Science.gov

Sample records for 20-foot vertical spin

  1. 20-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1947-01-01

    Construction of a typical model used in the 20-Foot Spin Tunnel. >From 'Characteristics of Nine Research Wind Tunnels of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory': 'Dynamic models are used for free-spinning tunnel tests. A dynamic model is one for which geometric similarity between model and airplane is extended to obtain geometric similarity of the paths of motion of corresponding points by maintaining constant, in addition to the scale ratio of linear dimensions, three other ratios, that of force, mass, and time. In model testing, however, complete similarity can generally not be duplicated and some compromise is necessary. For free-spinning-model tests in the NACA 20-foot tunnel, the ratio of inertia to frictional or viscous forces (Reynolds number) is not maintained constant, but the ratio of inertia to gravity forces (Froude number) is maintained constant.' 'Models used in the spin tunnel until recently [this report was written in 1957] were made primarily of balsa and reinforced with hardwood. Now, plastic models are being used almost entirely, because they are more durable and when properly constructed are no heavier than balsa models. The models are constructed accurately to scale by pressing plastic material and class cloth into a previously constructed mold. A typical mod is shown in [this picture]. The model is swung as a torsional pendulum and is ballasted to obtain dynamic similarity by placing lead weights in suitable locations within the model wings and fuselage. Corrections are made for the effect of ambient and entrapped air.'

  2. Recent experiences with implementing a video based six degree of freedom measurement system for airplane models in a 20 foot diameter vertical spin tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, Walter L.; Childers, Brooks A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Fremaux, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    A model space positioning system (MSPS), a state-of-the-art, real-time tracking system to provide the test engineer with on line model pitch and spin rate information, is described. It is noted that the six-degree-of-freedom post processor program will require additional programming effort both in the automated tracking mode for high spin rates and in accuracy to meet the measurement objectives. An independent multicamera system intended to augment the MSPS is studied using laboratory calibration methods based on photogrammetry to characterize the losses in various recording options. Data acquired to Super VHS tape encoded with Vertical Interval Time Code and transcribed to video disk are considered to be a reasonable priced choice for post editing and processing video data.

  3. Compilation of Test Data on 111 Free-Spinning Airplane Models Tested in the Langley 15-Foot and 20-Foot Free-Spinning Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malvestuto, Frank S.; Gale, Lawrence J.; Wood, John H.

    1947-01-01

    A compilation of free-spinning-airplane model data on the spin and recovery characteristics of 111 airplanes is presented. These data were previously published in separate memorandum reports and were obtained from free-spinning tests in the Langley 15-foot and the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnels. The model test data presented include the steady-spin and recovery characteristics of each model for various combinations of aileron and elevator deflections and for various loadings and dimensional configurations. Dimensional data, mass data, and a three-view drawing of the corresponding free-spinning tunnel model are also presented for each airplane. The data presented should be of value to designers and should facilitate the design of airplanes incorporating satisfactory spin-recovery characteristics.

  4. Free-Spinning and Recovery Characteristics of a 1/18-Scale Model of the Ryan X-13 Airplane as Determined from Tests in the Langley 20-Foot Free-Spinning Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.

    1955-01-01

    An investigation is being conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/18 scale model of the Ryan X-13 airplane to determine its spin and recovery characteristics. The spin and recovery characteristics determined to date are presented in this report.

  5. Emergency Spin-Recovery Device for the 1/18-Scale Model of the Ryan X-13 Airplane as Determined from Tests in the Langley 20-Foot Free-Spinning Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.

    1955-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/18-scale model of the Ryan X-13 airplane to determine the size parachute required for emergency-spin recovery during demonstration spins. Test results for erect spins indicate that a stable 12.73-foot-diameter parachute with a drag coefficient of 1.11 (based on the 12.73-foot projected diameter) is the minimum size required to insure satisfactory recovery in an emergency. The use of a stable parachute is recommended. Test results for inverted spins indicate that the l2.75-foot-diameter parachute is also satisfactory to terminate inverted spins.

  6. Free-Spinning, Longitudinal-Trim, and Tumbling Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultke MX-813 (Prototype of XP-92) Airplane as Determined in the Langley 20-Foot Free-Spinning Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Ralph W., Jr.; White, Richard P.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to evaluate the spin, longitudinal-trim, and tumbling characteristics of a 1/20-scale model of the Consolidated Vultee MX-813 airplane. The effects of control position were determined for the model ballasted to represent the airplane in its design gross weight loading. The model, in general, would not spin but demonstrated a tendency to trim at very high stalled angles of attack. Static tests substantiated the dynamic tests as regards the trim characteristics. Movement of the elevator, however, from up to slightly down was effective in pitching the model from stalled to normal trim attitudes. The model would not tumble.

  7. 20-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1941-01-01

    The large structure on the left of the photograph is the Free-Spinning Wind Tunnel in which dynamic scale models of modern airplanes are tested to determine their spinning characteristics and ability to recover from spins from movement of the control surfaces. From the information obtained in this manner, the spin recovery characteristics of the full-scale airplane may be predicted. The large sphere on the right is 60 feet in diameter and houses the NACA 12-Foot Free-Flight Wind Tunnel in which dynamic scale models of airplanes are flown in actual controlled flight to provide information from which the stability characteristics of the full-scale airplane may be predicted.

  8. Supplementary Investigation in the Langley 20-Foot Free-Spinning Tunnel of the Spin and Recovery Characteristics of a 0.057-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XFU-1 Airplane, Ted No. NACA DE 311

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Theodore

    1948-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the effects of decreasing the rudder deflection, of decreasing the rudder span, and of differential rudder movements on the spin and recovery characteristics of a 0.057-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane. The results indicated that decreasing the rudder span or the rudder deflections, individually or jointly, did not seriously alter the spin or recovery characteristics of the model; and recovery by normal use of controls (full rapid rudder reversal followed l/2 to 1 turn later by movement of the stick forward of neutral) remained satisfactory. Linking the original rudders so that the inboard rudder moves from full with the spin to neutral while the outboard rudder moves from neutral to full against the spin will also result in satisfactory spin and recovery characteristics. Calculations of rudder-pedal forces for recovery showed that the expected forces would probably be within the capabilities of a pilot but that it would be advisable to install some type of boost in the control system to insure easy and rapid movement of the rudders.

  9. Spin-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/28-Scale Model of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) with and without Vertical Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, C. Michael

    1997-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel to determine the developed spin and spin-recovery characteristics of a 1/28-scale, free-spinning model of the NASA F-18 HARV (High Alpha Research Vehicle) airplane that can configured with and without the vertical tails installed. The purpose of the test was to determine what effects, if any, the absence of vertical tails (and rudders) had on the spin and spin-recovery capabilities of the HARV. The model was ballasted to dynamically represent the full-scale airplane at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Erect and inverted spin tests with symmetric mass loadings were conducted with the free-spinning model. The model results indicate that the basic airplane with vertical tails installed (with unaugmented control system) will exhibit fast, flat erect and inverted spins from which acceptable recoveries can be made. Removing the vertical tails had little effect on the erect spin mode, but did degrade recoveries from erect spins. In contrast, inverted spins without the vertical tails were significantly more severe than those with the tails installed.

  10. Mechanical design of a rotary balance system for NASA. Langley Research Center's vertical spin tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, J. W.; Fleck, V. J.

    1992-01-01

    A new lightweight Rotary Balance System is presently being fabricated and installed as part of a major upgrade to the existing 20 Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel. This upgrade to improve model testing productivity of the only free spinning vertical wind tunnel includes a modern fan/drive and tunnel control system, an updated video recording system, and the new rotary balance system. The rotary balance is a mechanical apparatus which enables the measurement of aerodynamic force and moment data under spinning conditions (100 rpm). This data is used in spin analysis and is vital to the implementation of large amplitude maneuvering simulations required for all new high performance aircraft. The new rotary balance system described in this report will permit greater test efficiency and improved data accuracy. Rotary Balance testing with the model enclosed in a tare bag can also be performed to obtain resulting model forces from the spinning operation. The rotary balance system will be stored against the tunnel sidewall during free flight model testing.

  11. Diffusion weighted vertical gradient and spin echo.

    PubMed

    Engström, Mathias; Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    In this work, diffusion weighting and parallel imaging is combined with a vertical gradient and spin echo data readout. This sequence was implemented and evaluated on healthy volunteers using a 1.5 and a 3 T whole-body MR system. As the vertical gradient and spin echo trajectory enables a higher k-space velocity in the phase-encoding direction than single-shot echo planar imaging, the geometrical distortions are reduced. When combined with parallel imaging such as generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition, the geometric distortions are reduced even further, while also keeping the minimum echo time reasonably low. However, this combination of a diffusion preparation and multiple refocusing pulses during the vertical gradient and spin echo readout, generally violates the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill condition, which leads to interferences between echo pathways. To suppress the stimulated echo pathway, refocusing pulses with a sharper slice profiles and an odd/even crusher variation scheme were implemented and evaluated. Being a single-shot acquisition technique, the reconstructed images are robust to rigid-body head motion and spatially varying brain motion, both of which are common sources of artifacts in diffusion MRI. PMID:23008151

  12. Spin Transport and Giant Electroresistance in Ferromagnetic Graphene Vertical Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee Chul; Myung, Nojoon; Lee, Seung Joo

    We investigate spin transport through ferromagnetic graphene vertical heterostructures where a sandwiched tunneling layer is either a normal or ferroelectric insulator. We show that the spin-polarization of the tunneling current is electrically controlled via gate voltages. We also demonstrate that the tunneling current of Dirac fermions can be prohibited when the spin configuration of ferromagnetic graphene sheets is opposite. Giant electroresistance can thus be developed by using the proposed heterostructure in this study. The effects of temperature on spin transport and the giant electroresistance ratio are also investigated. Our findings discover the prospect of manipulating the spin transport properties in vertical heterostructures through electric fields via gate and bias electrodes. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement No604391 Graphene Flagship, Project Code (IBS-R024-D1), and the NRF grant funded by MSIP(No. 2014-066298).

  13. Spin-Dependent Transport in Fe/GaAs(100)/Fe Vertical Spin-Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, P. K. Johnny; Zhang, Wen; Wu, Jing; Will, Iain G.; Xu, Yongbing; Xia, Ke; Holmes, Stuart N.; Farrer, Ian; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, Dave A.

    2016-07-01

    The integration of magnetic materials with semiconductors will lead to the development of the next spintronics devices such as spin field effect transistor (SFET), which is capable of both data storage and processing. While the fabrication and transport studies of lateral SFET have attracted greatly attentions, there are only few studies of vertical devices, which may offer the opportunity for the future three-dimensional integration. Here, we provide evidence of two-terminal electrical spin injection and detection in Fe/GaAs/Fe vertical spin-valves (SVs) with the GaAs layer of 50 nanometers thick and top and bottom Fe electrodes deposited by molecular beam epitaxy. The spin-valve effect, which corresponds to the individual switching of the top and bottom Fe layers, is bias dependent and observed up to 20 K. We propose that the strongly bias- and temperature-dependent MR is associated with spin transport at the interfacial Fe/GaAs Schottky contacts and in the GaAs membranes, where balance between the barrier profiles as well as the dwell time to spin lifetime ratio are crucial factors for determining the device operations. The demonstration of the fabrication and spin injection in the vertical SV with a semiconductor interlayer is expected to open a new avenue in exploring the SFET.

  14. Spin-Dependent Transport in Fe/GaAs(100)/Fe Vertical Spin-Valves

    PubMed Central

    Wong, P. K. Johnny; Zhang, Wen; Wu, Jing; Will, Iain G.; Xu, Yongbing; Xia, Ke; Holmes, Stuart N.; Farrer, Ian; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, Dave A.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of magnetic materials with semiconductors will lead to the development of the next spintronics devices such as spin field effect transistor (SFET), which is capable of both data storage and processing. While the fabrication and transport studies of lateral SFET have attracted greatly attentions, there are only few studies of vertical devices, which may offer the opportunity for the future three-dimensional integration. Here, we provide evidence of two-terminal electrical spin injection and detection in Fe/GaAs/Fe vertical spin-valves (SVs) with the GaAs layer of 50 nanometers thick and top and bottom Fe electrodes deposited by molecular beam epitaxy. The spin-valve effect, which corresponds to the individual switching of the top and bottom Fe layers, is bias dependent and observed up to 20 K. We propose that the strongly bias- and temperature-dependent MR is associated with spin transport at the interfacial Fe/GaAs Schottky contacts and in the GaAs membranes, where balance between the barrier profiles as well as the dwell time to spin lifetime ratio are crucial factors for determining the device operations. The demonstration of the fabrication and spin injection in the vertical SV with a semiconductor interlayer is expected to open a new avenue in exploring the SFET. PMID:27432047

  15. Spin-Dependent Transport in Fe/GaAs(100)/Fe Vertical Spin-Valves.

    PubMed

    Wong, P K Johnny; Zhang, Wen; Wu, Jing; Will, Iain G; Xu, Yongbing; Xia, Ke; Holmes, Stuart N; Farrer, Ian; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, Dave A

    2016-01-01

    The integration of magnetic materials with semiconductors will lead to the development of the next spintronics devices such as spin field effect transistor (SFET), which is capable of both data storage and processing. While the fabrication and transport studies of lateral SFET have attracted greatly attentions, there are only few studies of vertical devices, which may offer the opportunity for the future three-dimensional integration. Here, we provide evidence of two-terminal electrical spin injection and detection in Fe/GaAs/Fe vertical spin-valves (SVs) with the GaAs layer of 50 nanometers thick and top and bottom Fe electrodes deposited by molecular beam epitaxy. The spin-valve effect, which corresponds to the individual switching of the top and bottom Fe layers, is bias dependent and observed up to 20 K. We propose that the strongly bias- and temperature-dependent MR is associated with spin transport at the interfacial Fe/GaAs Schottky contacts and in the GaAs membranes, where balance between the barrier profiles as well as the dwell time to spin lifetime ratio are crucial factors for determining the device operations. The demonstration of the fabrication and spin injection in the vertical SV with a semiconductor interlayer is expected to open a new avenue in exploring the SFET. PMID:27432047

  16. Vertical Spin Current Injection induced Domain Wall Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sanchar; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran; Tulapurkar, Ashwin

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel oscillator based on domain wall motion using vertical spin current injection and an external magnetic field above the Walker breakdown. We numerically simulate 1D Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation to extract the oscillation parameters such as the amplitude, the frequency and the Q-factor, as a function of the inputs. We also provide a theoretical analysis using rigid domain walls and find an approximate waveform for the oscillations. We find that the oscillation frequency is twice the resonant frequency of a magnet in an applied magnetic field; while the amplitude is approximately a linear function of the ratio of the demagnetization field and the applied magnetic field. Both of them are independent of input current and other material parameters to a very good degree of accuracy; and hence can be of great technological advantage for accurate oscillatory waveforms.

  17. Hot electron injection, vertical transport, and electrical spin detection in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian; Huang, Biqin; Altfeder, Igor; Monsma, Douwe

    2007-03-01

    In our devices, spin-dependent hot electron transport through metallic ferromagnetic thin films is used to polarize a charge current injected into the conduction band of Si, and then to analyze the remaining polarization after vertical drift. Our measurements of a clear spin-valve signature indicate substantial electron spin polarization after transport through several microns of Si.

  18. Gate-Tunable Spin Transport and Giant Electroresistance in Ferromagnetic Graphene Vertical Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Myoung, Nojoon; Park, Hee Chul; Lee, Seung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Controlling tunneling properties through graphene vertical heterostructures provides advantages in achieving large conductance modulation which has been known as limitation in lateral graphene device structures. Despite of intensive research on graphene vertical heterosturctures for recent years, the potential of spintronics based on graphene vertical heterostructures remains relatively unexplored. Here, we present an analytical device model for graphene-based spintronics by using ferromagnetic graphene in vertical heterostructures. We consider a normal or ferroelectric insulator as a tunneling layer. The device concept yields a way of controlling spin transport through the vertical heterostructures, resulting in gate-tunable spin-switching phenomena. Also, we revealed that a 'giant' resistance emerges through a ferroelectric insulating layer owing to the anti-parallel configuration of ferromagnetic graphene layers by means of electric fields via gate and bias voltages. Our findings discover the prospect of manipulating the spin transport properties in vertical heterostructures without use of magnetic fields. PMID:27126101

  19. Gate-Tunable Spin Transport and Giant Electroresistance in Ferromagnetic Graphene Vertical Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myoung, Nojoon; Park, Hee Chul; Lee, Seung Joo

    2016-04-01

    Controlling tunneling properties through graphene vertical heterostructures provides advantages in achieving large conductance modulation which has been known as limitation in lateral graphene device structures. Despite of intensive research on graphene vertical heterosturctures for recent years, the potential of spintronics based on graphene vertical heterostructures remains relatively unexplored. Here, we present an analytical device model for graphene-based spintronics by using ferromagnetic graphene in vertical heterostructures. We consider a normal or ferroelectric insulator as a tunneling layer. The device concept yields a way of controlling spin transport through the vertical heterostructures, resulting in gate-tunable spin-switching phenomena. Also, we revealed that a ‘giant’ resistance emerges through a ferroelectric insulating layer owing to the anti-parallel configuration of ferromagnetic graphene layers by means of electric fields via gate and bias voltages. Our findings discover the prospect of manipulating the spin transport properties in vertical heterostructures without use of magnetic fields.

  20. Gate-Tunable Spin Transport and Giant Electroresistance in Ferromagnetic Graphene Vertical Heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Myoung, Nojoon; Park, Hee Chul; Lee, Seung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Controlling tunneling properties through graphene vertical heterostructures provides advantages in achieving large conductance modulation which has been known as limitation in lateral graphene device structures. Despite of intensive research on graphene vertical heterosturctures for recent years, the potential of spintronics based on graphene vertical heterostructures remains relatively unexplored. Here, we present an analytical device model for graphene-based spintronics by using ferromagnetic graphene in vertical heterostructures. We consider a normal or ferroelectric insulator as a tunneling layer. The device concept yields a way of controlling spin transport through the vertical heterostructures, resulting in gate-tunable spin-switching phenomena. Also, we revealed that a ‘giant’ resistance emerges through a ferroelectric insulating layer owing to the anti-parallel configuration of ferromagnetic graphene layers by means of electric fields via gate and bias voltages. Our findings discover the prospect of manipulating the spin transport properties in vertical heterostructures without use of magnetic fields. PMID:27126101

  1. Geology of the "20-foot" clay and Gardiners clay in southern Nassau and southwestern Suffolk counties, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doriski, T.P.; Wilde-Katz, Franceska

    1983-01-01

    Data from 1978-79 drilling was compiled with information from previous reports and historical records to prepare surface contour and isopach maps of the ' 20-foot ' clay and Gardiners Clay in southern Nassau and southwestern Suffolk Counties. These units are major confining layers in the upper part of the groundwater reservoir along Long Island 's south shore. Where present, they influence the groundwater flow patterns locally. The ' 20-foot ' clay, previously mapped in Nassau County only, was found in test borings in Suffolk County also. Its surface altitude ranges from 20 to 40 ft below NGVD (National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929); thickness ranges from 0 to 30 ft. The surface altitude of the Gardiners Clay ranges from 40 to 120 ft below NGVD; thickness ranges from 0 to 90 ft. Previously known discontinuities in both formations are more accurately delineated, and several new discontinuities have been inferred from the new data. The Matawan Group-Magothy Formation undifferentiated the Monmouth Group, and the Jameco Gravel directly underlie the Gardiners Clay. Revised surface altitudes of these formations are depicted on maps and cross sections of the south-shore area. (Author 's abstract)

  2. Unhappy vertices in artificial spin ice: new degeneracies from vertex frustration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Muir J.; Nelson, Tammie R.; Nisoli, Cristiano

    2013-04-01

    In 1935, Pauling estimated the residual entropy of water ice with remarkable accuracy by considering the degeneracy of the ice rule solely at the vertex level. Indeed, his estimate works well for both the three-dimensional pyrochlore lattice and the two-dimensional six-vertex model, solved by Lieb in 1967. A similar estimate can be done for the honeycomb artificial spin. Indeed, its pseudo-ice rule, like the ice rule in Pauling and Lieb's systems, simply extends to the global ground state a degeneracy which is already present in the vertices. Unfortunately, the anisotropy of the magnetic interaction limits the design of inherently degenerate vertices in artificial spin ice, and the honeycomb is the only degenerate array produced so far. In this paper we show how to engineer artificial spin ice in a virtually infinite variety of degenerate geometries built out of non-degenerate vertices. In this new class of vertex models, the residual entropy follows not from a freedom of choice at the vertex level, but from the nontrivial relative arrangement of the vertices themselves. In such arrays not all of the vertices can be chosen in their lowest energy configuration. They are therefore vertex-frustrated and contain unhappy vertices. This can lead to residual entropy and to a variety of exotic states, such as sliding phases, smectic phases and emerging chirality. These new geometries will finally allow for the fabrication of many novel, extensively degenerate versions of artificial spin ice.

  3. Spin-stabilized magnetic levitation without vertical axis of rotation

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Louis; Christenson, Todd; Aaronson, Gene

    2009-06-09

    The symmetry properties of a magnetic levitation arrangement are exploited to produce spin-stabilized magnetic levitation without aligning the rotational axis of the rotor with the direction of the force of gravity. The rotation of the rotor stabilizes perturbations directed parallel to the rotational axis.

  4. Control of light polarization using optically spin-injected vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Frougier, J. Jaffrès, H.; Deranlot, C.; George, J.-M.; Baili, G.; Dolfi, D.; Alouini, M.; Sagnes, I.; Garnache, A.

    2013-12-16

    We fabricated and characterized an optically pumped (100)-oriented InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum well Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VECSEL). The structure is designed to allow the integration of a Metal-Tunnel-Junction ferromagnetic spin-injector for future electrical injection. We report here the control at room temperature of the electromagnetic field polarization using optical spin injection in the active medium of the VECSEL. The switching between two highly circular polarization states had been demonstrated using an M-shaped extended cavity in multi-modes lasing. This result witnesses an efficient spin-injection in the active medium of the LASER.

  5. Vertical Spin Tunnel Testing and Stability Analyses of Earth Entry Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaab, L. J.; Fremaux, C. M.

    2014-06-01

    This report presents results from dynamic stability testing in the NASA LaRC Vertical Spin Tunnel of a series of Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles and subsequent data analysis. Evaluation of a proposed dynamic stability criteria is also performed.

  6. Large current modulation and spin-dependent tunneling of vertical graphene/MoS2 heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Myoung, Nojoon; Seo, Kyungchul; Lee, Seung Joo; Ihm, G

    2013-08-27

    Vertical graphene heterostructures have been introduced as an alternative architecture for electronic devices by using quantum tunneling. Here, we present that the current on/off ratio of vertical graphene field-effect transistors is enhanced by using an armchair graphene nanoribbon as an electrode. Moreover, we report spin-dependent tunneling current of the graphene/MoS2 heterostructures. When an atomically thin MoS2 layer sandwiched between graphene electrodes becomes magnetic, Dirac fermions with different spins feel different heights of the tunnel barrier, leading to spin-dependent tunneling. Our finding will develop the present graphene heterostructures for electronic devices by improving the device performance and by adding the possibility of spintronics based on graphene. PMID:23886348

  7. Electron-electron interaction, weak localization and spin valve effect in vertical-transport graphene devices

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Mingsheng; Gong, Youpin; Wei, Xiangfei; Zhu, Chao; Xu, Jianbao; Liu, Ping; Guo, Yufen; Li, Weiwei; Liu, Liwei; Liu, Guangtong

    2014-04-14

    We fabricated a vertical structure device, in which graphene is sandwiched between two asymmetric ferromagnetic electrodes. The measurements of electron and spin transport were performed across the combined channels containing the vertical and horizontal components. The presence of electron-electron interaction (EEI) was found not only at low temperatures but also at moderate temperatures up to ∼120 K, and EEI dominates over weak localization (WL) with and without applying magnetic fields perpendicular to the sample plane. Moreover, spin valve effect was observed when magnetic filed is swept at the direction parallel to the sample surface. We attribute the EEI and WL surviving at a relatively high temperature to the effective suppress of phonon scattering in the vertical device structure. The findings open a way for studying quantum correlation at relatively high temperature.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of vertically aligned carbon nanotube forest for solid state fiber spinning.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seong Woo; Hwang, Jae Won; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2012-07-01

    Continuous carbon nanotubes (CNT) fibers were directly spun from a vertically aligned CNT forest grown by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The correlation of the CNT structure with Fe catalyst coarsening, reaction time, and the CNTs bundling phenomenon was investigated. We controlled the diameters and walls of the CNTs and minimized the amorphous carbon deposition on the CNTs for favorable bundling and spinning of the CNT fibers. The CNT fibers were fabricated with an as-grown vertically aligned CNT forest by a PECVD process using nanocatalyst an Al2O3 buffer layer, followed by a dry spinning process. Well-aligned CNT fibers were successfully manufactured using a dry spinning process and a surface tension-based densification process by ethanol. The mechanical properties were characterized for the CNT fibers spun from different lengths of a vertically aligned CNT forest. Highly oriented CNT fibers from the dry spinning process were characterized with high strength, high modulus, and high electrical as well as thermal conductivities for possible application as ultralight, highly strong structural materials. Examples of structural materials include space elevator cables, artificial muscle, and armor material, while multifunctional materials include E-textile, touch panels, biosensors, and super capacitors. PMID:22966627

  9. 1300 nm optically pumped quantum dot spin vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharthi, S. S.; Orchard, J.; Clarke, E.; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    We report a room temperature optically pumped Quantum Dot-based Spin-Vertical-External-Cavity Surface-Emitting laser (QD Spin-VECSEL) operating at the telecom wavelength of 1.3 μm. The active medium was composed of 5 × 3 QD layers; each threefold group was positioned at an antinode of the standing wave of the optical field. Circularly polarized lasing in the QD-VECSEL under Continuous-Wave optical pumping has been realized with a threshold pump power of 11 mW. We further demonstrate at room temperature control of the QD-VECSEL output polarization ellipticity via the pump polarization.

  10. Frequency tuning of polarization oscillations in spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemann, Markus; Pusch, Tobias; Michalzik, Rainer; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the coupled spin-photon dynamics in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) is an attractive opportunity to overcome the limitations of conventional, purely charge based semiconductor lasers. Such spin-controlled VCSELs (spin-VCSELs) offer several advantages, like reduced threshold, spin amplification and polarization control. Furthermore the coupling between carrier spin and light polarization bears the potential for ultrafast polarization dynamics. By injecting spin-polarized carriers, the complex polarization dynamics can be controlled and utilized for high-speed applications. Polarization oscillations as resonance oscillations of the coupled spin- photon system can be generated using pulsed spin injection, which can be much faster than the intensity dynamics in conventional devices. We already demonstrated that the oscillations can be switched in a controlled manner. These controllable polarization dynamics can be used for ultrafast polarization-based optical data communication. The polarization oscillation frequency and therefore the possible data transmission rate is assumed to be mainly determined by the birefringence-induced mode-splitting. This provides a direct tool to increase the polarization dynamics toward higher frequencies by adding a high amount of birefringence to the VCSEL structure. Using this technique, we could recently demonstrate experimentally a birefringence splitting of more than 250 GHz using mechanical strain. Here, we employ the well-known spin-flip model to investigate the tuning of the polarization oscillation frequency. The changing mechanical strain is represented by a linear birefringence sweep to values up to 80πGHz. The wide tuning range presented enables us to generate polarization oscillation frequencies exceeding the conventional intensity modulation frequency in the simulated device by far, mainly dependent on the birefringence in the cavity only.

  11. Rolling Motion of a Ball Spinning About a Near-Vertical Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2012-01-01

    A ball that is projected forward without spin on a horizontal surface will slide for a short distance before it starts rolling. Sliding friction acts to decrease the translation speed v and it acts to increase the rotation speed ω. When v = Rω, where R is the ball radius, the ball will start rolling and the friction force drops almost to zero since the contact point at the bottom of the ball comes to rest on the surface. The coefficient of rolling friction is much smaller than that for sliding friction. A different situation arises if the ball is projected forward while it is spinning about a vertical or near vertical axis. The latter situation arises in many ball sports. It arises if a player attempts to curve a ball down a bowling alley, or when a billiards player imparts sidespin or "English" to a ball,2 and it can arise in golf if a player strikes a ball with a putter at a point well away from the middle of the putter head. The situation also arises in the game of curling,3 although in that case the object that is projected is a cylindrical rock rather than a spherical ball, and it arises in tennis when a ball lands on the court spinning about a near vertical axis, as it does in both a slice serve and a kick serve. In a slice serve, the axis is almost vertical. In a kick serve, the axis is tilted about 30 degrees away from the vertical in order to increase the amount of topspin.4

  12. High domain wall velocities via spin transfer torque using vertical current injection

    PubMed Central

    Metaxas, Peter J.; Sampaio, Joao; Chanthbouala, André; Matsumoto, Rie; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Fert, Albert; Zvezdin, Konstantin A.; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Domain walls, nanoscale transition regions separating oppositely oriented ferromagnetic domains, have significant promise for use in spintronic devices for data storage and memristive applications. The state of these devices is related to the wall position and thus rapid operation will require a controllable onset of domain wall motion and high speed wall displacement. These processes are traditionally driven by spin transfer torque due to lateral injection of spin polarized current through a ferromagnetic nanostrip. However, this geometry is often hampered by low maximum wall velocities and/or a need for prohibitively high current densities. Here, using time-resolved magnetotransport measurements, we show that vertical injection of spin currents through a magnetic tunnel junction can drive domain walls over hundreds of nanometers at ~500 m/s using current densities on the order of 6 MA/cm2. Moreover, these measurements provide information about the stochastic and deterministic aspects of current driven domain wall mediated switching. PMID:23670402

  13. High domain wall velocities via spin transfer torque using vertical current injection.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Peter J; Sampaio, Joao; Chanthbouala, André; Matsumoto, Rie; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Fert, Albert; Zvezdin, Konstantin A; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Domain walls, nanoscale transition regions separating oppositely oriented ferromagnetic domains, have significant promise for use in spintronic devices for data storage and memristive applications. The state of these devices is related to the wall position and thus rapid operation will require a controllable onset of domain wall motion and high speed wall displacement. These processes are traditionally driven by spin transfer torque due to lateral injection of spin polarized current through a ferromagnetic nanostrip. However, this geometry is often hampered by low maximum wall velocities and/or a need for prohibitively high current densities. Here, using time-resolved magnetotransport measurements, we show that vertical injection of spin currents through a magnetic tunnel junction can drive domain walls over hundreds of nanometers at ~500 m/s using current densities on the order of 6 MA/cm(2). Moreover, these measurements provide information about the stochastic and deterministic aspects of current driven domain wall mediated switching. PMID:23670402

  14. High domain wall velocities via spin transfer torque using vertical current injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Peter J.; Sampaio, Joao; Chanthbouala, André; Matsumoto, Rie; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Fert, Albert; Zvezdin, Konstantin A.; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie

    2013-05-01

    Domain walls, nanoscale transition regions separating oppositely oriented ferromagnetic domains, have significant promise for use in spintronic devices for data storage and memristive applications. The state of these devices is related to the wall position and thus rapid operation will require a controllable onset of domain wall motion and high speed wall displacement. These processes are traditionally driven by spin transfer torque due to lateral injection of spin polarized current through a ferromagnetic nanostrip. However, this geometry is often hampered by low maximum wall velocities and/or a need for prohibitively high current densities. Here, using time-resolved magnetotransport measurements, we show that vertical injection of spin currents through a magnetic tunnel junction can drive domain walls over hundreds of nanometers at ~500 m/s using current densities on the order of 6 MA/cm2. Moreover, these measurements provide information about the stochastic and deterministic aspects of current driven domain wall mediated switching.

  15. Observation of Gravitationally Induced Vertical Striation of Polarized Ultracold Neutrons by Spin-Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afach, S.; Ayres, N. J.; Ban, G.; Bison, G.; Bodek, K.; Chowdhuri, Z.; Daum, M.; Fertl, M.; Franke, B.; Griffith, W. C.; Grujić, Z. D.; Harris, P. G.; Heil, W.; Hélaine, V.; Kasprzak, M.; Kermaidic, Y.; Kirch, K.; Knowles, P.; Koch, H.-C.; Komposch, S.; Kozela, A.; Krempel, J.; Lauss, B.; Lefort, T.; Lemière, Y.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Musgrave, M.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Pendlebury, J. M.; Piegsa, F. M.; Pignol, G.; Plonka-Spehr, C.; Prashanth, P. N.; Quéméner, G.; Rawlik, M.; Rebreyend, D.; Ries, D.; Roccia, S.; Rozpedzik, D.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Severijns, N.; Thorne, J. A.; Weis, A.; Wursten, E.; Wyszynski, G.; Zejma, J.; Zenner, J.; Zsigmond, G.

    2015-10-01

    We describe a spin-echo method for ultracold neutrons (UCNs) confined in a precession chamber and exposed to a |B0|=1 μ T magnetic field. We have demonstrated that the analysis of UCN spin-echo resonance signals in combination with knowledge of the ambient magnetic field provides an excellent method by which to reconstruct the energy spectrum of a confined ensemble of neutrons. The method takes advantage of the relative dephasing of spins arising from a gravitationally induced striation of stored UCNs of different energies, and also permits an improved determination of the vertical magnetic-field gradient with an exceptional accuracy of 1.1 pT /cm . This novel combination of a well-known nuclear resonance method and gravitationally induced vertical striation is unique in the realm of nuclear and particle physics and should prove to be invaluable for the assessment of systematic effects in precision experiments such as searches for an electric dipole moment of the neutron or the measurement of the neutron lifetime.

  16. Observation of Gravitationally Induced Vertical Striation of Polarized Ultracold Neutrons by Spin-Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Afach, S; Ayres, N J; Ban, G; Bison, G; Bodek, K; Chowdhuri, Z; Daum, M; Fertl, M; Franke, B; Griffith, W C; Grujić, Z D; Harris, P G; Heil, W; Hélaine, V; Kasprzak, M; Kermaidic, Y; Kirch, K; Knowles, P; Koch, H-C; Komposch, S; Kozela, A; Krempel, J; Lauss, B; Lefort, T; Lemière, Y; Mtchedlishvili, A; Musgrave, M; Naviliat-Cuncic, O; Pendlebury, J M; Piegsa, F M; Pignol, G; Plonka-Spehr, C; Prashanth, P N; Quéméner, G; Rawlik, M; Rebreyend, D; Ries, D; Roccia, S; Rozpedzik, D; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Severijns, N; Thorne, J A; Weis, A; Wursten, E; Wyszynski, G; Zejma, J; Zenner, J; Zsigmond, G

    2015-10-16

    We describe a spin-echo method for ultracold neutrons (UCNs) confined in a precession chamber and exposed to a |B0|=1  μT magnetic field. We have demonstrated that the analysis of UCN spin-echo resonance signals in combination with knowledge of the ambient magnetic field provides an excellent method by which to reconstruct the energy spectrum of a confined ensemble of neutrons. The method takes advantage of the relative dephasing of spins arising from a gravitationally induced striation of stored UCNs of different energies, and also permits an improved determination of the vertical magnetic-field gradient with an exceptional accuracy of 1.1  pT/cm. This novel combination of a well-known nuclear resonance method and gravitationally induced vertical striation is unique in the realm of nuclear and particle physics and should prove to be invaluable for the assessment of systematic effects in precision experiments such as searches for an electric dipole moment of the neutron or the measurement of the neutron lifetime. PMID:26550870

  17. Spin-dependent transport properties of a GaMnAs-based vertical spin metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kanaki, Toshiki Asahara, Hirokatsu; Ohya, Shinobu Tanaka, Masaaki

    2015-12-14

    We fabricate a vertical spin metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (spin-MOSFET) structure, which is composed of an epitaxial single-crystal heterostructure with a ferromagnetic-semiconductor GaMnAs source/drain, and investigate its spin-dependent transport properties. We modulate the drain-source current I{sub DS} by ∼±0.5% with a gate-source voltage of ±10.8 V and also modulate I{sub DS} by up to 60% with changing the magnetization configuration of the GaMnAs source/drain at 3.5 K. The magnetoresistance ratio is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that obtained in the previous studies on spin MOSFETs. Our result shows that a vertical structure is one of the hopeful candidates for spin MOSFET when the device size is reduced to a sub-micron or nanometer scale.

  18. Analysis of heavy spin-3/2 baryon-heavy spin-1/2 baryon-light vector meson vertices in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, T. M.; Savci, M.; Azizi, K; Zamiralov, V. S.

    2011-05-01

    The heavy spin-3/2 baryon-heavy spin-1/2 baryon vertices with light vector mesons are studied within the light cone QCD sum rules method. These vertices are parametrized in terms of three coupling constants. These couplings are calculated for all possible transitions. It is shown that correlation functions for these transitions are described by only one invariant function for every Lorenz structure. The obtained relations between the correlation functions of the different transitions are structure independent while explicit expressions of invariant functions depend on the Lorenz structure.

  19. Pilot Escape from Spinning Airplanes as Determined from Free-spinning-tunnel Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scher, Stanley H

    1951-01-01

    Procedure for pilot escape from spinning airplanes has been determined by means of tests in which pilot escape was simulated from 21 airplane models spinning in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The results in general indicated that the pilot should bail out of the outboard side. Calculated centripetal accelerations acting on the pilot during a spin are presented.

  20. Magnetotransport properties of a few-layer graphene-ferromagnetic metal junctions in vertical spin valve devices

    SciTech Connect

    Entani, Shiro Naramoto, Hiroshi; Sakai, Seiji

    2015-05-07

    Magnetotransport properties were studied for the vertical spin valve devices with two junctions of permalloy electrodes and a few-layer graphene interlayer. The graphene layer was directly grown on the bottom electrode by chemical vapor deposition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the permalloy surface fully covered with a few-layer graphene is kept free from oxidation and contamination even after dispensing and removing photoresist. This enabled fabrication of the current perpendicular to plane spin valve devices with a well-defined interface between graphene and permalloy. Spin-dependent electron transport measurements revealed a distinct spin valve effect in the devices. The magnetotransport ratio was 0.8% at room temperature and increased to 1.75% at 50 K. Linear current-voltage characteristics and resistance increase with temperature indicated that ohmic contacts are realized at the relevant interfaces.

  1. Magnetotransport properties of a few-layer graphene-ferromagnetic metal junctions in vertical spin valve devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entani, Shiro; Naramoto, Hiroshi; Sakai, Seiji

    2015-05-01

    Magnetotransport properties were studied for the vertical spin valve devices with two junctions of permalloy electrodes and a few-layer graphene interlayer. The graphene layer was directly grown on the bottom electrode by chemical vapor deposition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the permalloy surface fully covered with a few-layer graphene is kept free from oxidation and contamination even after dispensing and removing photoresist. This enabled fabrication of the current perpendicular to plane spin valve devices with a well-defined interface between graphene and permalloy. Spin-dependent electron transport measurements revealed a distinct spin valve effect in the devices. The magnetotransport ratio was 0.8% at room temperature and increased to 1.75% at 50 K. Linear current-voltage characteristics and resistance increase with temperature indicated that ohmic contacts are realized at the relevant interfaces.

  2. Computerized rapid high resolution quantitative analysis of plasma lipoproteins based upon single vertical spin centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Cone, J T; Segrest, J P; Chung, B H; Ragland, J B; Sabesin, S M; Glasscock, A

    1982-08-01

    A method has been developed for rapidly quantitating the cholesterol concentration of normal and certain variant lipoproteins in a large number of patients (over 240 in one week). The method employs a microcomputer interfaced to the vertical autoprofiler (VAP) described earlier (Chung et al. 1981. J. Lipid Res. 22: 1003-1014). Software developed to accomplish rapid on-line analysis of the VAP signal uses peak shapes and positions derived from prior VAP analysis of isolated authentic lipoproteins HDL, LDL, and VLDL to quantitate these species in a VAP profile. Variant lipoproteins VHDL (a species with density greater than that of HDL(3)), MDL (a species, most likely Lp(a), with density intermediate between that of HDL and LDL), and IDL are subsequently quantitated by a method combining difference calculations with curve shapes. The procedure has been validated qualitatively by negative stain electron microscopy, gradient gel electrophoresis, strip electrophoresis, chemical analysis of the lipids, radioimmunoassay of the apolipoproteins, and measurement of the density of the peak centers. It has been validated quantitatively by comparison with Lipid Research Clinic methodology for HDL-, LDL-, and VLDL-cholesterol, and for MDL- and IDL-cholesterol by comparison of the amounts of MDL or IDL predicted to be present by the method with that known to be present following standard addition to whole plasma. These validations show that the method is a rapid and accurate technique of lipoprotein analysis suitable for the routine screening of patients for abnormal amounts of normal or variant lipoproteins, as well as for use as a research tool for quantitation of changes in cholesterol content of six or seven different plasma lipoprotein fractions.-Cone, J. T., J. P. Segrest, B. H. Chung, J. B. Ragland, S. M. Sabesin, and A. Glasscock. Computerized rapid high resolution quantitative analysis of plasma lipoproteins based upon single vertical spin centrifugation. PMID:7130860

  3. Towards high-frequency operation of polarization oscillations in spin vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemann, Markus; Höpfner, Henning; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.; Pusch, Tobias; Michalzik, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    Compared to purely charge based devices, spintronic lasers offer promising perspectives for new superior device concepts. Especially vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with spin-polarization (spin-VCSELs) feature ultrafast spin and polarization dynamics. Oscillations in the circular polarization degree can be generated using pulsed spin-injection. The oscillations evolve due to the carrier-spin-photon system that is coupled for the linear modes in the VCSEL's cavity via the birefringence. The polarization oscillations are independent of the conventional relaxation oscillations and have the potential to exceed frequencies of 100 GHz. The oscillations are switchable and can be the basis for ultrafast directly modulated spin-VCSELs for, e.g., communication purposes. The polarization oscillation frequency is mainly determined by the birefringence. We show a method to tune the birefringence and thus the polarization oscillation frequency by adding mechanical strain to the substrate in the vicinity of the laser. We achieved first experimental results for high-frequency operation using 850 nm oxide-confined single-mode VCSELs. The results are compared with simulations using the spin-flip-model for high birefringence values.

  4. Vertical Spin Tunnel Testing and Stability Analysis of Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Morelli, Eugene A.; Fremaux, C. Michael; Bean, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEVs) are blunt-body vehicles designed with the purpose of transporting payloads from space to the surface of the Earth. To achieve high reliability and minimum weight, MMEEVs avoid using limited-reliability systems, such as parachutes, retro-rockets, and reaction control systems and rely on the natural aerodynamic stability of the vehicle throughout the Entry, Descent, and Landing phases of flight. Testing in NASA Langley's 20-FT Vertical Spin Tunnel (20-FT VST), dynamically-scaled MMEEV models was conducted to improve subsonic aerodynamic models and validate stability criteria for this class of vehicle. This report documents the resulting data from VST testing for an array of 60-deg sphere-cone MMEEVs. Model configurations included were 1.2 meter, and 1.8 meter designs. The addition of a backshell extender, which provided a 150% increase in backshell diameter for the 1.2 meter design, provided a third test configuration. Center of Gravity limits were established for all MMEEV configurations. An application of System Identification (SID) techniques was performed to determine the aerodynamic coefficients in order to provide databases for subsequent 6-degree-of-freedom simulations.

  5. Controlled switching of ultrafast circular polarization oscillations in spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Höpfner, Henning Lindemann, Markus; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2014-01-13

    We demonstrate a scheme for controlled switching of polarization oscillations in spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (spin-VCSEL). Under hybrid electrical and optical pumping conditions, our VCSEL devices show polarization oscillations with frequencies far above the VCSEL's electrical modulation bandwidth. Using multiple optical pulses, we are able to excite and amplify these polarization oscillations. When specific phase and amplitude conditions for the optical excitation pulses are met, destructive interference leads to switch-off of the polarization oscillation, enabling the generation of controlled short polarization bursts.

  6. Time-resolved observation of fast domain-walls driven by vertical spin currents in short tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, Joao; Lequeux, Steven; Metaxas, Peter J.; Chanthbouala, Andre; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie

    2013-12-01

    We present time-resolved measurements of the displacement of magnetic domain-walls (DWs) driven by vertical spin-polarized currents in track-shaped magnetic tunnel junctions. In these structures, we observe very high DW velocities (600 m/s) at current densities below 107 A/cm2. We show that the efficient spin-transfer torque combined with a short propagation distance allows avoiding the Walker breakdown process and achieving deterministic, reversible, and fast (≈1 ns) DW-mediated switching of magnetic tunnel junction elements, which is of great interest for the implementation of fast DW-based spintronic devices.

  7. 1300 nm optically pumped quantum dot spin vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Alharthi, S. S. Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.; Orchard, J.; Clarke, E.

    2015-10-12

    We report a room temperature optically pumped Quantum Dot-based Spin-Vertical-External-Cavity Surface-Emitting laser (QD Spin-VECSEL) operating at the telecom wavelength of 1.3 μm. The active medium was composed of 5 × 3 QD layers; each threefold group was positioned at an antinode of the standing wave of the optical field. Circularly polarized lasing in the QD-VECSEL under Continuous-Wave optical pumping has been realized with a threshold pump power of 11 mW. We further demonstrate at room temperature control of the QD-VECSEL output polarization ellipticity via the pump polarization.

  8. Time-resolved observation of fast domain-walls driven by vertical spin currents in short tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Sampaio, Joao; Lequeux, Steven; Chanthbouala, Andre; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji

    2013-12-09

    We present time-resolved measurements of the displacement of magnetic domain-walls (DWs) driven by vertical spin-polarized currents in track-shaped magnetic tunnel junctions. In these structures, we observe very high DW velocities (600 m/s) at current densities below 10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}. We show that the efficient spin-transfer torque combined with a short propagation distance allows avoiding the Walker breakdown process and achieving deterministic, reversible, and fast (≈1 ns) DW-mediated switching of magnetic tunnel junction elements, which is of great interest for the implementation of fast DW-based spintronic devices.

  9. Spin-to-charge conversion in lateral and vertical topological-insulator/ferromagnet heterostructures with microwave-driven precessing magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfouzi, Farzad; Nagaosa, Naoto; Nikolić, Branislav K.

    2014-09-01

    Using the charge-conserving Floquet-Green function approach to open quantum systems driven by an external time-periodic potential, we analyze how spin current pumped by the precessing magnetization of a ferromagnetic (F) layer is injected laterally into the interface with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and converted into charge current flowing in the same direction. In the case of a metallic interface with the Rashba SOC used in recent experiments [J. C. R. Sánchez, L. Vila, G. Desfonds, S. Gambarelli, J. P. Attané, J. M. De Teresa, C. Magén, and A. Fert, Nat. Commun. 4, 2944 (2013), 10.1038/ncomms3944], both spin ISα and charge I current flow within the interface where I /ISα≃ 2-8% (depending on the precession cone angle), while for a F/topological-insulator (F/TI) interface employed in related experiments [Y. Shiomi, K. Nomura, Y. Kajiwara, K. Eto, M. Novak, K. Segawa, Y. Ando, and E. Saitoh, arXiv:1312.7091] the conversion efficiency is greatly enhanced (I /ISα≃ 40-60%) due to perfect spin-momentum locking on the surface of a TI. The spin-to-charge conversion occurs also when spin current is pumped vertically through the F/TI interface with smaller efficiency (I /ISα˜0.001%), but with the charge current signal being sensitive to whether the Dirac fermions at the interface are massive or massless.

  10. Circular polarization switching and bistability in an optically injected 1300 nm spin-vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Alharthi, S. S. Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.; Hurtado, A.; Korpijarvi, V.-M.; Guina, M.

    2015-01-12

    We report the experimental observation of circular polarization switching (PS) and polarization bistability (PB) in a 1300 nm dilute nitride spin-vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). We demonstrate that the circularly polarized optical signal at 1300 nm can gradually or abruptly switch the polarization ellipticity of the spin-VCSEL from right-to-left circular polarization and vice versa. Moreover, different forms of PS and PB between right- and left-circular polarizations are observed by controlling the injection strength and the initial wavelength detuning. These results obtained at the telecom wavelength of 1300 nm open the door for novel uses of spin-VCSELs in polarization sensitive applications in future optical systems.

  11. Spin transport in p-Ge through a vertically stacked Ge/Fe3Si junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, M.; Santo, K.; Ikawa, M.; Yamada, S.; Kanashima, T.; Hamaya, K.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally show spin transport up to 125 K in a ˜40-nm-thick p-Ge(111) layer, epitaxially grown on a ferromagnetic Fe3Si. From the magnitude of the spin signals, the spin diffusion length of the p-Ge(111) layer at 10 K can be estimated to be approximately 50 nm. To understand the detectable spin transport in the p-Ge(111), we should consider the energy splitting between heavy-hole and light-hole bands at the L point.

  12. The Aerodynamic Drag of Flying-boat Hull Model as Measured in the NACA 20-foot Wind Tunnel I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Edwin P

    1935-01-01

    Measurements of aerodynamic drag were made in the 20-foot wind tunnel on a representative group of 11 flying-boat hull models. Four of the models were modified to investigate the effect of variations in over-all height, contours of deck, depth of step, angle of afterbody keel, and the addition of spray strips and windshields. The results of these tests, which cover a pitch-angle range from -5 to 10 degrees, are presented in a form suitable for use in performance calculations and for design purposes.

  13. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman AF-2S, -2W Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.; Wilson, Jack H.

    1950-01-01

    An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/24-scale model of the Grumman AF-2S, -2W airplane was conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effects of controls on the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics for a range of possible loadings of the.airplane were determined. The effect of a revised-tail installation (small dual fins added to the stabilizer of the original tail and the vertical-tail height of the original tail increased) and the effect of various ventral-fin and antispin-fillet installations were determined. The investigation also included spin-recovery parachute tests.

  14. Hyperfine-induced hysteretic funnel structure in spin blockaded tunneling current of coupled vertical quantum dots at low magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Leary, A.; Wicha, A.; Harack, B.; Coish, W. A.; Hilke, M.; Yu, G.; Gupta, J. A.; Payette, C.; Austing, D. G.

    2013-12-04

    We outline the properties of the hyperfine-induced funnel structure observed in the two-electron spin blockade region of a weakly coupled vertical double quantum dot device. Hysteretic steps in the leakage current occur due to dynamic nuclear polarization when either the bias voltage or the magnetic field is swept up and down. When the bias voltage is swept, an intriguing ∼3 mT wide cusp near 0 T appears in the down-sweep position, and when the magnetic field is swept, the current at 0 T can be switched from 'low' to 'high' as the bias is increased.

  15. Hyperfine-induced hysteretic funnel structure in spin blockaded tunneling current of coupled vertical quantum dots at low magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, A.; Wicha, A.; Harack, B.; Coish, W. A.; Hilke, M.; Yu, G.; Payette, C.; Gupta, J. A.; Austing, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    We outline the properties of the hyperfine-induced funnel structure observed in the two-electron spin blockade region of a weakly coupled vertical double quantum dot device. Hysteretic steps in the leakage current occur due to dynamic nuclear polarization when either the bias voltage or the magnetic field is swept up and down. When the bias voltage is swept, an intriguing ˜3 mT wide cusp near 0 T appears in the down-sweep position, and when the magnetic field is swept, the current at 0 T can be switched from "low" to "high" as the bias is increased.

  16. Investigation of the Spin and Recovery Characteristics of a 0.057-Scale Model of the Modified Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane. TED No. NACA DE 311

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Theodore; Pumphrey, Norman E.

    1950-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the spin and recovery characteristics of a 0.057-scale model of the modified Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane. The primary change in the design from that previously tested was a revision of the twin vertical tails. Tests were also made to determine the effect of installation of external wing tanks. The results indicated that the revision in the vertical tails did not greatly alter the spin and recovery characteristics of the model and recovery by normal use of controls (fill rapid rudder reversal followed approximately one-half turn later by movement of the stick forward of neutral) was satisfactory. Adding the external wing tanks to cause the recovery characteristics to become critical and border on an unsatisfactory condition; however, it was shown that satisfactory recovery could be obtained by jettisoning the tanks, followed by normal recovery technique.

  17. Birefringence controlled room-temperature picosecond spin dynamics close to the threshold of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. Y.; Jähme, H.; Soldat, H.; Gerhardt, N. C.; Hofmann, M. R.; Ackemann, T.

    2010-11-01

    We analyze the spin-induced circular polarization dynamics at the threshold of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers at room-temperature using a hybrid excitation combining electrically pumping without spin preference and spin-polarized optical injection. After a short pulse of spin-polarized excitation, fast oscillations of the circular polarization degree (CPD) are observed within the relaxation oscillations. A theoretical investigation of this behavior on the basis of a rate equation model shows that these fast oscillations of CPD could be suppressed by means of a reduction of the birefringence of the laser cavity.

  18. Rolling Motion of a Ball Spinning about a Near-Vertical Axis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2012-01-01

    A ball that is projected forward without spin on a horizontal surface will slide for a short distance before it starts rolling. Sliding friction acts to decrease the translation speed v and it acts to increase the rotation speed [omega]. When v = R[omega], where R is the ball radius, the ball will start rolling and the friction force drops almost…

  19. Investigation of Spinning and Tumbling Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee XFY-1 Airplane in the Free-Spinning Tunnel, TED No. NACA DE 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry A.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/20-scale model of the Consolidated Vultee XFY-1 airplane with a windmilling propeller simulated to determine the effects of control setting and movements upon the erect spin and recovery characteristics for a range of airplane-loading conditions. The effects on the model's spin-recovery characteristics of removing the lower vertical tail, removing the gun pods, and fixing the rudders at neutral were also investigated briefly. The investigation included determination of the size parachute required for emergency recovery from demonstration spins. The tumbling tendencies of the model were also investigated. Brief static force tests were made to determine the aerodynamic characteristics in pitch at high angles of attack. The investigation indicated that the spin and recovery characteristics of the airplane with propeller windmilling will be satisfactory for all loading conditions if recovery is attempted by full rudder reversal accompanied by simultaneous movement of the stick laterally to full with the spin (stick right in a right spin) and longitudinally to neutral. Inverted spins should be satisfactorily terminated by fully reversing the rudder followed immediately by moving the stick laterally towards the forward rudder pedal and longitudinally to neutral. Removal of the gun pods or fixing the rudders at neutral will not adversely affect the airplane's spin-recovery characteristics, but removal of the lower vertical tail will result in unsatisfactory spin-recovery characteristics. The model-test results showed that a 13.3-foot wing-tip conventional parachute (drag coefficient approximately 0.7) should be effective as an emergency spin-recovery device during demonstration spins of the airplane. It was indicated that the airplane should not tumble and that no unusual longitudinal-trim characteristics should be obtained for the center-of-gravity positions investigated.

  20. Concluding Report on Free-Spinning and Recovery Characteristics of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman F11F-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA AD 395

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.

    1956-01-01

    An investigation has been completed in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/24-scale model of the Grumman F11F-1 airplane to determine its spin and recovery characteristics. An interim report, Research Memorandum SL55G20, was published earlier and the present report concludes the presentation of results of the investigation. Primarily, the present report presents results obtained with engine gyroscopic moments simulated on the model. Also, the current results were obtained with a revised larger vertical tail recently incorporated on the airplane. It was difficult to obtain developed spins on the model when the spin direction was in the same sense as that of the engine rotation (right spin on the airplane). The developed spins obtained were very oscillatory and the recoveries were unsatisfactory. These results were similar to those previously reported for which engine rotation was not simulated. When the spin direction was in the opposite sense (left spin on the airplane), however, developed spins were readily obtainable. Recoveries from these spins also were unsatisfactory. Satisfactory recoveries were obtained on the model, however, when rudder reversal was accompanied by extension of small canards near the nose of the airplane or by deflection of the horizontal tail differentially with the spin.

  1. Control of emitted light polarization in a 1310 nm dilute nitride spin-vertical cavity surface emitting laser subject to circularly polarized optical injection

    SciTech Connect

    Alharthi, S. S. Hurtado, A.; Al Seyab, R. K.; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.; Korpijarvi, V.-M.; Guina, M.

    2014-11-03

    We experimentally demonstrate the control of the light polarization emitted by a 1310 nm dilute nitride spin-Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) at room temperature. This is achieved by means of a combination of polarized optical pumping and polarized optical injection. Without external injection, the polarization of the optical pump controls that of the spin-VCSEL. However, the addition of the externally injected signal polarized with either left- (LCP) or right-circular polarization (RCP) is able to control the polarization of the spin-VCSEL switching it at will to left- or right-circular polarization. A numerical model has been developed showing a very high degree of agreement with the experimental findings.

  2. Large-Scale Boundary-Layer Control Tests on Two Wings in the NACA 20-Foot Wind Tunnel, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Hugh B.

    1935-01-01

    Tests were made in the N.A.C.A. 20-foot wind tunnel on: (1) a wing, of 6.5-foot span, 5.5-foot chord, and 30 percent maximum thickness, fitted with large end plates and (2) a 16-foot span 2.67-foot chord wing of 15 percent maximum thickness to determine the increase in lift obtainable by removing the boundary layer and the power required for the blower. The results of the tests on the stub wing appeared more favorable than previous small-scale tests and indicated that: (1) the suction method was considerably superior to the pressure method, (2) single slots were more effective than multiple slots (where the same pressure was applied to all slots), the slot efficiency increased rapidly for increasing slot widths up to 2 percent of the wing chord and remained practically constant for all larger widths tested, (3) suction pressure and power requirements were quite low (a computation for a light airplane showed that a lift coefficient of 3.0 could be obtained with a suction as low as 2.3 times the dynamic pressure and a power expenditure less than 3 percent of the rated engine power), and (4) the volume of air required to be drawn off was quite high (approximately 0.5 cubic feet per second per unit wing area for an airplane landing at 40 miles per hour with a lift coefficient of 3,0), indicating that considerable duct area must be provided in order to prevent flow losses inside the wing and insure uniform distribution of suction along the span. The results from the tests of the large-span wing were less favorable than those on the stub wing. The reasons for this were, probably: (1) the uneven distribution of suction along the span, (2) the flow losses inside the wing, (3) the small radius of curvature of the leading edge of the wing section, and (4) the low Reynolds Number of these tests, which was about one half that of the stub wing. The results showed a large increase in the maximum lift coefficient with an increase in Reynolds Number in the range of the tests. The

  3. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/16-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF5U-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA 2349

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Richard P.

    1947-01-01

    Spin tests of a 1/16-scale model of the Chance Vought XF5U-1 airplane have been performed in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effect of control position and movement upon the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics ae well as the effects of propellers, of stability flaps, and of various revisions to the design configuration have been determined for the normal fighter loading. The investigation also included spin recovery parachute, tumbling, and pilot-escape tests. For the original design configuration, with or without windmilling propellers, the recovery characteristics of the model were considered unsatisfactory. Increasing the maximum upward deflection of the ailavators from 45 deg to 65 deg resulted in greatly improved recovery characteristics. Dimensional revisions to the original airplane configuration, which satisfactorily improved the general spin and recovery characteristics of the model, consisted of: (1) a supplementary vertical tail 34 inches by 59 inches (full-scale) attached to a boom 80 inches aft of the trailing edge of the airplane in the plane of symmetry, (2) a large semispan undersurface spoiler placed along the airplane quarter-chord line and opened on the outboard side in a spin, or (3) two additional vertical tails 64 inches by 52 inches (full-scale) located at the tips of the ailavators. A satisfactory parachute arrangement for emergency spin recovery from demonstration spins was found to be an arrangement consisting of a 13.3-foot parachute attached by a 30-foot towline to the arresting gear mast on the airplane and opened simultaneously with an 8-foot parachute on the outboard end of the wing attached by a 3-foot towline. Tests indicated that pilot escape from a spin would be extremely hazardous unless the pilot is mechanically ejected from the cockpit. Model tumbling tests indicated that the airplane would not tumble.

  4. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/17 Scale Model of the Cessna T-37A Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1958-01-01

    Results of an investigation of a dynamic model in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel are presented. Erect spin and recovery characteristics were determined for a range of mass distributions and center-of-gravity positions. The effects of lateral displacement of the center of gravity, engine rotation, nose strakes, and increased rudder area were investigated.

  5. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  6. Low temperature and cost-effective growth of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers using spin-coated polymer-stabilized palladium nanocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Amin M.; Shafiee, Sareh; Krasia-Christoforou, Theodora; Savva, Ioanna; Göransson, Gert; Desmaris, Vincent; Enoksson, Peter

    2015-02-01

    We describe a fast and cost-effective process for the growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) at a temperature compatible with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology, using highly stable polymer-Pd nanohybrid colloidal solutions of palladium catalyst nanoparticles (NPs). Two polymer-Pd nanohybrids, namely poly(lauryl methacrylate)-block-poly((2-acetoacetoxy)ethyl methacrylate)/Pd (LauMAx-b-AEMAy/Pd) and polyvinylpyrrolidone/Pd were prepared in organic solvents and spin-coated onto silicon substrates. Subsequently, vertically aligned CNFs were grown on these NPs by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at different temperatures. The electrical properties of the grown CNFs were evaluated using an electrochemical method, commonly used for the characterization of supercapacitors. The results show that the polymer-Pd nanohybrid solutions offer the optimum size range of palladium catalyst NPs enabling the growth of CNFs at temperatures as low as 350 °C. Furthermore, the CNFs grown at such a low temperature are vertically aligned similar to the CNFs grown at 550 °C. Finally the capacitive behavior of these CNFs was similar to that of the CNFs grown at high temperature assuring the same electrical properties thus enabling their usage in different applications such as on-chip capacitors, interconnects, thermal heat sink and energy storage solutions.

  7. Photodissociation of alkyl and aryl iodides and effect of fluorination: Analysis of proposed mechanisms and vertical excitations by spin-orbit ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajitha, D.; Fedorov, D. G.; Finley, J. P.; Hirao, K.

    2002-10-01

    An ab initio study of the vertical electronic excitations in CX3I, C6X5H, and C6X5I (X=H and F) is presented. All-electron basis sets are used and the relativistic effects are accounted for with the relativistic elimination of small components scheme. The structures are optimized with the complete active space self-consistent field approach and the excitation energies are computed with the spin-orbit multiconfiguration quasidegenerate perturbation theory. The n-σ* transitions of CX3I, low-lying π-π* transitions of C6X5H, and low-lying n-σ*, π-π*, and π-σ* transitions of C6X5I are elucidated. For CH3I, energy values of parallel and perpendicular transitions differ from experimental values by 455 and 1156 cm-1, respectively. Effects of fluorination are emphasized, it is found that fluorination increases the gap between 3Q0 and 1Q1 transitions and increase is substantially more in aryl iodides than in alkyl iodides. Electronic factors influencing increased I* quantum yield in the photodissociation on fluorination of alkyl iodides is attributed to increased gap between 3Q0 and 1Q1 transitions reducing curve crossing probability and for aryl iodides there is additional role by phenyl transitions. A correlation diagram illustrating transitions of aryl iodides is presented.

  8. The Influence of Dimensional Modifications upon the Spin and Recovery Characteristics of a Tailless Airplane Model Having Its Wings Swept Forward 15 Deg (Cornelius XFG-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Ralph W., Jr.; Daughtridge, Lee T., Jr.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free- spinning tunnel scale model of the Cornelius XFG-1 glider, a tailless design having its wings swept forward 15 degrees. It was previously found to possess erratic spin and recovery characteristics, and tests were made to determine modifications which would lead to normal steady spins with consistently good recoveries. The results of the investigation indicated that modifications that aid not appreciably alter the basic design aid not appreciably improve the spin and recovery characteristics. In this instance it appears that the sweptforward wing is the cause of unsatisfactory spin and recovery characteristics.

  9. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/28-Scale Model of the North American FJ-4 Airplane with External Fuel Tanks, TED No. NACA AD 3112

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healy, Frederick M.

    1958-01-01

    A supplementary investigation to determine the effect of external fuel tanks on the spin and recovery characteristics of a l/28-scale model of the North American FJ-4 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The model had been extensively tested previously (NACA Research Memorandum SL38A29) and therefore only brief tests were made to evaluate the effect of tank installation. Erect spin tests of the model indicate that flat-type spins-are more prevalent with 200-gallon external fuel tanks than with tanks not installed. The recovery technique determined for spins without tanks, rudder reversal to full against the spin accompanied by simultaneous movement of ailerons to full with the spin, is recommended for spins encountered with external tanks installed. If inverted spins are encountered with external tanks installed, the tanks should be jettisoned and recovery attempted by rudder reversal to full against the spin with ailerons maintained at neutral.

  10. RHIC spin flipper commissioning results

    SciTech Connect

    Bai M.; Roser, T.; Dawson, C.; Kewisch, J.; Makdisi, Y.; Oddo, P.; Pai, C.; Pile, P.

    2012-05-20

    The five AC dipole RHIC spin flipper design in the RHIC Blue ring was first tested during the RHIC 2012 polarized proton operation. The advantage of this design is to eliminate the vertical coherent betatron oscillations outside the spin flipper. The closure of each ac dipole vertical bump was measured with orbital response as well as spin. The effect of the rotating field on the spin motion by the spin flipper was also confirmed by measuring the suppressed resonance at Q{sub s} = 1 - Q{sub osc}.

  11. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/40-Scale Model of the McConnell F-101A Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel of a 1/40-scale model of the McDonnell F-101A airplane to alleviate the unfavorable spinning characteristics encountered with the airplane. The model results indicate that a suitable strake extended on the inboard side of the nose of the airplane (right side in a right spin) in conjunction with the use of optimum control recovery technique will terminate spin rotation of the airplane. It may be difficult to recover from subsequent high angle-of-attack trimmed flight attitudes even by forward stick movement. The optimum spin-recovery control technique for the McDonnell F-101A is simultaneous full rudder reversal to against the spin and aileron movement to full with the spin (stick full right in a right erect spin) and forward movement of the stick immediately after rotation stops.

  12. THE VERTICAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, Stephen L.; Spencer, Jeffrey B.

    1994-01-01

    'THE VERTICAL' computer keyboard is designed to address critical factors which contribute to Repetitive Motion Injuries (RMI) (including Carpal Tunnel Syndrome) in association with computer keyboard usage. This keyboard splits the standard QWERTY design into two halves and positions each half 90 degrees from the desk. In order to access a computer correctly. 'THE VERTICAL' requires users to position their bodies in optimal alignment with the keyboard. The orthopaedically neutral forearm position (with hands palms-in and thumbs-up) reduces nerve compression in the forearm. The vertically arranged keypad halves ameliorate onset occurrence of keyboard-associated RMI. By utilizing visually-reference mirrored mylar surfaces adjustable to the user's eye, the user is able to readily reference any key indicia (reversed) just as they would on a conventional keyboard. Transverse adjustability substantially reduces cumulative musculoskeletal discomfort in the shoulders. 'THE VERTICAL' eliminates the need for an exterior mouse by offering a convenient finger-accessible curser control while the hands remain in the vertically neutral position. The potential commercial application for 'THE VERTICAL' is enormous since the product can effect every person who uses a computer anywhere in the world. Employers and their insurance carriers are spending hundreds of millions of dollars per year as a result of RMI. This keyboard will reduce the risk.

  13. Spin stabilized magnetic levitation of horizontal rotors.

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Louis Anthony

    2004-10-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of a new configuration for achieving spin stabilized magnetic levitation. In the classical configuration, the rotor spins about a vertical axis; and the spin stabilizes the lateral instability of the top in the magnetic field. In this new configuration the rotor spins about a horizontal axis; and the spin stabilizes the axial instability of the top in the magnetic field.

  14. Impact on Spin Tune From Horizontal Orbital Angle Between Snakes and Orbital Angle Between Spin Rotators

    SciTech Connect

    Bai,M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.

    2008-10-01

    To keep the spin tune in the spin depolarizing resonance free region is required for accelerating polarized protons to high energy. In RHIC, two snakes are located at the opposite side of each accelerator. They are configured to yield a spin tune of 1/2. Two pairs of spin rotators are located at either side of two detectors in each ring in RHIC to provide longitudinal polarization for the experiments. Since the spin rotation from vertical to longitudinal is localized between the two rotators, the spin rotators do not change the spin tune. However, due to the imperfection of the orbits around the snakes and rotators, the spin tune can be shifted. This note presents the impact of the horizontal orbital angle between the two snakes on the spin tune, as well as the effect of the vertical orbital angle between two rotators at either side of the collision point on the spin tune.

  15. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/29-Scale Model of the Republic XP-91 Airplane with a Vee Tail Installed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Thomas L.

    1948-01-01

    A spin investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20 -foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/29 - scale model of the Republic XP-91 airplane with vee tail installed. The effects cf control settings and movements upon the effect spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the clean condition (wing tanks removed, landing gear and flaps retracted). The tests were made at a loading simulating that following cruise at altitude and at a time when nearly all fuel was expended. The results indicated that the airplane might not spin at normal spinning-control configuration, but if a spin were obtained, recovery therefrom by full rudder reversal would be satisfactory. It was also indicated that aileron-against settings would lead to violent oscillatory motions and should be avoided.

  16. RHIC Spin Flipper Commissioning Status

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, M.; Meot, F.; Dawson, C.; Oddo, P.; Pai, C.; Pile, P.; Makdisi, Y.; Meng, W.; Roser, T.

    2010-05-23

    The commissioning of the RHIC spin flipper in the RHIC Blue ring during the RHIC polarized proton run in 2009 showed the detrimental effects of global vertical coherent betatron oscillation induced by the 2-AC dipole plus 4-DC dipole configuration. This global orbital coherent oscillation of the RHIC beam in the Blue ring in the presence of collision modulated the beam-beam interaction between the two RHIC beams and affected Yellow beam polarization. The experimental data at injection with different spin tunes by changing the snake current also demonstrated that it was not possible to induce a single isolated spin resonance with the global vertical coherent betatron oscillation excited by the two AC dipoles. Hence, a new design was proposed to eliminate the coherent vertical betatron oscillation outside the spin flipper by adding three additional AC dipoles. This paper presents the experimental results as well as the new design.

  17. 15-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Constructing the forms for the foundation of the 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. Charles Zimmerman was given the assignment to design and build a larger spin tunnel that would supplant the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Authorization to build the tunnel using funds from the Federal Public Works Administration (PWA) came in June 1933. Construction started in late winter 1934 and the tunnel was operational in April 1935. The initial construction costs were $64,000. The first step was to pour the foundation for the tunnel and the housing which would encase the wind tunnel.

  18. 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Schematic drawing of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris describe the tunnel in NACA TR No. 387: 'The tunnel has an open jet, an open test chamber, and a closed return passage. ... The air passes through the test section in a downward direction then enters the exit cone and passes through the first set of guide vanes to a propeller. From here it passes, by way of the return passage, through the successive sets of guide vanes at the corners, then through the honeycomb, and finally through the entrance cone.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual spin of an airplane. Satisfactory air flow has been attained with a velocity that is uniform over the jet to within 0.5%. The turbulence present in the tunnel has been compared with that of several other tunnels by means of the results of sphere drag tests and was found to average well with the values of those tunnels. Included also in the report are comparisons of results of stable autorotation and of rolling-moment tests obtained both in the vertical tunnel and in the old horizontal 5-foot atmospheric tunnel.' The design of a vertical tunnel having a 5-foot diameter jet was accordingly started by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1928. Actual construction of the new tunnel was completed in 1930, and the calibration tests were then made.'

  19. 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1932-01-01

    The researcher is sitting above the exit cone of the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel and is examining the new 6-component spinning balance. This balance was developed between 1930 and 1933. It was an important advance in the technology of rotating or rolling balances. As M.J. Bamber and C.H. Zimmerman wrote in NACA TR 456: 'Data upon the aerodynamic characteristics of a spinning airplane may be obtained in several ways; namely, flight tests with full-scale airplanes, flight tests with balanced models, strip-method analysis of wind-tunnel force and moment tests, and wind-tunnel tests of rotating models.' Further, they note: 'Rolling-balance data have been of limited value because it has not been possible to measure all six force and moment components or to reproduce a true spinning condition. The spinning balance used in this investigation is a 6-component rotating balance from which it is possible to obtain wind-tunnel data for any of a wide range of possible spinning conditions.' Bamber and Zimmerman described the balance as follows: 'The spinning balance consists of a balance head that supports the model and contains the force-measuring units, a horizontal turntable supported by streamline struts in the center of the jet and, outside the tunnel, a direct-current driving motor, a liquid tachometer, an air compressor, a mercury manometer, a pair of indicating lamps, and the necessary controls. The balance head is mounted on the turntable and it may be set to give any radius of spin between 0 and 8 inches.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual

  20. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation to Determine the Effect of Spin-Recovery Rockets and Thrust Simulation on the Recovery Characteristics of a 1/21-Scale Model of the Chance Vought F7U-3 Airplane, TED No. NACA AD 3103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, Sanger H., Jr.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1955-01-01

    An investigation of a l/21-scale model of the Chance Vought F7U-3 airplane in the co&at-load- condition has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel, The recovery characteristics of the model were determined by use of spin-recovery rockets for the erect and inverted spinning condition. The rockets were so placed as to provide either a yawing or rolling moment about the model center of gravity. Also included in the investigation were tests to determine the effect of simulated engine thrust on the recovery characteristics of the model. On the basis of model tests, recoveries from erect and inverted spins were satisfactory when a yawing moment of 22,200 foot-pounds (full scale) was provided against the spin by rockets attached to the wing tips; the anti-spin yawing moment was applied for approximately 9 seconds, (full scale). Satisfactory recoveries were obtained from erect spins when a rolling moment of 22,200 foot-pounds (full scale) was provided with the spin (rolls right wing down in right spin). Although the inverted spin was satisfactorily terminated when a rolling moment of equal magnitude was provided, a roll rocket was not considered to be an optimum spin-recovery device to effect recoveries from inverted spins for this airplane because of resulting gyrations during spin recovery. Simulation of engine thrust had no apparent effect on the spin recovery characteristics.

  1. Geometrical spin symmetry and spin

    SciTech Connect

    Pestov, I. B.

    2011-07-15

    Unification of General Theory of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics leads to General Quantum Mechanics which includes into itself spindynamics as a theory of spin phenomena. The key concepts of spindynamics are geometrical spin symmetry and the spin field (space of defining representation of spin symmetry). The essence of spin is the bipolar structure of geometrical spin symmetry induced by the gravitational potential. The bipolar structure provides a natural derivation of the equations of spindynamics. Spindynamics involves all phenomena connected with spin and provides new understanding of the strong interaction.

  2. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the McDonnell XP-88 Airplane with a Conventional Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Theodore

    1947-01-01

    An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/24-scale model of the McDonnell XP-88 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effects of control settings and movements on the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model in the normal loading were determined. Tests of the model in the long-range loading also were made. The investigation included tail-modification, spin-recovery parachute, pilot-escape, and rudder-pedal-force tests. Recoveries were generally satisfactory for spins in the normal loading provided the ailerons were not held against the spin. Satisfactory recoveries were obtained regardless of the aileron setting when the leading-edge flaps were deflected and normal recovery technique was used or when the horizontal tail was raised 70 inches, full scale. Recoveries were rapid from all inverted spins obtained. In the long-range loading with tanks on, it may be necessary to jettison the tanks in order to obtain recovery. A 12.0-foot spin-recovery parachute at the tail or a 4.0-foot parachute opened on the outer wing tip (drag coefficient of 0.66) was found to be effective for recoveries from demonstration spins. Test results showed that in an emergency the pilot should attempt to escape from the outboard side of the spinning airplane. The rudder-pedal forces in a spin were indicated to be within the capabilities of the pilot.

  3. Free-spinning-tunnel Investigation of a 1/30 Scale Model of a Twin-jet-swept-wing Fighter Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/30-scale dynamic model of a twin-jet swept-wing fighter airplane. The model results indicate that the optimum erect spin recovery technique determined (simultaneous rudder reversal to full against the spin and aileron deflection to full with the spin) will provide satisfactory recovery from steep-type spins obtained on the airplane. It is considered that the air-plane will not readily enter flat-type spins, also indicated as possible by the model tests, but developed-spin conditions should be avoided in as much as the optimum recovery procedure may not provide satisfactory recovery if the airplane encounters a flat-type developed spin. Satisfactory recovery from inverted spins will be obtained on the airplane by neutralization of all controls. A 30-foot- diameter (laid-out-flat) stable tail parachute having a drag coefficient of 0.67 and a towline length of 27.5 feet will be satisfactory for emergency spin recovery.

  4. Spin voltage generation across rare earth spin filter barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Guoxing; Chang, Joonyeon; Moodera, Jagadeesh

    2011-03-01

    When a metal is in close contact with a rare-earth based magnetic compound, strong exchange interaction exists between the localized 4f electrons and the free moving conduction electrons. One important consequence is that the spin degeneracy among the conduction electrons is lifted, showing up as an effective Zeeman splitting higher than tens of Tesla in low dimensional systems such as graphene and other 2DEG. We perform our work using a vertical transport geometry, which consists of double spin filtering barriers based on a ferromagnetic Eu chalcogenide - EuS. A thin Al metallic layer is sandwiched in the middle and its conduction electrons thus experience the strong spin splitting, which is subsequently detected via the spin filtering effect. A spontaneous spin dependent voltage appears across such a device, and its polarity is directly determined by the EuS/Al interface. The voltage level difference between the spin-parallel and -antiparallel configurations is as large as a few mV. Such spin splitting also induces a clear universal behavior in the observed TMR bias dependence. Such spin voltage effect offers a possibility of directly converting magnetic exchange energy into electrical power. This work is supported by NSF DMR 0504158, ONR N00014-06-1-0235, and KIST-MIT project funds.

  5. Model of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Model of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris wrote in NACA TR 387: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual spin of an airplane. Satisfactory air flow has been attained with a velocity that is uniform over the jet to within 0.5 per cent. The turbulence present in the tunnel has been compared with that of several other tunnels by means of the results of sphere drag tests and was found to average well with the values of those tunnels. Included also in the report are comparisons of results of stable autorotation and of rolling-moment tests obtained both in the vertical tunnel and in the old horizontal 5-foot atmospheric tunnel.' The design of a vertical tunnel having a 5-foot diameter jet was accordingly started by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1928. Actual construction of the new tunnel was completed in 1930, and the calibration tests were then made.'

  6. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/20-Scale Model of the North American T2J-1 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/20-scale dynamic model of the North American T2J-1 airplane. The model results indicate that the optimum technique for recovery from erect spins of the airplane will be dependent on the distribution of the disposable load. The recommended recovery procedure for spins encountered at the flight design gross weight is simultaneous rudder reversal to against the spin and aileron movement to with the spin. With full wingtip tanks plus rocket installation and full internal fuel load, rudder reversal should be followed by a downward movement of the elevator. For the flight design gross weight plus partially full wingtip tanks, recovery should be attempted by simultaneous rudder reversal to against the spin, movement of ailerons to with the spin, and ejection of the wing-tip tanks. The optimum recovery technique for airplane-inverted spins is rudder reversal to against the spin with the stick maintained longitudinally and laterally neutral.

  7. 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. The 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel was built to study spinning characteristics of aircraft. It was an open throat tunnel capable of a maximum speed of 80 mph. NACA engineer Charles H. Zimmerman designed the tunnel starting in 1928. Construction was completed in December 1929. It was one of two tunnels which replaced the original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (The other was the 7x10-Foot Wind Tunnel.). In NACA TR 387 (p. 499), Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris report that 'the tunnel passages are constructed of 1/8-inch sheet iron, stiffened with angle iron and bolted together at the corners. The over-all dimensions are: Height 31 feet 2 inches; length, 20 feet 3 inches; width, 10 feet 3 inches.' The tunnel was partially constructed in the Langley hanger as indicated by the aircraft in the background. Published in NACA TR 387, 'The Vertical Wind Tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics,' by Carl J. Wenzinger and Thomas A. Harris, 1931.

  8. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 0.034-Scale Model of the Production Version of the Chance Vought F7U-3 Airplane, TED No. NACA AD 3103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1955-01-01

    An investigation of a 0.034-scale model of the production version of the Chance Vought F7U-3 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The inverted and erect spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the combat loading with the model in the clean condition and the effect of extending slats was investigated. A brief investigation of pilot ejection was also performed. The results indicate that the inverted spin-recovery characteristics of the airplane will be satisfactory by full rudder reversal. If the rudders can only be neutralized because of high pedal forces in the inverted spins, satisfactory recovery will be obtained if the auxiliary rudders can be moved to neutral or against the spin provided the stick is held full forward. Optimum control technique for satisfactory recovery from erect spins will be full rudder reversal in conjunction with aileron movement to full with the spin (stick right in a right spin). Extension of the slats will have a slightly adverse effect on recoveries from (1 inverted spins but will have a favorable effect on recoveries from erect spins. The results of brief tests indicate that if a pilot is ejected during a spin while a spin-recovery parachute is extended and fully inflated, he will probably clear the tail parachute.

  9. Topological spin and valley pumping in silicene

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Sheng, L.; Wang, B. G.; Xing, D. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We propose to realize adiabatic topological spin and valley pumping by using silicene, subject to the modulation of an in-plane ac electric field with amplitude Ey and a vertical electric field consisting of an electrostatic component and an ac component with amplitudes and . By tuning and , topological valley pumping or spin-valley pumping can be achieved. The low-noise valley and spin currents generated can be useful in valleytronic and spintronic applications. Our work also demonstrates that bulk topological spin or valley pumping is a general characteristic effect of two-dimensional topological insulators, irrelevant to the edge state physics. PMID:27507592

  10. Topological spin and valley pumping in silicene.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Sheng, L; Wang, B G; Xing, D Y

    2016-01-01

    We propose to realize adiabatic topological spin and valley pumping by using silicene, subject to the modulation of an in-plane ac electric field with amplitude Ey and a vertical electric field consisting of an electrostatic component and an ac component with amplitudes and . By tuning and , topological valley pumping or spin-valley pumping can be achieved. The low-noise valley and spin currents generated can be useful in valleytronic and spintronic applications. Our work also demonstrates that bulk topological spin or valley pumping is a general characteristic effect of two-dimensional topological insulators, irrelevant to the edge state physics. PMID:27507592

  11. Topological spin and valley pumping in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Sheng, L.; Wang, B. G.; Xing, D. Y.

    2016-08-01

    We propose to realize adiabatic topological spin and valley pumping by using silicene, subject to the modulation of an in-plane ac electric field with amplitude Ey and a vertical electric field consisting of an electrostatic component and an ac component with amplitudes and . By tuning and , topological valley pumping or spin-valley pumping can be achieved. The low-noise valley and spin currents generated can be useful in valleytronic and spintronic applications. Our work also demonstrates that bulk topological spin or valley pumping is a general characteristic effect of two-dimensional topological insulators, irrelevant to the edge state physics.

  12. Observation of a hybrid spin resonance

    PubMed

    Bai; Allgower; Ahrens; Alessi; Brown; Bunce; Cameron; Chu; Courant; Glenn; Huang; Jeon; Kponou; Krueger; Luccio; Makdisi; Lee; Ratner; Reece; Roser; Spinka; Syphers; Tsoupas; Underwood; van Asselt W; Williams

    2000-02-01

    A new type of spin depolarization resonance has been observed at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). This spin resonance is identified as a strong closed-orbit sideband around the dominant intrinsic spin resonance. The strength of the resonance was proportional to the 9th harmonic component of the horizontal closed orbit and proportional to the vertical betatron oscillation amplitude. This "hybrid" spin resonance cannot be overcome by the partial snake at the AGS, but it can be corrected by the harmonic orbit correctors. PMID:11017474

  13. Surprising Behavior of Spinning Tops and Eggs on an Inclined Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2016-01-01

    A spinning top or a spinning hard-boiled egg is fascinating to observe since both objects can remain upright for a relatively long time without falling over. If spun at sufficient speed on a horizontal surface, the spin axis rises to a vertical position and the bottom end tends to remain fixed in position on the surface. If the initial spin is…

  14. Dissociated Vertical Deviation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dissociated Vertical Deviation En Español Read in Chinese What is Dissociated Vertical Deviation (DVD)? DVD is ...

  15. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/25-Scale Model of the McDonnell F3H-1N Airplane, TED No. NACA AD 3100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry A.; Wilkes, L. Faye

    1954-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/23-scale model of the McDonnell F3H-1N airplane. The effects of control settings and movements upon the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the clean condition. Spin-recovery parachute tests were also performed. The results indicated that erect spins obtained on the airplane for the take-off or combat loadings should be satisfactorily terminated if full rudder reversal is accompanied by moving the ailerons to full with the spin (stick full right in a right spin). The spins obtained should be oscillatory in pitch, roll, and yaw. Recoveries from inverted spins should be satisfactory by full reversal of the rudder. A 16.7-foot- diameter tail parachute with a towline length of 30 feet and a drag coefficient of 0.734 should be adequate for emergency recovery from demonstration spins.

  16. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/25-Scale Model of the Chance Vought F8U-1P Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browman, James S., Jr.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/25-scale dynamic model to determine the spin and recovery characteristics of the Chance Vought F8U-1P airplane. Results indicated that the F8U-IP airplane would have spin-recovery characteristics similar to the XF8U-1 design, a model of which was tested and the results of the tests reported in NACA Research Memorandum SL56L31b. The results indicate that some modification in the design, or some special technique for recovery, is required in order to insure satisfactory recovery from fully developed erect spins. The recommended recovery technique for the F8U-lP will be full rudder reversal and movement of ailerons full with the spin (stick right in a right spin) with full deflection of the wing leading- edge flap. Inverted spins will be difficult to obtain and any inverted spin obtained should be readily terminated by full rudder reversal to oppose the yawing rotation and neutralization of the longitudinal and lateral controls. In an emergency, the same size parachute recommended for the XFBU-1 airplane will be adequate for termination of the spin: a stable parachute 17.7 feet in diameter (projected) with a drag coefficient of 1.14 (based on projected diameter) and a towline length of 36.5 feet.

  17. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman F9F-6 Airplane TED No. NACA DE 364

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of a 1/24-scale model of the Grumman F9F-6 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the normal flight loading with the model in the clean condition. The effect of loading variations was investigated briefly. Spin-recovery parachute tests were also performed. The results indicate that erect spins obtained on the airplane in the clean condition will be satisfactorily terminated for all loading conditions provided full rudder reversal is accompanied by moving the ailerons and flaperons (lateral controls) to full with the spin (stick right in a right spin). Inverted spins should be satisfactorily terminated by full reversal of the rudder alone. The model tests indicate that an 11.4-foot (laid-out-flat diameter) tail parachute (drag coefficient approximately 0.73) should be effective as an emergency spin-recovery device during demonstration spins of the airplane provided the towline is attached above the horizontal stabilizer.

  18. Vertical Map Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Joanne M.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the superiority of vertical filing of maps in compressor-style vertical units over horizontal filing in drawers, emphasizing such factors as physical protection of the collection, ease of filing and retrieval, and efficient use of space. Disadvantages of vertical filing are also reviewed. (Author/JL)

  19. Spin-bowling in cricket re-visited: model trajectories for various spin-vector angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Garry; Robinson, Ian

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we investigate, via the calculation of model trajectories appropriate to slow bowling in cricket, the effects on the flight path of the ball before pitching due to changes in the angle of the spin-vector. This was accomplished by allowing the spin-vector to vary in three ways. Firstly, from off-spin, where the spin-vector points horizontally and directly down the pitch, to top-spin where it points horizontally towards the off-side of the pitch. Secondly, from off-spin to side-spin where, for side-spin, the spin-vector points vertically upwards. Thirdly, where the spin-vector points horizontally and at 45° to the pitch (in the general direction of ‘point’, as viewed by the bowler), and is varied towards the vertical, while maintaining the 45° angle in the horizontal plane. It is found that, as is well known, top-spin causes the ball to dip in flight, side-spin causes the ball to move side-ways in flight and, perhaps most importantly, off-spin can cause the ball to drift to the off-side of the pitch late in its flight as it begins to fall. At a more subtle level it is found that, if the total spin is kept constant and a small amount of top-spin is added to the ball at the expense of some off-spin, there is little change in the side-ways drift. However, a considerable reduction in the length at which the ball pitches occurs, ∼25 cm, an amount that batsmen can ignore at their peril. On the other hand, a small amount of side-spin introduced to a top-spin delivery does not alter the point of pitching significantly, but produces a considerable amount of side-ways drift, ∼10 cm or more. For pure side-spin the side-ways drift is up to ∼30 cm. When a side-spin component is added to the spin of a ball bowled with a mixture of off-spin and top-spin in equal proportions, significant movement occurs in both the side-ways direction and in the point of pitching, of the order of a few tens of centimetres.

  20. Experimental realization of a silicon spin field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biqin; Monsma, Douwe J.; Appelbaum, Ian

    2007-08-01

    A longitudinal electric field is used to control the transit time (through an undoped silicon vertical channel) of spin-polarized electrons precessing in a perpendicular magnetic field. Since an applied voltage determines the final spin direction at the spin detector and hence the output collector current, this comprises a spin field-effect transistor. An improved hot-electron spin injector providing ≈115% magnetocurrent, corresponding to at least ≈37% electron current spin polarization after transport through 10μm undoped single-crystal silicon, is used for maximum current modulation.

  1. Vertical bounce of two vertically aligned balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2007-11-01

    When a tennis ball rests on top of a basketball and both drop to the floor together, the tennis ball is projected vertically at high speed. A mass-spring model of the impact, as well as air track data, suggest that the tennis ball should be projected at relatively low speed. Measurements of the forces on each ball and the bounce of vertically aligned superballs are used to resolve the discrepancy.

  2. Time-of-flight spectroscopy via spin precession: The Larmor clock and anomalous spin dephasing in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biqin; Appelbaum, Ian

    2010-12-01

    Drift-diffusion theory—which fully describes charge transport in semiconductors—is also universally used to model transport of spin-polarized electrons in the presence of longitudinal electric fields. By transforming spin transit time into spin orientation with precession (a technique called the “Larmor clock”) in current-sensing vertical-transport intrinsic Si devices, we show that spin diffusion (and concomitant spin dephasing) can be greatly enhanced with respect to charge diffusion, in direct contrast to predictions of spin Coulomb-drag diffusion suppression.

  3. Vanishing current hysteresis under competing nuclear spin pumping processes in a quadruplet spin-blockaded double quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Amaha, S.; Hatano, T.; Tarucha, S.; Gupta, J. A.; Austing, D. G.

    2015-04-27

    We investigate nuclear spin pumping with five-electron quadruplet spin states in a spin-blockaded weakly coupled vertical double quantum dot device. Two types of hysteretic steps in the leakage current are observed on sweeping the magnetic field and are associated with bidirectional polarization of nuclear spin. Properties of the steps are understood in terms of bias-voltage-dependent conditions for the mixing of quadruplet and doublet spin states by the hyperfine interaction. The hysteretic steps vanish when up- and down-nuclear spin pumping processes are in close competition.

  4. INVESTIGATION OF A RESIDUAL VERTICAL INSTRINSIC RESONANCES WITH DUAL PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKES IN THE AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    LIN,F.; LEE, S.Y.; AHRENS, L.A.; BAI, M.; BROWN, K.; COURANT, E.D.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    Two partial helical dipole snakes were found to be able to overcome all imperfection and intrinsic spin resonances provided that the vertical betatron tunes were maintained in the spin tune gap near the integer 9. Recent vertical betatron tune scan showed that the two weak resonances at the beginning of the acceleration cycle may be the cause of polarization loss. This result has been confirmed by the vertical polarization profile measurement, and spin tracking simulations. Possible cure of the remaining beam polarization is discussed.

  5. Offset vertical radar profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witten, A.; Lane, J.

    2003-01-01

    Diffraction tomography imaging was applied to VRP data acquired by vertically moving a receiving antenna in a number of wells. This procedure simulated a vertical downhole receiver array. Similarly, a transmitting antenna was sequentially moved along a series of radial lines extending outward from the receiver wells. This provided a sequence of multistatic data sets and, from each data set, a two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional image of spatial variations in wave speed was reconstructed.

  6. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  7. Positivity of spin foam amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baez, John C.; Christensen, J. Daniel

    2002-04-01

    The amplitude for a spin foam in the Barrett-Crane model of Riemannian quantum gravity is given as a product over its vertices, edges and faces, with one factor of the Riemannian 10j symbols appearing for each vertex, and simpler factors for the edges and faces. We prove that these amplitudes are always nonnegative for closed spin foams. As a corollary, all open spin foams going between a fixed pair of spin networks have real amplitudes of the same sign. This means one can use the Metropolis algorithm to compute expectation values of observables in the Riemannian Barrett-Crane model, as in statistical mechanics, even though this theory is based on a real-time (eiS) rather than imaginary-time e-S path integral. Our proof uses the fact that when the Riemannian 10j symbols are nonzero, their sign is positive or negative depending on whether the sum of the ten spins is an integer or half-integer. For the product of 10j symbols appearing in the amplitude for a closed spin foam, these signs cancel. We conclude with some numerical evidence suggesting that the Lorentzian 10j symbols are always nonnegative, which would imply similar results for the Lorentzian Barrett-Crane model.

  8. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider spin flipper commissioning plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, M.; Dawson, C.; Makdisi, Y.; Meng, W.; Meot, F.; Oddo, P.; Pai, C.; Pile, P.; Roser, T.

    2010-09-27

    The commissioning of the RHIC spin flipper in the RHIC Blue ring during the RHIC polarized proton run in 2009 showed the detrimental effects of global vertical coherent betatron oscillation induced by the 2-AC dipole plus 4-DC dipole configuration. This global orbital coherent oscillation of the RHIC beam in the Blue ring in the presence of collision modulated the beam-beam interaction between the two RHIC beams and affected Yellow beam lifetime. The experimental data at injection with different spin tunes by changing the snake current also demonstrated that it was not possible to induce a single isolated spin resonance with the global vertical coherent betatron oscillation excited by the two AC dipoles. Hence, RHIC spin flipper was re-designed to eliminate the coherent vertical betatron oscillation outside the spin flipper by adding three additional AC dipoles. This paper presents the experimental results as well as the new design.

  9. Concluding Report of Free-Spinning, Tumbling, and Recovery Characteristics of a 1/18-Scale Model of the Ryan X-13 Airplane, Coord. No. AF-199

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.

    1957-01-01

    An investigation has been completed in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/18-scale model of the Ryan X-13 airplane to determine its spin, recovery, and tumbling characteristics, and to determine the minimum altitude from which a belly landing could be made in case of power failure in hovering flight. Model spin tests were conducted with and without simulated engine rotation. Tests without simulated engine rotation indicated two types of spins: one, a slightly oscillatory flat spin; and the other, a violently oscillatory spin. Tests with simulated engine rotation indicated that spins to the left were fast rotating and steep and those to the right were slow rotating and flat. The optimum technique for recovery is reversal of the rudder to against the spin and simultaneous movement of the ailerons to full with the spin followed by movement of the elevators to neutral after the spin rotation ceases. Tumbling tests made on the model indicated that although the Ryan X-13 airplane will not tumble in the ordinary sense (end-over-end pitching motion), it may instead tend to enter a wild gyrating'motion. Tests made to simulate power failure in hovering flight by dropping the model indicated that the model entered what appeared to be a right spin. An attempt should be made to stop this motion immediately by moving the rudder to oppose the rotation (left pedal), moving the ailerons to with the spin (stick right), and moving the stick forward after the spin rotation ceases to obtain flying speed for pullout. The minimum altitude required for a belly landing in case of power failure in hovering flight was indicated to be about 4,200 feet.

  10. Spin ejector

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, John A.; Flanigan, John J.; Kindley, Robert J.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus for spin ejecting a body having a flat plate base containing bosses. The apparatus has a base plate and a main ejection shaft extending perpendicularly from the base plate. A compressible cylindrical spring is disposed about the shaft. Bearings are located between the shaft and the spring. A housing containing a helical aperture releasably engages the base plate and surrounds the shaft bearings and the spring. A piston having an aperture follower disposed in the housing aperture is seated on the spring and is guided by the shaft and the aperture. The spring is compressed and when released causes the piston to spin eject the body.

  11. Dynamic control of spin wave spectra using spin-polarized currents

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qi; Zhang, Huaiwu Tang, Xiaoli; Bai, Feiming; Zhong, Zhiyong; Fangohr, Hans

    2014-09-15

    We describe a method of controlling the spin wave spectra dynamically in a uniform nanostripe waveguide through spin-polarized currents. A stable periodic magnetization structure is observed when the current flows vertically through the center of nanostripe waveguide. After being excited, the spin wave is transmitted at the sides of the waveguide. Numerical simulations of spin-wave transmission and dispersion curves reveal a single, pronounced band gap. Moreover, the periodic magnetization structure can be turned on and off by the spin-polarized current. The switching process from full rejection to full transmission takes place within less than 3 ns. Thus, this type magnonic waveguide can be utilized for low-dissipation spin wave based filters.

  12. An Investigation of the Free-Spinning and Recovery Characteristics of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman F11F-1 Airplane with Alternate Nose Configurations with and without Wing Fuel Tanks, TED No. NACA AD 395

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.

    1958-01-01

    A supplementary investigation has been conducted in the langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/24-scale model of the Grumman F11F-1 airplane to determine the spin and recovery characteristics with alternate nose configurations, the production version and the elongated APS-67 version, with and without empty and full wing tanks. When spins were obtained with either alternate nose configuration, they were oscillatory and recovery characteristics were considered unsatisfactory on the basis of the fact that very slow recoveries were indicated to be possible. The simultaneous extension of canards near the nose of the model with rudder reversal was effective in rapidly terminating the spin. The addition of empty wing tanks had little effect on the developed spin and recovery characteristics. The model did not spin erect with full wing tanks. For optimum recovery from inverted spins, the rudder should be reversed to 22O against the spin and simultaneously the flaperons should be moved with the developed spin; the stick should be held at or moved to full forward longitudinally. The minimum size parachute required to insure satisfactory recoveries in an emergency was found to be 12 feet in diameter (laid out flat) with a drag coefficient of 0.64 (based on the laid-out-flat diameter) and a towline length of 32 feet.

  13. An evaluation of aerodynamics modeling of spinning light airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, B. N.; Taylor, L. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    This paper extends the application of the modified strip theory for wing body combination of a spinning light airplane reported earlier. In addition, to account for the contribution of the tail plane, the shielding effect on vertical tail under steady state spin condition is modeled from basic aerodynamic considerations. The results of this combined analysis, presented for some light airplane configurations, are shown to be in good agreement with spin tunnel rotary balance test data.

  14. Spin pumping and spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Eiji

    2012-02-01

    Utilization of a spin current, a flow of electrons' spins in a solid, is the key technology in spintronics that will allow the achievement of efficient magnetic memories and computing devices. In this technology, generation and detection of spin currents are necessary. Here, we review inverse spin-Hall effect and spin-current-generation phenomena recently discovered both in metals and insulators: inverse spin-Hall effect, spin pumping, and spin Seebeck effect. (1)Spin pumping and spin torque in a Mott insulator system We found that spin pumping and spin torque effects appear also at an interface between Pt and an insulator YIG.. This means that we can connect a spin current carried by conduction electrons and a spin-wave spin current flowing in insulators. We demonstrate electric signal transmission by using these effects and interconversion of the spin currents [1]. (2) Spin Seebeck effect We have observed, by using the inverse spin-Hall effect [2], spin voltage generation from a heat current in a NiFe, named the spin-Seebeck effect [3]. Surprisingly, spin-Seebeck effect was found to appear even in insulators [4], a situation completely different from conventional charge Seebeck effect. The result implies an important role of elementary excitation in solids beside charge in the spin Seebeck effect. In the talk, we review the recent progress of the research on this effect. This research is collaboration with K. Ando, K. Uchida, Y. Kajiwara, S. Maekawa, G. E. W. Bauer, S. Takahashi, and J. Ieda. [4pt] [1] Y. Kajiwara and E. Saitoh et al. Nature 464 (2010) 262. [0pt] [2] E. Saitoh et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 (2006) 182509. [0pt] [3] K. Uchida and E. Saitoh et al., Nature 455 (2008)778. [0pt] [4] K. Uchida and E. Saitoh et al.,Nature materials 9 (2010) 894 - 897.

  15. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... smaller stomach is about the size of a banana. It limits the amount of food you can ... staples. This creates a long vertical tube or banana-shaped stomach. The surgery does not involve cutting ...

  16. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  17. The effect of spin in swing bowling in cricket: model trajectories for spin alone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Garry; Robinson, Ian

    2015-02-01

    In ‘swing’ bowling, as employed by fast and fast-medium bowlers in cricket, back-spin along the line of the seam is normally applied in order to keep the seam vertical and to provide stability against ‘wobble’ of the seam. Whilst spin is normally thought of as primarily being the slow bowler's domain, the spin applied by the swing bowler has the side-effect of generating a lift or Magnus force. This force, depending on the orientation of the seam and hence that of the back-spin, can have a side-ways component as well as the expected vertical ‘lift’ component. The effect of the spin itself, in influencing the trajectory of the fast bowler's delivery, is normally not considered, presumably being thought of as negligible. The purpose of this paper is to investigate, using calculated model trajectories, the amount of side-ways movement due to the spin and to see how this predicted movement compares with the total observed side-ways movement. The size of the vertical lift component is also estimated. It is found that, although the spin is an essential part of the successful swing bowler's delivery, the amount of side-ways movement due to the spin itself amounts to a few centimetres or so, and is therefore small, but perhaps not negligible, compared to the total amount of side-ways movement observed. The spin does, however, provide a considerable amount of lift compared to the equivalent delivery bowled without spin, altering the point of pitching by up to 3 m, a very large amount indeed. Thus, for example, bowling a ball with the seam pointing directly down the pitch and not designed to swing side-ways at all, but with the amount of back-spin varied, could provide a very powerful additional weapon in the fast bowler's arsenal. So-called ‘sling bowlers’, who use a very low arm action, can take advantage of spin since effectively they can apply side-spin to the ball, giving rise to a large side-ways movement, ˜ 20{}^\\circ cm or more, which certainly is

  18. Emergent spin

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, Michael

    2014-03-15

    Quantum mechanics and relativity in the continuum imply the well known spin–statistics connection. However for particles hopping on a lattice, there is no such constraint. If a lattice model yields a relativistic field theory in a continuum limit, this constraint must “emerge” for physical excitations. We discuss a few models where a spin-less fermion hopping on a lattice gives excitations which satisfy the continuum Dirac equation. This includes such well known systems such as graphene and staggered fermions. -- Highlights: •The spin–statistics theorem is not required for particles on a lattice. •Spin emerges dynamically when spinless fermions have a relativistic continuum limit. •Graphene and staggered fermions are examples of this phenomenon. •The phenomenon is intimately tied to chiral symmetry and fermion doubling. •Anomaly cancellation is a crucial feature of any valid lattice fermion action.

  19. Spin Tests of 1/20-Scale Models of the Chance Vought Revised XF6U-1 and F6U-1 Airplanes, TED No. NACA 2390

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.; Berman, Theodore

    1948-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on the 1/20-scale model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 airplane altered to represent the XF6U-1 airplane as it will be spin-tested in flight, and also altered to represent the F6U-1 airplane as it will be produced for service use. Spin tests were made to determine the effects of control settings and movements at the normal loading. The results show that the spins obtained on the revised XF6U-1 airplane will be oscillatory in roll and yaw and that recoveries by rudder reversal will be rapid. Model test results indicate that the F6U-1 airplane will probably not spin. Inasmuch as the results of this investigation show that the new designs are as good as or better than the original XF6U-1 design in regard to spin recovery, it is felt that the conclusions and recommendations reached for the original design can be applied to the new designs for all loading conditions.

  20. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the North American XP-86 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Theodore

    1948-01-01

    A spin investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/24-scale model of the North American XP-86 airplane. The effects of control settings and movements upon the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the design gross weight loading. The long-range loading was also investigated and the effects of extending slats and dive flaps were determined. In addition, the investigation included the determination of the size of spin-recovery parachute required for emergency recovery from demonstration spins, the rudder force required to move the rudder for recovery, and the best method for the pilot to escape if it should become necessary to do so during a spin. The results of the investigation indicated that the XP-86 airplane will probably recover satisfactorily from erect and inverted spins for all possible loadings. It was found that fully extending both slats would be beneficial but that extending the dive brakes would cause unsatisfactory recoveries. It was determined that a 10.0-foot-diameter tail parachute with a drag coefficient of 0.7 and with a towline 30.0 feet long attached below the jet exit or a 6.0-foot-diameter wingtip parachute opened on the outer wing tip with a towline 6.0 feet long would insure recoveries from any spins obtainable. The rudder-pedal force necessary to move the rudder for satisfactory recovery was found to be within the physical capabilities of the pilot.

  1. Magnetization dynamics of topological defects and the spin solid in a kagome artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, V. S.; Heimbach, F.; Stasinopoulos, I.; Grundler, D.

    2016-04-01

    We report broadband spin-wave spectroscopy on kagome artificial spin ice (ASI) made of large arrays of interconnected Ni80Fe20 nanobars. Spectra taken in saturated and disordered states exhibit a series of resonances with characteristic magnetic field dependencies. Making use of micromagnetic simulations, we identify resonances that reflect the spin-solid-state and monopole-antimonopole pairs on Dirac strings. The latter resonances allow for the generation of highly charged vertices in ASIs via microwave-assisted switching. Our findings open further perspectives for fundamental studies on ASIs and their usage in reprogrammable magnonics.

  2. Coherent Spin Transport through a 350Micron Thick Silicon Wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biqin; Monsma, Douwe J.; Appelbaum, Ian

    2007-10-01

    We use all-electrical methods to inject, transport, and detect spin-polarized electrons vertically through a 350-micron-thick undoped single-crystal silicon wafer. Spin precession measurements in a perpendicular magnetic field at different accelerating electric fields reveal high spin coherence with at least 13π precession angles. The magnetic-field spacing of precession extrema are used to determine the injector-to-detector electron transit time. These transit time values are associated with output magnetocurrent changes (from in-plane spin-valve measurements), which are proportional to final spin polarization. Fitting the results to a simple exponential spin-decay model yields a conduction electron spin lifetime (T1) lower bound in silicon of over 500 ns at 60 K.

  3. Spin injection into semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oestreich, M.; Hübner, J.; Hägele, D.; Klar, P. J.; Heimbrodt, W.; Rühle, W. W.; Ashenford, D. E.; Lunn, B.

    1999-03-01

    The injection of spin-polarized electrons is presently one of the major challenges in semiconductor spin electronics. We propose and demonstrate a most efficient spin injection using diluted magnetic semiconductors as spin aligners. Time-resolved photoluminescence with a Cd0.98Mn0.02Te/CdTe structure proves the feasibility of the spin-alignment mechanism.

  4. Vertical Seismoelectric Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araji, A.

    2011-12-01

    The seismoelectric method corresponds to the measurement of electromagnetic disturbances associated with the passage of seismic waves in a porous medium. The coupling is due to the existence of the electric double layer at the solid/water interfaces. We consider the case of vertical seismoelectric profiling in which we trigger a seismic source in a vertical borehole and measure the seismoelectric response on the surface. We aim to image hetrogeneities in that section of the subsurface by utilizing the seismoelectric sources created at interfaces. An iterative source localization inversion algorithm is used to achieve the imaging of interfaces.

  5. Spin noise in mixed Spin Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Erik; Junghyun, Paul; Singh, Swati; Devakul, Trithep; Feguin, Adrian; Hart, Connor; Walsworth, Ronald

    2016-05-01

    The spin noise due to interaction of multiple spin species in mixed spin systems provides a fundamental limit to ultra-sensitive ensemble sensing and quantum information applications. In our work, we investigate the interaction of dense nuclear 13C spins with electronic nitrogen spins using Nitrogen-Vacancy centers in diamond. Our work shows experimentally and theoretically, that under certain conditions, spin noise is greatly suppressed and the coherence time of NV centers improved by order of magnitudes, providing a pathway to engineering high density ensemble samples with long coherence times at room temperature.

  6. Aiding Vertical Guidance Understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael; McCrobie, Daniel; Alkin, Martin; Sherry, Lance; Polson, Peter; Palmer, Everett; McQuinn, Noreen

    1998-01-01

    A two-part study was conducted to evaluate modern flight deck automation and interfaces. In the first part, a survey was performed to validate the existence of automation surprises with current pilots. Results indicated that pilots were often surprised by the behavior of the automation. There were several surprises that were reported more frequently than others. An experimental study was then performed to evaluate (1) the reduction of automation surprises through training specifically for the vertical guidance logic, and (2) a new display that describes the flight guidance in terms of aircraft behaviors instead of control modes. The study was performed in a simulator that was used to run a complete flight with actual airline pilots. Three groups were used to evaluate the guidance display and training. In the training, condition, participants went through a training program for vertical guidance before flying the simulation. In the display condition, participants ran through the same training program and then flew the experimental scenario with the new Guidance-Flight Mode Annunciator (G-FMA). Results showed improved pilot performance when given training specifically for the vertical guidance logic and greater improvements when given the training and the new G-FMA. Using actual behavior of the avionics to design pilot training and FMA is feasible, and when the automated vertical guidance mode of the Flight Management System is engaged, the display of the guidance mode and targets yields improved pilot performance.

  7. Vertical Alignment and Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Donna; Calzada, Lucio; LaPointe, Nancy; Lee, Audra; Sullivan, Lynn

    This study investigated whether vertical (grade level sequence) alignment of the curriculum in conjunction with teacher collaboration would enhance student performance on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) test in south Texas school districts of various sizes. Surveys were mailed to the office of the superintendent of 47 school…

  8. Vertical shaft windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grana, D. C.; Inge, S. V., Jr. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A vertical shaft has several equally spaced blades mounted. Each blade consists of an inboard section and an outboard section skew hinged to the inboard section. The inboard sections automatically adjust their positions with respect to the fixed inboard sections with changes in velocity of the wind. This windmill design automatically governs the maximum rotational speed of shaft.

  9. Vertically-tapered optical waveguide and optical spot transformer formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Bakke, Thor; Sullivan, Charles T.

    2004-07-27

    An optical waveguide is disclosed in which a section of the waveguide core is vertically tapered during formation by spin coating by controlling the width of an underlying mesa structure. The optical waveguide can be formed from spin-coatable materials such as polymers, sol-gels and spin-on glasses. The vertically-tapered waveguide section can be used to provide a vertical expansion of an optical mode of light within the optical waveguide. A laterally-tapered section can be added adjacent to the vertically-tapered section to provide for a lateral expansion of the optical mode, thereby forming an optical spot-size transformer for efficient coupling of light between the optical waveguide and a single-mode optical fiber. Such a spot-size transformer can also be added to a III-V semiconductor device by post processing.

  10. Nonlocal Nuclear Spin Quieting in Quantum Dot Molecules: Optically Induced Extended Two-Electron Spin Coherence Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Colin M.; Ross, Aaron M.; Kim, Danny; Gammon, Daniel; Bracker, Allan S.; Sham, L. J.; Steel, Duncan G.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the extension of coherence between all four two-electron spin ground states of an InAs quantum dot molecule (QDM) via nonlocal suppression of nuclear spin fluctuations in two vertically stacked quantum dots (QDs), while optically addressing only the top QD transitions. Long coherence times are revealed through dark-state spectroscopy as resulting from nuclear spin locking mediated by the exchange interaction between the QDs. Line shape analysis provides the first measurement of the quieting of the Overhauser field distribution correlating with reduced nuclear spin fluctuations.

  11. Nonlocal Nuclear Spin Quieting in Quantum Dot Molecules: Optically Induced Extended Two-Electron Spin Coherence Time.

    PubMed

    Chow, Colin M; Ross, Aaron M; Kim, Danny; Gammon, Daniel; Bracker, Allan S; Sham, L J; Steel, Duncan G

    2016-08-12

    We demonstrate the extension of coherence between all four two-electron spin ground states of an InAs quantum dot molecule (QDM) via nonlocal suppression of nuclear spin fluctuations in two vertically stacked quantum dots (QDs), while optically addressing only the top QD transitions. Long coherence times are revealed through dark-state spectroscopy as resulting from nuclear spin locking mediated by the exchange interaction between the QDs. Line shape analysis provides the first measurement of the quieting of the Overhauser field distribution correlating with reduced nuclear spin fluctuations. PMID:27563998

  12. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman XF9F-2 Airplane with Wing-Tip Tanks Installed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Theodore; Wilson, Jack H.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/24-scale model of the Grumman XF9F-2 airplane with wing-tip tanks installed has been conducted-in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effects of control settings and movements on the erect spin and recovery characteristics of the model for a range of possible loadings of the tip tanks were determined. Spin and recovery characteristics without tanks were determined in a previous investigation. The model results indicated that the airplane spins will generally be oscillatory and that recoveries will be satisfactory for all loadings by normal recovery technique (full rudder reversal followed approximately one-half turn later by moving the elevator down). The rudder force necessary for recovery should be within the physical capability of the pilot but the elevator force may be excessive so that some type of balance or booster might be necessary, or it might be necessary to jettison the wing-tip tanks.

  13. Tail venting for enhanced yaw damping at spinning conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, H. P., III; Whipple, Raymond D.; Fremaux, C. M.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley 20-ft Vertical Spin Tunnel to determine the spin and spin-recovery characteristics of a 1/11-scale model of a low-wing general aviation airplane with a horizontal tail modified with variable-size gaps to allow ventilation of the vertical stabilizer and rudder. Erect spins at symmetric loadings were tested with varying gap sizes on either or both sides of the horizontal tail. The model results indicate that the basic airplane (with no gaps) exhibits a fast, flat spin from which no recoveries can be obtained. The airplane with the modified tail has either a fast, flat spin from which no recoveries or poor recoveries may be made, or a slower, steeper spin from which fair to excellent recoveries may be obtained, depending on the size and orientation of the tail gaps. The major contribution to spin recovery was from the gap on the leeward side of the tail. Gap widths of 15-25 percent of the tail semispan were needed to produce satisfactory recovery from the flat spin.

  14. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Steel, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. Grain heights are less than their diameter so the grains resemble antacid tablets, coins, or poker chips. These grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by grain and channel sizes. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

  15. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; McCausland, Jeffrey; Steel, Fiona

    2010-03-01

    We experimentally study jamming of cylindrical grains in a vertical channel. The grains have a low aspect-ratio (height/diameter < 1) so their shape is like antacid tablets or poker chips. They are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section. The channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. It is observed that grains sometimes jam in this apparatus. In a jam, grains form a stable structure from one side of the channel to the other with nothing beneath them. Jams may be strong enough to support additional grains above. The probability of a jam occurring is a function of the grain height and diameter. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  16. Vertical organic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100 nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-μm structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted.

  17. Vertical bloch line memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-chuan (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A new read gate design for the vertical Bloch line (VBL) memory is disclosed which offers larger operating margin than the existing read gate designs. In the existing read gate designs, a current is applied to all the stripes. The stripes that contain a VBL pair are chopped, while the stripes that do not contain a VBL pair are not chopped. The information is then detected by inspecting the presence or absence of the bubble. The margin of the chopping current amplitude is very small, and sometimes non-existent. A new method of reading Vertical Bloch Line memory is also disclosed. Instead of using the wall chirality to separate the two binary states, the spatial deflection of the stripe head is used. Also disclosed herein is a compact memory which uses vertical Bloch line (VBL) memory technology for providing data storage. A three-dimensional arrangement in the form of stacks of VBL memory layers is used to achieve high volumetric storage density. High data transfer rate is achieved by operating all the layers in parallel. Using Hall effect sensing, and optical sensing via the Faraday effect to access the data from within the three-dimensional packages, an even higher data transfer rate can be achieved due to parallel operation within each layer.

  18. Direct detection of spin chemical potential shift through spin filtering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Guoxing; Moodera, Jagadeesh

    2010-03-01

    Spin filtering (SF) effect is a unique way to generate highly spin-polarized tunnel currents from nonmagnetic electrodes. Magnetic tunnel junctions based on pure SF effect have been realized recently [1] as a clear demonstration of principle for the spin manipulation through SF effect. The next challenge is the readout of spin information. In this work, we present the direct detection of the spin chemical potential shift in an Al nano cluster sandwiched between two SF EuS tunnel barriers. The spin channels are split by depositing Al directly onto EuS, and the indirect exchange interaction between the Al conduction electrons and the localized Eu 4f electrons gives rise to an effective Zeeman splitting with the strength of a few mV. EuS on the readout side is isolated from the Al clusters with a natural Al2O3 barrier. In a vertical measurement geometry with no transport current, we directly detected the spin dependent voltage levels by aligning the detection SF barrier parallel or antiparallel to the first SF barrier, corresponding to the equilibrium up- and down-spin chemical potentials. A simple analysis treating the barriers as a set of resistors revealed that the observed voltage difference is the actual chemical potential shift modulated by the SF efficiency.[4pt] [1] G.X. Miao, M. Muller, J.S. Moodera,PRL102,076601(2009)

  19. Spin-Spin Coupling in Asteroidal Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Gravitationally bound binaries constitute a substantial fraction of the small body population of the solar system, and characterization of their rotational states is instrumental to understanding their formation and dynamical evolution. Unlike planets, numerous small bodies can maintain a perpetual aspheroidal shape, giving rise to a richer array of non-trivial gravitational dynamics. In this work, we explore the rotational evolution of triaxial satellites that orbit permanently deformed central objects, with specific emphasis on quadrupole-quadrupole interactions. Our analysis shows that in addition to conventional spin-orbit resonances, both prograde and retrograde spin-spin resonances naturally arise for closely orbiting, highly deformed bodies. Application of our results to the illustrative examples of (87) Sylvia and (216) Kleopatra multi-asteroid systems implies capture probabilities slightly below ~10% for leading-order spin-spin resonances. Cumulatively, our results suggest that spin-spin coupling may be consequential for highly elongated, tightly orbiting binary objects.

  20. Spin-liquid condensate of spinful bosons.

    PubMed

    Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shoucheng

    2014-08-22

    We introduce the concept of a bosonic spin liquid condensate (SLC), where spinful bosons in a lattice form a zero-temperature spin disordered charge condensate that preserves the spin rotation symmetry, but breaks the U(1) symmetry due to a spinless order parameter with charge one. It has an energy gap to all the spin excitations. We show that such SLC states can be realized in a system of spin S ≥ 2 bosons. In particular, we analyze the SLC phase diagram in the spin 2 case using a mean-field variational wave function method. We show there is a direct analogy between the SLC and the resonating-valence-bond state. PMID:25192078

  1. RHIC SPIN FLIPPER

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; ROSER, T.

    2007-06-25

    This paper proposes a new design of spin flipper for RHIC to obtain full spin flip with the spin tune staying at half integer. The traditional technique of using an rf dipole or solenoid as spin flipper to achieve full spin flip in the presence of full Siberian snake requires one to change the snake configuration to move the spin tune away from half integer. This is not practical for an operational high energy polarized proton collider like RHIC where beam lifetime is sensitive to small betatron tune change. The design of the new spin flipper as well as numerical simulations are presented.

  2. Spin projection chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, E. P.; Pastawski, H. M.; Levstein, P. R.

    2004-01-01

    We formulate the many-body spin dynamics at high temperature within the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism. For the simplest XY interaction, analytical expressions in terms of the one particle solutions are obtained for linear and ring configurations. For small rings of even spin number, the group velocities of excitations depend on the parity of the total spin projection. This should enable a dynamical filtering of spin projections with a given parity i.e., a spin projection chromatography.

  3. Magnons, Spin Current and Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2012-02-01

    When metals and semiconductors are placed in a temperature gradient, the electric voltage is generated. This mechanism to convert heat into electricity, the so-called Seebeck effect, has attracted much attention recently as the mechanism for utilizing wasted heat energy. [1]. Ferromagnetic insulators are good conductors of spin current, i.e., the flow of electron spins [2]. When they are placed in a temperature gradient, generated are magnons, spin current and the spin voltage [3], i.e., spin accumulation. Once the spin voltage is converted into the electric voltage by inverse spin Hall effect in attached metal films such as Pt, the electric voltage is obtained from heat energy [4-5]. This is called the spin Seebeck effect. Here, we present the linear-response theory of spin Seebeck effect based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem [6-8] and discuss a variety of the devices. [4pt] [1] S. Maekawa et al, Physics of Transition Metal Oxides (Springer, 2004). [0pt] [2] S. Maekawa: Nature Materials 8, 777 (2009). [0pt] [3] Concept in Spin Electronics, eds. S. Maekawa (Oxford University Press, 2006). [0pt] [4] K. Uchida et al., Nature 455, 778 (2008). [0pt] [5] K. Uchida et al., Nature Materials 9, 894 (2010) [0pt] [6] H. Adachi et al., APL 97, 252506 (2010) and Phys. Rev. B 83, 094410 (2011). [0pt] [7] J. Ohe et al., Phys. Rev. B (2011) [0pt] [8] K. Uchida et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 104419 (2010).

  4. 'Endurance' Untouched (vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of 'Endurance Crater.' The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through the martian atmosphere. The 360-degree view is presented in a vertical projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction.

  5. The vertical motion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosein, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Today's flight simulators, such as NASA's multimillion dollar Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS), recreate an authentic aircraft environment, and reproduce the sensations of flight by mechanically generating true physical events. In addition to their application as a training tool for pilots, simulators have become essential in the design, construction, and testing of new aircraft. Simulators allow engineers to study an aircraft's flight performance and characteristics without the cost or risk of an actual test flight. Because of their practicality, simulators will become more and more important in the development and design of new, safer aircraft.

  6. Vertical wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Danson, D.P.

    1988-08-16

    This patent describes a wind driven turbine of the vertical axis type comprising: (a) a support base; (b) a generally vertical column rotatably mounted to the support base; (c) upper and lower support means respectively mounted on the column for rotation therewith; wind driven blades connected between the upper and lower support means for rotation about the column and each blade being individually rotatable about a blade axis extending longitudinally through the blade to vary a blade angle of attach thereof relative to wind velocity during rotation about the column; and (e) control means for variably adjusting angles of attack of each blade to incident wind, the control means including a connecting rod means having drive means for rotating each blade about the associated blade axis in response to radial movement of the connecting rod means and control shaft pivotally mounted within the column and having a first shaft portion connected to the connecting rod means and a second shaft portion radially offset from the first shaft portion and pivotally connected to radially displace the first portion and thereby the connecting rod means to vary the blade angles of attack during rotation about the column.

  7. Vertical organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-11

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100 nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-μm structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted. PMID:26466388

  8. Free-Spinning Tunnel Tests of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA 2390

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.

    1946-01-01

    A spin investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/20-scale model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 airplane, The effects of control settings and movements upon the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the normal-fighter condition. The investigation also included tests for the take-off fighter condition (wing-tip tanks plus fuel added) spin-recovery parachutes, and simulated pilot escape. In general, for the normal-fighter condition, the model was extremely oscillatory in roll, pitch, and yaw. The angles of the fuselage varied from extremely flat to inverted attitudes, and the model rotated with the rudder in a series of short turns and glides. Recoveries by rudder reversal were rapid but the model would immediately go into a spin in the other direction. Recoveries by merely neutralizing the rudder were satisfactory when the elevator and ailerons were set to neutral, the ensuing flight path being a steep glide. Thus, it is recommended that all controls be neutralized for safe recovery from spins obtained on the airplane. With the external wing-tip tanks installed, the spins were somewhat less oscillatory in roll but recovery could not be obtained unless full-down elevator was used in conjunction with the rudder. If a spin is entered inadvertently with the full-scale airplane with external wing-tip tanks installed and if recovery is not imminent after a recovery attempt is made, it is recommended that the tanks be jettisoned and the controls neutralized.

  9. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 0.057-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtridge, Lee T., Jr.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 0.057-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effects of control settings and movements on the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics were determined, as were also the effects of extending the wing slats, of center-of-gravity movement, and-of variation in the mass distribution. The investigation also included wing-tip spin-recovery-parachute tests, pilot-escape tests, and rudder-control-force tests. The investigation indicated that the spin and recovery characteristics of the airplane will be satisfactory for all conditions. It was found that a single 4.24-foot (full-scale) parachute when opened alone from the outboard wing tip or two 8.77-foot (full-scale) parachutes when opened simultaneously, one from each wing tip, would effect satisfactory emergency recoveries (the drag coefficients of the parachutes, based on the surface area of the parachute, were 0.83 and 0.70 for the 4.24- and 8.77-foot parachutes, respectively). The towline length in both cases was 25 feet (full scale). Tests results showed that, if the pilot should have to leave the airplane during a spin, he should jump from the outboard side (left side in a right spin) of the cockpit. The rudder-control force necessary for recovery from a spin was found to be rather high but appeared to be within the upper limits of a pilot's capabilities.

  10. General spin precession and betatron oscillation in storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Spin precession of particles having both anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments (EDMs) is considered. We give the generalized expression of spin precession of these particles injected with transversal extent in magnetic storage rings. This is the generalization of the Farley’s pitch correction [F. J. N. Farley, Phys. Lett. B 42, 66 (1972)], including radial oscillation as well as vertical one. The transversal betatron oscillation formulae of these particles are also reproduced.

  11. Construction of Foundation for 15-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Completed foundation for the outer housing for the 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. Charles Zimmerman was given the assignment to design and build a larger spin tunnel that would supplant the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Authorization to build the tunnel using funds from the Federal Public Works Administration (PWA) came in June 1933. Construction started in late winter 1934 and the tunnel was operational in April 1935. The initial construction costs were $64,000.

  12. Noncommutativity due to spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, M.; Kupriyanov, V. G.; da Silva, A. J.

    2010-04-01

    Using the Berezin-Marinov pseudoclassical formulation of the spin particle we propose a classical model of spin noncommutativity. In the nonrelativistic case, the Poisson brackets between the coordinates are proportional to the spin angular momentum. The quantization of the model leads to the noncommutativity with mixed spatial and spin degrees of freedom. A modified Pauli equation, describing a spin half particle in an external electromagnetic field is obtained. We show that nonlocality caused by the spin noncommutativity depends on the spin of the particle; for spin zero, nonlocality does not appear, for spin half, ΔxΔy≥θ2/2, etc. In the relativistic case the noncommutative Dirac equation was derived. For that we introduce a new star product. The advantage of our model is that in spite of the presence of noncommutativity and nonlocality, it is Lorentz invariant. Also, in the quasiclassical approximation it gives noncommutativity with a nilpotent parameter.

  13. Spin Rotation of Formalism for Spin Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio,A.

    2008-02-01

    The problem of which coefficients are adequate to correctly represent the spin rotation in vector spin tracking for polarized proton and deuteron beams in synchrotrons is here re-examined in the light of recent discussions. The main aim of this note is to show where some previous erroneous results originated and how to code spin rotation in a tracking code. Some analysis of a recent experiment is presented that confirm the correctness of the assumptions.

  14. Spin wave Feynman diagram vertex computation package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Alexander; Javernick, Philip; Datta, Trinanjan

    Spin wave theory is a well-established theoretical technique that can correctly predict the physical behavior of ordered magnetic states. However, computing the effects of an interacting spin wave theory incorporating magnons involve a laborious by hand derivation of Feynman diagram vertices. The process is tedious and time consuming. Hence, to improve productivity and have another means to check the analytical calculations, we have devised a Feynman Diagram Vertex Computation package. In this talk, we will describe our research group's effort to implement a Mathematica based symbolic Feynman diagram vertex computation package that computes spin wave vertices. Utilizing the non-commutative algebra package NCAlgebra as an add-on to Mathematica, symbolic expressions for the Feynman diagram vertices of a Heisenberg quantum antiferromagnet are obtained. Our existing code reproduces the well-known expressions of a nearest neighbor square lattice Heisenberg model. We also discuss the case of a triangular lattice Heisenberg model where non collinear terms contribute to the vertex interactions.

  15. Incipient- and Developed-Spin and Recovery Characteristics of a Modern High-Speed Fighter Design with Low Aspect Ratio as Determined from Dynamic-Model Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry A.; Libbey, Charles E.

    1961-01-01

    Incipient- and developed-spin and recovery characteristics of a modern high-speed fighter design with low aspect ratio have been investigated by means of dynamic model tests. A 1/7-scale radio-controlled model was tested by means of drop tests from a helicopter. Several 1/25-scale models with various configuration changes were tested in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. Model results indicated that generally it would be difficult to obtain a developed spin with a corresponding airplane and that either the airplane would recover of its own accord from any poststall motion or the poststall motion could be readily terminated by proper control technique. On occasion, however, the results indicated that if a post-stall motion were allowed to continue, a fully developed spin might be obtainable from which recovery could range from rapid to no recovery at all, even when optimum control technique was used. Satisfactory recoveries could be obtained with a proper-size tail parachute or strake, application of pitching-, rolling-, or yawing-moment rockets, or sufficient differential deflection of the horizontal tail.

  16. Spin Circuit Representation for Spin Pumping Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kuntal; Datta, Supriyo

    2015-03-01

    There has been enormous progress in the field of spintronics and nanomagnetics in recent years with the discovery of many new materials and phenomena and it remains a formidable challenge to integrate these phenomena into functional devices and evaluate their potential. To facilitate this process a modular approach has been proposed whereby different phenomena are represented by spin circuit components. Unlike ordinary circuit components, these spin circuit components are characterized by 4-component voltages and currents (one for charge and three for spin). In this talk we will (1) present a spin circuit representation for spin pumping phenomena, (2) combine it with a spin circuit representation for the spin Hall effect to show that it reproduces established results obtained earlier by other means, and finally (3) use it to propose a possible method for enhancing the spin pumping efficiency by an order of magnitude through the addition of a spin sink layer. This work was supported by FAME, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  17. Spin Seebeck power generators

    SciTech Connect

    Cahaya, Adam B.; Tretiakov, O. A.; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2014-01-27

    We derive expressions for the efficiency and figure of merit of two spin caloritronic devices based on the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), i.e., the generation of spin currents by a temperature gradient. The inverse spin Hall effect is conventionally used to detect the SSE and offers advantages for large area applications. We also propose a device that converts spin current into electric one by means of a spin-valve detector, which scales favorably to small sizes and approaches a figure of merit of 0.5 at room temperature.

  18. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  19. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 #6;± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  20. Measurement of ultralow vertical emittance using a calibrated vertical undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Rassool, R. P.

    2014-11-01

    Very few experimental techniques are useful for the direct observation of ultralow vertical emittance in electron storage rings. In this work, quantitative measurements of ultralow (pm rad) electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator are presented. An undulator radiation model was developed using the measured magnetic field of the APPLE-II type undulator. Using calibrated experimental apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of ɛy=0.9 ±0.3 pm rad has been observed. These measurements could also inform modeling of the angular distribution of undulator radiation at high harmonics, for proposed diffraction-limited storage ring light sources.

  1. Observation of Picometer Vertical Emittance with a Vertical Undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Dowd, R.; Tan, Y.-R. E.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Taylor, G. N.; Rassool, R. P.

    2012-11-01

    Using a vertical undulator, picometer vertical electron beam emittances have been observed at the Australian Synchrotron storage ring. An APPLE-II type undulator was phased to produce a horizontal magnetic field, which creates a synchrotron radiation field that is very sensitive to the vertical electron beam emittance. The measured ratios of undulator spectral peak heights are evaluated by fitting to simulations of the apparatus. With this apparatus immediately available at most existing electron and positron storage rings, we find this to be an appropriate and novel vertical emittance diagnostic.

  2. Hole spin relaxation in InAs/GaAs quantum dot molecules.

    PubMed

    Segarra, C; Climente, J I; Rajadell, F; Planelles, J

    2015-10-21

    We calculate the spin-orbit induced hole spin relaxation between Zeeman sublevels of vertically stacked InAs quantum dots. The widely used Luttinger-Kohn Hamiltonian, which considers coupling of heavy- and light-holes, reveals that hole spin lifetimes (T1) of molecular states significantly exceed those of single quantum dot states. However, this effect can be overcome when cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction is strong. Misalignment of the dots along the stacking direction is also found to be an important source of spin relaxation. PMID:26418483

  3. Cooperative spin decoherence in finite spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Fernando; Fernandez-Rossier, Joaquin

    2014-03-01

    Overcoming the problem of relaxation and decoherence of magnetic nanostructures is one of the mayor goals in magnetic data storage. Although spin chains with as few as 12 magnetic atoms have revealed stability in cryogenic conditions, understanding the mechanism leading to these effects is essential for the engineered of stable structures. Here we consider the problem of spin decoherence and relaxation of finite size quantum spin chains due to elastic and spin conserving interactions with an electron gas. Specifically, we consider how the decoherence (T2) and relaxation (T1) times between the two degenerate ground states of a chain of N coupled spins compares with the one of an isolated spin in the same environment. We find that the spin decoherence time of Ising chains can be either enhanced or suppressed depending on the matching between the Fermi wavelength 2 π /kF and the inter-spin distance a. In particular, we find that depending on the values of kF a , it can show, for certain values that depends on the dimensionality of the electron gas, a cooperative enhancement proportional to N2 of the decoherence, analogous to super radiance decay of atom ensembles, or a suppression.

  4. Spin structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-ping Chen, Alexandre Deur, Sebastian Kuhn, Zein-eddine Meziani

    2011-06-01

    Spin-dependent observables have been a powerful tool to probe the internal structure of the nucleon and to understand the dynamics of the strong interaction. Experiments involving spin degrees of freedom have often brought out surprises and puzzles. The so-called "spin crisis" in the 1980s revealed the limitation of naive quark-parton models and led to intensive worldwide efforts, both experimental and theoretical, to understand the nucleon spin structure. With high intensity and high polarization of both the electron beam and targets, Jefferson Lab has the world's highest polarized luminosity and the best figure-of-merit for precision spin structure measurements. It has made a strong impact in this subfield of research. This chapter will highlight Jefferson Lab's unique contributions in the measurements of valence quark spin distributions, in the moments of spin structure functions at low to intermediate Q2, and in the transverse spin structure.

  5. Spinning eggs and ballerinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    Measurements are presented on the rise of a spinning egg. It was found that the spin, the angular momentum and the kinetic energy all decrease as the egg rises, unlike the case of a ballerina who can increase her spin and kinetic energy by reducing her moment of inertia. The observed effects can be explained, in part, in terms of rolling friction between the egg and the surface on which it spins.

  6. ON-LINE TOOLS FOR PROPER VERTICAL POSITIONING OF VERTICAL SAMPLING INTERVALS DURING SITE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents on-line tools for proper vertical positioning of vertical sampling intervals during site assessment. Proper vertical sample interval selection is critical for generate data on the vertical distribution of contamination. Without vertical delineation, th...

  7. Spinning Eggs and Ballerinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    Measurements are presented on the rise of a spinning egg. It was found that the spin, the angular momentum and the kinetic energy all decrease as the egg rises, unlike the case of a ballerina who can increase her spin and kinetic energy by reducing her moment of inertia. The observed effects can be explained, in part, in terms of rolling friction…

  8. 4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe (VTL). Machining the fixture for GE Turboshroud. G.S. O'Brien, operator. - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  9. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  10. Vertically reciprocating auger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etheridge, Mark; Morgan, Scott; Fain, Robert; Pearson, Jonathan; Weldi, Kevin; Woodrough, Stephen B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The mathematical model and test results developed for the Vertically Reciprocating Auger (VRA) are summarized. The VRA is a device capable of transporting cuttings that result from below surface drilling. It was developed chiefly for the lunar surface, where conventional fluid flushing while drilling would not be practical. The VRA uses only reciprocating motion and transports material through reflections with the surface above. Particles are reflected forward and land ahead of radially placed fences, which prevent the particles from rolling back down the auger. Three input wave forms are considered to drive the auger. A modified sawtooth wave form was chosen for testing, over a modified square wave or sine wave, due to its simplicity and effectiveness. The three-dimensional mathematical model predicted a sand throughput rate of 0.2667 pounds/stroke, while the actual test setup transported 0.075 pounds/stroke. Based on this result, a correction factor of 0.281 is suggested for a modified sawtooth input.

  11. Spinning eggs-which end will rise?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Ken

    2004-06-01

    We examine the spinning behavior of egg-shaped axisymmetric bodies whose cross sections are described by several oval curves similar to real eggs with thin and fat ends. We use the gyroscopic balance condition of Moffatt and Shimomura and analyze the slip velocity of the bodies at the point of contact as a function of θ, the angle between the axis of symmetry and the vertical axis, and find the existence of the critical angle θc. When the bodies are spun with an initial angle θinitial>θc, θ will increase to π, implying that the body will spin at the thin end. Alternatively, if θinitial<θc, then θ will decrease. For some oval curves, θ will reduce to 0 and the corresponding bodies will spin at the fat end. For other oval curves, a fixed point at θf is predicted, where 0<θf<θc. Then the bodies will spin not at the fat end, but at a new stable point with θf. The empirical fact that eggs more often spin at the fat than at the thin end is explained.

  12. The Steady Spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, Richard; Schmidt, Wilhelm

    1931-01-01

    With the object of further clarifying the problem of spinning, the equilibrium of the forces and moments acting on an airplane is discussed in light of the most recent test data. Convinced that in a spin the flight attitude by only small angles of yaw is more or less completely steady, the study is primarily devoted to an investigation of steady spin with no side slip. At small angles, wholly arbitrary and perfectly steady spins may be forced, depending on the type of control displacements. But at large angles only very steep and only "approaching steady" spins are possible, no matter what the control displacements.

  13. Numerical studies of Siberian snakes and spin rotators for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.

    1995-04-17

    For the program of polarized protons in RHIC, two Siberian snakes and four spin rotators per ring will be used. The Snakes will produce a complete spin flip. Spin Rotators, in pairs, will rotate the spin from the vertical direction to the horizontal plane at a given insertion, and back to the vertical after the insertion. Snakes, 180{degrees} apart and with their axis of spin precession at 90{degrees} to each other, are an effective means to avoid depolarization of the proton beam in traversing resonances. Classical snakes and rotators are made with magnetic solenoids or with a sequence of magnetic dipoles with fields alternately directed in the radial and vertical direction. Another possibility is to use helical magnets, essentially twisted dipoles, in which the field, transverse the axis of the magnet, continuously rotates as the particles proceed along it. After some comparative studies, the authors decided to adopt for RHIC an elegant solution with four helical magnets both for the snakes and the rotators proposed by Shatunov and Ptitsin. In order to simplify the construction of the magnets and to minimize cost, four identical super conducting helical modules will be used for each device. Snakes will be built with four right-handed helices. Spin rotators with two right-handed and two left-handed helices. The maximum field will be limited to 4 Tesla. While small bore helical undulators have been built for free electron lasers, large super conducting helical magnets have not been built yet. In spite of this difficulty, this choice is dictated by some distinctive advantages of helical over more conventional transverse snakes/rotators: (i) the devices are modular, they can be built with arrangements of identical modules, (ii) the maximum orbit excursion in the magnet is smaller, (iii) orbit excursion is independent from the separation between adjacent magnets, (iv) they allow an easier control of the spin rotation and the orientation of the spin precession axis.

  14. The Gains from Vertical Scaling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Domingue, Ben

    2013-01-01

    It is often assumed that a vertical scale is necessary when value-added models depend upon the gain scores of students across two or more points in time. This article examines the conditions under which the scale transformations associated with the vertical scaling process would be expected to have a significant impact on normative interpretations…

  15. Scale Shrinkage in Vertical Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camilli, Gregory; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Three potential causes of scale shrinkage (measurement error, restriction of range, and multidimensionality) in item response theory vertical equating are discussed, and a more comprehensive model-based approach to establishing vertical scales is described. Test data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress are used to illustrate the…

  16. Inverse spin Hall effect by spin injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. Y.; Horing, Norman J. M.; Lei, X. L.

    2007-09-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [S. O. Valenzuela and M. Tinkham, Nature (London) 442, 176 (2006)], the authors present a quantitative microscopic theory to investigate the inverse spin-Hall effect with spin injection into aluminum considering both intrinsic and extrinsic spin-orbit couplings using the orthogonalized-plane-wave method. Their theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. It is also clear that the magnitude of the anomalous Hall resistivity is mainly due to contributions from extrinsic skew scattering.

  17. Spin Transport in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2008-03-01

    Silicon has been broadly viewed as the ideal material for spintronics due to its low atomic weight, lattice inversion symmetry, and near lack of nuclear spin, resulting in exceptionally long spin lifetime. Despite this appeal, however, the experimental difficulties of achieving coherent spin transport in silicon were overcome for the first time only recently, by using unique spin-polarized hot-electron injection and detection techniques. [1] Our subsequent observations of very long spin lifetimes and transit lengths [2] have impact on prospects for Silicon spintronics as the basis for a new paradigm of information processing. [1] Ian Appelbaum, Biqin Huang, and Douwe J. Monsma, ``Electronic measurement and control of spin transport in silicon,'' Nature 447, 295 (2007). [2] Biqin Huang, Douwe J. Monsma, and Ian Appelbaum, ``Coherent spin transport through a 350-micron-thick silicon wafer,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 177209 (2007).

  18. Spin wave beam mediated synchronization of nano-contact spin torque oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houshang, Afshin; Iacocca, Ezio; Durrenfeld, Philipp; Sani, Sohrab; Akerman, Johan; Dumas, Randy

    2015-03-01

    The synchronization of multiple nano-contact spin torque oscillators (NC-STOs) is mediated by propagating spin waves (SWs). While it has been shown that the Oersted field generated in the vicinity of the NC can dramatically alter the emission pattern of SWs, its role in the synchronization behavior of multiple NCs has not been considered. We investigate the synchronization behavior in double NC-STOs oriented either vertically or horizontally, with respect to the in-plane component of the external field. Two NCs with nominal diameters of 100 nm and a center-to-center spacing of 300 nm are defined on top of an all metallic Co/Cu/NiFe pseudo spin valve. Synchronization is promoted (impeded) by the Oersted field landscape when the NCs are oriented vertically (horizontally) due to the highly anisotropic SW propagation. The vertical positioning of the NCs gives rise to a unique magnetic field landscape that acts to localize SWs in a region just outside one of the NCs, as confirmed by micromagnetic simulations. This work was supported by the European Commission FP7-ICT-2001-Contract No 317950 ``MOSAIC,'' VR, SSF, and the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

  19. Vertical bloch line memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, R.; Wu, J.; Stadler, H.

    1990-01-01

    Vertical Bloch Line (VBL) memory is a recently conceived, integrated, solid-state, block-access, VLSI memory which offers the potential of 1Gbit/sq cm real storage density, gigabit per second data rates, and sub-millisecond average access times simultaneously at relatively low mass, volume, and power values when compared to alternative technologies. VBL's are micromagnetic structures within magnetic domain walls which can be manipulated using magnetic fields from integrated conductors. The presence or absence of VBL pairs are used to store binary information. At present, efforts are being directed at developing a single-chip memory using 25Mbit/sq cm technology in magnetic garnet material which integrates, at a single operating point, the writing, storage, reading, and amplification functions needed in a memory. This paper describes the current design architecture, functional elements, and supercomputer simulation results which are used to assist the design process. The current design architecture uses three metal layers, two ion implantation steps for modulating the thickness of the magnetic layer, one ion implantation step for assisting propagation in the major line track, one NiFe soft magnetic layer, one CoPt hard magnetic layer, and one reflective Cr layer for facilitating magneto-optic observation of magnetic structure. Data are stored in a series of elongated magnetic domains, called stripes, which serve as storage sites for arrays of VBL pairs. The ends of these stripes are placed near conductors which serve as VBL read/write gates. A major line track is present to provide a source and propagation path for magnetic bubbles. Writing and reading, respectively, are achieved by converting magnetic bubbles to VBL's and vice versa. The output function is effected by stretching a magnetic bubble and detecting it magnetoresistively. Experimental results from the past design cycle created four design goals for the current design cycle. First, the bias field ranges

  20. Test of Einstein equivalence principle for 0-spin and half-integer-spin atoms: search for spin-gravity coupling effects.

    PubMed

    Tarallo, M G; Mazzoni, T; Poli, N; Sutyrin, D V; Zhang, X; Tino, G M

    2014-07-11

    We report on a conceptually new test of the equivalence principle performed by measuring the acceleration in Earth's gravity field of two isotopes of strontium atoms, namely, the bosonic (88)Sr isotope which has no spin versus the fermionic (87)Sr isotope which has a half-integer spin. The effect of gravity on the two atomic species has been probed by means of a precision differential measurement of the Bloch frequency for the two atomic matter waves in a vertical optical lattice. We obtain the values η=(0.2±1.6)×10(-7) for the Eötvös parameter and k=(0.5±1.1)×10(-7) for the coupling between nuclear spin and gravity. This is the first reported experimental test of the equivalence principle for bosonic and fermionic particles and opens a new way to the search for the predicted spin-gravity coupling effects. PMID:25062176

  1. Spin Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinova, Jairo; Valenzuela, Sergio O.; Wunderlich, J.; Back, C. H.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-10-01

    Spin Hall effects are a collection of relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomena in which electrical currents can generate transverse spin currents and vice versa. Despite being observed only a decade ago, these effects are already ubiquitous within spintronics, as standard spin-current generators and detectors. Here the theoretical and experimental results that have established this subfield of spintronics are reviewed. The focus is on the results that have converged to give us the current understanding of the phenomena, which has evolved from a qualitative to a more quantitative measurement of spin currents and their associated spin accumulation. Within the experimental framework, optical-, transport-, and magnetization-dynamics-based measurements are reviewed and linked to both phenomenological and microscopic theories of the effect. Within the theoretical framework, the basic mechanisms in both the extrinsic and intrinsic regimes are reviewed, which are linked to the mechanisms present in their closely related phenomenon in ferromagnets, the anomalous Hall effect. Also reviewed is the connection to the phenomenological treatment based on spin-diffusion equations applicable to certain regimes, as well as the spin-pumping theory of spin generation used in many measurements of the spin Hall angle. A further connection to the spin-current-generating spin Hall effect to the inverse spin galvanic effect is given, in which an electrical current induces a nonequilibrium spin polarization. This effect often accompanies the spin Hall effect since they share common microscopic origins. Both can exhibit the same symmetries when present in structures comprising ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers through their induced current-driven spin torques or induced voltages. Although a short chronological overview of the evolution of the spin Hall effect field and the resolution of some early controversies is given, the main body of this review is structured from a pedagogical

  2. Surprising Behavior of Spinning Tops and Eggs on an Inclined Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2016-01-01

    A spinning top or a spinning hard-boiled egg is fascinating to observe since both objects can remain upright for a relatively long time without falling over. If spun at sufficient speed on a horizontal surface, the spin axis rises to a vertical position and the bottom end tends to remain fixed in position on the surface. If the initial spin is insufficient, then the spin axis will not rise all the way to the vertical, in which case a spinning top or a spinning egg will precess slowly around a vertical axis. If the bottom end is rounded, as it is with an egg or with a top having a round rather than a pointed peg, then the vertical precession axis does not necessarily pass through the center of mass. Instead, the precession axis may be located several centimeters away from the center of mass, depending on the radius of the bottom end. As a result, the whole egg or the whole top then rolls along the surface in an approximately circular path, several centimeters in diameter. The essential physics is described in Ref. 1 and the references therein, and in the many more books and papers since the early 1900s quoted in each of the references therein.

  3. Spin caloritronics in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Angsula; Frota, H. O.

    2015-06-14

    Spin caloritronics, the combination of spintronics with thermoelectrics, exploiting both the intrinsic spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment in addition to its fundamental electronic charge and temperature, is an emerging technology mainly in the development of low-power-consumption technology. In this work, we study the thermoelectric properties of a Rashba dot attached to two single layer/bilayer graphene sheets as leads. The temperature difference on the two graphene leads induces a spin current, which depends on the temperature and chemical potential. We demonstrate that the Rashba dot behaves as a spin filter for selected values of the chemical potential and is able to filter electrons by their spin orientation. The spin thermopower has also been studied where the effects of the chemical potential, temperature, and also the Rashba term have been observed.

  4. Spin-Orbit Caloritronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchon, Aurelien; Ndiaye, Papa Birame; Moon, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2014-03-01

    Utilizing spin-orbit coupling to enable the electrical manipulation of ferromagnets has recently attracted a considerable amount of interest. This spin-orbit torque appears in magnetic systems displaying inversion symmetry breaking. Another adjacent emerging topic, spin caloritronics, aims at exploiting magnonic spin currents driven by temperature gradients, allowing for the transmission of information and the control of magnetic domain walls. In this work, we demonstrate that a magnon flow generates torques on the local magnetization when subjected to Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) just as an electron flow generates torques when submitted to Rashba interaction. A direct consequence is the capability to control the magnetization direction of a homogeneous ferromagnet by applying a temperature gradient or local RF excitations. Merging the spin-orbit torques with spin caloritronics is rendered possible by the emergence of DMI in magnetic materials and opens promising avenues in the development of chargeless information technology.

  5. Gauge invariant two-point vertices of shadow fields, AdS/CFT, and conformal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Metsaev, R. R.

    2010-05-15

    In the framework of gauge invariant Stueckelberg approach, totally symmetric arbitrary spin shadow fields in flat space-time of dimension greater than or equal to four are studied. Gauge invariant two-point vertices for such shadow fields are obtained. We demonstrate that, in Stueckelberg gauge frame, these gauge invariant vertices become the standard two-point vertices of CFT. Light-cone gauge two-point vertices of the shadow fields are also obtained. AdS/CFT correspondence for the shadow fields and the non-normalizable solutions of free massless totally symmetric arbitrary spin AdS fields is studied. AdS fields are considered in a modified de Donder gauge and this simplifies considerably the study of AdS/CFT correspondence. We demonstrate that the bulk action, when it is evaluated on solution of the Dirichlet problem, leads to the two-point gauge invariant vertex of shadow field. Also we show that the bulk action evaluated on solution of the Dirichlet problem leads to new description of conformal fields. The new description involves Stueckelberg gauge symmetries and gives simple higher-derivative Lagrangian for the conformal arbitrary spin field. In the Stueckelberg gauge frame, our Lagrangian becomes the standard Lagrangian of conformal field. Light-cone gauge Lagrangian of the arbitrary spin conformal field is also obtained.

  6. Picosecond Spin Caloritronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, David G.

    The coupling of spin and heat, i.e., spin caloritronics, gives rise to new physical phenomena in nanoscale spin devices and new ways to manipulate local magnetization. Our work in this field takes advantage of recent advances in the measurement and understanding of heat transport at the nanoscale using ultrafast lasers. We use a picosecond duration pump laser pulses as a source of heat and picosecond duration probe laser pulses to detect changes in temperature, spin accumulation, and spin transfer torque using a combination of time-domain thermoreflectance and time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect Our pump-probe optical methods enable us to change the temperature of ferromagnetic layers on a picosecond time-scale and generate enormous heat fluxes on the order of 100 GW m-2 that persist for ~ 30 ps. Thermally-driven ultrafast demagnetization of a perpendicular ferromagnet leads to spin accumulation in a normal metal and spin transfer torque in an in-plane ferromagnet. The data are well described by models of spin generation and transport based on differences and gradients of thermodynamic parameters. The spin-dependent Seebeck effect of a perpendicular ferromagnetic layer converts a heat current into spin current, which in turn can be used to exert a spin transfer torque (STT) on a second ferromagnetic layer with in-plane magnetization. Using a [Co,Ni] multilayer as the source of spin, an energy fluence of ~ 4 J m-2 creates thermal STT sufficient to induce ~ 1 % tilting of the magnetization of a 2 nm-thick CoFeB layer.

  7. Spin coating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Torczynski, John R.

    2000-01-01

    A spin coating apparatus requires less cleanroom air flow than prior spin coating apparatus to minimize cleanroom contamination. A shaped exhaust duct from the spin coater maintains process quality while requiring reduced cleanroom air flow. The exhaust duct can decrease in cross section as it extends from the wafer, minimizing eddy formation. The exhaust duct can conform to entrainment streamlines to minimize eddy formation and reduce interprocess contamination at minimal cleanroom air flow rates.

  8. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  9. Horizontal and Vertical Line Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Pat

    2003-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which students learn about the artist Piet Mondrian and create their own abstract artworks. Focuses on geometric shapes using horizontal and vertical lines. Includes background information about the artist. (CMK)

  10. Rockets for spin recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The potential effectiveness of rockets as an auxiliary means for an aircraft to effect recovery from spins was investigated. The advances in rocket technology produced by the space effort suggested that currently available systems might obviate many of the problems encountered in earlier rocket systems. A modern fighter configuration known to exhibit a flat spin mode was selected. An analytical study was made of the thrust requirements for a rocket spin recovery system for the subject configuration. These results were then applied to a preliminary systems study of rocket components appropriate to the problem. Subsequent spin tunnel tests were run to evaluate the analytical results.

  11. Polariton spin whirls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilibrizzi, P.; Sigurdsson, H.; Liew, T. C. H.; Ohadi, H.; Wilkinson, S.; Askitopoulos, A.; Shelykh, I. A.; Lagoudakis, P. G.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the observation of spin whirls in a radially expanding polariton condensate formed under nonresonant optical excitation. Real space imaging of polarization- and time-resolved photoluminescence reveals a spiralling polarization pattern in the plane of the microcavity. Simulations of the spatiotemporal dynamics of a spinor condensate reveal the crucial role of polariton interactions with a spinor exciton reservoir. Harnessing spin-dependent interactions between the exciton reservoir and polariton condensates allows for the manipulation of spin currents and the realization of dynamic collective spin effects in solid-state systems.

  12. PREFACE: Spin Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieny, B.; Sousa, R.; Prejbeanu, L.

    2007-04-01

    Conventional electronics has in the past ignored the spin on the electron, however things began to change in 1988 with the discovery of giant magnetoresistance in metallic thin film stacks which led to the development of a new research area, so called spin-electronics. In the last 10 years, spin-electronics has achieved a number of breakthroughs from the point of view of both basic science and application. Materials research has led to several major discoveries: very large tunnel magnetoresistance effects in tunnel junctions with crystalline barriers due to a new spin-filtering mechanism associated with the spin-dependent symmetry of the electron wave functions new magnetic tunnelling barriers leading to spin-dependent tunnelling barrier heights and acting as spin-filters magnetic semiconductors with increasingly high ordering temperature. New phenomena have been predicted and observed: the possibility of acting on the magnetization of a magnetic nanostructure with a spin-polarized current. This effect, due to a transfer of angular momentum between the spin polarized conduction electrons and the local magnetization, can be viewed as the reciprocal of giant or tunnel magnetoresistance. It can be used to switch the magnetization of a magnetic nanostructure or to generate steady magnetic excitations in the system. the possibility of generating and manipulating spin current without charge current by creating non-equilibrium local accumulation of spin up or spin down electrons. The range of applications of spin electronics materials and phenomena is expanding: the first devices based on giant magnetoresistance were the magnetoresistive read-heads for computer disk drives. These heads, introduced in 1998 with current-in plane spin-valves, have evolved towards low resistance tunnel magnetoresistice heads in 2005. Besides magnetic recording technology, these very sensitive magnetoresistive sensors are finding applications in other areas, in particular in biology. magnetic

  13. Paramagnetic spin pumping.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Y; Saitoh, E

    2014-12-31

    We have demonstrated spin pumping from a paramagnetic state of an insulator La2NiMnO6 into a Pt film. Single-crystalline films of La2NiMnO6 which exhibit a ferromagnetic order at TC≈270  K were grown by pulsed laser deposition. The inverse spin Hall voltage induced by spin-current injection has been observed in the Pt layer not only in the ferromagnetic phase of La2NiMnO6, but also in a wide temperature range above TC. The efficient spin pumping in the paramagnetic phase is ascribable to ferromagnetic correlation, not to ferromagnetic order. PMID:25615367

  14. Spinning Characteristics of the XN2Y-1 Airplane Obtained from the Spinning Balance and Compared with Results from the Spinning Tunnel and from Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamber, M J; House, R O

    1937-01-01

    Report presents the results of tests of a 1/10-scale model of the XN2Y-1 airplane tested in the NACA 5-foot vertical wind tunnel in which the six components of forces and moments were measured. The model was tested in 17 attitudes in which the full-scale airplane had been observed to spin, in order to determine the effects of scale, tunnel, and interference. In addition, a series of tests was made to cover the range of angles of attack, angles of sideslip, rates of rotation, and control setting likely to be encountered by a spinning airplane. The data were used to estimate the probable attitudes in steady spins of an airplane in flight and of a model in the free-spinning tunnel. The estimated attitudes of steady spin were compared with attitudes measured in flight and in the spinning tunnel. The results indicate that corrections for certain scale and tunnel effects are necessary to estimate full-scale spinning attitudes from model results.

  15. The Wake of a Single Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsky, Danielle

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) pose various advantages over traditional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs), including their smaller size and footprint, quiet operation, and ability to produce power under a greater variety of wind directions and wind speeds. To determine the optimal spacing of an array of VAWTs for maximum power output, an understanding of the fundamental wake structure of a single VAWT is needed. This study is among the first attempts to experimentally visualize the wake of a VAWT using stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV). A scale VAWT is placed inside a wind tunnel and a motor rotates the scale model at a constant rotational speed. Wake data at several Reynolds numbers and tip speed ratios indicate that vortices are shed by each blade of the spinning VAWT, demonstrating significant differences between the wake of a VAWT and a spinning cylinder.

  16. Stability analyses of a vertical axis automatic washing machine without balancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Wei; Zhang, Qiu-Ju

    2010-05-01

    This paper analyzes the nonlinear vibration characteristics associated with the spin drying process of a vertical axis automatic washing machine without any balancer. At first, damping properties born with the machine's suspension system are discussed and a mathematical model involving tangential damping forces is built. Based on a rotating coordinate transformation, this model is then converted to an autonomous form for stability analyses. The continuation and bifurcation software AUTO [1] is applied and a Hopf bifurcation phenomenon is observed from a one-parameter bifurcation diagram. Based on several two-parameter bifurcation diagrams, several parameters affecting the Hopf bifurcation are then discussed. At last, bifurcation results are validated by time responses of the autonomous system. For a further view of the spin drying process, simulations of the non-autonomous system are also provided. This paper provides a new insight into the spin drying process of the vertical axis automatic washing machine.

  17. Spin-spin and spin-orbit interaction effects of two-electron quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseghi, B.; Rezaei, G.; Taghizadeh, S. F.; Shahedi, Z.

    2014-09-01

    Simultaneous effects of spin-spin and spin-orbit interactions on the energy spectrum of a two-electron spherical quantum dot with parabolic confinement and under the influence of external electric and magnetic fields are investigated. We have calculated energy eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system for different spin states. Results show that effects of spin-spin interactions are negligible in comparison with those of the spin-orbit interactions. Spin-orbit interaction splits energy levels and removes degeneracy of different spin states. Moreover it is seen that energy eigenvalues and levels splitting strongly depend on the external magnetic field and the dot dimensions.

  18. Magnetic Excitation for Spin Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter; Mehmed, Oral; Brown, Gerald V.

    1997-01-01

    The Dynamic Spin Rig Laboratory (DSRL) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is a facility used for vibration testing of structures under spinning conditions. The current actuators used for excitation are electromagnetic shakers which are configured to apply torque to the rig's vertical rotor. The rotor is supported radially and axially by conventional bearings. Current operation is limited in rotational speed, excitation capability, and test duration. In an effort to enhance its capabilities, the rig has been initially equipped with a radial magnetic bearing which provides complementary excitation and shaft support. The new magnetic feature has been used in actual blade vibration tests and its performance has been favorable. Due to the success of this initial modification further enhancements are planned which include making the system fully magnetically supported. This paper reports on this comprehensive effort to upgrade the DSRL with an emphasis on the new magnetic excitation capability.

  19. Heat-driven spin transport in a ferromagnetic metal

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yadong; Yang, Bowen; Tang, Chi; Jiang, Zilong; Shi, Jing; Schneider, Michael; Whig, Renu

    2014-12-15

    As a non-magnetic heavy metal is attached to a ferromagnet, a vertically flowing heat-driven spin current is converted to a transverse electric voltage, which is known as the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (SSE). If the ferromagnet is a metal, this voltage is also accompanied by voltages from two other sources, i.e., the anomalous Nernst effect in both the ferromagnet and the proximity-induced ferromagnetic boundary layer. By properly identifying and carefully separating those different effects, we find that in this pure spin current circuit the additional spin current drawn by the heavy metal generates another significant voltage by the ferromagnetic metal itself which should be present in all relevant experiments.

  20. Effect of spin rotation coupling on spin transport

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Debashree Basu, B.

    2013-12-15

    We have studied the spin rotation coupling (SRC) as an ingredient to explain different spin-related issues. This special kind of coupling can play the role of a Dresselhaus like coupling in certain conditions. Consequently, one can control the spin splitting, induced by the Dresselhaus like term, which is unusual in a semiconductor heterostructure. Within this framework, we also study the renormalization of the spin-dependent electric field and spin current due to the k{sup →}⋅p{sup →} perturbation, by taking into account the interband mixing in the rotating system. In this paper we predict the enhancement of the spin-dependent electric field resulting from the renormalized spin rotation coupling. The renormalization factor of the spin electric field is different from that of the SRC or Zeeman coupling. The effect of renormalized SRC on spin current and Berry curvature is also studied. Interestingly, in the presence of this SRC-induced SOC it is possible to describe spin splitting as well as spin galvanic effect in semiconductors. -- Highlights: •Studied effect of spin rotation coupling on the spin electric field, spin current and Berry curvature. •In the k{sup →}⋅p{sup →} framework we study the renormalization of spin electric field and spin current. •For an inertial system we have discussed the spin splitting. •Expression for the Berry phase in the inertial system is discussed. •The inertial spin galvanic effect is studied.

  1. Spin Waves in Quasiequilibrium Spin Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, Kevin S.; Dahal, Hari P.

    2006-07-28

    Using the Landau Fermi liquid theory we discovered a new propagating transverse spin wave in a paramagnetic system which is driven slightly out of equilibrium without applying an external magnetic field. We find a gapless mode which describes the uniform precession of the magnetization in the absence of a magnetic field. We also find a gapped mode associated with the precession of the spin current around the internal field. The gapless mode has a quadratic dispersion leading to a T{sup 3/2} contribution to the specific heat. These modes significantly contribute to the dynamic structure function.

  2. Sparkling and Spinning Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Ruth Kearney

    1964-01-01

    Teachers should foster in children's writing the use of words with "sparkle" and "spin"--"sparkle" implying brightness and vitality, "spin" connoting industry, patience, and painstaking work. By providing creative listening experiences with good children's or adult literature, the teacher can encourage students to broaden their imaginations and…

  3. Single-spin CCD.

    PubMed

    Baart, T A; Shafiei, M; Fujita, T; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Vandersypen, L M K

    2016-04-01

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics relies on the ability to store, transport and manipulate electron spin polarization with great precision. In its ultimate limit, information is stored in the spin state of a single electron, at which point quantum information processing also becomes a possibility. Here, we demonstrate the manipulation, transport and readout of individual electron spins in a linear array of three semiconductor quantum dots. First, we demonstrate single-shot readout of three spins with fidelities of 97% on average, using an approach analogous to the operation of a charge-coupled device (CCD). Next, we perform site-selective control of the three spins, thereby writing the content of each pixel of this 'single-spin charge-coupled device'. Finally, we show that shuttling an electron back and forth in the array hundreds of times, covering a cumulative distance of 80 μm, has negligible influence on its spin projection. Extrapolating these results to the case of much larger arrays points at a diverse range of potential applications, from quantum information to imaging and sensing. PMID:26727201

  4. Centralizers of spin subalgebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arizmendi, Gerardo; Herrera, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    We determine the centralizers of certain isomorphic copies of spin subalgebras spin(r) in so(dr m), where dr is the dimension of a real irreducible representation of Clr0, the even Clifford algebra determined by the positive definite inner product on Rr, where r, m ∈ N.

  5. Coherent spin-networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Eugenio; Magliaro, Elena; Perini, Claudio

    2010-07-15

    In this paper we discuss a proposal of coherent states for loop quantum gravity. These states are labeled by a point in the phase space of general relativity as captured by a spin-network graph. They are defined as the gauge-invariant projection of a product over links of Hall's heat kernels for the cotangent bundle of SU(2). The labels of the state are written in terms of two unit vectors, a spin and an angle for each link of the graph. The heat-kernel time is chosen to be a function of the spin. These labels are the ones used in the spin-foam setting and admit a clear geometric interpretation. Moreover, the set of labels per link can be written as an element of SL(2,C). These states coincide with Thiemann's coherent states with the area operator as complexifier. We study the properties of semiclassicality of these states and show that, for large spins, they reproduce a superposition over spins of spin-networks with nodes labeled by Livine-Speziale coherent intertwiners. Moreover, the weight associated to spins on links turns out to be given by a Gaussian times a phase as originally proposed by Rovelli.

  6. Spin coating of electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Maclay, G. Jordan

    1989-01-01

    Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

  7. Antiferromagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect.

    PubMed

    Wu, Stephen M; Zhang, Wei; Kc, Amit; Borisov, Pavel; Pearson, John E; Jiang, J Samuel; Lederman, David; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-03-01

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF_{2}. A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF_{2} (110) (30  nm)/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF_{2} (110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF_{2} through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2-80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop transition corresponding to the sudden rotation of antiferromagnetic spins out of the easy axis is observed in the spin Seebeck signal when large magnetic fields (>9  T) are applied parallel to the easy axis of the MnF_{2} thin film. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the easy axis, the spin-flop transition is absent, as expected. PMID:26991198

  8. Hadron Spin Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2002-01-09

    Spin effects in exclusive and inclusive reactions provide an essential new dimension for testing QCD and unraveling hadron structure. Remarkable new experiments from SLAC, HERMES (DESY), and Jefferson Lab present many challenges to theory, including measurements at HERMES and SMC of the single spin asymmetries in ep {yields} e{prime}{pi}X where the proton is polarized normal to the scattering plane. This type of single spin asymmetry may be due to the effects of rescattering of the outgoing quark on the spectators of the target proton, an effect usually neglected in conventional QCD analyses. Many aspects of spin, such as single-spin asymmetries and baryon magnetic moments are sensitive to the dynamics of hadrons at the amplitude level, rather than probability distributions. I will illustrate the novel features of spin dynamics for relativistic systems by examining the explicit form of the light-front wavefunctions for the two-particle Fock state of the electron in QED, thus connecting the Schwinger anomalous magnetic moment to the spin and orbital momentum carried by its Fock state constituents and providing a transparent basis for understanding the structure of relativistic composite systems and their matrix elements in hadronic physics. I also present a survey of outstanding spin puzzles in QCD, particularly A{sub NN} in elastic pp scattering, the J/{psi} {yields} {rho}{pi} puzzle, and J/{psi} polarization at the Tevatron.

  9. Single spin magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  10. Single spin magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution. PMID:27378060

  11. Single-spin CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baart, T. A.; Shafiei, M.; Fujita, T.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.

    2016-04-01

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics relies on the ability to store, transport and manipulate electron spin polarization with great precision. In its ultimate limit, information is stored in the spin state of a single electron, at which point quantum information processing also becomes a possibility. Here, we demonstrate the manipulation, transport and readout of individual electron spins in a linear array of three semiconductor quantum dots. First, we demonstrate single-shot readout of three spins with fidelities of 97% on average, using an approach analogous to the operation of a charge-coupled device (CCD). Next, we perform site-selective control of the three spins, thereby writing the content of each pixel of this ‘single-spin charge-coupled device’. Finally, we show that shuttling an electron back and forth in the array hundreds of times, covering a cumulative distance of 80 μm, has negligible influence on its spin projection. Extrapolating these results to the case of much larger arrays points at a diverse range of potential applications, from quantum information to imaging and sensing.

  12. Spin-Wave Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Jin; Yu, Weichao; Wu, Ruqian; Xiao, Jiang

    2015-10-01

    A diode, a device allowing unidirectional signal transmission, is a fundamental element of logic structures, and it lies at the heart of modern information systems. The spin wave or magnon, representing a collective quasiparticle excitation of the magnetic order in magnetic materials, is a promising candidate for an information carrier for the next-generation energy-saving technologies. Here, we propose a scalable and reprogrammable pure spin-wave logic hardware architecture using domain walls and surface anisotropy stripes as waveguides on a single magnetic wafer. We demonstrate theoretically the design principle of the simplest logic component, a spin-wave diode, utilizing the chiral bound states in a magnetic domain wall with a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, and confirm its performance through micromagnetic simulations. Our findings open a new vista for realizing different types of pure spin-wave logic components and finally achieving an energy-efficient and hardware-reprogrammable spin-wave computer.

  13. Thermal Spin Transfer Torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Gerrit

    2009-03-01

    The coupling between spin and charge in electronic transport is studied in the field of spintronics. Heat currents are coupled to both charge and spin currents as well [1]. This extension of spintronics to what may be called ``spin caloritronics'' recently enjoys renewed attention [2]. The spin-transfer torque associated with electric currents can excite magnetizations in nanostructures, switching magnetic configuration in spin valves and move domain walls in magnetic wires when exceeding critical values of the order of 10^7Acm-2 [3]. Also heat currents transfer spin angular momentum [4], either intrinsically or via the thermoelectric generation of particle spin currents. We predict that temperature differences of the order of 100 K over typical metallic nanostructures cause effects equivalent to the critical charge current densities. In this talk I will give a brief review of various aspects of spin caloritronics with emphasis on thermal spin transfer torques. This work has been carried out in collaboration with Moosa Hatami, Qinfang Zhang, Paul Kelly, Hans Joakim Skadsem, Arne Brataas and Sadamichi Maekawa. [4pt] [1] M. Johnson and R.H. Silsbee, Phys. Rev. B 35, 4959 (1987).[0pt] [2] International Workshop on Spin Caloritronics, Lorentz Center of Leiden University, 9-13 February 2009, http://www.lorentzcenter.nl/lc/web/2009/323/info.php3?wsid=323[0pt] [3] D. C. Ralph and M. D. Stiles, J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 320, 1190 (2008).[0pt] [4] M. Hatami, G.E.W. Bauer, Q. Zhang, and P.J. Kelly, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 066603 (2007).

  14. Synchronization of spin-transfer torque oscillators by spin pumping, inverse spin Hall, and spin Hall effects

    SciTech Connect

    Elyasi, Mehrdad; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-02-14

    We have proposed a method to synchronize multiple spin-transfer torque oscillators based on spin pumping, inverse spin Hall, and spin Hall effects. The proposed oscillator system consists of a series of nano-magnets in junction with a normal metal with high spin-orbit coupling, and an accumulative feedback loop. We conduct simulations to demonstrate the effect of modulated charge currents in the normal metal due to spin pumping from each nano-magnet. We show that the interplay between the spin Hall effect and inverse spin Hall effect results in synchronization of the nano-magnets.

  15. Gluon Spin Contribution to The Nucleon Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Firooz; Shahveh, Abolfazl; Taghavi-Shahri, Fateme

    2010-10-01

    We have calculated δg/ g in the nucleon at all measured kinematics. The smallness of δg/ g in the measured kinematics should not be interpreted as the the gluon contribution to the nucleon spin is small. In fact the first moment of gluon polarization in the nucleon, Δ g( Q2) can be sizable.

  16. Magnetic Charge Organization and Screening in Thermalized Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Ian

    2014-03-01

    Artificial spin ice is a material-by-design in which interacting single-domain ferromagnetic nanoislands are used to model Ising spins in frustrated spin systems. Artificial spin ice has proved a useful system in which to directly probe the physics of geometrical frustration, allowing us to better understand materials such as spin ice. Recently, several new experimental techniques have been developed that allow effective thermalization of artificial spin ice. Given the intense interest in magnetic monopole excitations in spin ice materials and artificial spin ice's success in modeling these materials, it should not come as a surprise that interesting monopole physics emerges here as well. The first experimental investigation of thermalized artificial square spin ice determined that the system's monopole-like excitations obeyed a Boltzmann distribution and also found evidence for monopole-antimonopole interactions. Further experiments have implicated these monopole excitations in the growth of ground state domains. Our recent study of artificial kagome spin ice, whose odd-coordinated vertices always possess a net magnetic charge, has revealed a theoretically-predicted magnetic charge ordering transition which has not been previously observed experimentally. We have also investigated the details of magnetic charge interactions in lattices of mixed coordination number. This work was done in collaboration with Sheng Zhang, Cristiano Nisoli, Gia-Wei Chern, Michael Erickson, Liam O'Brien, Chris Leighton, Paul Lammert, Vincent Crespi, and Peter Schiffer. This work was primarily funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division, grant no. DE-SC0005313.

  17. Higher spin interactions in four-dimensions: Vasiliev versus Fronsdal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, Nicolas; Kessel, Pan; Skvortsov, Evgeny; Taronna, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    We consider four-dimensional higher-spin (HS) theory at the first nontrivial order corresponding to the cubic action. All HS interaction vertices are explicitly obtained from Vasiliev’s equations. In particular, we obtain the vertices that are not determined solely by the HS algebra structure constants. The dictionary between the Fronsdal fields and HS connections is found and the corrections to the Fronsdal equations are derived. These corrections turn out to involve derivatives of arbitrary order. We observe that the vertices not determined by the HS algebra produce naked infinities, when decomposed into the minimal derivative vertices and improvements. Therefore, standard methods can only be used to check a rather limited number of correlation functions within the HS AdS/CFT duality. A possible resolution of the puzzle is discussed.

  18. The Fock space of loopy spin networks for quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Christoph; Livine, Etera R.

    2016-08-01

    In the context of the coarse-graining of loop quantum gravity, we introduce loopy and tagged spin networks, which generalize the standard spin network states to account explicitly for non-trivial curvature and torsion. Both structures relax the closure constraints imposed at the spin network vertices. While tagged spin networks merely carry an extra spin at every vertex encoding the overall closure defect, loopy spin networks allow for an arbitrary number of loops attached to each vertex. These little loops can be interpreted as local excitations of the quantum gravitational field and we discuss the statistics to endow them with. The resulting Fock space of loopy spin networks realizes new truncation of loop quantum gravity, allowing to formulate its graph-changing dynamics on a fixed background graph plus local degrees of freedom attached to the graph nodes. This provides a framework for re-introducing a non-trivial background quantum geometry around which we would study the effective dynamics of perturbations. We study how to implement the dynamics of topological BF theory in this framework. We realize the projection on flat connections through holonomy constraints and we pay special attention to their often overlooked non-trivial flat solutions defined by higher derivatives of the δ -distribution.

  19. Measurements of vertical bar Vcb vertical bar and vertical bar Vub vertical bar at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Rotondo, M.

    2005-10-12

    We report results from the BABAR Collaboration on the semileptonic B decays, highlighting the measurements of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements Vub and Vcb. We describe the techniques used to obtain the matrix element |Vcb| using the measurement of the inclusive B {yields} Xclv process and a large sample of exclusive B {yields} D*lv decays. The vertical bar Vub vertical bar matrix elements has been measured studying different kinematic variables of the B {yields} Xulv process, and also with the exclusive reconstruction of B {yields} {pi}({rho})lv decays.

  20. Vertical motion simulator familiarization guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danek, George L.

    1993-01-01

    The Vertical Motion Simulator Familiarization Guide provides a synoptic description of the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) and descriptions of the various simulation components and systems. The intended audience is the community of scientists and engineers who employ the VMS for research and development. The concept of a research simulator system is introduced and the building block nature of the VMS is emphasized. Individual sections describe all the hardware elements in terms of general properties and capabilities. Also included are an example of a typical VMS simulation which graphically illustrates the composition of the system and shows the signal flow among the elements and a glossary of specialized terms, abbreviations, and acronyms.

  1. Congenital vertical talus: a review.

    PubMed

    McKie, Janay; Radomisli, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Congenital vertical talus, also known as congenital convex pes valgus, is an uncommon disorder of the foot, manifested as a rigid rocker-bottom flatfoot. Radiographically, it is defined by dorsal dislocation of the navicular on the talus. This condition requires surgical correction. If left untreated, this foot deformity results in a painful and rigid flatfoot with weak push-off power. This article provides an overview of this rare foot deformity, outlines appropriate workup of the disorder, and details current treatment options, with emphasis on the evolution of treatment of congenital vertical talus. PMID:19963176

  2. Spin-orbit coupling and quantum spin Hall effect for neutral atoms without spin flips.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Colin J; Siviloglou, Georgios A; Miyake, Hirokazu; Burton, William Cody; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-11-27

    We propose a scheme which realizes spin-orbit coupling and the quantum spin Hall effect for neutral atoms in optical lattices without relying on near resonant laser light to couple different spin states. The spin-orbit coupling is created by modifying the motion of atoms in a spin-dependent way by laser recoil. The spin selectivity is provided by Zeeman shifts created with a magnetic field gradient. Alternatively, a quantum spin Hall Hamiltonian can be created by all-optical means using a period-tripling, spin-dependent superlattice. PMID:24329453

  3. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  4. Towards a Compositional SPIN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses our initial experience with introducing automated assume-guarantee verification based on learning in the SPIN tool. We believe that compositional verification techniques such as assume-guarantee reasoning could complement the state-reduction techniques that SPIN already supports, thus increasing the size of systems that SPIN can handle. We present a "light-weight" approach to evaluating the benefits of learning-based assume-guarantee reasoning in the context of SPIN: we turn our previous implementation of learning for the LTSA tool into a main program that externally invokes SPIN to provide the model checking-related answers. Despite its performance overheads (which mandate a future implementation within SPIN itself), this approach provides accurate information about the savings in memory. We have experimented with several versions of learning-based assume guarantee reasoning, including a novel heuristic introduced here for generating component assumptions when their environment is unavailable. We illustrate the benefits of learning-based assume-guarantee reasoning in SPIN through the example of a resource arbiter for a spacecraft. Keywords: assume-guarantee reasoning, model checking, learning.

  5. Spin forming development

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, W.G.

    1982-05-01

    Bendix product applications require the capability of fabricating heavy gage, high strength materials. Five commercial sources have been identified that have the capability of spin forming metal thicknesses greater than 9.5 mm and four equiment manufacturers produce machines with this capability. Twelve assemblies selected as candidates for spin forming applications require spin forming of titanium, 250 maraging steel, 17-4 pH stainless steel, Nitronic 40 steel, 304 L stainless steel, and 6061 aluminum. Twelve parts have been cold spin formed from a 250 maraging steel 8.1 mm wall thickness machine preform, and six have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick flat plate. Thirty-three Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy parts and 26 17-4 pH stainless steel parts have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick plate. Hot spin forming directly from plate has demonstrated the feasibility and favorable economics of this fabrication technique for Bendix applications.

  6. Electron spin decoherence in nuclear spin baths and dynamical decoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, N.; Yang, W.; Ho, S. W.; Hu, J. L.; Wan, J. T. K.; Liu, R. B.

    2011-12-23

    We introduce the quantum theory of the electron spin decoherence in a nuclear spin bath and the dynamical decoupling approach for protecting the electron spin coherence. These theories are applied to various solid-state systems, such as radical spins in molecular crystals and NV centers in diamond.

  7. Quantum Spin Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The quantum Hall liquid is a novel state of matter with profound emergent properties such as fractional charge and statistics. Existence of the quantum Hall effect requires breaking of the time reversal symmetry caused by an external magnetic field. In this work, we predict a quantized spin Hall effect in the absence of any magnetic field, where the intrinsic spin Hall conductance is quantized in units of 2 e/4{pi}. The degenerate quantum Landau levels are created by the spin-orbit coupling in conventional semiconductors in the presence of a strain gradient. This new state of matter has many profound correlated properties described by a topological field theory.

  8. Contrasting spin dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, F. L.; Ahilan, K.; Imai, T.; Sefat, A. S.; McGuire, Michael A; Sales, Brian C; Mandrus, David; Cheng, P.; Shen, B.; Wen, H.-H.

    2010-01-01

    We report the first NMR investigation of spin dynamics in the overdoped nonsuperconducting regime of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} up to x=0.26. We demonstrate that the absence of interband transitions with large momentum transfer Q{sub AF}-({pi}/a,0) between the hole and electron Fermi surfaces results in complete suppression of antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations for x {ge} 0.15. Our experimental results provide direct evidence for a correlation between T{sub c} and the strength of Q{sub AF} antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations.

  9. Spin of the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1996-12-01

    The author argues that their response to the spin crisis should not be to abandon the naive quark model baby, but rather to allow it to mature. In particular, he advocates dressing the baby in qq pairs, first showing that this can be done without compromising the naive quark model's success with either spectroscopy or the OZI rule. Finally, he shows that despite their near invisibility elsewhere, pairs do play an important role in the proton's spin structure by creating an antipolarized qq sea. In the context of an explicit calculation he demonstrates that it is plausible that the entire ''spin crisis'' arises from this effect.

  10. Higher spin cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Chethan; Raju, Avinash; Roy, Shubho; Thakur, Somyadip

    2014-02-01

    We construct cosmological solutions of higher spin gravity in 2+1 dimensional de Sitter space. We show that a consistent thermodynamics can be obtained for their horizons by demanding appropriate holonomy conditions. This is equivalent to demanding the integrability of the Euclidean boundary conformal field theory partition function, and it reduces to Gibbons-Hawking thermodynamics in the spin-2 case. By using the prescription of Maldacena, we relate the thermodynamics of these solutions to those of higher spin black holes in AdS3.

  11. Efficient demagnetization protocol for the artificial triangular spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, J. H.; Mól, L. A. S.; Moura-Melo, W. A.; Pereira, A. R.

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we study demagnetization protocols for an artificial spin ice in a triangular geometry. Our results show that a simple hysteresis-like process is very efficient in driving the system to its ground state, even for a relatively strong disorder in the system, confirming previous expectations. In addition, transitions between the magnetized state and the ground state were observed to be mediated by the creation and propagation of vertices that behave like magnetic monopoles pseudo-particles. This is an important step towards a more detailed experimental study of monopole-like excitations in artificial spin ice systems.

  12. Vertical and lateral forces between a permanent magnet and a high-temperature superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, John R.; Cansiz, Ahmet

    1999-12-01

    The vertical and horizontal forces and associated stiffnesses on a permanent magnet (PM) above a high-temperature superconductor (HTS) were measured during vertical and horizontal traverses in zero-field cooling (ZFC) and in field cooling (FC). In ZFC, the vertical stiffness was greater in the first descent than in the first ascent and second descent, and the stiffness in the second descent was between those of the first descent and the first ascent. At the FC position, the vertical stiffness was two times greater than the lateral stiffness at each height, to within 1% of the vertical stiffness value. The cross stiffness of vertical force with respect to lateral position was positive for FC, but negative for ZFC. Free-spin-down experiments of a PM levitated above a HTS were also performed. These results showed that the coefficient of friction is double valued at frequencies just below the rotor resonance, a result attributed to cross stiffness in the PM/HTS interaction. A frozen-image model was used to calculate the vertical and horizontal forces and stiffnesses, and reasonable agreement with the data occurred for vertical or horizontal movements of the PM less than several mm from the FC position.

  13. Vertical and lateral forces between a permanent magnet and a high-temperature superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.; Cansiz, A.

    1999-12-01

    The vertical and horizontal forces and associated stiffnesses on a permanent magnet (PM) above a high-temperature superconductor (HTS) were measured during vertical and horizontal traverses in zero-field cooling (ZFC) and in field cooling (FC). In ZFC, the vertical stiffness was greater in the first descent than in the first ascent and second descent, and the stiffness in the second descent was between those of the first descent and the first ascent. At the FC position, the vertical stiffness was two times greater than the lateral stiffness at each height, to within 1{percent} of the vertical stiffness value. The cross stiffness of vertical force with respect to lateral position was positive for FC, but negative for ZFC. Free-spin-down experiments of a PM levitated above a HTS were also performed. These results showed that the coefficient of friction is double valued at frequencies just below the rotor resonance, a result attributed to cross stiffness in the PM/HTS interaction. A frozen-image model was used to calculate the vertical and horizontal forces and stiffnesses, and reasonable agreement with the data occurred for vertical or horizontal movements of the PM less than several mm from the FC position. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Subnanometre resolution in three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging of individual dark spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinolds, M. S.; Warner, M.; de Greve, K.; Dovzhenko, Y.; Thiel, L.; Walsworth, R. L.; Hong, S.; Maletinsky, P.; Yacoby, A.

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has revolutionized biomedical science by providing non-invasive, three-dimensional biological imaging. However, spatial resolution in conventional MRI systems is limited to tens of micrometres, which is insufficient for imaging on molecular scales. Here, we demonstrate an MRI technique that provides subnanometre spatial resolution in three dimensions, with single electron-spin sensitivity. Our imaging method works under ambient conditions and can measure ubiquitous `dark' spins, which constitute nearly all spin targets of interest. In this technique, the magnetic quantum-projection noise of dark spins is measured using a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) magnetometer located near the surface of a diamond chip. The distribution of spins surrounding the NV magnetometer is imaged with a scanning magnetic-field gradient. To evaluate the performance of the NV-MRI technique, we image the three-dimensional landscape of electronic spins at the diamond surface and achieve an unprecedented combination of resolution (0.8 nm laterally and 1.5 nm vertically) and single-spin sensitivity. Our measurements uncover electronic spins on the diamond surface that can potentially be used as resources for improved magnetic imaging. This NV-MRI technique is immediately applicable to diverse systems including imaging spin chains, readout of spin-based quantum bits, and determining the location of spin labels in biological systems.

  15. Spin pumping and inverse spin Hall effects—Insights for future spin-orbitronics (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Jiang, Wanjun; Fradin, Frank Y.; Pearson, John E.; Hoffmann, Axel; Sklenar, Joseph; Ketterson, John B.

    2015-05-07

    Quantification of spin-charge interconversion has become increasingly important in the fast-developing field of spin-orbitronics. Pure spin current generated by spin pumping acts as a sensitive probe for many bulk and interface spin-orbit effects, which has been indispensable for the discovery of many promising new spin-orbit materials. We apply spin pumping and inverse spin Hall effect experiments, as a useful metrology, and study spin-orbit effects in a variety of metals and metal interfaces. We quantify the spin Hall effects in Ir and W using the conventional bilayer structures and discuss the self-induced voltage in a single layer of ferromagnetic permalloy. Finally, we extend our discussions to multilayer structures and quantitatively reveal the spin current flow in two consecutive normal metal layers.

  16. Vertical Instability at IPNS RCS.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Brumwell, F. R.; Dooling, J. C.; Harkay, K. C.; Kustom, R.; McMichael, G. E.; Middendorf, M. E.; Nassiri, A.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2008-01-01

    The rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) at ANL accelerates > 3.0 times 10{sup 12} protons from 50 MeV to 450 MeV with 30-Hz repetition frequency. During the acceleration cycle, the rf frequency varies from 2.21 MHz to 5.14 MHz. Presently, the beam current is limited by a vertical instability. By analyzing turn-by-turn beam position monitor (BPM) data, large- amplitude mode 0 and mode 1 vertical beam centroid oscillations were observed in the later part of the acceleration cycle. The oscillations start in the tail of the bunch, build up, and remain localized in the tail half of the bunch. This vertical instability was compared with a head-tail instability that was intentionally induced in the RCS by adjusting the trim sextupoles. It appears that our vertical instability is not a classical head-tail instability [1]. More data analysis and experiments were performed to characterize the instability.

  17. Physics and the Vertical Jump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offenbacher, Elmer L.

    1970-01-01

    The physics of vertical jumping is described as an interesting illustration for motivating students in a general physics course to master the kinematics and dynamics of one dimensional motion. The author suggests that mastery of the physical principles of the jump may promote understanding of certain biological phenomena, aspects of physical…

  18. Vertical reactor coolant pump instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The investigation conducted at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant to determine and correct increasing vibrations in the vertical reactor coolant pumps is described. Diagnostic procedures to determine the vibration causes and evaluate the corrective measures taken are also described.

  19. Electron spin decoherence in silicon carbide nuclear spin bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping

    In this paper, we study the electron spin decoherence of single defects in silicon carbide (SiC) nuclear spin bath. We find that, although the natural abundance of 29Si (4.7 counter-intuitive result, is the suppression of heteronuclear-spin flip-flop process in finite magnetic field. Our results show that electron spin of defect centers in SiC are excellent candidates for solid state spin qubit in quantum information processing.

  20. Spin waves in a persistent spin-current Fermi liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, J. D.; Bedell, K. S.

    2010-06-15

    We report two theoretical results for transverse spin waves, which arise in a system with a persistent spin current. Using Fermi liquid theory, we introduce a spin current in the ground state of a polarized or unpolarized Fermi liquid, and we derive the resultant spin waves using the Landau kinetic equation. The resulting spin waves have a q{sup 1} and q{sup 1/2} dispersion to leading order for the polarized and unpolarized systems, respectively.

  1. Controllable magnetic correlation between two impurities by spin-orbit coupling in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Hu, F. M.; Kou, Liangzhi; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Two magnetic impurities on the edge of a zigzag graphene nanoribbon strongly interact with each other via indirect coupling, which can be mediated by conducting carriers. By means of Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations, we find that the spin-orbit coupling λ and the chemical potential μ in system can be used to drive the transition of local-spin exchange from ferromagnetism to anti-ferromagnetism. Since the tunable ranges for λ and μ in graphene are experimentally reachable, we thus open the possibilities for its device application. The symmetry in spatial distribution is broken by the vertical and the transversal spin-spin correlations due to the effect of spin-orbit coupling, leading to the spatial anisotropy of spin exchange, which distinguish our findings from the case in normal Fermi liquid. PMID:25754911

  2. Spin Foam and Regge Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gionti, S. J. Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Recent results in Local Regge Calculus are confronted with Spin Foam Formalism. Introducing Barrett-Crane Quantization in Local Regge Calculus makes it possible to associate a unique Spin jh with an hinge h, fulfilling one of the requirements of Spin Foam definition. It is shown that inter-twiner terms of Spin Foam can follow from the closure constraint in Local Regge Calculus.

  3. Vertical Sextants give Good Sights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Mark

    Many texts stress the need for marine sextants to be held precisely vertical at the instant that the altitude of a heavenly body is measured. Several authors lay particular emphasis on the technique of the instrument in a small arc about the horizontal axis to obtain a good sight. Nobody, to the author's knowledge, however, has attempted to quantify the errors involved, so as to compare them with other errors inherent in determining celestial position lines. This paper sets out to address these issues and to pose the question: what level of accuracy of vertical alignment can reasonably be expected during marine sextant work at sea ?When a heavenly body is brought to tangency with the visible horizon it is particularly important to ensure that the sextant is held in a truly vertical position. To this end the instrument is rocked gently about the horizontal so that the image of the body describes a small arc in the observer's field of vision. As Bruce Bauer points out, tangency with the horizon must be achieved during the process of rocking and not a second or so after rocking has been discontinued. The altitude is recorded for the instant that the body kisses the visible horizon at the lowest point of the rocking arc, as in Fig. 2. The only other visual clue as to whether the sextant is vertical is provided by the right angle made by the vertical edge of the horizon glass mirror with the horizon. There may also be some input from the observer's sense of balance and his hand orientation.

  4. EDITORIAL: Spin-transfer-torque-induced phenomena Spin-transfer-torque-induced phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirohata, Atsufumi

    2011-09-01

    This cluster, consisting of five invited articles on spin-transfer torque, offers the very first review covering both magnetization reversal and domain-wall displacement induced by a spin-polarized current. Since the first theoretical proposal on spin-transfer torque—reported by Berger and Slonczewski independently—spin-transfer torque has been experimentally demonstrated in both vertical magnetoresistive nano-pillars and lateral ferromagnetic nano-wires. In the former structures, an electrical current flowing vertically in the nano-pillar exerts spin torque onto the thinner ferromagnetic layer and reverses its magnetization, i.e., current-induced magnetization switching. In the latter structures, an electrical current flowing laterally in the nano-wire exerts torque onto a domain wall and moves its position by rotating local magnetic moments within the wall, i.e., domain wall displacement. Even though both phenomena are induced by spin-transfer torque, each phenomenon has been investigated separately. In order to understand the physical meaning of spin torque in a broader context, this cluster overviews both cases from theoretical modellings to experimental demonstrations. The earlier articles in this cluster focus on current-induced magnetization switching. The magnetization dynamics during the reversal has been calculated by Kim et al using the conventional Landau--Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, adding a spin-torque term. This model can explain the dynamics in both spin-valves and magnetic tunnel junctions in a nano-pillar form. This phenomenon has been experimentally measured in these junctions consisting of conventional ferromagnets. In the following experimental part, the nano-pillar junctions with perpendicularly magnetized FePt and half-metallic Heusler alloys are discussed from the viewpoint of efficient magnetization reversal due to a high degree of spin polarization of the current induced by the intrinsic nature of these alloys. Such switching can

  5. MMS Spin Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    The four Magnetospheric Multiscale observatories all undergo what's called a spin test, to learn how well the spacecraft are balanced. It also provides information on how well the mass properties o...

  6. Pluto's Spinning Moons

    NASA Video Gallery

    Most inner moons in the solar system keep one face pointed toward their central planet; this animation shows that certainly isn’t the case with the small moons of Pluto, which behave like spinning ...

  7. ^3He Spin Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, A.; Ishimoto, H.; Kojima, H.

    2009-03-01

    The superfluid component of ^3He A1 phase is spin-polarized. The process of forcing the superfluid component through a spin filtering structure, in a manner of mechano-magnetic effect, can be used to increase the spin polarization beyond the equilibrium under a given applied magnetic field. We have constructed a test cell in which a glass capillary array acts as the spin (and entropy) filter and an electrostatically actuated diaphragm forces the superfluid flow through it. Preliminary results show that a maximum relative increase of polarization by 50 % could be achieved. The maximum increase in polarization appears to be limited by the critical superfluid flow through the channels in the glass capillary array. The dependence of the observed effects on temperature, pressure and magnetic field will be presented.

  8. The spin deep within

    SciTech Connect

    Stackhouse, S.

    2008-10-08

    The electronic configuration of iron impurities in lower-mantle minerals influences their physical properties, but it is not well constrained. New studies suggest that ferrous iron in silicate phases exists mainly in an intermediate spin state.

  9. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2015-05-07

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems.

  10. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems.

  11. Spin in Hadron Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Aidala, Christine A.

    2009-08-04

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has brought the study of spin effects in hadronic collisions to a new energy regime. In conjunction with other experiments at facilities around the world, much can be learned from the high-energy polarized proton collisions RHIC provides, allowing the collider to serve as a powerful tool to continue to understand the rich subtleties and surprises of spin effects in QCD, some of which were originally discovered more than three decades ago.

  12. Litter-Spinning Retarders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.

    1995-01-01

    Aerodynamic plates stop litter from spinning during hoisting by helicopter. Features of proposed litter-spinning retarders include convenience of deployment and independence from ground restraint. Retarder plate(s) folded flat against bottom of litter during storage or while litter is loaded. Plate(s) held in storage position by latch that releases manually or automatically as litter is hoisted. Upon release, springs move plates into deployed position.

  13. Free-Spinning and Recovery Characteristics of a 1/19-Scale Model of the North American T-28C Airplane, TED No. NACA AD 3127

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.

    1956-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/19-scale model of the North American T-28C airplane to determine the spin and recovery characteristics. The T-28C airplane is similar to the T-28B airplane except for slight modifications for the arresting hook. The lower rear section of the fuselage was cut out and, consequently, the lower part of the rudder was removed to make a smooth fairing with the fuselage. The T-28B airplane had good recovery characteristics; but these modifications, along with the addition of gun packages on the wings, led to poor and unsatisfactory spin-recovery characteristics during demonstration spins of the T-28C airplane. Model test results indicated that without the gun packages installed, satisfactory recoveries could be obtained if the elevators were held full back while the rudder was fully reversed and the ailerons were held neutral. However, with the addition of gun packages to the wings and the corresponding change in loading, recoveries were considered unsatisfactory. Recoveries attempted by using a larger chord or larger span rudder were improved very slightly, but were still considered marginal or unsatisfactory. Strakes placed on the nose of the model were effective in slowing the spin rotation slightly and, in most instances, decreased the turns for recovery slightly. Recovery characteristics were slightly marginal for the full fuel loading when strakes and the extended-chord rudder were installed; but with the wing fuel partly used, recovery characteristics were again considered unsatisfactory or, at least, definitely on the marginal side. The optimum control technique for recovery is movement of the rudder to full against the spin with the stick held full back (elevators full up) and the ailerons held neutral, followed by forward movement of the stick only after the spin rotation ceases. Inverted-spin test results indicate that the airplane will spin steep and fast and that recovery

  14. Enhancement of Rashba coupling in vertical In0.05Ga0.95As/GaAs quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S. M.; Badrutdinov, A. O.; Serra, L.; Kodera, T.; Nakaoka, T.; Kumagai, N.; Arakawa, Y.; Tayurskii, D. A.; Kono, K.; Ono, K.

    2011-08-01

    We study the spin-splitting energies in low-potential-barrier quantum dots, finding splitting energies that are orbital state dependent. The theoretical analysis is done with a generalization of the Fock-Darwin states in the presence of spin-orbit interactions. We discuss experimental evidence indicating that the Rashba interaction strength in vertical InxGa1-xAs/GaAs quantum dots is in the range 80 meV Å ⩽λR⩽ 120 meV Å. This enhanced spin-orbit interaction can be understood from the high penetration of the electron wave function into the quantum well with low-potential barrier.

  15. Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Dynamic Spin Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Provenza, Andrew; Kurkov, Anatole; Mehmed, Oral; Johnson, Dexter; Montague, Gerald; Duffy, Kirsten; Jansen, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    The Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Dynamic Spin Rig is an apparatus for vibration testing of turbomachine blades in a vacuum at rotational speeds from 0 to 40,000 rpm. This rig includes (1) a vertically oriented shaft on which is mounted an assembly comprising a rotor holding the blades to be tested, (2) two actively controlled heteropolar radial magnetic bearings at opposite ends of the shaft, and (3) an actively controlled magnetic thrust bearing at the upper end of the shaft. This rig is a more capable successor to a prior apparatus, denoted the Dynamic Spin Rig (DSR), that included a vertically oriented shaft with a mechanical thrust bearing at the upper end and a single actively controlled heteropolar radial magnetic bearing at the lower end.

  16. Designing electron spin textures and spin interferometers by shape deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Zu-Jian; Gentile, Paola; Ortix, Carmine; Cuoco, Mario

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that the spin orientation of an electron propagating in a one-dimensional nanostructure with Rashba spin-orbit (SO) coupling can be manipulated on demand by changing the geometry of the nanosystem. Shape deformations that result in a nonuniform curvature give rise to complex three-dimensional spin textures in space. We employ the paradigmatic example of an elliptically deformed quantum ring to unveil the way to get an all-geometrical and all-electrical control of the spin orientation. The resulting spin textures exhibit a tunable topological character with windings around the radial and the out-of-plane directions. We show that these topologically nontrivial spin patterns affect the spin interference effect in the deformed ring, thereby resulting in different geometry-driven ballistic electronic transport behaviors. Our results establish a deep connection between electronic spin textures, spin transport, and the nanoscale shape of the system.

  17. Spin-current emission governed by nonlinear spin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Takaharu; Matsuura, Saki; Nomura, Akiyo; Watanabe, Shun; Kang, Keehoon; Sirringhaus, Henning; Ando, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Coupling between conduction electrons and localized magnetization is responsible for a variety of phenomena in spintronic devices. This coupling enables to generate spin currents from dynamical magnetization. Due to the nonlinearity of magnetization dynamics, the spin-current emission through the dynamical spin-exchange coupling offers a route for nonlinear generation of spin currents. Here, we demonstrate spin-current emission governed by nonlinear magnetization dynamics in a metal/magnetic insulator bilayer. The spin-current emission from the magnetic insulator is probed by the inverse spin Hall effect, which demonstrates nontrivial temperature and excitation power dependences of the voltage generation. The experimental results reveal that nonlinear magnetization dynamics and enhanced spin-current emission due to magnon scatterings are triggered by decreasing temperature. This result illustrates the crucial role of the nonlinear magnon interactions in the spin-current emission driven by dynamical magnetization, or nonequilibrium magnons, from magnetic insulators. PMID:26472712

  18. Spin-current emission governed by nonlinear spin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Takaharu; Matsuura, Saki; Nomura, Akiyo; Watanabe, Shun; Kang, Keehoon; Sirringhaus, Henning; Ando, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Coupling between conduction electrons and localized magnetization is responsible for a variety of phenomena in spintronic devices. This coupling enables to generate spin currents from dynamical magnetization. Due to the nonlinearity of magnetization dynamics, the spin-current emission through the dynamical spin-exchange coupling offers a route for nonlinear generation of spin currents. Here, we demonstrate spin-current emission governed by nonlinear magnetization dynamics in a metal/magnetic insulator bilayer. The spin-current emission from the magnetic insulator is probed by the inverse spin Hall effect, which demonstrates nontrivial temperature and excitation power dependences of the voltage generation. The experimental results reveal that nonlinear magnetization dynamics and enhanced spin-current emission due to magnon scatterings are triggered by decreasing temperature. This result illustrates the crucial role of the nonlinear magnon interactions in the spin-current emission driven by dynamical magnetization, or nonequilibrium magnons, from magnetic insulators. PMID:26472712

  19. Spin-Current and Spin-Splitting in Helicoidal Molecules Due to Spin-Orbit Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of organic materials in spintronic devices has been seriously considered after recent experimental works have shown unexpected spin-dependent electrical properties. The basis for the confection of any spintronic device is ability of selecting the appropriated spin polarization. In this direction, DNA has been pointed out as a potential candidate for spin selection due to the spin-orbit coupling originating from the electric field generated by accumulated electrical charges along the helix. Here, we demonstrate that spin-orbit coupling is the minimum ingredient necessary to promote a spatial spin separation and the generation of spin-current. We show that the up and down spin components have different velocities that give rise to a spin-current. By using a simple situation where spin-orbit coupling is present, we provide qualitative justifications to our results that clearly point to helicoidal molecules as serious candidates to integrate spintronic devices. PMID:27009836

  20. Spin-Current and Spin-Splitting in Helicoidal Molecules Due to Spin-Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caetano, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    The use of organic materials in spintronic devices has been seriously considered after recent experimental works have shown unexpected spin-dependent electrical properties. The basis for the confection of any spintronic device is ability of selecting the appropriated spin polarization. In this direction, DNA has been pointed out as a potential candidate for spin selection due to the spin-orbit coupling originating from the electric field generated by accumulated electrical charges along the helix. Here, we demonstrate that spin-orbit coupling is the minimum ingredient necessary to promote a spatial spin separation and the generation of spin-current. We show that the up and down spin components have different velocities that give rise to a spin-current. By using a simple situation where spin-orbit coupling is present, we provide qualitative justifications to our results that clearly point to helicoidal molecules as serious candidates to integrate spintronic devices.

  1. Spin-Current and Spin-Splitting in Helicoidal Molecules Due to Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    PubMed

    Caetano, R A

    2016-01-01

    The use of organic materials in spintronic devices has been seriously considered after recent experimental works have shown unexpected spin-dependent electrical properties. The basis for the confection of any spintronic device is ability of selecting the appropriated spin polarization. In this direction, DNA has been pointed out as a potential candidate for spin selection due to the spin-orbit coupling originating from the electric field generated by accumulated electrical charges along the helix. Here, we demonstrate that spin-orbit coupling is the minimum ingredient necessary to promote a spatial spin separation and the generation of spin-current. We show that the up and down spin components have different velocities that give rise to a spin-current. By using a simple situation where spin-orbit coupling is present, we provide qualitative justifications to our results that clearly point to helicoidal molecules as serious candidates to integrate spintronic devices. PMID:27009836

  2. Bose-Einstein condensation and spin mixtures of optically trapped metastable helium

    SciTech Connect

    Partridge, G. B.; Jaskula, J.-C.; Bonneau, M.; Boiron, D.; Westbrook, C. I.

    2010-05-15

    We report the realization of a Bose-Einstein condensate of metastable helium-4 atoms ({sup 4}He*) in an all-optical potential. Up to 10{sup 5} spin-polarized {sup 4}He* atoms are condensed in an optical dipole trap formed from a single, focused, vertically propagating far-off-resonance laser beam. The vertical trap geometry is chosen to best match the resolution characteristics of a delay-line anode microchannel plate detector capable of registering single He* atoms. We also confirm the instability of certain spin-state combinations of {sup 4}He* to two-body inelastic processes, which necessarily affects the scope of future experiments using optically trapped spin mixtures. In order to better quantify this constraint, we measure spin-state-resolved two-body inelastic loss rate coefficients in the optical trap.

  3. Membrane curvature and cholesterol effects on lipids packing and spin-labelled lipids conformational distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manukovsky, Nurit; Sanders, Ella; Matalon, Erez; Wolf, Sharon G.; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2013-10-01

    Nitroxide spin-labelled lipid analogues are often used to study model membrane properties using EPR spectroscopy. Whereas in liquid phase membranes the spin label assumes, on average, its putative location, in gel phases and frozen membrane, depending on its position along the acyl chain, it may exhibit a different average location. Here we used 2H three-pulse Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) of phospholipid spin probes, combined with various deuteration schemes to detect the effect of the model membrane curvature and cholesterol on vertical migrations of the spin label. We compared large and small unilamellar 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) vesicles with and without cholesterol (10%). The vertical displacement of the spin label was manifested as an apparently flat trans-membrane profile of water concentration and of label proximity to the head group choline. The spin-label propensity to migrate was found to increase with vesicle curvature and decrease in the presence of cholesterol. This in turn reflects the effect of packing and ordering of the membrane lipids. The results show that in curved vesicles lacking cholesterol, the label attached to carbon 16 may travel as far high along the membrane normal as the location of the label on carbon 5, due to the presence of U-shaped lipid conformations. This phenomenon must be taken into account when using spin-labelled lipids as membrane depth markers or to trace trans-membrane profiles.

  4. Topological frustration of artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drisko, Jasper; Marsh, Thomas; Cumings, John

    Dislocations are topological defects ubiquitous in crystalline materials, although they are often neglected in experimental and theoretical studies due to their complexity. Artificial spin ices (ASIs), lithographically patterned arrays of ferromagnetic nanostructures, are highly tunable systems that allow for detailed investigations of frustration by providing exquisite control and insight at the single-spin level. Here, we introduce controlled topological defects into thermally active square ASI lattices and directly observe the resulting spin configurations upon annealing. Whereas a canonical square ASI lattice can support perfect ground state ordering, we find the presence of a dislocation results in extended frustration within the system. Locally, the magnets are unfrustrated, but frustration of the lattice persists due to its topology. A chain of higher energy vertices always originates from each dislocation point and either extends to an edge of our finite crystal, or rarely, to a second dislocation point if it is present in the same crystal. We also simulate our work using a kinetic Monte Carlo technique and find remarkably similar behavior between the simulations and our experiments, with the same types of domain walls and domain patterns as in our experimental samples. Our results indicate that topological defects have non-trivial consequences and should receive more attention in investigations of three dimensional crystals with q ≠0 order parameters.

  5. Controlling Magnetization using Spin Orbit Torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2015-03-01

    Recently it has been shown that spin orbit coupling (SOC) and/or broken inversion symmetry in vertical heterostructures can generate accumulation of spins when a charge current is flowing through them. In doing so, it can exert a torque on an adjacent magnet. Indeed, high Z metals (Ta, Pt, W, etc.) with strong SOC have been used to inject spin currents into adjacent ferromagnetic layers and thereby to induce magnetic switching, oscillation, domain wall movement etc. SOC physics promises to significantly reduce the required current for current induced magnetic switching for next generation data-storage applications. In this presentation we shall discuss some of our recent work on SOC induced control of magnets with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). A current flowing in-plane presents interesting symmetry problems with respect to a PMA magnet. We shall discuss how these symmetry relations can be utilized for switching of and domain wall movement in the PMA magnets. In addition to storage applications, we shall also discuss possibility of exploiting SOC for spintronic logic applications.

  6. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Mattione

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  7. Vertically Integrated Circuits at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The exploration of the vertically integrated circuits, also commonly known as 3D-IC technology, for applications in radiation detection started at Fermilab in 2006. This paper examines the opportunities that vertical integration offers by looking at various 3D designs that have been completed by Fermilab. The emphasis is on opportunities that are presented by through silicon vias (TSV), wafer and circuit thinning and finally fusion bonding techniques to replace conventional bump bonding. Early work by Fermilab has led to an international consortium for the development of 3D-IC circuits for High Energy Physics. The consortium has submitted over 25 different designs for the Fermilab organized MPW run organized for the first time.

  8. Hot electron spin transport in C60 fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, Luis Eduardo; Gobbi, Marco; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Golmar, Federico; Llopis, Roger; Casanova, Felix

    2012-02-01

    Carbon-based molecular materials are interesting for spin transport application mainly due to their small sources of spin relaxation [1]. However, spin coherence lengths reported in many molecular films do not exceed a few tens of nanometers [2]. In this work we will present results showing how hot spin-polarized electrons injected well above the Fermi level in C60 fullerene films travel coherently for hundreds of nanometers. We fabricated hot-electron vertical transistors, in which the current created across an Al/Al2O3 junction is polarized by a metallic Co/Cu/Py spin valve trilayer and subsequently injected in the molecular thin film. This geometry allows us to determine the energy level alignment at each interface between different materials. Moreover, the collector magnetocurrent excess 85%, even for C60 films thicknesses of 300 nm. We believe these results show the importance of hot spin-polarized electron injection and propagation in molecular materials. [1] V. Dediu, L.E. Hueso, I. Bergenti, C. Taliani, Nature Mater. 8, 707 (2009) [2] M. Gobbi, F. Golmar, R. Llopis, F. Casanova, L.E. Hueso, Adv. Mater. 23, 1609 (2011)

  9. NASA-Ames vertical gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A national facility, the NASA-Ames vertical gun range (AVGR) has an excellent reputation for revealing fundamental aspects of impact cratering that provide important constraints for planetary processes. The current logistics in accessing the AVGR, some of the past and ongoing experimental programs and their relevance, and the future role of this facility in planetary studies are reviewed. Publications resulting from experiments with the gun (1979 to 1984) are listed as well as the researchers and subjects studied.

  10. Next generation vertical electrode cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Craig

    2001-05-01

    The concept of the vertical electrode cell (VEC) for aluminum electrowinning is presented with reference to current research. Low-temperature electrolysis allows nonconsumable metal-alloy anodes to show ongoing promise in laboratory tests. The economic and environmental advantages of the VEC are surveyed. The unique challenges of bringing VEC technology into practice are discussed. The current status of laboratory research is summarized. New results presented show that commercial purity aluminum can be produced with promisingly high current efficiency.

  11. Measurements of nuclear spin dynamics by spin-noise spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S.; Kavokin, K. V.; Glazov, M. M.; Vladimirova, M.; Scalbert, D.; Cronenberger, S.; Lemaître, A.; Bloch, J.

    2015-06-15

    We exploit the potential of the spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) for studies of nuclear spin dynamics in n-GaAs. The SNS experiments were performed on bulk n-type GaAs layers embedded into a high-finesse microcavity at negative detuning. In our experiments, nuclear spin polarisation initially prepared by optical pumping is monitored in real time via a shift of the peak position in the electron spin noise spectrum. We demonstrate that this shift is a direct measure of the Overhauser field acting on the electron spin. The dynamics of nuclear spin is shown to be strongly dependent on the electron concentration.

  12. Amplification of Spin Waves by Thermal Spin-Transfer Torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Hernández, E.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2011-11-01

    We observe amplification of spin-wave packets propagating along a film of single-crystal yttrium iron garnet subject to a transverse temperature gradient. The spin waves are excited and detected with standard techniques used in magnetostatic microwave delay lines in the 1-2 GHz frequency range. The amplification is attributed to the action of a thermal spin-transfer torque acting on the magnetization that opposes the relaxation and which is created by spin currents generated through the spin-Seebeck effect. The experimental data are interpreted with a spin-wave model that gives an amplification gain in very good agreement with the data.

  13. Spin pumping by magnetopolaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yunshan; Yan, Peng; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian; Bauer, Gerrit

    2015-03-01

    Recent experiments report the strong coupling of microwaves to the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet with weakly damped magnetization dynamics. We developed a scattering approach to study the coupled magnetization and microwave cavities beyond the paramagnetic/macrospin and rotating wave approximations that are implicit in the Tavis-Cummings model. To this end we solve the coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert and Maxwell's equations for a thin film magnet in a microwave cavity, leading to rich ferromagnetic spin wave resonance spectra of the transmitted or absorbed microwaves. Our method is valid for the full parameter range spanning the weak to strong coupling limits. We demonstrate strong coupling achievement not only for the FMR mode but also for standing spin waves, although the lowest excitation has a decisive leading role for coupling strength. Spin pumping in FI|N bilayers as detected by inverse spin Hall voltages provides additional access to study strong coupling electrically. Funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme [FP7-People-2012-ITN] under Grant Agreement 316657 (SpinIcur).

  14. Overview of spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1992-12-23

    Spin physics activities at medium and high energies became significantly active when polarized targets and polarized beams became accessible for hadron-hadron scattering experiments. My overview of spin physics will be inclined to the study of strong interaction using facilities at Argonne ZGS, Brookhaven AGS (including RHIC), CERN, Fermilab, LAMPF, an SATURNE. In 1960 accelerator physicists had already been convinced that the ZGS could be unique in accelerating a polarized beam; polarized beams were being accelerated through linear accelerators elsewhere at that time. However, there was much concern about going ahead with the construction of a polarized beam because (i) the source intensity was not high enough to accelerate in the accelerator, (ii) the use of the accelerator would be limited to only polarized-beam physics, that is, proton-proton interaction, and (iii) p-p elastic scattering was not the most popular topic in high-energy physics. In fact, within spin physics, [pi]-nucleon physics looked attractive, since the determination of spin and parity of possible [pi]p resonances attracted much attention. To proceed we needed more data beside total cross sections and elastic differential cross sections; measurements of polarization and other parameters were urgently needed. Polarization measurements had traditionally been performed by analyzing the spin of recoil protons. The drawbacks of this technique are: (i) it involves double scattering, resulting in poor accuracy of the data, and (ii) a carbon analyzer can only be used for a limited region of energy.

  15. Spin hydrodynamic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, R.; Matsuo, M.; Ono, M.; Harii, K.; Chudo, H.; Okayasu, S.; Ieda, J.; Takahashi, S.; Maekawa, S.; Saitoh, E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic generation is the conversion of fluid kinetic energy into electricity. Such conversion, which has been applied to various types of electric power generation, is driven by the Lorentz force acting on charged particles and thus a magnetic field is necessary. On the other hand, recent studies of spintronics have revealed the similarity between the function of a magnetic field and that of spin-orbit interactions in condensed matter. This suggests the existence of an undiscovered route to realize the conversion of fluid dynamics into electricity without using magnetic fields. Here we show electric voltage generation from fluid dynamics free from magnetic fields; we excited liquid-metal flows in a narrow channel and observed longitudinal voltage generation in the liquid. This voltage has nothing to do with electrification or thermoelectric effects, but turned out to follow a universal scaling rule based on a spin-mediated scenario. The result shows that the observed voltage is caused by spin-current generation from a fluid motion: spin hydrodynamic generation. The observed phenomenon allows us to make mechanical spin-current and electric generators, opening a door to fluid spintronics.

  16. Manipulating topological states by imprinting non-collinear spin textures

    SciTech Connect

    Streubel, Robert; Han, Luyang; Im, Mi -Young; Kronast, Florian; Rößler, Ulrich K.; Radu, Florin; Abrudan, Radu; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Fischer, Peter; Makarov, Denys

    2015-03-05

    Topological magnetic states, such as chiral skyrmions, are of great scientific interest and show huge potential for novel spintronics applications, provided their topological charges can be fully controlled. So far skyrmionic textures have been observed in noncentrosymmetric crystalline materials with low symmetry and at low temperatures. We propose theoretically and demonstrate experimentally the design of spin textures with topological charge densities that can be tailored at ambient temperatures. Tuning the interlayer coupling in vertically stacked nanopatterned magnetic heterostructures, such as a model system of a Co/Pd multilayer coupled to Permalloy, the in-plane non-collinear spin texture of one layer can be imprinted into the out-of-plane magnetised material. We observe distinct spin textures, e.g. vortices, magnetic swirls with tunable opening angle, donut states and skyrmion core configurations. We show that applying a small magnetic field, a reliable switching between topologically distinct textures can be achieved at remanence

  17. Manipulating topological states by imprinting non-collinear spin textures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Streubel, Robert; Han, Luyang; Im, Mi -Young; Kronast, Florian; Rößler, Ulrich K.; Radu, Florin; Abrudan, Radu; Lin, Gungun; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Fischer, Peter; et al

    2015-03-05

    Topological magnetic states, such as chiral skyrmions, are of great scientific interest and show huge potential for novel spintronics applications, provided their topological charges can be fully controlled. So far skyrmionic textures have been observed in noncentrosymmetric crystalline materials with low symmetry and at low temperatures. We propose theoretically and demonstrate experimentally the design of spin textures with topological charge densities that can be tailored at ambient temperatures. Tuning the interlayer coupling in vertically stacked nanopatterned magnetic heterostructures, such as a model system of a Co/Pd multilayer coupled to Permalloy, the in-plane non-collinear spin texture of one layer can bemore » imprinted into the out-of-plane magnetised material. We observe distinct spin textures, e.g. vortices, magnetic swirls with tunable opening angle, donut states and skyrmion core configurations. We show that applying a small magnetic field, a reliable switching between topologically distinct textures can be achieved at remanence« less

  18. Harnessing spin precession with dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, A. D.; Datta, S.; Viennot, J. J.; Delbecq, M. R.; Cottet, A.; Kontos, T.

    2016-01-01

    Non-collinear spin transport is at the heart of spin or magnetization control in spintronics devices. The use of nanoscale conductors exhibiting quantum effects in transport could provide new paths for that purpose. Here we study non-collinear spin transport in a quantum dot. We use a device made out of a single-wall carbon nanotube connected to orthogonal ferromagnetic electrodes. In the spin transport signals, we observe signatures of out of equilibrium spin precession that are electrically tunable through dissipation. This could provide a new path to harness spin precession in nanoscale conductors.

  19. Harnessing spin precession with dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Crisan, A. D.; Datta, S.; Viennot, J. J.; Delbecq, M. R.; Cottet, A.; Kontos, T.

    2016-01-01

    Non-collinear spin transport is at the heart of spin or magnetization control in spintronics devices. The use of nanoscale conductors exhibiting quantum effects in transport could provide new paths for that purpose. Here we study non-collinear spin transport in a quantum dot. We use a device made out of a single-wall carbon nanotube connected to orthogonal ferromagnetic electrodes. In the spin transport signals, we observe signatures of out of equilibrium spin precession that are electrically tunable through dissipation. This could provide a new path to harness spin precession in nanoscale conductors. PMID:26816050

  20. [Vertical fractures: apropos of 2 clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Félix Mañes Ferrer, J; Micò Muñoz, P; Sánchez Cortés, J L; Paricio Martín, J J; Miñana Laliga, R

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present a clinical review of the vertical root fractures. Two clinical cases are presented to demonstrates the criteria for obtaining a correct diagnosis of vertical root fractures. PMID:1659859

  1. Vertical separation of the two beams

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.

    1985-10-01

    The author discusses the problem of design of insertion points on the SSC, and in particular keeping the length necessary for them under control. Here he considers the possibility of having vertically separated beams, without a vertical dispersion suppressor.

  2. Spin-valve phototransistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biqin; Altfeder, Igor; Appelbaum, Ian

    2007-01-01

    The spin-valve phototransistor is a semiconductor-ferromagnetic metal multilayer-semiconductor transistor operated by photoexciting hot electrons in the emitter semiconductor into a Schottky collector. This device uses an ultra-high vacuum-bonded float zone Si/multilayer/n-InP structure. To distinguish the emitter interband-excited component of collector current from base/collector internal photoemission, a lock-in spectroscopy sensitive only to the magnetocurrent is used. The experimental results indicate a pathway to improve the magnetocurrent of a related device, the spin-valve photodiode, by increasing the fraction of hot electron current that travels through both layers of the ferromagnetic spin valve and demonstrate that hot electrons photogenerated in one semiconductor can be collected by another through a thin ferromagnetic multilayer.

  3. Doped Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia; Libal, Andras; Reichhardt, Charles

    We examine square and kagome artificial spin ice for colloids confined in arrays of double-well traps. Unlike magnetic artificial spin ices, colloidal and vortex artificial spin ice realizations allow creation of doping sites through double occupation of individual traps. We find that doping square and kagome ice geometries produces opposite effects. For square ice, doping creates local excitations in the ground state configuration that produce a local melting effect as the temperature is raised. In contrast, the kagome ice ground state can absorb the doping charge without generating non-ground-state excitations, while at elevated temperatures the hopping of individual colloids is suppressed near the doping sites. These results indicate that in the square ice, doping adds degeneracy to the ordered ground state and creates local weak spots, while in the kagome ice, which has a highly degenerate ground state, doping locally decreases the degeneracy and creates local hard regions.

  4. Mechanical spin bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spin bearing assembly including, a pair of mutually opposing complementary bearing support members having mutually spaced apart bearing support surfaces which may be, for example, bearing races and a set of spin bearings located therebetween. Each spin bearing includes a pair of end faces, a central rotational axis passing through the end faces, a waist region substantially mid-way between the end faces and having a first thickness dimension, and discrete side surface regions located between the waist region and the end faces and having a second thickness dimension different from the first thickness dimension of the waist region and wherein the side surface regions further have respective curvilinear contact surfaces adapted to provide a plurality of bearing contact points on the bearing support members.

  5. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  6. Fermi spin current contribution in spin wave spectrum of spin-1/2 fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel; Kuzmenkov, Leonid

    2016-05-01

    General theory predicts the presence of the thermal part of the spin current in the spin evolution equation for bosons and fermions. For bosons in Bose-Einstein condensate state, it is equal to zero. However, for degenerate fermions it is non zero and it can give a considerable contribution since it describes the Pauli blocking. In this work, we consider spin-1/2 partially polarized fermions. We derive an equation of state for the thermal part of the spin current of degenerate fermions and call it Fermi spin current. We present the spin evolution equation with the Fermi spin current as a part of applied hydrodynamic model. We consider spectrum of collective excitation and describe contribution of the Fermi spin current in the spin wave spectrum. The work of P.A. was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Grant No. 16-32-00886) and the Dynasty foundation.

  7. Spin filter and spin valve in ferromagnetic graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yu Dai, Gang

    2015-06-01

    We propose and demonstrate that a EuO-induced and top-gated graphene ferromagnetic junction can be simultaneously operated as a spin filter and a spin valve. We attribute such a remarkable result to a coexistence of a half-metal band and a common energy gap for opposite spins in ferromagnetic graphene. We show that both the spin filter and the spin valve can be effectively controlled by a back gate voltage, and they survive for practical metal contacts and finite temperature. Specifically, larger single spin currents and on-state currents can be reached with contacts with work functions similar to graphene, and the spin filter can operate at higher temperature than the spin valve.

  8. Spin-orbit coupling and spin relaxation in phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpas, Marcin; Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    We employ first principles density functional theory calculations to study intrinsic and extrinsic spin-orbit coupling in monolayer phosphorene. We also extract the spin-mixing amplitudes of the Bloch wave functions to give realistic estimates of the Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation rate. The most remarkable result is the striking anisotropy in both spin-orbit coupling and spin relaxation rates, which could be tested experimentally in spin injection experiments. We also identify spin hot spots in the electronic structure of phosphorene at accidental bands anticrossings. We compare the Elliott-Yafet with Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation times, obtained from extrinsic couplings in an applied electric field. We also compare the results in phosphorene with those of black phosphorous. This work is supported by the DFG SPP 1538, SFB 689, and by the EU Seventh Framework Programme under Grant Agreement No. 604391 Graphene Flagship.

  9. Manipulating single electron spins and coherence in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awschalom, David

    2008-05-01

    The non-destructive detection of a single electron spin in a quantum dot (QD) is demonstrated using a time- averaged magneto-optical Kerr rotation measurementootnotetextJ. Berezovsky, M. H. Mikkelsen, O. Gywat, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, and D. D. Awschalom, Science 314, 1916 (2006).. This technique provides a means to directly probe the spin off- resonance, thus minimally disturbing the system. Furthermore, the ability to sequentially initialize, manipulate, and read out the state of a qubit, such as an electron spin in a quantum dot, is necessary for virtually any scheme for quantum information processing. In addition to the time-averaged measurements, we have extended the single dot KR technique into the time domain with pulsed pump and probe lasers, allowing the observation of the coherent evolution of an electron spin stateootnotetextM. H. Mikkelsen, J. Berezovsky, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, and D. D. Awschalom, Nature Physics 3, 770 (2007).. The dot is formed by interface fluctuations of a GaAs quantum well and embedded in a diode structure to allow controllable gating/charging of the QD. To enhance the small single spin signal, the QD is positioned within a vertical optical cavity. Observations of coherent single spin precession in an applied magnetic field allow a direct measurement of the electron g-factor and transverse spin lifetime. These measurements reveal information about the relevant spin decoherence mechanisms, while also providing a sensitive probe of the local nuclear spin environment. Finally, we have recently eveloped a scheme for high speed all-optical manipulation of the spin state that enables multiple operations within the coherence timeootnotetextJ. Berezovsky, M. H. Mikkelsen, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, and D. D. Awschalom, accepted for publication (2008).. The results represent progress toward the control and coupling of single spins and photons for quantum information processingootnotetextS. Ghosh, W.H. Wang, F. M. Mendoza, R. C

  10. Optical spin excitations in quantum spin ladders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simutis, Gediminas; Gvasaliya, Severian; Xiao, Fan; Landee, Christopher; Zheludev, Andrey

    We present a Raman spectroscopy study of magnetic excitations in quantum spin ladders. We start with a strong-rung ladder Cu(Qnx)(Cl1-xBrx)2. It has recently attracted attention due to proposal that the ratio of leg to rung exchange can be varied continuously by substituting Br for Cl. We have measured the Raman spectra for the hole doping series and report on the scattering from two magnons. We extract the onset and cutoff of the scattering for the whole series and compare it to the estimates from previous bulk measurements as well as numerical calculations. We find that the magnetic spectrum indeed varies continuously as the halogen ions are exchanged. The general behavior is found to be consistent with expectations, however small systematic deviations persist. The difference can potentially be explained by the existence of three-dimensional coupling, however more systematic computational studies are needed to ascertain the origin of the inconsistencies. Having established the analysis using the strong rung case, we then turn our attention to other ladder systems. Unusual magnetic signal is found in a strong leg spin ladder, which is discussed in terms of selection rules and an unexpected energy scale.

  11. Spin Charge Separation in the Quantum Spin Hall State

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The quantum spin Hall state is a topologically non-trivial insulator state protected by the time reversal symmetry. We show that such a state always leads to spin-charge separation in the presence of a {pi} flux. Our result is generally valid for any interacting system. We present a proposal to experimentally observe the phenomenon of spin-charge separation in the recently discovered quantum spin Hall system.

  12. Squeezed spin states: Squeezing the spin uncertainty relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitagawa, Masahiro; Ueda, Masahito

    1993-01-01

    The notion of squeezing in spin systems is clarified, and the principle for spin squeezing is shown. Two twisting schemes are proposed as building blocks for spin squeezing and are shown to reduce the standard quantum noise, s/2, of the coherent S-spin state down to the order of S(sup 1/3) and 1/2. Applications to partition noise suppression are briefly discussed.

  13. Inhomogeneously broadened spin masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romalis, M. V.; Happer, W.

    1999-08-01

    Hyperpolarized 3He gas, where the nuclear spin polarization has been increased to several tens of percent by optical pumping, can couple such a large negative resistance into an external circuit that masing can ensue. The masing threshold can be suppressed by application of a magnetic field gradient. However, edge enhancement, that is, the less effective diffusional damping of the precessing magnetization at the container walls, can lower the masing threshold. The edge enhancement of the masing is greatly modified by magnetic self-interactions of the spins.

  14. Measuring Black Hole Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    1999-09-01

    WE PROPOSE TO CARRY OUT A SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF EMISSION AND ABSORPTION SPECTRAL FEATURES THAT ARE OFTEN SEEN IN X-RAY SPECTRA OF BLACK HOLE BINARIES. THE EXCELLENT SENSITIVITY AND ENERGY RESOLUTION OF THE ACIS/HETG COMBINATION WILL NOT ONLY HELP RESOLVE AMBIGUITIES IN INTERPRETING THESE FEATURES, BUT MAY ALLOW MODELLING OF THE EMISSION LINE PROFILES IN DETAIL. THE PROFILES MAY CONTAIN INFORMATION ON SUCH FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES AS THE SPIN OF BLACK HOLES. THEREFORE, THIS STUDY COULD LEAD TO A MEASUREMENT OF BLACK HOLE SPIN FOR SELECTED SOURCES. THE RESULT CAN THEN BE DIRECTLY COMPARED WITH THOSE FROM PREVIOUS STUDIES BASED ON INDEPENDENT METHODS.

  15. Spin Currents in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2011-03-01

    I will discuss the results of our recent spin injection experiments using long-distance non-degenerate undoped (and n-type doped) Si devices. We have a unique capability to recover the details of electron transport on a sub-ns timescale through a ``Larmor clock'' transformation of spin precession data, despite using only quasistatic current measurements. I suggest that this is potentially a new tool for probing non-equilibrium phenomena in semiconductors, revealing both intrinsic and extrinsic materials properties through sensitivity to subtleties of the bandstructure and impurity spectrum. Supported by ONR and NSF.

  16. Spin labeling EPR.

    PubMed

    Klare, Johann P; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has emerged as an efficient tool to elucidate the structure and conformational dynamics of biomolecules under native-like conditions. This article summarizes the basics as well as recent progress of site-directed spin labeling. Continuous wave EPR spectra analyses and pulse EPR techniques are reviewed with special emphasis on applications to the sensory rhodopsin-transducer complex mediating the photophobic response of the halophilic archaeum Natronomonas pharaonis and the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26. PMID:19728138

  17. Spin, Gravity, and Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Yuri N.

    2001-01-01

    The gravitational effects in the relativistic quantum mechanics are investigated. The exact Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation is constructed for the Dirac particle coupled to the static spacetime metric. As a direct application, we analyze the nonrelativistic limit of the theory. The new term describing the specific spin (gravitational moment) interaction effect is recovered in the Hamiltonian. The comparison of the true gravitational coupling with the purely inertial case demonstrates that the spin relativistic effects do not violate the equivalence principle for the Dirac fermions.

  18. Higher Spin Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chi-Ming

    This dissertation splits into two distinct halves. The first half is devoted to the study of the holography of higher spin gauge theory in AdS 3. We present a conjecture that the holographic dual of W N minimal model in a 't Hooft-like large N limit is an unusual "semi-local" higher spin gauge theory on AdS3 x 1. At each point on the S1 lives a copy of three-dimensional Vasiliev theory, that contains an infinite tower of higher spin gauge fields coupled to a single massive complex scalar propagating in AdS3. The Vasiliev theories at different points on the S1 are correlated only through the AdS3 boundary conditions on the massive scalars. All but one single tower of higher spin symmetries are broken by the boundary conditions. This conjecture is checked by comparing tree-level two- and three-point functions, and also one-loop partition functions on both side of the duality. The second half focuses on the holography of higher spin gauge theory in AdS 4. We demonstrate that a supersymmetric and parity violating version of Vasiliev's higher spin gauge theory in AdS4 admits boundary conditions that preserve N = 0,1,2,3,4 or 6 supersymmetries. In particular, we argue that the Vasiliev theory with U( M) Chan-Paton and N = 6 boundary condition is holographically dual to the 2+1 dimensional U(N) k x U(M) -k ABJ theory in the limit of large N, k and finite M. In this system all bulk higher spin fields transform in the adjoint of the U(M) gauge group, whose bulk t'Hooft coupling is M/N. Our picture suggests that the supersymmetric Vasiliev theory can be obtained as a limit of type IIA string theory in AdS4 x CP3, and that the non-Abelian Vasiliev theory at strong bulk 't Hooft coupling smoothly turn into a string field theory. The fundamental string is a singlet bound state of Vasiliev's higher spin particles held together by U(M) gauge interactions.

  19. Spin Wave Genie

    2015-02-16

    The four-dimensional scattering function S(Q,w) obtained by inelastic neutron scattering measurements provides unique "dynamical fingerprints" of the spin state and interactions present in complex magnetic materials. Extracting this information however is currently a slow and complex process that may take an expert -depending on the complexity of the system- up to several weeks of painstaking work to complete. Spin Wave Genie was created to abstract and automate this process. It strives to both reduce themore » time to complete this analysis and make these calculations more accessible to a broader group of scientists and engineers.« less

  20. Spin Wave Genie

    SciTech Connect

    2015-02-16

    The four-dimensional scattering function S(Q,w) obtained by inelastic neutron scattering measurements provides unique "dynamical fingerprints" of the spin state and interactions present in complex magnetic materials. Extracting this information however is currently a slow and complex process that may take an expert -depending on the complexity of the system- up to several weeks of painstaking work to complete. Spin Wave Genie was created to abstract and automate this process. It strives to both reduce the time to complete this analysis and make these calculations more accessible to a broader group of scientists and engineers.

  1. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    SciTech Connect

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  2. A design for vertical crossing insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    A crossing insertion designed for an SSC with vertically separated 1-in-1 beam lines is presented in this note. The author supposes that the beam lines consist of separate magnets in separate cryostats separated by about 70 cm. He then describes the design, where vertical separation is done with four vertical dipoles producing a steplike beam line.

  3. Vertical Lift - Not Just For Terrestrial Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A

    2000-01-01

    Autonomous vertical lift vehicles hold considerable potential for supporting planetary science and exploration missions. This paper discusses several technical aspects of vertical lift planetary aerial vehicles in general, and specifically addresses technical challenges and work to date examining notional vertical lift vehicles for Mars, Titan, and Venus exploration.

  4. Spin Hall and spin Nernst effects: temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrdal, Anna; Barnas, Jozef; Dugaev, Vitalii

    We have considered temperature dependence of spin Hall and spin Nernst effect in two-dimensional electron gas with spin-orbit interaction of Rashba type [arXiv:1510.03080]. In our considerations we have employed the approach based on the Matsubara Green functions. The formalism used in the case of electric field as a driving force was subsequently adopted to the situation of a spin current driven by a temperature gradient. To achieve this, we have used the concept of an auxiliary vector field. Such a description gives the possibility to consider all mechanisms leading to the spin Hall and spin Nernst effect on equal footing and also their behavior at finite temperatures. Both spin Hall and spin Nernst conductivities were calculated in the approximation including the vertex correction. The total spin Hall conductivity, including vertex correction, has been shown to vanish exactly in the whole temperature range. Thus, our results extend the earlier ones to an arbitrary temperatures. In turn, the total spin Nernst conductivity remains finite when the vertex corrections are included. Using the Ioffe-Regel localization criterion, we have also estimated the range of parameters where the calculated results for the spin Hall and spin Nernst conductivities are applicable.

  5. Spin current swapping and spin hall effect in disordered metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidaoui, Hamed; Pauyac, Christian; Manchon, Aurelien

    2015-03-01

    The conversion of charge currents into spin currents via the spin Hall effect has attracted intense experimental and theoretical efforts lately, providing an efficient means to generate electric signals and manipulate the magnetization of single layers. More recently, it was proposed that spin-dependent scattering induced by spin-orbit coupled impurities also produces a so-called spin swapping, i.e. an exchange between the spin angular momentum and linear momentum of itinerant electrons. In this work, we investigate the nature of spin swapping and its interplay with extrinsic spin Hall effect and spin relaxation in finite size normal metals. We use two complementary methods based on non-equilibrium Green's function technique. The first method consists in rigorously deriving the drift-diffusion equation of the spin accumulation in the presence of spin-orbit coupled impurities from quantum kinetics using Wigner expansion. The second method is the real-space tight binding modeling of a finite system in the presence of spin-orbit coupled disorder.

  6. Spin guides and spin splitters: waveguide analogies in one-dimensional spin chains.

    PubMed

    Makin, Melissa I; Cole, Jared H; Hill, Charles D; Greentree, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    Here we show a mapping between waveguide theory and spin-chain transport, opening an alternative approach to solid-state quantum information transport. By applying temporally varying control profiles to a spin chain, we design a virtual waveguide or "spin guide" to conduct spin excitations along defined space-time trajectories of the chain. We show that the concepts of confinement, adiabatic bend loss, and beam splitting can be mapped from optical waveguide theory to spin guides, and hence to "spin splitters." Importantly, the spatial scale of applied control pulses is required to be large compared to the interspin spacing, thereby allowing the design of scalable control architectures. PMID:22304287

  7. Vertical jumping and signaled avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Cándido, Antonio; Maldonado, Antonio; Vila, Jaime

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment intended to demonstrate that the vertical jumping response can be learned using a signaled-avoidance technique. A photoelectric cell system was used to record the response. Twenty female rats, divided equally into two groups, were exposed to intertrial intervals of either 15 or 40 s. Subjects had to achieve three successive criteria of acquisition: 3, 5, and 10 consecutive avoidance responses. Results showed that both groups learned the avoidance response, requiring increasingly larger numbers of trials as the acquisition criteria increased. No significant effect of intertrial interval was observed. PMID:16812559

  8. ?Vertical Sextants give Good Sights?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, Michael

    Mark Dixon suggests (Forum, Vol. 50, 137) that nobody thus far has attempted to quantify the errors from tilt that arise while observing with the marine sextant. The issue in fact, with the related problem of what exactly is the axis about which the sextant is rotated whilst being (to define the vertical), was the subject of a lively controversy in the first two volumes of this Journal some fifty years ago. Since the consensus of opinion seems to have been that the maximum error does not necessarily occur at 45 degrees, whereas Dixon's table suggests that it does, some reiteration of the arguments may be in order.

  9. Vertical-Bloch-Line Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.

    1993-01-01

    Vertical-Bloch-line memory is developmental very-large-scale integrated-circuit block-access magnetic memory. Stores data in form of localized pairs of twists (VBL pairs) in magnetic field at edge of ferromagnetic domain in each stripe. Presence or absence of VBL pair at bit position denotes one or zero, respectively. Offers advantages of resistance to ionizing radiation, potential areal storage density approximately less than 1 Gb/cm squared, data rates approximately less than 1 Gb/s, and average access times of order of milliseconds. Furthermore, mass, volume, and demand for power less than other magnetic and electronic memories.

  10. Neighbourly polytopes with few vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Devyatov, Rostislav A

    2011-10-31

    A family of neighbourly polytopes in R{sup 2d} with N=2d+4 vertices is constructed. All polytopes in the family have a planar Gale diagram of a special type, namely, with exactly d+3 black points in convex position. These Gale diagrams are parametrized by 3-trees (trees with a certain additional structure). For all polytopes in the family, the number of faces of dimension m containing a given vertex A depends only on d and m. Bibliography: 7 titles.

  11. Attitude stability of spinning satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caughey, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    Some problems of attitude stability of spinning satellites are treated in a rigorous manner. With certain restrictions, linearized stability analysis correctly predicts the attitude stability of spinning satellites, even in the critical cases of the Liapunov-Poincare stability theory.

  12. All Spin Digital Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behin-Aein, Behtash; Datta, Deepanjan; Salahuddin, Sayeef; Datta, Supriyo

    2009-03-01

    Switching of a magnetic free layer using spin polarized current has been demonstrated in Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) devices. Currently MTJ's are being studied for memory and microwave oscillator applications. The purpose of this talk is to explore a modified MTJ where a clock pulse via the fixed layer facilities the switching of the free layer in accordance with a weak bias provided by an input magnet in the form of a spin current. Based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation (LLG) augmented with spin torque functions, we show the switching energy and the switching time of the free layer which indicates the possibility of very low power digital logic applications. Ordinary digital circuits store information in the form of capacitor charges that communicate through electrical interconnects. The purpose of this paper is to show that modified MTJ's can be the basis for all spin digital circuits. Our primary objective is to stimulate proof of concept experiments that could usher in a whole new set of devices suitable for spintronic circuits.

  13. Artificial frustrated spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Y.; Chioar, I. A.; Nguyen, V. D.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M.; Montaigne, F.; Canals, B.; Rougemaille, N.

    2015-09-01

    Complex architectures of nanostructures are routinely elaborated using bottom-up or nanofabrication processes. This technological capability allows scientists to engineer materials with properties that do not exist in nature, but also to manufacture model systems to explore fundamental issues in condensed matter physics. Two-dimensional frustrated arrays of magnetic nanostructures are one class of systems for which theoretical predictions can be tested experimentally. These systems have been the subject of intense research in the last few years and allowed the investigation of a rich physics and fascinating phenomena, such as the exploration of the extensively degenerate ground-state manifolds of spin ice systems, the evidence of new magnetic phases in purely two-dimensional lattices, and the observation of pseudoexcitations involving classical analogues of magnetic monopoles. We show here, experimentally and theoretically, that simple magnetic geometries can lead to unconventional, non-collinear spin textures. For example, kagome arrays of inplane magnetized nano-islands do not show magnetic order. Instead, these systems are characterized by spin textures with intriguing properties, such as chirality, coexistence of magnetic order and disorder, and charge crystallization. Magnetic frustration effects in lithographically patterned kagome arrays of nanomagnets with out-of-plane magnetization also lead to an unusal, and still unknown, magnetic ground state manifold. Besides the influence of the lattice geometry, the micromagnetic nature of the elements constituting the arrays introduce the concept of chiral magnetic monopoles, bringing additional complexity into the physics of artificial frustrated spin systems.

  14. Does the Moon Spin?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Robert; Simpson, Frances

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the question, "Does the Moon spin?", and show how the question is investigated. They emphasise the importance of the process by which people work out what they know, by "learning from the inside out." They stress that those involved in science education have to challenge current conceptions and ideas, making…

  15. TRANSVERSITY SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES.

    SciTech Connect

    BOER,D.

    2001-04-27

    The theoretical aspects of two leading twist transversity single spin asymmetries, one arising from the Collins effect and one from the interference fragmentation functions, are reviewed. Issues of factorization, evolution and Sudakov factors for the relevant observables are discussed. These theoretical considerations pinpoint the most realistic scenarios towards measurements of transversity.

  16. Spin Physics at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Hasch, D.

    2007-06-13

    The HERMES experiment at DESY is a second generation experiment to study the spin structure of the nucleon by measuring not only inclusive but also semi-inclusive and exclusive processes in deep-inelastic lepton scattering. An overview of most recent results is given.

  17. Spin Physics with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Yelena Prok

    2010-05-01

    Inelastic scattering using polarized nucleon targets and polarized charged lepton beams allows the extraction of double and single spin asymmetries that provide information about the helicity structure of the nucleon. A program designed to study such processes at low and intermediate $Q^2$ for the proton and deuteron has been pursued by the CLAS Collaboration at Jefferson Lab since 1998. Our inclusive data with high statistical precision and extensive kinematic coverage allow us to better constrain the polarized parton distributions and to accurately determine various moments of spin structure function $g_1$ as a function of $Q^2$. The latest results will be shown, illustrating our contribution to the world data, with comparisons of the data with NLO global fits, phenomenological models, chiral perturbation theory and the GDH and Bjorken sum rules. The semi-inclusive measurements of single and double spin asymmetries for charged and neutral pions are also show, indicating the importance of the orbital motion of quarks in understanding the spin structure of the nucleon.

  18. Transverse Spin at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaorong

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been exciting development in both experimental and theoretical studies of transverse spin asymmetries in polarized p+p and and DIS collisions. As a unique polarized proton-proton collider, Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides a unique opportunity to investigate the novel physics mechanisms that cause the large single spin asymmetry at the forward rapidity. Both PHENIX and STAR experiments have been studying the transverse spin asymmetries with a variety of final state particles in different kinematic regimes since 2006. Especially, recent theoretical development on scattering a polarized probe on the saturated nuclear may provide a unique way to probe the gluon and quark TMDs. RHIC successfully ran polarized p+Au collisions in 2015. We will expect to have new results from polarized d+Au to compare with existing results from p+p collision to extend our understanding of QCD. Further more, In 2015, PHENIX installed MPC-ex calorimeter at very forward region to measure direct photon AN and STAR installed Roman Pots to study the diffractive events in polarized p+p and p+Au collisions. The recent results on transverse polarized p+p and p+Au collisions from both PHENIX and STAR experiments will be presented in this talk. I will also briefly discuss the possibility for the transverse Spin program at future experiments sPHENIX and forward sPHENIX at RHIC. Supported by US Department of Energy and RIKEN Brookhaven Research Center.

  19. Layered kagome spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamp, James; Dutton, Sian; Mourigal, Martin; Mukherjee, Paromita; Paddison, Joseph; Ong, Harapan; Castelnovo, Claudio

    Spin ice materials provide a rare instance of emergent gauge symmetry and fractionalisation in three dimensions: the effective degrees of freedom of the system are emergent magnetic monopoles, and the extensively many `ice rule' ground states are those devoid of monopole excitations. Two-dimensional (kagome) analogues of spin ice have also been shown to display a similarly rich behaviour. In kagome ice however the ground-state `ice rule' condition implies the presence everywhere of magnetic charges. As temperature is lowered, an Ising transition occurs to a charge-ordered state, which can be mapped to a dimer covering of the dual honeycomb lattice. A second transition, of Kosterlitz-Thouless or three-state Potts type, occurs to a spin-ordered state at yet lower temperatures, due to small residual energy differences between charge-ordered states. Inspired by recent experimental capabilities in growing spin ice samples with selective (layered) substitution of non-magnetic ions, in this work we investigate the fate of the two ordering transitions when individual kagome layers are brought together to form a three-dimensional pyrochlore structure coupled by long range dipolar interactions. We also consider the response to substitutional disorder and applied magnetic fields.

  20. Stabilizing a spinning Skylab.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, S. M.; Justice, D. W.; Schweitzer, G.; Patel, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the dynamics of a spinning Skylab space station. The stability of motion of several simplified models with flexible appendages was investigated. A digital simulation model that more accurately portrays the complex Skylab vehicle is described, and simulation results are compared with analytically derived results.

  1. Stabilizing a spinning Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, S. M.; Patel, J. S.; Justice, D. W.; Schweitzer, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of a study of the dynamics of a spinning Skylab space station. The stability of motion of several simplified models with flexible appendages was investigated. A digital simulation model that more accurately portrays the complex Skylab vehicle is described, and simulation results are compared with analytically derived results.

  2. Nucleon spin structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Ruan, Jianhong

    2015-10-01

    This paper contains three parts relating to the nucleon spin structure in a simple picture of the nucleon: (i) The polarized gluon distribution in the proton is dynamically predicted starting from a low scale by using a nonlinear quantum chromodynamics (QCD) evolution equation — the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Paris (DGLAP) equation with the parton recombination corrections, where the nucleon is almost consisted only of valence quarks. We find that the contribution of the gluon polarization to the nucleon spin structure is much larger than the predictions of most other theories. This result suggests that a significant orbital angular momentum of the gluons is required to balance the gluon spin momentum. (ii) The spin structure function g1p of the proton is studied, where the perturbative evolution of parton distributions and nonperturbative vector meson dominance (VMD) model are used. We predict g1p asymptotic behavior at small x from lower Q2 to higher Q2. The results are compatible with the data including the early HERA estimations and COMPASS new results. (iii) The generalized Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule is understood based on the polarized parton distributions of the proton with the higher twist contributions. A simple parameterized formula is proposed to clearly present the contributions of different components in the proton to Γ 1p(Q2). The results suggest a possible extended objects with size 0.2-0.3 fm inside the proton.

  3. Spin Transport in Semiconductor heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Domnita Catalina Marinescu

    2011-02-22

    The focus of the research performed under this grant has been the investigation of spin transport in magnetic semiconductor heterostructures. The interest in these systems is motivated both by their intriguing physical properties, as the physical embodiment of a spin-polarized Fermi liquid, as well as by their potential applications as spintronics devices. In our work we have analyzed several different problems that affect the spin dynamics in single and bi-layer spin-polarized two-dimensional (2D) systems. The topics of interests ranged from the fundamental aspects of the electron-electron interactions, to collective spin and charge density excitations and spin transport in the presence of the spin-orbit coupling. The common denominator of these subjects is the impact at the macroscopic scale of the spin-dependent electron-electron interaction, which plays a much more subtle role than in unpolarized electron systems. Our calculations of several measurable parameters, such as the excitation frequencies of magneto-plasma modes, the spin mass, and the spin transresistivity, propose realistic theoretical estimates of the opposite-spin many-body effects, in particular opposite-spin correlations, that can be directly connected with experimental measurements.

  4. An overview of spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1991-07-01

    Spin physics is playing an increasingly important role in high energy experiments and theory. This review looks at selected topics in high energy spin physics that were discussed at the 9th International Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics at Bonn in September 1990.

  5. Gluonic Spin Contribution to Proton Spin at NLO

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Andrew

    2011-05-24

    In 1988, when the EMC results showed that the quarks had a much smaller contribution to the spin of the proton than previously thought, the 'Proton Spin Crisis' began. Since then, considerable effort has been directed into discovering the main contributors to proton spin and how much each contributes. One such contributor is the gluonic spin component. QCD NLO evolution equations are combined with boundary conditions obtained from heavy quark decoupling expressions to evolve the equations from infinity to the mass of the charm quark in order to determine the gluonic spin contribution.

  6. Organic-inorganic proximity effect in the magneto-conductance of vertical organic field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, B.; Greenman, M.; Devir-Wolfman, A. H.; Tessler, N.; Ehrenfreund, E.

    2016-07-01

    Vertical organic field effect transistors having a patterned source electrode and an a-SiO2 insulation layer show high performance as a switching element with high transfer characteristics. By measuring the low field magneto-conductance under ambient conditions at room temperature, we show here that the proximity of the inorganic a-SiO2 insulation to the organic conducting channel affects considerably the magnetic response. We propose that in n-type devices, electrons in the organic conducting channel and spin bearing charged defects in the inorganic a-SiO2 insulation layer (e.g., O2 = Si+.) form oppositely charged spin pairs whose singlet-triplet spin configurations are mixed through the relatively strong hyperfine field of 29Si. By increasing the contact area between the insulation layer and the conducting channel, the ˜2% magneto-conductance response may be considerably enhanced.

  7. Hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a hopping carrier: implications for spin transport in 1-D vs 3-D organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhitaryan, Vagharsh; Dobrovitski, Viatcheslav; 0 Team

    2015-03-01

    The hyperfine coupling of a carrier spin to a nuclear spin bath is a predominant channel for the carrier spin relaxation in organic semiconductors. We investigate the hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a carrier performing a random walk on a d-dimensional regular lattice theoretically, in a transport regime typical for organic semiconductors. We show that in d = 1 and d = 2 the time dependence of spin polarization, P (t) , is dominated by a superexponential decay, crossing over to an exponential tail at long times. The faster decay is attributed to multiple self-intersections (returns) of the random walk trajectories, which occur more often in lower dimensions. We also show, analytically and numerically, that the returns lead to sensitivity of P (t) to external electric and magnetic fields, and this sensitivity strongly depends on dimensionality of the system (d = 1 vs. d = 3). Furthermore, we consider the coordinate dependence of spin polarization, σ (r) , in a hypothetic lateral or vertical organic spin-valve device. We demonstrate that, while σ (r) is essentially exponential, the effect of multiple self-intersections can be identified in transport measurements from the specific field-dependence of spin relaxation length. This work was supported by the Department of Energy-Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  8. Inertial oscillation of a vertical rotating draft with application to a supercell storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.; Stock, Larry V.

    1992-01-01

    An analytic model (vertical rotating draft) which includes the gross features of a supercell storm on an f-plane, undergoes an inertial oscillation that appears to have been overlooked in previous analytic and numerical models. The oscillation is nonlinear and consists of a long quiescent phase and a short intense phase. During the intense phase, the rotating draft has the following features of a supercell: the diameter of the core contracts as it spins up and expands as it spins down; if vertical wind shear is included, the track of the rotating draft turns to the right (an anticyclonic rotating draft turns to the left); this turning point is followed by a predominantly upward flow; and the horizontal pressure gradient is very small (a property of most tornadoless supercells). The rapid spin-up during the intense phase and the high Rossby numbers obtainable establish the ability of the Coriolis force to spin up single cyclonic or anticyclonic supercells by means of this inertial oscillation. This surprising result has implications for numerical supercell simulations, which generally do not rely on the Coriolis force as a source of rotation. The physics and mathematics of the inertial oscillation are given, and the solution is applied to a documented supercell.

  9. Spin Circuit Representation of Spin Pumping in Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kuntal

    Earlier we developed spin circuit representation of spin pumping and combined it with the spin circuit representation for the inverse spin Hall effect to show that it reproduces the established results in literature. Here we construct the spin circuit representation of spin pumping in topological insulators. The discovery of spin-polarized surface states in three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs) with strong spin-orbit coupling is promising for the development of spintronics. There is considerable bulk conduction too in 3D TIs (e.g., Bi2Se3) apart from possessing the surface states. We utilize the spin circuit model for spin orbit torques in topological insulator surface states to develop the equivalent circuit model of spin pumping in topological insulators. Such equivalent circuit model developed here can be utilized to analyze available experimental results and evaluate more complex structures. This work was supported by FAME, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  10. Excitation of coherent propagating spin waves by pure spin currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, Vladislav E.; Urazhdin, Sergei; Liu, Ronghua; Divinskiy, Boris; Telegin, Andrey; Demokritov, Sergej O.

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of pure spin currents not accompanied by the flow of electrical charge provides unprecedented opportunities for the emerging technologies based on the electron's spin degree of freedom, such as spintronics and magnonics. It was recently shown that pure spin currents can be used to excite coherent magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures. However, because of the intrinsic nonlinear self-localization effects, magnetic auto-oscillations in the demonstrated devices were spatially confined, preventing their applications as sources of propagating spin waves in magnonic circuits using these waves as signal carriers. Here, we experimentally demonstrate efficient excitation and directional propagation of coherent spin waves generated by pure spin current. We show that this can be achieved by using the nonlocal spin injection mechanism, which enables flexible design of magnetic nanosystems and allows one to efficiently control their dynamic characteristics.

  11. Excitation of coherent propagating spin waves by pure spin currents.

    PubMed

    Demidov, Vladislav E; Urazhdin, Sergei; Liu, Ronghua; Divinskiy, Boris; Telegin, Andrey; Demokritov, Sergej O

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of pure spin currents not accompanied by the flow of electrical charge provides unprecedented opportunities for the emerging technologies based on the electron's spin degree of freedom, such as spintronics and magnonics. It was recently shown that pure spin currents can be used to excite coherent magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures. However, because of the intrinsic nonlinear self-localization effects, magnetic auto-oscillations in the demonstrated devices were spatially confined, preventing their applications as sources of propagating spin waves in magnonic circuits using these waves as signal carriers. Here, we experimentally demonstrate efficient excitation and directional propagation of coherent spin waves generated by pure spin current. We show that this can be achieved by using the nonlocal spin injection mechanism, which enables flexible design of magnetic nanosystems and allows one to efficiently control their dynamic characteristics. PMID:26818232

  12. State diagram of an orthogonal spin transfer spin valve device

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Li; Wolf, Georg; Pinna, Daniele; Chaves-O'Flynn, Gabriel D.; Kent, Andrew D.

    2015-05-21

    We present the switching characteristics of a spin-transfer device that incorporates a perpendicularly magnetized spin-polarizing layer with an in-plane magnetized free and fixed magnetic layer, known as an orthogonal spin transfer spin valve device. This device shows clear switching between parallel (P) and antiparallel (AP) resistance states and the reverse transition (AP → P) for both current polarities. Further, hysteretic transitions are shown to occur into a state with a resistance intermediate between that of the P and AP states, again for both current polarities. These unusual spin-transfer switching characteristics can be explained within a simple macrospin model that incorporates thermal fluctuations and considers a spin-polarized current that is tilted with respect to the free layer's plane, due to the presence of the spin-transfer torque from the polarizing layer.

  13. Modeling spin transport with current-sensing spin detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2010-03-01

    The impulse response (or ``Green's function'') of a current-sensing spin detector is derived analytically by incorporating the proper boundary conditions. This result is also compared to a Monte Carlo simulation (which automatically takes the proper boundary conditions into account) and an empirical spin transit time distribution obtained from experimental spin precession measurements. In the strong drift-dominated transport regime, this spin current impulse response can be approximated by multiplying the spin density impulse response by the average drift velocity. However, in weak drift fields, large modeling errors up to a factor of 3 in most-probable spin transit time can be incurred unless the full spin current Green's function is used.

  14. Modeling spin transport with current-sensing spin detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2009-10-01

    By incorporating the proper boundary conditions, we analytically derive the impulse response (or "Green's function") of a current-sensing spin detector. We also compare this result to a Monte Carlo simulation (which automatically takes the proper boundary condition into account) and an empirical spin transit time distribution obtained from experimental spin precession measurements. In the strong drift-dominated transport regime, this spin current impulse response can be approximated by multiplying the spin density impulse response by the average drift velocity. However, in weak drift fields, large modeling errors up to a factor of 3 in most-probable spin transit time can be incurred unless the full spin current Green's function is used.

  15. Spin wave excitation patterns generated by spin torque oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macià, F.; Hoppensteadt, F. C.; Kent, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Spin torque nano-oscillators (STNO) are nanoscale devices that can convert a direct current into short wavelength spin wave excitations in a ferromagnetic layer. We show that arrays of STNO can be used to create directional spin wave radiation similarly to electromagnetic antennas. Combining STNO excitations with planar spin waves also creates interference patterns. We show that these interference patterns are static and have information on the wavelength and phase of the spin waves emitted from the STNO. We describe a means of actively controlling spin wave radiation patterns with the direct current flowing through STNO, which is useful in on-chip communication and information processing and could be a promising technique for studying short wavelength spin waves in different materials.

  16. Hydrodynamics of spin-polarized transport and spin pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Gurzhi, R. N. Kalinenko, A. N.; Kopeliovich, A. I.; Pyshkin, P. V.; Yanovsky, A. V.

    2007-07-15

    The dynamics of a nonequilibrium spin system dominated by collisions preserving the total quasimomentum of the interacting electrons and quasiparticles is considered. An analysis of the derived hydrodynamic equations shows that weakly attenuated spin-polarization waves associated with an oscillating drift current can exist in a magnetically inhomogeneous conducting ring. Spin-polarized transport in a ballistic regime of wave propagation through a conductor is also considered, and a simple method is proposed for distinguishing these waves from spin and current oscillations that develop in the hydrodynamic regime. It is shown that a potential difference arises between the leads of an open nonuniformly spin-polarized conductor as a manifestation of spin polarization of electron density. This spin-mediated electrical phenomenon occurs in both hydrodynamic and diffusive limits.

  17. Spin quantum Hall effects in featureless nonfractionalized spin-1 magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuan-Ming; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2014-05-01

    The Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki state (or Haldane phase) in a spin-1 chain represents a large class of gapped topological paramagnets that host symmetry-protected gapless excitations on the boundary. In this work, we show how to realize this type of featureless spin-1 state on a generic two-dimensional lattice. These states have a gapped spectrum in the bulk, but they support gapless edge states protected by spin rotational symmetry along a certain direction, and they exhibit the spin quantum Hall effect. Using a fermion representation of integer spins, we show a concrete example of such spin-1 topological paramagnets on a kagome lattice, and we suggest a microscopic spin-1 Hamiltonian that may realize it.

  18. Excitation of coherent propagating spin waves by pure spin currents

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, Vladislav E.; Urazhdin, Sergei; Liu, Ronghua; Divinskiy, Boris; Telegin, Andrey; Demokritov, Sergej O.

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of pure spin currents not accompanied by the flow of electrical charge provides unprecedented opportunities for the emerging technologies based on the electron's spin degree of freedom, such as spintronics and magnonics. It was recently shown that pure spin currents can be used to excite coherent magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures. However, because of the intrinsic nonlinear self-localization effects, magnetic auto-oscillations in the demonstrated devices were spatially confined, preventing their applications as sources of propagating spin waves in magnonic circuits using these waves as signal carriers. Here, we experimentally demonstrate efficient excitation and directional propagation of coherent spin waves generated by pure spin current. We show that this can be achieved by using the nonlocal spin injection mechanism, which enables flexible design of magnetic nanosystems and allows one to efficiently control their dynamic characteristics. PMID:26818232

  19. Pseudospin, real spin, and spin polarization of photoemitted electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rui; Weng, Hongming; Fang, Zhong; Dai, Xi

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we discuss the connections between pseudospin, real spin of electrons in a material, and spin polarization of photoemitted electrons out of a material. By investigating these three spin textures for Bi2Se3 and SmB6 compounds, we find that the spin orientation of photoelectrons for SmB6 has a different correspondence to pseudospin and real spin compared to Bi2Se3 , due to the different symmetry properties of the photoemission matrix between the initial and final states. We calculate the spin polarization and circular dichroism spectra of photoemitted electrons for both compounds, which can be detected by spin-resolved and circular dichroism angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments.

  20. Electrical spin injection and detection of spin precession in room temperature bulk GaN lateral spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Aniruddha; Baten, Md Zunaid; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2016-01-01

    We report the measurement of diffusive electronic spin transport characteristics in an epitaxial wurtzite GaN lateral spin valve at room temperature. Hanle spin precession and non-local spin accumulation measurements have been performed with the spin valves fabricated with FeCo/MgO spin contacts. Electron spin relaxation length and spin-flip lifetime of 176 nm and 37 ps, respectively, are derived from analysis of results obtained from four-terminal Hanle spin precession measurements at 300 K. The role of dislocations and defects in bulk GaN has also been examined in the context of electronic spin relaxation dynamics.

  1. Spin Hall controlled magnonic microwaveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. E.; Urazhdin, S.; Rinkevich, A. B.; Reiss, G.; Demokritov, S. O.

    2014-04-14

    We use space-resolved magneto-optical spectroscopy to study the influence of spin Hall effect on the excitation and propagation of spin waves in microscopic magnonic waveguides. We find that the spin Hall effect not only increases the spin-wave propagation length, but also results in an increased excitation efficiency due to the increase of the dynamic susceptibility in the vicinity of the inductive antenna. We show that the efficiency of the propagation length enhancement is strongly dependant on the type of the excited spin-wave mode and its wavelength.

  2. Bouncing Balls that Spin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knipp, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When a ball bounces elastically against a floor, the vertical component (v[subscript y]) of the velocity of the ball's mass-center changes sign. This is a special case of the elastic collision of two balls (i.e., two objects, neither of which is much more massive than the other), in which case the balls' post-collision relative velocity (=…

  3. Self-aligned, vertical-channel, polymer field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Stutzmann, Natalie; Friend, Richard H; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2003-03-21

    The manufacture of high-performance, conjugated polymer transistor circuits on flexible plastic substrates requires patterning techniques that are capable of defining critical features with submicrometer resolution. We used solid-state embossing to produce polymer field-effect transistors with submicrometer critical features in planar and vertical configurations. Embossing is used for the controlled microcutting of vertical sidewalls into polymer multilayer structures without smearing. Vertical-channel polymer field-effect transistors on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrates were fabricated, in which the critical channel length of 0.7 to 0.9 micrometers was defined by the thickness of a spin-coated insulator layer. Gate electrodes were self-aligned to minimize overlap capacitance by inkjet printing that used the embossed grooves to define a surface-energy pattern. PMID:12649478

  4. The wake of a single vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsky, Danielle A.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the wake of a Windspire vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). In recent years, research on VAWTs has increased due to various potential advantages over the more common horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Unlike very large HAWTs, moderately sized-and virtually silent-VAWTs can be placed in urban and suburban regions where land space is limited. To date, many VAWT studies have assumed that the turbine has the same aerodynamic structure as a spinning cylinder despite a significant increase in geometric complexity. This experiment attempts to understand the fundamental wake structure of a single VAWT (and compare it to the wake structure of a spinning cylinder). In this experiment, a scaled-down VAWT is placed inside a wind tunnel under a controlled laboratory setting. A motor rotates the scale model at a constant angular speed. Stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to visualize the wake of the turbine and image processing techniques are used to quantify the velocity and vorticity of the wake.

  5. Spin Funneling for Enhanced Spin Injection into Ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Shehrin; Diep, Vinh Q; Camsari, Kerem Yunus; Datta, Supriyo

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that high spin-orbit coupling (SOC) materials convert a charge current density into a spin current density which can be used to switch a magnet efficiently and there is increasing interest in identifying materials with large spin Hall angle for lower switching current. Using experimentally benchmarked models, we show that composite structures can be designed using existing spin Hall materials such that the effective spin Hall angle is larger by an order of magnitude. The basic idea is to funnel spins from a large area of spin Hall material into a small area of ferromagnet using a normal metal with large spin diffusion length and low resistivity like Cu or Al. We show that this approach is increasingly effective as magnets get smaller. We avoid unwanted charge current shunting by the low resistive NM layer utilizing the newly discovered phenomenon of pure spin conduction in ferromagnetic insulators via magnon diffusion. We provide a spin circuit model for magnon diffusion in FMI that is benchmarked against recent experiments and theory. PMID:27374496

  6. Spin Funneling for Enhanced Spin Injection into Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, Shehrin; Diep, Vinh Q.; Camsari, Kerem Yunus; Datta, Supriyo

    2016-07-01

    It is well-established that high spin-orbit coupling (SOC) materials convert a charge current density into a spin current density which can be used to switch a magnet efficiently and there is increasing interest in identifying materials with large spin Hall angle for lower switching current. Using experimentally benchmarked models, we show that composite structures can be designed using existing spin Hall materials such that the effective spin Hall angle is larger by an order of magnitude. The basic idea is to funnel spins from a large area of spin Hall material into a small area of ferromagnet using a normal metal with large spin diffusion length and low resistivity like Cu or Al. We show that this approach is increasingly effective as magnets get smaller. We avoid unwanted charge current shunting by the low resistive NM layer utilizing the newly discovered phenomenon of pure spin conduction in ferromagnetic insulators via magnon diffusion. We provide a spin circuit model for magnon diffusion in FMI that is benchmarked against recent experiments and theory.

  7. Electron-spin dynamics induced by photon spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauke, Heiko; Ahrens, Sven; Keitel, Christoph H.; Grobe, Rainer

    2014-10-01

    Strong rotating magnetic fields may cause a precession of the electron's spin around the rotation axis of the magnetic field. The superposition of two counterpropagating laser beams with circular polarization and opposite helicity features such a rotating magnetic field component but also carries spin. The laser's spin density, which can be expressed in terms of the laser's electromagnetic fields and potentials, couples to the electron's spin via a relativistic correction to the Pauli equation. We show that the quantum mechanical interaction of the electron's spin with the laser's rotating magnetic field and with the laser's spin density counteract each other in such a way that a net spin rotation remains with a precession frequency that is much smaller than the frequency one would expect from the rotating magnetic field alone. In particular, the frequency scales differently with the laser's electric field strength depending on whether relativistic corrections are taken into account or not. Thus, the relativistic coupling of the electron's spin to the laser's spin density changes the dynamics not only quantitatively but also qualitatively as compared to the nonrelativistic theory. The electron's spin dynamics are a genuine quantum mechanical relativistic effect.

  8. All-electric spin transistor using perpendicular spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Bae, Joohyung; Min, Byoung-Chul; Kim, Hyung-jun; Chang, Joonyeon; Koo, Hyun Cheol

    2016-04-01

    All-electric spin transistor is demonstrated using perpendicular spins in an InAs quantum well channel. For the injection and detection of perpendicular spins in the quantum well channel, we use Tb20Fe62Co18/Co40Fe40B20 electrodes, where the Tb20Fe62Co18 layer produces the perpendicular magnetization and the Co40Fe40B20 layer enhances the spin polarization. In this spin transistor device, a gate-controlled spin signal as large as 80 mΩ is observed at 10 K without an external magnetic field. In order to confirm the spin injection and relaxation independently, we measure the three-terminal Hanle effect with an in-plane magnetic field, and obtain a spin signal of 1.7 mΩ at 10 K. These results clearly present that the electric field is an efficient way to modulate spin orientation in a strong spin-orbit interaction system.

  9. Spin Funneling for Enhanced Spin Injection into Ferromagnets

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Shehrin; Diep, Vinh Q.; Camsari, Kerem Yunus; Datta, Supriyo

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that high spin-orbit coupling (SOC) materials convert a charge current density into a spin current density which can be used to switch a magnet efficiently and there is increasing interest in identifying materials with large spin Hall angle for lower switching current. Using experimentally benchmarked models, we show that composite structures can be designed using existing spin Hall materials such that the effective spin Hall angle is larger by an order of magnitude. The basic idea is to funnel spins from a large area of spin Hall material into a small area of ferromagnet using a normal metal with large spin diffusion length and low resistivity like Cu or Al. We show that this approach is increasingly effective as magnets get smaller. We avoid unwanted charge current shunting by the low resistive NM layer utilizing the newly discovered phenomenon of pure spin conduction in ferromagnetic insulators via magnon diffusion. We provide a spin circuit model for magnon diffusion in FMI that is benchmarked against recent experiments and theory. PMID:27374496

  10. Muon spin rotation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The bulk of the muon spin rotation research work centered around the development of the muon spin rotation facility at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The collimation system was both designed and fabricated at Virginia State University. This improved collimation system, plus improvements in detectors and electronics enabled the acquisition of spectra free of background out to 15 microseconds. There were two runs at Brookhaven in 1984, one run was devoted primarily to beam development and the other run allowed several successful experiments to be performed. The effect of uniaxial strain on an Fe(Si) crystal at elevated temperature (360K) was measured and the results are incorporated herein. A complete analysis of Fe pulling data taken earlier is included.

  11. Spin effects and compactification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silenko, Alexander J.; Teryaev, Oleg V.

    2014-02-01

    We consider the dynamics of Dirac particles moving in the curved spaces with one coordinate subjected to compactification and thus interpolating smoothly between three- and two-dimensional spaces. We use the model of compactification, which allows us to perform the exact Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation of the Dirac equation and then to obtain the exact solutions of the equations of motion for momentum and spin in the classical limit. The spin precesses with the variable angular velocity, and a "flick" may appear in the remnant two-dimensional space once or twice during the period. We note an irreversibility in the particle dynamics because the particle can always penetrate from the lower-dimensional region to the higher-dimensional region, but not inversely.

  12. Art of spin decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiangsong; Sun Weimin; Wang Fan; Goldman, T.

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the problem of spin decomposition for an interacting system from a natural perspective of constructing angular-momentum eigenstates. We split, from the total angular-momentum operator, a proper part which can be separately conserved for a stationary state. This part commutes with the total Hamiltonian and thus specifies the quantum angular momentum. We first show how this can be done in a gauge-dependent way, by seeking a specific gauge in which part of the total angular-momentum operator vanishes identically. We then construct a gauge-invariant operator with the desired property. Our analysis clarifies what is the most pertinent choice among the various proposals for decomposing the nucleon spin. A similar analysis is performed for extracting a proper part from the total Hamiltonian to construct energy eigenstates.

  13. Neutron phase spin echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegsa, Florian M.; Hautle, Patrick; Schanzer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A novel neutron spin resonance technique is presented based on the well-known neutron spin echo method. In a first proof-of-principle measurement using a monochromatic neutron beam, it is demonstrated that relative velocity changes of down to a precision of 4 ×10-7 can be resolved, corresponding to an energy resolution of better than 3 neV. Currently, the sensitivity is only limited by counting statistics and not by systematic effects. An improvement by another two orders of magnitude can be achieved with a dedicated setup, allowing energy resolutions in the 10 peV regime. The new technique is ideally suited for investigations in the field of precision fundamental neutron physics, but will also be beneficial in scattering applications.

  14. Ground State Spin Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, James; Faccin, Mauro; Biamonte, Jacob

    2013-03-01

    Designing and optimizing cost functions and energy landscapes is a problem encountered in many fields of science and engineering. These landscapes and cost functions can be embedded and annealed in experimentally controllable spin Hamiltonians. Using an approach based on group theory and symmetries, we examine the embedding of Boolean logic gates into the ground-state subspace of such spin systems. We describe parameterized families of diagonal Hamiltonians and symmetry operations which preserve the ground-state subspace encoding the truth tables of Boolean formulas. The ground-state embeddings of adder circuits are used to illustrate how gates are combined and simplified using symmetry. Our work is relevant for experimental demonstrations of ground-state embeddings found in both classical optimization as well as adiabatic quantum optimization.

  15. Dusty spin plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Brodin, G.; Marklund, M.; Zamanian, J.

    2008-09-07

    A fluid model is derived, taking into account the effect of spin magnetization of electrons as well as of magnetized dust grains. The model is analyzed, and it is found that both the acoustic velocity and the Alfven velocity is decreased due to the magnetization effects. Furthermore, for low-temperature high density plasmas, it is found that the linear wave modes can be unstable, due to the magnetic attraction of individual fluid elements. The significance of our results are discussed.

  16. Spin Physics at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Contalbrigo, M.

    2007-11-19

    The HERMES experiment at DESY is a second generation experiment to study the spin structure of the nucleon by measuring not only inclusive but also semi-inclusive and exclusive processes in deep-inelastic lepton scattering where both beam and target can be polarised. An overview of finalized measurements and an outlook to upcoming new results is given for data taken with hydrogen and deuterium targets with longitudinal and transverse nucleon polarisation.

  17. Spin and gravitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental variational principle for a perfect fluid in general relativity is extended so that it applies to the metric-torsion Einstein-Cartan theory. Field equations for a perfect fluid in the Einstein-Cartan theory are deduced. In addition, the equations of motion for a fluid with intrinsic spin in general relativity are deduced from a special relativistic variational principle. The theory is a direct extension of the theory of nonspinning fluids in special relativity.

  18. Recovery of spinning satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppey, J. M.; Mahaffey, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of a space tug and a spinning satellite in a coupled configuration was simulated and analyzed. A docking concept was developed to investigate the requirements pertaining to the design of a docking interface. Sensing techniques and control requirements for the chase vehicle were studied to assess the feasibility of an automatic docking. The effects of nutation dampers and liquid propellant slosh motion upon the docking transient were investigated.

  19. Spinning out a star.

    PubMed

    Lord, Michael D; Mandel, Stanley W; Wager, Jeffrey D

    2002-06-01

    Spinouts rarely take off; most, in fact, fall into one or more of four traps that doom them from the start. Some companies spin out ventures that are too close to the core of their businesses, in effect selling off their crown jewels. Sometimes, a parent company uses the spinout primarily to pawn off debt or expenses or to quickly raise external capital for itself. Other times, a company may try to spin out an area of its business that lacks one or more of the critical legs of a successful company--a coherent business model, say, or a solid financial base. And in many cases, parent companies can't bring themselves to sever their ownership ties and give up control of their spinouts. R.J. Reynolds, the tobacco giant, managed to avoid these traps when it successfully spun out a most unlikely venture, the pharmaceutical company Targacept. As the story illustrates, the problem with spinouts is similar to the problem of rich children. Their parents have the wherewithal to spoil them or shelter them or cling to them, but what they need is tough love and discipline--much the same discipline that characterizes successful start-ups. R.J. Reynolds recognized that it didn't know that much about the pharmaceutical business and couldn't merely try to spin out a small clone of itself. It had to treat the venture as if it were essentially starting from scratch, with a passionate entrepreneurial leader, a solid business plan, help from outside partners in the industry, and ultimately substantial venture backing. That these lessons are less obvious to executives contemplating spinning out ventures closer to their core businesses may be why so many spinouts fail. PMID:12048993

  20. Spin-driven inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Yuri N.

    1993-11-01

    Following recent studies of Ford, we suggest - in the framework of general relativity - an inflationary cosmological model with self-interacting spinning matter. A generalization of the standard fluid model is discussed and estimates of the physical parameters of the evolution are given. I would like to thank Professor Friedrich W. Hehl for the careful reading of the manuscript and useful advice. This research was supported by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (Bonn).

  1. Nuclear spin circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Vaara, Juha; Rizzo, Antonio; Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Coriani, Sonia

    2014-04-07

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in magneto-optic spectroscopy techniques that use nuclear magnetization as the source of the magnetic field. Here we present a formulation of magnetic circular dichroism (CD) due to magnetically polarized nuclei, nuclear spin-induced CD (NSCD), in molecules. The NSCD ellipticity and nuclear spin-induced optical rotation (NSOR) angle correspond to the real and imaginary parts, respectively, of (complex) quadratic response functions involving the dynamic second-order interaction of the electron system with the linearly polarized light beam, as well as the static magnetic hyperfine interaction. Using the complex polarization propagator framework, NSCD and NSOR signals are obtained at frequencies in the vicinity of optical excitations. Hartree-Fock and density-functional theory calculations on relatively small model systems, ethene, benzene, and 1,4-benzoquinone, demonstrate the feasibility of the method for obtaining relatively strong nuclear spin-induced ellipticity and optical rotation signals. Comparison of the proton and carbon-13 signals of ethanol reveals that these resonant phenomena facilitate chemical resolution between non-equivalent nuclei in magneto-optic spectra.

  2. Optimally Squeezed Spin States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojo, Alberto

    2004-03-01

    We consider optimally spin-squeezed states that maximize the sensitivity of the Ramsey spectroscopy, and for which the signal to noise ratio scales as the number of particles N. Using the variational principle we prove that these states are eigensolutions of the Hamiltonian H(λ)=λ S_z^2-S_x, and that, for large N, the states become equivalent to the quadrature squeezed states of the harmonic oscillator. We present numerical results that illustrate the validity of the equivalence. We also present results of spin squeezing via atom-field interactions within the context of the Tavis-Cummings model. An ensemble of N two-level atoms interacts with a quantized cavity field. For all the atoms initially in their ground states, it is shown that spin squeezing of both the atoms and the field can be achieved provided the initial state of the cavity field has coherence between number states differing by 2. Most of the discussion is restricted to the case of a cavity field initially in a coherent state, but initial squeezed states for the field are also discussed. An analytic solution is found that is valid in the limit that the number of atoms is much greater than unity. References: A. G. Rojo, Phys. Rev A, 68, 013807 (2003); Claudiu Genes, P. R. Berman, and A. G. Rojo Phys. Rev. A 68, 043809 (2003).

  3. Advancements of vertically aligned liquid crystal displays.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Jaggi, Chinky; Sharma, Vandna; Raina, Kuldeep Kumar

    2016-02-01

    This review describes the recent advancements in the field of the vertical aligned (VA) liquid crystal displays. The process and formation of different vertical alignment modes such as conventional VA, patterned VA, multi-domain VA, and polymer stabilised VA etc are widely discussed. Vertical alignment of liquid crystal due to nano particle dispersion in LC host, bifunctional PR-SAM formed by silane coupling reaction to oxide surfaces, azo dye etc., are also highlighted and discussed. Overall, the article highlights the advances in the research of vertical aligned liquid crystal in terms of their scientific and technological aspects. PMID:26800482

  4. Vertical motion requirements for landing simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the significance of vertical acceleration cues in the simulation of the visual approach and landing maneuver. Landing performance measures were obtained for four subject pilots operating a visual landing simulation device which provides up to plus or minus 40 feet of vertical motion. Test results indicate that vertical motion cues are utilized in the landing task, and that they are particularly important in the simulation of aircraft with marginal longitudinal handling qualities. To assure vertical motion cues of the desired fidelity in the landing tasks, it appears that a simulator must have excursion capabilities of at least plus or minus 20 feet.

  5. Graphene spin diode: Strain-modulated spin rectification

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yunhua; Wang, B. E-mail: wangbiao@mail.sysu.edu.cn; Liu, Yulan E-mail: wangbiao@mail.sysu.edu.cn

    2014-08-04

    Strain effects on spin transport in a ferromagnetic/strained/normal graphene junction are explored theoretically. It is shown that the spin-resolved Fermi energy range can be controlled by the armchair direction strain because the strain-induced pseudomagnetic field suppresses the current. The spin rectification effect for the bias reversal occurs because of a combination of ferromagnetic exchange splitting and the broken spatial symmetry of the junction. In addition, the spin rectification performance can be tuned remarkably by manipulation of the strains. In view of this strain-modulated spin rectification effect, we propose that the graphene-based ferromagnetic/strained/normal junction can be used as a tunable spin diode.

  6. Amplification of spin waves by the spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Hernández, E.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2012-04-01

    We observe amplification of spin-wave packets propagating along a film of single-crystal yttrium iron garnet (YIG) subject to a transverse temperature gradient. The spin waves are excited and detected with standard techniques used to study volume or surface magnetostatic waves in the 1-2 GHz frequency range. Amplification gains larger than 20 are observed in a YIG film heated by a current of 20 mA in a Pt layer in a simple YIG/Pt bilayer. The amplification is attributed to the action of a spin-transfer thermal torque acting on the magnetization that opposes the relaxation and which is created by spin currents generated through the spin Seebeck effect. The experimental data are interpreted with a spin-wave model.

  7. Towards Long Range Spin-Spin Interactions via Mechanical Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabcenell, Aaron; Gieseler, Jan; Safira, Arthur; Kolkowitz, Shimon; Zibrov, Alexander; Harris, Jack; Lukin, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen vacancy centers (NVs) are promising candidates for quantum computation, with room temperature optical spin read-out and initialization, microwave manipulability, and weak coupling to the environment resulting in long spin coherence times. The major outstanding challenge involves engineering coherent interactions between the spin states of spatially separated NV centers. To address this challenge, we are working towards the experimental realization of mechanical spin transducers. We have successfully fabricated magnetized high quality factor (Q> 105) , doubly-clamped silicon nitride mechanical resonators integrated close to a diamond surface, and report on experimental progress towards achieving the coherent coupling of the motion of these resonators with the electronic spin states of individual NV centers under cryogenic conditions. Such a system is expected to provide a scalable platform for mediating effective interactions between isolated spin qubits.

  8. FAST AND EXACT SPIN-s SPHERICAL HARMONIC TRANSFORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2010-08-15

    We demonstrate a fast spin-s spherical harmonic transform algorithm, which is flexible and exact for band-limited functions. In contrast to previous work, where spin transforms are computed independently, our algorithm permits the computation of several distinct spin transforms simultaneously. Specifically, only one set of special functions is computed for transforms of quantities with any spin, namely the Wigner d matrices evaluated at {pi}/2, which may be computed with efficient recursions. For any spin, the computation scales as O(L{sup 3}), where L is the band limit of the function. Our publicly available numerical implementation permits very high accuracy at modest computational cost. We discuss applications to the cosmic microwave background and gravitational lensing.

  9. Spin-bus concept of spin quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mehring, Michael; Mende, Jens

    2006-05-15

    We present a spin-bus concept of quantum computing where an electron spin S=1/2 acts as a bus qubit connected to a finite number N of nuclear spins I=1/2 serving as client qubits. Spin-bus clusters are considered as local processing units and may be interconnected with other spin-bus clusters via electron-electron coupling in a scaled up version. Here we lay the ground for the basic functional unit with long qubit registers, provide the theory and experimental verification of correlated qubit states, and demonstrate the Deutsch algorithm. Experiments were performed on a qubyte plus one nuclear spin in a solid state system.

  10. Spin Transfer Torque in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Ching; Chen, Zhihong

    2014-03-01

    Graphene is an idea channel material for spin transport due to its long spin diffusion length. To develop graphene based spin logic, it is important to demonstrate spin transfer torque in graphene. Here, we report the experimental measurement of spin transfer torque in graphene nonlocal spin valve devices. Assisted by a small external in-plane magnetic field, the magnetization reversal of the receiving magnet is induced by pure spin diffusion currents from the injector magnet. The magnetization switching is reversible between parallel and antiparallel configurations by controlling the polarity of the applied charged currents. Current induced heating and Oersted field from the nonlocal charge flow have also been excluded in this study. Next, we further enhance the spin angular momentum absorption at the interface of the receiving magnet and graphene channel by removing the tunneling barrier in the receiving magnet. The device with a tunneling barrier only at the injector magnet shows a comparable nonlocal spin valve signal but lower electrical noise. Moreover, in the same preset condition, the critical charge current density for spin torque in the single tunneling barrier device shows a substantial reduction if compared to the double tunneling barrier device.

  11. Coherent spin mixing dynamics in a spin-1 atomic condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Wenxian; Chang, M.-S.; Chapman, M.S.; Zhou, D.L.; You, L.

    2005-07-15

    We study the coherent off-equilibrium spin mixing inside an atomic condensate. Using mean-field theory and adopting the single-spatial-mode approximation, the condensate spin dynamics is found to be well described by that of a nonrigid pendulum and displays a variety of periodic oscillations in an external magnetic field. Our results illuminate several recent experimental observations and provide critical insights into the observation of coherent interaction-driven oscillations in a spin-1 condensate.

  12. Hardy's argument and successive spin-s measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ahanj, Ali

    2010-07-15

    We consider a hidden-variable theoretic description of successive measurements of noncommuting spin observables on an input spin-s state. In this scenario, the hidden-variable theory leads to a Hardy-type argument that quantum predictions violate it. We show that the maximum probability of success of Hardy's argument in quantum theory is ((1/2)){sup 4s}, which is more than in the spatial case.

  13. Spin transport in antiferromagnetic insulator detected by spin pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei; Li, Yi; Bailey, William

    Spin transport in antiferromagnetic insulators has drawn attention recently. Prior work has been done on the spin diffusion length of different antiferromagnetic materials via inverse spin hall effect. In this work, we measure the spin pumping of Py/Cu/CoO to characterize the absorption of spin current in the CoO layer. The series of Py/Cu/CoO (t) with changing the thickness of CoO layer indicates that there is a Gilbert damping enhancement of 0.001 in saturation at about 2 nm at room temperature. The spin mixing conductance obtained from this experimental series and from Py (t)/Cu/CoO series is 2.4 nm-2 and 3.2 nm-2 , respectively. We also measured the spin pumping of the Py/Cu/CoO sample at low temperatures. The Gilbert damping exhibits a positive peak at about 280 K, which is close to the Néel temperature of CoO. Our work shows a finite spin mixing conductance in Py/Cu/CoO and the spin diffusion length of CoO is quite small at room temperature. We also find that its Gilbert damping reaches its maximum value at Néel temperature.

  14. Counting spins with a new spin echo double resonance

    PubMed

    Cull; Joers; Gullion; Norberg; Conradi

    1998-08-01

    In traditional spin echo double resonance (SEDOR), the echo amplitude M is decreased when the observed spins S are flipped by pi together with the pi refocusing pulse on the observed spins I; the dependence on tau is then determined. In the new version of SEDOR, the echo amplitude is measured as a function of the S spin flip angle theta at a constant pulse spacing tau. The analysis is simple and powerful for long tau, where the strong collision limit applies. There, the variation of M with theta can be fit, yielding the number n of spins S to which each spin I is coupled. Data from amorphous silicon with 1H and 2D show the described effect. A MAS version of the new method is used on multiply labeled alanine and urea, with results in good agreement with the predictions for n = 2, as expected. By Fourier transforming M with respect to the flip angle theta, a stick spectrum results; the largest numbered non-vanishing stick yields the number n of spins S coupled to each spin I. Simulations are presented for an n = 2 system. The present technique is compared to the multiple-quantum spin-counting method. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9716478

  15. Correlation functions of the integrable spin-s chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, G. A. P.; Klümper, A.

    2016-06-01

    We study the correlation functions of su(2) invariant spin-s chains in the thermodynamic limit. We derive nonlinear integral equations for an auxiliary correlation function ω for any spin s and finite temperature T. For the spin-3/2 chain for arbitrary temperature and zero magnetic field we obtain algebraic expressions for the reduced density matrix of two-sites. In the zero temperature limit, the density matrix elements are evaluated analytically and appear to be given in terms of Riemann’s zeta function values of even and odd arguments. Dedicated to Professor Rodney Baxter on the occasion of his 75th birthday.

  16. ``Spin inverter'' as building block of All Spin Logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Angik; Srinivasan, Srikant; Datta, Supriyo

    2012-02-01

    All-spin logic (ASL) represents a new approach to information processing where the roles of charges and capacitors in charge based transistors are played by spins and magnets, without the need for repeated spin-charge conversion. In our past work, we have presented numerical simulations based on a coupled spin transport and Landau Lifshitz Gilbert model showing that ring oscillators and logic circuits with intrinsic directionality [IEEE Trans. Magn. 47,10, 4026, 2011; Proc. IEDM, 2011)] can be implemented by manipulation of spins in magnetic nanostructures. The aim of this talk is (1) to identify a basic ASL unit that can be interconnected to build up spin circuits analogous to the way transistors are interconnected to build conventional circuits and (2) to present a compact model for this basic unit that can be used to design and analyze large scale spin circuits. We will show that this basic ASL unit is a one-magnet ``spin inverter'' with gain that can be cascaded to accomplish a spin circuit implementation of almost any logic functionality

  17. Visualizing spin states using the spin coherent state representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee Loh, Yen; Kim, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum eigenfunctions are readily understood in terms of spherical harmonics. However, the quantum mechanical phenomenon of spin is often said to be mysterious and hard to visualize, with no classical analog. Many textbooks give a heuristic and somewhat unsatisfying picture of a precessing spin vector. Here, we show that the spin-coherent-state representation is a striking, elegant, and mathematically meaningful tool for visualizing spin states. We also demonstrate that cartographic projections such as the Hammer projection are useful for visualizing functions defined on spherical surfaces.

  18. Low temperature and high field regimes of connected kagome artificial spin ice: the role of domain wall topology

    PubMed Central

    Zeissler, Katharina; Chadha, Megha; Lovell, Edmund; Cohen, Lesley F.; Branford, Will R.

    2016-01-01

    Artificial spin ices are frustrated magnetic nanostructures where single domain nanobars act as macrosized spins. In connected kagome artificial spin ice arrays, reversal occurs along one-dimensional chains by propagation of ferromagnetic domain walls through Y-shaped vertices. Both the vertices and the walls are complex chiral objects with well-defined topological edge-charges. At room temperature, it is established that the topological edge-charges determine the exact switching reversal path taken. However, magnetic reversal at low temperatures has received much less attention and how these chiral objects interact at reduced temperature is unknown. In this study we use magnetic force microscopy to image the magnetic reversal process at low temperatures revealing the formation of quite remarkable high energy remanence states and a change in the dynamics of the reversal process. The implication is the breakdown of the artificial spin ice regime in these connected structures at low temperatures. PMID:27443523

  19. HDice, Highly-Polarized Low-Background Frozen-Spin HD Targets for CLAS experiments at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiangdong; Bass, Christopher; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Deur, Alexandre P.; Dezern, Gary L.; Ho, Dao Hoang; Kageya, Tsuneo; Khandaker, Mahbubul A,; Kashy, David H.; Laine, Vivien Eric; Lowry, Michael M.; O'Connell, Thomas Robert; Sandorfi, Andrew M.; Teachey, II, Robert W.; Whisnant, Charles Steven; Zarecky, Michael R.

    2012-12-01

    Large, portable frozen-spin HD (Deuterium-Hydride) targets have been developed for studying nucleon spin properties with low backgrounds. Protons and Deuterons in HD are polarized at low temperatures (~10mK) inside a vertical dilution refrigerator (Oxford Kelvinox-1000) containing a high magnetic field (up to 17T). The targets reach a frozen-spin state within a few months, after which they can be cold transferred to an In-Beam Cryostat (IBC). The IBC, a thin-walled dilution refrigerator operating either horizontally or vertically, is use with quasi-4{pi} detector systems in open geometries with minimal energy loss for exiting reaction products in nucleon structure experiments. The first application of this advanced target system has been used for Spin Sum Rule experiments at the LEGS facility in Brookhaven National Laboratory. An improved target production and handling system has been developed at Jefferson Lab for experiments with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, CLAS.

  20. Low temperature and high field regimes of connected kagome artificial spin ice: the role of domain wall topology.

    PubMed

    Zeissler, Katharina; Chadha, Megha; Lovell, Edmund; Cohen, Lesley F; Branford, Will R

    2016-01-01

    Artificial spin ices are frustrated magnetic nanostructures where single domain nanobars act as macrosized spins. In connected kagome artificial spin ice arrays, reversal occurs along one-dimensional chains by propagation of ferromagnetic domain walls through Y-shaped vertices. Both the vertices and the walls are complex chiral objects with well-defined topological edge-charges. At room temperature, it is established that the topological edge-charges determine the exact switching reversal path taken. However, magnetic reversal at low temperatures has received much less attention and how these chiral objects interact at reduced temperature is unknown. In this study we use magnetic force microscopy to image the magnetic reversal process at low temperatures revealing the formation of quite remarkable high energy remanence states and a change in the dynamics of the reversal process. The implication is the breakdown of the artificial spin ice regime in these connected structures at low temperatures. PMID:27443523

  1. Rupture of vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-01

    Soap films are ephemeral and fragile objects. They tend to thin under gravity, which gives rise to the fascinating variations of colors at their interfaces but leads systematically to rupture. Even a child can create, manipulate and admire soap films and bubbles. Nevertheless, the reason why it suddenly bursts remains a mystery although the soap chosen to stabilize the film as well as the humidity of the air seem very important. One difficulty to study the rupture of vertical soap films is to control the initial solution. To avoid this problem we choose to study the rupture during the generation of the film at a controlled velocity. We have built an experiment, in which we measure the maximum length of the film together with its lifetime. The generation of the film is due to the presence of a gradient of surface concentration of surfactants at the liquid/air interface. This leads to a Marangoni force directed toward the top of the film. The film is expected to burst only when its weight is not balanced anymore by this force. We will show that this leads to the surprising result that the thicker films have shorter lifetimes than the thinner ones. It is thus the ability of the interface to sustain a surface concentration gradient of surfactants which controls its stability.

  2. The Ames Vertical Gun Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karcz, J. S.; Bowling, D.; Cornelison, C.; Parrish, A.; Perez, A.; Raiche, G.; Wiens, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    The Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) is a national facility for conducting laboratory- scale investigations of high-speed impact processes. It provides a set of light-gas, powder, and compressed gas guns capable of accelerating projectiles to speeds up to 7 km s(exp -1). The AVGR has a unique capability to vary the angle between the projectile-launch and gravity vectors between 0 and 90 deg. The target resides in a large chamber (diameter approximately 2.5 m) that can be held at vacuum or filled with an experiment-specific atmosphere. The chamber provides a number of viewing ports and feed-throughs for data, power, and fluids. Impacts are observed via high-speed digital cameras along with investigation-specific instrumentation, such as spectrometers. Use of the range is available via grant proposals through any Planetary Science Research Program element of the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) calls. Exploratory experiments (one to two days) are additionally possible in order to develop a new proposal.

  3. HL-20 Vertical Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The HL-20 space taxi, Langley's candidate personnel launch system, is one of several designs being considered by NASA as a complement to the Space Shuttle. Human factors studies, using Langley volunteers as subjects, have been ongoing since March 1991 to verify crew seating arrangements, habitability, ingress and egress, equipment layout and maintenance and handling operations, and to determine visibility requirements during docking and landing operations. Langley volunteers, wearing flight suits and helmets, were put through a series of tests with the craft placed both vertically and horizontally to simulate launch and landing attitudes, The HL-20 would be launched into a low orbit by an expendable rocket and then use its own propulsion system to boost itself to the space station. Following exchange of crews or delivery of small payload, the HL-20 would return to Earth like the space shuttle, making a runway landing near the launch site, The full-scale engineering research model of the HL-20 design was constructed by students and faculty at North Carolina State University and North Carolina A&T State University with the Mars Mission Research Center under a grant from NASA Langley.

  4. Opportunity at 'Cook Islands' (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,825th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 12, 2009). North is at the top.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

    The rover had driven half a meter (1.5 feet) earlier on Sol 1825 to fine-tune its location for placing its robotic arm onto an exposed patch of outcrop including a target area informally called 'Cook Islands.' On the preceding sol, Opportunity turned around to drive frontwards and then drove 4.5 meters (15 feet) toward this outcrop. The tracks from the SOl 1824 drive are visible near the center of this view at about the 11 o'clock position. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). Opportunity had previously been driving backward as a strategy to redistribute lubrication in a wheel drawing more electrical current than usual.

    The outcrop exposure that includes 'Cook Islands' is visible just below the center of the image.

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  5. Vertical gating of sketched nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Yun-Yi; Park, Dong-Wook; Huang, Mengchen; Annadi, Anil; Lee, Hyungwoo; Ma, Zhenqiang; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    Conductive-atomic force microscope (c-AFM) lithography at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface has enabled the creation of various classes of nanostructures, such as nanoscale transistors, single-electron transistors and has proven to be a promising testbed for mesoscopic physics. To date, these devices have used lithographically-defined side gates, which are limited by leakage currents. To reduce leakage and improve the electric field effect, we have investigated nanostructures with in-situ grown gold top gate. We will discuss designs of logic devices such as inverters, NAND, and NOR gates. In the quantum regime, we compare the performance of in-situ vertical top gates and that of written coplanar side gates with Quantum Dot devices. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the following agencies and grants: AFOSR (FA9550-­10-­1­-0524(JL), FA9550-­12-­1-­0342(CBE)), NSF (DMR­1124131 (JL, CBE) and DMR­1234096 (CBE)), ONR (N00014-15-1-2847 (JL)).

  6. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  7. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  8. Vertical and horizontal access configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1987-01-01

    A number of configuration features and maintenance operations are influenced by the choice of whether a design is based on vertical or horizontal access for replacing reactor components. The features which are impacted most include the first wall/blanket segmentation, the poloidal field coil locations, the toroidal field coil number and size, access port size for in-vessel components, and facilities. Since either configuration can be made to work, the choice between the two is not clear cut because both have certain advantages. It is apparent that there are large cost benefits in the poloidal field coil system for ideal coil locations for high elongation plasmas and marginal savings for the INTOR case. If we assume that a new tokamak design will require a higher plasma elongation, the recommendation is to arrange the poloidal field coils in a cost-effective manner while providing reasonable midplane access for heating interfaces and test modules. If a new design study is not based on a high elongation plasma, it still appears prudent to consider this approach so that in-vessel maintenance can be accomplished without moving very massive structures such as the bulk shield. 10 refs., 29 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Vertical combustor for particulate refuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, P. M.; Carlson, L.

    1981-03-01

    A one-dimensional model is constructed of a vertical combustor for refuse particle combustion in order to analyze it for waste energy recovery. The three components of the model, fuel particles, inert solid particles and the gaseous mixture are described by momentum, energy, and mass conservation equations, resulting in three different flow velocities and temperatures for the medium. The gaseous component is further divided into six chemical species that evolve in combustion at temperatures below about 1367 K. A detailed description is given of the fuel particle combustion through heating, devolatilization, and combustion of the volatile gas in the boundary layer, return of the flame sheet to the fuel surface, and char combustion. The solutions show the combustor to be viable for U.S. refuse which consists of combustibles that can be volatilized up to 85 to 95% below 1366 K. Char combustion, however, is found to be too slow to be attempted in the combustor, where the fuel residence time is of the order of 2 s.

  10. Multiferroics with spiral spin orders.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Yoshinori; Seki, Shinichiro

    2010-04-12

    Cross correlation between magnetism and electricity in a solid can host magnetoelectric effects, such as magnetic (electric) induction of polarization (magnetization). A key to attain the gigantic magnetoelectric response is to find the efficient magnetism-electricity coupling mechanisms. Among those, recently the emergence of spontaneous (ferroelectric) polarization in the insulating helimagnet or spiral-spin structure was unraveled, as mediated by the spin-exchange and spin-orbit interactions. The sign of the polarization depends on the helicity (spin rotation sense), while the polarization direction itself depends on further details of the mechanism and the underlying lattice symmetry. Here, we describe some prototypical examples of the spiral-spin multiferroics, which enable some unconventional magnetoelectric control such as the magnetic-field-induced change of the polarization direction and magnitude as well as the electric-field-induced change of the spin helicity and magnetic domain. PMID:20496385

  11. Vaporization of Kitaev Spin Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasu, Joji; Udagawa, Masafumi; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2014-11-01

    The quantum spin liquid is an exotic quantum state of matter in magnets. This state is a spin analog of liquid helium that does not solidify down to the lowest temperature due to strong quantum fluctuations. In conventional fluids, the liquid and gas possess the same symmetry and adiabatically connect to each other by bypassing the critical end point. We find that the situation is qualitatively different in quantum spin liquids realized in a three-dimensional Kitaev model; both gapless and gapped quantum spin liquid phases at low temperatures are always distinguished from the high-temperature paramagnet (spin gas) by a phase transition. The results challenge the common belief that the absence of thermodynamic singularity down to the lowest temperature is a symptom of a quantum spin liquid.

  12. Inductance due to spin current

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei

    2014-03-21

    The inductance of spintronic devices that transport charge neutral spin currents is discussed. It is known that in a media that contains charge neutral spins, a time-varying electric field induces a spin current. We show that since the spin current itself produces an electric field, this implies existence of inductance and electromotive force when the spin current changes with time. The relations between the electromotive force and the corresponding flux, which is a vector calculated by the cross product of electric field and the trajectory of the device, are clarified. The relativistic origin generally renders an extremely small inductance, which indicates the advantage of spin current in building low inductance devices. The same argument also explains the inductance due to electric dipole current and applies to physical dipoles consist of polarized bound charges.

  13. Dynamic scaling in spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, C.; Mezei, F.; Ehlers, G.; Manuel, P.; Campbell, I. A.

    2003-08-01

    We present neutron spin echo (NSE) results and a revisited analysis of historical data on spin glasses, which reveal a pure power-law time decay of the spin autocorrelation function s(Q,t)=S(Q,t)/S(Q) at the glass temperature Tg. The power law exponent is in excellent agreement with that calculated from dynamic and static critical exponents deduced from macroscopic susceptibility measurements made on a quite different time scale. This scaling relation involving exponents of different physical quantities determined by completely independent experimental methods is stringently verified experimentally in a spin glass. As spin glasses are a subgroup of the vast family of glassy systems also comprising structural glasses and other noncrystalline systems the observed strict critical scaling behavior is important. Above the phase transition the strikingly nonexponential relaxation, best fitted by the Ogielski (power-law times stretched exponential) function, appears as an intrinsic, homogeneous feature of spin glasses.

  14. Spin transport in lateral structures with semiconducting channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainuddin, Abu Naser

    Spintronics is an emerging field of electronics with the potential to be used in future integrated circuits. Spintronic devices are already making their mark in storage technologies in recent times and there are proposals for using spintronic effects in logic technologies as well. So far, major improvement in spintronic effects, for example, the `spin-valve' effect, is being achieved in metals or insulators as channel materials. But not much progress is made in semiconductors owing to the difficulty in injecting spins into them, which has only very recently been overcome with the combined efforts of many research groups around the world. The key motivations for semiconductor spintronics are their ease in integration with the existing semiconductor technology along with the gate controllability. At present semiconductor based spintronic devices are mostly lateral and are showing a very poor performance compared to their metal or insulator based vertical counterparts. The objective of this thesis is to analyze these devices based on spin-transport models and simulations. At first a lateral spin-valve device is modeled with the spin-diffusion equation based semiclassical approach. Identifying the important issues regarding the device performance, a compact circuit equivalent model is presented which would help to improve the device design. It is found that the regions outside the current path also have a significant influence on the device performance under certain conditions, which is ordinarily neglected when only charge transport is considered. Next, a modified spin-valve structure is studied where the spin signal is controlled with a gate in between the injecting and detecting contacts. The gate is used to modulate the rashba spin-orbit coupling of the channel which, in turn, modulates the spin-valve signal. The idea of gate controlled spin manipulation was originally proposed by Datta and Das back in 1990 and is called 'Datta-Das' effect. In this thesis, we have

  15. Symplectic integrators for spin systems.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Robert I; Modin, Klas; Verdier, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    We present a symplectic integrator, based on the implicit midpoint method, for classical spin systems where each spin is a unit vector in R{3}. Unlike splitting methods, it is defined for all Hamiltonians and is O(3)-equivariant, i.e., coordinate-independent. It is a rare example of a generating function for symplectic maps of a noncanonical phase space. It yields a new integrable discretization of the spinning top. PMID:25019718

  16. Understanding the proton's spin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Myhrer; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2010-02-01

    We discuss the tremendous progress that has been towards an understanding of how the spin of the proton is distributed on its quark and gluon constituents. This is a problem that began in earnest twenty years ago with the discovery of the proton "spin crisis" by the European Muon Collaboration. The discoveries prompted by that original work have given us unprecedented insight into the amount of spin carried by polarized gluons and the orbital angular momentum of the quarks.

  17. Vertical Integration, Monopoly, and the First Amendment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Timothy J.

    This paper addresses the relationship between the First Amendment, monopoly of transmission media, and vertical integration of transmission and content provision. A survey of some of the incentives a profit-maximizing transmission monopolist may have with respect to content is followed by a discussion of how vertical integration affects those…

  18. Teaching Students the Verticality of Technical Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Peter J.

    1992-01-01

    Advocates making technical writing courses more vertical in structure by including an extensive study of at least one specific form of technical documentation. Examines how students can gain experience in the vertical process by designing, writing, testing, and producing user manuals for on-campus cooperative education clients. Lists the benefits…

  19. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser.

    PubMed

    Chalupczak, W; Josephs-Franks, P

    2015-07-17

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra. PMID:26230788

  20. Spin manipulation in nanoscale superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, D.

    2016-04-01

    The interplay of superconductivity and magnetism in nanoscale structures has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the exciting new physics created by the competition of these antagonistic ordering phenomena, and the prospect of exploiting this competition for superconducting spintronics devices. While much of the attention is focused on spin-polarized supercurrents created by the triplet proximity effect, the recent discovery of long range quasiparticle spin transport in high-field superconductors has rekindled interest in spin-dependent nonequilibrium properties of superconductors. In this review, the experimental situation on nonequilibrium spin injection into superconductors is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions of the field are outlined.

  1. Spin-orbital driven ferroelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shan; Li, You-Quan

    2014-10-01

    We study the effect of octahedron rotation on the electric polarization with spin-orbit coupling. Employing local coordinates to represent the tilting of the ligands' octahedra, we evaluate the electric polarization in a chain of transition metal ions with non-polar octahedron rotation. We find the orbital ordering produced by the ligands' rotation and the spin order, together, determine the polarization features, manifesting that non-vanishing polarization appears in collinear spin order and the direction of polarization is no more restricted in the plane of spin rotation in cycloidal ordering.

  2. Spin manipulation in nanoscale superconductors.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, D

    2016-04-27

    The interplay of superconductivity and magnetism in nanoscale structures has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the exciting new physics created by the competition of these antagonistic ordering phenomena, and the prospect of exploiting this competition for superconducting spintronics devices. While much of the attention is focused on spin-polarized supercurrents created by the triplet proximity effect, the recent discovery of long range quasiparticle spin transport in high-field superconductors has rekindled interest in spin-dependent nonequilibrium properties of superconductors. In this review, the experimental situation on nonequilibrium spin injection into superconductors is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions of the field are outlined. PMID:27001949

  3. The straintronic spin-neuron.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ayan K; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-07-17

    In artificial neural networks, neurons are usually implemented with highly dissipative CMOS-based operational amplifiers. A more energy-efficient implementation is a 'spin-neuron' realized with a magneto-tunneling junction (MTJ) that is switched with a spin-polarized current (representing weighted sum of input currents) that either delivers a spin transfer torque or induces domain wall motion in the soft layer of the MTJ to mimic neuron firing. Here, we propose and analyze a different type of spin-neuron in which the soft layer of the MTJ is switched with mechanical strain generated by a voltage (representing weighted sum of input voltages) and term it straintronic spin-neuron. It dissipates orders of magnitude less energy in threshold operations than the traditional current-driven spin neuron at 0 K temperature and may even be faster. We have also studied the room-temperature firing behaviors of both types of spin neurons and find that thermal noise degrades the performance of both types, but the current-driven type is degraded much more than the straintronic type if both are optimized for maximum energy-efficiency. On the other hand, if both are designed to have the same level of thermal degradation, then the current-driven version will dissipate orders of magnitude more energy than the straintronic version. Thus, the straintronic spin-neuron is superior to current-driven spin neurons. PMID:26112081

  4. 14 CFR 23.221 - Spinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spinning. 23.221 Section 23.221 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Spinning § 23.221 Spinning. (a...-turn spin or a three-second spin, whichever takes longer, in not more than one additional turn...

  5. 14 CFR 23.221 - Spinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Spinning. 23.221 Section 23.221 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Spinning § 23.221 Spinning. (a...-turn spin or a three-second spin, whichever takes longer, in not more than one additional turn...

  6. 14 CFR 23.221 - Spinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spinning. 23.221 Section 23.221 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Spinning § 23.221 Spinning. (a...-turn spin or a three-second spin, whichever takes longer, in not more than one additional turn...

  7. 14 CFR 23.221 - Spinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spinning. 23.221 Section 23.221 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Spinning § 23.221 Spinning. (a...-turn spin or a three-second spin, whichever takes longer, in not more than one additional turn...

  8. Spin resonance strength calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Courant,E.D.

    2008-10-06

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  9. Spin waves in the (

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscombe, O. J.; Chen, G. F.; Fang, Chen; Perring, T. G.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Christianson, Andrew D; Egami, Takeshi; Wang, Nanlin; Hu, Jiangping; Dai, Pengcheng

    2011-01-01

    We use neutron scattering to show that spin waves in the iron chalcogenide Fe{sub 1.05}Te display novel dispersion clearly different from both the first principles density functional calculations and recent observations in the related iron pnictide CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. By fitting to a Heisenberg Hamiltonian, we find that although the nearest-neighbor exchange couplings in the two systems are quite different, their next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) couplings are similar. This suggests that superconductivity in the pnictides and chalcogenides share a common magnetic origin that is intimately associated with the NNN magnetic coupling between the irons.

  10. The biomechanics of vertical hopping: a review.

    PubMed

    Lamontagne, Mario; Kennedy, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive vertical hopping is a simple and relatively controlled task useful for studying basic neuromuscular properties and tissue mechanics. However, several biomechanical and physiological factors are involved. This article provides an overview of muscle and tendon properties and how these interact during vertical hopping. Muscle properties discussed are force-velocity and force-length relationships, electromechanical delay, muscle fiber type, stretch induced contraction amplification, and muscle spindle afferent feedback. Tendon properties include storage and reuse of elastic energy, tendon stiffness, afferent information from Golgi tendon organs, and failure points. These muscle and tendon properties interact to generate vertical hopping force and power. In addition to these basic properties, there are other more complicated factors to consider when analyzing vertical hopping such as balance and coordination. A wealth of information can be gathered by studying vertical hopping. Caution should be taken, however, to prevent inappropriate conclusions being drawn about hop performance due to oversimplification. PMID:24067123

  11. Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmsen, Carl W.; Temkin, Henryk; Coldren, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    1. Introduction to VCSELs L. A. Coldren, C. W. Wilmsen and H. Temkin; 2. Fundamental issues in VCSEL design L. A. Coldren and Eric R. Hegblom; 3. Enhancement of spontaneous emission in microcavities E. F. Schubert and N. E. J. Hunt; 4. Epitaxy of vertical-cavity lasers R. P. Schneider Jr and Y. H. Young; 5. Fabrication and performance of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers Kent D. Choquette and Kent Geib; 6. Polarization related properties of vertical cavity lasers Dmitri Kuksenkov and Henryk Temkin; 7. Visible light emitting vertical cavity lasers Robert L. Thornton; 8. Long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers Dubrakovo I. Babic, Joachim Piprek and John E. Bowers; 9. Overview of VCSEL applications Richard C. Williamson; 10. Optical interconnection applications and required characteristics Kenichi Kasahara; 11. VCSEL-based fiber-optic data communications Kenneth Hahn and Kirk Giboney; 12. VCSEL-based smart pixels for free space optoelectronic processing C. W. Wilmsen.

  12. Determination of the Pt spin diffusion length by spin-pumping and spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Pearson, John E.; Hoffmann, Axel; Vlaminck, Vincent; Colegio de Ciencias e Ingenería, Universidad San Fransciso de Quito, Quito ; Divan, Ralu; Bader, Samuel D.; Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439

    2013-12-09

    The spin diffusion length of Pt at room temperature and at 8 K is experimentally determined via spin pumping and spin Hall effect in permalloy/Pt bilayers. Voltages generated during excitation of ferromagnetic resonance from the inverse spin Hall effect and anisotropic magnetoresistance effect were investigated with a broadband approach. Varying the Pt layer thickness gives rise to an evolution of the voltage line shape due to the superposition of the above two effects. By studying the ratio of the two voltage components with the Pt layer thickness, the spin diffusion length of Pt can be directly extracted. We obtain a spin diffusion length of ∼1.2 nm at room temperature and ∼1.6 nm at 8 K.

  13. Chiral spin liquids in arrays of spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Rodrigo

    The chiral spin liquid proposed by Kalmeyer and Laughlin is a spin analogue of the fractional quantum Hall effect: it has gapped bulk quasiparticles, charge-neutral chiral edge modes and topological order in the ground state. Recently there has been unambiguous numerical evidence that the chiral spin liquid can be stabilized as the ground state of extended Heisenberg models on the kagome lattice. I will talk about an analytical approach to investigate the emergence and the properties of the chiral spin liquid phase in spatially anisotropic 2D lattices. The approach is inspired by ``coupled-wire constructions'' of quantum Hall states: starting from a quasi-1D system, we build towards the 2D limit by coupling Heisenberg chains with three-spin interactions that drive the chiral spin order. Using a renormalization group analysis, we show that the chiral spin liquid is more easily stabilized in the kagome lattice than in the triangular lattice. Moreover, using the conformal field theory that describes single chains, we explicitly construct the operators that create bulk quasiparticles and those that account for the topological degeneracy on the torus. I will also discuss possible extensions of this approach to construct more exotic quantum spin liquids.

  14. Spin liquid phases of large spin Mott insulating ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, Todd C.; Lawler, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding exotic forms of magnetism, primarily those driven by large spin fluctuations such as the quantum spin liquid state, is a major goal of condensed matter physics. But, the relatively small number of viable candidate materials poses a difficulty. We believe this problem can be solved by Mott insulating ultracold atoms with large spin moments that interact via whole-atom exchange. The large spin fluctuations of this exchange could stabilize exotic physics similar to condensed matter systems, all in an extremely tunable environment. We have approached the problem by performing a mean field theory for spin-f bosons in an optical lattice which is exact in the large-f limit. This setting is similar to that of SU(N) magnetism proposed for alkali-earth atoms but without the SU(N) symmetry. We find that states with long-range order, such as the spin nematic phase of f = 1 Na atoms, become highly entangled spin-liquid-like states for f = 3 Cr atoms. This is evidence that the magnetic phase diagram for Mott insulating atoms at larger spins generically contains exotic forms of magnetism.

  15. Reducing the spin-spin interaction of stable carbon radicals.

    PubMed

    Green, Uri; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Ruthstein, Sharon; Cohen, Haim

    2013-05-01

    We report the discovery that a flow of CO2, N2 or He can sufficiently reduce the spin-spin interactions of specific stable carbon centered radicals by displacing the molecular oxygen in the atmosphere enabling their detection via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). This finding unlike other reported effects on carbon radicals occurs under STP conditions and is reversible. PMID:23518921

  16. Spin-SILC: CMB polarisation component separation with spin wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Keir K.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Leistedt, Boris; McEwen, Jason D.; Pontzen, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    We present Spin-SILC, a new foreground component separation method that accurately extracts the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarisation E and B modes from raw multifrequency Stokes Q and U measurements of the microwave sky. Spin-SILC is an internal linear combination method that uses spin wavelets to analyse the spin-2 polarisation signal P = Q + iU. The wavelets are additionally directional (non-axisymmetric). This allows different morphologies of signals to be separated and therefore the cleaning algorithm is localised using an additional domain of information. The advantage of spin wavelets over standard scalar wavelets is to simultaneously and self-consistently probe scales and directions in the polarisation signal P = Q + iU and in the underlying E and B modes, therefore providing the ability to perform component separation and E-B decomposition concurrently for the first time. We test Spin-SILC on full-mission Planck simulations and data and show the capacity to correctly recover the underlying cosmological E and B modes. We also demonstrate a strong consistency of our CMB maps with those derived from existing component separation methods. Spin-SILC can be combined with the pseudo- and pure E-B spin wavelet estimators presented in a companion paper to reliably extract the cosmological signal in the presence of complicated sky cuts and noise. Therefore, it will provide a computationally-efficient method to accurately extract the CMB E and B modes for future polarisation experiments.

  17. Spin pumping and spin-transfer torques in antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Qian

    2015-03-01

    Spin pumping and spin-transfer torques are key elements of coupled dynamics of magnetization and conduction electron spin, which have been widely studied in various ferromagnetic materials. Recent progress in spintronics suggests that a spin current can significantly affects the behavior of an antiferromagnetic material, and the electron motion become adiabatic when the staggered field varies sufficiently slowly. However, pumping from antiferromagnets and its relation to current-induced torques is yet unclear. In a recent study, we have solved this puzzle analytically by calculating how electrons scatter off a normal metal-antiferromagnetic interface. The pumped spin and staggered spin currents are derived in terms of the staggered field, the magnetization, and their rates of change. We find that for both compensated and uncompensated interfaces, spin pumping is of a similar magnitude as in ferromagnets; the direction of spin pumping is controlled by the polarization of the driving microwave. Via the Onsager reciprocity relations, the current-induced torques are also derived, the salient feature of which is illustrated by a terahertz nano-oscillator. In collaboration with Ran Cheng, Jiang Xiao, and A. Brataas.

  18. Tensor spin observables and spin stucture at low Q2

    SciTech Connect

    Slifer, Karl J.

    2015-04-01

    We discuss recent spin structure results from Jefferson Lab, and outline an emerging program to study tensor spin observables using solid deuteron targets. These new experiments open the potential to study hidden color, the tensor nature of short range correlations, and to probe for exotic gluonic states.

  19. Spin Hall effect for detection of spin-currents -- Realization of a Spin transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, Joerg

    2012-02-01

    The realization of a viable semiconductor transistor and information processing devices based on the electron spin has fueled intense basic research of three key elements: injection, detection, and manipulation of spins in the semiconductor microchannel. The inverse spin Hall effect (iSHE) detection of spins manipulated by a gate electrode [1] has recently led to the experimental demonstration of a spin transistor device. [2] Here, the spin injection into a 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) was done optically in the depletion layer of a reverse biased pn-junction. [3] The iSHE detection is also used for electrical spin injection from a Fe electrode into a lateral GaAs channel combined with a simultaneous non-local spin valve measurement [4-10]. The spins in the channel are manipulated via the Hanle spin precession induced by an applied magnetic field and via a drift of electrons induced by an applied electric field. The output spin signal is suppressed or enhanced depending on the applied electrical bias rendering the device to a spin transitor different from the Datta Das concept. [11] [4pt] [1] S. Datta and B. Das, Appl. Phys. Lett. 56, 665 (1990). [0pt] [2] J. Wunderlich, et al., Science 330,1801 (2010). [0pt] [3] J. Wunderlich, et al., Nature Phys., 5, 675 (2009). [0pt] [4] X. Lou, Nature Phys. 3, 197 (2007). [0pt] [5] M. Ciorga, et al., Phys. Rev. B 79, 165321 (2009). [0pt] [6] C. Awo-Affouda, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 102511 (2009). [0pt] [7] M. K. Chan, et al., Phys. Rev. B 80, 161206(R) (2009). [0pt] [8] G. Salis, et al., Phys. Rev. B 80, 115332 (2009). [0pt] [9] G. Salis, et al., Phys. Rev. B 81, 205323 (2010). [0pt] [10] E. S. Garlid, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 156602 (2010). [0pt] [11] K. Olejnik, et al., submitted.

  20. Novel itinerant transverse spin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, John Delaney

    In 1956, Lev Davidovich Landau put forth his theory on systems of interacting fermions, or fermi liquids. A year later, Viktor Pavlovich Silin described spin waves that such a system of fermions would support. The treatment of the contribution of the molecular field to the spin wave dispersion was a novel aspect of these spin waves. Silin predicted that there would exist a hierarchy of spin waves in a fermi liquid, one for each component of the spherical harmonic expansion of the fermi surface. In 1968, Anthony J. Leggett and Michael J. Rice derived from fermi liquid theory how the behavior of the spin diffusion coefficient of a fermi liquid could be directly experimentally observable via the spin echo effect [24]. Their prediction, that the diffusion coefficient of a fermi liquid would not decay exponentially with temperature, but rather would have a maximum at some non-zero temperature, was a direct consequence of the fermi liquid molecular field and spin wave phenomena, and this was corroborated by experiment in 1971 by Corruccini, et al. [13]. A parallel advancement in the theory of fermi liquid spin waves came with the extension of the theory to describe weak ferromagnetic metals. In 1959, Alexei Abrikosov and I. E. Dzyaloshiski put forth a theoretical description of a ferromagnetic fermi liquid [1]. In 2001, Kevin Bedell and Krastan Blagoev showed that a non-trivial contribution to the dispersion of the ferromagnetic current spin wave arises from the necessary consideration of higher harmonic moments in the distortion of the fermi surface from its ground state [8]. In the chapters to follow, the author presents new results for transverse spin waves in a fermi liquid, which arise from a novel ground state of a fermi liquid-one in which an l = 1 harmonic distortion exists in the ground state polarization. It is shown that such an instability can lead to spin waves with dispersions that are characterized by a linear dependence on the wave number at long

  1. Spin slush in an extended spin ice model

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Jeffrey G.; Gingras, Michel J. P.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new classical spin liquid on the pyrochlore lattice by extending spin ice with further neighbour interactions. We find that this disorder-free spin model exhibits a form of dynamical heterogeneity with extremely slow relaxation for some spins, while others fluctuate quickly down to zero temperature. We thus call this state spin slush, in analogy to the heterogeneous mixture of solid and liquid water. This behaviour is driven by the structure of the ground-state manifold which extends the celebrated two-in/two-out ice states to include branching structures built from three-in/one-out, three-out/one-in and all-in/all-out tetrahedra defects. Distinctive liquid-like patterns in the magnetic correlations serve as a signature of this intermediate range order. Possible applications to materials as well the effects of quantum tunnelling are discussed. PMID:27470199

  2. Intrinsic spin torque without spin-orbit coupling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Whan; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Stiles, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    We derive an intrinsic contribution to the non-adiabatic spin torque for non-uniform magnetic textures. It differs from previously considered contributions in several ways and can be the dominant contribution in some models. It does not depend on the change in occupation of the electron states due to the current flow but rather is due to the perturbation of the electronic states when an electric field is applied. Therefore it should be viewed as electric-field-induced rather than current-induced. Unlike previously reported non-adiabatic spin torques, it does not originate from extrinsic relaxation mechanisms nor spin-orbit coupling. This intrinsic non-adiabatic spin torque is related by a chiral connection to the intrinsic spin-orbit torque that has been calculated from the Berry phase for Rashba systems. PMID:26877628

  3. Unconventional spin texture in a noncentrosymmetric quantum spin Hall insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mera Acosta, C.; Babilonia, O.; Abdalla, L.; Fazzio, A.

    2016-07-01

    We propose that the simultaneous presence of both Rashba and band inversion can lead to a Rashba-like spin splitting formed by two bands with the same in-plane helical spin texture. Because of this unconventional spin texture, the backscattering is forbidden in edge and bulk conductivity channels. We propose a noncentrosymmetric honeycomb-lattice quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator family formed by the IV, V, and VII elements with this property. The system formed by Bi, Pb, and I atoms is mechanically stable and has both a large Rashba spin splitting of 60 meV and a large nontrivial band gap of 0.14 eV. Since the edge and the bulk states are protected by the time-reversal (TR) symmetry, contrary to what happens in most doped QSH insulators, the bulk states do not contribute to the backscattering in the electronic transport, allowing the construction of a spintronic device with less energy loss.

  4. Spin slush in an extended spin ice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Jeffrey G.; Gingras, Michel J. P.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new classical spin liquid on the pyrochlore lattice by extending spin ice with further neighbour interactions. We find that this disorder-free spin model exhibits a form of dynamical heterogeneity with extremely slow relaxation for some spins, while others fluctuate quickly down to zero temperature. We thus call this state spin slush, in analogy to the heterogeneous mixture of solid and liquid water. This behaviour is driven by the structure of the ground-state manifold which extends the celebrated two-in/two-out ice states to include branching structures built from three-in/one-out, three-out/one-in and all-in/all-out tetrahedra defects. Distinctive liquid-like patterns in the magnetic correlations serve as a signature of this intermediate range order. Possible applications to materials as well the effects of quantum tunnelling are discussed.

  5. Spin slush in an extended spin ice model.

    PubMed

    Rau, Jeffrey G; Gingras, Michel J P

    2016-01-01

    We present a new classical spin liquid on the pyrochlore lattice by extending spin ice with further neighbour interactions. We find that this disorder-free spin model exhibits a form of dynamical heterogeneity with extremely slow relaxation for some spins, while others fluctuate quickly down to zero temperature. We thus call this state spin slush, in analogy to the heterogeneous mixture of solid and liquid water. This behaviour is driven by the structure of the ground-state manifold which extends the celebrated two-in/two-out ice states to include branching structures built from three-in/one-out, three-out/one-in and all-in/all-out tetrahedra defects. Distinctive liquid-like patterns in the magnetic correlations serve as a signature of this intermediate range order. Possible applications to materials as well the effects of quantum tunnelling are discussed. PMID:27470199

  6. Transverse Spin and Spin-Orbit Coupling in Silicon Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-Soria, Alba; Martinez, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    Evanescent and tightly confined propagating waves exhibit a remarkable transverse spin density since the longitudinal component of the electric field is not negligible. In this work, we obtain via numerical simulations the electric field components of the fundamental guided modes of two waveguides typically used in silicon photonics: the strip and the slot waveguide. We obtain the relation between transverse and longitudinal field components, the transverse spin densities and other important parameters, such as the longitudinal component of the so-called Belinfante spin momentum density. By asymmetrically placing a circularly-polarized point-like dipole source in regions showing local circular polarization, the guided mode is excited unidirectionally via spin-orbit coupling. In contrast to metal plates supporting surface plasmons, the multimode behavior of silicon waveguides results in different spin-orbit coupling properties for each guided mode. Our results may find application in silicon photonic devices, integrated quantum optics and polarization manipulation at the nanoscale.

  7. Spin injection and spin transport in paramagnetic insulators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Okamoto, Satoshi

    2016-02-22

    We investigate the spin injection and the spin transport in paramagnetic insulators described by simple Heisenberg interactions using auxiliary particle methods. Some of these methods allow access to both paramagnetic states above magnetic transition temperatures and magnetic states at low temperatures. It is predicted that the spin injection at an interface with a normal metal is rather insensitive to temperatures above the magnetic transition temperature. On the other hand below the transition temperature, it decreases monotonically and disappears at zero temperature. We also analyze the bulk spin conductance. We show that the conductance becomes zero at zero temperature as predictedmore » by linear spin wave theory but increases with temperature and is maximized around the magnetic transition temperature. These findings suggest that the compromise between the two effects determines the optimal temperature for spintronics applications utilizing magnetic insulators.« less

  8. Spin-flip noise due to nonequilibrium spin accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liang; Niu, Jiasen; Guo, Huiqiang; Wei, Jian; Li, D. L.; Feng, J. F.; Han, X. F.; Coey, J. M. D.; Zhang, X.-G.

    2016-05-01

    When current flows through a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), there is spin accumulation at the electrode-barrier interfaces if the magnetic moments of the two ferromagnetic electrodes are not aligned. Here we report that such nonequilibrium spin accumulation generates its own characteristic low frequency noise (LFN). Past work viewed the LFN in MTJs as an equilibrium effect arising from resistance fluctuations (SR) which a passively applied current (I ) converts to measurable voltage fluctuations (SV=I2SR ). We treat the LFN associated with spin accumulation as a nonequilibrium effect, and find that the noise power can be fitted in terms of the spin-polarized current by SIf =a I coth(I/b )-a b , resembling the form of the shot noise for a tunnel junction, but with current now taking the role of the bias voltage, and spin-flip probability taking the role of tunneling probability.

  9. Nonstochastic magnetic reversal in artificial quasicrystalline spin ice

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, B.; Bhat, V. S.; Woods, J.; Teipel, E.; Smith, N.; De Long, L. E.; Sklenar, J.; Ketterson, J. B.; Hastings, J. T.

    2014-05-07

    We have measured the isothermal DC magnetization of Penrose P2 tilings (P2T) composed of wire segments of permalloy thin film. Micromagnetic simulations reproduce the coercive fields and “knee anomalies” observed in experimental data and show magnetic shape anisotropy constrains segments to be single-domain (Ising spins) at low fields, similar to artificial spin ice (ASI). Mirror symmetry controls the initial reversal of individual segments oriented parallel to the applied field, followed by complex switching of multiple adjacent segments (“avalanches”) of various orientations such that closed magnetization loops (“vortices”) are favored. Ferromagnetic P2T differ from previously studied ASI systems due to their aperiodic translational symmetry and numerous inequivalent pattern vertices, which drive nonstochastic switching of segment polarizations.

  10. Numerical simulation and fabrication of silicon sheet via spin casting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewoo; Kim, Hyunhui; Lee, Changbum; Kim, Joonsoo; Jang, Bo-Yun; Lee, Jinseok; Ahn, Youngsoo; Yoon, Wooyoung

    2013-05-01

    A spin-casting process for fabricating polycrystalline silicon sheets for use as solar cell wafers is proposed, and the parameters that control the sheet thickness are investigated. A numerical study of the fluidity of molten silicon indicates that the formation of thin silicon sheets without a mold and via spin casting is feasible. The faster the rotation speed of graphite mold, the thinner the thickness of sheet. After the spread of the molten silicon to cover the graphite mold with rotation speed of above 500 rpm, the solidification has to start. Silicon sheets can be produced by using the centrifugal force under appropriate experimental conditions. The spin-cast sheet had a vertical columnar microstructure due to the normal heat extraction to the substrate, and the sheet lifetime varied from 0.1 microS to 0.3 microS measured by using the microwave photoconductance decay (MW-PCD) to confirm that the spin-cast silicon sheet is applicable to photovoltaics. PMID:23858887

  11. SAMPEX Spin Stabilized Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Dean C.; Markley, F. Landis; Watson, Todd P.

    2008-01-01

    The Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), the first of the Small Explorer series of spacecraft, was launched on July 3, 1992 into an 82' inclination orbit with an apogee of 670 km and a perigee of 520 km and a mission lifetime goal of 3 years. After more than 15 years of continuous operation, the reaction wheel began to fail on August 18,2007. With a set of three magnetic torquer bars being the only remaining attitude actuator, the SAMPEX recovery team decided to deviate from its original attitude control system design and put the spacecraft into a spin stabilized mode. The necessary operations had not been used for many years, which posed a challenge. However, on September 25, 2007, the spacecraft was successfully spun up to 1.0 rpm about its pitch axis, which points at the sun. This paper describes the diagnosis of the anomaly, the analysis of flight data, the simulation of the spacecraft dynamics, and the procedures used to recover the spacecraft to spin stabilized mode.

  12. High Resolution Coherent Population Trapping on a Single Hole Spin in a Semiconductor Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houel, Julien; Prechtel, Jonathan H.; Kuhlmann, Andreas V.; Brunner, Daniel; Kuklewicz, Christopher E.; Gerardot, Brian D.; Stoltz, Nick G.; Petroff, Pierre M.; Warburton, Richard J.

    2014-03-01

    We report high resolution coherent population trapping on a single hole spin in a semiconductor quantum dot. The absorption dip signifying the formation of a dark state exhibits an atomic physicslike dip width of just 10 MHz. We observe fluctuations in the absolute frequency of the absorption dip, evidence of very slow spin dephasing. We identify the cause of this process as charge noise by, first, demonstrating that the hole spin g factor in this configuration (in-plane magnetic field) is strongly dependent on the vertical electric field, and second, by characterizing the charge noise through its effects on the optical transition frequency. An important conclusion is that charge noise is an important hole spin dephasing process.

  13. On quantum corrections in higher-spin theory in flat space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Dmitry; Tseytlin, Arkady A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider an interacting theory of an infinite tower of massless higher-spin fields in flat space with cubic vertices and their coupling constants found previously by Metsaev. We compute the one-loop bubble diagram part of the self-energy of the spin 0 member of the tower by summing up all higher-spin loop contributions. We find that the result contains an exponentially UV divergent part and we discuss how it could be cancelled by a tadpole contribution depending on yet to be determined quartic interaction vertex. We also compute the tree-level four-scalar scattering amplitude due to all higher-spin exchanges and discuss its inconsistency with the BCFW constructibility condition. We comment on possible relation to similar computations in AdS background in connection with AdS/CFT.

  14. Enhanced spin polarization in graphene with spin energy gap induced by spin-orbit coupling and strain

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zheng-Fang; Wu, Qing-Ping E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.jx.cn; Chen, Ai-Xi E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.jx.cn; Xiao, Xian-Bo; Liu, Nian-Hua

    2014-05-28

    We investigate the possibility of spin polarization in graphene. The result shows that a spin energy gap can be opened in the presence of both spin-orbit coupling and strain. We find that high spin polarization with large spin-polarized current is achieved in the spin energy gap. However, only one of the two modulations is present, no spin polarization can be generated. So the combination of the two modulations provides a way to design tunable spin polarization without need for a magnetic element or an external magnetic field.

  15. Drift transport of helical spin coherence with tailored spin-orbit interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunihashi, Y.; Sanada, H.; Gotoh, H.; Onomitsu, K.; Kohda, M.; Nitta, J.; Sogawa, T.

    2016-03-01

    Most future information processing techniques using electron spins in non-magnetic semiconductors will require both the manipulation and transfer of spins without their coherence being lost. The spin-orbit effective magnetic field induced by drifting electrons enables us to rotate the electron spins in the absence of an external magnetic field. However, the fluctuations in the effective magnetic field originating from the random scattering of electrons also cause undesirable spin decoherence, which limits the length scale of the spin transport. Here we demonstrate the drift transport of electron spins adjusted to a robust spin structure, namely a persistent spin helix. We find that the persistent spin helix enhances the spatial coherence of drifting spins, resulting in maximized spin decay length near the persistent spin helix condition. Within the enhanced distance of the spin transport, the transport path of electron spins can be modulated by employing time-varying in-plane voltages.

  16. Spin transport in p-type germanium.

    PubMed

    Rortais, F; Oyarzún, S; Bottegoni, F; Rojas-Sánchez, J-C; Laczkowski, P; Ferrari, A; Vergnaud, C; Ducruet, C; Beigné, C; Reyren, N; Marty, A; Attané, J-P; Vila, L; Gambarelli, S; Widiez, J; Ciccacci, F; Jaffrès, H; George, J-M; Jamet, M

    2016-04-27

    We report on the spin transport properties in p-doped germanium (Ge-p) using low temperature magnetoresistance measurements, electrical spin injection from a ferromagnetic metal and the spin pumping-inverse spin Hall effect method. Electrical spin injection is carried out using three-terminal measurements and the Hanle effect. In the 2-20 K temperature range, weak antilocalization and the Hanle effect provide the same spin lifetime in the germanium valence band (≈1 ps) in agreement with predicted values and previous optical measurements. These results, combined with dynamical spin injection by spin pumping and the inverse spin Hall effect, demonstrate successful spin accumulation in Ge. We also estimate the spin Hall angle θ(SHE) in Ge-p (6-7 x 10(-4) at room temperature, pointing out the essential role of ionized impurities in spin dependent scattering. PMID:26988255

  17. Spin transport in p-type germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rortais, F.; Oyarzún, S.; Bottegoni, F.; Rojas-Sánchez, J.-C.; Laczkowski, P.; Ferrari, A.; Vergnaud, C.; Ducruet, C.; Beigné, C.; Reyren, N.; Marty, A.; Attané, J.-P.; Vila, L.; Gambarelli, S.; Widiez, J.; Ciccacci, F.; Jaffrès, H.; George, J.-M.; Jamet, M.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the spin transport properties in p-doped germanium (Ge-p) using low temperature magnetoresistance measurements, electrical spin injection from a ferromagnetic metal and the spin pumping-inverse spin Hall effect method. Electrical spin injection is carried out using three-terminal measurements and the Hanle effect. In the 2-20 K temperature range, weak antilocalization and the Hanle effect provide the same spin lifetime in the germanium valence band (≈1 ps) in agreement with predicted values and previous optical measurements. These results, combined with dynamical spin injection by spin pumping and the inverse spin Hall effect, demonstrate successful spin accumulation in Ge. We also estimate the spin Hall angle {θ\\text{SHE}} in Ge-p (6-7× {{10}-4} ) at room temperature, pointing out the essential role of ionized impurities in spin dependent scattering.

  18. Vertical grid of retrieved atmospheric profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccherini, Simone; Carli, Bruno; Raspollini, Piera

    2016-05-01

    The choice of the vertical grid of atmospheric profiles retrieved from remote sensing observations is discussed considering the two cases of profiles used to represent the results of individual measurements and of profiles used for subsequent data fusion applications. An ozone measurement of the MIPAS instrument is used to assess, for different vertical grids, the quality of the retrieved profiles in terms of profile values, retrieval errors, vertical resolutions and number of degrees of freedom. In the case of individual retrievals no evident advantage is obtained with the use of a grid finer than the one with a reduced number of grid points, which are optimized according to the information content of the observations. Nevertheless, this instrument dependent vertical grid, which seems to extract all the available information, provides very poor results when used for data fusion applications. A loss of about a quarter of the degrees of freedom is observed when the data fusion is made using the instrument dependent vertical grid relative to the data fusion made using a vertical grid optimized for the data fusion product. This result is explained by the analysis of the eigenvalues of the Fisher information matrix and leads to the conclusion that different vertical grids must be adopted when data fusion is the expected application.

  19. Microfabricated Spin Polarized Atomic Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez Martinez, Ricardo

    Spin polarized atomic magnetometers involve the preparation of atomic spins and their detection for monitoring magnetic fields. Due to the fact that magnetic fields are ubiquitous in our world, spin polarized atomic magnetometers are used in a wide range of applications from the detection of magnetic fields generated by the human heart and brain to the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance. In this thesis we developed microfabricated spin polarized atomic magnetometers. These sensors are based on optical pumping and spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms and noble gases contained in microfabricated millimeter-scale vapor cells. In the first part of the thesis, we improved different features of current microfabricated optical magnetometers. Specifically, we improved the bandwidth of these devices, without degrading their magnetic field sensitivity, by broadening their magnetic resonance through spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms. We also implemented all-optical excitation techniques to avoid problems, such as the magnetic perturbation of the environment, induced by the radio-frequency fields used in some of these sensors. In the second part of the thesis we demonstrated a microfluidic chip for the optical production and detection of hyperpolarized Xe gas through spin-exchange collisions with optically pumped Rb atoms. These devices are critical for the widespread use of spin polarized atomic magnetometers in applications requiring simple, compact, low-cost, and portable instrumentation.

  20. Invariant Spin in the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Anthony W.

    2008-10-13

    We discuss recent theoretical progress in understanding the distribution of spin and orbital angular momentum in the proton. Particular attention is devoted to the effect of QCD evolution and to the distinction between 'chiral' and 'invariant' spin. This is particularly significant with respect to the possible presence of polarized strange quarks.

  1. Electron Spin and Its History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commins, Eugene D.

    2012-11-01

    The history of electron spin is summarized. Topics include the discovery of electron spin, the birth of quantum electrodynamics, the invention of magnetic resonance, the invention of renormalization, the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron in experiment and theory, and searches for the electron electric dipole moment.

  2. Spin Technologies in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Over the past several decades SiC has evolved from being a simple abrasive to a versatile material platform for high-power electronics, optoelectronics, and nanomechanical devices. These technologies have been driven by advanced growth, doping, and processing capabilities, and the ready availability of large-area, single-crystal SiC wafers. Recent advances have also established SiC as a promising host for a novel class of technologies based on the spin of intrinsic color centers. In particular, the divacancies and related defects have ground-state electronic-spin triplets with ms-long coherence times that can be optically addressed near telecom wavelengths and manipulated with magnetic, electric, and strain fields. Recently, divacancy addressability has been extended to the single defect level, laying foundation for single spin technologies in SiC. This rapidly developing field has prompted research into the SiC material host to understand how defect-bound electron spins interact with their surrounding nuclear spin bath. Although nuclear spins are typically a major source of decoherence in color-center spin systems, they are also an important resource since they interact with magnetic fields orders of magnitude more weakly than electronic spins. This fact has motivated their use for quantum memories and ultra-sensitive sensors. In this talk I will review advances in this rapidly developing field and discuss our efforts towards this latter goal. This work was supported by the AFOSR, DARPA, and the NSF.

  3. Invariant Spin in the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Anthony

    2008-11-01

    We discuss recent theoretical progress in understanding the distribution of spin and orbital angular momentum in the proton. Particular attention is devoted to the effect of QCD evolution and to the distinction between "chiral" and "invariant" spin. This is particularly significant with respect to the possible presence of polarized strange quarks.

  4. Spin transport in hydrogenated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, David; Van Tuan, Dinh; M-M Dubois, Simon; Gmitra, Martin; Cummings, Aron W.; Kochan, Denis; Ortmann, Frank; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Fabian, Jaroslav; Roche, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    In this review we discuss the multifaceted problem of spin transport in hydrogenated graphene from a theoretical perspective. The current experimental findings suggest that hydrogenation can either increase or decrease spin lifetimes, which calls for clarification. We first discuss the spin-orbit coupling induced by local σ -π re-hybridization and {s}{{{p}}3} C-H defect formation together with the formation of a local magnetic moment. First-principles calculations of hydrogenated graphene unravel the strong interplay of spin-orbit and exchange couplings. The concept of magnetic scattering resonances, recently introduced by Kochan et al (2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 116602) is revisited by describing the local magnetism through the self-consistent Hubbard model in the mean field approximation in the dilute limit, while spin relaxation lengths and transport times are computed using an efficient real space order N wavepacket propagation method. Typical spin lifetimes on the order of 1 ns are obtained for 1 ppm of hydrogen impurities (corresponding to a transport time of about 50 ps), and the scaling of spin lifetimes with impurity density is described by the Elliott-Yafet mechanism. This reinforces the statement that local defect-induced magnetism can be at the origin of the substantial spin polarization loss in the clean graphene limit.

  5. A Novel RF E × B Spin Manipulator at COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mey, Sebstian; Gebel, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    The Jülich Electric Dipole Moment Investigations (JEDI) Collaboration is developing tools for the measurement of permanent Electric Dipole Moments (EDMs) of charged, light hadrons in storage rings. While the Standard Model prediction for the EDM gives unobservably small magnitudes, a non-vanishing EDM from 𝒞𝒫 violating sources beyond the standard model can lead to a tiny build-up of vertical polarization in a beforehand horizontally polarized beam. This requires a spin tune modulation by an RF dipole without any excitation of coherent beam oscillations. In the course of 2014, a prototype RF E × B dipole has been successfully commissioned and tested. We verified that the device can be used to continuously flip the vertical polarization of a 970MeV/c deuteron beam without exciting any coherent beam oscillations.

  6. Methods of testing parameterizations: Vertical ocean mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tziperman, Eli

    1992-01-01

    The ocean's velocity field is characterized by an exceptional variety of scales. While the small-scale oceanic turbulence responsible for the vertical mixing in the ocean is of scales a few centimeters and smaller, the oceanic general circulation is characterized by horizontal scales of thousands of kilometers. In oceanic general circulation models that are typically run today, the vertical structure of the ocean is represented by a few tens of discrete grid points. Such models cannot explicitly model the small-scale mixing processes, and must, therefore, find ways to parameterize them in terms of the larger-scale fields. Finding a parameterization that is both reliable and plausible to use in ocean models is not a simple task. Vertical mixing in the ocean is the combined result of many complex processes, and, in fact, mixing is one of the less known and less understood aspects of the oceanic circulation. In present models of the oceanic circulation, the many complex processes responsible for vertical mixing are often parameterized in an oversimplified manner. Yet, finding an adequate parameterization of vertical ocean mixing is crucial to the successful application of ocean models to climate studies. The results of general circulation models for quantities that are of particular interest to climate studies, such as the meridional heat flux carried by the ocean, are quite sensitive to the strength of the vertical mixing. We try to examine the difficulties in choosing an appropriate vertical mixing parameterization, and the methods that are available for validating different parameterizations by comparing model results to oceanographic data. First, some of the physical processes responsible for vertically mixing the ocean are briefly mentioned, and some possible approaches to the parameterization of these processes in oceanographic general circulation models are described in the following section. We then discuss the role of the vertical mixing in the physics of the

  7. Recent Development in Proton Spin Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2008-12-10

    In the naive model of the proton, its 1/2 spin is carried by its quark constituents. However, experiments over the last several decades have shown that the quark spin only contribute a small portion of the proton spin. In this talk, I will present recent developments exploring this proton spin puzzle, and focus on the progress made in the last few years on the longitudinal spin physics, the generalized parton distribution physics, and the transverse spin physics.

  8. Spin noise spectroscopy of ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, H.; Berski, F.; Hübner, J.; Oestreich, M.; Balocchi, A.; Marie, X.; Mansur-Al-Suleiman, M.; Bakin, A.; Waag, A.

    2013-12-04

    We investigate the thermal equilibrium dynamics of electron spins bound to donors in nanoporous ZnO by optical spin noise spectroscopy. The spin noise spectra reveal two noise contributions: A weak spin noise signal from undisturbed localized donor electrons with a dephasing time of 24 ns due to hyperfine interaction and a strong spin noise signal with a spin dephasing time of 5 ns which we attribute to localized donor electrons which interact with lattice defects.

  9. Spinning bodies in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Ambrosi, G.; Satish Kumar, S.; van de Vis, J.; van Holten, J. W.

    2016-02-01

    We study the motion of neutral and charged spinning bodies in curved spacetime in the test-particle limit. We construct equations of motion using a closed covariant Poisson-Dirac bracket formulation that allows for different choices of the Hamiltonian. We derive conditions for the existence of constants of motion and apply the formalism to the case of spherically symmetric spacetimes. We show that the periastron of a spinning body in a stable orbit in a Schwarzschild or Reissner-Nordstrøm background not only precesses but also varies radially. By analyzing the stability conditions for circular motion we find the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) as a function of spin. It turns out that there is an absolute lower limit on the ISCOs for increasing prograde spin. Finally we establish that the equations of motion can also be derived from the Einstein equations using an appropriate energy-momentum tensor for spinning particles.

  10. Composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Chow, W.W.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-05-01

    The use of two coupled laser cavities has been employed in edge emitting semiconductor lasers for mode suppression and frequency stabilization. The incorporation of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. Composite resonators can be utilized to control spectral and temporal properties within the laser; previous studies of coupled cavity vertical cavity lasers have employed photopumped structures. The authors report the first composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode consisting of two optical cavities and three monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. Cavity coupling effects and two techniques for external modulation of the laser are described.

  11. Vertical transmission of Salmonella paratyphi A.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, R; Wattal, C; Sharma, A; Kler, N; Garg, P; Gujral, K; Khera, N

    2007-08-01

    Neonatal enteric fever is a rare but life-threatening illness. Patients may present with varying severity, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi causing more severe illness than Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A. Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A is considered to cause milder infection with fewer complications. We report a rare case of vertical transmission of Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A with severe complications and high mortality. Even though there are case reports of vertical transmission of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi, to our knowledge, this is the first case report of vertical transmission of Salmonella enterica serotype ParatyphiA. The role of blood culture in accurate diagnosis and treatment is also discussed. PMID:17785907

  12. Tobacco smoking and vertical periodontal bone loss.

    PubMed

    Baljoon, Mostafa

    2005-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with increased prevalence and severity of destructive periodontal disease in terms of periodontal pocketing, periodontal bone loss, and tooth loss. The smoking destructive effect on periodontal bone may be of even "horizontal" and vertical "angular" pattern. The vertical bone loss or the "vertical defect" is a sign of progressive periodontal breakdown that involves the periodontal bone. Water pipe smoking has a sharp rise by the popularity in the recent years by men and women in Middle East countries. The general objective of this thesis was to investigate the relationship between tobacco smoking and vertical periodontal bone loss cross-sectionally and longitudinally. This thesis is based on two study populations, Swedish musicians and a Saudi Arabian population. All participants had a full set of intra-oral radiographs including 16 periapical and 4 bitewing projections that were assessed with regard to presence or absence of vertical defects. In Study I, the number of defects per person increased with age. Vertical defects were more common in the posterior as compared to the anterior region of the dentition and the distribution of defects within the maxilla as well as the mandible typically revealed a right-left hand side symmetry. Cigarette smoking was significantly associated with the prevalence and severity of vertical bone defects (Studies II and III). The relative risk associated with cigarette smoking was 2 to 3-fold increased. The impact of water pipe smoking was of the same magnitude as that of cigarette smoking and the relative risk associated with water pipe smoking was 6-fold increased compared to non-smoking. In addition, the risk of vertical defects increased with increased exposure in cigarette smokers as well as water pipe smokers (Study III). In Study IV, the proportion of vertical defects increased over a 10-year period and the increase over time was significantly associated with smoking. Moreover, the 10-year

  13. Displaced vertices in extended supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesselbach, S.; Franke, F.; Fraas, H.

    2000-10-01

    In extended supersymmetric models with additional singlet Higgs fields displaced vertices could be observed if the decay width of the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle becomes very small due to a singlino dominated LSP. We study the supersymmetric parameter space where displaced vertices of the second lightest neutralino exist in the NMSSM and an E6 inspired model. For a mass difference between LSP and NLSP of more than 10 GeV the singlet vacuum expectation value has to be at least of the order of /100 TeV in order to obtain a lightest neutralino with a singlino component large enough for displaced vertices.

  14. Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, N.; Caps, H.

    2015-01-01

    Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films are experimentally investigated. Measurements are performed by introducing deformable elastic objets in the films. The shape adopted by those objects once set in the film is related to the surface tension value at a given vertical position by numerically solving the adapted elasticity equations. We show that the observed dependency of the surface tension versus the vertical position is predicted by simple modeling that takes into account the mechanical equilibrium of the films coupled to previous thickness measurements.

  15. Unconventional vertical word-order impairs reading.

    PubMed

    Bonfiglioli, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Western written languages unfold across both the horizontal (from left to right) and the vertical (from top to bottom) dimensions. Culturally determined horizontal reading/writing habits are so pervasive that their influence can be found not only in visual scanning but also in performance across different domains and tasks. However, little is known on the effects of vertical word order. In the present study, a lexical decision task is used to show that reading performance is less efficient when verbal material is vertically arranged following a bottom-to-top order. PMID:21692428

  16. Spin Seebeck Effect vs. Anomalous Nernst Effect in Ta/CoFeB /Ta Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bowen; Xu, Yadong; Schneider, Mike; Shi, Jing; Univ of California-Riverside Team; Everspin Technologies Inc. Team

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) in a vertical trilayer structure under a vertical temperature gradient. The structure consists of a 3nm CoFeB layer sandwiched by β-phase tantalum (Ta) layers. The samples are deposited by magnetron sputtering. The existence of Ta β-phase is verified by the resistivity and its negative temperature coefficient of resistance(TCR). Under a fixed vertical temperature gradient, the measured transverse thermoelectric voltage is linearly proportional to the total sample resistance when the Ta thickness exceeds 2 nm, which can be explained by a shunting resistor model. When the Ta thickness is below 2 nm, the voltage deviates from the linear resistance dependence and merges to the ANE voltage of the CoFeB single layer, due to a weakened inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) in Ta thinner than the spin diffusion length. In the linear regime, the slope contains both a varying SSE and a fixed ANE responses, thus the SSE contribution could be quantitatively separated out from the ANE of CoFeB. Our results indicate a large SSE from the β-phase Ta due to its large Spin Hall Angle. This work was supported by CNN/DMEA and DOE.

  17. Electro-optical spin measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodale, Robert (Inventor); Hampton, Herbert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An electro-optical spin measurement system for a spin model in a spin tunnel includes a radio controlled receiver/transmitter, targets located on the spin model, optical receivers mounted around the perimeter of the spin tunnel and the base of the spin tunnel for receiving data from the targets, and a control system for accumulating data from the radio controlled receiver and receivers. Six targets are employed. The spin model includes a fuselage, wings, nose, and tail. Two targets are located under the fuselage of the spin model at the nose tip and tail. Two targets are located on the side of the fuselage at the nose tip and tail, and a target is located under each wing tip. The targets under the fuselage at the nose tip and tail measure spin rate of the spin model, targets on the side of the fuselage at the nose tip and tail measure angle of attack of the spin model, and the targets under the wing tips measure roll angle of the spin model. Optical receivers are mounted at 90 degree increments around the periphery of the spin tunnel to determine angle of attack and roll angle measurements of the spin model. Optical receivers are also mounted at the base of the spin tunnel to define quadrant and position of the spin model and to determine the spin rate of the spin model.

  18. Anisotropy-Driven Spin Relaxation in Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengke; Li, Jing; Qing, Lan; Dery, Hanan; Appelbaum, Ian

    2013-12-01

    A unique spin depolarization mechanism, induced by the presence of g-factor anisotropy and intervalley scattering, is revealed by spin-transport measurements on long-distance germanium devices in a magnetic field longitudinal to the initial spin orientation. The confluence of electron-phonon scattering (leading to Elliott-Yafet spin flips) and this previously unobserved physics enables the extraction of spin lifetime solely from spin-valve measurements, without spin precession, and in a regime of substantial electric-field-generated carrier heating. We find spin lifetimes in Ge up to several hundreds of nanoseconds at low temperature, far beyond any other available experimental results.

  19. Vertical Motions of Oceanic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    lasting a few hundred thousand years as the island migrates over a broad flexural arch related to isostatic compensation of a nearby active volcano. The arch is located about 190±30 km away from the center of volcanic activity and is also related to the rejuvenated volcanic stage on the islands. Reefs on Oahu that are uplifted several tens of m above sea level are the primary evidence for uplift as the islands over-ride the flexural arch. At the other end of the movement spectrum, both in terms of magnitude and length of response, are the rapid uplift and subsidence that occurs as magma is accumulated within or erupted from active submarine volcanoes. These changes are measured in days to years and are of cm to m variation; they are measured using leveling surveys, tiltmeters, EDM and GPS above sea level and pressure gauges and tiltmeters below sea level. Other acoustic techniques to measure such vertical movement are under development. Elsewhere, evidence for subsidence of volcanoes is also widespread, ranging from shallow water carbonates on drowned Cretaceous guyots, to mapped shoreline features, to the presence of subaerially-erupted (degassed) lavas on now submerged volcanoes. Evidence for uplift is more limited, but includes makatea islands with uplifted coral reefs surrounding low volcanic islands. These are formed due to flexural uplift associated with isostatic loading of nearby islands or seamounts. In sum, oceanic volcanoes display a long history of subsidence, rapid at first and then slow, sometimes punctuated by brief periods of uplift due to lithospheric loading by subsequently formed nearby volcanoes.

  20. Spin filter for arbitrary spins by substrate engineering.

    PubMed

    Pal, Biplab; Römer, Rudolf A; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2016-08-24

    We design spin filters for particles with potentially arbitrary spin [Formula: see text] using a one-dimensional periodic chain of magnetic atoms as a quantum device. Describing the system within a tight-binding formalism we present an analytical method to unravel the analogy between a one-dimensional magnetic chain and a multi-strand ladder network. This analogy is crucial, and is subsequently exploited to engineer gaps in the energy spectrum by an appropriate choice of the magnetic substrate. We obtain an exact correlation between the magnitude of the spin of the incoming beam of particles and the magnetic moment of the substrate atoms in the chain desired for opening up of a spectral gap. Results of spin polarized transport, calculated within a transfer matrix formalism, are presented for particles having half-integer as well as higher spin states. We find that the chain can be made to act as a quantum device which opens a transmission window only for selected spin components over certain ranges of the Fermi energy, blocking them in the remaining part of the spectrum. The results appear to be robust even when the choice of the substrate atoms deviates substantially from the ideal situation, as verified by extending the ideas to the case of a 'spin spiral'. Interestingly, the spin spiral geometry, apart from exhibiting the filtering effect, is also seen to act as a device flipping spins-an effect that can be monitored by an interplay of the system size and the period of the spiral. Our scheme is applicable to ultracold quantum gases, and might inspire future experiments in this direction. PMID:27352129

  1. Spin Orbit Interaction Engineering for beyond Spin Transfer Torque memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang L.

    Spin transfer torque memory uses electron current to transfer the spin torque of electrons to switch a magnetic free layer. This talk will address an alternative approach to energy efficient non-volatile spintronics through engineering of spin orbit interaction (SOC) and the use of spin orbit torque (SOT) by the use of electric field to improve further the energy efficiency of switching. I will first discuss the engineering of interface SOC, which results in the electric field control of magnetic moment or magneto-electric (ME) effect. Magnetic memory bits based on this ME effect, referred to as magnetoelectric RAM (MeRAM), is shown to have orders of magnitude lower energy dissipation compared with spin transfer torque memory (STTRAM). Likewise, interests in spin Hall as a result of SOC have led to many advances. Recent demonstrations of magnetization switching induced by in-plane current in heavy metal/ferromagnetic heterostructures have been shown to arise from the large SOC. The large SOC is also shown to give rise to the large SOT. Due to the presence of an intrinsic extraordinarily strong SOC and spin-momentum lock, topological insulators (TIs) are expected to be promising candidates for exploring spin-orbit torque (SOT)-related physics. In particular, we will show the magnetization switching in a chromium-doped magnetic TI bilayer heterostructure by charge current. A giant SOT of more than three orders of magnitude larger than those reported in heavy metals is also obtained. This large SOT is shown to come from the spin-momentum locked surface states of TI, which may further lead to innovative low power applications. I will also describe other related physics of SOC at the interface of anti-ferromagnetism/ferromagnetic structure and show the control exchange bias by electric field for high speed memory switching. The work was in part supported by ERFC-SHINES, NSF, ARO, TANMS, and FAME.

  2. Thermally induced vertical phase separation and photovoltaic characteristics of polymer solar cells for P3HT/PCBM composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Masaru; Wei, Huang; Yoshida, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of vertical phase separation has been reported for various spin-cast polymer films, including bulk-heterojunction films of polymer solar cells (PSCs). Focusing on real-space analysis, we conducted a study on the relationship between the morphology and processing conditions of PSCs for typical poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) cells. Our results demonstrated that spin-casting caused a localized reduction in the P3HT concentration in the bulk center. Thermal annealing after cathode formation enhanced the unevenness in concentration and created a multilayered vertical phase-separated morphology in which the P3HT domains were gathered near the electrodes, leaving only PCBM domains at the center of the film. Cells with this morphology had good power conversion efficiency (∼3%).

  3. Multiferroics of spin origin.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Yoshinori; Seki, Shinichiro; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2014-07-01

    Multiferroics, compounds with both magnetic and ferroelectric orders, are believed to be a key material system to achieve cross-control between magnetism and electricity in a solid with minute energy dissipation. Such a colossal magnetoelectric (ME) effect has been an issue of keen interest for a long time in condensed matter physics as well as a most desired function in the emerging spin-related electronics. Here we begin with the basic mechanisms to realize multiferroicity or spin-driven ferroelectricity in magnetic materials, which have recently been clarified and proved both theoretically and experimentally. According to the proposed mechanisms, many families of multiferroics have been explored, found (re-discovered), and newly developed, realizing a variety of colossal ME controls. We overview versatile multiferroics from the viewpoints of their multiferroicity mechanisms and their fundamental ME characteristics on the basis of the recent advances in exploratory materials. One of the new directions in multiferroic science is the dynamical ME effect, namely the dynamical and/or fast cross-control between electric and magnetic dipoles in a solid. We argue here that the dynamics of multiferroic domain walls significantly contributes to the amplification of ME response, which has been revealed through the dielectric spectroscopy. Another related issue is the electric-dipole-active magnetic resonance, called electromagnons. The electromagnons can provide a new stage of ME optics via resonant coupling with the external electromagnetic wave (light). Finally, we give concluding remarks on multiferroics physics in the light of a broader perspective from the emergent electromagnetism in a solid as well as from the possible application toward future dissipationless electronics. PMID:24994716

  4. Ultrafast Coherent Control of a Single Electron Spin in a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, Maiken H.

    2009-03-01

    Practical quantum information processing schemes require fast single-qubit operations. For spin-based qubits, this involves performing arbitrary coherent rotations of the spin state on timescales much faster than the spin coherence time. While we recently demonstrated the ability to initialize and monitor the evolution of single spins in quantum dots (QDs)ootnotetextM. H. Mikkelsen, J. Berezovsky, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, D. D. Awschalom, Nature Physics 3, 770 (2007); J. Berezovsky, M. H. Mikkelsen, O. Gywat, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, and D. D. Awschalom, Science 314, 1916 (2006)., here we present an all-optical scheme for ultrafast manipulation of these states through arbitrary angles. The GaAs QDs are embedded in a diode structure to allow controllable charging of the QDs and positioned within a vertical optical cavity to enhance the small single spin signal. By applying off-resonant optical pulses, we coherently rotate a single electron spin in a QD up to π radians on picosecond timescales ootnotetextJ. Berezovsky, M. H. Mikkelsen, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, D. D. Awschalom, Science 320, 349 (2008)..We directly observe this spin manipulation using time-resolved Kerr rotation spectroscopy at T=10K. Measurements of the spin rotation as a function of laser detuning and intensity confirm that the optical Stark effect is the operative mechanism and the results are well-described by a model including the electron-nuclear spin interaction. Using short tipping pulses, this technique enables one to perform a large number of operations within the coherence time. This ability to perform arbitrary single-qubit operations enables sequential all-optical initialization, ultrafast control and detection of a single electron spin for quantum information purposes.

  5. On the Uniqueness of Higher-Spin Symmetries in ADS and Cft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, N.; Ponomarev, D.; Skvortsov, E.; Taronna, M.

    2013-12-01

    We study the uniqueness of higher-spin algebras which are at the core of higher-spin theories in AdS and of CFTs with exact higher-spin symmetry, i.e. conserved tensors of rank greater than two. The Jacobi identity for the gauge algebra is the simplest consistency test that appears at the quartic order for a gauge theory. Similarly, the algebra of charges in a CFT must also obey the Jacobi identity. These algebras are essentially the same. Solving the Jacobi identity under some simplifying assumptions listed out, we obtain that the Eastwood-Vasiliev algebra is the unique solution for d = 4 and d≥7. In 5d, there is a one-parameter family of algebras that was known before. In particular, we show that the introduction of a single higher-spin gauge field/current automatically requires the infinite tower of higher-spin gauge fields/currents. The result implies that from all the admissible non-Abelian cubic vertices in AdSd, that have been recently classified for totally symmetric higher-spin gauge fields, only one vertex can pass the Jacobi consistency test. This cubic vertex is associated with a gauge deformation that is the germ of the Eastwood-Vasiliev's higher-spin algebra.

  6. 23. INCLINED END POST / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. INCLINED END POST / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / PORTAL BRACING DETAIL. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge, Spanning Missouri River on Highway 30 between Nebraska & Iowa, Blair, Washington County, NE

  7. 30. BEARING SHOE / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / UPPER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. BEARING SHOE / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / UPPER AND LOWER CHORD DETAIL OF DECK TRUSS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge, Spanning Missouri River on Highway 30 between Nebraska & Iowa, Blair, Washington County, NE

  8. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study

    SciTech Connect

    Lodde, P.F.

    1980-07-01

    The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

  9. The solid angle through the vertical rectangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröer, H.

    We want to determine the solid angle through the vertical rectangle. We use the cosine law for sides and the spherical law of sines. The relation to luminous flux (radiant flux or radiant power) is shown.

  10. Vertically stabilized elongated cross-section tokamak

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, George V.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a vertically stabilized, non-circular (minor) cross-section, toroidal plasma column characterized by an external separatrix. To this end, a specific poloidal coil means is added outside a toroidal plasma column containing an endless plasma current in a tokamak to produce a rectangular cross-section plasma column along the equilibrium axis of the plasma column. By elongating the spacing between the poloidal coil means the plasma cross-section is vertically elongated, while maintaining vertical stability, efficiently to increase the poloidal flux in linear proportion to the plasma cross-section height to achieve a much greater plasma volume than could be achieved with the heretofore known round cross-section plasma columns. Also, vertical stability is enhanced over an elliptical cross-section plasma column, and poloidal magnetic divertors are achieved.

  11. Congenital Vertical Talus: Etiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark; Dobbs, Matthew B

    2015-10-01

    Congenital vertical talus is a rare foot deformity. If left untreated, it causes significant disability, including pain and functional limitations. Although the etiology of vertical talus is likely heterogeneous, recent evidence strongly supports a genetic cause linking it to genes expressed during early limb development. Traditional management for vertical talus involves extensive surgeries that are associated with significant short- and long-term complications. A minimally invasive approach that relies on serial manipulation and casting to achieve most of the correction has been shown to produce excellent short-term results with regard to clinical and radiographic correction in both isolated and nonisolated cases of vertical talus. Although long-term studies are needed, achieving correction without extensive surgery may lead to more flexible and functional feet, much as Ponseti method has done for clubfeet. PMID:26337950

  12. Magnetic spin reduction system for free spinning objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G. F. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A spinning Earth satellite is shown in which it is desired to reduce the rotation or spin to a level that the satellite may be secured or handled remotely from a spacecraft. This is accomplished by the spacecraft having a mast carrying an electrical current coil which encircles the satellite. The magnetic field of the coil is normal to the spin axis of the satellite which causes circular eddy current flow in the housing of the satellite. This generates magnetic force opposing the rotation. In another embodiment the magnetic field is generated by the use of an electromagnet on a remote manipulation arm.

  13. Spin-Thermodynamics of Ultra-Cold Spin-1 Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. B.; Yao, D. X.; Bao, C. G.

    2015-08-01

    The spin-thermodynamics of a -body spin-1 condensate containing only the spin-degrees of freedom is studied via a theory in which , the total spin and its Z-component are exactly conserved. The magnetic field is considered as zero at first. Then the effect of a residual is evaluated. A temperature is defined as below that all the spatial degrees of freedom can be considered as being frozen and, accordingly, a pure spin-system will emerge. Effort is made to evaluate . When goes up from zero, the internal energy and the entropy experience sharp changes in two narrow domains of surrounding two turning temperatures and , the latter is higher. When or , and remain unchanged. Whereas when , and . It was found that and originate from the gap (the energy difference between the ground state (g.s.) and the first excited state) and the width (the energy difference between the g.s. and the highest state without spatial excitation) of the spectra, respectively. Thus their appearance is a common feature in spin-thermodynamics. In fact, marks the lowest excitation of the spin-modes, while marks the maximization of the entropy in the spin-space. In particular, the T-dependent population density is defined so that the theory can be checked by experimental data. Two kinds of condensates are notable: (i) the strongly trapped systems with a very small , they can work as pure spin-systems at relatively higher temperature; (ii) the systems with a high magnetization (say, ), the dimensions of their spin-spaces are very low. Furthermore, a larger together with a large N (for Rb) or a large (for Na) will lead to a sufficiently large so that a real g.s. can be experimentally created at a higher temperature. The spin-thermodynamics would remain valid whenever the spatial modes decouple from the spin-modes. This can occur at a higher temperature as demonstrated in Pechkis et al. (Phys Rev Lett 111:025301, 2013).

  14. Separating inverse spin Hall voltage and spin rectification voltage by inverting spin injection direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenxu; Peng, Bin; Han, Fangbin; Wang, Qiuru; Soh, Wee Tee; Ong, Chong Kim; Zhang, Wanli

    2016-03-01

    We develop a method for universally resolving the important issue of separating the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) from the spin rectification effect (SRE) signal. This method is based on the consideration that the two effects depend on the spin injection direction: The ISHE is an odd function of the spin injection direction while the SRE is independent on it. Thus, the inversion of the spin injection direction changes the ISHE voltage signal, while the SRE voltage remains. It applies generally to analyzing the different voltage contributions without fitting them to special line shapes. This fast and simple method can be used in a wide frequency range and has the flexibility of sample preparation.

  15. Vertical sounding balloons for long duration flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaterre, P.

    1994-02-01

    Vertical soundings in the lower stratosphere are possible on command with an Infrared Montgolfiere, between 16 km and 28 km. Results of simulations are presented. The first test flight of a 7800 m3 Montgolfiere with a relief valve, has been conducted in Arctic area (Spitzbergen, July 1992). The flight of an Infrared Montgolfiere, with full vertical sounding capabilities, is planned for the end of 1993, from Ecuador (South AMERICA).

  16. Vertical sounding balloons for long duration flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaterre, P.

    1994-02-01

    Vertical soundings in the lower stratosphere are possible on command with an Infrared Montgolfiere, between 16 km and 28 km. Results of simulations are presented. The first test flight of a 7800 cu m Montgolfiere with a relief valve, has been conducted in Arctic area (Spitzbergen, July 1992). The flight of an Infrared Montgolfiere, with full vertical sounding capabilities, is planned for the end of 1993, from Ecuador (South AMERICA).

  17. Square-wave switching by crossed-polarization gain modulation in vertical-cavity semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mulet, J.; Giudici, M.; Javaloyes, J.; Balle, S.

    2007-10-15

    We study experimentally and theoretically the effects of crossed-polarization reinjection (XPR) on the output characteristics of a vertical-cavity semiconductor laser. We find a set of parameters values for which each polarization component develops a square-wave modulation at a period close to twice the reinjection delay. We analyze the regularity of this modulation in terms of the laser pumping current and of the reinjection level. These observations are numerically reproduced within the spin-flip model modified to account for XPR. In particular, the degradation of the square-wave switching is linked to the finite value of the spin-flip rate, and it occurs when the current approaches the boundaries of polarization bistability.

  18. [Is the sense of verticality vestibular?].

    PubMed

    Barra, J; Pérennou, D

    2013-06-01

    The vestibular system constitutes an inertial sensor, which detects linear (otoliths) and angular (semicircular canals) accelerations of the head in the three dimensions. The otoliths are specialized in the detection of linear accelerations and can be used by the brain as a "plumb line" coding earth gravity acceleration (direction). This property of otolithic system suggested that the sense of verticality is supported by the vestibular system. The preeminence of vestibular involvement in the sense of verticality stated in the 1900s was progressively supplanted by the notion of internal models of verticality. The internal models of verticality involve rules and properties of integration of vestibular graviception, somaesthesic graviception, and vision. The construction of a mental representation of verticality was mainly modeled as a bottom-up organization integrating visual, somatosensory and vestibular information without any cognitive modulations. Recent studies reported that the construction of internal models of verticality is not an automatic multi-sensory integration process but corresponds to more complex mechanisms including top-down influences such as awareness of body orientation or spatial representations. PMID:23856176

  19. Effect of vertical motion on current meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kallio, Nicholas A.

    1966-01-01

    The effect of vertical motion on the performance of current meters at various stream velocities was evaluated to determine whether accurate discharge measurements can be made from a bobbing boat. Three types of current meters--Ott, Price, and vane types--were tested under conditions simulating a bobbing boat. A known frequency and amplitude of vertical motion were imparted to the current meter, and the related effect on the measured stream velocity was determined. One test of the Price meter was made under actual conditions, using a boat and standard measuring gear. The results of the test under actual conditions verified those obtained by simulating the vertical movements of a boat. The tests show that for stream velocities below 2.5 feet per second the accuracy of all three meters is significantly affected when the meters are subjected to certain conditions of vertical motion that can occur during actual field operations. Both the rate of vertical motion and the frequency of vertical oscillation affect the registration of the meter. The results of these tests, presented in the form of graphs and tables, can be used as a guide to determine whether wind and stream flow are within an acceptable range for a reliable discharge measurement from a boat.

  20. Horizontal wires replace the vertical files.

    PubMed

    Colburn, J L

    1997-01-01

    Traditionally, clippings of newspaper articles, pictures from magazines, pamphlets, charts, graphs, posters, proceedings, or copies thereof, and other miscellaneous information sources have been stored in vertical files in libraries. The practice of creating and maintaining vertical files is extremely time consuming. In a medical library, in particular, old information about diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis can quickly become incorrect, misleading, and possibly harmful. Adequately tending to the vertical files can require a librarian to create a balancing act between properly maintaining vertical files and meeting the needs of the users in other areas of the library. The maintenance of vertical files is, by nature, highly consumptive of paper and space consuming. A reasonable alternative to the traditional vertical files is the World-Wide Web. Search engines exist for locating specific information, and bookmarks and/or links which point users to particularly useful sites can be set in search software. Some methods for searching are discussed, and a variety of World-Wide Web information sources are offered. PMID:10173596

  1. Spin squeezing, entanglement and correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirsi, Swarnamala

    2004-11-01

    Spin-s assemblies are classified into two mutually exclusive classes: oriented and non-oriented systems. The density matrix rgr, describing oriented systems, can assume diagonal form in the angular momentum basis \\vert sm \\rangle (m=-s \\cdots {+}s ) defined with respect to the axis of quantization, whereas the eigenstates of rgr for the non-oriented assembly cannot all be identified with \\vert sm \\rangle states. A new scheme for constructing a mixed, non-oriented spin-s state using s(2s+1) spinors all pointing in different directions in space and 2s weights is discussed. Such a construction takes its inspiration from Schwinger's idea of realizing an \\vert sm \\rangle state as being made up of (s+m) 'up' spinors and (s-m) 'down' spinors, all defined with respect to a single axis in space. Since the oriented systems are never squeezed, non-oriented spin-1 assemblies which can be prepared in the laboratory with the available NQR technology are examined for signatures of squeezing using our scheme in a frame of reference where the Heisenberg-Robertson uncertainty relation has the same form as the Schrödinger uncertainty relation. It is shown that unlike in the case of the pure spin-1 state where squeezing is synonymous with non-orientedness, a non-oriented spin-1 system need not be squeezed and the existence of entanglement is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the system to be squeezed.

  2. Spin transport in epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tbd, -

    2014-03-01

    Spintronics is a paradigm focusing on spin as the information vector in fast and ultra-low-power non volatile devices such as the new STT-MRAM. Beyond its widely distributed application in data storage it aims at providing more complex architectures and a powerful beyond CMOS solution for information processing. The recent discovery of graphene has opened novel exciting opportunities in terms of functionalities and performances for spintronics devices. We will present experimental results allowing us to assess the potential of graphene for spintronics. We will show that unprecedented highly efficient spin information transport can occur in epitaxial graphene leading to large spin signals and macroscopic spin diffusion lengths (~ 100 microns), a key enabler for the advent of envisioned beyond-CMOS spin-based logic architectures. We will also show that how the device behavior is well explained within the framework of the Valet-Fert drift-diffusion equations. Furthermore, we will show that a thin graphene passivation layer can prevent the oxidation of a ferromagnet, enabling its use in novel humide/ambient low-cost processes for spintronics devices, while keeping its highly surface sensitive spin current polarizer/analyzer behavior and adding new enhanced spin filtering property. These different experiments unveil promising uses of graphene for spintronics.

  3. Turbulent Flow Past Spinning Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Carlucci, Pasquale; Thangam, Siva

    2009-11-01

    Flow past cylinders aligned along their axis where a base freely spins while attached to a non-spinning forebody is considered from a computational and experimental point of view. The time-averaged equations of motion and energy are solved using the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation with an efficient finite-volume algorithm. An anisotropic two-equation Reynolds-stress model that incorporates the effect of rotation-modified energy spectrum and swirl is used to perform computations for the flow past axially rotating cylinders. Both rigid cylinders as well as that of cylinders with free-spinning base are considered from a computational point of view. A subsonic wind tunnel with a forward-sting mounted spinning cylinder is used for experiments. Experiments are performed for a range of spin rates and free stream flow conditions. The experimental results of Carlucci & Thangam (2001) are used to benchmark flow over spinning cylinders. The data is extended to munitions spinning in the wake of other munitions. Applications involving the design of projectiles are discussed.

  4. Relativistic Definition of Spin Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Lewis H.

    2002-12-01

    Some years ago Mashhoon [1] made the highly interesting suggestion that there existed a coupling of spin with rotations, just as there exists such a coupling with orbital angular momentum, as seen in the Sagnac effect, for example. Spin being essentially a quantum phenomenon, the obvious place to look for this was by studying the Dirac equation, and Hehl and Ni, in such an investigation [2], indeed found a coupling term of just the type Mashhoon had envisaged. Part of their procedure, however, was to take the nonrelativistic limit, and this was done by performing appropriate Foldy-Wouthuysen (FW) transformations. In the nonrelativistic limit, it is well-known that the spin operators for Dirac particles are in essence the Pauli matrices; but it is also well-known, and indeed was part of the motivation for Foldy and Wouthuysen's paper, that for fully-fledged Dirac particles the (4×4 generalisation of the) Pauli matrices do not yield satisfactory spin operators, since spin defined in this way would not be conserved. The question therefore presented itself: is there a relativistic spin operator for Dirac particles, such that in the relativistic, as well as the nonrelativistic, régime a Mashhoon spin-rotation coupling exists?...

  5. Radiation-spin interaction, Gilbert damping, and spin torque.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jeongwon; Khanna, F C; Choi, B C

    2004-03-01

    Magnetization relaxation processes, which are represented by the Gilbert damping term and the spin torque term in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, are described by the radiation-spin interaction (RSI), where the radiation field is produced by magnetization precessional motion itself. It is shown that the LLG equation including the Gilbert damping term and the spin torque term is derived from the spin Hamiltonian containing the RSI. The derivation of the LLG equation is given in a self-consistent method. It is also shown that, according to RSI, the magnitude of the magnetization vector deviates from the magnetization saturation with the order of O(alpha(2)), where alpha is the Gilbert damping parameter. PMID:15089513

  6. Spin waves in a spin-1 normal Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Natu, Stefan S.; Mueller, Erich J.

    2010-05-15

    We present a theory of spin waves in a noncondensed gas of spin-1 bosons and provide both analytic calculations of the linear theory and full numerical simulations of the nonlinear response. We highlight the role of spin-dependent contact interactions in the dynamics of a thermal gas. Although these interactions are small compared to the thermal energy, they set the scale for low-energy, long-wavelength spin waves. In particular, we find that the polar state of {sup 87}Rb is unstable to collisional mixing of magnetic sublevels even in the normal state. We augment our analytic calculations by providing full numerical simulations of a trapped gas, explicitly demonstrating this instability. Further, we show that for strong antiferromagnetic interactions, the polar gas is unstable. Finally, we explore coherent population dynamics in a collisionless transversely polarized gas.

  7. Enhanced Atomic-Scale Spin Contrast due to Spin Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouazi, S.; Kubetzka, A.; von Bergmann, K.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2014-02-01

    Atom manipulation with the magnetic tip of a scanning tunneling microscope is a versatile technique to construct and investigate well-defined atomic spin arrangements. Here we explore the possibility of using a magnetic adatom as a local probe to image surface spin textures. As a model system we choose a Néel state with 120° between neighboring magnetic moments. Close to the threshold of manipulation, the adatom resides in the threefold, magnetically frustrated hollow sites, and consequently no magnetic signal is detected in manipulation images. At smaller tip-adatom distances, however, the adatom is moved towards the magnetically active bridge sites and due to the exchange force of the tip the manipulation process becomes spin dependent. In this way the adatom can be used as an amplifying probe for the surface spin texture.

  8. Spin precession in anisotropic cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu.; Teryaev, O. V.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the precession of a Dirac particle spin in some anisotropic Bianchi universes. This effect is present already in the Bianchi-I universe. We discuss in some detail the geodesics and the spin precession for both the Kasner and the Heckmann-Schucking solutions. In the Bianchi-IX universe the spin precession acquires the chaotic character due to the stochasticity of the oscillatory approach to the cosmological singularity. The related helicity flip of fermions in the very early universe may produce the sterile particles contributing to dark matter.

  9. Spinning fluids in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, J. R.; Smalley, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    General relativity field equations are employed to examine a continuous medium with internal spin. A variational principle formerly applied in the special relativity case is extended to the general relativity case, using a tetrad to express the spin density and the four-velocity of the fluid. An energy-momentum tensor is subsequently defined for a spinning fluid. The equations of motion of the fluid are suggested to be useful in analytical studies of galaxies, for anisotropic Bianchi universes, and for turbulent eddies.

  10. Spin-manipulating polarized deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, V S; Krisch, A D; Leonova, M A; Raymond, R S; Sivers, D W; Wong, V K; Hinterberger, F; Kondratenko, A M; Stephenson, E J

    2011-03-01

    Spin dynamics of polarized deuteron beams near depolarization resonances, including a new polarization preservation concept based on specially-designed multiple resonance crossings, has been tested in a series of experiments in the COSY synchrotron. Intricate spin dynamics with sophisticated pre-programmed patterns as well as effects of multiple crossings of a resonance were studied both theoretically and experimentally with excellent agreement. Possible applications of these results to preserve, manipulate and spin-flip polarized beams in synchrotrons and storage rings are discussed.

  11. Pairing Correlations at High Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yan; Fan, Ping; Yuan, Da-Qing; Zhu, Shen-Yun; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Petrache, C. M.; Ragnarsson, I.; Carlsson, B. G.

    The pairing correcting energies at high spins in 161Lu and 138Nd are studied by comparing the results of the cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky (CNS) and cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky-Bogoliubov (CNSB) models. It is concluded that the Coriolis effect rather than the rotational alignment effect plays a major role in the reduction of the pairing correlations in the high spin region. Then we proposed an average pairing correction method which not only better reproduces the experimental data comparing with the CNS model but also enables a clean-cut tracing of the configurations thus the full-spin-range discussion on the various rotating bands.

  12. A cryostat to hold frozen-spin polarized HD targets in CLAS: HDice-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, M. M.; Bass, C. D.; D`Angelo, A.; Deur, A.; Dezern, G.; Hanretty, C.; Ho, D.; Kageya, T.; Kashy, D.; Khandaker, M.; Laine, V.; O`Connell, T.; Pastor, O.; Peng, P.; Sandorfi, A. M.; Sokhan, D.; Wei, X.; Zarecky, M.

    2016-04-01

    The design, fabrication, operation, and performance of a 3/4He dilution refrigerator and superconducting magnet system for holding a frozen-spin polarized hydrogen deuteride target in the Jefferson Laboratory CLAS detector during photon beam running is reported. The device operates both vertically (for target loading) and horizontally (for target bombardment). The device proves capable of maintaining a base temperature of 50 mK and a holding field of 1 T for extended periods. These characteristics enabled multi-month polarization lifetimes for frozen spin HD targets having proton polarization of up to 50% and deuteron up to 27%.

  13. Novel Vertical Interconnects With 180 Degree Phase Shift for Amplifiers, Filters, and Integrated Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goverdhanam, Kavita; Simons, Rainee N.; Katehi, Linda P. B.; Burke, Thomas P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, novel low loss, wide-band coplanar stripline technology for RF/microwave integrated circuits is demonstrated on high resistivity silicon wafer. In particular, the fabrication process for the deposition of spin-on-glass (SOG) as a dielectric layer, the etching of microvias for the vertical interconnects, the design methodology for the multiport circuits and their measured/simulated characteristics are graphically illustrated. The study shows that circuits with very low loss, large bandwidth and compact size are feasible using this technology. This multilayer planar technology has potential to significantly enhance RF/microwave IC performance when combined with semiconductor devices and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

  14. Vector cavity solitons in broad area Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers.

    PubMed

    Averlant, Etienne; Tlidi, Mustapha; Thienpont, Hugo; Ackemann, Thorsten; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental observation of two-dimensional vector cavity solitons in a Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL) under linearly polarized optical injection when varying optical injection linear polarization direction. The polarization of the cavity soliton is not the one of the optical injection as it acquires a distinct ellipticity. These experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by the spin-flip VCSEL model. Our findings open the road to polarization multiplexing when using cavity solitons in broad-area lasers as pixels in information technology. PMID:26847004

  15. Vector cavity solitons in broad area Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Averlant, Etienne; Tlidi, Mustapha; Thienpont, Hugo; Ackemann, Thorsten; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental observation of two-dimensional vector cavity solitons in a Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL) under linearly polarized optical injection when varying optical injection linear polarization direction. The polarization of the cavity soliton is not the one of the optical injection as it acquires a distinct ellipticity. These experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by the spin-flip VCSEL model. Our findings open the road to polarization multiplexing when using cavity solitons in broad-area lasers as pixels in information technology. PMID:26847004

  16. Forced vibration analysis of rotating structures with application to vertical axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobitz, D. W.

    Predictive methods for the dynamic analysis of wind turbine systems are important for assessing overall structural integrity and fatigue life. For the former, the identification of resonance points (spectral analysis) is of primary concern. For the latter forced vibration analysis is necessary. These analyses are complicated by the fact that, for a spinning turbine, the stress-producing deformations take place in both fixed and rotating reference systems simultaneously. As an example, the tower of a horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) must be analyzed in a fixed frame, and the rotor in a rotating one. Forced vibration analysis is further complicated in that accurate models need to be developed for aeroload prediction. Methods which are available for forced vibration analysis of both horizontal and vertical axis machines are identified and the method which was developed for vertical axis wind turbines is emphasized, with some comparisons of the predictions to experimental data.

  17. Spin filter for arbitrary spins by substrate engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Biplab; Römer, Rudolf A.; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2016-08-01

    We design spin filters for particles with potentially arbitrary spin S≤ft(=1/2,1,3/2,\\ldots \\right) using a one-dimensional periodic chain of magnetic atoms as a quantum device. Describing the system within a tight-binding formalism we present an analytical method to unravel the analogy between a one-dimensional magnetic chain and a multi-strand ladder network. This analogy is crucial, and is subsequently exploited to engineer gaps in the energy spectrum by an appropriate choice of the magnetic substrate. We obtain an exact correlation between the magnitude of the spin of the incoming beam of particles and the magnetic moment of the substrate atoms in the chain desired for opening up of a spectral gap. Results of spin polarized transport, calculated within a transfer matrix formalism, are presented for particles having half-integer as well as higher spin states. We find that the chain can be made to act as a quantum device which opens a transmission window only for selected spin components over certain ranges of the Fermi energy, blocking them in the remaining part of the spectrum. The results appear to be robust even when the choice of the substrate atoms deviates substantially from the ideal situation, as verified by extending the ideas to the case of a ‘spin spiral’. Interestingly, the spin spiral geometry, apart from exhibiting the filtering effect, is also seen to act as a device flipping spins—an effect that can be monitored by an interplay of the system size and the period of the spiral. Our scheme is applicable to ultracold quantum gases, and might inspire future experiments in this direction.

  18. SPIN-UP/SPIN-DOWN MODELS FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano, R. Di; Voss, R.

    2011-09-01

    In the single-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a white dwarf (WD) must gain a significant amount of matter from a companion star. Because the accreted mass carries angular momentum, the WD is likely to achieve fast spin periods, which can increase the critical mass, M{sub crit}, needed for explosion. When M{sub crit} is higher than the maximum mass achieved by the WD, the central regions of the WD must spin down before it can explode. This introduces super-Chandrasekhar single-degenerate explosions, and a delay between the completion of mass gain and the time of the explosion. Matter ejected from the binary during mass transfer therefore has a chance to become diffuse, and the explosion occurs in a medium with a density similar to that of typical regions of the interstellar medium. Also, either by the end of the WD's mass increase or else by the time of explosion, the donor may exhaust its stellar envelope and become a WD. This alters, generally diminishing, explosion signatures related to the donor star. Nevertheless, the spin-up/spin-down model is highly predictive. Prior to explosion, progenitors can be super-M{sub Ch} WDs in either wide binaries with WD companions or cataclysmic variables. These systems can be discovered and studied through wide-field surveys. Post-explosion, the spin-up/spin-down model predicts a population of fast-moving WDs, low-mass stars, and even brown dwarfs. In addition, the spin-up/spin-down model provides a paradigm which may be able to explain both the similarities and the diversity observed among SNe Ia.

  19. Spin-transfer-torque-assisted magnetization reversal in spin-valve strips using the spin-pumping effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Mao; Nozaki, Yukio

    2016-06-01

    The modulation of a switching field by a spin-transfer torque generated by the spin-pumping effect is demonstrated in spin-valve strips. A spin current pumped into a spin valve prefers an antiparallel configuration of magnetization, so that the hysteresis loop of a soft magnetic layer is shifted by applying an alternating-current magnetic field with a frequency that matched the resonant condition of a hard magnetic layer. Furthermore, we confirmed that an alternating spin current generated by the spin pumping in the hard magnetic layer produces an orthogonal magnetic torque that can reduce the coercive field of the soft magnetic layer.

  20. Novel spin-on metal hardmask materials for filling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dioses, Alberto D.; Chada, Venkata; Wolfer, Elizabeth; Ng, Edward; Mullen, Salem; Yao, Huirong; Cho, JoonYeon; Padmanaban, Munirathna

    2014-03-01

    Hardmasks are indispensable materials during pattern transfer to the desired substrates in the semiconductor manufacturing process. Primarily there are two types of hardmask materials - organic and inorganic - and they can be coated onto substrates or underlying materials either by a simple spin-on process or by more expensive methods such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD), atomic layer deposition (ALD) and sputtering process. Most inorganic hardmasks such as SiO2, SiON, SiN and TiN are deposited using the CVD process. Future nodes require hardmasks with high etch resistance as the designs move from horizontal to vertical (3D). We have reported novel spin-on metallic hardmasks (MHM) with comparable or higher etch resistance than SiO2.1-2 In addition to high etch resistance, they are easy to remove using wet etch chemicals. The spin-on process offers high throughput and commonly used spin tracks can be utilized; thereby reducing overall process costs when compared with CVD. Via-fill performance is also an important attribute of hardmask materials for these future nodes. Organic spin-on materials, both siloxane- and carbon-based, are used in filling applications of deep via or deep trench fill, such as those found in LELE double-patterning schemes. Inorganic materials deposited by either chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or atomic layer deposition (ALD) have higher resistance to oxygenated plasma than organic materials, but are hindered by their poor filling performance. Therefore, novel tungsten (W) containing MHM materials having both good filling performance and higher resistance to oxygenated plasma than organic materials would be of value in some filling applications. The present paper describes specific metal oxides useful for filling applications. In addition to basic filling performance and etch resistance, other properties such as optical properties, outgas and shelf life via forced aging etc. will be discussed.