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Sample records for 20-foot spin tunnel

  1. 20-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1947-01-01

    Construction of a typical model used in the 20-Foot Spin Tunnel. >From 'Characteristics of Nine Research Wind Tunnels of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory': 'Dynamic models are used for free-spinning tunnel tests. A dynamic model is one for which geometric similarity between model and airplane is extended to obtain geometric similarity of the paths of motion of corresponding points by maintaining constant, in addition to the scale ratio of linear dimensions, three other ratios, that of force, mass, and time. In model testing, however, complete similarity can generally not be duplicated and some compromise is necessary. For free-spinning-model tests in the NACA 20-foot tunnel, the ratio of inertia to frictional or viscous forces (Reynolds number) is not maintained constant, but the ratio of inertia to gravity forces (Froude number) is maintained constant.' 'Models used in the spin tunnel until recently [this report was written in 1957] were made primarily of balsa and reinforced with hardwood. Now, plastic models are being used almost entirely, because they are more durable and when properly constructed are no heavier than balsa models. The models are constructed accurately to scale by pressing plastic material and class cloth into a previously constructed mold. A typical mod is shown in [this picture]. The model is swung as a torsional pendulum and is ballasted to obtain dynamic similarity by placing lead weights in suitable locations within the model wings and fuselage. Corrections are made for the effect of ambient and entrapped air.'

  2. 20-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1941-01-01

    The large structure on the left of the photograph is the Free-Spinning Wind Tunnel in which dynamic scale models of modern airplanes are tested to determine their spinning characteristics and ability to recover from spins from movement of the control surfaces. From the information obtained in this manner, the spin recovery characteristics of the full-scale airplane may be predicted. The large sphere on the right is 60 feet in diameter and houses the NACA 12-Foot Free-Flight Wind Tunnel in which dynamic scale models of airplanes are flown in actual controlled flight to provide information from which the stability characteristics of the full-scale airplane may be predicted.

  3. Compilation of Test Data on 111 Free-Spinning Airplane Models Tested in the Langley 15-Foot and 20-Foot Free-Spinning Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malvestuto, Frank S.; Gale, Lawrence J.; Wood, John H.

    1947-01-01

    A compilation of free-spinning-airplane model data on the spin and recovery characteristics of 111 airplanes is presented. These data were previously published in separate memorandum reports and were obtained from free-spinning tests in the Langley 15-foot and the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnels. The model test data presented include the steady-spin and recovery characteristics of each model for various combinations of aileron and elevator deflections and for various loadings and dimensional configurations. Dimensional data, mass data, and a three-view drawing of the corresponding free-spinning tunnel model are also presented for each airplane. The data presented should be of value to designers and should facilitate the design of airplanes incorporating satisfactory spin-recovery characteristics.

  4. Free-Spinning and Recovery Characteristics of a 1/18-Scale Model of the Ryan X-13 Airplane as Determined from Tests in the Langley 20-Foot Free-Spinning Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.

    1955-01-01

    An investigation is being conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/18 scale model of the Ryan X-13 airplane to determine its spin and recovery characteristics. The spin and recovery characteristics determined to date are presented in this report.

  5. Emergency Spin-Recovery Device for the 1/18-Scale Model of the Ryan X-13 Airplane as Determined from Tests in the Langley 20-Foot Free-Spinning Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.

    1955-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/18-scale model of the Ryan X-13 airplane to determine the size parachute required for emergency-spin recovery during demonstration spins. Test results for erect spins indicate that a stable 12.73-foot-diameter parachute with a drag coefficient of 1.11 (based on the 12.73-foot projected diameter) is the minimum size required to insure satisfactory recovery in an emergency. The use of a stable parachute is recommended. Test results for inverted spins indicate that the l2.75-foot-diameter parachute is also satisfactory to terminate inverted spins.

  6. Free-Spinning, Longitudinal-Trim, and Tumbling Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultke MX-813 (Prototype of XP-92) Airplane as Determined in the Langley 20-Foot Free-Spinning Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Ralph W., Jr.; White, Richard P.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to evaluate the spin, longitudinal-trim, and tumbling characteristics of a 1/20-scale model of the Consolidated Vultee MX-813 airplane. The effects of control position were determined for the model ballasted to represent the airplane in its design gross weight loading. The model, in general, would not spin but demonstrated a tendency to trim at very high stalled angles of attack. Static tests substantiated the dynamic tests as regards the trim characteristics. Movement of the elevator, however, from up to slightly down was effective in pitching the model from stalled to normal trim attitudes. The model would not tumble.

  7. Supplementary Investigation in the Langley 20-Foot Free-Spinning Tunnel of the Spin and Recovery Characteristics of a 0.057-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XFU-1 Airplane, Ted No. NACA DE 311

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Theodore

    1948-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the effects of decreasing the rudder deflection, of decreasing the rudder span, and of differential rudder movements on the spin and recovery characteristics of a 0.057-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane. The results indicated that decreasing the rudder span or the rudder deflections, individually or jointly, did not seriously alter the spin or recovery characteristics of the model; and recovery by normal use of controls (full rapid rudder reversal followed l/2 to 1 turn later by movement of the stick forward of neutral) remained satisfactory. Linking the original rudders so that the inboard rudder moves from full with the spin to neutral while the outboard rudder moves from neutral to full against the spin will also result in satisfactory spin and recovery characteristics. Calculations of rudder-pedal forces for recovery showed that the expected forces would probably be within the capabilities of a pilot but that it would be advisable to install some type of boost in the control system to insure easy and rapid movement of the rudders.

  8. Recent experiences with implementing a video based six degree of freedom measurement system for airplane models in a 20 foot diameter vertical spin tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, Walter L.; Childers, Brooks A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Fremaux, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    A model space positioning system (MSPS), a state-of-the-art, real-time tracking system to provide the test engineer with on line model pitch and spin rate information, is described. It is noted that the six-degree-of-freedom post processor program will require additional programming effort both in the automated tracking mode for high spin rates and in accuracy to meet the measurement objectives. An independent multicamera system intended to augment the MSPS is studied using laboratory calibration methods based on photogrammetry to characterize the losses in various recording options. Data acquired to Super VHS tape encoded with Vertical Interval Time Code and transcribed to video disk are considered to be a reasonable priced choice for post editing and processing video data.

  9. The Aerodynamic Drag of Flying-boat Hull Model as Measured in the NACA 20-foot Wind Tunnel I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Edwin P

    1935-01-01

    Measurements of aerodynamic drag were made in the 20-foot wind tunnel on a representative group of 11 flying-boat hull models. Four of the models were modified to investigate the effect of variations in over-all height, contours of deck, depth of step, angle of afterbody keel, and the addition of spray strips and windshields. The results of these tests, which cover a pitch-angle range from -5 to 10 degrees, are presented in a form suitable for use in performance calculations and for design purposes.

  10. Pilot Escape from Spinning Airplanes as Determined from Free-spinning-tunnel Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scher, Stanley H

    1951-01-01

    Procedure for pilot escape from spinning airplanes has been determined by means of tests in which pilot escape was simulated from 21 airplane models spinning in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The results in general indicated that the pilot should bail out of the outboard side. Calculated centripetal accelerations acting on the pilot during a spin are presented.

  11. Large-Scale Boundary-Layer Control Tests on Two Wings in the NACA 20-Foot Wind Tunnel, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Hugh B.

    1935-01-01

    Tests were made in the N.A.C.A. 20-foot wind tunnel on: (1) a wing, of 6.5-foot span, 5.5-foot chord, and 30 percent maximum thickness, fitted with large end plates and (2) a 16-foot span 2.67-foot chord wing of 15 percent maximum thickness to determine the increase in lift obtainable by removing the boundary layer and the power required for the blower. The results of the tests on the stub wing appeared more favorable than previous small-scale tests and indicated that: (1) the suction method was considerably superior to the pressure method, (2) single slots were more effective than multiple slots (where the same pressure was applied to all slots), the slot efficiency increased rapidly for increasing slot widths up to 2 percent of the wing chord and remained practically constant for all larger widths tested, (3) suction pressure and power requirements were quite low (a computation for a light airplane showed that a lift coefficient of 3.0 could be obtained with a suction as low as 2.3 times the dynamic pressure and a power expenditure less than 3 percent of the rated engine power), and (4) the volume of air required to be drawn off was quite high (approximately 0.5 cubic feet per second per unit wing area for an airplane landing at 40 miles per hour with a lift coefficient of 3,0), indicating that considerable duct area must be provided in order to prevent flow losses inside the wing and insure uniform distribution of suction along the span. The results from the tests of the large-span wing were less favorable than those on the stub wing. The reasons for this were, probably: (1) the uneven distribution of suction along the span, (2) the flow losses inside the wing, (3) the small radius of curvature of the leading edge of the wing section, and (4) the low Reynolds Number of these tests, which was about one half that of the stub wing. The results showed a large increase in the maximum lift coefficient with an increase in Reynolds Number in the range of the tests. The

  12. 15-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Constructing the forms for the foundation of the 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. Charles Zimmerman was given the assignment to design and build a larger spin tunnel that would supplant the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Authorization to build the tunnel using funds from the Federal Public Works Administration (PWA) came in June 1933. Construction started in late winter 1934 and the tunnel was operational in April 1935. The initial construction costs were $64,000. The first step was to pour the foundation for the tunnel and the housing which would encase the wind tunnel.

  13. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  14. A study of the noise radiation from four helicopter rotor blades. [tests in Ames 40 by 20 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, A.; Mosher, M.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were taken of a modern helicopter rotor with four blade tip shapes in the NASA Ames 40-by-80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The four tip shapes are: rectangular, swept, trapezoidal, and swept tapered in platform. Acoustic effects due to tip shape changes were studied based on the dBA level, peak noise pressure, and subjective rating. The swept tapered blade was found to be the quietest above an advancing tip Mach number of about 0.9, and the swept blade was the quietest at low speed. The measured high speed impulsive noise was compared with theoretical predictions based on thickness effects; good agreement was found.

  15. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/17 Scale Model of the Cessna T-37A Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1958-01-01

    Results of an investigation of a dynamic model in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel are presented. Erect spin and recovery characteristics were determined for a range of mass distributions and center-of-gravity positions. The effects of lateral displacement of the center of gravity, engine rotation, nose strakes, and increased rudder area were investigated.

  16. Spin tunneling in conducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovsky, A.

    1998-12-31

    Different tunneling mechanisms in conventional and half-metallic ferromagnetic tunnel junctions are analyzed within the same general method. Direct tunneling is compared with impurity-assisted, surface state assisted, and inelastic contributions to a tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). Theoretically calculated direct tunneling in iron group systems leads to about a 30% change in resistance, which is close to experimentally observed values. It is shown that the larger observed values of the TMR might be a result of tunneling involving surface polarized states. The authors find that tunneling via resonant defect states in the barrier radically decreases the TMR (down to 4% with Fe-based electrodes), and a resonant tunnel diode structure would give a TMR of about 8%. With regards to inelastic tunneling, magnons and phonons exhibit opposite effects: one-magnon emission generally results in spin mixing and, consequently, reduces the TMR, whereas phonons are shown to enhance the TMR. The inclusion of both magnons and phonons reasonably explains an unusually bias dependence of the TMR. The model presented here is applied qualitatively to half-metallics with 100% spin polarization, where one-magnon processes are suppressed and the change in resistance in the absence of spin-mixing on impurities may be arbitrarily large. Even in the case of imperfect magnetic configurations, the resistance change can be a few 1,000%. Examples of half-metallic systems are CrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} and CrO{sub 2}/RuO{sub 2}, and an account of their peculiar band structures is presented. The implications and relation of these systems to CMR materials, which are nearly half-metallic, are discussed.

  17. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kececioglu, Ersin

    In this thesis, we will focus on spin tunneling in a family of systems called magnetic molecules such as Fe8 and Mn12. This is comparatively new, in relation to other tunneling problems. Many issues are not completely solved and/or understood yet. The magnetic molecule Fe 8 has been observed to have a rich pattern of degeneracies in its magnetic spectrum. We focus on these degeneracies from several points of view. We start with the simplest anisotropy Hamiltonian to describe the Fe 8 molecule and extend our discussion to include higher order anisotropy terms. We give analytical expressions as much as we can, for the degeneracies in the semi-classical limit in both cases. We reintroduce jump instantons to the instanton formalism. Finally, we discuss the effect of the environment on the molecule. Our results, for all different models and techniques, agree well with both experimental and numerical results.

  18. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Adam

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions (magnetic field, temperature, etc.) usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. We demonstrate successful tunneling, charge, and spin transport with a fluorinated graphene tunnel barrier on a graphene channel. We show that while spin transport stops short of room temperature, spin polarization efficiency values are the highest of any graphene spin devices. We also demonstrate that hydrogenation of graphene can also be used to create a tunnel barrier. We begin with a four-layer stack of graphene and hydrogenate the top few layers to decouple them from the graphene transport channel beneath. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect to be commensurate with previous studies. The measured spin polarization efficiencies for hydrogenated graphene are higher than most oxide tunnel barriers on graphene, but not as high as with fluorinated graphene tunnel barriers. However, here we show that spin transport persists up to room temperature. Our results for the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barriers are compared with fluorinated tunnel barriers and we discuss the

  19. Tunneling Anomalous and Spin Hall Effects.

    PubMed

    Matos-Abiague, A; Fabian, J

    2015-07-31

    We predict, theoretically, the existence of the anomalous Hall effect when a tunneling current flows through a tunnel junction in which only one of the electrodes is magnetic. The interfacial spin-orbit coupling present in the barrier region induces a spin-dependent momentum filtering in the directions perpendicular to the tunneling current, resulting in a skew tunneling even in the absence of impurities. This produces an anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents in the nonmagnetic electrode when a bias voltage is applied across the tunneling heterojunction. If the barrier is composed of a noncentrosymmetric material, the anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents become anisotropic with respect to both the magnetization and crystallographic directions, allowing us to separate this interfacial phenomenon from the bulk anomalous and spin Hall contributions. The proposed effect should be useful for proving and quantifying the interfacial spin-orbit fields in metallic and metal-semiconductor systems. PMID:26274432

  20. Tunneling spin injection into single layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Pi, K; McCreary, K M; Li, Yan; Wong, Jared J I; Swartz, A G; Kawakami, R K

    2010-10-15

    We achieve tunneling spin injection from Co into single layer graphene (SLG) using TiO₂ seeded MgO barriers. A nonlocal magnetoresistance (ΔR(NL)) of 130  Ω is observed at room temperature, which is the largest value observed in any material. Investigating ΔR(NL) vs SLG conductivity from the transparent to the tunneling contact regimes demonstrates the contrasting behaviors predicted by the drift-diffusion theory of spin transport. Furthermore, tunnel barriers reduce the contact-induced spin relaxation and are therefore important for future investigations of spin relaxation in graphene. PMID:21231003

  1. Magnetic tunnel spin injectors for spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Roger

    Research in spin-based electronics, or "spintronics", has a universal goal to develop applications for electron spin in a broad range of electronics and strives to produce low power nanoscale devices. Spin injection into semiconductors is an important initial step in the development of spintronic devices, with the goal to create a highly spin polarized population of electrons inside a semiconductor at room temperature for study, characterization, and manipulation. This dissertation investigates magnetic tunnel spin injectors that aim to meet the spin injection requirements needed for potential spintronic devices. Magnetism and spin are inherently related, and chapter 1 provides an introduction on magnetic tunneling and spintronics. Chapter 2 then describes the fabrication of the spin injector structures studied in this dissertation, and also illustrates the optical spin detection technique that correlates the measured electroluminescence polarization from quantum wells to the electron spin polarization inside the semiconductor. Chapter 3 reports the spin injection from the magnetic tunnel transistor (MTT) spin injector, which is capable of producing highly spin polarized tunneling currents by spin selective scattering in its multilayer structure. The MTT achieves ˜10% lower bound injected spin polarization in GaAs at 1.4 K. Chapter 4 reports the spin injection from CoFe-MgO(100) tunnel spin injectors, where spin dependent tunneling through MgO(100) produces highly spin polarized tunneling currents. These structures achieve lower bound spin polarizations exceeding 50% at 100 K and 30% in GaAs at 290 K. The CoFe-MgO spin injectors also demonstrate excellent thermal stability, maintaining high injection efficiencies even after exposure to temperatures of up to 400 C. Bias voltage and temperature dependent studies on these structures indicate a significant dependence of the electroluminescence polarization on the spin and carrier recombination lifetimes inside the

  2. Mechanical design of a rotary balance system for NASA. Langley Research Center's vertical spin tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, J. W.; Fleck, V. J.

    1992-01-01

    A new lightweight Rotary Balance System is presently being fabricated and installed as part of a major upgrade to the existing 20 Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel. This upgrade to improve model testing productivity of the only free spinning vertical wind tunnel includes a modern fan/drive and tunnel control system, an updated video recording system, and the new rotary balance system. The rotary balance is a mechanical apparatus which enables the measurement of aerodynamic force and moment data under spinning conditions (100 rpm). This data is used in spin analysis and is vital to the implementation of large amplitude maneuvering simulations required for all new high performance aircraft. The new rotary balance system described in this report will permit greater test efficiency and improved data accuracy. Rotary Balance testing with the model enclosed in a tare bag can also be performed to obtain resulting model forces from the spinning operation. The rotary balance system will be stored against the tunnel sidewall during free flight model testing.

  3. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Adam L.; van't Erve, Olaf M. J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Whitener, Keith E.; Jonker, Berend T.

    2016-05-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenation or fluorination of graphene can be used to create a tunnel barrier. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures, and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect. We compare the results for hydrogenated and fluorinated tunnel and we discuss the possibility that ferromagnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barrier affect the spin transport of our devices.

  4. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/28-Scale Model of the North American FJ-4 Airplane with External Fuel Tanks, TED No. NACA AD 3112

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healy, Frederick M.

    1958-01-01

    A supplementary investigation to determine the effect of external fuel tanks on the spin and recovery characteristics of a l/28-scale model of the North American FJ-4 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The model had been extensively tested previously (NACA Research Memorandum SL38A29) and therefore only brief tests were made to evaluate the effect of tank installation. Erect spin tests of the model indicate that flat-type spins-are more prevalent with 200-gallon external fuel tanks than with tanks not installed. The recovery technique determined for spins without tanks, rudder reversal to full against the spin accompanied by simultaneous movement of ailerons to full with the spin, is recommended for spins encountered with external tanks installed. If inverted spins are encountered with external tanks installed, the tanks should be jettisoned and recovery attempted by rudder reversal to full against the spin with ailerons maintained at neutral.

  5. Spin-dependent tunneling effects in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li

    2009-03-01

    It has long been known that current extracted from magnetic electrodes through ultra thin oxide tunnel barriers is spin polarized. This current gives rise to two important properties: tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) when the tunnel barrier is sandwiched between two thin magnetic electrodes and, spin momentum transfer, which can be used to manipulate the magnetic state of the magnetic electrodes. In the first part of my talk I show how the structure of thin CoFe layers can be made amorphous by simply sandwiching them between two amorphous layers, one of them the tunnel barrier. No glass forming elements are needed. By slightly changing the thickness of these layers or by heating them above their glass transition temperature they become crystalline. Surprisingly, the TMR of the amorphous structure is significantly higher than of its crystalline counterpart. The tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance, which has complex voltage dependence, is also discussed. In the second part of my talk I discuss the microwave emission spectrum from magnetic tunnel junctions induced by spin torque from spin polarized dc current passed through the device. We show that the spectrum is very sensitive to small variations in device structures, even in those devices which exhibit similarly high TMR (˜120%) and which have similar resistance-area products (˜4-10 φμm^2). We speculate that these variations are due to non-uniform spatial magnetic excitation arising from inhomogeneous current flow through the tunnel barrier. [In collaboration with Xin Jiang, M. Hayashi, Rai Moriya, Brian Hughes, Teya Topuria, Phil Rice, and Stuart S.P. Parkin

  6. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/40-Scale Model of the McConnell F-101A Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel of a 1/40-scale model of the McDonnell F-101A airplane to alleviate the unfavorable spinning characteristics encountered with the airplane. The model results indicate that a suitable strake extended on the inboard side of the nose of the airplane (right side in a right spin) in conjunction with the use of optimum control recovery technique will terminate spin rotation of the airplane. It may be difficult to recover from subsequent high angle-of-attack trimmed flight attitudes even by forward stick movement. The optimum spin-recovery control technique for the McDonnell F-101A is simultaneous full rudder reversal to against the spin and aileron movement to full with the spin (stick full right in a right erect spin) and forward movement of the stick immediately after rotation stops.

  7. Theory of electrically controlled resonant tunneling spin devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. -Y.; Cartoixa, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    We report device concepts that exploit spin-orbit coupling for creating spin polarized current sources using nonmagnetic semiconductor resonant tunneling heterostructures, without external magnetic fields. The resonant interband tunneling psin filter exploits large valence band spin-orbit interaction to provide strong spin selectivity.

  8. Construction of Foundation for 15-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Completed foundation for the outer housing for the 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. Charles Zimmerman was given the assignment to design and build a larger spin tunnel that would supplant the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Authorization to build the tunnel using funds from the Federal Public Works Administration (PWA) came in June 1933. Construction started in late winter 1934 and the tunnel was operational in April 1935. The initial construction costs were $64,000.

  9. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/29-Scale Model of the Republic XP-91 Airplane with a Vee Tail Installed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Thomas L.

    1948-01-01

    A spin investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20 -foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/29 - scale model of the Republic XP-91 airplane with vee tail installed. The effects cf control settings and movements upon the effect spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the clean condition (wing tanks removed, landing gear and flaps retracted). The tests were made at a loading simulating that following cruise at altitude and at a time when nearly all fuel was expended. The results indicated that the airplane might not spin at normal spinning-control configuration, but if a spin were obtained, recovery therefrom by full rudder reversal would be satisfactory. It was also indicated that aileron-against settings would lead to violent oscillatory motions and should be avoided.

  10. Simulations of Resonant Intraband and Interband Tunneling Spin Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David; Cartoixa-Soler, Xavier; McGill, T. C.; Smith, Darryl L.; Schulman, Joel N.

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews resonant intraband and interband tunneling spin filters It explores the possibility of building a zero-magnetic-field spin polarizer using nonmagnetic III-V semiconductor heterostructures. It reviews the extensive simulations of quantum transport in asymmetric InAs/GaSb/AlSb resonant tunneling structures with Rashba spin splitting and proposes a. new device concept: side-gated asymmetric Resonant Interband Tunneling Diode (a-RITD).

  11. Spin-valley filter and tunnel magnetoresistance in asymmetrical silicene magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dali; Huang, Zeyuan; Zhang, Yongyou; Jin, Guojun

    2016-05-01

    The spin and valley transports and tunnel magnetoresistance are studied in a silicene-based asymmetrical magnetic tunnel junction consisting of a ferromagnetic tunnel barrier, sandwiched between a ferromagnetic electrode and a normal electrode. For such an asymmetrical silicene junction, a general formulism is established. The numerical results show that the spin-valley resolved conductances strongly depend on the magnetization orientation of the ferromagnetic tunnel barrier, and the fully spin-valley polarized current can be realized by tuning a perpendicularly applied electric field. We also find that the tunnel magnetoresistance in this case can be effectively modified by the external electric field when the conductance is fully spin-valley polarized. In particular, the exchange field in the ferromagnetic electrode can further substantially enhance the tunnel magnetoresistance of the system. Our work provides a practical method for electric and magnetic manipulation of valley/spin polarization and tunnel magnetoresistance.

  12. Preliminary Tests in the NACA Free-Spinning Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, C H

    1937-01-01

    Typical models and the testing technique used in the NACA free-spinning wind tunnel are described in detail. The results of tests on two models afford a comparison between the spinning characteristics of scale models in the tunnel and of the airplanes that they represent.

  13. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman AF-2S, -2W Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.; Wilson, Jack H.

    1950-01-01

    An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/24-scale model of the Grumman AF-2S, -2W airplane was conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effects of controls on the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics for a range of possible loadings of the.airplane were determined. The effect of a revised-tail installation (small dual fins added to the stabilizer of the original tail and the vertical-tail height of the original tail increased) and the effect of various ventral-fin and antispin-fillet installations were determined. The investigation also included spin-recovery parachute tests.

  14. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms and Large Spin Tunnelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulatov, A.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm with different evolution paths proposed in this paper. The algorithm is applied to a random binary optimization problem (a version of the 3-Satisfiability problem) where the n-bit cost function is symmetric with respect to the permutation of individual bits. The evolution paths are produced, using the generic control Hamiltonians H (r) that preserve the bit symmetry of the underlying optimization problem. In the case where the ground state of H(0) coincides with the totally-symmetric state of an n-qubit system the algorithm dynamics is completely described in terms of the motion of a spin-n/2. We show that different control Hamiltonians can be parameterized by a set of independent parameters that are expansion coefficients of H (r) in a certain universal set of operators. Only one of these operators can be responsible for avoiding the tunnelling in the spin-n/2 system during the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We show that it is possible to select a coefficient for this operator that guarantees a polynomial complexity of the algorithm for all problem instances. We show that a successful evolution path of the algorithm always corresponds to the trajectory of a classical spin-n/2 and provide a complete characterization of such paths.

  15. Room-temperature tunnel magnetoresistance and spin-polarized tunneling through an organic semiconductor barrier.

    PubMed

    Santos, T S; Lee, J S; Migdal, P; Lekshmi, I C; Satpati, B; Moodera, J S

    2007-01-01

    Electron spin-polarized tunneling is observed through an ultrathin layer of the molecular organic semiconductor tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq3). Significant tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) was measured in a Co/Al2O3/Alq3/NiFe magnetic tunnel junction at room temperature, which increased when cooled to low temperatures. Tunneling characteristics, such as the current-voltage behavior and temperature and bias dependence of the TMR, show the good quality of the organic tunnel barrier. Spin polarization (P) of the tunnel current through the Alq3 layer, directly measured using superconducting Al as the spin detector, shows that minimizing formation of an interfacial dipole layer between the metal electrode and organic barrier significantly improves spin transport. PMID:17358495

  16. Spin-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/28-Scale Model of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) with and without Vertical Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, C. Michael

    1997-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel to determine the developed spin and spin-recovery characteristics of a 1/28-scale, free-spinning model of the NASA F-18 HARV (High Alpha Research Vehicle) airplane that can configured with and without the vertical tails installed. The purpose of the test was to determine what effects, if any, the absence of vertical tails (and rudders) had on the spin and spin-recovery capabilities of the HARV. The model was ballasted to dynamically represent the full-scale airplane at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Erect and inverted spin tests with symmetric mass loadings were conducted with the free-spinning model. The model results indicate that the basic airplane with vertical tails installed (with unaugmented control system) will exhibit fast, flat erect and inverted spins from which acceptable recoveries can be made. Removing the vertical tails had little effect on the erect spin mode, but did degrade recoveries from erect spins. In contrast, inverted spins without the vertical tails were significantly more severe than those with the tails installed.

  17. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of local "spin accumulation" devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkey, Holly N.; Li, Pengke; Appelbaum, Ian

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the origin of purported "spin accumulation" signals observed in local "three-terminal" (3T) measurements of ferromagnet/insulator/n-Si tunnel junctions using inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). Voltage bias and magnetic field dependences of the IET spectra were found to account for the dominant contribution to 3T magnetoresistance, thus indicating that it arises from inelastic tunneling through impurities and defects at junction interfaces and within the barrier, rather than from spin accumulation due to pure elastic tunneling into bulk Si as has been previously assumed.

  18. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the McDonnell XP-88 Airplane with a Conventional Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Theodore

    1947-01-01

    An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/24-scale model of the McDonnell XP-88 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effects of control settings and movements on the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model in the normal loading were determined. Tests of the model in the long-range loading also were made. The investigation included tail-modification, spin-recovery parachute, pilot-escape, and rudder-pedal-force tests. Recoveries were generally satisfactory for spins in the normal loading provided the ailerons were not held against the spin. Satisfactory recoveries were obtained regardless of the aileron setting when the leading-edge flaps were deflected and normal recovery technique was used or when the horizontal tail was raised 70 inches, full scale. Recoveries were rapid from all inverted spins obtained. In the long-range loading with tanks on, it may be necessary to jettison the tanks in order to obtain recovery. A 12.0-foot spin-recovery parachute at the tail or a 4.0-foot parachute opened on the outer wing tip (drag coefficient of 0.66) was found to be effective for recoveries from demonstration spins. Test results showed that in an emergency the pilot should attempt to escape from the outboard side of the spinning airplane. The rudder-pedal forces in a spin were indicated to be within the capabilities of the pilot.

  19. Free-spinning-tunnel Investigation of a 1/30 Scale Model of a Twin-jet-swept-wing Fighter Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/30-scale dynamic model of a twin-jet swept-wing fighter airplane. The model results indicate that the optimum erect spin recovery technique determined (simultaneous rudder reversal to full against the spin and aileron deflection to full with the spin) will provide satisfactory recovery from steep-type spins obtained on the airplane. It is considered that the air-plane will not readily enter flat-type spins, also indicated as possible by the model tests, but developed-spin conditions should be avoided in as much as the optimum recovery procedure may not provide satisfactory recovery if the airplane encounters a flat-type developed spin. Satisfactory recovery from inverted spins will be obtained on the airplane by neutralization of all controls. A 30-foot- diameter (laid-out-flat) stable tail parachute having a drag coefficient of 0.67 and a towline length of 27.5 feet will be satisfactory for emergency spin recovery.

  20. Enhancement of Spin-transfer torque switching via resonant tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterji, Niladri; Tulapurkar, Ashwin A.; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran

    2014-12-08

    We propose the use of resonant tunneling as a route to enhance the spin-transfer torque switching characteristics of magnetic tunnel junctions. The proposed device structure is a resonant tunneling magnetic tunnel junction based on a MgO-semiconductor heterostructure sandwiched between a fixed magnet and a free magnet. Using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism coupled self consistently with the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski equation, we demonstrate enhanced tunnel magneto-resistance characteristics as well as lower switching voltages in comparison with traditional trilayer devices. Two device designs based on MgO based heterostructures are presented, where the physics of resonant tunneling leads to an enhanced spin transfer torque thereby reducing the critical switching voltage by up to 44%. It is envisioned that the proof-of-concept presented here may lead to practical device designs via rigorous materials and interface studies.

  1. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Adam L.

    2015-09-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions (magnetic field, temperature, etc.) usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate homoepitaxial tunnel barrier devices in which graphene serves as both the tunnel barrier and the high mobility transport channel. Beginning with multilayer graphene, we fluorinate or hydrogenate the top layer to decouple it from the bottom layer, so that it serves as a single monolayer tunnel barrier for both charge and spin injection into the lower graphene transport channel. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves, and a weakly temperature dependent zero bias resistance. We perform lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect to be commensurate with previous studies (~200 ps). However, we also demonstrate the highest spin polarization efficiencies (~45%) yet measured in graphene-based spin devices [1]. [1] A.L. Friedman, et al., Homoepitaxial tunnel barriers with functionalized graphene-on-graphene for charge and spin transport, Nat. Comm. 5, 3161 (2014).

  2. Spin wave resonance detection using magnetic tunnel junction structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Chong; Fan, Xin; Pan, Liqing; Kou, Xiaoming; Wu, Jun; Yang, Qinghui; Zhang, Huaiwu; Xiao, John Q.

    2011-11-01

    We have demonstrated that spin wave resonance in a permalloy microstrip can be detected by an electrical method based on magnetic tunnel junction structures. The detection method promises high spatial resolution and sensitivity. Both even and odd spin wave resonance modes can be clearly observed in a permalloy microstrip. The spin wave induced voltage is proportional to the input microwave power at each resonance mode. Data analysis using the model of quantized dipole-exchange spin wave resonance suggests the edge pinning of spin wave sensitively depends on the order of the spin wave mode, as well as on the excitation frequency for modes of the higher order.

  3. GMAG Dissertation Award: Tunnel spin injectors for semiconductor spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xin

    2004-03-01

    Spin-based electronics aims to develop novel sensor, memory and logic devices by manipulating the spin states of carriers in semiconducting materials. This talk will focus on electrical spin injection into semiconductors, which is a prerequisite for spintronics and, in particular, on tunnel based spin injectors that are potentially operable above room temperature. The magneto-transport properties of two families of tunnel spin injectors will be discussed. The spin polarization of the electron current within the semiconductor is detected by measuring the circular polarization of the electroluminescence (EL) from a quantum well light emitting diode structure. The temperature and bias dependence of the EL polarization provides insight into the mechanism of spin relaxation within the semiconductor heterostructure. Collaborators: Roger Wang^1,2, Sebastiaan van Dijken^1,*, Robert Shelby^1, Roger Macfarlane^1, Seth Bank^2, Glenn Solomon^2, James Harris^2, and Stuart S. P. Parkin^1 * Currently at Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

  4. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/20-Scale Model of the North American T2J-1 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/20-scale dynamic model of the North American T2J-1 airplane. The model results indicate that the optimum technique for recovery from erect spins of the airplane will be dependent on the distribution of the disposable load. The recommended recovery procedure for spins encountered at the flight design gross weight is simultaneous rudder reversal to against the spin and aileron movement to with the spin. With full wingtip tanks plus rocket installation and full internal fuel load, rudder reversal should be followed by a downward movement of the elevator. For the flight design gross weight plus partially full wingtip tanks, recovery should be attempted by simultaneous rudder reversal to against the spin, movement of ailerons to with the spin, and ejection of the wing-tip tanks. The optimum recovery technique for airplane-inverted spins is rudder reversal to against the spin with the stick maintained longitudinally and laterally neutral.

  5. Spin-dependent Klein tunneling in polariton graphene with photonic spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solnyshkov, Dmitry; Nalitov, Anton; Teklu, Berihu; Franck, Louis; Malpuech, Guillaume

    2016-02-01

    We study Klein tunneling in polariton graphene. We show that the photonic spin-orbit coupling associated with the energy splitting between TE and TM photonic modes can be described as an emergent gauge field. It suppresses the Klein tunneling in a small energy range close to the Dirac points. Thanks to polariton spin-anisotropic interactions, polarized optical pumping allows one to create potential barriers acting on a single polariton spin. We show that the resulting spin-dependent Klein tunneling can be used to create a perfectly transmitting polarization rotator operating at microscopic scale.

  6. Towards Room Temperature Spin Filtering in Oxide Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata-Harms, Jodi; Wong, Franklin; Arenholz, Elke; Suzuki, Yuri

    2012-02-01

    Spin filtering, in which the magnetic tunnel barrier preferentially filters spin-up and spin-down electrons from a nonmagnetic electrode, has been demonstrated in junction heterostructures. By incorporating two spin filtering barriers, double spin filter magnetic tunnel junctions (DSF-MTJs) were predicted to yield magnetoresistance (MR) values orders of magnitude larger than that of conventional magnetic tunnel junctions. Recently, DSF-MTJs have exhibited spin filtering with magnetic electrodes at room temperature and at low temperature with nonmagnetic electrodes in EuS-based devices [1,2]. We have fabricated DSF-MTJs with nonmagnetic SrRuO3 electrodes and room temperature ferrimagnets, NiFe2O4 and CoFe2O4, for spin filters in pursuit of room temperature functionality. Atomic force microscopy shows smooth films quantified by roughness values between 0.1--0.5nm. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism reveals ferromagnetic Ni^2+ and Co^2+, and element-specific hysteresis loops indicate the independent switching of the two spin filters. Transport data reveals junction MR and non-linear I-V characteristics consistent with tunneling. [4pt] [1] M.G. Chapline et al., PRB, 74, 014418 (2006).[0pt] [2] G.- X. Miao et al., PRL, 102, 076601 (2009).

  7. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/25-Scale Model of the McDonnell F3H-1N Airplane, TED No. NACA AD 3100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry A.; Wilkes, L. Faye

    1954-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/23-scale model of the McDonnell F3H-1N airplane. The effects of control settings and movements upon the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the clean condition. Spin-recovery parachute tests were also performed. The results indicated that erect spins obtained on the airplane for the take-off or combat loadings should be satisfactorily terminated if full rudder reversal is accompanied by moving the ailerons to full with the spin (stick full right in a right spin). The spins obtained should be oscillatory in pitch, roll, and yaw. Recoveries from inverted spins should be satisfactory by full reversal of the rudder. A 16.7-foot- diameter tail parachute with a towline length of 30 feet and a drag coefficient of 0.734 should be adequate for emergency recovery from demonstration spins.

  8. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/25-Scale Model of the Chance Vought F8U-1P Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browman, James S., Jr.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/25-scale dynamic model to determine the spin and recovery characteristics of the Chance Vought F8U-1P airplane. Results indicated that the F8U-IP airplane would have spin-recovery characteristics similar to the XF8U-1 design, a model of which was tested and the results of the tests reported in NACA Research Memorandum SL56L31b. The results indicate that some modification in the design, or some special technique for recovery, is required in order to insure satisfactory recovery from fully developed erect spins. The recommended recovery technique for the F8U-lP will be full rudder reversal and movement of ailerons full with the spin (stick right in a right spin) with full deflection of the wing leading- edge flap. Inverted spins will be difficult to obtain and any inverted spin obtained should be readily terminated by full rudder reversal to oppose the yawing rotation and neutralization of the longitudinal and lateral controls. In an emergency, the same size parachute recommended for the XFBU-1 airplane will be adequate for termination of the spin: a stable parachute 17.7 feet in diameter (projected) with a drag coefficient of 1.14 (based on projected diameter) and a towline length of 36.5 feet.

  9. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman F9F-6 Airplane TED No. NACA DE 364

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of a 1/24-scale model of the Grumman F9F-6 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the normal flight loading with the model in the clean condition. The effect of loading variations was investigated briefly. Spin-recovery parachute tests were also performed. The results indicate that erect spins obtained on the airplane in the clean condition will be satisfactorily terminated for all loading conditions provided full rudder reversal is accompanied by moving the ailerons and flaperons (lateral controls) to full with the spin (stick right in a right spin). Inverted spins should be satisfactorily terminated by full reversal of the rudder alone. The model tests indicate that an 11.4-foot (laid-out-flat diameter) tail parachute (drag coefficient approximately 0.73) should be effective as an emergency spin-recovery device during demonstration spins of the airplane provided the towline is attached above the horizontal stabilizer.

  10. Hybrid magnetic tunnel junction/spin filter device

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.; Nelson-Cheeseman, B.; Wong, F.; Chopdekar, R.; Arenholz, E.; Chi, Miaofang; Browning, Nigel

    2008-07-10

    Surfaces and interfaces of complex oxides materials provide a rich playground for the exploration of novel magnetic properties not found in the bulk but also the development of functional interfaces to be incorporated into applications. We have recently been able to demonstrate a new type of hybrid spin filter/ magnetic tunnel junction. Our hybrid spin-filter/magnetic-tunnel junction devices are epitaxial oxide junctions of La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} electrodes with magnetic NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} barrier layers. Depending on whether the barrier is in a paramagnetic or ferromagnetic state, the junction exhibits magnetic tunnel junction behavior where the spin polarized conduction is dominated by the electrode-barrier interface or spin filter behavior where conduction is dominated by barrier layer magnetism.

  11. Giant spin-dependent thermoelectric effect in magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiwei; Hehn, Michel; Chaput, Laurent; Negulescu, Béatrice; Andrieu, Stéphane; Montaigne, François; Mangin, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Thermoelectric effects in magnetic nanostructures and the so-called spin caloritronics are attracting much interest. Indeed it provides a new way to control and manipulate spin currents, which are key elements of spin-based electronics. Here we report on a giant magnetothermoelectric effect in a magnetic tunnel junction. The thermovoltage in this geometry can reach 1 mV. Moreover a magnetothermovoltage effect could be measured with ratio similar to the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio. The Seebeck coefficient can then be tuned by changing the relative magnetization orientation of the two magnetic layers in the tunnel junction. Therefore, our experiments extend the range of spintronic devices application to thermoelectricity and provide a crucial piece of information for understanding the physics of thermal spin transport. PMID:22434187

  12. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the North American XP-86 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Theodore

    1948-01-01

    A spin investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/24-scale model of the North American XP-86 airplane. The effects of control settings and movements upon the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the design gross weight loading. The long-range loading was also investigated and the effects of extending slats and dive flaps were determined. In addition, the investigation included the determination of the size of spin-recovery parachute required for emergency recovery from demonstration spins, the rudder force required to move the rudder for recovery, and the best method for the pilot to escape if it should become necessary to do so during a spin. The results of the investigation indicated that the XP-86 airplane will probably recover satisfactorily from erect and inverted spins for all possible loadings. It was found that fully extending both slats would be beneficial but that extending the dive brakes would cause unsatisfactory recoveries. It was determined that a 10.0-foot-diameter tail parachute with a drag coefficient of 0.7 and with a towline 30.0 feet long attached below the jet exit or a 6.0-foot-diameter wingtip parachute opened on the outer wing tip with a towline 6.0 feet long would insure recoveries from any spins obtainable. The rudder-pedal force necessary to move the rudder for satisfactory recovery was found to be within the physical capabilities of the pilot.

  13. Ferromagnetic tunnel contacts to graphene: Contact resistance and spin signal

    SciTech Connect

    Cubukcu, M.; Laczkowski, P.; Vergnaud, C.; Marty, A.; Attané, J.-P.; Notin, L.; Vila, L. Jamet, M.; Martin, M.-B.; Seneor, P.; Anane, A.; Deranlot, C.; Fert, A.; Auffret, S.; Ducruet, C.

    2015-02-28

    We report spin transport in CVD graphene-based lateral spin valves using different magnetic contacts. We compared the spin signal amplitude measured on devices where the cobalt layer is directly in contact with the graphene to the one obtained using tunnel contacts. Although a sizeable spin signal (up to ∼2 Ω) is obtained with direct contacts, the signal is strongly enhanced (∼400 Ω) by inserting a tunnel barrier. In addition, we studied the resistance-area product (R.A) of a variety of contacts on CVD graphene. In particular, we compared the R.A products of alumina and magnesium oxide tunnel barriers grown by sputtering deposition of aluminum or magnesium and subsequent natural oxidation under pure oxygen atmosphere or by plasma. When using an alumina tunnel barrier on CVD graphene, the R.A product is high and exhibits a large dispersion. This dispersion can be highly reduced by using a magnesium oxide tunnel barrier, as for the R.A value. This study gives insight in the material quest for reproducible and efficient spin injection in CVD graphene.

  14. Tunnel based spin injection devices for semiconductor spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xin

    This dissertation summarizes the work on spin-dependent electron transport and spin injection in tunnel based spintronic devices. In particular, it focuses on a novel three terminal hot electron device combining ferromagnetic metals and semiconductors---the magnetic tunnel transistor (MTT). The MTT has extremely high magnetic field sensitivity and is a useful tool to explore spin-dependent electron transport in metals, semiconductors, and at their interfaces over a wide energy range. In Chap. 1, the basic concept and fabrication of the MTT are discussed. Two types of MTTs, with ferromagnetic single and spin-valve base layers, respectively, are introduced and compared. In the following chapters, the transport properties of the MTT are discussed in detail, including the spin-dependent hot electron attenuation lengths in CoFe and NiFe thin films on GaAs (Chap. 2), the bias voltage dependence of the magneto-current (Chap. 3), the giant magneto-current effect in MTTs with a spin-valve base (Chap. 4), and the influence of non-magnetic seed layers on magneto-electronic properties of MTTs with a Si collector (Chap. 5). Chap. 6 concentrates on electrical injection of spin-polarized electrons into semiconductors, which is an essential ingredient in semiconductor spintronics. Two types of spin injectors are discussed: an MTT injector and a CoFe/MgO tunnel injector. The spin polarization of the injected electron current is detected optically by measuring the circular polarization of electroluminescence from a quantum well light emitting diode. Using an MTT injector a spin polarization of ˜10% is found for injection electron energy of ˜2 eV at 1.4K. This moderate spin polarization is most likely limited by significant electron spin relaxation at high energy. Much higher spin injection efficiency is obtained by using a CoFe/MgO tunnel injector with spin polarization values of ˜50% at 100K. The temperature and bias dependence of the electroluminescence polarization provides

  15. Spin injection in n-type resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi Gordo, Vanessa; Herval, Leonilson KS; Galeti, Helder VA; Gobato, Yara Galvão; Brasil, Maria JSP; Marques, Gilmar E.; Henini, Mohamed; Airey, Robert J.

    2012-10-01

    We have studied the polarized resolved photoluminescence of n-type GaAs/AlAs/GaAlAs resonant tunneling diodes under magnetic field parallel to the tunnel current. Under resonant tunneling conditions, we have observed two emission lines attributed to neutral (X) and negatively charged excitons (X-). We have observed a voltage-controlled circular polarization degree from the quantum well emission for both lines, with values up to -88% at 15 T at low voltages which are ascribed to an efficient spin injection from the 2D gases formed at the accumulation layers.

  16. Spin Tunneling in Ferromagnetic and Half-metallic Junctions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratkovsky, Alexander

    1998-03-01

    Direct tunneling in ferromagnetic junctions is compared with impurity-assisted, surface states, and inelastic contribution to a tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR). Direct tunneling in iron group systems leads to about a 30% change in resistance, which is close to observed values. It is shown that the larger observed values of the tunnel TMR might be a result of tunneling involving surface polarized states. We find that a tunneling via resonant defect states in the barrier radically decreases the TMR (down to 4% with Fe-based electrodes), and a resonant tunnel diode structure would give the TMR of about 8%. (A.M. Bratkovsky, Phys. Rev. B 56), 2344 (1997). With regards to the inelastic tunneling it is interesting to note an opposite role of magnons and phonons: one-magnon emission generally results in a spin mixing and, consequently, reduces the TMR, whereas phonons tend to enhance the TMR. Inclusion of phonons allows to reasonably fit an unusual bias dependence of the TMR. The model applies qualitatively to half-metallics with 100% spin polarization, where one-magnon processes are suppressed and the change in resistance in the absence of spin-mixing on impurities may be arbitrarily large. Even in the case of imperfect magnetic configurations the resistance change can be a few 1000 percent.^1 Examples of the half-metallic systems which could operate at room temperature are CrO_2/TiO2 and CrO_2/RuO_2, and an account of their peculiar band structures is presented. Implications and relation to a CMR materials which are close to the half-metallic behavior are discussed.

  17. Spin excitations and correlations in scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ternes, Markus

    2015-06-01

    In recent years inelastic spin-flip spectroscopy using a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope has been a very successful tool for studying not only individual spins but also complex coupled systems. When these systems interact with the electrons of the supporting substrate correlated many-particle states can emerge, making them ideal prototypical quantum systems. The spin systems, which can be constructed by arranging individual atoms on appropriate surfaces or embedded in synthesized molecular structures, can reveal very rich spectral features. Up to now the spectral complexity has only been partly described. This manuscript shows that perturbation theory enables one to describe the tunneling transport, reproducing the differential conductance with surprisingly high accuracy. Well established scattering models, which include Kondo-like spin-spin and potential interactions, are expanded to enable calculation of arbitrary complex spin systems in reasonable time scale and the extraction of important physical properties. The emergence of correlations between spins and, in particular, between the localized spins and the supporting bath electrons are discussed and related to experimentally tunable parameters. These results might stimulate new experiments by providing experimentalists with an easily applicable modeling tool.

  18. Strongly bias-dependent tunnel magnetoresistance in manganite spin filter tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bhagwati; Zhang, Wenrui; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Blamire, Mark G

    2015-05-20

    A highly unconventional bias-dependent tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) response is observed in Sm0.75 Sr0.25 MnO3 -based nanopillar spin filter tunnel junctions (SFTJs) with two different behaviors in two different thickness regimes of the barrier layer. Thinner barrier devices exhibit conventional SFTJ behaviors; however, for larger barrier thicknesses, the TMR-bias dependence is more complex and reverses sign at higher bias. PMID:25845706

  19. The tunneling magnetic resistance in ferromagnetic junctions with spin-filter composite tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, ZhengWei; Lv, Houxiang; Li, Ling; Xu, Ming

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of the free-electron model, the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) in FM/I/SF/NM quasi-magnetic tunnel junctions (QMTJ) is investigated. FM, NM, I and SF represent the ferromagnetic metal, nonmagnetic metal, insulator and spin-filter barrier, respectively. Our results show that due to the spin-filtering effect in SF potential barriers, the FM/I/SF/NM can obtain relatively stabilized TMR in higher bias region when it has higher potential height and thicker SF barrier. And, for obtaining large TMR, the total thickness of the barrier region would be carefully selected as the influence of the supplementary I layer.

  20. Spin-polarized tunneling in MgO-based tunnel junctions with superconducting electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schebaum, Oliver; Fabretti, Savio; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; Thomas, Andy

    2012-03-01

    We prepared magnetic tunnel junctions with one ferromagnetic and one superconducting Al-Si electrode. Pure cobalt electrodes were compared with a Co-Fe-B alloy and the Heusler compound Co2FeAl. The polarization of the tunneling electrons was determined using the Maki-Fulde model and is discussed along with the spin-orbit scattering and the total pair-breaking parameters. The junctions were post-annealed at different temperatures to investigate the symmetry filtering mechanism responsible for the giant tunneling magnetoresistance ratios in Co-Fe-B/MgO/Co-Fe-B junctions.

  1. Charge and Spin Noise in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovskiy, Alexander; Swiebodzinski, Jacek; Kamenev, Alex; Dunn, Thomas; Pfannkuche, Daniela

    Manipulation of magnetization by electric current lies in the mainstream of the rapidly developing field of spintronics. The electric current influences the magnetization through the spin-torque effect. Entering a magnet, spin-polarized current exerts a torque on the magnetization, which aligns the magnetization parallel or antiparallel to the spin polarization of the current. The spin-torque effect can be used for fast magnetization switching in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) that consist of two magnetic layers separated by a tunnel barrier. Moreover, applying external magnetic field and passing electric current simultaneously, one can induce a wide variety of nonequilibrium dynamical regimes, ranging from hysteretic switching between two static orientations of magnetization to steady nonequilibrium magnetization precession. Theoretical description of nonlinear nonequilibrium magnetization dynamics is given by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. In this approach, the magnetization is treated on a classical level, resulting in a deterministic dynamics, which can exhibit crossover from periodic to chaotic orbits. In presence of spin-polarized current, there are nonequilibrium fluctuations of magnetization - the spin shot noise - that distort the classical dynamics of magnetization. Those fluctuations originate from the discrete nature of spin and, in this respect, they are similar to the well-known shot noise in the charge transport that stems from the discreteness of charge.

  2. Giant thermal spin-torque-assisted magnetic tunnel junction switching.

    PubMed

    Pushp, Aakash; Phung, Timothy; Rettner, Charles; Hughes, Brian P; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2015-05-26

    Spin-polarized charge currents induce magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) switching by virtue of spin-transfer torque (STT). Recently, by taking advantage of the spin-dependent thermoelectric properties of magnetic materials, novel means of generating spin currents from temperature gradients, and their associated thermal-spin torques (TSTs), have been proposed, but so far these TSTs have not been large enough to influence MTJ switching. Here we demonstrate significant TSTs in MTJs by generating large temperature gradients across ultrathin MgO tunnel barriers that considerably affect the switching fields of the MTJ. We attribute the origin of the TST to an asymmetry of the tunneling conductance across the zero-bias voltage of the MTJ. Remarkably, we estimate through magneto-Seebeck voltage measurements that the charge currents that would be generated due to the temperature gradient would give rise to STT that is a thousand times too small to account for the changes in switching fields that we observe. PMID:25971730

  3. Giant thermal spin-torque–assisted magnetic tunnel junction switching

    PubMed Central

    Pushp, Aakash; Phung, Timothy; Rettner, Charles; Hughes, Brian P.; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Spin-polarized charge currents induce magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) switching by virtue of spin-transfer torque (STT). Recently, by taking advantage of the spin-dependent thermoelectric properties of magnetic materials, novel means of generating spin currents from temperature gradients, and their associated thermal-spin torques (TSTs), have been proposed, but so far these TSTs have not been large enough to influence MTJ switching. Here we demonstrate significant TSTs in MTJs by generating large temperature gradients across ultrathin MgO tunnel barriers that considerably affect the switching fields of the MTJ. We attribute the origin of the TST to an asymmetry of the tunneling conductance across the zero-bias voltage of the MTJ. Remarkably, we estimate through magneto-Seebeck voltage measurements that the charge currents that would be generated due to the temperature gradient would give rise to STT that is a thousand times too small to account for the changes in switching fields that we observe. PMID:25971730

  4. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation to Determine the Effect of Spin-Recovery Rockets and Thrust Simulation on the Recovery Characteristics of a 1/21-Scale Model of the Chance Vought F7U-3 Airplane, TED No. NACA AD 3103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, Sanger H., Jr.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1955-01-01

    An investigation of a l/21-scale model of the Chance Vought F7U-3 airplane in the co&at-load- condition has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel, The recovery characteristics of the model were determined by use of spin-recovery rockets for the erect and inverted spinning condition. The rockets were so placed as to provide either a yawing or rolling moment about the model center of gravity. Also included in the investigation were tests to determine the effect of simulated engine thrust on the recovery characteristics of the model. On the basis of model tests, recoveries from erect and inverted spins were satisfactory when a yawing moment of 22,200 foot-pounds (full scale) was provided against the spin by rockets attached to the wing tips; the anti-spin yawing moment was applied for approximately 9 seconds, (full scale). Satisfactory recoveries were obtained from erect spins when a rolling moment of 22,200 foot-pounds (full scale) was provided with the spin (rolls right wing down in right spin). Although the inverted spin was satisfactorily terminated when a rolling moment of equal magnitude was provided, a roll rocket was not considered to be an optimum spin-recovery device to effect recoveries from inverted spins for this airplane because of resulting gyrations during spin recovery. Simulation of engine thrust had no apparent effect on the spin recovery characteristics.

  5. Macroscopic quantum spin tunneling with two interacting spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, Solomon A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    We study the simple Hamiltonian, H=-K(S1z2+S2z2)+λS⃗1·S⃗2, of two large, coupled spins which are taken equal, each of total spin s with λ the exchange coupling constant. The exact ground state of this simple Hamiltonian is not known for an antiferromagnetic coupling corresponding to the λ>0. In the absence of the exchange interaction, the ground state is fourfold degenerate, corresponding to the states where the individual spins are in their highest weight or lowest weight states, |↑,↑>,|↓,↓>,|↑,↓>,|↓,↑>, in obvious notation. The first two remain exact eigenstates of the full Hamiltonian. However, we show that the two states |↑,↓>,|↓,↑> organize themselves into the combinations |±>=(1)/(2)(|↑,↓>±|↓↑>), up to perturbative corrections. For the antiferromagnetic case, we show that the ground state is nondegenerate, and we find the interesting result that for integer spins the ground state is |+> and the first excited state is the antisymmetric combination |-> while for half odd integer spin, these roles are exactly reversed. The energy splitting, however, is proportional to λ2s, as expected by perturbation theory to the 2sth order. We obtain these results through the spin coherent state path integral.

  6. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 0.034-Scale Model of the Production Version of the Chance Vought F7U-3 Airplane, TED No. NACA AD 3103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1955-01-01

    An investigation of a 0.034-scale model of the production version of the Chance Vought F7U-3 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The inverted and erect spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the combat loading with the model in the clean condition and the effect of extending slats was investigated. A brief investigation of pilot ejection was also performed. The results indicate that the inverted spin-recovery characteristics of the airplane will be satisfactory by full rudder reversal. If the rudders can only be neutralized because of high pedal forces in the inverted spins, satisfactory recovery will be obtained if the auxiliary rudders can be moved to neutral or against the spin provided the stick is held full forward. Optimum control technique for satisfactory recovery from erect spins will be full rudder reversal in conjunction with aileron movement to full with the spin (stick right in a right spin). Extension of the slats will have a slightly adverse effect on recoveries from (1 inverted spins but will have a favorable effect on recoveries from erect spins. The results of brief tests indicate that if a pilot is ejected during a spin while a spin-recovery parachute is extended and fully inflated, he will probably clear the tail parachute.

  7. Investigation of Spinning and Tumbling Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee XFY-1 Airplane in the Free-Spinning Tunnel, TED No. NACA DE 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry A.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/20-scale model of the Consolidated Vultee XFY-1 airplane with a windmilling propeller simulated to determine the effects of control setting and movements upon the erect spin and recovery characteristics for a range of airplane-loading conditions. The effects on the model's spin-recovery characteristics of removing the lower vertical tail, removing the gun pods, and fixing the rudders at neutral were also investigated briefly. The investigation included determination of the size parachute required for emergency recovery from demonstration spins. The tumbling tendencies of the model were also investigated. Brief static force tests were made to determine the aerodynamic characteristics in pitch at high angles of attack. The investigation indicated that the spin and recovery characteristics of the airplane with propeller windmilling will be satisfactory for all loading conditions if recovery is attempted by full rudder reversal accompanied by simultaneous movement of the stick laterally to full with the spin (stick right in a right spin) and longitudinally to neutral. Inverted spins should be satisfactorily terminated by fully reversing the rudder followed immediately by moving the stick laterally towards the forward rudder pedal and longitudinally to neutral. Removal of the gun pods or fixing the rudders at neutral will not adversely affect the airplane's spin-recovery characteristics, but removal of the lower vertical tail will result in unsatisfactory spin-recovery characteristics. The model-test results showed that a 13.3-foot wing-tip conventional parachute (drag coefficient approximately 0.7) should be effective as an emergency spin-recovery device during demonstration spins of the airplane. It was indicated that the airplane should not tumble and that no unusual longitudinal-trim characteristics should be obtained for the center-of-gravity positions investigated.

  8. Spin-dependent Klein tunneling in graphene: Role of Rashba spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming-Hao; Bundesmann, Jan; Richter, Klaus

    2012-02-01

    Within an effective Dirac theory the low-energy dispersions of monolayer graphene in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling and spin-degenerate bilayer graphene are described by formally identical expressions. We explore implications of this correspondence for transport by choosing chiral tunneling through pn and pnpjunctions as a concrete example. A real-space Green's function formalism based on a tight-binding model is adopted to perform the ballistic transport calculations, which cover and confirm previous theoretical results based on the Dirac theory. Chiral tunneling in monolayer graphene in the presence of Rashba coupling is shown to indeed behave like in bilayer graphene. Combined effects of a forbidden normal transmission and spin separation are observed within the single-band n↔p transmission regime. The former comes from real-spin conservation, in analogy with pseudospin conservation in bilayer graphene, while the latter arises from the intrinsic spin-Hall mechanism of the Rashba coupling.

  9. How to reveal metastable skyrmionic spin structures by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupé, B.; Kruse, C. N.; Dornheim, T.; Heinze, S.

    2016-05-01

    We predict the occurrence of metastable skyrmionic spin structures such as antiskyrmions and higher-order skyrmions in ultra-thin transition-metal films at surfaces using Monte Carlo simulations based on a spin Hamiltonian parametrized from density functional theory calculations. We show that such spin structures will appear with a similar contrast in spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy images. Both skyrmions and antiskyrmions display a circular shape for out-of-plane magnetized tips and a two-lobe butterfly contrast for in-plane tips. An unambiguous distinction can be achieved by rotating the tip magnetization direction without requiring the information of all components of the magnetization.

  10. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman XF9F-2 Airplane with Wing-Tip Tanks Installed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Theodore; Wilson, Jack H.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/24-scale model of the Grumman XF9F-2 airplane with wing-tip tanks installed has been conducted-in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effects of control settings and movements on the erect spin and recovery characteristics of the model for a range of possible loadings of the tip tanks were determined. Spin and recovery characteristics without tanks were determined in a previous investigation. The model results indicated that the airplane spins will generally be oscillatory and that recoveries will be satisfactory for all loadings by normal recovery technique (full rudder reversal followed approximately one-half turn later by moving the elevator down). The rudder force necessary for recovery should be within the physical capability of the pilot but the elevator force may be excessive so that some type of balance or booster might be necessary, or it might be necessary to jettison the wing-tip tanks.

  11. Anomalous Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Spin Transfer Torque in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with Embedded Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Useinov, Arthur; Ye, Lin-Xiu; Useinov, Niazbeck; Wu, Te-Ho; Lai, Chih-Huang

    2015-01-01

    The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with embedded nanoparticles (NPs) was calculated in range of the quantum-ballistic model. The simulation was performed for electron tunneling through the insulating layer with embedded magnetic and non-magnetic NPs within the approach of the double barrier subsystem connected in parallel to the single barrier one. This model can be applied for both MTJs with in-plane magnetization and perpendicular one. We also calculated the in-plane component of the spin transfer torque (STT) versus the applied voltage in MTJs with magnetic NPs and determined that its value can be much larger than in single barrier system (SBS) for the same tunneling thickness. The reported simulation reproduces experimental data of the TMR suppression and peak-like TMR anomalies at low voltages available in leterature. PMID:26681336

  12. Spin nutation effects in molecular nanomagnet-superconductor tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Abouie, J; Abdollahipour, B; Rostami, A A

    2013-11-20

    We study the spin nutation effects of a molecular nanomagnet on the Josephson current through a superconductor|molecular nanomagnet|superconductor tunnel junction. We explicitly demonstrate that, due to the spin nutation of the molecular nanomagnet, two oscillatory terms emerge in the ac Josephson current in addition to the conventional ac Josephson current. Some resonances occur in the junction due to the interactions of the transported quasiparticles with the bias voltage and molecular nanomagnet spin dynamics. Their appearance indicates that the energy exchanged during these interactions is in the range of the superconducting energy gap. We also show that the spin nutation is able to convert the ac Josephson current to a dc current, which is interesting for applications. PMID:24129308

  13. Quantum revivals and magnetization tunneling in effective spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizanac, M.; Altwein, D.; Vedmedenko, E. Y.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum mechanical objects or nano-objects have been proposed as bits for information storage. While time-averaged properties of magnetic, quantum-mechanical particles have been extensively studied experimentally and theoretically, experimental investigations of the real time evolution of magnetization in the quantum regime were not possible until recent developments in pump-probe techniques. Here we investigate the quantum dynamics of effective spin systems by means of analytical and numerical treatments. Particular attention is paid to the quantum revival time and its relation to the magnetization tunneling. The quantum revival time has been initially defined as the recurrence time of a total wave-function. Here we show that the quantum revivals of wave-functions and expectation values in spin systems may be quite different which gives rise to a more sophisticated definition of the quantum revival within the realm of experimental research. Particularly, the revival times for integer spins coincide which is not the case for half-integer spins. Furthermore, the quantum revival is found to be shortest for integer ratios between the on-site anisotropy and an external magnetic field paving the way to novel methods of anisotropy measurements. We show that the quantum tunneling of magnetization at avoided level crossing is coherent to the quantum revival time of expectation values, leading to a connection between these two fundamental properties of quantum mechanical spins.

  14. Nonlinear spin current and magnetoresistance of molecular tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Derek; Haney, Paul; Larade, Brian; MacDonald, Allan; Guo, Hong

    2006-04-28

    We report on a theoretical study of spin-polarized quantum transport through a Ni-bezenedithiol(BDT)-Ni molecular magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). Our study is based on carrying out density functional theory within the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function formalism, so that microscopic details of the molecular MTJ are taken into account from first principles. A magnetoresistance ratio of approximately 27% is found for the Ni-BDT-Ni MTJ which declines toward zero as bias voltage is increased. The spin currents are nonlinear functions of bias voltage, even changing sign at certain voltages due to specific features of the coupling between molecular states and magnetic leads. PMID:16712257

  15. Spin Hall effect of light in photon tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Hailu; Wen Shuangchun; Shu Weixing; Fan Dianyuan

    2010-10-15

    We resolve the breakdown of angular momentum conservation on two-dimensional photon tunneling by considering the spin Hall effect (SHE) of light. This effect manifests itself as polarization-dependent transverse shifts of the field centroid when a classic wave packet tunnels through a prism-air-prism barrier. For the left or the right circularly polarized component, the transverse shift can be modulated by altering the refractive index gradient associated with the two prisms. We find that the SHE in conventional beam refraction can be evidently enhanced via photon tunneling mechanism. The transverse spatial shift is governed by the total angular momentum conservation law, while the transverse angular shift is governed by the total linear momentum conservation law. These findings open the possibility for developing new nanophotonic devices and can be extrapolated to other physical systems.

  16. Spin polarized tunneling study on spin Hall effect metals and topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Luqiao

    2015-03-01

    Spin orbit interactions give rise to interesting physics phenomena in solid state materials such as the spin Hall effect (SHE) and topological insulator surface states. Those effects have been extensively studied using electrical detection techniques so far. However, to date most experiments focus only on characterizing electrons near Fermi surface, while the spin-orbit interaction is expected to be dependent on electrons' energies. Here we develop a tunneling spectroscopy technique to measure spin Hall materials and topological insulators under finite bias voltages. By electrically injecting spin polarized current into spin Hall metals or topological insulators through nonmagnetic material/oxide/ferromagnet (FM) junctions and measuring the induced transverse voltage, we are able to quantify the magnitude of the SHE in typical 5d transition metals and the spin momentum locking in topological insulators. The obtained spin Hall angles in Ta, Pt, W and Ir at zero bias are consistent with the results from spin torque experiments, verifying the SHE origin of those earlier observations. At finite biases, the transverse signals provide important information in determining the mechanisms of the observed effects, such as intrinsic vs extrinsic, surface vs bulk. Because of the impedance matching capability of tunnel junctions, the spin polarized tunneling spectroscopy technique is expected to be a powerful tool to measure a wide group of matters including the various newly discovered or proposed topological materials. with Ching-tzu Chen, Y. Zhu, J. Z. Sun, A. Richardella, N. Samarth and I. Garate. The work is partially supported by the DARPA MESO program (N66001-11-1-4110).

  17. Tunnel spin injection into graphene through ALD-grown tunnel barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takehiro; Masubuchi, Satoru; Iguchi, Kazuyuki; Moriya, Rai; Machida, Tomoki

    2012-02-01

    Graphene is a promising material for spintronics devices because of its long spin relaxation time due to weak spin-orbit interaction and hyperfine interaction. For the spintronics, it is very essential to develop a reliable method to inject spin polarized electrons into graphene from ferromagnetic electrodes. In this study, between ferromagnetic electrodes and graphene we fabricated a new type of Al2O3 tunnel barrier grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Before ALD of Al2O3, we functionalized the surface of graphene with a self-assembled monolayer of 3, 4, 9, 10 perylene tetracarboxylic acid (PTCA) to improve adhesion and growth of Al2O3. Using ALD-Al2O3/PTCA composite barrier, large nonlocal magnetoresistance of 30 φ was observed at 45 K. Nonlocal magnetoresistance reached maximum around charge neutrality point, and I-V characteristics of the contacts are nonlinear. These results indicate the achievement of tunnel spin injection into graphene, revealing potentially high performance of ALD-Al2O3/PTCA tunnel barrier [1]. [1] T. Yamaguchi et al., J. Magn. Magn. Mater. (2011), doi: 10. 1016/j.jmmm. 2011. 09. 031

  18. Electronic Spin Tunneling in the Binding of Carbon - to Hemoglobin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstman, Bernard Scott

    1981-11-01

    A non-adiabatic quantum tunneling process is investigated as the mechanism for effecting the electronic spin change of the hemoglobin's iron upon the binding of carbon monoxide. As the carbon monoxide approaches there is a spin state change in the Fe('2+) from S = 2 to S = 0. The Born -Oppenheimer approximation can be used to separate the recombination of the CO to the iron in the heme at low temperatures into a nuclear tunneling and an electronic tunneling. Based upon the spin change of the Fe as well as the size of the tunneling matrix element and the energy splitting of the two states in the transition region, we assume the reaction to be a non-adiabatic electronic Landau-Zener state to state tunneling. The tunneling involves a spin change of the Fe and thus a spin-orbit interaction is used as the perturbation that couples the S = 2 and S = 0 manifolds. Since the matrix element for the transition is due to spin-orbit coupling the size of the matrix element can be changed, and hence the tunneling rate, by changing the spin magnetic sublevel of the initially CO unbound Fe. This is accomplished by applying a strong magnetic field of approximately 100 000 gauss which will tend to align the Fe spin at low enough temperature. The L vector will be affected only slightly by the external magnetic field since the Zeeman effect on the orbital levels is much smaller (10('-2)) than that of the internal crystal field of the molecule. Hence the crystal field of the heme determines the L quantization axis in each local heme coordinate system. Thus in a random oriented distribution of hemes frozen in place we expect faster CO recombination for those hemes who have their L vector aligned in the direction of the magnetic field than for those hemes whose L vector is perpendicular to the magnetic field. Hemoglobin has a strong absorption band at 436 nm when CO is bound. This absorption is also orientation dependent for the absorption is predominantly for light polarized in the plane

  19. Spin relaxation mechanism in graphene spin valves with Al2O3 and MgO tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amamou, Walid; Lin, Zhisheng; van Baren, Jeremiah; Shi, Jing; Kawakami, Roland

    Contact induced spin relaxation in graphene lateral spin valves is one of major limiting factors for obtaining long spin lifetimes in graphene. There are various spin relaxation mechanisms, including spin absorption, interfacial spin scattering, and fringe field effects, which may account for the observed short spin lifetimes. One possible solution is to introduce a tunnel barrier between graphene and the ferromagnetic electrode, which should reduce contact induced spin relaxation and allow for longer spin lifetimes. We study the spin relaxation mechanisms in our graphene spin valves with two different types of tunnel barriers, aluminum oxide and MgO/TiO2 using the standard non-local measurement geometry. To extract the spin lifetime from Hanle spin precession data, we perform fits based on Bloch equation models that include the effects of spin absorption into the magnetic contacts. We observe a strong dependence of the extracted spin lifetime on the resistance-area (RA) product of the contacts. To understand the role of spin absorption, we compare these results to fits obtained using Hanle models that do not take spin absorption into account. Analysis shows that spin absorption might not be the dominant source of contact induced spin relaxation for graphene spin valves with sputtered Al2O3 and MgO/TiO2 barriers. Interfacial spin-flip scattering or spin dephasing resulting from local magnetostatic fields due to contact roughness are likely to be more important. C-SPIN, ONR.

  20. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/16-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF5U-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA 2349

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Richard P.

    1947-01-01

    Spin tests of a 1/16-scale model of the Chance Vought XF5U-1 airplane have been performed in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effect of control position and movement upon the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics ae well as the effects of propellers, of stability flaps, and of various revisions to the design configuration have been determined for the normal fighter loading. The investigation also included spin recovery parachute, tumbling, and pilot-escape tests. For the original design configuration, with or without windmilling propellers, the recovery characteristics of the model were considered unsatisfactory. Increasing the maximum upward deflection of the ailavators from 45 deg to 65 deg resulted in greatly improved recovery characteristics. Dimensional revisions to the original airplane configuration, which satisfactorily improved the general spin and recovery characteristics of the model, consisted of: (1) a supplementary vertical tail 34 inches by 59 inches (full-scale) attached to a boom 80 inches aft of the trailing edge of the airplane in the plane of symmetry, (2) a large semispan undersurface spoiler placed along the airplane quarter-chord line and opened on the outboard side in a spin, or (3) two additional vertical tails 64 inches by 52 inches (full-scale) located at the tips of the ailavators. A satisfactory parachute arrangement for emergency spin recovery from demonstration spins was found to be an arrangement consisting of a 13.3-foot parachute attached by a 30-foot towline to the arresting gear mast on the airplane and opened simultaneously with an 8-foot parachute on the outboard end of the wing attached by a 3-foot towline. Tests indicated that pilot escape from a spin would be extremely hazardous unless the pilot is mechanically ejected from the cockpit. Model tumbling tests indicated that the airplane would not tumble.

  1. Frequency shift of spin waves in tunnel-junction spin-transfer nano-oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Matos-Abiague, A.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2010-10-01

    The excitations of microwave spin waves in magnetic tunnel junctions are theoretically investigated. An analytical approach which describes the dependence of the microwave precession frequency on the applied voltage is developed. It is shown that the spin-wave frequency is directly related to both the in-plane and perpendicular spin-transfer torques. In the low field regime the perpendicular torque can induce changes in the slope of the oscillation frequency versus applied voltage (df/dv) from negative (redshift) to positive (blueshift) values.

  2. Homoepitaxial tunnel barriers with functionalized graphene-on-graphene for charge and spin transport.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Adam L; van 't Erve, Olaf M J; Li, Connie H; Robinson, Jeremy T; Jonker, Berend T

    2014-01-01

    The coupled imperatives for reduced heat dissipation and power consumption in high-density electronics have rekindled interest in devices based on tunnelling. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, layer uniformity, interface stability and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Two-dimensional materials such as graphene obviate these issues and offer a new paradigm for tunnel barriers. Here we demonstrate a homoepitaxial tunnel barrier structure in which graphene serves as both the tunnel barrier and the high-mobility transport channel. We fluorinate the top layer of a graphene bilayer to decouple it from the bottom layer, so that it serves as a single-monolayer tunnel barrier for both charge and spin injection into the lower graphene channel. We demonstrate high spin injection efficiency with a tunnelling spin polarization >60%, lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the Hanle effect. PMID:24445349

  3. Tunneling Spectroscopy by Level Matching in the Spin Rotating Frame.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Changho

    In this thesis it is reported how the level-matching NMR in the spin rotating frame can be used to establish the tunneling-state manifold of a methyl group. The energy levels are identified from the spectrum of Zeeman-tunneling level matching resonances where fast CH_3 group population transfers take place. The three -pulse sequence (ABC) used for observing such resonances consists of a spin-locking sequence (AB) followed in ~500 mus by an r.f. pulse C with a comb of pi/2 pulses preceding it. With this new experimental method both the Zeeman to tunneling polarization transfer (during the pulse B) and the reverse transfer (during the pulse C) are detected. The proton Zeeman energy splitting homega_ {rm Z} is varied by changing, point by point, the magnitude of the effective field in the proton nuclear spin rotating frame from a few Gauss to 50 Gauss. The tilt of the effective field in the rotating frame can be set at any angle, from Theta=90^circ (normal rotating frame) to Theta=45 ^circ (45^circ tilted rotating frame). Since dipole-dipole interaction is dependent on tilt, changing the tilt allows us to manipulate the dipole-dipole interaction. In this way the resolution is improved (to better than 10 KHz). In addition the symmetry of the transitions can be identified. This tunneling spectroscopy is limited to tunneling splittings less than ~ 800 KHz. Tunneling spectra of strongly hindered CH _3 torsional oscillator pairs (of methylmalonic acid, dimethyl sulfide, propionic acid and hexane) are reported. The level matching resonances in all these materials were detected at omega_{rm Z}=nomega_{rm T} with n = 1/4, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3 and 1. In one case n = 2 spectral peak was observed. Two noninteracting CH_3 particles manifold, composed of AA, AE and EE states, explains the observed multi-quanta transitions driven by intra- and/or inter-methyl group dipole-dipole interactions to first or second order. Level matching resonances at omega_{rm Z}=2omega _{rm T}/3 and omega

  4. Free-Spinning Tunnel Tests of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA 2390

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.

    1946-01-01

    A spin investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/20-scale model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 airplane, The effects of control settings and movements upon the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the normal-fighter condition. The investigation also included tests for the take-off fighter condition (wing-tip tanks plus fuel added) spin-recovery parachutes, and simulated pilot escape. In general, for the normal-fighter condition, the model was extremely oscillatory in roll, pitch, and yaw. The angles of the fuselage varied from extremely flat to inverted attitudes, and the model rotated with the rudder in a series of short turns and glides. Recoveries by rudder reversal were rapid but the model would immediately go into a spin in the other direction. Recoveries by merely neutralizing the rudder were satisfactory when the elevator and ailerons were set to neutral, the ensuing flight path being a steep glide. Thus, it is recommended that all controls be neutralized for safe recovery from spins obtained on the airplane. With the external wing-tip tanks installed, the spins were somewhat less oscillatory in roll but recovery could not be obtained unless full-down elevator was used in conjunction with the rudder. If a spin is entered inadvertently with the full-scale airplane with external wing-tip tanks installed and if recovery is not imminent after a recovery attempt is made, it is recommended that the tanks be jettisoned and the controls neutralized.

  5. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 0.057-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtridge, Lee T., Jr.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 0.057-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effects of control settings and movements on the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics were determined, as were also the effects of extending the wing slats, of center-of-gravity movement, and-of variation in the mass distribution. The investigation also included wing-tip spin-recovery-parachute tests, pilot-escape tests, and rudder-control-force tests. The investigation indicated that the spin and recovery characteristics of the airplane will be satisfactory for all conditions. It was found that a single 4.24-foot (full-scale) parachute when opened alone from the outboard wing tip or two 8.77-foot (full-scale) parachutes when opened simultaneously, one from each wing tip, would effect satisfactory emergency recoveries (the drag coefficients of the parachutes, based on the surface area of the parachute, were 0.83 and 0.70 for the 4.24- and 8.77-foot parachutes, respectively). The towline length in both cases was 25 feet (full scale). Tests results showed that, if the pilot should have to leave the airplane during a spin, he should jump from the outboard side (left side in a right spin) of the cockpit. The rudder-control force necessary for recovery from a spin was found to be rather high but appeared to be within the upper limits of a pilot's capabilities.

  6. Electrically tunable spin filtering for electron tunneling between spin-resolved quantum Hall edge states and a quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyama, H. Fujita, T.; Teraoka, S.; Oiwa, A.; Tarucha, S.

    2014-06-30

    Spin filtering with electrically tunable efficiency is achieved for electron tunneling between a quantum dot and spin-resolved quantum Hall edge states by locally gating the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) leads near the tunnel junction to the dot. The local gating can change the potential gradient in the 2DEG and consequently the edge state separation. We use this technique to electrically control the ratio of the dot–edge state tunnel coupling between opposite spins and finally increase spin filtering efficiency up to 91%, the highest ever reported, by optimizing the local gating.

  7. Majorana fermion fingerprints in spin-polarised scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotetes, Panagiotis; Mendler, Daniel; Heimes, Andreas; Schön, Gerd

    2015-11-01

    We calculate the spatially resolved tunnelling conductance of topological superconductors (TSCs) based on ferromagnetic chains, measured by means of spin-polarised scanning tunnelling microscopy (SPSTM). Our analysis reveals novel signatures of MFs arising from the interplay of their strongly anisotropic spin-polarisation and the magnetisation content of the tip. We focus on the deep Yu-Shiba-Rusinov (YSR) limit where only YSR bound states localised in the vicinity of the adatoms govern the low-energy as also the topological properties of the system. Under these conditions, we investigate the occurrence of zero/finite bias peaks (ZBPs/FBPs) for a single or two coupled TSC chains forming a Josephson junction. Each TSC can host up to two Majorana fermions (MFs) per edge if chiral symmetry is preserved. Here we retrieve the conductance for all the accessible configurations of the MF number of each chain. Our results illustrate innovative spin-polarisation-sensitive experimental routes for arresting the MFs by either restoring or splitting the ZBP in a predictable fashion via: (i) weakly breaking chiral symmetry, e.g. by the SPSTM tip itself or by an external Zeeman field and (ii) tuning the superconducting phase difference of the TSCs, which is encoded in the 4π-Josephson coupling of neighbouring MFs.

  8. Observation of Spin Hall Effect in Photon Tunneling via Weak Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xinxing; Ling, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhiyou; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2014-01-01

    Photonic spin Hall effect (SHE) manifesting itself as spin-dependent splitting escapes detection in previous photon tunneling experiments due to the fact that the induced beam centroid shift is restricted to a fraction of wavelength. In this work, we report on the first observation of this tiny effect in photon tunneling via weak measurements based on preselection and postselection technique on the spin states. We find that the spin-dependent splitting is even larger than the potential barrier thickness when spin-polarized photons tunneling through a potential barrier. This photonic SHE is attributed to spin-redirection Berry phase which can be described as a consequence of the spin-orbit coupling. These findings provide new insight into photon tunneling effect and thereby offer the possibility of developing spin-based nanophotonic applications. PMID:25487043

  9. Macroscopic quantum tunnelling in spin filter ferromagnetic Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Massarotti, D; Pal, A; Rotoli, G; Longobardi, L; Blamire, M G; Tafuri, F

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial coupling of two materials with different ordered phases, such as a superconductor (S) and a ferromagnet (F), is driving new fundamental physics and innovative applications. For example, the creation of spin-filter Josephson junctions and the demonstration of triplet supercurrents have suggested the potential of a dissipationless version of spintronics based on unconventional superconductivity. Here we demonstrate evidence for active quantum applications of S-F-S junctions, through the observation of macroscopic quantum tunnelling in Josephson junctions with GdN ferromagnetic insulator barriers. We show a clear transition from thermal to quantum regime at a crossover temperature of about 100 mK at zero magnetic field in junctions, which present clear signatures of unconventional superconductivity. Following previous demonstration of passive S-F-S phase shifters in a phase qubit, our result paves the way to the active use of spin filter Josephson systems in quantum hybrid circuits. PMID:26054495

  10. Macroscopic quantum tunnelling in spin filter ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

    PubMed Central

    Massarotti, D.; Pal, A.; Rotoli, G.; Longobardi, L.; Blamire, M. G.; Tafuri, F.

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial coupling of two materials with different ordered phases, such as a superconductor (S) and a ferromagnet (F), is driving new fundamental physics and innovative applications. For example, the creation of spin-filter Josephson junctions and the demonstration of triplet supercurrents have suggested the potential of a dissipationless version of spintronics based on unconventional superconductivity. Here we demonstrate evidence for active quantum applications of S-F-S junctions, through the observation of macroscopic quantum tunnelling in Josephson junctions with GdN ferromagnetic insulator barriers. We show a clear transition from thermal to quantum regime at a crossover temperature of about 100 mK at zero magnetic field in junctions, which present clear signatures of unconventional superconductivity. Following previous demonstration of passive S-F-S phase shifters in a phase qubit, our result paves the way to the active use of spin filter Josephson systems in quantum hybrid circuits. PMID:26054495

  11. Thermal spin-transfer torque in magnetic tunnel junctions (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Heiliger, Christian Franz, C.; Czerner, Michael

    2014-05-07

    The thermal spin-transfer torque (TSTT) is an effect to switch the magnetic free layer in a magnetic tunnel junction by a temperature gradient only. We present ab initio calculations of the TSTT. In particular, we discuss the influence of magnetic layer composition by considering Fe{sub x}Co{sub 1–x} alloys. Further, we compare the TSTT to the bias voltage driven STT and discuss the requirements for a possible thermal switching. For example, only for very thin barriers of 3 monolayers MgO, a thermal switching is imaginable. However, even for such a thin barrier, the TSTT is still too small for switching at the moment and further optimization is needed. In particular, the TSTT strongly depends on the composition of the ferromagnetic layer. In our current study, it turns out that at the chosen thickness of the ferromagnetic layer, pure Fe gives the highest thermal spin-transfer torque.

  12. Vector spin modeling for magnetic tunnel junctions with voltage dependent effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Young, Ian A.

    2014-05-01

    Integration and co-design of CMOS and spin transfer devices requires accurate vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices. A physically realistic model of the MTJ should comprehend the spin torque dynamics of nanomagnet interacting with an injected vector spin current and the voltage dependent spin torque. Vector spin modeling allows for calculation of 3 component spin currents and potentials along with the charge currents/potentials in non-collinear magnetic systems. Here, we show 4-component vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction devices coupled with spin transfer torque in the nanomagnet. Nanomagnet dynamics, voltage dependent spin transport, and thermal noise are comprehended in a self-consistent fashion. We show comparison of the model with experimental magnetoresistance (MR) of MTJs and voltage degradation of MR with voltage. Proposed model enables MTJ circuit design that comprehends voltage dependent spin torque effects, switching error rates, spin degradation, and back hopping effects.

  13. Vector spin modeling for magnetic tunnel junctions with voltage dependent effects

    SciTech Connect

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Young, Ian A.

    2014-05-07

    Integration and co-design of CMOS and spin transfer devices requires accurate vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices. A physically realistic model of the MTJ should comprehend the spin torque dynamics of nanomagnet interacting with an injected vector spin current and the voltage dependent spin torque. Vector spin modeling allows for calculation of 3 component spin currents and potentials along with the charge currents/potentials in non-collinear magnetic systems. Here, we show 4-component vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction devices coupled with spin transfer torque in the nanomagnet. Nanomagnet dynamics, voltage dependent spin transport, and thermal noise are comprehended in a self-consistent fashion. We show comparison of the model with experimental magnetoresistance (MR) of MTJs and voltage degradation of MR with voltage. Proposed model enables MTJ circuit design that comprehends voltage dependent spin torque effects, switching error rates, spin degradation, and back hopping effects.

  14. Dual Control of Giant Field-like Spin Torque in Spin Filter Tunnel Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Y. -H.; Chu, F. -C.; Kioussis, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    We predict a giant field-like spin torque, , in spin-filter (SF) barrier tunnel junctions in sharp contrast to existing junctions based on nonmagnetic passive barriers. We demonstrate that has linear bias behavior, is independent of the SF thickness, and has odd parity with respect to the SF’s exchange splitting. Thus, it can be selectively controlled via external bias or external magnetic field which gives rise to sign reversal of via magnetic field switching. The underlying mechanism is the interlayer exchange coupling between the noncollinear magnetizations of the SF and free ferromagnetic electrode via the nonmagnetic insulating (I) spacer giving rise to giant spin-dependent reflection at the SF/I interface. These findings suggest that the proposed field-like-spin-torque MRAM may provide promising dual functionalities for both ‘reading’ and ‘writing’ processes which require lower critical current densities and faster writing and reading speeds. PMID:26095146

  15. Dual Control of Giant Field-like Spin Torque in Spin Filter Tunnel Junctions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y-H; Chu, F-C; Kioussis, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    We predict a giant field-like spin torque, T[symbol in text], in spin-filter (SF) barrier tunnel junctions in sharp contrast to existing junctions based on nonmagnetic passive barriers. We demonstrate that has linear bias behavior, is independent of the SF thickness, and has odd parity with respect to the SF's exchange splitting. Thus, it can be selectively controlled via external bias or external magnetic field which gives rise to sign reversal of T[symbol in text] via magnetic field switching. The underlying mechanism is the interlayer exchange coupling between the noncollinear magnetizations of the SF and free ferromagnetic electrode via the nonmagnetic insulating (I) spacer giving rise to giant spin-dependent reflection at the SF/I interface. These findings suggest that the proposed field-like-spin-torque MRAM may provide promising dual functionalities for both 'reading' and 'writing' processes which require lower critical current densities and faster writing and reading speeds. PMID:26095146

  16. Dual Control of Giant Field-like Spin Torque in Spin Filter Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.-H.; Chu, F.-C.; Kioussis, Nicholas

    2015-06-01

    We predict a giant field-like spin torque, , in spin-filter (SF) barrier tunnel junctions in sharp contrast to existing junctions based on nonmagnetic passive barriers. We demonstrate that has linear bias behavior, is independent of the SF thickness, and has odd parity with respect to the SF’s exchange splitting. Thus, it can be selectively controlled via external bias or external magnetic field which gives rise to sign reversal of via magnetic field switching. The underlying mechanism is the interlayer exchange coupling between the noncollinear magnetizations of the SF and free ferromagnetic electrode via the nonmagnetic insulating (I) spacer giving rise to giant spin-dependent reflection at the SF/I interface. These findings suggest that the proposed field-like-spin-torque MRAM may provide promising dual functionalities for both ‘reading’ and ‘writing’ processes which require lower critical current densities and faster writing and reading speeds.

  17. Oliver E. Buckley Prize Talk: Spin polarized tunneling and tunnel magnetoresistance -- Learning from the past and moving forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moodera, Jagadeesh

    2009-03-01

    Electron tunneling phenomenon has contributed enormously to our understanding of various branches of physics over the years. The technique of spin polarized tunneling (SPT), sensing the spin polarization of tunneling electrons using a superconducting spin detector, discovered by Meservey and Tedrow in the early seventies has been successfully utilized over the years to understand many aspects of magnetism and superconductivity. Electrical spin injection/detection in a semiconductor is strongly believed to succeed through such an approach. The successful observation of a large change in tunnel current in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) in the mid nineties has brought extreme activity in this field -- both from fundamental study as well as extensive application in mind (as sensors, nonvolatile memory devices, logic elements etc). From the early history of this field that led to the discovery of room temperature TMR effect to the observation of many novel phenomena to the exciting recent work on spin filtering, spin transport in semiconductors to toggling of the superconducting state with spin current will be highlighted and reviewed. Work done in collaboration with Drs. Meservey and Tedrow, PhD students, postdoctorals, as well as high school students and undergraduates. NSF, ONR, DARPA and KIST-MIT project funds supported the research over the years.

  18. Quantum tunneling of massive spin-1 particles from non-stationary metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.; Övgün, A.

    2016-01-01

    We focus on the HR of massive vector (spin-1) particles tunneling from Schwarzschild BH expressed in the Kruskal-Szekeres and dynamic Lemaitre coordinates. Using the Proca equation together with the Hamilton-Jacobi and the WKB methods, we show that the tunneling rate, and its consequence Hawking temperature are well recovered by the quantum tunneling of the massive vector particles.

  19. Spin diode based on Fe/MgO double tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Iovan, A; Andersson, S; Naidyuk, Yu G; Vedyaev, A; Dieny, B; Korenivski, V

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate a spin diode consisting of a semiconductor-free nanoscale Fe/MgO-based double tunnel junction. The device exhibits a near perfect spin-valve effect combined with a strong diode effect. The mechanism consistent with our data is resonant tunneling through discrete states in the middle ferromagnetic layer sandwiched by tunnel barriers of different spin-dependent transparency. The observed magnetoresistance is a record high>1000%, essentially making the structure an on/off spin switch. This, combined with the strong diode effect, approximately 100, demonstrates a new device principle, promising for memory and reprogrammable logic applications. PMID:18284216

  20. Spin-dependent tunneling spectroscopy for interface characterization of epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Du, G. X.; Wang, Shouguo; Ma, Q. L.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. C. C.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Kohn, A.; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2010-01-01

    Low-voltage spin-dependent tunneling spectroscopy of an epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junction is measured and compared to first-principles calculation of the tunneling conductance. The measured dynamic conductance ($dI/dV$) in the parallel configuration shows distinct asymmetric features as a function of the bias voltage $V$. The peaks are independent of barrier thickness, magnetic field, and temperature. From the first-principles calculation, we identify the positive and negative bias spectra corresponding to different types of Fe/MgO interfaces. Tunneling spectroscopy thus can be used as a powerful tool for interface characterization.

  1. Chiral Tunneling of Topological States: Towards the Efficient Generation of Spin Current Using Spin-Momentum Locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, K. M. Masum; Sajjad, Redwan N.; Ghosh, Avik W.

    2015-05-01

    We show that the interplay between chiral tunneling and spin-momentum locking of helical surface states leads to spin amplification and filtering in a 3D topological insulator (TI). Our calculations show that the chiral tunneling across a TI p n junction allows normally incident electrons to transmit, while the rest are reflected with their spins flipped due to spin-momentum locking. The net result is that the spin current is enhanced while the dissipative charge current is simultaneously suppressed, leading to an extremely large, gate-tunable spin-to-charge current ratio (˜20 ) at the reflected end. At the transmitted end, the ratio stays close to 1 and the electrons are completely spin polarized.

  2. Spin Tests of a Low-lying Monoplane in Flight and in the Free-spinning Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidman, Oscar; Mcavoy, William H

    1940-01-01

    Comparative full-scale and model spin tests were made with a low-lying monoplane in order to extend the available information as to the utility of the free-spinning wind tunnel as an aid in predicting full-scale spin characteristics. For a given control disposition the model indicated steeper spins than were actually obtained with the airplane, the difference being most pronounced for spins with elevators up. Recovery characteristics for the model, on the whole, agreed with those for the airplane, but a disagreement was noted for the case of recovery with elevators held full up. Free-spinning wind-tunnel tests are a useful aid in estimating spin characteristics of airplanes, but it must be appreciated that model results can give only general indications of full-scale behavior.

  3. Perpendicular-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junction switched by spin-Hall-assisted spin-transfer torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaohao; Zhao, Weisheng; Deng, Erya; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Chappert, Claude

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the magnetization switching induced by spin-Hall-assisted spin-transfer torque (STT) in a three-terminal device consisting of a perpendicular-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) and an β-W strip. Magnetization dynamics in free layer of MTJ is simulated by solving numerically a modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The influences of spin-Hall write current (density, duration and direction) on the STT switching are evaluated. We find that the switching speed of a STT-MTJ can be significantly improved (reduced to <1 ns) by using a sufficiently large spin-Hall write current density (~25 MA cm-2) with an appropriate duration (~0.5 ns). Finally we develop an electrical model of three-terminal MTJ/β-W device with Verilog-A language and perform transient simulation of switching a 4 T/1MTJ/1β-W memory cell with Spectre simulator. Simulation results demonstrate that spin-Hall-assisted STT-MTJ has advantages over conventional STT-MTJ in write speed and energy.

  4. Charge and spin current oscillations in a tunnel junction induced by magnetic field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartora, C. A.; Nobrega, K. Z.; Cabrera, G. G.

    2016-08-01

    Usually, charge and spin transport properties in tunnel junctions are studied in the DC bias regime and/or in the adiabatic regime of time-varying magnetic fields. In this letter, the temporal dynamics of charge and spin currents in a tunnel junction induced by pulsed magnetic fields is considered. At low bias voltages, energy and momentum of the conduction electrons are nearly conserved in the tunneling process, leading to the description of the junction as a spin-1/2 fermionic system coupled to time-varying magnetic fields. Under the influence of pulsed magnetic fields, charge and spin current can flow across the tunnel junction, displaying oscillatory behavior, even in the absence of DC bias voltage. A type of spin capacitance function, in close analogy to electric capacitance, is predicted.

  5. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of local “spin accumulation” devices

    SciTech Connect

    Tinkey, Holly N.; Li, Pengke; Appelbaum, Ian

    2014-06-09

    We investigate the origin of purported “spin accumulation” signals observed in local “three-terminal” (3T) measurements of ferromagnet/insulator/n-Si tunnel junctions using inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). Voltage bias and magnetic field dependences of the IET spectra were found to account for the dominant contribution to 3T magnetoresistance, thus indicating that it arises from inelastic tunneling through impurities and defects at junction interfaces and within the barrier, rather than from spin accumulation due to pure elastic tunneling into bulk Si as has been previously assumed.

  6. First-principles study of spin transport in Fe-SiCNT-Fe magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Sudhanshu; Jalu, Surendra

    2015-08-01

    We report first-principles calculations of spin-dependent quantum transport in Fe-SiCNT-Fe magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). Perfect spin filtration effect and substantial tunnel magnetoresistance are obtained, which suggests SiCNTs as a suitable candidate over CNTs for implementing 1D MTJs. The calculated tunnel magnetoresistance is several hundred percent at zero bias voltage, it reduces to nearly zero after the bias voltage of about 1 V. When the orientation of magnetic configurations of both electrodes is parallel, the zero bias spin injection factor is staggering 99% and remains reasonably high in the range of 60%-75% after the bias voltage of 0.6 V.

  7. Determining Exchange Splitting in a Magnetic Semiconductor by Spin-Filter Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, T. S.; Moodera, J. S.; Venkataraman, K.; Negusse, E.; Holroyd, J.; Dvorak, J.; Liberati, M.; Idzerda, Y. U.; Arenholz, E.

    2008-06-24

    A large exchange splitting of the conduction band in ultrathin films of the ferromagnetic semiconductor EuO was determined quantitatively, by using EuO as a tunnel barrier and fitting the current-voltage characteristics and temperature dependence to tunneling theory. This exchange splitting leads to different tunnel barrier heights for spin-up and spin-down electrons, and is large enough to produce a near fully spin-polarized current. Moreover, the magnetic properties of these ultrathin films (<6 nm) show a reduction in Curie temperature with decreasing thickness, in agreement with theoretical calculation [R. Schiller et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3847 (2001)].

  8. Contact induced spin relaxation in graphene spin valves with Al2O3 and MgO tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amamou, Walid; Lin, Zhisheng; van Baren, Jeremiah; Turkyilmaz, Serol; Shi, Jing; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate spin relaxation in graphene by systematically comparing the roles of spin absorption, other contact-induced effects (e.g., fringe fields), and bulk spin relaxation for graphene spin valves with MgO barriers, Al2O3 barriers, and transparent contacts. We obtain effective spin lifetimes by fitting the Hanle spin precession data with two models that include or exclude the effect of spin absorption. Results indicate that additional contact-induced spin relaxation other than spin absorption dominates the contact effect. For tunneling contacts, we find reasonable agreement between the two models with median discrepancy of ˜20% for MgO and ˜10% for Al2O3.

  9. Hydrogenated Graphene as a Homoepitaxial Tunnel Barrier for Spin and Charge Transport in Graphene.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Adam L; van 't Erve, Olaf M J; Robinson, Jeremy T; Whitener, Keith E; Jonker, Berend T

    2015-07-28

    We demonstrate that hydrogenated graphene performs as a homoepitaxial tunnel barrier on a graphene charge/spin channel. We examine the tunneling behavior through measuring the IV curves and zero bias resistance. We also fabricate hydrogenated graphene/graphene nonlocal spin valves and measure the spin lifetimes using the Hanle effect, with spintronic nonlocal spin valve operation demonstrated up to room temperature. We show that while hydrogenated graphene indeed allows for spin transport in graphene and has many advantages over oxide tunnel barriers, it does not perform as well as similar fluorinated graphene/graphene devices, possibly due to the presence of magnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene that act as spin scatterers. PMID:26047069

  10. Concept for room temperature single-spin tunneling force microscopy with atomic spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Adam

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy (AFM) system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated defect states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  11. Atomic-resolution single-spin magnetic resonance detection concept based on tunneling force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, A.; Ambal, K.; Boehme, C.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single-electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated qubit states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  12. The possibility of determining the spin-orbit interaction constants using scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotkevych, N. V.; Vovk, N. R.; Kolesnichenko, Yu. A.

    2016-04-01

    A study of electron tunneling from quasi-two-dimensional (surface) states with spin-orbit interaction into bulk-mode states, within the framework of a model of an infinitely thin inhomogeneous tunnel magnetic barrier between two conductors. We analyze how the scattering of quasi-two-dimensional electrons on a single magnetic defect affects the tunneling current in this system. We also obtain an analytical expression for the conductance of the tunnel point-contact, as a function of its distance from the defect. It is shown that analyzing local magnetization oscillations around the defect using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy allows us to determine the spin-orbit interaction constant.

  13. Self-consistent model of spin accumulation magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/insulator/semiconductor tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian; Tinkey, Holly N.; Li, Pengke

    2014-12-01

    Spin accumulation in a paramagnetic semiconductor due to voltage-biased current tunneling from a polarized ferromagnet is experimentally manifest as a small additional spin-dependent resistance. We describe a rigorous model incorporating the necessary self-consistency between electrochemical potential splitting, spin-dependent injection current, and applied voltage that can be used to simulate this so-called "3 T " signal as a function of temperature, doping, ferromagnet bulk spin polarization, tunnel barrier features and conduction nonlinearity, and junction voltage bias.

  14. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; Fuente, César De La; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths.

  15. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; Fuente, César de la; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths. PMID:26333417

  16. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; de la Fuente, César; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths. PMID:26333417

  17. Probing the thiol-gold planar interface by spin polarized tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaohang; McGill, Stephen A.; Xiong, Peng; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Jianhua

    2014-04-14

    Reports of induced magnetism at thiol-gold interface have generated considerable recent interest. In these studies, the sample magnetization was generally measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry which has limitation in determining surface and interface magnetism. In this work, we have fabricated planar tunnel junctions incorporating a thiol-gold interface. An observed room temperature humidity effect together with low temperature inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy confirmed the existence of a thiol-gold interface in the organic-inorganic hybrid heterostructure. Spin polarized tunneling measurements were performed to probe the spin polarization at the thiol-gold interface; however, the obtained spin polarized tunneling spectra indicate no measurable spin polarization at the thiol-gold interface.

  18. Search for Spin Filtering By Electron Tunneling Through Ferromagnetic EuS Barriers in Pbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figielski, T.; Morawski, A.; Wosinski, T.; Wrotek, S.; Makosa, A.; Lusakowska, E.; Story, T.; Sipatov, A. Yu.; Szczerbakow, A.; Grasza, K.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Perpendicular transport through single- and double-barrier heterostructures consisting of ferromagnetic EuS layers embedded into PbS matrix was investigated. Manifestations of both resonant tunneling and spin filtering through EuS barrier have been observed.

  19. Switching current density reduction in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy spin transfer torque magnetic tunneling junctions

    SciTech Connect

    You, Chun-Yeol

    2014-01-28

    We investigate the switching current density reduction of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy spin transfer torque magnetic tunneling junctions using micromagnetic simulations. We find that the switching current density can be reduced with elongated lateral shapes of the magnetic tunnel junctions, and additional reduction can be achieved by using a noncollinear polarizer layer. The reduction is closely related to the details of spin configurations during switching processes with the additional in-plane anisotropy.

  20. Enhanced Tunnel Spin Injection into Graphene using Chemical Vapor Deposited Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    PubMed Central

    Kamalakar, M. Venkata; Dankert, André; Bergsten, Johan; Ive, Tommy; Dash, Saroj P.

    2014-01-01

    The van der Waals heterostructures of two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals constitute a new paradigm in nanoscience. Hybrid devices of graphene with insulating 2D hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) have emerged as promising nanoelectronic architectures through demonstrations of ultrahigh electron mobilities and charge-based tunnel transistors. Here, we expand the functional horizon of such 2D materials demonstrating the quantum tunneling of spin polarized electrons through atomic planes of CVD grown h-BN. We report excellent tunneling behavior of h-BN layers together with tunnel spin injection and transport in graphene using ferromagnet/h-BN contacts. Employing h-BN tunnel contacts, we observe enhancements in both spin signal amplitude and lifetime by an order of magnitude. We demonstrate spin transport and precession over micrometer-scale distances with spin lifetime up to 0.46 nanosecond. Our results and complementary magnetoresistance calculations illustrate that CVD h-BN tunnel barrier provides a reliable, reproducible and alternative approach to address the conductivity mismatch problem for spin injection into graphene. PMID:25156685

  1. Enhanced tunnel spin injection into graphene using chemical vapor deposited hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Kamalakar, M Venkata; Dankert, André; Bergsten, Johan; Ive, Tommy; Dash, Saroj P

    2014-01-01

    The van der Waals heterostructures of two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals constitute a new paradigm in nanoscience. Hybrid devices of graphene with insulating 2D hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) have emerged as promising nanoelectronic architectures through demonstrations of ultrahigh electron mobilities and charge-based tunnel transistors. Here, we expand the functional horizon of such 2D materials demonstrating the quantum tunneling of spin polarized electrons through atomic planes of CVD grown h-BN. We report excellent tunneling behavior of h-BN layers together with tunnel spin injection and transport in graphene using ferromagnet/h-BN contacts. Employing h-BN tunnel contacts, we observe enhancements in both spin signal amplitude and lifetime by an order of magnitude. We demonstrate spin transport and precession over micrometer-scale distances with spin lifetime up to 0.46 nanosecond. Our results and complementary magnetoresistance calculations illustrate that CVD h-BN tunnel barrier provides a reliable, reproducible and alternative approach to address the conductivity mismatch problem for spin injection into graphene. PMID:25156685

  2. Shape Biased Low Power Spin Dependent Tunneling Magnetic Field Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondra, Mark; Qian, Zhenghong; Wang, Dexin; Nordman, Cathy; Anderson, John

    2001-10-01

    Spin Dependent Tunneling (SDT) devices are leading candidates for inclusion in a number of Unattended Ground Sensor applications. Continued progress at NVE has pushed their performance to 1OOs of pT I rt. Hz 1 Hz. However, these sensors were designed to use an applied field from an on-chip coil to create an appropriate magnetic sensing configuration. The power required to generate this field (^100mW) is significantly greater than the power budget (^lmW) for a magnetic sensor in an Unattended Ground Sensor (UGS) application. Consequently, a new approach to creating an ideal sensing environment is required. One approach being used at NVE is "shape biasing." This means that the physical layout of the SDT sensing elements is such that the magnetization of the sensing film is correct even when no biasing field is applied. Sensors have been fabricated using this technique and show reasonable promise for UGS applications. Some performance trade-offs exist. The power is easily tinder 1 MW, but the sensitivity is typically lower by a factor of 10. This talk will discuss some of the design details of these sensors as well as their expected ultimate performance.

  3. Spin-symmetry conversion in methyl rotors induced by tunnel resonance at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.; Sun, C.; Horsewill, A. J.; Alsanoosi, A. M.; Aibout, A.

    2014-02-28

    Field-cycling NMR in the solid state at low temperature (4.2 K) has been employed to measure the tunneling spectra of methyl (CH{sub 3}) rotors in phenylacetone and toluene. The phenomenon of tunnel resonance reveals anomalies in {sup 1}H magnetization from which the following tunnel frequencies have been determined: phenylacetone, ν{sub t} = 6.58 ± 0.08 MHz; toluene, ν{sub t(1)} = 6.45 ± 0.06 GHz and ν{sub t(2)} = 7.07 ± 0.06 GHz. The tunnel frequencies in the two samples differ by three orders of magnitude, meaning different experimental approaches are required. In phenylacetone the magnetization anomalies are observed when the tunnel frequency matches one or two times the {sup 1}H Larmor frequency. In toluene, doping with free radicals enables magnetization anomalies to be observed when the tunnel frequency is equal to the electron spin Larmor frequency. Cross-polarization processes between the tunneling and Zeeman systems are proposed and form the basis of a thermodynamic model to simulate the tunnel resonance spectra. These invoke space-spin interactions to drive the changes in nuclear spin-symmetry. The tunnel resonance lineshapes are explained, showing good quantitative agreement between experiment and simulations.

  4. Spin-dependent resonant tunneling of multiferroic tunnel junction via head-to-head 180° domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jian-Qing; Zhang, Hu; Song, Yu-Min

    2013-10-01

    The extraordinary properties of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at oxide heterostructure interface such as LaAlO3/SrTiO3 have attracted considerable investigations. Recent work suggested that the 2DEG could be formed within the SrTiO3 tunnel barrier by replacing the central TiO2 atomic layer with LaO, and that such a tunnel junction exhibits resonant tunneling behavior with new intriguing properties and potential applications [J. D. Burton et al., Phys. Rev. B 80, 115408 (2009)]. Here we investigate an alternative approach providing the resonant transmission of which a 180° head-to-head (HH) domain wall in the middle of the tunnel barrier induces the 2DEG via the free electronic carriers screening the polarization bound charges in situ. Using first-principles calculations on the Fe/PbTiO3/Fe as a model system, we show that this strategy allows for the formation of a 2DEG within the barrier, and that the remarkable difference between the majority- and minority-spin channels results in large tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. The resonant tunneling and the large TMR effect are beneficial to magnetic recording applications. We also discuss the feasibility to obtain such a 180° HH domain wall in the practical magnetic tunnel junctions and the influences of FeO formation at the iron-complex oxide interface on the electronic structure and tunneling properties.

  5. Spinning Characteristics of the XN2Y-1 Airplane Obtained from the Spinning Balance and Compared with Results from the Spinning Tunnel and from Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamber, M J; House, R O

    1937-01-01

    Report presents the results of tests of a 1/10-scale model of the XN2Y-1 airplane tested in the NACA 5-foot vertical wind tunnel in which the six components of forces and moments were measured. The model was tested in 17 attitudes in which the full-scale airplane had been observed to spin, in order to determine the effects of scale, tunnel, and interference. In addition, a series of tests was made to cover the range of angles of attack, angles of sideslip, rates of rotation, and control setting likely to be encountered by a spinning airplane. The data were used to estimate the probable attitudes in steady spins of an airplane in flight and of a model in the free-spinning tunnel. The estimated attitudes of steady spin were compared with attitudes measured in flight and in the spinning tunnel. The results indicate that corrections for certain scale and tunnel effects are necessary to estimate full-scale spinning attitudes from model results.

  6. Macroscopic quantum tunneling and quantum - classical phase transitions of the escape rate in large spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, S. A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review on the theoretical and the experimental developments on macroscopic quantum tunneling and quantum-classical phase transitions of the escape rate in large spin systems. A substantial amount of research work has been done in this area of research over the years, so this article does not cover all the research areas that have been studied, for instance the effect of dissipation is not discussed and can be found in other review articles. We present the basic ideas with simplified calculations so that it is readable to both specialists and nonspecialists in this area of research. A brief derivation of the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics in its original form using the orthonormal position and momentum basis is reviewed. For tunneling of a particle into the classically forbidden region, the imaginary time (Euclidean) formulation of path integral is useful, we review this formulation and apply it to the problem of tunneling in a double well potential. For spin systems such as single molecule magnets, the formulation of path integral requires the use of non-orthonormal spin coherent states in (2 s + 1) dimensional Hilbert space, the coordinate independent and the coordinate dependent form of the spin coherent state path integral are derived. These two (equivalent) forms of spin coherent state path integral are applied to the tunneling of single molecule magnets through a magnetic anisotropy barrier. Most experimental and numerical results are presented. The suppression of tunneling for half-odd integer spin (spin-parity effect) at zero magnetic field is derived using both forms of spin coherent state path integral, which shows that this result (spin-parity effect) is independent of the choice of coordinate. At nonzero magnetic field we present both the experimental and the theoretical results of the oscillation of tunneling splitting as a function of the applied magnetic field applied along the spin hard anisotropy axis

  7. Resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of Mn12 acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendínez, S.; Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Terban, M. W.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Espin, J.; Imaz, I.; Maspoch, D.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-01-01

    We report measurements and theoretical analysis of resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of a molecular magnet. Amorphous nanospheres of Mn12 acetate have been fabricated and characterized by chemical, infrared, TEM, x-ray, and magnetic methods. Magnetic measurements have revealed sharp tunneling peaks in the field derivative of the magnetization that occur at the typical resonant field values for the Mn12 acetate crystal in the field parallel to the easy axis. Theoretical analysis is provided that explains these observations. We argue that resonant spin tunneling in a molecular magnet can be established in a powder sample, without the need for a single crystal and without aligning the easy magnetization axes of the molecules. This is confirmed by reanalyzing the old data on a powdered sample of nonoriented micron-size crystals of Mn12 acetate. Our findings can greatly simplify the selection of candidates for quantum spin tunneling among newly synthesized molecular magnets.

  8. Large current modulation and spin-dependent tunneling of vertical graphene/MoS2 heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Myoung, Nojoon; Seo, Kyungchul; Lee, Seung Joo; Ihm, G

    2013-08-27

    Vertical graphene heterostructures have been introduced as an alternative architecture for electronic devices by using quantum tunneling. Here, we present that the current on/off ratio of vertical graphene field-effect transistors is enhanced by using an armchair graphene nanoribbon as an electrode. Moreover, we report spin-dependent tunneling current of the graphene/MoS2 heterostructures. When an atomically thin MoS2 layer sandwiched between graphene electrodes becomes magnetic, Dirac fermions with different spins feel different heights of the tunnel barrier, leading to spin-dependent tunneling. Our finding will develop the present graphene heterostructures for electronic devices by improving the device performance and by adding the possibility of spintronics based on graphene. PMID:23886348

  9. Spin-transfer torque and specific features of magnetic-state switching in vacuum tunnel nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Demin, G. D. Popkov, A. F.; Dyuzhev, N. A.

    2015-12-15

    The specific features of spin-transfer torque in vacuum tunnel structures with magnetic electrodes are investigated using the quasi-classical Sommerfeld model of electron conductivity, which takes into account the exchange splitting of the spin energy subbands of free electrons. Using the calculated voltage dependences of the transferred torques for a tunnel structure with cobalt electrodes and noncollinear magnetic moments in the electrodes, diagrams of stable spin states on the current–field parameter plane in the in-plane geometry of the initial magnetization are obtained.

  10. Nontrivial Bloch oscillation and Zener tunneling frequencies in helicoidal molecules due to spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caetano, R. A.

    2014-05-01

    Bloch oscillation and Zener tunneling are investigated in helicoidal molecules, with DNA as the representative example, in the presence of spin-orbit coupling induced by electrical charges accumulated along the structure of the molecule. We show that the presence of the spin-orbit coupling does not destroy the Bloch oscillations and, further, it induces the appearance of nontrivial Bloch oscillation frequencies associated with resonances among Wannier-Stark states. The Zener tunneling between the spin states is also studied here by looking at the time evolution of the polarization of the wave packet. The results show that the polarization also oscillates with nontrivial well-determined frequencies.

  11. Voltage-controlled spin selection in a magnetic resonant tunneling diode.

    PubMed

    Slobodskyy, A; Gould, C; Slobodskyy, T; Becker, C R; Schmidt, G; Molenkamp, L W

    2003-06-20

    We have fabricated all II-VI semiconductor resonant tunneling diodes based on the (Zn,Mn,Be)Se material system, containing dilute magnetic material in the quantum well, and studied their current-voltage characteristics. When subjected to an external magnetic field the resulting spin splitting of the levels in the quantum well leads to a splitting of the transmission resonance into two separate peaks. This is interpreted as evidence of tunneling transport through spin polarized levels, and could be the first step towards a voltage controlled spin filter. PMID:12857209

  12. Spin-Valve and Spin-Tunneling Devices: Read Heads, MRAMs, Field Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, P. P.

    Hard disk magnetic data storage is increasing at a steady state in terms of units sold, with 144 million drives sold in 1998 (107 million for desktops, 18 million for portables, and 19 million for enterprise drives), corresponding to a total business of 34 billion US [1]. The growing need for storage coming from new PC operating systems, INTERNET applications, and a foreseen explosion of applications connected to consumer electronics (digital TV, video, digital cameras, GPS systems, etc.), keep the magnetics community actively looking for new solutions, concerning media, heads, tribology, and system electronics. Current state of the art disk drives (January 2000), using dual inductive-write, magnetoresistive-read (MR) integrated heads reach areal densities of 15 to 23 bit/μm2, capable of putting a full 20 GB in one platter (a 2 hour film occupies 10 GB). Densities beyond 80 bit/μm2 have already been demonstrated in the laboratory (Fujitsu 87 bit/μm2-Intermag 2000, Hitachi 81 bit/μm2, Read-Rite 78 bit/μ m2, Seagate 70 bit/μ m2 - all the last three demos done in the first 6 months of 2000, with IBM having demonstrated 56 bit/μ m2 already at the end of 1999). At densities near 60 bit/μm2, the linear bit size is sim 43 nm, and the width of the written tracks is sim 0.23 μm. Areal density in commercial drives is increasing steadily at a rate of nearly 100% per year [1], and consumer products above 60 bit/μm2 are expected by 2002. These remarkable achievements are only possible by a stream of technological innovations, in media [2], write heads [3], read heads [4], and system electronics [5]. In this chapter, recent advances on spin valve materials and spin valve sensor architectures, low resistance tunnel junctions and tunnel junction head architectures will be addressed.

  13. Spin injection and detection in a graphene lateral spin valve using an yttrium-oxide tunneling barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Katsuyoshi; Kasai, Shinya; Li, Song-Lin; Nakaharai, Shu; Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Yamamoto, Mahito; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate charge and spin current transport in a graphene-based lateral spin valve using yttrium oxide (Y-O) as a tunneling barrier between graphene and a ferromagnetic electrode. A Y-O layer grown on graphene is flat, with a root-mean-square roughness of 0.17 nm, which is much lower than that of conventional barrier materials. This flatness allows the utilization of a very thin but well-defined tunneling barrier, leading to a large spin signal of ˜20 Ω and a high spin injection efficiency of 15% with a low contact resistance of ˜1 kΩ. These findings represent important progress toward the realization of graphene-based spintronics applications.

  14. Analytical description of ballistic spin currents and torques in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chshiev, M.; Manchon, A.; Kalitsov, A.; Ryzhanova, N.; Vedyayev, A.; Strelkov, N.; Butler, W. H.; Dieny, B.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we demonstrate explicit analytical expressions for both charge and spin currents which constitute the 2 ×2 spinor in magnetic tunnel junctions with noncollinear magnetizations under applied voltage. The calculations have been performed within the free electron model in the framework of the Keldysh formalism and WKB approximation. We demonstrate that spin/charge currents and spin transfer torques are all explicitly expressed through only three irreducible quantities, without further approximations. The conditions and mechanisms of deviation from the conventional sine angular dependence of both spin currents and torques are shown and discussed. It is shown in the thick barrier approximation that all tunneling transport quantities can be expressed in an extremely simplified form via Slonczewski spin polarizations and our effective spin averaged interfacial transmission probabilities and effective out-of-plane polarizations at both interfaces. It is proven that the latter plays a key role in the emergence of perpendicular spin torque as well as in the angular dependence character of all spin and charge transport considered. It is demonstrated directly also that for any applied voltage, the parallel component of spin current at the FM/I interface is expressed via collinear longitudinal spin current components. Finally, spin transfer torque behavior is analyzed in a view of transverse characteristic length scales for spin transport.

  15. Spin polarization of Co-Fe alloys estimated by point contact Andreev reflection and tunneling magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, S. V.; Nakatani, T. M.; Rajanikanth, A.; Takahashi, Y. K.; Hono, K.

    2009-04-01

    The compositional dependence on spin polarization of Co100-xFex alloys has been studied by point contact Andreev reflection (PCAR) and tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) measurements. The intrinsic spin polarization for bcc Co75Fe25 alloy is P =0.58±0.03 at 4.2K contrary to the pure Fe (P=0.46±0.03) and Co (P=0.45±0.03). The tunneling spin polarization values of Co75Fe25 (110) textured polycrystalline electrode and (001) epitaxially grown electrode was estimated to be PT=0.5±0.01 and PT=0.57±0.01 at 8K from the TMR ratios using Julliere's model for the MTJs prepared on oxidized Si and MgO (001) substrates. The spin polarization obtained from the tunneling junctions and PCAR experiments have been discussed.

  16. Spin-Tunnel Investigation of A 1/40-Scale Model of the F-111A Airplane with Store Loadings and with Supplementary Spin-Recovery Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.; White, William L.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley spin tunnel to determine the spin and spin-recovery characteristics of the F-111A airplane in the symmetric and asymmetric stores loading conditions. Tests were also made with the model in the clean condition to determine whether the spin-recovery characteristics could be improved by the use of supplementary devices.

  17. Voltage dependence properties of ballistic spin currents and spin transfer torques in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chshiev, Mairbek

    2009-03-01

    Interest in spintronics [1] has been strongly accentuated by the discovery of current induced magnetization switching caused by spin transfer torque (STT) [2]. Among the most favorable candidate systems for the realization of STT-based spintronic devices are epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) [3]. Here we present a systematic study of voltage-induced STT in MTJs and provide an insight into the nature of its voltage behavior by investigating the properties of ballistic spin currents [4,5]. We demonstrate that the band filling has a dramatic impact on voltage dependence properties of both STT components, tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as well as on equilibrium interlayer exchange coupling [5]. Both in-plane (Slonczewski) and perpendicular-to-the-plane (field-like) STT components demonstrate a wide range of nontrivial behavior as a function of applied voltage [4,5]. The explanation is given in terms of the spin and charge current dependence on the interplay between evanescent states in the insulator and the Fermi surfaces of the ferromagnetic electrodes comprising the MTJ [5]. In particular we show that in ballistic regime the field-like torque is an even parity function of applied voltage while the parallel torque may exhibit a wide range of behavior [4,5]. Recent experiments [6] are in agreement with these predictions. Calculations are based on the non-equilibrium Green functions technique.[4pt] [1] A. Fert et al, Mat. Sci. Eng. B, 84, 1 (2001); S. A. Wolf, Science, 294, 1488 (2001)[0pt] [2] J. C. Slonczewski, J. Magn. Magn. Mat. 159, L1 (1996); L. Berger, Phys. Rev. B 54, 9353 (1996[0pt] [3] W. H. Butler et al, Phys. Rev. B, 63, 054416 (2001); J. Mathon and A. Umerski, Phys. Rev. B, 63, 220403(R) (2001)[0pt] [4] I. Theodonis et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 237205 (2006)[0pt] [5] M. Chshiev et al. IEEE Trans. Mag. 44 (11) (2008); A. Kalitsov et al., submitted[0pt] [6] H. Kubota et al, Nature Physics 4, 37 (2008); J. C. Sankey et al, ibid. 4, 67 (2008); A. Deac et

  18. The Influence of Dimensional Modifications upon the Spin and Recovery Characteristics of a Tailless Airplane Model Having Its Wings Swept Forward 15 Deg (Cornelius XFG-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Ralph W., Jr.; Daughtridge, Lee T., Jr.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free- spinning tunnel scale model of the Cornelius XFG-1 glider, a tailless design having its wings swept forward 15 degrees. It was previously found to possess erratic spin and recovery characteristics, and tests were made to determine modifications which would lead to normal steady spins with consistently good recoveries. The results of the investigation indicated that modifications that aid not appreciably alter the basic design aid not appreciably improve the spin and recovery characteristics. In this instance it appears that the sweptforward wing is the cause of unsatisfactory spin and recovery characteristics.

  19. Spin-filter device based on the Rashba effect using a nonmagnetic resonant tunneling diode.

    PubMed

    Koga, Takaaki; Nitta, Junsaku; Takayanagi, Hideaki; Datta, Supriyo

    2002-03-25

    We propose an electronic spin-filter device that uses a nonmagnetic triple barrier resonant tunneling diode (TB-RTD). This device combines the spin-split resonant tunneling levels induced by the Rashba spin-orbit interaction and the spin blockade phenomena between two regions separated by the middle barrier in the TB-RTD. Detailed calculations using the InAlAs/InGaAs material system reveal that a splitting of a peak should be observed in the I-V curve of this device as a result of the spin-filtering effect. The filtering efficiency exceeds 99.9% at the peak positions in the I-V curve. PMID:11909487

  20. Spin transport and Hanle effect in silicon nanowires using graphene tunnel barriers.

    PubMed

    van 't Erve, O M J; Friedman, A L; Li, C H; Robinson, J T; Connell, J; Lauhon, L J; Jonker, B T

    2015-01-01

    Spin-based devices offer non-volatile, scalable, low power and reprogrammable functionality for emerging device technologies. Here we fabricate nanoscale spintronic devices with ferromagnetic metal/single-layer graphene tunnel barriers used to generate spin accumulation and spin currents in a silicon nanowire transport channel. We report the first observation of spin precession via the Hanle effect in both local three-terminal and non-local spin-valve geometries, providing a direct measure of spin lifetimes and confirmation of spin accumulation and pure spin transport. The use of graphene as the tunnel barrier provides a low-resistance area product contact and clean magnetic switching characteristics, because it smoothly bridges the nanowire and minimizes complicated magnetic domains that otherwise compromise the magnetic behaviour. Utilizing intrinsic two-dimensional layers such as graphene or hexagonal boron nitride as tunnel contacts on nanowires offers many advantages over conventional materials deposited by vapour deposition, enabling a path to highly scaled electronic and spintronic devices. PMID:26089110

  1. Probing ultrafast spin dynamics with optical pump-probe scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shoji; Aizawa, Yuta; Wang, Zi-han; Oshima, Ryuji; Mera, Yutaka; Matsuyama, Eiji; Oigawa, Haruhiro; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2014-08-01

    Studies of spin dynamics in low-dimensional systems are important from both fundamental and practical points of view. Spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy allows localized spin dynamics to be characterized and plays important roles in nanoscale science and technology. However, nanoscale analysis of the ultrafast dynamics of itinerant magnetism, as well as its localized characteristics, should be pursued to advance further the investigation of quantum dynamics in functional structures of small systems. Here, we demonstrate the optical pump-probe scanning tunnelling microscopy technique, which enables the nanoscale probing of spin dynamics with the temporal resolution corresponding, in principle, to the optical pulse width. Spins are optically oriented using circularly polarized light, and their dynamics are probed by scanning tunnelling microscopy based on the optical pump-probe method. Spin relaxation in a single quantum well with a width of 6 nm was observed with a spatial resolution of ∼ 1 nm. In addition to spin relaxation dynamics, spin precession, which provides an estimation of the Landé g factor, was observed successfully. PMID:24974938

  2. Probing ultrafast spin dynamics with optical pump-probe scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shoji; Aizawa, Yuta; Wang, Zi-Han; Oshima, Ryuji; Mera, Yutaka; Matsuyama, Eiji; Oigawa, Haruhiro; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2014-08-01

    Studies of spin dynamics in low-dimensional systems are important from both fundamental and practical points of view. Spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy allows localized spin dynamics to be characterized and plays important roles in nanoscale science and technology. However, nanoscale analysis of the ultrafast dynamics of itinerant magnetism, as well as its localized characteristics, should be pursued to advance further the investigation of quantum dynamics in functional structures of small systems. Here, we demonstrate the optical pump-probe scanning tunnelling microscopy technique, which enables the nanoscale probing of spin dynamics with the temporal resolution corresponding, in principle, to the optical pulse width. Spins are optically oriented using circularly polarized light, and their dynamics are probed by scanning tunnelling microscopy based on the optical pump-probe method. Spin relaxation in a single quantum well with a width of 6 nm was observed with a spatial resolution of ~1 nm. In addition to spin relaxation dynamics, spin precession, which provides an estimation of the Landé g factor, was observed successfully.

  3. Spin transport and Hanle effect in silicon nanowires using graphene tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van't Erve, O. M. J.; Friedman, A. L.; Li, C. H.; Robinson, J. T.; Connell, J.; Lauhon, L. J.; Jonker, B. T.

    2015-06-01

    Spin-based devices offer non-volatile, scalable, low power and reprogrammable functionality for emerging device technologies. Here we fabricate nanoscale spintronic devices with ferromagnetic metal/single-layer graphene tunnel barriers used to generate spin accumulation and spin currents in a silicon nanowire transport channel. We report the first observation of spin precession via the Hanle effect in both local three-terminal and non-local spin-valve geometries, providing a direct measure of spin lifetimes and confirmation of spin accumulation and pure spin transport. The use of graphene as the tunnel barrier provides a low-resistance area product contact and clean magnetic switching characteristics, because it smoothly bridges the nanowire and minimizes complicated magnetic domains that otherwise compromise the magnetic behaviour. Utilizing intrinsic two-dimensional layers such as graphene or hexagonal boron nitride as tunnel contacts on nanowires offers many advantages over conventional materials deposited by vapour deposition, enabling a path to highly scaled electronic and spintronic devices.

  4. Interplay between resonant tunneling and spin precession oscillations in all-electric all-semiconductor spin transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomar, M. I.; Serra, Llorenç; Sánchez, David

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the transmission properties of a spin transistor coupled to two quantum point contacts acting as a spin injector and detector. In the Fabry-Pérot regime, transport is mediated by quasibound states formed between tunnel barriers. Interestingly, the spin-orbit interaction of the Rashba type can be tuned in such a way that nonuniform spin-orbit fields can point along distinct directions at different points of the sample. We discuss both spin-conserving and spin-flipping transitions as the spin-orbit angle of orientation increases from parallel to antiparallel configurations. Spin precession oscillations are clearly seen as a function of the length of the central channel. Remarkably, we find that these oscillations combine with the Fabry-Pérot motion, giving rise to quasiperiodic transmissions in the purely one-dimensional case. Furthermore, we consider the more realistic case of a finite width in the transverse direction and find that the coherent oscillations become deteriorated for moderate values of the spin-orbit strength. Our results then determine the precise role of the spin-orbit intersubband coupling potential in the Fabry-Pérot-Datta-Das intermixed oscillations.

  5. Interfacial spin-filter assisted spin transfer torque effect in Co/BeO/Co magnetic tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.-H. Chu, F.-C.

    2015-03-07

    The first-principles calculation is employed to demonstrate the spin-selective transport properties and the non-collinear spin-transfer torque (STT) effect in the newly proposed Co/BeO/Co magnetic tunnel junction. The subtle spin-polarized charge transfer solely at O/Co interface gives rise to the interfacial spin-filter (ISF) effect, which can be simulated within the tight binding model to verify the general expression of STT. This allows us to predict the asymmetric bias behavior of non-collinear STT directly via the interplay between the first-principles calculated spin current densities in collinear magnetic configurations. We believe that the ISF effect, introduced by the combination between wurtzite-BeO barrier and the fcc-Co electrode, may open a new and promising route in semiconductor-based spintronics applications.

  6. Giant amplification of tunnel magnetoresistance in a molecular junction: Molecular spin-valve transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Dhungana, Kamal B.; Pati, Ranjit

    2014-04-21

    Amplification of tunnel magnetoresistance by gate field in a molecular junction is the most important requirement for the development of a molecular spin valve transistor. Herein, we predict a giant amplification of tunnel magnetoresistance in a single molecular spin valve junction, which consists of Ru-bis-terpyridine molecule as a spacer between two ferromagnetic nickel contacts. Based on the first-principles quantum transport approach, we show that a modest change in the gate field that is experimentally accessible can lead to a substantial amplification (320%) of tunnel magnetoresistance. The origin of such large amplification is attributed to the spin dependent modification of orbitals at the molecule-lead interface and the resultant Stark effect induced shift in channel position with respect to the Fermi energy.

  7. XN2Y-1 Model Being Prepared for Spin Tunnel Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    Model of XN2Y-1 biplane mounted on a special test rig to determine moments of inertia prior to spin tests in the Langley 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. This was one of two balsa wood models (the other was a 1/12- scale model of the F4B-2) for initial testing and calibration of the new tunnel. Researchers were very concerned that the results they might achieve with models in the tunnel would not correlate with the spinning behavior of full-scale airplanes. They noted that: 'comparisons between results from the N.A.C.A. spinning balance and full-scale flight tests have indicated considerable scale effect upon aerodynamic characteristics in spinning attitudes.' Thus, these first two models were chosen for testing in the new tunnel because their full-scale spinning characteristics were already well known. These first tests proved encouraging to the researchers but they did not achieve the precise degree of reliability hoped for. The facility's opening however, does signify the advent of a serious and long term commitment to studying the problem of aircraft spinning. From NACA TR No. 557: 'At the beginning of a test the model is mounted upon a launching spindle about the axis of which it is free to rotate. This spindle is on the end of a wooden rod and is held in the center of the tunnel by one of the operators standing in the observation chamber. With the spindle vertical the attitude of the model is such that the fuselage axis is approximately 35L to the horizontal, nose down, and the wings are 10L to the horizontal with the left wing tip the lower (for a right spin). When the model is in this attitude, air flowing upward through the tunnel causes it to rotate fairly rapidly. The air speed is increased by a second operator until the air force on the model is equal to its weight. The model then automatically disengages itself from the spindle and continues to float in the air stream entirely free of mechanical restraint. The launching spindle is immediately withdrawn from the

  8. XN2Y-1 Model Being Prepared for Spin Tunnel Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    Model of XN2Y-1 biplane mounted on a special test rig to determine moments of inertia prior to spin tests in the Langley 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. This was one of two balsa wood models (the other was a 1/12- scale model of the F4B-2) for initial testing and calibration of the new tunnel. Researchers were very concerned that the results they might achieve with models in the tunnel would not correlate with the spinning behavior of full-scale airplanes. They noted that: 'comparisons between results from the N.A.C.A. spinning balance and full-scale flight tests have indicated considerable scale effect upon aerodynamic characteristics in spinning attitudes.' Thus, these first two models were chosen for testing in the new tunnel because their full-scale spinning characteristics were already well known. These first tests proved encouraging to the researchers but they did not achieve the precise degree of reliability hoped for. The facility's opening however, does signify the advent of a serious and long term commitment to studying the problem of aircraft spinning. Charles Zimmerman wrote in NACA TR No. 557: 'At the beginning of a test the model is mounted upon a launching spindle about the axis of which it is free to rotate. This spindle is on the end of a wooden rod and is held in the center of the tunnel by one of the operators standing in the observation chamber. With the spindle vertical the attitude of the model is such that the fuselage axis is approximately 35 to the horizontal, nose down, and the wings are 10 to the horizontal with the left wing tip the lower (for a right spin). When the model is in this attitude, air flowing upward through the tunnel causes it to rotate fairly rapidly. The air speed is increased by a second operator until the air force on the model is equal to its weight. The model then automatically disengages itself from the spindle and continues to float in the air stream entirely free of mechanical restraint. The launching spindle is immediately

  9. Spin-polarized current and tunnel magnetoresistance in heterogeneous single-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    Current in heterogeneous tunnel junctions is studied in the framework of the parabolic conduction-band model. The developed model of the electron tunneling takes explicitly into account the difference of effective masses between ferromagnetic and insulating layers and between conduction subbands. Calculations for Fe/MgO/Fe-like structures have shown the essential impact of effective mass differences in regions (constituents) of the structure on the tunnel magnetoresistance of the junction.

  10. Suppression of quantum tunneling for all spins for easy-axis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Avinash; Paranjape, M. B.

    2011-05-01

    The semiclassical limit of quantum spin systems corresponds to a dynamical Lagrangian which contains the usual kinetic energy, the couplings and interactions of the spins, and an additional, first-order kinematical term which corresponds to the Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten (WZNW) term for the spin degree of freedom. It was shown that in the case of the kinetic dynamics determined only by the WZNW term, half-odd integer spin systems show a lack of tunneling phenomena, whereas integer spin systems are subject to it in the case of potentials with easy-plane easy-axis symmetry. Here we prove for the theory with a normal quadratic kinetic term of arbitrary strength or the first-order theory with azimuthal symmetry (which is equivalently the so-called easy-axis situation), that the tunneling is in fact suppressed for all nonzero values of spin. This model exemplifies the concept that in the presence of complex Euclidean action, it is necessary to use the ensuing complex critical points in order to define the quantum (perturbation) theory. In the present example, if we do not do so, exactly the opposite, erroneous conclusion that the tunneling is unsuppressed for all spins, is reached.

  11. Unidirectional Spin-Dependent Molecule-Ferromagnet Hybridized States Anisotropy in Cobalt Phthalocyanine Based Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraud, Clément; Bouzehouane, Karim; Deranlot, Cyrile; Fusil, Stéphane; Jabbar, Hashim; Arabski, Jacek; Rakshit, Rajib; Kim, Dong-Jik; Kieber, Christophe; Boukari, Samy; Bowen, Martin; Beaurepaire, Eric; Seneor, Pierre; Mattana, Richard; Petroff, Frédéric

    2015-05-01

    Organic or molecular spintronics is a rising field of research at the frontier between condensed matter physics and chemistry. It aims to mix spin physics and the richness of chemistry towards designing new properties for spin electronics devices through engineering at the molecular scale. Beyond the expectation of a long spin lifetime, molecules can be also used to tailor the spin polarization of the injected current through the spin-dependent hybridization between molecules and ferromagnetic electrodes. In this Letter, we provide direct evidence of a hybrid interface spin polarization reversal due to the differing hybridization between phthalocyanine molecules and each cobalt electrode in Co /CoPc /Co magnetic tunnel junctions. Tunnel magnetoresistance and anisotropic tunnel magnetoresistance experiments show that interfacial hybridized electronic states have a unidirectional anisotropy that can be controlled by an electric field and that spin hybridization at the bottom and top interfaces differ, leading to an inverse tunnel magnetoresistance.

  12. Non-Kramers freezing and unfreezing of tunneling in the biaxial spin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovsky, E. M.; Martínez-Hidalgo, X.

    2000-05-01

    The ground state tunnel splitting for the biaxial spin model in the magnetic field, Script H = - DSx2 + ESz2 - gμBSzHz, has been investigated using an instanton approach. We find a new type of spin instanton and a new quantum interference phenomenon associated with it: at a certain field, H2 = 2SE1/2(D + E)1/2/(gμB), the dependence of the tunneling splitting on the field switches from oscillations to a monotonic growth. The predictions of the theory can be tested in Fe8 molecular nanomagnets.

  13. Is spin transport through molecules really occurring in organic spin valves? A combined magnetoresistance and inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Galbiati, Marta; Tatay, Sergio; Delprat, Sophie; Khanh, Hung Le; Deranlot, Cyrile; Collin, Sophie; Seneor, Pierre Mattana, Richard Petroff, Frédéric

    2015-02-23

    Molecular and organic spintronics is an emerging research field which combines the versatility of chemistry with the non-volatility of spintronics. Organic materials have already proved their potential as tunnel barriers (TBs) or spacers in spintronics devices showing sizable spin valve like magnetoresistance effects. In the last years, a large effort has been focused on the optimization of these organic spintronics devices. Insertion of a thin inorganic tunnel barrier (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or MgO) at the bottom ferromagnetic metal (FM)/organic interface seems to improve the spin transport efficiency. However, during the top FM electrode deposition, metal atoms are prone to diffuse through the organic layer and potentially short-circuit it. This may lead to the formation of a working but undesired FM/TB/FM magnetic tunnel junction where the organic plays no role. Indeed, establishing a protocol to demonstrate the effective spin dependent transport through the organic layer remains a key issue. Here, we focus on Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Alq{sub 3}/Co junctions and show that combining magnetoresistance and inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy measurements one can sort out working “organic” and short-circuited junctions fabricated on the same wafer.

  14. Tunable wavevector and spin filtering in graphene induced by resonant tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei-Tao; Li, Wen; Wang, Yong-Long; Jiang, Hua; Xu, Chang-Tan

    2013-08-01

    The resonant tunneling in graphene superlattices with an exchange field is studied theoretically. The results show that a resonant tunneling occurs in the transmission gap by virtue of the transverse wave vector. The position, width, and number of resonant tunneling can be effectively manipulated by adjusting the barrier strength, barrier width, and well width, respectively, which indicates the remarkable wavevector filtering behavior. This resonant effect together with the exchange splitting can be utilized to design an efficient spin filter. It is also found that the energy spectrum in the bound region displays bandlike distribution due to the coupling of eigenstates.

  15. Electric breakdown in ultrathin MgO tunnel barrier junctions for spin-transfer torque switching

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefers, M.; Drewello, V.; Reiss, G.; Thomas, A.; Thiel, K.; Eilers, G.; Muenzenberg, M.; Schuhmann, H.; Seibt, M.

    2009-12-07

    Magnetic tunnel junctions for spin-transfer torque (STT) switching are prepared to investigate the dielectric breakdown. Intact and broken tunnel junctions are characterized by transport measurements prior to transmission electron microscopy analysis. The comparison to our previous model for thicker MgO tunnel barriers reveals a different breakdown mechanism arising from the high current densities in a STT device: instead of local pinhole formation at a constant rate, massive electromigration and heating leads to displacement of the junction material and voids are appearing. This is determined by element resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and three dimensional tomographic reconstruction.

  16. Spin-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/28-Scale Model of a Subsonic Attack Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry A.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation has been made of a 1/28-scale model of the Grumman A-6A airplane in the Langley spin tunnel. The erect spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the flight design gross weight loading and for a loading with full internal fuel and empty external wing fuel tanks. The effects of extending slats and deflecting flaps were investigated. Inverted-spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the flight design gross weight loading. The size of the spin-recovery tail parachute necessary to insure satisfactory spin-recovery was determined, and the effect of firing wing-mounded rockets during spins was investigated.

  17. Low-resistance spin injection into silicon using graphene tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van't Erve, O. M. J.; Friedman, A. L.; Cobas, E.; Li, C. H.; Robinson, J. T.; Jonker, B. T.

    2012-12-01

    Spin manipulation in a semiconductor offers a new paradigm for device operation beyond Moore's law. Ferromagnetic metals are ideal contacts for spin injection and detection, but the intervening tunnel barrier required to accommodate the large difference in conductivity introduces defects, trapped charge and material interdiffusion, which severely compromise performance. Here, we show that single-layer graphene successfully circumvents the classic issue of conductivity mismatch between a metal and a semiconductor for electrical spin injection and detection, providing a highly uniform, chemically inert and thermally robust tunnel barrier. We demonstrate electrical generation and detection of spin accumulation in silicon above room temperature, and show that the contact resistance-area products are two to three orders of magnitude lower than those achieved with oxide tunnel barriers on silicon substrates with identical doping levels. Our results identify a new route to low resistance-area product spin-polarized contacts, a key requirement for semiconductor spintronic devices that rely on two-terminal magnetoresistance, including spin-based transistors, logic and memory.

  18. Hysteresis loops of spin-dependent electronic current in a paramagnetic resonant tunnelling diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, P.; Spisak, B. J.; Wołoszyn, M.; Adamowski, J.

    2012-11-01

    Nonlinear properties of the spin-dependent electronic transport through a semiconductor resonant tunnelling diode with a paramagnetic quantum well are considered. The spin-dependent Wigner-Poisson model of the electronic transport and the two-current Mott’s formula for the independent spin channels are applied to determine the current-voltage curves of the nanodevice. Two types of the electronic current hysteresis loops are found in the current-voltage characteristics for both the spin components of the electronic current. The physical interpretation of these two types of the electronic current hysteresis loops is given based on the analysis of the spin-dependent electron densities and the potential energy profiles. The differences between the current-voltage characteristics for both the spin components of the electronic current allow us to explore the changes of the spin polarization of the current for different electric fields and determine the influence of the electronic current hysteresis on the spin polarization of the current flowing through the paramagnetic resonant tunnelling diode.

  19. Spin and charge thermopower of resonant tunneling diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolau, Javier H.; Sánchez, David

    2014-03-17

    We investigate thermoelectric effects in quantum well systems. Using the scattering approach for coherent conductors, we calculate the thermocurrent and thermopower both in the spin-degenerate case and in the presence of giant Zeeman splitting due to magnetic interactions in the quantum well. We find that the thermoelectric current at linear response is maximal when the well level is aligned with the Fermi energy and is robust against thermal variations. Furthermore, our results show a spin voltage generation in response to the applied thermal bias, giving rise to large spin Seebeck effects tunable with external magnetic fields, quantum well tailoring, and background temperature.

  20. Spin and charge thermopower of resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolau, Javier H.; Sánchez, David

    2014-03-01

    We investigate thermoelectric effects in quantum well systems. Using the scattering approach for coherent conductors, we calculate the thermocurrent and thermopower both in the spin-degenerate case and in the presence of giant Zeeman splitting due to magnetic interactions in the quantum well. We find that the thermoelectric current at linear response is maximal when the well level is aligned with the Fermi energy and is robust against thermal variations. Furthermore, our results show a spin voltage generation in response to the applied thermal bias, giving rise to large spin Seebeck effects tunable with external magnetic fields, quantum well tailoring, and background temperature.

  1. Controlled tunneling-induced dephasing of Rabi rotations for high-fidelity hole spin initialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardelt, P.-L.; Simmet, T.; Müller, K.; Dory, C.; Fischer, K. A.; Bechtold, A.; Kleinkauf, A.; Riedl, H.; Finley, J. J.

    2015-09-01

    We report the subpicosecond initialization of a single heavy hole spin in a self-assembled quantum dot with >98.5 % fidelity and without external magnetic field. Using an optically addressable charge and spin storage device we tailor the relative electron and hole tunneling escape time scales from the dot and simultaneously achieve high-fidelity initialization, long hole storage times, and high-efficiency readout via a photocurrent signal. We measure electric-field-dependent Rabi oscillations of the neutral and charged exciton transitions in the ultrafast tunneling regime and demonstrate that tunneling-induced dephasing (TID) of excitonic Rabi rotations is the major source for the intensity damping of Rabi oscillations in the low Rabi frequency, low temperature regime. Our results are in very good quantitative agreement with quantum-optical simulations revealing that TID can be used to precisely measure tunneling escape times and extract changes in the Coulomb binding energies for different charge configurations of the quantum dot. Finally, we demonstrate that for subpicosecond electron tunneling escape, TID of a coherently driven exciton transition facilitates ultrafast hole spin initialization with near-unity fidelity.

  2. Tunneling Spectroscopy Study of Spin-Polarized Quasiparticle Injection Effects in Cuparate/Manganite Heterostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, J. Y. T.; Yeh, N. C.; Vasquez, R. P.

    1998-01-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy was performed at 4.2K on epitaxial thin-film heterostructures comprising YBa2Cu3O7 and La0.7Ca0.3MnO3, to study the microscopic effects of spin-polarized quasiparticle injection from the half-metallic ferromagnetic manganite on the high-Tc cuprate superconductor.

  3. Vertical Spin Tunnel Testing and Stability Analyses of Earth Entry Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaab, L. J.; Fremaux, C. M.

    2014-06-01

    This report presents results from dynamic stability testing in the NASA LaRC Vertical Spin Tunnel of a series of Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles and subsequent data analysis. Evaluation of a proposed dynamic stability criteria is also performed.

  4. CMOS Interface Circuits for Spin Tunneling Junction Based Magnetic Random Access Memories

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesh Saripalli

    2002-12-31

    Magneto resistive memories (MRAM) are non-volatile memories which use magnetic instead of electrical structures to store data. These memories, apart from being non-volatile, offer a possibility to achieve densities better than DRAMs and speeds faster than SRAMs. MRAMs could potentially replace all computer memory RAM technologies in use today, leading to future applications like instan-on computers and longer battery life for pervasive devices. Such rapid development was made possible due to the recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in Spin tunneling junction devices. Spin tunneling junctions (STJ) are composite structures consisting of a thin insulating layer sandwiched between two magnetic layers. This thesis research is targeted towards these spin tunneling junction based Magnetic memories. In any memory, some kind of an interface circuit is needed to read the logic states. In this thesis, four such circuits are proposed and designed for Magnetic memories (MRAM). These circuits interface to the Spin tunneling junctions and act as sense amplifiers to read their magnetic states. The physical structure and functional characteristics of these circuits are discussed in this thesis. Mismatch effects on the circuits and proper design techniques are also presented. To demonstrate the functionality of these interface structures, test circuits were designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.35{micro} CMOS process. Also circuits to characterize the process mismatches were fabricated and tested. These results were then used in Matlab programs to aid in design process and to predict interface circuit's yields.

  5. Enhanced thermal spin transfer in MgO-based double-barrier tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xingtao; Wang, Shizhuo; Qin, Minghui

    2016-06-01

    Based on atomic first principles, we predict enhanced thermal spin transfer (TST) effects and small switching temperature gradient in Fe | MgO | Fe | MgO | Fe double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). At room temperature, temperature gradient {{Δ }}T ∼10 {{K}} with {{\

  6. Absence of a spin-signature from a single Ho adatom as probed by spin-sensitive tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrecher, M.; Sonntag, A.; Dias, M. Dos Santos; Bouhassoune, M.; Lounis, S.; Wiebe, J.; Wiesendanger, R.; Khajetoorians, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Whether rare-earth materials can be used as single-atom magnetic memory is an ongoing debate in recent literature. Here we show, by inelastic and spin-resolved scanning tunnelling-based methods, that we observe a strong magnetic signal and excitation from Fe atoms adsorbed on Pt(111), but see no signatures of magnetic excitation or spin-based telegraph noise for Ho atoms. Moreover, we observe that the indirect exchange field produced by a single Ho atom is negligible, as sensed by nearby Fe atoms. We demonstrate, using ab initio methods, that this stems from a comparatively weak coupling of the Ho 4f electrons with both tunnelling electrons and substrate-derived itinerant electrons, making both magnetic coupling and detection very difficult when compared to 3d elements. We discuss these results in the context of ongoing disputes and clarify important controversies.

  7. Absence of a spin-signature from a single Ho adatom as probed by spin-sensitive tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Steinbrecher, M.; Sonntag, A.; Dias, M. dos Santos; Bouhassoune, M.; Lounis, S.; Wiebe, J.; Wiesendanger, R.; Khajetoorians, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Whether rare-earth materials can be used as single-atom magnetic memory is an ongoing debate in recent literature. Here we show, by inelastic and spin-resolved scanning tunnelling-based methods, that we observe a strong magnetic signal and excitation from Fe atoms adsorbed on Pt(111), but see no signatures of magnetic excitation or spin-based telegraph noise for Ho atoms. Moreover, we observe that the indirect exchange field produced by a single Ho atom is negligible, as sensed by nearby Fe atoms. We demonstrate, using ab initio methods, that this stems from a comparatively weak coupling of the Ho 4f electrons with both tunnelling electrons and substrate-derived itinerant electrons, making both magnetic coupling and detection very difficult when compared to 3d elements. We discuss these results in the context of ongoing disputes and clarify important controversies. PMID:26838811

  8. Controlling spin-dependent tunneling by bandgap tuning in epitaxial rocksalt MgZnO films

    PubMed Central

    Li, D. L.; Ma, Q. L.; Wang, S. G.; Ward, R. C. C.; Hesjedal, T.; Zhang, X.-G.; Kohn, A.; Amsellem, E.; Yang, G.; Liu, J. L.; Jiang, J.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F.

    2014-01-01

    Widespread application of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) for information storage has so far been limited by the complicated interplay between tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio and the product of resistance and junction area (RA). An intricate connection exists between TMR ratio, RA value and the bandgap and crystal structure of the barrier, a connection that must be unravelled to optimise device performance and enable further applications to be developed. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to tailor the bandgap of an ultrathin, epitaxial Zn-doped MgO tunnel barrier with rocksalt structure. This structure is attractive due to its good Δ1 spin filtering effect, and we show that MTJs based on tunable MgZnO barriers allow effective balancing of TMR ratio and RA value. In this way spin-dependent transport properties can be controlled, a key challenge for the development of spintronic devices. PMID:25451163

  9. Controlling spin-dependent tunneling by bandgap tuning in epitaxial rocksalt MgZnO films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, D. L.; Ma, Q. L.; Wang, S. G.; Ward, R. C. C.; Hesjedal, T.; Zhang, X. -G.; Kohn, A.; Amsellem, E.; Yang, G.; Liu, J. L.; et al

    2014-12-02

    Widespread application of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) for information storage has so far been limited by the complicated interplay between tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio and the product of resistance and junction area (RA). An intricate connection exists between TMR ratio, RA value and the bandgap and crystal structure of the barrier, a connection that must be unravelled to optimise device performance and enable further applications to be developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel method to tailor the bandgap of an ultrathin, epitaxial Zn-doped MgO tunnel barrier with rocksalt structure. This structure is attractive due to its good Δ1more » spin filtering effect, and we show that MTJs based on tunable MgZnO barriers allow effective balancing of TMR ratio and RA value. Finally, in this way spin-dependent transport properties can be controlled, a key challenge for the development of spintronic devices.« less

  10. Controlling spin-dependent tunneling by bandgap tuning in epitaxial rocksalt MgZnO films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D. L.; Ma, Q. L.; Wang, S. G.; Ward, R. C. C.; Hesjedal, T.; Zhang, X. -G.; Kohn, A.; Amsellem, E.; Yang, G.; Liu, J. L.; Jiang, J.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F.

    2014-12-02

    Widespread application of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) for information storage has so far been limited by the complicated interplay between tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio and the product of resistance and junction area (RA). An intricate connection exists between TMR ratio, RA value and the bandgap and crystal structure of the barrier, a connection that must be unravelled to optimise device performance and enable further applications to be developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel method to tailor the bandgap of an ultrathin, epitaxial Zn-doped MgO tunnel barrier with rocksalt structure. This structure is attractive due to its good Δ1 spin filtering effect, and we show that MTJs based on tunable MgZnO barriers allow effective balancing of TMR ratio and RA value. Finally, in this way spin-dependent transport properties can be controlled, a key challenge for the development of spintronic devices.

  11. Intrinsic oscillations of spin current polarization in a paramagnetic resonant tunneling diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, P.; Adamowski, J.; Wołoszyn, M.; Spisak, B. J.

    2012-10-01

    A spin- and time-dependent electron transport has been studied in a paramagnetic resonant tunneling diode using the self-consistent Wigner-Poisson method. Based on the calculated current-voltage characteristics in an external magnetic field, we have demonstrated that under a constant bias both the spin-up and spin-down current components exhibit the THz oscillations in two different bias voltage regimes. We have shown that the oscillations of the spin-up (down) polarized current result from the coupling between the two resonance states: one localized in the triangular quantum well created in the emitter region and the second localized in the main quantum well. We have also elaborated the one-electron model of the current oscillations, which confirms the results obtained with the Wigner-Poisson method. The spin current oscillations can lower the effectiveness of spin filters based on the paramagnetic resonant tunneling structures and can be used to design the generators of the spin polarized current THz oscillations that can operate under the steady bias and constant magnetic field.

  12. Spin-wave thermal population as temperature probe in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Goff, A.; Nikitin, V.; Devolder, T.

    2016-07-01

    We study whether a direct measurement of the absolute temperature of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) can be performed using the high frequency electrical noise that it delivers under a finite voltage bias. Our method includes quasi-static hysteresis loop measurements of the MTJ, together with the field-dependence of its spin wave noise spectra. We rely on an analytical modeling of the spectra by assuming independent fluctuations of the different sub-systems of the tunnel junction that are described as macrospin fluctuators. We illustrate our method on perpendicularly magnetized MgO-based MTJs patterned in 50 × 100 nm2 nanopillars. We apply hard axis (in-plane) fields to let the magnetic thermal fluctuations yield finite conductance fluctuations of the MTJ. Instead of the free layer fluctuations that are observed to be affected by both spin-torque and temperature, we use the magnetization fluctuations of the sole reference layers. Their much stronger anisotropy and their much heavier damping render them essentially immune to spin-torque. We illustrate our method by determining current-induced heating of the perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junction at voltages similar to those used in spin-torque memory applications. The absolute temperature can be deduced with a precision of ±60 K, and we can exclude any substantial heating at the spin-torque switching voltage.

  13. Resonant TMR inversion in LiF/EuS based spin-filter tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fen; Yang, Yihang; Xue, Qian; Gao, Zhiwei; Chen, Aixi; Miao, Guo-Xing

    2016-08-01

    Resonant tunneling can lead to inverse tunnel magnetoresistance when impurity levels rather than direct tunneling dominate the transport process. We fabricated hybrid magnetic tunnel junctions of CoFe/LiF/EuS/Ti, with an epitaxial LiF energy barrier joined with a polycrystalline EuS spin-filter barrier. Due to the water solubility of LiF, the devices were fully packaged in situ. The devices showed sizeable positive TMR up to 16% at low bias voltages but clearly inverted TMR at higher bias voltages. The TMR inversion depends sensitively on the thickness of LiF, and the tendency of inversion disappears when LiF gets thick enough and recovers its intrinsic properties.

  14. Observation of thermally driven field-like spin torque in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Arnab; Shukla, Amit Kumar; Konishi, Katsunori; Jain, Sourabh; Asam, Nagarjuna; Bhuktare, Swapnil; Singh, Hanuman; Lam, Duc Duong; Fujii, Yuya; Miwa, Shinji; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Tulapurkar, Ashwin A.

    2016-07-01

    We report the thermally driven giant field-like spin-torque in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) on application of heat current from top to bottom. The field-like term is detected by the shift of the magneto-resistance hysteresis loop applying temperature gradient. We observed that the field-like term depends on the magnetic symmetry of the MTJ. In asymmetric structures, with different ferromagnetic materials for free and fixed layers, the field-like term is greatly enhanced. Our results show that a pure spin current density of the order of 109 A/m2 can be produced by creating a 120 mK temperature difference across 0.9 nm thick MgO tunnelling barrier. Our results will be useful for writing MTJ and domain wall-based memories using thermally driven spin torque.

  15. Quantum interference effect in electron tunneling through a quantum-dot-ring spin valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jing-Min; Zhao, Jia; Zhang, Kai-Cheng; Peng, Ya-Jing; Chi, Feng

    2011-12-01

    Spin-dependent transport through a quantum-dot (QD) ring coupled to ferromagnetic leads with noncollinear magnetizations is studied theoretically. Tunneling current, current spin polarization and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as functions of the bias voltage and the direct coupling strength between the two leads are analyzed by the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. It is shown that the magnitudes of these quantities are sensitive to the relative angle between the leads' magnetic moments and the quantum interference effect originated from the inter-lead coupling. We pay particular attention on the Coulomb blockade regime and find the relative current magnitudes of different magnetization angles can be reversed by tuning the inter-lead coupling strength, resulting in sign change of the TMR. For large enough inter-lead coupling strength, the current spin polarizations for parallel and antiparallel magnetic configurations will approach to unit and zero, respectively. PACS numbers:

  16. Enhanced spin-torque in double tunnel junctions using a nonmagnetic-metal spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. H.; Cheng, Y. H.; Ko, C. W.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2015-10-12

    This study proposes an enhancement in the spin-transfer torque of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) designed with double-barrier layer structure using a nonmagnetic metal spacer, as a replacement for the ferromagnetic material, which is traditionally used in these double-barrier stacks. Our calculation results show that the spin-transfer torque and charge current density of the proposed double-barrier MTJ can be as much as two orders of magnitude larger than the traditional double-barrier one. In other words, the proposed double-barrier MTJ has a spin-transfer torque that is three orders larger than that of the single-barrier stack. This improvement may be attributed to the quantum-well states that are formed in the nonmagnetic metal spacer and the resonant tunneling mechanism that exists throughout the system.

  17. Spin injection studies on thin film Fe/MgO/Si tunneling devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Jonas; Pu, Yong; Swartz, Adrian; Bhallamudi, Vidya; Kawakami, Roland; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel; Hammel, Chris; Pelz, Jon

    2011-03-01

    We report progress on the injection of spin polarized electrons into 35 nm thick Si films, using Fe/MgO injector/tunnel barrier structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy on SIMOX silicon-on-insulator substrates. The device requires heavy top-surface n-type doping of the Si film to produce a suitable tunnel barrier, accomplished by diffusion from a spin-on phosphorous-doped glass. Measurements indicate a roughly exponential doping profile with 7E20 per cubic cm at the top surface and a 2 nm decay length. Three terminal measurements showed evidence of spin injection similar to reports of Jansen et al., while injection with a thinner MgO barrier shows more complicated behavior. On-going measurements and modeling will be discussed.

  18. Modulation of spin transfer torque amplitude in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Clément, P.-Y.; Baraduc, C. Chshiev, M.; Diény, B.; Ducruet, C.; Vila, L.

    2015-09-07

    Magnetization switching induced by spin transfer torque is used to write magnetic memories (Magnetic Random Access Memory, MRAM) but can be detrimental to the reading process. It would be quite convenient therefore to modulate the efficiency of spin transfer torque. A solution is adding an extra degree of freedom by using double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with two spin-polarizers, with controllable relative magnetic alignment. We demonstrate, for these structures, that the amplitude of in-plane spin transfer torque on the middle free layer can be efficiently tuned via the magnetic configuration of the electrodes. Using the proposed design could thus pave the way towards more reliable read/write schemes for MRAM. Moreover, our results suggest an intriguing effect associated with the out-of-plane (field-like) spin transfer torque, which has to be further investigated.

  19. Electron tunneling in lithium-ammonia solutions probed by frequency-dependent electron spin relaxation studies.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T J; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H; Edwards, Peter P

    2012-06-01

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T(1)) and spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multiexponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1-10) × 10(-12) s over a temperature range 230-290 K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a time scale of ∼10(-13) s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great

  20. Spin-torque shot noise in magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Chudnovskiy, A L; Swiebodzinski, J; Kamenev, A

    2008-08-01

    A spin polarized current may transfer angular momentum to a ferromagnet, resulting in a spin-torque phenomenon. At the same time the shot noise, associated with the current, leads to a nonequilibrium stochastic force acting on the ferromagnet. We derive a stochastic version of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for a magnetization of a "free" ferromagnetic layer in contact with a "fixed" ferromagnet. We solve the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation and show that the nonequilibrium noise yields to a nonmonotonic dependence of the precession spectrum linewidth on the current. PMID:18764485

  1. Electrical spin injection and detection in silicon nanowires through oxide tunnel barriers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shixiong; Dayeh, Shadi A; Li, Yan; Crooker, Scott A; Smith, Darryl L; Picraux, S T

    2013-02-13

    We demonstrate all-electrical spin injection, transport, and detection in heavily n-type-doped Si nanowires using ferromagnetic Co/Al(2)O(3) tunnel barrier contacts. Analysis of both local and nonlocal spin valve signals at 4 K on the same nanowire device using a standard spin-transport model suggests that high spin injection efficiency (up to ~30%) and long spin diffusion lengths (up to ~6 μm) are achieved. These values exceed those reported for spin transport devices based on comparably doped bulk Si. The spin valve signals are found to be strongly bias and temperature dependent and can invert sign with changes in the dc bias current. The influence of the nanowire morphology on field-dependent switching of the contacts is also discussed. Owing to their nanoscale geometry, ~5 orders of magnitude less current is required to achieve nonlocal spin valve voltages comparable to those attained in planar microscale spin transport devices, suggesting lower power consumption and the potential for applications of Si nanowires in nanospintronics. PMID:23324028

  2. Resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of Mn12 acetate

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lendínez, S.; Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Terban, M. W.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Espin, J.; Imaz, I.; Maspoch, D.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-01-06

    We report measurements and theoretical analysis of resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of a molecular magnet. Amorphous nanospheres of Mn₁₂ acetate have been fabricated and characterized by chemical, infrared, TEM, X-ray, and magnetic methods. Magnetic measurements have revealed sharp tunneling peaks in the field derivative of the magnetization that occur at the typical resonant field values for the Mn₁₂ acetate crystal in the field parallel to the easy axis.Theoretical analysis is provided that explains these observations. We argue that resonant spin tunneling in a molecular magnet can be established in a powder sample, without the need for amore » single crystal and without aligning the easy magnetization axes of the molecules. This is confirmed by re-analyzing the old data on a powdered sample of non-oriented micron-size crystals of Mn₁₂ acetate. In conclusion, our findings can greatly simplify the selection of candidates for quantum spin tunneling among newly synthesized molecular magnets.« less

  3. Controlling electronic access to the spin excitations of a single molecule in a tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.; Warner, Ben; El Hallak, Fadi; Prueser, Henning; Ajibade, Afolabi; Gill, Tobias G.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Persson, Mats

    Spintronic phenomena can be utilized to create new devices with applications in data storage and sensing. Scaling these down to the single molecule level requires controlling the properties of the current-carrying orbitals to enable access to spin states through phenomena such as inelastic electron tunneling. Here we show that the spintronic properties of a tunnel junction containing a single molecule can be controlled by their coupling to the local environment. For tunneling through iron phthalocyanine (FePc) on an insulating copper nitride (Cu2N) monolayer above Cu(001), we find that spin transitions may be strongly excited depending on the binding site of the central Fe atom. Different interactions between the Fe and the underlying Cu or N atoms shift the Fe d-orbitals with respect to the Fermi energy, and control the relative strength of the spin excitations, an effect that can described in a simple co-tunneling model. This work demonstrates the importance of the atomic-scale environment in the development of single molecule spintronic devices.

  4. Electrical spin injection into GaAs based light emitting diodes using perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction-type spin injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, B. S.; Barate, P.; Frougier, J.; Renucci, P.; Xu, B.; Djeffal, A.; Jaffrès, H.; George, J.-M.; Marie, X.; Petit-Watelot, S.; Mangin, S.; Han, X. F.; Wang, Z. G.; Lu, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Remanent electrical spin injection into an InGaAs/GaAs based quantum well light emitting diode is realized by using a perpendicularly magnetized MgO/CoFeB/Ta/CoFeB/MgO spin injector. We demonstrate that the Ta interlayer plays an important role to establish the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and the thickness of Ta interlayer determines the type of exchange coupling between the two adjacent CoFeB layers. They are ferromagnetically or antiferromagnetically coupled for a Ta thickness of 0.5 nm or 0.75 nm, respectively. A circular polarized electroluminescence (Pc) of about 10% is obtained at low temperature and at zero magnetic field. The direction of the electrically injected spins is determined only by the orientation of the magnetization of the bottom CoFeB layer which is adjacent to the MgO/GaAs interface. This work proves the critical role of the bottom CoFeB/MgO interface on the spin-injection and paves the way for the electrical control of spin injection via magnetic tunnel junction-type spin injector.

  5. Spin-1 atoms in optical superlattices: Single-atom tunneling and entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Andreas; Bruder, Christoph; Demler, Eugene

    2011-12-15

    We examine spinor Bose-Einstein condensates in optical superlattices theoretically using a Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian that takes spin effects into account. Assuming that a small number of spin-1 bosons is loaded in an optical potential, we study single-particle tunneling that occurs when one lattice site is ramped up relative to a neighboring site. Spin-dependent effects modify the tunneling events in a qualitative and quantitative way. Depending on the asymmetry of the double well, different types of magnetic order occur, making the system of spin-1 bosons in an optical superlattice a model for mesoscopic magnetism. We use a double-well potential as a unit cell for a one-dimensional superlattice. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous magnetic fields are applied, and the effects of the linear and the quadratic Zeeman shifts are examined. We also investigate the bipartite entanglement between the sites and construct states of maximal entanglement. The entanglement in our system is due to both orbital and spin degrees of freedom. We calculate the contribution of orbital and spin entanglements and show that the sum of these two terms gives a lower bound for the total entanglement.

  6. Macroscopic Measurement of Resonant Magnetization Tunneling in High-Spin Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, M. P.; Tejada, J.; Ziolo, R.

    1996-05-01

    We report the observation of steps at regular intervals of magnetic field in the hysteresis loop of a macroscopic sample of oriented Mn12O12(CH3COO)16(H2O)4 crystals. The magnetic relaxation rate increases substantially when the field is tuned to a step. We propose that these effects are manifestations of thermally assisted, field-tuned resonant tunneling between quantum spin states, and attribute the observation of quantum-mechanical phenomena on a macroscopic scale to tunneling in a large (Avogadro's) number of magnetically identical molecules.

  7. Negative tunneling magneto-resistance in quantum wires with strong spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seungju; Serra, Llorenç; Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2015-06-01

    We consider a two-dimensional magnetic tunnel junction of the FM/I/QW(FM+SO)/I/N structure, where FM, I and QW(FM+SO) stand for a ferromagnet, an insulator and a quantum wire with both magnetic ordering and Rashba spin-orbit (SOC), respectively. The tunneling magneto-resistance (TMR) exhibits strong anisotropy and switches sign as the polarization direction varies relative to the quantum-wire axis, due to interplay among the one-dimensionality, the magnetic ordering, and the strong SOC of the quantum wire.

  8. Nonlinear and Nonequilibrium Spin Injection in Magnetic Tunneling Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hong

    2007-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of charge and spin quantum transport in spintronic devices requires an atomistic first principles approach that can handle nonlinear and nonequilibrium transport conditions. We have developed an approach for this purpose based on real space density functional theory (DFT) carried out within the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function formalism (NEGF). We report theoretical analysis of nonlinear and nonequilibrium spin injection and quantum transport in Fe/MgO/Fe trilayer structures as a function of external bias voltage. Devices with well relaxed atomic structures and with FeO oxidization layers are investigated as a function of external bias voltage. We also report calculations of nonequilibrium spin injection into molecular layers and graphene. Comparisons to experimental data will be presented. Work in collaborations with: Derek Waldron, Vladimir Timochevski (McGill University); Ke Xia (Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, China); Eric Zhu, Jian Wang (University of Hong Kong); Paul Haney, and Allan MacDonald (University of Texas at Austin).

  9. Comparison of Magnetization Tunneling in the Giant-Spin and Multi-Spin Descriptions of Single-Molecule Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junjie; Del Barco, Enrique; Hill, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    We perform a mapping of the spectrum obtained for a triangular Mn3 single-molecule magnet (SMM) with idealized C3 symmetry via exact diagonalization of a multi-spin (MS) Hamiltonian onto that of a giant-spin (GS) model which assumes strong ferromagnetic coupling and a spin S = 6 ground state. Magnetic hysteresis measurements on this Mn3 SMM reveal clear evidence that the steps in magnetization due to magnetization tunneling obey the expected quantum mechanical selection rules [J. Henderson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 017202 (2009)]. High-frequency EPR and magnetization data are first fit to the MS model. The tunnel splittings obtained via the two models are then compared in order to find a relationship between the sixth order transverse anisotropy term B6^6 in GS model and the exchange constant J coupling the Mn^III ions in the MS model. We also find that the fourth order transverse term B4^3 in the GS model is related to the orientation of JahnTeller axes of Mn^III ions, as well as J

  10. Hanle measurements of electrodeposited Fe/GaAs spin tunnel contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, Sarmita; Hohertz, Donna; McNeil, James; Kavanagh, Karen L.; SpringThorpe, Anthony

    2014-03-28

    We report spin transport in electrodeposited Fe/n-GaAs tunnel diodes via three-terminal Hanle measurements. For temperatures between 20 K and 150 K, the spin resistance was up to 20 times higher than expected from theoretical calculations and 1000 times larger compared to a vacuum-deposited counterpart. This higher spin resistance was correlated with a higher contact resistance, and a higher concentration of oxygen impurities in the electrodeposited Fe film and interface, as detected via x-ray photoelectron and Auger spectroscopies, and inferred from Fe film nucleation rates. These results can be explained via a small effective tunnel-contact area of 5%, but extra spin filtering via interfacial states or magnetic oxide layers cannot be ruled out. The spin diffusion times (8.5 ± 0.4 ns to 1.8 ± 0.4 ns, for 20 K to 150 K) extracted from Lorentzian fits were in good agreement with values obtained from earlier 4-terminal Hanle measurements (7.8 ± 0.4 ns to 3.2 ± 0.4 ns, for 25 K to 77 K), both 10 times slower than reported vacuum-deposited contacts.

  11. Edge-state-dependent tunneling of dipole-exchange spin waves in submicrometer magnetic strips with an air gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, X. J.; Zhang, D.; Li, S. W.

    2012-12-01

    We have investigated the tunneling of dipole-exchange spin waves across an air gap in submicrometer-sized permalloy magnetic strips by means of micromagnetic simulations. The magnetizations beside the gap could form three distinct end-domain states with various strengths of dipolar coupling. Spin-wave tunneling through the gap at individual end-domain states is studied. It is found that the tunneling behavior is strongly dependent on these domain states. Nonmonotonic decay of transmission of spin waves with the increase of the gap width is observed. The underlying mechanism for these behaviors is proposed. The tunneling characteristics of the dipole-exchange spin waves differ essentially from those of the magnetostatic ones reported previously.

  12. Twist in the bias dependence of spin torques in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyn, Sören; Sampaio, João; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Fukushima, Akio; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yakushiji, Kay; Yuasa, Shinji

    2016-06-01

    The spin torque in magnetic tunnel junctions possesses two components that both depend on the applied voltage. Here, we develop a method for the accurate extraction of this bias dependence from experiments over large voltage ranges. We study several junctions with different magnetic layer structures of the top electrode. Our results obtained on junctions with symmetric CoFeB electrodes agree well with theoretical calculations. The bias dependences of asymmetric samples, with top electrodes containing NiFe, however, are twisted compared to the quadratic form generally assumed. Our measurements reveal the complexity of spin-torque mechanisms at large bias.

  13. Dynamical properties of three terminal magnetic tunnel junctions: Spintronics meets spin-orbitronics

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasello, R.; Carpentieri, M.; Finocchio, G.

    2013-12-16

    This Letter introduces a micromagnetic model able to characterize the magnetization dynamics in three terminal magnetic tunnel junctions, where the effects of spin-transfer torque and spin-orbit torque are taken into account. Our results predict that the possibility to separate electrically those two torque sources is very promising from a technological point of view for both next generation of nanoscale spintronic oscillators and microwave detectors. A scalable synchronization scheme based on the parallel connection of those three terminal devices is also proposed.

  14. Negative spin polarization of Mn2VGa probed by tunnel magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Klewe, Christoph; Meinert, Markus; Schmalhorst, Jan; Reiss, Günter

    2013-02-20

    The ferrimagnetic Heusler compound Mn(2)VGa is predicted to have a pseudogap in the majority spin channel, which should lead to a negative tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR). We synthesized epitaxial Mn(2)VGa thin films on MgO(001) substrates by dc and rf magnetron co-sputtering, resulting in nearly stoichiometric films. XRD analysis revealed a mostly B2 ordered structure for the films deposited at substrate temperatures of 350, 450, and 550 °C. Magnetic tunnel junctions with MgO barriers and CoFe counter-electrodes were fabricated. After post-annealing at up to T(a) = 425 °C negative TMR was obtained around zero bias, providing evidence for inverted spin polarization. The band structures of both electrodes were computed within the coherent potential approximation and used to calculate the TMR(V) characteristics, which were in good agreement with our experimental findings. PMID:23327939

  15. Spin-orbit torque magnetization switching of a three-terminal perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubukcu, Murat; Boulle, Olivier; Drouard, Marc; Garello, Kevin; Onur Avci, Can; Mihai Miron, Ioan; Langer, Juergen; Ocker, Berthold; Gambardella, Pietro; Gaudin, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    We report on the current-induced magnetization switching of a three-terminal perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction by spin-orbit torque and its read-out using the tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. The device is composed of a perpendicular Ta/FeCoB/MgO/FeCoB stack on top of a Ta current line. The magnetization of the bottom FeCoB layer can be switched reproducibly by the injection of current pulses with density 5 × 1011 A/m2 in the Ta layer in the presence of an in-plane bias magnetic field, leading to the full-scale change of the TMR signal. Our work demonstrates the proof of concept of a perpendicular spin-orbit torque magnetic memory cell.

  16. Macroscopic Measurement of Resonant Magnetization Tunneling in High-Spin Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, M. P.; Tejada, J.; Maciejewski, J.; Ziolo, R.

    1996-03-01

    We report the observation of steps in the hysteresis loop of a macroscopic sample of oriented crystals of Mn_12O_12(CH_3COO)_16(H_2O)_4, a high-spin (S=10) molecule. The steps occur at regular intervals of magnetic field, every 0.46 T. The magnetic relaxation rate increases substantially when the field is tuned to a step. We interpret these effects as manifestations of thermally assisted, field-tuned resonant tunneling between quantum spin states. A simple model is presented that accounts for the observations and yields good quantitative agreement with measured values of the anisotropy barrier. We attribute the observation of quantum-mechanical phenomena on a macroscopic scale to tunneling in a large (Avogadro's) number of magnetically identical molecules.

  17. Spin orbital torque driven magnetization switching in magnetic tunnel junction with inter-layer exchange coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Lei; Ma, Zhongshui; Wei, Dan

    2015-01-14

    The switching processes of elliptically shaped magnetic tunnel junction bits with the structure Ta/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB have been studied by the micromagnetic models. By comparing the tunneling magneto-resistance minor and major loops calculated by our model with related experimental results, we found that the inter-layer exchange coupling between the two CoFeB layers and a reduced saturation magnetization M{sub s} distribution at the edge of the elliptical bit should be included. The chosen strength of the inter-layer exchange coupling also matches well with experimental observations. The current induced magnetization switching is generated from the spin Hall effect in the Ta layer. The critical switching currents calculated by our model are coincident with experiment. This shows the reliability of our micromagnetic model with the spin orbital torque term.

  18. Spin-orbit torque magnetization switching of a three-terminal perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Cubukcu, Murat; Boulle, Olivier; Drouard, Marc; Mihai Miron, Ioan; Gaudin, Gilles; Langer, Juergen; Ocker, Berthold

    2014-01-27

    We report on the current-induced magnetization switching of a three-terminal perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction by spin-orbit torque and its read-out using the tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. The device is composed of a perpendicular Ta/FeCoB/MgO/FeCoB stack on top of a Ta current line. The magnetization of the bottom FeCoB layer can be switched reproducibly by the injection of current pulses with density 5 × 10{sup 11} A/m{sup 2} in the Ta layer in the presence of an in-plane bias magnetic field, leading to the full-scale change of the TMR signal. Our work demonstrates the proof of concept of a perpendicular spin-orbit torque magnetic memory cell.

  19. Resistive switching and voltage induced modulation of tunneling magnetoresistance in nanosized perpendicular organic spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göckeritz, Robert; Homonnay, Nico; Müller, Alexander; Fuhrmann, Bodo; Schmidt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale multifunctional perpendicular organic spin valves have been fabricated. The devices based on an La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/Alq3/Co trilayer show resistive switching of up to 4-5 orders of magnitude and magnetoresistance as high as -70% the latter even changing sign when voltage pulses are applied. This combination of phenomena is typically observed in multiferroic tunnel junctions where it is attributed to magnetoelectric coupling between a ferromagnet and a ferroelectric material. Modeling indicates that here the switching originates from a modification of the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 surface. This modification influences the tunneling of charge carriers and thus both the electrical resistance and the tunneling magnetoresistance which occurs at pinholes in the organic layer.

  20. Observation of spin-dependent quantum well resonant tunneling in textured CoFeB layers

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, J. M. Costa, J. D.; Ventura, J.; Sousa, J. B.; Wisniowski, P.; Freitas, P. P.

    2014-03-17

    We report the observation of spin-dependent quantum well (QW) resonant tunneling in textured CoFeB free layers of single MgO magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy spectra clearly show the presence of resonant oscillations in the parallel configuration, which are related with the appearance of majority-spin Δ{sub 1} QW states in the CoFeB free layer. To gain a quantitative understanding, we calculated QW state positions in the voltage-thickness plane using the so-called phase accumulation model (PAM) and compared the PAM solutions with the experimental resonant voltages observed for a set of MTJs with different CoFeB free layer thicknesses (t{sub fl} = 1.55, 1.65, 1.95, and 3.0 nm). An overall good agreement between experiment and theory was obtained. An enhancement of the tunnel magnetoresistance with bias is observed in a bias voltage region corresponding to the resonant oscillations.

  1. Spin Dynamics and Quantum Tunneling in Fe8 Nanomagnet and in AFM Rings by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Seung-Ho-Baek

    2004-12-19

    In this thesis, our main interest has been to investigate the spin dynamics and quantum tunneling in single molecule magnets (SMMs), For this we have selected two different classes of SMMs: a ferrimagnetic total high spin S = 10 cluster Fe8 and antiferromagnetic (AFM) ring-type clusters. For Fe8, our efforts have been devoted to the investigation of the quantum tunneling of magnetization in the very low temperature region. The most remarkable experimental finding in Fe8 is that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T{sub l}) at low temperatures takes place via strong collision mechanism, and thus it allows to measure directly the tunneling rate vs T and H for the first time. For AFM rings, we have shown that 1/T{sub l} probes the thermal fluctuations of the magnetization in the intermediate temperature range. We find that the fluctuations are dominated by a single characteristic frequency which has a power law T-dependence indicative of fluctuations due to electron-acoustic phonon interactions.

  2. Ultrafast demagnetization enhancement in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunneling junction driven by spin tunneling current

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Zhu, Tao; Zhang, Xiang-Qun; Yang, Hai-Tao; Cheng, Zhao-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The laser-induced ultrafast demagnetization of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunneling junction is exploited by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TRMOKE) for both the parallel state (P state) and the antiparallel state (AP state) of the magnetizations between two magnetic layers. It was observed that the demagnetization time is shorter and the magnitude of demagnetization is larger in the AP state than those in the P state. These behaviors are attributed to the ultrafast spin transfer between two CoFeB layers via the tunneling of hot electrons through the MgO barrier. Our observation indicates that ultrafast demagnetization can be engineered by the hot electrons tunneling current. It opens the door to manipulate the ultrafast spin current in magnetic tunneling junctions. PMID:24097037

  3. Ultrafast demagnetization enhancement in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunneling junction driven by spin tunneling current.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Zhu, Tao; Zhang, Xiang-Qun; Yang, Hai-Tao; Cheng, Zhao-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The laser-induced ultrafast demagnetization of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunneling junction is exploited by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TRMOKE) for both the parallel state (P state) and the antiparallel state (AP state) of the magnetizations between two magnetic layers. It was observed that the demagnetization time is shorter and the magnitude of demagnetization is larger in the AP state than those in the P state. These behaviors are attributed to the ultrafast spin transfer between two CoFeB layers via the tunneling of hot electrons through the MgO barrier. Our observation indicates that ultrafast demagnetization can be engineered by the hot electrons tunneling current. It opens the door to manipulate the ultrafast spin current in magnetic tunneling junctions. PMID:24097037

  4. Ultrafast demagnetization enhancement in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunneling junction driven by spin tunneling current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Zhu, Tao; Zhang, Xiang-Qun; Yang, Hai-Tao; Cheng, Zhao-Hua

    2013-10-01

    The laser-induced ultrafast demagnetization of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunneling junction is exploited by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TRMOKE) for both the parallel state (P state) and the antiparallel state (AP state) of the magnetizations between two magnetic layers. It was observed that the demagnetization time is shorter and the magnitude of demagnetization is larger in the AP state than those in the P state. These behaviors are attributed to the ultrafast spin transfer between two CoFeB layers via the tunneling of hot electrons through the MgO barrier. Our observation indicates that ultrafast demagnetization can be engineered by the hot electrons tunneling current. It opens the door to manipulate the ultrafast spin current in magnetic tunneling junctions.

  5. CoFe alloy as middle layer for strong spin dependent quantum well resonant tunneling in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R. S.; Yang, See-Hun; Jiang, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Rice, Philip M.; Canali, Carlo M.; Parkin, S. S. P.

    2013-01-01

    We report the spin-dependent quantum well resonant tunneling effect in CoFe/MgO/CoFe/MgO/CoFeB (CoFe) double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions. The dI/dV spectra reveal clear resonant peaks for the parallel magnetization configurations, which can be matched to quantum well resonances obtained from calculation. The differential TMR exhibits an oscillatory behavior with a sign change due to the formation of the spin-dependent QW states in the middle CoFe layer. Also, we observe pronounced TMR enhancement at resonant voltages at room temperature, suggesting that it is very promising to achieve high TMR using the spin-dependent QW resonant tunneling effect.

  6. Resonant tunneling between two-dimensional layers accounting for spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Lähderanta, E.

    2016-05-01

    We present a theory of quantum tunneling between two-dimensional (2D) layers with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction (SOI) in the layers. Accounting for SOI in the layers leads to a complex pattern in the tunneling characteristic with typical features corresponding to SOI energy. The resonant features strongly depend on the SOI parameters; for clear experimental observation the SOI characteristic energy should exceed the resonant broadening related to the particles' quantum lifetime in the layers. It appears that the experiments on hole tunneling are favorable to meet this criterion. We also consider a promising candidate for observing the effect, that is, p -doped SiGe strained heterostructures. As supported by our calculations, small adjustments of the parameters for experimentally studied AlGaAs/GaAs p -type quantum walls or designing a 2D-2D tunneling experiment for recently fabricated SiGe structures are very likely to reveal the SOI features in the 2D-2D tunneling.

  7. Rotational Excitation Spectroscopy with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope - Distinction of Nuclear Spin States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natterer, Fabian Donat; Patthey, François; Brune, Harald

    2014-03-01

    The appeal of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) stems from its unmatched spatial resolution and the ability to measure the magnetic, electronic and vibrational properties of individual atoms and molecules. Rotational excitations of molecules could provide additional information of surface processes but have hitherto remained elusive. Here we demonstrate rotational excitation spectroscopy (RES) with the STM for hydrogen and its isotopes on graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. Since the Pauli principle imposes restrictions on the allowed rotational levels J for molecules with identical nuclei, a certain alignment of the nuclear spins entails a specific set of rotational levels. Conversely, measuring the rotational levels allows characterizing the molecular nuclear spin state. We measured excitation energies at 44 meV and 21 meV, corresponding to rotational transitions J = 0 --> 2 for hydrogen and deuterium. We thereby identify the nuclear spin isomers para-H2 and ortho-D2. For HD, we observe J = 0 --> 1 and J = 0 --> 2 transitions, as expected for heteronuclear diatomics. Our measurements demonstrate the potential of STM-RES in the study of nuclear spin states with unprecedented spatial resolution. We acknowledge funding from the Swiss National Science Foundation under Projects No. 140479 and No. 148891.

  8. Spin texture of Bi2Se3 thin films in the quantum tunneling limit.

    PubMed

    Landolt, Gabriel; Schreyeck, Steffen; Eremeev, Sergey V; Slomski, Bartosz; Muff, Stefan; Osterwalder, Jürg; Chulkov, Evgueni V; Gould, Charles; Karczewski, Grzegorz; Brunner, Karl; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens W; Dil, J Hugo

    2014-02-01

    By means of spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy we studied the spin structure of thin films of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 grown on InP(111). For thicknesses below six quintuple layers the spin-polarized metallic topological surface states interact with each other via quantum tunneling and a gap opens. Our measurements show that the resulting surface states can be described by massive Dirac cones which are split in a Rashba-like manner due to the substrate induced inversion asymmetry. The inner and the outer Rashba branches have distinct localization in the top and the bottom part of the film, whereas the band apices are delocalized throughout the entire film. Supported by calculations, our observations help in the understanding of the evolution of the surface states at the topological phase transition and provide the groundwork for the realization of two-dimensional spintronic devices based on topological semiconductors. PMID:24580629

  9. In situ scanning tunneling microscope tip treatment device for spin polarization imaging

    DOEpatents

    Li, An-Ping [Oak Ridge, TN; Jianxing, Ma [Oak Ridge, TN; Shen, Jian [Knoxville, TN

    2008-04-22

    A tip treatment device for use in an ultrahigh vacuum in situ scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The device provides spin polarization functionality to new or existing variable temperature STM systems. The tip treatment device readily converts a conventional STM to a spin-polarized tip, and thereby converts a standard STM system into a spin-polarized STM system. The tip treatment device also has functions of tip cleaning and tip flashing a STM tip to high temperature (>2000.degree. C.) in an extremely localized fashion. Tip coating functions can also be carried out, providing the tip sharp end with monolayers of coating materials including magnetic films. The device is also fully compatible with ultrahigh vacuum sample transfer setups.

  10. Hemoglobin-carbon monoxide binding rate. Low temperature magneto-optical detection of spin-tunneling.

    PubMed Central

    Redi, M H; Gerstman, B S; Hopfield, J J

    1981-01-01

    The spin-tunneling model of Hb--CO binding is used to calculate the binding rate at low temperature and high magnetic fields. The rate is calculated in second order perturbation theory assuming that spin-orbit coupling mediates the Hb iron electronic state change. The reaction which occurs at the crossing of the S = 2 and S = 0 energy vs. configuration coordinate curves is nonadiabatic, having a small electronic transition matrix element. Since detection of CO binding by polarized light in the Soret band makes it possible to observe hemes at specific orientation to the field direction, the rate is calculated for arbitrary heme orientation. Comparison with measurements at low temperature in zero field is made for spin quantization along the molecular crystal field direction. PMID:6268215

  11. Photon assisted tunneling through three quantum dots with spin-orbit-coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Han-Zhao; An, Xing-Tao; Wang, Ai-Kun; Liu, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-14

    The effect of an ac electric field on quantum transport properties in a system of three quantum dots, two of which are connected in parallel, while the third is coupled to one of the other two, is investigated theoretically. Based on the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function method, the spin-dependent current, occupation number, and spin accumulation can be obtained in our model. An external magnetic flux, Rashba spin-orbit-coupling (SOC), and intradot Coulomb interactions are considered. The magnitude of the spin-dependent average current and the positions of the photon assisted tunneling (PAT) peaks can be accurately controlled and manipulated by simply varying the strength of the coupling and the frequency of the ac field. A particularly interesting result is the observation of a new kind of PAT peak and a multiple-PAT effect that can be generated and controlled by the coupling between the quantum dots. In addition, the spin occupation number and spin accumulation can be well controlled by the Rashba SOC and the magnetic flux.

  12. Structural defects analysis versus spin polarized tunneling in Co2FeAl/MgO/CoFe magnetic tunnel junctions with thick MgO barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, M. S.; Tiusan, C.; Petrisor, T.; Petrisor, T.; Hehn, M.; Lu, Y.; Snoeck, E.

    2013-12-01

    We report on spin polarization reduction by incoherent tunneling in single crystal Co2FeAl/MgO/Co50Fe50 magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). A large density of misfit dislocations in the Heusler based MTJs has been provided by a thick MgO barrier and its 3.8% lattice mismatch with the Co2FeAl electrode. Our analysis implicates a correlated structural-transport approach. The crystallographic coherence in the real space has been investigated by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy phase analysis. The electronic transport experiments in variable temperature, fitted with a theoretical extended-Glazman-Matveev model, address different levels of the tunneling mechanisms from direct to multi-center hopping. We demonstrate a double impact of dislocations, as extended defects, on the tunneling polarization. Firstly, the breaking of the crystal symmetry destroys the longitudinal and lateral coherence of the propagating Bloch functions. This affects the symmetry filtering efficiency of the Δ1 states across the (001) MgO barriers and reduces the associated effective tunneling polarization. Secondly, dislocations provide localized states within the MgO gap. This determines temperature activated spin-conserving inelastic tunneling through chains of defects which are responsible for the one order of magnitude drop of the tunnel magnetoresistance from low to room temperature.

  13. Spin filter effect at room temperature in GaN/GaMnN ferromagnetic resonant tunnelling diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, P.; Adamowski, J.; Wołoszyn, M.; Spisak, B. J.

    2013-06-01

    We have investigated the spin current polarization without the external magnetic field in the resonant tunneling diode with the emitter and quantum well layers made from the ferromagnetic GaMnN. For this purpose, we have applied the self-consistent Wigner-Poisson method and studied the spin-polarizing effect for the parallel and antiparallel alignments of the magnetization of the ferromagnetic layers. The results of our calculations show that the antiparallel magnetization is much more advantageous for the spin filter operation and leads to the full spin current polarization at low temperatures and 35% spin polarization of the current at room temperature.

  14. Spin-polarized currents in the tunnel contact of a normal conductor and a two-dimensional topological insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, A. A. Sablikov, V. A.

    2013-11-15

    The spin filtering of electrons tunneling from the edge states of a two-dimensional topological insulator into a normal conductor under a magnetic field (external or induced due to proximity to a magnetic insulator) is studied. Calculations are performed for a tunnel contact of finite length between the topological insulator and an electronic multimode quantum strip. It is shown that the flow of tunneling electrons is split in the strip, so that spin-polarized currents arise in its left and right branches. These currents can be effectively controlled by the contact voltage and the chemical potential of the system. The presence of a magnetic field, which splits the spin subbands of the electron spectrum in the strip, gives rise to switching of the spin current between the strip branches.

  15. Spin memristive magnetic tunnel junctions with CoO-ZnO nano composite barrier

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Shen, Ting-Ting; Cao, Yan-Ling; Zhang, Kun; Yan, Shi-Shen; Tian, Yu-Feng; Kang, Shi-Shou; Zhao, Ming-Wen; Dai, You-Yong; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Grünberg, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The spin memristive devices combining memristance and tunneling magnetoresistance have promising applications in multibit nonvolatile data storage and artificial neuronal computing. However, it is a great challenge for simultaneous realization of large memristance and magnetoresistance in one nanoscale junction, because it is very hard to find a proper spacer layer which not only serves as good insulating layer for tunneling magnetoresistance but also easily switches between high and low resistance states under electrical field. Here we firstly propose to use nanon composite barrier layers of CoO-ZnO to fabricate the spin memristive Co/CoO-ZnO/Co magnetic tunnel junctions. The bipolar resistance switching ratio is high up to 90, and the TMR ratio of the high resistance state gets to 8% at room temperature, which leads to three resistance states. The bipolar resistance switching is explained by the metal-insulator transition of CoO1−v layer due to the migration of oxygen ions between CoO1−v and ZnO1−v. PMID:24452305

  16. Reprint of : Majorana fermion fingerprints in spin-polarised scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotetes, Panagiotis; Mendler, Daniel; Heimes, Andreas; Schön, Gerd

    2016-08-01

    We calculate the spatially resolved tunnelling conductance of topological superconductors (TSCs) based on ferromagnetic chains, measured by means of spin-polarised scanning tunnelling microscopy (SPSTM). Our analysis reveals novel signatures of MFs arising from the interplay of their strongly anisotropic spin-polarisation and the magnetisation content of the tip. We focus on the deep Yu-Shiba-Rusinov (YSR) limit where only YSR bound states localised in the vicinity of the adatoms govern the low-energy as also the topological properties of the system. Under these conditions, we investigate the occurrence of zero/finite bias peaks (ZBPs/FBPs) for a single or two coupled TSC chains forming a Josephson junction. Each TSC can host up to two Majorana fermions (MFs) per edge if chiral symmetry is preserved. Here we retrieve the conductance for all the accessible configurations of the MF number of each chain. Our results illustrate innovative spin-polarisation-sensitive experimental routes for arresting the MFs by either restoring or splitting the ZBP in a predictable fashion via: (i) weakly breaking chiral symmetry, e.g. by the SPSTM tip itself or by an external Zeeman field and (ii) tuning the superconducting phase difference of the TSCs, which is encoded in the 4π-Josephson coupling of neighbouring MFs.

  17. Gap state charge induced spin-dependent negative differential resistance in tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Zhang, X.-G.; Han, X. F.

    2016-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate through first-principles calculation a new spin-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR) mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) with cubic cation disordered crystals (CCDC) AlO x or Mg1‑x Al x O as barrier materials. The CCDC is a class of insulators whose band gap can be changed by cation doping. The gap becomes arched in an ultrathin layer due to the space charge formed from metal-induced gap states. With an appropriate combination of an arched gap and a bias voltage, NDR can be produced in either spin channel. This mechanism is applicable to 2D and 3D ultrathin junctions with a sufficiently small band gap that forms a large space charge. It provides a new way of controlling the spin-dependent transport in spintronic devices by an electric field. A generalized Simmons formula for tunneling current through junction with an arched gap is derived to show the general conditions under which ultrathin junctions may exhibit NDR.

  18. Spin current in an electron waveguide tunnel-coupled to a topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Sukhanov, Aleksei A; Sablikov, Vladimir A

    2012-10-10

    We show that electron tunneling from edge states in a two-dimensional topological insulator into a parallel electron waveguide leads to the appearance of spin-polarized current in the waveguide. The spin polarization P can be very close to unity and the electron current passing through the tunnel contact splits in the waveguide into two branches flowing from the contact. The polarization essentially depends on the electron scattering by the contact and the electron-electron interaction in the one-dimensional edge states. The electron-electron interaction is treated within the Luttinger liquid model. The main effect of the interaction stems from the renormalization of the electron velocity, due to which the polarization increases with the interaction strength. Electron scattering by the contact leads to a decrease in P. A specific effect occurs when the bottom of the subbands in the waveguide crosses the Dirac point of the spectrum of edge states when changing the voltage or chemical potential. This leads to changing the direction of the spin current. PMID:22968932

  19. Characterization of Aluminum Oxide Tunnel Barrier for use in a Non-Local Spin Detection Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Joseph; Garramone, John; Sitnitsky, Ilona; Labella, Vincent

    2010-03-01

    Aluminum oxide can be utilized as an interface layer between ferromagnetic metals and silicon to achieve spin injection into silicon. The goal of our research is to inject and readout spins using a non-local measurement device that utilizes 1-2 nm aluminum oxide interface layers as tunnel barriers. An important step of fabricating a non-local measurement device out of silicon is the growth of an aluminum oxide tunnel barrierfootnotetextO. van't Erve, A. Hanbicki, M. Holub, C. Li, C. Awo-Affouda, P. Thompson and B. Jonker, Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 212109 (2007).. Aluminum Oxide thin films where grown using a Knudsen cell to deposit 1 nm, 2 nm, and 3 nm of aluminum. The films were then oxidized in O2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was performed to characterize the film stoichiometry, and the band gap. We will also report on current voltage measurements of these films after they have been capped with metal and compare the resistance area product to those calculated for spin injection into siliconfootnotetextB.-C. Min, K. Motohashi, C. Lodder, and R. Jansen, Nat. Mater. 5, 817 (2006). .

  20. Electric field control of spin transfer torque in multiferroic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Useinov, Artur; Kalitsov, Alan; Velev, Julian; Kioussis, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    Based on model calculations we predict that the spin transfer torque (STT) in magnetic tunnel junctions with ferroelectric barriers can be strongly influenced by the saturated polarization of the barrier. The STT in such multiferroic tunnel junctions is calculated within the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism generalized for non-collinear transport and implemented in the framework of a single-band tight-binding (TB) model. We calculate the bias dependence of both the in-plane (T∥) and out-of-plane (T⊥) components of STT as a function of the ferroelectric polarization (P) in the barrier. We find that the components of STT strongly depend on both the magnitude and the direction of the polarization. In particular switching of the polarization direction can dramatically alter the value of the STT and can even lead to a change of sign of T∥ and the voltage-induced part of T⊥. The effect is proportional to the magnitude of the polarization.

  1. Tunneling spectroscopy by matching energy levels in the spin-rotating frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Changho; Pintar, M. M.

    1997-09-01

    Tunneling spectra of strongly hindered CH3 in methylmalonic acid, dimethyl sulfide, propionic acid, and hexane are reported. The Zeeman-tunneling level-matching resonances are detected at ωZ=nωT, n=14, 13, 12, 23, 1, and 2 when the level matching is maintained for 10 ms in the 54.7° tilted proton spin-rotating frame. A ground-state manifold of two noninteracting but equivalent methyl groups accounts for these spectra. All the transitions, which bring about the population equalization whenever a matching resonance occurs, are driven by time-independent dipole-dipole interactions. The resonance peaks at ωZ=23ωT and ωZ=2ωT, which are observed in a tilted rotating frame only, indicate that pairs of methyl groups undergo a symmetry conversion simultaneously. The calculated magnetization changes, which are the consequence of population equilibration, reproduce the observed resonance peaks intensities well.

  2. Enhanced spin Hall effect of tunneling light in hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tingting; Li, Chaoyang; Luo, Li

    2016-01-01

    Giant enhancement of spin Hall effect of tunneling light (SHETL) is theoretically proposed in a frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) structure with hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM). We calculate the transverse shift of right-circularly polarized light in a SiO2-air-HMM-air-SiO2 waveguide and analyze the physical mechanism of the enhanced SHETL. The HMM anisotropy can greatly increase the transverse shift of polarized light even though HMM loss might reduce it. Compared with transverse shift of transmitted light through a single HMM slab with ZnAlO/ZnO multilayer, the maximum transverse shift of tunneling light through a FTIR structure with identical HMM can be significantly enlarged by more than three times which reaches −38 μm without any amplification method. PMID:27477307

  3. High-performance molybdenum disulfide field-effect transistors with spin tunnel contacts.

    PubMed

    Dankert, André; Langouche, Lennart; Kamalakar, Mutta Venkata; Dash, Saroj Prasad

    2014-01-28

    Molybdenum disulfide has recently emerged as a promising two-dimensional semiconducting material for nanoelectronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications. Here, we investigate the field-effect transistor behavior of MoS2 with ferromagnetic contacts to explore its potential for spintronics. In such devices, we elucidate that the presence of a large Schottky barrier resistance at the MoS2/ferromagnet interface is a major obstacle for the electrical spin injection and detection. We circumvent this problem by a reduction in the Schottky barrier height with the introduction of a thin TiO2 tunnel barrier between the ferromagnet and MoS2. This results in an enhancement of the transistor on-state current by 2 orders of magnitude and an increment in the field-effect mobility by a factor of 6. Our magnetoresistance calculation reveals that such integration of ferromagnetic tunnel contacts opens up the possibilities for MoS2-based spintronic devices. PMID:24377305

  4. Enhanced spin Hall effect of tunneling light in hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tingting; Li, Chaoyang; Luo, Li

    2016-01-01

    Giant enhancement of spin Hall effect of tunneling light (SHETL) is theoretically proposed in a frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) structure with hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM). We calculate the transverse shift of right-circularly polarized light in a SiO2-air-HMM-air-SiO2 waveguide and analyze the physical mechanism of the enhanced SHETL. The HMM anisotropy can greatly increase the transverse shift of polarized light even though HMM loss might reduce it. Compared with transverse shift of transmitted light through a single HMM slab with ZnAlO/ZnO multilayer, the maximum transverse shift of tunneling light through a FTIR structure with identical HMM can be significantly enlarged by more than three times which reaches -38 μm without any amplification method. PMID:27477307

  5. Enhanced spin Hall effect of tunneling light in hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tingting; Li, Chaoyang; Luo, Li

    2016-08-01

    Giant enhancement of spin Hall effect of tunneling light (SHETL) is theoretically proposed in a frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) structure with hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM). We calculate the transverse shift of right-circularly polarized light in a SiO2-air-HMM-air-SiO2 waveguide and analyze the physical mechanism of the enhanced SHETL. The HMM anisotropy can greatly increase the transverse shift of polarized light even though HMM loss might reduce it. Compared with transverse shift of transmitted light through a single HMM slab with ZnAlO/ZnO multilayer, the maximum transverse shift of tunneling light through a FTIR structure with identical HMM can be significantly enlarged by more than three times which reaches ‑38 μm without any amplification method.

  6. Theory of asymmetric and negative differential magnon tunneling under temperature bias: Towards a spin Seebeck diode and transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jie; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    2013-09-01

    We study the nonequilibrium transport for the asymmetric and negative differential magnon tunneling driven by temperature bias. We demonstrate that the many-body magnon interaction that makes the magnonic spectrum temperature-dependent is the crucial factor for the emergence of rectification and negative differential spin Seebeck effects in magnon tunneling junctions. When magnonic junctions have temperature-dependent density of states, reversing the temperature bias is able to give asymmetric spin currents and increasing temperature bias could give an anomalously decreasing magnonic spin current. We show that these properties are relevant for building spin Seebeck diodes and transistors, which could play important roles in controlling information and energy in magnonics and spin caloritronics.

  7. Decoherence and mode hopping in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator.

    PubMed

    Muduli, P K; Heinonen, O G; Akerman, Johan

    2012-05-18

    We discuss the coherence of magnetic oscillations in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator as a function of the external field angle. Time-frequency analysis shows mode hopping between distinct oscillator modes, which arises from linear and nonlinear couplings in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, analogous to mode hopping observed in semiconductor ring lasers. These couplings and, therefore, mode hopping are minimized near the current threshold for the antiparallel alignment of free-layer with reference layer magnetization. Away from the antiparallel alignment, mode hopping limits oscillator coherence. PMID:23003182

  8. Parametric excitation in a magnetic tunnel junction-based spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Dürrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E.; Åkerman, J.; Muduli, P. K.

    2014-02-03

    Using microwave current injection at room temperature, we demonstrate parametric excitation of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ)-based spin-torque oscillator (STO). Parametric excitation is observed for currents below the auto-oscillation threshold, when the microwave current frequency f{sub e} is twice the STO free-running frequency f{sub 0}. Above threshold, the MTJ becomes parametrically synchronized. In the synchronized state, the STO exhibits an integrated power up to 5 times higher and a linewidth reduction of two orders of magnitude, compared to free-running conditions. We also show that the parametric synchronization favors single mode oscillations in the case of multimode excitation.

  9. Enhancement of spin-torque diode sensitivity in a magnetic tunnel junction by parametric synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Dhananjay; Sisodia, Naveen; Sharma, Raghav; Dürrenfeld, P.; Åkerman, J.; Muduli, P. K.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate enhanced radio frequency (RF) detection sensitivity in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator (STO) using parametric synchronization. The parametric synchronization is observed above the auto-oscillation threshold of the STO and enhances the RF sensitivity at 2f0, where f0 is the auto-oscillation frequency. The maximum RF sensitivity for parametric synchronization at 2 f0≃9 GHz is 16 mV/mW, while the maximum RF sensitivity at f0≃4.5 GHz without parametric synchronization is 12 mV/mW. Macrospin simulations corroborate the experimental results.

  10. Spinel oxides: 1 spin-filter barrier for a class of magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2012-01-01

    The orbital composition of the electrode wave functions and the complex bands within the barrier band gap are two important factors in deciding the spin-filter effect. This is illustrated in a class of spinel oxides, including MgAl2O4, ZnAl2O4, SiMg2O4, and SiZn2O4. Through first-principles calculations of the complex bands and electron transmission along the [001] direction, they are shown to have the same D1 spin-filter effect as MgO due to the combination of both factors. Due to better lattice match with typical bcc magnetic electrodes than MgO, these materials provide a broad spectrum of candidate materials for magnetic tunnel junctions.

  11. Bit error rate investigation of spin-transfer-switched magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zihui; Zhou, Yuchen; Zhang, Jing; Huai, Yiming

    2012-10-01

    A method is developed to enable a fast bit error rate (BER) characterization of spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) cells without integrating with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor circuit. By utilizing the reflected signal from the devices under test, the measurement setup allows a fast measurement of bit error rates at >106, writing events per second. It is further shown that this method provides a time domain capability to examine the MTJ resistance states during a switching event, which can assist write error analysis in great detail. BER of a set of spin-transfer-torque MTJ cells has been evaluated by using this method, and bit error free operation (down to 10-8) for optimized in-plane MTJ cells has been demonstrated.

  12. Observation of thermal spin-transfer torque via ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Bai, Lihui; Chen, Xiaobin; Guo, Hong; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Houssameddine, D.; Hu, C.-M.

    2016-08-01

    The thermal spin-transfer torque (TSTT) in magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) was systematically studied using electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Evidence for the existence of TSTT in MTJs is observed. A temperature difference was applied across an MTJ acting as a TSTT on the free layer of the MTJ. The FMR of the free layer was then excited by a microwave current and electrically detected as a dc voltage. We found that the FMR line shape was changed by the TSTT, indicated by the ratio of dispersive and Lorentz components of the FMR spectra (D /L ). D /L increases by increasing the temperature difference. In addition, we analyze the magnetization orientation dependence of TSTT and provide solid evidence that this dependence differs from the magnetization orientation dependence of spin-transfer torque driven by a dc bias.

  13. Ferroelectric control of spin-transfer torque in multiferroic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Useinov, Artur; Kalitsov, Alan; Velev, Julian; Kioussis, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    Based on model calculations we predict electric-field control of the spin-transfer torque (STT) in magnetic tunnel junctions with ferroelectric barriers. We demonstrate that the bias dependence of the in-plane T∥ and out-of-plane T⊥ components of the STT can be dramatically modified by the ferroelectric polarization. In particular, the magnitude of the STT can be enhanced or suppressed by switching the polarization direction and in some cases the sign of STT can be toggled. The underlying mechanism is the combination of polarization-induced symmetry breaking and the interplay of the bias-induced and polarization-induced spin-dependent screening giving rise to a rich behavior of the electrostatic potential energy profile. These properties could lead to enhanced switching efficiency in STT-based devices and open a new avenue for applications of multiferroic devices.

  14. Spin-dependent tunneling time in periodic diluted-magnetic-semiconductor/nonmagnetic-barrier superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ping-Fan; Guo, Yong

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the tunneling time (dwell time) in periodic diluted-magnetic-semiconductor/nonmagnetic-barrier (DMS/NB) superlattices subjected to an external magnetic field. It is found that spin-dependent resonant bands form in the spectra of dwell time, which can be effectively manipulated by not only the external magnetic field but also the geometric parameters of the system. Moreover, an intuitive semiclassical delay is defined to illustrate the behavior of the dwell time, and the former one is shown to be the result of "smoothing out" the latter one. We also find that the dwell time in diluted-magnetic-semiconductor/semiconductor superlattices behaves surprisingly different from the DMS/NB case, especially for spin-down electrons.

  15. Quantum spin models with long-range interactions and tunnelings: a quantum Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maik, Michał; Hauke, Philipp; Dutta, Omjyoti; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2012-11-01

    We use a quantum Monte Carlo method to investigate various classes of two-dimensional spin models with long-range interactions at low temperatures. In particular, we study a dipolar XXZ model with U(1) symmetry that appears as a hard-core boson limit of an extended Hubbard model describing polarized dipolar atoms or molecules in an optical lattice. Tunneling, in such a model, is short-range, whereas density-density couplings decay with distance following a cubic power law. We also investigate an XXZ model with long-range couplings of all three spin components—such a model describes a system of ultracold ions in a lattice of microtraps. We describe an approximate phase diagram for such systems at zero and at finite temperature, and compare their properties. In particular, we compare the extent of crystalline, superfluid and supersolid phases. Our predictions apply directly to current experiments with mesoscopic numbers of polar molecules and trapped ions.

  16. Time-resolved spin-torque switching in MgO-based perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devolder, T.; Kim, Joo-Von; Garcia-Sanchez, F.; Swerts, J.; Kim, W.; Couet, S.; Kar, G.; Furnemont, A.

    2016-01-01

    We study nanosecond-scale spin-torque-induced switching in perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junctions. Although the switching voltages match with the macrospin instability threshold, the electrical signatures of the reversal indicate the presence of domain walls in junctions of various sizes. In the antiparallel (AP)-to-parallel (P) switching, a nucleation phase is followed by an irreversible flow of a wall through the sample at an average velocity of 40 m/s with back-and-forth oscillation movements indicating a Walker propagation regime. A model with a single wall locally responding to the spin torque reproduces the essential dynamical signatures of the reversal. The P-to-AP transition has a complex dynamics with dynamical back-hopping whose probability increases with voltage. We attribute this back-hopping to the instability of the nominally fixed layers.

  17. Effect of interfacial structures on spin dependent tunneling in epitaxial L10-FePt/MgO/FePt perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Li, D. L.; Wang, S. G.; Ma, Q. L.; Liang, S. H.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F.; Hesjedal, T.; Ward, R. C. C.; Kohn, A.; Elkayam, A.; Tal, N.; Zhang, X.-G.

    2015-02-01

    Epitaxial FePt(001)/MgO/FePt magnetic tunnel junctions with L10-FePt electrodes showing perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxial growth. Tunnel magnetoresistance ratios of 21% and 53% were obtained at 300 K and 10 K, respectively. Our previous work, based on transmission electron microscopy, confirmed a semi-coherent interfacial structure with atomic steps (Kohn et al., APL 102, 062403 (2013)). Here, we show by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculation that the bottom FePt/MgO interface is either Pt-terminated for regular growth or when an Fe layer is inserted at the interface, it is chemically bonded to O. Both these structures have a dominant role in spin dependent tunneling across the MgO barrier resulting in a decrease of the tunneling magnetoresistance ratio compared with previous predictions.

  18. Effect of interfacial structures on spin dependent tunneling in epitaxial L1{sub 0}-FePt/MgO/FePt perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Li, D. L.; Wang, S. G. Ma, Q. L.; Liang, S. H.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F.; Hesjedal, T.; Ward, R. C. C.; Kohn, A.; Elkayam, A.; Tal, N.; Zhang, X.-G.

    2015-02-28

    Epitaxial FePt(001)/MgO/FePt magnetic tunnel junctions with L1{sub 0}-FePt electrodes showing perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxial growth. Tunnel magnetoresistance ratios of 21% and 53% were obtained at 300 K and 10 K, respectively. Our previous work, based on transmission electron microscopy, confirmed a semi-coherent interfacial structure with atomic steps (Kohn et al., APL 102, 062403 (2013)). Here, we show by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculation that the bottom FePt/MgO interface is either Pt-terminated for regular growth or when an Fe layer is inserted at the interface, it is chemically bonded to O. Both these structures have a dominant role in spin dependent tunneling across the MgO barrier resulting in a decrease of the tunneling magnetoresistance ratio compared with previous predictions.

  19. Ultrafast spin tunneling and injection in coupled nanostructures of InGaAs quantum dots and quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiao-Jie Kiba, Takayuki; Yamamura, Takafumi; Takayama, Junichi; Subagyo, Agus; Sueoka, Kazuhisa; Murayama, Akihiro

    2014-01-06

    We investigate the electron-spin injection dynamics via tunneling from an In{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}As quantum well (QW) to In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As quantum dots (QDs) in coupled QW-QDs nanostructures. These coupled nanostructures demonstrate ultrafast (5 to 20 ps) spin injection into the QDs. The degree of spin polarization up to 45% is obtained in the QDs after the injection, essentially depending on the injection time. The spin injection and conservation are enhanced with thinner barriers due to the stronger electronic coupling between the QW and QDs.

  20. Abnormal bias dependence of magnetoresistance in CoFeB/MgO/Si spin-injection tunnel contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Park, June-Young; Park, Byong-Guk; Baek, Seung-heon Chris; Park, Seung-Young; Jo, Younghun

    2015-11-02

    We report a strong bias voltage dependence of magnetoresistance (MR) in CoFeB/MgO/Si spin-injection tunnel contacts using the three-terminal Hanle geometry. When a bias voltage is relatively large, the MR is composed of two characteristic signals: a conventional Hanle signal observed at a low magnetic field, which is due to the precession of injected spins, and another signal originating from the rotation of the magnetization at a larger magnetic field. In contrast, for a small bias voltage, additional signals appear at a wide range of magnetic fields, which occasionally overwhelms the conventional Hanle signals. Because the additional signals are pronounced at a low bias and are significantly reduced by annealing at moderate temperatures, they can be attributed to multi-step tunneling via defect states at the interfaces or tunnel barrier. Our results demonstrate that the spin injection signal caused by the defect states can be evaluated by its bias voltage dependence.

  1. The effect of current-induced spin switching in the presence of quantum tunneling of magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiorny, Maciej; Barnaś, Józef

    2013-03-01

    Knowledge of transport properties of individual large-spin (S > 1 / 2) atoms/molecules exhibiting magnetic anisotropy is of key importance from the point of view of information processing technologies. The ultimate aim is to incorporate such objects as functional elements of spintronic devices, with the objective of employing spin-polarized currents to control the magnetic state of the system. In particular, for an atom/molecule with the predominant `easy-axis' uniaxial magnetic anisotropy this allows for switching the system's spin between two metastable states. However, the uniaxial component of magnetic anisotropy, underlying the magnetic bistability, is frequently accompanied by the transverse one, whose presence manifests, e.g., as quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM). Here, we show that not only does QTM induce an effective energy barrier for the spin switching, but also its effect on the transport reveals as an additional signal in transport characteristics. Furthermore, we propose how to experimentally investigate QTM by means of the STM inelastic transport spectroscopy. also at Adam Mickiewicz University

  2. Voltage-controlled oxide barriers in organic/hybrid spin valves based on tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünewald, M.; Homonnay, N.; Kleinlein, J.; Schmidt, G.

    2014-11-01

    Resistive switching, i.e., the remanent (reversible) change of a device's resistance, is a widely investigated phenomenon as it holds the prospect for realizing high density memory devices. Resistive switching has also been observed in organic semiconductors; however, a clear understanding of the underlying physics could not yet be obtained. Possible options are for example interface effects at the electrodes or the formation and destruction of filaments. Here we present resistive switching in an organic spin valve based on tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance. Similar to experiments in conventional spin-valve devices with two ferromagnetic electrodes we observe a modulation of the magnetoresistance by the electrical switching. However, as the magnetoresistance effect's origin is unambiguously clear, which is not always the case for effects in conventional structures, it can be exploited to prove that a tunnel barrier exists at the interface between the ferromagnetic oxide electrode and the organic semiconductor. Furthermore our experiments reveal that this barrier is reversibly modified during the switching, which causes both the change in magnetoresistance and total device resistance. Quantitative analysis indicates that the barrier is situated in the oxide layer. A phenomenological model provides a full description of the microscopic processes involved in the resistive switching.

  3. Spin-dependent tunneling in epitaxial Fe/Cr/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions with an ultrathin Cr(001) spacer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Rie; Fukushima, Akio; Yakushiji, Kay; Nishioka, Shingo; Nagahama, Taro; Katayama, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Ando, Koji; Yuasa, Shinji

    2009-05-01

    We fabricated fully epitaxial Fe/Cr/MgO/Fe(001) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with an atomically flat ultrathin Cr(001) layer grown below the MgO barrier layer and studied the spin-dependent transport to clarify scattering process of tunneling electrons. Because Cr does not have Bloch states with Δ1 symmetry at the Fermi energy (EF) , Δ1 evanescent states in MgO, which dominantly mediate the tunneling current, cannot couple with Cr Bloch states without a scattering process. The Fe/Cr/MgO/Fe(001) MTJs are therefore a model system for studying nonspecular scattering processes where the orbital symmetry of tunneling states is not conserved. The resistance-area (RA) product of the MTJs was found to not increase exponentially as a function of the Cr thickness (tCr) , indicating that the Cr layer does not act as a perfect tunnel barrier despite of the absence of Δ1 states at EF . Moreover, the magnetoresistance ratio of the MTJs was seen to oscillate as a function of tCr with a period of 2 monolayers, reflecting the layered antiferromagnetic structure of Cr(001). Surprisingly, the MR ratio showed local maxima at the odd numbers of Cr monolayers and local minima at the even numbers of Cr monolayers, indicating that the tunneling current is oppositely spin polarized with respect to the interface magnetization. These results suggest that nonspecular scatterings mediate the coupling between evanescent states in MgO and certain non- Δ1 Bloch states in Cr that have negative spin polarization, thereby inducing nonspecular tunneling current even at a low temperature and a small bias voltage. We also investigated, as a reference sample, Fe/MgO/Cr/Fe MTJs with a less-oxidized Cr/MgO interface by growing the Cr(001) layer on the MgO barrier layer and found that their RA product increased much more rapidly with increasing tCr . This indicates that partial oxidation of interface Cr atoms in the Fe/Cr/MgO/Fe MTJs is one of the major origins of nonspecular scatterings. Both an

  4. Spin tunneling and magnetotransport in GaMnAs-based heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki

    2003-03-01

    In this talk, we present the spin-dependent tunneling (vertical transport) and in-plane magnetotransport properties of GaMnAs-based ferromagnetic heterostructures. First we describe tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) in all-semiconductor GaMnAs/AlAs/GaMnAs magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) [1][2]. Very high TMR ratios (max. 75 were observed at 8 K for the junction with the AlAs barrier thickness d<1.6nm. For d>1.6nm, the TMR ratio was found to decrease with increasing d, which can be explained by theoretical calculations based on k_allel conservation of tunneling carriers. Unlike the conventional MTJs, the present MTJs are all-epitaxial monocrystalline semiconductor-based junctions, which have some advantages including good compatibility with semiconductor devices and more freedom in the design of structures [3]. Second, we show our magnetotransport study on ferromagnetic III-V semiconductor heterostructures with higher Curie temperature TC [4]. In selectively doped heterostructures (Mn delta-doped GaAs / Be-doped AlGaAs), in which holes are supplied from the Be-doped p-AlGaAs layer resembling an inverted high electron mobility transistor (I-HEMT) structure, ferromagnetic ordering was clearly observed. In the heterostructure prepared with proper conditions, its TC was as high as 172 K, far above the TC of InAs- or GaAs-based random-alloy magnetic semiconductors. [1] M. Tanaka and Y. Higo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 026602; Physica E13 (2002) 495. [2] Y. Higo, H. Shimizu, and M. Tanaka, J. Appl. Phys. 89 (2001) 6745. [3] T. Hayashi, M. Tanaka, and Asamitsu, J. Appl. Phys. 87 (2000) 4673. [4] A. M. Nazmul, S. Sugahara, and M. Tanaka, Appl. Phys. Lett. 80 (2002) 3120; cond-mat/0208299 (2002).

  5. Rotary Balance Wind Tunnel Testing for the FASER Flight Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denham, Casey; Owens, D. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Flight dynamics research was conducted to collect and analyze rotary balance wind tunnel test data in order to improve the aerodynamic simulation and modeling of a low-cost small unmanned aircraft called FASER (Free-flying Aircraft for Sub-scale Experimental Research). The impetus for using FASER was to provide risk and cost reduction for flight testing of more expensive aircraft and assist in the improvement of wind tunnel and flight test techniques, and control laws. The FASER research aircraft has the benefit of allowing wind tunnel and flight tests to be conducted on the same model, improving correlation between wind tunnel, flight, and simulation data. Prior wind tunnel tests include a static force and moment test, including power effects, and a roll and yaw damping forced oscillation test. Rotary balance testing allows for the calculation of aircraft rotary derivatives and the prediction of steady-state spins. The rotary balance wind tunnel test was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST). Rotary balance testing includes runs for a set of given angular rotation rates at a range of angles of attack and sideslip angles in order to fully characterize the aircraft rotary dynamics. Tests were performed at angles of attack from 0 to 50 degrees, sideslip angles of -5 to 10 degrees, and non-dimensional spin rates from -0.5 to 0.5. The effects of pro-spin elevator and rudder deflection and pro- and anti-spin elevator, rudder, and aileron deflection were examined. The data are presented to illustrate the functional dependence of the forces and moments on angle of attack, sideslip angle, and angular rate for the rotary contributions to the forces and moments. Further investigation is necessary to fully characterize the control effectors. The data were also used with a steady state spin prediction tool that did not predict an equilibrium spin mode.

  6. Magnetic field dependence of spin torque switching in nanoscale magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; Rowlands, Graham; Katine, Jordan; Langer, Juergen; Krivorotov, Ilya

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic random access memory based on spin transfer torque effect in nanoscale magnetic tunnel junctions (STT-RAM) is emerging as a promising candidate for embedded and stand-alone computer memory. An important performance parameter of STT-RAM is stability of its free magnetic layer against thermal fluctuations. Measurements of the free layer switching probability as a function of sub-critical voltage at zero effective magnetic field (read disturb rate or RDR measurements) have been proposed as a method for quantitative evaluation of the free layer thermal stability at zero voltage. In this presentation, we report RDR measurement as a function of external magnetic field, which provide a test of the RDR method self-consistency and reliability.

  7. Tunneling, decoherence, and entanglement of two spins interacting with a dissipative bath

    SciTech Connect

    Sahrapour, Mohammad M.; Makri, Nancy

    2013-03-21

    We use numerically exact iterative path integral methods to investigate the decoherence and entanglement dynamics of a tunneling pair of two coupled qubits (spins) system interacting with a dissipative bath. We find that decoherence is generally accompanied by the destruction of entanglement, although the specifics of this destruction depend sensitively on the parameters of the Hamiltonian (qubit-qubit coupling and/or energy bias), the strength of dissipation, the temperature, and the choice of initial condition. We also observe that dissipation can in some cases generate a substantial amount of entanglement. Finally, if an entangled eigenstate exists which does not couple to the environment, the long-time entanglement can significantly exceed the value corresponding to the Boltzmann equilibrium state.

  8. Spin-dependent tunneling junctions with parallel hard bias for read heads

    SciTech Connect

    Sin, Kyusik; Gibbons, Matthew R.; Funada, Shin; Mao, Ming; Rao, Dean; Chien, Chester; Tong, Hua-Ching

    2001-06-01

    We investigated the feasibility of a spin-dependent tunneling (SDT) read head with a parallel hard bias. In this scheme, the longitudinal biasing to the free layer is provided by fringe fields from a hard magnet which is fabricated over or under the free layer. A linear response to the applied field is achieved for a SDT junction biased with 400 Aa CoCrPt underneath. Thinner CoCrPt layers yield Barkhausen jumps in the free layer. Micromagnetic simulation indicates the bias field at the edge of the free layer is smaller than that which would result from an abutted magnet. The simulation results are similar to experimental data, and indicate that shielded devices with 400 Aa permanent magnet will provide stable transfer curves. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Mode-hopping mechanism generating colored noise in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Raghav; Dürrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E.; Heinonen, O. G.; Åkerman, J.; Muduli, P. K.

    2014-09-29

    The frequency noise spectrum of a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator is examined where multiple modes and mode-hopping events are observed. The frequency noise spectrum is found to consist of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise. We find a systematic and similar dependence of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise on bias current and the relative angle between the reference and free layers, which changes the effective damping and hence the mode-hopping behavior in this system. The frequency at which the 1/f frequency noise changes to white noise increases as the free layer is aligned away from the anti-parallel orientation w.r.t the reference layer. These results indicate that the origin of 1/f frequency noise is related to mode-hopping, which produces both white noise as well as 1/f frequency noise similar to the case of ring lasers.

  10. Polarization Factors and Spin-Transfer Torque in Magnetic Tunneling Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slonczewski, John

    2004-03-01

    Recent advances in fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions having small RA enhance the prospect of 2-terminal memory elements using spin transfer for writing and TMR for reading. Using Bardeen theory, I find a sufficient condition for the existence of the tunnel-effective polarization factors which I-V experiments support. The mere presence of an ideal crystalline slab within the barrier suffices, regardless of electron structure and atomic disorder within the magnets and interface regions. I find the moment-coplanar torque density L_R=(h/4π e)P_LJ_0sin θ acting on a right magnet with applied voltage V. Here, P_L(V) and P_R(V) are the polarization factors of the left and right magnets, and J_0(V) is the mean current density in the conventional expression J=J_0(1+P_LP_Rs θ ). This connection between LR and J may aid laboratory exploration of junction technology for current-driven switching by study of J(V,θ ) prior to the difficult fabrication of pillars having submicron dimensions.

  11. Nuclear spin Hall and Klein tunneling effects during oxidation with electric and magnetic field inductions in graphene.

    PubMed

    Little, Reginald B; McClary, Felicia; Rice, Bria; Jackman, Corine; Mitchell, James W

    2012-12-14

    The recent observation of the explosive oxidation of graphene with enhancement for decreasing temperature and the requirements for synchronizing oxidants for collective oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions presented a chemical scenario for the thermal harvesting by the magnetic spin Hall Effect. More experimental data are presented to demonstrate such spin Hall Effect by determining the influence of spins of so-called spectator fermionic cations. Furthermore, the so-called spectator bosonic cations are discovered to cause a Klein tunneling effect during the redox reaction of graphene. The Na(+) and K(+), fermionic cations and the Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), bosonic cations were observed and compared under a variety of experimental conditions: adiabatic reactions with initial temperatures (18-22 °C); reactions toward infinite dilution; isothermal reactions under nonadiabatic conditions at low temperature of 18 °C; reactions under paramagnetic O(2) or diamagnetic N(2) atmospheres of different permeabilities; reactions in applied and no applied external magnetic field; and reactions toward excess concentrations of common and uncommon Na(+) and Mg(2+) cations. The observed reaction kinetics and dynamics under these various, diverse conditions are consistent with the spin Hall mechanism, energy harvesting and short time violation of Second Law of Thermodynamics for redox reactions of graphene by the Na(+)K(+) mixture and are consistent with the Klein tunnel mechanism for the redox reactions of graphene by the Mg(2+)Ca(2+) mixture. Mixed spin Hall and Klein tunnel mechanisms are discovered to slow and modulate explosive redox reactions. Such spin Hall Effect also gives explanation of recent tunneling of electrons through boron nitride. PMID:23108034

  12. A graphene solution to conductivity mismatch: spin injection from ferromagnetic metal/graphene tunnel contacts into silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van't Erve, Olaf

    2014-03-01

    New paradigms for spin-based devices, such as spin-FETs and reconfigurable logic, have been proposed and modeled. These devices rely on electron spin being injected, transported, manipulated and detected in a semiconductor channel. This work is the first demonstration on how a single layer of graphene can be used as a low resistance tunnel barrier solution for electrical spin injection into Silicon at room temperature. We will show that a FM metal / monolayer graphene contact serves as a spin-polarized tunnel barrier which successfully circumvents the classic metal / semiconductor conductivity mismatch issue for electrical spin injection. We demonstrate electrical injection and detection of spin accumulation in Si above room temperature, and show that the corresponding spin lifetimes correlate with the Si carrier concentration, confirming that the spin accumulation measured occurs in the Si and not in interface trap states. An ideal tunnel barrier should exhibit several key material characteristics: a uniform and planar habit with well-controlled thickness, minimal defect / trapped charge density, a low resistance-area product for minimal power consumption, and compatibility with both the FM metal and semiconductor, insuring minimal diffusion to/from the surrounding materials at temperatures required for device processing. Graphene, offers all of the above, while preserving spin injection properties, making it a compelling solution to the conductivity mismatch for spin injection into Si. Although Graphene is very conductive in plane, it exhibits poor conductivity perpendicular to the plane. Its sp2 bonding results in a highly uniform, defect free layer, which is chemically inert, thermally robust, and essentially impervious to diffusion. The use of a single monolayer of graphene at the Si interface provides a much lower RA product than any film of an oxide thick enough to prevent pinholes (1 nm). Our results identify a new route to low resistance-area product spin

  13. Double-pinned magnetic tunnel junction sensors with spin-valve-like sensing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Z. H.; Huang, L.; Feng, J. F. Wen, Z. C.; Li, D. L.; Han, X. F.; Nakano, Takafumi; Naganuma, Hiroshi; Yu, T.

    2015-08-07

    MgO magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensors with spin-valve-like sensing layers of Ir{sub 22}Mn{sub 78} (6)/Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} (t{sub NiFe} = 20–70)/Ru (0.9)/Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20} (3) (unit: nm) have been fabricated. A linear field dependence of magnetoresistance for these MTJ sensors was obtained by carrying out a two-step field annealing process. The sensitivity and linear field range can be tuned by varying the thickness of NiFe layer and annealing temperature, and a high sensitivity of 37%/mT has been achieved in the MTJ sensors with 70 nm NiFe at the optimum annealing temperature of 230 °C. Combining the spin-valve-like sensing structure and a soft magnetic NiFe layer, MTJ sensors with relatively wide field sensing range have been achieved and could be promising for showing high sensitivity magnetic field sensing applications.

  14. Evaluation and Control of Break-Even Time of Nonvolatile Static Random Access Memory Based on Spin-Transistor Architecture with Spin-Transfer-Torque Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuto, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Shuu'ichirou; Sugahara, Satoshi

    2012-04-01

    The energy performance of a nonvolatile static random access memory (NV-SRAM) cell for power gating applications was quantitatively analyzed for the first time using the performance index of break-even time (BET). The NV-SRAM cell is based on spin-transistor architecture using ordinary metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and spin-transfer-torque magnetic tunnel junctions (STT-MTJs), whose circuit representation of spin-transistor is referred to as a pseudo-spin-MOSFET (PS-MOSFET). The cell is configured with a standard six-transistor SRAM cell and two PS-MOSFETs. The NV-SRAM cell basically has a short BET of submicroseconds. Although the write (store) operation to the STT-MTJs causes an increase in the BET, it can be successfully reduced by the proposed power-aware bias-control for the PS-MOSFETs.

  15. Size dependence of nanosecond-scale spin-torque switching in perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devolder, T.; Le Goff, A.; Nikitin, V.

    2016-06-01

    We have time resolved the spin-transfer-torque-induced switching in perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junctions of diameters from 50 to 250 nm in the subthreshold thermally activated regime. When the field and the spin torque concur to both favor the P to AP transition, the reversal yields monotonic resistance ramps that can be interpreted as a domain wall propagation through the device at velocities of the order of 17 to 30 nm/ns; smaller cells switch faster, and proportionally to their diameter. At the largest sizes, transient domain wall pinning can occasionally occur. When the field hinders the P to AP transition triggered by the spin torque, the P to AP switching is preceded by repetitive switching attempts, during which the resistance transiently increases until successful reversal occurs. At 50 nm, the P to AP switching proceeds reproducibly in 3 ns, with a monotonic featureless increase of the device resistance. In the reverse transition (AP to P), the variability of thermally activated reversal is not restricted to stochastic variations of incubation delays before the onset of reversal: several reversal paths are possible even in the smallest perpendicularly magnetized junctions. Besides, the nonuniform nature of the magnetic response seems still present at the nanoscale, with sometimes electrical signatures of strong disorder during the AP to P reversal. The AP to P transition is preceded by a strong instability of the AP states in devices larger than 100 nm. The resistance becomes extremely agitated before switching to P in a path yielding a slow (20 to 50 ns) and irregular increase of the conductance with substantial event-to-event variability. Unreversed bubbles of typical diameter 60 nm can persist a few additional microseconds in the largest junctions. The complexity of the AP to P switching is reduced but not suppressed when the junctions are downsized below 60 nm. The instability of the initial AP state is no longer detected but the other features

  16. Long-ranged magnetic proximity effects in noble metal-doped cobalt probed with spin-dependent tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabureac, M. S.; MacLaren, D. A.; Courtois, H.; Marrows, C. H.

    2014-04-01

    We inserted non-magnetic layers of Au and Cu into sputtered AlO_{x}-based magnetic tunnel junctions and Meservey-Tedrow junctions in order to study their effect on tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) and spin polarization (TSP). When either Au or Cu are inserted into a Co/AlO_{x} interface, we find that TMR and TSP remain finite and measurable for thicknesses up to several nanometres. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy shows that the Cu and Au interface layers are fully continuous when their thickness exceeds ~3nm, implying that spin-polarized carriers penetrate the interface noble metal to distances exceeding this value. A power law model based on exchange scattering is found to fit the data better than a phenomenological exponential decay. The discrepancy between these length scales and the much shorter ones reported from x-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of magnetic proximitization is ascribed to the fact that our tunnelling transport measurements selectively probe s-like electrons close to the Fermi level. When a 0.1 nm thick Cu or Au layer is inserted within the Co, we find that the suppression of TMR and TSP is restored on a length scale of lesssim1nm, indicating that this is a sufficient quantity of Co to form a fully spin-polarized band structure at the interface with the tunnel barrier.

  17. Generation of constant-amplitude radio-frequency sweeps at a tunnel junction for spin resonance STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, William; Baumann, Susanne; Lutz, Christopher P.; Heinrich, Andreas J.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the measurement and successful compensation of the radio-frequency transfer function of a scanning tunneling microscope over a wide frequency range (15.5-35.5 GHz) and with high dynamic range (>50 dB). The precise compensation of cabling resonances and attenuations is critical for the production of constant-voltage frequency sweeps for electric-field driven electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments. We also demonstrate that a well-calibrated tunnel junction voltage is necessary to avoid spurious ESR peaks that can arise due to a non-flat transfer function.

  18. Generation of constant-amplitude radio-frequency sweeps at a tunnel junction for spin resonance STM.

    PubMed

    Paul, William; Baumann, Susanne; Lutz, Christopher P; Heinrich, Andreas J

    2016-07-01

    We describe the measurement and successful compensation of the radio-frequency transfer function of a scanning tunneling microscope over a wide frequency range (15.5-35.5 GHz) and with high dynamic range (>50 dB). The precise compensation of cabling resonances and attenuations is critical for the production of constant-voltage frequency sweeps for electric-field driven electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments. We also demonstrate that a well-calibrated tunnel junction voltage is necessary to avoid spurious ESR peaks that can arise due to a non-flat transfer function. PMID:27475577

  19. Spin- and symmetry-filtering combined tunnel magnetoresistance through epitaxial MgO/EuS tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiwei; Yang, Yihang; Liu, Fen; Xue, Qian; Miao, Guo-Xing

    2016-07-01

    We created epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions of FeCo/MgO/EuS on MgO buffered Si (100). Tunnel magnetoresistance reached up to 64% at 4.2 K. An unexpected fast drop of magnetoresistance was recorded for MgO thickness above 1 nm, which is attributed to the forced nonspecular conductance across the EuS conduction band minimum located at the X points, rather than the desired ∆1 conductance centered around the Γ point.

  20. Spin-tunnel investigation of the spinning characteristics of typical single-engine general aviation airplane designs. 2: Low-wing model A; tail parachute diameter and canopy distance for emergency spin recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, S. M., Jr.; Bowman, J. S., Jr.; White, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    A spin tunnel study is reported on a scale model of a research airplane typical of low-wing, single-engine, light general aviation airplanes to determine the tail parachute diameter and canopy distance (riser length plus suspension-line length) required for energency spin recovery. Nine tail configurations were tested, resulting in a wide range of developed spin conditions, including steep spins and flat spins. The results indicate that the full-scale parachute diameter required for satisfactory recovery from the most critical conditions investigated is about 3.2 m and that the canopy distance, which was found to be critical for flat spins, should be between 4.6 and 6.1 m.

  1. Effects of boron composition on tunneling magnetoresistance ratio and microstructure of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB pseudo-spin-valve magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Kodzuka, M.; Ohkubo, T.; Hono, K.; Ikeda, S.; Ohno, H.; Gan, H. D.

    2012-02-15

    The effect of B concentration on the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of (Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 100-x}B{sub x}/MgO/(Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 100-x}B{sub x} (x = 22 and 33) pseudo-spin-valve (P-SV) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) was investigated. The TMR ratios for optimally annealed MTJs with x = 22 and 33 were 340% and 170%, respectively, at room temperature. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observation showed a weaker (001) texture in the MgO barrier in the MTJ with x = 33. The bottom electrode was not fully crystallized even with a considerable amount of B in the (Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 67}B{sub 33}, while good epitaxy was observed between (001) textured MgO and (Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 78}B{sub 22} electrodes.

  2. Tunnel magnetoresistance and spin torque switching in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions with a Co/Ni multilayer electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Takahiro; Gudmundsen, Theodore J.; Huang, Pinshane Y.; Liu, Luqiao; Muller, David A.; Ralph, Daniel C.; Buhrman, Robert A.

    2010-08-01

    We have fabricated MgO-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with a Co/Ni switching layer to reduce the demagnetizing field via interface anisotropy. With a fcc-(111) oriented Co/Ni multilayer combined with an FeCoB insertion layer, the demagnetizing field is 2 kOe and the tunnel magnetoresistance can be as high as 106%. Room-temperature measurements of spin-torque switching are in good agreement with predictions for a reduced critical current associated with the small demagnetization for antiparallel-to-parallel switching. For parallel-to-antiparallel switching the small demagnetization field causes spatially nonuniform reversal nucleated at the sample ends, with a low energy barrier but a higher switching current.

  3. Spin Tunnel Investigation of a 1/30 Scale Model of the North American A-5A Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry A.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley spin tunnel to determine the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/30-scale dynamic model of the North American A-5A airplane. Tests were made for the basic flight design loading with the center of gravity at 30-percent mean aerodynamic chord and also for a forward position and a rearward position with the center of gravity at 26-percent and 40-percent mean aerodynamic chord, respectively. Tests were also made to determine the effect of full external wing tanks on both wings, and of an asymmetrical condition when only one full tank is carried.

  4. Enhancement of tunneling density of states at a Y junction of spin-1/2 Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardanya, Sougata; Agarwal, Amit

    2015-07-01

    We calculate the tunneling density of states (TDOS) in a dissipationless three-wire junction of interacting spin-1/2 electrons, and find an anomalous enhancement of the TDOS in the zero-bias limit, even for repulsive interactions for several bosonic fixed points. This enhancement is physically related to the reflection of holes from the junction for incident electrons, and it occurs only in the vicinity of the junction (x spin excitations and ω is the bias frequency), crossing over to the bulk value, which is always suppressed at larger distances. The TDOS exponent can be directly probed in an STM experiment by measuring the differential tunneling conductance as a function of either the bias voltage or temperature as done in C. Blumenstein et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 776 (2011), 10.1038/nphys2051.

  5. Spin-filtering effect of thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier on tunneling magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Sungjung; Jung, K. Y.; Jun, K. I.; Shin, K. H.; Kim, D. S.; Hong, J. K.; Rhie, K. E-mail: krhie@korea.ac.kr; Lee, B. C. E-mail: krhie@korea.ac.kr

    2014-04-14

    Tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) dependence on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier thickness was investigated for CoFe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/CoFe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). MTJs with very thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers were grown by inserting an amorphous FeZr buffer layer whose role is only to reduce the roughness of bottom electrode. The TMR decreased as the thickness of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was reduced. The results are analyzed with the dependence of the spin-filtering effect on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness. It was found that a simple model of separating sp- and d-like electrons does not work, and it may suggest that the tunneling electrons are in rather hybridized state.

  6. A temperature dependent tunneling study of the spin density wave gap in EuFe2As2 single crystals.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anirban; Anupam; Hossain, Z; Gupta, Anjan K

    2013-09-18

    We report temperature dependent scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy measurements on single crystals of EuFe2As2 in the 15-292 K temperature range. The in situ cleaved crystals show atomic terraces with homogeneous tunnel spectra that correlate well with the spin density wave (SDW) transition at a temperature, TSDW ≈ 186 K. Above TSDW the local tunnel spectra show a small depression in the density of states (DOS) near the Fermi energy (EF). The gap becomes more pronounced upon entering the SDW state with a gap value ∼90 meV at 15 K. However, the zero bias conductance remains finite down to 15 K indicating a finite DOS at the EF in the SDW phase. Furthermore, no noticeable change is observed in the DOS at the antiferromagnetic ordering transition of Eu(2+) moments at 19 K. PMID:23962901

  7. Magnetization switching in a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction by combining spin-transfer torque and electric field-effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, S.; Nakatani, Y.; Yamanouchi, M.; Ikeda, S.; Sato, H.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-26

    We propose and demonstrate a scheme for magnetization switching in magnetic tunnel junctions, in which two successive voltage pulses are applied to utilize both spin-transfer torque and electric field effect. Under this switching scheme, a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction with perpendicular magnetic easy axis is shown to switch faster than by spin-transfer torque alone and more reliably than that by electric fields alone.

  8. Vertical Spin Tunnel Testing and Stability Analysis of Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Morelli, Eugene A.; Fremaux, C. Michael; Bean, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEVs) are blunt-body vehicles designed with the purpose of transporting payloads from space to the surface of the Earth. To achieve high reliability and minimum weight, MMEEVs avoid using limited-reliability systems, such as parachutes, retro-rockets, and reaction control systems and rely on the natural aerodynamic stability of the vehicle throughout the Entry, Descent, and Landing phases of flight. Testing in NASA Langley's 20-FT Vertical Spin Tunnel (20-FT VST), dynamically-scaled MMEEV models was conducted to improve subsonic aerodynamic models and validate stability criteria for this class of vehicle. This report documents the resulting data from VST testing for an array of 60-deg sphere-cone MMEEVs. Model configurations included were 1.2 meter, and 1.8 meter designs. The addition of a backshell extender, which provided a 150% increase in backshell diameter for the 1.2 meter design, provided a third test configuration. Center of Gravity limits were established for all MMEEV configurations. An application of System Identification (SID) techniques was performed to determine the aerodynamic coefficients in order to provide databases for subsequent 6-degree-of-freedom simulations.

  9. Spintronic logic design methodology based on spin Hall effect-driven magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Wang; Wang, Zhaohao; Zhang, Youguang; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Lv, Weifeng; Zhao, Weisheng

    2016-02-01

    Conventional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology is now approaching its physical scaling limits to enable Moore’s law to continue. Spintronic devices, as one of the potential alternatives, show great promise to replace CMOS technology for next-generation low-power integrated circuits in nanoscale technology nodes. Until now, spintronic memory has been successfully commercialized. However spintronic logic still faces many critical challenges (e.g. direct cascading capability and small operation gain) before it can be practically applied. In this paper, we propose a standard complimentary spintronic logic (CSL) design methodology to form a CMOS-like logic design paradigm. Using the spin Hall effect (SHE)-driven magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) device as an example, we demonstrate CSL implementation, functionality and performance. This logic family provides a unified design methodology for spintronic logic circuits and partly solves the challenges of direct cascading capability and small operation gain in the previously proposed spintronic logic designs. By solving a modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, the magnetization dynamics in the free layer of the MTJ is theoretically described and a compact electrical model is developed. With this electrical model, numerical simulations have been performed to evaluate the functionality and performance of the proposed CSL design. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed CSL design paradigm is rather promising for low-power logic computing.

  10. On the valve nature of a monolayer of aligned molecular magnets in tunneling spin-polarized electrons: Towards organic molecular spintronics

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Sudipto; Pal, Amlan J.

    2014-01-06

    We form a monolayer of magnetic organic molecules and immobilize their moments pointing either upwards or downwards with respect to the substrate through an electrostatic-binding process. Such a monolayer is probed with a scanning tunneling microscope tip, which is also magnetized with the magnetization vector pointing towards (or away from) apex of the tip. From spin-polarized tunneling current, we show that the current was higher when magnetization vectors of the tip and molecules were parallel as compared to that when they were anti-parallel. We show that for tunneling of spin-polarized electrons, aligned organic molecular magnets can act as a valve.

  11. 14. EXTERIOR VIEW OF OLD TENFOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. EXTERIOR VIEW OF OLD TEN-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  12. 13. EXTERIOR VIEW OF OLD TENFOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. EXTERIOR VIEW OF OLD TEN-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  13. New type of magnetic tunnel junction based on spin filtering through a reduced symmetry oxide: FeCo|Mg3B2O6|FeCo.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Derek A

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions with high-tunneling magnetoresistance values such as Fe|MgO|Fe capitalize on spin filtering in the oxide region based on the band symmetry of incident electrons. However, these structures rely on magnetic leads and oxide regions of the same cubic symmetry class. A new magnetic tunnel junction (FeCo|Mg(3)B(2)O(6)|FeCo) is presented that uses a reduced symmetry oxide region (orthorhombic) to provide spin filtering between the two cubic magnetic leads. Complex band structure analysis of Mg(3)B(2)O(6) based on density functional calculations shows that significant spin filtering could occur in this system. This new type of magnetic tunnel junction may have been fabricated already and can explain recent experimental studies of rf-sputtered FeCoB|MgO|FeCoB junctions where there is significant B diffusion into the MgO region. PMID:20017563

  14. An experimental study of the effect of tail configuration on the spinning characteristics of general aviation aircraft. M.S. Thesis; [static wind tunnel force measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballin, M. G.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using static wind tunnel tests to obtain information about spin damping characteristics of an isolated general aviation aircraft tail was investigated. A representative tail section was oriented to the tunnel free streamline at angles simulating an equilibrium spin. A full range of normally encountered spin conditions was employed. Results of parametric studies performed to determine the effect of spin damping on several tail design parameters show satisfactory agreement with NASA rotary balance tests. Wing and body interference effects are present in the NASA studies at steep spin attitudes, but agreement improves with increasing pitch angle and spin rate, suggesting that rotational flow effects are minimal. Vertical position of the horizontal stabilizer is found to be a primary parameter affecting yaw damping, and horizontal tail chordwise position induces a substantial effect on pitching moment.

  15. Spin accumulation in Si channels using CoFe/MgO/Si and CoFe/AlO{sub x}/Si tunnel contacts with high quality tunnel barriers prepared by radical-oxygen annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Akushichi, T. Shuto, Y.; Sugahara, S.; Takamura, Y.

    2015-05-07

    We investigate spin injection into Si channels using three-terminal spin-accumulation (3T-SA) devices with high-quality CoFe/MgO/n-Si and CoFe/AlO{sub x}/n-Si tunnel spin-injectors whose tunnel barriers are formed by radical oxidation of Mg and Al thin films deposited on Si(100) substrates and successive annealing under radical-oxygen exposure. When the MgO and AlO{sub x} barriers are not treated by the radical-oxygen annealing, the Hanle-effect signals obtained from the 3T-SA devices are closely fitted by a single Lorentz function representing a signal due to trap spins. On the other hand, when the tunnel barriers are annealed under radical-oxygen exposure, the Hanle-effect signals can be accurately fitted by the superposition of a Lorentz function and a non-Lorentz function representing a signal due to accumulated spins in the Si channel. These results suggest that the quality improvement of tunnel barriers treated by radical-oxygen annealing is highly effective for spin-injection into Si channels.

  16. Twofold spin-triplet pairing states and tunneling conductance in ferromagnet/ferromagnet/iron pnictide superconductor heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Tao, Y.C.; Dong, Z.C.; Hu, J.G.

    2013-06-15

    By applying an extended eight-component Bogoliubov–de Gennes equation, we study theoretically the tunneling conductance in clean ferromagnet/ferromagnet/iron pnictide superconductor (FM/FM/iron-based SC) heterojunctions. Under the condition of noncollinear magnetizations, twofold novel Andreev reflections exist due to the existence of two bands in the SC, in which the incident electron and the two Andreev-reflected holes, belonging to the same spin subband, form twofold spin-triplet pairing states near the FM/iron-based SC interface. It is shown that the conversions of the conductance not only between the zero-bias peak and valley at zero energy but also between the peaks and dips at two gap energies are strongly dependent on both the interband coupling strength in the SC and the spin polarization in the FM. The qualitative differences from tunneling into a conventional s-wave SC are also presented, which may help with experimentally probing and identifying the antiphase s-wave pairing symmetry in the iron-based SC. -- Highlights: •An eight-component Bogoliubov–de Gennes (BDG) equation. •Twofold novel ARs and twofold usual ARs. •Conversions of conductance between the zero-bias peak and valley at zero energy. •Conversions of conductance between peaks and dips at two gap energies. •The importance of the interband coupling strength in the SC.

  17. A compact model for magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) switched by thermally assisted Spin transfer torque (TAS + STT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weisheng; Duval, Julien; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Chappert, Claude

    2011-12-01

    Thermally assisted spin transfer torque [TAS + STT] is a new switching approach for magnetic tunnel junction [MTJ] nanopillars that represents the best trade-off between data reliability, power efficiency and density. In this paper, we present a compact model for MTJ switched by this approach, which integrates a number of physical models such as temperature evaluation and STT dynamic switching models. Many experimental parameters are included directly to improve the simulation accuracy. It is programmed in the Verilog-A language and compatible with the standard IC CAD tools, providing an easy parameter configuration interface and allowing high-speed co-simulation of hybrid MTJ/CMOS circuits.

  18. Simulation of electric-field and spin-transfer-torque induced magnetization switching in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangli; Zhang, Zongzhi; Liu, Yaowen; Jin, Q. Y.

    2015-05-01

    Macrospin simulations are performed to model the magnetization switching driven by the combined action of electric-field and spin-polarized electric current (spin-transfer torque; STT) in MgO/CoFeB based magnetic tunnel junctions with interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The results indicate that at low current case, the free layer magnetization shows a fast toggle-like switching, the final parallel or antiparallel magnetization state is determined by the electric-field effect, and the STT just helps or resists it to reach the final state depending on the current direction. However, with the increase of current strength, the contribution of STT effect gradually increases, which eventually achieves a deterministic magnetization switching state. Simulations further demonstrate that by appropriately tuning the parameters of applied electric-field and current the power consumption can be easily reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  19. Quantum-tunneling dynamics of a spin-polarized Fermi gas in a double-well potential

    SciTech Connect

    Salasnich, L.; Mazzarella, G.; Toigo, F.; Salerno, M.

    2010-02-15

    We study the exact dynamics of a one-dimensional spin-polarized gas of fermions in a double-well potential at zero and finite temperature. Despite the system being made of noninteracting fermions, its dynamics can be quite complex, showing strongly aperiodic spatio-temporal patterns during the tunneling. The extension of these results to the case of mixtures of spin-polarized fermions interacting with self-trapped Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) at zero temperature is considered as well. In this case we show that the fermionic dynamics remains qualitatively similar to that observed in the absence of BEC but with the Rabi frequencies of fermionic excited states explicitly depending on the number of bosons and on the boson-fermion interaction strength. From this, the possibility of controlling quantum fermionic dynamics by means of Feshbach resonances is suggested.

  20. Spin Transfer Torque Switching and Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy in Full Heusler Alloy Co2FeAl-BASED Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukegawa, H.; Wen, Z. C.; Kasai, S.; Inomata, K.; Mitani, S.

    2014-12-01

    Some of Co-based full Heusler alloys have remarkable properties in spintronics, that is, high spin polarization of conduction electrons and low magnetic damping. Owing to these properties, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using Co-based full Heusler alloys are potentially of particular importance for spintronic application such as magnetoresistive random access memories (MRAMs). Recently, we have first demonstrated spin transfer torque (STT) switching and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), which are required for developing high-density MRAMs, in full-Heusler Co2FeAl alloy-based MTJs. In this review, the main results of the experimental demonstrations are shown with referring to related issues, and the prospect of MTJs using Heusler alloys is also discussed.

  1. Effects of Be acceptors on the spin polarization of carriers in p-i-n resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awan, I. T.; Galeti, H. V. A.; Galvão Gobato, Y.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Taylor, D.; Henini, M.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of Be acceptors on the electroluminescence and the spin polarization in GaAs/AlAs p-i-n resonant tunneling diodes. The quantum well emission comprise two main lines separated by ˜20 meV attributed to excitonic and Be-related transitions, which intensities show remarkably abrupt variations at critical voltages, particularly at the electron resonant peak where it shows a high-frequency bistability. The circular-polarization degree of the quantum-well electroluminescence also shows strong and abrupt variations at the critical bias voltages and it attains relatively large values (of ˜-75% at 15 T). These effects may be explored to design novel devices for spintronic applications such as a high-frequency spin-oscillators.

  2. Effect of uniaxial strain on the tunnel magnetoresistance of T-shaped graphene nanoribbon based spin-valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouladi, A. Ahmadi

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigated the spin-dependent transport through a T-shaped graphene nanoribbon (TsGNR) based spin-valve consisting of armchair graphene sandwiched between two semi-infinite ferromagnetic armchair graphene nanoribbon leads in the presence of an applied uniaxial strain. Based on a tight-binding model and standard nonequilibrium Green's function technique, it is demonstrated that the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) for the system can be increased about 98% by tuning the uniaxial strain. Our results show that the absolute values of TMR around the zero bias voltage for compressive strain are larger than tensile strain. In addition, the TMR of the system can be nicely controlled by GNR width.

  3. Simulation of electric-field and spin-transfer-torque induced magnetization switching in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiangli; Zhang, Zongzhi; Liu, Yaowen; Jin, Q. Y.

    2015-05-07

    Macrospin simulations are performed to model the magnetization switching driven by the combined action of electric-field and spin-polarized electric current (spin-transfer torque; STT) in MgO/CoFeB based magnetic tunnel junctions with interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The results indicate that at low current case, the free layer magnetization shows a fast toggle-like switching, the final parallel or antiparallel magnetization state is determined by the electric-field effect, and the STT just helps or resists it to reach the final state depending on the current direction. However, with the increase of current strength, the contribution of STT effect gradually increases, which eventually achieves a deterministic magnetization switching state. Simulations further demonstrate that by appropriately tuning the parameters of applied electric-field and current the power consumption can be easily reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  4. Effects of Be acceptors on the spin polarization of carriers in p-i-n resonant tunneling diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Awan, I. T.; Galvão Gobato, Y.; Galeti, H. V. A.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Taylor, D.; Henini, M.

    2014-08-07

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of Be acceptors on the electroluminescence and the spin polarization in GaAs/AlAs p-i-n resonant tunneling diodes. The quantum well emission comprise two main lines separated by ∼20 meV attributed to excitonic and Be-related transitions, which intensities show remarkably abrupt variations at critical voltages, particularly at the electron resonant peak where it shows a high-frequency bistability. The circular-polarization degree of the quantum-well electroluminescence also shows strong and abrupt variations at the critical bias voltages and it attains relatively large values (of ∼−75% at 15 T). These effects may be explored to design novel devices for spintronic applications such as a high-frequency spin-oscillators.

  5. Non-equilibrium tunneling in zigzag graphene nanoribbon break-junction results in spin filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liming; Qiu, Wanzhi; Sharafat Hossain, Md; Al-Dirini, Feras; Evans, Robin; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-02-01

    Spintronic devices promise new faster and lower energy-consumption electronic systems. Graphene, a versatile material and candidate for next generation electronics, is known to possess interesting spintronic properties. In this paper, by utilizing density functional theory and non-equilibrium green function formalism, we show that Fano resonance can be generated by introducing a break junction in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR). Using this effect, we propose a new spin filtering device that can be used for spin injection. Our theoretical results indicate that the proposed device could achieve high spin filtering efficiency (over 90%) at practical fabrication geometries. Furthermore, our results indicate that the ZGNR break junction lattice configuration can dramatically affect spin filtering efficiency and thus needs to be considered when fabricating real devices. Our device can be fabricated on top of spin transport channel and provides good integration between spin injection and spin transport.

  6. Hole spin injection from a GaMnAs layer into GaAs-AlAs-InGaAs resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, D. H.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Orlita, M.; Kunc, J.; Galeti, H. V. A.; Henini, M.; Taylor, D.; Galvão Gobato, Y.

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated the polarization-resolved electroluminescence (EL) of a p-i-n GaAs/AlAs/InGaAs resonant tunneling diode (RTD) containing a GaMnAs (x  =  5%) spin injector under high magnetic fields. We demonstrate that under hole resonant tunneling condition, the GaMnAs contact acts as an efficient spin-polarized source for holes tunneling through the device. Polarization degrees up to 80% were observed in the device around the hole resonance at 2 K under 15 T. Our results could be valuable for improving the hole-spin injection in GaMnAs-based spintronic devices.

  7. Room-temperature detection of spin accumulation in silicon across Schottky tunnel barriers using a metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor structure (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaya, K.; Ando, Y.; Masaki, K.; Maeda, Y.; Fujita, Y.; Yamada, S.; Sawano, K.; Miyao, M.

    2013-05-01

    Using a metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor structure with a high-quality CoFe/n+-Si contact, we systematically study spin injection and spin accumulation in a nondegenerated Si channel with a doping density of ˜4.5 × 1015 cm-3 at room temperature. By applying the gate voltage (VG) to the channel, we obtain sufficient bias currents (IBias) for creating spin accumulation in the channel and observe clear spin-accumulation signals even at room temperature. Whereas the magnitude of the spin signals is enhanced by increasing IBias, it is reduced by increasing VG interestingly. These features can be understood within the framework of the conventional spin diffusion model. As a result, a room-temperature spin injection technique for the nondegenerated Si channel without using insulating tunnel barriers is established, which indicates a technological progress for Si-based spintronic applications with gate electrodes.

  8. Radio frequency measurements of tunnel couplings and singlet-triplet spin states in Si:P quantum dots.

    PubMed

    House, M G; Kobayashi, T; Weber, B; Hile, S J; Watson, T F; van der Heijden, J; Rogge, S; Simmons, M Y

    2015-01-01

    Spin states of the electrons and nuclei of phosphorus donors in silicon are strong candidates for quantum information processing applications given their excellent coherence times. Designing a scalable donor-based quantum computer will require both knowledge of the relationship between device geometry and electron tunnel couplings, and a spin readout strategy that uses minimal physical space in the device. Here we use radio frequency reflectometry to measure singlet-triplet states of a few-donor Si:P double quantum dot and demonstrate that the exchange energy can be tuned by at least two orders of magnitude, from 20 μeV to 8 meV. We measure dot-lead tunnel rates by analysis of the reflected signal and show that they change from 100 MHz to 22 GHz as the number of electrons on a quantum dot is increased from 1 to 4. These techniques present an approach for characterizing, operating and engineering scalable qubit devices based on donors in silicon. PMID:26548556

  9. Radio frequency measurements of tunnel couplings and singlet-triplet spin states in Si:P quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, M. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Weber, B.; Hile, S. J.; Watson, T. F.; van der Heijden, J.; Rogge, S.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2015-11-01

    Spin states of the electrons and nuclei of phosphorus donors in silicon are strong candidates for quantum information processing applications given their excellent coherence times. Designing a scalable donor-based quantum computer will require both knowledge of the relationship between device geometry and electron tunnel couplings, and a spin readout strategy that uses minimal physical space in the device. Here we use radio frequency reflectometry to measure singlet-triplet states of a few-donor Si:P double quantum dot and demonstrate that the exchange energy can be tuned by at least two orders of magnitude, from 20 μeV to 8 meV. We measure dot-lead tunnel rates by analysis of the reflected signal and show that they change from 100 MHz to 22 GHz as the number of electrons on a quantum dot is increased from 1 to 4. These techniques present an approach for characterizing, operating and engineering scalable qubit devices based on donors in silicon.

  10. Tunneling conductance for Majorana fermions in spin-orbit coupled semiconductor-superconductor heterostructures using superconducting leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Girish; Tewari, Sumanta

    2016-05-01

    It has been recently pointed out that the use of a superconducting (SC) lead instead of a normal metal lead can suppress the thermal broadening effects in tunneling conductance from Majorana fermions, helping reveal the quantized conductance of 2 e2/h . In this paper we discuss the specific case of tunneling conductance with SC leads of spin-orbit coupled semiconductor-superconductor (SM-SC) heterostructures in the presence of a Zeeman field, a system which has been extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally using a metallic lead. We examine the d I /d V spectra using a SC lead for different sets of physical parameters including temperature, tunneling strength, wire length, magnetic field, and induced SC pairing potential in the SM nanowire. We conclude that in a finite wire the Majorana splitting energy Δ E , which has nontrivial dependence on these physical parameters, remains responsible for the d I /d V peak broadening, even when the temperature broadening is suppressed by the SC gap in the lead. In a finite wire the signatures of Majorana fermions with a SC lead are oscillations of quasi-Majorana peaks about bias V =±Δlead , in contrast to the case of metallic leads where such oscillations are about zero bias. Our results will be useful for analysis of future experiments on SM-SC heterostructures using SC leads.

  11. Low-current-density spin-transfer switching in Gd{sub 22}Fe{sub 78}-MgO magnetic tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Kinjo, Hidekazu Machida, Kenji; Aoshima, Ken-ichi; Kato, Daisuke; Kuga, Kiyoshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Shimidzu, Naoki; Matsui, Koichi

    2014-05-28

    Magnetization switching of a relatively thick (9 nm) Gd-Fe free layer was achieved with a low spin injection current density of 1.0 × 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} using MgO based magnetic tunnel junction devices, fabricated for light modulators. At about 560 × 560 nm{sup 2} in size, the devices exhibited a tunneling magnetoresistance ratio of 7%. This low-current switching is mainly attributed to thermally assisted spin-transfer switching in consequence of its thermal magnetic behavior arising from Joule heating.

  12. Magnetoelectric coupling and spin-dependent tunneling in Fe/PbTiO{sub 3}/Fe multiferroic heterostructure with a Ni monolayer inserted at one interface

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jian-Qing Zhang, Hu; Song, Yu-Min

    2015-08-07

    We report on first-principles calculations of a Ni monolayer inserted at one interface in the epitaxial Fe/PbTiO{sub 3}/Fe multiferroic heterostructure, focusing on the magnetoelectric coupling and the spin-dependent transport properties. The results of magnetoelectric coupling calculations reveal an attractive approach to realize cumulative magnetoelectric effects in the ferromagnetic/ferroelectric/ferromagnetic superlattices. The underlying physics is attributed to the combinations of several different magnetoelectric coupling mechanisms such as interface bonding, spin-dependent screening, and different types of magnetic interactions. We also demonstrate that inserting a Ni monolayer at one interface in the Fe/PbTiO{sub 3}/Fe multiferroic tunnel junction is an efficient method to produce considerable tunneling electroresistance effect by modifying the tunnel potential barrier and the interfacial electronic structure. Furthermore, coexistence of tunneling magnetoresistance and tunneling electroresistance leads to the emergence of four distinct resistance states, which can be served as a multistate-storage device. The complicated influencing factors including bulk properties of the ferromagnetic electrodes, decay rates of the evanescent states in the tunnel barrier, and the specific interfacial electronic structure provide us promising opportunities to design novel multiferroic tunnel junctions with excellent performances.

  13. Are insulating LiF barriers relevant for spin-polarized tunnelling applications? Insights from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaic, P.; Burzo, E.; Carva, K.

    2016-08-01

    Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Fe/LiF (0 0 1) interfaces and spin-polarized transport properties of Fe/LiF/Fe (0 0 1) heterostructures are studied by means of self-consistent atomistic first-principles calculations. Total energy calculations performed for various interfacial geometries show that the Fe/LiF (0 0 1) interface with Fe atoms located above anionic sites is the most stable. F–Fe and Li–Fe substitutional intermixings at Fe/LiF (0 0 1) interfaces are not energetically favourable, but F accumulation in the interstitial void spaces at Fe/LiF (0 0 1) interfaces is possible. The magnetism of interfacial Fe atoms is robust. The majority-spin ferromagnetic state conductances decay rapidly with respect to the barrier thickness, while the minority-spin ones have very large contributions at specific hot spots and play a major role in the transport properties. Depending on the interfacial geometry, tunnelling magnetoresistance ratios ranging from 460%–2400% are evidenced. Interfacial interdiffusion can affect the transport properties. The exchange coupling between Fe electrodes through LiF barriers is negligible.

  14. Radio-frequency magnetic susceptibility of spin ice crystals Dy2Ti2O7 using tunnel diode resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teknowijoyo, Serafim; Cho, Kyuil; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Prozorov, Ruslan; Cava, Robert J.; Krizan, Jason W.; Ames Laboratory; Iowa State University Team; Princeton University Collaboration

    Spin ice compound, Dy2Ti2O7, has shown complex frequency - dependent magnetic behavior at low temperatures. While the DC measurements show conventional paramagnetic behavior, finite frequency susceptibility shows two regimes, - complex kagomé ice behavior at around 2 K and spin collective behavior above 10 K, depending on the frequency. Conventional AC susceptometry is limited to frequencies in a kHz range, but to get an insight into the possible Arrhenius activated behavior and characteristic relaxation times, higher frequencies are desired. We used self-oscillating tunnel-diode resonator (TDR) to probe magnetic susceptibility at 14.6 MHz, in the presence of a DC magnetic field and down to 50 mK. We found an unusual non-monotonic field dependence of the lower transition temperature, most likely associated with different spin configurations in a kagomé ice and an activated behavior of the upper transition, which has now shifted to 50 K range. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE BES MSED and was performed at the Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University under Contract DE-AC02-07CH11358. The work at Princeton university was supported by DOE BES Grant Number DE-FG02-08ER46544.

  15. Electric and thermal spin torque across disordered FeCo/MgO/FeCo magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-Zhuo; Xia, Ke

    2016-05-01

    We report on a first principles study of the spin transfer torque (STT) induced by electric voltages across and temperature gradients through Fe0.5Co0.5/MgO /Fe0.5Co0.5 (001) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). A small amount of interfacial oxygen vacancies (OVs) has demonstrated considerable effects on the bias-dependent STT, enabling the "threshold voltage" for in-plane STT to be optimized to 0.2 V, and one sample with an asymmetric OV distribution reproduced the experimental measurements. The spin torque efficiency increases with the MgO barrier thickness until it reaches a constant value, while interfacial OVs tend to reduce the efficiency when compared with that of the perfect junction. The thermal spin torque (TST) is also affected greatly by imperfections at the interface, leading to enhancements in FeCo/MgO/FeCo junctions, whereas a weakening effect is found in Fe/MgO/Fe junctions. The TST magnitude in FeCo/MgO/FeCo MTJs is typically smaller than that of a similar MTJ with Fe electrodes.

  16. Geology of the "20-foot" clay and Gardiners clay in southern Nassau and southwestern Suffolk counties, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doriski, T.P.; Wilde-Katz, Franceska

    1983-01-01

    Data from 1978-79 drilling was compiled with information from previous reports and historical records to prepare surface contour and isopach maps of the ' 20-foot ' clay and Gardiners Clay in southern Nassau and southwestern Suffolk Counties. These units are major confining layers in the upper part of the groundwater reservoir along Long Island 's south shore. Where present, they influence the groundwater flow patterns locally. The ' 20-foot ' clay, previously mapped in Nassau County only, was found in test borings in Suffolk County also. Its surface altitude ranges from 20 to 40 ft below NGVD (National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929); thickness ranges from 0 to 30 ft. The surface altitude of the Gardiners Clay ranges from 40 to 120 ft below NGVD; thickness ranges from 0 to 90 ft. Previously known discontinuities in both formations are more accurately delineated, and several new discontinuities have been inferred from the new data. The Matawan Group-Magothy Formation undifferentiated the Monmouth Group, and the Jameco Gravel directly underlie the Gardiners Clay. Revised surface altitudes of these formations are depicted on maps and cross sections of the south-shore area. (Author 's abstract)

  17. Observing spin excitations in 3 d transition-metal adatoms on Pt(111) with inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy: A first-principles perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweflinghaus, Benedikt; dos Santos Dias, Manuel; Lounis, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Spin excitations in atomic-scale nanostructures have been investigated with inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy, sometimes with conflicting results. In this work, we present a theoretical viewpoint on a recent experimental controversy regarding the spin excitations of Co adatoms on Pt(111). While one group [Balashov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 257203 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.257203] claims to have detected them, another group reported their observation only after the hydrogenation of the Co adatom [Dubout et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 106807 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.106807]. Utilizing time-dependent density functional theory in combination with many-body perturbation theory, we demonstrate that, although inelastic spin excitations are possible for Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co adatoms, their efficiency differs. While the excitation signature is less pronounced for Mn and Co adatoms, it is larger for Cr and Fe adatoms. We find that the tunneling matrix elements or the tunneling cross-section related to the nature and symmetry of the relevant electronic states are more favorable for triggering the spin excitations in Fe than in Co. An enhancement of the tunneling and of the inelastic spectra is possible by attaching hydrogen to the adatom at the appropriate position.

  18. Analysis of flight and wind-tunnel tests on Udet airplanes with reference to spinning characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, H

    1929-01-01

    This report presents an analysis of results of wind-tunnel tests conducted at the D.V.L. Values were determined for the effectiveness of all the controls at various angles of attack. The autorotation was studied by subjecting the rotating model to an air blast.

  19. Magnon contribution to the spin torque and magnetoresistance properties of FeCoB/MgO/FeCoB magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Tseng, Hsin-Wei; Read, John; Katine, Jordan; Ralph, Daniel; Buhrman, Robert

    2012-02-01

    We have studied the spin-torque excited ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR) and the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) properties of FeCoB/MgO/FeCoB magnetic tunnel junctions as a function of temperature from 300K to 10K. We find that while the TMR increases by ˜ 50% upon cooling to 10 K, the in-plane spin torque and the perpendicular or field-like torque both decrease substantially. The results demonstrate that while magnon-assisted tunneling degrades TMR, it acts to significantly enhance ST in MTJs, in accord with theoretical prediction. Moreover, the bias-dependent structure in both the asymmetry of the in-plane ST and the parallel conductance of the MTJ is more pronounced at low temperature, indicative of this asymmetry being due substantially to the interfacial electronic structure of the electrodes.

  20. Determination of spin-dependent Seebeck coefficients of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebing, N.; Serrano-Guisan, S.; Rott, K.; Reiss, G.; Langer, J.; Ocker, B.; Schumacher, H. W.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient and the tunneling magneto thermopower (TMTP) of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) in the presence of thermal gradients across the MTJ. The thermo power voltage VTP across the MTJ is found to scale linearly with the heating power and reveals similar field dependence as the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR). Based on calibration measurements and finite element simulations of the heat flux, the thermal gradient and large spin-dependent Seebeck coefficients of the order of (240 ± 110) μV/K are derived. From additional measurements on MTJs after dielectric breakdown, a TMR up to 90% and Seebeck coefficients up to 650 μV/K can be derived.

  1. 6. CLOSEUP VIEW OF TENFOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF TEN-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  2. 10. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  3. 11. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  4. 3. VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL, LOOKING NORTHWEST (1991). WrightPatterson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL, LOOKING NORTHWEST (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  5. 9. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  6. 8. NORTH VIEW ALONG SIDE OF TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. NORTH VIEW ALONG SIDE OF TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  7. 7. SOUTH VIEW ALONG SIDE OF TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. SOUTH VIEW ALONG SIDE OF TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  8. Spin-transfer switching in full-Heusler Co2FeAl-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Wen, Zhenchao; Kondou, Kouta; Kasai, Shinya; Mitani, Seiji; Inomata, Koichiro

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrated spin-transfer magnetization switching using magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a full-Heusler alloy Co2FeAl (CFA). We prepared CFA (1.5 nm)/MgO/CoFe (4 nm) ("CFA-free") and CFA (30 nm)/MgO/CoFeB (2 nm) ("CFA-reference") MTJs on a Cr(001) layer. The intrinsic critical current density (Jc0) of the CFA-free (CFA-reference) MTJ was 29 MA/cm2 (7.1 MA/cm2). The larger Jc0 of the CFA-free MTJ is attributed to the significant enhancement of the Gilbert damping factor (˜0.04) of the CFA due to the Cr layer. The Jc0 of the CFA-reference is as small as that reported for typical CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs.

  9. Optimization of the polarized Klein tunneling currents in a sub-lattice: pseudo-spin filters and latticetronics in graphene ribbons.

    PubMed

    López, Luis I A; Yaro, Simeón Moisés; Champi, A; Ujevic, Sebastian; Mendoza, Michel

    2014-02-12

    We found that with an increase of the potential barrier applied to metallic graphene ribbons, the Klein tunneling current decreases until it is totally destroyed and the pseudo-spin polarization increases until it reaches its maximum value when the current is zero. This inverse relation disfavors the generation of polarized currents in a sub-lattice. In this work we discuss the pseudo-spin control (polarization and inversion) of the Klein tunneling currents, as well as the optimization of these polarized currents in a sub-lattice, using potential barriers in metallic graphene ribbons. Using density of states maps, conductance results, and pseudo-spin polarization information (all of them as a function of the energy V and width of the barrier L), we found (V, L) intervals in which the polarized currents in a given sub-lattice are maximized. We also built parallel and series configurations with these barriers in order to further optimize the polarized currents. A systematic study of these maps and barrier configurations shows that the parallel configurations are good candidates for optimization of the polarized tunneling currents through the sub-lattice. Furthermore, we discuss the possibility of using an electrostatic potential as (i) a pseudo-spin filter or (ii) a pseudo-spin inversion manipulator, i.e. a possible latticetronic of electronic currents through metallic graphene ribbons. The results of this work can be extended to graphene nanostructures. PMID:24441476

  10. Polarity-tunable spin transport in all-oxide multiferroic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Rohit; Petraru, Adrian; Nair, Harikrishnan S.; Vavra, Ondrej; Ziegler, Martin; Kim, Seong Keun; Jeong, Doo Seok; Kohlstedt, Hermann

    2016-05-01

    A multiferroic tunnel junction (MFTJ) promisingly offers multinary memory states in response to electric- and magnetic-fields, referring to tunneling electroresistance (TER) and tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), respectively. In spite of recent progress, a substantial number of questions concerning the understanding of these two intertwined phenomena still remain open, e.g. the role of microstructural/chemical asymmetry at the interfaces of the junction and the effect of an electrode material on the MFTJ properties. In this regard, we look into the multiferroic effect of all-complex-oxide MFTJ (La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/Pb(Zr0.3Ti0.7)O3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3). The results reveal apparent TER-TMR interplay--captured by the reversible electric-field control of the TMR effect. Finally, microscopy analysis on the MFTJ revealed that the observed TER-TMR interplay is perhaps mediated by microstructural and chemical asymmetry in our nominally symmetric MFTJ.A multiferroic tunnel junction (MFTJ) promisingly offers multinary memory states in response to electric- and magnetic-fields, referring to tunneling electroresistance (TER) and tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), respectively. In spite of recent progress, a substantial number of questions concerning the understanding of these two intertwined phenomena still remain open, e.g. the role of microstructural/chemical asymmetry at the interfaces of the junction and the effect of an electrode material on the MFTJ properties. In this regard, we look into the multiferroic effect of all-complex-oxide MFTJ (La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/Pb(Zr0.3Ti0.7)O3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3). The results reveal apparent TER-TMR interplay--captured by the reversible electric-field control of the TMR effect. Finally, microscopy analysis on the MFTJ revealed that the observed TER-TMR interplay is perhaps mediated by microstructural and chemical asymmetry in our nominally symmetric MFTJ. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01277a

  11. Investigation of the Spin and Recovery Characteristics of a 0.057-Scale Model of the Modified Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane. TED No. NACA DE 311

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Theodore; Pumphrey, Norman E.

    1950-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the spin and recovery characteristics of a 0.057-scale model of the modified Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane. The primary change in the design from that previously tested was a revision of the twin vertical tails. Tests were also made to determine the effect of installation of external wing tanks. The results indicated that the revision in the vertical tails did not greatly alter the spin and recovery characteristics of the model and recovery by normal use of controls (fill rapid rudder reversal followed approximately one-half turn later by movement of the stick forward of neutral) was satisfactory. Adding the external wing tanks to cause the recovery characteristics to become critical and border on an unsatisfactory condition; however, it was shown that satisfactory recovery could be obtained by jettisoning the tanks, followed by normal recovery technique.

  12. Mn concentration and quantum size effects on spin-polarized transport through CdMnTe based magnetic resonant tunneling diode.

    PubMed

    Mnasri, S; Abdi-Ben Nasrallahl, S; Sfina, N; Lazzari, J L; Saïd, M

    2012-11-01

    Theoretical studies on spin-dependent transport in magnetic tunneling diodes with giant Zeeman splitting of the valence band are carried out. The studied structure consists of two nonmagnetic layers CdMgTe separated by a diluted magnetic semiconductor barrier CdMnTe, the hole is surrounded by two p-doped CdTe layers. Based on the parabolic valence band effective mass approximation and the transfer matrix method, the magnetization and the current densities for holes with spin-up and spin-down are studied in terms of the Mn concentration, the well and barrier thicknesses as well as the voltage. It is found that, the current densities depend strongly on these parameters and by choosing suitable values; this structure can be a good spin filter. Such behaviors are originated from the enhancement and suppression in the spin-dependent resonant states. PMID:23421288

  13. Power-dependent spin amplification in (In, Ga)As/GaAs quantum well via Pauli blocking by tunnel-coupled quantum dot ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. L.; Kiba, T.; Yang, X. J.; Takayama, J.; Murayama, A.

    2016-04-01

    Power-dependent time-resolved optical spin orientation measurements were performed on In0.1Ga0.9As quantum well (QW) and In0.5Ga0.5As quantum dot (QD) tunnel-coupled structures with an 8-nm-thick GaAs barrier. A fast transient increase of electron spin polarization was observed at the QW ground state after circular-polarized pulse excitation. The temporal maximum of polarization increased with increasing pumping fluence owing to enhanced spin blocking in the QDs, yielding a highest amplification of 174% with respect to the initial spin polarization. Further elevation of the laser power gradually quenched the polarization dynamics, which was induced by saturated spin filling of both the QDs and the QW phase spaces.

  14. Temperature-dependent spin injection dynamics in InGaAs/GaAs quantum well-dot tunnel-coupled nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. L.; Kiba, T.; Yang, X. J.; Takayama, J.; Murayama, A.

    2016-03-01

    Time-resolved optical spin orientation spectroscopy was employed to investigate the temperature-dependent electron spin injection in In0.1Ga0.9As quantum well (QW) and In0.5Ga0.5As quantum dots (QDs) tunnel-coupled nanostructures with 4, 6, and 8 nm-thick GaAs barriers. The fast picosecond-ranged spin injection from QW to QD excited states (ES) was observed to speed up with temperature, as induced by pronounced longitudinal-optical (LO)-phonon-involved multiple scattering process, which contributes to a thermally stable and almost fully spin-conserving injection within 5-180 K. The LO-phonon coupling was also found to cause accelerated electron spin relaxation of QD ES at elevated temperature, mainly via hyperfine interaction with random nuclear field.

  15. Polarity-tunable spin transport in all-oxide multiferroic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Soni, Rohit; Petraru, Adrian; Nair, Harikrishnan S; Vavra, Ondrej; Ziegler, Martin; Kim, Seong Keun; Jeong, Doo Seok; Kohlstedt, Hermann

    2016-05-19

    A multiferroic tunnel junction (MFTJ) promisingly offers multinary memory states in response to electric- and magnetic-fields, referring to tunneling electroresistance (TER) and tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), respectively. In spite of recent progress, a substantial number of questions concerning the understanding of these two intertwined phenomena still remain open, e.g. the role of microstructural/chemical asymmetry at the interfaces of the junction and the effect of an electrode material on the MFTJ properties. In this regard, we look into the multiferroic effect of all-complex-oxide MFTJ (La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/Pb(Zr0.3Ti0.7)O3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3). The results reveal apparent TER-TMR interplay-captured by the reversible electric-field control of the TMR effect. Finally, microscopy analysis on the MFTJ revealed that the observed TER-TMR interplay is perhaps mediated by microstructural and chemical asymmetry in our nominally symmetric MFTJ. PMID:27166713

  16. A low-temperature spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope operating in a fully rotatable magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Meckler, S; Gyamfi, M; Pietzsch, O; Wiesendanger, R

    2009-02-01

    A new scanning tunneling microscope for spin-polarized experiments has been developed. The microscope is operated at 4.7 K in a superconducting triple axis vector magnet providing the possibility for measurements depending on the direction of the magnetic field. In single axis mode the maximum field is 5 T perpendicular to the sample plane and 1.3 T in the sample plane, respectively. In cooperative mode fields are limited to 3.5 T perpendicular and 1 T in plane. The microscope is operated in an ultrahigh vacuum system providing optimized conditions for the self-assembled growth of magnetic structures at the atomic scale. The available temperature during growth ranges from 10 up to 1100 K. The performance of the new instrument is illustrated by spin-polarized measurements on 1.6 atomic layers Fe/W(110). It is demonstrated that the magnetization direction of ferromagnetic Fe and Gd tips can be adjusted using the external magnetic field. Atomic resolution is demonstrated by imaging an Fe monolayer on Ru(0001). PMID:19256654

  17. Magnetization switching by combining electric field and spin-transfer torque effects in a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangli; Wang, Chengjie; Liu, Yaowen; Zhang, Zongzhi; Jin, Q. Y.; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Effective manipulation of magnetization orientation driven by electric field in a perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junction introduces technologically relevant possibility for developing low power magnetic memories. However, the bipolar orientation characteristic of toggle-like magnetization switching possesses intrinsic difficulties for practical applications. By including both the in-plane (T//) and field-like (T⊥) spin-transfer torque terms in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulation, reliable and deterministic magnetization reversal can be achieved at a significantly reduced current density of 5×109 A/m2 under the co-action of electric field and spin-polarized current, provided that the electric-field pulse duration exceeds a certain critical value τc. The required critical τc decreases with the increase of T⊥ strength because stronger T⊥ can make the finally stabilized out-of-plane component of magnetization stay in a larger negative value. The power consumption for such kind of deterministic magnetization switching is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than that of the switching driven by current only. PMID:26732287

  18. Current-induced magnetization switching of a three terminal perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction by spin-orbit torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubukcu, Murat; Drouard, Marc; Boulle, Olivier; Garello, Kevin; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Langer, Juergen; Ocker, Berthold; Gambardella, Pietro; Gaudin, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    A current flowing in the plane of a magnetic multilayer with structural inversion asymmetry, such as Pt/Co/AlOx, creates a torque on the magnetization. This torque is due to the strong spin-orbit interaction present in such multilayers and can lead to fast magnetization reversal with a low writing energy.We will present the first proof of concept of a perpendicular spin-orbit torque magnetic random access memory (SOT-MRAM) cell composed of a Ta/FeCoB/MgO/FeCoB magnetic tunnel junction. The basic write and read operations, i.e., the magnetization reversal by current injection in the Ta track and its detection using the high TMR signal, are demonstrated. Our results open a path for the development of a novel class of three terminal MRAM combining fast, reliable and low energy writing. This work was supported by the European Commission under the Seventh Framework Program (Grant Agreement 318144, spot project).

  19. Magnetization switching by combining electric field and spin-transfer torque effects in a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangli; Wang, Chengjie; Liu, Yaowen; Zhang, Zongzhi; Jin, Q Y; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Effective manipulation of magnetization orientation driven by electric field in a perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junction introduces technologically relevant possibility for developing low power magnetic memories. However, the bipolar orientation characteristic of toggle-like magnetization switching possesses intrinsic difficulties for practical applications. By including both the in-plane (T//) and field-like (T⊥) spin-transfer torque terms in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulation, reliable and deterministic magnetization reversal can be achieved at a significantly reduced current density of 5×10(9) A/m(2) under the co-action of electric field and spin-polarized current, provided that the electric-field pulse duration exceeds a certain critical value τc. The required critical τc decreases with the increase of T⊥ strength because stronger T⊥ can make the finally stabilized out-of-plane component of magnetization stay in a larger negative value. The power consumption for such kind of deterministic magnetization switching is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than that of the switching driven by current only. PMID:26732287

  20. Magnetization switching by combining electric field and spin-transfer torque effects in a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangli; Wang, Chengjie; Liu, Yaowen; Zhang, Zongzhi; Jin, Q. Y.; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Effective manipulation of magnetization orientation driven by electric field in a perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junction introduces technologically relevant possibility for developing low power magnetic memories. However, the bipolar orientation characteristic of toggle-like magnetization switching possesses intrinsic difficulties for practical applications. By including both the in-plane (T//) and field-like (T⊥) spin-transfer torque terms in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulation, reliable and deterministic magnetization reversal can be achieved at a significantly reduced current density of 5×109 A/m2 under the co-action of electric field and spin-polarized current, provided that the electric-field pulse duration exceeds a certain critical value τc. The required critical τc decreases with the increase of T⊥ strength because stronger T⊥ can make the finally stabilized out-of-plane component of magnetization stay in a larger negative value. The power consumption for such kind of deterministic magnetization switching is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than that of the switching driven by current only.

  1. Concluding Report on Free-Spinning and Recovery Characteristics of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman F11F-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA AD 395

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.

    1956-01-01

    An investigation has been completed in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/24-scale model of the Grumman F11F-1 airplane to determine its spin and recovery characteristics. An interim report, Research Memorandum SL55G20, was published earlier and the present report concludes the presentation of results of the investigation. Primarily, the present report presents results obtained with engine gyroscopic moments simulated on the model. Also, the current results were obtained with a revised larger vertical tail recently incorporated on the airplane. It was difficult to obtain developed spins on the model when the spin direction was in the same sense as that of the engine rotation (right spin on the airplane). The developed spins obtained were very oscillatory and the recoveries were unsatisfactory. These results were similar to those previously reported for which engine rotation was not simulated. When the spin direction was in the opposite sense (left spin on the airplane), however, developed spins were readily obtainable. Recoveries from these spins also were unsatisfactory. Satisfactory recoveries were obtained on the model, however, when rudder reversal was accompanied by extension of small canards near the nose of the airplane or by deflection of the horizontal tail differentially with the spin.

  2. Resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of Mn12 acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Lendínez, S.; Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Terban, M. W.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Espin, J.; Imaz, I.; Maspoch, D.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-01-06

    We report measurements and theoretical analysis of resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of a molecular magnet. Amorphous nanospheres of Mn₁₂ acetate have been fabricated and characterized by chemical, infrared, TEM, X-ray, and magnetic methods. Magnetic measurements have revealed sharp tunneling peaks in the field derivative of the magnetization that occur at the typical resonant field values for the Mn₁₂ acetate crystal in the field parallel to the easy axis.Theoretical analysis is provided that explains these observations. We argue that resonant spin tunneling in a molecular magnet can be established in a powder sample, without the need for a single crystal and without aligning the easy magnetization axes of the molecules. This is confirmed by re-analyzing the old data on a powdered sample of non-oriented micron-size crystals of Mn₁₂ acetate. In conclusion, our findings can greatly simplify the selection of candidates for quantum spin tunneling among newly synthesized molecular magnets.

  3. First-principles study of spin transport in BN doped CrO2-graphene-CrO2 magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Sudhanshu; Mishra, Pradeep; Goyal, Rohit

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the spin-dependent electronic transport properties of Magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) consisting of Boron (B) and Nitrogen (N) doped graphene nanosheet sandwiched between two CrO2 half-metallic-ferromagnet (HMF) electrodes. A large value of tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) and perfect spin filtration was obtained as compared to un-doped graphene MTJ structures reported in past. The use of HMF electrodes further raises the TMR and improves the spin filtration in comparison to MTJs with metallic and ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes, which suggest HMF electrodes as a suitable candidate over metallic and FM electrodes for implementing graphene sheet based MTJs. A high value of TMR ∼100% is obtained at zero bias voltage, which remains constantly high at higher bias voltages in the range of 0 V to 1 V. The higher value of TMR and better (near perfect) spin filtration abilities suggest its usefulness in spin-valves and other spintronics based applications. The spin-dependent non-equilibrium transport is also investigated by analyzing the bias dependent transmission coefficients.

  4. Tunneling Spectroscopy from Magnetization Evolution in a Tilted Rotating Frame of Nuclear Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damyanovich, A.; Peternelj, J.; Pintar, M. M.

    2000-07-01

    The time evolution of the proton Zeeman magnetization in the rotating frame at the magic angle θM = cos-1(1/3) is calculated for an isolated tunneling methyl group and its Fourier transform is given. The calculation compares well with the experimental spectra of CH3CD2I and methylmalonic acid. It is shown that Fourier transform spectroscopy of the magnetization evolution in a tilted RF frame represents an excellent alternative to the analogous experiment performed at exact resonance, resulting in improved resolution and a much better signal-to-noise ratio.

  5. Tunneling spectroscopy of quasiparticle bound states in a spinful Josephson junction.

    PubMed

    Chang, W; Manucharyan, V E; Jespersen, T S; Nygård, J; Marcus, C M

    2013-05-24

    The spectrum of a segment of InAs nanowire, confined between two superconducting leads, was measured as function of gate voltage and superconducting phase difference using a third normal-metal tunnel probe. Subgap resonances for odd electron occupancy-interpreted as bound states involving a confined electron and a quasiparticle from the superconducting leads, reminiscent of Yu-Shiba-Rusinov states-evolve into Kondo-related resonances at higher magnetic fields. An additional zero-bias peak of unknown origin is observed to coexist with the quasiparticle bound states. PMID:23745916

  6. Entanglement growth and correlation spreading with variable-range interactions in spin and fermionic tunneling models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyskikh, Anton S.; Fagotti, Maurizio; Schachenmayer, Johannes; Essler, Fabian; Daley, Andrew J.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics following a global parameter quench for two one-dimensional models with variable-range power-law interactions: a long-range transverse Ising model, which has recently been realized in chains of trapped ions, and a long-range lattice model for spinless fermions with long-range tunneling. For the transverse Ising model, the spreading of correlations and growth of entanglement are computed using numerical matrix product state techniques, and are compared with exact solutions for the fermionic tunneling model. We identify transitions between regimes with and without an apparent linear light cone for correlations, which correspond closely between the two models. For long-range interactions (in terms of separation distance r , decaying slower than 1 /r ), we find that despite the lack of a light cone, correlations grow slowly as a power law at short times, and that—depending on the structure of the initial state—the growth of entanglement can also be sublinear. These results are understood through analytical calculations, and should be measurable in experiments with trapped ions.

  7. Double-decker phthalocyanine complex: Scanning tunneling microscopy study of film formation and spin properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komeda, Tadahiro; Katoh, Keiichi; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2014-05-01

    We review recent studies of double-decker and triple-decker phthalocyanine (Pc) molecules adsorbed on surfaces in terms of the bonding configuration, electronic structure and spin state. The Pc molecule has been studied extensively in surface science. A Pc molecule can contain various metal atoms at the center, and the class of the molecule is called as metal phthalocyanine (MPc). If the center metal has a large radius, like as lanthanoid metals, it becomes difficult to incorporate the metal atom inside of the Pc ring. Pc ligands are placed so as to sandwich the metal atom, where the metal atom is placed out of the Pc plane. The molecule in this configuration is called as a multilayer-decker Pc molecule. After the finding that the double-decker Pc lanthanoid complex shows single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior, it has attracted a large attention. This is partly due to a rising interest for the ‘molecular spintronics’, in which the freedoms of spin and charge of an electron are applied to the quantum process of information. SMMs represent a class of compounds in which a single molecule behaves as a magnet. The reported blocking temperature, below which a single SMM molecule works as an quantum magnet, has been increasing with the development in the molecular design and synthesis techniques of multiple-decker Pc complex. However, even the bulk properties of these molecules are promising for the use of electronic materials, the films of multi-decker Pc molecules is less studied than those for the MPc molecules. An intriguing structural property is expected for the multi-decker Pc molecules since the Pc planes are linked by metal atoms. This gives an additional degree of freedom to the rotational angle between the two Pc ligands, and they can make a wheel-like symmetric rotation. Due to a simple and well-defined structure of a multi-decker Pc complex, the molecule can be a model molecule for molecular machine studies. The multi-decker Pc molecules can provide

  8. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the McDonnell XP-88 Airplane with a VEE Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Theodore

    1947-01-01

    An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/24-scale model of the McDonnell XP-88 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-ft free-spinning tunnel. Results of tests with a conventional tail have been previously reported; the results presented herein are for the model with a vee tail installed. The effects of control settings and movements on the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model. In the normal loading were determined. Tests of the model in the long-range loading also were made. The investigation included leading-edge-flap, spin-recovery-parachute, and rudder-pedal-force tests. The recovery characteristics of the model were satisfactory for the normal loading. Deflecting the leading-edge flaps improved recoveries. The results indicated that with the external wing tanks installed (long-range loading) recoveries may be poor and, therefore, if a spin is inadvertently entered in this condition the tanks should be jettisoned if recovery does not appear imminent immediately after it is attempted. A 10-foot spin-recovery tail parachute with a towline 40 feet long and a drag coefficient of 0.63 was found to be effective for spin recovery. The rudder pedal force required for spin recovery was indicated to be within the capabilities of the pilot.

  9. Free-Spinning Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Low-Wing Monoplane with Systematic Changes in Wings and Tails V : Effect of Airplane Relative Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidman, Oscar; Neihouse, A I

    1940-01-01

    The reported tests are a continuation of an NACA investigation being made in the free-spinning wind tunnel to determine the effects of independent variations in load distribution, wing and tail arrangement, and control disposition on the spin characteristics of airplanes. The standard series of tests was repeated to determine the effect of airplane relative density. Tests were made at values of the relative-density parameter of 6.8, 8.4 (basic), and 12.0; and the results were analyzed. The tested variations in the relative-density parameter may be considered either as variations in the wing loading of an airplane spun at a given altitude, with the radii of gyration kept constant, or as a variation of the altitude at which the spin takes place for a given airplane. The lower values of the relative-density parameter correspond to the lower wing loadings or to the lower altitudes of the spin.

  10. Python Engine Installed in Altitude Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    An engine mechanic checks instrumentation prior to an investigation of engine operating characteristics and thrust control of a large turboprop engine with counter-rotating propellers under high-altitude flight conditions in the 20-foot-dianieter test section of the Altitude Wind Tunnel at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Cleveland, Ohio, now known as the John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.

  11. Understanding the effect of vacancy defects on spin transport in CrO2-graphene-CrO2 magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Sudhanshu; Kaushik, Divya

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of vacancy defects on spin transport in graphene-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). An increase in conductance was seen in vacancy-defected MTJ structure which is in contrast to the results reported in past where a decrease in conductance with vacancy was observed for graphene sheets. This increase in conductance may be due to the use of CrO2 half-metallic ferromagnet (HMF) electrodes instead of metallic or ferromagnet (FM) electrodes. Furthermore, high tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ˜99% and perfect spin filtration was obtained for both vacancy-defected and no-defect (pristine) MTJ structures. The TMR in vacancy-defected structure is seen to decrease by 6.2% and by 13% at bias voltages of 1.2V and 1.4V, when compared to TMR in no-defect MTJ structure.

  12. Reducing spin-torque switching current by incorporating an ultra-thin Ta layer with CoFeB free layer in magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R. S. Meng, H.; Naik, V. B.; Sim, C. H.; Yap, S.; Luo, P.

    2014-12-15

    We studied the spin torque switching in dual MgO layer based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) by incorporating an ultra-thin (0.5 nm) Ta layer at the CoFeB free layer/top MgO layer interface. The Ta incorporated MTJ showed a significant reduction (∼30%) in critical switching current density (J{sub C0} ) as compared to that of the control MTJ whilst maintaining the same tunneling magnetoresistance as well as thermal stability. The reduction of J{sub C0} can be attributed to the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy arising from the incorporation of an ultrathin Ta layer with the MgO|CoFeB structure. This scheme of reducing J{sub C0} without degrading other properties may contribute to the development of spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory for low power applications.

  13. Quantum size effects on spin-transfer torque in a double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (semiconductor) spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daqiq, Reza; Ghobadi, Nader

    2016-07-01

    We study the quantum size effects of an MgO-based double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (DBMTJ-NM) (semiconductor (DBMTJ-SC)) spacer on the charge current and the spin-transfer torque (STT) components using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The results show oscillatory behavior due to the resonant tunneling effect depending on the structure parameters. We find that the charge current and the STT components in the DBMTJ-SC demonstrate the magnitude enhancement in comparison with the DBMTJ-NM. The bias dependence of the STT components in a DBMTJ-NM shows different behavior in comparison with spin valves and conventional MTJs. Therefore, by choosing a specific SC spacer with suitable thickness in a DBMTJ the charge current and the STT components significantly increase so that one can design a device with high STT and faster magnetization switching.

  14. Strongly (001)-textured MgO/Co40Fe40B20 spin-tunnel contact on n-Ge(001) and its spin accumulation: Structural modification with ultrathin Mg insertion by sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soogil; Kim, Sanghoon; Son, Jangyup; Baek, Seung-heon Chris; Lee, Seok-Hee; Hong, Jongill

    2016-04-01

    The sputter-deposited fcc-MgO (001)[100]/bcc-Co40Fe40B20 (001)[110] spin-tunnel contact (STC) was successfully prepared on n-Ge(001). We found that the interfacial modification by ultrathin (6 Å) Mg insertion at the interface between n-Ge and MgO plays an important role in spin injection into Ge. The significantly amplified spin accumulation was observed in this STC as a result of the structural modification. The three-terminal Hanle signal of this STC was 2.7 times larger than that of the STC without Mg insertion. Our study confirms that a sputtering technique is indeed practical and useful to modify interfacial structures for the efficient injection of spins into semiconductors.

  15. Spin Torque in Asymmetric CoFeB/MgO/FeB Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wei; Li, Yun; Read, John; Ralph, Daniel; Buhrman, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that the use of asymmetric electrodes in MTJs can significantly affect spin torque (ST) behavior. We will report on the measurement via spin torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR) and switching phase diagram (SPD) studies of the in-plane and field-like (out-of-plane) torkance of low resistance, asymmetric IrMn/FeB/MgO/FeCoB) and IrMn/FeCoB/MgO/FeB MTJ nanopillars in the as-grown state (TMR˜22%) and the annealed state (TMR˜90%), and in comparison to that of symmetric counterparts; IrMn/FeB/MgO/FeB) and Ir/Mn/FeCoB/MgO/FeCoB MTJs. For the asymmetric MTJs only,the ST-FMR data show a strong field-like torkance for low voltage bias V that reverses sign when the free and pinned layers are reversed. At the higher V regime explored by the SPD the equivalent linear term in the field-like torque can dominate over the in-plane torque, resulting in either the parallel or antiparallel alignment being favored for both bias polarities, depending on the composition of the free layer.

  16. Instantons and scaling of the transitions rates in Quantum Monte Carlo simulations of thermally-assisted quantum tunneling in spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Jiang, Zhang; Boixo, Sergio; Issakov, Sergei; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Troyer, Matthias; Neven, Hartmut

    We study analytically and numerically the dynamics of the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) algorithm to simulate thermally-assisted tunneling in mean-field spin models without conservation of total spin. We use Kramers escape rate theory to calculate the scaling of the QMC time with the problem size to simulate the tunneling transitions. We develop path-integral instanton approach in coherent state and Suzuki-Trotter representations to calculate the escape rate and most probable escape path in QMC dynamics. Analtytical results are in a good agreement with numerical studies. We identify the class of models where the exponent in the scaling of the QMC time is the same as that in physical tunneling but the pre-factor depends very significantly on the QMC path representation. We propose the classes of problems where QMC can fail to simulate tunneling efficiently. The work of GM and MT has been supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation through the National Competence Center in Research QSIT and by ODNI, IARPA via MIT Lincoln Laboratory Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002.

  17. Wind-tunnel free-flight investigation of a model of a spin-resistant fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grafton, S. B.; Chambers, J. R.; Coe, P. L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to provide some insight into the features affecting the high-angle-of-attack characteristics of a high-performance twin-engine fighter airplane which in operation has exhibited excellent stall characteristics with a general resistance to spinning. Various techniques employed in the study included wind-tunnel free-flight tests, flow-visualization tests, static force tests, and dynamic (forced-oscillation) tests. In addition to tests conducted on the basic configuration tests were made with the wing planform and the fuselage nose modified. The results of the study showed that the model exhibited good dynamic stability characteristics at angles of attack well beyond that for wing stall. The directional stability of the model was provided by the vertical tail at low and moderate angles of attack and by the fuselage forebody at high angles of attack. The wing planform was found to have little effect on the stability characteristics at high angles of attack. The tests also showed that although the fuselage forebody produced beneficial contributions to static directional stability at high angles of attack, it also produced unstable values of damping in yaw. Nose strakes located in a position which eliminated the beneficial nose contributions produced a severe directional divergence.

  18. Asymmetric angular dependence of spin-transfer torques in CoFe/Mg-B-O/CoFe magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ling; Xu, Zhi-Jun; Zuo, Xian-Jun; Yang, Ze-Jin; Gao, Qing-He; Linghu, Rong-Feng; Guo, Yun-Dong

    2016-04-01

    Using a first-principles noncollinear wave-function-matching method, we studied the spin-transfer torques (STTs) in CoFe/Mg-B-O/CoFe(001) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), where three different types of B-doped MgO in the spacer are considered, including B atoms replacing Mg atoms (Mg3BO4), B atoms replacing O atoms (Mg4BO3), and B atoms occupying interstitial positions (Mg4BO4) in MgO. A strong asymmetric angular dependence of STT can be obtained both in ballistic CoFe/Mg3BO4 and CoFe/Mg4BO4 based MTJs, whereas a nearly symmetric STT curve is observed in the junctions based on CoFe/Mg4BO3. Furthermore, the asymmetry of the angular dependence of STT can be suppressed significantly by the disorder of B distribution. Such skewness of STTs in the CoFe/Mg-B-O/CoFe MTJs could be attributed to the interfacial resonance states induced by the B diffusion into MgO spacer.

  19. An Investigation of the Free-Spinning and Recovery Characteristics of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman F11F-1 Airplane with Alternate Nose Configurations with and without Wing Fuel Tanks, TED No. NACA AD 395

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.

    1958-01-01

    A supplementary investigation has been conducted in the langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/24-scale model of the Grumman F11F-1 airplane to determine the spin and recovery characteristics with alternate nose configurations, the production version and the elongated APS-67 version, with and without empty and full wing tanks. When spins were obtained with either alternate nose configuration, they were oscillatory and recovery characteristics were considered unsatisfactory on the basis of the fact that very slow recoveries were indicated to be possible. The simultaneous extension of canards near the nose of the model with rudder reversal was effective in rapidly terminating the spin. The addition of empty wing tanks had little effect on the developed spin and recovery characteristics. The model did not spin erect with full wing tanks. For optimum recovery from inverted spins, the rudder should be reversed to 22O against the spin and simultaneously the flaperons should be moved with the developed spin; the stick should be held at or moved to full forward longitudinally. The minimum size parachute required to insure satisfactory recoveries in an emergency was found to be 12 feet in diameter (laid out flat) with a drag coefficient of 0.64 (based on the laid-out-flat diameter) and a towline length of 32 feet.

  20. Co2Fe6B2/MgO-based perpendicular spin-transfer-torque magnetic-tunnel-junction spin-valve without [Co/Pt] n lower synthetic-antiferromagnetic layer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Eun; Shim, Tae-Hun; Park, Jea-Gun

    2015-11-27

    We design a Co2Fe6B2/MgO-based p-MTJ spin-valve without a [Co/Pt] n lower synthetic-antiferromagnetic (SyAF) layer to greatly reduce the 12-inch wafer fabrication cost of the p-MTJ spin-valve. This spin-valve achieve a tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of 158% and an exchange field (H ex) of 1.4 kOe at an ex situ annealing temperature of >350 °C, which ensures writing error immunity. In particular, the TMR ratio strongly depends on the body-center-cubic capping-layer nanoscale thickness (t bcc), i.e., the TMR ratio peaks at t bcc = 0.6 nm. PMID:26536817

  1. Concluding Report of Free-Spinning, Tumbling, and Recovery Characteristics of a 1/18-Scale Model of the Ryan X-13 Airplane, Coord. No. AF-199

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.

    1957-01-01

    An investigation has been completed in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/18-scale model of the Ryan X-13 airplane to determine its spin, recovery, and tumbling characteristics, and to determine the minimum altitude from which a belly landing could be made in case of power failure in hovering flight. Model spin tests were conducted with and without simulated engine rotation. Tests without simulated engine rotation indicated two types of spins: one, a slightly oscillatory flat spin; and the other, a violently oscillatory spin. Tests with simulated engine rotation indicated that spins to the left were fast rotating and steep and those to the right were slow rotating and flat. The optimum technique for recovery is reversal of the rudder to against the spin and simultaneous movement of the ailerons to full with the spin followed by movement of the elevators to neutral after the spin rotation ceases. Tumbling tests made on the model indicated that although the Ryan X-13 airplane will not tumble in the ordinary sense (end-over-end pitching motion), it may instead tend to enter a wild gyrating'motion. Tests made to simulate power failure in hovering flight by dropping the model indicated that the model entered what appeared to be a right spin. An attempt should be made to stop this motion immediately by moving the rudder to oppose the rotation (left pedal), moving the ailerons to with the spin (stick right), and moving the stick forward after the spin rotation ceases to obtain flying speed for pullout. The minimum altitude required for a belly landing in case of power failure in hovering flight was indicated to be about 4,200 feet.

  2. Observation of single-spin transport in an island-shaped CoFeB double magnetic tunnel junction prepared by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siripongsakul, Thamrongsin; Naganuma, Hiroshi; Kovacs, Andras; Kohn, Amit; Oogane, Mikihiko; Ando, Yasuo

    2016-02-01

    The Co40Fe40B20(CFB)/MgO/CFB/MgO/CFB-based multilayer was prepared by conventional magnetron sputtering and utilised in the fabrication of double magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJs) for which the middle CFB layers were island-shaped. By analysing the magnetic property of the CFB islands with Langevin's equation, it was possible to identify their diameters of 7.6, 8.9 and 11.0 nm; accordingly submicron-scaled DMTJs were fabricated to investigate single-spin transport phenomena. The coulomb staircase and the oscillatory tunnel magnetoresistive (TMR) were able to be observed at 6 K, where the TMR ratio was enhanced up to 60%, which is the highest value ever achieved in this structure.

  3. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy experiments on the rough surface of a polycrystalline NiFe film with a fine magnetic tip sensitive to a well-defined magnetization component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, H.; Nara, D.; Kageyama, R.; Honda, K.; Sato, T.; Kusanagi, K.; Srinivasan, E.; Koike, K.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a micrometer-sized magnetic tip integrated onto the write head of a hard disk drive for spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM) in the modulated tip magnetization mode. Using SP-STM, we measured a well-defined in-plane spin-component of the tunneling current of the rough surface of a polycrystalline NiFe film. The spin asymmetry of the NiFe film was about 1.3% within the bias voltage range of -3 to 1 V. We obtained the local spin component image of the sample surface, switching the magnetic field of the sample to reverse the sample magnetization during scanning. We also obtained a spin image of the rough surface of a polycrystalline NiFe film evaporated on the recording medium of a hard disk drive.

  4. Electrical-field and spin-transfer torque effects in CoFeB/MgO-based perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Chikako; Noshiro, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Sugii, Toshihiro; Furuya, Atsushi; Ataka, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Uehara, Yuji

    2016-05-01

    The electric-field (E) dependence of the magnetoresistance (RH) loops for top-pinned perpendicular CoFeB/MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) in the presence of a spin-transfer torque (STT)-current was measured. The E effects were distinguished from the STT-current effects using a micromagnetic simulation. The coercive field (Hc) decreased and the RH loop shifted as both the positive and negative bias E increased owing to the STT current. Furthermore, E-assisted switching for an MTJ with a diameter of 20 nm, which exhibited a nearly coherent magnetization reversal, was demonstrated using micromagnetic simulation.

  5. Current-induced switching of magnetic tunnel junctions: Effects of field-like spin-transfer torque, pinned-layer magnetization orientation, and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, R. K.; Jhon, M. H.; Ng, N.; Gan, C. K.; Srolovitz, D. J.

    2014-01-13

    We study current-induced switching in magnetic tunnel junctions in the presence of a field-like spin-transfer torque and titled pinned-layer magnetization in the high current limit at finite temperature. We consider both the Slonczewski and field-like torques with coefficients a{sub J} and b{sub J}, respectively. At finite temperatures, σ=b{sub J}/a{sub J}=±1 leads to a smaller mean switching time compared that with σ=0. The reduction of switching time in the presence of the field-like term is due to the alignment effect (for σ>0) and the initial torque effect.

  6. Time-domain analysis of spin-torque induced switching paths in nanoscale CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction devices

    SciTech Connect

    Heindl, R.; Rippard, W. H.; Russek, S. E.; Pufall, M. R.

    2014-12-28

    We performed thousands of single-shot, real-time measurements of spin-transfer-torque induced switching in nanoscale CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions having in-plane magnetizations. Our investigation discovered a variety of switching paths occurring in consecutive, nominally identical switching trials of a single device. By mapping the voltage as a function of time to an effective magnetization angle, we determined that reversal of a single device occurs via a variety of thermally activated paths. Our results show a complex switching behavior that has not been captured by previous observations and cannot be fully explained within the simple macrospin model.

  7. Spin Tests of 1/20-Scale Models of the Chance Vought Revised XF6U-1 and F6U-1 Airplanes, TED No. NACA 2390

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.; Berman, Theodore

    1948-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on the 1/20-scale model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 airplane altered to represent the XF6U-1 airplane as it will be spin-tested in flight, and also altered to represent the F6U-1 airplane as it will be produced for service use. Spin tests were made to determine the effects of control settings and movements at the normal loading. The results show that the spins obtained on the revised XF6U-1 airplane will be oscillatory in roll and yaw and that recoveries by rudder reversal will be rapid. Model test results indicate that the F6U-1 airplane will probably not spin. Inasmuch as the results of this investigation show that the new designs are as good as or better than the original XF6U-1 design in regard to spin recovery, it is felt that the conclusions and recommendations reached for the original design can be applied to the new designs for all loading conditions.

  8. A modular designed ultra-high-vacuum spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope with controllable magnetic fields for investigating epitaxial thin films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangkang; Lin, Wenzhi; Chinchore, Abhijit V; Liu, Yinghao; Smith, Arthur R

    2011-05-01

    A room-temperature ultra-high-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope for in situ scanning freshly grown epitaxial films has been developed. The core unit of the microscope, which consists of critical components including scanner and approach motors, is modular designed. This enables easy adaptation of the same microscope units to new growth systems with different sample-transfer geometries. Furthermore the core unit is designed to be fully compatible with cryogenic temperatures and high magnetic field operations. A double-stage spring suspension system with eddy current damping has been implemented to achieve ≤5 pm z stability in a noisy environment and in the presence of an interconnected growth chamber. Both tips and samples can be quickly exchanged in situ; also a tunable external magnetic field can be introduced using a transferable permanent magnet shuttle. This allows spin-polarized tunneling with magnetically coated tips. The performance of this microscope is demonstrated by atomic-resolution imaging of surface reconstructions on wide band-gap GaN surfaces and spin-resolved experiments on antiferromagnetic Mn(3)N(2)(010) surfaces. PMID:21639503

  9. Probing many body effects using Fourier Transform Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy: Can spin-orbit splitting in dispersion be observed in q-space?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahi, Gelareh; UBC Labortory for Atomic Imaging Research (LAIR)) Team

    Well studied surface systems such as Ag and Cu provide a safe platform to test novel spectroscopy methods that can have extended applications in near future. Our current focus is given to Fourier Transform Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (FT-STS) that allows us to study scattering effects (quasiparticle interactions - namely QPI) of CO and Co on Cu(111) surface. Magnetic Co adatoms are expected to generate a spin-orbit split in dispersion in QPI(q) space, the existence of which is confirmed by the k-space angle-resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES) of Cu(111) surface in the recent years. Hence the previously observed electron-phonon kink and spin-orbit splitting of the dispersion, as well as the scattering properties of CO molecules and Co adatoms, should also be observable in QPI space via FT-STS of Cu(111), and compatible with previous studies on similar systems. We are using a low temperature (4.2 K) commercial Scanning Tunneling Microscope (CREATEC STM) that operates using Nanonis electronic controllers and software which allows us to perform FT-STS as well as topological imaging.

  10. Spin dependent transport in FeCo|MgBO|FeCo magnetic tunnel junctions: Can boron in the oxide region be a good thing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Derek

    2009-03-01

    Recent experimental studies on FeCoB/MgO/FeCoB tunnel junctions have shown that boron can diffuse into the oxide region during rf-sputtering and result in the formation of crystalline MgBO regions[1,2]. These tunnel junctions still provide high tunneling magnetoresistance values as well as very low RA products[3]. Using a plane wave-pseudopotential density functional approach, I have examined potential Mg(B) oxides such as Mg2B2O5 (both monoclinic and triclinic) as well at kotoite (Mg3B2O6). Total energy calculations indicate that these oxides should be more stable than the formation of separate regions of MgO and B2O3. Kotoite (Mg3B2O6) also has a boron concentration close to that found in the experimentally grown MgBO regions. In addition, kotoite provides a good lattice match with MgO and could act to template neighboring FeCo into crystalline bcc layers during annealing. This evidence suggests that kotoite is formed during the deposition process. I will also discuss the complex band structure of kotoite (Mg3B2O6) and examine how this will also affect spin dependent transport from the FeCo leads. [1] J. Y. Bae et al., J. Appl. Phys. 99 08T316 (2006) [2] J. C. Read et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 90 132503 (2007) [3] J. C. Read personal communication

  11. Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Spin-Transfer-Torque Switching in Polycrystalline Co2FeAl Full-Heusler-Alloy Magnetic Tunnel Junctions on Amorphous Si /SiO2 Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Zhenchao; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Kasai, Shinya; Inomata, Koichiro; Mitani, Seiji

    2014-08-01

    We study polycrystalline B2-type Co2FeAl (CFA) full-Heusler-alloy-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) fabricated on a Si /SiO2 amorphous substrate. Polycrystalline CFA films with a (001) orientation, a high B2 ordering, and a flat surface are achieved by using a MgO buffer layer. A tunnel magnetoresistance ratio up to 175% is obtained for a MTJ with a CFA /MgO/CoFe structure on a 7.5-nm-thick MgO buffer. Spin-transfer-torque-induced magnetization switching is achieved in the MTJs with a 2-nm-thick polycrystalline CFA film as a switching layer. By using a thermal activation model, the intrinsic critical current density (Jc0) is determined to be 8.2×106 A /cm2, which is lower than 2.9×107 A /cm2, the value for epitaxial CFA MTJs [Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 182403 (2012), 10.1063/1.4710521]. We find that the Gilbert damping constant (α) evaluated by using ferromagnetic resonance measurements for the polycrystalline CFA film is approximately 0.015 and is almost independent of the CFA thickness (2-18 nm). The low Jc0 for the polycrystalline MTJ is mainly attributed to the low α of the CFA layer compared with the value in the epitaxial one (approximately 0.04).

  12. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R.

    2014-04-15

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  13. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R

    2014-04-01

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  14. Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert micromagnetic simulation on spin transfer torque efficiency of sub-30 nm perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with etching damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kenchi; Ohuchida, Satoshi; Muraguchi, Masakazu; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2015-04-01

    The threshold current density Jc0, effective anisotropy field Heff, and the spin transfer torque (STT) efficiency of magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy (p-MTJs) with the free layer diameter d from 10 to 30 nm was evaluated when etching degraded the saturation magnetization Ms and/or anisotropic energy Ku of the ferromagnetic layers with thickness of 1 to 3 nm around the pillar, using Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) micro-magnetic simulation. The STT efficiency for MTJs with only Ms reduction increased with a decrease in d, which reproduces the experimental trend. Jc0 and Heff for MTJs with only Ku reduction dramatically decreased even when the thickness of the damaged region is only 1 nm. The thickness of the damaged region had a large influence on Jc0 and Heff for MTJs with either Ms or Ku reduction.

  15. Determination of Spin Inversion Probability, H-Tunneling Correction, and Regioselectivity in the Two-State Reactivity of Nonheme Iron(IV)-Oxo Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yoon Hye; Mai, Binh Khanh; Lee, Yong-Min; Dhuri, Sunder N; Mandal, Debasish; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Kim, Yongho; Shaik, Sason; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-04-16

    We show by experiments that nonheme Fe(IV)O species react with cyclohexene to yield selective hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions with virtually no C═C epoxidation. Straightforward DFT calculations reveal, however, that C═C epoxidation on the S = 2 state possesses a low-energy barrier and should contribute substantially to the oxidation of cyclohexene by the nonheme Fe(IV)O species. By modeling the selectivity of this two-site reactivity, we show that an interplay of tunneling and spin inversion probability (SIP) reverses the apparent barriers and prefers exclusive S = 1 HAT over mixed HAT and C═C epoxidation on S = 2. The model enables us to derive a SIP value by combining experimental and theoretical results. PMID:26263154

  16. Respective influence of in-plane and out-of-plane spin-transfer torques in magnetization switching of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timopheev, A. A.; Sousa, R.; Chshiev, M.; Buda-Prejbeanu, L. D.; Dieny, B.

    2015-09-01

    The relative contributions of in-plane (damping-like) and out-of-plane (field-like) spin-transfer torques (STT) in the magnetization switching of out-of-plane magnetized magnetic tunnel junctions (pMTJ) has been theoretically analyzed using the transformed Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation with the STT terms. It is demonstrated that in a pMTJ structure obeying macrospin dynamics, the out-of-plane torque influences the precession frequency, but it does not contribute significantly to the STT switching process (in particular to the switching time and switching current density), which is mostly determined by the in-plane STT contribution. This conclusion is confirmed by finite temperature and finite writing pulse macrospin simulations of the current field switching diagrams. It contrasts with the case of STT switching in in-plane magnetized magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) in which the field-like term also influences the switching critical current. This theoretical analysis was successfully applied to the interpretation of voltage field STT switching diagrams experimentally measured on pMTJ pillars 36 nm in diameter, which exhibit macrospin behavior. The physical nonequivalence of Landau and Gilbert dissipation terms in the presence of STT-induced dynamics is also discussed.

  17. Paramagnetic spin splitting of the conductances for tunnel junctions between partially gapped metals with charge density waves and normal metals or ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabovich, A. M.; Li, Mai Suan; Pekala, M.; Szymczak, H.; Voitenko, A. I.

    2005-03-01

    We consider tunnelling between a metal partially gapped by charge density waves (CDWM) and an ordinary metal (M) or a ferromagnet (FM) separated by an insulator (I) in an external magnetic field H. Zeeman paramagnetic splitting is assumed to dominate in the CDWM over orbital magnetic effects. The quasiparticle tunnel current J and relevant differential conductance G are calculated as functions of the bias voltage V. The peaks of G(V), originating from the electron density of states singularities near the charge density wave gap edges, were shown to be split in the magnetic field, each peak having a predominant spin polarization. This effect is analogous to the H-induced splitting of G(V) peaks obtained by Tedrow and Meservey for junctions between normal metals and superconductors (S). Thus, it is possible to electrically measure the polarization of current carriers in such a set-up, although the behaviours of G(V) in the two cases are substantially different. The use of M-I-CDWM junctions instead of M-I-S ones has certain advantages. The absence of the Meissner effect, which weakens the constraints upon the junction geometry and electrode materials, comprises the main benefit. The other advantage is the larger energy range of the charge density wave gaps in comparison to that for superconductors' gaps, so that larger Hs may be applied.

  18. Spin dependent transport properties of Mn-Ga/MgO/Mn-Ga magnetic tunnel junctions with metal(Mg, Co, Cr) insertion layer

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, S. H.; Tao, L. L.; Liu, D. P. Han, X. F.; Lu, Y.

    2014-04-07

    We report a first principles theoretical investigation of spin polarized quantum transport in Mn{sub 2}Ga/MgO/Mn{sub 2}Ga and Mn{sub 3}Ga/MgO/Mn{sub 3}Ga magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) with the consideration of metal(Mg, Co, Cr) insertion layer effect. By changing the concentration of Mn, our calculation shows a considerable disparity in transport properties: A tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio of 852% was obtained for Mn{sub 2}Ga-based MTJs, however, only a 5% TMR ratio for Mn{sub 3}Ga-based MTJs. In addition, the influence of insertion layer has been considered in our calculation. We found the Co insertion layer can increase the TMR of Mn{sub 2}Ga-based MTJ to 904%; however, the Cr insertion layer can decrease the TMR by 668%; A negative TMR ratio can be obtained with Mg insertion layer. Our work gives a comprehensive understanding of the influence of different insertion layer in Mn-Ga based MTJs. It is proved that, due to the transmission can be modulated by the interfacial electronic structure of insertion, the magnetoresistance ratio of Mn{sub 2}Ga/MgO/Mn{sub 2}Ga MTJ can be improved by inserting Co layer.

  19. Spin polarization of carriers in resonant tunneling devices containing InAs self-assembled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobrega, J. Araújo e.; Gordo, V. Orsi; Galeti, H. V. A.; Gobato, Y. Galvão; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Taylor, D.; Orlita, M.; Henini, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we have investigated transport and optical properties of n-i-n resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) containing a layer of InAs self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) grown on a (311)B oriented GaAs substrate. Polarization-resolved photoluminescence (PL) and magneto-transport measurements were performed under applied voltage and magnetic fields up to 15 T at 2 K under linearly polarized laser excitation. It was observed that the QD circular polarization degree depends strongly on the applied voltage. Its voltage dependence is explained by the formation of excitonic complexes such as positively (X+) and negatively (X-) charged excitons in the QDs. Our results demonstrate an effective electrical control of an ensemble of InAs QD properties by tuning the applied voltage across a RTD device into the resonant tunneling condition.

  20. Incipient- and Developed-Spin and Recovery Characteristics of a Modern High-Speed Fighter Design with Low Aspect Ratio as Determined from Dynamic-Model Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry A.; Libbey, Charles E.

    1961-01-01

    Incipient- and developed-spin and recovery characteristics of a modern high-speed fighter design with low aspect ratio have been investigated by means of dynamic model tests. A 1/7-scale radio-controlled model was tested by means of drop tests from a helicopter. Several 1/25-scale models with various configuration changes were tested in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. Model results indicated that generally it would be difficult to obtain a developed spin with a corresponding airplane and that either the airplane would recover of its own accord from any poststall motion or the poststall motion could be readily terminated by proper control technique. On occasion, however, the results indicated that if a post-stall motion were allowed to continue, a fully developed spin might be obtainable from which recovery could range from rapid to no recovery at all, even when optimum control technique was used. Satisfactory recoveries could be obtained with a proper-size tail parachute or strake, application of pitching-, rolling-, or yawing-moment rockets, or sufficient differential deflection of the horizontal tail.

  1. Nonequilibrium green function approach to elastic and inelastic spin-charge transport in topological insulator-based heterostructures and magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfouzi, Farzad

    Current and future technological needs increasingly motivate the intensive scientific research of the properties of materials at the nano-scale. One of the most important domains in this respect at present concerns nano-electronics and its diverse applications. The great interest in this domain arises from the potential reduction of the size of the circuit components, maintaining their quality and functionality, and aiming at greater efficiency, economy, and storage characteristics for the corresponding physical devices. The aim of this thesis is to present a contribution to the analysis of the electronic charge and spin transport phenomena that occur at the quantum level in nano-structures. This thesis spans the areas of quantum transport theory through time-dependent systems, electron-boson interacting systems and systems of interest to spintronics. A common thread in the thesis is to develop the theoretical foundations and computational algorithms to numerically simulate such systems. In order to optimize the numerical calculations I resort to different techniques (such as graph theory in finding inverse of a sparse matrix, adaptive grids for integrations and programming languages (e.g., MATLAB and C++) and distributed computing tools (MPI, CUDA). Outline of the Thesis: After giving an introduction to the topics covered in this thesis in Chapter 1, I present the theoretical foundations to the field of non-equilibrium quantum statistics in Chapter 2. The applications of this formalism and the results are covered in the subsequent chapters as follows: Spin and charge quantum pumping in time-dependent systems: Covered in Chapters 3, 4 and 5, this topics was initially motivated by experiments on measuring voltage signal from a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) exposed to a microwave radiation in ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) condition. In Chapter 3 we found a possible explanation for the finite voltage signal measured from a tunnel junction consisting of only a single

  2. Realizing the Harper Hamiltonian and Spin-Orbit Coupling with Laser-Assisted Tunneling in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Colin; Miyake, Hiro; Burton, Cody; Chung, Woo Chang; Siviloglou, Georgios; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    The study of charged particles in a magnetic field has led to paradigm shifts in condensed matter physics including the discovery of topologically ordered states like the quantum Hall and fractional quantum Hall states. Quantum simulation of such systems using neutral atoms has drawn much interest recently in the atomic physics community due to the versatility and defect-free nature of such systems. We discuss our recent experimental realization of the Harper Hamiltonian and strong, uniform effective magnetic fields for neutral particles in an optical lattice. Additionally, our scheme represents a promising system to realize spin-orbit coupling and the quantum spin Hall states without flipping atomic spin states and thus without the intrinsic heating that comes with near-resonant Raman lasers. We point out that our scheme can be implemented all optically through the use of a period-tripling superlattice, offering faster switching times and more precise control than with magnetic field gradients. Finally, we show that this method is very general for engineering novel single particle spectra in an optical lattice and can be used to map out Hofstadter's butterfly.

  3. Nonequilibrium green function approach to elastic and inelastic spin-charge transport in topological insulator-based heterostructures and magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfouzi, Farzad

    Current and future technological needs increasingly motivate the intensive scientific research of the properties of materials at the nano-scale. One of the most important domains in this respect at present concerns nano-electronics and its diverse applications. The great interest in this domain arises from the potential reduction of the size of the circuit components, maintaining their quality and functionality, and aiming at greater efficiency, economy, and storage characteristics for the corresponding physical devices. The aim of this thesis is to present a contribution to the analysis of the electronic charge and spin transport phenomena that occur at the quantum level in nano-structures. This thesis spans the areas of quantum transport theory through time-dependent systems, electron-boson interacting systems and systems of interest to spintronics. A common thread in the thesis is to develop the theoretical foundations and computational algorithms to numerically simulate such systems. In order to optimize the numerical calculations I resort to different techniques (such as graph theory in finding inverse of a sparse matrix, adaptive grids for integrations and programming languages (e.g., MATLAB and C++) and distributed computing tools (MPI, CUDA). Outline of the Thesis: After giving an introduction to the topics covered in this thesis in Chapter 1, I present the theoretical foundations to the field of non-equilibrium quantum statistics in Chapter 2. The applications of this formalism and the results are covered in the subsequent chapters as follows: Spin and charge quantum pumping in time-dependent systems: Covered in Chapters 3, 4 and 5, this topics was initially motivated by experiments on measuring voltage signal from a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) exposed to a microwave radiation in ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) condition. In Chapter 3 we found a possible explanation for the finite voltage signal measured from a tunnel junction consisting of only a single

  4. Frequency driven inversion of tunnel magnetoimpedance and observation of positive tunnel magnetocapacitance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parui, Subir; Ribeiro, Mário; Atxabal, Ainhoa; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Sun, Xiangnan; Llopis, Roger; Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E.

    2016-08-01

    The relevance for modern computation of non-volatile high-frequency memories makes ac-transport measurements of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) crucial for exploring this regime. Here, we demonstrate a frequency-mediated effect in which the tunnel magnetoimpedance reverses its sign in a classical Co/Al2O3/NiFe MTJ, whereas we only observe a gradual decrease in the tunnel magnetophase. Such effects are explained by the capacitive coupling of a parallel resistor and capacitor in the equivalent circuit model of the MTJ. Furthermore, we report a positive tunnel magnetocapacitance effect, suggesting the presence of a spin-capacitance at the two ferromagnet/tunnel-barrier interfaces. Our results are important for understanding spin transport phenomena at the high frequency regime in which the spin-polarized charge accumulation due to spin-dependent penetration depth at the two interfaces plays a crucial role.

  5. Hyperfine-induced hysteretic funnel structure in spin blockaded tunneling current of coupled vertical quantum dots at low magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Leary, A.; Wicha, A.; Harack, B.; Coish, W. A.; Hilke, M.; Yu, G.; Gupta, J. A.; Payette, C.; Austing, D. G.

    2013-12-04

    We outline the properties of the hyperfine-induced funnel structure observed in the two-electron spin blockade region of a weakly coupled vertical double quantum dot device. Hysteretic steps in the leakage current occur due to dynamic nuclear polarization when either the bias voltage or the magnetic field is swept up and down. When the bias voltage is swept, an intriguing ∼3 mT wide cusp near 0 T appears in the down-sweep position, and when the magnetic field is swept, the current at 0 T can be switched from 'low' to 'high' as the bias is increased.

  6. Hyperfine-induced hysteretic funnel structure in spin blockaded tunneling current of coupled vertical quantum dots at low magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, A.; Wicha, A.; Harack, B.; Coish, W. A.; Hilke, M.; Yu, G.; Payette, C.; Gupta, J. A.; Austing, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    We outline the properties of the hyperfine-induced funnel structure observed in the two-electron spin blockade region of a weakly coupled vertical double quantum dot device. Hysteretic steps in the leakage current occur due to dynamic nuclear polarization when either the bias voltage or the magnetic field is swept up and down. When the bias voltage is swept, an intriguing ˜3 mT wide cusp near 0 T appears in the down-sweep position, and when the magnetic field is swept, the current at 0 T can be switched from "low" to "high" as the bias is increased.

  7. Spin-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/30-Scale Model of the North American A-5 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry A.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation has been made to determine the erect and. inverted spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/30-scale dynamic model of the North American A-5A airplane. Tests were made for the basic flight design loading with the center of gravity at 30-percent mean aerodynamic chord and also for a forward position and a rearward position with the center of gravity at 26-percent and 40-percent mean aerodynamic chord, respectively. Tests were also made to determine the effect of full external wing tanks on both wings, and of an asymmetrical condition when only one full tank is carried.

  8. Electric field control of spin re-orientation in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions—CoFeB and MgO thickness dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Hao; Naik, Vinayak Bharat; Liu, Ruisheng; Han, Guchang

    2014-07-28

    We report an investigation of electric-field (EF) control of spin re-orientation as functions of the thicknesses of CoFeB free layer (FL) and MgO layer in synthetic-antiferromagnetic pinned magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. It is found that the EF modulates the coercivity (Hc) of the FL almost linearly for all FL thicknesses, while the EF efficiency, i.e., the slope of the linearity, increases as the FL thickness increases. This linear variation in Hc is also observed for larger MgO thicknesses (≥1.5 nm), while the EF efficiency increases only slightly from 370 to 410 Oe nm/V when MgO thickness increases from 1.5 to 1.76 nm. We have further observed the absence of quasi-DC unipolar switching. We discuss its origin and highlight the underlying challenges to implement the EF controlled switching in a practical magnetic memory.

  9. Wind-tunnel investigation of the descent characteristics of bodies of revolution simulating anti-personnel bombs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, S. H.

    1951-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free spinning tunnel to study the relative behavior in descent of a number of homogeneous balsa bodies of revolution simulating anti-personnel bombs with a small cylindrical exploding device suspended approximately 10 feet below the bomb. The bodies of revolution included hemispherical, near-hemispherical, and near-paraboloid shapes. The ordinates of one near-paraboloid shape were specified by the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, U. S. Army. The behavior of the various bodies without the cylinder was also investigated. The results of the investigation indicated that several of the bodies descended vertically with their longitudinal axis, suspension line, and small cylinder in a vertical attitude,. However, the body, the ordinates of which had been specified by the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, U. S. Army, oscillated considerably from a vertical attitude while descending and therefore appeared unsuitable for its intended use. The behavior of this body became satisfactory when its center of gravity was moved well forward from its original position. In general, the results indicated that the descent characteristics of the bodies of revolution become more favorable as their shapes approached that of a hemisphere.

  10. Co/Nb/Co trilayers as efficient cryogenic spin valves and supercurrent switches: the relevance to the standard giant and tunnel magnetoresistance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamopoulos, D.; Aristomenopoulou, E.; Lagogiannis, A.

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, Ferromagnetic/Superconducting/Ferromagnetic trilayers (FM/SC/FM TLs) are intensively studied. Here, based on (CoO-)Co/Nb/Co TLs of thin Nb interlayer (below 30 nm) we introduce two classes of low-T c SC-based cryogenic devices, depending on the thickness of the Co outer layers and the presence of a CoO underlayer. An extended range of Co thickness (from 10 to 80 nm) was investigated and an underlayer of CoO was selectively employed, practically aiming to control in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization processes through utilization of shape anisotropy and exchange bias. To this effect magnetic force microscopy, magnetization and magnetoresistance data are presented. Ancillary atomic force microscopy and Rutherford back scattering data are presented, as well. CoO-Co/Nb/Co TLs of the first class have thin Co outer layers (10-30 nm) and are further assisted by the presence of a CoO underlayer to behave as efficient spin valves (ΔR/Rnor = 1.5% and ΔR/Rmin = 2.4%) under the action of the FMs in-plane exchange fields; the effect is termed superconducting Spin-Valve Effect (sSVE). Co/Nb/Co TLs of the second class have thick Co outer layers (50-80 nm) and without the need of a CoO underlayer act as almost absolute supercurrent switches (ΔR/Rnor = 97.7% and ΔR/Rmin = 28000%) under the action of FMs out-of-plane stray fields; the effect is termed superconducting Magneto-Resistance Effect (sMRE). The properties of these (CoO-)Co/Nb/Co TLs resemble the behavior of standard FM/normal-metal/FM and FM/insulator/FM TLs that exhibit the effects giant (GMR) and tunnel (TMR) magnetoresistance, respectively. Aiming to utilize the FM/SC/FM TLs studied here into cryogenic applications we thoroughly surveyed their operational H-T phase diagram and discuss how can be used to realize binary (‘0’-‘1’) elemental devices for information management in both read heads and memory units. The underlying physical mechanisms responsible for the sSVE and sMRE observed in the two

  11. 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Schematic drawing of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris describe the tunnel in NACA TR No. 387: 'The tunnel has an open jet, an open test chamber, and a closed return passage. ... The air passes through the test section in a downward direction then enters the exit cone and passes through the first set of guide vanes to a propeller. From here it passes, by way of the return passage, through the successive sets of guide vanes at the corners, then through the honeycomb, and finally through the entrance cone.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual spin of an airplane. Satisfactory air flow has been attained with a velocity that is uniform over the jet to within 0.5%. The turbulence present in the tunnel has been compared with that of several other tunnels by means of the results of sphere drag tests and was found to average well with the values of those tunnels. Included also in the report are comparisons of results of stable autorotation and of rolling-moment tests obtained both in the vertical tunnel and in the old horizontal 5-foot atmospheric tunnel.' The design of a vertical tunnel having a 5-foot diameter jet was accordingly started by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1928. Actual construction of the new tunnel was completed in 1930, and the calibration tests were then made.'

  12. Wind-tunnel Tests of a Cyclogiro Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, John B; Windler, Ray

    1935-01-01

    During an extensive study of all types of rotating wings, the NACA examined the cyclogiro rotor and made an aerodynamic analysis of that system (reference 1). The examination disclosed that such a machine had sufficient promise to justify an experimental investigation; a model with a diameter and span of 8 feet was therefore constructed and tested in the 20-foot wind tunnel during 1934. The experimental work included tests of the effect of the motion upon the rotor forces during the static-lift and forward-flight conditions at several rotor speeds and the determination of the relations between the forces generated by the rotor and the power required by it.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of spin injector using a high-quality B2-ordered-Co2FeSi0.5Al0.5/MgO/Si(100) tunnel contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawame, Yu; Akushichi, Taiju; Takamura, Yota; Shuto, Yusuke; Sugahara, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    We successfully fabricate a (100)-orientated B2-type-Co2FeSi0.5Al0.5 (CFSA)/MgO/Si(100) tunnel contact that is promising for an efficient spin injector for Si channels. The MgO barrier is formed by radical oxidation of an Mg thin film deposited on a Si(100) surface at room temperature and successive radical oxygen annealing at 400 °C. The CFSA electrode is grown on the MgO barrier at 400 °C by ultrahigh-vacuum molecular beam deposition, and it exhibits a (100)-orientated columnar polycrystalline structure with a high degree (63%) of B2-order. The MgO barrier near the interface of the CFSA/MgO junction is crystallized with the (100) orientation, i.e., the spin filter effect due to the MgO barrier could be expected for this junction. A three-terminal Si-channel spin-accumulation device with a CFSA/MgO/Si(100) spin injector is fabricated, and the Hanle effect of accumulated spin polarized electrons injected from this contact to the Si channel is observed.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of spin injector using a high-quality B2-ordered-Co{sub 2}FeSi{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.5}/MgO/Si(100) tunnel contact

    SciTech Connect

    Kawame, Yu Akushichi, Taiju; Shuto, Yusuke; Sugahara, Satoshi; Takamura, Yota

    2015-05-07

    We successfully fabricate a (100)-orientated B2-type-Co{sub 2}FeSi{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.5} (CFSA)/MgO/Si(100) tunnel contact that is promising for an efficient spin injector for Si channels. The MgO barrier is formed by radical oxidation of an Mg thin film deposited on a Si(100) surface at room temperature and successive radical oxygen annealing at 400 °C. The CFSA electrode is grown on the MgO barrier at 400 °C by ultrahigh-vacuum molecular beam deposition, and it exhibits a (100)-orientated columnar polycrystalline structure with a high degree (63%) of B2-order. The MgO barrier near the interface of the CFSA/MgO junction is crystallized with the (100) orientation, i.e., the spin filter effect due to the MgO barrier could be expected for this junction. A three-terminal Si-channel spin-accumulation device with a CFSA/MgO/Si(100) spin injector is fabricated, and the Hanle effect of accumulated spin polarized electrons injected from this contact to the Si channel is observed.

  15. Temperature driven transition from giant to tunneling magneto-resistance in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Alq{sub 3}/Co spin Valve: Role of Verwey transition of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, P. Rawat, R.; Potdar, S. R.; Choudhary, R. J.; Banerjee, A.

    2014-05-07

    We demonstrate interface energy level engineering, exploiting the modification in energy band structure across Verwey transition temperature (T{sub V}) of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, in a Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(111)/Alq{sub 3}/Co spin-valve (SV). I-V characteristics exhibit a transition in conduction mode from carrier injection to tunneling across T{sub V} of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} electrode. Both giant magneto-resistance (GMR) and tunneling MR (TMR) have been observed in a single SV, below and above T{sub V}, respectively. We have achieved room-temperature SV operation in our device. We believe that the tuning of charge gap at Fermi level across T{sub V} resulting in a corresponding tuning of conduction mode and a unique cross over from GMR to TMR.

  16. Ferroelectric control of spin injection in La0.7 Sr0.3 MnO3 /BaTiO3 /La0.5 Ca0.5 MnO3 /La0.7 Sr0.3 MnO3 multiferroic tunnel junctions with a bilayer barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yuewei; Miao, L. D.; Du, R. Z.; Li, Q.

    2015-03-01

    Using a ferroelectric (FE) barrier with ferromagnetic electrodes has become a promising method for controlling spin injection by purely electrical means, which is an important challenge in spintronics. Recently, we have designed a La0.7Sr0.3MnO3(LSMO) /BaTiO3(BTO) /La0.5Ca0.5MnO3(LCMO) /LSMO tunnel junctions in which the reversal of FE polarization of BTO will magnetoelectrically lead to a FM metallic - antiferromagnetic insulating phase transition in LCMO and result in an enhanced tunneling electroresistance (TER). Using the bilayer barrier, we observed that the spin injection can be controlled by barrier polarization reversal as shown in the change of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). The temperature evolution of tunnel electromagnetoresistance (TEMR) (percentage ratio between the TMR values for the two polarization states), which is directly proportional to the change of tunnel-current spin polarization, was studied and larger TEMR was obtained with increasing temperature. Meanwhile, TEMR increases with TER effect for samples with different LCMO insertion thicknesses, suggesting a controllable strong electric control of tunnel-current spin polarization using a designed structure with proper interfaces.

  17. Electro-optical spin measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodale, Robert (Inventor); Hampton, Herbert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An electro-optical spin measurement system for a spin model in a spin tunnel includes a radio controlled receiver/transmitter, targets located on the spin model, optical receivers mounted around the perimeter of the spin tunnel and the base of the spin tunnel for receiving data from the targets, and a control system for accumulating data from the radio controlled receiver and receivers. Six targets are employed. The spin model includes a fuselage, wings, nose, and tail. Two targets are located under the fuselage of the spin model at the nose tip and tail. Two targets are located on the side of the fuselage at the nose tip and tail, and a target is located under each wing tip. The targets under the fuselage at the nose tip and tail measure spin rate of the spin model, targets on the side of the fuselage at the nose tip and tail measure angle of attack of the spin model, and the targets under the wing tips measure roll angle of the spin model. Optical receivers are mounted at 90 degree increments around the periphery of the spin tunnel to determine angle of attack and roll angle measurements of the spin model. Optical receivers are also mounted at the base of the spin tunnel to define quadrant and position of the spin model and to determine the spin rate of the spin model.

  18. Tunneling Magnetothermopower in Magnetic Tunnel Junction Nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebing, N.; Serrano-Guisan, S.; Rott, K.; Reiss, G.; Langer, J.; Ocker, B.; Schumacher, H. W.

    2011-10-01

    We study tunneling magnetothermopower (TMTP) in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars. Thermal gradients across the junctions are generated by an electric heater line. Thermopower voltages up to a few tens of μV between the top and bottom contact of the nanopillars are measured which scale linearly with the applied heating power and hence the thermal gradient. The thermopower signal varies by up to 10μV upon reversal of the relative magnetic configuration of the two CoFeB layers from parallel to antiparallel. This signal change corresponds to a large spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of the order of 100μV/K and a large TMTP change of the tunnel junction of up to 90%.

  19. Tunneling magnetothermopower in magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars.

    PubMed

    Liebing, N; Serrano-Guisan, S; Rott, K; Reiss, G; Langer, J; Ocker, B; Schumacher, H W

    2011-10-21

    We study tunneling magnetothermopower (TMTP) in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars. Thermal gradients across the junctions are generated by an electric heater line. Thermopower voltages up to a few tens of μV between the top and bottom contact of the nanopillars are measured which scale linearly with the applied heating power and hence the thermal gradient. The thermopower signal varies by up to 10  μV upon reversal of the relative magnetic configuration of the two CoFeB layers from parallel to antiparallel. This signal change corresponds to a large spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of the order of 100  μV/K and a large TMTP change of the tunnel junction of up to 90%. PMID:22107572

  20. Dirac and scalar particles tunnelling from topological massive warped-AdS3 black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gecim, G.; Sucu, Y.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the Dirac and scalar particles tunnelling as a radiation of Warped AdS3 black holes in Topological Massive Gravity. Using Hamilton-Jacobi method, we discuss tunnelling probability and Hawking temperature of the spin-1/2 and spin-0 particles for the black hole. We observe the tunnelling probability and Hawking temperature to be same for the spin-1/2 and spin-0. We show that the tunnelling process may occur, for both Dirac and scalar particles.

  1. PREFACE: Spin Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieny, B.; Sousa, R.; Prejbeanu, L.

    2007-04-01

    Conventional electronics has in the past ignored the spin on the electron, however things began to change in 1988 with the discovery of giant magnetoresistance in metallic thin film stacks which led to the development of a new research area, so called spin-electronics. In the last 10 years, spin-electronics has achieved a number of breakthroughs from the point of view of both basic science and application. Materials research has led to several major discoveries: very large tunnel magnetoresistance effects in tunnel junctions with crystalline barriers due to a new spin-filtering mechanism associated with the spin-dependent symmetry of the electron wave functions new magnetic tunnelling barriers leading to spin-dependent tunnelling barrier heights and acting as spin-filters magnetic semiconductors with increasingly high ordering temperature. New phenomena have been predicted and observed: the possibility of acting on the magnetization of a magnetic nanostructure with a spin-polarized current. This effect, due to a transfer of angular momentum between the spin polarized conduction electrons and the local magnetization, can be viewed as the reciprocal of giant or tunnel magnetoresistance. It can be used to switch the magnetization of a magnetic nanostructure or to generate steady magnetic excitations in the system. the possibility of generating and manipulating spin current without charge current by creating non-equilibrium local accumulation of spin up or spin down electrons. The range of applications of spin electronics materials and phenomena is expanding: the first devices based on giant magnetoresistance were the magnetoresistive read-heads for computer disk drives. These heads, introduced in 1998 with current-in plane spin-valves, have evolved towards low resistance tunnel magnetoresistice heads in 2005. Besides magnetic recording technology, these very sensitive magnetoresistive sensors are finding applications in other areas, in particular in biology. magnetic

  2. Effect of stripe height on the critical current density of spin-torque noise in a tunneling magnetoresistive read head with a low resistance area product below 1.0 Ω μm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Yasushi Fan, Peng; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2015-05-07

    To understand the spin-torque effect on the noise in tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) read heads, the GHz range noise spectra of TMR read heads with a narrow track width (w = 36 nm), and various stripe heights (h) are investigated as a function of the external magnetic field (H{sub ex}) and dc bias current density (j). The strong noise peak intensity depends on both H{sub ex} and j, indicating that the spin-torque affects the thermal mag-noise under a positive (negative) j for a positive (negative) H{sub ex}, regardless of h in the TMR heads. Due to the increased shape anisotropy, the critical current density (j{sub c}), where the non-thermal fluctuation noise originates from the spin-torque, increases markedly as the head dimension is reduced, and the maximum value of j{sub c} is approximately +1.5 × 10{sup 12} A/m{sup 2} for a head with w = 36 nm and h = 15 nm. These results demonstrate that the non-thermal fluctuation noise originating from the spin-torque in the TMR head can be suppressed in the current density range below 10{sup 12} A/m{sup 2}, as the head dimension is reduced and the shape anisotropy is increased.

  3. 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1932-01-01

    The researcher is sitting above the exit cone of the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel and is examining the new 6-component spinning balance. This balance was developed between 1930 and 1933. It was an important advance in the technology of rotating or rolling balances. As M.J. Bamber and C.H. Zimmerman wrote in NACA TR 456: 'Data upon the aerodynamic characteristics of a spinning airplane may be obtained in several ways; namely, flight tests with full-scale airplanes, flight tests with balanced models, strip-method analysis of wind-tunnel force and moment tests, and wind-tunnel tests of rotating models.' Further, they note: 'Rolling-balance data have been of limited value because it has not been possible to measure all six force and moment components or to reproduce a true spinning condition. The spinning balance used in this investigation is a 6-component rotating balance from which it is possible to obtain wind-tunnel data for any of a wide range of possible spinning conditions.' Bamber and Zimmerman described the balance as follows: 'The spinning balance consists of a balance head that supports the model and contains the force-measuring units, a horizontal turntable supported by streamline struts in the center of the jet and, outside the tunnel, a direct-current driving motor, a liquid tachometer, an air compressor, a mercury manometer, a pair of indicating lamps, and the necessary controls. The balance head is mounted on the turntable and it may be set to give any radius of spin between 0 and 8 inches.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual

  4. Spin transport and accumulation in n{sup +}-Si using Heusler compound Co{sub 2}FeSi/MgO tunnel contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Mizue Sugiyama, Hideyuki; Inokuchi, Tomoaki; Saito, Yoshiaki; Hamaya, Kohei

    2015-08-31

    We investigate spin transport and accumulation in n{sup +}-Si using Heusler compound Co{sub 2}FeSi/MgO/Si on insulator (SOI) devices. The magnitudes of the non-local four- and three-terminal Hanle effect signals when using Heusler compound Co{sub 2}FeSi/MgO/SOI devices are larger than when using CoFe/MgO/SOI devices, whereas the preparation methods of MgO layers on SOI are exactly same in both devices. Different bias voltage dependencies on the magnitude of spin accumulation signals are also observed between these devices. Especially, Co{sub 2}FeSi/MgO/SOI devices show large spin accumulation signals compared with CoFe/MgO/SOI devices in the low bias voltage region less than ∼1000 mV in which the increase of the spin polarization is expected from the estimation of the density of states in Heusler compound Co{sub 2}FeSi and CoFe under spin extraction conditions. These results indicate that the species of ferromagnetic material definitely affects the magnitude and behavior of the spin signals. The use of highly polarized ferromagnets such as Heusler compounds would be important for improving the spin polarization and the magnitude of spin signals through Si channels.

  5. 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. The 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel was built to study spinning characteristics of aircraft. It was an open throat tunnel capable of a maximum speed of 80 mph. NACA engineer Charles H. Zimmerman designed the tunnel starting in 1928. Construction was completed in December 1929. It was one of two tunnels which replaced the original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (The other was the 7x10-Foot Wind Tunnel.). In NACA TR 387 (p. 499), Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris report that 'the tunnel passages are constructed of 1/8-inch sheet iron, stiffened with angle iron and bolted together at the corners. The over-all dimensions are: Height 31 feet 2 inches; length, 20 feet 3 inches; width, 10 feet 3 inches.' The tunnel was partially constructed in the Langley hanger as indicated by the aircraft in the background. Published in NACA TR 387, 'The Vertical Wind Tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics,' by Carl J. Wenzinger and Thomas A. Harris, 1931.

  6. Laminar flow test installation in the Boeing Research Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George-Falvy, Dezso

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the initial wind tunnels tests in the 5- by 8-ft Boeing Research Wind Tunnel of a near full-scale (20-foot chord) swept wing section having laminar flow control (LFC) by slot suction over its first 30 percent chord. The model and associated test apparatus were developed for use as a testbed for LFC-related experimentation in support of preliminary design studies done under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This paper contains the description of the model and associated test apparatus as well as the results of the initial test series in which the proper functioning of the test installation was demonstrated and new data were obtained on the sensitivity of suction-controlled laminar flow to surface protuberances in the presence of crossflow due to sweep.

  7. Free-Spinning and Recovery Characteristics of a 1/19-Scale Model of the North American T-28C Airplane, TED No. NACA AD 3127

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.

    1956-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/19-scale model of the North American T-28C airplane to determine the spin and recovery characteristics. The T-28C airplane is similar to the T-28B airplane except for slight modifications for the arresting hook. The lower rear section of the fuselage was cut out and, consequently, the lower part of the rudder was removed to make a smooth fairing with the fuselage. The T-28B airplane had good recovery characteristics; but these modifications, along with the addition of gun packages on the wings, led to poor and unsatisfactory spin-recovery characteristics during demonstration spins of the T-28C airplane. Model test results indicated that without the gun packages installed, satisfactory recoveries could be obtained if the elevators were held full back while the rudder was fully reversed and the ailerons were held neutral. However, with the addition of gun packages to the wings and the corresponding change in loading, recoveries were considered unsatisfactory. Recoveries attempted by using a larger chord or larger span rudder were improved very slightly, but were still considered marginal or unsatisfactory. Strakes placed on the nose of the model were effective in slowing the spin rotation slightly and, in most instances, decreased the turns for recovery slightly. Recovery characteristics were slightly marginal for the full fuel loading when strakes and the extended-chord rudder were installed; but with the wing fuel partly used, recovery characteristics were again considered unsatisfactory or, at least, definitely on the marginal side. The optimum control technique for recovery is movement of the rudder to full against the spin with the stick held full back (elevators full up) and the ailerons held neutral, followed by forward movement of the stick only after the spin rotation ceases. Inverted-spin test results indicate that the airplane will spin steep and fast and that recovery

  8. Model of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Model of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris wrote in NACA TR 387: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual spin of an airplane. Satisfactory air flow has been attained with a velocity that is uniform over the jet to within 0.5 per cent. The turbulence present in the tunnel has been compared with that of several other tunnels by means of the results of sphere drag tests and was found to average well with the values of those tunnels. Included also in the report are comparisons of results of stable autorotation and of rolling-moment tests obtained both in the vertical tunnel and in the old horizontal 5-foot atmospheric tunnel.' The design of a vertical tunnel having a 5-foot diameter jet was accordingly started by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1928. Actual construction of the new tunnel was completed in 1930, and the calibration tests were then made.'

  9. Investigation of the Model ME 210 in the Spin Wind Tunnel of the DVL. Report 4; Model with Long Fuselage and with a VEE Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffschmid, A

    1950-01-01

    After conclusion of the spin investigation of the model Me 210 with elongated fuselage and central vertical tail surfaces (model condition III; reference 3), tests were performed on the same model with a vee tail (model condition IV). Here the entire tail surfaces consist of only one surface with pronounced dihedral. Since the blanketing of the vertical tail surfaces by the horizontal tail surfaces, which may occur in case of standard tail surfaces, does not occur here, one could expect for this type of tail surface favorable spin characteristics, particularly with respect to rudder effectiveness for spin recovery. However, the test results did not confirm these expectations. The steady spin was shown to be very irregular; regarding rudder effectiveness the vee tail surfaces proved to be inferior even to standard tail surfaces, thus they represent the most unfavorable of the four fuselage and tail-surface combinations investigated so far.

  10. 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Force Test set-up in 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT). In 1928, the NACA decided to replace its original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT #1) with two tunnels--the 5-foot vertical tunnel and a 7 by 10 foot rectangular throat tunnel. Both were open-throat, closed-return-passage tunnels and were housed in the same building the first wind tunnel had been located in. While the 5-foot vertical tunnel was to be used mainly for spin tests, the 7x10 was an all-purpose tunnel although the main intent was to study stability and control problems. Construction was completed in the summer of 1930; calibration later that same year. The balance was installed and the tunnel went into operation in early 1931. There was a 6-component balance in this wind tunnel. The balance could support either static or rotation tests.

  11. Spin Transfer Torque in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Ching; Chen, Zhihong

    2014-03-01

    Graphene is an idea channel material for spin transport due to its long spin diffusion length. To develop graphene based spin logic, it is important to demonstrate spin transfer torque in graphene. Here, we report the experimental measurement of spin transfer torque in graphene nonlocal spin valve devices. Assisted by a small external in-plane magnetic field, the magnetization reversal of the receiving magnet is induced by pure spin diffusion currents from the injector magnet. The magnetization switching is reversible between parallel and antiparallel configurations by controlling the polarity of the applied charged currents. Current induced heating and Oersted field from the nonlocal charge flow have also been excluded in this study. Next, we further enhance the spin angular momentum absorption at the interface of the receiving magnet and graphene channel by removing the tunneling barrier in the receiving magnet. The device with a tunneling barrier only at the injector magnet shows a comparable nonlocal spin valve signal but lower electrical noise. Moreover, in the same preset condition, the critical charge current density for spin torque in the single tunneling barrier device shows a substantial reduction if compared to the double tunneling barrier device.

  12. Rockets for spin recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The potential effectiveness of rockets as an auxiliary means for an aircraft to effect recovery from spins was investigated. The advances in rocket technology produced by the space effort suggested that currently available systems might obviate many of the problems encountered in earlier rocket systems. A modern fighter configuration known to exhibit a flat spin mode was selected. An analytical study was made of the thrust requirements for a rocket spin recovery system for the subject configuration. These results were then applied to a preliminary systems study of rocket components appropriate to the problem. Subsequent spin tunnel tests were run to evaluate the analytical results.

  13. Effect of electron trap states on spin-dependent transport characteristics in CoFe/MgO/n{sup +}-Si junctions investigated by Hanle effect measurements and inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuchi, Tomoaki Ishikawa, Mizue; Sugiyama, Hideyuki; Tanamoto, Tetsufumi; Saito, Yoshiaki

    2014-12-08

    Spin-dependent transport properties in CoFe/MgO/n{sup +}-Si junctions were investigated by Hanle effect measurements and inelastic electron tunneling (IET) spectroscopy. The CoFe/MgO/n{sup +}-Si junctions examined in this study exhibited two different Hanle curves. In the low bias region, broad Hanle signals were mainly observed; in the high bias region, narrow Hanle signals were mainly observed. The d{sup 2}I/dV{sup 2}-V curves (which correspond to IET spectra) contain several peaks originating from phonon modes and other peaks originating from electron trap states. At the bias voltage where electron trap states are observed, Δd{sup 2}I/dV{sup 2} depends on the magnetic field and the full width at half-maximum of the Δd{sup 2}I/dV{sup 2}–H curves corresponds to that of the broad Hanle signals. These results indicate that electron trap states are located in the low energy region and cause a decrease in spin lifetime.

  14. Wind-Tunnel Tests of 10-foot-diameter Autogiro Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, John B; Bioletti, Carlton

    1937-01-01

    Report presents the results of a series of 10-foot-diameter autogiro rotor models tested in the NACA 20-foot wind tunnel. Four of the models differed only in the airfoil sections of the blades, the sections used being the NACA 0012, 0018, 4412, and 4418. Three additional models employing the NACA 0012 section were tested, in which a varying portion of the blade near the hub was replaced by a streamline tube with a chord of about one-fourth the blade chord.

  15. Spin-flip noise due to nonequilibrium spin accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liang; Niu, Jiasen; Guo, Huiqiang; Wei, Jian; Li, D. L.; Feng, J. F.; Han, X. F.; Coey, J. M. D.; Zhang, X.-G.

    2016-05-01

    When current flows through a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), there is spin accumulation at the electrode-barrier interfaces if the magnetic moments of the two ferromagnetic electrodes are not aligned. Here we report that such nonequilibrium spin accumulation generates its own characteristic low frequency noise (LFN). Past work viewed the LFN in MTJs as an equilibrium effect arising from resistance fluctuations (SR) which a passively applied current (I ) converts to measurable voltage fluctuations (SV=I2SR ). We treat the LFN associated with spin accumulation as a nonequilibrium effect, and find that the noise power can be fitted in terms of the spin-polarized current by SIf =a I coth(I/b )-a b , resembling the form of the shot noise for a tunnel junction, but with current now taking the role of the bias voltage, and spin-flip probability taking the role of tunneling probability.

  16. Impurity-assisted tunneling magnetoresistance under a weak magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Txoperena, Oihana; Song, Yang; Qing, Lan; Gobbi, Marco; Hueso, Luis E; Dery, Hanan; Casanova, Fèlix

    2014-10-01

    Injection of spins into semiconductors is essential for the integration of the spin functionality into conventional electronics. Insulating layers are often inserted between ferromagnetic metals and semiconductors for obtaining an efficient spin injection, and it is therefore crucial to distinguish between signatures of electrical spin injection and impurity-driven effects in the tunnel barrier. Here we demonstrate an impurity-assisted tunneling magnetoresistance effect in nonmagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic tunnel barriers. In both cases, the effect reflects on-off switching of the tunneling current through impurity channels by the external magnetic field. The reported effect is universal for any impurity-assisted tunneling process and provides an alternative interpretation to a widely used technique that employs the same ferromagnetic electrode to inject and detect spin accumulation. PMID:25325651

  17. Impurity-Assisted Tunneling Magnetoresistance under a Weak Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Txoperena, Oihana; Song, Yang; Qing, Lan; Gobbi, Marco; Hueso, Luis E.; Dery, Hanan; Casanova, Fèlix

    2014-10-01

    Injection of spins into semiconductors is essential for the integration of the spin functionality into conventional electronics. Insulating layers are often inserted between ferromagnetic metals and semiconductors for obtaining an efficient spin injection, and it is therefore crucial to distinguish between signatures of electrical spin injection and impurity-driven effects in the tunnel barrier. Here we demonstrate an impurity-assisted tunneling magnetoresistance effect in nonmagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic tunnel barriers. In both cases, the effect reflects on-off switching of the tunneling current through impurity channels by the external magnetic field. The reported effect is universal for any impurity-assisted tunneling process and provides an alternative interpretation to a widely used technique that employs the same ferromagnetic electrode to inject and detect spin accumulation.

  18. Spin polarization of the split Kondo state.

    PubMed

    von Bergmann, Kirsten; Ternes, Markus; Loth, Sebastian; Lutz, Christopher P; Heinrich, Andreas J

    2015-02-20

    Spin-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy is employed to quantitatively determine the spin polarization of the magnetic field-split Kondo state. Tunneling conductance spectra of a Kondo-screened magnetic atom are evaluated within a simple model taking into account inelastic tunneling due to spin excitations and two Kondo peaks positioned symmetrically around the Fermi energy. We fit the spin state of the Kondo-screened atom with a spin Hamiltonian independent of the Kondo effect and account for Zeeman splitting of the Kondo peak in the magnetic field. We find that the width and the height of the Kondo peaks scales with the Zeeman energy. Our observations are consistent with full spin polarization of the Kondo peaks, i.e., a majority spin peak below the Fermi energy and a minority spin peak above. PMID:25763966

  19. Water tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjarke, Lisa J.

    1991-01-01

    Some of the uses of water tunnels are demonstrated through the description of the NASA Ames-Dryden Flow Visualization Facility. It is concluded that water tunnels are capable of providing a quick and inexpensive means of flow visualization and can aid in the understanding of complex fluid mechanics phenomena.

  20. Inelastic spin depolarization spectroscopy in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2013-07-01

    In ballistic injection spin transport devices, a tunnel junction emitter bias voltage determines the energy at which spin-polarized hot electrons cross a Schottky barrier into the conduction band of a semiconductor collector. Fast energy relaxation via phonon emission restores equilibrium for subsequent transport at the band edge. Through an analysis incorporating voltage-dependent measurement of magnetocurrent polarization in silicon spin transport devices along with magnetic-tunnel- and spin-valve-transistor configurations, the contribution to total spin depolarization caused by this inelastic scattering in the presence of spin-orbit interaction is quantified. From the shape of this spectroscopy, it is found that all measured spin depolarization can be accounted for solely by considering spin relaxation during bulk transport in quasi-equilibrium near the conduction band edge; the relaxation of initial spin state is irrelevant to the spin-dependent device characteristics.

  1. On tunneling across horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanzo, L.

    2011-07-01

    The tunneling method for stationary black holes in the Hamilton-Jacobi variant is reconsidered in the light of some critiques that have been moved against. It is shown that once the tunneling trajectories have been correctly identified the method is free from internal inconsistencies, it is manifestly covariant, it allows for the extension to spinning particles and it can even be used without solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. These conclusions borrow support on a simple analytic continuation of the classical action of a pointlike particle, made possible by the unique assumption that it should be analytic in the complexified Schwarzschild or Kerr-Newman space-time. A more general version of the Parikh-Wilczek method will also be proposed along these lines.

  2. Tunneling machine

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, L.L.

    1980-02-19

    A diametrically compact tunneling machine for boring tunnels is disclosed. The machine includes a tubular support frame having a hollow piston mounted therein which is movable from a retracted position in the support frame to an extended position. A drive shaft is rotatably mounted in the hollow piston and carries a cutter head at one end. The hollow piston is restrained against rotational movement relative to the support frame and the drive shaft is constrained against longitudinal movement relative to the hollow piston. A plurality of radially extendible feet project from the support frame to the tunnel wall to grip the tunnel wall during a tunneling operation wherein the hollow piston is driven forwardly so that the cutter head works on the tunnel face. When the hollow piston is fully extended, a plurality of extendible support feet, which are fixed to the rearward and forward ends of the hollow piston, are extended, the radially extendible feet are retracted and the support frame is shifted forwardly by the piston so that a further tunneling operation may be initiated.

  3. Tunnelling of relativistic particles from new type black hole in new massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gecim, Ganim; Sucu, Yusuf

    2013-02-01

    In the framework of the three dimensional New Massive Gravity theory introduced by Bergshoeff, Hohm and Townsend, we analyze the behavior of relativistic spin-1/2 and spin-0 particles in the New-type Black Hole backgroud, solution of the New Massive Gravity.We solve Dirac equation for spin-1/2 and Klein-Gordon equation for spin-0. Using Hamilton-Jacobi method, we discuss tunnelling probability and Hawking temperature of the spin-1/2 and spin-0 particles for the black hole. We observe that the tunnelling probability and Hawking temperature are same for the spin-1/2 and spin-0.

  4. Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically-functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode (“tethered molecule-pair” configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the “free analyte” configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. PMID:20522930

  5. First results for custom-built low-temperature (4.2 K) scanning tunneling microscope/molecular beam epitaxy and pulsed laser epitaxy system designed for spin-polarized measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Lin, Wenzhi; Wang, Kangkang; Chinchore, Abhijit; Corbett, Joseph; Savage, Alan; Chen, Tianjiao; Shi, Meng; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    A custom low-temperature (4.2 K) scanning tunneling microscope system has been developed which is combined directly with a custom molecular beam epitaxy facility (and also including pulsed laser epitaxy) for the purpose of studying surface nanomagnetism of complex spintronic materials down to the atomic scale. For purposes of carrying out spin-polarized STM measurements, the microscope is built into a split-coil, 4.5 Tesla superconducting magnet system where the magnetic field can be applied normal to the sample surface; since, as a result, the microscope does not include eddy current damping, vibration isolation is achieved using a unique combination of two stages of pneumatic isolators along with an acoustical noise shield, in addition to the use of a highly stable as well as modular `Pan'-style STM design with a high Q factor. First 4.2 K results reveal, with clear atomic resolution, various reconstructions on wurtzite GaN c-plane surfaces grown by MBE, including the c(6x12) on N-polar GaN(0001). Details of the system design and functionality will be presented.

  6. 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Smoke generator for 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT) (left center); Force Test Set-Up in the center. In 1928, the NACA decided to replace its original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT #1) with two tunnels--the 5-foot vertical tunnel and a 7 by 10 foot rectangular throat tunnel. Both were open-throat, closed-return-passage tunnels. While the 5-foot vertical tunnel was to be used mainly for spin tests, the 7x10 was an all-purpose tunnel although the main intent was to study stability and control problems. Construction was completed in the summer of 1930; calibration later that same year. The balance was installed and the tunnel went into operation in early 1931.

  7. Antiferromagnetic coupling across silicon regulated by tunneling currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareev, R. R.; Schmid, M.; Vancea, J.; Back, C. H.; Schreiber, R.; Bürgler, D.; Schneider, C. M.; Stromberg, F.; Wende, H.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the enhancement of antiferromagnetic coupling in epitaxial Fe/Si/Fe structures by voltage-driven spin-polarized tunneling currents. Using the ballistic electron magnetic microscopy, we established that the hot-electron collector current reflects magnetization alignment and the magnetocurrent exceeds 200% at room temperature. The saturation magnetic field for the collector current corresponding to the parallel alignment of magnetizations rises up with the tunneling current, thus demonstrating stabilization of the antiparallel alignment and increasing antiferromagnetic coupling. We connect the enhancement of antiferromagnetic coupling with local dynamic spin torques mediated by spin-polarized tunneling electrons.

  8. 35% magnetocurrent with spin transport through Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biqin; Zhao, Lai; Monsma, Douwe J.; Appelbaum, Ian

    2007-07-01

    Efficient injection of spin-polarized electrons into the conduction band of silicon is limited by the formation of a silicide at the ferromagnetic metal (FM)/silicon interface. In the present work, this "magnetically dead" silicide (where strong spin scattering significantly reduces injected spin polarization) is eliminated by moving the FM in the spin injector from the tunnel junction base anode to the emitter cathode and away from the silicon surface. This results in over an order-of-magnitude increase in spin injection efficiency, from a previously reported magnetocurrent ratio of ≈2% to ≈35% and an estimated spin polarization in Si from ≈1% to at least ≈15%. The injector tunnel junction bias dependence of this spin transport signal is also measured, demonstrating the importance of low bias voltage to preserve high injected spin polarization.

  9. Graphene-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobas, Enrique

    2013-03-01

    Graphene's in-plane transport has been widely researched and has yielded extraordinary carrier mobilities of 105 cm2/Vs and spin diffusion lengths of exceeding 100 μm. These properties bode well for graphene in future electronics and spintronics technologies. Its out-of-plane transport has been far less studied, although its parent material, graphite, shows a large conductance anisotropy. Recent calculations show graphene's interaction with close-packed ferromagnetic metal surfaces should produce highly spin-polarized transport out-of-plane, an enabling breakthrough for spintronics technology. In this work, we fabricate and measure FM/graphene/FM magnetic tunnel junctions using CVD-grown single-layer graphene. The resulting juctions show non-linear current-voltage characteristics and a very weak temperature dependence consistent with charge tunneling transport. Furthermore, we study spin transport across the junction as a function of bias voltage and temperature. The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) peaks at two percent for single-layer graphene junctions and exhibits the expected bias asymmetry and a temperature dependence that fits well with established spin-polarized tunneling models. Results of mutli-layer graphene tunnel junctions will also be discussed.

  10. The interfacial and surface properties of thin Fe and Gd films grown on W(110) as studied by scanning tunneling microscopy, site-resolved photoelectron diffraction, and spin polarized photoelectron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tober, E.D.

    1997-06-01

    Combined scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurements from Gd films grown on W(110) prepared with and without annealing have been used to provide a detailed picture of the growth of such films, permitting a quantitative structural explanation for previously-measured magnetic properties and the identification of a new two-dimensional structure for the first monolayer. The analysis of the film roughness of room-temperature-grown films as a function of coverage and lateral length scale reveals that the growing Gd surface follows scaling laws for a self-affine surface. Annealing these as-deposited films at elevated temperatures is found to drastically alter the morphology of the films, as seen by both STM and LEED. Nanometer-scale islands of relatively well-defined size and shape are observed under certain conditions. Finally, the first monolayer of Gd is observed to form a (7x14) superstructure with pseudo-(7x7) symmetry that is consistent with a minimally-distorted hexagonal two-dimensional Gd(0001) film. Furthermore, a new beamline and photoelectron spectrometer/diffractometer at the Advanced Light Source have been used to obtain full-solid-angle and site-specific photoelectron diffraction (PD) data from interface W atoms just beneath (1x1) Fe and (7x14) Gd monolayers on W(110) by utilizing the core level shift in the W 4f{sub 7/2} spectrum. A comparison of experiment with multiple scattering calculations permits determining the Fe adsorption site and the relative interlayer spacing to the first and second W layers. These Fe results are also compared to those from the very different Gd overlayer and from the clean W(110) surface. Such interface PD measurements show considerable promise for future studies. Finally, the rare-earth ferromagnetic system of Gd(0001) has been examined through the use of spin polarized photoelectron diffraction from the Gd 4s and 5s photoelectron multiplets.

  11. Alternative generation of spin current in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jung-Woo; Jin, Mi-Jin; Park, Jungmin; Modepalli, Vijayakumar; Jo, Jun-Hyeon

    2014-03-01

    The manipulation of spin current which can be achieved in various device configurations has been under intense research in recent years. The spin current is typically obtained by injecting electrons from the ferromagnetic electrodes. In this study, we employed alternative methods for the generation of spin current in graphene. The first method we studied is using spin Hall effect. In the spin Hall effect, the charge current generates spin current due to a relativistic spin-orbit coupling. Generally the spin-orbit coupling in graphene is extremely weak to produce substantial spin current. We employed physical doping of heavy atoms on top of the graphene layer for the spin Hall induced spin current in graphene. The second alternative method we investigated is seebeck spin tunneling. The ferromagnetic electrode together with thin tunnel barrier (1-3nm of Al2O3 layer) was employed to introduce thermally induced spin imbalance in graphene. The gate dependence of generated spin current reflects unique electronic structure of graphene. This work was supported in part by future challenge project of UNIST and Basic Science Research Program of NRF Korea.

  12. Tunneling Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Emil; Fujisawa, Sho; Barlas, Afsar; Romin, Yevgeniy; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2012-01-01

    Tunneling nanotubes are actin-based cytoplasmic extensions that function as intercellular channels in a wide variety of cell types.There is a renewed and keen interest in the examination of modes of intercellular communication in cells of all types, especially in the field of cancer biology. Tunneling nanotubes –which in the literature have also been referred to as “membrane nanotubes,” “’intercellular’ or ‘epithelial’ bridges,” or “cytoplasmic extensions” – are under active investigation for their role in facilitating direct intercellular communication. These structures have not, until recently, been scrutinized as a unique and previously unrecognized form of direct cell-to-cell transmission of cellular cargo in the context of human cancer. Our recent study of tunneling nanotubes in human malignant pleural mesothelioma and lung adenocarcinomas demonstrated efficient transfer of cellular contents, including proteins, Golgi vesicles, and mitochondria, between cells derived from several well-established cancer cell lines. Further, we provided effective demonstration that such nanotubes can form between primary malignant cells from human patients. For the first time, we also demonstrated the in vivo relevance of these structures in humans, having effectively imaged nanotubes in intact solid tumors from patients. Here we provide further analysis and discussion on our findings, and offer a prospective ‘road map’ for studying tunneling nanotubes in the context of human cancer. We hope that further understanding of the mechanisms, methods of transfer, and particularly the role of nanotubes in tumor-stromal cross-talk will lead to identification of new selective targets for cancer therapeutics. PMID:23060969

  13. 7 x 10 Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of 7 x 10 Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT). In 1928, the NACA decided to replace its original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT #1) with two tunnels--the 5-foot vertical tunnel and a 7 by 10 foot rectangular throat tunnel. Both were open-throat, closed-return-passage tunnels. While the 5 foot vertical tunnel was to be used mainly for spin tests, the 7x10 was an all-purpose tunnel although the main intent was to study stability and control problems. Construction was completed in the summer of 1930; calibration later that same year. The balance was installed and the tunnel went into operation in early 1931. The Warwick Machine Co. of Newport News, Virginia had the contract to fabricate and erection the 7x10 Foot tunnel for a total cost of $18,018.90. The balance was made by Fairbanks, Morse and Co., of Baltimore, Maryland for $2,544.00. The honeycomb was made by the Berkley Machine Works and Foundry Co., Inc. of Norfolk, Virginia for $1,580 and the control panel by Clark Controller Co. of Cleveland, OH for $1,153. Published in NACA TR No. 412, 'The 7 by 10 Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics,' by Thomas A. Harris, 1932; Reference Notes on the 'Atmospheric Wind Tunnel' in the Langley Historical Archives (D. Baals notes on wind tunnels).

  14. Efficient spin transfer phenomena in Fe/MgO/GaAs structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. J.; Hickey, M. C.; Van Veenhuizen, M. J.; Chang, J.; Heiman, D.; Perry, C. H.; Moodera, J. S.

    2011-03-01

    The efficiency of spin polarized charge transfer was investigated in an Fe/MgO tunnel barrier/GaAs based structure using spin dependent photocurrent measurements, whereby a spin imbalance in carrier population was generated in the GaAs by circularly polarized light. The dominance of tunneling transport processes over Schottky emission gave rise to a high spin transfer efficiency of 35% under the photovoltaic mode of device operation. A spin dependent tunneling conductance associated with spin polarized electron transport was identified by the observation of phase changes. This transport prevails over the unpolarized electron and hole conduction over the bias range which corresponds to flat band conditions.

  15. Electric field modulation of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in tunnel junctions with antiferromagnetic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Minori; Nawaoka, Kohei; Miwa, Shinji; Hatanaka, Shohei; Mizuochi, Norikazu; Suzuki, Yoshishige

    2016-08-01

    We present electric field modulation of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) in MnIr|MgO|Ta tunnel junctions. TAMR enables direct observation of the antiferromagnetic spin direction at the MnIr|MgO interface. We found that the shape of magnetoresistance (MR) curve can be modulated by an electric field, which can be explained by electric field modulation of the interfacial magnetic anisotropy at MnIr|MgO.

  16. Influence of thermal annealing on the spin injection and spin detection through Fe/GaAs interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liefeith, Lennart-Knud; Tholapi, Rajkiran; Hänze, Max; Hartmann, Robert; Slobodskyy, Taras; Hansen, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    A strong bias asymmetry of the spin-injection efficiency through an epitaxial Fe/GaAs Schottky tunnel contact is observed. Low-temperature post-growth thermal annealing is shown to strongly affect the spin-injection efficiency. The annealing leads either to a reduction or an enhancement. The spin accumulation is addressed electrically in a lateral spin-valve geometry using a non-local spin-valve setup at liquid helium temperatures. A spin-injection efficiency of up to 5.5% is estimated from experimental results. The electrical properties of the Schottky tunnel diode do not reflect the bias asymmetry and the changes in the spin-injection efficiency during annealing. Formation of spin-polarized interface states (IS) close to the Fermi-level is a possible explanation. The IS will not only radically affect the spin-injection but also the spin-detection process.

  17. Superpoissonian shot noise in organic magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cascales, Juan Pedro; Martinez, Isidoro; Aliev, Farkhad G.; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Lin, Minn-Tsong; Szczepański, Tomasz; Dugaev, Vitalii K.; Barnaś, Józef

    2014-12-08

    Organic molecules have recently revolutionized ways to create new spintronic devices. Despite intense studies, the statistics of tunneling electrons through organic barriers remains unclear. Here, we investigate conductance and shot noise in magnetic tunnel junctions with 3,4,9,10-perylene-teracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) barriers a few nm thick. For junctions in the electron tunneling regime, with magnetoresistance ratios between 10% and 40%, we observe superpoissonian shot noise. The Fano factor exceeds in 1.5–2 times the maximum values reported for magnetic tunnel junctions with inorganic barriers, indicating spin dependent bunching in tunneling. We explain our main findings in terms of a model which includes tunneling through a two level (or multilevel) system, originated from interfacial bonds of the PTCDA molecules. Our results suggest that interfaces play an important role in the control of shot noise when electrons tunnel through organic barriers.

  18. Superpoissonian shot noise in organic magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cascales, Juan Pedro; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Martinez, Isidoro; Lin, Minn-Tsong; Szczepański, Tomasz; Dugaev, Vitalii K.; Barnaś, Józef; Aliev, Farkhad G.

    2014-12-01

    Organic molecules have recently revolutionized ways to create new spintronic devices. Despite intense studies, the statistics of tunneling electrons through organic barriers remains unclear. Here, we investigate conductance and shot noise in magnetic tunnel junctions with 3,4,9,10-perylene-teracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) barriers a few nm thick. For junctions in the electron tunneling regime, with magnetoresistance ratios between 10% and 40%, we observe superpoissonian shot noise. The Fano factor exceeds in 1.5-2 times the maximum values reported for magnetic tunnel junctions with inorganic barriers, indicating spin dependent bunching in tunneling. We explain our main findings in terms of a model which includes tunneling through a two level (or multilevel) system, originated from interfacial bonds of the PTCDA molecules. Our results suggest that interfaces play an important role in the control of shot noise when electrons tunnel through organic barriers.

  19. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique for Wind Tunnel Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.

    2006-01-01

    Videogrammetric measurement technique developments at NASA Langley were driven largely by the need to quantify model deformation at the National Transonic Facility (NTF). This paper summarizes recent wind tunnel applications and issues at the NTF and other NASA Langley facilities including the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel, 8-Ft high Temperature Tunnel, and the 20-Ft Vertical Spin Tunnel. In addition, several adaptations of wind tunnel techniques to non-wind tunnel applications are summarized. These applications include wing deformation measurements on vehicles in flight, determining aerodynamic loads based on optical elastic deformation measurements, measurements on ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures, and the use of an object-to-image plane scaling technique to support NASA s Space Exploration program.

  20. Domino Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Peter R; Wagner, J Philipp; Reisenauer, Hans Peter; Gerbig, Dennis; Ley, David; Sarka, János; Császár, Attila G; Vaughn, Alexander; Allen, Wesley D

    2015-06-24

    Matrix-isolation experiments near 3 K and state-of-the-art quantum chemical computations demonstrate that oxalic acid [1, (COOH)2] exhibits a sequential quantum mechanical tunneling phenomenon not previously observed. Intensities of numerous infrared (IR) bands were used to monitor the temporal evolution of the lowest-energy O-H rotamers (1cTc, 1cTt, 1tTt) of oxalic acid for up to 19 days following near-infrared irradiation of the matrix. The relative energies of these rotamers are 0.0 (1cTc), 2.6 (1cTt), and 4.0 (1tTt) kcal mol(-1). A 1tTt → 1cTt → 1cTc isomerization cascade was observed with half-lives (t1/2) in different matrix sites ranging from 30 to 360 h, even though the sequential barriers of 9.7 and 10.4 kcal mol(-1) are much too high to be surmounted thermally under cryogenic conditions. A general mathematical model was developed for the complex kinetics of a reaction cascade with species in distinct matrix sites. With this model, a precise, global nonlinear least-squares fit was achieved simultaneously on the temporal profiles of nine IR bands of the 1cTc, 1cTt, and 1tTt rotamers. Classes of both fast (t(1/2) = 30-50 h) and slow (t(1/2) > 250 h) matrix sites were revealed, with the decay rate of the former in close agreement with first-principles computations for the conformational tunneling rates of the corresponding isolated molecules. Rigorous kinetic and theoretical analyses thus show that a "domino" tunneling mechanism is at work in these oxalic acid transformations. PMID:26027801

  1. Looking into Tunnel Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    1999-01-01

    Describes how to make tunnel books, which are viewed by looking into a "tunnel" created by accordion-folded expanding sides. Suggests possible themes. Describes how to create a walk-through tunnel book for first grade students. (CMK)

  2. Carpal tunnel release

    MedlinePlus

    Median nerve decompression; Carpal tunnel decompression; Surgery - carpal tunnel ... The median nerve and the tendons that flex (or curl) your fingers go through a passage called the carpal tunnel in ...

  3. Tunnel magnetoresistance in epitaxially grown magnetic tunnel junctions using Heusler alloy electrode and MgO barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunegi, S.; Sakuraba, Y.; Oogane, M.; Telling, N. D.; Shelford, L. R.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Hicken, R. J.; Takanashi, K.; Ando, Y.

    2009-07-01

    Epitaxially grown magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a stacking structure of Co{sub 2}MnSi/MgO/CoFe were fabricated. Their tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effects were investigated. The TMR ratio and tunnelling conductance characteristics of MTJs were considerably different between those with an MgO barrier prepared using sputtering (SP-MTJ) and those prepared using EB evaporation (EB-MTJ). The EB-MTJ exhibited a very large TMR ratio of 217% at room temperature and 753% at 2 K. The bias voltage dependence of the tunnelling conductance in the parallel magnetic configuration for the EB-MTJ suggests that the observed large TMR ratio at RT results from the coherent tunnelling process through the crystalline MgO barrier. The tunnelling conductance in the anti-parallel magnetic configuration suggests that the large temperature dependence of the TMR ratio results from the inelastic spin-flip tunnelling process.

  4. Carpal tunnel biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Calandruccio JH. Carpal tunnel syndrome, ulnar tunnel syndrome, and stenosing tenosynovitis. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012: ...

  5. Fingerprints of the superconducting pairing glue via inelastic tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlobil, Patrik; Schmalian, Jörg; Jandke, Jasmin; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    In the past, tunneling spectroscopy has been interpreted as a direct probe of the fermionic density of states in superconductors. However, in this talk we discuss the impact of inelastic tunneling on tunnel spectra and show that depending on the actual system these interpretations have to be revisited. We show how such inelastic tunneling processes can occur in bulk systems and how they affect the analysis of the experimental data. Considering the spin-gap for spin excitations in the high-Tc superconductors we can trace back the peak-dip-hump features observed in many unconventional superconductors to the shift of the spin spectral weight to higher energies below the critical temperature Tc .

  6. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum. PMID:25423049

  7. Nonequilibrium spin injection in monolayer black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingyan; Yu, Zhizhou; Wang, Yin; Xie, Yiqun; Wang, Jian; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-21

    Monolayer black phosphorus (MBP) is an interesting emerging electronic material with a direct band gap and relatively high carrier mobility. In this work we report a theoretical investigation of nonequilibrium spin injection and spin-polarized quantum transport in MBP from ferromagnetic Ni contacts, in two-dimensional magnetic tunneling structures. We investigate physical properties such as the spin injection efficiency, the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio, spin-polarized currents, charge currents and transmission coefficients as a function of external bias voltage, for two different device contact structures where MBP is contacted by Ni(111) and by Ni(100). While both structures are predicted to give respectable spin-polarized quantum transport, the Ni(100)/MBP/Ni(100) trilayer has the superior properties where the spin injection and magnetoresistance ratio maintains almost a constant value against the bias voltage. The nonequilibrium quantum transport phenomenon is understood by analyzing the transmission spectrum at nonequilibrium. PMID:26675820

  8. Nonequilibrium spin injection in monolayer black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingyan; Yu, Zhizhou; Wang, Yin; Xie, Yiqun; Wang, Jian; Guo, Hong

    Monolayer black phosphorus (MBP) is an interesting emerging electronic material with a direct band gap and relatively high carrier mobility. In this work we report a theoretical investigation of nonequilibrium spin injection and spin-polarized quantum transport in MBP from ferromagnetic Ni contacts, in two-dimensional magnetic tunneling structures. We investigate physical properties such as the spin injection efficiency, the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio, spin-polarized currents, charge currents and transmission coefficients as a function of external bias voltage, for two different device contact structures where MBP is contacted by Ni(111) and by Ni(100). While both structures are predicted to give respectable spin-polarized quantum transport, the Ni(100)/MBP/Ni(100) trilayer has the superior properties where the spin injection and magnetoresistance ratio maintains almost a constant value against the bias voltage. The nonequilibrium quantum transport phenomenon is understood by analyzing the transmission spectrum at nonequilibrium.

  9. Quantum tunneling of the non-stationary BTZ black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; Yang, Shu Zheng

    2009-07-01

    The semi-classical tunneling method is extended to study the Hawking tunneling radiation from the non-stationary BTZ black hole via general tortoise coordination transformation and WKB approximation. In this paper, we simplify the spin-0 scalar field equation and the spin-1/2 Dirac equation at the event horizon of this black hole, and then the quantum tunneling probability and Hawking temperature are obtained. Finally, the correctional tunneling rate is researched, and the results show that after considering the changed background space-time of the non-stationary BTZ black hole, the tunneling rate depends not only on the entropy change but also on the integral about {\\dot r}_H .

  10. Calibration of a Larmor clock for tunneling time experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Jesus; Potnis, Shreyas; Spierings, David; Ebadi, Sapehr; Steinberg, Aephraim

    2016-05-01

    How much time does it take for a particle to tunnel? This has been a controversial question since the early times of quantum mechanics. The debate stems mainly from the inability to measure time directly. One proposal to measure the tunnelling time is the Larmor clock, in which the spin degree of freedom of the tunneling particle is used as a clock. This clock only ``ticks'' inside the forbidden region due to the precession of the spin about a magnetic field localized within the barrier. Here, we report the calibration of a Larmor clock to measure tunneling times of a 87 Rb Bose Einstein condensate. We use the Zeeman sublevels of the ground-state F = 2 manifold and Raman beams for the implementation of a Larmor clock. Experimental progress towards measuring the tunneling time and the challenges involved in this measurement will also be discussed.

  11. Ultrafast hole tunneling in asymmetric double quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Mark F.; Ten, Sergey Y.; McGinnis, Brian P.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Khitrova, Galina; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    1995-04-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of tunneling in Asymmetric Double Quantum Well (ADQW) structures for which holes were found to tunnel from the narrow well to the wide well on sub-picosecond time-scales. These times are as fast, or faster than electron tunneling times despite the absence of resonances between hole states. Valence band structure calculations for our ADQW structures indicate that ultrafast hole tunneling can be attributed spin-dependent delocalization of the hole wavefunctions with a concomitant singularity (in principle) in the density of final wide well states.

  12. Antiferromagnetic coupling across silicon regulated by tunneling currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareev, Rashid; Schmid, Maximilian; Vancea, Johann; Back, Christian; Schreiber, Reinert; Buergler, Daniel; Stromberg, Frank; Wende, Heiko

    2012-02-01

    We present the room temperature enhancement of antiferromagnetic coupling in epitaxial Fe(3 nm)/Si(2.4 nm)/Fe(3 nm) structures by voltage-driven spin-polarized tunneling currents. Using the ballistic electron magnetic microscopy we established that the saturation field for the collector current corresponding to parallel alignment of magnetizations rises up with the tunneling current, thus demonstrating stabilization of the antiparallel alignment and increase of antiferromagnetic coupling. We connect the enhancement of antiferromagnetic coupling with local dynamic spin torques mediated by spin-polarized tunneling electrons. Finally, in the antiparallel state the spin-polarized majority (minority) electrons exert dynamic torques in the bottom (upper) iron layer and, thus, additionally stabilize magnetization alignment.

  13. Close-in blasting at the TRI-MET light rail tunnels in Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Revey, G.F.; Painter, D.Z.

    1995-12-31

    Frontier/Traylor Joint Venture is presently constructing a section of the Tri-County Metropolitan Transit District of Oregon`s (TRI-MET) Westside Light Rail System. This new section will extend Portland`s existing transit system to the western suburbs of Beaverton and Hillsboro. The drill-blast excavations at this project include 10,000 feet of 20 foot tunnel, 18 cross passages, three shafts, an underground railway station, and a U-wall open cut. From a blast designer`s perspective, this job has been extremely challenging. Blast vibration is limited to 0.5 ips at 200 feet or at the nearest structure, and airblast is limited to 129 dB--linear peak and 96 dB--C scale. The tunnels pass under heavily built up areas and have top of tunnel to surface cover distances as low as 70 feet. Surface blasting in the 26,000 cubic yard U-wall excavation was limited to five short nighttime periods due to its proximity to the very busy highway 26. This paper describes the techniques that were used to develop safe blasting designs for the TRI-MET Surface blasts and tunnel rounds. It also discusses the measures that were necessary to mitigate noise, vibration, and flyrock.

  14. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene.

    PubMed

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando; Dressel, Martin; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2016-02-01

    Controlling the dynamics of spins on surfaces is pivotal to the design of spintronic and quantum computing devices. Proposed schemes involve the interaction of spins with graphene to enable surface-state spintronics and electrical spin manipulation. However, the influence of the graphene environment on the spin systems has yet to be unravelled. Here we explore the spin-graphene interaction by studying the classical and quantum dynamics of molecular magnets on graphene. Whereas the static spin response remains unaltered, the quantum spin dynamics and associated selection rules are profoundly modulated. The couplings to graphene phonons, to other spins, and to Dirac fermions are quantified using a newly developed model. Coupling to Dirac electrons introduces a dominant quantum relaxation channel that, by driving the spins over Villain's threshold, gives rise to fully coherent, resonant spin tunnelling. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the interaction between spins and graphene, establishing the basis for electrical spin manipulation in graphene nanodevices. PMID:26641019

  15. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando; Dressel, Martin; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2016-02-01

    Controlling the dynamics of spins on surfaces is pivotal to the design of spintronic and quantum computing devices. Proposed schemes involve the interaction of spins with graphene to enable surface-state spintronics and electrical spin manipulation. However, the influence of the graphene environment on the spin systems has yet to be unravelled. Here we explore the spin-graphene interaction by studying the classical and quantum dynamics of molecular magnets on graphene. Whereas the static spin response remains unaltered, the quantum spin dynamics and associated selection rules are profoundly modulated. The couplings to graphene phonons, to other spins, and to Dirac fermions are quantified using a newly developed model. Coupling to Dirac electrons introduces a dominant quantum relaxation channel that, by driving the spins over Villain’s threshold, gives rise to fully coherent, resonant spin tunnelling. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the interaction between spins and graphene, establishing the basis for electrical spin manipulation in graphene nanodevices.

  16. Spin slush in an extended spin ice model

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Jeffrey G.; Gingras, Michel J. P.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new classical spin liquid on the pyrochlore lattice by extending spin ice with further neighbour interactions. We find that this disorder-free spin model exhibits a form of dynamical heterogeneity with extremely slow relaxation for some spins, while others fluctuate quickly down to zero temperature. We thus call this state spin slush, in analogy to the heterogeneous mixture of solid and liquid water. This behaviour is driven by the structure of the ground-state manifold which extends the celebrated two-in/two-out ice states to include branching structures built from three-in/one-out, three-out/one-in and all-in/all-out tetrahedra defects. Distinctive liquid-like patterns in the magnetic correlations serve as a signature of this intermediate range order. Possible applications to materials as well the effects of quantum tunnelling are discussed. PMID:27470199

  17. Spin slush in an extended spin ice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Jeffrey G.; Gingras, Michel J. P.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new classical spin liquid on the pyrochlore lattice by extending spin ice with further neighbour interactions. We find that this disorder-free spin model exhibits a form of dynamical heterogeneity with extremely slow relaxation for some spins, while others fluctuate quickly down to zero temperature. We thus call this state spin slush, in analogy to the heterogeneous mixture of solid and liquid water. This behaviour is driven by the structure of the ground-state manifold which extends the celebrated two-in/two-out ice states to include branching structures built from three-in/one-out, three-out/one-in and all-in/all-out tetrahedra defects. Distinctive liquid-like patterns in the magnetic correlations serve as a signature of this intermediate range order. Possible applications to materials as well the effects of quantum tunnelling are discussed.

  18. Spin slush in an extended spin ice model.

    PubMed

    Rau, Jeffrey G; Gingras, Michel J P

    2016-01-01

    We present a new classical spin liquid on the pyrochlore lattice by extending spin ice with further neighbour interactions. We find that this disorder-free spin model exhibits a form of dynamical heterogeneity with extremely slow relaxation for some spins, while others fluctuate quickly down to zero temperature. We thus call this state spin slush, in analogy to the heterogeneous mixture of solid and liquid water. This behaviour is driven by the structure of the ground-state manifold which extends the celebrated two-in/two-out ice states to include branching structures built from three-in/one-out, three-out/one-in and all-in/all-out tetrahedra defects. Distinctive liquid-like patterns in the magnetic correlations serve as a signature of this intermediate range order. Possible applications to materials as well the effects of quantum tunnelling are discussed. PMID:27470199

  19. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waltman, S. B.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1989-01-01

    The recent development of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy technology allows the application of electron tunneling to position detectors for the first time. The vacuum tunnel junction is one of the most sensitive position detection mechanisms available. It is also compact, simple, and requires little power. A prototype accelerometer based on electron tunneling, and other sensor applications of this promising new technology are described.

  20. Effects of disorder on spin injection and extraction for organic semiconductor spin-valves

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Sha Liu, Feilong; Smith, Darryl L.; Ruden, P. Paul

    2015-02-28

    A device model for tunnel injection and extraction of spin-polarized charge carriers between ferromagnetic contacts and organic semiconductors with disordered molecular states is presented. Transition rates for tunneling are calculated based on a transfer Hamiltonian. Transport in the bulk semiconductor is described by macroscopic device equations. Tunneling predominantly involves organic molecular levels near the metal Fermi energy, and therefore typically in the tail of the band that supports carrier transport in the semiconductor. Disorder-induced broadening of the relevant band plays a critical role for the injection and extraction of charge carriers and for the resulting magneto-resistance of an organic semiconductor spin valve.

  1. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in a magnetic tunnel junction with half-metallic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, J. D.; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) is the difference in resistance of a magnetic tunnel junction due to a change in magnetization direction of one or both magnetic electrodes with respect to the flow of current. We present the results of first-principles density functional calculations of the TAMR effect in magnetic tunnel junctions with L a0.7S r0.3Mn O3 (LSMO) electrodes and a SrTi O3 (STO) tunneling barrier. We find an ˜500 % difference in resistance between magnetization in the plane and out of the plane. This large TAMR effect originates from the half-metallic nature of LSMO: When magnetization is out of plane spin-orbit coupling (SOC) contributions to the transmission come only from spin-flip scattering, which is intrinsically small due to the half-metallicity. For in-plane magnetization, however, there is a large non-spin-flip SOC contribution to the conductance. The large magnitude of the effect stems from the additional fact that there is an inherent polar discontinuity between LSMO and STO which leads to quasilocalized states at the interface whose influence on tunneling is strongly dependent on the magnetization orientation.

  2. The importance of Fe surface states for spintronic devices based on magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chantis, Athanasios N

    2008-01-01

    In this article we give a review of our recent theoretical studies of the influence of Fe(001) surface (interface) states on spin-polarized electron transport across magnetic tunnel junctions with Fe electrodes. We show that minority-spin surface (interface) states are responsible for at least two effects which are important for spin electronics. First, they can produce a sizable tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junctions with a single Fe electrode. The effect is driven by a Rashba shift of the resonant surface band when the magnetization changes direction. This can introduce a new class of spintronic devices, namely, tunneling magnetoresistance junctions with a single ferromagnetic electrode. Second, in Fe/GaAs(001) magnetic tunnel junctions minority-spin interface states produce a strong dependence of the tunneling current spin polarization on applied electrical bias. A dramatic sign reversal within a voltage range of just a few tenths of an eV is predicted. This explains the observed sign reversal of spin polarization in recent experiments of electrical spin injection in Fe/GaAs(001) and related reversal of tunneling magnetoresistance through vertical Fe/GaAs/Fe trilayers.

  3. Inelastic electron tunnelling and noise spectroscopies in organic magnetic tunnel junctions with PTCDA barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Farkhad; Martinez, Isidoro; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Cascales, Juan Pedro; Andres, Pablo; Lin, Minn-Tsong

    2015-03-01

    The influence of internal barrier dynamics on spin, charge transport and their fluctuations in organic spintronics remains poorly understood. Here we present inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy (IETS) and low frequency noise (LFN) studies in magnetic tunnel junctions with thin (1.2-5nm) organic PTCDA barriers in the tunnelling regime at temperatures down to 0.3K. Shot noise is superpoissonian with a Fano factor exceeding in 1.5-2 times the maximum values reported for magnetic tunnel junctions with inorganic barriers, indicating spin dependent bunching in tunneling. IETS results show energy relaxation of tunneling electrons through the excitation of collective (librons) and internal (phonons) vibrational modes of the molecules. The bias dependence of the normalised 1/f noise studied up to 350mV reveals that the excitation of some phonon modes has a strong impact on LFN with over a 10-fold reproducible increase near some specific biases. The dependence of the IETS and LFN anomalies with the relative magnetic alignment of the electrodes will also be discussed.

  4. Tunneling magnetoresistive heads for magnetic data storage.

    PubMed

    Mao, Sining

    2007-01-01

    Spintronics is emerging to be a new form of nanotechnologies, which utilizes not only the charge but also spin degree of freedom of electrons. Spin-dependent tunneling transport is one of the many kinds of physical phenomena involving spintronics, which has already found industrial applications. In this paper, we first provide a brief review on the basic physics and materials for magnetic tunnel junctions, followed more importantly by a detailed coverage on the application of magnetic tunneling devices in magnetic data storage. The use of tunneling magnetoresistive reading heads has helped to maintain a fast growth of areal density, which is one of the key advantages of hard disk drives as compared to solid-state memories. This review is focused on the first commercial tunneling magnetoresistive heads in the industry at an areal density of 80 approximately 100 Gbit/in2 for both laptop and desktop Seagate hard disk drive products using longitudinal media. The first generation tunneling magnetoresistive products utilized a bottom stack of tunnel junctions and an abutted hard bias design. The output signal amplitude of these heads was 3 times larger than that of comparable giant magnetoresistive devices, resulting in a 0.6 decade bit error rate gain over the latter. This has enabled high component and drive yields. Due to the improved thermal dissipation of vertical geometry, the tunneling magnetoresistive head runs cooler with a better lifetime performance, and has demonstrated similar electrical-static-discharge robustness as the giant magnetoresistive devices. It has also demonstrated equivalent or better process and wafer yields compared to the latter. The tunneling magnetoresistive heads are proven to be a mature and capable reader technology. Using the same head design in conjunction with perpendicular recording media, an areal density of 274 Gbit/in2 has been demonstrated, and advanced tunneling magnetoresistive heads can reach 311 Gbit/in2. Today, the

  5. NASA general aviation stall/spin flight testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patton, J. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive program incorporating spin tunnel, static and rotary balance wind tunnel, full scale wind tunnel, free flight radio control model, flight simulation, and full scale flight testing was undertaken. Work includes aerodynamic definition of various configurations at high angles of attack, testing of stall and spin prevention concepts, definition of spin and spin recovery characteristics, and development of test techniques and emergency spin recovery systems. Some of the more interesting results to date are presented for the first airplane in the program in the areas of tail design, wind leading edge design, mass distribution, center of gravity location, and small airframe changes, with associated pilot observations. Design philosophy of the spin recovery parachute system is discussed, in addition to test techniques.

  6. Room Temperature Magnetic Barrier Layers in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.; Wong, F. J.; Chopdekar, R. V.; Arenholz, E.; Suzuki, Y.

    2010-03-09

    We investigate the spin transport and interfacial magnetism of magnetic tunnel junctions with highly spin polarized LSMO and Fe3O4 electrodes and a ferrimagnetic NiFe2O4 (NFO) barrier layer. The spin dependent transport can be understood in terms of magnon-assisted spin dependent tunneling where the magnons are excited in the barrier layer itself. The NFO/Fe3O4 interface displays strong magnetic coupling, while the LSMO/NFO interface exhibits clear decoupling as determined by a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This decoupling allows for distinct parallel and antiparallel electrode states in this all-magnetic trilayer. The spin transport of these devices, dominated by the NFO barrier layer magnetism, leads to a symmetric bias dependence of the junction magnetoresistance at all temperatures.

  7. Cryogenic wind tunnels. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the cryogenic concept to various types of tunnels including Ludwieg tube tunnel, Evans clean tunnel, blowdown, induced-flow, and continuous-flow fan-driven tunnels is discussed. Benefits related to construction and operating costs are covered, along with benefits related to new testing capabilities. It is noted that cooling the test gas to very low temperatures increases Reynolds number by more than a factor of seven. From the energy standpoint, ambient-temperature fan-driven closed-return tunnels are considered to be the most efficient type of tunnel, while a large reduction in the required tunnel stagnation pressure can be achieved through cryogenic operation. Operating envelopes for three modes of operation for a cryogenic transonic pressure tunnel with a 2.5 by 2.5 test section are outlined. A computer program for calculating flow parameters and power requirements for wind tunnels with operating temperatures from saturation to above ambient is highlighted.

  8. The straintronic spin-neuron.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ayan K; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-07-17

    In artificial neural networks, neurons are usually implemented with highly dissipative CMOS-based operational amplifiers. A more energy-efficient implementation is a 'spin-neuron' realized with a magneto-tunneling junction (MTJ) that is switched with a spin-polarized current (representing weighted sum of input currents) that either delivers a spin transfer torque or induces domain wall motion in the soft layer of the MTJ to mimic neuron firing. Here, we propose and analyze a different type of spin-neuron in which the soft layer of the MTJ is switched with mechanical strain generated by a voltage (representing weighted sum of input voltages) and term it straintronic spin-neuron. It dissipates orders of magnitude less energy in threshold operations than the traditional current-driven spin neuron at 0 K temperature and may even be faster. We have also studied the room-temperature firing behaviors of both types of spin neurons and find that thermal noise degrades the performance of both types, but the current-driven type is degraded much more than the straintronic type if both are optimized for maximum energy-efficiency. On the other hand, if both are designed to have the same level of thermal degradation, then the current-driven version will dissipate orders of magnitude more energy than the straintronic version. Thus, the straintronic spin-neuron is superior to current-driven spin neurons. PMID:26112081

  9. Spin pumping and inverse spin Hall effect in germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Sanchez, Juan-Carlos; Vergnaud, C.; Vila, L.; Attane, J.-P.; Marty, A.; Jaffres, Henri; Jamet, Matthieu; George, Jean-Marie

    2014-03-01

    We have measured the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) in n-Ge at room temperature. The spin current in germanium was generated by spin pumping from a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction in order to prevent the impedance mismatch issue. A clear electromotive force was measured in Ge at the ferromagnetic resonance of CFB. The same study was then carried out on several test samples, in particular, we have investigated the influence of the MgO tunnel barrier and sample annealing on the ISHE signal. The reference CFB/MgO bilayer grown on SiO2 exhibits a clear electromotive force due to anisotropic magnetoresistance and anomalous Hall effect, which is dominated by an asymmetric contribution with respect to the resonance field. We also found that the MgO tunnel barrier is essential to observe ISHE in Ge and that sample annealing systematically leads to an increase of the signal. We propose a theoretical model based on the presence of localized states at the interface to account for these observations. Finally, all of our results are fully consistent with the observation of ISHE in heavily doped n-Ge with a spin Hall angle around 0.001. JCRS acknowledges the Eurotalent CEA program.

  10. Spin Electronics in Metallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, Felipe Tijiwa

    2011-12-01

    The work described in this thesis reflects a through investigation of spin-dependent transport through metallic nanoparticles, via tunnel junctions. Our devices consist of metallic nanoparticles embedded in an insulating matrix tunnel coupled to two metallic electrodes. At low temperatures, the small dimensions of the particles provide the necessary conditions to study the role played by discrete energy levels in the transport properties of these devices. In Chapter 1, a brief introduction to some of the relevant background topics related to this work, will be presented. Chapter 2 gives a detailed description of measurement procedures used on the experiments, and the adopted techniques for sample fabrication. In some of the devices presented here, the electrodes are made of ferromagnetic materials, which are used as source of spin-polarized current. The case where both electrodes are ferromagnetic, in a spin-valve configuration, will be discussed in Chapter 3, showing that spin accumulation mechanisms are responsible for the observed spin-polarized current. It will also be shown that the effect of an applied perpendicular magnetic field, relative to the magnetization orientation of the electrodes, indicates the suppression of spin precession in such small particles. Moreover, in the presence of an external non-collinear magnetic field, it is the local field "felt" by the particle that determines the character of the tunnel current. Even in samples where only one of the electrodes is ferromagnetic, spin-polarization of the tunnel current due to spin accumulation in the particle is observed. Asymmetries in the current-voltage (IV) characteristics as well as in the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of these devices will be presented in Chapter 4. Another type of device, which will be addressed in Chapter 5, consists of ferromagnetic nanoparticles coupled to normal-metal electrodes. The rich electronic structure as well as a complex set of relaxation mechanisms in these

  11. Giant intrinsic thermomagnetic effects in thin MgO magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, J. M.; Costa, J. D.; Ventura, J.; Fernandez-Garcia, M. P.; Azevedo, J.; Araujo, J. P.; Sousa, J. B.; Wisniowski, P.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2013-05-01

    An intrinsic spin-dependent Seebeck effect in the linear tunneling transport regime of magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) was discovered recently. This effect leads to a nonlinear correction of Ohm's law in the dc response. We analyze this intrinsic magneto-thermoelectrical effect for MTJs with different MgO barrier (tb=0.7-1.35 nm) thicknesses. We report strong intrinsic effects in MTJs with thin MgO barriers (1189%), upon reversal of the magnetization of the two CoFeB layers. Such large effects are promising for useful spin caloritronic devices, integrating charge, heat, and spin tunnel transport.

  12. 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Drawing of 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT). In 1928, the NACA decided to replace its original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT #1) with two tunnels--the 5-foot vertical tunnel and a 7 by 10 foot rectangular throat tunnel. Both were open-throat, closed-return-passage tunnels. While the 5-foot vertical tunnel was to be used mainly for spin tests, the 7x10 was an all-purpose tunnel although the main intent was to study stability and control problems. Construction was completed in the summer of 1930; calibration later that same year. The balance was installed and the tunnel went into operation in early 1931. The Warwick Machine Co. of Newport News, Virginia had the contract to fabricate and erection the 7x10-Foot tunnel for a total cost of $18,018.90. The balance was made by Fairbanks, Morse and Co., of Baltimore, Maryland for 2,544.00. The honeycomb was made by the Berkley Machine Works and Foundry Co., Inc. of Norfolk, Virginia for $1,580 and the control panel by Clark Controller Co. of Cleveland, OH for $1,153.

  13. 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Engineer is shown adjusting a test model of the Clark-Y airfoil #1 in 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT). In 1928, the NACA decided to replace its original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT #1) with two tunnels--the 5-foot vertical tunnel and a 7 by 10 foot rectangular throat tunnel. Both were open-throat, closed-return-passage tunnels and were housed in the same building the first wind tunnel had been located in. While the 5-foot vertical tunnel was to be used mainly for spin tests, the 7x10 was an all-purpose tunnel although the main intent was to study stability and control problems. Construction was completed in the summer of 1930; calibration later that same year. The balance was installed and the tunnel went into operation in early 1931. The test model used to study the coefficients of lift, drag, cross-wind force, and pitching moment was a 'Clark Y airfoil with a 10-inch chord and a 60-inch span, and the model was set at 20 positive yaw.'

  14. Cryogenic wind tunnels. III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Specific problems pertaining to cryogenic wind tunnels, including LN(2) injection, GN(2) exhaust, thermal insulation, and automatic control are discussed. Thermal and other physical properties of materials employed in these tunnels, properties of cryogenic fluids, storage and transfer of liquid nitrogen, strength and toughness of metals and nonmetals at low temperatures, and material procurement and qualify control are considered. Safety concerns with cryogenic tunnels are covered, and models for cryogenic wind tunnels are presented, along with descriptions of major cryogenic wind-tunnel facilities the United States, Europe, and Japan. Problems common to wind tunnels, such as low Reynolds number, wall and support interference, and flow unsteadiness are outlined.

  15. Unimpeded Tunneling in Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iurov, Andrii; Roslyak, Oleksiy; Gumbs, Godfrey; Huang, Danhong

    2010-03-01

    The Klein paradox is unimpeded tunneling of the purely bonded Dirac electron state across arbitrary wide gated region. Its another manifestation is perfect reflection in the graphene stacks. We studied the Klein paradox in zigzag (ZNR) and anti- zigzag (AZNR) graphene nanoribbons. For ZNR (AZNR), the number N of lattice sites across the nanoribbon is even (odd). Since the ZNR and AZNR (configurations are indistinguishable in the Dirac formalism, we supplemented the model with a pseudo-parity operator whose eigenvalues correctly give the dependence on N for the sublattice wavefunctions, in agreement with the tight- binding model. We have shown that the Klein tunneling in zigzag nanoribbons is determined by conservation of the pseudo-parity rather than pseudo-spin which is required in infinite graphene. Chirality is the projection of the pseudo-spin on momentum at different corners of the Brillouin zone. Perfect transmission for head-on incidence is replaced by perfect transmission at the center of the ribbon.

  16. Tunneling spectroscopy of a magnetic adatoms on topological insulator surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiorny, M.; Bjerngaard, M.; Paaske, J.

    In this communication, we address the question of how the presence of a magnetic impurity on a topological insulator (TI) surface manifests in the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) when such a system is probed by a STM. For this purpose, we consider a single magnetic adatom with arbitrary spin, whose dynamics is governed by the local magnetic anisotropy. The spin is exchange-coupled to two-dimensional helical surface electrons, corresponding to the surface of a three-dimensional TI like Bi2Se3, with its characteristic hexagonally warped Dirac cone band structure. Employing an effective exchange-tunneling model, we calculate the non-linear differential conductance from a spin-polarized STM tip to the helical substrate, valid in the perturbative regime of weak exchange-tunneling and including the nonequilibrium pumping of the adatom spin states. The interplay between the magnetic anisotropy and the spin-momentum locked surface electrons is shown to give a number of specific imprints in the IETS, which could be investigated by spin-resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy. M. Misiorny, M. Bjerngaard and J. Paaske, manuscript in preparation Work supported by the Polish Ministry of Science and Education as `Iuventus Plus' project (IP2014 030973) in years 2015-2016.

  17. Indirect control of antiferromagnetic domain walls with spin current.

    PubMed

    Wieser, R; Vedmedenko, E Y; Wiesendanger, R

    2011-02-11

    The indirect controlled displacement of an antiferromagnetic domain wall by a spin current is studied by Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert spin dynamics. The antiferromagnetic domain wall can be shifted both by a spin-polarized tunnel current of a scanning tunneling microscope or by a current driven ferromagnetic domain wall in an exchange coupled antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic layer system. The indirect control of antiferromagnetic domain walls opens up a new and promising direction for future spin device applications based on antiferromagnetic materials. PMID:21405493

  18. 4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific Standard Double-Track Tunnel, ca. 1913. Compare to photos in documentation sets for Tunnel 18 (HAER No. CA-197), Tunnel 34 (HAER No. CA-206), and Tunnel 1 (HAER No. CA-207). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  19. Coulomb blockade of spin-dependent shuttling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee Chul; Kadigrobov, Anatoli M.; Shekhter, Robert I.; Jonson, M.

    2013-12-01

    We show that nanomechanical shuttling of single electrons may enable qualitatively new functionality if spin-polarized electrons are injected into a nanoelectromechanical single-electron tunneling (NEM-SET) device. This is due to the combined effects of spin-dependent electron tunneling and Coulomb blockade of tunneling, which are phenomena that occur in certain magnetic NEM-SET devices. Two effects are predicted to occur in such structures. The first is a reentrant shuttle instability, by which we mean the sequential appearance, disappearance and again the appearance of a shuttle instability as the driving voltage is increased (or the mechanical dissipation is diminished). The second effect is an enhanced spin polarization of the nanomechanically assisted current flow.

  20. Experimental Investigations of Flow past Spinning Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlucci, Pasquale; Buckley, Liam; Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Thangam, Siva

    2015-11-01

    Experimental investigations of flow past spinning cylinders is presented in the context of their application and relevance to flow past projectiles. A subsonic wind tunnel is used to perform experiments on flow past spinning cylinders that are sting-mounted and oriented such that their axis of rotation is aligned with the mean flow. The experiments cover a Reynolds number range of up to 300000 and rotation numbers of up to 2 (based on cylinder diameter). The experimental validation of the tunnel characteristics and the benchmarking of the flow field in the tunnel are described. The experimental results for spinning cylinders with both rear-mounted and fore-mounted stings are presented along with available computational and experimental findings. This work was funded in part by U. S. Army ARDEC.

  1. Geometrical spin symmetry and spin

    SciTech Connect

    Pestov, I. B.

    2011-07-15

    Unification of General Theory of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics leads to General Quantum Mechanics which includes into itself spindynamics as a theory of spin phenomena. The key concepts of spindynamics are geometrical spin symmetry and the spin field (space of defining representation of spin symmetry). The essence of spin is the bipolar structure of geometrical spin symmetry induced by the gravitational potential. The bipolar structure provides a natural derivation of the equations of spindynamics. Spindynamics involves all phenomena connected with spin and provides new understanding of the strong interaction.

  2. Enhanced Atomic-Scale Spin Contrast due to Spin Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouazi, S.; Kubetzka, A.; von Bergmann, K.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2014-02-01

    Atom manipulation with the magnetic tip of a scanning tunneling microscope is a versatile technique to construct and investigate well-defined atomic spin arrangements. Here we explore the possibility of using a magnetic adatom as a local probe to image surface spin textures. As a model system we choose a Néel state with 120° between neighboring magnetic moments. Close to the threshold of manipulation, the adatom resides in the threefold, magnetically frustrated hollow sites, and consequently no magnetic signal is detected in manipulation images. At smaller tip-adatom distances, however, the adatom is moved towards the magnetically active bridge sites and due to the exchange force of the tip the manipulation process becomes spin dependent. In this way the adatom can be used as an amplifying probe for the surface spin texture.

  3. Pumped Spin-Current in Single Quantum Dot with Spin-Dependent Electron Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Song; Du, Xiaohong

    2016-05-01

    Spin-dependent electron temperature effect on the spin pump in a single quantum dot connected to Normal and/or Ferromagnetic leads are investigated with the help of master equation method. Results show that spin heat accumulation breaks the tunneling rates balance at the thermal equilibrium state thus the charge current and the spin current are affected to some extent. Pure spin current can be obtained by adjusting pumping intensity or chemical potential of the lead. Spin heat accumulation of certain material can be detected by measuring the charge current strength in symmetric leads architectures. In practical devices, spin-dependent electron temperature effect is quite significant and our results should be useful in quantum information processing and spin Caloritronics.

  4. Pumped Spin-Current in Single Quantum Dot with Spin-Dependent Electron Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Song; Du, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    Spin-dependent electron temperature effect on the spin pump in a single quantum dot connected to Normal and/or Ferromagnetic leads are investigated with the help of master equation method. Results show that spin heat accumulation breaks the tunneling rates balance at the thermal equilibrium state thus the charge current and the spin current are affected to some extent. Pure spin current can be obtained by adjusting pumping intensity or chemical potential of the lead. Spin heat accumulation of certain material can be detected by measuring the charge current strength in symmetric leads architectures. In practical devices, spin-dependent electron temperature effect is quite significant and our results should be useful in quantum information processing and spin Caloritronics.

  5. Major SSC tunneling begins

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-11

    In Texas, work has been completed on the first on the Superconducting Supercollider's major shafts. Now a boring machine has started driving the fifty-four mile elliptical accelerator tunnel. To date, contracts let for the tunnel have come in far below preliminary estimates. Five of the main fourteen foot diameter tunnel contracts have been awarded for a total of 107.4 million dollars, about forty million dollars below estimates. These contracts represent %60 percent of the total tunneling project.

  6. The Tunnels of Samos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostol, Tom M. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This 'Project Mathematics' series video from CalTech presents the tunnel of Samos, a famous underground aquaduct tunnel located near the capital of Pithagorion (named after the famed Greek mathematician, Pythagoras, who lived there), on one of the Greek islands. This tunnel was constructed around 600 BC by King Samos and was built under a nearby mountain. Through film footage and computer animation, the mathematical principles and concepts of why and how this aquaduct tunnel was built are explained.

  7. Variable Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Variable Density Tunnel in operation. Man at far right is probably Harold J. 'Cannonball' Tuner, longtime safety officer, who started with Curtiss in the teens. This view of the Variable Density Tunnel clearly shows the layout of the Tunnel's surroundings, as well as the plumbing and power needs of the this innovative research tool.

  8. Squeezable electron tunneling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreland, J.; Alexander, S.; Cox, M.; Sonnenfeld, R.; Hansma, P. K.

    1983-09-01

    We report a versatile new technique for constructing electron tunneling junctions with mechanically-adjusted artificial barriers. I-V curves are presented for tunneling between Ag electrodes with vacuum, gas, liquid or solid in the barrier. An energy gap is apparent in the measured I-V curve when tunneling occurs between superconducting Pb electrodes.

  9. Spin-orbit effects in a triple quantum dot shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villavicencio, J.; Maldonado, I.; Cota, E.; Platero, G.

    2013-12-01

    Spin transport properties of a triple quantum dot shuttle system are analyzed in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. We calculate the spin current through the device as a function of the bias voltage detuning. We find that new resonances in the current through the shuttle appear due to the presence of spin-orbit interaction, and the states involved in the conduction process are identified. Also, spin current polarization is analyzed as a function of tunnel coupling and detuning, and conditions are found where the device can act as a spin filter.

  10. Inelastic tunneling spectroscopy study on organic semiconductor tunnel barriers with magnetic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, K. V.; Shim, J. H.; Moodera, J. S.

    2008-03-01

    Spin injection and transport through organic semiconductor (OS) is recently being researched extensively. Exploring the interfacial structural and chemical modifications in FM/OS/FM tunnel junctions can lead to a better understanding of spin injection and transport in OS. Inelastic tunneling spectroscopy (IETS), a high sensitivity technique, measures the vibrational and excitational modes of the molecules within a tunnel barrier, which are greatly influenced by any distortions in the molecules. These measurements are performed on thin films of OS, rubrene and pentacene, using Co/seed/OS/Py and Al/seed/OS/Al junctions, all grown in-situ, for two different seed layers viz. Al2O3 and LiF. The IETS spectra matches well with the reported Raman and IR spectroscopy measurements performed for powder and bulk single crystal samples. In addition, the IETS spectra show weak signatures of the molecular distortions through modifications to certain phonon peaks. Due to the amorphous nature of the films certain electronic states are also observed at higher bias voltages. The effect of vibrational modes on the spin conserved tunneling and the effect of different electrodes on the IETS spectra will also be presented and discussed.

  11. Effects of Pt capping layer on perpendicular magnet anisotropy in pseudo-spin valves of Ta/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB/Pt magnetic-tunneling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Du-Yeong; Shim, Tae-Hun; Park, Jea-Gun

    2013-05-01

    We investigated how the Pt capping layer affected perpendicular magnet anisotropy in magnetic-tunnel-junctions fabricated with a Ta electrode, a lower CoFeB layer, an MgO barrier, an upper CoFeB layer, and a Pt capping electrode, which was estimated by using an anisotropy constant multiplied by the upper CoFeB layer thickness (Ku * t). The maximum Ku * t was found at an annealing temperature of 300 °C for an magnetic tunnel junction with an upper CoFeB layer thickness of 0.9 nm, indicating a highly textured MgO (100) barrier of 1.0 nm with none of the remaining Pt inter-diffused in the upper CoFeB layer.

  12. Nanosized perpendicular organic spin-valves

    SciTech Connect

    Göckeritz, Robert; Homonnay, Nico; Müller, Alexander; Richter, Tim; Fuhrmann, Bodo; Schmidt, Georg

    2015-03-09

    A fabrication process for perpendicular organic spin-valve devices based on the organic semiconductor Alq3 has been developed which offers the possibility to achieve active device areas of less than 500 × 500 nm{sup 2} and is flexible in terms of material choice for the active layers. Characterization of the resulting devices shows a large magnetoresistance of sometimes more than 100%, however with equally large variation from device to device. Comparison with large area spin-valves indicates that the magnetoresistance of both large and small devices most likely originates from tunneling through pinholes and tunneling magnetoresistance.

  13. Spin Transport and Giant Electroresistance in Ferromagnetic Graphene Vertical Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee Chul; Myung, Nojoon; Lee, Seung Joo

    We investigate spin transport through ferromagnetic graphene vertical heterostructures where a sandwiched tunneling layer is either a normal or ferroelectric insulator. We show that the spin-polarization of the tunneling current is electrically controlled via gate voltages. We also demonstrate that the tunneling current of Dirac fermions can be prohibited when the spin configuration of ferromagnetic graphene sheets is opposite. Giant electroresistance can thus be developed by using the proposed heterostructure in this study. The effects of temperature on spin transport and the giant electroresistance ratio are also investigated. Our findings discover the prospect of manipulating the spin transport properties in vertical heterostructures through electric fields via gate and bias electrodes. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement No604391 Graphene Flagship, Project Code (IBS-R024-D1), and the NRF grant funded by MSIP(No. 2014-066298).

  14. Dirac particles tunneling from black holes with topological defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusufi, Kimet

    2016-08-01

    We study Hawking radiation of Dirac particles with spin-1 / 2 as a tunneling process from Schwarzschild-de Sitter and Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter black holes in background spacetimes with a spinning cosmic string and a global monopole. Solving Dirac's equation by employing the Hamilton-Jacobi method and WKB approximation we find the corresponding tunneling probabilities and the Hawking temperature. Furthermore, we show that the Hawking temperature of those black holes remains unchanged in presence of topological defects in both cases.

  15. Four-state ferroelectric spin-valve

    PubMed Central

    Quindeau, Andy; Fina, Ignasi; Marti, Xavi; Apachitei, Geanina; Ferrer, Pilar; Nicklin, Chris; Pippel, Eckhard; Hesse, Dietrich; Alexe, Marin

    2015-01-01

    Spin-valves had empowered the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) devices to have memory. The insertion of thin antiferromagnetic (AFM) films allowed two stable magnetic field-induced switchable resistance states persisting in remanence. In this letter, we show that, without the deliberate introduction of such an AFM layer, this functionality is transferred to multiferroic tunnel junctions (MFTJ) allowing us to create a four-state resistive memory device. We observed that the ferroelectric/ferromagnetic interface plays a crucial role in the stabilization of the exchange bias, which ultimately leads to four robust electro tunnel electro resistance (TER) and tunnel magneto resistance (TMR) states in the junction. PMID:25961513

  16. Efficient spin filter using multi-terminal quantum dot with spin-orbit interaction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We propose a multi-terminal spin filter using a quantum dot with spin-orbit interaction. First, we formulate the spin Hall effect (SHE) in a quantum dot connected to three leads. We show that the SHE is significantly enhanced by the resonant tunneling if the level spacing in the quantum dot is smaller than the level broadening. We stress that the SHE is tunable by changing the tunnel coupling to the third lead. Next, we perform a numerical simulation for a multi-terminal spin filter using a quantum dot fabricated on semiconductor heterostructures. The spin filter shows an efficiency of more than 50% when the conditions for the enhanced SHE are satisfied. PACS numbers: 72.25.Dc,71.70.Ej,73.63.Kv,85.75.-d PMID:21711500

  17. Tunneling Anisotropic Magnetoresistance with Half-Metallic Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, J. D.; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2015-03-01

    Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) is the difference in resistance of a magnetic tunnel junction due to a change in direction of the magnetization of one or both of the magnetic electrodes with respect to the flow of current, i.e. tunnel conductance for magnetization in the plane differs from magnetization out of the plane. The origin of the effect is spin-orbit coupling (SOC). We will present results of first-principles density functional calculations of the TAMR effect in a half-metallic material, i.e. a metal that has free carriers only in one spin channel. In particular we explore the TAMR effect in magnetic tunnel junctions with La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) electrodes and a SrTiO3 (STO) tunneling barrier. We find ~ 500% difference in resistance between magnetization in the plane and out of the plane. This large TAMR effect originates from the half-metallic nature of LSMO: when magnetization is out-of-plane SOC contributions to the transmission comes only from spin-flip scattering, which is still inherently small due to the half-metallicity. For in-plane magnetization, however, there is a large non-spin-flip SOC contribution to the conductance. The spin-flip vs. non-spin-flip dichotomy along with the orbital character of the states on the Fermi surface of LSMO leads to the large TAMR effect. This effect should be a general feature of half-metallic or highly spin-polarized magnetic electrodes and could open the door to enhanced spintronic device functionalities.

  18. Direct detection of spin chemical potential shift through spin filtering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Guoxing; Moodera, Jagadeesh

    2010-03-01

    Spin filtering (SF) effect is a unique way to generate highly spin-polarized tunnel currents from nonmagnetic electrodes. Magnetic tunnel junctions based on pure SF effect have been realized recently [1] as a clear demonstration of principle for the spin manipulation through SF effect. The next challenge is the readout of spin information. In this work, we present the direct detection of the spin chemical potential shift in an Al nano cluster sandwiched between two SF EuS tunnel barriers. The spin channels are split by depositing Al directly onto EuS, and the indirect exchange interaction between the Al conduction electrons and the localized Eu 4f electrons gives rise to an effective Zeeman splitting with the strength of a few mV. EuS on the readout side is isolated from the Al clusters with a natural Al2O3 barrier. In a vertical measurement geometry with no transport current, we directly detected the spin dependent voltage levels by aligning the detection SF barrier parallel or antiparallel to the first SF barrier, corresponding to the equilibrium up- and down-spin chemical potentials. A simple analysis treating the barriers as a set of resistors revealed that the observed voltage difference is the actual chemical potential shift modulated by the SF efficiency.[4pt] [1] G.X. Miao, M. Muller, J.S. Moodera,PRL102,076601(2009)

  19. Inversion of Spin Signal and Spin Filtering in Ferromagnet|Hexagonal Boron Nitride-Graphene van der Waals Heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Kamalakar, M. Venkata; Dankert, André; Kelly, Paul J.; Dash, Saroj P.

    2016-01-01

    Two dimensional atomically thin crystals of graphene and its insulating isomorph hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) are promising materials for spintronic applications. While graphene is an ideal medium for long distance spin transport, h-BN is an insulating tunnel barrier that has potential for efficient spin polarized tunneling from ferromagnets. Here, we demonstrate the spin filtering effect in cobalt|few layer h-BN|graphene junctions leading to a large negative spin polarization in graphene at room temperature. Through nonlocal pure spin transport and Hanle precession measurements performed on devices with different interface barrier conditions, we associate the negative spin polarization with high resistance few layer h-BN|ferromagnet contacts. Detailed bias and gate dependent measurements reinforce the robustness of the effect in our devices. These spintronic effects in two-dimensional van der Waals heterostructures hold promise for future spin based logic and memory applications. PMID:26883717

  20. Inversion of Spin Signal and Spin Filtering in Ferromagnet|Hexagonal Boron Nitride-Graphene van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Kamalakar, M Venkata; Dankert, André; Kelly, Paul J; Dash, Saroj P

    2016-01-01

    Two dimensional atomically thin crystals of graphene and its insulating isomorph hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) are promising materials for spintronic applications. While graphene is an ideal medium for long distance spin transport, h-BN is an insulating tunnel barrier that has potential for efficient spin polarized tunneling from ferromagnets. Here, we demonstrate the spin filtering effect in cobalt|few layer h-BN|graphene junctions leading to a large negative spin polarization in graphene at room temperature. Through nonlocal pure spin transport and Hanle precession measurements performed on devices with different interface barrier conditions, we associate the negative spin polarization with high resistance few layer h-BN|ferromagnet contacts. Detailed bias and gate dependent measurements reinforce the robustness of the effect in our devices. These spintronic effects in two-dimensional van der Waals heterostructures hold promise for future spin based logic and memory applications. PMID:26883717

  1. Inversion of Spin Signal and Spin Filtering in Ferromagnet|Hexagonal Boron Nitride-Graphene van der Waals Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamalakar, M. Venkata; Dankert, André; Kelly, Paul J.; Dash, Saroj P.

    2016-02-01

    Two dimensional atomically thin crystals of graphene and its insulating isomorph hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) are promising materials for spintronic applications. While graphene is an ideal medium for long distance spin transport, h-BN is an insulating tunnel barrier that has potential for efficient spin polarized tunneling from ferromagnets. Here, we demonstrate the spin filtering effect in cobalt|few layer h-BN|graphene junctions leading to a large negative spin polarization in graphene at room temperature. Through nonlocal pure spin transport and Hanle precession measurements performed on devices with different interface barrier conditions, we associate the negative spin polarization with high resistance few layer h-BN|ferromagnet contacts. Detailed bias and gate dependent measurements reinforce the robustness of the effect in our devices. These spintronic effects in two-dimensional van der Waals heterostructures hold promise for future spin based logic and memory applications.

  2. Temperature dependence of tunneling magnetoresistance in epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions using a Co2FeAl Heusler alloy electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenhong; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Inomata, Koichiro

    2010-09-01

    Spin-valve-type epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) consisting of a full-Heusler alloy Co2FeAl (CFA) and a MgO tunnel barrier were fabricated on a single-crystal MgO(001) substrate using sputtering method for all the layers. Experimental temperature-dependent tunnel magnetoresistance in the MTJs was revealed to be fitted well using spin wave excitation model for tunneling spin polarization, P(T)=P0(1-αT3/2) up to room temperature, where P0 is the spin polarization at 0 K and α is a fitting parameter. The determined P and α are shown to be significantly different between bottom and top CFA electrodes facing a MgO barrier. It is demonstrated that the bottom CFA deposited on a Cr buffer has a low α and behaves as a half-metal with P˜1 in terms of the Δ1 symmetry due to the coherent tunneling through a MgO barrier.

  3. Single to quadruple quantum dots with tunable tunnel couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Takakura, T.; Noiri, A.; Obata, T.; Yoneda, J.; Yoshida, K.; Otsuka, T.; Tarucha, S.

    2014-03-17

    We prepare a gate-defined quadruple quantum dot to study the gate-tunability of single to quadruple quantum dots with finite inter-dot tunnel couplings. The measured charging energies of various double dots suggest that the dot size is governed by the gate geometry. For the triple and quadruple dots, we study the gate-tunable inter-dot tunnel couplings. For the triple dot, we find that the effective tunnel coupling between side dots significantly depends on the alignment of the center dot potential. These results imply that the present quadruple dot has a gate performance relevant for implementing spin-based four-qubits with controllable exchange couplings.

  4. Fermion tunneling from higher-dimensional black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kai; Yang, Shu-Zheng

    2009-03-01

    Via the semiclassical approximation method, we study the 1/2-spin fermion tunneling from a higher-dimensional black hole. In our work, the Dirac equations are transformed into a simple form, and then we simplify the fermion tunneling research to the study of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation in curved space-time. Finally, we get the fermion tunneling rates and the Hawking temperatures at the event horizon of higher-dimensional black holes. We study fermion tunneling of a higher-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and a higher-dimensional spherically symmetric quintessence black hole. In fact, this method is also applicable to the study of fermion tunneling from four-dimensional or lower-dimensional black holes, and we will take the rainbow-Finsler black hole as an example in order to make the fact explicit.

  5. Fermion tunneling from higher-dimensional black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Kai; Yang Shuzheng

    2009-03-15

    Via the semiclassical approximation method, we study the 1/2-spin fermion tunneling from a higher-dimensional black hole. In our work, the Dirac equations are transformed into a simple form, and then we simplify the fermion tunneling research to the study of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation in curved space-time. Finally, we get the fermion tunneling rates and the Hawking temperatures at the event horizon of higher-dimensional black holes. We study fermion tunneling of a higher-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and a higher-dimensional spherically symmetric quintessence black hole. In fact, this method is also applicable to the study of fermion tunneling from four-dimensional or lower-dimensional black holes, and we will take the rainbow-Finsler black hole as an example in order to make the fact explicit.

  6. All Spin Digital Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behin-Aein, Behtash; Datta, Deepanjan; Salahuddin, Sayeef; Datta, Supriyo

    2009-03-01

    Switching of a magnetic free layer using spin polarized current has been demonstrated in Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) devices. Currently MTJ's are being studied for memory and microwave oscillator applications. The purpose of this talk is to explore a modified MTJ where a clock pulse via the fixed layer facilities the switching of the free layer in accordance with a weak bias provided by an input magnet in the form of a spin current. Based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation (LLG) augmented with spin torque functions, we show the switching energy and the switching time of the free layer which indicates the possibility of very low power digital logic applications. Ordinary digital circuits store information in the form of capacitor charges that communicate through electrical interconnects. The purpose of this paper is to show that modified MTJ's can be the basis for all spin digital circuits. Our primary objective is to stimulate proof of concept experiments that could usher in a whole new set of devices suitable for spintronic circuits.

  7. Tunneling and Speedup in Permutation-Invariant Quantum Optimization Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albash, Tameem

    Tunneling is often claimed to be the key mechanism underlying possible speedups in quantum optimization via the quantum adiabatic algorithm. Restricting ourselves to qubit-permutation invariant problems, we show that tunneling in these problems can be understood using the semi-classical potential derived from the spin-coherent path integral formalism. Using this, we show that the class of problems that fall under Reichardt's bound (1), i.e., have a constant gap and hence can be efficiently solved using the quantum adiabatic algorithm, do not exhibit tunneling in the large system-size limit. We proceed to construct problems that do not fall under Reichardt's bound but numerically have a constant gap and do exhibit tunneling. However, perhaps counter-intuitively, tunneling does not provide the most efficient mechanism for finding the solution to these problems. Instead, an evolution involving a sequence of diabatic transitions through many avoided level-crossings, involving no tunneling, is optimal and outperforms tunneling in the adiabatic regime. In yet another twist, we show that in this case, classical spin-vector dynamics is as efficient as the diabatic quantum evolution (2).

  8. Spin vibronics in interacting nonmagnetic molecular nanojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, S.; Brüggemann, J.; Thorwart, M.

    2015-07-01

    We show that in the presence of ferromagnetic electronic reservoirs and spin-dependent tunnel couplings, molecular vibrations in nonmagnetic single molecular transistors induce an effective intramolecular exchange magnetic field. It generates a finite spin accumulation and precession for the electrons confined on the molecular bridge and occurs under (non)equilibrium conditions. The effective exchange magnetic field is calculated here to lowest order in the tunnel coupling for a nonequilibrium transport setup. Coulomb interaction between electrons is taken into account as well as a finite electron-phonon coupling. We show that for realistic physical parameters, an effective spin-phonon coupling emerges. It is induced by quantum many-body interactions, which are either of electron-phonon or Coulomb type. We investigate the precession and accumulation of the confined spins as function of bias and gate voltages as well as their dependence on the angle enclosed by the magnetizations between the left and right reservoir.

  9. Quantum Tunneling of ^3 He in Solid ^4 He: A New Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, C.; Kim, S. S.; Candela, D.; Sullivan, N. S.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the analysis of the experimental values of the nuclear spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times for the tunneling of ^3 He as isotopic impurities in solid ^4 He. These two relaxation times cannot be described quantitatively using a unique correlation time although it is often presented as such in the literature. In this paper, we discuss how to distinguish the high-frequency portion of the spectral densities that determine the spin-lattice relaxation rates from the low-frequency components which determine the spin-spin relaxation rates.

  10. Fermions Tunneling from Bardeen-Vaidya Black Hole via General Tortoise Coordinate Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Lin; Shuzheng, Yang

    In this paper, we research on the scalar field particles and 1/2 spin fermions tunneling from the event horizon of Bardeen-Vaidya black hole by semiclassical method and general tortoise coordinate transformation, and obtain the Hawking temperature and tunneling rate near the event horizon.

  11. Generation and coherent control of pure spin currents via terahertz pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Schüler, Michael Berakdar, Jamal

    2014-04-21

    We inspect the time and spin-dependent, inelastic tunneling in engineered semiconductor-based double quantum well driven by time-structured terahertz pulses. An essential ingredient is an embedded spin-active structure with vibrational modes that scatter the pulse driven carriers. Due to the different time scales of the charge and spin dynamics, the spin-dependent electron-vibron coupling may result in pure net spin current (with negligible charge current). Heating the vibrational site may affect the resulting spin current. Furthermore, by controlling the charge dynamics, the spin dynamics and the generated spin current can be manipulated and switched on and off coherently.

  12. Turbulent Flow Past Spinning Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Carlucci, Pasquale; Thangam, Siva

    2009-11-01

    Flow past cylinders aligned along their axis where a base freely spins while attached to a non-spinning forebody is considered from a computational and experimental point of view. The time-averaged equations of motion and energy are solved using the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation with an efficient finite-volume algorithm. An anisotropic two-equation Reynolds-stress model that incorporates the effect of rotation-modified energy spectrum and swirl is used to perform computations for the flow past axially rotating cylinders. Both rigid cylinders as well as that of cylinders with free-spinning base are considered from a computational point of view. A subsonic wind tunnel with a forward-sting mounted spinning cylinder is used for experiments. Experiments are performed for a range of spin rates and free stream flow conditions. The experimental results of Carlucci & Thangam (2001) are used to benchmark flow over spinning cylinders. The data is extended to munitions spinning in the wake of other munitions. Applications involving the design of projectiles are discussed.

  13. Deflagration, fronts of tunneling, and dipolar ordering in molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanin, Dmitry

    2011-03-01

    Although there is no exchange interaction in crystals of molecular magnets characterized by a giant effective spin S (S = 10 for Mn 12 , and Fe 8) , magnetic field B (D) generated by magnetic moments g μ B S of magnetic molecules creates energy bias W (D) = 2 Sg μ BB (D) on a molecule that largely exceeds the tunnelling splitting Δ of matching quantum states on different sides of the anisotropy barrier. Thus the dipolar field has a profound influence on the processes of tunnelling and relaxation in molecular magnets. Both theoretical and experimental works showed a slow non-exponential relaxation of the magnetization in both initially ordered and completely disordered states since most of the spins are off tunneling resonance at any time. Recently a new mode of relaxation via tunneling has been found, the so-called fronts of tunneling, in which (within a 1 d theoretical model) dipolar field adjusts so that spins are on resonance within the broad front core. In this ``laminar'' regime fronts of tunnelling are moving fast at speeds that can exceed that of the temperature-driven magnetic deflagration, if a sufficiently strong transverse field is applied. However, a ``non-laminar'' regime has also been found in which instability causes spins to go off resonance and the front speed drops. In a combination with magnetic deflagration, the laminar regime becomes more stable and exists in the whole dipolar window 0 <= W <=W (D) on the external bias W , where the deflagration speed strongly increases. Another dipolar effect in molecular magnets is dipolar ordering below 1 K that has recently been shown to be non-uniform because of formation of magnetic domains. An object of current research is possible non-uniformity of magnetic deflagration and tunneling fronts via domain instability that could influence their speed.

  14. Probing spin flip scattering in ballistic nanosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Z. M.; Feng, J. F.; Wang, Y.; Han, Prof. X. F.; Zhan, W. S.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Because spin-flip scattering length is longer than the electron mean-free-path in a metal, past studies of spin-flip scattering are limited to the diffusive regime. Spin accumulation in the nanometer sized spacer layer of a magnetic double barrier tunnel junction allows the study of spin flip scattering near ballistic limit. We extract the spin-flip conductance $G_s$ of the spacer layer from magnetoresistance measurements. A linear temperature dependence of $G_s$ is found. The bias voltage dependence shows a quantum well resonance which explains the sharp reduction of the magnetoresistance. At 4.2K $G_s$ yields the mean-free-path (70nm) and the spin-flip length ($1.0$-$2.6\\mu$m).

  15. Clocked single-spin source based on a spin-split superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, Niklas; Splettstoesser, Janine; Giazotto, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    We propose an accurate clocked single-spin source for ac-spintronic applications. Our device consists of a superconducting island covered by a ferromagnetic insulator (FI) layer through which it is coupled to superconducting leads. Single-particle transfer relies on the energy gaps and the island's charging energy, and is enabled by a bias and a time-periodic gate voltage. Accurate spin transfer is achieved by the FI layer which polarizes the island, provides spin-selective tunneling barriers and improves the precision by suppressing Andreev reflection. We analyze realistic material combinations and experimental requirements which allow for a clocked spin current in the MHz regime.

  16. Large-scale fabrication of BN tunnel barriers for graphene spintronics

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Wangyang; Makk, Péter; Maurand, Romain; Bräuninger, Matthias; Schönenberger, Christian

    2014-08-21

    We have fabricated graphene spin-valve devices utilizing scalable materials made from chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Both the spin-transporting graphene and the tunnel barrier material are CVD-grown. The tunnel barrier is realized by Hexagonal boron nitride, used either as a monolayer or bilayer and placed over the graphene. Spin transport experiments were performed using ferromagnetic contacts deposited onto the barrier. We find that spin injection is still greatly suppressed in devices with a monolayer tunneling barrier due to resistance mismatch. This is, however, not the case for devices with bilayer barriers. For those devices, a spin relaxation time of ∼260 ps intrinsic to the CVD graphene material is deduced. This time scale is comparable to those reported for exfoliated graphene, suggesting that this CVD approach is promising for spintronic applications which require scalable materials.

  17. Unimpeded tunneling in graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslyak, O.; Iurov, A.; Gumbs, Godfrey; Huang, Danhong

    2010-04-01

    We studied the Klein paradox in zigzag (ZNR) and anti-zigzag (AZNR) graphene nanoribbons. Due to the fact that ZNR (the number of lattice sites across the nanoribbon = N is even) and AZNR (N is odd) configurations are indistinguishable when treated by the Dirac equation, we supplemented the model with a pseudo-parity operator whose eigenvalues correctly depend on the sublattice wavefunctions for the number of carbon atoms across the ribbon, in agreement with the tight-binding model. We have shown that the Klein tunneling in zigzag nanoribbons is related to conservation of the pseudo-parity rather than pseudo-spin as in infinite graphene. The perfect transmission in the case of head-on incidence is replaced by perfect transmission at the center of the ribbon and the chirality is interpreted as the projection of the pseudo-parity on momentum at different corners of the Brillouin zone.

  18. The cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Based on theoretical studies and experience with a low speed cryogenic tunnel and with a 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, the cryogenic wind tunnel concept was shown to offer many advantages with respect to the attainment of full scale Reynolds number at reasonable levels of dynamic pressure in a ground based facility. The unique modes of operation available in a pressurized cryogenic tunnel make possible for the first time the separation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and aeroelastic effects. By reducing the drive-power requirements to a level where a conventional fan drive system may be used, the cryogenic concept makes possible a tunnel with high productivity and run times sufficiently long to allow for all types of tests at reduced capital costs and, for equal amounts of testing, reduced total energy consumption in comparison with other tunnel concepts.

  19. Simulator of Road Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danišovič, Peter; Schlosser, František; Šrámek, Juraj; Rázga, Martin

    2015-05-01

    A Tunnel Traffic & Operation Simulator is a device of the Centre of Transport Research at the University of Žilina. The Simulator allows managing technological equipment of virtual two-tube highway tunnel, which is interconnected with simulation of vehicle traffic in tunnel. Changes of the traffic-operation states and other equipment are reflecting at the simulated traffic, as well as simulations of various emergency events in traffic initiate changes in tunnel detecting and measuring devices. It is thus possible to simulate emergency states, which can be affected by various faults of technology as well as by climatic conditions. The solutions can be found in irreplaceable experiences of Slovak road tunnel operators, changes of trafficoperation states, visualizations of operator technological display screens, technological devices labelling in order to increase operational safety of road tunnels.

  20. Kondo effect in magnetic tunnel junctions with an AlOx tunnel barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chao; Shull, Robert D.; Chen, P. J.; Pong, Philip W. T.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of the magnetization configuration on the Kondo effect in a magnetic tunnel junction is investigated. In the parallel configuration, an additional resistance contribution (R*) below 40 K exhibits a logarithmic temperature dependence, indicating the presence of the Kondo effect. However, in the anti-parallel configuration, the Kondo-effect-associated spin-flip scattering has a nontrivial contribution to the tunneling current, which compensates the reduction of the current directly caused by Kondo scattering, making R* disappear. These results indicate that suppression and restoration of the Kondo effect can be experimentally achieved by altering the magnetization configuration, enhancing our understanding of the role of the Kondo effect in spin-dependent transport.