWA) pH is 4.2 over the whole study period. Nonsea salt- (nss-) sulfate is the most abundant species in the samples, and the pH mostly depended upon the concentrations of the major species nss-SO42, NO3-, Ca2+, and NH4+. All species concentrations show higher levels in the cold season (especially NO3- and Ca2+), which indicates the dominant dilution effects in the warm season due to heavy rainfall and the influence of the continental outflow of pollutants during the cold season. For Hong Kong bulk deposition, the VWA pH is slightly lower in the cold season, and there is a slight decrease in VWA pH over the period from 1994 to 2000. The impact of acid rain in Hong Kong is briefly discussed.

  15. 2-year study of chemical composition of bulk deposition in a South China coastal city: comparison with East Asian cities

    SciTech Connect

    K.M. Wai; P.A. Tanner; C.W.F. Tam

    2005-09-01

    Using the emission strengths of the precursor gases, the nature of soil in China, the ventilation power and half value rainout region length, the nss-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Ca{sup 2+}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentrations, and pH of rainwater at Hong Kong and other cities of China and Japan are compared and rationalized. The chemical composition of Hong Kong bulk deposition from 1998 to 2000 is taken from the collection and analysis of 156 daily samples. The volume-weighted average (VWA) pH is 4.2 over the whole study period. Nonsea salt- (nss-) sulfate is the most abundant species in the samples, and the pH mostly depended upon the concentrations of the major species nss-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Ca{sup 2+}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +}. All species concentrations show higher levels in the cold season (especially NO{sub 3}- and Ca{sup 2+}), which indicates the dominant dilution effects in the warm season due to heavy rainfall and the influence of the continental outflow of pollutants during the cold season. For Hong Kong bulk deposition, the VWA pH is slightly lower in the cold season, and there is a slight decrease in VWA pH over the period from 1994 to 2000. The impact of acid rain in Hong Kong is briefly discussed. 36 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. 2-year study of chemical composition of bulk deposition in a south China coastal city: comparison with east Asian cities.

    PubMed

    Wai, K M; Tanner, P A; Tam, C W F

    2005-09-01

    Using the emission strengths of the precursor gases, the nature of soil in China, the ventilation power and half value rainout region length, the nss-SO42-, NO3-, Ca2+, and NH4+ concentrations, and pH of rainwater at Hong Kong and other cities of China and Japan are compared and rationalized. The chemical composition of Hong Kong bulk deposition from 1998 to 2000 is taken from our collection and analysis of 156 daily samples. The volume-weighted average (VWA) pH is 4.2 over the whole study period. Nonsea salt- (nss-) sulfate is the most abundant species in the samples, and the pH mostly depended upon the concentrations of the major species nss-SO42, NO3-, Ca2+, and NH4+. All species concentrations show higher levels in the cold season (especially NO3- and Ca2+), which indicates the dominant dilution effects in the warm season due to heavy rainfall and the influence of the continental outflow of pollutants during the cold season. For Hong Kong bulk deposition, the VWA pH is slightly lower in the cold season, and there is a slight decrease in VWA pH over the period from 1994 to 2000. The impact of acid rain in Hong Kong is briefly discussed. PMID:16190210

  17. Changes in Intra-pelvic Obliquity Angle 0–2 Years After Total Hip Arthroplasty and Its Effects on Leg Length Discrepancy: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Cheng, Tao; Zhang, Xian-Long

    2015-01-01

    Background: Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most effective treatments for phase III and IV hip arthrosis. Lower limb length balancing is one of the determining factors of a successful surgery, particularly in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the postoperative change in intra-pelvic obliquity (intra-PO) angle in the coronal plane and its effects on leg length discrepancy (LLD) within 2 years. Methods: A total of 78 patients (70 females, 8 males) were enrolled in this study. All patients were suffering from DDH with varying degrees of LLD. Pelvic plain radiographs were collected before and after the operation. The intra-PO angles were measured 0, 0.5, 1 and 2 years after THA. At the same time, postoperative LLD was measured with blocking test. Results: PO changed significantly in the first year after THA surgery (0 year vs. 0.5 year, P < 0.01; 0.5 year vs. 1 year, P < 0.01), and the changing value of intra-PO angle (ΔPO) slowed down substantially during the first 2 years after THA (0.5 year vs. 0.5–1 year, P < 0.01; 0.5–1 year vs. 1–2 years, P < 0.01). With the change in intra-PO angle, LLD also got narrow within the 1st year (0 year vs. 0.5 year, P < 0.01; 0.5 year vs. 1 year, P < 0.01). Elderly patients had a smaller intra-PO angle reduction (Group A vs. Group B, P = 0.01; Group B vs. Group C, P < 0.01). Conclusions: Intra-PO angle and LLD gap narrowed with time after THA surgery. In particular, elderly patients had smaller change in intra-PO angle. PMID:25963356

  18. Prospective Study Evaluating Postoperative Radiotherapy Plus 2-Year Androgen Suppression for Post-Radical Prostatectomy Patients With Pathologic T3 Disease and/or Positive Surgical Margins

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, Richard Danjoux, Cyril; Gardner, Sandra; Morton, Gerard; Szumacher, Ewa; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Cheung, Patrick; Pearse, Maria

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a combined approach of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) plus 2-year androgen suppression (AS) for patients with pathologic T3 disease (pT3) and/or positive surgical margins (PSM) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients with pT3 and/or PSM after RP were treated with RT plus 2-year AS, as per a pilot, prospective study. Androgen suppression started within 1 month after the completion of RT and consisted of nilutamide for 4 weeks and buserelin acetate depot subcutaneously every 2 months for 2 years. Relapse-free rate, including freedom from prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse, was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression analysis was performed to evaluate prognostic factors for relapse. Prostate-specific antigen relapse was defined as a PSA rise above 0.2 ng/mL, with two consecutive increases over a minimum of 3 months. Results: The median age was 61 years at the time of RP. The median interval between RP and postoperative RT was 4.2 months. Forty-nine patients had undetectable PSA (<0.2 ng/mL), and 29 had persistently detectable postoperative PSA at the time of the protocol treatment. Median follow-up from RT was 6.4 years. Relapse-free rates at 5 and 7 years were 94.4% and 86.3%, respectively. Survival rates were 96% at 5 years and 93.1% at 7 years. On Cox regression analysis, persistently detectable postoperative PSA and pT3b-T4 were significant predictors for relapse. Conclusion: The combined treatment of postoperative RT plus 2-year AS yielded encouraging results for patients with pT3 and/or PSM and warrants a confirmatory study.

  19. Cementless anatomical prosthesis for the treatment of 3-part and 4-part proximal humerus fractures: cadaver study and prospective clinical study with minimum 2 years followup

    PubMed Central

    Obert, Laurent; Saadnia, Rachid; Loisel, François; Uhring, Julien; Adam, Antoine; Rochet, Séverin; Clappaz, Pascal; Lascar, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional and radiological outcomes of a cementless, trauma-specific locked stem for 3- and 4-part proximal humeral fractures. Materials and methods: This study consisted of two parts: a cadaver study with 22 shoulders and a multicenter prospective clinical study of 23 fracture patients evaluated at least 2 years after treatment. In the cadaver study, the locked stem (HumelockTM, FX Solutions) and its instrumentation were evaluated. In the clinical study, five senior surgeons at four different hospitals performed the surgical procedures. An independent surgeon evaluated the patients using clinical (Constant score, QuickDASH) and radiological (X-rays, CT scans) outcome measures. Results: The cadaver study allowed us to validate the height landmarks relative to the pectoralis major tendon. In the clinical study, at the review, abduction was 95° (60–160), forward flexion was 108° (70–160), external rotation (elbow at body) was 34° (0–55), the QuickDASH was 31 (4.5–59), the overall Constant score was 54 (27–75), and the weighted Constant score was 76 (31.5–109). Discussion: This preliminary study of hemiarthroplasty (HA) with a locked stem found results that were at least equivalent to published series. As all patients had at least a 2-year follow-up, integration of the locked stem did not cause any specific complications. These results suggest that it is possible to avoid using cement when hemiarthroplasty is performed for the humeral stem. This implant makes height adjustment and transosseous suturing of the tuberosities more reproducible. PMID:27194107

  20. Joint unloading implant modifies subchondral bone trabecular structure in medial knee osteoarthritis: 2-year outcomes of a pilot study using fractal signature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Sode, Miki; Fuerst, Thomas; Block, Jon E

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is largely attributable to chronic excessive and aberrant joint loading. The purpose of this pilot study was to quantify radiographic changes in subchondral bone after treatment with a minimally invasive joint unloading implant (KineSpring® Knee Implant System). Methods Nine patients with unilateral medial knee OA resistant to nonsurgical therapy were treated with the KineSpring System and followed for 2 years. Main outcomes included Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, function, and stiffness subscores and independent core laboratory determinations of joint space width and fractal signature of the tibial cortex. Results WOMAC scores, on average, improved by 92% for pain, 91% for function, and 79% for stiffness over the 2-year follow-up period. Joint space width in the medial compartment of the treated knee significantly increased from 0.9 mm at baseline to 3.1 mm at 2 years; joint space width in the medial compartment of the untreated knee was unchanged. Fractal signatures of the vertically oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment decreased by 2.8% in the treated knee and increased by 2.1% in the untreated knee over 2 years. No statistically significant fractal signature changes were observed in the horizontally oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment or in the horizontal or vertical trabeculae of the lateral compartment in the treated knee. Conclusion Preliminary evidence suggests that the KineSpring System may modify knee OA disease progression by increasing joint space width and improving subchondral bone trabecular integrity, thereby reducing pain and improving joint function. PMID:25670891

  1. A randomized study on migration of the Spectron EF and the Charnley flanged 40 cemented femoral components using radiostereometric analysis at 2 years

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose We performed a randomized study to determine the migration patterns of the Spectron EF femoral stem and to compare them with those of the Charnley stem, which is regarded by many as the gold standard for comparison of implants due to its extensive documentation. Patients and methods 150 patients with a mean age of 70 years were randomized, single-blinded, to receive either a cemented Charnley flanged 40 monoblock, stainless steel, vaquasheen surface femoral stem with a 22.2-mm head (n = 30) or a cemented Spectron EF modular, matte, straight, collared, cobalt-chrome femoral stem with a 28-mm femoral head and a roughened proximal third of the stem (n = 120). The patients were followed with repeated radiostereometric analysis for 2 years to assess migration. Results At 2 years, stem retroversion was 2.3° and 0.7° (p < 0.001) and posterior translation was 0.44 mm and 0.17 mm (p = 0.002) for the Charnley group (n = 26) and the Spectron EF group (n = 74), respectively. Subsidence was 0.26 mm for the Charnley and 0.20 mm for the Spectron EF (p = 0.5). Interpretation The Spectron EF femoral stem was more stable than the Charnley flanged 40 stem in our study when evaluated at 2 years. In a report from the Norwegian arthroplasty register, the Spectron EF stem had a higher revision rate due to aseptic loosening beyond 5 years than the Charnley. Initial stability is not invariably related to good long-term results. Our results emphasize the importance of prospective long-term follow-up of prosthetic implants in clinical trials and national registries and a stepwise introduction of implants. PMID:21895504

  2. Effect of Workplace Noise on Hearing Ability in Tile and Ceramic Industry Workers in Iran: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Mirmohammadi, Seyyed Jalil; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Noise as a common physical hazard may lead to noise-induced hearing loss, an irreversible but preventable disorder. Annual audiometric evaluations help detect changes in hearing status before clinically significant hearing loss develops. This study was designed to track hearing threshold changes during 2-year follow-up among tile and ceramic workers. Methods. This follow-up study was conducted on 555 workers (totally 1110 ears). Subjects were divided into four groups according to the level of noise exposure. Hearing threshold in conventional audiometric frequencies was measured and standard threshold shift was calculated for each ear. Results. Hearing threshold was increased during 2 years of follow-up. Increased hearing threshold was most frequently observed at 4000, 6000, and 3000 Hz. Standard threshold shift was observed in 13 (2.34%), 49 (8.83%), 22 (3.96%), and 63 (11.35%) subjects in the first and second years of follow-up in the right and left ears, respectively. Conclusions. This study has documented a high incidence of noise-induced hearing loss in tile and ceramic workers that would put stress on the importance of using hearing protection devices. PMID:24453922

  3. Co-occurrence of and remission from general anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms after acute lung injury: a 2-year longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Shanholtz, Carl; Dennison-Himmelfarb, Cheryl R.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the co-occurrence, and predictors of remission, of general anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms during 2-year follow-up in survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) treated in an intensive care unit (ICU). Design, Setting, and Patients This prospective cohort study enrolled 520 patients from 13 medical and surgical ICUs in 4 hospitals, with follow-up at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months post-ALI. Measurements and Main Results The outcomes of interest were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) anxiety and depression subscales (scores ≥8 indicating substantial symptoms) and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IESR, scores ≥1.6 indicating substantial PTSD symptoms). Of the 520 enrolled patients, 274 died before 3-month follow-up; 186/196 consenting survivors (95%) completed at least one HADS and IESR assessment during 2-year follow-up, and most completed multiple assessments. Across follow-up time points, the prevalence of supra-threshold general anxiety, depression, and PTSD symptoms ranged from 38–44%, 26–33%, and 22–24%, respectively; more than half of the patients had supra-threshold symptoms in at least one domain during 2-year follow-up. The majority (59%) of survivors with any supra-threshold symptoms were above threshold for 2 or more types of symptoms (i.e., of general anxiety, depression, and/or PTSD). In fact, the most common pattern involved simultaneous general anxiety, depression, and PTSD symptoms. Most patients with general anxiety, depression, or PTSD symptoms during 2-year follow-up had supra-threshold symptoms at 24-month (last) follow-up. Higher SF-36 physical functioning domain scores at the prior visit were associated with a greater likelihood of remission from general anxiety and PTSD symptoms during follow-up. Conclusions The majority of ALI survivors had clinically significant general anxiety, depressive, or PTSD symptoms, and these symptoms tended to co-occur across

  4. Evaluation of psychic change through the application of empirical and clinical techniques for a 2-year treatment: a single case study.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Clara M López; Schalayeff, Cristina; Acosta, Silvia R; Vernengo, Pía; Roussos, Andrés J; Lerner, Beatríz Dorfman

    2005-07-01

    Abstract The authors present results obtained by a combination of clinical and empirical methods used in the evaluation of psychic change involving a single case study carried out during 2 years of nonmanualized psychodynamic psychotherapy (Barber & Crits-Christoph, 1993 ; Barber, Foltz, DeRubeis, & Landis, 2002 ). A multidimensional definition of change that includes clinical (psychoanalytic) and empirical perspectives is provided. The authors used material from supervision sessions and clinical meetings to assess the psychodynamic diagnosis and evolution. The following empirical techniques and instruments were used: core conflictual relationship theme (Luborsky & Crits-Christoph, 1990), Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (Derogatis, 1983), and Differential Elements for a Psychodynamic Diagnostic (C. M. López Moreno et al., 1998 ). Several markers of psychic change along the therapeutic process were found. The instruments proved to be sensitive to the changes obtained during the psychotherapy. Used together, the instruments allowed an integrated evaluation of the patient's evolution during the treatment.

  5. Do deviant peer associations mediate the contributions of self-esteem to problem behavior during early adolescence? A 2-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    DuBois, David L; Silverthorn, Naida

    2004-06-01

    We investigated deviant peer associations as a mediator of the influences of general and peer-oriented self-esteem on problem behavior using data from a 2-year longitudinal study of 350 young adolescents. Measures of problem behavior included substance use (alcohol use, smoking) and antisocial behavior (fighting, stealing). Using latent growth curve modeling and covariance structure analysis, an extension of a model proposed by DuBois et al. (2002) was evaluated for each type of problem behavior. Findings revealed that lower general self-esteem and greater peer orientation in self-esteem each predicted deviant associations with peers and that deviant peer associations, in turn, were associated with higher levels and rates of change in problem behavior. Deviant peer associations mediated the associations of general and peer-oriented self-esteem with levels and rates of change in problem behavior such that direct paths from self-esteem to problem behavior generally were nonsignificant.

  6. Improvement in hematological, visceral, and skeletal manifestations of Gaucher disease type 1 with oral eliglustat tartrate (Genz-112638) treatment: 2-year results of a phase 2 study

    PubMed Central

    Lukina, Elena; Watman, Nora; Arreguin, Elsa Avila; Dragosky, Marta; Iastrebner, Marcelo; Rosenbaum, Hanna; Phillips, Mici; Pastores, Gregory M.; Kamath, Ravi S.; Rosenthal, Daniel I.; Kaper, Mathilde; Singh, Tejdip; Puga, Ana Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Eliglustat tartrate is an investigational oral substrate reduction therapy for Gaucher disease type 1 that is pharmacologically distinct from intravenous enzyme replacement therapy. Eliglustat tartrate improved clinical manifestations in patients who received 50 or 100 mg twice daily for 1 year during an open-label phase 2 study (Blood. 2010;116(6):893-899). We report further improvements after 2 years of treatment in 20 patients (11 females, 9 males; mean age, 33 years) with baseline splenomegaly and thrombocytopenia and/or anemia. Statistically significant (P < .001) percentage improvements from baseline occurred in platelet count (mean ± SD, 81% ± 56%), hemoglobin level (20% ± 15%), spleen volume (−52% ± 11%), and liver volume (−24% ± 13%). Mean platelet count increased ∼ 50 000/mm3. Mean hemoglobin level increased 2.1 g/dL overall and 3.1 g/dL in 10 patients with baseline anemia. Organ volume reductions were greatest in patients with severe baseline organomegaly. Seventeen (85%) patients met established therapeutic goals for ≥ 3 of the 4 parameters. Lumbar spine bone mineral density increased 7.8% ± 10.6% (P = .01) and T-score 0.6 ± 0.8 (P = .012), with major gains in osteoporotic and osteopenic patients. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment showed that bone marrow infiltration by Gaucher cells was decreased (8/18 patients) or stable (10/18 patients). No safety-related trends emerged during 2 years of treatment. This multisite, open-label, single-arm phase 2 study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00358150. PMID:20713962

  7. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  8. Efficacy, safety and patient-reported outcomes of combination etanercept and sulfasalazine versus etanercept alone in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a double-blind randomised 2-year study

    PubMed Central

    Combe, B; Codreanu, C; Fiocco, U; Gaubitz, M; Geusens, P P; Kvien, T K; Pavelka, K; Sambrook, P N; Smolen, J S; Khandker, R; Singh, A; Wajdula, J; Fatenejad, S

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy and safety of etanercept and etanercept plus sulfasalazine versus sulfasalazine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite sulfasalazine therapy. Methods: Patients were randomly assigned to etanercept (25 mg twice weekly; sulfasalazine was discontinued at baseline), etanercept plus sulfasalazine (unchanged regimen of 2–3 g/day) or sulfasalazine in a double-blind, randomised, 2-year study in adult patients with active RA despite sulfasalazine therapy. Efficacy was assessed using the American College of Rheumatology criteria, disease activity scores (DAS) and patient-reported outcomes (PRO). Results: Demographic variables and baseline disease characteristics were comparable among treatment groups; mean DAS 5.1, 5.2 and 5.1 for etanercept (n  =  103), etanercept plus sulfasalazine (n  =  101) and sulfasalazine (n  =  50), respectively. Withdrawal due to lack of efficacy was highest with sulfasalazine (26 (52%) vs 6 (6%) for either etanercept group, p<0.001). Patients receiving etanercept or etanercept plus sulfasalazine had a more rapid initial response, which was sustained at 2 years, than those receiving sulfasalazine: mean DAS 2.8, 2.5 versus 4.5, respectively (p<0.05); ACR 20 response was achieved by 67%, 77% versus 34% of patients, respectively (p<0.01) Overall, PRO followed a similar pattern; a clinically significant improvement in health assessment questionnaire was achieved by 76%, 78% versus 40% of patients, respectively (p<0.01). Commonly reported adverse events occurring in the etanercept groups were injection site reactions and pharyngitis/laryngitis (p<0.01). Conclusion: Etanercept and etanercept plus sulfasalazine are efficacious for the long-term management of patients with RA. The addition of etanercept or substitution with etanercept should be considered as treatment options for patients not adequately responding to sulfasalazine. PMID:18794178

  9. Determinants of “return to work in good health” among workers with back pain who consult in primary care settings: a 2-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Bourbonnais, Renée; Frémont, Pierre; Rossignol, Michel; Stock, Susan R.; Nouwen, Arie; Larocque, Isabelle; Demers, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Many factors have been linked to return to work after a back pain episode, but our understanding of this phenomenon is limited and cross-sectional dichotomous indices of return to work are not valid measures of this construct. To describe the course of “return to work in good health” (RWGH—a composite index of back pain outcome) among workers who consulted in primary care settings for back pain and identify its determinants, a 2-year prospective study was conducted. Subjects (n = 1,007, 68.4%) were workers who consulted in primary care settings of the Quebec City area for a nonspecific back pain. They completed five telephone interviews over 2 years (follow-up = 86%). Analyses linking baseline variables with 2-year outcome were conducted with polytomous logistic regression. The proportion of “success” in RWGH increased from 18% at 6 weeks to 57% at 2 years. In women, persistent pain, pain radiating to extremities, increasing job seniority, not having a unionized job, feeling that the physician did listen carefully and increasing fear-avoidance beliefs towards work and activity were determinants of “failure” in RWGH. In men, decreasing age, cigarette smoking, poor self-reported health status, pain in the thoracic area, previous back surgeries, a non-compensated injury, high pain levels, belief that job is below qualifications, likelihood of losing job, job status, satisfaction with health services and fear-avoidance beliefs towards work were all significant. RWGH among workers with back pain receives multiple influences, especially among men. In both genders, however, fear-avoidance beliefs about work are associated with failure and high self-efficacy is associated with success. PMID:16868783

  10. Social Development:: 2 Year Olds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Social Development: 2 Year Olds Page Content Article Body By nature, ... probably are acting the same way. At age two, children view the world almost exclusively through their ...

  11. Language Development: 2 Year Olds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Language Development: 2 Year Olds Page Content Article Body ... Pay attention to how he also is using language to describe ideas and information and to express ...

  12. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  13. Impact on malaria morbidity of a programme supplying insecticide treated nets in children aged under 2 years in Tanzania: community cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Abdulla, Salim; Schellenberg, Joanna Armstrong; Nathan, Rose; Mukasa, Oscar; Marchant, Tanya; Smith, Tom; Tanner, Marcel; Lengeler, Christian

    2001-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of a social marketing programme for distributing nets treated with insecticide on malarial parasitaemia and anaemia in very young children in an area of high malaria transmission. Design Community cross sectional study. Annual, cross sectional data were collected at the beginning of the social marketing campaign (1997) and the subsequent two years. Net ownership and other risk and confounding factors were assessed with a questionnaire. Blood samples were taken from the children to assess prevalence of parasitaemia and haemoglobin levels. Setting 18 villages in the Kilombero and Ulanga districts of southwestern Tanzania. Participants A random sample of children aged under 2 years. Main outcome measures The presence of any parasitaemia in the peripheral blood sample and the presence of anaemia (classified as a haemoglobin level of <80 g/l). Results Ownership of nets increased rapidly (treated or not treated nets: from 58% to 83%; treated nets: from 10% to 61%). The mean haemoglobin level rose from 80 g/l to 89 g/l in the study children in the successive surveys. Overall, the prevalence of anaemia in the study population decreased from 49% to 26% in the two years studied. Treated nets had a protective efficacy of 62% (95% confidence interval 38% to 77%) on the prevalence of parasitaemia and of 63% (27% to 82%) on anaemia. Conclusions These results show that nets treated with insecticide have a substantial impact on morbidity when distributed in a public health setting. PMID:11157527

  14. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  15. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  16. Attitudes to medication after kidney transplantation and their association with medication adherence and graft survival: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Tielen, Mirjam; van Exel, Job; Laging, Mirjam; Beck, Denise K; Khemai, Roshni; van Gelder, Teun; Betjes, Michiel G H; Weimar, Willem; Massey, Emma K

    2014-01-01

    Background. Nonadherence to medication is a common problem after kidney transplantation. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes towards medication, adherence, and the relationship with clinical outcomes. Method. Kidney recipients participated in a Q-methodological study 6 weeks after transplantation. As a measure of medication adherence, respondents completed the Basel Assessment of Adherence to Immunosuppressive Medications Scale (BAASIS(©)-interview). Moreover, the intrapatient variability in the pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus was calculated, which measures stability of drug intake. Data on graft survival was retrieved from patient records up to 2 years after transplantation. Results. 113 renal transplant recipients (19-75 years old) participated in the study. Results revealed three attitudes towards medication adherence-attitude 1: "confident and accurate," attitude 2: "concerned and vigilant," and attitude 3: "appearance oriented and assertive." We found association of attitudes with intrapatient variability in pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus, but not with self-reported nonadherence or graft survival. However, self-reported nonadherence immediately after transplantation was associated with lower two-year graft survival. Conclusion. These preliminary findings suggest that nonadherence shortly after kidney transplantation may be a risk factor for lower graft survival in the years to follow. The attitudes to medication were not a risk factor.

  17. Acquired hemophilia A in the United Kingdom: a 2-year national surveillance study by the United Kingdom Haemophilia Centre Doctors' Organisation.

    PubMed

    Collins, Peter W; Hirsch, Sybil; Baglin, Trevor P; Dolan, Gerard; Hanley, John; Makris, Michael; Keeling, David M; Liesner, Ri; Brown, Simon A; Hay, Charles R M

    2007-03-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a severe bleeding disorder caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Previous reports have focused on referral center patients and it is unclear whether these findings are generally applicable. To improve understanding of the disease, a 2-year observational study was established to identify and characterize the presenting features and outcome of all patients with acquired hemophilia A in the United Kingdom. This allowed a consecutive cohort of patients, unbiased by referral or reporting practice, to be studied. A total of 172 patients with a median age of 78 years were identified, an incidence of 1.48/million/y. The cohort was significantly older than previously reported series, but bleeding manifestations and underlying diseases were similar. Bleeding was the cause of death in 9% of the cohort and remained a risk until the inhibitor had been eradicated. There was no difference in inhibitor eradication or mortality between patients treated with steroids alone and a combination of steroids and cytotoxic agents. Relapse of the inhibitor was observed in 20% of the patients who had attained first complete remission. The data provide the most complete description of acquired hemophilia A available and are applicable to patients presenting to all centers.

  18. Bacterial community shift is induced by dynamic environmental parameters in a changing coastal ecosystem (northern Adriatic, northeastern Mediterranean Sea)--a 2-year time-series study.

    PubMed

    Tinta, T; Vojvoda, J; Mozetič, P; Talaber, I; Vodopivec, M; Malfatti, F; Turk, V

    2015-10-01

    The potential link between the microbial dynamics and the environmental parameters was investigated in a semi-enclosed and highly dynamic coastal system (Gulf of Trieste, northern Adriatic Sea, NE Mediterranean Sea). Our comprehensive 2-year time-series study showed that despite the shallowness of this area, there was a significant difference between the surface and the bottom bacterial community structure. The bottom bacterial community was more diverse than the surface one and influenced by sediment re-suspension. The surface seawater temperature had a profound effect on bacterial productivity, while the bacterial community structure was more affected by freshwater-borne nutrients and phytoplankton blooms. Phytoplankton blooms caused an increase of Gammaproteobacteria (Alteromonadaceae, SAR86 and Vibrionaceae) and shift in dominance from SAR11 to Rhodobacteraceae taxon at the surface. Our results propose the importance of the water mass movements as drivers of freshwater-borne nutrients and of allochthonous microbial taxa. This study emphasizes the prediction power based on association networks analyses that are fed with long-term measurements of microbial and environmental parameters. These interaction maps offer valuable insights into the response of marine ecosystem to climate- and anthropogenic-driven stressors.

  19. Influence of Anti-TNF and Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs Therapy on Pulmonary Forced Vital Capacity Associated to Ankylosing Spondylitis: A 2-Year Follow-Up Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Vásquez-Jiménez, José Clemente; De la Cerda-Trujillo, Liliana Faviola; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Norma Alejandra; Díaz-Rizo, Valeria; Díaz-González, Viviana; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto German; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Ingrid Patricia; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo Hernan; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of anti-TNF agents plus synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) versus DMARDs alone for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) with reduced pulmonary function vital capacity (FVC%). Methods. In an observational study, we included AS who had FVC% <80% at baseline. Twenty patients were taking DMARDs and 16 received anti-TNF + DMARDs. Outcome measures: changes in FVC%, BASDAI, BASFI, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), Borg scale after 6MWT, and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire at 24 months. Results. Both DMARDs and anti-TNF + DMARDs groups had similar baseline values in FVC%. Significant improvement was achieved with anti-TNF + DMARDs in FVC%, at 24 months, when compared to DMARDs alone (P = 0.04). Similarly, patients in anti-TNF + DMARDs group had greater improvement in BASDAI, BASFI, Borg scale, and 6MWT when compared to DMARDs alone. After 2 years of follow-up, 14/16 (87.5%) in the anti-TNF + DMARDs group achieved the primary outcome: FVC% ≥80%, compared with 11/20 (55%) in the DMARDs group (P = 0.04). Conclusions. Patients with anti-TNF + DMARDs had a greater improvement in FVC% and cardiopulmonary scales at 24 months compared with DMARDs. This preliminary study supports the fact that anti-TNF agents may offer additional benefits compared to DMARDs in patients with AS who have reduced FVC%. PMID:26078986

  20. Comparison of olanzapine long-acting injection and oral olanzapine: a 2-year, randomized, open-label study in outpatients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Detke, Holland C; Weiden, Peter J; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Choukour, Moutaz; Watson, Susan B; Brunner, Elizabeth; Ascher-Svanum, Haya

    2014-08-01

    We compared long-term treatment effectiveness of monthly olanzapine long-acting injection (LAI) with that of oral olanzapine. Outpatients with 2 or more episodes of psychotic worsening in the past 24 months with Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score of lower than 70 were randomized to 405 mg/4 weeks of olanzapine LAI (n = 264) or 10 mg/d of oral olanzapine (n = 260) for 2 years of open-label treatment. Dosing thereafter was flexible (150-405 mg/4 weeks of LAI vs 5-20 mg/d of oral). Primary outcome was time to all-cause discontinuation. At baseline, patients were clinically stable (mean Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score of 57). Seventeen percent of patients had been psychiatrically hospitalized in the previous 6 months, and 4.6% were rated nonadherent in the month before study entry. The groups did not differ significantly in median time to all-cause discontinuation (645 days for LAI, 678 days for oral; P = 0.61), discontinuation rate (53.8% for LAI, 51.2% for oral; P = 0.60), or relapse rate (20.1% for LAI, 18.5% for oral; P = 0.66). Postbaseline psychiatric hospitalization rate was low for both groups (7.6% for LAI, 9.2% for oral), but mean hospitalization duration was significantly longer for oral patients (1.80 days [20 for those hospitalized] vs 0.43 days [6 for those hospitalized], P = 0.02). There were no clinically significant group differences in adverse events or safety measures. No post-injection delirium/sedation syndrome events occurred. In conclusion, olanzapine LAI and oral olanzapine were similarly effective and well tolerated for up to 2 years of treatment in patients with schizophrenia. Treatment discontinuation for olanzapine LAI was similar to that of oral olanzapine, despite the 3-hour post-injection observation period and other precautionary procedures related to risk of post-injection delirium/sedation syndrome. PMID:24781441

  1. The Prognosis of Acute Low Back Pain in Primary Care in the U.S. A 2-Year Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehling, Wolf E.; Gopisetty, Viranjini; Bartmess-LeVasseur, Elizabeth; Acree, Mike; Pressman, Alice; Goldberg, Harley; Hecht, Frederick M; Carey, Tim; Avins, Andrew L

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study Objective to assess the prognosis of patients presenting with acute low back pain (LBP) in a primary care setting in the U.S. Summary of Background Data Practice guidelines for acute LBP based on return-to-work outcomes underestimate the development of chronic pain in the primary care setting. Due to differences in inclusion criteria, chronic pain definitions and national health systems, prognostic cohort studies have reported a wide range of results limiting interpretation and generalization. Current data from carefully designed prognostic studies of acute LBP are lacking for the U.S. primary care system. Methods Members of a large health service organization were enrolled after seeking medical care for acute LBP, with or without sciatica, of up to 30 days duration, with no prior episode in the past 12 months and no history of spine surgery. We conducted phone interviews at baseline, six months and two years. Based on receiver operating characteristic analyses, a combination of global perceived recovery with pain intensity was used as primary outcome for chronic pain. Recurrence and multiple secondary outcomes were assessed to allow for comparison with other studies. Results 605 patients had an average pain intensity of 5.6 (numeric rating scale 0–10) and disability of 15.8 (Roland Morris scale 0–24). Eight percent had declared sick leave between pain onset and baseline interview. 13% of 521 patients (86% follow-up) suffered from chronic pain at six months and 19% of 443 patients at 2 years. At six months, 54% had experienced at least one LBP recurrence, and 47% in the subsequent 18 months. Conclusion The prognosis of strictly-defined acute LBP, with or without sciatica, is less favorable than commonly stated in practice guidelines based on failure to return to work. Broad initiatives to develop new means for the primary and secondary prevention of recurrent and chronic LBP are urgently needed. PMID:22504516

  2. Effects of a 2-year school-based daily physical activity intervention on cardiovascular disease risk factors: the Sogndal school-intervention study.

    PubMed

    Resaland, G K; Anderssen, S A; Holme, I M; Mamen, A; Andersen, L B

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a 2-year school-based physical activity (PA) intervention in 9-year-old children on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. One intervention school (I-school) (n=125) and one control school (C-school) (n=131) were included. The children at the I-school carried out 60 min of PA daily. The PA lessons were planned, organized and led by expert physical education (PE) teachers. In the C-school, children were offered the normal 45 min of PE twice weekly. The intervention resulted in a greater beneficial development in systolic (P=0.003) and diastolic (P=0.002) blood pressure, total cholesterol-to-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (P=0.011), triglyceride (P=0.030) and peak oxygen uptake (P<0.001) in I-school children than in C-school children. No significant differences were observed in waist circumference, body mass index and the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance between the two groups. Furthermore, the intervention, primarily carried out at moderate intensity, had the strongest impact in children with the least favorable starting point. In conclusion, a daily school-based PA intervention can beneficially modify children's CVD risk profile if the intervention has sufficient duration and includes a substantial amount of daily PA, and if the PA is implemented by expert PE teachers.

  3. Serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities of paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), mild cognitive impairment, and 2-year conversion to dementia: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cervellati, Carlo; Trentini, Alessandro; Romani, Arianna; Bellini, Tiziana; Bosi, Cristina; Ortolani, Beatrice; Zurlo, Amedeo; Passaro, Angelina; Seripa, Davide; Zuliani, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Converging lines of evidence suggest that paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) may confer protection against inflammatory and oxidative challenge which, in turn, plays a key-role in the onset and progression of dementia. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether serum PON-1 paraoxonase/arylesterase activities might predict the clinical conversion of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) or vascular dementia (VAD). Serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were measured by spectrophotometric assays at baseline in 141 MCI patients (median age: 77 years; interquartile range 71-81) and in 78 healthy controls (median age: 76 years; interquartile range 73-79). After 2 years of follow-up, 86 MCI remained stable (MCI/MCI), 34 converted to LOAD (MCI/LOAD), whereas 21 converted to VAD (MCI/VAD). Baseline arylesterase activity was lower in all MCI groups compared with controls (all p < 0.01), whereas paraoxonase activity was lower in MCI/VAD group compared to controls (p < 0.05) and MCI/MCI patients (p = 0.009). Low paraoxonase and arylesterase activities (I quartile) were associated to higher risk of conversion to VAD (OR: 3.74, 95% CI: 1.37-10.25 and OR: 3.16, 95% CI: 1.17-8.56, respectively). Our results suggest that in MCI patients low PON-1 activity might contribute to identify individuals susceptible to develop vascular dementia.

  4. Working memory arrest in children with high-functioning autism compared to children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: results from a 2-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Per N; Skogli, Erik W; Hovik, Kjell T; Geurts, Hilde; Egeland, Jens; Øie, Merete

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the development of verbal working memory in children with high-functioning autism compared to children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and typically developing children. A total of 34 children with high-functioning autism, 72 children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and 45 typically developing children (age 9-16 years) were included at baseline and followed up approximately 25 months later. The children were given a letter/number sequencing task to assess verbal working memory. The performance of children with high-functioning autism on verbal working memory did not improve after 2 years, while improvement was observed in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and typically developing children. The results indicate a different developmental trajectory for verbal working memory in children with high-functioning autism compared to children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and typically developing children. More research is needed to construct a developmental framework more suitable for children with autism spectrum disorder.

  5. The performance of moss, grass, and 1- and 2-year old spruce needles as bioindicators of contamination: a comparative study at the scale of the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Suchara, Ivan; Sucharova, Julie; Hola, Marie; Reimann, Clemens; Boyd, Rognvald; Filzmoser, Peter; Englmaier, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Moss (Pleurozium schreberi), grass (Avenella flexuosa), and 1- and 2-year old spruce (Picea abies) needles were collected over the territory of the Czech Republic at an average sample density of 1 site per 290km(2). The samples were analysed for 39 elements (Ag, Al, As, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Ga, Hg, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nd, Ni, Pb, Pr, Rb, S, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, Th, Tl, U, V, Y and Zn) using ICP-MS and ICP-AES techniques (the major nutrients Ca, K, Mg and Na were not analysed in moss). Moss showed by far the highest element concentrations for most elements. Exceptions were Ba (spruce), Mn (spruce), Mo (grass), Ni (spruce), Rb (grass) and S (grass). Regional distribution maps and spatial trend analysis were used to study the suitability of the four materials as bioindicators of anthropogenic contamination. The highly industrialised areas in the north-west and the far east of the country and several more local contamination sources were indicated in the distribution maps of one or several sample materials. At the scale of the whole country moss was the best indicator of known contamination sources. However, on a more local scale, it appeared that spruce needles were especially well suited for detection of urban contamination.

  6. Serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities of paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), mild cognitive impairment, and 2-year conversion to dementia: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cervellati, Carlo; Trentini, Alessandro; Romani, Arianna; Bellini, Tiziana; Bosi, Cristina; Ortolani, Beatrice; Zurlo, Amedeo; Passaro, Angelina; Seripa, Davide; Zuliani, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Converging lines of evidence suggest that paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) may confer protection against inflammatory and oxidative challenge which, in turn, plays a key-role in the onset and progression of dementia. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether serum PON-1 paraoxonase/arylesterase activities might predict the clinical conversion of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) or vascular dementia (VAD). Serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were measured by spectrophotometric assays at baseline in 141 MCI patients (median age: 77 years; interquartile range 71-81) and in 78 healthy controls (median age: 76 years; interquartile range 73-79). After 2 years of follow-up, 86 MCI remained stable (MCI/MCI), 34 converted to LOAD (MCI/LOAD), whereas 21 converted to VAD (MCI/VAD). Baseline arylesterase activity was lower in all MCI groups compared with controls (all p < 0.01), whereas paraoxonase activity was lower in MCI/VAD group compared to controls (p < 0.05) and MCI/MCI patients (p = 0.009). Low paraoxonase and arylesterase activities (I quartile) were associated to higher risk of conversion to VAD (OR: 3.74, 95% CI: 1.37-10.25 and OR: 3.16, 95% CI: 1.17-8.56, respectively). Our results suggest that in MCI patients low PON-1 activity might contribute to identify individuals susceptible to develop vascular dementia. PMID:26178739

  7. Emotional Development: 2 Year Olds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Emotional Development: 2 Year Olds Page Content Article Body It’s so ... to follow the ups and downs of a two-year-old. One moment he’s beaming and friendly; ...

  8. Long-term impact of a chef on school lunch consumption: findings from a 2-year pilot study in Boston middle schools.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Juliana F W; Smit, Liesbeth A; Parker, Ellen; Austin, S Bryn; Frazier, A Lindsay; Economos, Christina D; Rimm, Eric B

    2012-06-01

    School cafeterias can play an important role in providing healthy meals. Although schools participating in the National School Lunch Program are required to meet minimum program standards, advocates recommend that innovations be sought to enhance menu dietary quality. This study evaluated the Chef Initiative, a 2-year pilot study in two Boston middle schools, designed to increase the availability and consumption of healthier school foods. Between 2007 and 2009, a professional chef trained cafeteria staff to prepare healthier school lunches (ie, more whole grains, fresh/frozen fruits and vegetables, and less sugar, salt, saturated fats, and trans fats). Meal nutrient compositions were monitored from 2007 to 2009, and a plate waste study conducted in the spring of 2009 compared food selection and consumption patterns among students at Chef Initiative schools, with students receiving standard school lunches at two matched control schools. Paired t tests and descriptive statistics were used to examine differences in menus and mixed-model analysis of variance was used to analyze differences in students' food selection and consumption between Chef Initiative and control schools. Overall, the Chef Initiative schools provided healthier lunches and the percent of foods consumed at Chef Initiative and control schools were similar (61.6% vs 57.3%; P=0.63). Of the areas targeted, there was greater whole-grain selection and vegetable consumption; 51% more students selected whole grains (P=0.02) and students consumed 0.36 more vegetable servings/day (P=0.01) at Chef Initiative schools. The potential of chefs collaborating with cafeteria staff to improve the availability, selection, and consumption of healthier meals is promising. PMID:22504283

  9. Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Tantalum Augment in Patients with Paprosky III or IV Acetabular Bone Defects: A Minimum 2-year Follow Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min; Kim, Hyung-Joo; Lim, Seung-Jae; Moon, Young-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to report the short-term outcomes of revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) using tantalum augments in patients with severe acetabular bone defects. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 15 revision THAs performed in 15 patients using tantalum augments between June 2010 and December 2013. Acetabular bone defects were Paprosky type IIIA in 7 hips, type IIIB in 7, and type IV in 1. The causes of revision surgery were aseptic loosening in 12 hips and deep infection in 3. Revisions were first in 1 hip, second in 3, and third in 11. Six patients were male and 9 female with a mean age of 59 years (range, 48-75 years). Mean follow-up was 29 months (range, 24-48 months). Results Mean Harris hip score was improved from 34 points (range, 12-54 points) preoperatively to 84 points (range, 38-90 points) at final follow-up. On the final follow-up radiographs, there were 12 hips (80.0%) with stable fixation of the acetabular cup, 2 (13.3%) with secondary stability after mild acetabular protrusion, and 1 (6.7%) with radiolucency around the acetabular cup without mechanical symptoms. Complications included one patient with acute hematogenous infection managed by surgical debridement and long-term antibiotic therapy. There were no cases with nerve palsy or dislocation during the follow-up period. Conclusion The present study showed satisfactory clinical and radiographic outcomes of revision THA using tantalum augments due to severe acetabular bone defects of Paprosky type III or IV at a minimum follow-up of 2 years. PMID:27536651

  10. Scaling up family medicine training in Gezira, Sudan – a 2-year in-service master programme using modern information and communication technology: a survey study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 the Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) was initiated in Gezira state, Sudan, designed as an in-service training model. The project is a collaboration project between the University of Gezira, which aims to provide a 2-year master’s programme in family medicine for practicing doctors, and the Ministry of Health, which facilitates service provision and funds the training programme. This paper presents the programme, the teaching environment, and the first batch of candidates enrolled. Methods In this study a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect baseline data at the start of the project from doctors who joined the programme. A checklist was also used to assess the health centres where they work. A total of 188 out of 207 doctors responded (91%), while data were gathered from all 158 health centres (100%) staffed by the programme candidates. Results The Gezira model of in-service family medicine training has succeeded in recruiting 207 candidates in its first batch, providing health services in 158 centres, of which 84 had never been served by a doctor before. The curriculum is community oriented. The mean age of doctors was 32.5 years, 57% were males, and 32% were graduates from the University of Gezira. Respondents stated high confidence in practicing some skills such as asthma management and post-abortion uterine evacuation. They were least confident in other skills such as managing depression or inserting an intrauterine device. The majority of health centres was poorly equipped for management of noncommunicable diseases, as only 10% had an electrocardiography machine (ECG), 5% had spirometer, and 1% had a defibrillator. Conclusions The Gezira model has responded to local health system needs. Use of modern information and communication technology is used to facilitate both health service provision and training. The GFMP represents an example of a large-volume scaling-up programme of family medicine in Africa. PMID:24443978

  11. Electromagnetic Field Penetration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    A numerical method is presented to determine electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of rectangular enclosure with apertures on its wall used for input and output connections, control panels, visual-access windows, ventilation panels, etc. Expressing EM fields in terms of cavity Green's function inside the enclosure and the free space Green's function outside the enclosure, integral equations with aperture tangential electric fields as unknown variables are obtained by enforcing the continuity of tangential electric and magnetic fields across the apertures. Using the Method of Moments, the integral equations are solved for unknown aperture fields. From these aperture fields, the EM field inside a rectangular enclosure due to external electromagnetic sources are determined. Numerical results on electric field shielding of a rectangular cavity with a thin rectangular slot obtained using the present method are compared with the results obtained using simple transmission line technique for code validation. The present technique is applied to determine field penetration inside a Boeing-757 by approximating its passenger cabin as a rectangular cavity filled with a homogeneous medium and its passenger windows by rectangular apertures. Preliminary results for, two windows, one on each side of fuselage were considered. Numerical results for Boeing-757 at frequencies 26 MHz, 171-175 MHz, and 428-432 MHz are presented.

  12. Dietary arsenic consumption and urine arsenic in an endemic population: response to improvement of drinking water quality in a 2-year consecutive study.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Anirban; Deb, Debasree; Ghose, Aloke; Du Laing, Gijs; De Neve, Jan; Santra, Subhas Chandra; Guha Mazumder, Debendra Nath

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the association between arsenic intake through water and diet, and arsenic levels in first morning-void urine under variable conditions of water contamination. This was done in a 2-year consecutive study in an endemic population. Exposure of arsenic through water and diet was assessed for participants using arsenic-contaminated water (≥50 μg L(-1)) in a first year (group I) and for participants using water lower in arsenic (<50 μg L(-1)) in the next year (group II). Participants with and without arsenical skin lesions were considered in the statistical analysis. Median dose of arsenic intake through drinking water in groups I and II males was 7.44 and 0.85 μg kg body wt.(-1) day(-1) (p <0.0001). In females, it was 5.3 and 0.63 μg kg body wt.(-1) day(-1) (p <0.0001) for groups I and II, respectively. Arsenic dose through diet was 3.3 and 2.6 μg kg body wt.(-1) day(-1) (p = 0.088) in males and 2.6 and 1.9 μg kg body wt.(-1) day(-1) (p = 0.0081) in females. Median arsenic levels in urine of groups I and II males were 124 and 61 μg L(-1) (p = 0.052) and in females 130 and 52 μg L(-1) (p = 0.0001), respectively. When arsenic levels in the water were reduced to below 50 μg L(-1) (Indian permissible limit), total arsenic intake and arsenic intake through the water significantly decreased, but arsenic uptake through the diet was found to be not significantly affected. Moreover, it was found that drinking water mainly contributed to variations in urine arsenic concentrations. However, differences between male and female participants also indicate that not only arsenic uptake, but also many physiological factors affect arsenic behavior in the body and its excretion. As total median arsenic exposure still often exceeded 3.0 μg kg body wt.(-1) day(-1) (the permissible lower limit established by the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives) after installation of the drinking water filters, it can be concluded that

  13. Two Year Community: Design and Components of a Two-Year College Interdisciplinary Field-Study Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Benjamin A.; Martin, Todd C.

    2013-01-01

    Interdisciplinary field study courses at 2-year colleges can provide an opportunity to enhance student learning. The authors present here an 11-day interdisciplinary field-study course designed for nonscience majors at a 2-year college. Using a theoretical learning framework that emphasizes cognitive and metacognitive gains, the field study…

  14. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions or the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Injection of nutrient stimulates the growth and metabolism of reservoir bacteria, which produces beneficial products to enhance oil recovery. Sometimes, chemical treatments are used to clean or condition injection water. Such a chemical treatment has been initiated by Sullivan and Company at the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit. The unit injection water was treated with a mixture of water, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, and three proprietary chemicals. To determine if the chemicals would have an impact on the pilot, it was important to determine the effects of the chemical additives on the growth and metabolism of the bacteria from wells in this field. Two types of media were used: a mineral salts medium with molasses and nitrate, and this medium with 25 ppm of the treatment chemicals added. Samples were collected anaerobically from each of two wells, 1A-9 and 7-2. A sample from each well was inoculated and cultured in the broth tubes of molasses-nitrate medium with and without the chemicals. Culturing temperature was 35{degrees}C. Absorbance, pressure and cell number were checked to determine if the chemicals affected the growth and metabolism of bacteria in the brine samples. 12 figs.

  15. Age 2: Findings from the 2-Year-Old Follow-Up of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B). E.D. TAB. NCES 2006-043

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Gail M.; Flanagan, Kristin Denton

    2006-01-01

    This E.D. TAB is the first report produced using data from the second round of data collection for the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B), a study of a nationally representative sample of children born in the year 2001. The report provides descriptive information about these children when they were about 2 years old. It…

  16. Mental health service use by patients with dysthymic disorder: treatment use and dropout in a 7 1/2-year naturalistic follow-up study.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Brian R; Klein, Daniel N

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about long-term treatment use among patients with dysthymia. This paper describes patterns of treatment use by 85 outpatients with dysthymic disorder and a comparison group of 36 outpatients with nonchronic (episodic) major depression in a naturalistic follow-up. Patients with dysthymia had higher rates of treatment use across 7 1/2 years compared with patients with episodic major depression. Baseline variables that predicted which patients with dysthymia dropped out of treatment before recovering from dysthymic disorder included age, ethnicity, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Revised Third Edition Axis II pathology as obtained from informant reports, higher self-reported autonomy, and receiving psychotherapy alone as compared to receiving a combination of psychotherapy and medication. Dysthymic disorder places a significant burden on the mental health services system, yet many outpatients with dysthymia may be receiving inadequate treatment. Younger patients, ethnic minority patients, and patients with personality disorders may be at increased risk of dropping out from treatment for depression. Combination treatments may increase treatment retention.

  17. The Role of Depressive Symptoms, Family Invalidation and Behavioral Impulsivity in the Occurrence and Repetition of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Chinese Adolescents: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Jianing; Leung, Freedom

    2012-01-01

    This study used zero-inflated poisson regression analysis to examine the role of depressive symptoms, family invalidation, and behavioral impulsivity in the occurrence and repetition of non-suicidal self-injury among Chinese community adolescents over a 2-year period. Participants, 4782 high school students, were assessed twice during the…

  18. Predictors (0-10 Months) of Psychopathology at Age 1 1/2 Years--A General Population Study in the Copenhagen Child Cohort CCC 2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skovgaard, A. M.; Olsen, E. M.; Christiansen, E.; Houmann, T.; Landorph, S. L.; Jorgensen, T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies of mental health problems in the first years of life are few. This study aims to investigate infancy predictors of psychopathology in the second year of life. Methods: A random general population sample of 210 children from the Copenhagen Child Birth Cohort CCC 2000 was investigated by data from National Danish…

  19. Working Memory Arrest in Children with High-Functioning Autism Compared to Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Results from a 2-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Per N.; Skogli, Erik W.; Hovik, Kjell T.; Geurts, Hilde; Egeland, Jens; Øie, Merete

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the development of verbal working memory in children with high-functioning autism compared to children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and typically developing children. A total of 34 children with high-functioning autism, 72 children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and 45 typically…

  20. Etiological Role and Repeated Infections of Sapovirus among Children Aged Less than 2 Years in a Cohort Study in a Peri-urban Community of Peru.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofang; Jahuira, Helena; Gilman, Robert H; Alva, Alicia; Cabrera, Lilia; Okamoto, Michiko; Xu, Hang; Windle, Henry J; Kelleher, Dermot; Varela, Marco; Verastegui, Manuela; Calderon, Maritza; Sanchez, Gerardo; Sarabia, Vanessa; Ballard, Sarah B; Bern, Caryn; Mayta, Holger; Crabtree, Jean E; Cama, Vitaliano; Saito, Mayuko; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    Human sapovirus has been shown to be one of the most important etiologies in pediatric patients with acute diarrhea. However, very limited data are available about the causative roles and epidemiology of sapovirus in community settings. A nested matched case-control study within a birth cohort study of acute diarrhea in a peri-urban community in Peru from 2007 to 2010 was conducted to investigate the attributable fraction (AF) and genetic diversity of sapovirus. By quantitative reverse transcription-real-time PCR (qPCR) sapovirus was detected in 12.4% (37/299) of diarrheal and 5.7% (17/300) of nondiarrheal stools (P = 0.004). The sapovirus AF (7.1%) was higher in the second year (13.2%) than in the first year (1.4%) of life of children. Ten known genotypes and one novel cluster (n = 5) within four genogroups (GI, GII, GIV, and GV) were identified by phylogenetic analysis of a partial VP1 gene. Further sequence analysis of the full VP1 gene revealed a possible novel genotype, tentatively named GII.8. Notably, symptomatic reinfections with different genotypes within the same (n = 3) or different (n = 5) genogroups were observed in eight children. Sapovirus exhibited a high attributable burden for acute gastroenteritis, especially in the second year of life, of children in a Peruvian community. Further large-scale studies are needed to understand better the global burden, genetic diversity, and repeated infections of sapovirus.

  1. Etiological Role and Repeated Infections of Sapovirus among Children Aged Less than 2 Years in a Cohort Study in a Peri-urban Community of Peru.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofang; Jahuira, Helena; Gilman, Robert H; Alva, Alicia; Cabrera, Lilia; Okamoto, Michiko; Xu, Hang; Windle, Henry J; Kelleher, Dermot; Varela, Marco; Verastegui, Manuela; Calderon, Maritza; Sanchez, Gerardo; Sarabia, Vanessa; Ballard, Sarah B; Bern, Caryn; Mayta, Holger; Crabtree, Jean E; Cama, Vitaliano; Saito, Mayuko; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    Human sapovirus has been shown to be one of the most important etiologies in pediatric patients with acute diarrhea. However, very limited data are available about the causative roles and epidemiology of sapovirus in community settings. A nested matched case-control study within a birth cohort study of acute diarrhea in a peri-urban community in Peru from 2007 to 2010 was conducted to investigate the attributable fraction (AF) and genetic diversity of sapovirus. By quantitative reverse transcription-real-time PCR (qPCR) sapovirus was detected in 12.4% (37/299) of diarrheal and 5.7% (17/300) of nondiarrheal stools (P = 0.004). The sapovirus AF (7.1%) was higher in the second year (13.2%) than in the first year (1.4%) of life of children. Ten known genotypes and one novel cluster (n = 5) within four genogroups (GI, GII, GIV, and GV) were identified by phylogenetic analysis of a partial VP1 gene. Further sequence analysis of the full VP1 gene revealed a possible novel genotype, tentatively named GII.8. Notably, symptomatic reinfections with different genotypes within the same (n = 3) or different (n = 5) genogroups were observed in eight children. Sapovirus exhibited a high attributable burden for acute gastroenteritis, especially in the second year of life, of children in a Peruvian community. Further large-scale studies are needed to understand better the global burden, genetic diversity, and repeated infections of sapovirus. PMID:27076657

  2. [Growth of breastfed and bottle-fed infants up to 2 years of age: CLACYD (Lactation, Alimentation, Growth and Development) study 1993-1995].

    PubMed

    Agrelo, F; Lobo, B; Chesta, M; Berra, S; Sabulsky, J

    1999-07-01

    Studies done in various countries show important differences in the growth of breastfed and bottle-fed children. In addition, it has been found that breast-fed children grow more slowly beginning at the age of 2 or 3 months in comparison with the reference pattern of the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and the World Health Organization (WHO). These results cast doubt on whether maximum growth is the same as optimal growth. The objective of this study was to compare the growth in weight and length, from birth to 24 months, for a group of children who were breast-fed with that of a group who were bottle-fed. The study was also intended to describe the growth of the breastfed group in relation to the NCHS/WHO norms and a WHO "12-month breast-fed pooled data set." For this research, data were analyzed from the "Cordoba: lactation, feeding, growth, and development" study (or CLACYD study, for its Spanish-language acronym). That study looked at a representative cohort, stratified by social class, of children born in 1993 in the city of Cordoba, Argentina. The researchers analyzed anthropometric data on 74 children who were breast-fed during the first year of life and on 108 bottle-fed children. The data had been recorded, using standardized techniques, at birth and at 6, 12, and 24 months of age. Both groups were homogenous with respect to the age and schooling of the parents, social stratum, birth order, maternal height, and child's weight and length at birth. The living conditions (housing construction and availability of water and sewer services) were better among the group that was bottle-fed (P = 0.04). The breast-fed children had a lower weight and a shorter length at 6, 12, and 24 months than did the bottle-fed children. The breast-fed children also showed a slowing in growth with respect to the NCHS/WHO guidelines beginning in the second semester. This indicates that the NCHS/WHO norms are not totally adequate for evaluating the growth of breast

  3. Efficacy and safety of finasteride therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia: results of a 2-year randomized controlled trial (the PROSPECT study). PROscar Safety Plus Efficacy Canadian Two year Study.

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, J C; Fradet, Y; Boake, R C; Pommerville, P J; Perreault, J P; Afridi, S K; Elhilali, M M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of 2 years' treatment of moderate benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with finasteride. DESIGN: Double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, multicentre, prospective randomized study. SETTING: Outpatient care in 28 centres across Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Men aged 45 to 80, in good health, with moderate BPH and no evidence of prostate cancer. A total of 613 men were entered into the study; 472 completed the 2 years of treatment. INTERVENTION: After 1 month of receiving a placebo (run-in period), patients were given either finasteride (5 mg/d) or a placebo for 2 years. OUTCOME MEASURES: Efficacy: changes from baseline in BPH symptom scores, maximum urinary flow rates and prostate volume. Safety: onset, course and resolution of all adverse events during the treatment period. RESULTS: In the efficacy analyses the mean BPH symptom scores decreased 2.1 points (from 15.8 to 13.7) in the finasteride group, as compared with a decrease of 0.7 points (from 16.6 to 15.9) in the placebo group (P < or = 0.01). The maximum urinary flow rate increased by a mean of 1.4 mL/s (from 11.1 to 12.5 mL/s) in the finasteride group, as compared with an increase of 0.3 mL/s (from 10.9 to 11.2 mL/s) in the placebo group (p < or = 0.01). The mean prostate volume decreased by 21% (from a mean volume of 44.1 cm3 at baseline) in the treatment group; it increased by 8.4% (from a mean volume of 45.8 cm3 at baseline) in the placebo group (p < or = 0.01). In the safety analysis, the proportion of patients who experienced any adverse event was similar in the two groups (81.0% in the treatment group and 81.2% in the placebo group). However, the incidence of adverse events related to sexual dysfunction were significantly higher in the finasteride group than in the placebo group (ejaculation disorder 7.7% v. 1.7% and impotence 15.8% v. 6.3%; p < or = 0.01 for both parameters). CONCLUSION: Finasteride is a well-tolerated and effective alternative to watchful

  4. Predicting adolescent problematic online game use from teacher autonomy support, basic psychological needs satisfaction, and school engagement: a 2-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chengfu; Li, Xian; Zhang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Problematic online game use (POGU) has become a serious global public health concern among adolescents. However, its influencing factors and mediating mechanisms remain largely unknown. This study provides the first longitudinal design to test stage-environment fit theory empirically in POGU. A total of 356 Chinese students reported on teacher autonomy support, basic psychological needs satisfaction, school engagement, and POGU in the autumn of their 7th-9th grade years. Path analyses supported the proposed pathway: 7th grade teacher autonomy support increased 8th grade basic psychological needs satisfaction, which in turn increased 9th grade school engagement, which ultimately decreased 9th grade POGU. Furthermore, 7th grade teacher autonomy support directly increased 9th grade school engagement, which in turn decreased 9th grade POGU. These findings suggest that teacher autonomy support is an important protective predictor of adolescent POGU, and basic psychological needs satisfaction and school engagement are the primary mediators in this association.

  5. The Role of Human Coronaviruses in Children Hospitalized for Acute Bronchiolitis, Acute Gastroenteritis, and Febrile Seizures: A 2-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Jevšnik, Monika; Steyer, Andrej; Pokorn, Marko; Mrvič, Tatjana; Grosek, Štefan; Strle, Franc; Lusa, Lara; Petrovec, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are associated with a variety of clinical presentations in children, but their role in disease remains uncertain. The objective of our prospective study was to investigate HCoVs associations with various clinical presentations in hospitalized children up to 6 years of age. Children hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis (AB), acute gastroenteritis (AGE), or febrile seizures (FS), and children admitted for elective surgical procedures (healthy controls) were included in the study. In patients with AB, AGE, and FS, a nasopharyngeal (NP) swab and blood sample were obtained upon admission and the follow-up visit 14 days later, whereas in children with AGE a stool sample was also acquired upon admission; in healthy controls a NP swab and stool sample were taken upon admission. Amplification of polymerase 1b gene was used to detect HCoVs in the specimens. HCoVs-positive specimens were also examined for the presence of several other viruses. HCoVs were most often detected in children with FS (19/192, 9.9%, 95% CI: 6–15%), followed by children with AGE (19/218, 8.7%, 95% CI: 5.3–13.3%) and AB (20/308, 6.5%, 95% CI: 4.0–9.8%). The presence of other viruses was a common finding, most frequent in the group of children with AB (19/20, 95%, 95% CI: 75.1–99.8%), followed by FS (10/19, 52.6%, 95% CI: 28.9–75.6%) and AGE (7/19, 36.8%, 95% CI: 16.3–61.6%). In healthy control children HCoVs were detected in 3/156 (1.9%, 95% CI: 0.4–5.5%) NP swabs and 1/150 (0.7%, 95% CI: 0.02–3.3%) stool samples. It seems that an etiological role of HCoVs is most likely in children with FS, considering that they had a higher proportion of positive HCoVs results than patients with AB and those with AGE, and had the highest viral load; however, the co-detection of other viruses was 52.6%. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00987519 PMID:27171141

  6. Decreased use of glucocorticoids in biological-experienced patients with rheumatoid arthritis who initiated intravenous abatacept: results from the 2-year ACTION study

    PubMed Central

    Alten, Rieke; Nüßlein, Hubert; Galeazzi, Mauro; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin; Nurmohamed, Michael T; Bensen, William G; Burmester, Gerd R; Peter, Hans-Hartmut; Pavelka, Karel; Chartier, Mélanie; Poncet, Coralie; Rauch, Christiane; Elbez, Yedid; Le Bars, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prolonged glucocorticoid use may increase the risk of adverse safety outcomes, including cardiovascular events. The European League Against Rheumatism and the Canadian Rheumatology Association advise tapering glucocorticoid dose as rapidly as clinically feasible. There is a paucity of published data on RA that adequately describe concomitant treatment patterns. Methods ACTION (AbataCepT In rOutiNe clinical practice) is a non-interventional cohort study of patients from Europe and Canada that investigated the long-term retention of intravenous abatacept in clinical practice. We assessed concomitant glucocorticoids in patients with established RA who had participated in ACTION and received ≥1 biological agent prior to abatacept initiation. Results The analysis included 1009 patients. Glucocorticoids were prescribed at abatacept initiation in 734 (72.7%) patients at a median 7.5 mg/day dose (n=692). Of the patients who remained on abatacept at 24 months, 40.7% were able to decrease their dose of glucocorticoids, including 26.9% who decreased their dose from >5 mg/day to ≤5 mg/day. Conclusion Reduction and/or cessation of glucocorticoid therapy is possible with intravenous abatacept in clinical practice. PMID:26925253

  7. Risedronate prevents persistent bone loss in prostate cancer patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy: results of a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Izumi, K; Mizokami, A; Sugimoto, K; Narimoto, K; Kitagawa, Y; Koh, E; Namiki, M

    2011-09-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer (PCa) causes bone loss. Although we reported previously that risedronate significantly recovers bone mineral density (BMD) for up to 12 months, there have been no reports with longer follow-up periods to date. This study extended our earlier series extending the follow-up period to 24 months. Eligible patients had histologically confirmed PCa without lumbar spine metastasis and underwent ADT. Lumbar spine BMD, urinary deoxypyridinoline (uDPD) and serum bone alkaline phosphatase were measured at 6, 12 and 24 months. Among the total of 96 patients, we analyzed 26 and 18 patients in risedronate administration and control groups, respectively. BMD relative to the young adult mean ratio, uDPD and serum bone alkaline phosphatase of the risedronate administration group recovered significantly after 24 months compared with the control group (P<0.0001, P=0.0001, and P<0.0001, respectively). Transient blurred vision, malaise and vertigo were observed in 1 patient each among the 46 patients treated with risedronate within 28 days after first administration. Oral administration of risedronate is safe and effective for the recovery of ADT-induced bone loss in PCa patients even at 24 months after commencement of treatment.

  8. Clinical instructors' perception of a faculty development programme promoting postgraduate year-1 (PGY1) residents' ACGME six core competencies: a 2-year study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Fa-Yauh; Yang, Ying-Ying; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Chuang, Chiao-Lin; Lee, Wei-Shin; Chang, Ching-Chih; Huang, Chia-Chang; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Cheng, Hao-Min; Jap, Tjin-Shing

    2011-01-01

    Objective The six core competencies designated by Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) are essential for establishing a patient centre holistic medical system. The authors developed a faculty programme to promote the postgraduate year 1 (PGY(1)) resident, ACGME six core competencies. The study aims to assess the clinical instructors' perception, attitudes and subjective impression towards the various sessions of the 'faculty development programme for teaching ACGME competencies.' Methods During 2009 and 2010, 134 clinical instructors participated in the programme to establish their ability to teach and assess PGY(1) residents about ACGME competencies. Results The participants in the faculty development programme reported that the skills most often used while teaching were learnt during circuit and itinerant bedside, physical examination teaching, mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) evaluation demonstration, training workshop and videotapes of 'how to teach ACGME competencies.' Participants reported that circuit bedside teaching and mini-CEX evaluation demonstrations helped them in the interpersonal and communication skills domain, and that the itinerant teaching demonstrations helped them in the professionalism domain, while physical examination teaching and mini-CEX evaluation demonstrations helped them in the patients' care domain. Both the training workshop and videotape session increase familiarity with teaching and assessing skills. Participants who applied the skills learnt from the faculty development programme the most in their teaching and assessment came from internal medicine departments, were young attending physician and had experience as PGY(1) clinical instructors. Conclusions According to the clinical instructors' response, our faculty development programme effectively increased their familiarity with various teaching and assessment skills needed to teach PGY(1) residents and ACGME competencies, and these clinical

  9. Vagus nerve stimulation therapy: 2-year prospective open-label study of 40 subjects with refractory epilepsy and low IQ who are living in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Huf, Roger L; Mamelak, Adam; Kneedy-Cayem, Kara

    2005-05-01

    Treating seizures among patients with mental retardation/developmental disabilities (MR/DD) is difficult owing in large part to the presence of additional comorbidities and the resulting need for polytherapy. Therefore, a nonpharmacological treatment option is needed for this population. This prospective, open-label study documented the long-term outcome of 40 low-IQ (<70) patients living in long-term care facilities who received vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy for pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Subjects were seen every 1 to 3 months by their neurologist (R.H.). Seizure frequency, antiepileptic medication, and quality-of-life information were documented preimplantation and quarterly thereafter through 2 years. The surgery and therapy were well tolerated. Seizures were reduced by at least 50% for 11 subjects. Antiepileptic medications were reduced from 3.3 per subject at baseline to an average of 2.3 per subject after 2 years. According to caregiver reports, overall quality of life improved for the majority of subjects; also, using the Client Development Evaluation Report (CDER), statistically significant improvements were reported at both 1 and 2 years in attention span, word usage, clarity of speech, standing balance, washing dishes, and household chores. VNS is a viable treatment option for low-IQ patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy who are living in long-term care facilities. PMID:15820352

  10. Comparison of 2-year clinical outcomes between diabetic versus nondiabetic patients with acute myocardial infarction after 1-month stabilization: Analysis of the prospective registry of DIAMOND (DIabetic acute myocardial infarctiON Disease) in Korea: an observational registry study.

    PubMed

    Hur, Seung-Ho; Won, Ki-Bum; Kim, In-Cheol; Bae, Jang-Ho; Choi, Dong-Ju; Ahn, Young-Keun; Park, Jong-Seon; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Choi, Rak-Kyeong; Choi, Donghoon; Kim, Joon-Hong; Han, Kyoo-Rok; Park, Hun-Sik; Choi, So-Yeon; Yoon, Jung-Han; Gwon, Hyeon-Cheol; Rha, Seung-Woon; Jang, Wooyeong; Bae, Jang-Whan; Hwang, Kyung-Kuk; Lim, Do-Sun; Jung, Kyung-Tae; Oh, Seok-Kyu; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Shin, Eun-Seok; Kim, Kee-Sik

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed the 2-year clinical outcomes of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a cohort of the DIAMOND (DIabetic Acute Myocardial infarctiON Disease) registry. Clinical outcomes were compared between 1088 diabetic AMI patients in the DIAMOND registry after stabilization of MI and 1088 nondiabetic AMI patients from the KORMI (Korean AMI) registry after 1 : 1 propensity score matching using traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Stabilized patients were defined as patients who did not have any clinical events within 1 month after AMI. Primary outcomes were the 2-year rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), a composite of all-cause death, recurrent MI (re-MI), and target vessel revascularization (TVR). Matched comparisons revealed that diabetic patients exhibited significantly lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and estimated glomerular filtration rate and smaller stent size. Diabetic patients exhibited significantly higher 2-year rates of MACE (8.0% vs 3.7%), all-cause death (3.9% vs 1.4%), re-MI (2.8% vs 1.2%), and TVR (3.5% vs 1.3%) than nondiabetic patients (all P < 0.01), and higher cumulative rates in Kaplan-Meier analyses of MACE, all-cause death, and TVR (all P < 0.05). A multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that chronic kidney disease, LVEF < 35%, and long stent were independent predictors of MACE, and large stent diameter and the use of drug-eluting stents were protective factors against MACE. The 2-year MACE rate beyond 1 month after AMI was significantly higher in DM patients than non-DM patients, and this rate was associated with higher comorbidities, coronary lesions, and procedural characteristics in DM.

  11. EDF field operation computerization study

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot, L.; Pirus, D.

    2006-07-01

    The main control room has been the subject of extensive research and actions into improved operations assistance. On the other hand, few studies concern the need for field operation improvements, which have few assistance resources adapted to working requirements. Why? Past studies have shown the inability of technology to assume job constraints (insufficient screen readability, excessive equipment weight, prohibitive response times). Nevertheless, today new technologies can be adapted to field operations, and they justify further study. Real needs exist: local operations are often complex and are led in difficult environments where conditions prevent the use of paper-based documents. The issue is a significant risk of error which might impact plant reliability. The cumbersome nature of paper procedures, the working environment and the operational feed-back of experience led us to concentrate on the field operation to identify how it may be improved by the use of these new technologies. Such equipment would allow a better traceability and quality of actions. Possibility of communications with other plant personnel and information sharing may be also immediately available for all. This paper presents a study which intends to collect assistance requirements through an analysis of working practices and organizations with local personnel. Our aim is to identify which of those might benefit from IT support. This collection was obtained through interviews and observations. These two methods helped us to define potential needs, constraints and consequences for work organization. This paper presents the study results and findings, identifies professions which may benefit from the use of wearable computers and describes how the reliability and efficiency of human actions would be improved. Finally we identify design requirements and criteria to be used for writing the technical specifications for a test prototype. (authors)

  12. Long-term effects of a diet loosely restricting carbohydrates on HbA1c levels, BMI and tapering of sulfonylureas in type 2 diabetes: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Haimoto, Hajime; Iwata, Mitsunaga; Wakai, Kenji; Umegaki, Hiroyuki

    2008-02-01

    The aim was to assess the long-term effect of a loose restriction of carbohydrate intake (carbohydrate-reduced diet: CARD) compared to a conventional diet (CD) in type 2 diabetes. One hundred and thirty-three type 2 diabetic outpatients followed the CD (n=57, 1734+/-410 kcal, carbohydrate:protein:fat ratio=57:16:26) or CARD (n=76, 1773+/-441 kcal, carbohydrate:protein:fat ratio=45:18:33) according to their own will, and were followed up for 2 years. Glycemic control, body mass index (BMI), serum cholesterols and dose of antidiabetic drugs were assessed at baseline and after 1 and 2 years. At baseline, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and BMI levels were 7.1+/-1.0% and 24.2+/-2.9, respectively, in the CD group, and 7.4+/-1.1% and 25.1+/-3.4 in the CARD group, showing no significant differences. During the 2-year follow-up period, HbA1c levels were significantly improved in the CARD group (CD: 7.5+/-1.3%, CARD: 6.7+/-0.6%, P<0.001), and BMI decreased more significantly in the CARD group (CD: 23.8+/-3.0, CARD: 23.8+/-3.5, P<0.001). The doses of sulfonylureas clearly tapered, and serum cholesterol profiles improved significantly with the CARD. Our results warrant a long-term and large-scale randomized study of the diet for type 2 diabetes.

  13. The role of depressive symptoms, family invalidation and behavioral impulsivity in the occurrence and repetition of non-suicidal self-injury in Chinese adolescents: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    You, Jianing; Leung, Freedom

    2012-04-01

    This study used zero-inflated poisson regression analysis to examine the role of depressive symptoms, family invalidation, and behavioral impulsivity in the occurrence and repetition of non-suicidal self-injury among Chinese community adolescents over a 2-year period. Participants, 4782 high school students, were assessed twice during the follow-up period. Results indicate that while Year 1 depressive symptoms and family invalidation were significantly associated with the occurrence of Year 2 NSSI, Year 1 behavioral impulsivity contributed to both the occurrence and repetition of Year 2 NSSI. Findings of this study suggest that adolescents who display multiple impulsive behaviors may be at particular risk for engaging in repetitive NSSI. Clinical implications of these findings and future research directions were discussed.

  14. Field-structured composite studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James Ellis; Williamson, Rodney L.

    2004-04-01

    Field-structured composites (FSCs) were produced by hosting micron-sized gold-coated nickel particles in a pre-polymer and allowing the mixture to cure in a magnetic field environment. The feasibility of controlling a composite's electrical conductivity using feedback control applied to the field coils was investigated. It was discovered that conductivity in FSCs is primarily determined by stresses in the polymer host matrix due to cure shrinkage. Thus, in cases where the structuring field was uniform and unidirectional so as to produce chainlike structures in the composite, no electrical conductivity was measured until well after the structuring field was turned off at the gel point. In situations where complex, rotating fields were used to generate complex, three-dimensional structures in a composite, very small, but measurable, conductivity was observed prior to the gel point. Responsive, sensitive prototype chemical sensors were developed based on this technology with initial tests showing very promising results.

  15. Studying fringe field effect of a field emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayfullin, M. F.; Nikiforov, K. A.

    2014-10-01

    Field emitter arrays on heavy As-doped Si wafer are studied in vacuum nanoelectronics diode configuration. Different shapes of emitters are considered: cone-shaped point-emitters and cylinder-shaped sharp-edge-emitters are compared. Micro scale field enhancement factor on the edge of cylindrical emitter was calculated via home-developed Matlab application and the results are presented. Two types of anode geometry are proposed: plane anode and spherical anode. Experimental and modelling results of surface electric field distribution are presented. The spherical shape of anode allows higher voltage (and higher field emission current) without destructive arcs risk.

  16. Combining Dedicated Online Training and Apprenticeships in the Field to Assist in Professionalization of Humanitarian Aid Workers: a 2-year Pilot Project for Anesthesia and Intensive Care Residents Working in Resource Constrained and Low-income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Foletti, Marco; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Ragazzoni, Luca; Djalali, Ahmadreza; Ripoll Gallardo, Alba; Burkle, Frederick M.; Della Corte, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: As a result of the gaps in humanitarian response highlighted by several reports, the international community called for an increased professionalization of humanitarian aid workers. This paper describes a pilot project by an Italian university and a non-profit, non-governmental organization to implement a medical apprenticeship in low-income countries during Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine residencies. Methods: Before deployment, participants were required to complete a dedicated online training course about safety and security in the field, principles of anesthesia at the district hospital level, emergency and essential surgical care, essentials of medical treatment in resource-constrained environments and psychological support in emergencies. Results: At the end of the program, a qualitative self-evaluation questionnaire administered to participants highlighted how the project allowed the participants to advance their professional skills when working in a low-resource environment, while also mastering their adapting skills and the ability to interact and cooperate with local healthcare personnel. The project also proved to be a means for personal growth, making these experiences a recommendation for all residents as a necessary step for the professionalization of healthcare personnel involved in humanitarian aid. PMID:25642362

  17. Computer-Guided Implant Surgery in Fresh Extraction Sockets and Immediate Loading of a Full Arch Restoration: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study of 14 Consecutively Treated Patients.

    PubMed

    Daas, M; Assaf, A; Dada, K; Makzoumé, J

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem. Low scientific evidence is identified in the literature for combining implant placement in fresh extraction sockets with immediate function. Moreover, the few studies available on immediate implants in postextraction sites supporting immediate full-arch rehabilitation clearly lack comprehensive protocols. Purpose. The purpose of this study is to report outcomes of a comprehensive protocol using CAD-CAM technology for surgical planning and fabrication of a surgical template and to demonstrate that immediate function can be easily performed with immediate implants in postextraction sites supporting full-arch rehabilitation. Material and Methods. 14 subjects were consecutively rehabilitated (13 maxillae and 1 mandible) with 99 implants supporting full-arch fixed prostheses followed between 6 and 24 months (mean of 16 months). Outcome measures were prosthesis and implant success, biologic and prosthetic complications, pain, oedema evaluation, and radiographic marginal bone levels at surgery and then at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results. The overall cumulative implant survival rate at mean follow-up time of 16 months was 97.97%. The average marginal bone loss was 0,9 mm. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study, the results validate this treatment modality for full-arch rehabilitations with predictable outcomes and high survival rate after 2 years. PMID:26064119

  18. Comprehensive study of back and leg pain improvements after adult spinal deformity surgery: analysis of 421 patients with 2-year follow-up and of the impact of the surgery on treatment satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Justin K; Smith, Justin S; Clark, Aaron J; Lafage, Virginie; Kim, Han Jo; Rolston, John D; Eastlack, Robert; Hart, Robert A; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Kelly, Michael P; Kebaish, Khaled; Gupta, Munish; Klineberg, Eric; Hostin, Richard; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank; Ames, Christopher P

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Back and leg pain are the primary outcomes of adult spinal deformity (ASD) and predict patients' seeking of surgical management. The authors sought to characterize changes in back and leg pain after operative or nonoperative management of ASD. Outcomes were assessed according to pain severity, type of surgical procedure, Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-Schwab spine deformity class, and patient satisfaction. METHODS This study retrospectively reviewed data in a prospective multicenter database of ASD patients. Inclusion criteria were the following: age > 18 years and presence of spinal deformity as defined by a scoliosis Cobb angle ≥ 20°, sagittal vertical axis length ≥ 5 cm, pelvic tilt angle ≥ 25°, or thoracic kyphosis angle ≥ 60°. Patients were grouped into nonoperated and operated subcohorts and by the type of surgical procedure, spine SRS-Schwab deformity class, preoperative pain severity, and patient satisfaction. Numerical rating scale (NRS) scores of back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, physical component summary (PCS) scores of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, minimum clinically important differences (MCIDs), and substantial clinical benefits (SCBs) were assessed. RESULTS Patients in whom ASD had been operatively managed were 6 times more likely to have an improvement in back pain and 3 times more likely to have an improvement in leg pain than patients in whom ASD had been nonoperatively managed. Patients whose ASD had been managed nonoperatively were more likely to have their back or leg pain remain the same or worsen. The incidence of postoperative leg pain was 37.0% at 6 weeks postoperatively and 33.3% at the 2-year follow-up (FU). At the 2-year FU, among patients with any preoperative back or leg pain, 24.3% and 37.8% were free of back and leg pain, respectively, and among patients with severe (NRS scores of 7-10) preoperative back or leg pain, 21.0% and 32.8% were free of back and leg pain, respectively

  19. Studies in Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastianelli, Fiorenzo

    We analyze several topics in quantum field theory, mainly motivated by their role in the formulation of string theories. The common theme in what follows is the implementation of symmetries, such as local supersymmetry or BRST symmetry, through an action principle and the analysis of anomalies, the latter describing the breakdown of these symmetries at the quantum level. In the first part of this dissertation, we analyze "chiral bosons", i.e. massless scalar fields in a two -dimensional spacetime propagating in only one of the two light-cone directions. We present a general method for constructing couplings for chiral bosons and give details for the coupling to supergravity. The notion of a two dimensional chiral boson is generalized in d = 4k + 2 spacetime dimensions to that of a self-dual antisymmetric tensor field. We derive the coupling to gravity and compute the gravitational anomalies using the Feynman rules obtained from the action. We find agreement with the important work of Alvarez-Gaume and Witten, who conjectured the relevant Feynman rules. Our result therefore completes and justifies the Alvarez-Gaume-Witten findings. For the case of d = 2 we also show how to use the method of Fujikawa for computing anomalies from the non-invariance of the path integral measure. We obtain the full effective action by integrating the anomaly equation. In the second part we focus on a method for computing the consistent anomalies in the Fujikawa scheme. In a first application, we derive the consistent regulators for the various fields of the quantum action of the spinning string in superspace. These regulators produce the anomalies which satisfy the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions. In a second application, we analyze the anomalous structure of the Green-Schwarz formulation of the heterotic string. We find anomalies which generically do not cancel on an arbitrary world-sheet manifold. This raises questions concerning the possible validity of such a formulation of

  20. Stability assessment of a moderately conforming all-polyethylene tibial component in total knee arthroplasty: a prospective RSA study with 2 years of follow-up of the Kinemax Plus design.

    PubMed

    Adalberth, G; Nilsson, K G; Byström, S; Kolstad, K; Mallmin, H; Milbrink, J

    1999-01-01

    The magnitude and pattern of the migration of an all-polyethylene tibial component with moderately conforming articular surfaces in total knee arthroplasty was analyzed in 20 patients > or =60 years during a 2-year follow-up using radiostereometry (RSA). Most of the migration occurred during the initial 4 months, whereafter the migration diminished, reaching a mean maximum migration of 0.75 mm at 2 years. Similar patterns were found for rotation of the implant. Maximum subsidence at 2 years was 0.7 mm and was most commonly located at the posteromedial part of the tibial component. These results indicate that an all-polyethylene tibial component with moderately conforming articular geometry and with a thickness of 10-12 mm demonstrated migration patterns compatible with a favorable prognosis in regard to future aseptic loosening.

  1. Recent biophysical studies in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maret, Georg

    1990-06-01

    A brief overview of biophysical effects of steady magnetic fields is given. The need of high field strength is illustrated by several recent diamagnetic orientation experiments. They include rod-like viruses, purple membranes and chromosomes. Results of various studies on bees, quails, rats and pigeons exposed to fields above 7 T are also resumed.

  2. Mentoring Field Directors: A National Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Martha L.; Raskin, Miriam S.

    2014-01-01

    In social work field education, mentoring is underused and lacks research data. There is a paucity of research that examines the effect mentoring has on social work field directors who administer field programs at the undergraduate and/or graduate level. This exploratory study fills this void by examining the mentoring opportunities and…

  3. Decrease in self-esteem mediates the association between symptoms of social phobia and depression in middle adolescence in a sex-specific manner: a 2-year follow-up of a prospective population cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Social phobia and depression are common, highly comorbid disorders in middle adolescence. The mechanism underlying this comorbidity, however, is unclear. Decrease in self-esteem caused by the initial disorder might play a decisive role in the development of the subsequent disorder. The present study aimed to determine whether the association between symptoms of social phobia and depression is mediated by decrease in self-esteem in mid-adolescent girls and boys. Methods As a part of the prospective Adolescent Mental Health Cohort (AMCH), subjects of this study were 9th grade pupils (mean age, 15.5) responding to a survey conducted in 2002–2003 (T1) and to a 2-year follow-up survey in 2004–2005 (T2) (N = 2070, mean age 17.6 years, 54.5% girls). Results Symptoms of social phobia without symptoms of depression at age 15 and symptoms of depression at age 17 were associated only among boys, and this association was mediated by decrease in self-esteem. Symptoms of depression without symptoms of social phobia at age 15 and symptoms of social phobia at age 17 were associated only among girls, and this association was partially mediated by decrease in self-esteem. Conclusions Decrease in self-esteem plays a decisive role in the association between social phobia and depression. Self-esteem should be a key focus in interventions for adolescents suffering from social phobia or depression. Efficient intervention for the first disorder might help to prevent the decline in self-esteem and thus the incidence of the subsequent disorder. These findings are based on a sample of Finnish adolescents and should be confirmed in other jurisdictions or in more ethnically diverse samples. PMID:24641987

  4. Repetitive Behaviours in Typically Developing 2-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leekam, Susan; Tandos, Jonathan; McConachie, Helen; Meins, Elizabeth; Parkinson, Kathryn; Wright, Charlotte; Turner, Michelle; Arnott, Bronia; Vittorini, Lucia; Le Couteur, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Background: Repetitive behaviours are an essential part of the diagnosis of autism but are also commonly seen in typically developing children. The current study investigated the frequency and factor structure of repetitive behaviours in a large community sample of 2-year-olds. Methods: A new measure, the Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire (RBQ-2)…

  5. Association between inflammatory cytokines and the risk of post-stroke depression, and the effect of depression on outcomes of patients with ischemic stroke in a 2-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jian-Tong; Cheng, Chao; Ma, Ying-Jun; Huang, Jin; Dai, Min-Chao; Jiang, Chen; Wang, Cheng; Shao, Jun-Fei

    2016-01-01

    The association between inflammatory cytokines and the risk of post-stroke depression (PSD) remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate this association and the effect of PSD on the outcomes of ischemic stroke patients. A total of 355 patients who had experienced ischemic stroke participated in inflammatory cytokine detection by ELISA, in addition to depression, quality of life (QOL) and body performance testing. Cox regression was used to evaluate the associations between PSD risk, inflammatory cytokines and the outcomes of patients. Measurement data was evaluated using Student's t test, and counted data was measured by χ2 test. The incidence of PSD during the 2-year follow-up was 23.1%. The risk of PSD elevated with increased interleukin (IL)-6 expression levels [hazard ratio (HR)=3.18; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.37–7.36] following the adjustment of confounders. However, no significant associations were identified between PSD and other inflammatory cytokines. QOL and body performance in the depressed group were significantly worse compared with those in the non-depressed group. The risk of stroke recurrence in patients with depression increased two-fold compared with patients without depression (HR=2.020; 95% CI, 1.123–3.635; Ptrend=0.019). No significant associations between PSD and the risk of mortality (HR=1.497; 95% CI, 0.547–4.098) were observed. In conclusion, depression is prevalent in patients following ischemic stroke. IL-6 is positively associated with the risk of PSD, and may predict its development in patients following ischemic stroke. PSD correlates with outcomes of patients, and the effective management of PSD may improve the prognosis of patients. PMID:27588080

  6. French multicenter phase III randomized study testing concurrent twice-a-day radiotherapy and cisplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (BiRCF) in unresectable pharyngeal carcinoma: Results at 2 years (FNCLCC-GORTEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Bensadoun, Rene-Jean . E-mail: rene-jean.bensadoun@nice.fnclcc.fr; Benezery, Karen; Dassonville, Olivier; Magne, Nicolas; Poissonnet, Gilles; Ramaioli, Alain; Lemanski, Claire; Bourdin, Sylvain; Tortochaux, Jacques; Peyrade, Frederic; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Chamorey, Emmanuel Phar; Vallicioni, Jacques; Seng Hang; Alzieu, Claude; Gery, Bernard; Chauvel, Pierre; Schneider, Maurice; Santini, Jose; Demard, Francois; Calais, Gilles

    2006-03-15

    Background: Unresectable carcinomas of the oropharynx and hypopharynx still have a poor long-term prognosis. Following a previous phase II study, this phase III multicenter trial was conducted between November 1997 and March 2002. Methods: Nontreated, strictly unresectable cases were eligible. Twice-daily radiation: two fractions of 1.2 Gy/day, 5 days per week, with no split (D1{sup {yields}}D46). Total tumor doses: 80.4 Gy/46 day (oropharynx), 75.6 Gy/44 day (hypopharynx). Chemotherapy (arm B): Cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} (D1, D22, D43); 5FU, continuous infusion (D1{sup {yields}}D5), 750 mg/m{sup 2}/day cycle 1; 430 mg/m{sup 2}/day cycles 2 and 3. Results: A total of 163 evaluable patients. Grade 3-4 acute mucositis 82.6% arm B/69.5% arm A (NS); Grade 3-4 neutropenia 33.3% arm B/2.4% arm A (p < 0.05). Enteral nutrition through gastrostomy tube was more frequent in arm B before treatment and at 6 months (p < 0.01). At 24 months, overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and specific survival (SS) were significantly better in arm B. OS: 37.8% arm B vs. 20.1% arm A (p = 0.038); DFS: 48.2% vs. 25.2% (p = 0.002); SS: 44.5% vs. 30.2% (p 0.021). No significant difference between the two arms in the amount of side effects at 1 and 2 years. Conclusion: For these unresectable cases, chemoradiation provides better outcome than radiation alone, even with an 'aggressive' dose-intensity radiotherapy schedule.

  7. A minimum 2-year comparative study of autologous cancellous bone grafting versus beta-tricalcium phosphate in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Toru; Naito, Kentaro; Arima, Hironori; Yoshimura, Masaki; Ohata, Kenji; Takami, Toshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Although titanium stand-alone cages are commonly used in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), there are several concerns such as cage subsidence after surgery. The efficacy of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules as a packing material in 1- or 2-level ACDF using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage is not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to investigate the validity of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP. This retrospective study included 55 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF with autologous iliac cancellous bone grafting and 45 consecutive patients with β-TCP grafting. All patients completed at least 2-year postoperative follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the associations between study variables and nonunion after surgery. Significant neurological recovery after surgery was obtained in both groups. Cage subsidence was noted in 14 of 72 cages (19.4 %) in the autograft group and 12 of 64 cages (18.8 %) in the β-TCP group. A total of 66 cages (91.7 %) in the autograft group showed osseous or partial union, and 58 cages (90.6 %) in the β-TCP group showed osseous or partial union by 2 years after surgery. There were no significant differences in cage subsidence and the bony fusion rate between the two groups. Multivariate analysis using a logistic regression model showed that fusion level at C6/7, 2-level fusion, and cage subsidence of grades 2-3 were significantly associated with nonunion at 2 years after surgery. Although an acceptable surgical outcome with negligible complication appears to justify the use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP, cage subsidence after surgery needs to be avoided to achieve acceptable bony fusion at the fused segments. Fusion level at C6/7 or 2-level fusion may be another risk factor of nonunion. PMID:27098659

  8. A minimum 2-year comparative study of autologous cancellous bone grafting versus beta-tricalcium phosphate in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Toru; Naito, Kentaro; Arima, Hironori; Yoshimura, Masaki; Ohata, Kenji; Takami, Toshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Although titanium stand-alone cages are commonly used in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), there are several concerns such as cage subsidence after surgery. The efficacy of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules as a packing material in 1- or 2-level ACDF using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage is not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to investigate the validity of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP. This retrospective study included 55 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF with autologous iliac cancellous bone grafting and 45 consecutive patients with β-TCP grafting. All patients completed at least 2-year postoperative follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the associations between study variables and nonunion after surgery. Significant neurological recovery after surgery was obtained in both groups. Cage subsidence was noted in 14 of 72 cages (19.4 %) in the autograft group and 12 of 64 cages (18.8 %) in the β-TCP group. A total of 66 cages (91.7 %) in the autograft group showed osseous or partial union, and 58 cages (90.6 %) in the β-TCP group showed osseous or partial union by 2 years after surgery. There were no significant differences in cage subsidence and the bony fusion rate between the two groups. Multivariate analysis using a logistic regression model showed that fusion level at C6/7, 2-level fusion, and cage subsidence of grades 2-3 were significantly associated with nonunion at 2 years after surgery. Although an acceptable surgical outcome with negligible complication appears to justify the use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP, cage subsidence after surgery needs to be avoided to achieve acceptable bony fusion at the fused segments. Fusion level at C6/7 or 2-level fusion may be another risk factor of nonunion.

  9. Performance of p16INK4a ELISA as a primary cervical cancer screening test among a large cohort of HIV-infected women in western Kenya: a 2-year cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tara J; Smith-McCune, Karen; Reuschenbach, Miriam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Maloba, May; Huchko, Megan J

    2016-01-01

    Objective A biomarker with increased specificity for cervical dysplasia compared with human papillomavirus (HPV) testing would be an attractive option for cervical cancer screening among HIV-infected women in resource-limited settings. p16INK4a has been explored as a biomarker for screening in general populations. Design A 2-year cross-sectional study. Setting 2 large HIV primary care clinics in western Kenya. Participants 1054 HIV-infected women in western Kenya undergoing cervical cancer screening as part of routine HIV care from October 2010 to November 2012. Interventions Participants underwent p16INK4a specimen collection and colposcopy. Lesions with unsatisfactory colposcopy or suspicious for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2+ (CIN2+; including CIN2/3 or invasive cervical cancer) were biopsied. Following biopsy, disease status was determined by histopathological diagnosis. Primary and secondary outcome measures We measured the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of p16INK4a ELISA for CIN2+ detection among HIV-infected women and compared them to the test characteristics of current screening methods used in general as well as HIV-infected populations. Results Average p16INK4a concentration in cervical samples was 37.4 U/mL. After colposcopically directed biopsy, 127 (12%) women were determined to have CIN2+. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.664 for p16INK4a to detect biopsy-proven CIN2+. At a p16INK4a cut-off level of 9 U/mL, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 89.0%, 22.9%, 13.6% and 93.8%, respectively. The overall p16INK4a positivity at a cut-off level of 9 U/mL was 828 (78.6%) women. There were 325 (30.8%) cases of correct p16INK4a prediction to detect or rule out CIN2+, and 729 (69.2%) cases of incorrect p16INK4a prediction. Conclusions p16INK4a ELISA did not perform well as a screening test for CIN2+ detection among HIV-infected women due to low

  10. Smoking Patterns, Attitudes and Motives: Unique Characteristics among 2-Year versus 4-Year College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, C. J.; An, L. C.; Thomas, J. L.; Lust, K. A.; Sanem, J. R.; Swan, D. W.; Ahluwalia, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Given the previously documented higher rates of smoking among 2-year college students in comparison with 4-year university students, this study compares smoking patterns, attitudes and motives among 2-year and 4-year college students. Two thousand two hundred and sixty-five undergraduate students aged 18-25 years at a 2-year college and a 4-year…

  11. Molecular approaches to field studies of malaria.

    PubMed

    Beck, Hans-Peter; Tetteh, Kevin

    2008-12-01

    The third 'Molecular Approaches to Malaria' conference was held in Lorne, Australia, in February 2008 and provided extensive information on the application of molecular tools in field studies on malaria. In recent years, technological advances and capacity building in malaria-endemic countries have permitted molecular tools to be applied much more frequently and successfully with exciting new findings. In this review, Hans-Peter Beck and Kevin Tetteh report on the most recent findings using molecular tools in field studies.

  12. Lessons from a Dominican Republic Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Michael M., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing student-centered pedagogy, this case study explores an increasingly prominent and instructive addition to traditional academic coursework--the field study experience. This is particularly true in the arena of environmental education where students learn best by experiencing environmental problems first-hand and then interacting with…

  13. Indigenous Studies as an International Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pino-Robles, Rodolfo

    This paper proposes the development of Indigenous Studies as an international field, both in the sense of advancing the discipline internationally, wherever there are Indigenous peoples, and in the sense of incorporating international perspectives into curricula. In Canada, Indigenous Studies has been and is still treated as something to be done…

  14. Interaction Between Flames and Electric Fields Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between flames and electric fields has long been an interesting research subject that has theoretical importance as well as practical significance. Many of the reactions in a flame follow an ionic pathway: that is, positive and negative ions are formed during the intermediate steps of the reaction. When an external electric field is applied, the ions move according to the electric force (the Coulomb force) exerted on them. The motion of the ions modifies the chemistry because the reacting species are altered, it changes the velocity field of the flame, and it alters the electric field distribution. As a result, the flame will change its shape and location to meet all thermal, chemical, and electrical constraints. In normal gravity, the strong buoyant effect often makes the flame multidimensional and, thus, hinders the detailed study of the problem.

  15. Marine and Environmental Studies Field Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranston School Dept., RI.

    This laboratory manual was developed for a field-oriented high school oceanology program. The organization of the units includes a selection of supplementary activities to allow students to explore ocean studies in more depth. Included are 19 units. The units include biological oceanography, physical oceanography, and some social science topics. A…

  16. Jupiter Environmental Research & Field Studies Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huttemeyer, Bob

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development and workings of the Jupiter Environmental Research and Field Studies Academy that focuses on enabling both teachers and students to participate in real-life learning experiences. Discusses qualifications for admittance, curriculum, location, ongoing projects, students, academics, preparation for life, problem solving, and…

  17. Outdoor Education, Junior Biology Field Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aikman, John H.; And Others

    Field studies for grade nine and ten biology students are developed in this teacher and student guide for outdoor education. A small section is devoted to teacher pre-planning and final sections are concerned with equipment, audio-visual resources, and a large booklist. Twenty-three investigations related to earth science and biology topics are…

  18. Prevalence and Antifungal Susceptibility of 442 Candida Isolates from Blood and Other Normally Sterile Sites: Results of a 2-Year (1996 to 1998) Multicenter Surveillance Study in Quebec, Canada

    PubMed Central

    St-Germain, G.; Laverdière, M.; Pelletier, R.; Bourgault, A.-M.; Libman, M.; Lemieux, C.; Noël, G.

    2001-01-01

    During a 2-year surveillance program (1996 to 1998) in Quebec, Canada, 442 strains of Candida species were isolated from 415 patients in 51 hospitals. The distribution of species was as follows: Candida albicans, 54%; C. glabrata, 15%; C. parapsilosis, 12%; C. tropicalis, 9%; C. lusitaniae, 3%; C. krusei, 3%; and Candida spp., 3%. These data, compared to those of a 1985 survey, indicate variations in species distribution, with the proportions of C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis increasing by 9 and 4%, respectively, and those of C. albicans and C. tropicalis decreasing by 10 and 7%, respectively. However, these differences are statistically significant for C. glabrata and C. tropicalis only. MICs of amphotericin B were ≥4 μg/ml for 3% of isolates, all of which were non-C. albicans species. Three percent of C. albicans isolates were resistant to flucytosine (≥32 μg/ml). Resistance to itraconazole (≥1 μg/ml) and fluconazole (≥64 μg/ml) was observed, respectively, in 1 and 1% of C. albicans, 14 and 9% of C. glabrata, 5 and 0% of C. tropicalis, and 0% of C. parapsilosis and C. lusitaniae isolates. Clinical data were obtained for 343 patients. The overall crude mortality rate was 38%, reflecting the multiple serious underlying illnesses found in these patients. Bloodstream infections were documented for 249 patients (73%). Overall, systemic triazoles had been administered to 10% of patients before the onset of candidiasis. The frequency of isolation of non-C. albicans species was significantly higher in this group of patients. Overall, only two C. albicans isolates were found to be resistant to fluconazole. These were obtained from an AIDS patient and a leukemia patient, both of whom had a history of previous exposure to fluconazole. At present, it appears that resistance to fluconazole in Quebec is rare and is restricted to patients with prior prolonged azole treatment. PMID:11230409

  19. The association of maternal vitamin D status with infant birth outcomes, postnatal growth and adiposity in the first 2 years of life in a multi-ethnic Asian population: the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ong, Yi Lin; Quah, Phaik Ling; Tint, Mya Thway; Aris, Izzuddin M; Chen, Ling Wei; van Dam, Rob M; Heppe, Denise; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Chong, Yap Seng; Yap, Fabian; Lee, Yung Seng; Foong-Fong Chong, Mary

    2016-08-01

    Maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy has been associated with infant birth and postnatal growth outcomes, but reported findings have been inconsistent, especially in relation to postnatal growth and adiposity outcomes. In a mother-offspring cohort in Singapore, maternal plasma vitamin D was measured between 26 and 28 weeks of gestation, and anthropometric measurements were obtained from singleton offspring during the first 2 years of life with 3-month follow-up intervals to examine birth, growth and adiposity outcomes. Associations were analysed using multivariable linear regression. Of a total of 910 mothers, 13·2 % were vitamin D deficient (<50 nmol/l) and 26·5 % were insufficient (50-75 nmol/l). After adjustment for potential confounders and multiple testing, no statistically significant associations were observed between maternal vitamin D status and any of the birth outcomes - small for gestational age (OR 1·00; 95 % CI 0·56, 1·79) and pre-term birth (OR 1·16; 95 % CI 0·64, 2·11) - growth outcomes - weight-for-age z-scores, length-for-age z-scores, circumferences of the head, abdomen and mid-arm at birth or postnatally - and adiposity outcomes - BMI, and skinfold thickness (triceps, biceps and subscapular) at birth or postnatally. Maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy did not influence infant birth outcomes, postnatal growth and adiposity outcomes in this cohort, perhaps due to the low prevalence (1·6 % of the cohort) of severe maternal vitamin D deficiency (defined as of <30·0 nmol/l) in our population. PMID:27339329

  20. HIV-Exposed Uninfected Infants Show Robust Memory B-Cell Responses in Spite of a Delayed Accumulation of Memory B Cells: an Observational Study in the First 2 Years of Life

    PubMed Central

    Nkumama, Irene N.; Gambo, Faith K.; Muema, Daniel M.; Hassan, Amin S.; Jahangir, Margaret N.; Etyang, Timothy J.; Berkley, James A.; Urban, Britta C.

    2016-01-01

    Improved HIV care has led to an increase in the number of HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) infants born to HIV-infected women. Although they are uninfected, these infants experience increased morbidity and mortality. One explanation may be that their developing immune system is altered by HIV exposure, predisposing them to increased postnatal infections. We explored the impact of HIV exposure on the B-cell compartment by determining the B-cell subset distribution, the frequency of common vaccine antigen-specific memory B cells (MBCs), and the levels of antibodies to the respective antigens in HEU and HIV-unexposed uninfected (HUU) infants born to uninfected mothers, using flow cytometry, a B-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively, during the first 2 years of life. For the majority of the B-cell subsets, there were no differences between HEU and HUU infants. However, HIV exposure was associated with a lower proportion of B cells in general and MBCs in particular, largely due to a lower proportion of unswitched memory B cells. This reduction was maintained even after correcting for age. These phenotypic differences in the MBC compartment did not affect the ability of HEU infants to generate recall responses to previously encountered antigens or reduce the antigen-specific antibody levels at 18 months of life. Although HIV exposure was associated with a transient reduction in the proportion of MBCs, we found that the ability of HEU infants to mount robust MBC and serological responses was unaffected. PMID:27170641

  1. Clinical outcomes of pars plicata anterior vitrectomy: 2-year results

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Priya; Agarwal, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the safety and outcome of a surgical approach that uses pars plicata site for anterior vitrectomy during phacoemulsification procedure complicated by posterior capsule rupture and residual cortical matter. Design: Single center, retrospective, interventional, noncomparative study. Materials and Methods: Medical records of a consecutive series of 35 eyes of 35 patients who underwent pars plicata anterior vitrectomy (PPAV) were reviewed. The main outcome measures were corrected and uncorrected distance visual acuity (CDVA, UDVA), early and late postoperative complications and intraocular pressure (IOP). Ultrasound biomicroscopic (UBM) evaluation of sclerotomy site and spectral domain optical coherence tomography analysis for central macular thickness (CMT) was performed. The final visual outcome at 2 years was evaluated. Results: At 2 years follow-up, the mean postoperative UDVA (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR]) and CDVA (logMAR) was 0.49 ± 0.26 and 0.19 ± 0.14, respectively. There was no significant change in the IOP (P = 0.061) and the mean CMT at 2 years was 192.5 ± 5.54 μm. The postoperative UBM image of the sclerotomy site at 8 weeks demonstrated a clear wound without any vitreous adhesion or incarceration. Intraoperative hyphema was seen in 1 (2.8%) case and postoperative uveitis was seen in 2 (5.7%) cases, which resolved with medications. No case of an iatrogenic retinal break or retinal detachment was reported. Conclusions: PPAV enables a closed chamber approach, allows thorough cleanup of vitreous in the pupillary plane and anterior chamber and affords better access to the subincisional and retropupillary cortical remnant with a significant visual outcome and an acceptable complication rate. PMID:26632124

  2. Microbial field pilot study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  3. B-type natriuretic peptide and high sensitive C-reactive protein predict 2-year all cause mortality in chest pain patients: a prospective observational study from Salta, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several mechanisms are involved in the pathophysiology of the Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS). We have addressed whether B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in admission samples may improve risk stratification in chest pain patients with suspected ACS. Methods We included 982 patients consecutively admitted with chest pain and suspected ACS at nine hospitals in Salta, Northern Argentina. Total and cardiac mortality were recorded during a 2-year follow up period. Patients were divided into quartiles according to BNP and hsCRP levels, respectively, and inter quartile differences in mortality were statistically evaluated applying univariate and multivariate analyses. Results 119 patients died, and the BNP and hsCRP levels were significantly higher among these patients than in survivors. In a multivariable Cox regression model for total death and cardiac death in all patients, the hazard ratio (HR) in the highest quartile (Q4) as compared to the lowest quartile (Q1) of BNP was 2.32 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.24-4.35), p = 0.009 and 3.34 (95% CI, 1.26-8.85), p = 0.015, respectively. In the TnT positive patients (TnT > 0.01 ng/mL), the HR for total death and cardiac death in Q4 as compared to Q1 was 2.12 (95% CI, 1.07-4.18), p = 0.031 and 3.42 (95% CI, 1.13-10.32), p = 0.029, respectively. The HR for total death for hsCRP in Q4 as compared to Q1 was 1.97 (95% CI, 1.17-3.32), p = 0.011, but this biomarker did not predict cardiac death (p = 0.21). No prognostic impact of these two biomarkers was found in the TnT negative patients. Conclusion BNP and hsCRP may act as clinically useful biomarkers when obtained at admission in a population with suspected ACS. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01377402. PMID:21958326

  4. Infantile Amnesia across the Years: A 2-Year Follow-Up of Children's Earliest Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Carole; Warren, Kelly L.; Short, Megan M.

    2011-01-01

    Although infantile amnesia has been investigated for many years in adults, only recently has it been investigated in children. This study was a 2-year follow-up and extension of an earlier study. Children (4-13 years old) were asked initially and 2 years later for their earliest 3 memories. At follow-up, their age at the time of these memories…

  5. Clinical neuroprediction: Amygdala reactivity predicts depressive symptoms 2 years later.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Whitney I; Hyde, Luke W; Shaw, Daniel S; Forbes, Erika E; Monk, Christopher S

    2016-06-01

    Depression is linked to increased amygdala activation to neutral and negatively valenced facial expressions. Amygdala activation may be predictive of changes in depressive symptoms over time. However, most studies in this area have focused on small, predominantly female and homogenous clinical samples. Studies are needed to examine how amygdala reactivity relates to the course of depressive symptoms dimensionally, prospectively and in populations diverse in gender, race and socioeconomic status. A total of 156 men from predominately low-income backgrounds completed an fMRI task where they viewed emotional facial expressions. Left and right amygdala reactivity to neutral, but not angry or fearful, facial expressions relative to a non-face baseline at age 20 predicted greater depressive symptoms 2 years later, controlling for age 20 depressive symptoms. Heightened bilateral amygdala reactivity to neutral facial expressions predicted increases in depressive symptoms 2 years later in a large community sample. Neutral facial expressions are affectively ambiguous and a tendency to interpret these stimuli negatively may reflect to cognitive biases that lead to increases in depressive symptoms over time. Individual differences in amygdala reactivity to neutral facial expressions appear to identify those at most risk for a more problematic course of depressive symptoms across time. PMID:26865423

  6. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.F.; Sale, K. ); Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C. )

    1991-06-10

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry. 18 refs.

  7. Field studies in geophysical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S.; King, W.C.; Ursic, J.R.

    1992-07-01

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT) is a quantitative, high- resolution technique for subsurface imaging. This method has been used in a number of shallow applications to image buried waste, trenches, soil strata, tunnels, synthetic magma chambers, and the buried skeletal remains of seismosaurus, the longest dinosaur ever discovered. The theory associated with the GDT inversion and implementing software have been developed for acoustic and scalar electromagnetic waves for bistatic and monostatic measurements in cross-borehole, offset vertical seismic profiling and reflection geometries. This paper presents an overview of some signal processing algorithms, a description of the instrumentation used in field studies, and selected imaging results.

  8. Field studies in geophysical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S. ); King, W.C. . Dept. of Geography and Environmental Engineering); Ursic, J.R. . Region V)

    1992-01-01

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT) is a quantitative, high- resolution technique for subsurface imaging. This method has been used in a number of shallow applications to image buried waste, trenches, soil strata, tunnels, synthetic magma chambers, and the buried skeletal remains of seismosaurus, the longest dinosaur ever discovered. The theory associated with the GDT inversion and implementing software have been developed for acoustic and scalar electromagnetic waves for bistatic and monostatic measurements in cross-borehole, offset vertical seismic profiling and reflection geometries. This paper presents an overview of some signal processing algorithms, a description of the instrumentation used in field studies, and selected imaging results.

  9. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste

  10. Planetary geomorphology field studies: Iceland and Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Field studies of terrestrial landforms and the processes that shape them provide new directions to the study of planetary features. These studies, conducted in Iceland and in Antarctica, investigated physical and chemical weathering mechanisms and rates, eolitan processes, mudflow phenomena, drainage development, and catastrophic fluvial and volcanic phenomena. Continuing investigations in Iceland fall in three main catagories: (1) catastrophic floods of the Jokulsa a Fjollum, (2) lahars associated with explosive volcanic eruptions of Askja caldera, and (3) rates of eolian abrasion in cold, volcanic deserts. The ice-free valleys of Antarctica, in particular those in South Victoria Land, have much is common with the surface of Mars. In addition to providing independent support for the application of the Iceland findings to consideration of the martian erosional system, the Antarctic observations also provide analogies to other martian phenomena. For example, a family of sand dunes in Victoria Valley are stabilized by the incorporation of snow as beds.

  11. Planetary geomorphology field studies: Washington and Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Field studies of terrestrial landforms and the processes that shape them provide new directions to the study of planetary features. Investigations discussed address principally mudflow phenomena and drainage development. At the Valley of 10,000 Smokes (Katmai, AK) and Mount St. Helens, WA, studies of the development of erosional landforms (in particular, drainage) on fresh, new surfaces permitted analysis of the result of competition between geomorphic processes. Of specific interest is the development of stream pattern as a function of the competition between perennial seepage overland flow (from glacial or groundwater sources), ephemeral overland flow (from pluvial or seasonal melt sources), and ephemeral/perennial groundwater sapping, as a function of time since initial resurfacing, material properties, and seasonal/annual environmental conditions.

  12. The Field Trip Book: Study Travel Experiences in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ronald V.

    2010-01-01

    Looking for social studies adventures to help students find connections to democratic citizenship? Look no further! This book provides just the answer teachers need for engaging students in field trips as researching learners with emphasis on interdisciplinary social studies plus skills in collecting and reporting data gathered from field…

  13. Satellite to study earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Satellite (Magsat) designed to measure the near earth magnetic field and crustal anomalies is briefly described. A scalar magnetometer to measure the magnitude of the earth's crustal magnetic field and a vector magnetometer to measure magnetic field direction as well as magnitude are included. The mission and its objectives are summarized along with the data collection and processing system.

  14. Studies of the Martian Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1998-01-01

    This report covers two awards: the first NAGW-2573 was awarded to enable participation in the Mars 94 mission that slipped to become the Mars 96 mission. Upon the unfortunate failure of Mars 96 to achieve its intended trajectory, the second grant was awarded to closeout the Mars 96 activities. Our initial efforts concentrated on assisting our colleagues: W. Riedler, K. Schwingenschuh, K. Gringanz, M. Verigin and Ye. Yeroshenko with advice on the development of the magnetic field portion of the investigation and to help them with test activities. We also worked with them to properly analyze the Phobos magnetic field and plasma data in order to optimize the return from the Mars 94/96 mission. This activity resulted in 18 papers on Mars scientific topics, and two on the instrumentation. One of these latter two papers was the last of the papers written, and speaks to the value of the closeout award. These 20 papers are listed in the attached bibliography. Because we had previously studied Venus and Titan and since it was becoming evident that the magnetic field was very weak, we compared the various properties of the Martian interaction with those of the analogous interactions at Venus and Titan while other papers simply analyzed the properties of the interaction as Phobos 2 observed them. One very interesting observation was the identification of ions picked up in the solar wind, originating in Mars neutral atmosphere. These had been predicted by our earlier observation of cyclotron waves at the proton gyrofrequency in the region upstream from Mars in the solar wind. Of course, the key question we addressed was that of the intrinsic or induced nature of the Martian magnetic field. We found little evidence for the former and much for the latter point of view. We also discussed the instrumentation planned for the Mars balloon and the instrumentation on the orbiter. In all these studies were very rewarding despite the short span of the Phobos data. Although they did not

  15. Geometrical study of nanoscale field effect diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manavizadeh, Negin; Raissi, Farshid; Asl Soleimani, Ebrahim; Pourfath, Mahdi

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, the previously proposed side-contacted field effect diode (FED) is carefully studied and its characteristic is compared against that of a modified FED and a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET). The influences of the body thickness, each gate length and access resistance are investigated. The figures of merit including intrinsic gate delay time and energy-delay product, which represent the speed and switching energy of the device, respectively, are studied. Our results highlight that FEDs are good candidates for obtaining a high Ion/Ioff ratio with a relatively short delay time compared to conventional FEDs and MOSFETs. We show that by a careful scaling of the source-drain region, the access resistance can be optimized. We demonstrate that a well-tempered device with a high switching response and a lower energy consumption can be achieved with a 30 nm body thickness, 85 nm source-drain length and a drain gate length longer than the source gate length.

  16. Medical Care and Your 1- to 2-Year-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... Zika & Pregnancy Medical Care and Your 1- to 2-Year-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Print A A A Text Size ... Following simple instructions? Saying a few words? Combining two words by age 2? The doctor may ask ...

  17. Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W.

    1996-10-01

    The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

  18. Dual rover human habitation field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaker, Harry L.; Thompson, Shelby G.; Szabo, Richard; Twyford, Evan S.; Conlee, Carl S.; Howard, Robert L.

    2013-10-01

    For the last 3 years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been testing a pressurized rover prototype in the deserts of Arizona to obtain human-in-the-loop performance data. This year's field trial consisted of operating two rovers simultaneously while embarking on two 7-day flight-like exploration missions. During the 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) at Black Point Lava Flow and SP Mountain in Arizona, NASA human factors investigators, in cooperation with other engineers and scientists, collected data on both the daily living and working within and around the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV). Both objective and subjective data were collected using standard human factors metrics. Over 305 h of crew habitability data were recorded during the field trial with 65 elements of habitation examined. Acceptability of the vehicles over the course of the missions was considered satisfactory by the majority of the crews. As with previous testing, habitation was considered acceptable by the crews, but some issues concerning stowage, Waste Containment System (WCS) volume, and sleep curtains need to be considered for redesign for the next generation vehicle.

  19. Immunogenicity, Safety, and Tolerability of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Followed by 23-Valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine in Recipients of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Aged ≥2 Years: An Open-Label Study

    PubMed Central

    Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per; Juergens, Christine; Maertens, Johan; Selleslag, Dominik; Sundaraiyer, Vani; Giardina, Peter C.; Clarke, Keri; Gruber, William C.; Scott, Daniel A.; Schmoele-Thoma, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Background. Life-threatening Streptococcus pneumoniae infections often occur after hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT); vaccination is important for prevention. Methods. In an open-label study, patients (n = 251) 3–6 months after allogeneic HSCT received 3 doses of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) at 1-month intervals, a fourth dose 6 months later, and 1 dose of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) 1 month later. Immunogenicity at prespecified time points and vaccine safety were assessed. Results. In the evaluable immunogenicity population (N = 216; mean age, 37.8 years), geometric mean fold rises (GMFRs) of immunoglobulin G geometric mean concentrations from baseline to postdose 3 showed significant increases in antibody levels across all PCV13 serotypes (GMFR range, 2.99–23.85; 95% confidence interval lower limit, >1); there were significant declines over the next 6 months, significant increases from predose 4 to postdose 4 (GMFR range, 3.00–6.97), and little change after PPSV23 (GMFR range, 0.86–1.12). Local and systemic reactions were more frequent after dose 4. Six patients experienced serious adverse events possibly related to PCV13 (facial diplegia, injection-site erythema and pyrexia, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and suspected lack of vaccine efficacy after dose 3 leading to pneumococcal infection), PCV13 and PPSV23 (Guillain-Barré syndrome), or PPSV23 (cellulitis). There were 14 deaths, none related to study vaccines. Conclusions. A 3-dose PCV13 regimen followed by a booster dose may be required to protect against pneumococcal disease in HSCT recipients. Dose 4 was associated with increased local and systemic reactions, but the overall safety profile of a 4-dose regimen was considered acceptable. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00980655. PMID:25870329

  20. ERICA plans for winter storms field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadlock, Ron

    The Experiment on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones over the Atlantic (ERICA) field study will be conducted between December 1, 1988, and February 28, 1989. The oceanic area that is approximately bounded by t he Gulf Stream and North America, from coastal Carolina to just east of Newfoundland, will be the region for special observations obtained by recently developed measurement systems, including high-resolution and safe Loran-C dropwindsondes, CLASS rawinsondes, an array of drifting data buoys, and multiple airborne Doppler radars. The special observations will be acquired within a framework of all conventional operational data available for the eastern United States and Canada, including that from the National Weather Service's land sites (plus supplemental rawinsonde observations), ocean platforms, U.S. Air Force WC-130 National Winter Storms Operations Plan reconnaissance flights, and civilian and military weather satellites. Satellite imagery and soundings willl be available in real time and archived through facilities of NOAA and the military.

  1. Coulomb Glass: a Mean Field Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandra, Salvatore; Palassini, Matteo

    2012-02-01

    We study the Coulomb glass model of disordered localized electrons with long-range Coulomb interaction, which describes systems such as disordered insulators, granular metals, amorphous semiconductors, or doped crystalline semiconductors. Long ago Efros and Shklovskii showed that the long-range repulsion induces a soft Coulomb gap in the single particle density of states at low temperatures. Recent works suggested that this gap is associated to a transition to a glass phase, similar to the Almeida-Thouless transition in spin glasses. In this work, we use a mean field approach to characterize several physical properties of the Coulomb glass. In particular, following a seminal work of Bray and Moore, we show that the Edward-Anderson parameter qEA and the spin glass susceptibility χSG are directly related to spectrum distribution of the Hessian matrix around free energy minima. Using this result, we show that no glass transition is associated to the gap formation.

  2. Process evaluation of the Pool Cool Diffusion Trial for skin cancer prevention across 2 years

    PubMed Central

    Escoffery, Cam; Glanz, Karen; Elliott, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Though process evaluation of health programs has received growing attention, few interventions have reported process evaluation over multiple years. This article describes 2 years of process evaluation (2003–04) for the Pool Cool Diffusion Trial. Pool Cool is a skin cancer prevention program designed to increase sun protection habits among children and improve organizational and environmental supports for sun protection at swimming pools. Each year, 80 telephone interviews and 40 site visits at pools across the United States were completed, to examine how fully the program was implemented and the extent of use of program components between the two study conditions. Major components of the Pool Cool program, including sun safety lessons, sun safety signs and sunscreen use, had high implementation. Between the 2 years, most of the core elements were either maintained or increased in use. There were no significant differences between the basic and enhanced conditions on implementation. Reasons given for successful implementation were the provision of a toolkit, ease of implementing the program, pool staff and children enjoying the program and the field coordinators' support. These data provide information on programmatic factors that contribute to successful program diffusion. PMID:17956884

  3. A 2-year dose-response study of lesion sequences during hepatocellular carcinogenesis in the male B6C3F(1) mouse given the drinking water chemical dichloroacetic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Julia H; Carter, Harry W; Deddens, James A; Hurst, Bernadette M; George, Michael H; DeAngelo, Anthony B

    2003-01-01

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is carcinogenic to the B6C3F(1) mouse and the F344 rat. Given the carcinogenic potential of DCA in rodent liver and the known concentrations of this compound in drinking water, reliable biologically based models to reduce the uncertainty of risk assessment for human exposure to DCA are needed. Development of such models requires identification and quantification of premalignant hepatic lesions, identification of the doses at which these lesions occur, and determination of the likelihood that these lesions will progress to cancer. In this study we determined the dose response of histopathologic changes occurring in the livers of mice exposed to DCA (0.05-3.5 g/L) for 26-100 weeks. Lesions were classified as foci of cellular alteration smaller than one liver lobule (altered hepatic foci; AHF), foci of cellular alteration larger than one liver lobule (large foci of cellular alteration; LFCA), adenomas (ADs), or carcinomas (CAs). Histopathologic analysis of 598 premalignant lesions revealed that (a)) each lesion class had a predominant phenotype; (b)) AHF, LFCA, and AD demonstrated neoplastic progression with time; and (c)) independent of DCA dose and length of exposure effects, some toxic/adaptive changes in non-involved liver were related to this neoplastic progression. A lesion sequence for carcinogenesis in male B6C3F(1) mouse liver has been proposed that will enable development of a biologically based mathematical model for DCA. Because all classes of premalignant lesions and CAs were found at both lower and higher doses, these data are consistent with the conclusion that nongenotoxic mechanisms, such as negative selection, are relevant to DCA carcinogenesis at lower doses where DCA genotoxicity has not been observed. PMID:12515679

  4. Examination of a Model for Field Studies in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riban, David M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses ways to increase the effectiveness of field studies as an instructional method. Describes a study in which high school students who completed a geological field study scored higher on an earth science test than students who had not participated in the field study. (MLH)

  5. Smoking patterns, attitudes and motives: unique characteristics among 2-year versus 4-year college students.

    PubMed

    Berg, C J; An, L C; Thomas, J L; Lust, K A; Sanem, J R; Swan, D W; Ahluwalia, J S

    2011-08-01

    Given the previously documented higher rates of smoking among 2-year college students in comparison with 4-year university students, this study compares smoking patterns, attitudes and motives among 2-year and 4-year college students. Two thousand two hundred and sixty-five undergraduate students aged 18-25 years at a 2-year college and a 4-year university completed an online survey in 2008. Current (past 30-day) smoking was reported by 43.5% of 2-year and 31.9% of 4-year college students, and daily smoking was reported by 19.9% of 2-year and 8.3% of 4-year college students. Attending a 2-year college was associated with higher rates of current smoking [odds ratio (OR) = 1.72] and daily smoking (OR = 2.84), and with less negative attitudes regarding smoking, controlling for age, gender, ethnicity and parental education. Also, compared with 4-year college student smokers, 2-year college smokers had lower motivation to smoke for social reasons, but more motivation to smoke for affect regulation, after controlling for age, gender, ethnicity and parental education. Two- and 4-year college students report different smoking patterns, attitudes and motives. These distinctions might inform tobacco control messages and interventions targeting these groups of young adults.

  6. Cost and Schedule Analytical Techniques Development: Option 2 Year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This Final Report summarizes the activities performed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) for the Option 2 Year from December 1, 1996 through November 30, 1997. The Final Report is in compliance with Paragraph 5 of Section F of the contract. This CSATD contract provides products and deliverable in the form of models, data bases, methodologies, studies and analyses for the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Engineering Cost Office (PPO3) the Program Plans and Requirements Officer (PP02), and other user organizations. Detailed Monthly Progress reports were submitted to MSFC in accordance with the contract's Statement of Work, Section TV "Reporting and Documentation". These reports spelled out each month's specific work accomplishments, deliverables submitted, major meetings held, and other pertinent information. This Final Report will summarize these activities at higher level. During this contract Option Year, SAIC expended 29,830 man-hours in tile performance of tasks called out in the Statement of Work and reported oil in this yearly Final Report. This represents approximately 16 full-time EPs. Included are the basis Huntsville-based team, plus SAIC specialists in San Diego, Ames Research Center, Chicago, and Colorado Springs performing specific tasks for which they are uniquely qualified.

  7. Plant Taxonomy as a Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    Suggests methods of teaching plant identification and taxonomic theory using keys, statistical analyses, and biometrics. Population variation, genotype- environment interaction and experimental taxonomy are used in laboratory and field. (AL)

  8. Field Ecology Studies in the Rocky Mountains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Philip A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a six-week field plant ecology course in Montana which is offered by the Botany Department at Southern Illinois University. The goals of the course, how it is taught, and student evaluation are also presented. (HM)

  9. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-01

    Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015.

  10. Preliminary Evaluation of a Field and Non-Field Based Social Studies Preservice Teacher Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, John D.; Vansickle, Ronald L.

    1978-01-01

    Comparison of pre-service social studies teachers in field and non-field based methods courses indicated no significant differences with regard to teaching skills, attitudes, or behaviors teachers should exhibit in the classroom. (Author/DB)

  11. Toward a Field of Interfaith Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Eboo

    2013-01-01

    Scholars from a range of fields have long taken an interest in how people who orient around religion differently interact with one another. Indeed, this phenomenon has been the subject of important works in political science ("The Clash of Civilizations" by Samuel Huntington), sociology ("American Grace" by Robert Putnam and…

  12. Geology Field Trip Studies to New England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, John H.

    1976-01-01

    A two week, 3,000 mile, geology field trip for secondary school earth science students through New England is discussed. Student expenses, preparation details, accommodations, meals, transportation, course credit, and fieldwork are considered. A detailed trip itinerary is included. (BT)

  13. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-05

    "9Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project provides several key results. State weatherization agencies do not generally track combustion safety failures, the data from those that do suggest that there is little actual evidence that combustion safety failures due to spillage from non-dryer exhaust are common and that only a very small number of homes are subject to the failures. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015. Of these homes, two houses that demonstrated prolonged and excessive spillage were also the only two with venting systems out of compliance with the National Fuel Gas Code. The remaining homes experienced spillage that only occasionally extended beyond the first minute of operation. Combustion zone depressurization, outdoor temperature, and operation of individual fans all provide statistically significant predictors of spillage.

  14. Media use by children younger than 2 years.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ari

    2011-11-01

    In 1999, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued a policy statement addressing media use in children. The purpose of that statement was to educate parents about the effects that media--both the amount and the content--may have on children. In one part of that statement, the AAP recommended that "pediatricians should urge parents to avoid television viewing for children under the age of two years." The wording of the policy specifically discouraged media use in this age group, although it is frequently misquoted by media outlets as no media exposure in this age group. The AAP believed that there were significantly more potential negative effects of media than positive ones for this age group and, thus, advised families to thoughtfully consider media use for infants. This policy statement reaffirms the 1999 statement with respect to media use in infants and children younger than 2 years and provides updated research findings to support it. This statement addresses (1) the lack of evidence supporting educational or developmental benefits for media use by children younger than 2 years, (2) the potential adverse health and developmental effects of media use by children younger than 2 years, and (3) adverse effects of parental media use (background media) on children younger than 2 years.

  15. Early Intervention for Children Birth Through 2 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetherby, Catherine, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Information is provided for parents of handicapped children, aged 0-2 years, on the uniqueness of each infant's learning processes and the valuable role that parents and others can play in helping their infants with special needs to make the most of their abilities. The digest examines parents' concerns during the infant's hospital stay and early…

  16. Minoxidil induced hypertrichosis in a 2 year-old child.

    PubMed

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Freedman, Joshua; Tosti, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 2 year-old male patient who developed generalized hypertrichosis after 2 months of treatment with 5% minoxidil foam for alopecia areata. This report highlights the danger of prescribing  topical minoxidil to young children and the need to correctly instruct caretakers about its administration. PMID:24555107

  17. Childhood Bereavement: Psychopathology in the 2 Years Postparental Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerel, Julie; Fristad, Mary A.; Verducci, Joseph; Weller, Ronald A.; Weller, Elizabeth B.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Although the death of a parent is one of the most significant stressors a child can experience, the psychiatric sequelae of parental death are not fully understood. Method: A total of 360 parent-bereaved children (ages 6-17) and their surviving parents were directly interviewed four times during the first 2 years following the death (at…

  18. Ornamental Horticulture Technology; Suggested 2-Year Post High School Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    Developed by a technical education specialist, this guide is designed to aid school administrators in planning and developing 2-year post-high school programs or evaluating existing programs in ornamental horticulture technology. In addition to general information on the program, contents include course outlines with examples of tests and…

  19. Preparing for biofilm studies in the field.

    PubMed

    McLean, Robert J C; Simpson, Thomas R

    2008-08-01

    In their natural environments, microorganisms are under constant environmental selection to form biofilms. Using aquatic biofilms as an example, this unit illustrates general concepts in field biology and practical suggestions for designing, conducting, and analyzing biofilm experiments at varying distances from the laboratory. The unit also addresses an example of a special situation (space flight) where experimentation must be done by proxy through another individual or machine.

  20. Geosynthetic clay liners - slope stability field study

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, D.A.; Daniel, D.E.; Koerner, R.M.; Bonaparte, R.

    1997-12-31

    A field research project was developed to examine the internal shear performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). Several combinations of cross sections were assembled using GCL materials that were available at the time of project initiation. The cross sections utilized were intended to simulate landfill cover applications. Thirteen (13) resulting test plots were constructed on two different slope angles, and each plot is instrumented for physical displacement and soil moisture characteristics. Test plots were constructed in a manner that dictated the shear plane in the clay portion of the GCL product. The project purpose is to assess field performance and to verify design parameters associated with the application of GCLs in waste containment applications. Interim research data shows that test slopes on 2H:1V show global deformation, but little internal shear evidence, and the 3H:1V slopes show little deformation at approximately 650 days. The research is ongoing, and this paper presents the most recent information available from the project.

  1. Comparative Study of Bacterial Growth in Magnet Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Derek; Masood, Samina

    It has been shown that magnetic fields affect bacterial growth. A comparative study of growth rates for gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria with different types of magnetic fields is done. Special focus is placed upon growth within liquid media, and the effect of magnetic fields relative to the chosen growth medium is considered.

  2. NASA Computational Case Study: Modeling Planetary Magnetic and Gravitational Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, David G.; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2014-01-01

    In this case study, we model a planet's magnetic and gravitational fields using spherical harmonic functions. As an exercise, we analyze data on the Earth's magnetic field collected by NASA's MAGSAT spacecraft, and use it to derive a simple magnetic field model based on these spherical harmonic functions.

  3. THE FIELD STUDY NOTEBOOK FOR THE OUTDOOR SCHOOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BURGESS, ROBERT A.; GILFILLAN, WARREN C.

    THE "FIELD STUDY NOTEBOOK" HAS BEEN PREPARED FOR USE BY PAROCHIAL AND PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS FOR STUDYING ECOLOGY AT AN OUTDOOR SCHOOL. THE NOTEBOOK EMPHASIZES COMMUNITY DYNAMICS THROUGH STUDENT ACTIVITIES THAT ILLUSTRATE ECOLOGICAL RELATIONSHIPS. INFORMATION IS PROVIDED ON THE ORGANIZATION OF A FIELD STUDY AND ON PERFORMING VARIOUS…

  4. Global and site specific multimedia (field) studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cutshall, N.H.; Guerin, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    Experience with radioactive fallout, with organic contaminants and with heavy metals has amply demonstrated that cross-media transfers are common and that understanding the transport, cycling, and fate of these contaminants requires a multimedia approach. Nonetheless, pollutants with similar physical and chemical attributes may follow markedly different pathways. The frequency of exceptions to predictions based on simplistic models is also sufficient to show that direct investigation of environmental contamination is essential to confirm validity of models used for conceptualizing a problem or for control. Modeling based on multimedia premises and regulatory controls that encompass multimedia considerations are challenged by a dilemma, however. First, the development of multimedia models or regulatory frameworks represents simplification and generalization. This is true for several reasons: (1) inadequate understanding of physical and environmental factors which control specific cross-media transfer; (2) the absence of specific data on certain multimedia pollutant concentrations; (3) even the most powerful computers do not have sufficient speed and capacity to deal with the known complexities of natural systems. On the other hand, for contaminants such as mercury, it may be necessary to include great detail; the overall distribution in the environment may be less important than the rate of some minor process. With sufficient experience and good judgment of what can be ignored, the simplifications and generalizations can be made. For the present, and for the foreseeable future, however, they absolutely must be accompanied by thorough field validation and monitoring.

  5. Simulated Laboratory/Field Study of Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubowsky, Nathan; Hartman, Elliott M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Immediately following a lecture discussion on early hominid characteristics and behavior, students participate in a laboratory study of bipedal locomotion based on an analysis of footprints. The development and use of this simulation are described. (JN)

  6. Communication Apprehension: Levels of First-Generation College Students at 2-Year Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Trevor A.; Miller, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    The study explored the oral communication apprehension (CA) levels of first-generation college students at a 2-year case study community institution. Overall and general-context CA were measured using the Personal Report of Communication Apprehension-24 (PRCA-24). The survey was sent by e-mail to 2,040 institutionally-identified first-generation…

  7. MST with Conduct Disordered Youth in Sweden: Costs and Benefits after 2 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsson, Tina M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the costs and benefits associated with multisystemic therapy (MST) for conduct disordered youth, 2 years following intake. Methods: The study employed a secondary analysis of 156 youth enrolled in a randomized trial assessing the psychosocial and behavioral outcomes of MST. Results: MST cost…

  8. Students with Disabilities at 2-Year Institutions in the United States: Factors Related to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamiseishvili, Ketevan; Koch, Lynn C.

    2012-01-01

    This study used data from the Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study to examine the demographic and in-college characteristics of students with disabilities at 2-year institutions, identify the types of educational services available to them, and determine how students' disability conditions and their selected demographic and…

  9. Framing in the Field: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Strategic Frame Analysis can inform the daily practice of policy advocates by bringing an evidence-based communications approach to their work. This case study of FrameWorks' decade-long association with the national Kids Count Network shares stories from advocates who are transforming their communications strategies, resulting in more effective…

  10. Field calibration studies for ionisation chambers in mixed high-energy radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Theis, C; Forkel-Wirth, D; Fuerstner, M; Mayer, S; Otto, Th; Roesler, S; Vincke, H

    2007-01-01

    The monitoring of ambient doses at work places around high-energy accelerators is a challenging task due the complexity of the mixed stray radiation fields encountered. At CERN, mainly Centronics IG5 high-pressure ionisation chambers are used to monitor radiation exposure in mixed fields. The monitors are calibrated in the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent H*(10) using standard, source-generated photon- and neutron fields. However, the relationship between ionisation chamber reading and ambient dose equivalent in a mixed high-energy radiation field can only be assessed if the spectral response to every component and the field composition is known. Therefore, comprehensive studies were performed at the CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility where the spectral fluence for each particle type has been assessed with Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, studies have been performed in an accessible controlled radiation area in the vicinity of a beam loss point of CERN's proton synchrotron. The comparison of measurements and calculations has shown reasonable agreement for most exposure conditions. The results indicate that conventionally calibrated ionisation chambers can give satisfactory response in terms of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields at high-energy accelerators in many cases. These studies are one step towards establishing a method of 'field calibration' of radiation protection instruments in which Monte Carlo simulations will be used to establish a correct correlation between the response of specific detectors to a given high-energy radiation field.

  11. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2001-11-30

    Studies were initiated at the Hanford Site to evaluate the process controlling the transport of fluids in the vadose zone and to develop a reliable database upon which vadose-zone transport models can be calibrated. These models are needed to evaluate contaminant migration through the vadose zone to underlying groundwaters at Hanford. A study site that had previously been extensively characterized using geophysical monitoring techniques was selected in the 200 E Area. Techniques used previously included neutron probe for water content, spectral gamma logging for radionuclide tracers, and gamma scattering for wet bulk density. Building on the characterization efforts of the past 20 years, the site was instrumented to facilitate the comparison of nine vadose-zone characterization methods: advanced tensiometers, neutron probe, electrical resistance tomography (ERT), high-resolution resistivity (HRR), electromagnetic induction imaging (EMI), cross-borehole radar (XBR), and cross-borehole seismic (XBS). Soil coring was used to obtain soil samples for analyzing ionic and isotopic tracers.

  12. Flow field studies on yawed, stranded cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batill, S. M.; Nelson, R. C.; Nebres, J. V.

    A study of the flowfield near yawed, stranded cables was conducted in order to investigate the mechanisms associated with the generation of both steady and unsteady fluid forces on the cables. Rigid cable models and a circular cylinder were tested in a wind tunnel at four different cable angles over a Reynolds number range from 6000 to 14,600 based on the nominal cable diameter. The smoke-wire and the kerosene smoke flow visualization techniques were used to qualitatively evaluate the flowfields associated with each cable geometry.

  13. Borderline personality disorder features predict negative outcomes 2 years later.

    PubMed

    Bagge, Courtney; Nickell, Angela; Stepp, Stephanie; Durrett, Christine; Jackson, Kristina; Trull, Timothy J

    2004-05-01

    In a sample of 351 young adults, the authors assessed whether borderline personality disorder (BPD) features prospectively predicted negative outcomes (poorer academic achievement and social maladjustment) over the subsequent 2 years, over and above gender and both Axis I and Axis II psychopathology. Borderline traits were significantly related to these outcomes, with impulsivity and affective instability the most highly associated. The present findings suggest that the impulsivity and affective instability associated with BPD leads to impairment in relating well with others, in meeting social role obligations, and in academic or occupational achievement. Therefore, these may be especially important features to target in interventions for BPD.

  14. Coastal Studies in a Comprehensive Summer Field Geology Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Barry; Jones, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a college geology course that incorporates a coastal segment. Field studies are done on Plum Island and include examining beaches, dune fields, and an adjacent marsh and spit. Topics include sedimentation, coastal geomorphology, botanical effects, and coastal studies methodology. (MA)

  15. Field Study Manual to Freshwater and Estuarine Habitats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    This field studies manual, developed by biology students in the 1971 Georgia Governor's Honors Program, was designed for collection of data pertinent to freshwater and estuarine habitats. In addition to the various methods of sampling the ecosystem and for quantification of the data, instructions for dividing the field study into three logical…

  16. Study made of interaction between sound fields and structural vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, R. H.; Smith, P. W., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Study analyzes structural vibrations and the interactions between them and sound fields. It outlines a conceptual framework to analyze the vibrations of systems and their interactions, incorporating the results of earlier studies and establishing a unified basis for continuing research.

  17. Studies of Interstellar and Circumstellar Magnetic Field with Aligned Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, A.; Yan, H.

    2004-12-01

    Population of levels of the hyperfine and fine split ground state of an atom is affected by radiative transitions induced by anisotropic radiation flux. Such aligned atoms precess in the external magnetic field and this affects properties of polarized radiation arising from both scattering and absorption by atoms. As the result the degree of light polarization depends on the direction of the magnetic field. This provides a new tool for studies of astrophysical magnetic fields using optical and UV polarimetry. We provide calculations for several atoms and ions that can be used to study magnetic fields in interplanetary medium, interstellar medius, circumstellar regions and quasars.

  18. Study of Several Potentials as Scalar Field Dark Matter Candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Vazquez-Gonzalez, Alberto; Magan a, Juan

    2008-12-04

    In this work we study several scalar field potentials as a plausible candidate to be the dark matter in the universe. The main idea is the following; if the scalar field is an ultralight boson particle, it condensates like a Bose-Einstein system at very early times and forms the basic structure of the Universe. Real scalar fields collapse in equilibrium configurations which oscillate in space-time (oscillatons). The cosmological behavior of the field equations are solved using the dynamical system formalism. We use the current cosmological parameters as constraints for the free parameters of the scalar field potentials. We are able to reproduce very well the cosmological predictions of the standard {lambda}CDM model with some scalar field potentials. Therefore, scalar field dark matter seems to be a good alternative to be the nature of the dark matter of the universe.

  19. Hispanic Student Enrollment and Educational Attainment in Texas 2-Year Colleges: A Multi-Year Statewide Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to examine the numbers and percentages of Hispanic college students enrolled in Texas 2-year colleges from the 2000 through the 2011 academic years and to examine the numbers and percentages of Hispanic students obtaining associate degrees from Texas 2-year colleges for the 2000 through the 2011 academic…

  20. Lattice Study of Magnetic Catalysis in Graphene Effective Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterowd, Christopher; Detar, Carleton; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of graphene ranks as one of the most important developments in condensed matter physics in recent years. As a strongly interacting system whose low-energy excitations are described by the Dirac equation, graphene has many similarities with other strongly interacting field theories, particularly quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Graphene, along with other relativistic field theories, have been predicted to exhibit spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) when an external magnetic field is present. Using nonperturbative methods developed to study QCD, we study the low-energy effective field theory (EFT) of graphene subject to an external magnetic field. We find strong evidence supporting the existence of SSB at zero-temperature and characterize the dependence of the chiral condensate on the external magnetic field. We also present results for the mass of the Nambu-Goldstone boson and the dynamically generated quasiparticle mass that result from the SSB.

  1. Phonetic Modification of Vowel Space in Storybook Speech to Infants up to 2 Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, Evamarie B.; Wieland, Elizabeth A.; Kondaurova, Maria V.; McAuley, J. Devin; Bergeson, Tonya R.; Dilley, Laura C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A large body of literature has indicated vowel space area expansion in infant-directed (ID) speech compared with adult-directed (AD) speech, which may promote language acquisition. The current study tested whether this expansion occurs in storybook speech read to infants at various points during their first 2 years of life. Method: In 2…

  2. How Joint Attention Relates to Cooperation in 1- and 2-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Zhen; Pan, Jingtong; Su, Yanjie; Gros-Louis, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Joint attention has been suggested to contribute to children's development of cooperation; however, few empirical studies have directly tested this hypothesis. Children aged 1 and 2 years participated in two joint action activities to assess their cooperation with an adult partner, who stopped participating at a specific moment during the…

  3. Attitudes of College Students Enrolled in 2-Year Health Care Programs towards Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdulla, Dalya

    2012-01-01

    Colleges offering 2-year diplomas to high-school graduates were among the forefront leaders in online learning however studies illustrating appropriate course construction for such student populations are scarce. Pharmacy Math (MATH16532) is a core course for students enrolled in the Practical Nursing (PN) and Pharmacy Technician (PT) programs at…

  4. Japanese Female Students' Perceptions of 2-Year Colleges as a Choice for Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anzai, Shinobu; Paik, Chie Matsuzawa

    2012-01-01

    Two-year colleges have played an important role in providing postsecondary education for women in postwar Japan. More recently, a dwindling college-bound population in Japan has resulted in a drastic decrease in the number of and enrollment in 2-year colleges. This study explored the motivations and aspirations of 12 Japanese female students to…

  5. Developmental Assessment of Preterm Infants at 2 Years: Validity of Parent Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Samantha; Wolke, Dieter; Marlow, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Parental questionnaires are inexpensive alternatives to standardized testing for outcome measurement. The Parent Report of Children's Abilities has previously been revised (PARCA-R) and validated for use with very-preterm infants at 2 years of age. This study revalidated the PARCA-R for assessing cognition in a larger and more inclusive sample of…

  6. Behavior Predictors of Language Development over 2 Years in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bopp, Karen D.; Mirenda, Pat; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This exploratory study examined predictive relationships between 5 types of behaviors and the trajectories of vocabulary and language development in young children with autism over 2 years. Method: Participants were 69 children with autism assessed using standardized measures prior to the initiation of early intervention (T1) and 6 months…

  7. How Are 2-Year US Colleges Addressing Student Alcohol Use and Related Problems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenk, Kathleen M.; Nelson, Toben F.; Erickson, Darin J.; Toomey, Traci L.

    2015-01-01

    A considerable amount of attention and research has been dedicated to addressing alcohol use and related problems among students at 4-year colleges; however, less attention has been given to alcohol-related issues among students at 2-year technical/community colleges. This article describes research that expands on a study by Chiauzzi and…

  8. Role Modeling in the First 2 Years of Medical School.

    PubMed

    Obadia, Sharon J

    2015-08-01

    Role modeling opportunities for osteopathic physician teachers during a student's first 2 years of medical school are emerging as more colleges of osteopathic medicine strive to connect basic science didactics with clinically based learning activities. Examples of positive modeling by physician teachers during the first years of medical school are illustrated by 10 vignettes that can be incorporated into faculty development programs to increase awareness of such opportunities. The physician teacher in each vignette interacts with the student demonstrating desired professional behaviors. These vignettes also illustrate the effect of a positive "hidden curriculum" on a student's professional development. By recognizing these valuable teachable moments, teachers can incorporate role modeling into their daily practice. PMID:26214824

  9. Child-directed action promotes 2-year-olds' imitation.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Rebecca A; Brand, Rebecca J

    2014-02-01

    Children are voracious learners and adults are ubiquitous teachers. This project investigated whether the special infant-directed action modifications parents use when teaching their children (called "motionese" by Brand et al., Developmental Science, 2002, Vol. 5, pp. 72-83) improves 2-year-olds' imitation. Children saw an adult perform a series of acts on four novel objects using either an infant-directed style (including larger range of motion and enhanced boundary marking) or an adult-directed style. Children's imitation of the acts was higher in the infant-directed condition relative to the adult-directed condition, and both types of demonstration increased imitation relative to baseline (no demonstration). We propose that motionese provides information about actions, objects, and intentionality, thereby enhancing toddlers' observational learning.

  10. Planning for Graduate Studies in Physics and Related Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Dennis C., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This brochure is written for students considering graduate work in physics or related fields such as astronomy, biophysics, and applied physics. It also provides some information for physics undergraduates who plan on pursuing postbaccalaureate studies in the fields of engineering, medicine, law, and other professions that attract significant…

  11. Apprenticeships, Collaboration and Scientific Discovery in Academic Field Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Derek Scott; Grayson, Diane J.; Madden, Erinn H.; Milewski, Antoni V.; Snyder, Cathy Ann

    2012-01-01

    Teachers may use apprenticeships and collaboration as instructional strategies that help students to make authentic scientific discoveries as they work as amateur researchers in academic field studies. This concept was examined with 643 students, ages 14-72, who became proficient at field research through cognitive apprenticeships with the…

  12. Toward a Virtual Field Trip Model for the Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    In the current state of social studies education, field trips are being cut from many schools' curriculum. While not a true substitution, today's technologies provide some opportunities through virtual field trips (VFTs) to simulate these experiences, engage students in knowledge production and disciplined inquiry, and have interactions with the…

  13. The Field Course as an Instructional Medium in Community Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Claud M.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a college course which uses field studies to examine communities and small urban places. The course is designed for undergraduate students with little or no field experience and is offered as an intensive two-week session between semesters. (RM)

  14. Experimental studies of sound field suppression at discrete frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiks, I. Sh.; Korotin, P. I.; Potapov, O. A.; Fiks, G. E.

    2016-03-01

    Practical implementation of an active sound control system ensuring sound suppression in outer space is described as applied to sound insulation problems for equipment whose total noise level is mainly due to low-frequency discrete spectral components. The operational principle of the proposed system is based on inverse field generation with respect to the field of the initial source of quasi-monochromatic signals. The inverse field is formed by a set of radiators, which are controlled by the signals of pressure receivers positioned in the near field of the source. Experimental studies carried out with the proposed sound control system demonstrate its efficiency and testify to the stability of its operation.

  15. Study of the effects of guide field on Hall reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Tharp, T. D.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Lawrence, E.; Dorfman, S.; Myers, C.; Yoo, J.; Huang, Y.-M.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2013-05-15

    The results from guide field studies on the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) are compared with results from Hall magnetohydrodynamic (HMHD) reconnection simulation with guide field. The quadrupole field, a signature of two-fluid reconnection at zero guide field, is modified by the presence of a finite guide field in a manner consistent with HMHD simulation. The modified Hall current profile contains reduced electron flows in the reconnection plane, which quantitatively explains the observed reduction of the reconnection rate. The present results are consistent with the hypothesis that the local reconnection dynamics is dominated by Hall effects in the collisionless regime of the MRX plasmas. While very good agreement is seen between experiment and simulations, we note that an important global feature of the experiments, a compression of the guide field by the reconnecting plasma, is not represented in the simulations.

  16. Field study of time-dependent selenium partitioning in soils using isotopically enriched stable selenite tracer.

    PubMed

    Di Tullo, Pamela; Pannier, Florence; Thiry, Yves; Le Hécho, Isabelle; Bueno, Maïté

    2016-08-15

    A better understanding of selenium fate in soils at both short and long time scales is mandatory to consolidate risk assessment models relevant for managing both contamination and soil fertilization issues. The purpose of this study was thus to investigate Se retention processes and their kinetics by monitoring time-dependent distribution/speciation changes of both ambient and freshly added Se, in the form of stable enriched selenite-77, over a 2-years field experiment. This study clearly illustrates the complex reactivity of selenium in soil considering three methodologically defined fractions (i.e. soluble, exchangeable, organic). Time-dependent redistribution of Se-77 within solid-phases having different reactivity could be described as a combination of chemical and diffusion controlled processes leading to its stronger retention. Experimental data and their kinetic modeling evidenced that transfer towards less labile bearing phases are controlled by slow processes limiting the overall sorption of Se in soils. These results were used to estimate time needed for (77)Se to reach the distribution of naturally present selenium which may extend up to several decades. Ambient Se speciation accounted for 60% to 100% of unidentified species as function of soil type whereas (77)Se(IV) remained the more abundant species after 2-years field experiment. Modeling Se in the long-term without taking account these slow sorption kinetics would thus result in underestimation of Se retention. When using models based on Kd distribution coefficient, they should be at least reliant on ambient Se which is supposed to be at equilibrium. PMID:27100008

  17. Myopia Control with a Novel Peripheral Gradient Soft Lens and Orthokeratology: A 2-Year Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pauné, Jaime; Morales, Hari; Armengol, Jesús; Quevedo, Lluisa; Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel; González-Méijome, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the degree of axial elongation with soft radial refractive gradient (SRRG) contact lenses, orthokeratology (OK), and single vision (SV) spectacle lenses (control) during a period of 1 year before treatment and 2 years after treatment. Methods. This was a prospective, longitudinal, nonrandomized study. The study groups consisted of 30, 29, and 41 children, respectively. The axial length (AL) was measured during 2 years after recruitment and lens fitting. Results. The baseline refractive sphere was correlated significantly (Spearman's Rho (ρ) correlation = 0.542; P < 0.0001) with the amount of myopia progression before baseline. After 2 years, the mean myopia progression values for the SRRG, OK, and SV groups were −0.56 ± 0.51, −0.32 ± 0.53, and −0.98 ± 0.58 diopter, respectively. The results represent reductions in myopic progression of 43% and 67% for the SRRG and OK groups, respectively, compared to the SV group. The AL increased 27% and 38% less in the SRRG and OK groups, respectively compared with the SV group at the 2-year visit (P < 0.05). Axial elongation was not significantly different between SRRG and OK (P = 0.430). Conclusion. The SRRG lens significantly decreased AL elongation compared to the SV control group. The SRRG lens was similarly effective to OK in preventing myopia progression in myopic children and adolescent. PMID:26605331

  18. Hooking the Geographer in Children with Field-Based Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krall, Florence; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Suggests projects to help elementary students learn about man-land relationships through field experience, inquiry techniques, and a thematic, interdisciplinary approach. Children study a natural community, a human community, solid wastes, and energy conservation. (Author/AV)

  19. CANTON CAFO FIELD SITE STUDY - SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND CONTAMINANT IMPACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation of CAFO research concerning the Canton CAFO field site study, including its characterization and contaminant impacts, was given at a NRMRL program review discussion of the CAFO Research Program.

  20. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors.

  1. Astronaut Neil Armstrong studies rock samples during geological field trip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Neil Armstrong, commander of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission, studies rock samples during a geological field trip to the Quitman Mountains area near the Fort Quitman ruins in far west Texas.

  2. Increased Food Insecurity Among Mothers of 2 Year Olds with Special Health Care Needs.

    PubMed

    Adams, Elizabeth J; Hoffmann, Laurel M; Rosenberg, Kenneth D; Peters, Dawn; Pennise, Melissa

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the association between having a child with special health care needs (CSHCN) and food insecurity when the child is 2 years old. We studied women who had a live birth in 2004-2005 and responded to Oregon's Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) survey 3 months postpartum (Time 1) and the follow-up survey (PRAMS-2), when the child was 2 years old (Time 2). Women answering affirmatively to the PRAMS-2 question, "In the last 12 months, did you ever eat less than you felt you should because there was not enough money for food?" were considered food insecure. CSHCN status was identified by affirmative responses to questions about needs for ongoing services (Time 2). PRAMS and PRAMS-2 responses were weighted for study design and non-response. Results report weighted analyses, unless noted. Among 1812 mothers completing PRAMS-2, 13.6 % (unweighted) had a 2-year-old CSHCN and 11.9 % (unweighted) were food insecure at Time 2. The estimated prevalence of food insecurity at 2-year follow-up was 20.7 % among families of CSHCN and 9.7 % for others. After adjustment for Time 2 marital status, education, lifetime U.S. residence, income and health conditions, multivariable logistic regression revealed that odds of food insecurity were more than two times as great for CSHCN mothers 2 years post-partum compared to non-CSHCN mothers (adjusted odds ratio 2.6, 95 % confidence interval 1.3, 4.6). Families of CSHCN face increased risk for food insecurity. Improved understanding of causal determinants of food insecurity among households of CSHCN is needed.

  3. SODA CONSUMPTION AND OVERWEIGHT STATUS OF 2-YEAR-OLD MEXICAN-AMERICAN CHILDREN IN CALIFORNIA

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Marcella L; Harley, Kim; Bradman, Asa; Vargas, Gloria; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of overweight in United States children, 2 – 5 years, has increased two-fold since 1975, with the highest prevalence in Mexican-Americans. The objective of this study was to determine the association between current soda consumption and overweight in 2-year-old Mexican-American children. Research Methods and Procedures The CHAMACOS study is a longitudinal study of the health of low-income Latino pregnant women and their children living in the Salinas Valley, California. Six hundred pregnant women were enrolled (October 1999 – October 2000), and their children were followed until 2 years of age. This cross-sectional analysis includes the 354 children who completed the 2-year follow-up interview. Standing height (cm) and weight (g) were measured at 2 years. Overweight was defined as ≥ 95th percentile of the sex-specific body mass index for each child’s age. Results Fifty-five (15.5%) children were overweight. Over half (56%) reported consuming any soda in the last week. After covariate adjustment, compared to no soda consumption, <1 soda / day was not related to overweight (adj-OR = 0.97, 95% CI 0.47, 1.99), but ≥1 soda / day was significantly associated with overweight (adj-OR = 3.39, 95% CI 1.43, 8.07) and the test for trend was significant (p = 0.02). Discussion At 2 years of age, the prevalence of overweight among the CHAMACOS cohort is higher than the national prevalence estimate for Mexican-American, 2–5 year olds, and is significantly associated with current soda consumption. Interventions to reduce consumption of soda in young Mexican-American children should be considered. PMID:17135613

  4. A field study of wind over a simulated block building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Shahabi, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    A full-scale field study of the wind over a simulated two-dimensional building is reported. The study develops an experiment to investigate the structure and magnitude of the wind fields. A description of the experimental arrangement, the type and expected accuracy of the data, and the range of the data are given. The data are expected to provide a fundamental understanding of mean wind and turbulence structure of the wind field around the bluff body. Preliminary analysis of the data demonstrates the reliability and completeness of the data in this regard.

  5. Aristoteles - An ESA mission to study the earth's gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambeck, K.

    In preparing for its first Solid-Earth Program, ESA has studied a satellite concept for a mission dedicated to the precise determination of the earth's geopotential (gravitational and magnetic) fields. Data from such a mission are expected to make substantial contributions to a number of research and applications fields in solid-earth geophysics, oceanography and global-change monitoring. The impact of a high-resolution gravity-field mission on studies of the various earth-science problems is assessed. The current state of our knowledge in this area is discussed and the ability of low-orbit satellite gradiometry to contribute to their solution is demonstrated.

  6. Compound Lava Flow Fields on Planetary Surfaces: Hawaiian Analogue Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crown, D. A.; Byrnes, J. M.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2002-12-01

    Quantitative, process-oriented analyses of planetary volcanism have primarily been based on analogue studies of single-lobed lava flows emplaced as discrete units. Comparative analyses of compound lava flow fields on the Earth and terrestrial planets are being conducted in order to include volcanic styles characterized by complex distributary systems, stratigraphic relationships, and emplacement histories. Field observations, differential Global Positioning Systems (dGPS) measurements, and visible, thermal, and radar remote sensing are being used to characterize Hawaiian lava flow fields and develop techniques for analyses of planetary flow fields using datasets with high spatial and/or spectral resolution, such as MOC and THEMIS. These terrestrial studies allow flow field surface morphology, topography, and lava textures as well as detailed maps of distributary networks to be used to examine flow field growth and development. Information on flow field evolution is provided by delineating relationships between remote sensing signatures, surface morphology, and lava transport processes and by identifying input parameters for flowfield emplacement models. Investigations of the Mauna Ulu (1969-1974) and Puu Oo (1983-present) flow fields (Kilauea Volcano, HI) have focused on understanding the nature of distributary networks at various scales in order to determine spatial and temporal variations in lava transport. Initial work at Mauna Ulu has included analyses of 1) the distribution, network morphometry, and volumetric significance of lava channels in the medial zone of the flow field, and 2) the distribution, lava texture, and volumetric significance of breakouts from surface conduits and subsurface storage. Analyses of the temporal evolution of individual conduit systems provide the basis for interpretation of complex patterns of overlapping surface units that characterize local flow stratigraphy. Reconstruction of lava transport networks and relationships to surface

  7. Efficacy of Salvage Radiotherapy Plus 2-Year Androgen Suppression for Postradical Prostatectomy Patients With PSA Relapse

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, Richard; Danjoux, Cyril; Gardner, Sandra; Morton, Gerard; Szumacher, Ewa; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Cheung, Patrick; Pearse, Maria

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a combined approach of radiotherapy (RT) plus 2-year androgen suppression (AS) as salvage treatment for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: Seventy-five patients with PSA relapse after RP were treated with salvage RT plus 2-year AS, as per a pilot, prospective study. AS started within 1 month after completion of salvage RT and consisted of nilutamide for 4 weeks and buserelin acetate depot subcutaneously every 2 months for 2 years. Relapse-free rate including freedom from PSA relapse was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. PSA relapse was defined as a PSA rise above 0.2 ng/mL with two consecutive increases over a minimum of 3 months. A Cox regression analysis was performed to evaluate prognostic factors for relapse. Results: Median age of the cohort was 63 years at the time of salvage RT. Median follow-up from salvage RT was 6.4 years. All achieved initially complete PSA response (< 0.2) with the protocol treatment. Relapse-free rate including the freedom from PSA relapse was 91.5% at 5 years and 78.6% at 7 years. Overall survival rate was 93.2% at both 5 and 7 years. On Cox regression analysis, pT3 stage and PSA relapse less than 2 years after RP were significant prognostic factors for relapse. Conclusion: The combined treatment of salvage RT plus 2-year AS yielded an encouraging result for patients with PSA relapse after RP and needs a confirmatory study.

  8. ELF electric and magnetic fields: Pacific Northwest Laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1992-06-01

    Studies have been conducted at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to examine extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for possible biological effects in animals. Three areas of investigation are reported here: (1) studies on the nervous system, including behavior and neuroendocrine function, (2) experiments on cancer development in animals, and (3) measurements of currents and electric fields induced in animal models by exposure to external magnetic fields. In behavioral experiments, rats have been shown to be responsive to ELF electric field exposure. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that short-term memory may be affected in albino rats exposed to combined ELF and static magnetic fields. Neuroendocrine studies have been conducted to demonstrate an apparent stress-related response in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Nighttime pineal melatonin levels have been shown to be significantly depressed in animals exposed to either electric or magnetic fields. A number of animal tumor models are currently under investigation to examine possible relationships between ELF exposure and carcinogenesis. Finally, theoretical and experimental measurements have been performed which form the basis for animals and human exposure comparisons.

  9. ELF electric and magnetic fields: Pacific Northwest Laboratory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. E.

    1992-06-01

    Studies were conducted at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to examine extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for possible biological effects in animals. Three areas of investigation are reported here: (1) studies on the nervous system, including behavior and neuroendocrine function; (2) experiments on cancer development in animals; and (3) measurements of currents and electric fields induced in animal models by exposure to external magnetic fields. In behavioral experiments, rats were shown to be responsive to ELF electric field exposure. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that short-term memory may be affected in albino rats exposed to combined ELF and static magnetic fields. Neuroendocrine studies were conducted to demonstrate an apparent stress-related response in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Nighttime pineal melatonin levels were shown to be significantly depressed in animals exposed to either electric or magnetic fields. A number of animal tumor models are currently under investigation to examine possible relationships between ELF exposure and carcinogenesis. Finally, theoretical and experimental measurements were performed which form the basis for animals and human exposure comparisons.

  10. High-field small animal magnetic resonance oncology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High-field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging and hyperpolarized 13C MRS as well as diffusion-weighted, blood oxygen level dependent contrast imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies.

  11. STUDYING THE INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD FROM ANISOTROPIES IN VELOCITY CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, A.; Lazarian, A.; Pogosyan, D. E-mail: lazarian@astro.wisc.edu

    2015-11-20

    Turbulence in the interstellar medium is anisotropic due to the ubiquitous magnetic fields. This anisotropy depends on the strength of the magnetic field and leaves an imprint on observations of spectral line maps. We use a grid of ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of driven turbulence and produce synthetic position–position–velocity maps to study the turbulence anisotropy in velocity channels of various resolutions. We found that the average structure function of velocity channels is aligned with the projection of the magnetic field on the plane of the sky. We also found that the degree of such anisotropy increases with the magnitude of the magnetic field. For thick velocity channels (low velocity resolution), the anisotropy is dominated by density, and the degree of anisotropy in these maps allows one to distinguish sub-Alfvénic and super-Alfvénic turbulence regimes, but it also depends strongly on the sonic Mach number. For thin channels (high velocity resolution), we find that the anisotropy depends less on the sonic Mach number. An important limitation of this technique is that it only gives a lower limit on the magnetic field strength because the anisotropy is related only to the magnetic field component on the plane of the sky. It can, and should, be used in combination with other techniques to estimate the magnetic field, such as the Fermi-Chandrasekhar method, anisotropies in centroids, Faraday rotation measurements, or direct line-of-sight determinations of the field from Zeeman effect observations.

  12. Field studies on pesticides and birds: Unexpected and unique relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, Charles J.

    1997-01-01

    We review the advantages and disadvantages of experimental and field studies for determining effects of pesticides on birds. Important problems or principles initially discovered in the field include effects of DDT (through its metabolite DDE) on eggshell thickness, reproductive success, and population stability; trophic-level bioaccumulation of the lipid-soluble organochlorine pesticides; indirect effects on productivity and survival through reductions in the food supply and cover by herbicides and insecticides; unexpected toxic effects and routes of exposure of organophosphorus compounds such as famphur and dimethoate; effects related to simultaneous application at full strength of several pesticides of different classes; and others. Also, potentially serious bird problems with dicofol, based on laboratory studies, later proved negligible in the field. In refining field tests of pesticides, the selection of a species or group of species to study is important, because exposure routes may vary greatly, and 10-fold interspecific differences in sensitivity to pesticides are relatively common. Although there are limitations with field investigations, particularly uncontrollable variables that must be addressed, the value of a well-designed field study far outweighs its shortcomings.

  13. Field studies on pesticides and birds: unexpected and unique relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    We review the advantages and disadvantages of experimental and field studies for determining effects of pesticides on birds. Important problems or principles initially discovered in the field include effects of DDT (through its metabolite DDE) on eggshell thickness, reproductive success, and population stability; trophic-level bioaccumulation of the lipid-soluble organochlorine pesticides; indirect effects on productivity and survival through reductions in the food supply and cover by herbicides and insecticides; unexpected toxic effects and routes of exposure of organophosphorus compounds such as famphur and dimethoate; effects related to simultaneous application at full strength of several pesticides of different classes; and others. Also, potentially serious bird problems with dicofol, based on laboratory studies, later proved negligible in the field. In refining field tests of pesticides, the selection of a species or group of species to study is important, because exposure routes may vary greatly, and 10-fold interspecific differences in sensitivity to pesticides are relatively common. Although there are limitations with field investigations, particularly uncontrollable variables that must be addressed, the value of a well-designed field study far outweighs its shortcomings

  14. Mapping Longitudinal Development of Local Cortical Gyrification in Infants from Birth to 2 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Wang, Li; Shi, Feng; Lyall, Amanda E.; Lin, Weili; Gilmore, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Human cortical folding is believed to correlate with cognitive functions. This likely correlation may have something to do with why abnormalities of cortical folding have been found in many neurodevelopmental disorders. However, little is known about how cortical gyrification, the cortical folding process, develops in the first 2 years of life, a period of dynamic and regionally heterogeneous cortex growth. In this article, we show how we developed a novel infant-specific method for mapping longitudinal development of local cortical gyrification in infants. By using this method, via 219 longitudinal 3T magnetic resonance imaging scans from 73 healthy infants, we systemically and quantitatively characterized for the first time the longitudinal cortical global gyrification index (GI) and local GI (LGI) development in the first 2 years of life. We found that the cortical GI had age-related and marked development, with 16.1% increase in the first year and 6.6% increase in the second year. We also found marked and regionally heterogeneous cortical LGI development in the first 2 years of life, with the high-growth regions located in the association cortex, whereas the low-growth regions located in sensorimotor, auditory, and visual cortices. Meanwhile, we also showed that LGI growth in most cortical regions was positively correlated with the brain volume growth, which is particularly significant in the prefrontal cortex in the first year. In addition, we observed gender differences in both cortical GIs and LGIs in the first 2 years, with the males having larger GIs than females at 2 years of age. This study provides valuable information on normal cortical folding development in infancy and early childhood. PMID:24647943

  15. Cytokines as a predictor of clinical response following hip arthroscopy: minimum 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Lauren M; Safran, Marc R; Maloney, William J; Goodman, Stuart B; Huddleston, James I; Bellino, Michael J; Scuderi, Gaetano J; Abrams, Geoffrey D

    2016-08-01

    Hip arthroscopy in patients with osteoarthritis has been shown to have suboptimal outcomes. Elevated cytokine concentrations in hip synovial fluid have previously been shown to be associated with cartilage pathology. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between hip synovial fluid cytokine concentration and clinical outcomes at a minimum of 2 years following hip arthroscopy. Seventeen patients without radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis had synovial fluid aspirated at time of portal establishment during hip arthroscopy. Analytes included fibronectin-aggrecan complex as well as a multiplex cytokine array. Patients completed the modified Harris Hip Score, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and the International Hip Outcomes Tool pre-operatively and at a minimum of 2 years following surgery. Pre and post-operative scores were compared with a paired t-test, and the association between cytokine values and clinical outcome scores was performed with Pearson's correlation coefficient with an alpha value of 0.05 set as significant. Sixteen of seventeen patients completed 2-year follow-up questionnaires (94%). There was a significant increase in pre-operative to post-operative score for each clinical outcome measure. No statistically significant correlation was seen between any of the intra-operative cytokine values and either the 2-year follow-up scores or the change from pre-operative to final follow-up outcome values. No statistically significant associations were seen between hip synovial fluid cytokine concentrations and 2-year follow-up clinical outcome assessment scores for those undergoing hip arthroscopy.

  16. Cytokines as a predictor of clinical response following hip arthroscopy: minimum 2-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Lauren M.; Safran, Marc R.; Maloney, William J.; Goodman, Stuart B.; Huddleston, James I.; Bellino, Michael J.; Scuderi, Gaetano J.; Abrams, Geoffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy in patients with osteoarthritis has been shown to have suboptimal outcomes. Elevated cytokine concentrations in hip synovial fluid have previously been shown to be associated with cartilage pathology. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between hip synovial fluid cytokine concentration and clinical outcomes at a minimum of 2 years following hip arthroscopy. Seventeen patients without radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis had synovial fluid aspirated at time of portal establishment during hip arthroscopy. Analytes included fibronectin–aggrecan complex as well as a multiplex cytokine array. Patients completed the modified Harris Hip Score, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and the International Hip Outcomes Tool pre-operatively and at a minimum of 2 years following surgery. Pre and post-operative scores were compared with a paired t-test, and the association between cytokine values and clinical outcome scores was performed with Pearson’s correlation coefficient with an alpha value of 0.05 set as significant. Sixteen of seventeen patients completed 2-year follow-up questionnaires (94%). There was a significant increase in pre-operative to post-operative score for each clinical outcome measure. No statistically significant correlation was seen between any of the intra-operative cytokine values and either the 2-year follow-up scores or the change from pre-operative to final follow-up outcome values. No statistically significant associations were seen between hip synovial fluid cytokine concentrations and 2-year follow-up clinical outcome assessment scores for those undergoing hip arthroscopy. PMID:27583163

  17. Cytokines as a predictor of clinical response following hip arthroscopy: minimum 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Lauren M; Safran, Marc R; Maloney, William J; Goodman, Stuart B; Huddleston, James I; Bellino, Michael J; Scuderi, Gaetano J; Abrams, Geoffrey D

    2016-08-01

    Hip arthroscopy in patients with osteoarthritis has been shown to have suboptimal outcomes. Elevated cytokine concentrations in hip synovial fluid have previously been shown to be associated with cartilage pathology. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between hip synovial fluid cytokine concentration and clinical outcomes at a minimum of 2 years following hip arthroscopy. Seventeen patients without radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis had synovial fluid aspirated at time of portal establishment during hip arthroscopy. Analytes included fibronectin-aggrecan complex as well as a multiplex cytokine array. Patients completed the modified Harris Hip Score, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and the International Hip Outcomes Tool pre-operatively and at a minimum of 2 years following surgery. Pre and post-operative scores were compared with a paired t-test, and the association between cytokine values and clinical outcome scores was performed with Pearson's correlation coefficient with an alpha value of 0.05 set as significant. Sixteen of seventeen patients completed 2-year follow-up questionnaires (94%). There was a significant increase in pre-operative to post-operative score for each clinical outcome measure. No statistically significant correlation was seen between any of the intra-operative cytokine values and either the 2-year follow-up scores or the change from pre-operative to final follow-up outcome values. No statistically significant associations were seen between hip synovial fluid cytokine concentrations and 2-year follow-up clinical outcome assessment scores for those undergoing hip arthroscopy. PMID:27583163

  18. A study of the electric field induced by magnetic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, M. A.

    2011-02-01

    Starting from our magnetic field model for magnetic clouds (MCs), which topologically considers them as cylinders with elliptical cross sections, we present a first attempt in the study of the electric field induced by the movements of magnetic clouds in the interplanetary medium and the expansions of their cross sections. These expansions are included in the model assuming linear time dependence in all the components of the plasma current density. In a previous paper we already determined the magnetic field and current density of our MCs model, and in its development we established that to get it physically consistent, the induced electric field has to be independent of time. In the present work we calculate the expressions for the components of this electric field and fit them to the corresponding experimental data determined from the measurements of the plasma velocity and magnetic field components through the expression $\\vec E$ = -$\\vec v$SW × $\\vec B$. To test the model, we have selected three intense and well-defined magnetic clouds observed in July 2000, November 2003, and May 2005. Until now we think it is one of the first attempts to incorporate this induced electric field in the context of analytical models for the study of MCs.

  19. Study of high field superconducting solenoids for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Barzi, E.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, Michael J.; Sadovskiy, Y.; Zlobin, Alexander V; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    The final beam cooling stages of a possible Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields of 40-50 T in an aperture of 40-50 mm. In this paper we study possible solutions towards creating DC fields of that order using available superconductors. Several magnetic and mechanical designs, optimized for the maximum performance are presented and compared in terms of cost and size.

  20. Cellular studies and interaction mechanisms of extremely low frequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liburdy, Robert P.

    1995-01-01

    Worldwide interest in the biological effects of ELF (extremely low frequency, <1 kHz) electromagnetic fields has grown significantly. Health professionals and government administrators and regulators, scientists and engineers, and, importantly, an increasing number of individuals in the general public are interested in this health issue. The goal of research at the cellular level is to identify cellular responses to ELF fields, to develop a dose threshold for such interactions, and with such information to formulate and test appropriate interaction mechanisms. This review is selective and will discuss the most recent cellular studies directed at these goals which relate to power line, sinusoidal ELF fields. In these studies an interaction site at the cell membrane is by consensus a likely candidate, since changes in ion transport, ligand-receptor events such as antibody binding, and G protein activation have been reported. These changes strongly indicate that signal transduction (ST) can be influenced. Also, ELF fields are reported to influence enzyme activation, gene expression, protein synthesis, and cell proliferation, which are triggered by earlier ST events at the cell membrane. The concept of ELF fields altering early cell membrane events and thereby influencing intracellular cell function via the ST cascade is perhaps the most plausible biological framework currently being investigated for understanding ELF effects on cells. For example, the consequence of an increase due to ELF fields in mitogenesis, the final endpoint of the ST cascade, is an overall increase in the probability of mutagenesis and consequently cancer, according to the Ames epigenetic model of carcinogenesis. Consistent with this epigenetic mechanism and the ST pathway to carcinogenesis is recent evidence that ELF fields can alter breast cancer cell proliferation and can act as a copromoter in vitro. The most important dosimetric question being addressed currently is whether the electric (E

  1. Electroresistance and field effect studies on manganite based heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Solanki, P. S.; Khachar, Uma; Vagadia, Megha; Ravalia, Ashish; Katba, Savan; Kuberkar, D. G.

    2015-04-14

    Electronic properties of manganites are significantly important for various spintronic applications such as microelectronics, magnetic data storage, communication technologies, and memory devices. Influence of applied electric field on the room temperature charge transport in ZnO/La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/SrNb{sub 0.002}Ti{sub 0.998}O{sub 3} (SNTO) heterostructure has been investigated using field effect studies. Large negative and positive electroresistance has been observed in heterostructure under various possible circuit geometries. Field effect studies have been carried out using three different circuit geometries, namely: (i) ZnO as a control electrode (E{sub LZ}), (ii) SNTO as a control electrode (E{sub LS}), and (iii) shorted ZnO and SNTO as control electrodes (E{sub LZS}). For this, channel electric field (E{sub CH}) dependent variation in channel resistance (R{sub C}) (of manganite channel) and I-V (across manganite channel) under various control fields (E{sub C}) have been studied. Variation in barrier height (Φ{sub B}) with control field (E{sub C}) for different geometries has been discussed.

  2. Studies of cryogenic electron plasmas in magnetic mirror fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Ramesh

    This thesis considers the properties of pure electron plasmas in Penning traps which have an axially varying magnetic field. Our theory of the thermal equilibrium of such plasmas in magnetic mirror fields indicates that their behavior may be characterized by the ratio of their temperature to their central density T/n. For cold, dense plasmas the density along the plasma axis scales linearly with the magnetic field, while for hot, tenuous plasmas, at the opposite limit of the parameter range, the density is constant along the axis, similar to the behavior of a neutral plasma in a magnetic mirror. We are able to conclude from this that the electrostatic potential varies along the field lines, in equilibrium. As the plasma charge and potential distribution must be consistent with the grounded potential on the trap walls, the plasma profile does not follow the geometry of the magnetic field lines; the plasma radius in the high-field region is smaller than would be obtained by mapping the field lines from the radial edge of the low-field region. Another interesting feature of these mirror equilibria is that there are trapped populations of particles both in the low-field and high-field regions. Our experiments on the Cryogenic Electron Trap have confirmed many of these theoretical results over a wide parameter range. We have been able to sample the volume charge density at various points on the axis. We have also measured the line-charge distribution of the plasma. Both these experiments are in general agreement with our theory of the global thermal equilibrium in the mirror- field. A surprising observation has been the unexpectedly long- life of the m = 1 diocotron mode in these traps where the magnetic field varies by ~100% across its length. We report these observations, along with plausible explanations for them. The trap we have constructed is intended for the eventual study of very cold electron plasmas in strong magnetic fields, where the plasma electrons are

  3. Simulation Studies of Field-Reversed Configurations with Rotating Magnetic Field Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belova, E. V.; Davidson, R. C.

    2008-11-01

    Results of 3D kinetic simulations of rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive in field-reversed configuration (FRC) are presented. Self-consistent hybrid simulations have been performed using the HYM code for even- and odd-parity RMF and different FRC parameters and RMF frequencies. Simulations show that the RMF pushes the plasma radially inward, resulting in a reduced plasma density outside separatrix. Lower plasma density and larger RMF amplitudes result in faster RMF field penetration, in agreement with previous two-fluid studies. Generation of axisymmetric toroidal magnetic field during the RMF current drive has been observed. Numerical study of the effects of the applied RMF field on particle confinement shows that the rate of particle losses increases for RMF frequency close to the ion cyclotron frequency. It is also shown that high-frequency even-parity RMF reduces ion losses when it is fully penetrated. It is also found that fully-penetrated, odd-parity RMF forces particles away from the midplane toward the FRC ends. The observed changes in particle confinement are related to ponderomotive forces. Partially penetrated RMF results in mostly radial ponderomotive forces which improve particle confinement in both cases.

  4. Study on advanced nanoscale near-field photolithography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-Been; Chiang, Hsiu-Lu; Huang, Jen-Ching

    2010-01-01

    At present, applying a near-field optical microscope to photolithographic line segment fabrication can only obtain nanoscale line segments of equal cutting depths, and cannot result in 3D shape fabrication. This study proposes an innovative line segment fabrication model of near-field photolithography that adjusts an optical fiber probe's field distance to control the exposure energy density, and moreover constructs an exposure energy density analysis method of the innovative photolithographic line segment fabrication. During the exposure simulation process of the innovative line segment fabrication model of near-field photolithography, the near-field distance between the optical fiber probe and the photoresist surface increases gradually, whereas the exposure energy density distribution decreases gradually. As a result, the cutting depth becomes shallower and the full-width at half maximum (FWHM) increases. The results of this study can serve as a theoretical reference for developing advanced nanoscale near-field photolithography techniques, to which an important and groundbreaking contribution is made.

  5. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Power Spectrum Variations: A VHO Enabled Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, A.; Koval, A.; Merka, J.; Narock, T.

    2010-01-01

    The newly reprocessed high time resolution (11/22 vectors/sec) Wind mission interplanetary magnetic field data and the solar wind key parameter search capability of the Virtual Heliospheric Observatory (VHO) affords an opportunity to study magnetic field power spectral density variations as a function of solar wind conditions. In the reprocessed Wind Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) data, the spin tone and its harmonics are greatly reduced that allows the meaningful fitting of power spectra to the approx.2 Hz limit above which digitization noise becomes apparent. The power spectral density is computed and the spectral index is fitted for the MHD and ion inertial regime separately along with the break point between the two for various solar wind conditions . The time periods of fixed solar wind conditions are obtained from VHO searches that greatly simplify the process. The functional dependence of the ion inertial spectral index and break point on solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions will be discussed

  6. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Power Spectrum Variations: A VHO Enabled Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, A.; Koval, A.; Merka, J.; Narock, T.

    2011-01-01

    The newly reprocessed high time resolution (11/22 vectors/sec) Wind mission interplanetary magnetic field data and the solar wind key parameter search capability of the Virtual Heliospheric Observatory (VHO) affords an opportunity to study magnetic field power spectral density variations as a function of solar wind conditions. In the reprocessed Wind Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) data, the spin tone and its harmonics are greatly reduced that allows the meaningful fitting of power spectra to the 2 Hz limit above which digitization noise becomes apparent. The power spectral density is computed and the spectral index is fitted for the MHD and ion inertial regime separately along with the break point between the two for various solar wind conditions. The time periods of fixed solar wind conditions are obtained from VHO searches that greatly simplify the process. The functional dependence of the ion inertial spectral index and break point on solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions will be discussed

  7. Whole-Home Dehumidifiers: Field-Monitoring Study

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Tom; Willem, Henry; Ni, Chun Chun; Stratton, Hannah; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Johnson, Russell

    2014-09-23

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) initiated a WHD field-metering study to expand current knowledge of and obtain data on WHD operation and energy consumption in real-world applications. The field study collected real-time data on WHD energy consumption, along with information regarding housing characteristics, consumer behavior, and various outdoor conditions expected to affect WHD performance and efficiency. Although the metering study collected similar data regarding air conditioner operation, this report discusses only WHDs. The primary objectives of the LBNL field-metering study are to (1) expand knowledge of the configurations, energy consumption profiles, consumer patterns of use (e.g., relative humidity [RH] settings), and environmental parameters of whole-home dehumidification systems; and (2) develop distributions of hours of dehumidifier operation in four operating modes: off, standby, fan-only, and compressor (also called dehumidification mode). Profiling energy consumption entails documenting the power consumption, duration of power consumption in different modes, condensate generation, and properties of output air of an installed system under field conditions of varying inlet air temperature and RH, as well as system configuration. This profiling provides a more detailed and deeper understanding of WHD operation and its complexities. This report describes LBNL’s whole-home dehumidification field-metering study conducted at four homes in Wisconsin and Florida. The initial phase of the WHD field-metering study was conducted on one home in Madison, Wisconsin, from June to December of 2013. During a second phase, three Florida homes were metered from June to October of 2014. This report presents and examines data from the Wisconsin site and from the three Florida sites.

  8. Rapid rise time pulsed magnetic field circuit for pump-probe field effect studies.

    PubMed

    Salaoru, T A; Woodward, Jonathan R

    2007-03-01

    Here we describe an electronic circuit capable of producing rapidly switched dc magnetic fields of up to 20 mT with a rise time of 10 ns and a pulse length variable from 50 ns to more than 10 micros, suitable for use in the study of magnetic field effects on radical pair (RP) reactions. This corresponds to switching the field on a time scale short relative to the lifetime of typical RPs and maintaining it well beyond their lifetimes. Previous experiments have involved discharging a capacitor through a low inductance coil for a limited time using a switching circuit. These suffer from decaying field strength over the duration of the pulse given primarily by the ratio of the pulse width to the RC constant of the circuit. We describe here a simple yet elegant solution that completely eliminates this difficulty by employing a feedback loop. This allows a constant field to be maintained over the entire length of the pulse. PMID:17411229

  9. Phase diagrams of diblock copolymers in electric fields: a self-consistent field theory study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji; Wang, Xianghong; Ji, Yongyun; He, Linli; Li, Shiben

    2016-04-21

    We investigated the phase diagrams of diblock copolymers in external electrostatic fields by using real-space self-consistent field theory. The lamella, cylinder, sphere, and ellipsoid structures were observed and analyzed by their segment distributions, which were arranged to two types of phase diagrams to examine the phase behavior in weak and strong electric fields. One type was constructed on the basis of Flory-Huggins interaction parameter and volume fraction. We identified an ellipsoid structure with a body-centered cuboid arrangement as a stable phase and discussed the shift of phase boundaries in the electric fields. The other type of phase diagrams was established on the basis of the dielectric constants of two blocks in the electric fields. We then determined the regions of ellipsoid phase in the phase diagrams to examine the influence of dielectric constants on the phase transition between ellipsoidal and hexagonally packed cylinder phases. A general agreement was obtained by comparing our results with those described in previous experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:27020849

  10. Complex coacervation: A field theoretic simulation study of polyelectrolyte complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jonghoon; Popov, Yuri O.; Fredrickson, Glenn H.

    2008-06-01

    Using the complex Langevin sampling strategy, field theoretic simulations are performed to study the equilibrium phase behavior and structure of symmetric polycation-polyanion mixtures without salt in good solvents. Static structure factors for the segment density and charge density are calculated and used to study the role of fluctuations in the electrostatic and chemical potential fields beyond the random phase approximation. We specifically focus on the role of charge density and molecular weight on the structure and complexation behavior of polycation-polyanion solutions. A demixing phase transition to form a ``complex coacervate'' is observed in strongly charged systems, and the corresponding spinodal and binodal boundaries of the phase diagram are investigated.

  11. Apprenticeships, Collaboration and Scientific Discovery in Academic Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Derek Scott; Grayson, Diane J.; Madden, Erinn H.; Milewski, Antoni V.; Snyder, Cathy Ann

    2012-11-01

    Teachers may use apprenticeships and collaboration as instructional strategies that help students to make authentic scientific discoveries as they work as amateur researchers in academic field studies. This concept was examined with 643 students, ages 14-72, who became proficient at field research through cognitive apprenticeships with the Smithsonian Institute, School for Field Studies and Earthwatch. Control student teams worked from single research goals and sets of methods, while experimental teams varied goals, methods, and collaborative activities in Kenya, Costa Rica, Panama, and Ecuador. Results from studies indicate that students who conducted local pilot studies, collaborative symposia, and ongoing, long-term fieldwork generated significantly more data than did control groups. Research reports of the experimental groups were ranked highest by experts, and contributed the most data to international science journals. Data and anecdotal information in this report indicate that structured collaboration in local long-term studies using apprenticeships may increase the potential for students' academic field studies contribution of new information to science.

  12. [Quality assurance at a health center: 2 years' experience].

    PubMed

    Marquet, R; Davins, J; Casas, J; Fernández, R M

    1991-11-01

    In the Primary Care field there is very little experience of organizing a quality control programme that covers all aspects of care. In our centre, at the beginning of 1989, a Quality Control Commission (QCC) was formed with the aim of establishing and coordinating these activities. We describe our two year experience in this report, with special emphasis on the programme's organizational side and the methodological difficulties we encountered while introducing the programme.

  13. The MAL-ED study: a multinational and multidisciplinary approach to understand the relationship between enteric pathogens, malnutrition, gut physiology, physical growth, cognitive development, and immune responses in infants and children up to 2 years of age in resource-poor environments.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Highly prevalent conditions with multiple and complex underlying etiologies are a challenge to public health. Undernutrition, for example, affects 20% of children in the developing world. The cause and consequence of poor nutrition are multifaceted. Undernutrition has been associated with half of all deaths worldwide in children aged <5 years; in addition, its pernicious long-term effects in early childhood have been associated with cognitive and physical growth deficits across multiple generations and have been thought to suppress immunity to further infections and to reduce the efficacy of childhood vaccines. The Etiology, Risk Factors, and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health (MAL-ED) Study, led by the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health and the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, has been established at sites in 8 countries with historically high incidence of diarrheal disease and undernutrition. Central to the study is the hypothesis that enteropathogen infection contributes to undernutrition by causing intestinal inflammation and/or by altering intestinal barrier and absorptive function. It is further postulated that this leads to growth faltering and deficits in cognitive development. The effects of repeated enteric infection and undernutrition on the immune response to childhood vaccines is also being examined in the study. MAL-ED uses a prospective longitudinal design that offers a unique opportunity to directly address a complex system of exposures and health outcomes in the community-rather than the relatively rarer circumstances that lead to hospitalization-during the critical period of development of the first 2 years of life. Among the factors being evaluated are enteric infections (with or without diarrhea) and other illness indicators, micronutrient levels, diet, socioeconomic status, gut function, and the environment. MAL-ED aims to describe these

  14. The MAL-ED study: a multinational and multidisciplinary approach to understand the relationship between enteric pathogens, malnutrition, gut physiology, physical growth, cognitive development, and immune responses in infants and children up to 2 years of age in resource-poor environments.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Highly prevalent conditions with multiple and complex underlying etiologies are a challenge to public health. Undernutrition, for example, affects 20% of children in the developing world. The cause and consequence of poor nutrition are multifaceted. Undernutrition has been associated with half of all deaths worldwide in children aged <5 years; in addition, its pernicious long-term effects in early childhood have been associated with cognitive and physical growth deficits across multiple generations and have been thought to suppress immunity to further infections and to reduce the efficacy of childhood vaccines. The Etiology, Risk Factors, and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health (MAL-ED) Study, led by the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health and the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, has been established at sites in 8 countries with historically high incidence of diarrheal disease and undernutrition. Central to the study is the hypothesis that enteropathogen infection contributes to undernutrition by causing intestinal inflammation and/or by altering intestinal barrier and absorptive function. It is further postulated that this leads to growth faltering and deficits in cognitive development. The effects of repeated enteric infection and undernutrition on the immune response to childhood vaccines is also being examined in the study. MAL-ED uses a prospective longitudinal design that offers a unique opportunity to directly address a complex system of exposures and health outcomes in the community-rather than the relatively rarer circumstances that lead to hospitalization-during the critical period of development of the first 2 years of life. Among the factors being evaluated are enteric infections (with or without diarrhea) and other illness indicators, micronutrient levels, diet, socioeconomic status, gut function, and the environment. MAL-ED aims to describe these

  15. Patient satisfaction and penile morphology changes with postoperative penile rehabilitation 2 years after Coloplast Titan prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Michael B; Carrion, Rafael; Wang, Run; Henry, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    A common complaint after inflatable penile prosthesis surgery is reduced penile length. We previously reported how using the Coloplast Titan inflatable penile prosthesis with aggressive new length measurement technique (NLMT) coupled with postoperative IPP rehabilitation of the implant for 1-year helped to improve patient satisfaction and erectile penile measurements. This is a 2 years follow-up of a prospective, three-center, study of 40 patients who underwent Titan prosthesis placement, with new length measurement technique for erectile dysfunction. Patient instructions were to inflate daily for 6 months and then inflate maximally for 1–2 h daily for 6–24 months. Fifteen penile measurements were taken before and immediately after surgery and at follow-up visits. Measurement changes were improved at 24 months as compared to immediately postoperative and at 12 months. 67.8% of subjects were satisfied with their length at 2 years, and 77% had perceived penile length that was longer (30.8%) or the same (46.2%) as prior to the surgery. 64.3% and 17.9% of subjects had increased and unchanged satisfaction, respectively, with penile length as compared to prior to penile implant surgery. All but one subject (96.5%) was satisfied with the overall function of his implant. This study suggests using the Coloplast Titan with aggressive cylinder sizing, and a postoperative penile rehabilitation inflation protocol can optimize patient satisfaction and erectile penile measurements at 2 years postimplant. PMID:26459782

  16. Patient satisfaction and penile morphology changes with postoperative penile rehabilitation 2 years after Coloplast Titan prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Michael B; Carrion, Rafael; Wang, Run; Henry, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    A common complaint after inflatable penile prosthesis surgery is reduced penile length. We previously reported how using the Coloplast Titan inflatable penile prosthesis with aggressive new length measurement technique (NLMT) coupled with postoperative IPP rehabilitation of the implant for 1-year helped to improve patient satisfaction and erectile penile measurements. This is a 2 years follow-up of a prospective, three-center, study of 40 patients who underwent Titan prosthesis placement, with new length measurement technique for erectile dysfunction. Patient instructions were to inflate daily for 6 months and then inflate maximally for 1-2 h daily for 6-24 months. Fifteen penile measurements were taken before and immediately after surgery and at follow-up visits. Measurement changes were improved at 24 months as compared to immediately postoperative and at 12 months. 67.8% of subjects were satisfied with their length at 2 years, and 77% had perceived penile length that was longer (30.8%) or the same (46.2%) as prior to the surgery. 64.3% and 17.9% of subjects had increased and unchanged satisfaction, respectively, with penile length as compared to prior to penile implant surgery. All but one subject (96.5%) was satisfied with the overall function of his implant. This study suggests using the Coloplast Titan with aggressive cylinder sizing, and a postoperative penile rehabilitation inflation protocol can optimize patient satisfaction and erectile penile measurements at 2 years postimplant.

  17. Pial synangiosis in patients with moyamoya younger than 2 years of age.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Eric M; Lin, Ning; Manjila, Sunil; Scott, R Michael; Smith, Edward R

    2014-04-01

    Object Patients with moyamoya who are younger than 2 years of age represent a therapeutic challenge because of their frequent neurological instability and concomitant anesthetic risks. The authors report their experience with pial synangiosis revascularization in this population. Methods The authors reviewed the clinical and radiographic records of all patients with moyamoya in a consecutive series of patients under 2 years of age, who underwent cerebral revascularization surgery using pial synangiosis at a single institution. Results During a 12-year period (1994-2005), 34 procedures (bilateral in 15 patients, unilateral in 4) were performed in 19 patients younger than 2 years (out of a total of 456 procedures in 240 patients). Eighteen of these patients presented with either stroke or transient ischemic attack. The average age of the 19 patients at first surgery was 1.4 years (range 6 months-1.9 years). Unanticipated staged operations occurred in 3 patients, due to persistent electroencephalographic changes during the initial surgery in 2 cases and due to brain swelling during the procedure requiring ventriculostomy in the other. There were 2 perioperative strokes; both patients had postoperative seizures but made clinical recoveries. The average follow-up was 7 years (range 1-14 years). Long term, at follow-up, 13 patients (68%) were clinically independent for their age, with 8 (42%) having no significant deficit. Late complications included subdural hygroma evacuation (1), additional revascularization procedures performed years later for frontal lobe ischemia (2), late infarction (1), and asymptomatic ischemic change on routine follow-up MRI studies (1). All patients who had both pre- and postoperative angiography demonstrated progression of disease. Conclusions Despite the challenges inherent to this population, the majority of children with moyamoya under the age of 2 years have a good long-term prognosis. The data from this study support the use of pial

  18. Field column study using zerovalent iron for mercury removal from contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Weisener, Christopher G; Sale, K Scott; Smyth, David J A; Blowes, David W

    2005-08-15

    Passive in situ remediation technologies, for example, permeable reactive barriers, PRBs, are an attractive and less expensive alternative compared to conventional pump and treat systems for groundwater remediation. Field column experiments were conducted to evaluate the removal of dissolved mercury from groundwater using zerovalent iron as the reactive media. Two column tests were conducted over a 6-week period, which simulated 2 and 10 years of groundwater flow through a potential full-scale treatment system. The influent groundwater pH was 7.8-9.5. The groundwater was reduced with an Eh, corrected to the standard hydrogen electrode, ranging from 0 to 120 mV over the trial period. Prior to treatment the total mercury concentration of the groundwater was approximately 40 microg L(-1). Effluent from the 10-year simulation contained approximately 0.5 microg/L of mercury during the first 3 weeks and increased to as much as 4 microg L(-1) by the end of the testing period. Effluent from the 2-year simulation was generally < 0.1 microg L(-1). Profile sampling of the 2-year simulation suggests that most of the mercury removal occurred in the initial 50% of the 20 cm column. Mineralogical studies, conducted using SEM/EDS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), confirm the accumulation of mercury onto a zerovalent iron surface in this 20-cm zone. These analyses indicate that mercury accumulated as a mercury sulfide with a stoichiometery similar to those of cinnabar and metacinnabar (HgS).

  19. Information transfer about roosts in female Bechstein's bats: an experimental field study.

    PubMed Central

    Kerth, Gerald; Reckardt, Karsten

    2003-01-01

    Information transfer among group members is believed to play an important part in the evolution of coloniality in both birds and bats. Although information transfer has received much scientific interest, field studies using experiments to test the underlying hypotheses are rare. We used a field experiment to test if communally breeding female Bechstein's bats (Myotis bechsteinii) exchange information regarding novel roosts. We supplied a wild colony, comprising 17 adult females of known relatedness, with pairs of suitable and unsuitable roosts and monitored the arrival of individuals marked with transponders (PIT-tags) over 2 years. As expected with information transfer, significantly more naive females were recruited towards suitable than towards unsuitable roosts. We conclude that information transfer about roosts has two functions: (i) it generates communal knowledge of a large set of roosts; and (ii) it aids avoidance of colony fission during roost switching. Both functions seem important in Bechstein's bats, in which colonies depend on many day roosts and where colony members live together for many years. PMID:12641906

  20. Assessing Student Learning in the Major Field of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    Assessing student attainment in the major field of study is increasingly important to employers and accrediting bodies alike. Construction and manufacturing firms do not like engineers who design faulty bridges and airplanes. Marketing firms want to hire students who understand the difference between a niche market and a global market. School…

  1. The significance of field work in monographic studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of this paper is to document the clear and obvious advantages of field work for monographic studies. These advantages include: 1) ability to understand published distributions better and greatly expand these data, 2) access to taxonomic data obscured on herbarium sheets (as colors, odors, ...

  2. Emotional Reactions of Students in Field Education: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litvack, Andrea; Mishna, Faye; Bogo, Marion

    2010-01-01

    An exploratory study using qualitative methodology was undertaken with recent MSW graduates (N=12) from 2 graduate social work programs to identify and describe the students' emotional reactions to experiences in field education. Significant and interrelated themes emerged including the subjective and unique definitions of emotionally charged…

  3. PACKAGE PLANTS FOR SMALL SYSTEMS: A FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A joint field study was conducted by AWWA and the Drinking Water Research Division of USEPA to evaluate existing small community systems that use package plant technology. Forty-eight package plant systems representing a geographic and technological cross section were evaluated t...

  4. DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, PART II: FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small, pilot field study was conducted to determine the adequacy of protocols for dietary exposure measurements. Samples were collected to estimate the amount of pesticides transferred from contaminated surfaces or hands to foods of young children and to validate a dietary mod...

  5. Field Research Studying Whales in an Undergraduate Animal Behavior Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLaren, R. David; Schulte, Dianna; Kennedy, Jen

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a new field research laboratory in an undergraduate animal behavior course involving the study of whale behavior, ecology and conservation in partnership with a non-profit research organization--the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation (BOS). The project involves two weeks of training and five weekend trips on whale watch…

  6. Which Is More Consequential: Fields of Study or Institutional Selectivity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Yingyi; Savas, Gokhan

    2014-01-01

    The persisting gender pay gap favoring men among college graduates is a puzzle given women's remarkable success in postsecondary education. This article examines income disparities among recent college graduates by intersecting gender and social class and evaluating the relative importance of fields of study and institutional selectivity.…

  7. Four Field Studies of Appalachian Parents of Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Joe E.; And Others

    This document contains the plans for conducting the field studies of Appalachian parents of young children which are part of the Appalachia Educational Laboratory's Home-Oriented Preschool Education Program (HOPE). HOPE is an integrated approach to education for preschool and kindergarten children being developed by AEL's Marketable Preschool…

  8. Comparison of different force fields for the study of disaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eighteen empirical force fields and the semi-empirical quantum method PM3CARB-1 were compared for studying ß-cellobiose, a-maltose, and a-galabiose [a-D-Galp-(1'4)-a-D-Galp]. For each disaccharide, the energies of 54 conformers with differing hydroxymethyl, hydroxyl and glycosidic linkage orientatio...

  9. Astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin study rock samples during field trip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Neil Armstrong, commander of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission, and Astronaut Edwin Aldrin, Lunar module pilot for Apollo 11, study rock samples during a geological field trip to the Quitman Mountains area near the Fort Quitman ruins in far west Texas.

  10. Preliminary simulation studies related to the Cerro Prieto Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Witherspoon, P.A.; Rivera, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Results of preliminary numerical simulations of the behavior of the Cerro Prieto field are discussed. The purpose of these studies is to examine: (1) the effect of using conventional isothermal methods of well test data analysis for geothermal systems, and (2) the influence of recharge from over under underlying aquifers on the temperature of a producing geothermal reservoir. 8 refs.

  11. On the design of experiments to study extreme field limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Chen, M.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Koga, J. K.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Chen, P.; Mur, V. D.; Narozhny, N. B.; Popov, V. S.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Korn, G.

    2012-12-01

    We propose experiments on the collision of high intensity electromagnetic pulses with electron bunches and on the collision of multiple electromagnetic pulses for studying extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves. The effects of nonlinear QED will be revealed in these laser plasma experiments.

  12. Counselor Attractiveness, Similarity, and Session Impact: A Field Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerison, Rebecca M.; Claiborn, Charles D.

    Past research has suggested that interpersonal influence in counseling is enhanced as clients perceive their counselors to be interpersonally attractive and similar to themselves. This study examined the relationship of specific verbal and nonverbal cues to perceived counselor attractiveness in a field setting, and explored the relation between…

  13. WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM ANALYSIS: FIELD STUDIES, MODELING AND MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The user‘s guide entitled “Water Distribution System Analysis: Field Studies, Modeling and Management” is a reference guide for water utilities and an extensive summarization of information designed to provide drinking water utility personnel (and related consultants and research...

  14. High Field Small Animal Magnetic Resonance Oncology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) imaging, and hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy as well as diffusion-weighted, Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies. PMID:24374985

  15. Magnetic field studies by Voyager 1 - Preliminary results at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Lepping, R. P.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    Confirmation and refinement of Saturnian magnetosphere features established by the Pioneer 11 emission are claimed for Voyager 1 magnetic field studies of the planet. The radius of the magnetopause at the subsolar point is 23 Saturn radii, and a magnetic tail of 80 Saturn radii diameter was discovered. The tail extends away from the sun and is similar to both type II comet tails and the terrestrial and Jovian magnetic tails. Data from Voyager's very close flyby of Titan, which is located within the Saturn magnetosphere, shows an absence of any substantial, intrinsic satellite magnetic field.

  16. Strabismus at Age 2 Years in Children Born Before 28 Weeks' Gestation: Antecedents and Correlates.

    PubMed

    VanderVeen, Deborah K; Allred, Elizabeth N; Wallace, David K; Leviton, Alan

    2016-03-01

    Children born very preterm are at greater risk of ophthalmic morbidities, including strabismus, than children born at term. We evaluated perinatal factors associated with strabismus at age 2 years in a large population of infants delivered before 28 weeks' gestation. A total of 996 infants in the multicenter ELGAN (Extremely Low Gestational Age Newborn) study who had a retinal exam in infancy and a developmental assessment at 2 years corrected age are included. Their mothers were interviewed about the pregnancy, and both mother and newborn charts were reviewed. Certified examiners administered the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II and performed an examination of ocular alignment. Time-oriented logistic regression risk models were created to evaluate the associations of characteristics and exposures with the development of strabismus. Overall, 14% (n = 141) of the children had strabismus at 2 years, and 80% of strabismic children had esotropia. Characteristics associated with strabismus were birth before 26 weeks' gestation, severe fetal growth restriction, and maternal history of aspirin ingestion. Associated postnatal factors included a SNAP-II (Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology) illness severity value ≥ 30, brain ventriculomegaly, type I retinopathy of prematurity, and ventilator-dependent severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Strabismus in very preterm populations is associated with a number of antenatal and postnatal antecedents as well as clinical and imaging correlates indicative of brain damage in these children. Routine ophthalmologic assessments in the early years can allow appropriate and timely interventions.

  17. Field-Theoretic Studies of Nanostructured Triblock Polyelectrolyte Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audus, Debra; Fredrickson, Glenn

    2012-02-01

    Recently, experimentalists have developed nanostructured, reversible gels formed from triblock polyelectrolytes (Hunt et al. 2011, Lemmers et al. 2010, 2011). These gels have fascinating and tunable properties that reflect a heterogeneous morphology with domains on the order of tens of nanometers. The complex coacervate domains, aggregated oppositely charged end-blocks, are embedded in a continuous aqueous matrix and are bridged by uncharged, hydrophilic polymer mid-blocks. We report on simulation studies that employ statistical field theory models of triblock polyelectrolytes, and we explore the equilibrium self-assembly of these remarkable systems. As the charge complexation responsible for the formation of coacervate domains is driven by electrostatic correlations, we have found it necessary to pursue full ``field-theoretic simulations'' of the models, as opposed to the familiar self-consistent field theory approach. Our investigations have focused on morphological trends with mid- and end-block lengths, polymer concentration, salt concentration and charge density.

  18. A Field Study on the Raindrop Fall Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Kalimur; Testik, Firat

    2016-04-01

    Raindrop fall velocity is a critical parameter in various rainfall related applications such as dual-polarization radar rainfall estimation. In such applications, it is typically assumed that raindrops fall at terminal velocity. Recent field observations, however, challenged this assumption of terminal raindrops. In this study, we investigated raindrop fall velocity in rainfall events using a new optical-type disdrometer called the High-speed Optical Disdrometer (HOD). We developed the HOD recently for precipitation microphysical observations, in particular for investigating raindrop dynamics including raindrop fall velocity. Our field observations showed clear deviations of raindrop fall velocities from predicted terminal velocities. These new field observations and our ongoing efforts to elucidate raindrop fall velocity characteristics will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AGS-1612681.

  19. Exenatide once weekly treatment maintained improvements in glycemic control and weight loss over 2 years

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    population. Nausea (predominantly mild in intensity) was the most common adverse event, although the frequency and intensity of nausea decreased over time. No severe hypoglycemia was observed. Conclusions Exenatide QW was well tolerated during the 2-year treatment period. This study demonstrated sustained glucose control and weight loss throughout 2 years of treatment with exenatide QW. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00308139 PMID:21529363

  20. Magnetic field studies by voyager 1: preliminary results at saturn.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuña, M H; Lepping, R P; Connerney, J E; Behannon, K W; Burlaga, L F; Neubauer, F M

    1981-04-10

    Magnetic field studies by Voyager 1 have confirmed and refined certain general features of the Saturnian magnetosphere and planetary magnetic field established by Pioneer 11 in 1979. The main field of Saturn is well represented by a dipole of moment 0.21 +/- 0.005 gauss-R(s)(3) (where 1 Saturn radius, R(s), is 60,330 kilometers), tilted 0.7 degrees +/- 0.35 degrees from the rotation axis and located within 0.02 R(s) of the center of the planet. The radius of the magnetopause at the subsolar point was observed to be 23 R(s) on the average, rather than 17 R(s). Voyager 1 discovered a magnetic tail of Saturn with a diameter of approximately 80 R(s). This tail extends away from the Sun and is similar to type II comet tails and the terrestrial and Jovian magnetic tails. Data from the very close flyby at Titan (located within the Saturnian magnetosphere) at a local time of 1330, showed an absence of any substantial intrinsic satellite magnetic field. However, the results did indicate a very well developed, induced magnetosphere with a bipolar magnetic tail. The upper limit to any possible internal satellite magnetic moment is 5 x 10(21) gauss-cubic centimeter, equivalent to a 30-nanotesla equatorial surface field.

  1. Satellite Studies of Ionospheric Electric Fields and Neutral Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, Bela G.

    2002-01-01

    We have studied mid- and low-latitude electrodynamic and neutral thermospheric dynamic processes using measurements on board the AE-E, DE-2, and UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) satellites, and global convection and general circulation models. These studies have determined the morphology of the equatorial zonal electric fields, the response of equatorial plasma irregularities to magnetospheric disturbances, and the time dependent response of the mid- and low latitude electric fields to magnetospheric disturbances. We have also used extensive F region zonal and meridional wind data obtained by Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) instrument on board the UARS to study the latitudinal dependence of daytime disturbance winds during magnetically disturbed periods and the general characteristics of the global thermospheric disturbance wind system during geomagnetically active periods. This project has supported the PhD thesis research of John Emmert.

  2. Urban Dispersion Program Overview and MID05 Field Study Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-07-31

    The Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) was a 4-year project (2004–2007) funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security with additional support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also contributed to UDP through funding a human-exposure component of the New York City (NYC) field studies in addition to supporting an EPA scientist in conducting modeling studies of NYC. The primary goal of UDP was to improve the scientific understanding of the flow and diffusion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of NYC. The overall UDP project manager and lead scientist was Dr. Jerry Allwine of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. UDP had several accomplishments that included conducting two tracer and meteorological field studies in Midtown Manhattan.

  3. Electron Dynamics in Intense Laser Fields: A Bohmian Mechanics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jooya, Hossein Z.; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-05-01

    We study the electron quantum dynamics of atomic hydrogen under intense near infrared laser fields by means of the De Broglie-Bohm's framework of Bohmian mechanics. This method is used to study the mechanism of the multiple plateau generation and the cut-off extension, as the main characteristic features of high order harmonic generation spectrum. Electron multiple recollision dynamics under intense mid-infrared laser fields is also investigated. In this case, the resulting patterns in the high-order harmonic generation and the above-threshold ionization spectra are analyzed by comprehensive picture provided by Bohmian mechanics. The time evolution of individual trajectories is closely studied to address some of the major structural features of the photoelectron angular distributions. This work is partially supported by DOE.

  4. Planning and setting objectives in field studies: Chapter 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Robert N.; Dodd, C. Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This chapter enumerates the steps required in designing and planning field studies on the ecology and conservation of reptiles, as these involve a high level of uncertainty and risk. To this end, the chapter differentiates between goals (descriptions of what one intends to accomplish) and objectives (the measurable steps required to achieve the established goals). Thus, meeting a specific goal may require many objectives. It may not be possible to define some of them until certain experiments have been conducted; often evaluations of sampling protocols are needed to increase certainty in the biological results. And if sampling locations are fixed and sampling events are repeated over time, then both study-specific covariates and sampling-specific covariates should exist. Additionally, other critical design considerations for field study include obtaining permits, as well as researching ethics and biosecurity issues.

  5. Geography Teacher Candidates' Experiences of Field Study in Western Anatolia: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balci, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish expectations of 5th grade students from Marmara University's Department of Geography Teaching on geographical field study in Western Anatolia. For this reason, a field study trip was organized to Western Anatolia. A survey, which was consisted of open-ended questions, was prepared by experts and it was…

  6. Analytical and Numerical Studies of Coherent Field Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Hans-Reinhard

    Motivated by the goal of investigating the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe, a study of dynamical aspects of nonlinear field-theoretical systems is performed. Symmetric and asymmetric double-well potentials in the φ4 theory are used as a model for these systems. In the first part, it is shown that in this model, a class of localized, time-dependent, spherically-symmetric objects dubbed oscillons exists. The most distinctive feature of these objects is that they are extremely long-lived. The properties of oscillons are studied by numerical and analytical means. In the second part of the study, the matching between (1+1)-dimensional nonlinear field theories coupled to an external stochastic environment and their lattice simulations is investigated. In particular, a method is developed to obtain numerical results which are lattice-spacing independent, and to extract the correct effective potential which emerges from the simulations. As an application, the thermal production of kinks is studied, obtaining the lattice-spacing independent number density of kinks and the effective barrier for kink production, i.e., the effective kink mass. Within its range of validity, the approach can be used to match numerical simulations to continuum studies of the emergence of coherent field structures in cosmology and condensed matter physics.

  7. Monte Carlo study of MLC fields for cobalt therapy machine

    PubMed Central

    Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Rani, Roopa A.; Kumar, Anil; Reddy, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    An automated Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) system has been developed as add-on for the cobalt-60 teletherapy machines available in India. The goal of the present computational study is to validate the MLC design using Monte Carlo (MC) modeling. The study was based on the Kirloskar-supplied Phoenix model machines that closely match the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) theratron-80 machine. The MLC is a retrofit attachment to the collimator assembly, with 14 non-divergent leaf pairs of 40 mm thick, 7 mm wide, and 150 mm long tungsten alloy plates with rounded edges and 20 mm tongue and 2 mm groove in each leaf. In the present work, the source and collimator geometry has been investigated in detail to arrive at a model that best represents the measured dosimetric data. The authors have studied in detail the proto-I MLC built for cobalt-60. The MLC field sizes were MC simulated for 2 × 2 cm2 to 14 × 14 cm2 square fields as well as irregular fields, and the percent depth dose (PDD) and profile data were compared with ROPS† treatment planning system (TPS). In addition, measured profiles using the IMATRIXX system‡ were also compared with the MC simulations. The proto-I MLC can define radiation fields up to 14 × 14 cm2 within 3 mm accuracy. The maximum measured leakage through the leaf ends in closed condition was 3.4% and interleaf leakage observed was 7.3%. Good agreement between MC results, ROPS and IMATRIXX results has been observed. The investigation also supports the hypothesis that optical and radiation field coincidence exists for the square fields studied with the MLC. Plots of the percent depth dose (PDD) data and profile data for clinically significant irregular fields have also been presented. The MC model was also investigated to speed up the calculations to allow calculations of clinically relevant conformal beams. †Radiation Oncology Planning System (ROPS) is supplied by Tirumala Jyothi Computer Systems described at https

  8. Integrated modeling and field study of potential mechanisms forinduced seismicity at The Geysers Goethermal Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Majer, Ernie; Oldenburg, Curt; Peterson, John; Vasco, Don

    2006-06-07

    In this paper, we present progress made in a study aimed atincreasing the understanding of the relative contributions of differentmechanisms that may be causing the seismicity occurring at The Geysersgeothermal field, California. The approach we take is to integrate: (1)coupled reservoir geomechanical numerical modeling, (2) data fromrecently upgraded and expanded NCPA/Calpine/LBNL seismic arrays, and (3)tens of years of archival InSAR data from monthly satellite passes. Wehave conducted a coupled reservoir geomechanical analysis to studypotential mechanisms induced by steam production. Our simulation resultscorroborate co-locations of hypocenter field observations of inducedseismicity and their correlation with steam production as reported in theliterature. Seismic and InSAR data are being collected and processed foruse in constraining the coupled reservoir geomechanicalmodel.

  9. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Wang

    2002-09-18

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ~140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ~140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ~140 MV/m. To

  10. Magnetic field studies by Voyager 2 - Preliminary results at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Lepping, R. P.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1982-01-01

    Results of Voyager 2 studies of the magnetosphere and planetary magnetic field of Saturn are presented. Magnetometer studies have confirmed the results obtained by Voyager 1, indicating the magnetic field to be that of a centered dipole of moment 0.21 gauss Saturn radii-cubed, tilted approximately 0.8 deg from the rotation axis and a maximum measured field intensity of 1187 nT at latitude 17.3 deg N just before periapsis. Voyager 2 observed multiple bow shock and magnetopause crossings during its inbound and outbound trajectories, which were complementary to those of Voyager 1, including magnetopause crossing at 18.5 Saturn radii on the inbound trajectory, and at 48.4-50.9 Saturn radii outbound indicative of magnetospheric expansion due to changing solar wind conditions. Throughout the outbound passage, the magnetospheric field was observed to be relatively steady and smooth, with no evidence for any azimuthal asymmetry or magnetic anomaly. Results thus are incapable of accounting for the observed periodic modulation of the Saturnian kilometric radio emissions.

  11. Simulation studies of FRC with rotating magnetic field current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belova, E. V.; Davidson, R. C.

    2007-11-01

    The HYM code has been modified to include the effects of rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive. Initial 3D two-fluid and hybrid simulations have been performed for even-parity RMF and different plasma parameters. Simulations show that the RMF pushes the plasma radially inward, resulting in a reduced plasma density outside the separatrix. Lower plasma density and larger RMF amplitudes result in faster RMF field penetration, in agreement with previous studies [R. Milroy, Phys. Plasmas 8, 2804 (2001)]. Effects of the applied RMF field on particle confinement have been studied using 3D test particle simulations. Simulations of stationary RMFs show that for relatively large ion Larmor radius (S^*<20), there is very little difference between even- and odd-parity RMFs in terms of the ion losses. The rate of particle losses is larger in larger FRCs, and increases with the RMF amplitude. In contrast, high-frequency RMF can reduce ion losses provided φrmfφci, and the RMF is of even-parity. The improved particle confinement is related to ponderomotive forces due to the rapidly oscillating, inhomogeneous electromagnetic field. It is also found that high-frequency, odd-parity RMFs force particles away from the midplane toward the FRC ends.

  12. Electron field emission in nanostructures: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Joseph Andrew

    The objective of this work was to study electron field emission from several nanostructures using a first-principles framework. The systems studied were carbon nanowires, graphene nanoribbons, and nanotubes of varying composition. These particular structures were chosen because they have recently been identified as showing novel physical phenomena, as well as having tremendous industrial applications. We examined the field emission under a variety of conditions, including laser illumination and the presence of adsorbates. The goal was to explore how these conditions affect the field emission performance. In addition to the calculations, this dissertation has presented computational developments by the author that allowed these demanding calculations to be performed. There are many possible choices for basis when performing an electronic structure calculation. Examples are plane waves, atomic orbitals, and real-space grids. The best choice of basis depends on the structure of the system being analyzed and the physical processes involved (e.g., laser illumination). For this reason, it was important to conduct rigorous tests of basis set performance, in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency. There are no existing benchmark calculations for field emission, but transport calculations for nanostructures are similar, and so provide a useful reference for evaluating the performance of various basis sets. Based on the results, for the purposes of studying a non-periodic nanostructure under field emission conditions, we decided to use a real-space grid basis which incorporates the Lagrange function approach. Once a basis was chosen, in this case a real-space grid, the issue of boundary conditions arose. The problem is that with a non-periodic system, field emitted electron density can experience non-physical reflections from the boundaries of the calculation volume, leading to inaccuracies. To prevent this issue, we used complex absorbing potentials (CAPs) to absorb

  13. Changes in refraction between the ages of 1 and 3 1/2 years.

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, R M; Barr, A

    1979-01-01

    A study has been made of the changes in refraction as a sample of 148 children grew between the ages of 1 and 3 1/2 years. There was no decrease in hypermetropia, but there was a significant decrease in the incidence of astigmatism. Study of the changes in the refraction in the horizontal and vertical meridia of individual eyes gave clear evidence of a trend towards emmetropia if the initial refraction in either meridian was myopic or less than +2.50 D. Above that level the refraction became more or less hypermetropic. PMID:465408

  14. Food production and nutrition for the crew during the first 2-year closure of Biosphere 2.

    PubMed

    Silverstone, S E

    1997-01-01

    Biosphere 2's finite natural resources: atmosphere, plants, water, and soil, and its unique increased rate of nutrient cycling, mandated a design for the agriculture that emphasized sustainability and high productivity. The results of the initial 2-year test of the agriculture system showed that it could provide a diet that was both nutritionally adequate and pleasing to the palate of the eight-member crew from September 1991 to September 1993. The agriculture design was developed from 1985 to 1991 at the Space Biospheres research greenhouses with consulting from the Institute of Ecotechnics (London) from its experiments in New Mexico, Australia, and France and the Environmental Research Laboratory (University of Arizona). During the 2-year mission this research was continued with the close collaboration of outside scientific consultants, particularly in the area of soil management and integrated pest management. The 2000-m2 cropping area provided approximately 81% of the overall nutritional needs of the crew. Initial results showed light to be the main limiting factor and the additional electric light was added after the first 2-year mission to increase the productivity for future experiments. The diet was primarily vegetarian supplemented with daily amounts of milk, and weekly meals of meat and eggs from the system's domestic goats, pigs, and chickens. Nontoxic methods of pest and disease control were used. The main pest problems were broad mite and root knot nematode. Inedible plant material, domestic animal wastes, and human waste water were successfully processed for nutrient return to the soil. Eighty-six varieties of crops were grown in Biosphere 2. Major staple crops included rice, sweet potato, beets, banana, and papaya. The African pygmy goats were the most productive of the domestic animals producing on average 1.14 kg of milk per day. The diet averaged 2200 calories, 73 g of protein, and 32 g of fat per person per day over the 2 years. The crew had a 10

  15. Food production and nutrition for the crew during the first 2-year closure of Biosphere 2.

    PubMed

    Silverstone, S E

    1997-01-01

    Biosphere 2's finite natural resources: atmosphere, plants, water, and soil, and its unique increased rate of nutrient cycling, mandated a design for the agriculture that emphasized sustainability and high productivity. The results of the initial 2-year test of the agriculture system showed that it could provide a diet that was both nutritionally adequate and pleasing to the palate of the eight-member crew from September 1991 to September 1993. The agriculture design was developed from 1985 to 1991 at the Space Biospheres research greenhouses with consulting from the Institute of Ecotechnics (London) from its experiments in New Mexico, Australia, and France and the Environmental Research Laboratory (University of Arizona). During the 2-year mission this research was continued with the close collaboration of outside scientific consultants, particularly in the area of soil management and integrated pest management. The 2000-m2 cropping area provided approximately 81% of the overall nutritional needs of the crew. Initial results showed light to be the main limiting factor and the additional electric light was added after the first 2-year mission to increase the productivity for future experiments. The diet was primarily vegetarian supplemented with daily amounts of milk, and weekly meals of meat and eggs from the system's domestic goats, pigs, and chickens. Nontoxic methods of pest and disease control were used. The main pest problems were broad mite and root knot nematode. Inedible plant material, domestic animal wastes, and human waste water were successfully processed for nutrient return to the soil. Eighty-six varieties of crops were grown in Biosphere 2. Major staple crops included rice, sweet potato, beets, banana, and papaya. The African pygmy goats were the most productive of the domestic animals producing on average 1.14 kg of milk per day. The diet averaged 2200 calories, 73 g of protein, and 32 g of fat per person per day over the 2 years. The crew had a 10

  16. A Collaborative Problem-solving Process Through Environmental Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mijung; Teck Tan, Hoe

    2013-02-01

    This study explored and documented students' responses to opportunities for collective knowledge building and collaboration in a problem-solving process within complex environmental challenges and pressing issues with various dimensions of knowledge and skills. Middle-school students (n = 16; age 14) and high-school students (n = 16; age 17) from two Singapore public institutions participated in an environmental science field study to experience knowledge integration and a decision-making process. Students worked on six research topics to understand the characteristics of an organic farm and plan for building an ecological village. Students collected and analysed data from the field and shared their findings. Their field work and discussions were video-recorded, and their reflective notes and final reports were collected for data coding and interpretation. The results revealed that throughout the study, students experienced the needs and development of integrated knowledge, encountered the challenges of knowledge sharing and communication during their collaboration, and learned how to cope with the difficulties. Based on research findings, this study further discusses students' learning through a collaborative problem-solving process, including the interdependence of knowledge and the development of mutual relationships such as respect and care for others' knowledge and learning.

  17. Human melatonin in magnetic fields: Second study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.; Cook, M.R.; Cohen, H.D.

    1995-11-01

    Melatonin (MLT) is a hormone secreted primarily at night by the pineal gland in the brain. A number of studies suggest it is part of the body`s natural defenses against cancer. This hormone is reported to stimulate immune function and has been implicated in the control of cell proliferation, the growth of transplanted tumors, and the promotion and/or co-promotion of mammary tumors. MLT also plays a key role in the regulation of reproductive hormones implicated in a number of carcinogenic processes. Studies with rodents, although not always consistent, suggest that nocturnal MLT levels may be suppressed by electric or magnetic field (EMF) exposure. This relationship has been proposed as a possible biological mechanism to account for epidemiological reports linking chronic EMF exposure and increased cancer risk. Research was needed to determine if a similar suppression of MLT occurs when humans are exposed to magnetic fields at night.

  18. Field Artillery Ammunition Processing System (FAAPS) concept evaluation study

    SciTech Connect

    Kring, C.T.; Babcock, S.M.; Watkin, D.C.; Oliver, R.P.

    1992-06-01

    The Field Artillery Ammunition Processing System (FAAPS) is an initiative to introduce a palletized load system (PLS) that is transportable with an automated ammunition processing and storage system for use on the battlefield. System proponents have targeted a 20% increase in the ammunition processing rate over the current operation while simultaneously reducing the total number of assigned field artillery battalion personnel by 30. The overall objective of the FAAPS Project is the development and demonstration of an improved process to accomplish these goals. The initial phase of the FAAPS Project and the subject of this study is the FAAPS concept evaluation. The concept evaluation consists of (1) identifying assumptions and requirements, (2) documenting the process flow, (3) identifying and evaluating technologies available to accomplish the necessary ammunition processing and storage operations, and (4) presenting alternative concepts with associated costs, processing rates, and manpower requirements for accomplishing the operation. This study provides insight into the achievability of the desired objectives.

  19. 2-Year-Olds' Speech Understanding in Multitalker Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Rochelle S.

    2011-01-01

    Infants and toddlers are often spoken to in the presence of background sounds, including speech from other talkers. Prior work has suggested that infants 1 year of age and younger can only recognize speech when it is louder than any distracters in the environment. The present study tests 24-month-olds' ability to understand speech in a multitalker…

  20. State Budgets Are Likely to Squeeze 2-Year Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selingo, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    Community colleges in nearly half of the states will probably face midyear reductions in their appropriations, according to a survey of members of the National Council of State Directors of Community Colleges. The study paints a bleak picture of a widening fiscal crisis among state governments, which started in the most recent budget year and is…

  1. CFD Simulations of Joint Urban Atmospheric Dispersion Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R; Humphreys III, T; Chan, S

    2004-06-17

    The application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the understanding of urban wind flow and dispersion processes has gained increasing attention over recent years. While many of the simpler dispersion models are based on a set of prescribed meteorology to calculate dispersion, the CFD approach has the ability of coupling the wind field to dispersion processes. This has distinct advantages when very detailed results are required, such as for the case where the releases occur around buildings and within urban areas. CFD also has great flexibility as a testbed for turbulence models, which has important implications for atmospheric dispersion problems. In the spring of 2003, a series of dispersion field experiments (Joint Urban 2003) were conducted at Oklahoma City (Allwine, et. al, 2004). These experiments were complimentary to the URBAN 2000 field studies at Salt Lake City (Shinn, et. al, 2000) in that they will provide a second set of comprehensive field data for evaluation of CFD as well as for other dispersion models. In contrast to the URBAN 2000 experiments that were conducted entirely at night, these new field studies took place during both daytime and nighttime thus including the possibility of convective as well as stable atmospheric conditions. Initially several CFD modeling studies were performed to provide guidance for the experimental team in the selection of release sites and in the deployment of wind and concentration sensors. Also, while meteorological and concentration measurements were taken over the greater Oklahoma City urban area, our CFD calculations were focused on the near field of the release point. The proximity of the source to a large commercial building and to the neighboring buildings several of which have multistories, present a significant challenge even for CFD calculations involving grid resolutions as fine as 1 meter. A total of 10 Intensive Observations Periods (IOP's) were conducted within the 2003 field experiments. SF6

  2. Canine parvovirus in vaccinated dogs: a field study.

    PubMed

    Miranda, C; Thompson, G

    2016-04-16

    The authors report a field study that investigated the canine parvovirus (CPV) strains present in dogs that developed the disease after being vaccinated. Faecal samples of 78 dogs that have been vaccinated against CPV and later presented with clinical signs suspected of parvovirus infection were used. Fifty (64.1 per cent) samples tested positive by PCR for CPV. No CPV vaccine type was detected. The disease by CPV-2b occurred in older and female dogs when compared with that by CPV-2c. The clinical signs presented by infected dogs were similar when any of both variants were involved. In most cases of disease, the resulting infection by field variants occurred shortly after CPV vaccination. Two dogs that had been subjected to a complete vaccination schedule and presented with clinical signs after 10 days of vaccination, had the CPV-2c variant associated. The phylogenetic studies showed a close relationship of the isolates in vaccinated dogs to European field strains. Despite the limited sample size in this study, the findings point to the significance of the continuous molecular typing of the virus as a tool to monitor the prevalent circulating CPV strains and access the efficacy of current vaccines. Adjustments on the vaccine types to be used may have to be evaluated again according to each epidemiological situation in order to achieve the dog's optimal immune protection against CPV. PMID:26960988

  3. Science and ecological literacy in undergraduate field studies education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapp, Kim J.

    There is an ever-increasing number of issues that face our world today; from climate change, water and food scarcity, to pollution and resource extraction. Science and ecology play fundamental roles in these problems, and yet the understanding of these fields is limited in our society (Miller, 2002; McBride, Brewer, Berkowitz, and Borrie, 2013). Across the nation students are finishing their undergraduate degrees and are expected to enter the workforce and society with the skills needed to succeed. The deficit of science and ecological literacy in these students has been recognized and a call for reform begun (D'Avanzo, 2003 and NRC, 2009). This mixed-methods study looked at how a field studies course could fill the gap of science and ecological literacy in undergraduates. Using grounded theory, five key themes were data-derived; definitions, systems thinking, human's role in the environment, impetus for change and transference. These themes where then triangulated for validity and reliability through qualitative and quantitative assessments. A sixth theme was also identified, the learning environment. Due to limited data to support this themes' development and reliability it is discussed in Chapter 5 to provide recommendations for further research. Key findings show that this field studies program influenced students' science and ecological literacy through educational theory and practice.

  4. Canine parvovirus in vaccinated dogs: a field study.

    PubMed

    Miranda, C; Thompson, G

    2016-04-16

    The authors report a field study that investigated the canine parvovirus (CPV) strains present in dogs that developed the disease after being vaccinated. Faecal samples of 78 dogs that have been vaccinated against CPV and later presented with clinical signs suspected of parvovirus infection were used. Fifty (64.1 per cent) samples tested positive by PCR for CPV. No CPV vaccine type was detected. The disease by CPV-2b occurred in older and female dogs when compared with that by CPV-2c. The clinical signs presented by infected dogs were similar when any of both variants were involved. In most cases of disease, the resulting infection by field variants occurred shortly after CPV vaccination. Two dogs that had been subjected to a complete vaccination schedule and presented with clinical signs after 10 days of vaccination, had the CPV-2c variant associated. The phylogenetic studies showed a close relationship of the isolates in vaccinated dogs to European field strains. Despite the limited sample size in this study, the findings point to the significance of the continuous molecular typing of the virus as a tool to monitor the prevalent circulating CPV strains and access the efficacy of current vaccines. Adjustments on the vaccine types to be used may have to be evaluated again according to each epidemiological situation in order to achieve the dog's optimal immune protection against CPV.

  5. Reversed-field pinch studies in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Hokin, S.; Almagri, A.; Cekic, M.; Chapman, B.; Crocker, N.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Fiksel, G.; Henry, J.; Ji, H.; Prager, S.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1993-04-03

    Studies of large-size (R = 1.5 m, a = 0.5 m), moderate current (I < 750 kA) reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas are carried out in the Madison Symmetric Torus in order to evaluate and improve RFP confinement, study general toroidal plasma MHD issues, determine the mechanism of the RFP dynamo, and measure fluctuation-induced transport and anomalous ion heating. MST confinement has been improved by reduction of magnetic field errors with correction coils in the primary circuit and reduction of impurities using boronization; high densities have been achieved with hydrogen pellet injection. MHD tearing modes with poloidal mode number m = 1 and toroidal mode numbers n = 5--7 are prevalent and nonlinearly couple to produce sudden relaxations akin to tokamak sawteeth. Edge fluctuation-induced transport has been measured with a variety of insertable probes. Ions exhibit anomalous heating, with increases of ion temperature occuring during strong MHD relaxation. The RFP dynamo has been studied with attention to various possible mechanisms, including motion-EMF drive, the Hall effect, and superthermal electrons. Initial profile control experiments have begun using insertable biased probes and plasma guns. The toroidal field capacity of MST will be upgraded during Summer, 1993 to allow low-current tokamak operation as well as improved RFP operation.

  6. Magnetic field studies by voyager 2: preliminary results at saturn.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuna, M H; Behannon, K W; Burlaga, L F; Connerney, J E; Lepping, R P; Neubauer, F M

    1982-01-29

    Further studies of the Saturnian magnetosphere and planetary magnetic field by Voyager 2 have substantiated the earlier results derived from Voyager 1 observations in 1980. The magnetic field is primarily that of a centered dipole (moment = 0.21 gauss-RS(3); where one Saturn radius, RS, is 60,330 kilometers) tilted approximately 0.8 degrees from the rotation axis. Near closest approach to Saturn, Voyager 2 traversed a kronographic longitude and latitude range that was complementary to that of Voyager 1. Somewhat surprisingly, no evidence was found in the data or the analysis for any large-scale magnetic anomaly in the northern hemisphere which could be associated with the periodic modulation of Saturnian kilometric radiation radio emissions. Voyager 2 crossed the magnetopause of a relatively compressed Saturnian magnetosphere at 18.5 RS while inbound near the noon meridian. Outbound, near the dawn meridian, the magnetosphere had expanded considerably and the magnetopause boundary was not observed until the spacecraft reached 48.4 to 50.9 RS and possibly beyond. Throughout the outbound magnetosphere passage, a period of 46 hours (4.5 Saturn rotations), the field was relatively steady and smooth showing no evidence for any azimuthal asymmetry or magnetic anomaly in the planetary field. We are thus left with a rather enigmatic situation to understand the basic source of Saturnian kilometric radiation modulation, other than the small dipole tilt.

  7. 1992-93 Results of geomorphological and field studies Volcanic Studies Program, Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.G.

    1993-10-01

    Field mapping and stratigraphic studies were completed of the Black Tank volcanic center, which represents the southwestern most eruptive center in the Cima volcanic field of California. The results of this mapping are presented. Contacts between volcanic units and geomorphic features were field checked, incorporating data from eight field trenches as well as several exposures along Black Tank Wash. Within each of the eight trenches, logs were measured and stratigraphic sections were described. These data indicate that three, temporally separate volcanic eruptions occurred at the Black Tank center. The field evidence for significant time breaks between each stratigraphic unit is the presence of soil and pavement-bounded unconformities.

  8. A 2-year audit of perioperative mortality in Malaysian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Inbasegaran, K; Kandasami, P; Sivalingam, N

    1998-12-01

    An audit of all perioperative deaths within seven days of surgery in 14 major public hospitals is presented. This study is part of a quality assurance programme examining the surgical and anaesthetic practices in these hospitals. During the study period from July 1992 till June 1994, 211,354 surgeries were performed and 715 deaths were reported out of which 699 were available for analysis. The data was obtained by confidential enquiry using predetermined questionnaires filled by participating surgeons and anaesthetists and analysed by a group of peers. The overall crude mortality rate was 0.34% and the majority of the deaths occurred in severely ill patients in whom the clinical management was satisfactory. Polytrauma including head, intra-abdominal and skeletal trauma accounted for 253 of the deaths (36.19%). The other causes were bowel obstruction with sepsis, burns, ischaemic limbs, congenital malformations in neonates and pregnancy-related hemorrhage. 62.52% of the deaths occurred within two days of surgery and 85.87% were related to emergency procedures. The review identified some shortfalls in perioperative care and these were lack of adequate critical care facilities, lack of supervision, unnecessary surgery in the moribund and inadequate preoperative optimisation. The results of the study have been forwarded to all participating hospitals for implementation of remedial measures.

  9. Phonetic Modification of Vowel Space in Storybook Speech to Infants up to 2 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Evamarie B.; Wieland, Elizabeth A.; Kondaurova, Maria V.; McAuley, J. Devin; Bergeson, Tonya R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A large body of literature has indicated vowel space area expansion in infant-directed (ID) speech compared with adult-directed (AD) speech, which may promote language acquisition. The current study tested whether this expansion occurs in storybook speech read to infants at various points during their first 2 years of life. Method In 2 studies, mothers read a storybook containing target vowels in ID and AD speech conditions. Study 1 was longitudinal, with 11 mothers recorded when their infants were 3, 6, and 9 months old. Study 2 was cross-sectional, with 48 mothers recorded when their infants were 3, 9, 13, or 20 months old (n = 12 per group). The 1st and 2nd formants of vowels /i/, /ɑ/, and /u/ were measured, and vowel space area and dispersion were calculated. Results Across both studies, 1st and/or 2nd formant frequencies shifted systematically for /i/ and /u/ vowels in ID compared with AD speech. No difference in vowel space area or dispersion was found. Conclusions The results suggest that a variety of communication and situational factors may affect phonetic modifications in ID speech, but that vowel space characteristics in speech to infants stay consistent across the first 2 years of life. PMID:25659121

  10. A field scale study of nZVI Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, D. M.; Kocur, C. M.; Chowdhury, A.; Weber, K.; Boparai, H. K.; Krol, M. M.; Sakulchaicharoen, N.; Sleep, B. E.; Austrins, L.; Peace, C.

    2011-12-01

    Nanometals have received significant attention in recent years due to their ability to rapidly destroy numerous priority source zone contaminants in controlled laboratory studies. This has led to great optimism about the potential of nanometal injection for insitu remediation. However, rapid nanometal settling, reportedly due to the ferromagnetic attractive forces between particles causing agglomeration, and poor mobility have limited widespread application of this technology. In literature studies different methods have been proposed to counteract attractive forces between nanometal particles (e.g., polymers providing steric and electrostatic repulsive forces), thus limiting agglomeration and preventing rapid settling. Although laboratory characterization of these particles confirm that these methods yield nanoscale particles that are stable and readily reactive for extended periods of time under laboratory conditions, several important uncertainties remain. The laboratory procedures for synthesizing stabilized nZVI are quite involved and labour intensive, with limited scale-up of the synthesis procedure to the field described in the literature. Furthermore, it is unclear if these nanometal particles would be of high quality and mobile in the field. In this study, these questions were addressed by scaling up laboratory synthesis techniques to produce 1000 litres of nanometal suspension at 1 g/L on site. The suspension was injected into a contaminated zone containing various chlorinated solvents. Detailed characterization of the field site before, during and after the field trial suggested that the injected nanoparticles travelled in excess of 1 m at normalized concentrations in excess of 50% and would therefore be available for contaminant destruction in the target source zone. This presentation will also discuss detailed characterization (e.g., TEM, zero valent iron content) of injected nanometals and those captured at the monitoring wells.

  11. The safety of field tubal sterilization: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Siswosudarmo, R

    1991-01-01

    A cohort study on female sterilization has been carried out to compare the safety of field-based procedures with hospital-based procedures. A total of 217 women were recruited, consisting of 103 field-based and 114 hospital-based acceptors. Married and healthy women 20-45 years of age, having at least two living children, not obese, no history of major abdominal surgery, no signs of acute pelvic inflammatory disease, and no contraindication to ketamin were included in the study. Women with severe pelvic adhesions encountered during surgery were excluded from the study. The ambulatory procedure was used for all acceptors except those who were sterilized in hospital immediately after delivery. They were asked to come to th Sarjito Hospital (hospital-based) or Puskesmas (primary health care center or field-based), after fasting the night before. Ketamin, 50-100 mg, was used intravenously for general anesthesia. Minilaparotomy followed by the Pomeroy method was used for standard female tubal sterilization. Tetracycline, 3 x 500 mg was given for five days prophylactically. Follow-up was carried out one and six weeks after the day of operation. Data were processed with an IBM-compatible PC, using version 3.0 SPSS program. Students t-test, chi-square test and relative risk (95% confidence limit (CL)) were used for statistical analysis. Both groups were comparable in terms of age, parity, body weight, and body height. The duration of operation in the field was somewhat longer than that in the hospital, i.e. 24.58 vs 21.14 minutes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Study of intermittent field hardware failure data in digital electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, E. J.; Halverson, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The collection and analysis of data concerning intermittent dailures in digital devices was performed using data from a computer design for shipboard usage. The failure data consisted of actual field failures classified by failure mechanisms and their likelihood of having been intermittent, potentially intermittent, or hard. Each class was studies with respect to computer operation in the ranges of 0 to 2,000 hours, 0 to 5, hours, and 0 to 10,000 hours. The study was done at the computer level as well as the microcircuit level. Results indicate that as age increases, the quasi-intermittent failure rate increases and the mean time to failure descreases.

  13. Study of the Cygnus Star-Forming Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopherson, Christopher; Kaltcheva, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    The star-forming complexes in Cygnus extend nearly 30 deg in Galactic longitude and 20 deg in latitude, and most probably include star-formation sites located between 600 and 4000 pc. We combine the catalog by Heiles (2000) with uvbyβ photometric data from the catalog of Paunzen (2015) to collate a sample of O and B-type stars with precise homogeneous distances, color excess and available polarimetry. This allows us to identify star-forming sites at different distances along the line of sight and to investigate their spatial correlation to the interstellar matter. Further, we use this sample to study the orientation of the polarization as revealed by the polarized light of the bright early-type stars and analyze the polarization-extinction correlation for this field. Since dust grains align in the presence of a magnetic field cause the observed polarization at optical wavelengths, the data contain information about the large-scale component of the Galactic magnetic field. In addition, wide-field astrophotography equipment was used to image the Cygnus field in Hydrogen-alpha, Hydrogen-beta and the [OIII] line at 500.7 nm. This allows us to map the overall distribution of ionized material and the interstellar dust and trace large-scale regions where the physical conditions change rapidly due to supernova shock fronts and strong stellar winds. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by NSF grant AST- 1516932 and the Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium, NASA Space Grant College and Fellowship Program, NASA Training Grant #NNX14AP22H.

  14. Study on Electron Heat Diffusion Across Stochastic Magnetic Field Affected by Magnitude of Perturbed Magnetic Field in Tokomak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hong

    2013-04-01

    Electron heat diffusion across stochastic magnetic fields is studied numerically in order to find out how the magnitude of perturbed magnetic field affect the enhanced heat conductivity and its radial profile in tokomak plasma physics. For these purposes, non-local stochastic magnetic fields are chosen as research objects in our simulation work. From our numerical results, we can find that the effects of the perturbed magnetic field magnitude are dominated parameter on the enhance electron heat transport conductivity wherever the magnetic field is single island or full stochastic field. Also, a theoretical analysis is provided and compared with numerical results.

  15. Study finds no cancer link to electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sahl, J.; Kelsh, M.; Greenland, S.

    1993-05-01

    The Southern California Edison Company reports a study of their personnel which looks for an association between exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) and deaths due to cancer (emphasis on leukemia, brain cancer and lymphoma). A total of 36,221 employees who had been employed by the company for at least one year were included in the study. The results appear to weaken the argument that EMF is the cause of cancer in the company work environment. The study is said to be an improvement over previous studies in that all personnel from a well-defined work environment were included, complete work histories were included, actual measurements of magnetic fields were performed, and state-of-the-art methods of analysis were used. The relevance of these results to the non-Edison work environment or community exposures is uncertain and to childhood cancers is still more uncertain. The company plans to update these data and perform additional analyses as part of its policy to study and evaluate the occupational implications of EMF.

  16. Tar Creek study, Sargent oil field, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, David L.; Fedasko, Bill; Carnahan, J.R.; Brunetti, Ross; Magoon, Leslie B.; Lillis, Paul G.; Lorenson, T.D.; Stanley, Richard G.

    2002-01-01

    Field work in the Tar Creek area of Sargent oil field was performed June 26 to 28, 2000. The Santa Clara County study area is located in Sections, 30, 31, and 32, Township 11 South, Range 4 East, M.D.B&M; and in Sections 25 and 36, Township 11 South, Range 3 East, M.D.B.&M., north and south of Tar Creek, west of Highway 101. The work was a cooperative effort of the California Department of Conservation's Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR), California Geological Survey (CGS), and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The purpose of the project was to map the stratigraphy and geologic structure (David Wagner, CGS); sample oil for age dating (Les Magoon, USGS); and search for undocumented wells plus conduct a GPS survey of the area (Bill Fedasko, J.P. Carnahan, and Ross Brunetti, DOGGR)

  17. Temperature field study of hot water circulation pump shaft system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. Y.; Kong, F. Y.; Daun, X. H.; Zhao, R. J.; Hu, Q. L.

    2016-05-01

    In the process of engineering application under the condition of hot water circulation pump, problems of stress concentration caused by the temperature rise may happen. In order to study the temperature field in bearing and electric motor chamber of the hot water circulation pump and optimize the structure, in present paper, the model of the shaft system is created through CREO. The model is analyzed by ANSYS workbench, in which the thermal boundary conditions are applied to calculate, which include the calorific values from the bearings, the thermal loss from electric motor and the temperature from the transporting medium. From the result, the finite element model can reflect the distribution of thermal field in hot water circulation pump. Further, the results show that the maximum temperature locates in the bearing chamber.The theoretical guidance for the electric motor heat dissipation design of the hot water circulation pump can be achieved.

  18. Magnetic Field Configuration Models and Reconstruction Methods: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-haddad, Nada; Möstl, Christian; Roussev, Ilia; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Poedts, Stefaan; Hidalgo, Miguel Angel; Marubashi, Katsuhide; Savani, Neel

    2012-07-01

    This study aims to provide a reference to different magnetic field models and reconstruction methods. In order to understand the dissimilarities of those models and codes, we analyze 59 events from the CDAW list, using four different magnetic field models and reconstruction techniques; force- free reconstruction (Lepping et al.(1990); Lynch et al.(2003)), magnetostatic reconstruction, referred as Grad-Shafranov (Hu & Sonnerup(2001); Mostl et al.(2009)), cylinder reconstruction (Marubashi & Lepping(2007)), elliptical, non-force free (Hidalgo et al.(2002)). The resulted parameters of the reconstructions, for the 59 events are compared, statistically, as well as in more details for some cases. The differences between the reconstruction codes are discussed, and suggestions are provided as how to enhance them. Finally we look at 2 unique cases under the microscope, to provide a comprehensive idea of the different aspects of how the fitting codes work.

  19. Alkaline flood prediction studies, Ranger VII pilot, Wilmington Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, E.H.; Breit, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    The paper discusses: (1) The design of a simulator to model alkaline displacement mechanisms and the current state-of-the-art understanding of in-situ caustic consumption. (2) Assimilation of laboratory core flood and rock consumption data. Use of this data in 1-D and 2-D limited area simulations, and a 3-D model of the entire pilot project. (3) Simulation studies of alkaline flood behavior in a small 2-D area of the field for various concentrations, slug sizes, long term consumption functions and two relative permeability adjustment mechanisms. (4) Scale up of 2-D simulation results, and their use in a 271 acre 1.097 x 10/sup 6/m/sup 2/), 7 layered 3-D model of the pilot. (5) Comparison of 3-D simulator results with initial field alkaline flood performance. (6) Recommended additional application of the simulator methods developed in this pilot and in other alkaline floods. 10 refs.

  20. Altered corpus callosum morphology associated with autism over the first 2 years of life

    PubMed Central

    Gerig, Guido; Lewis, John D.; Soda, Takahiro; Styner, Martin A.; Vachet, Clement; Botteron, Kelly N.; Elison, Jed T.; Dager, Stephen R.; Estes, Annette M.; Hazlett, Heather C.; Schultz, Robert T.; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Piven, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Numerous brain imaging studies indicate that the corpus callosum is smaller in older children and adults with autism spectrum disorder. However, there are no published studies examining the morphological development of this connective pathway in infants at-risk for the disorder. Magnetic resonance imaging data were collected from 270 infants at high familial risk for autism spectrum disorder and 108 low-risk controls at 6, 12 and 24 months of age, with 83% of infants contributing two or more data points. Fifty-seven children met criteria for ASD based on clinical-best estimate diagnosis at age 2 years. Corpora callosa were measured for area, length and thickness by automated segmentation. We found significantly increased corpus callosum area and thickness in children with autism spectrum disorder starting at 6 months of age. These differences were particularly robust in the anterior corpus callosum at the 6 and 12 month time points. Regression analysis indicated that radial diffusivity in this region, measured by diffusion tensor imaging, inversely predicted thickness. Measures of area and thickness in the first year of life were correlated with repetitive behaviours at age 2 years. In contrast to work from older children and adults, our findings suggest that the corpus callosum may be larger in infants who go on to develop autism spectrum disorder. This result was apparent with or without adjustment for total brain volume. Although we did not see a significant interaction between group and age, cross-sectional data indicated that area and thickness differences diminish by age 2 years. Regression data incorporating diffusion tensor imaging suggest that microstructural properties of callosal white matter, which includes myelination and axon composition, may explain group differences in morphology. PMID:25937563

  1. Altered corpus callosum morphology associated with autism over the first 2 years of life.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Jason J; Gerig, Guido; Lewis, John D; Soda, Takahiro; Styner, Martin A; Vachet, Clement; Botteron, Kelly N; Elison, Jed T; Dager, Stephen R; Estes, Annette M; Hazlett, Heather C; Schultz, Robert T; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Piven, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Numerous brain imaging studies indicate that the corpus callosum is smaller in older children and adults with autism spectrum disorder. However, there are no published studies examining the morphological development of this connective pathway in infants at-risk for the disorder. Magnetic resonance imaging data were collected from 270 infants at high familial risk for autism spectrum disorder and 108 low-risk controls at 6, 12 and 24 months of age, with 83% of infants contributing two or more data points. Fifty-seven children met criteria for ASD based on clinical-best estimate diagnosis at age 2 years. Corpora callosa were measured for area, length and thickness by automated segmentation. We found significantly increased corpus callosum area and thickness in children with autism spectrum disorder starting at 6 months of age. These differences were particularly robust in the anterior corpus callosum at the 6 and 12 month time points. Regression analysis indicated that radial diffusivity in this region, measured by diffusion tensor imaging, inversely predicted thickness. Measures of area and thickness in the first year of life were correlated with repetitive behaviours at age 2 years. In contrast to work from older children and adults, our findings suggest that the corpus callosum may be larger in infants who go on to develop autism spectrum disorder. This result was apparent with or without adjustment for total brain volume. Although we did not see a significant interaction between group and age, cross-sectional data indicated that area and thickness differences diminish by age 2 years. Regression data incorporating diffusion tensor imaging suggest that microstructural properties of callosal white matter, which includes myelination and axon composition, may explain group differences in morphology.

  2. Teaching and Learning in the Tropics: An Epistemic Exploration of "the Field" in a Development Studies Field Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Kamna

    2015-01-01

    Development studies employs theories, tools and methods often found in geography, including the international field trip to a "developing" country. In 2013 and 2014, I led a two-week trip to Ethiopia. To better comprehend the effects of "the field" on students' learning, I introduced an assessed reflexive field diary to…

  3. Field studies in architectural acoustics using Tablet PCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boye, Daniel

    2005-04-01

    Core requirements for the sciences within the liberal arts curriculum challenge students to become directly involved in scientific study. These requirements seek to develop scientifically literate leaders and members of society. Formal laboratory periods are not usually associated with these courses. Thus, conceptual discovery and quantitative experimentation must take place outside of the classroom. Physics 115: Musical Technology at Davidson College is such a course and contains a section dealing with architectural acoustics. Field studies in the past have been an awkward and cumbersome activity, especially for non-science majors. The emerging technology of Tablet PCs overcomes many of the problems of mobile data acquisition and analysis, and allows the students to determine the locations of the rooms to be studied. The impulse method for determining reverberation time is used and compared with calculations based on room size and absorption media. The use of Tablet PCs and the publicly available freeware Audacity in field studies investigating architectural acoustics will be discussed. [Work supported in part by the Associated Colleges of the South through their Technology Fellowship program.

  4. Nursing students’ satisfaction about their field of study

    PubMed Central

    HAKIM, ASHRAFALSADAT

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays students' opinion is considered as a necessary factor to evaluate quality in universities. This study was performed to evaluate the nursing students' satisfaction about their field of study. Methods: The research population in this study consists of all the students of nursing studying at the second to fourth year of university (72 students). The data were collected from all the studied population. Data collection instrument was a research questionnaire. In this cross-sectional research, nursing students' satisfaction (72 students) in 6 major topics (situation of educational environment, situation of clinical environment, trainers, social image, relation to colleagues and management) was studied. The data were analyzed in SPSS, version 14, using quantitative variables and descriptive statistics including frequency distribution tables and diagrams. Results: The findings indicated that 83.3% of the students had little satisfaction as to the situation of educational environment, 47.2% about situation of clinical environment, 41.7% concerning the theoretical educational method by professors, and 41.7% as to the method of clinical education by clinical trainers. Also 47.2% were not that satisfied with the method of evaluation by the school professors, 80.6% with the method of relationship with colleagues and also 62.5% with the nursing social image. Moreover, findings indicated that 33.3% of the participants in this research were dissatisfied with the method of evaluation by clinical trainers and 50% with the method of nursing management. Conclusion: In the present study, most students had little satisfaction concerning their field of study. So it is necessary to make an attempt for continuous development of quality services. PMID:25512925

  5. A 2-year longitudinal analysis of the relationships between violent assault and substance use in women.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, D G; Acierno, R; Resnick, H S; Saunders, B E; Best, C L

    1997-10-01

    Women experience alarming levels of physical and sexual assault, which may lead to escalation of substance use. Reciprocally, evidence from cross-sectional studies indicates that substance use may increase risk of assault. To date, directionality of this relationship remains unclear. This issue is addressed by the present 3-wave longitudinal study in which a national probability sample of 3,006 women were followed for 2 years. Dependent measures were obtained at each wave of the study and included questions about lifetime and new assault status, alcohol abuse, and drug use. Wave 1 use of drugs, but not abuse of alcohol, increased odds of new assault in the subsequent 2 years. Reciprocally, after a new assault, odds of both alcohol abuse and drug use were significantly increased, even among women with no previous use or assault history. For illicit drug use, findings support a vicious cycle relationship in which substance use increases risk of future assault and assault increases risk of subsequent substance use. PMID:9337502

  6. The Application of Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis in Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Parizad, Eskandar Gholami; Valizadeh, Azar

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is a method applied in separating large segments of deoxyribonucleotide using an alternating and cross field. In a uniform magnetic field, components larger than 50kb pass a route through the gel and since the movement of DNA (Deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules are in a Zigzag form, separation of DNAs as bands carried out better via gel. PFGE in microbiology is a standard method which is used for typing of bacteria. It is also a very useful tool in epidemiological studies and gene mapping in microbes and mammalian cell, also motivated development of large-insert cloning system such as bacterial and yeast artifical chromosomes. In this method, close and similar species in terms of genetic patterns show alike profiles regarding DNA separation, and those ones which don’t have similarity or are less similar, reveal different separation profiles. So this feature can be used to determine the common species as the prevalence agent of a disease. PFGE can be utilized for monitoring and evaluating different micro-organisms in clinical samples and existing ones in soil and water. This method can also be a reliable and standard method in vaccine preparation. In recent decades, PFGE is highly regarded as a powerful tool in control, prevention and monitoring diseases in different populations. PMID:26894068

  7. Cryogenic apparatus for study of near-field heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Kralik, T; Hanzelka, P; Musilova, V; Srnka, A; Zobac, M

    2011-05-01

    For bodies spaced in vacuum at distances shorter than the wavelength of the thermal radiation, radiative heat transfer substantially increases due to the contribution of evanescent electromagnetic waves. Experimental data on heat transfer in near-field regime are scarce. We have designed a cryogenic apparatus for the study of heat transfer over microscopic distances between metallic and non-metallic surfaces. Using a mechanical positioning system, a planeparallel gap between the samples, concentric disks, each 35 mm in diameter, is set and varied from 10(0) to 10(3) μm. The heat transferred from the hot (10 - 100 K) to the cold sample (∼5 K) sinks into a liquid helium bath through a thermal resistor, serving as a heat flux meter. Transferred heat power within ∼2 nW∕cm(2) and ∼30 μW∕cm(2) is derived from the temperature drop along the thermal resistor. For tungsten samples, the distance of the near-field effect onset was inversely proportional to temperature and the heat power increase was observed up to three orders of magnitude greater than the power of far-field radiative heat transfer.

  8. Cryogenic apparatus for study of near-field heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kralik, T.; Hanzelka, P.; Musilova, V.; Srnka, A.; Zobac, M.

    2011-05-15

    For bodies spaced in vacuum at distances shorter than the wavelength of the thermal radiation, radiative heat transfer substantially increases due to the contribution of evanescent electromagnetic waves. Experimental data on heat transfer in near-field regime are scarce. We have designed a cryogenic apparatus for the study of heat transfer over microscopic distances between metallic and non-metallic surfaces. Using a mechanical positioning system, a planeparallel gap between the samples, concentric disks, each 35 mm in diameter, is set and varied from 10{sup 0} to 10{sup 3} {mu}m. The heat transferred from the hot (10 - 100 K) to the cold sample ({approx}5 K) sinks into a liquid helium bath through a thermal resistor, serving as a heat flux meter. Transferred heat power within {approx}2 nW/cm{sup 2} and {approx}30 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} is derived from the temperature drop along the thermal resistor. For tungsten samples, the distance of the near-field effect onset was inversely proportional to temperature and the heat power increase was observed up to three orders of magnitude greater than the power of far-field radiative heat transfer.

  9. Cryogenic apparatus for study of near-field heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Kralik, T; Hanzelka, P; Musilova, V; Srnka, A; Zobac, M

    2011-05-01

    For bodies spaced in vacuum at distances shorter than the wavelength of the thermal radiation, radiative heat transfer substantially increases due to the contribution of evanescent electromagnetic waves. Experimental data on heat transfer in near-field regime are scarce. We have designed a cryogenic apparatus for the study of heat transfer over microscopic distances between metallic and non-metallic surfaces. Using a mechanical positioning system, a planeparallel gap between the samples, concentric disks, each 35 mm in diameter, is set and varied from 10(0) to 10(3) μm. The heat transferred from the hot (10 - 100 K) to the cold sample (∼5 K) sinks into a liquid helium bath through a thermal resistor, serving as a heat flux meter. Transferred heat power within ∼2 nW∕cm(2) and ∼30 μW∕cm(2) is derived from the temperature drop along the thermal resistor. For tungsten samples, the distance of the near-field effect onset was inversely proportional to temperature and the heat power increase was observed up to three orders of magnitude greater than the power of far-field radiative heat transfer. PMID:21639537

  10. Cryogenic apparatus for study of near-field heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralik, T.; Hanzelka, P.; Musilova, V.; Srnka, A.; Zobac, M.

    2011-05-01

    For bodies spaced in vacuum at distances shorter than the wavelength of the thermal radiation, radiative heat transfer substantially increases due to the contribution of evanescent electromagnetic waves. Experimental data on heat transfer in near-field regime are scarce. We have designed a cryogenic apparatus for the study of heat transfer over microscopic distances between metallic and non-metallic surfaces. Using a mechanical positioning system, a planeparallel gap between the samples, concentric disks, each 35 mm in diameter, is set and varied from 100 to 103 μm. The heat transferred from the hot (10 - 100 K) to the cold sample (˜5 K) sinks into a liquid helium bath through a thermal resistor, serving as a heat flux meter. Transferred heat power within ˜2 nW/cm2 and ˜30 μW/cm2 is derived from the temperature drop along the thermal resistor. For tungsten samples, the distance of the near-field effect onset was inversely proportional to temperature and the heat power increase was observed up to three orders of magnitude greater than the power of far-field radiative heat transfer.

  11. Biosorption of metal contaminants using immobilized biomass--Field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffers, T.H.; Bennett, P.G.; Corwin, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines has developed porous beads containing immobilized biological materials such as sphagnum peat moss for extracting metal contaminants from waste waters. The beads, designated as BIO-FIX beads, have removed toxic metals from over 100 waters in laboratory tests. These waters include acid mine drainage (AMD) water from mining sites, metallurgical and chemical industry waste water, and contaminated ground water. Following the laboratory studies, cooperative field tests were conducted to evaluate the metal adsorption properties of the beads in column and low-maintenance circuits, determine bead stability in varied climatic situations, and demonstrate the beads' potential as a viable waste water treatment technique. Field results indicated that BIO-FIX beads readily adsorbed cadmium, lead, and other toxic metals from dilute waters; effluents frequently met drinking water standards and other discharge criteria. The beads exhibited excellent handling characteristics in both column and low-maintenance circuits, and continued to extract metal ions after repeated loading-elution cycles. Based on laboratory and field data, cost evaluations for using BIO-FIX technology to treat two AMD waters were prepared. Operating costs for BIO-FIX treatment, which ranged from $1.40 to $2.30 per 1,000 gal of water treated, were comparable with chemical precipitation costs.

  12. Clinical Effects and Radiological Results of Vertebroplasty: Over a 2-year Follow-Up Period

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Han Ga Wi; Shin, Il Young; Moon, Seung-Myung; Hwang, Hyung Sik

    2012-01-01

    Objective We investigated the association between clinical and radiological results and assessed the radiological changes according to the distribution pattern and amount of injected cement after vertebroplasty. Methods Two hundred and one patients underwent vertebroplasty; of these, 15 were follow up for more than 2 years. For radiological analysis, we grouped the patients according to cement distribution as follows: group 1, unilateral, unilateral distribution of cement; group 2, bilateral-uneven, bilateral distribution of cement but separated mass; and group 3, bilateral-even, bilateral single mass of cement. To compare radiologic with clinical results, we assessed the visual analogue scale (VAS) score, amount of injected cement, bone mineral density (BMD), postoperative and follow-up vertebral body compression ratios, and postoperative and follow-up kyphotic angles. Results There were 4 (26.7%) patients in group 1, 6 (40.0%) in group 2, and 5 (33.3%) in group 3. The mean VAS score was 5.2 preoperatively, 1.8 postoperatively, and 3.2 at 2-year follow-up. The 2-year follow-up compression ratio was better in patients with even distribution of injected cement (group 2 and 3) than group 1. However, it was not statistically insignificant (p>0.05). The follow-up kyphotic angle was more aggravated in the group 1 than in the other groups (p<0.05). Conclusion Our study showed that vertebroplasty had a beneficial effect on pain relief, particularly in the immediate postoperative stage. The augmented spine tended to be more stable in the cases with increased amount and more even distribution of injected cement. PMID:25983842

  13. Preterm infant gut colonization in the neonatal ICU and complete restoration 2 years later.

    PubMed

    Moles, L; Gómez, M; Jiménez, E; Fernández, L; Bustos, G; Chaves, F; Cantón, R; Rodríguez, J M; Del Campo, R

    2015-10-01

    Preterm infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are exposed to multidrug-resistant bacteria previously adapted to the hospital environment. The aim of the present study was to characterize the bacterial antibiotic-resistant high-risk lineages colonizing preterm infants during their NICU stay and their persistence in faeces after 2 years. A total of 26 preterm neonates were recruited between October 2009 and June 2010 and provided 144 faecal samples. Milk samples (86 mother's milk, 35 human donor milk and 15 formula milk) were collected at the same time as faecal samples. An additional faecal sample was recovered in 16 infants at the age of 2 years. Samples were plated onto different selective media, and one colony per morphology was selected. Isolates were identified by 16S rDNA nucleotide sequence and MALDI-TOF. Antibiotic susceptibility (agar dilution), genetic diversity (RAPD, PFGE and MLST) and virulence factors (only in enterococcal and staphylococcal isolates) were determined by PCR. A high proportion of antibiotic-resistant high-risk clones was detected in both faecal and milk samples during the NICU admittance. Almost all infants were colonized by Enterococcus faecalis ST64 and Enterococcus faecium ST18 clones, while a wider genetic diversity was observed for the Gram-negative isolates. Multidrug-resistant high-risk clones were not recovered from the faecal samples of the 2-year-olds. In conclusion, the gut of preterm infants admitted to the NICU might be initially colonized by antibiotic-resistant and virulent high-risk lineages, which are later replaced by antibiotic-susceptible community ones.

  14. Clinically Significant Behavior Problems among Young Children 2 Years after the Great East Japan Earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Yagi, Junko; Homma, Hiroaki; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Nagao, Keizo; Okuyama, Makiko

    2014-01-01

    Background On March 11, 2011, a massive undersea earthquake and tsunami struck East Japan. Few studies have investigated the impact of exposure to a natural disaster on preschool children. We investigated the association of trauma experiences during the Great East Japan Earthquake on clinically significant behavior problems among preschool children 2 years after the earthquake. Method Participants were children who were exposed to the 2011 disaster at preschool age (affected area, n = 178; unaffected area, n = 82). Data were collected from September 2012 to June 2013 (around 2 years after the earthquake), thus participants were aged 5 to 8 years when assessed. Severe trauma exposures related to the earthquake (e.g., loss of family members) were assessed by interview, and trauma events in the physical environment related to the earthquake (e.g. housing damage), and other trauma exposure before the earthquake, were assessed by questionnaire. Behavior problems were assessed by caregivers using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), which encompasses internalizing, externalizing, and total problems. Children who exceeded clinical cut-off of the CBCL were defined as having clinically significant behavior problems. Results Rates of internalizing, externalizing, and total problems in the affected area were 27.7%, 21.2%, and 25.9%, respectively. The rate ratio suggests that children who lost distant relatives or friends were 2.36 times more likely to have internalizing behavior problems (47.6% vs. 20.2%, 95% CI: 1.10–5.07). Other trauma experiences before the earthquake also showed significant positive association with internalizing, externalizing, and total behavior problems, which were not observed in the unaffected area. Conclusions One in four children still had behavior problems even 2 years after the Great East Japan Earthquake. Children who had other trauma experiences before the earthquake were more likely to have behavior problems. These data will be

  15. Puerto Rico - 2002 : field studies to resolve aerosol processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Ravelo, R.

    1999-10-05

    A number of questions remain concerning homogeneous aerosol formation by natural organics interacting with anthropogenic pollutants. For example, chlorine has been proposed as a potential oxidant in the troposphere because of its very high reactivity with a wide range of organics (Finlayson-Pitts, 1993). Indeed, sea salt aerosol in the presence of ozone has been shown to produce chlorine atoms in heterogeneous photochemical reactions under laboratory conditions. Whether chlorine can initiate oxidation of natural organics such as monoterpene hydrocarbons and can generate homogeneous nucleation or condensable material that contributes to aerosol loadings needs to be assessed. The nighttime reactions of ozone and nitrate radical can also result in monoterpene reactions that contribute to aerosol mass. We are currently planning field studies in Puerto Rico to assess these aerosol issues and other atmospheric chemistry questions. Puerto Rico has a number of key features that make it very attractive for a field study of this sort. The principal feature is the island's very regular meteorology and its position in the Caribbean Sea relative to the easterly trade winds. This meteorology and the island's rectangular shape (100 x 35 miles) make it highly suitable for simplification of boundary layer conditions. In addition, the long stretch between Puerto Rico and the nearest pollution sources in Africa and southern Europe make the incoming background air relatively clean and constant. Furthermore, Puerto Rico has approximately 3.5 million people with a very well defined source region and a central area of rain forest vegetation. These features make Puerto Rico an ideal locale for assessing aerosol processes. The following sections describe specific areas of atmospheric chemistry that can be explored during the proposed field study.

  16. Classroom HVAC: Improving ventilation and saving energy -- field study plan

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Michael G.; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2004-10-14

    The primary goals of this research effort are to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a very practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms (CRs) with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research is motivated by the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many CRs are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in CRs. This document provides a summary of the detailed plans developed for the field study that will take place in 2005 to evaluate the energy and IAQ performance of a new classroom HVAC technology. The field study will include measurements of HVAC energy use, ventilation rates, and IEQ conditions in 10 classrooms with the new HVAC technology and in six control classrooms with a standard HVAC system. Energy use and many IEQ parameters will be monitored continuously, while other IEQ measurements will be will be performed seasonally. Continuously monitored data will be remotely accessed via a LonWorks network. Instrument calibration plans that vary with the type of instrumentation used are established. Statistical tests will be employed to compare energy use and IEQ conditions with the new and standard HVAC systems. Strengths of this study plan include the collection of real time data for a full school year, the use of high quality instrumentation, the incorporation of many quality control measures, and the extensive collaborations with industry that limit costs to the sponsors.

  17. Study of pattern fabrication model using near-field photolithography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-Been

    2011-01-01

    This study established a pattern fabrication model for near-field photolithography (NFP) and conducted pattern fabrication and analysis to understand the process of NFP. This study proposed that exposure energy density can accumulate when two exposure beams overlap. We also presented a method to analyze the exposure energy density of patterns and an error function derived from the results of the exposure energy simulation and the maximum exposure energy density. Using the Levenberg-Marquardt method and a reasonable convergence criterion, the exposure interval of two line segments for optimum pattern flatness was obtained. A simulation of the pattern fabrication model showed that when the exposure interval S = 1.66ρ(0) , optimum flatness could be obtained. The results of this study have potential for industrial application in fabrication of micro- and nano-scale channels.

  18. High risk of peripheral arterial disease in the United Kingdom: 2-year results of a prospective registry.

    PubMed

    Stansby, Gerard; Mister, Rebecca; Fowkes, Gerry; Roughton, Michael; Nugara, Fiona; Brittenden, Julie; Bradbury, Andrew; Ashley, Simon; Shearman, Cliff; Hannon, Ray; Flather, Marcus

    2011-02-01

    We report a prospective 2-year, multicenter study of patients presenting with intermittent claudication (IC; ankle brachial blood pressure index, ABPI ≤ 0.9). Mean age of the 473 patients enrolled was 68 years, 20% were diabetics, 30% had prior symptomatic coronary heart disease (CHD), 7% had prior stroke, and 39% were current smokers. At baseline, 26.2% of patients had BP ≤ 140/85 mm Hg or lower and at 2 years this figure was 32.5% (P = .01). Current smokers had fallen to 27% (from 39%) at 2 years (P < .001). Use of antiplatelet agents, statins, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors increased significantly during the course of the study as did claudication distance. Death and the composite of death, stroke or myocardial infarction (MI), occurred in 8.4% and 11.6% of patients, respectively. Prognosis was worse in patients with prior history of CHD, older age, those with diabetes and a lower ABPI. PMID:21220371

  19. Practical prediction model for the risk of 2-year mortality of individuals in the general population.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb-Rumyantzev, Alexander; Gautam, Shiva; Brown, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    This study proposed to validate a prediction model and risk-stratification tool of 2-year mortality rates of individuals in the general population suitable for office practice use. A risk indicator (R) derived from data in the literature was based on only 6 variables: to calculate R for an individual, starting with 0, for each year of age above 60, add 0.14; for a male, add 0.9; for diabetes mellitus, add 0.7; for albuminuria > 30 mg/g of creatinine, add 0.7; for stage ≥ 3 chronic kidney disease (CKD), add 0.9; for cardiovascular disease (CVD), add 1.4; or for both CKD and CVD, add 1.7. We developed a univariate logistic regression model predicting 2-year individual mortality rates. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data set (1999-2004 with deaths through 2006) was used as the target for validation. These 12,515 subjects had a mean age of 48.9 ± 18.1 years, 48% males, 9.5% diabetes, 11.7% albuminuria, 6.8% CVD, 5.4% CKD, and 2.8% both CKD and CVD. Using the risk indicator R alone to predict mortality demonstrated good performance with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.84. Dividing subjects into low-risk (R=0-1.0), low intermediate risk (R > 1.0-3.0), high intermediate risk (R > 3.0-5.0) or high-risk (R > 5.0) categories predicted 2-year mortality rates of 0.52%, 1.44%, 5.19% and 15.24%, respectively, by the prediction model compared with actual mortality rates of 0.29%, 2.48%, 5.13% and 13.40%, respectively. We have validated a model of risk stratification using easily identified clinical characteristics to predict 2-year mortality rates of individuals in the general population. The model demonstrated performance adequate for its potential use for clinical practice and research decisions.

  20. Comparative studies of color fields, visual acuity fields, and movement perception limits among varsity athletes and non-varsity groups.

    PubMed

    Mizusawa, K; Sweeting, R L; Knouse, S B

    1983-06-01

    This paper examined effects of sports practice on patterns of color fields, limits of peripheral movement perception, and visual acuity field by comparing varsity ball players and non-varsity control groups. The first study measured extent of color fields and limits of horizontal and vertical meridians for peripheral movement perception of 139 college students. The second study tested visual acuity fields of female and male basketball players and female and male controls. The first study indicated that athletes had wider limits for horizontal movement perception, while the non-athletes had better vertical movement perception limits. Basketball players demonstrated color fields and limits for peripheral movement perception superior to those of soccer players. In the second study, athletes did not have any wider visual acuity fields than non-athletes, but their movement-perception limits were significantly wider than those of non-athletes.

  1. Restricted Consonant Inventories of 2-Year-Old Finnish Children with a History of Recurrent Acute Otitis Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haapala, Sini; Niemitalo-Haapola, Elina; Raappana, Antti; Kujala, Tiia; Kujala, Teija; Jansson-Verkasalo, Eira

    2015-01-01

    Many children experience recurrent acute otitis media (RAOM) in early childhood. In a previous study, 2-year-old children with RAOM were shown to have immature neural patterns for speech sound discrimination. The present study further investigated the consonant inventories of these same children using natural speech samples. The results showed…

  2. An Optimization of Pulsed ElectroMagnetic Fields Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    To date, in our research we have focused on the use of normal human neuronal progenitor (NHNP) cells because of their importance in human nervous system regeneration, development and maintenance, but we have developed 2-D and 3-D bioreactors that can accommodate any cell line. In this Project, we will include the use of tissues important for physiological regeneration: Human osteoblasts or chondrocytes, and vascular cells. Our initial results with the NHNP cells were quite startling using extremely low-level electromagnetic fields (5 microtesla at 10Hz; 6mA). The low-amplitude, rapidly time-varying electromagnetic fields exert a very potent effect on the proliferation, morphology, and gene expression of the cells in culture, both in standard 2-dimensional culture plates as well as cells organized into 3-dimensional tissue-like assemblies (TLAs) in a 3D bioreactor. We have replicated our preliminary results many, many times, have analyzed the gene expression using gene arrays (followed by Luminex analysis for protein production), and have monitored cell proliferation, orientation, morphology, and glucose metabolism, and we are confident that we have a stable and reliable model to study the control of high-level cellular processes by application of low-amplitude, time varying electromagnetic fields (TVEMF) (1, 2). In additional studies at the University of Michigan, we have been able to generate functional in vitro engineered mammalian skeletal muscle, and have employed nerve-muscle co-culture techniques to promote axonal sprouting. We believe that nearly all tissues, in particular, neural, are susceptible to the influences of low-level TVEMF.

  3. Field study of disposed solid wastes from advanced coal processes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) are funded to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for managing solid wastes produced by advanced coal combustion processes. This information will be developed by conducting several field studies on disposed wastes from these processes. Data will be collected to characterize these wastes and their interactions with the environments in which they are disposed. Three sites were selected for the field studies: Colorado Ute's fluidized bed combustion (FBC) unit in Nucla, Colorado; Ohio Edison's limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit in Lorain, Ohio; and Freeman United's mine site in central Illinois with wastes supplied by the nearby Midwest Grain FBC unit. During the past year, field monitoring and sampling of the four landfill test cases constructed in 1989 and 1991 has continued. Option 1 of the contract was approved last year to add financing for the fifth test case at the Freeman United site. The construction of the Test Case 5 cells is scheduled to begin in November, 1992. Work during this past year has focused on obtaining data on the physical and chemical properties of the landfilled wastes, and on developing a conceptual framework for interpreting this information. Results to date indicate that hydration reactions within the landfilled wastes have had a major impact on the physical and chemical properties of the materials but these reactions largely ceased after the first year, and physical properties have changed little since then. Conditions in Colorado remained dry and no porewater samples were collected. In Ohio, hydration reactions and increases in the moisture content of the waste tied up much of the water initially infiltrating the test cells.

  4. Field-induced magnetostructural transition in Gd5ge4 studied by pulsed magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Z.W.; Nojiri, H.; Yoshii, S.; Rao, G.H.; Wang, Y.C.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner Jr., K.A.

    2008-05-22

    The field-induced magnetostructural transformation in Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} was examined by magnetization measurements in pulsed magnetic fields. The low-temperature irreversibility of the transition can be destroyed by the magnetocaloric effect, and depending on the heat exchange between the sample and its surroundings, the irreversibility (or kinetic arrest) can also be retained. Measurements by using various magnetic-field sweep rates were conducted to examine the dynamic response of the system in the transition region. The critical fields for the magnetostructural transition below 20 K are field sweep rate dependent--the larger the field sweep rate, the higher the critical field. However, this rate dependence is readily suppressed with increasing temperature.

  5. Numerical study of the magnetic field diffusion in the toroidal field coils of the TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Preis, H.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion of the vertical magnetic field through the toroidal field coils is numerically analyzed in TFTR. Two different excitations of the vertical field are assumed whose behavior can be described by either a step function or a ramp function. Using the computer code FEDIFF, the distribution of the eddy currents in the windings and casing of the toroidal field coils, as well as their time behavior, is calculated for these functions. From integration of the eddy current functions over their pulse length, the energy dissipated by them is obtained. Finally, the magnetic field of the eddy currents within the torous is calculated. Based upon this field, which is represented as a function of time and space coordinates, the influence of this diffusion upon the field curvature index is described.

  6. Bioaerosol sampling: sampling mechanisms, bioefficiency and field studies.

    PubMed

    Haig, C W; Mackay, W G; Walker, J T; Williams, C

    2016-07-01

    Investigations into the suspected airborne transmission of pathogens in healthcare environments have posed a challenge to researchers for more than a century. With each pathogen demonstrating a unique response to environmental conditions and the mechanical stresses it experiences, the choice of sampling device is not obvious. Our aim was to review bioaerosol sampling, sampling equipment, and methodology. A comprehensive literature search was performed, using electronic databases to retrieve English language papers on bioaerosol sampling. The review describes the mechanisms of popular bioaerosol sampling devices such as impingers, cyclones, impactors, and filters, explaining both their strengths and weaknesses, and the consequences for microbial bioefficiency. Numerous successful studies are described that point to best practice in bioaerosol sampling, from the use of small personal samplers to monitor workers' pathogen exposure through to large static samplers collecting airborne microbes in various healthcare settings. Of primary importance is the requirement that studies should commence by determining the bioefficiency of the chosen sampler and the pathogen under investigation within laboratory conditions. From such foundations, sampling for bioaerosol material in the complexity of the field holds greater certainty of successful capture of low-concentration airborne pathogens. From the laboratory to use in the field, this review enables the investigator to make informed decisions about the choice of bioaerosol sampler and its application.

  7. Practical use of video imagery in nearshore oceanographic field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, K.T.; Holman, R.A.; Lippmann, T.C.; Stanley, J.; Plant, N.

    1997-01-01

    An approach was developed for using video imagery to quantify, in terms of both spatial and temporal dimensions, a number of naturally occurring (nearshore) physical processes. The complete method is presented, including the derivation of the geometrical relationships relating image and ground coordinates, principles to be considered when working with video imagery and the two-step strategy for calibration of the camera model. The techniques are founded on the principles of photogrammetry, account for difficulties inherent in the use of video signals, and have been adapted to allow for flexibility of use in field studies. Examples from field experiments indicate that this approach is both accurate and applicable under the conditions typically experienced when sampling in coastal regions. Several applications of the camera model are discussed, including the measurement of nearshore fluid processes, sand bar length scales, foreshore topography, and drifter motions. Although we have applied this method to the measurement of nearshore processes and morphologic features, these same techniques are transferable to studies in other geophysical settings.

  8. Bioaerosol sampling: sampling mechanisms, bioefficiency and field studies.

    PubMed

    Haig, C W; Mackay, W G; Walker, J T; Williams, C

    2016-07-01

    Investigations into the suspected airborne transmission of pathogens in healthcare environments have posed a challenge to researchers for more than a century. With each pathogen demonstrating a unique response to environmental conditions and the mechanical stresses it experiences, the choice of sampling device is not obvious. Our aim was to review bioaerosol sampling, sampling equipment, and methodology. A comprehensive literature search was performed, using electronic databases to retrieve English language papers on bioaerosol sampling. The review describes the mechanisms of popular bioaerosol sampling devices such as impingers, cyclones, impactors, and filters, explaining both their strengths and weaknesses, and the consequences for microbial bioefficiency. Numerous successful studies are described that point to best practice in bioaerosol sampling, from the use of small personal samplers to monitor workers' pathogen exposure through to large static samplers collecting airborne microbes in various healthcare settings. Of primary importance is the requirement that studies should commence by determining the bioefficiency of the chosen sampler and the pathogen under investigation within laboratory conditions. From such foundations, sampling for bioaerosol material in the complexity of the field holds greater certainty of successful capture of low-concentration airborne pathogens. From the laboratory to use in the field, this review enables the investigator to make informed decisions about the choice of bioaerosol sampler and its application. PMID:27112048

  9. Doppler lidar studies of atmospheric wind field dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardesty, R. M.; Post, M. J.; Lawrence, T. R.; Hall, F. F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    For the past 5 years the Wave Propagation Lab. has operated a pulsed CO2 Doppler lidar system to evaluate coherent laser radar technology and to investigate applications of the technique in atmospheric research. The capability of the system to provide measurements of atmospheric winds, backscatter, and water vapor has been extensively studied over this period. Because Doppler lidar can measure atmospheric wind structure in the clear air without degradation by terrain features, it offers a unique capability as a research tool for studies of many transient or local scale atmospheric events. This capability was demonstrated in recent field experiments near Boulder, Colo. and Midland, Tex., in which the lidar clearly depicted the wind field structure associated with several types of phenomena, including thunderstorm microbursts, valley drainage flow, and passage of a dryline front. To improve sensitivity during the periods of low aerosol backscatter, the system has recently been upgraded with new transmitter/receiver hardware. The upgraded system, which transmit 2 J per pulse of output energy at a rate of 50 Hz and incorporates computer control for automated operation, underwent calibration testing during the spring of 1986.

  10. A model study of the role of workfunction variations in cold field emission from microstructures with inclusion of field enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, H.; Joshi, R. P.; Neuber, A.; Dickens, J.

    2015-10-01

    An analytical study of field emission from microstructures is presented that includes position-dependent electric field enhancements, quantum corrections due to electron confinement and fluctuations of the workfunction. Our calculations, applied to a ridge microstructure, predict strong field enhancements. Though quantization lowers current densities as compared to the traditional Fowler-Nordheim process, strong field emission currents can nonetheless be expected for large emitter aspect ratios. Workfunction variations arising from changes in electric field penetration at the surface, or due to interface defects or localized screening, are shown to be important in enhancing the emission currents.

  11. Attention to Multiple Events Helps 2 1/2-Year-Olds Extend New Verbs

    PubMed Central

    Childers, Jane B.

    2013-01-01

    An important question in verb learning is how children extend new verbs to new situational contexts. In Study 1, 2 1/2-year-old children were shown a complex event followed by new events that preserved only the action from the initial event, only the result, or no new events. Children seeing events that preserved either the action or the result produced appropriate verb extensions at test while children without this information did not. In a follow-up study, children hearing new verbs produced more extensions than did children hearing nonlabeling speech. These studies suggest that attention to related events is helpful to young verb learners, perhaps because they structurally align these events (e.g., Gentner, 1983; 1989) during verb learning. PMID:24324284

  12. Wide Field X-Ray Telescope Mission Concept Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. C.; Thomas, H. D.; Fabisinski, L. L.; Baysinger, M.; Hornsby, L. S.; Maples, C. D.; Purlee, T. E.; Capizzo, P. D.; Percy, T. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Wide Field X-Ray Telescope (WFXT) is an astrophysics mission concept for detecting and studying extra-galactic x-ray sources, including active galactic nuclei and clusters of galaxies, in an effort to further understand cosmic evolution and structure. This Technical Memorandum details the results of a mission concept study completed by the Advanced Concepts Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in 2012. The design team analyzed the mission and instrument requirements, and designed a spacecraft that enables the WFXT mission while using high heritage components. Design work included selecting components and sizing subsystems for power, avionics, guidance, navigation and control, propulsion, structures, command and data handling, communications, and thermal control.

  13. Cathodoluminescence studies of nanocrystalline silicon films for field emission displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biaggi Labiosa, Azlin M.

    The cathodoluminescence (CL) emission from p-type porous silicon (PSi) films excited with low energy electron beams compatible with field emission display (FED) technologies was investigated. First, a study was carried out to find the optimal PSi configuration that would yield the strongest CL emission. It was found that the highest, stable CL intensities were obtained from samples prepared from p-type wafers with resistivity between 1-2 Ocm. Afterwards, the effects on the morphological details and the chemical composition due to the electron irradiation of the PSi films were studied. During a continuous irradiation of 10 hours the CL intensity of the films reduced in less than 10%. In situ SIMS analyses before and after prolonged e-beam excitation showed minor compositional changes of the film and reduced sputtering of the silicon nanoparticles due to the electron irradiation. It was also found that the electron bombardment causes microscale morphological modifications of the films, but the nanoscale features appear to be unchanged. The structural changes are manifested by the increase in the density of the nanoparticles which explains the significant enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) that follows the electron irradiation. Second, after a thorough characterization of the PSi films under electron irradiation, tuning of the CL emission of PSi films was investigated. The PSi films used for this experiment were non-oxidized films unlike the ones used for the CL characterization that were oxidized films. The tuning was achieved by controlling the average size of the nanostructure thus showing that the origin of this CL emission is associated with the quantum confinement and the surface chemistry effects that are known to exist in the porous silicon system. However, the CL emission obtained from these samples was unstable which is attributed to the breaking of Si--H bonds due to the electron irradiation. Dangling bonds are then formed on the surface and this in

  14. The 2-year stability of parental perceptions of child vulnerability and parental overprotection.

    PubMed

    Thomasgard, M; Metz, W P

    1996-08-01

    Clinicians often identify parent-child relationships that are believed to be problematic for the child's future emotional growth, yet there are minimal outcome data on which to base anticipatory guidance. This 2-year follow-up study examined the stability and child behavioral correlates of parental perceptions of increased child vulnerability and parental overprotection. Of 192 potential participants, 114 parents (93% mothers, 86% white, 75% married, 90% middle-upper socioeconomic status) with children age 4 to 7 years successfully completed the Parent Protection Scale, Child Vulnerability Scale, Child Behavior Checklist 4-18, and the Parental Bonding Instrument. The 2-year stability of high parental overprotection was 37%; for high parental perception of child vulnerability, it was 31%. High perceived vulnerability at enrollment was significantly associated with both internalizing (somatic complaints, anxious/depressed) and externalizing (aggressive) behaviors at follow-up. A history of overprotection in the parent's childhood was not associated with current parental report of overprotective behaviors toward the child. PMID:8856517

  15. Live Pups from Evaporatively Dried Mouse Sperm Stored at Ambient Temperature for up to 2 Years

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Lee, Gloria Y.; Lawitts, Joel A.; Toner, Mehmet; Biggers, John D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a mouse sperm preservation method based on evaporative drying. Mouse sperm were evaporatively dried and stored at 4°C and ambient temperature for 3 months to 2 years. Upon rehydration, a single sperm was injected into a mature oocyte to develop into a blastocyst after culture or a live birth after embryo transfer to a recipient female. For the samples stored at 4°C for 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, the blastocyst formation rate was 61.5%, 49.1%, 31.5%, 32.2%, and 41.4%, respectively. The blastocyst rate for those stored at ambient temperature (∼22°C) for 3, 6, 12, and 18 months was 57.8%, 36.2%, 33.6%, and 34.4%, respectively. Fifteen, eight and three live pups were produced from sperm stored at room temperature for 12, 18, and 24 months, respectively. This is the first report of live offspring produced from dried mouse sperm stored at ambient temperature for up to 2 years. Based on these results, we suggest that evaporative drying is a potentially useful method for the routine preservation of mouse sperm. PMID:24924588

  16. Leaching of coal combustion products: Field and laboratory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chin-Min

    This study combines field monitoring and laboratory experiments to investigate the environmental impacts associated with the re-use of coal combustion by-products (CCPs). The monitoring data obtained from two full-scale CCP applications (i.e., re-use of fixated flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material as a low permeability liner for a swine manure pond and portland cement concrete pavements containing CCPs) allowed environmental impacts to be evaluated under real or simulated in-service conditions. A complimentary laboratory leaching study elucidated fundamental physical and chemical mechanisms that determine the leaching kinetics of inorganic contaminants from CCPs. In the first field study, water quality impacts associated with the re-use of FGD material as a low permeability liner for a swine manure pond were examined by monitoring the water quality of water samples collected from the pond surface water and a sump collection system beneath the liner over a period of 5 years. Water samples collected from the sump and pond surface water met all Ohio non-toxic criteria, and in fact, generally met all national primary and secondary drinking water standards. Furthermore it was found that hazardous (i.e., As, B, Cr, Cu, and Zn) and agricultural pollutants (i.e., phosphate and ammonia) were effectively retained by the FGD liner system. The retention might be due to both sorption and precipitation. In the second field study, the release of metals and metalloids from full-scale portland cement concrete pavements containing CCPs was evaluated by laboratory leaching tests and accelerated loading of full-scale pavement sections under controlled loading and environmental conditions. Three types of portland-cement-concrete driving surfaces were tested, including a control section (i.e., ordinary portland cement (OPC) concrete) containing no fly ash and two sections in which fly ash was substituted for a fraction of the cement; i.e., 30% fly ash (FA30) and 50% fly ash (FA50

  17. Microbial colonization of retorted shale in field and laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.E.; McNair, V.M.; Li, S.W.; Garland, T.R.; Wildung, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    The microbial colonization of retorted shale was measured in field lysimeters and laboratory with retorted shale obtained from an above-ground retort operating in the direct heating mode. In field lysimeter studies, total aerobic heterotrophic bacterial colony forming units (cfu), as measured by a selective plating medium in surface horizons of retorted shale and adjacent soils, were similar (3.3 x 10/sup 6/ and 2.7 x 10/sup 6/ bacterial cfu/g dry weight) two months after disposal. However, unlike the soil that exhibited a diverse community, the retorted shale was dominated by a single Micrococcus species that composed 30% of the total bacterial community. After one and two years, the total aerobic heterotrophic bacterial cfu in the retorted shale and soil were again similar; however, no bacterium dominated either community. A core sample from the field lysimeter indicated microbial colonization to a depth of 150 cm after one year. An increased ratio of anaerobic to aerobic heterotrophic bacterial cfu in the deepest sample (120 to 150 cm) implied the development of anaerobic conditions. In the laboratory, aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were shown capable of using, as the sole source of carbon, retorted shale in liquid cultures. Of the added nutritional amendments, PO/sub 4//sup -3/, NO/sub 3//sup -/ and SO/sub 4//sup -2/, only phosphate markedly altered the colonization of retorted shale in liquid culture; shortening the lag phase of colonization from less than three to seven weeks to less than one week and leading to a greater aerobic heterotrophic population over the incubation interval. The addition of phosphate also led to a aerobic heterotrophic bacterial community composed entirely of Micrococcus species.

  18. A study of field independence versus field dependence of school teachers and university students in mathematics.

    PubMed

    Chao, Li; Huang, Jianyi; Li, Angie

    2003-12-01

    The Group Embedded Figures Test was administered to 72 secondary school teachers and 54 university students in mathematics to measure their cognitive styles of field independence-dependence. A mean difference was found between the teachers and students as teachers scored more field-independent than the students. There was also a group-by-sex interaction, which indicated that the female teachers scored more field-independent than the male teachers, whereas the male students scored as more field-independent than the female students. Implications of the findings are reflected in the discussion.

  19. Confinement and heating studies of field-reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrien, Robert E.

    1990-10-01

    Confinement studies of field-reversed configurations (FRCs) have been actively pursued during the past ten years with the larger and longer-lived FRCs produced in the FRX-C and FRX-C/LSM devices. Confinement measurements have included the global FRC quantities and, in some cases, profiles of electron temperature and density. The inferred confinement times and transport coefficients are used for comparison with transport models as well as to find the best operating conditions in the experiment. Global power flow modelling shows that energy confinement during the equilibrium phase is usually dominated by particle losses, with a substantial secondary contribution from electron thermal conduction. Particle losses in present kinetic FRCs are strongly influenced by open field line confinement, which complicates the study of transport mechanisms. The electron thermal conduction is observed to be anomalous, as in other plasma devices. The bulk electrical resistivity is also anomalous and shows no evidence of classical Spitzer scaling. Recently, the resistive anomaly has been shown to correlate with tilt-like magnetic perturbations observed with Mirnov coils. FRC confinement studies have also been extended to a higher temperature regime during magnetic compression heating. In these experiments, translated FRCs are compressed by increasing the external magnetic flux up to a factor of seven on a time scale between the radial Alfven time and the FRC lifetime. Electron and ion temperatures up to 0.4 keV and 1.6 keV, respectively have been obtained. Confinement times scale roughly as r(exp 2) during compression.

  20. Field and data analysis studies related to the atmospheric environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidder, Stanley; Mach, Douglas; Bailey, Jeff; Stewart, Michael; Slaton, Dave; Buechler, Dennis; Botts, Michael; Collins, Laurie

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes work on a broad array of projects including: (1) applications of meteorological and/or oceanographic satellites; (2) improvement of the current set of NASA/USAF lightning related launch commit criteria rules; (3) the design, building, testing and deployment of a set of cylindrical field mills for aircraft use; (4) the study of marginal electrification storm conditions in relationship to the current launch commit rules for the space shuttle and various other launch vehicles using an instrumented aircraft; (5) support of the DC-8 and ER-2 lightning instrument package as part of both the Tropical Ocean - Global Atmospheric/Coupled Ocean-Atmospheric Response Experiment and the Convection and Moisture Experiment; (6) design of electronic circuitry and microprocessor firmware for the NASA Advanced Ground Based Field Mill; (7) design and testing of electronic and computer instrumentation for atmospheric electricity measurements; (8) simulating observations from a lightning imaging sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring satellite; and (9) supporting scientific visualization and the development of computer software tools.

  1. GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study 2016

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, Margaret; Marentette, Christina; Bujosa, Robert; Taylor, Jessica; Lewis, Preston

    2016-01-01

    During the spring of 2016, from April 4 - May 27, sixteen GLOBE schools participated in the GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study. Thirteen teachers from these schools had previously participated in the NASA LEARN program (Long-term Experience in Authentic Research with NASA) where they were GLOBE trained in Atmosphere protocols, and engaged in 1-3 years of research under the mentorship of NASA scientists. Each school was loaned two aerosol instruments for the Campaign duration, either 2 GLOBE sun photometers, 2 Calitoo sun photometers, or 1 of each. This allowed for students to make measurements side-by-side and in the case of the Calitoos, to compare AOT results immediately with each other for better consistency in data collection. Additionally, as part of the Field Campaign evaluation, multiple instruments allow for an assessment of the ease of use of each instrument for grade level of students, whether in middle school or high school. Before the Campaign, all GLOBE and Calitoo instruments were 'checked out' against an AERONET, then checked again upon return after the Campaign. By examining all data, before, during and after the Campaign, this gives an indication of instrument performance and proficiency obtained by the students. Support was provided to each teacher and their students at the level requested, via email, phone or video conferencing.

  2. Alkaline flood prediction studies, Ranger VII pilot, Wilmington Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, E.H.; Breit, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of a simulator to model alkaline displacement mechanisms, along with the current understanding of in-situ caustic consumption. Assimilation of laboratory coreflood and rock consumption data, and their use in one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) limited area simulations and in three-dimensional (3D) models of the entire pilot project are given. This paper also reports simulation studies of alkaline flood behavior in a small 2D area of a field for various concentrations, slug sizes, long-term consumption functions, and two relative-permeability adjustment mechanisms. The scale-up of 2D simulation results and their use in a 271-acre (1096.7-ha), seven-layered, 3D model of the pilot are also discussed and 3D simulator results are compared with initial field alkaline flood performance. Finally, recommended additional applications of the simulator methods developed in this pilot and in other alkaline floods are discussed.

  3. Comparison of the Vitamin D Status of Children Younger and Older Than 2 Years in Tehran: Are Supplements Really Necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Torkaman, Mohammad; Abolghasemi, Hassan; Amirsalari, Susan; Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Afsharpaiman, Shahla; Kavehmanesh, Zohreh; Khosravi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin D is a vital lipid-soluble vitamin in the body, helping the growth and development of bones. Vitamin D deficiency in children has several adverse effects. The most important preventative factor is determining the deficiency at an early stage and prescribing vitamin D-containing supplements. Objectives To investigate the vitamin D status of children younger and older than 2 years and determine the utility of prescribing vitamin D supplements. Patients and Methods Three hundred healthy children who attended the pediatric clinic for routine assessments were enrolled in this study. Their parents were asked to complete a questionnaire, which included questions about demographics, nutrition, and supplements. Blood levels of vitamin D, calcium, and phosphorus were then measured. Results The final study consisted of 286 children, 140 males and 146 females, with a mean age of 4.46 ± 2.82 yr. Of these, 218 (76.22%) children, with a mean age of 5.09 ± 2.82 yr, had vitamin D deficiency, and 76 children (23.78%), with a mean age of 2.58 ± 1.88 yr, had normal vitamin D levels (P = 0.001). The mean level of vitamin D was 29.71 ± 14.42 ng/mL in 88 (30.8%) patients up to 2 years and 17.11 ± 14.02 ng/mL in 198 (69.2%) patients older than 2 years (P = 0.0001). Conclusions The vitamin D levels of children aged more than 2 years are lower than those of children aged less than 2 years. Thus, prescribing vitamin D-containing supplements in children older than 2 years may be beneficial.

  4. A study of spin chemistry in weak magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Timmel, Christiane R; Henbest, Kevin B

    2004-12-15

    This paper reviews the latest developments in the field of spin chemistry with a particular focus on the effects of weak static and/or oscillating magnetic fields (typically smaller than the average hyperfine coupling) on radical recombination reactions. Anisotropic magnetic field effects and their significance in the debate about potential mechanisms controlling magnetoreception in birds are discussed.

  5. Biological and Agricultural Studies on Application of Discharge Plasma and Electromagnetic Fields 5. Effects of High Electric Fields on Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaka, Katsuo

    The biological effects of extremely low frequency electric fields on animals are reviewed with emphasis on studies of the nervous system, behavior, endocrinology, and blood chemistry. First, this paper provides a histrical overview of studies on the electric field effects initiated in Russia and the United States mainly regarding electric utility workers in high voltage substations and transmission lines. Then, the possible mechanisms of electric field effects are explained using the functions of surface electric fields and induced currents in biological objects. The real mechanisms have not yet been identified. The thresholds of electric field perception levels for rats, baboons, and humans are introduced and compared. The experimental results concerning the depression of melatonin secretion in rats exposed to electric fields are described.

  6. [Prospective assessment of children with pervasive developmental disorder after 2 years of day-hospital treatment].

    PubMed

    Poinso, F; Dubois, B; Chatel, C; Viellard, M; Bastard-Rosset, D; Girardot, A-M; Grandgeorge, P; De Martino, S; Sokolowsky, M; Salle-Collemiche, X; Da Fonseca, D

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of children with pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) has not been systematically assessed in French day-care units. In this prospective study, 11 children with a diagnosis of PDD were followed up for 2years in a day-care unit in the Marseille university hospital. The treatment they received is based on an initial assessment by the "Centre Ressources Autisme" (CRA PACA) and further included a continued observation of the child and an assessment of the child's abilities and needs. This treatment used various therapeutic approaches 10h weekly and also included parental counseling and coordinated work with schools. Treatment in our day-care unit can be categorized as eclectic, non-intensive therapy. It is based on methods such as TEACCH (Treatment and Education of Autistic and related Communication handicapped Children), Floor Time Play, speech and language therapy, developmental therapy, and psychotherapy. International studies on intensive behavioral therapies suggest that this treatment is superior to non-behavioral and/or non-intensive treatment. They suggest its efficiency is due both to the nature of the treatment (behavioral) and to its intensity (more than 25h a week). In this study, the CRA diagnosed children using the ADI and ADOS. The 11 children (mean age, 3years 5months) were tested twice, with the Vineland and CARS scales. The first assessment was on admission to the day hospital and the second was 2years later. The results showed developmental progress with a mean increase of 13.5 months at the Vineland Scale, and a decrease of the autism severity score on the CARS. The treatment presented here proves to be efficient; if compared to similar results in international studies, we obtained better results than their eclectic intensive or non-intensive treatment comparison group.

  7. A Scoping-Level Field Monitoring Study of Synthetic Turf Fields and Playgrounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recycled tire material, or "tire crumb," is used as a component in many recreational fields, including synthetic turf fields and playgrounds. The use of tire crumbs in these applications provides several benefits, including reduced sports injury. The public recently has raised co...

  8. Olfactory communication among Costa Rican squirrel monkeys: a field study.

    PubMed

    Boinski, S

    1992-01-01

    Behaviors with a possible role in olfactory communication among troop members were investigated as part of a field study on the reproductive and foraging ecology of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri oerstedi) in Costa Rica. All age classes engaged in the olfaction-related behaviors. Apart from olfactory investigation of female genitals by males during the mating season, no other potential olfaction-related behavior (urine wash, branch investigation, rump, chest, back rub and sneeze) exceeded 1% of mean behavioral samples. Assessment of reproduction condition appears to be the primary function of such olfactory investigation of the female genital region. The primary function of urine washing is suggested to be the general communication of reproductive status, possibly facilitating reproductive synchrony. Sneezing, rump, back and chest rubbing do not appear to deposit substances active in olfactory communication. PMID:1306175

  9. Communication Problems in Requirements Engineering: A Field Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Rawas, Amer; Easterbrook, Steve

    1996-01-01

    The requirements engineering phase of software development projects is characterized by the intensity and importance of communication activities. During this phase, the various stakeholders must be able to communicate their requirements to the analysts, and the analysts need to be able to communicate the specifications they generate back to the stakeholders for validation. This paper describes a field investigation into the problems of communication between disparate communities involved in the requirements specification activities. The results of this study are discussed in terms of their relation to three major communication barriers: (1) ineffectiveness of the current communication channels; (2) restrictions on expressiveness imposed by notations; and (3) social and organizational barriers. The results confirm that organizational and social issues have great influence on the effectiveness of communication. They also show that in general, end-users find the notations used by software practitioners to model their requirements difficult to understand and validate.

  10. Studies of the interplanetary magnetic field: IMP's to Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, Norman F.

    1987-01-01

    During the last two decades, spacecraft projects and individual experiments for which Frank McDonald was a leader have contributed very significantly to the current understanding of the structure of interplanetary space and the correlation between solar and interplanetary disturbances. Studies on the IMP, HELIOS, and Pioneer spin-stabilized spacecraft and the larger attitude-stabilized Voyager spacecraft have provided data sets from which the modern view of the heliosphere has evolved. That concept in which the inner solar system is shown to be dominated by individual streams associated with specific source regions on the Sun is illustrated. As these high-speed streams overtake the preexisting solar plasma, they coalesce and modify the characteristics so that at larger heliocentric distances, these disturbances appear as radially propagating concentric shells of compressed magnetic fields and enhanced fluctuations

  11. Optimization studies of the ITER low field side reflectometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Gregory R; Wilgen, John B; Bigelow, Tim S; Diem, Stephanie J

    2010-01-01

    Microwave reflectometry will be used on ITER to measure the electron density profile, density fluctuations due to MHD/turbulence, ELM density transients, and as a L-H transition monitor. The ITER low field side (LFS) reflectometer system will measure both core and edge quantities using multiple antenna arrays spanning frequency ranges of 15-155 GHz for the O-mode system and 55-220 GHz for the X-mode system. Optimization studies using the GENRAY ray-tracing code have been done for edge and core measurements. The reflectometer launchers will utilize the HE11 mode launched from circular corrugated waveguide. The launched beams are assumed to be Gaussian with a beam waist diameter of 0.643 times the waveguide diameter. Optimum launcher size and placement are investigated by computing the antenna coupling between launchers, assuming the launched and received beams have a Gaussian beam pattern.

  12. Optimization studies of the ITER low field side reflectometer

    SciTech Connect

    Diem, S. J.; Wilgen, J. B.; Bigelow, T. S.; Hanson, G. R.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.

    2010-10-15

    Microwave reflectometry will be used on ITER to measure the electron density profile, density fluctuations due to MHD/turbulence, edge localized mode (ELM) density transients, and as an L-H transition monitor. The ITER low field side reflectometer system will measure both core and edge quantities using multiple antenna arrays spanning frequency ranges of 15-155 GHz for the O-mode system and 55-220 GHz for the X-mode system. Optimization studies using the GENRAY ray-tracing code have been done for edge and core measurements. The reflectometer launchers will utilize the HE11 mode launched from circular corrugated waveguide. The launched beams are assumed to be Gaussian with a beam waist diameter of 0.643 times the waveguide diameter. Optimum launcher size and placement are investigated by computing the antenna coupling between launchers, assuming the launched and received beams have a Gaussian beam pattern.

  13. A field study of tritium migration in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L X; Zhang, M S; Tu, G R

    1995-12-01

    A field study of tritium migration from an underground nuclear explosion was carried out for more than 7 years. A series of satellite wells was drilled around the explosion cavity, which is within a nuclear test site water-supply aquifer. Samples from various wells were analysed. In this way, variations in the tritium concentration of water from different wells were determined, and the extent of tritium migration during the 7 years after the detonation was examined. The maximum tritium concentration reached in water from various wells is just 52-times higher than the maximum permissible concentration for drinking water and decreased afterwards. According to the results obtained, the flow rate of groundwater was inferred to be about 91 m per year and the maximum contamination distance of water supplies by the tritium were < or = 2 km from the explosion cavity.

  14. Optimization studies of the ITER low field side reflectometer.

    PubMed

    Diem, S J; Wilgen, J B; Bigelow, T S; Hanson, G R; Harvey, R W; Smirnov, A P

    2010-10-01

    Microwave reflectometry will be used on ITER to measure the electron density profile, density fluctuations due to MHD/turbulence, edge localized mode (ELM) density transients, and as an L-H transition monitor. The ITER low field side reflectometer system will measure both core and edge quantities using multiple antenna arrays spanning frequency ranges of 15-155 GHz for the O-mode system and 55-220 GHz for the X-mode system. Optimization studies using the GENRAY ray-tracing code have been done for edge and core measurements. The reflectometer launchers will utilize the HE11 mode launched from circular corrugated waveguide. The launched beams are assumed to be Gaussian with a beam waist diameter of 0.643 times the waveguide diameter. Optimum launcher size and placement are investigated by computing the antenna coupling between launchers, assuming the launched and received beams have a Gaussian beam pattern.

  15. Multidisciplinary study of Hewett Field, Zechstein Kalk Formation

    SciTech Connect

    West, K.L. )

    1994-04-01

    New technology and a multidisciplinary team approach were effectively used by Phillips Petroleum for optimum reservoir development in the Hewett field, North Sea. Near-horizontal drilling technology and depositional environment and fracture studies were used by engineering and geology. Geophysics contributed structure and porosity trend maps and used new technology developed by Phillips called Incremental Pay Thickness modeling. IPT modeling enhances the integration of well-log data and seismic wiggle traces so porosity and pay thickness can be estimated directly from seismic data. Seismic amplitude values were mapped and processed into estimated porosity thickness using the IPT mathematical relationship. This interpretation aided in locating three successful development wells in areas of predicted high porosity, which increased production by 67 MMCF/D and optimized recovery.

  16. Field study of hydrogeologic characterization methods in a heterogeneous aquifer.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew; Berg, Steven J; Illman, Walter A

    2011-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific storage (S(s)) are required parameters when designing transient groundwater flow models. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of commonly used hydrogeologic characterization approaches to accurately delineate the distribution of hydraulic properties in a highly heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit. The metric used to compare the various approaches was the prediction of drawdown responses from three separate pumping tests. The study was conducted at a field site, where a 15 m × 15 m area was instrumented with four 18-m deep Continuous Multichannel Tubing (CMT) wells. Each CMT well contained seven 17 cm × 1.9 cm monitoring ports equally spaced every 2 m down each CMT system. An 18-m deep pumping well with eight separate 1-m long screens spaced every 2 m was also placed in the center of the square pattern. In each of these boreholes, cores were collected and characterized using the Unified Soil Classification System, grain size analysis, and permeameter tests. To date, 471 K estimates have been obtained through permeameter analyses and 270 K estimates from empirical relationships. Geostatistical analysis of the small-scale K data yielded strongly heterogeneous K fields in three-dimensions. Additional K estimates were obtained through slug tests in 28 ports of the four CMT wells. Several pumping tests were conducted using the multiscreen and CMT wells to obtain larger scale estimates of both K and S(s). The various K and S(s) estimates were then quantitatively evaluated by simulating transient drawdown data from three pumping tests using a 3D forward numerical model constructed using HydroGeoSphere (Therrien et al. 2005). Results showed that, while drawdown predictions generally improved as more complexity was introduced into the model, the ability to make accurate drawdown predictions at all CMT ports was inconsistent.

  17. Growing Readers: A Hierarchical Linear Model of Children's Reading Growth During the First 2 Years of School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoach, D. Betsy; O'Connell, Ann A.; Reis, Sally M.; Levitt, Heather A.

    2006-01-01

    Using the first 4 waves of data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten cohort (ECLS-K), this piecewise 3-level (time-student-school) growth-curve model provides a portrait of students' reading growth over the first 2 years of school. On average, students make much greater reading gains in 1st grade than they do in kindergarten.…

  18. Early infant diet is not a predictor of body mass index and macronutrient intake at 2 years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many retrospective studies have suggested that breast feeding during the first year of life may provide protection against overweight and obesity during childhood and later in life. We compared body mass index (BMI) and macronutrient composition in 2-year-old children who were fed breast milk (BF, ...

  19. Predicting School Readiness from Neurodevelopmental Assessments at Age 2 Years after Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Infants Born Preterm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrianakos-Hoobler, Athena I.; Msall, Michael E.; Huo, Dezheng; Marks, Jeremy D.; Plesha-Troyke, Susan; Schreiber, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether neurodevelopmental outcomes at the age of 2 years accurately predict school readiness in children who survived respiratory distress syndrome after preterm birth. Method: Our cohort included 121 preterm infants who received surfactant and ventilation and were enrolled in a randomized controlled study of inhaled nitric…

  20. THE FREQUENCY OF T(14;18) IN BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES IS STABLE OVER A 2 YEAR PERIOD IN ADULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Frequency of t(14;18) in Blood Lymphocytes Is Stable over a 2 Year Period in Adults

    As part of a multi-endpoint molecular epidemiology study on in utero environmental exposures, umbilical cord and adult blood lymphocytes were examined for the frequency of t(14;18) by ...

  1. Interest Level in 2-Year-Olds with Autism Spectrum Disorder Predicts Rate of Verbal, Nonverbal, and Adaptive Skill Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klintwall, Lars; Macari, Suzanne; Eikeseth, Svein; Chawarska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that skill acquisition rates for children with autism spectrum disorders receiving early interventions can be predicted by child motivation. We examined whether level of interest during an Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule assessment at 2?years predicts subsequent rates of verbal, nonverbal, and adaptive skill…

  2. Finnish Parental Involvement Ethos, Health Support, Health Education Knowledge and Participation: Results from a 2-Year School Health Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sormunen, Marjorita; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-01-01

    A 2-year, participatory action research school health study focused on developing components for home-school partnerships to support children's health learning process. Two intervention schools implemented strengthened health and collaboration-orientated activities; two control schools followed the national core curriculum without extracurricular…

  3. Very Pre-Term Infants' Behaviour at 1 and 2 Years of Age and Parental Stress Following Basic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Pal, Sylvia M.; Maguire, Celeste M.; Bruil, Jeanet; le Cessie, Saskia; van Zwieten, Paul; Veen, Sylvia; Wit, Jan M.; Walther, Frans J.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the effects of basic developmental care on the behaviour of very pre-term infants and parental stress at 1 and 2 years of corrected age. A randomized controlled trial was done to compare basic Developmental Care (standardized nests and incubator covers) and controls (standard care). Parents of infants born less than 32 weeks of…

  4. Gender Differences in Physical Aggression: A Prospective Population-Based Survey of Children before and after 2 Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baillargeon, Raymond H.; Zoccolillo, Mark; Keenan, Kate; Cote, Sylvana; Perusse, Daniel; Wu, Hong-Xing; Boivin, Michel; Tremblay, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    There has been much controversy over the past decades on the origins of gender differences in children's aggressive behavior. A widely held view is that gender differences emerge sometime after 2 years of age and increase in magnitude thereafter because of gender-differentiated socialization practices. The objective of this study was to test…

  5. Phreatomagmatic explosive eruption processes informed by field and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Greg; Graettinger, Alison; Sonder, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    Phreatomagmatic explosive eruptions occur during the lifetime of nearly every volcano. Maar-diatremes form excellent case studies to understand such eruptions because most of these volcanoes are monogenetic so that the effects of the dominant phreatomagmatic activity are not overprinted by other processes as might occur at a polygenetic volcano. Diatremes preserve evidence of magma injection and explosions at various levels, in the form of irregularly shaped intrusions and vertical domains of country rock breccia and pyroclasts, and usually have subsidence features around the outer parts. Field data on intrusions in diatremes give analog information on the sizes of magma batches that might fuel phreatomagmatic explosions, and therefore the energies of individual explosions. Tephra rings often are dominated by country rock clasts, with progressively deeper-seated clasts appearing at progressively higher stratigraphic levels in the tephra. Scaled experiments with buried explosives show that only shallow explosions (<200 m) can deposit material onto tephra rings, and coarse ballistics are emplaced onto tephra rings mainly by explosions less than 100 m deep; therefore the presence of deep-seated lithics is related to mixing by multiple (non-erupting) explosions at various depths within the diatremes, not necessarily to progressive deepening of explosions. Excavation of experimental craters shows that mixing occurs through a combination of upward displacement and progressive disaggregation of host material domains, and marginal subsidence. Experimental explosion jets show a range of behaviors that depend on the scaled depth of explosions (physical depth scaled against explosion energy) and on the effects of pre-explosion crater morphology. Many scaled depth and pre-explosion crater combinations result in jets that collapse back into the crater and expel fine-grained density currents that travel radially outward. Field observations of fine-grained ash beds in tephra

  6. Upscaling behavioural studies to the field using acoustic telemetry.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Gustav; Klaminder, Jonatan; Jonsson, Micael; Fick, Jerker; Brodin, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory-based behavioural assays are often used in ecotoxicological studies to assess the environmental risk of aquatic contaminants. While results from such laboratory-based risk assessments may be difficult to extrapolate to natural environments, technological advancements over the past decade now make it possible to perform risk assessments through detailed studies of exposed individuals in natural settings. Acoustic telemetry is a technology to monitor movement and behaviour of aquatic organism in oceans, lakes, and rivers. The technology allows for tracking of multiple individuals simultaneously with very high temporal and spatial resolution, with the option to incorporate sensors to measure various physiological and environmental parameters. Although frequently used in fisheries research, aquatic ecotoxicology has been slow to adopt acoustic telemetry as a tool in field-based studies. This mini-review intends to introduce acoustic telemetry to aquatic ecotoxicologists, focusing on the potential of the technology to bridge the gap between laboratory assays and natural behaviours when making toxicological risk assessments. PMID:26683267

  7. Laboratory studies of oil spill bioremediation; toward understanding field behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, R.C.; Hinton, S.M.; Elmendorf, D.L.; Lute, J.R.; Grossman, M.J.; Robbins, W.K.; Hsu, Chang S.; Richard, B.E.; Haith, C.E.; Senius, J.D.; Minak-Bernero, V.; Chianelli, R.R.; Bragg, J.R.; Douglas, G.S.

    1993-12-31

    Oil spill remediation aims to enhance the natural process of microbial hydrocarbon biodegradation. The microbial foundations have been studied throughout this century, but the focus of most of this work has been on the degradation of well defined compounds by well defined microbial species. This paper addresses laboratory studies on crude oil biodegradation by microbial consortia obtained from oiled beaches in Prince William Sound, Alaska following the spill from the Exxon Valdez. It demonstrates that oil degradation is indeed likely to be nitrogen-limited in Prince William Sound, the different molecular classes in crude oil that are subjected to biodegradation, the identification of conserved species in the oil that can be used for assessing biodegradation and bioremediation in the field, the effectiveness of fertilizers in stimulating sub-surface biodegradation, the role of the olephilic fertilizer Inipol EAP22, and the identification of the oil-degrading microorganisms in Prince William Sound. Together, these laboratory studies provided guidance and important insights into the microbial phenomena underlying the successful bioremediation of the oiled shorelines.

  8. Changes in strength over a 2-year period in professional rugby union players.

    PubMed

    Appleby, Brendyn; Newton, Robert U; Cormie, Prue

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the magnitude of upper and lower body strength changes in highly trained professional rugby union players after 2 years of training. An additional purpose was to examine if the changes in strength were influenced by the starting strength level, lean mass index (LMI), or chronological age. This longitudinal investigation tracked maximal strength and body composition over 3 consecutive years in 20 professional rugby union athletes. Maximal strength in the bench press and back squat and body composition was assessed during preseason resistance training sessions each year. The athletes completed a very rigorous training program throughout the duration of this study consisting of numerous resistance, conditioning and skills training sessions every week. The primary findings of this study were as follows: (a) Maximal upper and lower body strength was increased by 6.5-11.5% after 2 years of training (p = 0.000-0.002 for bench press; p = 0.277-0.165 for squat); (b) magnitude of the improvement was negatively associated with initial strength level (r = -0.569 to -0.712, p ≤ 0.05); (c) magnitude of improvement in lower body maximal strength was positively related to the change in LMI (an indicator of hypertrophy; r = 0.692-0.880, p ≤ 0.05); and (d) magnitude of improvement was not associated with the age of professional rugby union athletes (r = -0.068 to -0.345). It appears particularly important for training programs to be designed for continued muscle hypertrophy in highly trained athletes. Even in professional rugby union athletes, this must be achieved in the face of high volumes of aerobic and skills training if strength is to be increased.

  9. Experimental study of the formation of field-reversed configurations employing high-order multipole fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slough, J. T.; Hoffman, A. L.

    1990-04-01

    A high-order multipole ``barrier'' field was applied at the vacuum tube wall in the TRX experiment [Phys. Fluids B 1, 840 (1989)] during both the preionization and field reversal phases of field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation. Use of this field during field reversal resulted in a significant reduction of impurities as well as increased flux trapping. With a large enough Bθ at the wall, sheath detachment from the wall became apparent, and flux loss through the sheath became negligible (<10%). At larger wall Bθ (>1.5 kG), destructive rotational spin-up occurred, driven by Hall current forces. When the multipole barrier field was also applied during either axial discharge or ringing theta current preionization, a very symmetric and uniform breakdown of the fill gas was achieved. In particular, using ringing theta preionization, complete ionization of the fill gas was accomplished with purely inductive fields of remarkably low magnitude, where Ez≤3 V/cm, and Eθ≤20 V/cm. Due to the improved ionization symmetry, about 65% to 75% of the lift-off flux (flux remaining after field reversal) could be retained through the remaining formation processes into an equilibrium FRC. Using the multipole field during both preionization and formation, it was possible to form FRC's with good confinement with greater than 3 mWb of trapped flux at 15 mTorr D2 or H2 in a 10 cm radius device. Values of s in excess of 4 could be achieved in this manner.

  10. Black shale weathering: An integrated field and numerical modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, E. W.; Wildman, R. A., Jr.; Berner, R. A.; Eckert, J. O., Jr.; Petsch, S. T.; Mok, U.; Evans, B.

    2003-04-01

    We present an integrated study of black shale weathering in a near surface environment. Implications of this study contribute to our understanding of organic matter oxidation in uplifted sediments, along with erosion and reburial of ancient unoxidized organic matter, as major controls on atmospheric oxygen levels over geologic time. The field study used to launch the modeling effort is based on core samples from central-eastern Kentucky near Clay City (Late Devonian New Albany/Ohio Shale), where the strata are essentially horizontal. Samples from various depth intervals (up to 12 m depth) were analyzed for texture (SEM images), porosity fraction (0.02 to 0.1), and horizontal and vertical permeability (water and air permeabilities differ due to the fine-grained nature of the sediments, but are on the order of 0.01 to 1. millidarcies, respectively). Chemical analyses were also performed for per cent C, N, S, and basic mineralogy was determined (clays, quartz, pyrite, in addition to organic matter). The samples contained from 2 to 15 per cent ancient (non-modern soil) organic matter. These results were used in the creation of a numerical model for kinetically controlled oxidation of the organic matter within the shale (based on kinetics from Chang and Berner, 1999). The one-dimensional model includes erosion, oxygen diffusion in the partially saturated vadose zone as well as water percolation and solute transport. This study extends the studies of Petsch (2000) and the weathering component of Lasaga and Ohmoto (2002) to include more reactions (e.g., pyrite oxidation to sulfuric acid and weathering of silicates due to low pH) and to resolve the near-surface boundary layer. The model provides a convenient means of exploring the influence of variable rates of erosion, oxygen level, rainfall, as well as physical and chemical characteristics of the shale on organic matter oxidation.

  11. The South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study: Nearshore Hydrodynamics Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, K. A.; Voulgaris, G.; Demir, H.; Work, P. A.; Hanes, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    As part of the South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study (SCCES) a nearshore field experiment was carried out for five days in December 2003 just north of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, providing measurements of the waves, currents and morphological evolution. This experiment occurred concurrently with an extensive field campaign several kilometers offshore which included measurements of the waves and currents on and near a significant sand shoal. The purpose of the nearshore experiment was to aid in the identification of the effect of the offshore shoal on the nearshore processes. The resulting dataset will be used for verification of numerical models being used to investigate the hydrodynamics of the region. The experiment was carried out from December 10 to December 15 and consisted of measurements of the waves and currents, extensive surveys of the bathymetry every day, grab samples of the sediments, and video imagery. The hydrodynamics were measured using two Sontek Triton downward-looking Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters and two Nortek AquaDopp profilers arranged in a cross-shore line from inside the swash to several surf zone widths past the breakers. The bathymetric surveying was accomplished using both a differential GPS system and a total station. Surveying was performed each day in order to capture the morphological changes. On the last day, seven sediment samples were taken along a single cross-section to determine the sediment characteristics across the beach. Additionally, a video camera was located on a balcony of the top floor of a nearby hotel providing an excellent field of view of the entire experimental area. Digital video was captured directly onto a computer during all daylight hours and many control points were surveyed in each day to facilitate rectification of the imagery. A variety of conditions were encountered during the experiment, including two storm fronts which passed through, generating wind speeds up to 15 m/s. The first storm generated

  12. Weight and Weight-Related Behaviors Among 2-Year College Students

    PubMed Central

    Nanney, Marilyn S.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Farbakhsh, Kian; Moe, Stacey G.; Linde, Jennifer A.; Gardner, Jolynn K.; Laska, Melissa N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives and Participants The purpose of this paper is to describe weight indicators and weight-related behaviors of students enrolled in 2-year colleges, including sex differences. Methods During Fall 2011 and Spring 2012, 441 students from 3 Minnesota community colleges enrolled in the Choosing Healthy Options in College Environments and Settings (CHOICES) Study and completed baseline assessments. Participants completed a baseline survey evaluating eating and activity patterns, sleep, and stress and measures of height, weight, waist circumference, and body fat. Results Participants were primarily female (68%), white (73%), with a mean age of 22.8 years and 66.2% reporting an annual income <$12,000. Almost half (47%) were overweight or obese. Young males appeared to engage the most in risky health behaviors and had higher levels of overweight or obesity, compared to young females. Conclusions Findings confirm the need for innovative interventions targeting this understudied and underserved young adult population. PMID:25692380

  13. Functional outcomes of proximal row carpectomy: 2-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Mandarano-Filho, Luiz Garcia; Campioto, Débora Schalge; Bezuti, Márcio Takey; Mazzer, Nilton; Barbieri, Cláudio Henrique

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To evaluate functional outcomes of patients submit-ted to proximal row carpectomy for the treatment of wrist arthri-tis METHODS : This is a retrospective study using wrist motion and grip strenght of patients diagnosed with Kienböck disease and scaphoid non-union surgically treated by this technique RESULTS : Eleven patients with 2-year follow-up were evaluated. Wrist motion (flexion, extension and ulnar deviation) and grip strength were significantly better from preoperative values. Ho-wever, no difference in radial deviation was observed in these patients CONCLUSION : Proximal row carpectomy provides an alternative option for treatment of wrist arthritis, resulting in better active range of motion and grip strength in the long run. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:27057144

  14. [Systematization of the experiences of 2 years of work. Arimao Population Council].

    PubMed

    Martínez Pérez, M

    1998-01-01

    The community and social participation as an action has been part of the daily life every group and community. A descriptive and qualitative study of the 2-year period 1994-1996 was conducted to determine the hygienic, sanitary, socioeconomic, sports, cultural and health transformation occurred at the circumscription # 73 of the ABalcón Arimao@ People's Council, in La Lisa municipality, which is located in an insalubrious suburb with a high criminal rate, school dropout and unemployment, that is subjected to social actions. The method of Experience Systematization of Oscar Hara in 5 times was applied and included in the living process of this community in addition to life histories. The most important achievement was to gather all the social members of the community, with their mobilization capacity, under the leadership of the main conductors of the process through an innovative methodology starting from its context. Positive changes were observed in the life style and the health status of the population.

  15. Magnetic field gradients and their uses in the study of the earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Southam, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic field gradients are discussed from the standpoint of their usefulness in modeling crustal magnetizations. The fact that gradients enhance shorter wavelength features helps reduce both the core signal and the signal from external fields in comparison with the crustal signal. If the gradient device can be oriented, then directions of lineation can be determined from single profiles, and anomalies caused by unlineated sources can be identified.

  16. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yumin

    2013-12-01

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters-shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  17. A field study on downwind odor transport from swine facilities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Li, X

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents field data to illustrate the characteristics of downwind odor dispersion. A total of eight swine facilities were studied in this project and power functions were found to be an appropriate description of the pattern of downwind odor transport for both swine buildings and manure storage lagoons and tanks. The coefficients of correlation for the power regressions ranged from 0.75-0.87. It was found that swine buildings have the potential of generating more odor than manure storage facilities such as lagoons and tanks and thus could be the major odor sources causing downwind odor nuisance. Therefore, to maintain the building clean should be highly recommended as swine producers' best management practice. For earthen basins, the odor strength was reduced by 80% at about 250-meter distance from the source. While for the swine building, a 50% of reduction in odor strength was observed at the same distance. The study did not show any advantages of using lagoons over concrete (or steel) manure tanks in terms of reducing downwind odor concentrations. Land application of manure did not cause persistent downwind odor problems. PMID:10736772

  18. A field study on downwind odor transport from swine facilities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Li, X

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents field data to illustrate the characteristics of downwind odor dispersion. A total of eight swine facilities were studied in this project and power functions were found to be an appropriate description of the pattern of downwind odor transport for both swine buildings and manure storage lagoons and tanks. The coefficients of correlation for the power regressions ranged from 0.75-0.87. It was found that swine buildings have the potential of generating more odor than manure storage facilities such as lagoons and tanks and thus could be the major odor sources causing downwind odor nuisance. Therefore, to maintain the building clean should be highly recommended as swine producers' best management practice. For earthen basins, the odor strength was reduced by 80% at about 250-meter distance from the source. While for the swine building, a 50% of reduction in odor strength was observed at the same distance. The study did not show any advantages of using lagoons over concrete (or steel) manure tanks in terms of reducing downwind odor concentrations. Land application of manure did not cause persistent downwind odor problems.

  19. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Yumin

    2013-12-15

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  20. A Study of Thermocurrent Induced Magnetic Fields in ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Anthony C.; Cooley, Victoria

    2014-03-31

    The case of axisymmetric ILC type cavities with titanium helium vessels is investigated. A first order estimate for magnetic field within the SRF current layer is presented. The induced magnetic field is found to be not more than 1.4x10-8 Tesla = 0.14 milligauss for the case of axial symmetry. Magnetic fields due to symmetry breaking effects are discussed.

  1. 7 CFR 25.403. - Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... applicable 2 years of the strategic plan, together with the benchmark activities to be undertaken during the... benchmark activity to be undertaken in the applicable 2 years of the strategic plan, set forth the following... other entity to assist in implementation of the community's strategic plan, and whether this support...

  2. 7 CFR 25.403. - Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... applicable 2 years of the strategic plan, together with the benchmark activities to be undertaken during the... benchmark activity to be undertaken in the applicable 2 years of the strategic plan, set forth the following... other entity to assist in implementation of the community's strategic plan, and whether this support...

  3. 7 CFR 25.403. - Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... applicable 2 years of the strategic plan, together with the benchmark activities to be undertaken during the... benchmark activity to be undertaken in the applicable 2 years of the strategic plan, set forth the following... other entity to assist in implementation of the community's strategic plan, and whether this support...

  4. 7 CFR 25.403. - Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... applicable 2 years of the strategic plan, together with the benchmark activities to be undertaken during the... benchmark activity to be undertaken in the applicable 2 years of the strategic plan, set forth the following... other entity to assist in implementation of the community's strategic plan, and whether this support...

  5. 7 CFR 25.403. - Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... applicable 2 years of the strategic plan, together with the benchmark activities to be undertaken during the... benchmark activity to be undertaken in the applicable 2 years of the strategic plan, set forth the following... other entity to assist in implementation of the community's strategic plan, and whether this support...

  6. Evaluation of 2-year-old intrasplenic fetal liver tissue transplants in rats.

    PubMed

    Lupp, Amelie; Danz, Manfred; Müller, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Liver cell transplantation into host organs like the spleen may possibly provide a temporary relief after extensive liver resection or severe liver disease or may enable treatment of an enzyme deficiency. With time, however, dedifferentiation or malignant transformation of the ectopically transplanted cells may be possible. Thus, in the present study syngenic fetal liver tissue suspensions were transplanted into the spleen of adult male rats and evaluated 2 years thereafter in comparison to orthotopic livers for histopathological changes and (as markers for preneoplastic transformation) for cytochrome P450 (P450) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) isoform expression. Because inducibility of P450 and GST isoforms may be changed in preneoplastic foci, prior to sacrifice animals were additionally treated either with beta-naphthoflavone, phenobarbital, dexamethasone, or the respective solvent. In the 2-year-old grafts more than 70% of the spleen mass was occupied by the transplant. The transplanted hepatocytes were arranged in cord-like structures. Also few bile ducts were present. Morphologically, no signs of malignancy were visible. With all rats, transplant recipients as well as controls, however, discrete nodular structures were seen in the livers. Due to age, both livers and transplants displayed only a low P450 2B1 and 3A2 and GST class alpha and mu isoform expression. No immunostaining for P450 1A1 was visible. At both sites, beta-naphthoflavone, phenobarbital, or dexamethasone treatment enhanced P450 1A1, P450 2B1 and 3A2, or P450 3A2 expression, respectively. No immunostaining for GST class pi isoforms was seen in the transplants. The livers of both transplant recipients and control rats, however, displayed GST pi-positive foci, corresponding to the nodular structures seen histomorphologically. Compared to the surrounding tissue, these foci also exhibited a more pronounced staining for GST class alpha and mu isoforms and a stronger inducibility of the P450 1A

  7. Spectral studies of the sources of ionospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earle, G. D.; Kelley, M. C.

    1987-01-01

    Spectral analyses (applying the Fourier analysis methods) were performed on three incoherent scatter radar data sets (obtained at Jicamarca, Peru; Chatanika, Alaska; and Arecibo, Puerto Rico) with the aim of investigating the origin of ionospheric electric fields in the frequency range of 0.01-2 cycles/h. In quiet times, atmospheric gravity waves appeared to be the most likely source of the ionospheric electric field. This hypothesis was tested by a direct simultaneous comparison of measurements of gravity waves in the mesosphere and of electric fields in the thermosphere during very quiet conditions. The results indicated that a gravity wave source is a plausible candidate for the electric field fluctuations.

  8. The impact of space electric field research on atmospheric studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozer, F. S.

    1974-01-01

    Space measurements of electric fields have provided instrumentation for measuring atmospheric parameters and a better basis for understanding the electrical coupling between the magnetosphere and the atmosphere. Applications of an incoherent scatter radar (developed for ionospheric electric field research) to the measurement of atmospheric winds and turbulence and of Langmuir double probes (also developed for space research) for measurement of atmospheric electric fields are described. The increased knowledge of magnetospheric electric fields has focused attention on the electrical coupling between the magnetosphere and the atmosphere with conclusions that should considerably modify previous physical concepts in both domains.

  9. Study of symmetry breaking of charged scalar field: Hydrodynamic version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, T.; Rodríguez-Meza, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    We rewrite the Klein-Gordon (KG) equation for a complex scalar field as a new Gross-Pitaevskii (GP)-like equation. The potential of the scalar field is a mexican-hat potential and the field is in a thermal bath with one loop contribution. We interpret the new GP equation as a finite temperature generalization of the GP equation for a charged field. We find its hydrodynamic version as well and using it, we derive the corresponding thermodynamics. We also obtain a generalized first law for a charged Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC).

  10. Field-based study of connectivity in an agricultural catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexartza-Artza, I.; Wainwright, J.

    2009-12-01

    Field-based studies of hydrological connectivity can provide context-specific knowledge that might both help understand dynamic complex systems and contribute to other synthetic or modelling approaches. The importance of such an understanding of catchment processes and also of the knowledge of catchment connections with water bodies and the changes of concentration with scale for Integrated Catchment Management has been increasingly emphasized. To provide a holistic understanding, approaches to the study of connectivity need to include both structural and functional aspects of the system and must consider the processes taking place within and across different temporal and spatial scales. A semi-quantitative nested approach has been used to investigate connectivity and study the interactions and feedbacks between the factors influencing transfer processes in the Ingbirchworth Catchment, in the uplands of the River Don, England. A series of reconnaissance techniques have been combined with monitoring of aspects such as rainfall, runoff, sediment transfer and soil-moisture distribution from plot to catchment scale and with consideration of linkages between land and water bodies. The temporal aspect has also been considered, with a special focus on the temporal distribution of events and the influence of longer term catchment changes such as those in land use and management practices. A variability of responses has been observed in relation to the characteristics of events, land use and scale of observation, with elements traditionally considered as limiting or enhancing connectivity responding differently under changing conditions. Sediment redistribution, reshaping of structure and consequent reinforcing loops can be observed across all land uses and landscape units, but the relevance it terms of effective connectivity of highly connected patches varies as the scale is increased. The knowledge acquired can contribute to recognise emerging processes significant for

  11. Mobile geophysical study of peat deposits in Fuhrberger Field, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, T.; Petersen, H.; Hagrey, S. A. al; Rabbel, W.

    2012-04-01

    In the water protection area of Fuhrberger Field, north of Hanover, geophysical techniques were applied to study the stakeholder problem of the source detection for nitrate accumulations in the ground water. We used our mobile multisensor platform to conduct measurements using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR, 200 MHz antenna) and Electromagnetic Induction (EMI, EM31). This aims to study the subsurface occurrences of peat deposits (surplus of organic carbon) supposed to be a source of nitrate emissions due to the aeration and the drawdown of groundwater levels (e.g. by pumping, drainage etc.). Resulting EMI and GPR signals show high data quality. Measured apparent electrical conductivity shows very low values (<10 mS/m) due to the mainly sandy subsurface. For this medium, both methods are expected to penetrate down to 3-5 m depth. GPR radargrams, time slices of GPR reflection energy and EMI apparent electrical conductivities are plotted on aerial photographs and compared to each other's and with vegetation intensity. We could separate areas characterized by low reflection energy and high conductivity, and vice versa. Briefly, organic rich sediments such as peats are assumed to have a relative high conductivity and thus low GPR reflectivity. Some areas of local conductivity increase correspond to a deep reflection interface (as seen in the radargrams), which even vanishes due to the high attenuation caused by the high conductivity. This implies that the upper layer is more conductive than the lower layer. Several local areas with these characteristics are found at the study sites. We recommend shallow drillings at representative points to deliver the necessary confirmation with ground truth information. Acknowledgments: iSOIL (Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping) is a Collaborative Project (Grant Agreement number 211386) co-funded by the Research DG of the European Commission within the RTD activities

  12. Study of the electric field formation in a multi-cusped magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui Yu, Daren; Wu, Huan; Zhao, Yinjian; Ma, Chengyu; Wang, Di; Wei, Haoyu

    2014-09-15

    The multi-cusped field thruster is a kind of electric thruster adopting a cusped magnetic field to achieve a potentially longer lifetime. It is observed in some experiments that the main electric potential drop forms near the exhaust plane, but the formation mechanism of the electric field in this kind of thrusters is not fully clear yet. Based on the analysis of the electron movement, a 2D Particle-in-Cell plus Monte Carlo model is built to reveal the difference of the constraint to electrons between the central leak path and the lateral region of the thruster. Electron trajectories from cathode are analyzed furthermore. It is found that the central leak path inside the discharge channel may play a significant role in the formation of the main electric potential drop near the exhaust plane.

  13. Magnetic field studies at jupiter by voyager 2: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuna, M H; Lepping, R P; Burlaga, L F; Behannon, K W; Neubauer, F M

    1979-11-23

    Data from the Goddard Space Flight Center magnetometers on Voyager 2 have yielded on inbound trajectory observations of multiple crossings of the bow shock and magnetosphere near the Jupiter-sun line at radial distances of 99 to 66 Jupiter radii (RJ) and 72 to 62 RJ, respectively. While outbound at a local hour angle of 0300, these distances increase appreciably so that at the time of writing only the magnetopause has been observed between 160 and 185 RJ. These results and the magnetic field geometry confirm the earlier conclusion from Voyager I studies that Jupiter has an enormous magnetic tail, approximately 300 to 400 RJ in diameter, trailing behind the planet with respect to the supersonic flow of the solar wind. Addi- tional observations of the distortion of the inner magnetosphere by a concentrated plasma show a spatial merging of the equatorial magnetodisk current with the cur- rent sheet in the magnetic tail. The spacecraft passed within 62,000 kilometers of Ganymede (radius = 2,635 kilometers) and observed characteristic fluctuations in- terpreted tentatively as being due to disturbances arising from the interaction of the Jovian magnetosphere with Ganymede.

  14. Transport studies in high-performance field reversed configuration plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Barnes, D. C.; Dettrick, S. A.; Trask, E.; Tuszewski, M.; Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.; Gupta, D.; Hubbard, K.; Korepanov, S.; Thompson, M. C.; Zhai, K.; Tajima, T.

    2016-05-01

    A significant improvement of field reversed configuration (FRC) lifetime and plasma confinement times in the C-2 plasma, called High Performance FRC regime, has been observed with neutral beam injection (NBI), improved edge stability, and better wall conditioning [Binderbauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 056110 (2015)]. A Quasi-1D (Q1D) fluid transport code has been developed and employed to carry out transport analysis of such C-2 plasma conditions. The Q1D code is coupled to a Monte-Carlo code to incorporate the effect of fast ions, due to NBI, on the background FRC plasma. Numerically, the Q1D transport behavior with enhanced transport coefficients (but with otherwise classical parametric dependencies) such as 5 times classical resistive diffusion, classical thermal ion conductivity, 20 times classical electron thermal conductivity, and classical fast ion behavior fit with the experimentally measured time evolution of the excluded flux radius, line-integrated density, and electron/ion temperature. The numerical study shows near sustainment of poloidal flux for nearly 1 ms in the presence of NBI.

  15. Intrinsic bioremediation of trichloroethylene and chlorobenzene: field and laboratory studies.

    PubMed

    Kao, C M; Prosser, J

    1999-10-01

    Activities at a former fire training area at Robins Air Force Base in Georgia, USA resulted in contamination of groundwater with a mixture of trichloroethylene (TCE) and chlorobenzene (CB). Results from the field investigation suggest that intrinsic bioremediation process is occurring, which caused the decrease in TCE and CB concentrations, and increase in TCE degradation byproducts [e.g., dichloroethylene isomers (DCEs), vinyl chloride (VC)] concentrations. Contaminated groundwater samples collected from this site were used to conduct microbial enumeration tests, and used as the inocula for microcosm establishment. Results from the microbial enumeration study indicate that methanogenesis was the dominant biodegradation pattern within the source and mid-plume areas, and the aerobic biodegradation process dominated the downgradient area. Laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using CB as the primary substrate to enhance the intrinsic biodegradation of TCE. Microcosm results suggest that CB can serve as the primary substrate (electron donor), and enhance TCE biodegradation to less-chlorinated compounds under both aerobic cometabolism and reductive dechlorination conditions.

  16. Field Studies of Geothermal Reservoirs Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    James C Witcher

    2002-07-30

    The Rio Grande rift provides an excellent field laboratory to study the nature of geothermal systems in an extensional environment. Much of the geologic complexity that is found in the Basin and Range is absent because the rift is located on cratonic crust with a thin and well-characterized Phanerozoic stratigraphy and tectonic history. On the other hand, the Neogene thermo-tectonic history of the rift has many parallels with the Basin and Range to the west. The geology of the southern Rio Grande rift is among the best characterized of any rift system in the world. Also, most geologic maps for the region are rather unique in that detailed analyses of Quaternary stratigraphic and surficial unit are added in concert with the details of bedrock geology. Pleistocene to Holocene entrenchment of the Rio Grande and tributaries unroofs the alteration signatures and permeability attributes of paleo outflow plumes and upflow zones, associated with present-day, but hidden or ''blind,'' hydrothermal systems at Rincon and San Diego Mountain.

  17. Study on Mixing Field of Salt Tolerant Polymer Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. H.; Zhang, M. G.; Li, X. G.; Zhang, D.; Jiang, B.

    The salt tolerant polymer (PAM) solution is a kind of viscoelastic fluid. The polymer. whose molecular weight is more than 2.5x107g/mol, is apt to form ultra-molecular structures in solution with pretty high viscoelasticity. These characteristics considerably affect the flow patterns and the mixing process. It is far more difficult to mix viscoelastic fluid homogeneously than Newtonian fluid. Because the molecular diffusion rate of viscoelastic fluid in mixing process is very low, improving the circulating performance of the agitator is the main path to increase the mixing velocity of the viscoelastic fluid. In this study, structure and operation parameters of new type agitator—double helical ribbon screw agitator designed for the salt tolerant polymer are optimized via laboratory experiment. The experiment results show that, compared with the screw propeller, the new type agitator improves circulation of fluid field effectively and increases the homogenized rate. It reduces the mixing time from 4h to 2h. And the viscosity of the polymer solution increases by 10%. However, the energy consumption does not increase.

  18. Chemical instrumentation for field studies of atmospheric wet deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, R.L.

    1986-04-01

    Field studies of wet deposition processes require the differentiation and determination of many trace reactive species in the atmosphere. The species may be present in clear-air-gaseous or aerosol phases, or they may be distributed between cloudwater or precipitation and interstitial gaseous phases. Analytical requirement on existing techniques have been extremely rigorous and, in several cases, have required development of new approaches to the sampling and determination of critical species. This paper views these developments with respect to airborne sampling in the following general areas: determination of sub-ppb levels of nitrogen oxides (NO, NO/sub x/, HNO/sub 3/) in real-time using ozone chemiluminescence; determination of sub-ppb levels of sulfur dioxide and aersol sulfate in real-time using the flame photometric detector; determination of oxidants (ozone, PAN, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) in gaseous and aqueous phases; determination of organic species (hydrocarbons, aldehydes, acids in gaseous and aqueous phases; cloud/raindrop - free air sampling; collection of aqueous liquid and solid samples; direct measurement of particle size distributions (aerosols, cloud droplets, rain droplets.)

  19. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor study is a multi-institutional research effort to determine the technical feasibility and key developmental issues of an RFP fusion reactor, especially at high power density, and to determine the potential economics, operations, safety, and environmental features of high-mass-power-density fusion systems. The TITAN conceptual designs are DT burning, 1000 MWe power reactors based on the RFP confinement concept. The designs are compact, have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m{sup 2} and a mass power density of 700 kWe/tonne. The inherent characteristics of the RFP confinement concept make fusion reactors with such a high mass power density possible. Two different detailed designs have emerged: the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium design, incorporating the integrated-blanket-coil concept; and the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design with ferritic steel structure. This report contains a collection of 16 papers on the results of the TITAN study which were presented at the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology. This collection describes the TITAN research effort, and specifically the TITAN-I and TITAN-II designs, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions and recommendations. Overall, the basic conclusions are that high-mass power-density fusion reactors appear to be technically feasible even with neutron wall loadings up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}; that single-piece maintenance of the FPC is possible and advantageous; that the economics of the reactor is enhanced by its compactness; and the safety and environmental features need not to be sacrificed in high-power-density designs. The fact that two design approaches have emerged, and others may also be possible, in some sense indicates the robustness of the general findings.

  20. Studies about space radiation promote new fields in radiation biology.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken

    2002-12-01

    Astronauts are constantly exposed to space radiation of various types of energy with a low dose-rate during long-term stays in space. Therefore, it is important to determine correctly the biological effects of space radiation on human health. Studies about biological the effects at a low dose and a low dose-rate include various aspects of microbeams, bystander effects, radioadaptive responses and hormesis which are important fields in radiation biology. In addition, space radiations contain high linear energy transfer (LET) particles. In particular, neutrons may cause reverse effectiveness at a low dose-rate in comparison to ionizing radiation. We are also interested in p53-centered signal transduction pathways involved in the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis induced by space radiations. We must also study whether the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of space radiation is affected by microgravity which is another typical component in space. To confirm this, we must prepare centrifuge systems in an International Space Station (ISS). In addition, we must prepare many types of equipment for space experiments in an ISS, because we cannot use conventional equipment from our laboratories. Furthermore, the research for space radiation might give us valuable information about the birth and evolution of life on the Earth. We can also realize the importance of preventing the ozone layer from depletion by the use of exposure equipment to sunlight in an ISS. For these reasons, we desire to educate space researchers of the next generation based on the consideration of the preservation of the Earth from research about space radiation. PMID:12793723

  1. Studies about space radiation promote new fields in radiation biology.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken

    2002-12-01

    Astronauts are constantly exposed to space radiation of various types of energy with a low dose-rate during long-term stays in space. Therefore, it is important to determine correctly the biological effects of space radiation on human health. Studies about biological the effects at a low dose and a low dose-rate include various aspects of microbeams, bystander effects, radioadaptive responses and hormesis which are important fields in radiation biology. In addition, space radiations contain high linear energy transfer (LET) particles. In particular, neutrons may cause reverse effectiveness at a low dose-rate in comparison to ionizing radiation. We are also interested in p53-centered signal transduction pathways involved in the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis induced by space radiations. We must also study whether the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of space radiation is affected by microgravity which is another typical component in space. To confirm this, we must prepare centrifuge systems in an International Space Station (ISS). In addition, we must prepare many types of equipment for space experiments in an ISS, because we cannot use conventional equipment from our laboratories. Furthermore, the research for space radiation might give us valuable information about the birth and evolution of life on the Earth. We can also realize the importance of preventing the ozone layer from depletion by the use of exposure equipment to sunlight in an ISS. For these reasons, we desire to educate space researchers of the next generation based on the consideration of the preservation of the Earth from research about space radiation.

  2. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Assisted in vitro Electroporation: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Novickij, Vitalij; Grainys, Audrius; Lastauskienė, Eglė; Kananavičiūtė, Rūta; Pamedytytė, Dovilė; Kalėdienė, Lilija; Novickij, Jurij; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation is a phenomenon occurring due to exposure of cells to Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) which leads to increase of membrane permeability. Electroporation is used in medicine, biotechnology, and food processing. Recently, as an alternative to electroporation by PEF, Pulsed ElectroMagnetic Fields (PEMF) application causing similar biological effects was suggested. Since induced electric field in PEMF however is 2–3 magnitudes lower than in PEF electroporation, the membrane permeabilization mechanism remains hypothetical. We have designed pilot experiments where Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida lusitaniae cells were subjected to single 100–250 μs electrical pulse of 800 V with and without concomitant delivery of magnetic pulse (3, 6 and 9 T). As expected, after the PEF pulses only the number of Propidium Iodide (PI) fluorescent cells has increased, indicative of membrane permeabilization. We further show that single sub-millisecond magnetic field pulse did not cause detectable poration of yeast. Concomitant exposure of cells to pulsed electric (PEF) and magnetic field (PMF) however resulted in the increased number PI fluorescent cells and reduced viability. Our results show increased membrane permeability by PEF when combined with magnetic field pulse, which can explain electroporation at considerably lower electric field strengths induced by PEMF compared to classical electroporation. PMID:27634482

  3. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Assisted in vitro Electroporation: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novickij, Vitalij; Grainys, Audrius; Lastauskienė, Eglė; Kananavičiūtė, Rūta; Pamedytytė, Dovilė; Kalėdienė, Lilija; Novickij, Jurij; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2016-09-01

    Electroporation is a phenomenon occurring due to exposure of cells to Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) which leads to increase of membrane permeability. Electroporation is used in medicine, biotechnology, and food processing. Recently, as an alternative to electroporation by PEF, Pulsed ElectroMagnetic Fields (PEMF) application causing similar biological effects was suggested. Since induced electric field in PEMF however is 2–3 magnitudes lower than in PEF electroporation, the membrane permeabilization mechanism remains hypothetical. We have designed pilot experiments where Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida lusitaniae cells were subjected to single 100–250 μs electrical pulse of 800 V with and without concomitant delivery of magnetic pulse (3, 6 and 9 T). As expected, after the PEF pulses only the number of Propidium Iodide (PI) fluorescent cells has increased, indicative of membrane permeabilization. We further show that single sub-millisecond magnetic field pulse did not cause detectable poration of yeast. Concomitant exposure of cells to pulsed electric (PEF) and magnetic field (PMF) however resulted in the increased number PI fluorescent cells and reduced viability. Our results show increased membrane permeability by PEF when combined with magnetic field pulse, which can explain electroporation at considerably lower electric field strengths induced by PEMF compared to classical electroporation.

  4. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Assisted in vitro Electroporation: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Novickij, Vitalij; Grainys, Audrius; Lastauskienė, Eglė; Kananavičiūtė, Rūta; Pamedytytė, Dovilė; Kalėdienė, Lilija; Novickij, Jurij; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation is a phenomenon occurring due to exposure of cells to Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) which leads to increase of membrane permeability. Electroporation is used in medicine, biotechnology, and food processing. Recently, as an alternative to electroporation by PEF, Pulsed ElectroMagnetic Fields (PEMF) application causing similar biological effects was suggested. Since induced electric field in PEMF however is 2-3 magnitudes lower than in PEF electroporation, the membrane permeabilization mechanism remains hypothetical. We have designed pilot experiments where Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida lusitaniae cells were subjected to single 100-250 μs electrical pulse of 800 V with and without concomitant delivery of magnetic pulse (3, 6 and 9 T). As expected, after the PEF pulses only the number of Propidium Iodide (PI) fluorescent cells has increased, indicative of membrane permeabilization. We further show that single sub-millisecond magnetic field pulse did not cause detectable poration of yeast. Concomitant exposure of cells to pulsed electric (PEF) and magnetic field (PMF) however resulted in the increased number PI fluorescent cells and reduced viability. Our results show increased membrane permeability by PEF when combined with magnetic field pulse, which can explain electroporation at considerably lower electric field strengths induced by PEMF compared to classical electroporation. PMID:27634482

  5. Clinical performance of a nanofilled resin composite with and without an intermediary layer of flowable composite: a 2-year evaluation.

    PubMed

    Stefanski, Sebastian; van Dijken, Jan W V

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical follow-up was to evaluate the 2-year clinical performance of a nanofilled resin composite in class II restorations. The restorations were made with and without intermediary layer of a nanofilled flowable resin composite studied in an intraindividual comparison. Each participant received at least two, as similar as possible, class II restorations of the nanofilled resin composite. One restoration of each pair (54) was chosen at random to be restored with an intermediary layer with flowable nanofilled resin composite. The other was restored without. The restorations were evaluated with slightly modified US Public Health Services criteria at baseline, 1, and 2 years. Ninety-two restorations, 46 pairs, were evaluated at 2 years. A prediction of the caries risk showed that 22 of the evaluated 48 patients were considered as high-risk patients. Two failures were observed, one in each group, resulting in a 2.2% failure rate. No statistical difference was seen between the restorations restored with and without layer of flowable resin composite. The nanofilled resin composite showed very good surface characteristics and color match, which did not change significantly during the follow-up period. The nanofilled resin composite showed a good clinical performance with a 2.2% failure rate after 2 years. No differences were observed between the restorations with and without the nanofilled flowable resin intermediary layer.

  6. Is Field a Hard Hat Area? A Study of Violence in Field Placements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tully, Carol T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 121 undergraduate and graduate social work students and 96 field instructors found that many students had experienced verbal and physical abuse and that most instructors had experienced verbal abuse and physical violence. Although students received some instruction on safety, practicum agencies often had no safety policies. Curriculum…

  7. Studies of exposure of rabbits to electromagnetic pulsed fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, S.F.; Nickless, F.; Liu, L.M.; Hoffman, R.

    1980-01-01

    Dutch rabbits were acutely exposed to electromagnetic pulsed (EMP) fields (pulse duration 0.4 mus, field strengths of 1--2 kV/cm and pulse repetition rates in the range of 10 to 38 Hz) for periods of up to two hours. The dependent variables investigated were pentobarbital-induced sleeping time and serum chemistry (including serum triglycerides, creatine phosphokinase (CPK) isoenzymes, and sodium and potassium). Core temperature measured immediately pre-exposure and postexposure revealed no exposure-related alterations. Over the range of field strengths and pulse durations investigated no consistent, statistically significant alterations were found in the end-points investigated.

  8. Study of Nonclassical Fields in Phase-Sensitive Reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung Shik; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    1996-01-01

    We show that the reservoir influence can be modeled by an infinite array of beam splitters. The superposition of the input fields in the beam splitter is discussed with the convolution laws for their quasiprobabilities. We derive the Fokker-Planck equation for the cavity field coupled with a phase-sensitive reservoir using the convolution law. We also analyze the amplification in the phase-sensitive reservoir with use of the modified beam splitter model. We show the similarities and differences between the dissipation and amplification models. We show that a super-Poissonian input field cannot become sub-Poissonian by the phase-sensitive amplification.

  9. Stimulated oxidation of metals (laser, electric field, etc.): Comparative studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nánai, László; Füle, Miklós

    2014-11-01

    In this report we demonstrate the importance of metal oxides, e.g. thin films and nanostructures, in modern science and technology. The basic laws of oxide thickness on base of diffusion of specimens versus time in different circumstances (Cabrera-Mott and Wagner laws) under the influence of external fields, e.g. electromagnetic field, static electric and magnetic field, are demonstrated. We give experimental results for various metal oxide layers over a wide range of different metals. Theoretical explanations are provided as well for the most reliable circumstances.

  10. 3-D seismic data for field development: Landslide field case study

    SciTech Connect

    Raeuchle, S.K.; Carr, T.R.; Tucker, R.D. )

    1990-05-01

    The Landslide field is located on the extreme southern flank of the San Joaquin basin, approximately 25 mi south of Bakersfield, California. The field, discovered in 1985, has produced in excess 9 million bbl of oil with an estimated ultimate recovery of more than 13 MMBO. The Miocene Stevens sands, which form the reservoir units at Landslide field, are interpreted as a series of constructional submarine fan deposits. Deposition of the fans was controlled by paleotopography with an abrupt updip pinch-out of the sands to the southwest. The three-dimensional seismic data over the field was used to locate the bottom hole of the landslide 22X-30 development well as close to this abrupt updip pinchout as possible in order to maximize oil recovery. A location was selected two traces (330 ft) from the updip pinch-out as mapped on the seismic data. The well was successfully drilled during 1989, encountering 150 ft of net sand with initial production in excess of 1,500 bbl of oil/day. A pressure buildup test indicates the presence of a boundary approximately 200 ft from the well bore. This boundary is interpreted as the updip pinchout of the Stevens sands against the paleohigh. Based on examination of changes in amplitude, the absence or presence of reservoir-quality sand can be mapped across the paleohighs. Application of three-dimensional seismic data, integration with well data, and in particular reconstruction cuts tied closely to existing wells can be used to map the ultimate extent of the field and contribute to efficient development.

  11. Field and Laboratory Studies of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggon, Matthew Mitchell

    This thesis is the culmination of field and laboratory studies aimed at assessing processes that affect the composition and distribution of atmospheric organic aerosol. An emphasis is placed on measurements conducted using compact and high-resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS). The first three chapters summarize results from aircraft campaigns designed to evaluate anthropogenic and biogenic impacts on marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of California. Subsequent chapters describe laboratory studies intended to evaluate gas and particle-phase mechanisms of organic aerosol oxidation. The 2013 Nucleation in California Experiment (NiCE) was a campaign designed to study environments impacted by nucleated and/or freshly formed aerosol particles. Terrestrial biogenic aerosol with > 85% organic mass was observed to reside in the free troposphere above marine stratocumulus. This biogenic organic aerosol (BOA) originated from the Northwestern United States and was transported to the marine atmosphere during periodic cloud-clearing events. Spectra recorded by a cloud condensation nuclei counter demonstrated that BOA is CCN active. BOA enhancements at latitudes north of San Francisco, CA coincided with enhanced cloud water concentrations of organic species such as acetate and formate. Airborne measurements conducted during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) were aimed at evaluating the contribution of ship emissions to the properties of marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of central California. In one study, analysis of organic aerosol mass spectra during periods of enhanced shipping activity yielded unique tracers indicative of cloud-processed ship emissions (m/z 42 and 99). The variation of their organic fraction (f42 and f 99) was found to coincide with periods of heavy (f 42 > 0.15; f99 > 0.04), moderate (0.05 < f42 < 0.15; 0.01 < f99 < 0.04), and negligible (f42 < 0.05; f99 < 0.01) ship influence. Application of

  12. Methodology for determining doses to in-field, out-of-field and partially in-field organs for late effects studies in photon radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Rebecca M.; Scarboro, Sarah B.; Taddei, Phillip J.; Krishnan, Sunil; Kry, Stephen F.; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2010-12-01

    An important but little examined aspect of radiation dosimetry studies involving organs outside the treatment field is how to assess dose to organs that are partially within a treatment field; this question is particularly important for studies intended to measure total absorbed dose in order to predict the risk of radiogenic late effects, such as second cancers. The purpose of this investigation was therefore to establish a method to categorize organs as in-field, out-of-field or partially in-field that would be applicable to both conventional and modern radiotherapy techniques. In this study, we defined guidelines to categorize the organs based on isodose inclusion criteria, developed methods to assess doses to partially in-field organs, and then tested the methods by applying them to a case of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma based on actual patient data. For partially in-field organs, we recommend performing a sensitivity test to determine whether potential inaccuracies in low-dose regions of the DVH (from the treatment planning system) have a substantial effect on the mean organ dose, i.e. >5%. In such cases, we suggest supplementing calculated DVH data with measured dosimetric data using a volume-weighting technique to determine the mean dose.

  13. Methodology for determining doses to in-field, out-of-field and partially in-field organs for late effects studies in photon radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Howell, Rebecca M; Scarboro, Sarah B; Taddei, Phillip J; Krishnan, Sunil; Kry, Stephen F; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-12-01

    An important but little examined aspect of radiation dosimetry studies involving organs outside the treatment field is how to assess dose to organs that are partially within a treatment field; this question is particularly important for studies intended to measure total absorbed dose in order to predict the risk of radiogenic late effects, such as second cancers. The purpose of this investigation was therefore to establish a method to categorize organs as in-field, out-of-field or partially in-field that would be applicable to both conventional and modern radiotherapy techniques. In this study, we defined guidelines to categorize the organs based on isodose inclusion criteria, developed methods to assess doses to partially in-field organs, and then tested the methods by applying them to a case of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma based on actual patient data. For partially in-field organs, we recommend performing a sensitivity test to determine whether potential inaccuracies in low-dose regions of the DVH (from the treatment planning system) have a substantial effect on the mean organ dose, i.e. >5%. In such cases, we suggest supplementing calculated DVH data with measured dosimetric data using a volume-weighting technique to determine the mean dose.

  14. Asymptomatic inhaled foreign body. A bullet in the lung for 2 years.

    PubMed

    Salim, Muhammad U; Asghar, Asif; Tareen, Irum; Azhar, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    It is very rare to have a big foreign body in the lungs without any complications or symptoms for 2 years. A 14-year-old male with episodes of minor hemoptysis for 4 weeks had a history of inhalation of a bullet 2 years earlier. He had asymptomatic for lung complications for 2 years. The bullet was removed by right thoracotomy and  non-anatomical wedge stapled resection, and he followed an uneventful recovery. An aspirated foreign body although big can remain asymptomatic for a long time, especially if it has migrated to the periphery. PMID:27652366

  15. Near-field scanning study for radio frequency interference estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jingnan

    This dissertation discusses the novel techniques using near-fields scanning to do radio frequency interference (RFI) estimation. As the electronic products are becoming more and more complicated, the radio frequency (RF) receiver in the system is very likely interfered by multiple noise sources simultaneously. A method is proposed to identify the interference from different noise sources separately, even when they are radiating at the same time. This method is very helpful for engineers to identify the contribution of the coupling from different sources and further solve the electromagnetic interference issues efficiently. On the other hand, the equivalent dipole-moment models and a decomposition method based on reciprocity theory can also be used together to estimate the coupling from the noise source to the victim antennas. This proposed method provides convenience to estimate RFI issues in the early design stage and saves the time of RFI simulation and measurements. The finite element method and image theory can also predict the far fields of the radiation source, locating above a ground plane. This method applies the finite element method (FEM) to get the equivalent current sources from the tangential magnetic near fields. With the equivalent current sources, the far-field radiation can be calculated based on Huygens's Principle and image theory. By using only the magnetic near fields on the simplified Huygens's surface, the proposed method significantly saves measurement time and cost while also retaining good far-field prediction.

  16. [Study on dewatering of activated sludge under applied electric field].

    PubMed

    Ji, Xue-Yuan; Wang, Yi-Li; Feng, Jing

    2012-12-01

    For an electro-dewatering process of activated sludge (AS), the effect of pH and conductivity of AS, flocculation conditioning and operation factors of horizontal electric field (voltage magnitude, method of applying electric field and distance between plates) were investigated, and the corresponding optimum electro-dewatering conditions were also obtained. The results showed that the best electro-dewatering effect was achieved for AS without change of its pH value (6.93) and conductivity (1.46 mS x cm(-1)). CPAM conditioning could lead to the increase of 30%-40% in the dewatering rate and accelerate the dewatering process, whereas a slight increase in the electro-dewatering rate. The electro-dewatering rate for conditioned AS reached 83.12% during an electric field applied period of 60 minutes, while this rate for original AS could be 75.31% even the electric field applied period extended to 120 minutes. The delay of applying the electric field had an inhibition effect on the AS electro-dewatering rate. Moreover, the optimum conditions for AS electro-dewatering were followed: CPAM dose of 9 g x kg(-1), electric field strength of 600 V x m(-1), distance between the two plates of 40 mm, dehydration time of 60 minutes. Under above optimum conditions the AS electro-dewatering rate could approach to 85.33% and the moisture content in AS decreased from 99.30% to 95.15% accordingly.

  17. Field Study of Napropamide Movement Through Unsaturated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, William A.; Elabd, Hesham; Resketo, Margaret

    1986-05-01

    A pulse of chloride and napropamide, a moderately absorbed herbicide, was applied to a 1.44-ha loamy sand field and was leached for 2 weeks with 23 cm net applied water. Thirty-six soil cores were taken on a 6 × 6 grid with a 12-m spacing to a depth of 3 m and were analyzed in 0.1-m increments for chloride concentration. Nineteen of the cores were also analyzed for napropamide concentration. Prior to the field leaching experiment, 36 undisturbed soil columns taken on a 6 × 6 grid l m adjacent to the field samples were removed and taken to the laboratory for controlled leaching experiments. Subsamples of soil at each site were used to determine adsorption distribution coefficients by the batch equilibrium method. Distribution coefficients were also calculated from the column leaching experiments by fitting the chloride and napropamide breakthrough curves to the solution of the convection dispersion equation. Although these two methods produced similar field average absorption coefficient values and variances, they were uncorrelated. Both the field cores and the laboratory leaching experiments showed evidence of some napropamide movement without apparent adsorption. This was particularly evident in the field experiments, where 73% of the chemical was found above 10 cm but trace concentrations reached depths down to 180 cm.

  18. Low-field Tails in EuBCO Vortex Field Distributions: a T-dependence muSR Study*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Y.; Ruiz, E. J.; Aslanian, H. H.; Santiago, R. D.; Li, Y.; Boekema, C.

    2002-03-01

    Muon-Spin-Rotation (muSR) vortex data ranging from 3.5 K to roomtemperature of EuBa2Cu3O7 have been analyzed using a Maximum-Entropy (ME) technique [1-3]. With a 1-kOe applied field, anomalous low-field tails [1, 4] stretching from about 0.5 kOe to 0.8 kOe are observed for magnetic field distributions below 40 K. The muSR time-histogram data are weighted with a Gaussian filter. The low-field tail in the vortex field distribution is best viewed within a filter-time interval, determined to lie between 0.73 and 0.95 microseconds. As temperature decreases, an increase in the low-field tail intensity is observed. We note, the presence of the low-field tail indicates that extra superconductivity could exist in the CuO-chain layers well below critical temperature. Currently, we are studying the temperature dependence of the low-field tail by fitting the ME transforms with a tail function and two Gaussians (representing the main vortex and grainboundary signals [1]). Fit-analysis results and comparison with YBCO vortex-tail behavior [1, 2] are reported. [1] Santiago et al, Phys Rev B63 132509 (2001); [2] Alves et al, Phys Rev B49 12396 (1994); [3] Cooke et al, Phys Rev B39 2748 (1989); [4] Aslanian et al, Physica C364-365 582 (2001).

  19. Human habitation field study of the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaker, Harry L.; Archer, Ronald D.; Szabo, Richard; Twyford, Evan S.; Conlee, Carl S.; Howard, Robert L.

    2013-10-01

    Landing and supporting a permanent outpost on a planetary surface represents humankind's capability to expand its own horizons and challenge current technology. With this in mind, habitability of these structures becomes more essential given the longer durations of the missions. The purpose of this evaluation was to obtain preliminary human-in-the-loop performance data on the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) in a Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) configuration during a 14-day simulated lunar exploration field trial and to apply this knowledge to further enhance the habitat's capabilities for forward designs. Human factors engineers at the NASA/Johnson Space Center's Habitability and Human Factors Branch recorded approximately 96 h of crew task performance with four work stations. Human factors measures used during this study included the NASA Task Load Index (TLX) and customized post questionnaires. Overall the volume for the PEM was considered acceptable by the crew; however; the habitat's individual work station volume was constrained when setting up the vehicle for operation, medical operations, and suit maintenance while general maintenance, logistical resupply, and geo science was considered acceptable. Crew workload for each station indicated resupply as being the lowest rated, with medical operations, general maintenance, and geo science tasks as being light, while suit maintenance was considered moderate and general vehicle setup being rated the highest. Stowage was an issue around the habitat with the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV) resupply stowage located in the center of the habitat as interfering with some work station volumes and activities. Ergonomics of the geo science station was considered a major issue, especially with the overhead touch screens.

  20. Environmental Controls on Hopanoid Distributions: Field and Culture Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H. L.; Freeman, K. H.; Macalady, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Hopanoid biomarkers play an important role in reconstructions of the earth's past biogeochemistry and evolution. Despite their excellent preservation potential and utility for microbial paleontology, relatively little of the earth's modern microbial biosphere has been explored with respect to hopanoid production. Due to the fact that hopanoids are used by bacteria to tune the physical properties of their cell membranes, geochemical gradients in nature may be associated with systematic changes in hopanoid diversity and abundances. Bacteriohopanpolyols (BHPs) are produced by both sulfur-oxidizing and sulfur-reducing bacteria. We hypothesize that BHPs are important for microbial adaptation to pH and sulfide concentrations in sulfur-oxidizing microbial communities. We investigated this hypothesis using both pure laboratory cultures and with samples of natural biofilms collected across oxygen and sulfide concentration gradients in the field. Samples were collected from the sulfidic Frasassi cave system, Italy, where the geomicrobiology of abundant sulfur cycling biofilms has previously been studied in detail (Macalady et al. 2007, Macalady et al. 2008). Culturing experiments were performed with two sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, an Acidithiobacillus sp. isolated from extremely acidic (pH 0-1) snotittes, and Beggiatoa alba, a neutrophilic sulfur oxidizer with close relatives in the Frasassi biofilms. Cultures were grown at range of pH and sulfide concentrations, harvested, freeze-dried and analyzed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (APCI- LC/MS). We observed six different BHPs for the Acidithiobacillus sp. including one novel structure. Acidithiobacillus BHPs change in response to changes in the pH of the growth medium, becoming more polar and more abundant at lower pH. These observations are consistent with the production of less fluid, more polar membranes to counteract proton leakage into cells as pH decreases. Macalady, J

  1. A field study of littoral processes in Estero Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dingler, J.R.; Anima, R.J.; Molzan, D.E.; Luepke, Gretchen; Peterson, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    Estero Bay, which lies on the central California coast, has rocky headlands at both ends and sandy beaches within it. The shoreline of the bay has adjusted to be in equilibrium with the predominant wave climate, which is from the northwest. Because of its present shoreline configuration, the net southward littoral transport found along much of the California coast does not occur within Estero Bay. Instead, the sand primarily moves on- and offshore with a reversing longshore component. This sand transport pattern produces a littoral cell within Estero Bay even though there is no submarine canyon in the area. The primary sand sinks for this cell appear to be the sand spit south of Morro Rock and the entrance to Morro Bay itself, although this opinion was not experimentally verified. Field work during one summer (1978) and the following winter (1979) produced baseline data on the profile of and grain-size distribution across the littoral zone. In the offshore part of the littoral zone we also studied ripple size and type, internal structure, depth of erosion, and mineralogy. Although these data, which were collected along nine transects spaced 2 km apart, are inadequate to yield transport and energy rates, they indicate a northward decrease in wave energy within Estero Bay and a mixing of the sediments in the offshore. Box core and rod height data from grid points in seven meters of water showed that on the order of a meter of erosion occurred in the central part of the bay between the two sampling periods. Offshore, the data were incomplete, but at one station, in 17 m of water, at least 20 cm of erosion occurred.

  2. Fundamental study of flow field generated by rotorcraft blades using wide-field shadowgraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The vortex trajectory and vortex wake generated by helicopter rotors are visualized using a wide-field shadowgraph technique. Use of a retro-reflective Scotchlite screen makes it possible to investigate the flow field generated by full-scale rotors. Tip vortex trajectories are visible in shadowgraphs for a range of tip Mach number of 0.38 to 0.60. The effect of the angle of attack is substantial. At an angle of attack greater than 8 degrees, the visibility of the vortex core is significant even at relatively low tip Mach numbers. The theoretical analysis of the sensitivity is carried out for a rotating blade. This analysis demonstrates that the sensitivity decreases with increasing dimensionless core radius and increases with increasing tip Mach number. The threshold value of the sensitivity is found to be 0.0015, below which the vortex core is not visible and above which it is visible. The effect of the optical path length is also discussed. Based on this investigation, it is concluded that the application of this wide-field shadowgraph technique to a large wind tunnel test should be feasible. In addition, two simultaneous shadowgraph views would allow three-dimensional reconstruction of vortex trajectories.

  3. Association between energy-dense food consumption at 2 years of age and diet quality at 4 years of age.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Sofia; Oliveira, Andreia; Ramos, Elisabete; Moreira, Pedro; Barros, Henrique; Lopes, Carla

    2014-04-14

    The present study aimed to evaluate the association between the consumption of energy-dense foods at 2 years of age and the consumption of foods and diet quality at 4 years of age. The sample included 705 children evaluated at 2 and 4 years of age, as part of the population-based birth cohort Generation XXI (Porto, Portugal). Data on sociodemographic and lifestyle factors of both children and mothers were collected by face-to-face interviews. The weight and height of children were measured by trained professionals. Based on FFQ, four energy-dense food groups were defined: soft drinks; sweets; cakes; salty snacks. A healthy eating index was developed using the WHO dietary recommendations for children (2006) aged 4 years. The associations were evaluated through Poisson regression models. After adjustment for maternal age and education, child's carer, child's siblings and child's BMI, higher consumption of energy-dense foods at 2 years of age was found to be associated with higher consumption of the same foods 2 years later. An inverse association was found between the intake (≥ median) of soft drinks (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 0.74, 95% CI 0.58, 0.95), salty snacks (IRR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.65, 1.00) and sweets (IRR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.58, 0.91) at 2 years of age and the consumption of fruit and vegetables at 4 years of age (≥ 5 times/d). Weekly and daily consumption of energy-dense foods at 2 years of age was associated with a lower healthy eating score at 4 years of age (IRR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.58, 0.96; IRR = 0.56, 95% CI 0.41, 0.77, respectively). The consumption of energy-dense foods at young ages is negatively associated with the diet quality of children a few years later.

  4. Studies of Westward Electrojets and Field-Aligned Currents in the Magnetotail during Substorms: Implications for Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Our studies elucidated the relationship between the auroral arcs and magnetotail phenomena. One paper examined particle energization in the source region of the field-aligned currents that intensify at substorm onset when the arc brightens to form the westward electrojet. A second paper examined the relationship between the precipitating particles in the arcs, the location of the westward electrojet, and magnetospheric source regions. Two earlier papers also investigated the roles that field aligned currents and particle acceleration have during substorms.

  5. Effects of cognitive rehabilitation training on schizophrenia: 2 years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jianqing; Zeng, Qiang; Liang, Jia; Zhou, Aihua; Yin, Xuebing; Xu, Ai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Schizophrenia is a mental disorder and characterized by abnormal social behavior and failure to recognize what is real. The current study was to explore the long-term effects of cognitive rehabilitation training on schizophrenia. Methods: Eighty six cases of hospitalized patients with schizophrenia were randomly divided into study group and control group. The relapse and employment (attending school) rates were used as indicators to assess the treatment effect. All patients were followed up by 2 years. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was conducted with relapse and employment (attending school) rates. Results: The rates of relapse in the study group and the control group were 18% and 41%, and relapse free survival time was 22.22 months and 18.55 months; the rates of employment (attending school) were 64% and 43%, and not employment (attending school) time were 10.68 months and 15.74 months, respectively. There was significant difference between the two groups (P<0.05). Conclusions: We found that the cognitive rehabilitation training could significantly reduce schizophrenic relapse rate, prolong the time of patients without relapse, improve the employment (attending school) rate, and shorten the discharged time, which is a powerful treatment method to improve social competence in schizophrenia patients. PMID:26629117

  6. Risk factors for suspected developmental delay at age 2 years in a Brazilian birth cohort.

    PubMed

    de Moura, Danilo R; Costa, Jaderson C; Santos, Iná S; Barros, Aluísio J D; Matijasevich, Alicia; Halpern, Ricardo; Dumith, Samuel; Karam, Simone; Barros, Fernando C

    2010-05-01

    Many children are at risk of not achieving their full potential for development. Epidemiological studies have the advantage of being able to identify a number of associated factors potentially amenable to intervention. Our purpose was to identify risk factors for suspected developmental delay (SDD) at age 2 years among all children born in the city of Pelotas, Brazil, in 2004. This study was part of the 2004 Pelotas Birth Cohort. The Battelle Screening Developmental Inventory (BSDI) was administered to cohort children at age 2 years. A hierarchical model of determination for SDD with confounder adjustment was built including maternal sociodemographic, reproductive and gestational characteristics, as well as child and environmental characteristics. Multivariable analysis was carried out using Poisson regression. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals [95% CI] were calculated. In the results, 3.3% of the 3869 children studied screened positive for SDD. After confounder control, children more likely to show SDD were: those with positive BSDI at age 12 months (PR = 5.51 [3.59, 8.47]); with 5-min Apgar <7 (PR = 3.52 [1.70, 7.27]); with mothers who had <4 years of schooling (PR = 3.35 [1.98, 5.66]); from social classes D and E (PR = 3.00 [1.45, 6.19]); with a history of gestational diabetes (PR = 2.77 [1.34, 5.75]); born <24 months after the last sibling (PR = 2.46 [1.42, 4.27]); were not told child stories in the preceding week (PR 2.28 [1.43, 3.63]); did not have children's literature at home (PR = 2.08 [1.27, 3.39]); with low birthweight (PR = 1.75 [1.00, 3.07]); were born preterm (PR = 1.74 [1.07, 2.81]); with <6 antenatal care appointments (PR = 1.70 [1.07, 2.68]); with history of hospitalisation (PR = 1.65 [1.09, 2.50]); and of male sex (PR = 1.43 [1.00, 2.04]). These risk factors may constitute potential targets for intervention by public policies and may provide help to paediatricians in preventing developmental delay.

  7. Treatment of a Circadian Rhythm Disturbance in a 2-Year-Old Blind Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mindell, J. A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The use of sleep scheduling and a daytime routine for the treatment of circadian rhythm disorder was found helpful in decreasing a blind 2-year old's nighttime wake periods and daytime sleepiness. (DB)

  8. Magnetic field studies at jupiter by voyager 1: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuna, M H; Lepping, R P; Burlaga, L F; Behannon, K W; Neubauer, F M

    1979-06-01

    Results obtained by the Goddard Space Flight Center magnetometers on Voyager 1 are described. These results concern the large-scale configuration of the Jovian bow shock and magnetopause, and the magnetic field in both the inner and outer magnetosphere. There is evidence that a magnetic tail extending away from the planet on the nightside is formed by the solar wind-Jovian field interaction. This is much like Earth's magnetosphere but is a new configuration for Jupiter's magnetosphere not previously considered from earlier Pioneer data. We report on the analysis and interpretation of magnetic field perturbations associated with intense electrical currents (approximately 5 x 10(6) amperes) flowing near or in the magnetic flux tube linking Jupiter with the satellite Jo and induced by the relative motion between Io and the corotating Jovian magnetosphere. These currents may be an important source of heating the ionosphere and interior of Io through Joule dissipation.

  9. Magnetic field studies at Jupiter by Voyager 1 - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Lepping, R. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1979-01-01

    Results obtained by the Goddard Space Flight Center magnetometers on Voyager 1 are described. These results concern the large-scale configuration of the Jovian bow shock and magnetopause, and the magnetic field in both the inner and outer magnetosphere. There is evidence that a magnetic tail extending away from the planet on the nightside is formed by the solar wind-Jovian field interaction. This is much like earth's magnetosphere but is a new configuration for Jupiter's magnetosphere not previously considered from earlier Pioneer data. The analysis and interpretation of magnetic field perturbations associated with intense electrical currents (approximately 5 million amperes) flowing near or in the magnetic flux tube linking Jupiter with the satellite Io and induced by the relative motion between Io and the corotating Jovian magnetosphere are reported. These currents may be an important source of heating the ionosphere and interior of Io through Joule dissipation.

  10. Numerical study of a ramjet dump combustor flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Increased interest in ramjet propulsion systems with higher performance requirements and tighter constraints on system size and weight has lead to the need for improved techniques for analyzing and designing such systems. A computer program has been developed to analyze the turbulent reacting flow field in a ramjet dump combustor configuration. The program solves the axisymmetric Navier-Stokes and species equations throughout the engine diffuser and combustor providing a unified analysis of the complete engine flow field, including flow separation, fuel-air mixing, and preliminary results with chemical reaction. Details of the program development are given, along with a comparison of program results with data from a dump combustor simulation experiment, to allow assessment of the flow field modeling that is employed.

  11. The School for Field Studies Centre for Coastal Studies: A Case Study of Sustainable Development Education in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, T. A.; Ollervides, F.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To present the School for Field Studies-Centre for Coastal Studies (SFS-CCS) study abroad Mexico program, and consider its relative success as a sustainable development education program. Design/methodology/approach: The SFS-CCS academic model and results of its implementation are presented. Program success is discussed by applying…

  12. Study of HTS Wires at High Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Turrioni, D.; Barzi, E.; Lamm, M.J.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; Kikuchi, A.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Fermilab is working on the development of high field magnet systems for ionization cooling of muon beams. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials is being considered for these magnets using Helium refrigeration. Critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of HTS conductors were performed at FNAL and at NIMS up to 28 T under magnetic fields at zero to 90 degree with respect to the sample face. A description of the test setups and results on a BSCCO-2223 tape and second generation (2G) coated conductors are presented.

  13. Gravitational field models for study of Earth mantle dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The tectonic forces or stresses due to the small scale mantle flow under the South American plate are detected and determined by utilizing the harmonics of the geopotential field model. The high degree harmonics are assumed to describe the small scale mantle convection patterns. The input data used in the derivation of this model is made up of 840,000 optical, electronic, and laser observations and 1,656 5 deg x 5 deg mean free air anomalies. Although there remain some statistically questionable aspects of the high degree harmonics, it seems appropriate now to explore their implications for the tectonic forces or stress field under the crust.

  14. Field and Laboratory Studies of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggon, Matthew Mitchell

    This thesis is the culmination of field and laboratory studies aimed at assessing processes that affect the composition and distribution of atmospheric organic aerosol. An emphasis is placed on measurements conducted using compact and high-resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS). The first three chapters summarize results from aircraft campaigns designed to evaluate anthropogenic and biogenic impacts on marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of California. Subsequent chapters describe laboratory studies intended to evaluate gas and particle-phase mechanisms of organic aerosol oxidation. The 2013 Nucleation in California Experiment (NiCE) was a campaign designed to study environments impacted by nucleated and/or freshly formed aerosol particles. Terrestrial biogenic aerosol with > 85% organic mass was observed to reside in the free troposphere above marine stratocumulus. This biogenic organic aerosol (BOA) originated from the Northwestern United States and was transported to the marine atmosphere during periodic cloud-clearing events. Spectra recorded by a cloud condensation nuclei counter demonstrated that BOA is CCN active. BOA enhancements at latitudes north of San Francisco, CA coincided with enhanced cloud water concentrations of organic species such as acetate and formate. Airborne measurements conducted during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) were aimed at evaluating the contribution of ship emissions to the properties of marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of central California. In one study, analysis of organic aerosol mass spectra during periods of enhanced shipping activity yielded unique tracers indicative of cloud-processed ship emissions (m/z 42 and 99). The variation of their organic fraction (f42 and f 99) was found to coincide with periods of heavy (f 42 > 0.15; f99 > 0.04), moderate (0.05 < f42 < 0.15; 0.01 < f99 < 0.04), and negligible (f42 < 0.05; f99 < 0.01) ship influence. Application of

  15. Preliminary field trash studies using near-infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is a cash crop that is important in the world market. Development of instrumental techniques to measure cotton quality parameters which are accurate, precise, and fast would be beneficial. Cotton trash (leaf, etc.) and field trash (plastic bags, etc.) comingled with lint adversely affects th...

  16. Field Studies of Wasmannia auropunctata Alkylpyrazines: Towards Management Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field bioassays with Wasmannia auropunctata (Roger) show that the alarm pheromone components 2,5-dimethyl-3-(2-methylbutyl)pyrazine and 3-methyl-2-(2-methylbutyl)pyrazine both attract and arrest ants in a natural environment. Comparisons between lures containing 2,5-dimethyl- 3-(2-methylbutyl)pyrazi...

  17. Star field attitude sensor study for the Pioneer Venus spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolf, W. P.; Reed, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of a star field attitude sensor for use with the Pioneer Venus spacecraft are presented. The aspects of technical feasibility, system interface considerations, and cost of flight hardware development are discussed. The tradeoffs which relate to performance, design, cost, and reliability are analyzed. The configuration of the system for installation in the spacecraft is described.

  18. Field Study for Remote Sensing: An instructor's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wake, W. H. (Editor); Hull, G. A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The need for and value of field work (surface truthing) in the verification of image identification from high atitude infrared and multispectral space sensor images are discussed in this handbook which presents guidelines for developing instructional and research procedures in remote sensing of the environment.

  19. Sampling atmospheric pesticides with SPME: Laboratory developments and field study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junxia; Tuduri, Ludovic; Mercury, Maud; Millet, Maurice; Briand, Olivier; Montury, Michel

    2009-02-01

    To estimate the atmospheric exposure of the greenhouse workers to pesticides, solid phase microextraction (SPME) was used under non-equilibrium conditions. Using Fick's law of diffusion, the concentrations of pesticides in the greenhouse can be calculated using pre-determined sampling rates (SRs). Thus the sampling rates (SRs) of two modes of SPME in the lab and in the field were determined and compared. The SRs for six pesticides in the lab were 20.4-48.3 mL min(-1) for the exposed fiber and 0.166-0.929 mL min(-1) for the retracted fiber. In field sampling, two pesticides, dichlorvos and cyprodinil were detected with exposed SPME. SR with exposed SPME for dichlorvos in the field (32.4 mL min(-1)) was consistent with that in the lab (34.5 mL min(-1)). SR for dichlorvos in the field (32.4 mL min(-1)) was consistent with that in the lab (34.5 mL min(-1)). The trends of temporal concentration and the inhalation exposure were also obtained.

  20. Laboratory and field studies of guayule modified to overexpress HMGR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the genetic modification of guayule to overexpress the isoprenoid pathway enzyme HMGR. The rubber content of two-month old in vitro transformed plantlets showed a 65% increase in rubber over the control for one line (HMGR6), and lower resin for another (HMGR2). In field evaluations HMGR6...

  1. Field Studies: Hands-on, Real-Science Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunniff, Patricia A.; McMillen, Janet L.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an intensive three-week experience for 10th and 11th graders in a National Science Foundation Young Scholars Program. Two weeks of biology instruction precede one week of field research. The curriculum includes life histories of birds in the Chesapeake Bay area, reproductive ecology, aquatic ecology, entomology, and statistics. (DDR)

  2. RECRUITMENT AND FIELD SAMPLING IN THE CTEPP NORTH CAROLINA AND OHIO FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recruiting study participants is always a challenge for researchers. It is more of a challenge when researchers have to recruit participants for a study involving intrusive, burdensome data collection activities. In this presentation, we describe our recruitment strategies and ...

  3. An ontological study of quantum fields and their symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, David John

    This dissertation interprets the formalism of quantum field theory (QFT) to help determine which physical properties are fundamental in worlds with natural laws like ours. I begin by arguing briefly that good metaphysical evidence can be drawn from mathematically rigorous forms of QFT. Although these rigorous QFTs are presently limited in their domain of applicability, insofar as our world resembles that domain we should expect these theories to be approximately true. Chapter Two addresses the most central question about the fundamental ontology of QFT: is it a theory of fields or of particles? Any theory describes reality in terms of some basic constituents. Historically, philosophers have assumed these to be either point particles (following Locke and the atomists) or continuous fields (following Descartes). Recent philosophical arguments suggest that the most basic ontology of QFT cannot consist of particles; it is commonly supposed that it must therefore consist of fields (Halvorson and Clifton, 2001; Malament, 1996). To the contrary, I show that two of the most persuasive arguments against particles are also arguments against the most widely advocated form of field interpretation. First, the configuration of fields, like the number of particles, cannot generally be carried over between different inequivalent representations of QFT. Since the differences between some representations encode only perspectival information about the observer, it follows that QFT states possess no objective field content. Second, arguments which rule out the possibility of particle states in interacting QFT also rule out the standard way of representing states as field configurations. So what is the most basic ontology of QFT? Chapter Three examines a possible answer, according to which fundamental reality is made up of properties, called quasi-local observables, which can be measured in regions of space and do not depend on our choice of representation. This third way has the

  4. Prevalence and comorbidity of eating disorders among a community sample of adolescents: 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Moreno, Luis; Arribas, Pilar; Plumed, Javier; Gimeno, Natalia; García-Blanco, Ana; Vaz-Leal, Francisco; Luisa Vila, María; Livianos, Lorenzo

    2015-05-30

    The previous literature about comorbidity between eating disorders (ED) and other DSM-IV psychiatric disorders in adolescence has employed cross-sectional studies with clinical samples, where the comorbid disorders were diagnosed retrospectively. The present study aims to overcome these limitations by the analysis of comorbidity in a community population during 2-year follow-up. A semi-structured interview was applied to a teenager sample. Firstly, a cross-sectional and non-randomized study on psychiatric morbidity was conducted with 993 teenagers between the ages of 12 and 16 from five schools. Secondly, 326 students between 14 and 17 years old of one school were reassessed 2 years later in order to detect ED new cases and find associations with previous psychiatric disorders. The ED prevalence was 3.6%. Cross-sectional analysis revealed that 62.9% of individuals with an ED had comorbid disorders: anxiety disorders (51.4%), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (31.4%), oppositional defiant disorder (11.4%), and obsessive compulsive disorder (8.6%). Prospective longitudinal analysis showed an ED incidence rate of 2.76% over the course of 2 years. 22.2% of new cases had received previous psychiatric diagnoses, of which all were anxiety disorders. Thus, ED exhibited a high comorbidity rate among adolescent populations and anxiety disorders were the most common comorbid diagnosis.

  5. Oxidative degradation in highly cross-linked and conventional polyethylene after 2 years of real-time shelf aging.

    PubMed

    Willie, Bettina M; Bloebaum, Roy D; Ashrafi, Shadi; Dearden, Colette; Steffensen, Trina; Hofmann, Aaron A

    2006-04-01

    Previous studies have reported oxidative degradation of conventional polyethylene (PE) components during shelf aging, following radiation. However, no studies have yet reported data concerning the effect of real-time shelf aging in the manufacturer's packaging on the oxidative degradation of commercially available highly cross-linking PE components. The null hypothesis tested was that in either highly cross-linked or conventional PE acetabular components there would be no significant difference in the amount of oxidative degradation between time zero PE liners and PE liners that had been real-time shelf aged for 2 years in their respective packaging. The results of the study indicated that after 2 years of real-time shelf aging, negligible oxidative degradation occurred with minimal changes in oxidation index, density, and percent crystallinity in commercially available highly cross-linked and conventional PE acetabular liners. These data suggested that oxidative degradation was not a clinical issue in the highly cross-linked and conventional PE components examined after 2 years of real-time shelf aging. It is likely that current manufacturing and packaging technologies have limited the previous clinical concerns related to oxidative degradation during shelf aging of highly cross-linked and conventional PE components.

  6. Prevalence and comorbidity of eating disorders among a community sample of adolescents: 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Moreno, Luis; Arribas, Pilar; Plumed, Javier; Gimeno, Natalia; García-Blanco, Ana; Vaz-Leal, Francisco; Luisa Vila, María; Livianos, Lorenzo

    2015-05-30

    The previous literature about comorbidity between eating disorders (ED) and other DSM-IV psychiatric disorders in adolescence has employed cross-sectional studies with clinical samples, where the comorbid disorders were diagnosed retrospectively. The present study aims to overcome these limitations by the analysis of comorbidity in a community population during 2-year follow-up. A semi-structured interview was applied to a teenager sample. Firstly, a cross-sectional and non-randomized study on psychiatric morbidity was conducted with 993 teenagers between the ages of 12 and 16 from five schools. Secondly, 326 students between 14 and 17 years old of one school were reassessed 2 years later in order to detect ED new cases and find associations with previous psychiatric disorders. The ED prevalence was 3.6%. Cross-sectional analysis revealed that 62.9% of individuals with an ED had comorbid disorders: anxiety disorders (51.4%), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (31.4%), oppositional defiant disorder (11.4%), and obsessive compulsive disorder (8.6%). Prospective longitudinal analysis showed an ED incidence rate of 2.76% over the course of 2 years. 22.2% of new cases had received previous psychiatric diagnoses, of which all were anxiety disorders. Thus, ED exhibited a high comorbidity rate among adolescent populations and anxiety disorders were the most common comorbid diagnosis. PMID:25771751

  7. A field study of solid rocket exhaust impacts on the near-field environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Keller, Vernon W.

    1990-01-01

    Large solid rocket motors release large quantities of hydrogen chloride and aluminum oxide exhaust during launch and testing. Measurements and analysis of the interaction of this material with the deluge water spray and other environmental factors in the near field (within 1 km of the launch or test site) are summarized. Measurements of mixed solid and liquid deposition (typically 2 normal HCl) following space shuttle launches and 6.4 percent scale model tests are described. Hydrogen chloride gas concentrations measured in the hours after the launch of STS 41D and STS 51A are reported. Concentrations of 9 ppm, which are above the 5 ppm exposure limits for workers, were detected an hour after STS 51A. A simplified model which explains the primary features of the gas concentration profiles is included.

  8. The Relationship between Life Goals and Fields of Study among Young European Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Aracil, Adela; Gabaldon, Daniel; Mora, Jose-Gines; Vila, Luis E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the relationships among life goals, job prospects and fields of study for a sample of young European higher education graduates. The results show that there is a characteristic pattern for each field of study with regard to the variables used. Graduates in a given field have similar life goals and job prospects, as well as a…

  9. 34 CFR 650.36 - May fellows make changes in institution or field of study?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May fellows make changes in institution or field of... What Conditions Must be Met By Fellows? § 650.36 May fellows make changes in institution or field of study? After an award is made, a fellow may not make any change in the field of study or...

  10. 34 CFR 650.36 - May fellows make changes in institution or field of study?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May fellows make changes in institution or field of... What Conditions Must be Met By Fellows? § 650.36 May fellows make changes in institution or field of study? After an award is made, a fellow may not make any change in the field of study or...

  11. Magnetic field studies at Jupiter by Voyager 2 - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Lepping, R. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1979-01-01

    The Voyager 2 magnetic field experiment, for which the instrumentation is identical to that on Voyager 1, operated flawlessly throughout the second Jupiter encounter. The paper presents a brief overview of the results obtained to date on the Jovian magnetosphere, the bow shock, the magnetopause, and the extended magnetic tail. The results and the magnetic field geometry confirm the earlier conclusion from Voyager 1 that Jupiter has an enormous magnetic tail, approximately 300-400 Jupiter radii in diameter, trailing behind the planet with respect to the supersonic flow of the solar wind. Additional observations of the distortion of the inner magnetosphere by a concentrated plasma show a spatial merging of the equatorial magnetodisk current with the current sheet in the magnetic tail. Disturbances near Ganymede are discussed.

  12. Numerical study of scramjet and ramjet flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Drummond, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Two computer programs have been developed to numerically calculate complex, two-dimensional flow fields in scramjets. The first program is written for inlet analysis whereas the second program is written primarily for combustor analysis. Both programs solve the full two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations by a well-known explicit, predictor-corrector technique. Turbulence is modeled by an algebraic eddy-viscosity model. The combustor program also includes one or more species conservation equations to calculate mixing and reacting flows. The hydrogen/air chemistry in this program is modeled by a complete reaction model. The combustor program has been recently modified to analyze axisymmetric ramjet dump combustor flow field. Results from these computer programs are presented that predict the flow in several scramjet inlet configurations, two model scramjet engine configurations, and in a dump combustor simulator. Computed results are also compared with available experimental data to allow assessment of the programs.

  13. PCB biodegradation: Laboratory studies transitioned into the field

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowicz, D.A.

    1993-12-31

    Two distinct bacterial systems are known to be involved in PCB biotransformations. Both aerobic PCB biodegradation (Oxidative attack) and anaerobic PCB dechlorination (reductive attack) have been demonstrated in the laboratory. These results have been successfully reproducted in recent experiments performed in aquatic sediments. In 1991, GE performed a large scale test of in situ aerobic PCB biodegradation in the Upper Hudson River. The experiments involved six sealed caissons (six feet in diameter) lowered into Aroclor 1242 contaminated sediments that had already undergone extensive anaerobic PCB dechlorination. Stimulation of indigenous PCB-degrading microorganisms resulted in >50% biodegradation over 10 weeks. A large scale stimulation of in situ anaerobic PCB dechlorination in Housatonic River sediments contaminated with untransformed Aroclor 1260 was initiated in 1992. The experiments similarly involve six sealed caissons (six feet in diameter) lowered into contaminated sediments to investigate new methods developed to accelerate PCB dechlorination in the field. Preliminary results from this ongoing field test will be discussed.

  14. Development geology study of Weber sandstone, Rangely field, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, W.D.; Bowker, K.

    1989-09-01

    The Pennsylvanian-Permian Weber Sandstone formation is the major producing horizon at the giant Rangely field, Rio Blanco County, Colorado. The Weber has been separated into six lithofacies using core descriptions, core analyses, optical and scanning-electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and special-core analyses. Two of the lithofacies (eolian) are productive. The subarkosic laminated sandstones (which have the best reservoir quality) have an average Boyle's Law porosity of 9.7%. Permeability varies directionally on a small scale because of differential cementation within the graded laminae; the very fine-grained portion of the laminae is more tightly cemented by carbonate minerals than are the fine-grained portions. Permeability along the laminae averages 1.2 md; permeability across the laminae is less than 1 md. The second productive lithofacies is massive (bioturbated) and more thoroughly cemented than the first; it is also composed of fine and very fine-grained sandstones. These massive subarkosic sandstones have an average porosity of 7% and permeability averaging less than 1 md. Fractures alter permeability in portions of the field. The remaining four lithofacies (fluvial) are not productive and act as intraformational permeability barriers. Arkosic sandstones, arkosic siltstones, shales, and rare carbonates comprise this group. The relationship of the lithofacies to the depositional environment and the recognition of them on electric logs has allowed correlations across the field. This has proven an important contribution to the management of the current CO{sub 2} flood.

  15. Antiferromagnetic and topological states in silicene: A mean field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Yao, Yu-Gui

    2015-08-01

    It has been widely accepted that silicene is a topological insulator, and its gap closes first and then opens again with increasing electric field, which indicates a topological phase transition from the quantum spin Hall state to the band insulator state. However, due to the relatively large atomic spacing of silicene, which reduces the bandwidth, the electron-electron interaction in this system is considerably strong and cannot be ignored. The Hubbard interaction, intrinsic spin orbital coupling (SOC), and electric field are taken into consideration in our tight-binding model, with which the phase diagram of silicene is carefully investigated on the mean field level. We have found that when the magnitudes of the two mass terms produced by the Hubbard interaction and electric potential are close to each other, the intrinsic SOC flips the sign of the mass term at either K or K‧ for one spin and leads to the emergence of the spin-polarized quantum anomalous Hall state. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014CB920903, 2013CB921903, 2011CBA00108, and 2012CB937500), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11021262, 11172303, 11404022, 11225418, and 11174337), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20121101110046), the Excellent Young Scholars Research Fund of Beijing Institute of Technology (Grant No. 2014CX04028), and the Basic Research Funds of Beijing Institute of Technology (Grant No. 20141842001).

  16. Thermodynamic Study on Plasma Expansion along a Divergent Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties are revisited for electrons that are governed by nonlocal electron energy probability functions in a plasma of low collisionality. Measurements in a laboratory helicon double layer experiment have shown that the effective electron temperature and density show a polytropic correlation with an index of γe=1.17 ±0.02 along the divergent magnetic field, implying a nearly isothermal plasma (γe=1 ) with heat being brought into the system. However, the evolution of electrons along the divergent magnetic field is essentially an adiabatic process, which should have a γe=5/3 . The reason for this apparent contradiction is that the nearly collisionless plasma is very far from local thermodynamic equilibrium and the electrons behave nonlocally. The corresponding effective electron enthalpy has a conservation relation with the potential energy, which verifies that there is no heat transferred into the system during the electron evolution. The electrons are shown in nonlocal momentum equilibrium under the electric field and the gradient of the effective electron pressure. The convective momentum of ions, which can be assumed as a cold species, is determined by the effective electron pressure and the effective electron enthalpy is shown to be the source for ion acceleration. For these nearly collisionless plasmas, the use of traditional thermodynamic concepts can lead to very erroneous conclusions regarding the thermal conductivity.

  17. Paleomagnetic Study of a Reversal of the Earth's Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Dunn, J R; Fuller, M; Ito, H; Schmidt, V A

    1971-05-21

    A detailed record of a field reversal has been obtained from the natural remanent magnetization of the Tatoosh intrusion in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. The reversal took place at 14.7 +/- 1 million years and is interpreted to be from reverse to normal. A decrease in the intensity of the field of about an order of magnitude occurs immediately before the reversal, while its orientation remains substantially unchanged. The onset of the reversal is marked by abrupt swinging of the virtual geomagnetic pole along an arc of a great circle. During the reversal the pole traces a path across the Pacific. In the last stage of the process recorded in the sections, the succession of virtual geomagnetic poles is very similar to those generated by secular variation in the recent past. Although the cooling rate of the intrusion is not sufficiently well known to permit a useful calculation of the duration of the reversal process, an estimate based on the length of the supposed secular variation cycles gives 1 to 4 x 103 years for the reversal of field direction and approximately 1 x 104 years for the time scale of the intensity changes. PMID:17792941

  18. Lunar gravity field recovery: sensitivity studies from simulated tracking data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, A.; Baur, O.

    2012-04-01

    The lunar gravity field is essential for understanding the structure and the thermal evolution of the Moon. Typically, the gravity field is inferred from tracking data to satellites orbiting the Moon. Due to the fact that the Moon is in the state of synchronous rotation with the Earth, direct tracking to the farside is impossible. NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), launched in 2009, is equipped with various instruments whose purpose is to prepare for save robotic returns to the Moon. To geolocate LRO, the spacecraft is tracked by means of radiometric techniques (ranges, range rates, angles) and optical laser (laser ranges). We analyzed tracking data to LRO with respect to various aspects, such as the number of observations, their spatial distribution on the lunar surface, and the present noise level. We used these real-data characteristics to simulate tracking data to LRO. We generated three different simulation scenarios: observations were simulated (1) during the exact time spans when LRO was tracked from a specific ground station, (2) whenever the spacecraft was in view from a station, and (3) for the nearside as well as for the farside of the Moon. Based on the resulting trajectories, we estimated three sets of spherical harmonic coefficients representing the lunar gravity field. Moreover, we varied the maximum degree of estimated coefficients and investigated the effect of noise on the estimated parameters. Observation simulation and parameter estimation was accomplished with the software packages GEODYN and SOLVE.

  19. Impact of involuntary out-patient commitment on reducing hospital services: 2-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Castells-Aulet, Laura; Hernández-Viadel, Miguel; Jiménez-Martos, Jesús; Cañete-Nicolás, Carlos; Bellido-Rodríguez, Carmen; Calabuig-Crespo, Roman; Asensio-Pascual, Pedro; Lera-Calatayud, Guillem

    2015-01-01

    Aims and method To evaluate whether involuntary out-patient commitment (OPC) in patients with severe mental disorder reduces their use of hospital services. This is a retrospective case-control study comparing a group of patients on OPC (n = 75) and a control group (n = 75) which was composed of patients whose sociodemographic variables and clinical characteristics were similar to those of the OPC group. Each control case is paired with an OPC case, so the control case must have an involuntary admission in the month that the index OPC case admission occurred. Emergency room visits, admissions and average length of hospital stay over a 2-year follow-up after the initiation of OPC were compared. Results No statistically significant evidence was found in the use of mental healthcare services between the two groups. Different reasons for admission found between the groups limit similarity when comparing the two. Clinical implications The findings cast doubt over the effectiveness of this legal measure to reduce emergency visits, the number of admissions and the length of stay in the hospital. PMID:26755954

  20. Negative symptom improvement during cognitive rehabilitation: results from a 2-year trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Eack, Shaun M; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I; Greenwald, Deborah P; Hogarty, Susan S; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2013-08-30

    Cognitive rehabilitation has shown beneficial effects on cognition in patients with schizophrenia, which may also help to improve negative symptoms due to overlapping pathophysiology between these two domains. To better understand the possible relationship between these areas, we conducted an exploratory analysis of the effects of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) on negative symptoms. Early course schizophrenia outpatients (n=58) were randomized to 2 years of CET or an Enriched Supportive Therapy (EST) control condition. Results revealed significant and medium-sized (d=0.61) differential improvements favoring CET in overall negative symptoms, particularly social withdrawal, affective flattening, and motor retardation. Neurocognitive improvement was associated with reduced negative symptoms in CET, but not EST patients. No relationships were observed between improvements in emotion processing aspects of social cognition, as measured by the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, and negative symptoms. CET represents an effective cognitive rehabilitation intervention for schizophrenia that may also have benefits to negative symptoms. Future studies specifically designed to examine negative symptoms during the course of cognitive rehabilitation are needed.