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Sample records for 20-mer peptide suppresses

  1. Induction of CD8 T-cell responses restricted to multiple HLA class I alleles in a cancer patient by immunization with a 20-mer NY-ESO-1f (NY-ESO-1 91-110) peptide.

    PubMed

    Eikawa, Shingo; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Isobe, Midori; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Luescher, Immanuel; Ohue, Yoshihiro; Ikeuchi, Kazuhiro; Uenaka, Akiko; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Udono, Heiichiro; Oka, Mikio; Nakayama, Eiichi

    2013-01-15

    Immunogenicity of a long 20-mer NY-ESO-1f peptide vaccine was evaluated in a lung cancer patient TK-f01, immunized with the peptide with Picibanil OK-432 and Montanide ISA-51. We showed that internalization of the peptide was necessary to present CD8 T-cell epitopes on APC, contrasting with the direct presentation of the short epitope. CD8 T-cell responses restricted to all five HLA class I alleles were induced in the patient after the peptide vaccination. Clonal analysis showed that B*35:01 and B*52:01-restricted CD8 T-cell responses were the two dominant responses. The minimal epitopes recognized by A*24:02, B*35:01, B*52:01 and C*12:02-restricted CD8 T-cell clones were defined and peptide/HLA tetramers were produced. NY-ESO-1 91-101 on A*24:02, NY-ESO-1 92-102 on B*35:01, NY-ESO-1 96-104 on B*52:01 and NY-ESO-1 96-104 on C*12:02 were new epitopes first defined in this study. Identification of the A*24:02 epitope is highly relevant for studying the Japanese population because of its high expression frequency (60%). High affinity CD8 T-cells recognizing tumor cells naturally expressing the epitopes and matched HLA were induced at a significant level. The findings suggest the usefulness of a long 20-mer NY-ESO-1f peptide harboring multiple CD8 T-cell epitopes as an NY-ESO-1 vaccine. Characterization of CD8 T-cell responses in immunomonitoring using peptide/HLA tetramers revealed that multiple CD8 T-cell responses comprised the dominant response. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  2. Suppressing the epimerization of endothioamide peptides during Fmoc/t-Bu-based solid phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Somnath; Chatterjee, Jayanta

    2016-11-01

    Despite a number of intriguing utilities associated with thioamide-containing peptides and proteins in the context of biophysics, pharmacology and chemical biology, it has hitherto remained as one of the underexplored territories of peptidomimetics. The synthesis of long mono to multiply substituted endothioamide peptides is invariably accompanied with severe epimerization, oxoamide formation and various other undesired side reactions, resulting in messy product profiles. This has completely restrained their use as novel chemical tools for biological studies. During the chain elongation of an N-terminally located thioamide peptide using the Fmoc/t-Bu chemistry, it becomes vulnerable to the repetitive basic treatments as required for such chemistry. The incompatibility of thioamide moiety with bases as well as strong coupling reagents leads to epimerization as well as other side reactions due to its nucleophilicity, resulting in the loss of the stereochemical identity of the thioamidated amino acid residue. An easy-to-implement and efficient protocol to synthesize long (>10-mer) endothioamide peptides, significantly suppressing epimerization and other side reactions using 10% piperidine/dimethylformamide for 1 min, is reported herein. The novelty of the protocol is shown through the efficient synthesis of a number of 10-12-mer mono to multiply thioamide-substituted peptides with broad substrate scopes. The utility of the protocol in the context of protein engineering and chemical protein synthesis is also shown through the synthesis of a thioamide version of the 16-mer peptide from the B1 domain of protein G. Such a protocol to synthesize long endothioamide peptides would open up avenues toward engineering and accessing novel thiopeptide and thioprotein-based chemical tools, the synthesis of which had been a serious hurdle thus far. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley

  3. SOCS1 Mimetic Peptide Suppresses Chronic Intraocular Inflammatory Disease (Uveitis)

    PubMed Central

    He, Chang; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Mattapallil, Mary J.; Sun, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Uveitis is a potentially sight-threatening disease characterized by repeated cycles of remission and recurrent inflammation. The JAK/STAT pathway regulates the differentiation of pathogenic Th1 and Th17 cells that mediate uveitis. A SOCS1 mimetic peptide (SOCS1-KIR) that inhibits JAK2/STAT1 pathways has recently been shown to suppress experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). However, it is not clear whether SOCS1-KIR ameliorated uveitis by targeting JAK/STAT pathways of pathogenic lymphocytes or via inhibition of macrophages and antigen-presenting cells that also enter the retina during EAU. To further investigate mechanisms that mediate SOCS1-KIR effects and evaluate the efficacy of SOCS1-KIR as an investigational drug for chronic uveitis, we induced EAU in rats by adoptive transfer of uveitogenic T-cells and monitored disease progression and severity by slit-lamp microscopy, histology, and optical coherence tomography. Topical administration of SOCS1-KIR ameliorated acute and chronic posterior uveitis by inhibiting Th17 cells and the recruitment of inflammatory cells into retina while promoting expansion of IL-10-producing Tregs. We further show that SOCS1-KIR conferred protection of resident retinal cells that play critical role in vision from cytotoxic effects of inflammatory cytokines by downregulating proapoptotic genes. Thus, SOCS1-KIR suppresses uveitis and confers neuroprotective effects and might be exploited as a noninvasive treatment for chronic uveitis. PMID:27703302

  4. Suppression of tumor growth by novel peptides homing to tumor-derived new blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Asai, Tomohiro; Nagatsuka, Mayumi; Kuromi, Koichi; Yamakawa, Satoru; Kurohane, Kohta; Ogino, Koichi; Tanaka, Michinori; Taki, Takao; Oku, Naoto

    2002-01-16

    Novel peptides homing to angiogenic vessels were recently isolated from a phage-displayed random pentadecapeptide library. One of the isolated peptides, ASSSYPLIHWRPWAR, significantly suppressed the migration of VEGF-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Dendoric ASSSYPLIHWRPWAR-peptide suppressed the formation of new blood vessels in dorsal air sac model mice. Furthermore, ASSSYPLIHWRPWAR-peptide and the fragment peptides containing WRP, which is revealed to be an epitope sequence, significantly suppressed the tumor growth, although 15-mer shuffled peptide derived from ASSSYPLIHWRPWAR and pentapeptides with alanine substitution of each residue of WRP did not. Taken together, ASSSYPLIHWRPWAR-peptide may cause tumor dormancy through inhibition of angiogenesis, and the WRP sequence may be the minimal and essential sequence for this activity.

  5. Umami-bitter interactions: the suppression of bitterness by umami peptides via human bitter taste receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Son, Hee Jin; Kim, Yiseul; Misaka, Takumi; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2015-01-09

    Taste-taste interactions often showed in human psychophysical studies. Considering that each tastant in foodstuffs individually stimulates its responsible gustatory systems to elicit relevant taste modalities, taste-taste interaction should be performed in taste receptor cell-based assay. While umami substances have been proposed to suppress the bitterness of various chemicals in human sensory evaluation, the bitter-umami interaction has not been explored in bitter taste receptors, TAS2Rs. We investigated umami-bitter taste interactions by presenting umami peptides with bitter substance (salicin) on Ca(2+)-flux signaling assay using hTAS2R16-expressing cells. Five representative umami peptides (Glu-Asp, Glu-Glu, Glu-Ser, Asp-Glu-Ser, and Glu-Gly-Ser) derived from soybean markedly attenuated the salicin-induced intracellular calcium influx in a time-dependent manner, respectively, while Gly-Gly, a tasteless peptide did not. The efficacies of Glu-Glu suppressing salicin-induced activation of hTAS2R16 were higher than that of probenecid, a specific antagonist of hTAS2R16. According to Ca(2+)-flux signaling assay using the mixtures of salicin and umami peptides, all five umami peptides suppressed salicin-induced intracellular calcium influx in a noncompetitive manner. These results may provide evidence that umami peptides suppress bitter taste via bitter taste receptor(s). This is the first report which defines the interaction between bitter and umami taste in taste receptor level.

  6. Capsaicin treatment differentially affects feeding suppression by bombesin-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Ladenheim, Ellen E; Knipp, Susan

    2007-05-16

    Peripheral administration of bombesin (BN) and the related mammalian peptides, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and neuromedin B (NMB), suppress food intake in rats. To examine whether all BN-like peptides utilize the same neural pathways to reduce feeding, rats were treated on postnatal day 2 with the injection vehicle or capsaicin, a neurotoxin that damages a subset of visceral afferent fibers. When rats reached adulthood, we compared the ability of a dose range of systemically administered BN, GRP18-27 and NMB to reduce intake of a 0.5 kcal/ml glucose solution in a short-term feeding test. Our results demonstrate that capsaicin treatment abolished or attenuated the suppression of glucose intake produced by BN and NMB but had no effect on the ability of GRP to reduce feeding. These results suggest that different neural substrates underlie the anorexic effects of peripherally administered BN-like peptides.

  7. Intracerebroventricular administration of chicken glucagon-like peptide-2 potently suppresses food intake in chicks.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kazuhisa; Saneyasu, Takaoki; Shimatani, Tomohiko; Aoki, Koji; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Nakanishi, Kiwako; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-related peptides, such as glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1, GLP-2 and oxyntomodulin (OXM), are processed from an identical precursor proglucagon. In mammals, all of these peptides are suggested to be involved in the central regulation of food intake. We previously showed that intracerebroventricular administration of chicken OXM and GLP-1 significantly suppressed food intake in chicks. Here, we show that central administration of chicken GLP-2 potently suppresses food intake in chicks. Male 8-day-old chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) were used in all experiments. Intracerebroventricular administration of chicken GLP-2 significantly suppressed food intake in chicks. Plasma glucose concentration was significantly decreased by chicken GLP-2, whereas plasma nonesterified fatty acid concentration was significantly increased. Intracerebroventricular administration of chicken GLP-2 did not affect plasma corticosterone concentration. In addition, the anorexigenic effect of GLP-2 was not reversed by the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonist α-helical CRF, suggesting that CRF is not a downstream mediator of the anorexigenic pathway of GLP-2 in chicks. Intracerebroventricular administration of an equimolar amount of GLP-1 and GLP-2, but not OXM, significantly suppressed food intake in both broiler and layer chicks. All our findings suggest that GLP-2 functions as a potent anorexigenic peptide in the brain, as well as GLP-1, in chicks.

  8. Bovine and human cathelicidin cationic host defense peptides similarly suppress transcriptional responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Mookherjee, Neeloffer; Wilson, Heather L; Doria, Silvana; Popowych, Yurij; Falsafi, Reza; Yu, Jie Jessie; Li, Yuexin; Veatch, Sarah; Roche, Fiona M; Brown, Kelly L; Brinkman, Fiona S L; Hokamp, Karsten; Potter, Andy; Babiuk, Lorne A; Griebel, Philip J; Hancock, Robert E W

    2006-12-01

    Genomic approaches can be exploited to expose the complexities and conservation of biological systems such as the immune network across various mammalian species. In this study, temporal transcriptional expression profiles were analyzed in human and bovine monocytic cells in response to the TLR-4 agonist, LPS, in the presence or absence of their respective host defense peptides. The cathelicidin peptides, human LL-37 and bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide-27 (BMAP-27), are homologs, yet they have diverged notably in terms of sequence similarity. In spite of their low sequence similarities, both of these cathelicidin peptides demonstrated potent, antiendotoxin activity in monocytic cells at low, physiologically relevant concentrations. Microarray studies indicated that 10 ng/ml LPS led to the up-regulation of 125 genes in human monocytes, 106 of which were suppressed in the presence of 5 mug/ml of the human peptide LL-37. To confirm and extend these data, temporal transcriptional responses to LPS were assessed in the presence or absence of the species-specific host defense peptides by quantitative real-time PCR. The transcriptional trends of 20 LPS-induced genes were analyzed in bovine and human monocytic cells. These studies demonstrated conserved trends of gene responses in that both peptides were able to profoundly suppress many LPS-induced genes. Consistent with this, the human and bovine peptides suppressed LPS-induced translocation of NF-kappaB subunits p50 and p65 into the nucleus of monocytic cells. However, there were also distinct differences in responses to LPS and the peptides; for example, treatment with 5 mug/ml BMAP-27 alone tended to influence gene expression (RELA, TNF-alpha-induced protein 2, MAPK phosphatase 1/dual specificity phosphatase 1, IkappaBkappaB, NFkappaBIL1, TNF receptor-associated factor 2) to a greater extent than did the same amount of human LL-37. We hypothesize that the immunomodulatory effects of the species-specific host

  9. A novel BK channel-targeted peptide suppresses sound evoked activity in the mouse inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Scott, L. L.; Brecht, E. J.; Philpo, A.; Iyer, S.; Wu, N. S.; Mihic, S. J.; Aldrich, R. W.; Pierce, J.; Walton, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated (BK) channels are broadly expressed in neurons and muscle where they modulate cellular activity. Decades of research support an interest in pharmaceutical applications for modulating BK channel function. Here we report a novel BK channel-targeted peptide with functional activity in vitro and in vivo. This 9-amino acid peptide, LS3, has a unique action, suppressing channel gating rather than blocking the pore of heterologously expressed human BK channels. With an IC50 in the high picomolar range, the apparent affinity is higher than known high affinity BK channel toxins. LS3 suppresses locomotor activity via a BK channel-specific mechanism in wild-type or BK channel-humanized Caenorhabditis elegans. Topical application on the dural surface of the auditory midbrain in mouse suppresses sound evoked neural activity, similar to a well-characterized pore blocker of the BK channel. Moreover, this novel ion channel-targeted peptide rapidly crosses the BBB after systemic delivery to modulate auditory processing. Thus, a potent BK channel peptide modulator is open to neurological applications, such as preventing audiogenic seizures that originate in the auditory midbrain. PMID:28195225

  10. Targeting the WASF3-CYFIP1 Complex Using Stapled Peptides Suppresses Cancer Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yong; Bahassan, Abdulaziz; Dong, Dayong; Hanold, Laura E; Ren, Xiaoou; Kennedy, Eileen J; Cowell, John K

    2016-02-15

    Activation of the WASF3 protein by extracellular stimuli promotes actin cytoskeleton reorganization and facilitates cancer cell invasion, whereas WASF3 depletion suppresses invasion and metastasis. In quiescent cells, the interaction between WASF3 and a complex of proteins, including CYFIP1, acts as a conformational restraint to prevent WASF3 activation. Therefore, we took advantage of this endogenous regulatory mechanism to investigate potential sites that disrupt WASF3 function. Here, we show that genetic knockdown of CYFIP1 in cancer cells led to the destabilization of the WASF3 complex, loss of WASF3 function, and suppressed invasion. Based on existing crystallographic data, we developed stapled peptides, referred to as WASF Helix Mimics (WAHM), that target an α-helical interface between WASF3 and CYFIP1. Treatment of highly invasive breast and prostate cancer cells with WAHM inhibitor peptides significantly reduced motility and invasion in vitro. Mechanistic investigations revealed that these inhibitors suppressed the interaction between Rac and the WASF3 complex, which has been shown to promote cell migration. Furthermore, peptide-mediated inhibition of WASF3 also resulted in the dysregulation of known downstream targets such as MMP-9 and KISS1. Finally, we demonstrate that this invasive phenotype is specific to WASF3 as depletion of WASF1 and WASF2, which can also bind to CYFIP1, did not affect invasion. Collectively, our findings suggest that targeting WASF3 function with WAHM peptides could represent a promising therapeutic strategy for preventing tumor invasion and metastasis.

  11. Targeting the WASF3-CYFIP1 complex using stapled peptides suppresses cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yong; Bahassan, Abdulaziz; Dong, Dayong; Hanold, Laura E; Ren, Xiaoou; Kennedy, Eileen J; Cowell, John K

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the WASF3 protein by extracellular stimuli promotes actin cytoskeleton reorganization and facilitates cancer cell invasion, whereas WASF3 depletion suppresses invasion and metastasis. In quiescent cells, the interaction between WASF3 and a complex of proteins including CYFIP1 acts as a conformational restraint to prevent WASF3 activation. Therefore, we took advantage of this endogenous regulatory mechanism to investigate potential sites that disrupt WASF3 function. Here, we show that genetic knockdown of CYFIP1 in cancer cells led to the destabilization of the WASF3 complex, loss of WASF3 function, and suppressed invasion. Based on existing crystallographic data, we developed stapled peptides, referred to as WASF Helix Mimics (WAHM), that target an α-helical interface between WASF3 and CYFIP1. Treatment of highly invasive breast and prostate cancer cells with WAHM inhibitor peptides significantly reduced motility and invasion in vitro. Mechanistic investigations revealed that these inhibitors suppressed the interaction between Rac and the WASF3 complex, which has been shown to promote cell migration. Furthermore, peptide-mediated inhibition of WASF3 also resulted in the dysregulation of known downstream targets such as MMP-9 and KISS1. Finally, we demonstrate that this invasive phenotype is specific to WASF3 as depletion of WASF1 and WASF2, which can also bind to CYFIP1, did not affect invasion. Collectively, our findings suggest that targeting WASF3 function with WAHM peptides could represent a promising therapeutic strategy for preventing tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:26676744

  12. Honokiol suppresses formyl peptide-induced human neutrophil activation by blocking formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Chao; Yu, Huang-Ping; Syu, Yu-Ting; Fang, Jia-You; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Shih-Hsin; Lee, Yen-Tung; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2017-07-27

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) mediates bacterial and mitochondrial N-formyl peptides-induced neutrophil activation. Therefore, FPR1 is an important therapeutic target for drugs to treat septic or sterile inflammatory diseases. Honokiol, a major bioactive compound of Magnoliaceae plants, possesses several anti-inflammatory activities. Here, we show that honokiol exhibits an inhibitory effect on FPR1 binding in human neutrophils. Honokiol inhibited superoxide anion generation, reactive oxygen species formation, and elastase release in bacterial or mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (FPR1 agonists)-activated human neutrophils. Adhesion of FPR1-induced human neutrophils to cerebral endothelial cells was also reduced by honokiol. The receptor-binding results revealed that honokiol repressed FPR1-specific ligand N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein binding to FPR1 in human neutrophils, neutrophil-like THP-1 cells, and hFPR1-transfected HEK293 cells. However, honokiol did not inhibit FPR2-specific ligand binding to FPR2 in human neutrophils. Furthermore, honokiol inhibited FPR1 agonist-induced calcium mobilization as well as phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, and JNK in human neutrophils. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that honokiol may have therapeutic potential for treating FPR1-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  13. PEDF-derived peptide inhibits corneal angiogenesis by suppressing VEGF expression.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takanori; Nishino, Yuri; Maeda, Sayaka; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2012-07-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) a glycoprotein that belongs to the superfamily of serine protease inhibitors, has been recently shown to be the most potent inhibitor of angiogenesis in the mammalian eye. However, which active domain of PEDF protein could be involved in its anti-angiogenic properties remains unknown. Therefore, in this study, we examined which PEDF-derived synthetic peptides could inhibit corneal neovascularization induced by chemical cauterization in vivo. Rats treated with topical application of PEDF protein had 31% less corneal neovascularization at day 7 after the injury than phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated rats. P5-2 and P5-3 peptides (residues 388-393 and 394-400 of PEDF protein, respectively) significantly suppressed the corneal neovascularization after chemical cauterization at day 7, and its anti-angiogenic potential was almost equal to that of full-length PEDF protein. Further, full-length PEDF protein and P5-3 peptide significantly decreased 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in the corneal. Our present study suggests that PEDF-derived synthetic peptide, P5-3 could inhibit the corneal neovascularization induced by chemical cauterization in rats by suppressing VEGF expression via its anti-oxidative properties.

  14. Suppression of a Natural Killer Cell Response by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Peptides.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Jamie L; Ries, Moritz; Guha, Natasha; Connole, Michelle; Colantonio, Arnaud D; Wiertz, Emmanuel J; Wilson, Nancy A; Kaur, Amitinder; Evans, David T

    2015-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell responses in primates are regulated in part through interactions between two highly polymorphic molecules, the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) on NK cells and their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I ligands on target cells. We previously reported that the binding of a common MHC class I molecule in the rhesus macaque, Mamu-A1*002, to the inhibitory receptor Mamu-KIR3DL05 is stabilized by certain simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) peptides, but not by others. Here we investigated the functional implications of these interactions by testing SIV peptides bound by Mamu-A1*002 for the ability to modulate Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cell responses. Twenty-eight of 75 SIV peptides bound by Mamu-A1*002 suppressed the cytolytic activity of primary Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cells, including three immunodominant CD8+ T cell epitopes previously shown to stabilize Mamu-A1*002 tetramer binding to Mamu-KIR3DL05. Substitutions at C-terminal positions changed inhibitory peptides into disinhibitory peptides, and vice versa, without altering binding to Mamu-A1*002. The functional effects of these peptide variants on NK cell responses also corresponded to their effects on Mamu-A1*002 tetramer binding to Mamu-KIR3DL05. In assays with mixtures of inhibitory and disinhibitory peptides, low concentrations of inhibitory peptides dominated to suppress NK cell responses. Consistent with the inhibition of Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cells by viral epitopes presented by Mamu-A1*002, SIV replication was significantly higher in Mamu-A1*002+ CD4+ lymphocytes co-cultured with Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cells than with Mamu-KIR3DL05- NK cells. These results demonstrate that viral peptides can differentially affect NK cell responses by modulating MHC class I interactions with inhibitory KIRs, and provide a mechanism by which immunodeficiency viruses may evade NK cell responses.

  15. Opioid peptides derived from food proteins suppress aggregation and promote reactivation of partly unfolded stressed proteins.

    PubMed

    Artemova, N V; Bumagina, Z M; Kasakov, A S; Shubin, V V; Gurvits, B Ya

    2010-02-01

    A new view of the opioid peptides is presented. The potential of small peptides derived from precursor food proteins, to bind to partly unfolded stressed proteins to prevent their irreversible aggregation and inactivation has been demonstrated in various in vitro test systems: dithiothreitol-induced aggregation of alpha-lactalbumin (LA), heat-induced aggregation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and aggregation and inactivation of bovine erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the process of its refolding after removal of stress conditions. Using dynamic light scattering (DLS), turbidimetry, fluorescence, and circular dichroism measurements protective effects of the synthetic opioid peptides: exorphin C from wheat gluten (Tyr-Pro-Ile-Ser-Leu), rubiscolin-5 from spinach ribulose-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) (Tyr-Pro-Leu-Asp-Leu), and hemorphin-6 from bovine hemoglobin (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Thr-Gln-Arg) have been revealed. We have demonstrated the concentration-dependent suppression of light scattering intensity of aggregates of LA and ADH in the presence of the peptides, the population of nanoparticles with higher hydrodynamic radii being shifted to the lower ones, accompanied by an increase in the lag period of aggregation. The presence of the peptides in the refolding solution was shown to assist reactivation of CA and enhance the yield of the CA soluble protein. The results suggest that bioactive food protein fragments may be regarded as exogenous supplements to the endogenous defense mechanisms of the human organism under stress conditions.

  16. Specific anti-integrase abzymes from HIV-infected patients: a comparison of the cleavage sites of intact globular HIV integrase and two 20-mer oligopeptides corresponding to its antigenic determinants.

    PubMed

    Odintsova, Elena S; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2013-03-01

    HIV-infected patients possess anti-integrase (IN) IgGs and IgMs that, after isolation by chromatography on IN-Sepharose, unlike canonical proteases, specifically hydrolyze only IN but not many other tested proteins. Hydrolysis of intact globular IN first leads to formation of many long fragments of protein, while its long incubation with anti-IN antibodies, especially in the case of abzymes (Abzs) with a high proteolytic activity, results in the formation of short and very short oligopeptides (OPs). To identify all sites of IgG-mediated proteolysis corresponding to known AGDs of integrase, we have used a combination of reverse-phase chromatography, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization spectrometry, and thin-layer chromatography to analyze the cleavage products of two 20-mer OPs corresponding to these AGDs. Both OPs contained 9-10 mainly clustered major, medium, and minor sites of cleavage. The main superficial cleavage sites of the AGDs in the intact IN and sites of partial or deep hydrolysis of the peptides analyzed do not coincide. The active sites of anti-IN Abzs are localized on their light chains, whereas the heavy chains are responsible for the affinity of protein substrates. Interactions of intact globular proteins with both light and heavy chains of Abzs provide high specificity of IN hydrolysis. The affinity of anti-IN Abzs for intact integrase was ~1000-fold higher than for the OPs. The data suggest that both OPs interact mainly with the light chains of different monoclonal Abzs of the total pool of IgGs, which possesses lower affinity for substrates; and therefore, depending on the oligopeptide sequences, their hydrolysis may be less specific and remarkably different in comparison with the cleavage of intact globular IN.

  17. Loss of bombesin-induced feeding suppression in gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, Lori L.; Ladenheim, Ellen E.; Akeson, Mark; Way, James M.; Weber, H. Christian; Sutliff, Vince E.; Jensen, Robert T.; Wine, Lara J.; Arnheiter, Heinz; Battey, James F.

    1998-01-01

    The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R) is one of three members of the mammalian bombesin subfamily of seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors that mediate diverse biological responses including secretion, neuromodulation, chemotaxis, and growth. The X chromosome-linked GRP-R gene is expressed widely during embryonic development and predominantly in gastrointestinal, neuronal, and neuroendocrine systems in the adult. Surprisingly, gene-targeted mice lacking a functional GRP-R gene develop and reproduce normally and show no gross phenotypic abnormalities. However, peripheral administration of bombesin at dosages up to 32 nmol/kg to such mice had no effect on the suppression of glucose intake, whereas normal mice showed a dose-dependent suppression of glucose intake. These data suggest that selective agonists for the GRP-R may be useful in inducing satiety. PMID:9501238

  18. Nonribosomal peptides, key biocontrol components for Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, isolated from a Greenlandic suppressive soil.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, Charlotte F; Watrous, Jeramie; Glaring, Mikkel A; Kersten, Roland; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Stougaard, Peter

    2015-03-17

    Potatoes are cultivated in southwest Greenland without the use of pesticides and with limited crop rotation. Despite the fact that plant-pathogenic fungi are present, no severe-disease outbreaks have yet been observed. In this report, we document that a potato soil at Inneruulalik in southern Greenland is suppressive against Rhizoctonia solani Ag3 and uncover the suppressive antifungal mechanism of a highly potent biocontrol bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, isolated from the suppressive potato soil. A combination of molecular genetics, genomics, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) revealed an antifungal genomic island in P. fluorescens In5 encoding two nonribosomal peptides, nunamycin and nunapeptin, which are key components for the biocontrol activity by strain In5 in vitro and in soil microcosm experiments. Furthermore, complex microbial behaviors were highlighted. Whereas nunamycin was demonstrated to inhibit the mycelial growth of R. solani Ag3, but not that of Pythium aphanidermatum, nunapeptin instead inhibited P. aphanidermatum but not R. solani Ag3. Moreover, the synthesis of nunamycin by P. fluorescens In5 was inhibited in the presence of P. aphanidermatum. Further characterization of the two peptides revealed nunamycin to be a monochlorinated 9-amino-acid cyclic lipopeptide with similarity to members of the syringomycin group, whereas nunapeptin was a 22-amino-acid cyclic lipopeptide with similarity to corpeptin and syringopeptin. Crop rotation and systematic pest management are used to only a limited extent in Greenlandic potato farming. Nonetheless, although plant-pathogenic fungi are present in the soil, the farmers do not experience major plant disease outbreaks. Here, we show that a Greenlandic potato soil is suppressive against Rhizoctonia solani, and we unravel the key biocontrol components for Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, one of the potent biocontrol bacteria

  19. Erythropoietin-Derived Nonerythropoietic Peptide Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Neuritis by Inflammation Suppression and Tissue Protection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuqi; Luo, Bangwei; Han, Fuyu; Li, Xiaoming; Xiong, Jian; Jiang, Man; Yang, Xioafeng; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2014-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) is an autoantigen-specific T-cell-mediated disease model for human demyelinating inflammatory disease of the peripheral nervous system. Erythropoietin (EPO) has been known to promote EAN recovery but its haematopoiesis stimulating effects may limit its clinic application. Here we investigated the effects and potential mechanisms of an EPO-derived nonerythropoietic peptide, ARA 290, in EAN. Exogenous ARA 290 intervention greatly improved EAN recovery, improved nerve regeneration and remyelination, and suppressed nerve inflammation. Furthermore, haematopoiesis was not induced by ARA 290 during EAN treatment. ARA 290 intervention suppressed lymphocyte proliferation and altered helper T cell differentiation by inducing increase of Foxp3+/CD4+ regulatory T cells and IL-4+/CD4+ Th2 cells and decrease of IFN-γ+/CD4+ Th1 cells in EAN. In addition, ARA 290 inhibited inflammatory macrophage activation and promoted its phagocytic activity. In vitro, ARA 290 was shown to promote Schwann cell proliferation and inhibit its inflammatory activation. In summary, our data demonstrated that ARA 290 could effectively suppress EAN by attenuating inflammation and exerting direct cell protection, indicating that ARA 290 could be a potent candidate for treatment of autoimmune neuropathies. PMID:24603865

  20. Extended Release of an Anti–Heparan Sulfate Peptide From a Contact Lens Suppresses Corneal Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jaishankar, Dinesh; Buhrman, Jason S.; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Gemeinhart, Richard A.; Shukla, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To prolong the release of a heparan sulfate binding peptide, G2-C, using a commercially available contact lens as a delivery vehicle and to demonstrate the ability of the released peptide to block herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models of corneal HSV-1 infection. Methods Commercially available contact lenses were immersed in peptide solution for 5 days prior to determining the release of the peptide at various time points. Cytotoxicity of the released samples was determined by MTT and cell cycle analysis, and the functional activity of the released samples were assessed by viral entry, and viral spread assay using human corneal epithelial cells (HCE). The ability to suppress infection in human and pig cornea ex vivo and mouse in vivo models were also assessed. Results Peptide G2-C was released through the contact lens. Following release for 3 days, the peptide showed significant activity by inhibiting HSV-1 viral entry and spread in HCE cells. Significant suppression of infection was also observed in the ex vivo and in vivo experiments involving corneas. Conclusions Extended release of an anti–HS peptide through a commercially available contact lens can generate significant anti–HSV-1 activity and provides a new and effective way to control corneal herpes. PMID:26780322

  1. Clostridium difficile suppresses colonic vasoactive intestinal peptide associated with altered motility.

    PubMed

    Nassif, A; Longo, W E; Sexe, R; Stratton, M; Standeven, J; Vernava, A M; Kaminski, D L

    1995-01-01

    We investigated whether Clostridium difficile toxin alters colonic tissue levels of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) at the expense of changes in colonic motility in the isolated perfused rabbit left colon. Colonic inflammation was induced by the intracolonic administration of 10(-8) M C. difflcile toxin. Strain gauge transducers were sewn onto the serosal surface of the colon to evaluate colonic motility. C. difflcile administration produced histologic changes consistent with epithelial damage. This was associated with an increased production of prostaglandin E(2) and thromboxane B(2). Tissue levels of VIP but not substance P were significantly reduced. This was associated with an increased number of contractions per minute and an average force of each colonic contraction. These results suggest that tissue levels of VIP are suppressed by C. difflcile and may participate in colonic dysmotility during active inflammation.

  2. Clostridium difficile suppresses colonic vasoactive intestinal peptide associated with altered motility

    PubMed Central

    Nassif, A.; Sexe, R.; Stratton, M.; Standeven, J.; Vernava, A. M.; Kaminski, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated whether Clostridium difficile toxin alters colonic tissue levels of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) at the expense of changes in colonic motility in the isolated perfused rabbit left colon. Colonic inflammation was induced by the intracolonic administration of 10−8 M C. difflcile toxin. Strain gauge transducers were sewn onto the serosal surface of the colon to evaluate colonic motility. C. difflcile administration produced histologic changes consistent with epithelial damage. This was associated with an increased production of prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane B2. Tissue levels of VIP but not substance P were significantly reduced. This was associated with an increased number of contractions per minute and an average force of each colonic contraction. These results suggest that tissue levels of VIP are suppressed by C. difflcile and may participate in colonic dysmotility during active inflammation. PMID:18475679

  3. Ingested (oral) SIRS peptide 1-21 suppresses type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Brod, Staley A; Hood, Zachary

    2008-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic disorder that results from autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cell. The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a model of the human autoimmune disease T1D. Soluble immune response suppressor (SIRS) is a nonspecific protein suppressor of immune response produced by immunomodulatory T cells stimulated by type I interferon (IFN). SIRS inhibits antibody responses in vivo, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever, and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses. Previous investigators have isolated the N-terminal sequence of SIRS protein consisting of 21 amino acids. Mice ingesting 1 microg SIRS peptide 1-21 showed significant delayed onset of T1D and a decreased frequency of T1D compared with mock-fed and 10-microg-fed mice and a significant decrease in islet inflammation. There were significant decreases in islet lymphocyte chemokine production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), macrophage inflammatory protein-1 gamma (MIP-1 gamma), regulated upon activation, normal T cell-expressed, and presumably secreted (RANTES), and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the SIRS-fed mice, factors important in migration of inflammatory cell into the islets. Ingested (oral) SIRS peptide inhibits clinical T1D by decreasing target organ cellular migration of islet destructive populations by suppression of islet lymphocyte chemokine secretion.

  4. Suppression of the invasion and migration of cancer cells by SERPINB family genes and their derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Wen, Hui-Chin; Liang, Wei-Guang; Lin, Sheng-Chieh; Yuan, Hsiao-Wei; Wu, Cheng-Wen; Chang, Wun-Shaing Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Apart from SERPINB2 and SERPINB5, the roles of the remaining 13 members of the human SERPINB family in cancer metastasis are still unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that most of these genes are differentially expressed in tumor tissues compared to matched normal tissues from lung or breast cancer patients. Overexpression of each SERPINB gene effectively suppressed the invasiveness and motility of malignant cancer cells. Among all of the genes, the SERPINB1, SERPINB5 and SERPINB7 genes were more potent, and the inhibitory effect was further enhanced by co-expression of any two of them. In addition, single treatment of the synthetic peptides corresponding to the P5-P5' sequences of the reactive center loop (RCL) of SERPINB1, SERPINB5 or SERPINB7 markedly suppressed the invasive and migratory properties of the cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. More significantly, combination treatment of these peptides in cancer cells further improved the suppressive effect by 20-40%. Here, we determined the expression of all SERPINB family members in lung and breast cancer patients, and identified those members with potent inhibitory ability toward invasion and migration, and designed RCL-derived peptides to suppress the malignancy of cancer cells. Forced re-expression of these anti-invasive SERPINB genes or application of the SERPINB RCL-peptides may provide a reasonable strategy against lethal cancer metastasis.

  5. The interaction with gold suppresses fiber-like conformations of the amyloid β (16-22) peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Luca; Ardèvol, Albert; Parrinello, Michele; Lutz, Helmut; Lu, Hao; Weidner, Tobias; Corni, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Inorganic surfaces and nanoparticles can accelerate or inhibit the fibrillation process of proteins and peptides, including the biomedically relevant amyloid β peptide. However, the microscopic mechanisms that determine such an effect are still poorly understood. By means of large-scale, state-of-the-art enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations, here we identify an interaction mechanism between the segments 16-22 of the amyloid β peptide, known to be fibrillogenic by itself, and the Au(111) surface in water that leads to the suppression of fiber-like conformations from the peptide conformational ensemble. Moreover, thanks to advanced simulation analysis techniques, we characterize the conformational selection vs. induced fit nature of the gold effect. Our results disclose an inhibition mechanism that is rooted in the details of the microscopic peptide-surface interaction rather than in general phenomena such as peptide sequestration from the solution.Inorganic surfaces and nanoparticles can accelerate or inhibit the fibrillation process of proteins and peptides, including the biomedically relevant amyloid β peptide. However, the microscopic mechanisms that determine such an effect are still poorly understood. By means of large-scale, state-of-the-art enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations, here we identify an interaction mechanism between the segments 16-22 of the amyloid β peptide, known to be fibrillogenic by itself, and the Au(111) surface in water that leads to the suppression of fiber-like conformations from the peptide conformational ensemble. Moreover, thanks to advanced simulation analysis techniques, we characterize the conformational selection vs. induced fit nature of the gold effect. Our results disclose an inhibition mechanism that is rooted in the details of the microscopic peptide-surface interaction rather than in general phenomena such as peptide sequestration from the solution. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  6. Whey peptide ingestion suppresses body fat accumulation in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 6 (SAMP6).

    PubMed

    Ichinoseki-Sekine, Noriko; Kakigi, Ryo; Miura, Susumu; Naito, Hisashi

    2015-06-01

    Body weight in young growing and young adult animals was reduced by a high dietary density of whey protein concentrate; however, it is unclear whether dietary proteins similarly affect body weight in aging animals. Here, we examined whether whey protein or whey peptide ingestion suppressed body fat accumulation and affected protein expression and phosphorylation in skeletal muscle in aging mice. Twenty-six male senescence-accelerated mouse prone 6 (SAMP6) mice were assigned randomly to three dietary treatment groups: 18.7% casein control (CON), 18.7% whey protein (WPR), and 18.7% whey peptide (WPE). After 28 weeks of treatment, skeletal tissues were dissected and weighed for analysis. Western blotting was performed to examine the expression of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) in quadriceps muscles. Body (CON: 47.6 ± 2.2 g, WPR: 48.2 ± 2.7 g, WPE: 38.3 ± 2.0 g) and relative white adipose tissue (CON: 38.5 ± 3.5 mg/g, WPR: 43.8 ± 4.0 mg/g, WPE: 21.1 ± 4.4 mg/g) weights were lower in the WPE group compared with the other two groups (p < 0.05), and no significant differences were observed between the CON and WPR groups. The relative weights of tibialis anterior muscle (CON: 1.04 ± 0.04 mg/g, WPR: 0.97 ± 0.03 mg/g, 1.23 ± 0.05 mg/g) and gastrocnemius muscle (CON: 3.02 ± 0.12 mg/g, WPR: 2.92 ± 0.15 mg/g, WPE: 3.65 ± 0.18 mg/g) were higher in the WPE group compared with the other groups (p < 0.05). The phosphorylation of AMPK (WPR: 1.03 ± 0.11, WPE: 1.36 ± 0.12; fold change from control) and ACC (WPR: 1.08 ± 0.07, WPE: 1.18 ± 0.05; fold change from control) in WPE was higher than in CON (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the expression levels of ATGL among the three groups. These data suggest that a normal (or moderate excess) dietary density of whey peptide attenuates body fat accumulation via upregulation of fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle in aging mice.

  7. Nonerythropoietic Erythropoietin-Derived Peptide Suppresses Adipogenesis, Inflammation, Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuqi; Luo, Bangwei; Shi, Rongchen; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Shufeng; Zhang, Zhiren

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has been identified as being crucial for obesity modulation; however, its erythropoietic activity may limit its clinical application. EPO-derived Helix B-surface peptide (pHBSP) is nonerythrogenic but has been reported to retain other functions of EPO. The current study aimed to evaluate the effects and potential mechanisms of pHBSP in obesity modulation. We found that pHBSP suppressed adipogenesis, adipokine expression and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) levels during 3T3-L1 preadipocyte maturation through the EPO receptor (EPOR). In addition, also through EPOR, pHBSP attenuated macrophage inflammatory activation and promoted PPARγ expression. Furthermore, PPARγ deficiency partly ablated the anti-inflammatory activity of pHBSP in macrophages. Correspondingly, pHBSP administration to high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice significantly improved obesity, insulin resistance (IR) and adipose tissue inflammation without stimulating hematopoiesis. Therefore, pHBSP can significantly protect against obesity and IR partly by inhibiting adipogenesis and inflammation. These findings have therapeutic implications for metabolic disorders, such as obesity and diabetes. PMID:26459940

  8. Cancer metastasis-suppressing peptide metastin upregulates excitatory synaptic transmission in hippocampal dentate granule cells.

    PubMed

    Arai, Amy C; Xia, Yan-Fang; Suzuki, Erika; Kessler, Markus; Civelli, Olivier; Nothacker, Hans-Peter

    2005-11-01

    Metastin is an antimetastatic peptide encoded by the KiSS-1 gene in cancer cells. Recent studies found that metastin is a ligand for the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor GPR54, which is highly expressed in specific brain regions such as the hypothalamus and parts of the hippocampus. This study shows that activation of GPR54 by submicromolar concentrations of metastin reversibly enhances excitatory synaptic transmission in hippocampal dentate granule cells in a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase-dependent manner. Synaptic enhancement by metastin was suppressed by intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-beta-S and the calcium chelator BAPTA. Analysis of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) revealed an increase in the mean amplitude but no change in event frequency. This indicates that GPR54 and the mechanism responsible for the increase in EPSCs are postsynaptic. Metastin-induced synaptic potentiation was abolished by 50 microM PD98059 and 20 microM U0126, two inhibitors of the MAP kinases ERK1 and ERK2. The effect was also blocked by inhibitors of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases and tyrosine kinases. RT-PCR experiments showed that both KiSS-1 and GPR54 are expressed in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Metastin is thus a novel endogenous factor that modulates synaptic excitability in the dentate gyrus through mechanisms involving MAP kinases, which in turn may be controlled upstream by calcium-activated kinases and tyrosine kinases.

  9. beta. -Endorphin and related peptides suppress phorbol myristate acetate-induced respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Diamant, M.; Henricks, P.A.J.; Nijkamp, F.P.; de Wied, D. )

    1989-01-01

    In the present study, the immunomodulatory effect of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-E) and shorter pro-opiomelancortin (POMC) fragments was evaluated by assessing their influence on respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). The effect of the peptides on phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated production of reactive oxygen metabolites was measured in a lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) assay. Both POMC peptides with opiate-like activity and their non-opioid derivatives were tested. With the exception of {alpha}-E, PMA-stimulated respiratory burst was suppressed by all POMC fragments tested. A U-shaped dose-response relation was observed. Doses lower than 10{sup {minus}17}M and higher than 10{sup {minus}8}M were without effect. {beta}-E and dT{beta}E both suppressed PMA-induced oxidative burst in human PMN at physiological concentrations. {gamma}-E and dT{gamma}E proved to be less potent inhibitors, reaching maximal effect at higher concentrations. DE{gamma}E exerted an even less pronounced but still significant suppressive effect at the concentration of 10{sup {minus}10}M. None of the endorphins tested was shown to affect resting oxidative metabolism in the PMN. The modulatory effects of the opioid peptides could not be blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone.

  10. A formyl peptide receptor agonist suppresses inflammation and bone damage in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kao, W; Gu, R; Jia, Y; Wei, Xuemin; Fan, H; Harris, J; Zhang, Zhiyi; Quinn, J; Morand, E F; Yang, Y H

    2014-09-01

    Annexin A1 (AnxA1) is an endogenous anti-inflammatory protein and agonist of the formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2). However, the potential for therapeutic FPR ligands to modify immune-mediated disease has been little explored. We investigated the effects of a synthetic FPR agonist on joint disease in the K/BxN model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). Arthritis was induced by injection of K/BxN serum at day 0 and 2 in wild-type (WT) or AnxA1(-/-) mice and clinical and histopathological manifestations measured 8-11 days later. WT mice were given the FPR agonist compound 43 (Cpd43) (6 or 30 mg·kg(-1) i.p.) for 4 days. Effects of AnxA1 and Cpd43 on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis were assessed in RAW 264.7 cells and human RA FLS and macrophages. Treatment with Cpd43 before or after the onset of arthritis reduced clinical disease severity and attenuated synovial TNF-α and osteoclast-associated gene expression. Deletion of AnxA1 in mice exacerbated arthritis severity in the K/BxN model. In vitro, Cpd43 suppressed osteoclastogenesis and NFAT activity elicited by RANKL, and inhibited IL-6 secretion by mouse macrophages. In human RA joint-derived FLS and monocyte-derived macrophages, Cpd43 treatment inhibited IL-6 release, while blocking FPR2 or silencing AnxA1 increased this release. The FPR agonist Cpd43 reduced osteoclastogenesis and inflammation in a mouse model of RA and exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in relevant human cells. These data suggest that FPR ligands may represent novel therapeutic agents capable of ameliorating inflammation and bone damage in RA. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor stimulation increases GFR and suppresses proximal reabsorption in the rat.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Scott C; Kashkouli, Ali; Singh, Prabhleen

    2013-01-15

    The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is released from the gut in response to fat or carbohydrate and contributes to negative feedback control of blood glucose by stimulating insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon, and slowing gastric emptying. GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) are also expressed in the proximal tubule, and possibly elsewhere in the kidney. Presently, we examined the effect of a GLP-1R agonist on single-nephron glomerular filtration rate (GFR; SNGFR), proximal reabsorption (Jprox), tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) responses, and urine flow rate in hydropenic male Wistar and Wistar-Froemter rats. Micropuncture and whole-kidney data were obtained before and during infusion of the GLP-1 agonist exenatide (1 nmol/h iv). SNGFR and Jprox were measured by late proximal collection at both extremes of TGF activation, which was achieved by perfusing Henle's loop at 0 or 50 nl/min. Primary changes in Jprox were revealed by analysis of covariance for Jprox with SNGFR as a covariate. Effects on TGF activation were determined in a separate set of experiments by comparing early distal and late proximal collections. Exenatide increased SNGFR by 33-50%, suppressed proximal tubular reabsorption by 20-40%, doubled early distal flow rate, and increased urine flow rate sixfold without altering the efficiency of glomerulotubular balance, TGF responsiveness, or the tonic influence of TGF. This implies that exenatide is both a proximal diuretic and a renal vasodilator. Since the natural agonist for the GLP-1R is regulated by intake of fat and carbohydrate, but not by salt or fluid, the control of salt excretion by the GLP-1R system departs from the usual negative-feedback paradigm for regulating salt balance.

  12. Fat digestion is required for suppression of ghrelin and stimulation of peptide YY and pancreatic polypeptide secretion by intraduodenal lipid.

    PubMed

    Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Patterson, Michael; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R; Horowitz, Michael

    2005-12-01

    Stimulation of cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion by fat is mediated by the products of fat digestion. Ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) appear to play an important role in appetite regulation, and their release is modulated by food ingestion, including fat. It is unknown whether fat digestion is a prerequisite for their suppression (ghrelin) or release (PYY, PP). Moreover, it is not known whether small intestinal exposure to fat is sufficient to suppress ghrelin secretion. Our study aimed to resolve these issues. Sixteen healthy young males received, on two separate occasions, 120-min intraduodenal infusions of a long-chain triglyceride emulsion (2.8 kcal/min) 1) without (condition FAT) or 2) with (FAT-THL) 120 mg of tetrahydrolipstatin (THL, lipase inhibitor), followed by a standard buffet-style meal. Blood samples for ghrelin, PYY, and PP were taken throughout. FAT infusion was associated with a marked, and progressive, suppression of plasma ghrelin from t = 60 min (P < 0.001) and stimulation of PYY from t = 30 min (P < 0.01). FAT infusion also stimulated plasma PP (P < or = 0.01), and the release was immediate. FAT-THL completely abolished the FAT-induced changes in ghrelin, PYY, and PP. In response to the meal, plasma ghrelin was further suppressed, and PYY and PP stimulated, during both FAT and FAT-THL infusions. In conclusion, in healthy humans, 1) the presence of fat in the small intestine suppresses ghrelin secretion, and 2) fat-induced suppression of ghrelin and stimulation of PYY and PP is dependent on fat digestion.

  13. Suppression of immune responses in collagen-induced arthritis by a rationally designed CD80-binding peptide agent.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Mythily; Eri, Rajaraman; Zunt, Susan L; Summerlin, Don-John; Brand, David D; Blum, Janice S

    2007-02-01

    The CD80/CD86-CD28/CD152 costimulatory pathways transmit signals for CD4+ T cell activation and suppression and are critically involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A significant number of CD4+ T cells and macrophages in the rheumatoid synovium express elevated levels of CD80, increasing the potential for costimulation in trans of naive T cells. To determine the effect of blockade of this costimulatory axis in RA, we designed novel CD80-binding peptides and evaluated their therapeutic potential in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an animal model of RA. The conserved MYPPPY motif of CD152 adopts a polyproline type II (PPII) helical conformation in the CD80-CD152 complex. The pairing preferences of the critical residues at the CD80-CD152 interface and their propensity to form PPII helices were integrated to design peptides with optimum PPII helical content that selectively block CD80-receptor interactions. The clinical efficacy was tested in DBA/1LacJ mice that were administered the CD80 blocking agents, called CD80-binding competitive antagonist peptides (CD80-CAPs), at the time of immunization with bovine type II collagen or 3 weeks after immunization. A single administration of select CD80-CAPs significantly reduced the clinical, radiologic, and histologic disease severity in CIA. Importantly, administration of CD80-CAPs during activated immune response significantly suppressed disease development by reducing mononuclear cell infiltration in the joints and mediating peripheral deletion of activated CD4+ T cells. A rationally designed CD80-binding peptide both prevents and suppresses CIA, suggesting a potential application in RA. Apoptosis of activated CD4+ T cells following in vivo blockade suggests that the effects of CD80-CAPs may be long-lasting.

  14. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide in the rat anterior pituitary gland is localized in gonadotrophs and suppresses prolactin secretion.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Genshin; Takekoshi, Susumu; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Kuhar, Michael J; Osamura, R Yoshiyuki

    2004-05-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) mRNA and CART peptide are abundant in the hypothalamic nuclei that control anterior pituitary function. CART peptide has also been localized in the anterior pituitary gland itself, although its role in pituitary function has not as yet been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the localization and function of CART peptide in the anterior pituitary gland. Immunohistochemical observations revealed that CART peptide colocalized with FSH and LH in gonadotroph cells but that it was absent from the other hormone-producing cells. Immunoelectronmicroscopy suggested that CART peptide and gonadotropin were colocalized in the same secretory granules. CART peptide suppressed prolactin release from dispersed anterior pituitary cells 15 min after its addition into the media [basal production, 234.9 +/- 14.6 ng/ml vs. CART 55-102 peptide 100 nm, 125.0 +/- 18.2 ng/ml (P < 0.01, n = 5)]. Prolactin release was suppressed by CART in a dose-related manner; on the other hand, CART peptide did not affect the secretion of other anterior pituitary hormones. CART peptide synthesis by these cells was elevated 15 min after the addition of leptin to the media (100 nm), as determined by immunoblotting, but LHRH (10 nm) did not significantly affect CART peptide expression. These findings suggest that CART synthesis in the anterior pituitary may be stimulated by leptin and that CART peptide may play a role in the regulation of anterior pituitary hormone secretion in the rat.

  15. Suppressive effects of peptide antibiotics against proliferation and cytokine production in mitogen-activated human peripheral-blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Masaki; Tanaka, Sachiko; Ishizawa, Hitomi; Nakamura, Yurie; Onda, Kenji; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Certain kinds of peptide antibiotics are suggested to have immunomodulatory effects; however, few studies have been carried out systemically to evaluate the antiproliferative effects of peptide antibiotics in human lymphoid cells. The suppressive efficacies of nine peptide antibiotics and seven non-antibiotic peptides against proliferation of human peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with T cell mitogen were examined in vitro. Nigericin (CAS 28643-80-3), valinomycin (CAS 2001-95-8), gramicidin D (CAS 1405-97-6), and tyrothricin (CAS 1404-88-2) strongly inhibited the proliferation of concanavalin A-stimulated PBMCs with IC50 values of 0.15-11.2 ng/ml, while these antibiotics did not show cytotoxicity at 10 000 ng/ml. The IC50 value of the immunosuppressant cyclosporine (CAS 59865-13-3) was 5.2 ng/ml. Virginiamycin (CAS 11006-76-1) and gramicidin S (CAS 113-73-5) moderately inhibited PBMC-proliferation with IC50 values of 1000 and 1900 ng/ml, respectively. On the other hand, bacitracin (CAS 1405-87-4), capreomycin (CAS 11003-38-6), polymyxin B (1404-26-8), angiotensin II antipeptide (CAS 121379-63-3), angiotensin III antipeptide (CAS 133605-55-7), fibrinogen binding inhibitor peptide (CAS 89105-94-2), LH-RH (CAS 71447-49-9), pepstatin A (CAS 26305-03-3), oxytocin (CAS 50-56-6), and vasopressin (CAS 16679-58-6) showed little or no suppressive effect on PBMC-proliferation. Nigericin and valinomycin decreased the concentrations of interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in the culture medium with IC50 values less than 0.01 ng/ml. Nigericin also decreased the concentrations of IL-4 and IL-6 with IC50 values of less than 1 ng/ml. The results show that peptide antibiotics such as nigericin and valinomycin efficiently suppress the production of several cytokines and proliferation in mitogen-stimulated human PBMCs.

  16. Relative atrial natriuretic peptide deficiency and inadequate renin and angiotensin II suppression in obese hypertensive men.

    PubMed

    Asferg, Camilla L; Nielsen, Søren J; Andersen, Ulrik B; Linneberg, Allan; Møller, Daniel V; Hedley, Paula L; Christiansen, Michael; Goetze, Jens P; Esler, Murray; Jeppesen, Jørgen L

    2013-07-01

    Obesity is a strong risk factor for hypertension, but the mechanisms by which obesity leads to hypertension are incompletely understood. On this background, we assessed dietary sodium intake, serum levels of natriuretic peptides (NPs), and the activity of the renin-angiotensin system in 63 obese hypertensive men (obeseHT: body mass index, ≥30.0 kg/m(2); 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, ≥130/80 mm Hg), in 40 obese normotensive men (obeseNT: body mass index, ≥30.0 kg/m(2); 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, <130/80 mm Hg), and in 27 lean normotensive men (leanNT: body mass index, 20.0-24.9 kg/m(2); 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, <130/80 mm Hg). All study subjects were medication free. As a surrogate estimate for dietary sodium intake, we measured sodium excretion in a 24-hour urine collection and we measured serum levels of midregional proatrial NP and plasma levels of renin and angiotensin II. The obese men had higher mean (±SD) urinary sodium excretion (obeseHT, 213.6±85.2 mmol; obeseNT, 233.0±70.0 mmol) than the lean normotensive men (leanNT, 155.5±51.7 mmol; P=0.003). ObeseHT had lower (median [interquartile range]) serum midregional proatrial NP levels (49.2 [37.3-64.7] pmol/L) than leanNT (69.3 [54.3-82.9] pmol/L; P=0.003), whereas obeseNT had midregional proatrial NP levels in between (54.1 [43.2-64.7] pmol/L); obeseNT had lower (median [interquartile range]) plasma levels of renin (5.0 [3.0-8.0] mIU/L versus 9.0 [4.0-18.0]) and angiotensin II (2.4 [1.5-3.5] pmol/L versus 4.2 [2.2-7.9]) than obeseHT (P≤0.049), whereas obeseHT had similar plasma levels of renin and angiotensin II as leanNT (P≥0.19). Thus, despite a high sodium intake and a high blood pressure, obese hypertensive men have a relative NP deficiency and an inadequate renin-angiotensin system suppression.

  17. Identification of a new androgen receptor (AR) co-regulator BUD31 and related peptides to suppress wild-type and mutated AR-mediated prostate cancer growth via peptide screening and X-ray structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Wu, Po-Long; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Lin, An-Chi; Ting, Huei-Ju; Pang, See-Tong; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Ma, Wen-Lung; Chen, Chung-Jung; Wu, Wen-Guey; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-12-01

    Treatment with individual anti-androgens is associated with the development of hot-spot mutations in the androgen receptor (AR). Here, we found that anti-androgens-mt-ARs have similar binary structure to the 5α-dihydrotestosterone-wt-AR. Phage display revealed that these ARs bound to similar peptides, including BUD31, containing an Fxx(F/H/L/W/Y)Y motif cluster with Tyr in the +5 position. Structural analyses of the AR-LBD-BUD31 complex revealed formation of an extra hydrogen bond between the Tyr+5 residue of the peptide and the AR. Functional studies showed that BUD31-related peptides suppressed AR transactivation, interrupted AR N-C interaction, and suppressed AR-mediated cell growth. Combination of peptide screening and X-ray structure analysis may serve as a new strategy for developing anti-ARs that simultaneously suppress both wt and mutated AR function.

  18. Suppressive effect on polyclonal B-cell activation of a synthetic peptide homologous to a transmembrane component of oncogenic retroviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Mitani, M.; Cianciolo, G.J.; Snyderman, R.; Yasuda, M.; Good, R.A.; Day, N.K.

    1987-01-01

    Purified feline leukemia virus, UV light-inactivated feline leukemia virus, and a synthetic peptide (CKS-17) homologous to a well-conserved region of the transmembrane components of several human and animal retroviruses were each studied for their effect on IgG production by feline peripheral blood lymphocytes. Using a reverse hemolytic plaque assay, both the viable virus and the UV-inactivated feline leukemia virus, but not the CKS-17, activated B lymphocytes to secrete IgG. When staphylococcal protein A, a polyclonal B-cell activator, was used to stimulate IgG synthesis by feline lymphocytes, the viable virus, the UV-inactivated virus, and the CKS-17 peptide each strongly suppressed IgG secretion without compromising viability of the lymphocytes. These finding suggest that the immunosuppressive influences of feline leukemia virus on immunoglobulin synthesis may reside in a conserved portion of the envelope glycoprotein that includes the region homologous to CKS-17.

  19. C-type natriuretic peptide inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet-leukocyte interactions via suppression of P-selectin expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotland, Ramona S.; Cohen, Marc; Foster, Paul; Lovell, Matthew; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2005-10-01

    The multifaceted process of immune cell recruitment to sites of tissue injury is key to the development of an inflammatory response and involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders. We recently identified C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as an important endothelium-derived mediator that regulates vascular tone and protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Herein, we investigated whether CNP inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet aggregation and thereby exerts a potential antiinflammatory influence on the blood vessel wall. We assessed the effects of CNP on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo in animals with high basal leukocyte activation (endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, eNOS-/-) or under acute inflammatory conditions (induced by interleukin-1 or histamine). CNP suppressed basal leukocyte rolling in eNOS-/- mice in a rapid, reversible, and concentration-dependent manner. These effects of CNP were mimicked by the selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C agonist cANF4-23. CNP also suppressed leukocyte rolling induced by IL-1 or histamine, inhibited platelet-leukocyte interactions, and prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of human blood. Furthermore, analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets revealed that CNP selectively attenuates expression of P-selectin. Thus, CNP is a modulator of acute inflammation in the blood vessel wall characterized by leukocyte and platelet activation. These antiinflammatory effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of P-selectin expression. These observations suggest that endothelial CNP might maintain an anti-atherogenic influence on the blood vessel wall and represent a target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory cardiovascular disorders. endothelium | natriuretic peptide receptor type C | atherosclerosis | thrombosis

  20. Collagen IV and CXC chemokine derived anti-angiogenic peptides suppress glioma xenograft growth

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Elena V.; Lal, Bachchu; Koskimaki, Jacob E.; Popel, Aleksander S.; Laterra, John

    2012-01-01

    Peptides are receiving increased attention as therapeutic agents, due to their high binding specificity and versatility to be modified as targeting or carrier molecules. Particularly, peptides with anti-angiogenic activity are of high interest due to their applicability to a wide range of cancers. In this study we investigate the biological activity of two novel antiangiogenic peptides in pre-clinical glioma models. One peptide SP2000 is derived from collagen IV and the other peptide SP3019 belongs to the CXC family. We previously characterized the capacity of SP2000 and SP3019 to inhibit multiple biological endpoints linked to angiogenesis in human endothelial cells in several assays. Here we report additional studies using endothelial cells and focus on the activity of these peptides against human glioma cell growth, migration and adhesion in vitro and growth as tumor xenografts in vivo. We found that SP2000 completely inhibits migration of the glioma cells at 50 μM and SP3019 produced 50% inhibition at 100 μM. Their relative anti-adhesion activities were similar with SP2000 and SP3019 generating 50% adhesion inhibition at 4.9 ± 0.82 μM and 21.3 ± 5.92 μM respectively. In vivo glioma growth inhibition was 63 % for SP2000 and 76% for SP3019 after 2 weeks of administration at daily doses of 10mg/kg and 20 mg/kg, respectively. The direct activity of these peptides against glioma cells in conjunction with their anti-angiogenic activities warrants their further development as either stand-alone agents or in combination with standard cytotoxic or emerging targeted therapies in malignant brain tumors. PMID:22495619

  1. Suppression of Propionibacterium acnes Infection and the Associated Inflammatory Response by the Antimicrobial Peptide P5 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Sunhyo; Han, Hyo Mi; Song, Peter I.

    2015-01-01

    The cutaneous inflammation associated with acne vulgaris is caused by the anaerobic bacterium Propionibacterium acnes through activation of the innate immune system in the skin. Current standard treatments for acne have limitations that include adverse effects and poor efficacy in many patients, making development of a more effective therapy highly desirable. In the present study, we demonstrate the protective effects of a novel customized α-helical cationic peptide, P5, against P. acnes-induced inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. Application of P5 significantly reduced expression of two inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-α in P. acnes-treated primary human keratinocytes, where P5 appeared to act in part by binding to bacterial lipoteichoic acid, thereby suppressing TLR2-to-NF-κB signaling. In addition, in a mouse model of acne vulgaris, P5 exerted both anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects against P. acnes, but exerted no cytotoxic effects against skin cells. These results demonstrate that P5, and perhaps other cationic antimicrobial peptides, offer the unique ability to reduce numbers P. acnes cells in the skin and to inhibit the inflammation they trigger. This suggests these peptides could potentially be used to effectively treat acne without adversely affecting the skin. PMID:26197393

  2. A T cell receptor antagonist peptide induces T cells that mediate bystander suppression and prevent autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced with multiple myelin antigens

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Lindsay B.; Murtaza, Anwar; Hafler, Brian P.; Sette, Alessandro; Kuchroo, Vijay K.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) residues 139–151 (HSLGKWLGHPDKF) can be prevented by treatment with a T cell receptor (TCR) antagonist peptide (L144/R147) generated by substituting at the two principal TCR contact residues in the encephalitogenic peptide. The TCR antagonist peptide blocks activation of encephalitogenic Th1 helper cells in vitro, but the mechanisms by which the antagonist peptide blocks EAE in vivo are not clear. Immunization with L144/R147 did not inhibit generation of PLP-(139–151)-specific T cells in vivo. Furthermore, preimmunization with L144/R147 protected mice from EAE induced with the encephalitogenic peptides PLP-(178–191) and myelin oligodendrocyte protein (MOG) residues 92–106 and with mouse myelin basic protein (MBP). These data suggest that the L144/R147 peptide does not act as an antagonist in vivo but mediates bystander suppression, probably by the generation of regulatory T cells. To confirm this we generated T cell lines and clones from animals immunized with PLP-(139–151) plus L144/R147. T cells specific for L144/R147 peptide were crossreactive with the native PLP-(139–151) peptide, produced Th2/Th0 cytokines, and suppressed EAE upon adoptive transfer. These studies demonstrate that TCR antagonist peptides may have multiple biological effects in vivo. One of the principal mechanisms by which these peptides inhibit autoimmunity is by the induction of regulatory T cells, leading to bystander suppression of EAE. These results have important implications for the treatment of autoimmune diseases where there are autopathogenic responses to multiple antigens in the target organ. PMID:9256473

  3. Intracerebroventricular administration of C-type natriuretic peptide suppresses food intake via activation of the melanocortin system in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada-Goto, Nobuko; Katsuura, Goro; Ebihara, Ken; Inuzuka, Megumi; Ochi, Yukari; Yamashita, Yui; Kusakabe, Toru; Yasoda, Akihiro; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Hosoda, Kiminori; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2013-05-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and its receptor are abundantly distributed in the brain, especially in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus associated with regulating energy homeostasis. To elucidate the possible involvement of CNP in energy regulation, we examined the effects of intracerebroventricular administration of CNP on food intake in mice. The intracerebroventricular administration of CNP-22 and CNP-53 significantly suppressed food intake on 4-h refeeding after 48-h fasting. Next, intracerebroventricular administration of CNP-22 and CNP-53 significantly decreased nocturnal food intake. The increment of food intake induced by neuropeptide Y and ghrelin was markedly suppressed by intracerebroventricular administration of CNP-22 and CNP-53. When SHU9119, an antagonist for melanocortin-3 and melanocortin-4 receptors, was coadministered with CNP-53, the suppressive effect of CNP-53 on refeeding after 48-h fasting was significantly attenuated by SHU9119. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that intracerebroventricular administration of CNP-53 markedly increased the number of c-Fos-positive cells in the ARC, paraventricular nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamus, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, and lateral hypothalamus. In particular, c-Fos-positive cells in the ARC after intracerebroventricular administration of CNP-53 were coexpressed with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone immunoreactivity. These results indicated that intracerebroventricular administration of CNP induces an anorexigenic action, in part, via activation of the melanocortin system.

  4. Nesfatin-1 stimulates cholecystokinin and suppresses peptide YY expression and secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Naresh; Mortazavi, Sima; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-03-25

    Nesfatin-1 is an 82 amino acid secreted peptide encoded in the precursor, nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2). It is an insulinotropic anorexigen abundantly expressed in the stomach and hypothalamus. Post-prandial insulin secretion is predominantly regulated by incretins glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). Nesfatin-1 was previously reported to modulate GLP-1 and GIP secretion in vitro in an enteroendocrine (STC-1) cell line. Intestine is a source of additional hormones including cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY (PYY) that regulate metabolism. We hypothesized that nesfatin-1 modulates CCK and PYY secretion. Immunofluorescence histochemistry showed NUCB2/nesfatin-1 co-localizing CCK and PYY in the intestinal mucosa of mice. Static incubation of STC-1 cells with nesfatin-1 upregulated both CCK mRNA expression (1 and 10 nM) and secretion (0.1, 1 and 10 nM) at 1 h post-incubation. In contrast, nesfatin-1 treatment for 1 h downregulated PYY mRNA expression (all doses tested) and secretion (0.01 and 0.1 nM) in STC-1 cells. Continuous infusion of nesfatin-1 using osmotic mini-pumps for 12 h upregulated CCK mRNA expression in large intestine, and downregulated PYY mRNA expression in both large and small intestines of male C57BL/6J mice. In these tissues, Western blot analysis found a corresponding increase in CCK and a decrease in PYY content. Collectively, we provide new information on the cell specific localization of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 in the intestinal mucosa, and a novel function for nesfatin-1 in modulating intestinal CCK and PYY expression and secretion in mice.

  5. Multi-Component Ion Modifiers and Arcing Suppressants to Enhance Differential Mobility Spectrometry for Separation of Peptides and Drug Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojevic, Voislav; Koyanagi, Gregory K.; Bohme, Diethard K.

    2014-03-01

    The optimization of ion/molecule chemistry in a differential mobility spectrometer (DMS) is shown to result in improved peak capacity, separation, and sensitivity. We have experimented with a modifier composed of multiple components, where each component accomplishes a specific task on mixtures of peptides and small drug molecules. Use of a higher proton affinity modifier (hexanol) provides increased peak capacity and separation. Analyte ion/modifier proton transfer is suppressed by adding a large excess of low proton affinity modifier (water or methanol), significantly increasing signal intensity and sensitivity for low proton affinity analytes. Finally, addition of an electrical arcing suppressant (chloroform) allows the device to operate reliably at higher separation fields, improving peak capacity and separation. We demonstrate a 20 % increase in the device peak capacity without any loss of sensitivity and estimate that further optimization of the modifier composition can increase this to 50 %. Use of 3-, 4-, or even 5-component modifiers offers the opportunity for the user to fine-tune the modifier performance to maximize the device performance, something not possible with a single component modifier.

  6. A specific aptamer-cell penetrating peptides complex delivered siRNA efficiently and suppressed prostate tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Yanjun; Liu, Jiayun; Ma, Yueyun; Su, Mingquan; Zhang, Hongyi; Hao, Xiaoke

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Specific and efficient delivery of siRNA into intended tumor cells remains as a challenge, even though RNAi has been exploited as a new strategy for prostate cancer therapy. This work aims to address both specificity and efficiency of SURVIVIN-siRNA delivery by constructing a therapeutic complex using combinatorial strategies. A fusion protein STD was first expressed to serve as a backbone, consisting of streptavidin, a cell-penetrating peptide called Trans-Activator of Transcription (TAT) and a double-stranded RNA binding domain. A biotinylated Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) specific aptamer A10 and SURVIVIN-siRNA were then linked to STD protein to form the therapeutic complex. This complex could specifically targeted PSMA+ tumor cells. Compared to lipofectamine and A10-siRNA chimera, it demonstrated higher efficiency in delivering siRNA into target cells by 19.2% and 59.9%, and increased apoptosis by 16.8% and 26.1% respectively. Upon systemic administration, this complex also showed significant efficacy in suppressing tumor growth in athymic mice (p <0.001). We conclude that this therapeutic complex could specifically and efficiently deliver SURVIVIN-siRNA to target cells and suppressed tumor growth in vivo, which indicates its potential to be used as a new strategy in prostate cancer therapy PMID:26954374

  7. Hindbrain leptin and glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor signaling interact to suppress food intake in an additive manner.

    PubMed

    Zhao, S; Kanoski, S E; Yan, J; Grill, H J; Hayes, M R

    2012-12-01

    The physiological control of feeding behavior involves modulation of the intake inhibitory effects of gastrointestinal satiation signaling via endogenous hindbrain leptin receptor (LepR) and glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation. Using a variety of dose-combinations of hindbrain delivered (4th intracerebroventricular; i.c.v.) leptin and the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4, experiments demonstrate that hindbrain LepR and GLP-1R signaling interact to control food intake and body weight in an additive manner. In addition, the maximum intake suppressive response that could be achieved by 4th i.c.v. leptin alone in non-obese rats (∼33%) was shown to be further suppressed when exendin-4 was co-administered. Importantly, it was determined that the interaction between hindbrain LepR signaling and GLP-1R signaling is relevant to endogenous food intake control, as hindbrain GLP-1R blockade by the selective antagonist exendin-(9-39) attenuated the intake inhibitory effects of hindbrain leptin delivery. Collectively, the findings reported here show that hindbrain LepR and GLP-1R activation interact in at least an additive manner to control food intake and body weight. As evidence is accumulating that combination pharmacotherapies offer greater sustained food intake and body weight suppression in obese individuals when compared with mono-drug therapies or lifestyle modifications alone, these findings highlight the need for further examination of combined central nervous system GLP-1R and LepR signaling as a potential drug target for obesity treatment.

  8. Antimicrobial cathelicidin peptide LL‑37 induces NET formation and suppresses the inflammatory response in a mouse septic model.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kaho; Hu, Zhongshuang; Tamura, Hiroshi; Reich, Johannes; Kuwahara-Arai, Kyoko; Iba, Toshiaki; Tabe, Yoko; Nagaoaka, Isao

    2017-10-01

    LL‑37 is the only known member of the cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides in humans. In addition to its broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities, LL‑37 may modulate various inflammatory reactions. The authors previously revealed that LL‑37 improves the survival of a murine cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) sepsis model. In the present study, the mechanism for the protective action of LL‑37 was elucidated using the CLP model, focusing on the effect of LL‑37 on the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). The results indicated that the intravenous administration of LL‑37 suppressed the increase of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including histone‑DNA complex and high‑mobility group protein 1, in addition to interleukin‑1β, tumor necrosis‑α and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)‑1 in plasma and peritoneal fluids. Notably, LL‑37 significantly suppressed the decrease of mononuclear cell number in blood, and the increase of polymorphonuclear cell (neutrophil) number in the peritoneal cavity during sepsis. Furthermore, LL‑37 reduced the bacterial burden in blood and peritoneal fluids. Notably, LL‑37 increased the level of NETs (myeloperoxidase‑DNA complex) in plasma and peritoneal fluids. In addition, it was verified that LL‑37 induces the release of NETs from neutrophils, and NETs possess the bactericidal activity. Overall, these observations suggest that LL‑37 improves the survival of CLP septic mice by possibly suppressing the inflammatory responses as evidenced by the inhibition of the increase of cytokines, soluble TREM‑1 and DAMPs (host cell death) and the alteration of inflammatory cell numbers, and bacterial growth via the release of NETs with bactericidal activity.

  9. Structure-based derivation of peptide inhibitors to target TGF-β1 receptor for the suppression of hypertrophic scarring fibroblast activation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huan; Yang, Songlin; Zheng, Jianghong; Mao, Guangyu

    2017-01-25

    The intermolecular recognition and interaction between human transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF-β1) and its cognate receptor TβRII have been implicated in the pathological condition of hypertrophic scarring (HS). Here, we attempted to rationally derive peptide inhibitors from the complex interface of TGF-β1 with TβRII to disrupt such interaction for the suppression of fibroblast activation involved in HS. A synthetic strategy that integrated computational design and fluorescence-based assay was described to examine the structural basis and energetic property of TGF-β1-TβRII crystal structure, from which a small peptide segment in the complex binding site was stripped artificially. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the linear peptide possesses a large intrinsic disorder that would incur considerable entropy penalty upon binding to TβRII; the peptide segment was then extended and cyclized by introducing a disulfide bond across its terminal residues that were premutated to cysteine. Normal mode analysis indicated that, as expected, the peptide flexibility was largely reduced upon the cyclization, and thus, the entropy penalty was minimized substantially, consequently promoting the spontaneous binding of peptide to TβRII. Fluorescence polarization assay confirmed that all linear peptides are typical non-binders of TβRII (Kd  = ND), while the designed cyclic peptides exhibit moderate or high affinity with Kd at micromolar level.

  10. Regulation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels suppresses the toxic effects of amyloid-beta peptide (25–35)☆

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Min; Ba, Maowen; Liang, Hui; Shao, Peng; Yu, Tianxia; Wang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we treated PC12 cells with 0–20 μM amyloid-β peptide (25–35) for 24 hours to induce cytotoxicity, and found that 5–20 μM amyloid-β peptide (25–35) decreased PC12 cell viability, but adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel activator diazoxide suppressed the decrease in PC12 cell viability induced by amyloid-β peptide (25–35). Diazoxide protected PC12 cells against amyloid-β peptide (25–35)-induced increases in mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels. These protective effects were reversed by the selective mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate. An inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine, also protected PC12 cells from amyloid-β peptide (25–35)-induced increases in both mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels. However, the H2O2-degrading enzyme catalase could not reverse the amyloid-β peptide (25–35)-induced increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species. A 24-hour exposure to amyloid-β peptide (25–35) did not result in apoptosis or necrosis, suggesting that the increases in both mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species levels preceded cell death. The data suggest that amyloid-β peptide (25–35) cytotoxicity is associated with adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels and nitric oxide. Regulation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels suppresses PC12 cell cytotoxicity induced by amyloid-β peptide (25–35). PMID:25206372

  11. Self-Assembling Peptides Form Immune Suppressive Amyloid Fibrils Effective in Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kurnellas, Michael P; Rothbard, Jonathan B; Steinman, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidogenic proteins have long been linked to neurodegenerative diseases. However, amyloid fibrils composed of six amino acids are protective in an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, decrease in the number of inflammatory foci in the parenchyma and meninges of the brain and spinal cord, and amelioration of the neurological signs of EAE when amyloid fibril-forming hexapeptides are administered reveal that some fibrils provide benefit. The therapeutic activity of the amyloid fibrils arise from diverse pathways that include binding of pro-inflammatory mediators in the plasma, reduction of IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ levels, and induction of type 1 interferon (IFN). Type 1 IFN has been used widely as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of MS and has been shown to be therapeutic in EAE with adoptive transfer of Th1 lymphocytes. However, type 1 IFN is known to exacerbate EAE with adoptive transfer of Th17 lymphocytes. Indeed, the amyloid fibril-forming peptide Tau 623-628 was therapeutic in Th1 adoptively transferred EAE, but ineffective in Th17 adoptively transferred EAE. However, the therapeutic effect of Tau 623-628 was restored in IFN-α/β receptor (IFNAR) knockout mice, indicating that other immune pathways independent of type 1 IFN induction play a role in the amelioration of EAE. Moreover, Amylin 28-33, a polar, non-ionizable peptide that does not form fibrils as rapidly as Tau 623-628, induces a small fraction of type 1 IFN compared to Tau 623-628 and is therapeutic in Th17 EAE. The diverse immunological pathways modulated by the self-assembling hexapeptides are under investigation with a goal to develop novel, safe, and potent therapeutics for neuroinflammation.

  12. Walker 256 Tumor Growth Suppression by Crotoxin Involves Formyl Peptide Receptors and Lipoxin A4

    PubMed Central

    Brigatte, Patrícia; Faiad, Odair Jorge; Ferreira Nocelli, Roberta Cornélio; Landgraf, Richardt G.; Palma, Mario Sergio; Cury, Yara; Curi, Rui; Sampaio, Sandra Coccuzzo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Crotoxin (CTX), the main toxin of South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom, on Walker 256 tumor growth, the pain symptoms associated (hyperalgesia and allodynia), and participation of endogenous lipoxin A4. Treatment with CTX (s.c.), daily, for 5 days reduced tumor growth at the 5th day after injection of Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the plantar surface of adult rat hind paw. This observation was associated with inhibition of new blood vessel formation and decrease in blood vessel diameter. The treatment with CTX raised plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and its natural analogue 15-epi-LXA4, an effect mediated by formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). In fact, the treatment with Boc-2, an inhibitor of FPRs, abolished the increase in plasma levels of these mediators triggered by CTX. The blockage of these receptors also abolished the inhibitory action of CTX on tumor growth and blood vessel formation and the decrease in blood vessel diameter. Together, the results herein presented demonstrate that CTX increases plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and 15-epi-LXA4, which might inhibit both tumor growth and formation of new vessels via FPRs. PMID:27190493

  13. The Host Defense Peptide Cathelicidin Is Required for NK Cell-Mediated Suppression of Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Büchau, Amanda S.; Morizane, Shin; Trowbridge, Janet; Schauber, Jürgen; Kotol, Paul; Bui, Jack D.; Gallo, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor surveillance requires the interaction of multiple molecules and cells that participate in innate and the adaptive immunity. Cathelicidin was initially identified as an antimicrobial peptide, although it is now clear that it fulfills a variety of immune functions beyond microbial killing. Recent data have suggested contrasting roles for cathelicidin in tumor development. Because its role in tumor surveillance is not well understood, we investigated the requirement of cathelicidin in controlling transplantable tumors in mice. Cathelicidin was observed to be abundant in tumor-infiltrating NK1.1+ cells in mice. The importance of this finding was demonstrated by the fact that cathelicidin knockout mice (Camp−/−) permitted faster tumor growth than wild type controls in two different xenograft tumor mouse models (B16.F10 and RMA-S). Functional in vitro analyses found that NK cells derived from Camp−/− versus wild type mice showed impaired cytotoxic activity toward tumor targets. These findings could not be solely attributed to an observed perforin deficiency in freshly isolated Camp−/− NK cells, because this deficiency could be partially restored by IL-2 treatment, whereas cytotoxic activity was still defective in IL-2-activated Camp−/− NK cells. Thus, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of cathelicidin in NK cell antitumor function. PMID:19949065

  14. Mitochondria related peptide MOTS-c suppresses ovariectomy-induced bone loss via AMPK activation

    SciTech Connect

    Ming, Wei; Lu, Gan; Xin, Sha; Huanyu, Lu; Yinghao, Jiang; Xiaoying, Lei; Chengming, Xu; Banjun, Ruan; Li, Wang; and others

    2016-08-05

    Therapeutic targeting bone loss has been the focus of the study in osteoporosis. The present study is intended to evaluate whether MOTS-c, a novel mitochondria related 16 aa peptide, can protect mice from ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. After ovary removal, the mice were injected with MOTS-c at a dose of 5 mg/kg once a day for 12 weeks. Our results showed that MOTS-c treatment significantly alleviated bone loss, as determined by micro-CT examination. Mechanistically, we found that the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) induced osteoclast differentiation was remarkably inhibited by MOTS-c. Moreover, MOTS-c increased phosphorylated AMPK levels, and compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, could partially abrogate the effects of the MOTS-c on osteoclastogenesis. Thus, our findings provide evidence that MOTS-c may exert as an inhibitor of osteoporosis via AMPK dependent inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. -- Highlights: •MOTS-c decreases OVX-induced bone loss in vivo. •MOTS-c inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. •MOTS-c inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast-specific gene expression. •MOTS-c represses osteoclast differentiation via the activation of AMPK.

  15. Suppression of Cocaine-Evoked Hyperactivity by Self-Adjuvanting and Multivalent Peptide Nanofiber Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rudra, Jai S; Ding, Ye; Neelakantan, Harshini; Ding, Chunyong; Appavu, Rajagopal; Stutz, Sonja; Snook, Joshua D; Chen, Haiying; Cunningham, Kathryn A; Zhou, Jia

    2016-05-18

    The development of anti-cocaine vaccines that counteract the rewarding effects of the drug are currently being investigated as adjunct therapies for prevention of relapse in abstinent users. However, cocaine is weakly immunogenic and requires conjugation to carrier proteins and coadministration with strong adjuvants, which carry the risk of local reactogenicity and systemic toxicity. Here we report synthetic and multivalent self-assembling peptide nanofibers as adjuvant-free carriers for cocaine vaccines. A novel cocaine hapten modified at the P3 site was conjugated to the N-terminus of an amphipathic self-assembling domain KFE8. In aqueous buffers the cocaine-KFE8 conjugate assembled into β-sheet rich nanofibers, which raised anti-cocaine antibodies without the need for added adjuvants in mice. Vaccinated mice were treated with cocaine and a significant negative correlation was observed between antibody levels and cocaine-evoked hyperactivity. These totally synthetic and multivalent nanofibers with well-defined chemical composition represent the first generation of adjuvant-free cocaine vaccines.

  16. SILENCING GASTRIN-RELEASING PEPTIDE RECEPTOR SUPPRESSES KEY REGULATORS OF AEROBIC GLYCOLYSIS IN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Rellinger, Eric J.; Romain, Carmelle; Choi, SunPhil; Qiao, Jingbo; Chung, Dai H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Under normoxic conditions, cancer cells use aerobic glycolysis as opposed to glucose oxidation for energy production; this altered metabolism correlates with poor outcomes in neuroblastoma. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) regulate aerobic glycolysis, while pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase 2 (PDP2) promotes glucose oxidation. Here, we sought to determine whether gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R) signaling regulates glucose metabolism. Procedure Neuroblastoma cell lines, BE(2)-C and SK-N-AS, were used. PCR microararay for glucose metabolism was performed on GRP-R silenced cells. Target protein expression was validated using Western blotting and VEGF ELISA. Cobalt chloride (CoCl2) was used to induce chemical hypoxia. Efficacy of targeting PDK regulation in neuroblastoma was assessed using dichloroacetate (DCA) by conducting cell viability assays and Western blotting for apoptotic markers. Results Silencing GRP-R decreased HIF-1α expression and blocked VEGF expression and secretion in both normoxic and CoCl2 induced hypoxia. PCR array analysis identified that GRP-R silencing reduced PDK4 and increased PDP2 mRNA expression. These findings were validated by Western blotting. CoCl2 induced hypoxia increased VEGF secretion, HIF-1α, and PDK4 expression. PDK4 silencing decreased HIF-1α expression and VEGF expression and secretion. DCA treatment decreased BE(2)-C and SK-N-AS proliferation while promoting cell death. GRP-R silencing and DCA treatment synergistically halted BE(2)-C proliferation. Conclusions We report that GRP-R regulates glucose metabolism in neuroblastoma by modulating HIF-1α, PDK4 and PDP2. PDK4 regulates glucose metabolism, in part, via regulation of HIF-1α. Synergistic consequences of GRP-R inhibition and DCA treatment may suggest a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of aggressive neuroblastoma. PMID:25630799

  17. Septal Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Expression Determines Suppression of Cocaine-Induced Behavior.

    PubMed

    Harasta, Anne E; Power, John M; von Jonquieres, Georg; Karl, Tim; Drucker, Daniel J; Housley, Gary D; Schneider, Miriam; Klugmann, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and its receptor GLP-1R are a key component of the satiety signaling system, and long-acting GLP-1 analogs have been approved for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus. Previous reports demonstrate that GLP-1 regulates glucose homeostasis alongside the rewarding effects of food. Both palatable food and illicit drugs activate brain reward circuitries, and pharmacological studies suggest that central nervous system GLP-1 signaling holds potential for the treatment of addiction. However, the role of endogenous GLP-1 in the attenuation of reward-oriented behavior, and the essential domains of the mesolimbic system mediating these beneficial effects, are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the central regions of highest Glp-1r gene activity are essential in mediating responses to drugs of abuse. Here, we show that Glp-1r-deficient (Glp-1r(-/-)) mice have greatly augmented cocaine-induced locomotor responses and enhanced conditional place preference compared with wild-type (Glp-1r(+/+)) controls. Employing mRNA in situ hybridization we located peak Glp-1r mRNA expression in GABAergic neurons of the dorsal lateral septum, an anatomical site with a crucial function in reward perception. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of dorsal lateral septum neurons revealed that genetic Glp-1r ablation leads to increased excitability of these cells. Viral vector-mediated Glp-1r gene delivery to the dorsal lateral septum of Glp-1r(-/-) animals reduced cocaine-induced locomotion and conditional place preference to wild-type levels. This site-specific genetic complementation did not affect the anxiogenic phenotype observed in Glp-1r(-/-) controls. These data reveal a novel role of GLP-1R in dorsal lateral septum function driving behavioral responses to cocaine.

  18. Septal Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Expression Determines Suppression of Cocaine-Induced Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Harasta, Anne E; Power, John M; von Jonquieres, Georg; Karl, Tim; Drucker, Daniel J; Housley, Gary D; Schneider, Miriam; Klugmann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and its receptor GLP-1R are a key component of the satiety signaling system, and long-acting GLP-1 analogs have been approved for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus. Previous reports demonstrate that GLP-1 regulates glucose homeostasis alongside the rewarding effects of food. Both palatable food and illicit drugs activate brain reward circuitries, and pharmacological studies suggest that central nervous system GLP-1 signaling holds potential for the treatment of addiction. However, the role of endogenous GLP-1 in the attenuation of reward-oriented behavior, and the essential domains of the mesolimbic system mediating these beneficial effects, are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the central regions of highest Glp-1r gene activity are essential in mediating responses to drugs of abuse. Here, we show that Glp-1r-deficient (Glp-1r−/−) mice have greatly augmented cocaine-induced locomotor responses and enhanced conditional place preference compared with wild-type (Glp-1r+/+) controls. Employing mRNA in situ hybridization we located peak Glp-1r mRNA expression in GABAergic neurons of the dorsal lateral septum, an anatomical site with a crucial function in reward perception. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of dorsal lateral septum neurons revealed that genetic Glp-1r ablation leads to increased excitability of these cells. Viral vector-mediated Glp-1r gene delivery to the dorsal lateral septum of Glp-1r−/− animals reduced cocaine-induced locomotion and conditional place preference to wild-type levels. This site-specific genetic complementation did not affect the anxiogenic phenotype observed in Glp-1r−/− controls. These data reveal a novel role of GLP-1R in dorsal lateral septum function driving behavioral responses to cocaine. PMID:25669605

  19. Induction of IL-10 cytokine and the suppression of T cell proliferation by specific peptides from red cell band 3 and in vivo effects of these peptides on autoimmune hemolytic anemia in NZB mice.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Abdel-Rahman; Elson, Christopher J

    2017-12-01

    The anion channel protein band 3 is the main target of the pathogenic red blood cells (RBC) autoantibodies in New Zealand black (NZB) mice. CD4 T cells from NZB mice with autoimmune hemolytic anemia respond to band 3. Previously, we have shown that IL-10 and peptides containing a dominant T cell epitope from red cell band 3 modulate autoimmune hemolytic anemia in NZB mice. Because of the immunoregulatory role of IL-10 in autoimmune diseases, we aim to identify individual band 3 peptides that induce high IL-10 production and simultaneously suppress CD4 T cell proliferation and to investigate the effect intranasal administration of IL-10 producing band 3 peptides on autoantibody responses of NZB mice. Splenic CD4 T cells of NZB mice were isolated and stimulated by co-culture of T cells with individual band 3 peptides. IL-10 production was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and proliferative response of CD4 T cells was estimated by incorporation of [(3)H] thymidine assay. NZB mice were given either PBS, or peptides 25 (241-251) and 29 (282-296) or both peptides intranasally on three occasions at 2-day intervals. The mice were bled at 6, 10 and 18 weeks after peptide inhalation, and the number of RBC auto-antibodies was measured by DELAT and hematocrit values were assessed. Peptides 25 (241-251) and 29 (282-296) induced the highest IL-10 production by CD4 T cells. These peptides also inhibited the peak T cell proliferative response. 6 and 10 weeks after peptide inhalation, the total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a in mice treated with both peptides 241-251 and 282-296 were significantly higher than control (P < 0.05). However, no significant difference in the mean hematocrit between of the peptide-treated mice and the control group was found. Although band 3 peptides 241-251 and 282-296 induced to the highest IL-10 production by CD4 T cells in vitro but fail to reverse the RBC autoantibody response in vivo. Modifications to improve solubility these peptides might

  20. Identification of a new androgen receptor (AR) co-regulator BUD31 and related peptides to suppress wild-type and mutated AR-mediated prostate cancer growth via peptide screening and X-ray structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Wu, Po-Long; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Lin, An-Chi; Ting, Huei-Ju; Pang, See-Tong; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Ma, Wen-Lung; Chen, Chung-Jung; Wu, Wen-Guey; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-01-01

    Treatment with individual anti-androgens is associated with the development of hot-spot mutations in the androgen receptor (AR), including T877A (hydroxyflutamide [HF]) and W741(C/L) (bicalutamide [CDX]). Here, we found that anti-androgens bound mt-ARs (HF-T877A-AR-LBD and CDX-W741L-AR-LBD) have similar binary structure to the 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) bound wild type (wt) AR (DHT-wt-AR-LBD). Phage display revealed that these ARs bound to similar peptides, including BUD31, containing an Fxx(F/H/L/W/Y)Y motif cluster with Tyr in the +5 position. Structural analyses of the AR-LBD-BUD31 complex at 2.1 Å resolution revealed formation of an extra hydrogen bond between the Tyr+5 residue of the peptide and Gln733 of the AR AF2 domain, suggesting that peptides with Fxx(F/H/L/W/Y)Y motifs can interact with wt or mutated ARs. Functional studies showed that BUD31-related peptides suppressed transactivation of both DHT-wt-AR and HF-T877A-AR by interrupting AR N- and C-terminal interactions, thereby inhibiting wt and mutant AR-mediated prostate cancer cell growth. Collectively, these results suggest the combination of peptide screening and X-ray structure analysis as a new strategy for developing anti-androgens that simultaneously suppress both wt and mutated AR function. PMID:25091737

  1. Suppression of Food Intake by Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists: Relative Potencies and Role of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4

    PubMed Central

    Jessen, Lene; Aulinger, Benedikt A.; Hassel, Jonathan L.; Roy, Kyle J.; Smith, Eric P.; Greer, Todd M.; Woods, Stephen C.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2012-01-01

    Administration of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists GLP-1 and exendin-4 (Ex-4) directly into the central nervous system decreases food intake. But although Ex-4 potently suppresses food intake after peripheral administration, the effects of parenteral GLP-1 are variable and not as strong. A plausible explanation for these effects is the rapid inactivation of circulating GLP-1 by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), an enzyme that does not alter Ex-4 activity. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the relative potency of Ex-4 and GLP-1 under conditions in which DPP-4 activity was reduced. Outbred rats, wild-type mice, and mice with a targeted deletion of DPP-4 (Dpp4−/−) were treated with GLP-1 alone or in combination with the DPP-4 inhibitor vildagliptin, Ex-4, or saline, and food intake was measured. GLP-1 alone, even at high doses, did not affect feeding in wild-type mice or rats but did reduce food intake when combined with vildagliptin or given to Dpp4−/− mice. Despite plasma clearance similar to DPP-4-protected GLP-1, equimolar Ex-4 caused greater anorexia than vildagliptin plus GLP-1. To determine whether supraphysiological levels of endogenous GLP-1 would suppress food intake if protected from DPP-4, rats with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and significantly elevated postprandial plasma GLP-1 received vildagliptin or saline. Despite 5-fold greater postprandial GLP-1 in these animals, vildagliptin did not affect food intake in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass rats. Thus, in both mice and rats, peripheral GLP-1 reduces food intake significantly less than Ex-4, even when protected from DPP-4. These findings suggest distinct potencies of GLP-1 receptor agonists on food intake that cannot be explained by plasma pharmacokinetics. PMID:23033273

  2. Enteral peptide formulas inhibit radiation induced enteritis and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells and suppress the expression and function of Alzheimer's and cell division control gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Cope, F.O. ); Issinger, O.G. ); McArdle, A.H. ); Shapiro, J.; Tomei, L.D. )

    1991-03-15

    Studies have shown that patients receiving enteral peptide formulas prior to irradiation have a significantly reduced incidence of enteritis and express a profound increase in intestinal cellularity. Two conceptual approaches were taken to describe this response. First was the evaluation in changes in programmed intestinal cell death and secondly the evaluation of a gene product controlling cell division cycling. This study provided a relationship between the ratio of cell death to cell formulations. The results indicate that in the canine and murine models, irradiation induces expression of the Alzheimer's gene in intestinal crypt cells, while the incidence of apoptosis in apical cells is significantly increased. The use of peptide enteral formulations suppresses the expression of the Alzheimer's gene in crypt cells, while apoptosis is eliminated in the apical cells of the intestine. Concomitantly, enteral peptide formulations suppress the function of the CK-II gene product in the basal and baso-lateral cells of the intestine. These data indicate that although the mitotic index is significantly reduced in enterocytes, this phenomenon alone is not sufficient to account for the peptide-induced radio-resistance of the intestine. The data also indicate a significant reduction of normal apoptosis in the upper lateral and apical cells of the intestinal villi. Thus, the ratio of cell death to cell replacement is significantly decreased resulting in an increase in villus height and hypertrophy of the apical villus cells. Thus, peptide solutions should be considered as an adjunct treatment both in radio- and chemotherapy.

  3. Ciprofloxacin Affects Host Cells by Suppressing Expression of the Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides Cathelicidins and Beta-Defensin-3 in Colon Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Protim; Mily, Akhirunnesa; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Jalal, Shah; Bergman, Peter; Raqib, Rubhana; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H.; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics exert several effects on host cells including regulation of immune components. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), e.g., cathelicidins and defensins display multiple functions in innate immunity. In colonic mucosa, cathelicidins are induced by butyrate, a bacterial fermentation product. Here, we investigated the effect of antibiotics on butyrate-induced expression of cathelicidins and beta-defensins in colon epithelial cells. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that ciprofloxacin and clindamycin reduce butyrate-induced transcription of the human cathelicidin LL-37 in the colonic epithelial cell line HT-29. Suppression of LL-37 peptide/protein by ciprofloxacin was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that ciprofloxacin suppresses the rabbit cathelicidin CAP-18 in rectal epithelia of healthy and butyrate-treated Shigella-infected rabbits. Ciprofloxacin also down-regulated butyrate-induced transcription of the human beta-defensin-3 in HT-29 cells. Microarray analysis of HT-29 cells revealed upregulation by butyrate with subsequent down-regulation by ciprofloxacin of additional genes encoding immune factors. Dephosphorylation of histone H3, an epigenetic event provided a possible mechanism of the suppressive effect of ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, LL-37 peptide inhibited Clostridium difficile growth in vitro. In conclusion, ciprofloxacin and clindamycin exert immunomodulatory function by down-regulating AMPs and other immune components in colonic epithelial cells. Suppression of AMPs may contribute to the overgrowth of C. difficile, causing antibiotic-associated diarrhea. PMID:27025750

  4. Vaccination with ErbB-2 peptides prevents cancer stem cell expansion and suppresses the development of spontaneous tumors in MMTV-PyMT transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gil, Eun-Young; Jo, Uk-Hyun; Lee, Hye Jin; Kang, Jinho; Seo, Jae Hong; Lee, Eun Sook; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, InSun; Phan-Lai, Vy; Disis, Mary L; Park, Kyong Hwa

    2014-08-01

    ErbB-2 has been implicated as a target for cancer-initiating cells in breast and other cancers. ErbB-2-directed peptide vaccines have been shown to be effective in prevention of spontaneous tumorigenesis of breast in neu transgenic mouse model, and cellular immunity is proposed as a mechanism for the anti-tumor efficacy. However, there has been no explanation as to how immunity suppresses tumorigenesis from the early stage carcinogenesis, when ErbB-2 expression in breast is low. Here, we investigated a peptide-based vaccine, which consists of two MHC class II epitopes derived from murine ErbB-2, to prevent the occurrence of spontaneous tumors in breast and assess immune impact on breast cancer stem cells. Female MMTV-PyMT transgenic mice were immunized with either ErbB-2 peptide vaccine, or a peptide from tetanus toxoid, or PBS in immune adjuvant. ErbB-2 peptides vaccine completely suppressed spontaneous breast tumors, and the efficacy was correlated with antigen-specific T-cell and antibody responses. In addition, immune serum from the mice of ErbB-2 vaccine group had an inhibitory effect on mammosphere-forming capacity and signaling through ErbB-2 and downstream Akt pathway in ErbB-2 overexpressing mouse mammary cancer cells. We provide evidence that multi-epitope class II peptides vaccine suppresses tumorigenesis of breast potentially by inhibiting the growth of cancer stem cells. We also suggest that a strategy of inducing strong immune responses using multi-epitope ErbB-2-directed helper vaccine might be useful in preventing breast cancer recurrence.

  5. T cells stimulated with an analog peptide of type II collagen require the Fc receptor γ-chain to secrete interleukin-4 and suppress autoimmune arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Myers, Linda K; Cullins, David L; Brand, David D; Kleinau, Sandra; Stuart, John M; Kang, Andrew H

    2011-09-01

    To explore the characteristics of the T cell population that responds to an analog peptide (A9) of type II collagen and regulates autoimmunity, using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Analog peptide A9 is a 26-amino acid peptide analogous to the sequence of a segment of type II collagen (CII245-270) but with substitutions at amino acid positions 260 (alanine for isoleucine), 261 (hydroxyproline for alanine), and 263 (asparagine for phenylalanine). We previously showed that A9 profoundly suppressed CIA and immune responses to type II collagen. In order to determine the mechanism of suppression, we used transgenic mice whose T cells express a type II collagen-specific receptor (T cell receptor) and performed passive cell transfer experiments. The results demonstrated that suppression of CIA by A9 is dependent on T cells. Using multiparameter flow cytometry, we determined that the cells responsible for suppression were CD4+ and expressed high levels of Fcε receptor Iγ chain (FcRγ). To establish the significance of this finding, we obtained mice genetically deficient in FcRγ in order to perform passive transfer experiments. The resulting FcRγ-/- CD4+ T cells, when primed by culture with A9, could not transfer the suppression of arthritis or secrete cytokines in response to A9. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the suppression of arthritis and the Th2 cytokine profile elicited by A9 is dependent on the presence of FcRγ in T cells. These findings are novel and may have therapeutic potential for patients with autoimmune arthritis. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  6. Design of azidoproline containing gluten peptides to suppress CD4+ T-cell responses associated with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kapoerchan, Varsha V; Wiesner, Martina; Overhand, Mark; van der Marel, Gijs A; Koning, Frits; Overkleeft, Herman S

    2008-02-15

    Celiac disease is an intestinal disease caused by intolerance for gluten, a common protein in food. A life-long gluten-free diet is the only available treatment. As it is well established that the interaction between proline-rich gluten derived peptides and the human HLA-DQ2 molecules induces immune responses that lead to disease development, we have now designed a series of gluten peptides in which proline residues were replaced by azidoprolines. These peptides were found to bind to HLA-DQ2 with an affinity similar to that of the natural gluten peptide. Moreover, some of these peptides were found to be non-immunogenic and block gluten induced immune responses. These can thus serve as lead compounds for the development of HLA-DQ2 blocker peptides.

  7. Fusogenic-oligoarginine peptide-mediated silencing of the CIP2A oncogene suppresses oral cancer tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Bryant, Angela A; Dumitriu, Anca; Attaway, Christopher C; Yu, Hong; Jakymiw, Andrew

    2015-11-28

    Intracellular delivery and endosomal escape of functional small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) remain major barriers limiting the clinical translation of RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapeutics. Recently, we demonstrated that a cell-penetrating endosome-disruptive peptide we synthesized, termed 599, enhanced the intracellular delivery and bioavailability of siRNAs designed to target the CIP2A oncoprotein (siCIP2A) into oral cancer cells and consequently inhibited oral cancer cell invasiveness and anchorage-independent growth in vitro. Thus, to further assess the therapeutic potential of the 599 peptide in mediating RNAi-based therapeutics for oral cancer and its prospective applicability in clinical settings, the objective of the current study was to determine whether intratumoral dosing of the 599 peptide-siCIP2A complex could induce silencing of CIP2A and consequently impair tumor growth using a xenograft oral cancer mouse model. Our results demonstrate that the 599 peptide is able to protect siRNAs from degradation by serum and ribonucleases in vitro and upon intratumoral injection in vivo, confirming the stability of the 599 peptide-siRNA complex and its potential for therapeutic utility. Moreover, 599 peptide-mediated delivery of siCIP2A to tumor tissue induces CIP2A silencing without any associated toxicity, consequently resulting in reduction of the mitotic index and significant inhibition of tumor growth. Together, these data suggest that the 599 peptide carrier is a clinically effective mediator of RNAi-based cancer therapeutics.

  8. Formation of bacterial pilus-like nanofibres by designed minimalistic self-assembling peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterman, Tom; Kornreich, Micha; Stern, Avigail; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Porath, Danny; Beck, Roy; Shimon, Linda J. W.; Gazit, Ehud

    2016-11-01

    Mimicking the multifunctional bacterial type IV pili (T4Ps) nanofibres provides an important avenue towards the development of new functional nanostructured biomaterials. Yet, the development of T4Ps-based applications is limited by the inability to form these nanofibres in vitro from their pilin monomers. Here, to overcome this limitation, we followed a reductionist approach and designed a self-assembling pilin-based 20-mer peptide, derived from the presumably bioelectronic pilin of Geobacter sulfurreducens. The designed 20-mer, which spans sequences from both the polymerization domain and the functionality region of the pilin, self-assembled into ordered nanofibres. Investigation of the 20-mer revealed that shorter sequences which correspond to the polymerization domain form a supramolecular β-sheet, contrary to their helical configuration in the native T4P core, due to alternative molecular recognition. In contrast, the sequence derived from the functionality region maintains a native-like, helical conformation. This study presents a new family of self-assembling peptides which form T4P-like nanostructures.

  9. Epitope-specific suppression of antibody response in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis by a monomethoxypolyethylene glycol conjugate of a myasthenogenic synthetic peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Atassi, M Z; Ruan, K H; Jinnai, K; Oshima, M; Ashizawa, T

    1992-01-01

    A synthetic peptide corresponding to a myasthenogenic region of Torpedo californica acetylcholine (AcCho) receptor (AcChoR) alpha subunit, AcChoR alpha-(125-148), was conjugated to monomethoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG). Injection of mice with the mPEG-AcChoR alpha-(125-148) conjugate and subsequent immunization with whole Torpedo AcChoR suppressed the development of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) by electrophysiological criteria. In anti-AcChoR sera from these animals, the antibody response against unconjugated AcChoR alpha-(125-148) was decreased, while the antibody responses against whole AcChoR and other epitopes were not altered. There were no detectable changes in T-cell proliferation responses to AcChoR alpha-(125-148) or to whole AcChoR in these animals. Prior injections with a "nonsense" peptide-mPEG conjugate had no effect on responses to the subsequent immunization with whole Torpedo AcChoR. The results indicate that the mPEG-AcChoR alpha-(125-148) conjugate has epitope-specific tolerogenicity for antibody responses in EAMG and that the AcChoR alpha-subunit region comprising residues 125-148 plays an important pathophysiological role in EAMG. The epitope-directed tolerogenic conjugates may be useful for future immunotherapies of human myasthenia gravis. The strategy of specific suppression of the antibody response to a predetermined epitope by using a synthetic mPEG-peptide conjugate may prove useful in manipulation and suppression of unwanted immune responses such as autoimmunity and allergy. PMID:1378618

  10. A cell-penetrating peptide suppresses the hypoxia inducible factor-1 function by binding to the helix-loop-helix domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Thompson, John D; Chan, William K

    2013-04-25

    The heterodimeric hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) complex is composed of the hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT). Activation of the HIF-1 function is essential for tumor growth and metastasis. We previously showed that transfection of a plasmid containing an ARNT-interacting peptide (Ainp1) cDNA suppresses the HIF-1 signaling in Hep3B cells. Here we generated TAT fusion of the Ainp1 peptide (6His-TAT-Ainp1) to determine whether and how the Ainp1 peptide suppresses the HIF-1 function. The bacterially expressed 6His-TAT-Ainp1 was purified under denatured condition and then refolded by limited dialysis. The refolded 6His-TAT-Ainp1 interacts with the helix-loop-helix (HLH) domain of ARNT in a similar fashion as the native 6His-Ainp1. 6His-TAT-Ainp1 colocalizes with ARNT in the nucleus of HeLa and Hep3B cells after protein transduction. The transduced protein reaches the maximum intracellular levels within 2 h while remains detectable up to 96 h in HeLa cells. At 2 μM concentration, 6His-TAT-Ainp1 is not cytotoxic in HeLa cells but suppresses the cobalt chloride-activated, hypoxia responsive enhancer-driven luciferase expression in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, it decreases the cobalt chloride-dependent induction of the HIF-1 target genes at both the message (vascular endothelial growth factor and aldolase C) and protein (carbonic anhydrase IX and glucose transporter 1) levels. The protein levels of HIF-1α and ARNT are not altered in the presence of 6His-TAT-Ainp1. In summary, we provided evidence to support that the Ainp1 peptide directly suppresses the HIF-1 function by interacting with the ARNT HLH domain, and in turn interfering with the heterodimerization of HIF-1α and ARNT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. TGF-β-induced Myelin Peptide-Specific Regulatory T Cells Mediate Antigen-Specific Suppression of Induction of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Podojil, Joseph R.; Chang, Judy; Luo, Xunrong; Miller, Stephen D.

    2010-01-01

    The low number of natural regulatory T cells (nTreg cells) in the circulation specific for a particular antigen and concerns about the bystander suppressive capacity of expanded nTregs presents a major clinical challenge for nTreg-based therapeutic treatment of autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we demonstrate that naïve CD4+CD25-Foxp3- T cells specific for the myelin proteolipid protein (PLP)139-151 peptide, can be converted into CD25+Foxp3+ induced Treg cells (iTreg cells) when stimulated in the presence of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), retinoic acid and interleukin-2. These PLP139-151-specific iTreg cells (139-iTreg cells) have a phenotype similar to natural Treg cells, but additionally express an intermediate level of CD62L and a high level of CD103. Upon transfer into SJL/J mice, 139-iTreg cells undergo antigen-driven proliferation and are effective at suppressing induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced by the cognate PLP139-151 peptide, but not PLP178-191 or a mixture of the two peptides. Furthermore, 139-iTregs inhibit delayed-type-hypersensitivity (DTH) responses to PLP139-151, but not PLP178-191, MOG35-55 or OVA323-339 in mice primed with a mixture of PLP139-151 and the other respective peptides. Additionally, 139-iTreg cells suppress the proliferation and activation of PLP139-151-, but not MOG35-55-specific CD4+ T cells in SJL/B6 F1 mice primed with a combination of PLP139-151 and MOG35-55. These findings suggest that antigen-specific-iTreg cells are amplified in vivo when exposed to cognate antigen under inflammatory conditions, and these activated iTreg cells suppress CD4+ responder T cells in an antigen-specific manner. PMID:20483764

  12. Human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a peptides do not reliably suppress anti-HPA-1a responses using a humanized severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D J; Eastlake, J L; Kumpel, B M

    2014-04-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) occurs most frequently when human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a-positive fetal platelets are destroyed by maternal HPA-1a immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies. Pregnancies at risk are treated by administration of high-dose intravenous Ig (IVIG) to women, but this is expensive and often not well tolerated. Peptide immunotherapy may be effective for ameliorating some allergic and autoimmune diseases. The HPA-1a/1b polymorphism is Leu/Pro33 on β3 integrin (CD61), and the anti-HPA-1a response is restricted to HPA-1b1b and HLA-DRB3*0101-positive pregnant women with an HPA-1a-positive fetus. We investigated whether or not HPA-1a antigen-specific peptides that formed the T cell epitope could reduce IgG anti-HPA-1a responses, using a mouse model we had developed previously. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in blood donations from HPA-1a-immunized women were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with peptides and HPA-1a-positive platelets. Human anti-HPA-1a in murine plasma was quantitated at intervals up to 15 weeks. HPA-1a-specific T cells in PBMC were identified by proliferation assays. Using PBMC of three donors who had little T cell reactivity to HPA-1a peptides in vitro, stimulation of anti-HPA-1a responses by these peptides occurred in vivo. However, with a second donation from one of these women which, uniquely, had high HPA-1a-specific T cell proliferation in vitro, marked suppression of the anti-HPA-1a response by HPA-1a peptides occurred in vivo. HPA-1a peptide immunotherapy in this model depended upon reactivation of HPA-1a T cell responses in the donor. For FNAIT, we suggest that administration of antigen-specific peptides to pregnant women might cause either enhancement or reduction of pathogenic antibodies.

  13. Human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a peptides do not reliably suppress anti-HPA-1a responses using a humanized severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, D J; Eastlake, J L; Kumpel, B M

    2014-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) occurs most frequently when human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a-positive fetal platelets are destroyed by maternal HPA-1a immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies. Pregnancies at risk are treated by administration of high-dose intravenous Ig (IVIG) to women, but this is expensive and often not well tolerated. Peptide immunotherapy may be effective for ameliorating some allergic and autoimmune diseases. The HPA-1a/1b polymorphism is Leu/Pro33 on β3 integrin (CD61), and the anti-HPA-1a response is restricted to HPA-1b1b and HLA-DRB3*0101-positive pregnant women with an HPA-1a-positive fetus. We investigated whether or not HPA-1a antigen-specific peptides that formed the T cell epitope could reduce IgG anti-HPA-1a responses, using a mouse model we had developed previously. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in blood donations from HPA-1a-immunized women were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with peptides and HPA-1a-positive platelets. Human anti-HPA-1a in murine plasma was quantitated at intervals up to 15 weeks. HPA-1a-specific T cells in PBMC were identified by proliferation assays. Using PBMC of three donors who had little T cell reactivity to HPA-1a peptides in vitro, stimulation of anti-HPA-1a responses by these peptides occurred in vivo. However, with a second donation from one of these women which, uniquely, had high HPA-1a-specific T cell proliferation in vitro, marked suppression of the anti-HPA-1a response by HPA-1a peptides occurred in vivo. HPA-1a peptide immunotherapy in this model depended upon reactivation of HPA-1a T cell responses in the donor. For FNAIT, we suggest that administration of antigen-specific peptides to pregnant women might cause either enhancement or reduction of pathogenic antibodies. PMID:24261689

  14. Synthetic antimicrobial and LPS-neutralising peptides suppress inflammatory and immune responses in skin cells and promote keratinocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    Pfalzgraff, Anja; Heinbockel, Lena; Su, Qi; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus; Weindl, Günther

    2016-01-01

    The stagnation in the development of new antibiotics and the concomitant high increase of resistant bacteria emphasize the urgent need for new therapeutic options. Antimicrobial peptides are promising agents for the treatment of bacterial infections and recent studies indicate that Pep19-2.5, a synthetic anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) peptide (SALP), efficiently neutralises pathogenicity factors of Gram-negative (LPS) and Gram-positive (lipoprotein/-peptide, LP) bacteria and protects against sepsis. Here, we investigated the potential of Pep19-2.5 and the structurally related compound Pep19-4LF for their therapeutic application in bacterial skin infections. SALPs inhibited LP-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and p38 MAPK and reduced cytokine release and gene expression in primary human keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts. In LPS-stimulated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and Langerhans-like cells, the peptides blocked IL-6 secretion, downregulated expression of maturation markers and inhibited dendritic cell migration. Both SALPs showed a low cytotoxicity in all investigated cell types. Furthermore, SALPs markedly promoted cell migration via EGFR transactivation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and accelerated artificial wound closure in keratinocytes. Peptide-induced keratinocyte migration was mediated by purinergic receptors and metalloproteases. In contrast, SALPs did not affect proliferation of keratinocytes. Conclusively, our data suggest a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with acute and chronic skin infections. PMID:27509895

  15. Harnessing short poly(A)-binding protein-interacting peptides for the suppression of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Fatscher, Tobias; Gehring, Niels H.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a cellular process that eliminates messenger RNA (mRNA) substrates with premature translation termination codons (PTCs). In addition, NMD regulates the expression of a number of physiological mRNAs, for example transcripts containing long 3′ UTRs. Current models implicate the interaction between cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein (PABPC1) and translation termination in NMD. Accordingly, PABPC1 present within close proximity of a termination codon antagonizes NMD. Here, we use reporter mRNAs with different NMD-inducing 3′ UTRs to establish a general NMD-inhibiting property of PABPC1. NMD-inhibition is not limited to PABPC1, but can also be achieved by peptides consisting of the PABP-interacting motif 2 (PAM2) of different proteins when recruited to an NMD-inhibiting position of NMD reporter transcripts. The short PAM2 peptides efficiently suppress NMD activated by a long 3′ UTR, an exon-junction complex (EJC) and individual EJC components, and stabilize a PTC-containing β-globin mRNA. In conclusion, our results establish short PABPC1-recruiting peptides as potent but position-dependent inhibitors of mammalian NMD. PMID:27874031

  16. Enantiomeric CopA3 dimer peptide suppresses cell viability and tumor xenograft growth of human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Ha; Kim, In-Woo; Shin, Yong Pyo; Park, Ho Jin; Lee, Young Shin; Lee, In Hee; Kim, Mi-Ae; Yun, Eun-Young; Nam, Sung-Hee; Ahn, Mi-Young; Kang, Dongchul; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2016-03-01

    The CopA3 dimer peptide is a coprisin analog that has an anticancer effect against human cancer cells in vitro. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of the enantiomeric CopA3 dimer peptide in human gastric cancer cell lines as well as in an in vivo tumor xenograft model. Enantiomeric CopA3 reduced gastric cancer cell viability and exhibited cytotoxicity against cancer cells. Enantiomeric CopA3-induced cell death was mediated by specific interactions with phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylcholine, membrane components that are enriched in cancer cells, in a calcein leakage assay. Moreover, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, flow cytometric analysis, and Western blot analysis showed that enantiomeric CopA3 induced apoptotic and necrotic gastric cancer cell death. The antitumor effect was also observed in a mouse tumor xenograft model in which intratumoral inoculation of the peptide resulted in a significant decrease in the SNU-668 gastric cancer tumor volume. In addition, periodic acid-Schiff and hematoxylin staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay revealed apoptotic and necrotic cell death in tumor masses treated with greater than 150 μg CopA3. Collectively, these results indicate that the enantiomeric CopA3 dimer peptide induces apoptosis and necrosis of gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, indicating that the peptide is a potential candidate for the treatment of gastric cancer, which is a common cause of cancer and cancer deaths worldwide.

  17. Phase I trial of a cancer vaccine consisting of 20 mixed peptides in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer: dose-related immune boosting and suppression.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Masanori; Arai, Gaku; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Naito, Seiji; Moriya, Fukuko; Suekane, Shigetaka; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Matsueda, Satoko; Sasada, Tetsuro; Yamada, Akira; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Itoh, Kyogo

    2015-04-01

    The heterogeneity expression of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and variability of human T cell repertoire suggest that effective cancer vaccine requires induction of a wide breadth of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) specificities. This can be achieved with vaccines targeting multiple TAA. We evaluated the safety and immune dynamics of a cancer vaccine consisting of 20 mixed peptides (KRM-20) designed to induce CTLs against 12 different TAA in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Patients received each of three different randomly assigned doses of KRM-20 (6, 20, or 60 mg) once a week for 6 weeks. KRM-20 was applicable for patients with positive human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A2, A3, A11, A24, A26, A31 or A33 alleles, which cover the majority of the global population. To evaluate the minimum immunological effective dose (MIED), peptide-specific CTL and immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses, and immune suppressive subsets were evaluated during the vaccination. Total of 17 patients was enrolled. No serious adverse drug reactions were encountered. The MIED of KRM-20 in CTL or IgG response calculated by logistic regression model was set as 16 or 1.6 mg, respectively. The frequency of immune suppressive subsets was fewer in the 20 mg cohort than that in 6 or 60 mg cohort. Clinical responses determined by prostate-specific antigen levels were two partial responses (from the 20 mg cohort), five no changes and ten progressive diseases. Twenty milligrams of KRM-20 could be recommended for further studies because of the safety and ability to augment CTL activity.

  18. Peptide-based Antibodies against Glutathione-binding Domains Suppress Superoxide Production Mediated by Mitochondrial Complex I*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingfeng; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Rawale, Sharad; Chen, Chun-An; Zweier, Jay L.; Kaumaya, Pravin T. P.; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2010-01-01

    Complex I (NQR) is a critical site of superoxide () production and the major host of redox protein thiols in mitochondria. In response to oxidative stress, NQR-derived protein thiols at the 51- and 75-kDa subunits are known to be reversibly S-glutathionylated. Although several glutathionylated domains from NQR 51 and 75 kDa have been identified, their roles in the regulatory functions remain to be explored. To gain further insights into protein S-glutathionylation of complex I, we used two peptides of S-glutathionylated domain (200GAGAYICGEETALIESIEGK219 of 51-kDa protein and 361VDSDTLCTEEVFPTAGAGTDLR382 of 75-kDa protein) as chimeric epitopes incorporating a “promiscuous” T-cell epitope to generate two polyclonal antibodies, AbGSCA206 and AbGSCB367. Binding of AbGSCA206 and AbGSCB367 inhibited NQR-mediated generation by 37 and 57%, as measured by EPR spin-trapping. To further provide an appropriate control, two peptides of non-glutathionylated domain (21SGDTTAPKKTSFGSLKDFDR40 of 51-kDa peptide and 100WNILTNSEKTKKAREGVMEFL120 of 75-kDa peptide) were synthesized as chimeric epitopes to generate two polyclonal antibodies, Ab51 and Ab75. Binding of A51 did not affect NQR-mediated generation to a significant level. However, binding of Ab75 inhibited NQR-mediated generation by 35%. None of AbGSCA206, AbGSCB367, Ab51, or Ab75 showed an inhibitory effect on the electron transfer activity of NQR, suggesting that antibody binding to the glutathione-binding domain decreased electron leakage from the hydrophilic domain of NQR. When heart tissue homogenates were immunoprecipitated with Ab51 or Ab75 and probed with an antibody against glutathione, protein S-glutathionylation was enhanced in post-ischemic myocardium at the NQR 51-kDa subunit, but not at the 75-kDa subunit, indicating that the 51-kDa subunit of flavin subcomplex is more sensitive to oxidative stress resulting from myocardial infarction. PMID:19940158

  19. Natriuretic peptide receptor A inhibition suppresses gastric cancer development through reactive oxygen species-mediated G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell death.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Ji-Wei; Wang, Wei-Zhi; Zhi, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Qun; Li, Bo-Wen; Wang, Lin-Jun; Xie, Kun-Ling; Tao, Jin-Qiu; Tang, Jie; Wei, Song; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Dian-Cai; Yang, Li; Xu, Ze-Kuan

    2016-10-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), the major receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), has been implicated in tumorigenesis; however, the role of ANP-NPRA signaling in the development of gastric cancer remains unclear. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that NPRA expression was positively associated with gastric tumor size and cancer stage. NPRA inhibition by shRNA induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, cell death, and autophagy in gastric cancer cells, due to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Either genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy led to caspase-dependent cell death. Therefore, autophagy induced by NPRA silencing may represent a cytoprotective mechanism. ROS accumulation activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). ROS-mediated activation of JNK inhibited cell proliferation by disturbing cell cycle and decreased cell viability. In addition, AMPK activation promoted autophagy in NPRA-downregulated cancer cells. Overall, our results indicate that the inhibition of NPRA suppresses gastric cancer development and targeting NPRA may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. FAMP, a novel apoA-I mimetic peptide, suppresses aortic plaque formation through promotion of biological HDL function in ApoE-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Yoshinari; Ando, Setsuko; Yahiro, Eiji; Oniki, Kosuke; Ayaori, Makoto; Abe, Satomi; Kawachi, Emi; Zhang, Bo; Shioi, Seijiro; Tanigawa, Hiroyuki; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Saku, Keijiro

    2013-05-24

    Apolipoprotein (apo) A-I is a major high-density lipoprotein (HDL) protein that causes cholesterol efflux from peripheral cells through the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), thus generating HDL and reversing the macrophage foam cell phenotype. Pre-β1 HDL is the smallest subfraction of HDL, which is believed to represent newly formed HDL, and it is the most active acceptor of free cholesterol. Furthermore it has a possible protective function against cardiovascular disease (CVD). We developed a novel apoA-I mimetic peptide without phospholipids (Fukuoka University ApoA-I Mimetic Peptide, FAMP). FAMP type 5 (FAMP5) had a high capacity for cholesterol efflux from A172 cells and mouse and human macrophages in vitro, and the efflux was mainly dependent on ABCA1 transporter. Incubation of FAMP5 with human HDL or whole plasma generated small HDL particles, and charged apoA-I-rich particles migrated as pre-β HDL on agarose gel electrophoresis. Sixteen weeks of treatment with FAMP5 significantly suppressed aortic plaque formation (scrambled FAMP, 31.3 ± 8.9% versus high-dose FAMP5, 16.2 ± 5.0%; P<0.01) and plasma C-reactive protein and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in apoE-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet. In addition, it significantly enhanced HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux capacity from the mice. A newly developed apoA-I mimetic peptide, FAMP, has an antiatherosclerotic effect through the enhancement of the biological function of HDL. FAMP may have significant atheroprotective potential and prove to be a new therapeutic tool for CVD.

  1. Small interfering RNA mediated knockdown of irisin suppresses food intake and modulates appetite regulatory peptides in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sundarrajan, Lakshminarasimhan; Unniappan, Suraj

    2017-10-01

    Irisin is a myokine encoded in fibronectin type III domain containing 5 (FNDC5). FNDC5 forms an integral part of the muscle post-exercise, and causes an increase in energy expenditure in mammals. Irisin is abundantly expressed in cardiac and skeletal muscles and is secreted upon activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1 alpha). Irisin regulates feeding behaviour and cardiovascular function in mammals. More recently, irisin has gained importance as a potential biomarker for myocardial infarction due to its abundance in cardiac muscle. The goal of this research was to determine whether irisin influences feeding, and regulates appetite regulatory peptides in zebrafish. Intraperitoneal injection of irisin [0.1, 1, 10 and 100ng/g body weight (BW)] did not affect feeding, but its knockdown using siRNA (10ng/g BW) caused a significant reduction in food intake. Knockdown of irisin reduced ghrelin and orexin-A mRNA expression, and increased cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript mRNA expression in zebrafish brain and gut. siRNA mediated knockdown of irisin also downregulated brain derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in zebrafish. The role of endogenous irisin on food intake is likely mediated by its actions on other metabolic peptides. Collectively, these results indicate that unaltered endogenous irisin is required to maintain food intake in zebrafish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Suppression of GPI-induced arthritis by oral administration of transgenic rice seeds expressing altered peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Tomoya; Tsuboi, Hiroto; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Asashima, Hiromitsu; Ohta, Masaru; Wakasa, Yuhya; Matsumoto, Isao; Takaiwa, Fumio; Sumida, Takayuki

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects and mechanisms of transgenic rice seeds expressing the altered peptide ligand (APL) of human glucose-6-phosphate-isomerase (hGPI325-339) in mice model of GPI induced arthritis (GIA). We generated transgenic rice expressing APL12 which was analog peptide of hGPI325-339. The transgenic rice seeds were orally administered prophylactically before the induction of GIA. The severity of arthritis and titers of serum anti-GPI antibodies were evaluated. We examined IL-17 production from splenocytes and inguinal lymph node (iLN) and mesenteric lymph nodes (mLN) cells and analyzed the expression levels of functional molecules from splenocytes and iLN cells. Prophylactic treatment of GIA mice with APL12 transgenic rice seeds (APL12-TG) significantly improved the severity of arthritis, histopathological arthritis scores, and decreased titers of serum anti-GPI antibodies, BAFF mRNA in iLN cells, IL-17 production in splenocytes and iLN cells compared with non-transgenic rice-treated mice. APL12-TG-treated GIA mice showed upregulation of Foxp3 and GITR protein in CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in the spleen. APL12-TG improved the severity of GIA through a decrease in production of IL-17 and anti-GPI antibodies via upregulation of Foxp3 and GITR expression on regulatory T cells in spleen.

  3. The urokinase receptor-derived cyclic peptide [SRSRY] suppresses neovascularization and intravasation of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ingangi, Vincenzo; Bifulco, Katia; Yousif, Ali Munaim; Ragone, Concetta; Motti, Maria Letizia; Rea, Domenica; Minopoli, Michele; Botti, Giovanni; Scognamiglio, Giuseppe; Fazioli, Flavio; Gallo, Michele; De Chiara, Annarosaria; Arra, Claudio; Grieco, Paolo; Carriero, Maria Vincenza

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) is a widely recognized master regulator of cell migration and uPAR88–92 is the minimal sequence required to induce cell motility and angiogenesis by interacting with the formyl peptide receptor type 1 (FPR1). In this study, we present evidence that the cyclization of the uPAR88–92 sequence generates a new potent inhibitor of migration, and extracellular matrix invasion of human osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells expressing comparable levels of FPR1 on cell surface. In vitro, the cyclized peptide [SRSRY] prevents formation of capillary-like tubes by endothelial cells co-cultured with chondrosarcoma cells and trans-endothelial migration of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells. When chondrosarcoma cells were subcutaneously injected in nude mice, tumor size, intra-tumoral microvessel density and circulating tumor cells in blood samples collected before the sacrifice, were significantly reduced in animals treated daily with i.p-administration of 6 mg/Kg [SRSRY] as compared to animals treated with vehicle only. Our findings indicate that [SRSRY] prevents three key events occurring during the metastatic process of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells: the extracellular matrix invasion, the formation of a capillary network and the entry into bloodstream. PMID:27323409

  4. A Fhit-mimetic peptide suppresses annexin A4-mediated chemoresistance to paclitaxel in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, Eugenio; Paduano, Francesco; Ngankeu, Apollinaire; Ortuso, Francesco; Lovat, Francesca; Pinton, Sandra; D'Agostino, Sabrina; Zanesi, Nicola; Aqeilan, Rami I; Campiglia, Pietro; Novellino, Ettore; Alcaro, Stefano; Croce, Carlo M; Trapasso, Francesco

    2016-05-24

    We recently reported that Fhit is in a molecular complex with annexin A4 (ANXA4); following to their binding, Fhit delocalizes ANXA4 from plasma membrane to cytosol in paclitaxel-resistant lung cancer cells, thus restoring their chemosensitivity to the drug. Here, we demonstrate that Fhit physically interacts with A4 through its N-terminus; molecular dynamics simulations were performed on a 3D Fhit model to rationalize its mechanism of action. This approach allowed for the identification of the QHLIKPS heptapeptide (position 7 to 13 of the wild-type Fhit protein) as the smallest Fhit sequence still able to preserve its ability to bind ANXA4. Interestingly, Fhit peptide also recapitulates the property of the native protein in inhibiting Annexin A4 translocation from cytosol to plasma membrane in A549 and Calu-2 lung cancer cells treated with paclitaxel. Finally, the combination of Tat-Fhit peptide and paclitaxel synergistically increases the apoptotic rate of cultured lung cancer cells and blocks in vivo tumor formation.Our findings address to the identification of chemically simplified Fhit derivatives that mimic Fhit tumor suppressor functions; intriguingly, this approach might lead to the generation of novel anticancer drugs to be used in combination with conventional therapies in Fhit-negative tumors to prevent or delay chemoresistance.

  5. A Fhit-mimetic peptide suppresses annexin A4-mediated chemoresistance to paclitaxel in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ngankeu, Apollinaire; Ortuso, Francesco; Lovat, Francesca; Pinton, Sandra; D'Agostino, Sabrina; Zanesi, Nicola; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Campiglia, Pietro; Novellino, Ettore; Alcaro, Stefano; Croce, Carlo M.; Trapasso, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that Fhit is in a molecular complex with annexin A4 (ANXA4); following to their binding, Fhit delocalizes ANXA4 from plasma membrane to cytosol in paclitaxel-resistant lung cancer cells, thus restoring their chemosensitivity to the drug. Here, we demonstrate that Fhit physically interacts with A4 through its N-terminus; molecular dynamics simulations were performed on a 3D Fhit model to rationalize its mechanism of action. This approach allowed for the identification of the QHLIKPS heptapeptide (position 7 to 13 of the wild-type Fhit protein) as the smallest Fhit sequence still able to preserve its ability to bind ANXA4. Interestingly, Fhit peptide also recapitulates the property of the native protein in inhibiting Annexin A4 translocation from cytosol to plasma membrane in A549 and Calu-2 lung cancer cells treated with paclitaxel. Finally, the combination of Tat-Fhit peptide and paclitaxel synergistically increases the apoptotic rate of cultured lung cancer cells and blocks in vivo tumor formation. Our findings address to the identification of chemically simplified Fhit derivatives that mimic Fhit tumor suppressor functions; intriguingly, this approach might lead to the generation of novel anticancer drugs to be used in combination with conventional therapies in Fhit-negative tumors to prevent or delay chemoresistance. PMID:27166255

  6. The urokinase receptor-derived cyclic peptide [SRSRY] suppresses neovascularization and intravasation of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ingangi, Vincenzo; Bifulco, Katia; Yousif, Ali Munaim; Ragone, Concetta; Motti, Maria Letizia; Rea, Domenica; Minopoli, Michele; Botti, Giovanni; Scognamiglio, Giuseppe; Fazioli, Flavio; Gallo, Michele; De Chiara, Annarosaria; Arra, Claudio; Grieco, Paolo; Carriero, Maria Vincenza

    2016-08-23

    The receptor for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) is a widely recognized master regulator of cell migration and uPAR88-92 is the minimal sequence required to induce cell motility and angiogenesis by interacting with the formyl peptide receptor type 1 (FPR1). In this study, we present evidence that the cyclization of the uPAR88-92 sequence generates a new potent inhibitor of migration, and extracellular matrix invasion of human osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells expressing comparable levels of FPR1 on cell surface. In vitro, the cyclized peptide [SRSRY] prevents formation of capillary-like tubes by endothelial cells co-cultured with chondrosarcoma cells and trans-endothelial migration of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells. When chondrosarcoma cells were subcutaneously injected in nude mice, tumor size, intra-tumoral microvessel density and circulating tumor cells in blood samples collected before the sacrifice, were significantly reduced in animals treated daily with i.p-administration of 6 mg/Kg [SRSRY] as compared to animals treated with vehicle only. Our findings indicate that [SRSRY] prevents three key events occurring during the metastatic process of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells: the extracellular matrix invasion, the formation of a capillary network and the entry into bloodstream.

  7. The food intake-suppressive effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling in the ventral tegmental area are mediated by AMPA/kainate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mietlicki-Baase, Elizabeth G.; Ortinski, Pavel I.; Rupprecht, Laura E.; Olivos, Diana R.; Alhadeff, Amber L.; Pierce, R. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is physiologically relevant for the control of palatable food intake. Here, we tested whether the food intake-suppressive effects of VTA GLP-1R activation are mediated by glutamatergic signaling within the VTA. Intra-VTA injections of the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4) reduced palatable high-fat food intake in rats primarily by reducing meal size; these effects were mediated in part via glutamatergic AMPA/kainate but not NMDA receptor signaling. Additional behavioral data indicated that GLP-1R expressed specifically within the VTA can partially mediate the intake- and body weight-suppressive effects of systemically administered Ex-4, offering the intriguing possibility that this receptor population may be clinically relevant for food intake control. Intra-VTA Ex-4 rapidly increased tyrosine hydroxylase levels within the VTA, suggesting that GLP-1R activation modulates VTA dopaminergic signaling. Further evidence for this hypothesis was provided by electrophysiological data showing that Ex-4 increased the frequency of AMPA-mediated currents and reduced the paired/pulse ratio in VTA dopamine neurons. Together, these data provide novel mechanisms by which GLP-1R agonists in the mesolimbic reward system control for palatable food intake. PMID:24105414

  8. Novel Nuclear Factor-KappaB Targeting Peptide Suppresses β-Amyloid Induced Inflammatory and Apoptotic Responses in Neuronal Cells.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Mythily; Bayon, Baindu; Chopra, Nipun; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2016-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κβ) is associated with both neuronal survival and increased vulnerability to apoptosis. The mechanisms underlying these dichotomous effects are attributed to the composition of NF-κΒ dimers. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), β-amyloid (Aβ) and other aggregates upregulate activation of p65:p50 dimers in CNS cells and enhance transactivation of pathological mediators that cause neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Hence selective targeting of activated p65 is an attractive therapeutic strategy for AD. Here we report the design, structural and functional characterization of peptide analogs of a p65 interacting protein, the glucocorticoid induced leucine zipper (GILZ). By virtue of binding the transactivation domain of p65 exposed after release from the inhibitory IκΒ proteins in activated cells, the GILZ analogs can act as highly selective inhibitors of activated p65 with minimal potential for off-target effects.

  9. Melphalan, alone or conjugated to an FSH-β peptide, kills murine testicular cells in vitro and transiently suppresses murine spermatogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Amory, John K; Hong, SungWoo; Yu, Xiaozhong; Muller, Charles H; Faustman, Elaine; Goldstein, Alex

    2014-07-01

    New approaches to sterilizing male animals are needed to control captive and wild animal populations. We sought to develop a nonsurgical method of permanent sterilization for male animals by administering the gonadotoxicant melphalan conjugated to peptides derived from the β-chain of FSHβ. We hypothesized that conjugating melphalan to FSHβ peptides would magnify the gonadotoxic effects of melphalan while minimizing systemic toxicity. The ability of conjugates of melphalan and FSHβ peptides to kill murine testicular cells was first tested in vitro in a three-dimensional testicular cell coculture system. In this system, melphalan caused considerable cell death as measured both by increases in lactate dehydrogenase concentrations in the culture supernatant and direct visualization of the cultures. Of the conjugates tested, melphalan conjugated to a 20-amino acid peptide derived from human FSHβ consisting of amino acids 33 to 53 (FSHβ (33-53)-melphalan) was very potent, with cell cytotoxicity and lactate dehydrogenase release roughly one-half that of melphalan. The effects of melphalan and FSHβ (33-53)-melphalan on spermatogenesis were then tested in vivo in mature C56Bl/6 male mice. Four weeks after intraperitoneal injection, all mice treated with either FSHβ (33-53)-melphalan or melphalan had approximately 75% reductions in testicular spermatid counts compared with control animals. Testicular histology revealed significant reduction in mature spermatids and spermatocytes in most tubules. However, 12 weeks after the injection, testicular spermatid counts and histology were similar to controls, except in one animal receiving FSHβ (33-53)-melphalan that had no apparent spermatogenesis. We conclude that melphalan and FSHβ (33-53)-melphalan are potent gonadotoxicants in male mice resulting in marked suppression of spermatogenesis 4 weeks after a single intraperitoneal injection. However, this effect is transient in most mice as spermatogenesis is similar to

  10. Silk and silkworm pupa peptides suppress adipogenesis in preadipocytes and fat accumulation in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Hee; Park, Dongsun; Yang, Goeun; Bae, Dae-Kwon; Yang, Yun-Hui; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kim, Dajeong; Kyung, Jangbeen; Yeon, Sungho; Koo, Kyo Chul; Lee, Jeong-Yong; Hwang, Seock-Yeon; Joo, Seong Soo; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2012-12-01

    The objective was to confirm the anti-obesity activity of a silk peptide (SP) and a silkworm pupa peptide (SPP) in rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and to elucidate their action mechanism(s) in a preadipocyte culture system. In an in vitro mechanistic study, the differentiation and maturation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were stimulated with insulin (5 μg/mL), and effects of SP and SPP on the adipogenesis of mature adipocytes were assessed. In an in vivo anti-obesity study, male C57BL/6 mice were fed an HFD containing SP or SPP (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0%) for 8 weeks, and blood and tissue parameters of obesity were analyzed. Hormonal stimulation of preadipocytes led to a 50-70% increase in adipogenesis. Polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses revealed increases in adipogenesis-specific genes (leptin and Acrp30) and proteins (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and Acrp30). The hormone-induced adipogenesis and activated gene expression was substantially inhibited by treatment with SP and SPP (1-50 μg/mL). The HFD markedly increased body weight gain by increasing the weight of epididymal and mesenteric fat. Body and fat weights were significantly reduced by SP and SPP, in which decreases in the area of abdominal adipose tissue and the size of epididymal adipocytes were confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and microscopic examination, respectively. Long-term HFD caused hepatic lipid accumulation and increased blood triglycerides and cholesterol, in addition to their regulatory factors Acrp30 and leptin. However, SP and SPP recovered the concentrations of Acrp30 and leptin, and attenuated steatosis. SP and SPP inhibit the differentiation of preadipocytes and adipogenesis by modulating signal transduction pathways and improve HFD-induced obesity by reducing lipid accumulation and the size of adipocytes.

  11. Ara h 1 CD4+ T cell epitope-based peptides: candidates for a peanut allergy therapeutic.

    PubMed

    Prickett, S R; Voskamp, A L; Phan, T; Dacumos-Hill, A; Mannering, S I; Rolland, J M; O'Hehir, R E

    2013-06-01

    Peanut allergy is a life-threatening condition; there is currently no cure. While whole allergen extracts are used for specific immunotherapy for many allergies, they can cause severe reactions and even fatalities in peanut allergy. To identify short, HLA-degenerate CD4(+) T cell epitope-based peptides of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1 that target allergen-specific T cells without causing IgE-mediated inflammatory cell activation, as candidates for safe peanut-specific immunotherapy. Ara h 1-specific CD4(+) T cell lines (TCL) were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of peanut-allergic subjects using CFSE-based methodology. T cell epitopes were identified using CFSE and thymidine-based proliferation assays. Epitope HLA-restriction was investigated using blocking antibodies, HLA-genotyping and epitope prediction algorithms. Functional peanut-specific IgE reactivity to peptides was assessed by basophil activation assay. A total of 145 Ara h 1-specific TCL were generated from 18 HLA-diverse peanut-allergic subjects. The TCL recognized 20-mer peptides throughout Ara h 1. Nine 20-mers containing the most frequently recognized epitopes were selected and their recognition confirmed in 18 additional peanut-allergic subjects. Ten core epitopes were mapped within these 20-mers. These were HLA-DQ and/or HLA-DR restricted, with each presented on at least two different HLA-molecules. Seven short (≤ 20 aa) non-basophil-reactive peptides encompassing all core epitopes were designed and validated in peanut-allergic donor PBMC T cell assays. Short CD4(+) T cell epitope-based Ara h 1 peptides were identified as novel candidates for a safe, T cell targeted peanut-specific immunotherapy for HLA-diverse populations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Soybean nodule-enhanced CLE peptides in roots act as signals in GmNARK-mediated nodulation suppression.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Young Woo; Hwang, Cheol Ho

    2011-09-01

    The number of nodules formed in the roots of leguminous plants is systemically controlled by autoregulation of nodulation (AON). This study characterized two of the CLAVATA3/endosperm-surrounding region (CLE) genes involved in AON signal transduction. The GmRIC1 and GmRIC2 genes initiated expression solely in the roots at approximately 3 days after inoculation (DAI) with Nod factor-producing rhizobia, corresponding to the time point of AON, and the expression was up-regulated by cytokinins. Levels of GmRIC1 and GmRIC2 gene expression were much higher in the supernodulation mutant, SS2-2, than in wild-type (WT) soybeans during nodule development, even after initiation of nitrogen fixation. At 3 DAI, GmRIC2 was induced in the cells of the pericycle and the outer cortex, which undergo cell division to form nodule primordia and spreads from the central region to the whole nodule as it develops. Overexpression of GmRIC1 and GmRIC2 strongly suppressed the nodulation of WT roots as well as transgenic hairy roots in a GmNARK-dependent manner. This systemic suppression of nodulation was caused by the secretion of two CLE proteins into the extracellular space. Double grafting between WT and SS2-2 soybeans showed that signal Q is larger in SS2-2 than in WT roots during nodulation. The results of this study suggest that GmRIC1 and GmRIC2 are good candidates for root-derived signal Q in AON signal transduction.

  13. Novel Nuclear Factor-KappaB Targeting Peptide Suppresses β-Amyloid Induced Inflammatory and Apoptotic Responses in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Mythily; Bayon, Baindu; Chopra, Nipun; Lahiri, Debomoy K.

    2016-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κβ) is associated with both neuronal survival and increased vulnerability to apoptosis. The mechanisms underlying these dichotomous effects are attributed to the composition of NF-κΒ dimers. In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), β-amyloid (Aβ) and other aggregates upregulate activation of p65:p50 dimers in CNS cells and enhance transactivation of pathological mediators that cause neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Hence selective targeting of activated p65 is an attractive therapeutic strategy for AD. Here we report the design, structural and functional characterization of peptide analogs of a p65 interacting protein, the glucocorticoid induced leucine zipper (GILZ). By virtue of binding the transactivation domain of p65 exposed after release from the inhibitory IκΒ proteins in activated cells, the GILZ analogs can act as highly selective inhibitors of activated p65 with minimal potential for off-target effects. PMID:27764084

  14. Reversal of type 1 diabetes by a new MHC II-peptide chimera: "Single-epitope-mediated suppression" to stabilize a polyclonal autoimmune T-cell process.

    PubMed

    Lin, Marvin; Stoica-Nazarov, Cristina; Surls, Jacqueline; Kehl, Margaret; Bona, Constantin; Olsen, Cara; Brumeanu, Teodor D; Casares, Sofia

    2010-08-01

    Polyclonality of self-reactive CD4(+) T cells is the hallmark of several autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes. We have previously reported that a soluble dimeric MHC II-peptide chimera prevents and reverses type 1 diabetes induced by a monoclonal diabetogenic T-cell population in double Tg mice [Casares, S. et al., Nat. Immunol. 2002. 3: 383-391]. Since most of the glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65)-specific CD4(+) T cells in the NOD mouse are tolerogenic but unable to function in an autoimmune environment, we have activated a silent, monoclonal T-regulatory cell population (GAD65(217-230)-specific CD4(+) T cells) using a soluble I-A(αβ) (g7)/GAD65(217-230)/Fcγ2a dimer, and measured the effect on the ongoing polyclonal diabetogenic T-cell process. Activated GAD65(217-230)-specific T cells and a fraction of the diabetogenic (B(9-23)-specific) T cells were polarized toward the IL-10-secreting T-regulatory type 1-like function in the pancreas of diabetic NOD mice. More importantly, this led to the reversal of hyperglycemia for more than 2 months post-therapy in 80% of mice in the context of stabilization of pancreatic insulitis and improved insulin secretion by the β cells. These findings argue for the stabilization of a polyclonal self-reactive T-cell process by a single epitope-mediated bystander suppression. Dimeric MHC class II-peptide chimeras-like approach may provide rational grounds for the development of more efficient antigen-specific therapies in type 1 diabetes.

  15. Sticky water surfaces: Helix-coil transitions suppressed in a cell-penetrating peptide at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schach, Denise; Globisch, Christoph; Roeters, Steven J.; Woutersen, Sander; Fuchs, Adrian; Weiss, Clemens K.; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Landfester, Katharina; Bonn, Mischa; Peter, Christine; Weidner, Tobias

    2014-12-01

    GALA is a 30 amino acid synthetic peptide consisting of a Glu-Ala-Leu-Ala repeat and is known to undergo a reversible structural transition from a disordered to an α-helical structure when changing the pH from basic to acidic values. In its helical state GALA can insert into and disintegrate lipid membranes. This effect has generated much interest in GALA as a candidate for pH triggered, targeted drug delivery. GALA also serves as a well-defined model system to understand cell penetration mechanisms and protein folding triggered by external stimuli. Structural transitions of GALA in solution have been studied extensively. However, cell penetration is an interfacial effect and potential biomedical applications of GALA would involve a variety of surfaces, e.g., nanoparticles, lipid membranes, tubing, and liquid-gas interfaces. Despite the apparent importance of interfaces in the functioning of GALA, the effect of surfaces on the reversible folding of GALA has not yet been studied. Here, we use sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) to probe the structural response of GALA at the air-water interface and IR spectroscopy to follow GALA folding in bulk solution. We combine the SFG data with molecular dynamics simulations to obtain a molecular-level picture of the interaction of GALA with the air-water interface. Surprisingly, while the fully reversible structural transition was observed in solution, at the water-air interface, a large fraction of the GALA population remained helical at high pH. This "stickiness" of the air-water interface can be explained by the stabilizing interactions of hydrophobic leucine and alanine side chains with the water surface.

  16. Suppression of collagen-induced arthritis by oral administration of transgenic rice seeds expressing altered peptide ligands of type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Mana; Wakasa, Yuhya; Tsuboi, Hiroto; Asashima, Hiromitsu; Hirota, Tomoya; Kondo, Yuya; Matsumoto, Isao; Takaiwa, Fumio; Sumida, Takayuki

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease associated with the recognition of self proteins secluded in arthritic joints. We previously reported that altered peptide ligands (APLs) of type II collagen (CII256-271) suppress the development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). In this study, we generated transgenic rice expressing CII256-271 and APL6 contained in fusion proteins with the rice storage protein glutelin in the seed endosperm. These transgene products successfully and stably accumulated at high levels (7-24 mg/g seeds) in protein storage vacuoles (PB-II) of mature seeds. We examined the efficacy of these transgenic rice seeds by performing oral administration of the seeds to CIA model mice that had been immunized with CII. Treatment with APL6 transgenic rice for 14 days significantly inhibited the development of arthritis (based on clinical score) and delayed disease onset during the early phase of arthritis. These effects were mediated by the induction of IL-10 from CD4(+ ) CD25(-) T cells against CII antigen in splenocytes and inguinal lymph nodes (iLNs), and treatment of APL had no effect on the production of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-2 or Foxp3(+) Treg cells. These findings suggest that abnormal immune suppressive mechanisms are involved in the therapeutic effect of rice-based oral vaccine expressing high levels of APLs of type II collagen on the autoimmune disease CIA, suggesting that the seed-based mucosal vaccine against CIA functions via a unique mechanism.

  17. Recombinant Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Prevents Aberrant Ca2+ Leakage through the Ryanodine Receptor by Suppressing Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production Induced by Isoproterenol in Failing Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Susa, Takehisa; Nanno, Takuma; Ishiguchi, Hironori; Myoren, Takeki; Nishimura, Shigehiko; Kato, Takayoshi; Hino, Akihiro; Oda, Tetsuro; Okuda, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Yano, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Catecholamines induce intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus enhancing diastolic Ca2+ leakage through the ryanodine receptor during heart failure (HF). However, little is known regarding the effect of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on ROS generation and Ca2+ handling in failing cardiomyocytes. The aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanism by which an exogenous ANP exerts cardioprotective effects during HF. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from the left ventricles of a canine tachycardia-induced HF model and sham-operated vehicle controls. The degree of mitochondrial oxidized DNA was evaluated by double immunohistochemical (IHC) staining using an anti-VDAC antibody for the mitochondria and an anti-8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine antibody for oxidized DNA. The effect of ANP on ROS was investigated using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate, diastolic Ca2+ sparks assessed by confocal microscopy using Fluo 4-AM, and the survival rate of myocytes after 48 h. The double IHC study revealed that isoproterenol (ISO) markedly increased oxidized DNA in the mitochondria in HF and that the ISO-induced DNA damage was markedly inhibited by the co-presence of ANP. ROS production and Ca2+ spark frequency (CaSF) were increased in HF compared to normal controls, and were further increased in the presence of ISO. Notably, ANP significantly suppressed both ISO-induced ROS and CaSF without changing sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content in HF (p<0.01, respectively). The survival rate after 48 h in HF was significantly decreased in the presence of ISO compared with baseline (p<0.01), whereas it was significantly improved by the co-presence of ANP (p<0.01). Together, our results suggest that ANP strongly suppresses ISO-induced mitochondrial ROS generation, which might correct aberrant diastolic Ca2+ sparks, eventually contributing to the improvement of cardiomyocyte survival in HF. PMID:27657534

  18. Seahorse-derived peptide suppresses invasive migration of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells by competing with intracellular α-enolase for plasminogen binding and inhibiting uPA-mediated activation of plasminogen

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Se-kwon; Jeon, You-Jin; Park, Sun Joo

    2014-01-01

    α-Enolase is a glycolytic enzyme and a surface receptor for plasminogen. α-Enolase-bound plasminogen promotes tumor cell invasion and cancer metastasis by activating plasmin and consequently degrading the extracellular matrix degradation. Therefore, α-enolase and plasminogen are novel targets for cancer therapy. We found that the amino acid sequence of a peptide purified from enzymatic hydrolysates of seahorse has striking similarities to that of α-enolase. In this study, we report that this peptide competes with cellular α-enolase for plasminogen binding and suppresses urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-mediated activation of plasminogen, which results in decreased invasive migration of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. In addition, the peptide treatment decreased the expression levels of uPA compared to that of untreated controls. These results provide new insight into the mechanism by which the seahorse-derived peptide suppresses invasive properties of human cancer cells. Our findings suggest that this peptide could emerge as a potential therapeutic agent for cancer. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(12): 691-696] PMID:24602611

  19. Seahorse-derived peptide suppresses invasive migration of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells by competing with intracellular α-enolase for plasminogen binding and inhibiting uPA-mediated activation of plasminogen.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Se-kwon; Jeon, You-Jin; Park, Sun Joo

    2014-12-01

    α-Enolase is a glycolytic enzyme and a surface receptor for plasminogen. α-Enolase-bound plasminogen promotes tumor cell invasion and cancer metastasis by activating plasmin and consequently degrading the extracellular matrix degradation. Therefore, α-enolase and plasminogen are novel targets for cancer therapy. We found that the amino acid sequence of a peptide purified from enzymatic hydrolysates of seahorse has striking similarities to that of α-enolase. In this study, we report that this peptide competes with cellular α-enolase for plasminogen binding and suppresses urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-mediated activation of plasminogen, which results in decreased invasive migration of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. In addition, the peptide treatment decreased the expression levels of uPA compared to that of untreated controls. These results provide new insight into the mechanism by which the seahorse-derived peptide suppresses invasive properties of human cancer cells. Our findings suggest that this peptide could emerge as a potential therapeutic agent for cancer.

  20. Valproic acid induces NET cell growth arrest and enhances tumor suppression of the receptor-targeted peptide-drug conjugate via activating somatostatin receptor type II.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lichun; Qian, Qingqing; Sun, Guangchun; Mackey, L Vienna; Fuselier, Joseph A; Coy, David H; Yu, Cui-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Human pancreatic carcinoids, a type of neuroendocrine tumors, are asymptomatic and difficult to diagnose, with the effects of traditional anti-cancer therapies being limited. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) was evaluated for its effects alone and in combination with receptor-targeting peptide-drug conjugate via increasing drug internalization. The in vitro and in vivo assays were used to evaluate the effects of VPA and somatostatin receptor-targeting camptothecin-somatostatin conjugate (CPT-SST). VPA induced proliferation suppression, cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. VPA acts as a HDAC inhibitor to induce a decrease of HDAC4 and an increase of acetylated histone 4 (AcH4). Meanwhile, most importantly, besides activating Notch signaling, VPA was observed to stimulate the expression of somatostatin receptor type 2 (SSTR2) that has been applied for receptor-targeting therapies. This characteristic was used for a combination therapy of VPA and CPT-SST. The combination displayed much more potent anti-tumor effects on carcinoid tumor growth by increasing SSTR2 density and drug internalization in target tumor cells. The combination of VPA and a SSTR2-targeting agent provides us a promising approach in treatment of carcinoid tumors.

  1. ARA 290, a peptide derived from the tertiary structure of erythropoietin, produces long-term relief of neuropathic pain coupled with suppression of the spinal microglia response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain is a difficult to treat disorder arising from central or peripheral nervous system lesions. The etiology of neuropathic pain consists of several overlapping pathways converging into an exaggerated pain state with symptoms such as allodynia and hyperalgesia. One of these pathways involves activation of spinal cord microglia and astrocytes, which drive and maintain the inflammatory response following the lesion. These cells are a potential target for drugs for neuropathic pain relief. In this current study, we investigated the dose-effect relationship of the tissue protective peptide ARA 290, derived from the tertiary structure of erythropoietin, on allodynia and concurrent spinal cord microglia and astrocytes. Results Following a spared nerve injury in rats, vehicle or ARA290 (administered in either one of 4 doses: 3, 10, 30 and 60 μg/kg) was administered on days 1, 3, 6, 8 and 10. ARA290 exerted a dose–response effect by significantly reducing mechanical allodynia up to 20 weeks when compared to vehicle. The reduction of cold allodynia was significant up to 20 weeks for the doses 3, 10, 30 and 60 μg/kg when compared to vehicle. The effect 10 and 30 μg/kg ARA290 and vehicle on the microglia response (iba-1-immunoreactivity, iba-1-IR) and astrocyte reaction (GFAP-immunoreactivity, GFAP-IR) was investigated in animals surviving 2 (group 1) or 20 (group 2) weeks following lesion or sham surgery. In group 1, significant microglia reactivity was observed in the L5 segment of the spinal cord of animals treated with vehicle when compared to sham operated, while animals treated with 10 or 30 μg/kg did not show a increase. In group 2, a more widespread and increased microglia reactivity was observed for animals treated with 0 and 10 μg/kg when compared to sham operated animals, indicated by involvement of more spinal cord segments and higher iba-1-IR. Animals treated with 30 μg/kg did not show increased microglia reactivity. No difference

  2. A novel ligand-independent peptide inhibitor of TREM-1 suppresses tumor growth in human lung cancer xenografts and prolongs survival of mice with lipopolysaccharide-induced septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Sigalov, Alexander B.

    2014-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) amplifies the inflammatory response and plays a role in cancer and sepsis. Inhibition of TREM-1 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in macrophages suppresses cancer cell invasion in vitro. In the clinical setting, high levels of TREM-1 expression on tumor-associated macrophages are associated with cancer recurrence and poor survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). TREM-1 upregulation on peritoneal neutrophils has been found in human sepsis patients and in mice with experimental lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic shock. However, the precise function of TREM-1 and the nature of its ligand are not yet known. In this study, we used the signaling chain homooligomerization (SCHOOL) model of immune signaling to design a novel, ligand-independent peptide-based TREM-1 inhibitor and demonstrated that this peptide specifically silences TREM-1 signaling in vitro and in vivo. Utilizing two human lung tumor xenograft nude mouse models (H292 and A549) and mice with LPS-induced sepsis, we show for the first time that blockade of TREM-1 function using non-toxic and non-immunogenic SCHOOL peptide inhibitors: 1) delays tumor growth in xenograft models of human NSCLC, 2) prolongs survival of mice with LPS-induced septic shock, and 3) substantially decreases cytokine production in vitro and in vivo. In addition, targeted delivery of SCHOOL peptides to macrophages utilizing lipoprotein-mimicking nanoparticles significantly increased peptide half-life and dosage efficacy. Together, the results suggest that ligand-independent modulation of TREM-1 function using small synthetic peptides might be a suitable treatment for sepsis and NSCLC and possibly other types of inflammation-associated disorders. PMID:24836682

  3. SHP-1, a novel peptide isolated from seahorse inhibits collagen release through the suppression of collagenases 1 and 3, nitric oxide products regulated by NF-kappaB/p38 kinase.

    PubMed

    Ryu, BoMi; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Considerable efforts have been taken to identify natural peptides as potential bioactive substances. In this study, novel peptide (SHP-1) derived from seahorse (Hippocampus, Syngnathidae) hydrolysate was explored for its inhibitory effects on collagen release in arthritis with the investigation of its underlying mechanism of action. The efficacy of SHP-1 was determined on cartilage protective effects such as inhibition of collagen and GAG release. SHP-1 was able to suppress not only the expression of collagenases 1 and 3, but also the production of NO via down-regulation of iNOS. However, it presented an irrelevant effect on the level of GAG release in chondrocytic and osteoblastic cells. Inhibition of collagen release by SHP-1 is associated with restraining the phosphorylation of NF-kappaB and p38 kinase cascade. Therefore, it could be suggested that SHP-1 has a potential to be used in arthritis treatment.

  4. D-Amino Acid Substitution of Peptide-Mediated NF-κB Suppression in mdx Mice Preserves Therapeutic Benefit in Skeletal Muscle, but Causes Kidney Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Reay, Daniel P; Bastacky, Sheldon I; Wack, Kathryn E; Stolz, Donna B; Robbins, Paul D; Clemens, Paula R

    2015-05-22

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients and the mdx mouse model of DMD, chronic activation of the classical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway contributes to the pathogenesis that causes degeneration of muscle fibers, inflammation and fibrosis. Prior studies demonstrate that inhibition of inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK)-mediated NF-κB activation using L-isomer NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO)-binding domain (NBD) peptide-based approaches reduce muscle pathology in the mdx mouse. For our studies, the NBD peptide is synthesized as a fusion peptide with an eight-lysine (8K) protein transduction domain to facilitate intracellular delivery. We hypothesized that the d-isoform peptide could have a greater effect than the naturally occurring L-isoform peptide due to the longer persistence of the D-isoform peptide in vivo. In this study, we compared systemic treatment with low (1 mg/kg) and high (10 mg/kg) doses of L- and D-isomer 8K-wild-type-NBD peptide in mdx mice. Treatment with both L- or D-isoform 8K-wild-type-NBD peptide resulted in decreased activation of NF-κB and improved histology in skeletal muscle of the mdx mouse. However, we observed kidney toxicity (characterized by proteinuria), increased serum creatinine, activation of NF-κB and pathological changes in kidney cortex that were most severe with treatment with the D-isoform of 8K-wild-type-NBD peptide. The observed toxicity was also seen in normal mice.

  5. Broomhead-King Hydrophobic Modes in Receptor-Targeted Peptide Design: How to Find Modes in a Short Data Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandell, Arnold J.; Selz, Karen A.; Owens, Michael J.; Shlesinger, Michael F.

    2003-05-01

    Broomhead-King modes are a lagged vector version of the Karhunen-Loeve orthogonal mode decomposition. We employ the Broomhead-King method to seek modes in short but evolutionarily stationary, protein and peptide, hydrophobically transformed, amino acid data sequences. We then use these modes to design 12-20 mer peptides whose amino acid series possess hydrophobic modes that match the leading modes of the targeted G-protein coupled, seven transmembrane, receptor proteins and act as indirect agonists and/or modulators of their in vitro and in vivo physiological activity. An example is briefly described involving peptide design targeting the human brain D2 dopamine receptor, thought to be involved in Parkinson's disease and the action of some antipsychotic drugs.

  6. Antitumor activity of adenoviral vector containing T42 and 4xT42 peptide gene through inducing apoptosis of tumor cells and suppressing angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiong; Qi, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Qing-Xin; Wang, Guang-Zhi; Sui, Guang-Yu; Hao, Xue-Wei; Sun, Shouli; Song, Xue; Chen, Ying-Li

    2015-03-01

    The T42 peptide, generated from two active fragments of tumstatin, has been shown to have anti‑tumor activity. The adenoviral vector is the most frequently used vector in research and clinical trials for gene therapy. In the present study, the anti‑tumor activity of the T42 peptide and quadruple T42 (4xT42) peptide adenoviral vectors were elucidated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Human embryonic kidney 293 cells were infected with plasmid adenovirus (pAd)‑enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)‑T42 or pAd‑EGFP‑4xT42 and the expression of the T42 and 4xT42 genes was confirmed by the identification of GFP expression and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments. The anti‑cancer effects of pAd‑EGFP‑T42 and pAd‑EGFP‑4xT42 on breast cancer cells in vivo and in vitro were subsequently investigated. The results indicated that the packaging of the recombinant adenoviruses with the viral titer was successful, following purification at 5x109 plaque forming units/ml. The results also revealed that the recombinant adenoviruses promoted apoptosis in MCF‑7 breast cancer cells and inhibited cancer growth. Through the analysis of caspase‑3, B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and Bcl‑2‑associated X protein expression, it was demonstrated that the T42/4xT42 peptide may induce apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. In addition, mouse xenograft experiments confirmed that the T42 peptide inhibited tumor growth and reduced angiogenesis in vivo. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that the T42 and 4xT42 peptide genes, transfected by a recombinant adenovirus, may provide a potential novel strategy for the treatment of breast cancer.

  7. Fluorescence-based characterization of genetically encoded peptides that fold in live cells: progress toward a generic hairpin scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zihao; Campbell, Robert E.

    2007-02-01

    Binding proteins suitable for expression and high affinity molecular recognition in the cytoplasm or nucleus of live cells have numerous applications in the biological sciences. In an effort to add a new minimal motif to the growing repertoire of validated non-immunoglobulin binding proteins, we have undertaken the development of a generic protein scaffold based on a single β-hairpin that can fold efficiently in the cytoplasm. We have developed a method, based on the measurement of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a genetically fused cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), that allows the structural stability of recombinant β-hairpin peptides to be rapidly assessed both in vitro and in vivo. We have previously reported the validation of this method when applied to a 16mer tryptophan zipper β-hairpin. We now describe the use of this method to evaluate the potential of a designed 20mer β-hairpin peptide with a 3rd Trp/Trp cross-strand pair to function as a generic protein scaffold. Quantitative analysis of the FRET efficiency, resistance to proteolysis (assayed by loss of FRET), and circular dichroism spectra revealed that the 20mer peptide is significantly more tolerant of destabilizing mutations than the 16mer peptide. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that the in vitro determined β-hairpin stabilities are well correlated with in vivo β-hairpin stabilities as determined by FRET measurements of colonies of live bacteria expressing the recombinant peptides flanked by CFP and YFP. Finally, we report on our progress to develop highly folded 24mer and 28mer β-hairpin peptides through the use of fluorescence-based library screening.

  8. Nesfatin-1-like peptide is a novel metabolic factor that suppresses feeding, and regulates whole-body energy homeostasis in male Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Gawli, Kavishankar; Ramesh, Naresh

    2017-01-01

    Nucleobindin-1 has high sequence similarity to nucleobindin-2, which encodes the anorectic and metabolic peptide, nesfatin-1. We previously reported a nesfatin-1-like peptide (NLP), anorectic in fish and insulinotropic in mice islet beta-like cells. The main objective of this research was to determine whether NLP is a metabolic regulator in male Wistar rats. A single intraperitoneal (IP) injection of NLP (100 μg/kg BW) decreased food intake and increased ambulatory movement, without causing any change in total activity or energy expenditure when compared to saline-treated rats. Continuous subcutaneous infusion of NLP (100 μg/kg BW) using osmotic mini-pumps for 7 days caused a reduction in food intake on days 3 and 4. Similarly, water intake was also reduced for two days (days 3 and 4) with the effect being observed during the dark phase. This was accompanied by an increased RER and energy expenditure. However, decreased whole-body fat oxidation, and total activity were observed during the long-term treatment (7 days). Body weight gain was not significantly different between control and NLP infused rats. The expression of mRNAs encoding adiponectin, resistin, ghrelin, cholecystokinin and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) were significantly upregulated, while leptin and peptide YY mRNA expression was downregulated in NLP-treated rats. These findings indicate that administration of NLP at 100 μg/kg BW reduces food intake and modulates whole body energy balance. In summary, NLP is a novel metabolic peptide in rats. PMID:28542568

  9. Conditional ablation of astroglial CCL2 suppresses CNS accumulation of M1 macrophages and preserves axons in mice with MOG peptide EAE.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Monica; Bannerman, Peter; Ma, Joyce; Guo, Fuzheng; Miers, Laird; Soulika, Athena M; Pleasure, David

    2014-06-11

    Current multiple sclerosis (MS) therapies only partially prevent chronically worsening neurological deficits, which are largely attributable to progressive loss of CNS axons. Prior studies of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced in C57BL/6 mice by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide 35-55 (MOG peptide), a model of MS, documented continued axon loss for months after acute CNS inflammatory infiltrates had subsided, and massive astroglial induction of CCL2 (MCP-1), a chemokine for CCR2(+) monocytes. We now report that conditional deletion of astroglial CCL2 significantly decreases CNS accumulation of classically activated (M1) monocyte-derived macrophages and microglial expression of M1 markers during the initial CNS inflammatory phase of MOG peptide EAE, reduces the acute and long-term severity of clinical deficits and slows the progression of spinal cord axon loss. In addition, lack of astroglial-derived CCL2 results in increased accumulation of Th17 cells within the CNS in these mice, but also in greater confinement of CD4(+) lymphocytes to CNS perivascular spaces. These findings suggest that therapies designed to inhibit astroglial CCL2-driven trafficking of monocyte-derived macrophages to the CNS during acute MS exacerbations have the potential to significantly reduce CNS axon loss and slow progression of neurological deficits.

  10. Short peptides derived from the interaction domain of SARS coronavirus nonstructural protein nsp10 can suppress the 2'-O-methyltransferase activity of nsp10/nsp16 complex.

    PubMed

    Ke, Min; Chen, Yu; Wu, Andong; Sun, Ying; Su, Ceyang; Wu, Hao; Jin, Xu; Tao, Jiali; Wang, Yi; Ma, Xiao; Pan, Ji-An; Guo, Deyin

    2012-08-01

    Coronaviruses are the etiological agents of respiratory and enteric diseases in humans and livestock, exemplified by the life-threatening severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). However, effective means for combating coronaviruses are still lacking. The interaction between nonstructural protein (nsp) 10 and nsp16 has been demonstrated and the crystal structure of SARS-CoV nsp16/10 complex has been revealed. As nsp10 acts as an essential trigger to activate the 2'-O-methyltransferase activity of nsp16, short peptides derived from nsp10 may have inhibitory effect on viral 2'-O-methyltransferase activity. In this study, we revealed that the domain of aa 65-107 of nsp10 was sufficient for its interaction with nsp16 and the region of aa 42-120 in nsp10, which is larger than the interaction domain, was needed for stimulating the nsp16 2'-O-methyltransferase activity. We further showed that two short peptides derived from the interaction domain of nsp10 could inhibit the 2'-O-methyltransferase activity of SARS-CoV nsp16/10 complex, thus providing a novel strategy and proof-of-principle study for developing peptide inhibitors against SARS-CoV. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The soybean (Glycine max) nodulation-suppressive CLE peptide, GmRIC1, functions interspecifically in common white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), but not in a supernodulating line mutated in the receptor PvNARK.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Brett J; Li, Dongxue; Hastwell, April H; Reid, Dugald E; Li, Yupeng; Jackson, Scott A; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2014-10-01

    Legume plants regulate the number of nitrogen-fixing root nodules they form via a process called the Autoregulation of Nodulation (AON). Despite being one of the most economically important and abundantly consumed legumes, little is known about the AON pathway of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). We used comparative- and functional-genomic approaches to identify central components in the AON pathway of common bean. This includes identifying PvNARK, which encodes a LRR receptor kinase that acts to regulate root nodule numbers. A novel, truncated version of the gene was identified directly upstream of PvNARK, similar to Medicago truncatula, but not seen in Lotus japonicus or soybean. Two mutant alleles of PvNARK were identified that cause a classic shoot-controlled and nitrate-tolerant supernodulation phenotype. Homeologous over-expression of the nodulation-suppressive CLE peptide-encoding soybean gene, GmRIC1, abolished nodulation in wild-type bean, but had no discernible effect on PvNARK-mutant plants. This demonstrates that soybean GmRIC1 can function interspecifically in bean, acting in a PvNARK-dependent manner. Identification of bean PvRIC1, PvRIC2 and PvNIC1, orthologues of the soybean nodulation-suppressive CLE peptides, revealed a high degree of conservation, particularly in the CLE domain. Overall, our work identified four new components of bean nodulation control and a truncated copy of PvNARK, discovered the mutation responsible for two supernodulating bean mutants and demonstrated that soybean GmRIC1 can function in the AON pathway of bean. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Ghrelin suppresses cholecystokinin (CCK), peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in the intestine, and attenuates the anorectic effects of CCK, PYY and GLP-1 in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Blanco, Ayelén Melisa; Bertucci, Juan Ignacio; Valenciano, Ana Isabel; Delgado, María Jesús; Unniappan, Suraj

    2017-07-01

    Ghrelin is an important gut-derived hormone with an appetite stimulatory role, while most of the intestinal hormones, including cholecystokinin (CCK), peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), are appetite-inhibitors. Whether these important peptides with opposing roles on food intake interact to regulate energy balance in fish is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to characterize the putative crosstalk between ghrelin and CCK, PYY and GLP-1 in goldfish (Carassius auratus). We first determined the localization of CCK, PYY and GLP-1 in relation to ghrelin and its main receptor GHS-R1a (growth hormone secretagogue 1a) in the goldfish intestine by immunohistochemistry. Colocalization of ghrelin/GHS-R1a and CCK/PYY/GLP-1 was found primarily in the luminal border of the intestinal mucosa. In an intestinal explant culture, a significant decrease in prepro-cck, prepro-pyy and proglucagon transcript levels was observed after 60min of incubation with ghrelin, which was abolished by preincubation with the GHS-R1a ghrelin receptor antagonist [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 (except for proglucagon). The protein expression of PYY and GLP-1 was also downregulated by ghrelin. Finally, intraperitoneal co-administration of CCK, PYY or GLP-1 with ghrelin results in no modification of food intake in goldfish. Overall, results of the present study show for the first time in fish that ghrelin exerts repressive effects on enteric anorexigens. It is likely that these interactions mediate the stimulatory effects of ghrelin on feeding and metabolism in fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Selective inhibition of nuclear factor-κB by nuclear factor-κB essential modulator-binding domain peptide suppresses the metastasis of highly metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takuya; Nakayama, Hideki; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Irie, Atsushi; Nagata, Masashi; Kawahara, Kenta; Takamune, Yasuo; Yoshida, Ryoji; Nakagawa, Yoshihiro; Ogi, Hidenao; Shinriki, Satoru; Ota, Kazutoshi; Hiraki, Akimitsu; Ikebe, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Shinohara, Masanori

    2012-03-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation contributes to the development of metastasis, thus leading to a poor prognosis in many cancers, including OSCC. However, little in vivo experimental data are available about the effects of NF-κB inhibition on OSCC metastasis. OSCC sublines were established from a GFP-expressing parental cell line, GSAS, and designated GSAS/N3 and N5 according to the in vivo passage number after cervical lymph node metastasis by a serial orthotopic transplantation model. In vitro migration and invasion were assessed in these cells, and the NF-κB activities and expression of NF-κB-regulated metastasis-related molecules were also examined. In in vivo experiments, the metastasis and survival of tumor-engrafted mice were monitored. Furthermore, the effects of a selective NF-κB inhibitor, NEMO-binding domain (NBD) peptide, on metastasis in GSAS/N5-engrafted mice were assessed, and engrafted tongue tumors were immunohistochemically examined. Highly metastatic GSAS/N3 and N5 cells showed an enhanced NF-κB activity, thus contributing to increased migration, invasion, and a poor prognosis compared with the parent cells. Furthermore, the expression levels of NF-κB-regulated metastasis-related molecules, such as fibronectin, β1 integrin, MMP-1, -2, -9, and -14, and VEGF-C, were upregulated in the highly metastatic cells. The NBD peptide suppressed metastasis and tongue tumor growth in GSAS/N5-inoculated mice, and was accompanied by the downregulation of the NF-κB-regulated metastasis-related molecules in engrafted tongue tumors. Our results suggest that the selective inhibition of NF-κB activation by NBD peptide may provide an effective approach for the treatment of highly metastatic OSCC.

  14. A peptide derived from the parasite receptor, complement C2 receptor inhibitor trispanning, suppresses immune complex-mediated inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Inal, Jameel M; Schneider, Brigitte; Armanini, Marta; Schifferli, Jürg A

    2003-04-15

    Complement C2 receptor inhibitor trispanning (CRIT) is a Schistosoma protein that binds the human complement protein, C2. We recently showed that peptides based on the ligand binding region of CRIT inhibit the classical pathway (CP) of complement activation in human serum, using hemolytic assays and so speculated that on the parasite surface CRIT has the function of evading human complement. We now show that in vitro the C2-binding 11-aa C terminus of the first extracellular domain of CRIT, a 1.3-kDa peptide termed CRIT-H17, inhibits CP activation in a species-specific manner, inhibiting mouse and rat complement but not that from guinea pig. Hitherto, the ability of CRIT to regulate complement in vivo has not been assessed. In this study we show that by inhibiting the CP, CRIT-H17 is able to reduce immune complex-mediated inflammation (dermal reversed passive Arthus reaction) in BALB/c mice. Upon intradermal injection of CRIT-H17, and similarly with recombinant soluble complement receptor type 1, there was a 41% reduction in edema and hemorrhage, a 72% reduction in neutrophil influx, and a reduced C3 deposition. Furthermore, when H17 was administered i.v. at a 1 mg/kg dose, inflammation was reduced by 31%. We propose that CRIT-H17 is a potential therapeutic agent against CP complement-mediated inflammatory tissue destruction.

  15. A phase I study of vaccination with NY-ESO-1f peptide mixed with Picibanil OK-432 and Montanide ISA-51 in patients with cancers expressing the NY-ESO-1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Isobe, Midori; Uenaka, Akiko; Wada, Hisashi; Sato, Eiichi; Doki, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Jun; Seto, Yasuyuki; Yamatsuji, Tomoki; Naomoto, Yoshio; Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Oka, Mikio; Pan, Linda; Hoffman, Eric W; Old, Lloyd J; Nakayama, Eiichi

    2011-12-15

    We conducted a phase I clinical trial of a cancer vaccine using a 20-mer NY-ESO-1f peptide (NY-ESO-1 91-110) that includes multiple epitopes recognized by antibodies, and CD4 and CD8 T cells. Ten patients were immunized with 600 μg of NY-ESO-1f peptide mixed with 0.2 KE Picibanil OK-432 and 1.25 ml Montanide ISA-51. Primary end points of the study were safety and immune response. Subcutaneous injection of the NY-ESO-1f peptide vaccine was well tolerated. Vaccine-related adverse events observed were fever (Grade 1), injection-site reaction (Grade 1 or 2) and induration (Grade 2). Vaccination with the NY-ESO-1f peptide resulted in an increase or induction of NY-ESO-1 antibody responses in nine of ten patients. The sera reacted with recombinant NY-ESO-1 whole protein as well as the NY-ESO-1f peptide. An increase in CD4 and CD8 T cell responses was observed in nine of ten patients. Vaccine-induced CD4 and CD8 T cells responded to NY-ESO-1 91-108 in all patients with various HLA types with a less frequent response to neighboring peptides. The findings indicate that the 20-mer NY-ESO-1f peptide includes multiple epitopes recognized by CD4 and CD8 T cells with distinct specificity. Of ten patients, two with lung cancer and one with esophageal cancer showed stable disease. Our study shows that the NY-ESO-1f peptide vaccine was well tolerated and elicited humoral, CD4 and CD8 T cell responses in immunized patients. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-1 prevents methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis of beta cells through improving mitochondrial function and suppressing prolonged AMPK activation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tien-Jyun; Tseng, Hsing-Chi; Liu, Meng-Wei; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of methylglyoxal (MG) contributes to glucotoxicity and mediates beta cell apoptosis. The molecular mechanism by which GLP-1 protects MG-induced beta cell apoptosis remains unclear. Metformin is a first-line drug for treating type 2 diabetes associated with AMPK activation. However, whether metformin prevents MG-induced beta cell apoptosis is controversial. Here, we explored the signaling pathway involved in the anti-apoptotic effect of GLP-1, and investigated whether metformin had an anti-apoptotic effect on beta cells. MG treatment induced apoptosis of beta cells, impaired mitochondrial function, and prolonged activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). The MG-induced pro-apoptotic effects were abolished by an AMPK inhibitor. Pretreatment of GLP-1 reversed MG-induced apoptosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction, and suppressed prolonged AMPK activation. Pretreatment of GLP-1 reversed AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR)-induced apoptosis, and suppressed prolonged AMPK activation. However, metformin neither leads to beta cell apoptosis nor ameliorates MG-induced beta cell apoptosis. In parallel, GLP-1 also prevents MG-induced beta cell apoptosis through PKA and PI3K-dependent pathway. In conclusion, these data indicates GLP-1 but not metformin protects MG-induced beta cell apoptosis through improving mitochondrial function, and alleviating the prolonged AMPK activation. Whether adding GLP-1 to metformin provides better beta cell survival and delays disease progression remains to be validated. PMID:26997114

  17. Constant light suppresses production of Met-enkephalin-containing peptides in cultured splenic macrophages and impairs primary immune response in rats.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Tovar, Marcela; Escobar, Carolina; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Asai, Miguel; Benítez-King, Gloria

    2015-03-01

    The light-dark cycle is an environmental factor that influences immune physiology, and so, variations of the photoperiod length result in altered immune responsivity. Macrophage physiology comprises a spectrum of functions that goes from host defense to immune down-regulation, in addition to their homeostatic activities. Macrophages also play a key role in the transition from innate to adaptive immune responses. Met-enkephalin (MEnk) has been recognized as a modulator of macrophage physiology acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion to influence macrophage activation, phenotype polarization and production of cytokines that would enhance lymphocyte activation at early stages of an immune response. Previously it was shown that splenic MEnk tissue content is reduced in rats exposed to constant light. In this work, we explored whether production of Met-enkephalin-containing peptides (MECPs) in cultured splenic macrophages is affected by exposure of rats to a constant light regime. In addition, we explored whether primary immune response was impaired under this condition. We found that in rats, 15 days in constant light was sufficient to disrupt their general activity rhythm. Splenic MEnk content oscillations and levels were also blunted throughout a 24-h period in animals subjected to constant light. In agreement, de novo synthesis of MECPs evaluated through incorporation of (35)S-methionine was reduced in splenic macrophages from rats exposed to constant light. Moreover, MECPs immunocytochemistry showed a decrease in the intracellular content and lack of granule-like deposits in this condition. Furthermore, we found that primary T-dependent antibody response was compromised in rats exposed to constant light. In those animals, pharmacologic treatment with MEnk increased IFN-γ-secreting cells. Also, IL-2 secretion from antigen-stimulated splenocytes was reduced after incubation with naloxone, suggesting that immune-derived opioid peptides and stimulation of opioid

  18. Ternatin, a cyclic peptide isolated from mushroom, and its derivative suppress hyperglycemia and hepatic fatty acid synthesis in spontaneously diabetic KK-A(y) mice.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Misato; Kawashima, Haruna; Takemori, Kumiko; Ito, Hiroyuki; Murai, Atsushi; Masuda, Shun; Yamada, Kaoru; Uemura, Daisuke; Horio, Fumihiko

    2012-10-19

    (-)-Ternatin is a highly methylated cyclic heptapeptide isolated from mushroom Coriolus versicolor. Ternatin has an inhibitory effect on fat accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. [D-Leu(7)]ternatin, a ternatin derivative, also inhibited fat accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells, although the effectiveness of [D-Leu(7)]ternatin was lower than that of ternatin. In this study, we investigated the effects of ternatin and [D-Leu(7)]ternatin on obesity and type 2 diabetes in KK-A(y) mice, an animal model for spontaneously developed type 2 diabetes. We continuously administered ternatin (8.5 or 17 nmol/day) or [D-Leu(7)]ternatin (68 nmol/day) to mice via a subcutaneous osmotic pump. Unexpectedly, neither ternatin nor [D-Leu(7)]ternatin affected body weight or adipose tissue weight in KK-A(y) mice. In contrast, it was demonstrated that both ternatin and [D-Leu(7)]ternatin suppress the development of hyperglycemia. In liver, the SREBP-1c mRNA level tended to be lower or significantly decreased in mice treated with ternatin or [D-Leu(7)]ternatin, respectively. Moreover, we found that ternatin directly lowered the SREBP-1c mRNA level in Hepa1-6 hepatocyte cells. This study showed that ternatin and [D-Leu(7)]ternatin each had a preventive effect on hyperglycemia and a suppressive effect on fatty acid synthesis in KK-A(y) mice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Erwinia amylovora PhoPQ system is involved in resistance to antimicrobial peptide and suppresses gene expression of two novel type III secretion systems.

    PubMed

    Nakka, Sridevi; Qi, Mingsheng; Zhao, Youfu

    2010-10-20

    The PhoPQ system is a pleiotropic two-component signal transduction system that controls many pathogenic properties in several mammalian and plant pathogens. Three different cues have been demonstrated to activate the PhoPQ system including a mild acidic pH, antimicrobial peptides, and low Mg(2+). In this study, our results showed that phoPQ mutants were more resistant to strong acidic conditions (pH 4.5 or 5) than that of the wild-type (WT) strain, suggesting that this system in Erwinia amylovora may negatively regulate acid resistance gene expression. Furthermore, the PhoPQ system negatively regulated gene expression of two novel type III secretion systems in E. amylovora. These results are in contrast to those reported for the PhoPQ system in Salmonella and Xanthomonas, where it positively regulates type III secretion system and acid resistance. In addition, survival of phoPQ mutants was about 10-fold lower than that of WT when treated with cecropin A at pH 5.5, suggesting that the PhoPQ system renders the pathogen more resistant to cecropin A.

  20. Plasmodium falciparum suppresses the host immune response by inducing the synthesis of insulin-like peptides (ILPs) in the mosquito Anopheles stephensi

    PubMed Central

    Pietri, Jose E.; Pietri, Eduardo J.; Potts, Rashaun; Riehle, Michael; Luckhart, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    The insulin-like peptides (ILPs) and their respective signaling and regulatory pathways are highly conserved across phyla. In invertebrates, ILPs regulate diverse physiological processes, including metabolism, reproduction, behavior, and immunity. We previously reported that blood feeding alone induced minimal changes in ILP expression in Anopheles stephensi. However, ingestion of a blood meal containing human insulin or Plasmodium falciparum, which can mimic insulin signaling, leads to significant increases in ILP expression in the head and midgut, suggesting a potential role for AsILPs in the regulation of P. falciparum sporogonic development. Here, we show that soluble P. falciparum products, but not LPS or zymosan, directly induced AsILP expression in immortalized A. stephensi cells in vitro. Further, AsILP expression is dependent on signaling by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK/ERK) and phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase (PI3K)/Akt branches of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) pathway. Inhibition of P. falciparum-induced ILPs in vivo decreased parasite development through kinetically distinct effects on mosquito innate immune responses. Specifically, knockdown of AsILP4 induced early expression of immune effector genes (1–6 hours after infection), a pattern associated with significantly reduced parasite abundance prior to invasion of the midgut epithelium. In contrast, knockdown of AsILP3 increased later expression of the same genes (24 hours after infection), a pattern that was associated with significantly reduced oocyst development. These data suggest that P. falciparum parasites alter the expression of mosquito AsILPs to dampen the immune response and facilitate their development in the mosquito vector. PMID:26165161

  1. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor induced suppression of food intake, and body weight is mediated by central IL-1 and IL-6.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Rozita; Palsdottir, Vilborg; Collander, Jim; Anesten, Fredrik; Vogel, Heike; Langlet, Fanny; Jaschke, Alexander; Schürmann, Annette; Prévot, Vincent; Shao, Ruijin; Jansson, John-Olov; Skibicka, Karolina Patrycja

    2013-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), produced in the intestine and the brain, can stimulate insulin secretion from the pancreas and alleviate type 2 diabetes. The cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) may enhance insulin secretion from β-cells by stimulating peripheral GLP-1 production. GLP-1 and its analogs also reduce food intake and body weight, clinically beneficial actions that are likely exerted at the level of the CNS, but otherwise are poorly understood. The cytokines IL-6 and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) may exert an anti-obesity effect in the CNS during health. Here we found that central injection of a clinically used GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4, potently increased the expression of IL-6 in the hypothalamus (11-fold) and the hindbrain (4-fold) and of IL-1β in the hypothalamus, without changing the expression of other inflammation-associated genes. Furthermore, hypothalamic and hindbrain interleukin-associated intracellular signals [phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3) and suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1)] were also elevated by exendin-4. Pharmacologic disruption of CNS IL-1 receptor or IL-6 biological activity attenuated anorexia and body weight loss induced by central exendin-4 administration in a rat. Simultaneous blockade of IL-1 and IL-6 activity led to a more potent attenuation of exendin-4 effects on food intake. Mice with global IL-1 receptor gene knockout or central IL-6 receptor knockdown showed attenuated decrease in food intake and body weight in response to peripheral exendin-4 treatment. GLP-1 receptor activation in the mouse neuronal Neuro2A cell line also resulted in increased IL-6 expression. These data outline a previously unidentified role of the central IL-1 and IL-6 in mediating the anorexic and body weight loss effects of GLP-1 receptor activation.

  2. Combined contributions of over-secreted glucagon-like peptide 1 and suppressed insulin secretion to hyperglycemia induced by gatifloxacin in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yunli; Wang, Xinting; Liu, Can; Yao, Dan; Hu, Mengyue; Li, Jia; Hu, Nan; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong

    2013-02-01

    Accumulating evidences have showed that gatifloxacin causes dysglycemia in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Our preliminary study demonstrated that gatifloxacin stimulated glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion from intestinal cells. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between gatifloxacin-stimulated GLP-1 release and dysglycemia in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and explore the possible mechanisms. Oral administration of gatifloxacin (100 mg/kg/day and 200 mg/kg/day) for 3 and 12 days led to marked elevation of GLP-1 levels, accompanied by significant decrease in insulin levels and increase in plasma glucose. Similar results were found in normal rats treated with 3-day gatifloxacin. Gatifloxacin-stimulated GLP-1 release was further confirmed in NCI-H716 cells, which was abolished by diazoxide, a K{sub ATP} channel opener. QT-PCR analysis showed that gatifloxacin also upregulated expression of proglucagon and prohormone convertase 3 mRNA. To clarify the contradiction on elevated GLP-1 without insulinotropic effect, effects of GLP-1 and gatifloxacin on insulin release were investigated using INS-1 cells. We found that short exposure (2 h) to GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion and biosynthesis, whereas long exposure (24 h and 48 h) to high level of GLP-1 inhibited insulin secretion and biosynthesis. Moreover, we also confirmed gatifloxacin acutely stimulated insulin secretion while chronically inhibited insulin biosynthesis. All the results gave an inference that gatifloxacin stimulated over-secretion of GLP-1, in turn, high levels of GLP-1 and gatifloxacin synergistically impaired insulin release, worsening hyperglycemia. -- Highlights: ► Gatifloxacin induced hyperglycemia both in diabetic rats and normal rats. ► Gatifloxacin enhanced GLP-1 secretion but inhibited insulin secretion in rats. ► Long-term exposure to high GLP-1 inhibited insulin secretion and biosynthesis. ► GLP-1 over-secretion may be

  3. Suppression of unimolecular decay of laser desorbed peptide and protein ions by entrainment in rarefied supersonic gas jets under weak electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hieke, Andreas

    2014-01-21

    Unimolecular decay of sample ions imposes a limit on the usable laser fluence in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ion sources. Traditionally, some modest degree of collisional sample ion cooling has been achieved by connecting MALDI ion sources directly to gas-filled radio frequency (RF) multipoles. It was also discovered in the early 1990s that gas-filled RF multipoles exhibit increased ion transmission efficiency due to collisional ion focusing effects. This unexpected experimental finding was later supported by elementary Monte Carlo simulations. Both experiments and simulations assumed a resting background gas with typical pressures of the order of 1 Pa. However, considerable additional improvements can be achieved if laser desorbed sample ions are introduced immediately after desorption, still within the ion source, in an axisymmetric rarefied supersonic gas jet with peak pressure of the order of 100 Pa and flow velocities >300 m/s, and under weak electric fields. We describe here the design principle and report performance data of an ion source coined “MALDI-2,” which incorporates elements of both rarefied aerodynamics and particle optics. Such a design allows superb suppression of metastable fragmentation due to rapid collisional cooling in <10 μs and nearly perfect injection efficiency into the attached RF ion guide, as numerous experiments have confirmed.

  4. Suppression of unimolecular decay of laser desorbed peptide and protein ions by entrainment in rarefied supersonic gas jets under weak electric fields.

    PubMed

    Hieke, Andreas

    2014-01-21

    Unimolecular decay of sample ions imposes a limit on the usable laser fluence in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ion sources. Traditionally, some modest degree of collisional sample ion cooling has been achieved by connecting MALDI ion sources directly to gas-filled radio frequency (RF) multipoles. It was also discovered in the early 1990s that gas-filled RF multipoles exhibit increased ion transmission efficiency due to collisional ion focusing effects. This unexpected experimental finding was later supported by elementary Monte Carlo simulations. Both experiments and simulations assumed a resting background gas with typical pressures of the order of 1 Pa. However, considerable additional improvements can be achieved if laser desorbed sample ions are introduced immediately after desorption, still within the ion source, in an axisymmetric rarefied supersonic gas jet with peak pressure of the order of 100 Pa and flow velocities >300 m/s, and under weak electric fields. We describe here the design principle and report performance data of an ion source coined "MALDI-2," which incorporates elements of both rarefied aerodynamics and particle optics. Such a design allows superb suppression of metastable fragmentation due to rapid collisional cooling in <10 μs and nearly perfect injection efficiency into the attached RF ion guide, as numerous experiments have confirmed.

  5. A-raf and B-raf are dispensable for normal endochondral bone development, and parathyroid hormone-related peptide suppresses extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation in hypertrophic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Provot, Sylvain; Nachtrab, Gregory; Paruch, Jennifer; Chen, Adele Pin; Silva, Alcino; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2008-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) and the parathyroid hormone-PTHrP receptor increase chondrocyte proliferation and delay chondrocyte maturation in endochondral bone development at least partly through cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent signaling pathways. Because data suggest that the ability of cAMP to stimulate cell proliferation involves the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase B-Raf, we hypothesized that B-Raf might mediate the proliferative action of PTHrP in chondrocytes. Though B-Raf is expressed in proliferative chondrocytes, its conditional removal from cartilage did not affect chondrocyte proliferation and maturation or PTHrP-induced chondrocyte proliferation and PTHrP-delayed maturation. Similar results were obtained by conditionally removing B-Raf from osteoblasts. Because A-raf and B-raf are expressed similarly in cartilage, we speculated that they may fulfill redundant functions in this tissue. Surprisingly, mice with chondrocytes deficient in both A-Raf and B-Raf exhibited normal endochondral bone development. Activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was detected primarily in hypertrophic chondrocytes, where C-raf is expressed, and the suppression of ERK activation in these cells by PTHrP or a MEK inhibitor coincided with a delay in chondrocyte maturation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that B-Raf and A-Raf are dispensable for endochondral bone development and they indicate that the main role of ERK in cartilage is to stimulate not cell proliferation, but rather chondrocyte maturation.

  6. Efficacy of the antimicrobial peptide TP4 against Helicobacter pylori infection: in vitro membrane perturbation via micellization and in vivo suppression of host immune responses in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, Jayaram Lakshmaiah; Huang, Han-Ning; Wu, Chang-Jer; Chen, Jyh-Yih

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is marked by a strong association with various gastric diseases, including gastritis, ulcers, and gastric cancer. Antibiotic treatment regimens have low success rates due to the rapid occurrence of resistant H. pylori strains, necessitating the development of novel anti-H. pylori strategies. Here, we investigated the therapeutic potential of a novel peptide, Tilapia Piscidin 4 (TP4), against multidrug resistant gastric pathogen H. pylori, based on its in vitro and in vivo efficacy. TP4 inhibited the growth of both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant H. pylori (CagA+, VacA+) via membrane micelle formation, which led to membrane depolarization and extravasation of cellular constituents. During colonization of gastric tissue, H. pylori infection maintains high T regulatorysubsets and a low Th17/Treg ratio, and results in expression of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Treatment with TP4 suppressed Treg subset populations and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. TP4 restored the Th17/Treg balance, which resulted in early clearance of H. pylori density and recovery of gastric morphology. Toxicity studies demonstrated that TP4 treatment has no adverse effects in mice or rabbits. The results of this study indicate that TP4 may be an effective and safe monotherapeutic agent for the treatment of multidrug resistant H. pylori infections. PMID:26002554

  7. A Multiscale Approach to Characterize the Early Aggregation Steps of the Amyloid-Forming Peptide GNNQQNY from the Yeast Prion Sup-35

    PubMed Central

    Nasica-Labouze, Jessica; Meli, Massimiliano; Derreumaux, Philippe; Colombo, Giorgio; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-01-01

    The self-organization of peptides into amyloidogenic oligomers is one of the key events for a wide range of molecular and degenerative diseases. Atomic-resolution characterization of the mechanisms responsible for the aggregation process and the resulting structures is thus a necessary step to improve our understanding of the determinants of these pathologies. To address this issue, we combine the accelerated sampling properties of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations based on the OPEP coarse-grained potential with the atomic resolution description of interactions provided by all-atom MD simulations, and investigate the oligomerization process of the GNNQQNY for three system sizes: 3-mers, 12-mers and 20-mers. Results for our integrated simulations show a rich variety of structural arrangements for aggregates of all sizes. Elongated fibril-like structures can form transiently in the 20-mer case, but they are not stable and easily interconvert in more globular and disordered forms. Our extensive characterization of the intermediate structures and their physico-chemical determinants points to a high degree of polymorphism for the GNNQQNY sequence that can be reflected at the macroscopic scale. Detailed mechanisms and structures that underlie amyloid aggregation are also provided. PMID:21625573

  8. A multiscale approach to characterize the early aggregation steps of the amyloid-forming peptide GNNQQNY from the yeast prion sup-35.

    PubMed

    Nasica-Labouze, Jessica; Meli, Massimiliano; Derreumaux, Philippe; Colombo, Giorgio; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-05-01

    The self-organization of peptides into amyloidogenic oligomers is one of the key events for a wide range of molecular and degenerative diseases. Atomic-resolution characterization of the mechanisms responsible for the aggregation process and the resulting structures is thus a necessary step to improve our understanding of the determinants of these pathologies. To address this issue, we combine the accelerated sampling properties of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations based on the OPEP coarse-grained potential with the atomic resolution description of interactions provided by all-atom MD simulations, and investigate the oligomerization process of the GNNQQNY for three system sizes: 3-mers, 12-mers and 20-mers. Results for our integrated simulations show a rich variety of structural arrangements for aggregates of all sizes. Elongated fibril-like structures can form transiently in the 20-mer case, but they are not stable and easily interconvert in more globular and disordered forms. Our extensive characterization of the intermediate structures and their physico-chemical determinants points to a high degree of polymorphism for the GNNQQNY sequence that can be reflected at the macroscopic scale. Detailed mechanisms and structures that underlie amyloid aggregation are also provided.

  9. TP53 suppression promotes erythropoiesis in del(5q) MDS, suggesting a targeted therapeutic strategy in lenalidomide-resistant patients.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Gisela; McGraw, Kathy; Yip, Bon Ham; Pellagatti, Andrea; Johnson, Joseph; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Kenian; Zhang, Lan Min; Fulp, William J; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Al Ali, Najla H; Basiorka, Ashley; Smith, Larry J; Daugherty, F Joseph; Littleton, Neil; Wells, Richard A; Sokol, Lubomir; Wei, Sheng; Komrokji, Rami S; Boultwood, Jacqueline; List, Alan F

    2013-10-01

    Stabilization of p53 in erythroid precursors in response to nucleosomal stress underlies the hypoplastic anemia in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) with chromosome 5q deletion [del(5q)]. We investigated whether cenersen, a clinically active 20-mer antisense oligonucleotide complementary to TP53 exon10, could suppress p53 expression and restore erythropoiesis in del(5q) MDS. Cenersen treatment of ribosomal protein S-14-deficient erythroblasts significantly reduced cellular p53 and p53-up-regulated modulator of apoptosis expression compared with controls, accompanied by a significant reduction in apoptosis and increased cell proliferation. In a two-stage erythroid differentiation assay, cenersen significantly suppressed nuclear p53 in bone marrow CD34+ cells isolated from patients with del(5q) MDS, whereas erythroid burst recovery increased proportionally to the magnitude of p53 suppression without evidence of del(5q) clonal suppression (r = -0.6; P = 0.005). To explore the effect of p53 suppression on erythropoiesis in vivo, dexamethasone, a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent p53 antagonist, was added to lenalidomide treatment in eight lower-risk, transfusion-dependent, del(5q) MDS patients with acquired drug resistance. Transfusion independence was restored in five patients accompanied by expansion of erythroid precursors and decreased cellular p53 expression. We conclude that targeted suppression of p53 could support effective erythropoiesis in lenalidomide-resistant del(5q) MDS.

  10. Limiting racemization and aspartimide formation in microwave-enhanced Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Palasek, Stacey A; Cox, Zachary J; Collins, Jonathan M

    2007-03-01

    Microwave energy represents an efficient manner to accelerate both the deprotection and coupling reactions in 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc) solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). Typical SPPS side reactions including racemization and aspartimide formation can occur with microwave energy but can easily be controlled by routine use of optimized methods. Cysteine, histidine, and aspartic acid were susceptible to racemization during microwave SPPS of a model 20mer peptide containing all 20 natural amino acids. Lowering the microwave coupling temperature from 80 degrees C to 50 degrees C limited racemization of histidine and cysteine. Additionally, coupling of both histidine and cysteine can be performed conventionally while the rest of the peptide is synthesized using microwave without any deleterious effect, as racemization during the coupling reaction was limited to the activated ester state of the amino acids up to 80 degrees C. Use of the hindered amine, collidine, in the coupling reaction also minimized formation of D-cysteine. Aspartimide formation and subsequent racemization of aspartic acid was reduced by the addition of HOBt to the deprotection solution and/or use of piperazine in place of piperidine.

  11. Reactivity of natural and induced human antibodies to MUC1 mucin with MUC1 peptides and n-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) peptides.

    PubMed

    von Mensdorff-Pouilly, S; Petrakou, E; Kenemans, P; van Uffelen, K; Verstraeten, A A; Snijdewint, F G; van Kamp, G J; Schol, D J; Reis, C A; Price, M R; Livingston, P O; Hilgers, J

    2000-06-01

    Antibodies (Abs) to MUC1 occur naturally in both healthy subjects and cancer patients and can be induced by MUC1 peptide vaccination. We compared the specificity of natural and induced MUC1 Abs with the objective of defining an effective MUC1 vaccine for active immunotherapy of adenocarcinoma patients. Serum samples, selected out of a screened population of 492 subjects for their high levels of IgG and/or IgM MUC1 Abs, were obtained from 55 control subjects and from 26 breast cancer patients before primary treatment, as well as from 19 breast cancer patients immunized with MUC1 peptides coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and mixed with QS-21. The samples were tested with enzyme-linked immunoassays for reactivity with (1) overlapping hepta- and 20-mer peptides spanning the MUC1 tandem repeat sequence; (2) two modified 60-mer peptides with substitutions in the PDTR (PDTA) or in the STAPPA (STAAAA) sequence of each tandem repeat; and (3) four 60-mer glycopeptides with each 1, 2, 3 and 5 mol N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) per repeat. More than one minimal epitopic sequence could be defined, indicating that Abs directed to more than one region of the MUC1 peptide core can coexist in one and the same subject. The most frequent minimal epitopic sequence of natural MUC1 IgG and IgM Abs was RPAPGS, followed by PPAHGVT and PDTRP. MUC1 peptide vaccination induced high titers of IgM and IgG Abs predominantly directed, respectively, to the PDTRPAP and the STAPPAHGV sequences of the tandem repeat. Natural MUC1 Abs from breast cancer patients reacted more strongly with the N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) peptides than with the naked 60-mer peptide, while reactivity with the GalNAc-peptides was significantly reduced (2-tailed p < 0.0001) in the MUC1 IgG and IgM Abs induced by MUC1 peptide vaccination. Whereas in cancer patients glycans appear to participate in epitope conformation, the epitope(s) recognized by MUC1 Abs induced by peptide vaccination are already masked by

  12. Drug Insight: appetite suppressants.

    PubMed

    Bray, George A

    2005-02-01

    The term 'appetite suppressant' is used to denote drugs that act primarily on the neurochemical transmitters of the central nervous system to reduce food intake. In addition to drugs that release or mimic the effect of norepinephrine (noradrenaline), this could include drugs that inhibit: reuptake of norepinephrine or 5-hydroxytryptamine (also known as serotonin); bind to the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors or the cannabinoid receptors; and some peptides that reduce food intake. The sympathomimetic drugs phentermine, diethylpropion, benzphetamine, and phendimetrazine--so named because they mimic many effects of norepinephrine--are only approved in a few countries, and then only for short-term use. Sibutramine, a norepinephrine-5-hydroxytryptamine reuptake inhibitor, is approved for long-term use. Several new mechanisms for drug action are under investigation. Appetite suppressants should be viewed as useful adjuncts to diet and physical activity and might help selected patients to achieve and maintain weight loss.

  13. Peptides from the Plasmodium falciparum STEVOR putative protein bind with high affinity to normal human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    García, Javier E; Puentes, Alvaro; Curtidor, Hernando; Vera, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Luis; Valbuena, John; López, Ramses; Ocampo, Marisol; Cortés, Jimena; Vanegas, Magnolia; Rosas, Jaiver; Reyes, Claudia; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2005-07-01

    Synthetic 20-mer long non-overlapped peptides, from STEVOR protein, were tested in RBC binding assays for identifying STEVOR protein regions having high RBC binding activity and evaluating whether these regions inhibit Plasmodium falciparum in vitro invasion. Affinity constants, binding site number per cell and Hill coefficients were determined by saturation assay with high activity binding peptides (HABPs). HABP binding assays using RBCs previously treated with enzymes were carried out to study the nature of the receptor. The molecular weight of RBC surface proteins interacting with HABPs was determined by cross-linking assays and SDS-PAGE analysis. RBC binding assays revealed that peptides 30561 (41MKSRRLAEIQLPKCPHYNND60), 30562 (61PELKKIIDKLNEERIKKYIE80) and 30567 (161ASCCKVHDNYLDNLKKGCFG180) bound saturably and with high binding activity, presenting nanomolar affinity constants. HABP binding activity to RBCs previously treated with neuraminidase and trypsin decreased, suggesting that these peptides bound to RBC surface proteins and that such binding could be sialic acid dependent. Cross-linking and SDS-PAGE assays showed that the three HABPs specifically bound to 30 and 40 kDa molecular weight RBC membrane proteins. Peptides 30561, 30562 and 30567 inhibited P. falciparum in vitro invasion of red blood cells in a concentration-dependent way. Goat sera having STEVOR protein polymeric peptides antibodies inhibit parasite in vitro invasion depending on concentration. Three peptides localized in STEVOR N-terminal and central regions had high, saturable, binding activity to 30 and 40 kDa RBC membrane proteins. These peptides inhibited the parasite's in vitro invasion, suggesting that STEVOR protein regions are involved in P. falciparum invasion processes during intra-erythrocyte stage.

  14. Bioactive Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H.; Lee, Byong H.

    2017-01-01

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development. PMID:28445415

  15. Bioactive Peptides.

    PubMed

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H; Lee, Byong H

    2017-04-26

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  16. Marine Peptides: Bioactivities and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-01-01

    Peptides are important bioactive natural products which are present in many marine species. These marine peptides have high potential nutraceutical and medicinal values because of their broad spectra of bioactivities. Their antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antioxidative, cardioprotective (antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic and anticoagulant), immunomodulatory, analgesic, anxiolytic anti-diabetic, appetite suppressing and neuroprotective activities have attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry, which attempts to design them for use in the treatment or prevention of various diseases. Some marine peptides or their derivatives have high commercial values and had reached the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical markets. A large number of them are already in different phases of the clinical and preclinical pipeline. This review highlights the recent research in marine peptides and the trends and prospects for the future, with special emphasis on nutraceutical and pharmaceutical development into marketed products. PMID:26132844

  17. Marine Peptides: Bioactivities and Applications.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-06-29

    Peptides are important bioactive natural products which are present in many marine species. These marine peptides have high potential nutraceutical and medicinal values because of their broad spectra of bioactivities. Their antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antioxidative, cardioprotective (antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic and anticoagulant), immunomodulatory, analgesic, anxiolytic anti-diabetic, appetite suppressing and neuroprotective activities have attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry, which attempts to design them for use in the treatment or prevention of various diseases. Some marine peptides or their derivatives have high commercial values and had reached the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical markets. A large number of them are already in different phases of the clinical and preclinical pipeline. This review highlights the recent research in marine peptides and the trends and prospects for the future, with special emphasis on nutraceutical and pharmaceutical development into marketed products.

  18. Epimerization in peptide thioester condensation.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Akaji, Kenichi; Aimoto, Saburo

    2012-11-01

    Peptide segment couplings are now widely utilized in protein chemical synthesis. One of the key structures for the strategy is the peptide thioester. Peptide thioester condensation, in which a C-terminal peptide thioester is selectively activated by silver ions then condensed with an amino component, is a powerful tool. But the amino acid adjacent to the thioester is at risk of epimerization. During the preparation of peptide thioesters by the Boc solid-phase method, no substantial epimerization of the C-terminal amino acid was detected. Epimerization was, however, observed during a thioester-thiol exchange reaction and segment condensation in DMSO in the presence of a base. In contrast, thioester-thiol exchange reactions in aqueous solutions gave no epimerization. The epimerization during segment condensation was significantly suppressed with a less polar solvent that is applicable to segments in thioester peptide condensation. These results were applied to a longer peptide thioester condensation. The epimer content of the coupling product of 89 residues was reduced from 27% to 6% in a condensation between segments of 45 and 44 residues for the thioester and the amino component, respectively.

  19. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  20. A novel pathogenic peptide of thyroglobulin (2208-2227) induces autoreactive T-cell and B-cell responses in both high and low responder mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Kanistras, Ioannis; Hatzioannou, Aikaterini; Lymberi, Peggy

    2014-06-01

    Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) is commonly induced by thyroglobulin (Tg) or Tg peptides in mice genetically susceptible to thyroiditis. In the present study, we investigated the immunogenic and pathogenic potential of a novel 20mer human Tg peptide, p2208 (amino acids 2208-2227), in mouse strains classified as low (LR) or high (HR) responders in EAT. The peptide was selected for its content in overlapping binding motifs for MHC class II products, associated with either resistance (A(b)), or susceptibility (A(s), E(k)) to EAT. We therefore immunized LR BALB/c (H-2(d)) and C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) strains, as well as HR CBA/J (H-2(k)) and SJL/J (H-2(s)) mice with 100 nmol of p2208 in adjuvant and collected their sera, lymph nodes and thyroid glands for further analysis. The p2208 peptide was found to contain B-cell and cryptic T-cell epitope(s) in two of the four strains examined, one LR and one HR. Specifically, it elicited direct EAT in C57BL/6 mice (two of seven mice, infiltration index 1-3), as well as in SJL/J mice (two of six mice, infiltration index 1-2). Such an EAT model could provide insights into the immunoregulatory cascades taking place in resistant hosts.

  1. Comparative studies on neutralisation of primary HIV-1 isolates by human sera and rabbit anti-V3 peptide sera.

    PubMed

    Lawoko, A L; Johansson, B; Hjalmarsson, S; Christensson, B; Ljungberg, B; Al-Khalili, L; Sjölund, M; Pipkorn, R; Fenyö, E M; Blomberg, J

    1999-10-01

    IgG binding to V3 peptides and serum neutralising responses were studied in four HIV-1 infected individuals with progressive disease over a period of 31-70 months. The 18-20 mer peptides comprised residues 299-317 (numbering of HIV1 MN) in the N-terminal half of the V3 loop of the envelope glycoprotein gp120 and were derived from the sequences of autologous, as well as heterologous isolates. All four individuals studied lacked anti-V3 IgG binding to at least one autologous V3 sequence. V3 peptides to which autologous sera lacked binding IgG were all immunogenic in rabbits and induced antisera that were broadly cross-reactive by EIA and broadly cross-neutralising to primary HIV-1 isolates. This indicates that the peptides are immunogenic per se and that the respective human hosts have selective defects in recognising the corresponding V3 sequences. Despite the absence of antibody binding to autologous V3 peptides, the human sera had neutralising antibodies to autologous (three out of four cases), as well as heterologous isolates (all cases). Moreover, in vitro exposure of the patients' isolates to autologous neutralising serum or the homologous rabbit antiserum selected for variants with amino acid substitutions close to the crown of the V3 loop or in regions outside the sequence corresponding to peptides used for immunisation. The amino acid exchanges affected V3 positions known to be antigenic and which are also prone to change successively in infected persons. It is likely that neutralising antibodies recognise both linear and conformational epitopes in the V3 loop. Apparently, there are several, but restricted, numbers of ways for this structure to change its conformation and thereby give rise to neutralisation resistant viruses.

  2. Intravitreal injection or topical eye-drop application of a μ-calpain C2L domain peptide protects against photoreceptor cell death in Royal College of Surgeons' rats, a model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Taku; Nakazawa, Mitsuru; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki; Hata, Shoji; Tomita, Hiroshi; Isago, Hitomi; Baba, Ayaka; Ishiguro, Sei-Ichi

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondrial μ-calpain initiates apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-dependent apoptosis in retinal photoreceptor degeneration. Mitochondrial μ-calpain inhibitors may represent therapeutic targets for the disease. Therefore, we sought to identify inhibitors of mitochondrial calpains and determine their effects in Royal College of Surgeons' (RCS) rats, an animal model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We synthesized 20-mer peptides of the C2-like (C2L) domain of μ-calpain. Two μ-calpain peptides N2 and N9 inhibited mitochondrial μ-calpain activity (IC(50); 892 and 498nM, respectively), but not other proteases. Western blotting showed that 50μM of both μ-calpain peptides caused specific degradation of mitochondrial μ-calpain. Three-dimensional structure of calpains suggested that the peptides N2 and N9 corresponded to the regions forming salt bridges between the protease core domain 2 and the C2L domain. We determined the inhibitory regions of μ-calpain peptides N2 and N9 using 10-mers, and one peptide, N2-10-2, inhibited the activity of mitochondrial μ-calpain (IC(50); 112nM). We next conjugated the peptide N2-10-2 to the C-terminal of HIV-1 tat (HIV), a cell-penetrating peptide. Using isolated rat liver mitochondria, 50μM HIV-conjugated μ-calpain N2-10-2 peptide (HIV-Nμ, IC(50); 285nM) significantly inhibited AIF truncation. The intravitreal injection of 20mM HIV-Nμ also prevented retinal photoreceptor apoptosis determined by TUNEL staining, and preserved retinal function assessed by electroretinography in RCS rats. Topical application of 40mM HIV-Nμ also prevented apoptosis of retinal photoreceptors in RCS rats. Our results demonstrate that HIV-Nμ, a peptide inhibitor of mitochondrial μ-calpain, offers a new modality for treating RP.

  3. Pharmacology of appetite suppression.

    PubMed

    Halford, J C; Blundell, J E

    2000-01-01

    Despite a rising worldwide epidemic of obesity there is currently only a very small number of anti-obesity drugs available to manage the problem. Large numbers of differing pharmacological agents reliably produce a reduction in food intake when administered acutely to animals, and when administered chronically they result in a significant decrease in body mass. Behavioural analysis of drug-induced anorexia in animals demonstrates that various compounds profoundly effect feeding behaviour in differing ways. This indicates the variety of mechanisms by which pharmacological agents can induce changes in food intake, body weight and eventually body composition. Some of the same drugs produce decreases in food intake and weight loss in humans. Some of these drugs do so by modifying the functioning of the appetite system as measured by subjective changes in feelings of hunger and fullness (indices of satiety). Such drugs can be considered as "appetite suppressants" with clinical potential as anti-obesity agents. Other drugs induce changes in food intake and body weight through various physiological mechanisms inducing feelings of nausea or even by side effect related malaise. Of the drugs considered suitable candidates for appetite suppressants are agents which act via peripherally satiety peptide systems (such as CCK, Bombesin/GRP, Enterostatin and GLP-1), or alter the CNS levels of various hypothalamic neuropeptides (NPY, Galanin, Orexin and Melanocortins) or levels of the key CNS appetite monoamine neurotransmitters such as serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA). Recently, the hormone leptin has been regarded as a hormonal signal linking adipose tissue status with a number of key central nervous system circuits. The peptide itself stimulates leptin receptors and it links with POMC and MC-4 receptors. These receptors may also provide drug targets for the control of appetite. Any changes induced by a potential appetite suppressant should be considered in terms of the (i

  4. A fish antimicrobial peptide, tilapia hepcidin TH2-3, shows potent antitumor activity against human fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jyh-Yih; Lin, Wei-Ju; Lin, Tai-Lang

    2009-09-01

    As part of a continuing search for potential anticancer drug candidates from antimicrobial peptides of marine organisms, tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) hepcidin TH2-3 was evaluated in several tumor cell lines. The results indicated that TH2-3, a synthetic 20-mer antimicrobial peptide, specifically inhibited human fibrosarcoma cell (HT1080 cell line) proliferation and migration. The way in which TH2-3 inhibited HT1080 cell growth was then studied. TH2-3 inhibited HT1080 cell growth in a concentration-dependent manner according to an MTT analysis, which was confirmed by a soft-agar assay and AO/EtBr staining. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that TH2-3 caused lethal membrane disruption in HT1080 cancer cells, and a wound healing assay supported that TH2-3 decreased the migration of HT1080 cells. In addition, c-Jun mRNA expression was downregulated after treatment with TH2-3 for 48-96 h compared to the untreated group. These findings suggest a mechanism of cytotoxic action of TH2-3 and indicate that TH2-3 may be a promising chemotherapeutic agent against human fibrosarcoma cells.

  5. Humoral immune responses to EGFR-derived peptides predict progression-free and overall survival of non-small cell lung cancer patients receiving gefitinib.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Koichi; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Hattori, Satoshi; Matsueda, Satoko; Kawahara, Akihiko; Sasada, Tetsuro; Itoh, Kyogo; Hoshino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene are associated with clinical response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as gefitinib, in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, humoral immune responses to EGFR in NSCLC patients have not been well studied. In this study, we investigated the clinical significance of immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to EGFR-derived peptides in NSCLC patients receiving gefitinib. Plasma IgG titers to each of 60 different EGFR-derived 20-mer peptides were measured by the Luminex system in 42 NSCLC patients receiving gefitinib therapy. The relationships between the peptide-specific IgG titers and presence of EGFR mutations or patient survival were evaluated statistically. IgG titers against the egfr_481-500, egfr_721-740, and egfr_741-760 peptides were significantly higher in patients with exon 21 mutation than in those without it. On the other hand, IgG titers against the egfr_841-860 and egfr_1001-1020 peptides were significantly lower and higher, respectively, in patients with deletion in exon 19. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that IgG responses to egfr_41_ 60, egfr_61_80 and egfr_481_500 were significantly prognostic for progression-free survival independent of other clinicopathological characteristics, whereas those to the egfr_41_60 and egfr_481_500 peptides were significantly prognostic for overall survival. Detection of IgG responses to EGFR-derived peptides may be a promising method for prognostication of NSCLC patients receiving gefitinib. Our results may provide new insight for better understanding of humoral responses to EGFR in NSCLC patients.

  6. Peptide bioregulation of aging: results and prospects.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, Vladimir N; Khavinson, Vladimir Kh

    2010-04-01

    The review comprises the results of author's long-term investigation in the mechanisms of aging and a role of peptide bioregulators in prevention of age-related pathology. A number of small peptides have been isolated from different organs and tissues and their analogues (di-, tri-, tetrapeptides) were synthesized from the amino acids. It was shown that long-term treatment with some peptide preparations increased mean life span by 20-40%, slow down the age-related changes in the biomarkers of aging and suppressed development of spontaneous and induced by chemical or radiation carcinogens tumorigenesis in rodents. Possible mechanisms of the biological effects of small peptides are discussed in the paper. The results of clinical applications of peptide preparation during the period of 6-12 years are presented as well.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1 cleavage product GLP-1 (9-36) amide enhances hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity in correlation with suppression of Kv4.2 expression and eEF2 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Day, Stephen M; Yang, Wenzhong; Ewin, Sarah; Zhou, Xueyan; Ma, Tao

    2017-08-18

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an endogenous gut hormone and a key regulator in maintaining glucose homeostasis by stimulating insulin secretion. Its natural cleavage product GLP-1 (9-36), used to be considered a "bio-inactive" metabolite mainly because of its lack of insulinotropic effects and low affinity for GLP-1 receptors, possesses unique properties such as anti-oxidant and cardiovascular protection. Little is known about the role of GLP-1 (9-36) in central nervous system. Here we report that chronic, systemic application of GLP-1 (9-36) in adult mice facilitated both the induction and maintenance phases of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a major form of synaptic plasticity. In contrast, spatial learning and memory, as assessed by the Morris water maze test, was not altered by GLP-1 (9-36) administration. At the molecular level, GLP-1 (9-36) reduced protein levels of the potassium channel Kv4.2 in hippocampus, which is linked to elevated dendritic membrane excitability. Moreover, GLP-1(9-36) treatment inhibited phosphorylation of mRNA translational factor eEF2, which is associated with increased capacity for de novo protein synthesis. Finally, we showed that the LTP-enhancing effects by GLP-1 (9-36) treatment in vivo were blunted by application of exendin(9-39)amide [EX(9-39)], the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) antagonist, suggesting its role as a GLP-1R agonist. These findings demonstrate that GLP-1 (9-36), which was considered a "bio-inactive" peptide, clearly exerts physiological effects on neuronal plasticity in the hippocampus, a brain region critical for learning and memory. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. N-terminal 5-mer peptide analog P165 of amyloid precursor protein inhibits UVA-induced MMP-1 expression by suppressing the MAPK pathway in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Hui; Wang, Wen; Wang, Rong; Liu, Zi-Lian; Zhu, Wei; Lian, Shi

    2014-07-05

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation leads to a progressive increase in dermal damage through the degradation of collagen, which is mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). UV radiation alters the intracellular signaling events that regulate the elaboration of MMPs. Our previous study showed that P165, the N-terminal 5-mer peptide analog of amyloid precursor protein, exerts a protective effect on ultraviolet A (UVA)-induced loss of collagen type I in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) by inhibiting the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and MMP-1. In this study, we focused on specific signal transduction pathways to elucidate the possible photoprotective mechanisms of P165 in controlling MMP-1 inhibition. Results from western blot analyses indicated that pretreatment with P165 dose-dependently inhibited UVA-induced phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kniase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and the phosphorylation of their downstream targets c-Jun and c-Fos. The photoprotective effects of P165 were further demonstrated in collagen type I secretion and cellular senescence induced by UVA irradiation. These findings suggest that P165 exerts photoprotective activity in UVA-treated HDFs by regulating MMP-1 generation. This activity may be mediated by inhibiting the MAPK signaling pathways. Thus, P165 is a potential agent for the prevention of skin photoaging.

  10. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... vital for the body to use its main energy source, glucose . Since C-peptide and insulin are produced ... these cases, C-peptide measurement is a useful alternative to testing for insulin. C-peptide measurements can ...

  11. Composite peptide-based vaccines for cancer immunotherapy (Review).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhang, Qing; Li, Ke; Yin, Hong; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2015-01-01

    The use of peptide-based vaccines as therapeutics aims to elicit immune responses through antigenic epitopes derived from tumor antigens. Peptide-based vaccines are easily synthesized and chemically stable entities, and of note, they are absent of oncogenic potential. However, their application is more complicated as the success of an effective peptide-based vaccine is determined by numerous parameters. The success thus far has been limited by the choice of tumor antigenic peptides, poor immunogenicity and incorporation of strategies to reverse cancer-mediated immune suppression. In the present review, an overview of the mechanisms of peptide-based vaccines is provided and antigenic peptides are categorized with respect to their tissue distribution in order to determine their usefulness as targets. Furthermore, certain approaches are proposed that induce and maintain T cells for immunotherapy. The recent progress indicates that peptide-based vaccines are preferential for targeted therapy in cancer patients.

  12. An antifungal peptide from baby lima bean.

    PubMed

    Wang, H X; Ng, T B

    2006-12-01

    A 6-kDa antifungal peptide with inhibitory activity on mycelial growth in Fusarium oxysporum, Mycosphaerella arachidicola, and Physalospora piricola was isolated from baby lima beans. The peptide suppressed growth in M. arachidicola with an IC(50) of 0.87 muM and inhibited activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 4 muM. The peptide exhibited an N-terminal amino acid sequence similar to those of leguminous defensins. The isolation procedure comprised ion exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on carboxymethyl (CM)-cellulose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The peptide was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and Affi-gel blue gel but was adsorbed on CM-cellulose.

  13. Synthetic peptides from conserved regions of the Plasmodium falciparum early transcribed membrane and ring exported proteins bind specifically to red blood cell proteins.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Jeison; Curtidor, Hernando; Obando-Martinez, Ana Z; Vizcaíno, Carolina; Pinto, Martha; Martinez, Nora L; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2009-11-16

    Severe malaria pathology is directly associated with cytoadherence of infected red blood cells (iRBCs) to healthy RBCs and/or endothelial cells occurring during the intraerythrocytic development of Plasmodium falciparum. We synthesized, as 20-mer long peptides, the members of the ring exported (REX) protein family encoded in chromosome 9, as well as the early transcribed membrane proteins (E-TRAMP) 10.2 and 4, to identify specific RBC binding regions in these proteins. Twelve binding peptides were identified (designated as HABPs): three were identified in REX1, two in REX2, one in REX3, two in REX4 and four in E-TRAMP 10.2. The majority of these HABPs was conserved among different P. falciparum strains, according to sequence analysis. No HABPs were found in E-TRAMP 4. Bindings of HABPs were saturable and sensitive to the enzymatic treatment of RBCs and HABPs had different structural features, according to circular dichroism studies. Our results suggest that the REX and E-TRAMP families participate in relevant interactions with RBC membrane proteins, which highlight these proteins as potential targets for the development of fully effective immunoprophylactic methods.

  14. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  15. A synthetic peptide from Trypanosoma cruzi mucin-like associated surface protein as candidate for a vaccine against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Serna, Carylinda; Lara, Joshua A; Rodrigues, Silas P; Marques, Alexandre F; Almeida, Igor C; Maldonado, Rosa A

    2014-06-12

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is responsible for producing significant morbidity and mortality throughout Latin America. The disease has recently become a public health concern to nonendemic regions like the U.S. and Europe. Currently there are no fully effective drugs or vaccine available to treat the disease. The mucin-associated surface proteins (MASPs) are glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoproteins encoded by a multigene family with hundreds of members. MASPs are among the most abundant antigens found on the surface of the infective trypomastigote stage of T. cruzi, thus representing an attractive target for vaccine development. Here we used immunoinformatics to select a 20-mer peptide with several predicted overlapping B-cell, MHC-I, and MHC-II epitopes, from a MASP family member expressed on mammal-dwelling stages of T. cruzi. The synthetic MASP peptide conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (MASPpep-KLH) was tested in presence or not of an adjuvant (alum, Al) as a vaccine candidate in the C3H/HeNsd murine model of T. cruzi infection. In considerable contrast to the control groups receiving placebo, Al, or KLH alone or the group immunized with MASPpep-KLH/Al, the group immunized with MASPpep-KLH showed 86% survival rate after challenge with a highly lethal dose of trypomastigotes. As evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, MASPpep-KLH-immunized animals had much lower parasite load in the heart, liver, and spleen than control animals. Moreover, protected animals produced trypanolytic, protective antibodies, and a cytokine profile conducive to resistance against parasite infection. Finally, in vivo depletion of either CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells indicated that the latter are critical for protection in mice immunized with MASPpep-KLH. In summary, this new peptide-based vaccine with overlapping B- and T-cell epitopes is able to control T. cruzi infection in mice by priming both humoral and cellular immunity.

  16. Stabilization of exosome-targeting peptides via engineered glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Michelle E; Leonard, Joshua N

    2015-03-27

    Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles that mediate intercellular transfer of cellular contents and are attractive vehicles for therapeutic delivery of bimolecular cargo such as nucleic acids, proteins, and even drugs. Efficient exosome-mediated delivery in vivo requires targeting vesicles for uptake by specific recipient cells. Although exosomes have been successfully targeted to several cellular receptors by displaying peptides on the surface of the exosomes, identifying effective exosome-targeting peptides for other receptors has proven challenging. Furthermore, the biophysical rules governing targeting peptide success remain poorly understood. To evaluate one factor potentially limiting exosome delivery, we investigated whether peptides displayed on the exosome surface are degraded during exosome biogenesis, for example by endosomal proteases. Indeed, peptides fused to the N terminus of exosome-associated transmembrane protein Lamp2b were cleaved in samples derived from both cells and exosomes. To suppress peptide loss, we engineered targeting peptide-Lamp2b fusion proteins to include a glycosylation motif at various positions. Introduction of this glycosylation motif both protected the peptide from degradation and led to an increase in overall Lamp2b fusion protein expression in both cells and exosomes. Moreover, glycosylation-stabilized peptides enhanced targeted delivery of exosomes to neuroblastoma cells, demonstrating that such glycosylation does not ablate peptide-target interactions. Thus, we have identified a strategy for achieving robust display of targeting peptides on the surface of exosomes, which should facilitate the evaluation and development of new exosome-based therapeutics.

  17. Sleep-promoting effects of muramyl peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, J M; Pappenheimer, J R; Karnovsky, M L

    1982-01-01

    A muramyl peptide that induces excess slow-wave sleep in rats, rabbits, and cats has recently been isolated from human urine. We now report that synthetic acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine ("muramyl dipeptide") and its lysyl derivative (acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutaminyllysine) can mimic the somnogenic effects of the natural peptide. Both compounds are also pyrogenic and may cause other disturbances of autonomic function. The pyrogenic effects of intravenously administered muramyl dipeptide can be suppressed by previous treatment with acetaminophen without blocking the sleep-promoting effects. Images PMID:6964403

  18. Insects antiviral and anticancer peptides: new leads for the future?

    PubMed

    Slocinska, Malgorzata; Marciniak, Pawel; Rosinski, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    Insect produce wide range of protein and peptides as a first fast defense line against pathogen infection. These agents act in different ways including insect immune system activation or by direct impact on the target tumor cells or viruses. It has been shown that some of the insect peptides suppress viral gene and protein expression, rybosilate DNA, whereas others cause membrane lysis, induce apoptosis or arrest cell cycle. Several of the purified and characterized peptides of insect origin are very promising in treating of serious human diseases like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpex simplex virus (HSV) or leukaemia. However, some obstacles need to be overcome. Cytotoxic activity of peptides, susceptibility to proteases or high cost of production remain still unsolved problems. Reports on the peptides antiviral and antitumour mechanisms are scanty. Thus, in this review we present characteristic, mode of action and potential medical applications of insects origin peptides with the antiviral and antitumour activity.

  19. Regulatory Peptides in Plants.

    PubMed

    Vanyushin, B F; Ashapkin, V V; Aleksandrushkina, N I

    2017-02-01

    Many different peptides regulating cell differentiation, growth, and development are found in plants. Peptides participate in regulation of plant ontogenesis starting from pollination, pollen tube growth, and the very early stages of embryogenesis, including formation of embryo and endosperm. They direct differentiation of meristematic stem cells, formation of tissues and individual organs, take part in regulation of aging, fruit maturation, and abscission of plant parts associated with apoptosis. Biological activity of peptides is observed at very low concentrations, and it has mainly signal nature and hormonal character. "Mature" peptides appear mainly due to processing of protein precursors with (or without) additional enzymatic modifications. Plant peptides differ in origin, structure, and functional properties. Their specific action is due to binding with respective receptors and interactions with various proteins and other factors. Peptides can also regulate physiological functions by direct peptide-protein interactions. Peptide action is coordinated with the action of known phytohormones (auxins, cytokinins, and others); thus, peptides control phytohormonal signal pathways.

  20. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  1. TANGO-Inspired Design of Anti-Amyloid Cyclic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaomeng; Brickson, Claire R; Murphy, Regina M

    2016-09-21

    β-Amyloid peptide (Aβ) self-associates into oligomers and fibrils, in a process that is believed to directly lead to neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease. Compounds that bind to Aβ, and inhibit fibrillogenesis and neurotoxicity, are of interest as an anti-Alzheimer therapeutic strategy. Peptides are particularly attractive for this purpose, because they have advantages over small molecules in their ability to disrupt protein-protein interactions, yet they are amenable to tuning of their properties through chemical means, unlike antibodies. Self-complementation and peptide library screening are two strategies that have been employed in the search for peptides that bind to Aβ. We have taken a different approach, by designing Aβ-binding peptides using transthyretin (TTR) as a template. Previously, we demonstrated that a cyclic peptide, with sequence derived from the known Aβ-binding site on TTR, suppressed Aβ aggregation into fibrils and protected neurons against Aβ toxicity. Here, we searched for cyclic peptides with improved efficacy, by employing the algorithm TANGO, designed originally to identify amyloidogenic sequences in proteins. By using TANGO as a guide to predict the effect of sequence modifications on conformation and aggregation, we synthesized a significantly improved cyclic peptide. We demonstrate that the peptide, in binding to Aβ, redirects Aβ toward protease-sensitive, nonfibrillar aggregates. Cyclic peptides designed using this strategy have attractive solubility, specificity, and stability characteristics.

  2. TRH-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Bílek, R; Bičíková, M; Šafařík, L

    2011-01-01

    TRH-like peptides are characterized by substitution of basic amino acid histidine (related to authentic TRH) with neutral or acidic amino acid, like glutamic acid, phenylalanine, glutamine, tyrosine, leucin, valin, aspartic acid and asparagine. The presence of extrahypothalamic TRH-like peptides was reported in peripheral tissues including gastrointestinal tract, placenta, neural tissues, male reproductive system and certain endocrine tissues. Work deals with the biological function of TRH-like peptides in different parts of organisms where various mechanisms may serve for realisation of biological function of TRH-like peptides as negative feedback to the pituitary exerted by the TRH-like peptides, the role of pEEPam such as fertilization-promoting peptide, the mechanism influencing the proliferative ability of prostatic tissues, the neuroprotective and antidepressant function of TRH-like peptides in brain and the regulation of thyroid status by TRH-like peptides.

  3. Peptide Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Håvard; Hamill, Pamela; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial host defense peptides are produced by all complex organisms as well as some microbes and have diverse and complex antimicrobial activities. Collectively these peptides demonstrate a broad range of antiviral and antibacterial activities and modes of action, and it is important to distinguish between direct microbicidal and indirect activities against such pathogens. The structural requirements of peptides for antiviral and antibacterial activities are evaluated in light of the diverse set of primary and secondary structures described for host defense peptides. Peptides with antifungal and antiparasitic activities are discussed in less detail, although the broad-spectrum activities of such peptides indicate that they are important host defense molecules. Knowledge regarding the relationship between peptide structure and function as well as their mechanism of action is being applied in the design of antimicrobial peptide variants as potential novel therapeutic agents. PMID:16847082

  4. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  6. Peptide Synthetase Gene in Trichoderma virens

    PubMed Central

    Wilhite, S. E.; Lumsden, R. D.; Straney, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    Trichoderma virens (synonym, Gliocladium virens), a deuteromycete fungus, suppresses soilborne plant diseases caused by a number of fungi and is used as a biocontrol agent. Several traits that may contribute to the antagonistic interactions of T. virens with disease-causing fungi involve the production of peptide metabolites (e.g., the antibiotic gliotoxin and siderophores used for iron acquisition). We cloned a 5,056-bp partial cDNA encoding a putative peptide synthetase (Psy1) from T. virens using conserved motifs found within the adenylate domain of peptide synthetases. Sequence similarities with conserved motifs of the adenylation domain, acyl transfer, and two condensation domains support identification of the Psy1 gene as a gene that encodes a peptide synthetase. Disruption of the native Psy1 gene through gene replacement was used to identify the function of this gene. Psy1 disruptants produced normal amounts of gliotoxin but grew poorly under low-iron conditions, suggesting that Psy1 plays a role in siderophore production. Psy1 disruptants cannot produce the major T. virens siderophore dimerum acid, a dipetide of acylated Nδ-hydroxyornithine. Biocontrol activity against damping-off diseases caused by Pythium ultimum and Rhizoctonia solani was not reduced by the Psy1 disruption, suggesting that iron competition through dimerum acid production does not contribute significantly to disease suppression activity under the conditions used. PMID:11679326

  7. Peptide signaling in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Hayakawa, Eisuke

    2012-01-01

    Peptides play a number of crucial roles as signaling molecules in metazoans. In order to elaborate a more complete picture of the roles played by peptides in a single organism, we launched the "Hydra Peptide Project". For this project, we used Hydra magnipapillata, a species belonging to Cnidaria, one of the most basal metazoan phyla, and using a peptidomic approach, we systematically identified a number of peptide signaling molecules, their encoding genes and their functions. In this article, we report the peptides isolated from Hydra and other cnidarians, as well as their synthesis, processing and release from the cells to the target. Possible peptide signaling pathways are overviewed and finally we discuss the evolution of the peptide signaling system.

  8. A switchable stapled peptide.

    PubMed

    Kalistratova, Aleksandra; Legrand, Baptiste; Verdié, Pascal; Naydenova, Emilia; Amblard, Muriel; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    The O-N acyl transfer reaction has gained significant popularity in peptide and medicinal chemistry. This reaction has been successfully applied to the synthesis of difficult sequence-containing peptides, cyclic peptides, epimerization-free fragment coupling and more recently, to switchable peptide polymers. Herein, we describe a related strategy to facilitate the synthesis and purification of a hydrophobic stapled peptide. The staple consists of a serine linked through an amide bond formed from its carboxylic acid function and the side chain amino group of diaminopropionic acid and through an ester bond formed from its amino group and the side chain carboxylic acid function of aspartic acid. The α-amino group of serine was protonated during purification. Interestingly, when the peptide was placed at physiological pH, the free amino group initiated the O-N shift reducing the staple length by one atom, leading to a more hydrophobic stapled peptide.

  9. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  10. Tandem mass spectrometry of amidated peptides.

    PubMed

    Mouls, Laetitia; Subra, Gilles; Aubagnac, Jean-Louis; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2006-11-01

    The behavior of C-terminal amidated and carboxylated peptides upon low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) was investigated. Two sets of 76 sequences of variable amino acid compositions and lengths were synthesized as model compounds. In most cases, C-terminal amidated peptides were found to produce, upon CID, an abundant loss of ammonia from the protonated molecules. To validate such MS/MS signatures, the studied peptides contained amino acids that can potentially release ammonia from their side chains, such as asparagine, glutamine, tryptophan, lysine and arginine. Arginine, and to a lesser extent lysine, was shown to induce a competitive fragmentation leading to the loss of ammonia from their side chains, thus interfering with the targeted backbone neutral release. However, when arginine or lysine was located at the C-terminal position mimicking a tryptic digest, losses of ammonia from the arginine side chain and from the peptide backbone were completely suppressed. Such results were discussed in the frame of peptidomic or proteomic studies in an attempt to reveal the presence of C-terminal amidated peptides or proteins.

  11. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  12. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  13. SWET for secure water suppression on probes with high quality factor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peter S C; Otting, Gottfried

    2005-07-01

    Water suppression by selective preirradiation is increasingly difficult to achieve on probeheads with high quality factor because of the opposing forces of radiation damping. Here we show that a simple modification to the WET scheme provides reliable water suppression in aqueous solutions of proteins and peptides with minimal saturation of the H(alpha) protons. The scheme is shown to work also with dilute peptide solutions. It is recommended to maintain the water suppression during the evolution time of COSY experiments by weak selective irradiation that causes only minimal Bloch-Siegert shifts. The new water-suppression scheme suppresses the water magnetization by spatial scrambling. Traditional water suppression by preirradiation is similarly based more on water scrambling due to the radiofrequency inhomogeneity than on relaxation effects.

  14. Fire Suppression, District 5

    Treesearch

    Roy Headley

    1916-01-01

    The increasing effectiveness of suppression practice is shown by the fact that in 1915 fire suppression cost one-third as much as in 1914, and damage to Government property was kept down to one-fourth the 1914 figure. The seasons were approximately equal in danger. Is further progress to be expected?

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  16. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Topical peptides as cosmeceuticals.

    PubMed

    Pai, Varadraj Vasant; Bhandari, Prasana; Shukla, Pankaj

    2017-01-01

    Peptides are known to have diverse biological roles, most prominently as signaling/regulatory molecules in a broad variety of physiological processes including defense, immunity, stress, growth, homeostasis and reproduction. These aspects have been used in the field of dermatology and cosmetology to produce short, stable and synthetic peptides for extracellular matrix synthesis, pigmentation, innate immunity and inflammation. The evolution of peptides over the century, which started with the discovery of penicillin, has now extended to their usage as cosmeceuticals in recent years. Cosmeceutical peptides may act as signal modulators of the extracellular matrix component, as structural peptides, carrier peptides and neurotransmitter function modulators. Transdermal delivery of peptides can be made more effective by penetration enhancers, chemical modification or encapsulation of peptides. The advantages of using peptides as cosmeceuticals include their involvement in many physiological functions of the skin, their selectivity, their lack of immunogenicity and absence of premarket regulatory requirements for their use. However, there are disadvantages: clinical evidence for efficacy is often weak, absorption may be poor due to low lipophilicity, high molecular weight and binding to other ingredients, and prices can be quite high.

  18. The natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gary F

    2004-03-01

    The natriuretic peptides are a family of widely distributed, but evolutionarily conserved, polypeptide mediators that exert a range of actions throughout the body. In cardiovascular homeostasis, the endocrine roles of the cardiac-derived atrial and B-type natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP) in regulating central fluid volume and blood pressure have been recognised for two decades. However, there is a growing realisation that natriuretic peptide actions go far beyond their volume regulating effects. These pleiotropic actions include local (autocrine/paracrine) regulatory actions of ANP and BNP within the heart, and of another natriuretic peptide, CNP, within the vessel wall. Effects on function and growth of the local tissue environment are likely to be of great importance, especially in disease states where tissue and circulating levels of ANP and BNP rise markedly. At present, the relevance of other natriuretic peptides (notably uroguanylin and DNP) to human physiology and pathology remain uncertain. Other articles in this issue of Basic Research in Cardiology review the molecular physiology of natriuretic peptide signalling, with a particular emphasis on the lessons from genetically targetted mice; the vascular activity of natriuretic peptides; the regulation and roles of natriuretic peptides in ischaemic myocardium; and the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic roles of natriuretic peptides in heart failure.

  19. Assaying peptide translocation by the peptide transporter TAP.

    PubMed

    Jongsma, Marlieke L M; Neefjes, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    MHC class I molecules display peptides at the cell surface that are mostly derived from cytosolic or nuclear proteins. Since peptide loading of MHC class I molecules occurs in the ER lumen, cytosolic peptides have to pass the ER membrane. The peptide transporter TAP translocates peptides over this ER membrane which is critical for successful MHC class I antigen presentation. How peptide translocation by TAP can be assayed and inhibitors of chemical or viral origin can be identified, will be described here.

  20. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  1. Peptide bioregulators inhibit apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V K; Kvetnoii, I M

    2000-12-01

    The effects of peptide bioregulators epithalon and vilon on the dynamics of irradiation-induced apoptotic death of spleen lymphocytes in rats indicate that these agents inhibit physiologically programmed cell death. The antiapoptotic effect of vilon was more pronounced, which corroborates the concept on tissue-specific effect of peptide bioregulators.

  2. Effects of protein and peptide addition on lipid oxidation in powder model system.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Young; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mori, Tomohiko; Matsumura, Yasuki

    2005-01-12

    The effect of protein and peptide addition on the oxidation of eicosapentaenoic acid ethyl ester (EPE) encapsulated by maltodextrin (MD) was investigated. The encapsulated lipid (powder lipid) was prepared in two steps, i.e., mixing of EPE with MD solutions (+/- protein and peptides) to produce emulsions and freeze-drying of the resultant emulsions. EPE oxidation in MD powder progressed more rapidly in the humid state [relative humidity (RH) = 70%] than in the dry state (RH = 10%). The addition of soy protein, soy peptide, and gelatin peptides improved the oxidation stability of EPE encapsulated by MD, and the inhibition of lipid oxidation by the protein and the peptides was more dramatic in the humid state. Especially, the oxidation of EPE was almost perfectly suppressed when the lipid was encapsulated with MD + soy peptide during storage in the humid state for 7 days. Several physical properties such as the lipid particle size of the emulsions, the fraction of nonencapsulated lipids, scanning electron microscopy images of powder lipids, and the mobility of the MD matrix were investigated to find the modification of encapsulation behavior by the addition of the protein and peptides, but no significant change was observed. On the other hand, the protein and peptides exhibited a strong radical scavenging activity in the powder systems as well as in the solution systems. These results suggest that a chemical mechanism such as radical scavenging ability plays an important role in the suppression of EPE oxidation in MD powder by soy proteins, soy peptides, and gelatin peptides.

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  4. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    GH suppression test; Glucose loading test; Acromegaly - blood test; Gigantism - blood test ... drink anything. You then drink a solution containing glucose (sugar). You may be told to drink slowly ...

  5. Cloning, phenotypic expression, and DNA sequence of the gene for lactacin F, an antimicrobial peptide produced by Lactobacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Muriana, P M; Klaenhammer, T R

    1991-01-01

    Lactacin F is a heat-stable bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus acidophilus 11088. A 63-mer oligonucleotide probe deduced from the N-terminal lactacin F amino acid sequence was used to clone the putative laf structural gene from plasmid DNA of a lactacin F-producing transconjugant, L. acidophilus T143. One clone, NCK360, harbored a recombinant plasmid, pTRK160, which contained a 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment of the size expected from hybridization experiments. An Escherichia coli-L. acidophilus shuttle vector was constructed, and a subclone (pTRK162) containing the 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment was introduced by electroporation into two lactacin F-negative strains, L. acidophilus 89 and 88-C. Lactobacillus transformants containing pTRK162 expressed lactacin F activity and immunity. Bacteriocin produced by the transformants exhibited an inhibitory spectrum and heat stability identical to those of the wild-type bacteriocin. An 873-bp region of the 2.2-kb fragment was sequenced by using a 20-mer degenerate lactacin F-specific primer to initiate sequencing from within the lactacin F structural gene. Analysis of the resulting sequence identified an open reading frame which could encode a protein of 75 amino acids. The 25 N-terminal amino acids for lactacin F were identified within the open reading frame along with an N-terminal extension, possibly a signal sequence. The lactacin F N-terminal sequence, through the remainder of the open reading frame (57 amino acids; 6.3 kDa), correlated extremely well with composition analyses of purified lactacin F which also predicted a size of 51 to 56 amino acid residues. Molecular characterization of lactacin F identified a small hydrophobic peptide that may be representative of a common bacteriocin class in lactic acid bacteria. Images PMID:1900281

  6. Immunosuppressive peptides and their therapeutic applications☆

    PubMed Central

    Thell, Kathrin; Hellinger, Roland; Schabbauer, Gernot; Gruber, Christian W.

    2014-01-01

    The immune system is vital for detecting and evading endogenous and exogenous threats to the body. Failure to regulate this homeostasis leads to autoimmunity, which is often associated with malfunctioning T cell signaling. Several medications are available to suppress over-reactive T lymphocytes, but many of the currently marketed drugs produce severe and life-threatening side-effects. Ribosomally synthesized peptides are gaining recognition from the pharmaceutical industry for their enhanced selectivity and decreased toxicity compared with small molecules; in particular, circular peptides exhibit remarkable stability and increased oral administration properties. For example, plant cyclotides effectively inhibit T lymphocyte proliferation. They are composed of a head-to-tail cyclized backbone and a cystine-knot motif, which confers them with remarkable stability, thus making them attractive pharmaceutical tools. PMID:24333193

  7. Jet noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-08-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  8. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  9. C-peptide exhibits a late induction effect on matrix metallopeptidase-9 in high glucose-stimulated rat mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junxia; Li, Yanning; Xu, Mingzhi; Li, Dandan; Wang, Yu; Qi, Jinsheng; He, Kunyu

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2 is considered to be a contributor of extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in diabetic nephropathy (DN). C-peptide can reverse fibrosis, thus exerting a beneficial effect on DN. Whether C-peptide induces MMP-9 and MMP-2 to reverse ECM accumulation is not clear. In the present study, in order to determine ECM metabolism, rat mesangial cells were treated with high glucose (HG) and C-peptide intervention, then the early and late effects of C-peptide on HG-affected MMP-9 and MMP-2 were evaluated. Firstly, it was confirmed that HG mainly suppressed MMP-9 expression levels. Furthermore, C-peptide treatment induced MMP-9 expression at 6 h and suppressed it at 24 h, revealing the early dual effects of C-peptide on MMP-9 expression. Subsequently, significant increase in MMP-9 expression at 72, 96 and 120 h C-peptide treatment was observed. These changes in MMP-9 protein content confirmed its expression changes following late C-peptide treatment. Furthermore, at 96 and 120 h C-peptide treatment reversed the HG-inhibited MMP-9 secretion, further indicating the late induction effect of C-peptide on MMP-9. The present results demonstrated that C-peptide exerted a late induction effect on MMP-9 in HG-stimulated rat mesangial cells, which may be associated with the underlying mechanism of C-peptide's reversal effects on DN. PMID:28101192

  10. Cyclic Opioid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Remesic, Michael; Lee, Yeon Sun; Hruby, Victor J

    2016-01-01

    For decades the opioid receptors have been an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Since the first discovery of enkephalin, approximately a dozen endogenous opioid peptides have been known to produce opioid activity and analgesia, but their therapeutics have been limited mainly due to low blood brain barrier penetration and poor resistance to proteolytic degradation. One versatile approach to overcome these drawbacks is the cyclization of linear peptides to cyclic peptides with constrained topographical structure. Compared to their linear parents, cyclic analogs exhibit better metabolic stability, lower offtarget toxicity, and improved bioavailability. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies have uncovered promising compounds for the treatment of pain as well as further elucidate structural elements required for selective opioid receptor activity. The benefits that come with employing cyclization can be further enhanced through the generation of polycyclic derivatives. Opioid ligands generally have a short peptide chain and thus the realm of polycyclic peptides has yet to be explored. In this review, a brief history of designing ligands for the opioid receptors, including classic linear and cyclic ligands, is discussed along with recent approaches and successes of cyclic peptide ligands for the receptors. Various scaffolds and approaches to improve bioavailability are elaborated and concluded with a discourse towards polycyclic peptides.

  11. Rapid detergent removal from peptide samples with ethyl acetate for mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Yee-Guide; Stanley, E Richard

    2010-02-01

    Detergents are required for the extraction of hydrophobic proteins and for the maintenance of their solubility in solution. However, the presence of detergents in the peptide samples severely suppresses ionization in mass spectrometry (MS) analysis and decreases chromatographic resolution in LC-MS. Thus, detergents must be removed for sensitive detection of peptides by MS. This unit describes a rapid protocol in which ethyl acetate extraction is used to remove octylglucoside from protease digests without loss of peptides. This procedure can also be used to reduce interference by sodium dodecyl sulfate, Nonidet P-40, or Triton X-100 in peptide samples for MS analysis.

  12. Targeted Peptide Specificity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-31

    the conformation of small natural peptide ligands. In the last year two peptides were investigaýed by 2D-NMR,(j2.- conotoxin SI, which targets to the...targets. Although these venoms are very complex, we have focused on three groups of peptide toxins, the a, j and w- conotoxins which target to nicotinic...grant period are summarized below.) In addition, the 2D-NMR work is continuing and in addition to examining one of the conotoxins specific for the

  13. Design of cocktail peptide vaccine against Cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tabaei, Samira; Mashkani, Baratali; Esmaili, Arezoo; Karimi, Reza; Jamehdar, Saeid Amel

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) remains a major morbidity and mortality cause in immuno suppressed patients. Therefore, significant effort has been made towards the development of a vaccine. In this study, the expression of the pp65 and gB fusion peptides and Fc domain of mouse IgG2a as a novel delivery system for selective uptake of antigens by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in Pichia pastoris yeast system were studied. Materials and Method: In this study, four immune dominant sequences in pp65 protein and 3 immuno dominant sequences in gB protein were selected according to literature review. Peptide linker -GGGGS- was used for construction of fusion peptide. This fusion peptide was cloned in the pPICZαA expression vector and transfected into P. pastoris host cells. Results: Dot blot and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) techniques showed that a high level of pp65-gB-Fc fusion peptide was expressed. Conclusion: This CMV pp65-gB-Fc fusion peptide could be a promising candidate for the development of a novel peptide vaccine. PMID:27279990

  14. The nature of peptide interactions with acid end-group PLGAs and facile aqueous-based microencapsulation of therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Andreas M.; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H.; Mazzara, J. Maxwell; Tong, Ling; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Olsen, Karl F.; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    An important poorly understood phenomenon in controlled-release depots involves the strong interaction between common cationic peptides and low Mw free acid end-group poly(lactic-co-glycolic acids) (PLGAs) used to achieve continuous peptide release kinetics. The kinetics of peptide sorption to PLGA was examined by incubating peptide solutions of 0.2-4 mM octreotide or leuprolide acetate salts in 0.1 M HEPES buffer, pH 7.4, with polymer particles or films at 4-37 °C for 24 h. The extent of absorption/loading of peptides in PLGA particles/films was assayed by two-phase extraction and amino acid analysis. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser scanning confocal imaging techniques were used to examine peptide penetration in the polymer phase. The release of sorbed peptide from leuprolide-PLGA particles was evaluated both in vitro (PBST + 0.02% sodium azide, 37 °C) and in vivo (male Sprague-Dawley rats). We found that when the PLGA-COOH chains are sufficiently mobilized, therapeutic peptides not only bind at the surface, a common belief to date, but can also internalized and distributed throughout the polymer phase at physiological temperature forming a salt with low-molecular weight PLGA-COOH. Importantly, absorption of leuprolide into low MW PLGA-COOH particles yielded ~17 wt% leuprolide loading in the polymer (i.e., ~70% of PLGA-COOH acids occupied), and the absorbed peptide was released from the polymer for > 2 weeks in a controlled fashion in vitro and as indicated by sustained testosterone suppression in male Sprague-Dawley rats. This new approach, which bypasses the traditional encapsulation method and associated production cost, opens up the potential for facile production of low-cost controlled-release injectable depots for leuprolide and related peptides. PMID:24021356

  15. The nature of peptide interactions with acid end-group PLGAs and facile aqueous-based microencapsulation of therapeutic peptides.

    PubMed

    Sophocleous, Andreas M; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H; Mazzara, J Maxwell; Tong, Ling; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Olsen, Karl F; Schwendeman, Steven P

    2013-12-28

    An important poorly understood phenomenon in controlled-release depots involves the strong interaction between common cationic peptides and low Mw free acid end-group poly(lactic-co-glycolic acids) (PLGAs) used to achieve continuous peptide release kinetics. The kinetics of peptide sorption to PLGA was examined by incubating peptide solutions of 0.2-4mM octreotide or leuprolide acetate salts in a 0.1M HEPES buffer, pH7.4, with polymer particles or films at 4-37°C for 24h. The extent of absorption/loading of peptides in PLGA particles/films was assayed by two-phase extraction and amino acid analysis. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser scanning confocal imaging, and microtome sectioning techniques were used to examine peptide penetration into the polymer phase. The release of sorbed peptide from leuprolide-PLGA particles was evaluated both in vitro (PBST+0.02% sodium azide, 37°C) and in vivo (male Sprague-Dawley rats). We found that when the PLGA-COOH chains are sufficiently mobilized, therapeutic peptides not only bind at the surface, a common belief to date, but also can be internalized and distributed throughout the polymer phase at physiological temperature forming a salt with low-molecular weight PLGA-COOH. Importantly, absorption of leuprolide into low MW PLGA-COOH particles yielded ~17 wt.% leuprolide loading in the polymer (i.e., ~70% of PLGA-COOH acids occupied), and the absorbed peptide was released from the polymer for >2 weeks in a controlled fashion in vitro and as indicated by sustained testosterone suppression in male Sprague-Dawley rats. This new approach, which bypasses the traditional encapsulation method and associated production cost, opens up the potential for facile production of low-cost controlled-release injectable depots for leuprolide and related peptides. © 2013.

  16. Anti-antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J.; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23737519

  17. Insulin C-peptide

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003701.htm Insulin C-peptide test To use the sharing features ... a product that is created when the hormone insulin is produced and released into the body. The ...

  18. Multiple Factors Related to the Secretion of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XingChun; Liu, Huan; Chen, Jiaqi; Li, Yan; Qu, Shen

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 is secreted by intestinal L cells in response to nutrient ingestion. It regulates the secretion and sensitivity of insulin while suppressing glucagon secretion and decreasing postprandial glucose levels. It also improves beta-cell proliferation and prevents beta-cell apoptosis induced by cytotoxic agents. Additionally, glucagon-like peptide-1 delays gastric emptying and suppresses appetite. The impaired secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 has negative influence on diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance related diseases. Thus, glucagon-like peptide-1-based therapies (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors) are now well accepted in the management of type 2 diabetes. The levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 are influenced by multiple factors including a variety of nutrients. The component of a meal acts as potent stimulants of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. The levels of its secretion change with the intake of different nutrients. Some drugs also have influence on GLP-1 secretion. Bariatric surgery may improve metabolism through the action on GLP-1 levels. In recent years, there has been a great interest in developing effective methods to regulate glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. This review summarizes the literature on glucagon-like peptide-1 and related factors affecting its levels. PMID:26366173

  19. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Melanins from opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Rosei, M A

    1996-12-01

    Opioid peptides and other Tyr-NH2-terminal peptides are substrates in vitro for mushroom and sepia tyrosine, giving rise to synthetic melanins retaining the peptide moiety (opiomelanins). The melanopeptides are characterized by a total solubility in hydrophylic solvents at neutral and basic pH. Opioid peptides (enkephalins, endorphins, and esorphins), if oxidized by tyrosinase in the presence of Dopa, are easily incorporated into Dopa-melanin, producing mixed-type pigments that can also be solubilized in hydrophylic solvents. Melanins derived from opioid peptides exhibit paramagnetism, as evidenced by an EPR spectrum identical to that of Dopa-melanin. However, the presence of the linked peptide chain is able to influence dramatically the electron transfer properties and the oxidizing behaviour of the melanopeptides, so that whereas Tyr-Gly-melanin appears to behave as Dopa-melanin, Enk-melanin does not exhibit any oxidizing activity. Opiomelanins are characterized by a peculiar UV-VIS spectrum; that is, by the presence of a distinct peak (330 nm) that disappears upon chemical treatment by acid hydrolysis. Opiomelanins are stable pigments at neutral and basic pH in the dark, whereas the addition of H2O2 leads to a 15% degradation. Under stimulated solar illumination, opiomelanins are more easily destroyed with respect to Dopa-melanin, with increasing degradation when exposed to increased hydrogen peroxide concentrations and more alkaline pH. Some speculations on the possible existence and role of opiomelanins have been outlined.

  1. Explosion suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  2. Suppression of Insulin Production and Secretion by a Decretin Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Alfa, Ronald W.; Park, Sangbin; Skelly, Kathleen-Rose; Poffenberger, Gregory; Jain, Nimit; Gu, Xueying; Kockel, Lutz; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yinghua; Powers, Alvin C.; Kim, Seung K.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Decretins, hormones induced by fasting that suppress insulin production and secretion, have been postulated from classical human metabolic studies. From genetic screens, we identified Drosophila Limostatin (Lst), a peptide hormone that suppresses insulin secretion. Lst is induced by nutrient restriction in gut-associated endocrine cells. limostatin deficiency led to hyperinsulinemia, hypoglycemia and excess adiposity. A conserved 15-residue polypeptide encoded by limostatin suppressed secretion by insulin-producing cells. Targeted knockdown of CG9918, a Drosophila orthologue of Neuromedin U receptors (NMUR), in insulin-producing cells phenocopied limostatin deficiency, and attenuated insulin suppression by purified Lst, suggesting CG9918 encodes an Lst receptor. NMUR1 is expressed in islet β-cells, and purified NMU suppresses insulin secretion from human islets. A human mutant NMU variant that co-segregates with familial early-onset obesity and hyperinsulinemia fails to suppress insulin secretion. We propose Lst as an index member of an ancient hormone class called decretins, which suppress insulin output. PMID:25651184

  3. Suppression of insulin production and secretion by a decretin hormone.

    PubMed

    Alfa, Ronald W; Park, Sangbin; Skelly, Kathleen-Rose; Poffenberger, Gregory; Jain, Nimit; Gu, Xueying; Kockel, Lutz; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yinghua; Powers, Alvin C; Kim, Seung K

    2015-02-03

    Decretins, hormones induced by fasting that suppress insulin production and secretion, have been postulated from classical human metabolic studies. From genetic screens, we identified Drosophila Limostatin (Lst), a peptide hormone that suppresses insulin secretion. Lst is induced by nutrient restriction in gut-associated endocrine cells. limostatin deficiency led to hyperinsulinemia, hypoglycemia, and excess adiposity. A conserved 15-residue polypeptide encoded by limostatin suppressed secretion by insulin-producing cells. Targeted knockdown of CG9918, a Drosophila ortholog of Neuromedin U receptors (NMURs), in insulin-producing cells phenocopied limostatin deficiency and attenuated insulin suppression by purified Lst, suggesting CG9918 encodes an Lst receptor. NMUR1 is expressed in islet β cells, and purified NMU suppresses insulin secretion from human islets. A human mutant NMU variant that co-segregates with familial early-onset obesity and hyperinsulinemia fails to suppress insulin secretion. We propose Lst as an index member of an ancient hormone class called decretins, which suppress insulin output.

  4. Hippocampal leptin suppresses methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Masahiro; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2010-10-01

    Leptin is an anorexigenic peptide which is synthesized in white adipose tissue. The actions of leptin are mediated by the leptin receptor which is abundantly localized in the hypothalamus and is involved in energy regulation and balance. Recently, there has been evidence suggesting that the leptin receptor is also present in the hippocampus and may be involved with hippocampal excitability and long-term depression. To investigate the physiological function of leptin signalling in the hippocampus, we studied the effects of leptin on methamphetamine-induced ambulatory hyperactivity by utilizing intra-hippocampal infusion (i.h.) in mice. Our results show that the infusion of leptin (5 ng each bilaterally i.h.) does not affect the basal ambulatory activity but significantly suppresses methamphetamine-induced ambulatory hyperactivity as compared to saline-infused controls. Interestingly, higher dose of leptin increases the suppression of the methamphetamine-induced ambulatory hyperactivity. The i.h. infusion of leptin did not activate the JAK-STAT pathway, which is the cellular signalling pathway through which leptin acts in the hypothalamus. The infusion of leptin also did not affect activation of p42/44 MAPK which is known to be another leptin-induced signalling pathway in the brain. These results demonstrate that leptin has a novel potential suppressive effect on methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion and also suggest that there must be an alternative pathway in the hippocampus through which leptin signalling is being mediated.

  5. Bioactivity of food peptides: biological response of rats to bovine milk whey peptides following acute exercise

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Carolina Soares; Lollo, Pablo Christiano Barboza; Morato, Priscila Neder; Risso, Eder Muller; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Several physiologically beneficial effects of consuming a whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) have been attributed to the greater availability of bioactive peptides. Aims: The aim was to investigate the effect of four branched-chain amino acid- (BCAA-)containing dipeptides, present in WPH, on immune modulation, stimulation of HSP expression, muscle protein synthesis, glycogen content, satiety signals and the impact of these peptides on the plasma free amino acid profiles. Methods: The animals were divided in groups: control (rest, without gavage), vehicle (water), L-isoleucyl-L-leucine (lle-Leu), L-leucyl-L-isoleucine (Leu-lle), L-valyl-Lleucine (Val-Leu), L-leucyl-L-valine (Leu-Val) and WPH. All animals were submitted to acute exercise, except for control. Results: lle-Leu stimulated immune response, hepatic and muscle glycogen and HSP60 expression, whereas Leu-Val enhanced HSP90 expression. All dipeptides reduced glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, no changes were observed on leptin. All peptides inhibited NF-kB expression. The plasma amino acid time-course showed peptide-specific and isomer-specific metabolic features, including increases of the BCAAs. Conclusion: The data indicate that lle-Leu was effective to attenuate immune-suppression exercise-induced, promoted glycogen content and stimulated anti-stress effect (HSP). Furthermore, Leu-Val increased HSP90, p-4EBP1, p-mTOR and p-AMPK expression. The data suggest the involvement of these peptides in various beneficial functions of WPH consumption. PMID:28326005

  6. Sensory suppression during feeding

    PubMed Central

    Foo, H.; Mason, Peggy

    2005-01-01

    Feeding is essential for survival, whereas withdrawal and escape reactions are fundamentally protective. These critical behaviors can compete for an animal's resources when an acutely painful stimulus affects the animal during feeding. One solution to the feeding-withdrawal conflict is to optimize feeding by suppressing pain. We examined whether rats continue to feed when challenged with a painful stimulus. During feeding, motor withdrawal responses to noxious paw heat either did not occur or were greatly delayed. To investigate the neural basis of sensory suppression accompanying feeding, we recorded from brainstem pain-modulatory neurons involved in the descending control of pain transmission. During feeding, pain-facilitatory ON cells were inhibited and pain-inhibitory OFF cells were excited. When a nonpainful somatosensory stimulus preactivated ON cells and preinhibited OFF cells, rats interrupted eating to react to painful stimuli. Inactivation of the brainstem region containing ON and OFF cells also blocked pain suppression during eating, demonstrating that brainstem pain-modulatory neurons suppress motor reactions to external stimulation during homeostatic behaviors. PMID:16275919

  7. The development of non-peptide glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ho-Sang; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Son, Moon-Ho

    2011-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is the main member of the incretin family and stimulates insulin secretion by binding with its specific receptor on pancreatic β-cells. In addition, GLP-1 exerts broad beneficial effects on the glucose regulation by suppressing food intake and delaying stomach emptying. Now, long acting GLP-1 analogs including exenatide and liraglutide have been approved for the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2, however long-term injection can limit their use for these chronic patients. In this report, the authors provide a review on the development of non-peptide GLP-1 receptor agonists and introduce a novel agonist DA-15864.

  8. Linear Peptides in Intracellular Applications.

    PubMed

    Zuconelli, Cristiane R; Brock, Roland; Adjobo-Hermans, Merel J W

    2017-01-01

    To this point, efforts to develop therapeutic peptides for intracellular applications were guided by the perception that unmodified linear peptides are highly unstable and therefore structural modifications are required to reduce proteolytic breakdown. Largely, this concept is a consequence of the fact that most research on intracellular peptides hitherto has focused on peptide degradation in the context of antigen processing, rather than on peptide stability. Interestingly, inside cells, endogenous peptides lacking any chemical modifications to enhance stability escape degradation to the point that they may even modulate intracellular signaling pathways. In addition, many unmodified synthetic peptides designed to interfere with intracellular signaling, following introduction into cells, have the expected activity demonstrating that biologically relevant concentrations can be reached. This review provides an overview of results and techniques relating to the exploration and application of linear, unmodified peptides. After an introduction to intracellular peptide turnover, the review mentions examples for synthetic peptides as modulators of intracellular signaling, introduces endogenous peptides with bioactivity, techniques to measure peptide stability, and peptide delivery. Future experiments should elucidate the rules needed to predict promising peptide candidates. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Electron transfer in peptides.

    PubMed

    Shah, Afzal; Adhikari, Bimalendu; Martic, Sanela; Munir, Azeema; Shahzad, Suniya; Ahmad, Khurshid; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-02-21

    In this review, we discuss the factors that influence electron transfer in peptides. We summarize experimental results from solution and surface studies and highlight the ongoing debate on the mechanistic aspects of this fundamental reaction. Here, we provide a balanced approach that remains unbiased and does not favor one mechanistic view over another. Support for a putative hopping mechanism in which an electron transfers in a stepwise manner is contrasted with experimental results that support electron tunneling or even some form of ballistic transfer or a pathway transfer for an electron between donor and acceptor sites. In some cases, experimental evidence suggests that a change in the electron transfer mechanism occurs as a result of donor-acceptor separation. However, this common understanding of the switch between tunneling and hopping as a function of chain length is not sufficient for explaining electron transfer in peptides. Apart from chain length, several other factors such as the extent of the secondary structure, backbone conformation, dipole orientation, the presence of special amino acids, hydrogen bonding, and the dynamic properties of a peptide also influence the rate and mode of electron transfer in peptides. Electron transfer plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems, so its control is a fundamental task in bioelectrochemical systems, the design of peptide based sensors and molecular junctions. Therefore, this topic is at the heart of a number of biological and technological processes and thus remains of vital interest.

  10. Cyclization in opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; Perlikowska, Renata; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides have been studied extensively as potential therapeutics for the treatment of pain. The major problems of using natural opioid peptides as drug candidates are their poor receptor specificity, metabolic instability and inability to reach the brain after systemic administration. A lot of synthetic efforts have been made to opioid analogs with improved pharmacological properties. One important structural modification leading to such analogs is cyclization of linear sequences. Intramolecular cyclization has been shown to improve biological properties of various bioactive peptides. Cyclization reduces conformational freedom responsible for the simultaneous activation of two or more receptors, increases metabolic stability and lipophilicity which may result in a longer half-life and easier penetration across biological membranes. This review deals with various strategies that have been employed to synthesize cyclic analogs of opioid peptides. Discussed are such bridging bonds as amide and amine linkages, sulfur-containing bonds, including monosulfide, disulfide and dithioether bridges, bismethylene bonds, monosulfide bridges of lanthionine and, finally, carbonyl and guanidine linkages. Opioid affinities and activities of cyclic analogs are given and compared with linear opioid peptides. Analgesic activities of analogs evaluated in the in vivo pain tests are also discussed.

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  12. Cytosolic antibody delivery by lipid-sensitive endosomolytic peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishiba, Misao; Takeuchi, Toshihide; Kawaguchi, Yoshimasa; Sakamoto, Kentarou; Yu, Hao-Hsin; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Madani, Fatemeh; Gräslund, Astrid; Futaki, Shiroh

    2017-08-01

    One of the major obstacles in intracellular targeting using antibodies is their limited release from endosomes into the cytosol. Here we report an approach to deliver proteins, which include antibodies, into cells by using endosomolytic peptides derived from the cationic and membrane-lytic spider venom peptide M-lycotoxin. The delivery peptides were developed by introducing one or two glutamic acid residues into the hydrophobic face. One peptide with the substitution of leucine by glutamic acid (L17E) was shown to enable a marked cytosolic liberation of antibodies (immunoglobulins G (IgGs)) from endosomes. The predominant membrane-perturbation mechanism of this peptide is the preferential disruption of negatively charged membranes (endosomal membranes) over neutral membranes (plasma membranes), and the endosomolytic peptide promotes the uptake by inducing macropinocytosis. The fidelity of this approach was confirmed through the intracellular delivery of a ribosome-inactivation protein (saporin), Cre recombinase and IgG delivery, which resulted in a specific labelling of the cytosolic proteins and subsequent suppression of the glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription. We also demonstrate the L17E-mediated cytosolic delivery of exosome-encapsulated proteins.

  13. Peptides in oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alberta; Guida, Agostino; Petruzzi, Massimo; Capone, Giovanni; Laino, Luigi; Serpico, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The oral cavity is home to numerous viruses and micro-organisms recognized as having a role in various oral diseases as well as in infections in other parts of the body. Indeed, in general a microbial infection underlies or is believed to underlie the ample spectrum of oral diseases, from tooth enamel decay to periodontal lesions, from candidiasis to virus-induced oral squamous cell carcinomas, and bullous autoimmune oral disorders. This clinico-pathological context stresses the need of targeted therapies to specifically kill infectious agents in a complex environment such as the oral cavity, and explains the current interest in exploring peptide-based therapeutic approaches in oral and dental research. Here, we review the therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, beta defensins, adrenomedullin, histatins, and of various peptides modulating gene expression and immuno-biological interaction(s) in oral diseases.

  14. Molecular modeling of peptides.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the field of molecular modeling of peptides. The main focus is on atomistic modeling with molecular mechanics potentials. The description of peptide conformations and solvation through potentials is discussed. Several important computer simulation methods are briefly introduced, including molecular dynamics, accelerated sampling approaches such as replica-exchange and metadynamics, free energy simulations and kinetic network models like Milestoning. Examples of recent applications for predictions of structure, kinetics, and interactions of peptides with complex environments are described. The reliability of current simulation methods is analyzed by comparison of computational predictions obtained using different models with each other and with experimental data. A brief discussion of coarse-grained modeling and future directions is also presented.

  15. Peptidomic identification and biological validation of neuroendocrine regulatory peptide-1 and -2.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hideki; Sasaki, Kazuki; Satomi, Yoshinori; Shimbara, Takuya; Kageyama, Haruaki; Mondal, Muhtashan S; Toshinai, Koji; Date, Yukari; González, Luis J; Shioda, Seiji; Takao, Toshifumi; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Minamino, Naoto

    2007-09-07

    Recent advances in peptidomics have enabled the identification of previously uncharacterized peptides. However, sequence information alone does not allow us to identify candidates for bioactive peptides. To increase an opportunity to discover bioactive peptides, we have focused on C-terminal amidation, a post-translational modification shared by many bioactive peptides. We analyzed peptides secreted from human medullary thyroid carcinoma TT cells that produce amidated peptides, and we identified two novel amidated peptides, designated neuroendocrine regulatory peptide (NERP)-1 and NERP-2. NERPs are derived from distinct regions of the neurosecretory protein that was originally identified as a product of a nerve growth factor-responsive gene in PC12 cells. Mass spectrometric analysis of the immunoprecipitate using specific antibodies as well as reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with radioimmunoassay analysis of brain extract demonstrated the endogenous presence of NERP-1 and NERP-2 in the rat. NERPs are abundant in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of the rat hypothalamus and colocalized frequently with vasopressin but rarely with oxytocin. NERPs dose-dependently suppressed vasopressin release induced by intracerebroventricular injection of hypertonic NaCl or angiotensin II in vivo. NERPs also suppressed basal and angiotensin II-induced vasopressin secretion from hypothalamic explants in vitro. Bioactivity of NERPs required C-terminal amidation. Anti-NERP IgGs canceled plasma vasopressin reduction in response to water loading, indicating that NERPs could be potent endogenous suppressors of vasopressin release. These findings suggest that NERPs are novel modulators in body fluid homeostasis.

  16. Identification and characterization of common B cell epitope in bovine leukemia virus via high-throughput peptide screening system in infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lanlan; Otsuki, Hiroyuki; Sato, Hirotaka; Kohara, Junko; Isogai, Emiko; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-30

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leukosis, the most common neoplastic disease of cattle. BLV is closely related to human T cell leukemia virus. B cell epitopes are important for the use of antibodies as therapeutic agents, the epitope-driven vaccine design, and immunological assays. A common B cell epitope for BLV has not yet been found due to individual differences in disease susceptibility. We used a peptide microarray with 156 synthetic 15-mer peptides covering the envelope glycoprotein gp51 and the Gag proteins p15, p24, and p12 to map B cell epitope and one B cell epitope, gp51p16, was recognized by all four cattle experimentally infected with BLV. A newly developed high-throughput peptide ELISA system revealed 590 (91.2%) of 647 cattle naturally infected with BLV, carrying 25 different bovine leukocyte antigen class II DRB3 (BoLA-DRB3) alleles, responded to a 20-mer gp51p16-C peptide containing a C-terminal cysteine and gp51p16. Alanine mutation and comparison of the sequences at 17 amino acid positions within gp51p16-C revealed that R7, R9, F10, V16, and Y18 were the common binding sites to BLV antibodies, and two of these sites were found to be highly conserved. Transient expression in the cells of five infectious molecular clones of BLV with a single alanine mutation at five common antibody binding sites had no effect syncytia formation of the gp51 protein. In addition, the mutant proteins, R7A and R9A had no effect on the expression of gp51 protein; the gp51 protein expressions of F10A, V16A and Y18A were lower than that of the wild type protein. This is the first report to identify a common B cell epitope in BLV by comprehensive screening of BLV-infected cattle with varied genetic backgrounds in BoLA-DRB3. Our results have important implications for disease control and diagnosis.

  17. Epitope peptides and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soichi

    2007-02-01

    Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens, usually proteins or glycoproteins. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Because allergen-specific IgE antibodies are the main effector molecules in the immune response to allergens, many studies have focused on the identification of IgE-binding epitopes (called B cell epitopes), specific and minimum regions of allergen molecules that binds to IgE. Our initial studies have provided evidence that only four to five amino acid residues are enough to comprise an epitope, since pentapeptide QQQPP in wheat glutenin is minimally required for IgE binding. Afterwards, various kinds of B cell epitope structures have been clarified. Such information contributes greatly not only to the elucidation of the etiology of allergy, but also to the development of strategies for the treatment and prevention of allergy. Allergen-specific T cells also play an important role in allergy and are obvious targets for intervention in the disease. Currently, the principle approach is to modify B cell epitopes to prevent IgE binding while preserving T cell epitopes to retain the capacity for immunotherapy. There is mounting evidence that the administration of peptide(s) containing immunodominant T cell epitopes from an allergen can induce T cell nonresponsiveness (immunotherapy). There have been clinical studies of peptide immunotherapy performed, the most promising being for bee venom sensitivity. Clinical trials of immunotherapy for cat allergen peptide have also received attention. An alternative strategy for the generation of an effective but hypoallergenic preparation for immunotherapy is to modify T cell epitope peptides by, for example, single amino acid substitution. In this article, I will present an overview of epitopes related to allergic disease, particularly stress on

  18. Appetite-related peptides in childhood and adolescence: role of ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Horner, Katy; Lee, SoJung

    2015-11-01

    During childhood and adolescence, a number of factors, including age, puberty, sex, race, and body composition, may contribute to differences in satiety, food intake, and appetite-related peptides. These peptides include the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and anorexigenic gut peptides peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). For example, lower fasting ghrelin levels, lower postprandial ghrelin suppression, and blunted PYY and GLP-1 responses to food intake could contribute to a dysregulation of appetite in already obese children and adolescents. Whereas, changes in these peptides observed during puberty could facilitate growth. A greater understanding of the major moderating factors of appetite-related peptides in the pediatric population is essential to improve interpretation of study findings and for effective tailoring of strategies targeting appetite control to individuals. While more studies are needed, there is some evidence to suggest that exercise-based lifestyle interventions could be a potential therapeutic strategy to improve appetite-peptide profiles in overweight and obese children and adolescents. The aim of this review is (i) to discuss the potential moderating factors of ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1, including age and puberty, sex, race and body composition; and (ii) to examine the effects of exercise interventions on these appetite-related gut peptides in children and adolescents.

  19. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  20. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  1. Learning motion discrimination with suppressed and un-suppressed MT.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin; Liu, Zili

    2006-06-01

    Perceptual learning of motion direction discrimination is generally thought to rely on the middle temporal area of the brain (MT/V5). A recent study investigating learning of motion discrimination when MT was psychophysically suppressed found that learning was possible with suppressed MT, but only when the task was sufficiently easy [Lu, H., Qian, N., Liu, Z. (2004). Learning motion discrimination with suppressed MT. Vision Research 44, 1817-1825]. We investigated whether this effect was indeed due to MT suppression or whether it could be explained by task difficulty alone. By comparing learning of motion discrimination when MT was suppressed vs. un-suppressed, at different task difficulties, we found that task difficulty alone could not explain the effects. At the highest difficulty, learning was not possible with suppressed MT, confirming [Lu, H., Qian, N., Liu, Z. (2004). Learning motion discrimination with suppressed MT. Vision Research 44, 1817-1825]. In comparison, learning was possible with un-suppressed MT at the same difficulty level. At the intermediate task difficulty, there was a clear learning disadvantage when MT was suppressed. Only for the easiest level of difficulty, did learning become equally possible for both suppressed and un-suppressed conditions. These findings suggest that MT plays an important role in learning to discriminate relatively fine differences in motion direction.

  2. Suppression Workshop Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-07

    the sodium is just about as effective as potassium in accelerating the OH decay rates . These results can be used to validate the kinetic suppression... rate of reaction of the combustibles. It represents the proportion of combustibles in the breech. It was found that a very strong effect on the blast...accelerating the CH decay rate decreased with continued potassium addition. They also found that, for a Fg c amount of potassium added to the flames, the

  3. Use of a porous silicon-gold plasmonic nanostructure to enhance serum peptide signals in MALDI-TOF analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Tan, Jie; Yu, Jiekai; Feng, Jiandong; Pan, Aiwu; Zheng, Shu; Wu, Jianmin

    2014-11-07

    Small peptides in serum are potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of cancer and other diseases. The identification of peptide biomarkers in human plasma/serum has become an area of high interest in medical research. However, the direct analysis of peptides in serum samples using mass spectrometry is challenging due to the low concentration of peptides and the high abundance of high-molecular-weight proteins in serum, the latter of which causes severe signal suppression. Herein, we reported that porous semiconductor-noble metal hybrid nanostructures can both eliminate the interference from large proteins in serum samples and significantly enhance the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) yields of peptides captured on the nanostructure. Serum peptide fingerprints with high fidelity can be acquired rapidly, and successful discrimination of colorectal cancer patients based on peptide fingerprints is demonstrated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Tremor suppression in ECG

    PubMed Central

    Dotsinsky, Ivan A; Mihov, Georgy S

    2008-01-01

    Background Electrocardiogram recordings are very often contaminated by high-frequency noise usually power-line interference and EMG disturbances (tremor). Specific method for interference cancellation without affecting the proper ECG components, called subtraction procedure, was developed some two decades ago. Filtering out the tremor remains a priori partially successful since it has a relatively wide spectrum, which overlaps the useful ECG frequency band. Method The proposed method for tremor suppression implements the following three procedures. Contaminated ECG signals are subjected to moving averaging (comb filter with linear phase characteristic) with first zero set at 50 Hz to suppress tremor and PL interference simultaneously. The reduced peaks of QRS complexes and other relatively high and steep ECG waves are then restored by an introduced by us procedure called linearly-angular, so that the useful high frequency components are preserved in the range specified by the embedded in the ECG instrument filter, usually up to 125 Hz. Finally, a Savitzky-Golay smoothing filter is applied for supplementary tremor suppression outside the QRS complexes. Results The results obtained show a low level of the residual EMG disturbances together with negligible distortion of the wave shapes regardless of rhythm and morphology changes. PMID:19019218

  5. Multidimensional signatures in antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yount, Nannette Y.; Yeaman, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional analyses distinguish between antimicrobial peptides by differences in amino acid sequence. Yet structural paradigms common to broader classes of these molecules have not been established. The current analyses examined the potential conservation of structural themes in antimicrobial peptides from evolutionarily diverse organisms. Using proteomics, an antimicrobial peptide signature was discovered to integrate stereospecific sequence patterns and a hallmark three-dimensional motif. This striking multidimensional signature is conserved among disulfide-containing antimicrobial peptides spanning biological kingdoms, and it transcends motifs previously limited to defined peptide subclasses. Experimental data validating this model enabled the identification of previously unrecognized antimicrobial activity in peptides of known identity. The multidimensional signature model provides a unifying structural theme in broad classes of antimicrobial peptides, will facilitate discovery of antimicrobial peptides as yet unknown, and offers insights into the evolution of molecular determinants in these and related host defense effector molecules. PMID:15118082

  6. Natriuretic peptides buffer renin-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Demerath, Theo; Staffel, Janina; Schreiber, Andrea; Valletta, Daniela; Schweda, Frank

    2014-06-15

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and cardiac natriuretic peptides [atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)] are opposing control mechanisms for arterial blood pressure. Accordingly, an inverse relationship between plasma renin concentration (PRC) and ANP exists in most circumstances. However, PRC and ANP levels are both elevated in renovascular hypertension. Because ANP can directly suppress renin release, we used ANP knockout (ANP(-/-)) mice to investigate whether high ANP levels attenuate the increase in PRC in response to renal hypoperfusion, thus buffering renovascular hypertension. ANP(-/-) mice were hypertensive and had reduced PRC compared with that in wild-type ANP(+/+) mice under control conditions. Unilateral renal artery stenosis (2-kidney, 1-clip) for 1 wk induced similar increases in blood pressure and PRC in both genotypes. Unexpectedly, plasma BNP concentrations in ANP(-/-) mice significantly increased in response to two-kidney, one-clip treatment, potentially compensating for the lack of ANP. In fact, in mice lacking guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A(-/-) mice), which is the common receptor for both ANP and BNP, renovascular hypertension was markedly augmented compared with that in wild-type GC-A(+/+) mice. However, the higher blood pressure in GC-A(-/-) mice was not caused by disinhibition of the renin system because PRC and renal renin synthesis were significantly lower in GC-A(-/-) mice than in GC-A(+/+) mice. Thus, natriuretic peptides buffer renal vascular hypertension via renin-independent effects, such as vasorelaxation. The latter possibility is supported by experiments in isolated perfused mouse kidneys, in which physiological concentrations of ANP and BNP elicited renal vasodilatation and attenuated renal vasoconstriction in response to angiotensin II.

  7. Antimicrobial peptides and the skin immune defense system

    PubMed Central

    Schauber, Jürgen; Gallo, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Our skin is constantly challenged by microbes but is rarely infected. Cutaneous production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is a primary system for protection, and expression of some AMPs further increases in response to microbial invasion. Cathelicidins are unique AMPs that protect the skin through 2 distinct pathways: (1) direct antimicrobial activity and (2) initiation of a host response resulting in cytokine release, inflammation, angiogenesis, and reepithelialization. Cathelicidin dysfunction emerges as a central factor in the pathogenesis of several cutaneous diseases, including atopic dermatitis, in which cathelicidin is suppressed; rosacea, in which cathelicidin peptides are abnormally processed to forms that induce inflammation; and psoriasis, in which cathelicidin peptide converts self-DNA to a potent stimulus in an autoinflammatory cascade. Recent work identified vitamin D3 as a major factor involved in the regulation of cathelicidin. Therapies targeting control of cathelicidin and other AMPs might provide new approaches in the management of infectious and inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:18439663

  8. Related impurities in peptide medicines.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Matthias; Bracke, Nathalie; Taevernier, Lien; Gevaert, Bert; Verbeke, Frederick; Wynendaele, Evelien; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-12-01

    Peptides are an increasingly important group of pharmaceuticals, positioned between classic small organic molecules and larger bio-molecules such as proteins. Currently, the peptide drug market is growing twice as fast as other drug markets, illustrating the increasing clinical as well as economical impact of this medicine group. Most peptides today are manufactured by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). This review will provide a structured overview of the most commonly observed peptide-related impurities in peptide medicines, encompassing the active pharmaceutical ingredients (API or drug substance) as well as the finished drug products. Not only is control of these peptide-related impurities and degradants critical for the already approved and clinically used peptide-drugs, these impurities also possess the capability of greatly influencing initial functionality studies during early drug discovery phases, possibly resulting in erroneous conclusions. The first group of peptide-related impurities is SPPS-related: deletion and insertion of amino acids are related to inefficient Fmoc-deprotection and excess use of amino acid reagents, respectively. Fmoc-deprotection can cause racemization of amino acid residues and thus diastereomeric impurities. Inefficient deprotection of amino acid side chains results into peptide-protection adducts. Furthermore, unprotected side chains can react with a variety of reagents used in the synthesis. Oxidation of amino acid side chains and dimeric-to-oligomeric impurities were also observed. Unwanted peptide counter ions such as trifluoroacetate, originating from the SPPS itself or from additional purification treatments, may also be present in the final peptide product. Contamination of the desired peptide product by other unrelated peptides was also seen, pointing out the lack of appropriate GMP. The second impurity group results from typical peptide degradation mechanisms such as β-elimination, diketopiperazine, pyroglutamate

  9. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  10. Peptide -- Silica Hybrid Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunbas, Aysegul; Sharma, Nikhil; Nagarkar, Radhika; Schneider, Joel; Pochan, Darrin

    2010-03-01

    In this study, a bio-inspired route was used to fabricate scaffolds that display hierarchical organization of an inorganic layer around an organic self-assembled peptide fibril template. The 20 amino acid peptide used in this study intramolecular folds into a beta-hairpin conformation on addition of a desired solution stimulus. This intramolecular folding is followed by intermolecular self-assembly of the peptides into a three dimensional network of entangled fibrils rich in beta-sheet with a high density of lysine groups exposed on the fibril-surfaces. The lysine-rich surface chemistry was utilized to create a silica shell around the fibrils. The mineralization process of the fibrils results in a rigid, porous silica network that retains the microscale and nanoscale structure of the peptide fibril network. Structural characterization via Transmission Electron Microscopy, cryogenic-Scanning Electron Microscopy, mechanical characterization via oscillatory rheology, Small Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering of the silicified hydrogels will be presented.

  11. Bioinformatic identification of plant peptides.

    PubMed

    Lease, Kevin A; Walker, John C

    2010-01-01

    Plant peptides play a number of important roles in defence, development and many other aspects of plant physiology. Identifying additional peptide sequences provides the starting point to investigate their function using molecular, genetic or biochemical techniques. Due to their small size, identifying peptide sequences may not succeed using the default bioinformatic approaches that work well for average-sized proteins. There are two general scenarios related to bioinformatic identification of peptides to be discussed in this paper. In the first scenario, one already has the sequence of a plant peptide and is trying to find more plant peptides with some sequence similarity to the starting peptide. To do this, the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is employed, with the parameters adjusted to be more favourable for identifying potential peptide matches. A second scenario involves trying to identify plant peptides without using sequence similarity searches to known plant peptides. In this approach, features such as protein size and the presence of a cleavable amino-terminal signal peptide are used to screen annotated proteins. A variation of this method can be used to screen for unannotated peptides from genomic sequences. Bioinformatic resources related to Arabidopsis thaliana will be used to illustrate these approaches.

  12. Immune evasion or avoidance: fungal skin infection linked to reduced defence peptides in Australian green-eyed treefrogs, Litoria serrata.

    PubMed

    Woodhams, Douglas C; Bell, Sara C; Kenyon, Nicole; Alford, Ross A; Rollins-Smith, Louise A

    2012-12-01

    Many parasites and pathogens suppress host immunity to maintain infection or initiate disease. On the skin of many amphibians, defensive peptides are active against the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the causative agent of the emerging infectious disease chytridiomycosis. We tested the hypothesis that infection with the fungus may be linked to lower levels of defensive peptides. We sampled both ambient (or constitutive) skin peptides on the ventral surface immediately upon capture, and stored skin peptides induced from granular glands by norepinephrine administration of Australian green-eyed treefrogs, Litoria serrata. Upon capture, uninfected frogs expressed an array of antimicrobial peptides on their ventral surface, whereas infected frogs had reduced skin peptide expression. Expression of ambient skin peptides differed with infection status, and antimicrobial peptides maculatin 1.1 and 2.1 were on average three times lower on infected frogs. However, the repertoire of skin peptides stored in granular glands did not differ with infection status; on average equal quantities were recovered from infected and from uninfected frogs. Our results could have at least two causes: (1) frogs with reduced peptide expression are more likely to become infected; (2) Bd infection interferes with defence peptides by inhibiting release or causing selective degradation of peptides on the skin surface. Immune evasion therefore may contribute to the pathogenesis of chytridiomycosis and a mechanistic understanding of this fungal strategy may lead to improved methods of disease control. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cysteine racemization during the Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis of the Nav1.7-selective peptide--protoxin II.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae H; Carlin, Kevin P; Wu, Gang; Ilyin, Victor I; Kyle, Donald J

    2012-07-01

    Protoxin II is biologically active peptide containing the inhibitory cystine knot motif. A synthetic version of the toxin was generated with standard Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis. If N-methylmorpholine was used as a base during synthesis of the linear protoxin II, it was found that a significant amount of racemization (approximately 50%) was observed during the process of cysteine residue coupling. This racemization could be suppressed by substituting N-methylmorpholine with 2,4,6-collidine. The crude linear toxin was then air oxidized and purified. Electrophysiological assessment of the synthesized protoxin II confirmed its previously described interactions with voltage-gated sodium channels. Eight other naturally occurring inhibitory knot peptides were also synthesized using this same methodology. The inhibitory potencies of these synthesized toxins on Nav1.7 and Nav1.2 channels are summarized.

  14. Synthesis of peptide analogues using the multipin peptide synthesis method.

    PubMed

    Valerio, R M; Benstead, M; Bray, A M; Campbell, R A; Maeji, N J

    1991-08-15

    Modification of the multipin peptide synthesis method which allows the simultaneous synthesis of large numbers of different peptide analogues is described. Peptides were assembled on polyethylene pins derivatized with a 4-(beta-alanyloxymethyl)benzoate (beta-Ala-HMB) handle. For comparative purposes, peptides were also assembled on the diketopiperazine-forming handle N epsilon-(beta-alanyl)lysylprolyloxylactate. In model studies it was demonstrated that beta-Ala-HMB-linked peptides were cleaved from polyethylene pins with dilute sodium hydroxide or 4% methylamine/water to yield analogues with beta-Ala-free acid (beta-Ala-CO2H) and beta-Ala-methylamide (beta-Ala-CONHCH3), respectively. To assess the suitability of this approach for T-cell determinant analysis, analogues of a known T-cell determinant were synthesized with the various C-terminal endings. Peptides were characterized by amino acid analysis and fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry. HPLC of the crude cleaved peptides indicated that 22 of the 24 peptides were greater than 95% pure. These crude peptide solutions were nontoxic in sensitive cell culture assays without further purification. All three cleavage procedures gave comparable activities in T-cell proliferation assays. These results demonstrate the potential of the multipin peptide synthesis method for the production of large numbers of different peptide analogues.

  15. Tumor-Specific Peptide, Selected from a Phage Peptide Library, Enhances Antitumor Activity of Lactaptin

    PubMed Central

    Makartsova, Anna A.; Fomin, Alexandr S.; Nushtaeva, Anna A.; Koval, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    A recombinant analogue of lactaptin (RL2), a new potential anticancer molecule, induces apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. The tumor suppression efficacy of RL2 was shown against mouse hepatoma-1 cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells. The RL2-based therapeutic drug lactaptin is distributed evenly throughout the organism, which reduces its antitumor efficacy. In the current study, we obtained a genetic construct that allows production of the recombinant fusion protein T3-RL2, consisting of RL2 and T3 peptide (YTYDPWLIFPAN), in E. coli cells. T3 peptide was selected from a phage peptide library as a result of two screenings: in vitro using MDA-MB-231 cell culture and in vivo using a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer MDA-MB-231. It was shown that the displayed peptide T3 provides binding and internalization of phage particles by MDA-MB-231 cells and their specific accumulation in MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue. In addition, based on the nucleotide sequences coding RL2 and the known tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, we obtained genetic constructs that provide synthesis of fusion proteins RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His. We studied the cytotoxic activity of fusion proteins T3-RL2, RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His in vitro using MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human adenocarcinoma cells. The in vitro results showed that the fusion proteins inhibit proliferation of both cell cultures, and their cytotoxic activity is higher than that of RL2. In vivo experiments on the study of the antitumor efficacy of the obtained fusion proteins demonstrated that T3-RL2 protein significantly inhibits MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in a xenograft model compared with RL2, while the antitumor effect of RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His proteins is comparable to the effect of RL2. PMID:27513518

  16. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  17. A Peptide Filtering Relation Quantifies MHC Class I Peptide Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Howarth, Mark; Cardelli, Luca; Emmott, Stephen; Elliott, Tim; Werner, Joern M.

    2011-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules enable cytotoxic T lymphocytes to destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells, thereby preventing disease progression. MHC class I molecules provide a snapshot of the contents of a cell by binding to protein fragments arising from intracellular protein turnover and presenting these fragments at the cell surface. Competing fragments (peptides) are selected for cell-surface presentation on the basis of their ability to form a stable complex with MHC class I, by a process known as peptide optimization. A better understanding of the optimization process is important for our understanding of immunodominance, the predominance of some T lymphocyte specificities over others, which can determine the efficacy of an immune response, the danger of immune evasion, and the success of vaccination strategies. In this paper we present a dynamical systems model of peptide optimization by MHC class I. We incorporate the chaperone molecule tapasin, which has been shown to enhance peptide optimization to different extents for different MHC class I alleles. Using a combination of published and novel experimental data to parameterize the model, we arrive at a relation of peptide filtering, which quantifies peptide optimization as a function of peptide supply and peptide unbinding rates. From this relation, we find that tapasin enhances peptide unbinding to improve peptide optimization without significantly delaying the transit of MHC to the cell surface, and differences in peptide optimization across MHC class I alleles can be explained by allele-specific differences in peptide binding. Importantly, our filtering relation may be used to dynamically predict the cell surface abundance of any number of competing peptides by MHC class I alleles, providing a quantitative basis to investigate viral infection or disease at the cellular level. We exemplify this by simulating optimization of the distribution of peptides derived from Human

  18. Elevated glucose concentration and natriuretic peptides receptor response on vascular smooth muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Kano, H; Hanehira, T; Minami, M; Ikeda, M; Horio, T; Yokokawa, K; Takeda, T

    1995-12-01

    1. Hyperglycaemia is believed to be a major cause of diabetic vascular complications such as accelerated atherosclerosis. In order to elucidate the effect of hyperglycaemia on vascular response in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), the natriuretic peptides receptor responses to vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) which are thought to suppress atherosclerosis were studied under high glucose (HG:22.2 mmol/L) conditions. 2. The total number of cells in SHR is higher and natriuretic peptides receptor response is smaller than that of cells in the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat. Membrane bound protein kinase C (PKC) activity in HG or SHR is higher compared to that of cells in normal glucose (NG:5.6 mmol/L) or WKY. Cells cultured in HG for at least 2 passages had higher total cell number and receptor mediated cGMP formation were suppressed compared to cells cultured in NG both in SHR and WKY. Specific PKC inhibitor PKC (19-36) 1 mu mol/L prevented HG induced suppression of natriuretic peptides response. 3. These results show that hyperglycaemia may be linked to suppressed natriuretic peptides receptor response which is caused by increased PKC activity both in WKY and SHR. This suppressed response may cause the accelerated atherosclerosis by hyperglycaemia.

  19. Next generation fire suppressants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jerry A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral ban microprocessors controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  20. Enhancing thought suppression with hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Richard A; Wimalaweera, Subodha

    2006-10-01

    Much research indicates that attempts to suppress thoughts lead to increased accessibility of those thoughts, especially when additional cognitive load is present. On the premise that hypnosis may permit more effective management of cognitive load, it was hypothesized that hypnosis may enhance more effective thought suppression. The present research examined whether the obstacle of cognitive load could be bypassed using hypnosis to facilitate successful thought suppression. Thirty-nine high and 40 low hypnotizable participants were hypnotized and received either a suppression instruction or no instruction for a memory of an embarrassing experience and subsequently completed a sentence-unscrambling task that indexed accessibility of embarrassing thoughts. Whereas lows instructed to suppress displayed a delayed increase in suppressed thoughts, highs did not. These findings support the proposition that hypnosis facilitates thought suppression.

  1. Specific interactions between amyloid-β peptide and curcumin derivatives: Ab initio molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimura, Hiromi; Kadoya, Ryushi; Suzuki, Tomoya; Murakawa, Takeru; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is caused by accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, it is effective to inhibit the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by secretases. However, because the secretases also play important roles to produce vital proteins for human body, inhibitors for the secretases may have side effects. To propose new agents for protecting the cleavage site of APP from the attacking of the γ-secretase, we have investigated here the specific interactions between a short APP peptide and curcumin derivatives, using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations.

  2. Suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, Mohamed T; Murphy, David

    2011-01-01

    Comparing two RNA populations that differ from the effects of a single independent variable, such as a drug treatment or a specific genetic defect, can establish differences in the abundance of specific transcripts that vary in a population dependent manner. There are different methods for identifying differentially expressed genes. These methods include microarray, Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), and quantitative Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). Herein, the protocol describes an easy and cost-effective alternative that does not require prior knowledge of the transcriptomes under examination. It is specifically relevant when low levels of RNA starting material are available. This protocol describes the use of Switching Mechanism At RNA Termini Polymerase Chain Reaction (SMART-PCR) to amplify cDNA from small amounts of RNA. The amplified cDNA populations under comparison are then subjected to Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH-PCR). SSH-PCR is a technique that couples subtractive hybridization with suppression PCR to selectively amplify fragments of differentially expressed genes. The resulting products are cDNA populations enriched for significantly overrepresented transcripts in either of the two input RNAs. These cDNA populations can then be cloned to generate subtracted cDNA library. Microarrays made with clones from the subtracted forward and reverse cDNA libraries are then screened for differentially expressed genes using targets generated from tester and driver total RNAs.

  3. Planck-suppressed operators

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel; McAllister, Liam E-mail: dbaumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu

    2014-01-01

    We show that the recent Planck limits on primordial non-Gaussianity impose strong constraints on light hidden sector fields coupled to the inflaton via operators suppressed by a high mass scale Λ. We study a simple effective field theory in which a hidden sector field is coupled to a shift-symmetric inflaton via arbitrary operators up to dimension five. Self-interactions in the hidden sector lead to non-Gaussianity in the curvature perturbations. To be consistent with the Planck limit on local non-Gaussianity, the coupling to any hidden sector with light fields and natural cubic couplings must be suppressed by a very high scale Λ > 10{sup 5}H. Even if the hidden sector has Gaussian correlations, nonlinearities in the mixing with the inflaton still lead to non-Gaussian curvature perturbations. In this case, the non-Gaussianity is of the equilateral or orthogonal type, and the Planck data requires Λ > 10{sup 2}H.

  4. Microbial Epitopes Act as Altered Peptide Ligands to Prevent Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Pedro J.; Garren, Hideki; Hirschberg, David L.; Langer-Gould, Annette M.; Levite, Mia; Karpuj, Marcela V.; Southwood, Scott; Sette, Alessandro; Conlon, Paul; Steinman, Lawrence

    1999-01-01

    Molecular mimicry refers to structural homologies between a self-protein and a microbial protein. A major epitope of myelin basic protein (MBP), p87–99 (VHFFKNIVTPRTP), induces experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). VHFFK contains the major residues for binding of this self-molecule to T cell receptor (TCR) and to the major histocompatibility complex. Peptides from papilloma virus strains containing the motif VHFFK induce EAE. A peptide from human papilloma virus type 40 (HPV 40) containing VHFFR, and one from HPV 32 containing VHFFH, prevented EAE. A sequence from Bacillus subtilis (RKVVTDFFKNIPQRI) also prevented EAE. T cell lines, producing IL-4 and specific for these microbial peptides, suppressed EAE. Thus, microbial peptides, differing from the core motif of the self-antigen, MBPp87–99, function as altered peptide ligands, and behave as TCR antagonists, in the modulation of autoimmune disease. PMID:10209044

  5. Concepts for Biologically Active Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kastin, Abba J.; Pan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Here we review a unique aspect of CNS research on biologically active peptides that started against a background of prevalent dogmas but ended by exerting considerable influence on the field. During the course of refuting some doctrines, we introduced several concepts that were unconventional and paradigm-shifting at the time. We showed that (1) hypothalamic peptides can act ‘up’ on the brain as well as ‘down’ on the pituitary, (2) peripheral peptides can affect the brain, (3) peptides can cross the blood-brain barrier, (4) the actions of peptides can persist longer than their half-lives in blood, (5) perinatal administration of peptides can exert actions persisting into adulthood, (6) a single peptide can have more than one action, (7) dose-response relationships of peptides need not be linear, (8) the brain produces antiopiate as well as opiate peptides, (9) there is a selective high affinity endogenous peptide ligand for the mu-opiate receptor, (10) a peptide’s name does not restrict its effects, and (11) astrocytes assume an active role in response to metabolic disturbance and hyperleptinemia. The evolving questions in our laboratories reflect the diligent effort of the neuropeptide community to identify the roles of peptides in the CNS. The next decade is expected to see greater progress in the following areas: (a) interactions of peptides with other molecules in the CNS; (b) peptide involvement in cell-cell interactions; and (c) peptides in neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases. The development of peptidomics and gene silencing approaches will expedite the formation of many new concepts in a new era. PMID:20726835

  6. In vitro inhibition of feline leukaemia virus infection by synthetic peptides derived from the transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Boenzli, Eva; Robert-Tissot, Céline; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Cattori, Valentino; Meli, Marina Luisa; Gutte, Bernd; Rovero, Paolo; Flynn, Norman; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Lutz, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) is a gammaretrovirus commonly affecting cats. Infection with this virus often leads to fatal outcomes and, so far, no cure is available for this disease. Synthetic peptides with structures mimicking the transmembrane protein of the viral surface proteins hold the potential to effectively interfere with viral entry by hampering the fusion of viral and host cell membranes and constitute a novel approach for the treatment of infections with retroviruses. We identified and synthetically produced 11 FeLV peptides and evaluated their potential to block FeLV infection in vitro. Cell cultures were exposed to FeLV subgroup A prior to the addition of the peptides. The inhibitory effect of the peptides was assessed by measuring FeLV gag protein in the supernatant of peptide versus mock-treated cell cultures using an ELISA. A peptide (EPK364) of 37 amino acids in length, with sequence homology to the HIV fusion inhibitor T-20, significantly suppressed viral replication by 88%, whereas no effects were found for shorter peptides. Two structurally modified variants of EPK364 also inhibited viral replication by up to 58% (EPK397) and 27% (EPK398). Our data support the identification of synthetic FeLV peptides that have the potential for a curative short-term therapy of viraemic cats. In addition, these peptides might become an important tool in xenotransplantation, where endogenous gammaretroviruses of the donor species might be able to infect the host. © 2011 International Medical Press

  7. Targeted drug delivery to tumor vasculature by a carbohydrate mimetic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Shingo; Sugihara, Kazuhiro; Shibata, Toshiaki K.; Nakayama, Jun; Akama, Tomoya O.; Tamura, Naoaki; Wong, Shuk-Man; Bobkov, Andrey A.; Takano, Yutaka; Ohyama, Chikara; Fukuda, Minoru; Fukuda, Michiko N.

    2011-01-01

    Although numerous carbohydrates play significant roles in mammalian cells, carbohydrate-based drug discovery has not been explored due to the technical difficulty of chemically synthesizing complex carbohydrate structures. Previously, we identified a series of carbohydrate mimetic peptides and found that a 7-mer peptide, designated I-peptide, inhibits hematogenous carbohydrate-dependent cancer cell colonization. During analysis of the endothelial surface receptor for I-peptide, we found that I-peptide bound to annexin 1 (Anxa1). Because Anxa1 is a highly specific tumor vasculature surface marker, we hypothesized that an I-peptide-like peptide could target anticancer drugs to the tumor vasculature. This study identifies IFLLWQR peptide, designated IF7, as homing to tumors. When synthetic IF7 peptide was conjugated to fluorescent Alexa 488 (A488) and injected intravenously into tumor-bearing mice, IF7-A488 targeted tumors within minutes. IF7 conjugated to the potent anticancer drug SN-38 and injected intravenously into nude mice carrying human colon HCT116 tumors efficiently suppressed tumor growth at low dosages with no apparent side effects. These results suggest that IF7 serves as an efficient drug delivery vehicle by targeting Anxa1 expressed on the surface of tumor vasculature. Given its extremely specific tumor-targeting activity, IF7 may represent a clinically relevant vehicle for anticancer drugs. PMID:22114188

  8. Avian host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P

    2013-11-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense of many organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that in the animal kingdom the functions of HDPs are not confined to direct antimicrobial actions. Research in mammals has indicated that HDPs have many immunomodulatory functions and are also involved in other physiological processes ranging from development to wound healing. During the past five years our knowledge about avian HDPs has increased considerably. This review addresses our current knowledge on the evolution, regulation and biological functions of HDPs of birds.

  9. Peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Bernd; Höhenwarter, Wolfgang; Krah, Alexander; Mattow, Jens; Schmid, Monika; Schmidt, Frank; Jungblut, Peter R

    2005-03-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-MS and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry have evolved into the major methods for identification of proteins following separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE or liquid chromatography. One main technological goal of proteome analyses beside high sensitivity and automation was the comprehensive analysis of proteins. Therefore, the protein species level with the essential information on co- and post-translational modifications must be achieved. The power of peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification was described here, as exemplified by the identification of protein species with high molecular masses (spectrin alpha and beta), low molecular masses (elongation factor EF-TU fragments), splice variants (alpha A crystallin), aggregates with disulfide bridges (alkylhydroperoxide reductase), and phosphorylated proteins (heat shock protein 27). Helpful tools for these analyses were the use of the minimal protein identifier concept and the software program MS-Screener to remove mass peaks assignable to contaminants and neighbor spots.

  10. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-11-15

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-..gamma.., tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin l..cap alpha.. or 1..beta... The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes.

  11. Separation of peptides from detergents using ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bagag, Aïcha; Giuliani, Alexandre; Canon, Francis; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Le Naour, François

    2011-11-30

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has dramatically evolved in the last two decades and has been the driving force of the spectacular expansion of proteomics during this period. However, the very poor compatibility of MS with detergents is still a technical obstacle in some studies, in particular on membrane proteins. Indeed, the high hydrophobicity of membrane proteins necessitates the use of detergents for their extraction and solubilization. Here, we address the analytical potential of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) for separating peptides from detergents. The study was focused on peptides from the human integral membrane protein CD9. A tryptic peptide was mixed with the non-ionic detergents Triton X-100 or beta-D-dodecyl maltoside (DDM) as well as with the ionic detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or sodium deoxycholate (SDC). Although electrospray ionization (ESI) alone led to a total suppression of the peptide ion signal on mass spectra with only detection of the detergents, use of FAIMS allowed separation and clear identification of the peptide with any of the detergents studied. The detection and identification of the target compound in the presence of an excess of detergents are then feasible. FAIMS should prove especially useful in the structural and proteomic analysis of membrane proteins.

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides and Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Samantha; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Koon, Hon Wai

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of innate immunity. They are often expressed in response to colonic inflammation and infection. Over the last several years, the roles of several antimicrobial peptides have been explored. Gene expression of many AMPs (beta defensin HBD2-4 and cathelicidin) is induced in response to invasion of gut microbes into the mucosal barrier. Some AMPs are expressed in a constitutive manner (alpha defensin HD 5-6 and beta defensin HBD1), while others (defensin and bactericidal/permeability increasing protein BPI) are particularly associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) due to altered defensin expression or development of autoantibodies against Bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI). Various AMPs have different spectrum and strength of antimicrobial effects. Some may play important roles in modulating the colitis (cathelicidin) while others (lactoferrin, hepcidin) may represent biomarkers of disease activity. The use of AMPs for therapeutic purposes is still at an early stage of development. A few natural AMPs were shown to be able to modulate colitis when delivered intravenously or intracolonically (cathelicidin, elafin and SLPI) in mouse colitis models. New AMPs (synthetic or artificial non-human peptides) are being developed and may represent new therapeutic approaches against colitis. This review discusses the latest research developments in the AMP field with emphasis in innate immunity and pathophysiology of colitis. PMID:22950497

  13. Effects of Endurance Running and Dietary Fat on Circulating Ghrelin and Peptide YY

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Ryan D.; Willis, Kentz S.; Ravussin, Eric; Larson-Meyer, Enette D.

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY) are newly recognized gut peptides involved in appetite regulation. Plasma ghrelin concentrations are elevated in fasting and suppressed following a meal, while PYY concentrations are suppressed in fasting and elevated postprandially. We determine whether ghrelin and PYY are altered by a low-fat, high-carbohydrate (10% fat, 75% carbohydrate) or moderate-fat, moderate-carbohydrate (35% fat, 50% carbohydrate) diet and; whether these peptides are affected by intense endurance running (which is likely to temporarily suppress appetite). Twenty-one endurance-trained runners followed a controlled diet (25% fat) and training regimen for 3 days before consuming the low-fat or isoenergetic moderate-fat diet for another 3 days in random cross-over fashion. On day 7 runners underwent glycogen restoration and then completed a 90-minute pre-loaded 10-km time trial on day 8, following a control breakfast. Blood samples were obtained on days 4 and 7 (fasting), and day 8 (non-fasting) before and after exercise for analysis of ghrelin, PYY, insulin and growth hormone (GH). Insulin, GH, Ghrelin and PYY changed significantly over time (p < 0.0001) but were not influenced by diet. Ghrelin was elevated during fasting (days 4 and 7), while insulin and PYY were suppressed. Following the pre-exercise meal, ghrelin was suppressed ~17% and insulin and PYY were elevated ~157 and ~40%, respectively, relative to fasting (day 7). Following exercise, PYY, ghrelin, and GH were significantly (p < 0.0001) increased by ~11, ~16 and ~813%, respectively. The noted disruption in the typical inverse relationship between ghrelin and PYY following exercise suggests that interaction of these peptides may be at least partially responsible for post-exercise appetite suppression. These peptides do not appear to be influenced by dietary fat intake. Key points The study presents novel findings which address whether the appetite-stimulating gut peptide ghrelin and the appetite-suppressing

  14. Ultrasonic Frost Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kazunari; Saiki, Kazushi; Sato, Hiroki; Ito, Takahiro

    2003-02-01

    The authors have observed the accumulation of frost on the surface of a rectangular aluminum alloy (duralumin) plate flexurally vibrating at approximately 37 kHz in an atmosphere of almost 100% relative humidity at 2°C. The plate surface, which had been prepolished with abrasive slurry for maintaining its average surface roughness of about 100 nm, was refrigerated at a temperature of -20°C with cold carbon-dioxide gas as coolant. Experiments have been conducted with and without fine silver oxide powder spread on the plate surface so as to examine the effect of artificial ice crystal nuclei. Ultrasonic vibrations with an amplitude of 3.4 μm (rms) are found to suppress frost accumulation by approximately 60%. The phenomenon cannot be ascribed directly to the heat generation caused by high-amplitude vibration, but may have a complex mechanical and/or acoustical effect on small ice crystals.

  15. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1994-10-04

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein. 3 figs.

  16. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

  17. ZERO SUPPRESSION FOR RECORDERS

    DOEpatents

    Fort, W.G.S.

    1958-12-30

    A zero-suppression circuit for self-balancing recorder instruments is presented. The essential elements of the circuit include a converter-amplifier having two inputs, one for a reference voltage and the other for the signal voltage under analysis, and a servomotor with two control windings, one coupled to the a-c output of the converter-amplifier and the other receiving a reference input. Each input circuit to the converter-amplifier has a variable potentiometer and the sliders of the potentiometer are ganged together for movement by the servoinotor. The particular noveity of the circuit resides in the selection of resistance values for the potentiometer and a resistor in series with the potentiometer of the signal circuit to ensure the full value of signal voltage variation is impressed on a recorder mechanism driven by servomotor.

  18. Factors influencing dust suppressant effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, C.R.; Eisele, T.C.; Chesney, D.J.; Kawatra, S.K.

    2008-11-15

    Water sprays are a common method used to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions. Various factors such as wettability, surface area coverage, fine particle engulfment rates, interparticle adhesion forces, suppressant penetration and suppressant longevity have all been suggested as critical factors in achieving effective PM control. However, it has not been established which of these factors are the most important. Experimental work indicated that suppressant penetration is the most critical of these factors. The length of time after application that suppressants were effective was also improved by using hygroscopic reagents that retained moisture to prevent evaporation. Maximizing suppressant penetration and improving suppressant longevity led to an average 86% reduction in PM10 concentrations in laboratory dust tower tests.

  19. [Hydrolysis of peptides by immobilized bacterial peptide hydrolases].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Deniakina, E K

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of hydrolysis of a mixture of peptides with an enzyme from the bacterium Xanthomonas rubrilineans, displaying a peptidase activity and immobilized on aluminum oxide, was studied. Kinetic schemes and equations allowing for approaching quantitative description of peptide hydrolysis in complex mixtures containing free amino acids and peptides were obtained. It was demonstrated that as a result of hydrolysis, the content of free amino acids in hydrolysates decreased 2.5- to 3-fold and the molecular weight of the constituent peptides, 2-fold.

  20. The site of saccadic suppression.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Kai V; Santoro, Loredana; Walsh, Vincent; Blakemore, Colin

    2004-01-01

    During rapid eye movements, or saccades, stable vision is maintained by active reduction of visual sensitivity. The site of this saccadic suppression remains uncertain. Here we show that phosphenes--small illusory visual perceptions--induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the human occipital cortex are immune to saccadic suppression, whereas phosphenes induced by retinal stimulation are not, thus providing direct physiological evidence that saccadic suppression occurs between the retina and the occipital visual cortex.

  1. Glucagon-like peptide 2 function in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Burrin, D G; Stoll, B; Guan, X

    2003-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is a member of family of peptides derived from the proglucagon gene expressed in the intestines, pancreas and brain. Tissue-specific posttranslational processing of proglucagon leads to GLP-2 and GLP-1 secretion from the intestine and glucagon secretion from the pancreas. GLP-2 and GLP-1 are co-secreted from the enteroendocrine L-cells located in distal intestine in response to enteral nutrient ingestion, especially carbohydrate and fat. GLP-2 secretion is mediated by direct nutrient stimulation of the L-cells and indirect action from enteroendocrine and neural inputs, including GIP, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and the vagus nerve. GLP-2 is secreted as a 33-amino acid peptide and is rapidly cleaved by dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPP-IV) to a truncated peptide which acts as a weak agonist with competitive antagonistic properties. GLP-2 acts to enhance nutrient absorption by inhibiting gastric motility and secretion and stimulating nutrient transport. GLP-2 also suppresses food intake when infused centrally. The trophic actions of GLP-2 are specific for the intestine and occur via stimulation of crypt cell proliferation and suppression of apoptosis in mucosal epithelial cells. GLP-2 reduces gut permeability, bacterial translocation and proinflammatory cytokine expression under conditions of intestinal inflammation and injury. The effects of GLP-2 are mediated by a G-protein-linked receptor that is localized to the intestinal mucosa and hypothalamus. The intestinal localization of the GLP-2R to neural and endocrine cells, but not enterocytes, suggests that its actions are mediated indirectly via a secondary signaling mechanism. The implications of GLP-2 in domestic animal production are largely unexplored. However, GLP-2 may have therapeutic application in treatment of gastrointestinal injury and diarrheal diseases that occur in developing neonatal and weanling animals.

  2. Bacterial Evasion of Host Antimicrobial Peptide Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jason N.; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), also known as host defense peptides, are small naturally occurring microbicidal molecules produced by the host innate immune response that function as a first line of defense to kill pathogenic microorganisms by inducing deleterious cell membrane damage. AMPs also possess signaling and chemoattractant activities and can modulate the innate immune response to enhance protective immunity or suppress inflammation. Human pathogens have evolved defense molecules and strategies to counter and survive the AMPs released by host immune cells such as neutrophils and macrophages. Here, we review the various mechanisms used by human bacterial pathogens to resist AMP-mediated killing, including surface charge modification, active efflux, alteration of membrane fluidity, inactivation by proteolytic digestion, and entrapment by surface proteins and polysaccharides. Enhanced understanding of AMP resistance at the molecular level may offer insight into the mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis and augment the discovery of novel therapeutic targets and drug design for the treatment of recalcitrant multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. PMID:26999396

  3. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities.

  4. Antitumor Peptides from Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lan-Hong; Wang, Yue-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Xiu-Kun; Sun, Mi

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides. PMID:22072999

  5. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  6. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  7. The PeptideAtlas Project.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    PeptideAtlas is a multi-species compendium of peptides observed with tandem mass spectrometry methods. Raw mass spectrometer output files are collected from the community and reprocessed through a uniform analysis and validation pipeline that continues to advance. The results are loaded into a database and the information derived from the raw data is returned to the community via several web-based data exploration tools. The PeptideAtlas resource is useful for experiment planning, improving genome annotation, and other data mining projects. PeptideAtlas has become especially useful for planning targeted proteomics experiments.

  8. Antitumor peptides from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lan-Hong; Wang, Yue-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Xiu-Kun; Sun, Mi

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides.

  9. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  10. Peptide Amyloid Surface Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Homomeric self-assembly of peptides into amyloid fibers is a feature of many diseases. A central role has been suggested for the lateral fiber surface affecting gains of toxic function. To investigate this, a protein scaffold that presents a discrete, parallel β-sheet surface for amyloid subdomains up to eight residues in length has been designed. Scaffolds that present the fiber surface of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) were prepared. The designs show sequence-specific surface effects apparent in that they gain the capacity to attenuate rates of IAPP self-assembly in solution and affect IAPP-induced toxicity in insulin-secreting cells. PMID:25541905

  11. Peptides and food intake.

    PubMed

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  12. Plant antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Robert; Barylski, Jakub; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Buchwald, Waldemar; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a component of barrier defense system of plants. They have been isolated from roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves of a wide variety of species and have activities towards phytopathogens, as well as against bacteria pathogenic to humans. Thus, plant AMPs are considered as promising antibiotic compounds with important biotechnological applications. Plant AMPs are grouped into several families and share general features such as positive charge, the presence of disulfide bonds (which stabilize the structure), and the mechanism of action targeting outer membrane structures.

  13. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  14. STRV Cryocooler Tip Motion Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1b) scheduled to fly at the beginning of June 1994, has a cryocooler vibration suppression experiment aboard doing motion suppression of the tip of the coldfinger. STRV-1b is a bread box sized satellite to be launched on the next flight of the Ariane-4.

  15. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  16. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  17. STRV Cryocooler Tip Motion Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1b) scheduled to fly at the beginning of June 1994, has a cryocooler vibration suppression experiment aboard doing motion suppression of the tip of the coldfinger. STRV-1b is a bread box sized satellite to be launched on the next flight of the Ariane-4.

  18. Suppressing Display Cockpit Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Rudolf

    1987-09-01

    Modern aircraft displays with relatively high visual brightness levels present day and night sensor images (generated by electro-optical systems) to crew members for navigation and fire control purposes. A heads out display (HOD) on a cathode ray tube (CRT) screen, while effective for one crew member, may distract or irritate another crew member if the image is reflected off a canopy panel into his eyes, particularly at night. This paper presents one solution applied to canopy reflection suppression encountered in the U.S. Army's APACHE Advanced Attack Helicopter where the co-pilot's HOD reflections interfered with the pilot's vision. When the co-pilot would move his head away from the screen, the reflected image path to the pilot, sitting above and behind the co-pilot, would no longer be blocked and distract him. A variety of polarizers were studied and the problem was solved by placing a linear polarizer over the CRT with its axis crossed relative to the skipping vector of the reflection, letting the canopy panel act as an analyzer. Reflected luminance was reduced by more than 25 times.

  19. Granulysin-Derived Peptides Demonstrate Antimicrobial and Anti-Inflammatory Effects Against Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    McInturff, Jamie E.; Wang, Shyh-Jeun; Machleidt, Thomas; Lin, T. Richard; Oren, Ami; Hertz, Cheryl J.; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Hart, Scott; Zeh, Karin; Anderson, Daniel H.; Gallo, Richard L.; Modlin, Robert L.; Kim, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a key therapeutic target in acne, yet this bacterium has become resistant to standard antibiotic agents. We investigated whether the human antimicrobial protein granulysin is a potential candidate for the treatment of acne. Granulysin and synthetic granulysin-derived peptides possessing a helix–loop–helix motif killed P. acnes in vitro. Modification of a helix–loop–helix peptide, 31–50, by substitution of a tryptophan for the valine at amino acid 44 (peptide 31–50v44w) to increase its interaction with bacterial surfaces also increased its antimicrobial activity. Moreover, when synthesized with d- rather than l-type amino acids, this peptide (d-31– 50v44w) became less susceptible to degradation by proteases and more effective in killing P. acnes. Granulysin peptides were bactericidal, demonstrating an advantage over standard bacteriostatic antibiotics in their control of P. acnes. Moreover, peptide d-31–50v44w killed P. acnes in isolated human microcomedone preparations. Importantly, peptides 31–50, 31–50v44w, and d-31–50v44w also have potential anti-inflammatory effects, as demonstrated by suppression of P. acnes-stimulated cytokine release. Taken together, these data suggest that granulysin peptides may be useful as topical therapeutic agents, providing alternatives to current acne therapies. PMID:16098035

  20. Plant CLE peptides from two distinct functional classes synergistically induce division of vascular cells

    PubMed Central

    Whitford, Ryan; Fernandez, Ana; De Groodt, Ruth; Ortega, Esther; Hilson, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The Clavata3 (CLV3)/endosperm surrounding region (CLE) signaling peptides are encoded in large plant gene families. CLV3 and the other A-type CLE peptides promote cell differentiation in root and shoot apical meristems, whereas the B-type peptides (CLE41–CLE44) do not. Instead, CLE41 inhibits the differentiation of Zinnia elegans tracheary elements. To test whether CLE genes might code for antagonistic or synergistic functions, peptides from both types were combined through overexpression within or application onto Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. The CLE41 peptide (CLE41p) promoted proliferation of vascular cells, although delaying differentiation into phloem and xylem cell lineages. Application of CLE41p or overexpression of CLE41 did not suppress the terminal differentiation of the root and shoot apices triggered by A-type CLE peptides. However, in combination, A-type peptides enhanced all of the phenotypes associated with CLE41 gain-of-function, leading to massive proliferation of vascular cells. This proliferation relied on auxin signaling because it was enhanced by exogenous application of a synthetic auxin, decreased by an auxin polar transport inhibitor, and abolished by a mutation in the Monopteros auxin response factor. These findings highlight that vascular patterning is a process controlled in time and space by different CLE peptides in conjunction with hormonal signaling. PMID:19011104

  1. A p7 Ion Channel-derived Peptide Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wei; Lang, Yange; Li, Tian; Zeng, Zhengyang; Song, Yu; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Viral infection is an early stage of its life cycle and represents a promising target for antiviral drug development. Here we designed and characterized three peptide inhibitors of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection based on the structural features of the membrane-associated p7 polypeptide of HCV. The three peptides exhibited low toxicity and high stability while potently inhibiting initial HCV infection and suppressed established HCV infection at non-cytotoxic concentrations in vitro. The most efficient peptide (designated H2-3), which is derived from the H2 helical region of HCV p7 ion channel, inhibited HCV infection by inactivating both intracellular and extracellular viral particles. The H2-3 peptide inactivated free HCV with an EC50 (50% effective concentration) of 82.11 nm, which is >1000-fold lower than the CC50 (50% cytotoxic concentration) of Huh7.5.1 cells. H2-3 peptide also bound to cell membrane and protected host cells from viral infection. The peptide H2-3 did not alter the normal electrophysiological profile of the p7 ion channel or block viral release from Huh7.5.1 cells. Our work highlights a new anti-viral peptide design strategy based on ion channel, giving the possibility that ion channels are potential resources to generate antiviral peptides. PMID:26251517

  2. SPR4-peptide Alters Bone Metabolism of Normal and HYP Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zelenchuk, Lesya V; Hedge, Anne-Marie; Rowe, Peter S N

    2015-01-01

    Context ASARM-peptides are substrates and ligands for PHEX, the gene responsible for X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP). PHEX binds to the DMP1-ASARM-motif to form a trimeric-complex with α5β3-integrin on the osteocyte surface and this suppresses FGF23 expression. ASARM-peptide disruption of this complex increases FGF23 expression. We used a 4.2 kDa peptide (SPR4) that binds to ASARM-peptide and ASARM-motif to study DMP1-PHEX interactions and to assess SPR4 for treating inherited hypophosphatemic rickets. Design Subcutaneously transplanted osmotic pumps were used to infuse SPR4-peptide or vehicle into wild-type mice (WT) and HYP-mice for 4 weeks. Results Asymmetrically distributed mineralization defects occurred with WT-SPR4 femurs. Specifically, SPR4 induced negative effects on trabecular bone and increased bone volume and mineralization in cortical-bone. Markedly increased sclerostin and reduced active β-catenin occurred with HYP mice. SPR4-infusion suppressed sclerostin and increased active β-catenin in WT and HYP mice and improved HYP-mice trabecular mineralization defects but not cortical mineralization defects. Conclusions SPR4-peptide has bimodal activity and acts by: (1) preventing DMP1 binding to PHEX and (2) sequestering an inhibitor of DMP1-PHEX binding, ASARM-peptide. In PHEX defective HYP-mice the second pathway predominates. Although SPR4-peptide improved trabecular calcification defects, decreased sclerostin and increased active β-catenin it did not correct HYP-mice cortical mineralization defects on a normal phosphate diet. Thus, for inherited hypophosphatemic rickets patients on a normal phosphate diet, SPR4-peptide is not a useful therapeutic. PMID:25460577

  3. Age-associated changes of appetite-regulating peptides.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Saeko; Miyasaka, Kyoko

    2010-07-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive decrease in appetite and food intake. The reasons for the decline in food intake are multifactorial, and relate to both peripheral and central mechanisms. Current studies about the regulation of food intake suggest that there are many central mediators that control the appetite. To determine the mechanism of age-associated decrease in appetite and food intake, we focused on the age-associated changes of the suppressing and stimulatory effect of some appetite-regulating peptides. At first, we examined cholecystokinin (CCK), one of the typical appetite-suppressing factors. Although sensitivity to CCK is enhanced in old animals, the mechanism underlying this effect has not been elucidated. Next, we focused on the appetite-stimulating peptides, orexin-A, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and ghrelin, which are known to play a critical role in food intake. To determine the age-associated decrease in appetite and food intake, we compared the stimulatory effect of intracerebroventricular administration of orexin-A, NPY and ghrelin. We report the studies of the age-associated changes of appetite-regulating peptides in this review.

  4. Painful consequences of anger suppression.

    PubMed

    Quartana, Phillip J; Burns, John W

    2007-05-01

    The authors experimentally examined the effects of anger suppression on pain perception. On the basis of ironic process theory, they proposed that efforts to suppress experiential or expressive components of anger may paradoxically enhance cognitive accessibility of anger-related thoughts and feelings, thereby contaminating perception of succeeding pain in an anger-congruent manner. Participants were randomly assigned to nonsuppression or experiential or expressive suppression conditions during mental arithmetic with or without harassment. A cold-pressor task followed. Results revealed that participants instructed to suppress experiential or expressive components of emotion during harassment not only reported the greatest pain levels, but also rated the anger-specific dimensions of pain uniquely strong. Results suggest that attempts to suppress anger may amplify pain sensitivity by ironically augmenting perception of the irritating and frustrating qualities of pain.

  5. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression

    PubMed Central

    Hulbert, Justin C.; Henson, Richard N.; Anderson, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  6. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  7. Self-assembled peptides for coating of active sulfur nanoparticles in lithium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewel, Yead; Yoo, Kisoo; Liu, Jin; Dutta, Prashanta

    2016-03-01

    Development of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is hindered by poor cyclability due to the loss of sulfur, although Li-S battery can provide high energy density. Coating of sulfur nanoparticles can help maintain active sulfur in the cathode of Li-S battery, and hence increase the cyclability. Among myriad of coating materials, synthetic peptides are very attractive because of their spontaneous self-assembly as well as electrical conductive characteristics. In this study, we explored the use of various synthetic peptides as a coating material for sulfur nanoparticles. Atomistic simulations were carried out to identify optimal peptide structure and density for coating sulfur nanoparticles. Three different peptide models, poly-proline, poly(leucine-lysine) and poly-histidine, are selected for this study based on their peptide-peptide and peptide-sulfur interactions. Simulation results show that both poly-proline and poly(leucine-lysine) can form self-assembled coating on sulfur nanoparticles (2-20 nm) in pyrrolidinone, a commonly used solvent for cathode slurry. We also studied the structural integrity of these synthetic peptides in organic [dioxolane (DOL) and dimethoxyethane (DME)] electrolyte used in Li-S battery. Both peptides show stable structures in organic electrolyte (DOL/DME) used in Li-S battery. Furthermore, the dissolution of sulfur molecules in organic electrolyte is investigated in the absence and presence of these peptide coatings. It was found that only poly(leucine-lysine)-based peptide can most effectively suppress the sulfur loss in electrolyte, suggesting its potential applications in Li-S battery as a coating material.

  8. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  9. Clinical uses of gut peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, J; Pappas, T N

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review clinical applications of gut-derived peptides as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: An increasing number of gut peptides have been evaluated for clinical use. Earlier uses as diagnostic agents have been complemented more recently by increasing application of gut peptides as therapeutic agents. METHOD: The authors conducted a literature review. RESULTS: Current experience with clinical use of gut peptides is described. Initial clinical applications focused on using secretomotor effects of gut peptides in diagnostic tests, many of which have now fallen into disuse. More recently, attention has been directed toward harnessing these secretomotor effects for therapeutic use in a variety of disorders, and also using the trophic effects of gut peptides to modulate gut mucosal growth in benign and malignant disease. Gut peptides have been evaluated in a variety of other clinical situations including use as adjuncts to imaging techniques, and modification of behaviors such as feeding and panic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Gut peptides have been used successfully in an increasing variety of clinical conditions. Further refinements in analogue and antagonist design are likely to lead to even more selective agents that may have important clinical applications. Further studies are needed to identity and evaluate these new agents. PMID:9065291

  10. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  11. Systematic screening for bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Maeji, N J; Bray, A M; Valerio, R M; Seldon, M A; Wang, J X; Geysen, H M

    1991-01-01

    Using simultaneous multiple peptide synthesis by the multipin approach, the feasibility of systematic large-scale pharmacological screening of peptide ligands was investigated. The method involves the assembly of small quantities of peptides (ca. 50 nmol) on plastic pins derivatized with an ester linker based on glycolate and 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoate. These esters are stable under peptide synthesis and side-chain deprotection conditions but cleave under relatively mild basic conditions to generate peptides having C-terminal acid, amide and methylamide. A two-step approach to side-chain deprotection and cleavage from the solid support allows potentially toxic reagents to be removed (washed) from the peptide prior to cleavage. Consequently, the resulting peptide solutions can be used in bioassays with minimal processing. A series of angiotensin II and substance P analogs were synthesized and evaluated in an in vivo rat model and in vitro radioreceptor assay, respectively. Structure-activity studies on analogs of these bioactive peptides are well documented. The data obtained were consistent with that reported in the literature.

  12. Microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mammadov, Rashad; Tekinay, Ayse B; Dana, Aykutlu; Guler, Mustafa O

    2012-02-01

    Peptide-based nanomaterials have been utilized for various applications from regenerative medicine to electronics since they provide several advantages including easy synthesis methods, numerous routes for functionalization and biomimicry of secondary structures of proteins which leads to design of self-assembling peptide molecules to form nanostructures. Microscopic characterization at nanoscale is critical to understand processes directing peptide molecules to self-assemble and identify structure-function relationship of the nanostructures. Here, fundamental studies in microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures are discussed to provide insights in widely used microscopy tools. In this review, we will encompass characterization studies of peptide nanostructures with modern microscopes, such as TEM, SEM, AFM, and advanced optical microscopy techniques. We will also mention specimen preparation methods and describe interpretation of the images.

  13. Bioactive peptides derived from food.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd-Markwick, Kay J; Moughan, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    As interest in the ability of functional foods to impact on human health has grown over the past decade, so has the volume of knowledge detailing the beneficial roles of food-derived bioactive peptides. Bioactive peptides from both plant and animal proteins have been discovered, with to date, by far the most being isolated from milk-based products. A wide range of activities has been described, including antimicrobial and antifungal properties, blood pressure-lowering effects, cholesterol-lowering ability, antithrombotic effects, enhancement of mineral absorption, immunomodulatory effects, and localized effects on the gut. Although there is still considerable research to be performed in the area of food-derived bioactive peptides, it is clear that the generation of bioactive peptides from dietary proteins during the normal digestive process is of importance. Therefore, it will become necessary when determining dietary protein quality to consider the potential effects of latent bioactive peptides that are released during digestion of the protein.

  14. Peptides and peptidomimetics as immunomodulators

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Ameya S; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama

    2014-01-01

    Peptides and peptidomimetics can function as immunomodulating agents by either blocking the immune response or stimulating the immune response to generate tolerance. Knowledge of B- or T-cell epitopes along with conformational constraints is important in the design of peptide-based immunomodulating agents. Work on the conformational aspects of peptides, synthesis and modified amino acid side chains have contributed to the development of a new generation of therapeutic agents for autoimmune diseases and cancer. The design of peptides/peptidomimetics for immunomodulation in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus and HIV infection is reviewed. In cancer therapy, peptide epitopes are used in such a way that the body is trained to recognize and fight the cancer cells locally as well as systemically. PMID:25186605

  15. Modification of gelation kinetics in bioactive peptide amphiphiles

    PubMed Central

    Niece, Krista L.; Czeisler, Catherine; Sahni, Vibhu; Tysseling-Mattiace, Vicki; Pashuck, Eugene T.; Kessler, John A.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2008-01-01

    Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) previously designed in our laboratory are known to self-assemble into nanofibers that exhibit bioactivity both in vitro and in vivo. Self-assembly can be triggered by charge neutralization or salt-mediated screening of charged residues in their peptide sequences, and the resulting nanofibers can form macroscopic gels at concentrations as low as 0.5% by weight. Controlling the kinetics of gelation while retaining the bioactivity of nanofibers could be critical in tailoring these materials for specific clinical applications. We report here on a series of PAs with different rates of gelation resulting from changes in their peptide sequence without changing the bioactive segment. The pre-existence of hydrogen-bonded aggregates in the solution state of more hydrophobic PAs appears to accelerate gelation kinetics. Mutation of the peptide sequence to include more hydrophilic and bulky amino acids suppresses formation of these nuclei and effectively slows down gelation through self-assembly of the nanofiber network. The ability to modify gelation kinetics in self-assembling systems without disrupting bioactivity could be important for injectable therapies in regenerative medicine. PMID:18774605

  16. Peptide separation methodologies for in-depth proteomics in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Fukao, Yoichiro; Yoshida, Masami; Kurata, Rie; Kobayashi, Mami; Nakanishi, Miyako; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Nakajima, Keiji; Ferjani, Ali

    2013-05-01

    In the post-genome era, several tools that have increased our global understanding of the molecular basis of several cell-based phenomena have been developed. However, proteomics has not been efficiently integrated with the other 'omics' (e.g. transcriptomics and metabolomics), because of the relatively low number of proteins identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Peptides from low-abundance proteins are often not detected by MS due to ionization suppression. To improve the number of peptide identifications in MS analyses, we propose three separation methodologies; namely, OFFGEL electrophoresis, 2D-liquid chromatography (LC) and the long monolithic silica-C18 capillary column method, with the common aim to decrease peptide complexity prior to MS analyses. Proteomics using the above three peptide separation methods were separately applied to protoplasts collected from the epidermal cell layer of Arabidopsis roots using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. In each method alone, 1,132, 836 and 795 proteins were specifically identified, respectively. This has allowed the identification of 1,493 proteins with no redundancy and with <1.0% false discovery rate. Moreover, approximately two-thirds of these proteins are identified here for the first time in the epidermal cell layer. These results show that use of different proteomic approaches can increase the total number of proteins identified. We propose that the integration of data from these methodologies represents a powerful tool for generation of proteome maps by enabling identification of low-abundance proteins in the various Arabidopsis root cell layers.

  17. Antimicrobial peptides: therapeutic potentials.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Jin; Park, Sung Jean; Mishig-Ochir, Tsogbadrakh; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2014-12-01

    The increasing appearance of multidrug-resistant pathogens has created an urgent need for suitable alternatives to current antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which act as defensive weapons against microbes, have received great attention because of broad-spectrum activities, unique action mechanisms and rare antibiotic-resistant variants. Despite desirable characteristics, they have shown limitations in pharmaceutical development due to toxicity, stability and manufacturing costs. Because of these drawbacks, only a few AMPs have been tested in Phase III clinical trials and no AMPs have been approved by the US FDA yet. However, these obstacles could be overcome by well-known methods such as changing physicochemical characteristics and introducing nonnatural amino acids, acetylation or amidation, as well as modern techniques like molecular targeted AMPs, liposomal formulations and drug delivery systems. Thus, the current challenge in this field is to develop therapeutic AMPs at a reasonable cost as well as to overcome the limitations.

  18. Asymmetric Peptide Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhilin; Tantakitti, Faifan; Palmer, Liam C; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-11-09

    Asymmetry in chemical structure or shape at molecular, nanoscale, or microscopic levels is essential to a vast number of functionalities in both natural and artificial systems. Bottom-up approaches to create asymmetric supramolecular nanostructures are considered promising but this strategy suffers from the potentially dynamic nature of noncovalent interactions. We report here on supramolecular self-assembly of asymmetric peptide amphiphiles consisting of two different molecularly linked domains. We found that strong noncovalent interactions and a high degree of internal order among the asymmetric amphiphiles lead to nanoribbons with asymmetric faces due to the preferential self-association of the two domains. The capture of gold nanoparticles on only one face of the nanoribbons demonstrates symmetry breaking in these supramolecular structures.

  19. Short Antimicrobial Peptides and Peptide Scaffolds as Promising Antibacterial Agents.

    PubMed

    Domalaon, Ronald; Zhanel, George G; Schweizer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have recently garnered significant attention as an emerging source of potential antibiotics, due to the swift emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria and a dwindling antibiotic pipeline. The vast majority of antimicrobial peptides are long, comprised of more than 10 amino acids, resulting in significant production costs for their synthesis while simultaneously displaying metabolic instability and relatively poor pharmacological profiles. To counter these problems, efforts have been shifted to shorter molecules and the development of new peptidomimetic approaches. In this paper, we review promising short, naturally-isolated or synthetic, antimicrobial peptides, along with their mimics, and discuss their merits as potential antibacterial agents.

  20. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  1. Self-assembled cationic peptide nanoparticles as an efficient antimicrobial agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihong; Xu, Kaijin; Wang, Huaying; Jeremy Tan, P. K.; Fan, Weimin; Venkatraman, Subbu S.; Li, Lanjuan; Yang, Yi-Yan

    2009-07-01

    Antimicrobial cationic peptides are of interest because they can combat multi-drug-resistant microbes. Most peptides form α-helices or β-sheet-like structures that can insert into and subsequently disintegrate negatively charged bacterial cell surfaces. Here, we show that a novel class of core-shell nanoparticles formed by self-assembly of an amphiphilic peptide have strong antimicrobial properties against a range of bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The nanoparticles show a high therapeutic index against Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice and are more potent than their unassembled peptide counterparts. Using Staphylococcus aureus-infected meningitis rabbits, we show that the nanoparticles can cross the blood-brain barrier and suppress bacterial growth in infected brains. Taken together, these nanoparticles are promising antimicrobial agents that can be used to treat brain infections and other infectious diseases.

  2. The novel roles of neutrophils via opioid peptides: regulation of the estrous cycle and pain.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoshiro

    2013-06-01

    Neutrophils are excreted into the vaginal vault at metestrus during the estrous cycle, and this phenomenon has long been used to determine the phase of the estrous cycle. A much smaller number of neutrophils are also detected in the uterus and the ovary. Recently, we provided several lines of evidence supporting the notion that neutrophils infiltrate into the ovary to regulate the estrous cycle by opioid peptides. Upon inflammation, on the other hand, neutrophils infiltrate into the site of infection to suppress pain by opioid peptides. Thus, opioid peptides are key molecules by which neutrophils play a novel role in regulation of the pain and estrous cycle. In both cases, opioid peptides appear to be secreted by neutrophils stimulated with chemokines, such as MIP-2 and KC in mouse, corticotropin-releasing hormone and IL-1.

  3. Recent advances in the research and development of marine antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    El-Gamal, Mohammed I; Abdel-Maksoud, Mohammed S; Oh, Chang-Hyun

    2013-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are a group of natural or semi-synthetic molecules possessing antimicrobial activities against bacteria, fungi, viruses, parasites, etc. They are considered as promising candidates for treatment of microbial infections and suppression of microbial resistance. The increasing emergence of bacterial resistance has required development of new efficient antibiotics that can be added to the antibacterial armamentarium. The marine world provides a rich source of antimicrobial peptides. That world has not been highly explored yet, and much more effort is required in order to discover new efficient antimicrobial peptides. In the present article, we have reviewed the recent progress in the field of marine antimicrobial peptides from 2009 until the mid of 2012.

  4. Discovery of peptide inhibitors targeting human programmed death 1 (PD-1) receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Jiankun; He, Zenghui; Wang, Xia; Meng, Jiajia; Zhao, Zhenjiang; Zhu, Lili; Liu, Xiaofeng; Li, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    Blocking the interaction of human programmed death 1 (hPD-1) and its ligand hPD-L1 has been a promising immunotherapy in cancer treatment. In this paper, using a computational de novo peptide design method, we designed several hPD-1 binding peptides. The most potent peptide Ar5Y_4 showed a KD value of 1.38 ± 0.39 μM, comparable to the binding affinity of the cognate hPD-L1. A Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) competitive binding assay result indicated that Ar5Y_4 could inhibit the interaction of hPD-1/hPD-L1. Moreover, Ar5Y_4 could restore the function of Jurkat T cells which had been suppressed by stimulated HCT116 cells. Peptides described in this paper provide promising biologic candidates for cancer immunotherapy or diagnostics. PMID:27533458

  5. In Vivo Treg Suppression Assays

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Creg J.; Collison, Lauren W.; Bettini, Maria; Pillai, Meenu R.; Rehg, Jerold E.; Vignali, Dario A.A.

    2011-01-01

    To fully examine the functionality of a regulatory T cell (Treg) population, one needs to assess their ability to suppress in a variety of in vivo models. We describe five in vivo models that examine the suppressive capacity of Tregs upon different target cell types. The advantages and disadvantages of each model includ ing resources, time, and technical expertise required to execute each model are also described. PMID:21287333

  6. Protective Role of PEDF-Derived Synthetic Peptide Against Experimental Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Y; Matsui, T; Taira, J; Higashimoto, Y; Yamagishi, S

    2016-09-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a glycoprotein with complex neuroprotective, anti-angiogenic, and anti-inflammatory properties, all of which could potentially be exploited as a therapeutic option for vascular complications in diabetes. We have previously shown that PEDF-derived synthetic peptide, P5-3 (FIFVLRD) has a comparable ability with full PEDF protein to inhibit rat corneal neovascularization induced by chemical cauterization. However, the effects of PEDF peptide on experimental diabetic nephropathy remain unknown. To address the issue, we modified P5-3 to stabilize and administered the modified peptide (d-Lys-d-Lys-d-Lys-Gln-d-Pro-P5-3-Cys-amide, 0.2 nmol/day) or vehicle to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ-rats) intraperitoneally by an osmotic mini pump for 2 weeks. We further examined the effects of modified peptide on human proximal tubular cells. Renal PEDF expression was decreased in STZ-rats. Although the peptide administration did not affect blood glucose or blood pressure, it decreased urinary excretion levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker, and reduced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene expression, and suppressed glomerular expansion in the diabetic kidneys. High glucose or advanced glycation end products stimulated oxidative stress generation and PAI-1 gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were significantly suppressed by 10 nM modified P5-3 peptide. Our present study suggests that PEDF-derived synthetic modified peptide could protect against experimental diabetic nephropathy and inhibit tubular cell damage under diabetes-like conditions through its anti-oxidative properties. Supplementation of modified P5-3 peptide may be a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetic nephropathy.

  7. A stabilized peptide ligand for multifunctional glioma targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ying, Man; Shen, Qing; Zhan, Changyou; Wei, Xiaoli; Gao, Jie; Xie, Cao; Yao, Bingxin; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-12-10

    )A7R conjugation, which in turn, cA7R-LS/DOX could substantially suppress subcutaneous tumor growth when compared with other DOX formulations (free DOX, LS/DOX and (L)A7R-LS/DOX). The designed cyclic A7R exhibited the capability of targeting glioma cells, neovasculature and VM simultaneously in vivo. Considering the ease of synthesis, high binding affinity to receptors and increased stability of cA7R peptide in the present study, the design of head-to-tail cyclized peptides by the formation of amide bond based on computer-aided peptide design presents an alternative method to identify proteolytically stable peptide ligands.

  8. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  9. Multidimensional peptide separations in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Link, Andrew J

    2002-12-01

    Multidimensional peptide separation will play an increasingly important role in the drive to identify and quantitate the proteome. By increasing the peak and load capacity, multidimensional approaches increase the number and dynamic range of peptides that can be analyzed in a complex biological organism. Separation methods using different physical properties of peptides have been combined with varying degrees of success. The ultimate goal is a rapid separation strategy that can be coupled with analytical methods, such as mass spectrometry, to provide comprehensive monitoring of the changing concentration, interactions, and structures of proteins in the proteome.

  10. Antimicrobial peptides and bacteriocins: alternatives to traditional antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yongming; Blecha, Frank

    2008-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ubiquitous, gene-encoded natural antibiotics that have gained recent attention in the search for new antimicrobials to combat infectious disease. In multicellular organisms, AMPs, such as defensins and cathelicidins, provide a coordinated protective response against infection and are a principal component of innate immunity in vertebrates. In unicellular organisms, AMPs, such as bacteriocins, function to suppress competitor species. Because many AMPs kill bacteria by disruption of membrane integrity and are thus thought to be less likely to induce resistance, AMPs are being extensively evaluated as novel antimicrobial drugs. This review summarizes and discusses the antibiotic properties of AMPs highlighting their potential as alternatives to conventional antibiotics.

  11. Suppression of calcium current by an endogenous neuropeptide in neurones of Aplysia californica.

    PubMed Central

    Brezina, V; Eckert, R; Erxleben, C

    1987-01-01

    1. Actions of the neuropeptide FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2) and its derivative YGG-FMRFamide (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2) on Ca2+ current were examined in identified, voltage-clamped neurones in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. 'Puffed' application of either peptide at concentrations of 1-50 microM was followed by a transient partial suppression of pharmacologically isolated inward Ca2+ current elicited by a depolarizing step. At 20 degrees C, suppression was maximal 10-25 s following the brief puff of peptide, and lasted up to 90 s. Bath application of peptide had a steady suppressing effect, showing little if any desensitization. 3. Alternative sources of inward current suppression were ruled out, indicating that application of FMRFamide or YGG-FMRFamide produces a true decrease in Ca2+ current, rather than enhancement of possible contaminating outward (K+, H+ or Cl-) currents. 4. FMRFamide and YGG-FMRFamide were equally effective in suppressing Ca2+ current (apparent dissociation constant, KD* approximately 10 microM). However, only 30-50% of the total Ca2+ current elicited by voltage steps to above +10 mV appeared to be susceptible to suppression by even saturating concentrations of peptide. This, as well as a reduced effect of the peptides on Ca2+ current which was observed at potentials below +10 mV, may perhaps result from the presence of more than one class of Ca2+ channels, only one of which is sensitive to FMRFamide. 5. FMRFamide eliminated a constant fraction of Ca2+ current at all potentials above +10 mV, and had no direct effect on activation or inactivation of the remaining current. This behaviour is consistent with reduction in the number of functional Ca2+ channels by the peptide. 6. Suppression of Ca2+ current produced a concomitant depression of Ca2+-dependent K+ current, which was shown previously to be insensitive to FMRFamide when activated by direct ionophoretic injection of Ca2+ into the cell. 7. The effect of

  12. Suppression of calcium current by an endogenous neuropeptide in neurones of Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Brezina, V; Eckert, R; Erxleben, C

    1987-07-01

    1. Actions of the neuropeptide FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2) and its derivative YGG-FMRFamide (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2) on Ca2+ current were examined in identified, voltage-clamped neurones in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. 'Puffed' application of either peptide at concentrations of 1-50 microM was followed by a transient partial suppression of pharmacologically isolated inward Ca2+ current elicited by a depolarizing step. At 20 degrees C, suppression was maximal 10-25 s following the brief puff of peptide, and lasted up to 90 s. Bath application of peptide had a steady suppressing effect, showing little if any desensitization. 3. Alternative sources of inward current suppression were ruled out, indicating that application of FMRFamide or YGG-FMRFamide produces a true decrease in Ca2+ current, rather than enhancement of possible contaminating outward (K+, H+ or Cl-) currents. 4. FMRFamide and YGG-FMRFamide were equally effective in suppressing Ca2+ current (apparent dissociation constant, KD* approximately 10 microM). However, only 30-50% of the total Ca2+ current elicited by voltage steps to above +10 mV appeared to be susceptible to suppression by even saturating concentrations of peptide. This, as well as a reduced effect of the peptides on Ca2+ current which was observed at potentials below +10 mV, may perhaps result from the presence of more than one class of Ca2+ channels, only one of which is sensitive to FMRFamide. 5. FMRFamide eliminated a constant fraction of Ca2+ current at all potentials above +10 mV, and had no direct effect on activation or inactivation of the remaining current. This behaviour is consistent with reduction in the number of functional Ca2+ channels by the peptide. 6. Suppression of Ca2+ current produced a concomitant depression of Ca2+-dependent K+ current, which was shown previously to be insensitive to FMRFamide when activated by direct ionophoretic injection of Ca2+ into the cell. 7. The effect of

  13. Signal Peptide Hydrophobicity Modulates Interaction with the Twin-Arginine Translocase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The general secretory pathway (Sec) and twin-arginine translocase (Tat) operate in parallel to export proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of prokaryotes and the thylakoid membrane of plant chloroplasts. Substrates are targeted to their respective machineries by N-terminal signal peptides that share a tripartite organization; however, Tat signal peptides harbor a conserved and almost invariant arginine pair that is critical for efficient targeting to the Tat machinery. Tat signal peptides interact with a membrane-bound receptor complex comprised of TatB and TatC components, with TatC containing the twin-arginine recognition site. Here, we isolated suppressors in the signal peptide of the Tat substrate, SufI, that restored Tat transport in the presence of inactivating substitutions in the TatC twin-arginine binding site. These suppressors increased signal peptide hydrophobicity, and copurification experiments indicated that they restored binding to the variant TatBC complex. The hydrophobic suppressors could also act in cis to suppress substitutions at the signal peptide twin-arginine motif that normally prevent targeting to the Tat pathway. Highly hydrophobic variants of the SufI signal peptide containing four leucine substitutions retained the ability to interact with the Tat system. The hydrophobic signal peptides of two Sec substrates, DsbA and OmpA, containing twin lysine residues, were shown to mediate export by the Tat pathway and to copurify with TatBC. These findings indicate that there is unprecedented overlap between Sec and Tat signal peptides and that neither the signal peptide twin-arginine motif nor the TatC twin-arginine recognition site is an essential mechanistic feature for operation of the Tat pathway. PMID:28765221

  14. Constrained Cyclic Peptides as Immunomodulatory Inhibitors of the CD2:CD58 Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Sable, Rushikesh; Durek, Thomas; Taneja, Veena; Craik, David J; Pallerla, Sandeep; Gauthier, Ted; Jois, Seetharama

    2016-08-19

    The interaction between the cell-cell adhesion proteins CD2 and CD58 plays a crucial role in lymphocyte recruitment to inflammatory sites, and inhibitors of this interaction have potential as immunomodulatory drugs in autoimmune diseases. Peptides from the CD2 adhesion domain were designed to inhibit CD2:CD58 interactions. To improve the stability of the peptides, β-sheet epitopes from the CD2 region implicated in CD58 recognition were grafted into the cyclic peptide frameworks of sunflower trypsin inhibitor and rhesus theta defensin. The designed multicyclic peptides were evaluated for their ability to modulate cell-cell interactions in three different cell adhesion assays, with one candidate, SFTI-a, showing potent activity in the nanomolar range (IC50: 51 nM). This peptide also suppresses the immune responses in T cells obtained from mice that exhibit the autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis. SFTI-a was resistant to thermal denaturation, as judged by circular dichroism spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, and had a half-life of ∼24 h in human serum. Binding of this peptide to CD58 was predicted by molecular docking studies and experimentally confirmed by surface plasmon resonance experiments. Our results suggest that cyclic peptides from natural sources are promising scaffolds for modulating protein-protein interactions that are typically difficult to target with small-molecule compounds.

  15. Responsiveness of beta-escin-permeabilized rabbit gastric gland model: effects of functional peptide fragments.

    PubMed

    Akagi, K; Nagao, T; Urushidani, T

    1999-09-01

    We established a beta-escin-permeabilized gland model with the use of rabbit isolated gastric glands. The glands retained an ability to secrete acid, monitored by [14C]aminopyrine accumulation, in response to cAMP, forskolin, and histamine. These responses were all inhibited by cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitory peptide. Myosin light-chain kinase inhibitory peptide also suppressed aminopyrine accumulation, whereas the inhibitory peptide of protein kinase C or that of calmodulin kinase II was without effect. Guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPgammaS) abolished cAMP-stimulated acid secretion concomitantly, interfering with the redistribution of H+-K+-ATPase from tubulovesicles to the apical membrane. To identify the targets of GTPgammaS, effects of peptide fragments of certain GTP-binding proteins were examined. Although none of the peptides related to Rab proteins showed any effect, the inhibitory peptide of Arf protein inhibited cAMP-stimulated secretion. These results demonstrate that our new model, the beta-escin-permeabilized gland, allows the introduction of relatively large molecules, e.g., peptides, into the cell, and will be quite useful for analyzing signal transduction of parietal cell function.

  16. An anti-infective synthetic peptide with dual antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities

    PubMed Central

    Silva, O. N.; de la Fuente-Núñez, C.; Haney, E. F.; Fensterseifer, I. C. M.; Ribeiro, S. M.; Porto, W. F.; Brown, P.; Faria-Junior, C.; Rezende, T. M. B.; Moreno, S. E.; Lu, T. K.; Hancock, R. E. W.; Franco, O. L.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant infections are predicted to kill 10 million people per year by 2050, costing the global economy $100 trillion. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop alternative technologies. We have engineered a synthetic peptide called clavanin-MO, derived from a marine tunicate antimicrobial peptide, which exhibits potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties both in vitro and in vivo. The peptide effectively killed a panel of representative bacterial strains, including multidrug-resistant hospital isolates. Antimicrobial activity of the peptide was demonstrated in animal models, reducing bacterial counts by six orders of magnitude, and contributing to infection clearance. In addition, clavanin-MO was capable of modulating innate immunity by stimulating leukocyte recruitment to the site of infection, and production of immune mediators GM-CSF, IFN-γ and MCP-1, while suppressing an excessive and potentially harmful inflammatory response by increasing synthesis of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and repressing the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12 and TNF-α. Finally, treatment with the peptide protected mice against otherwise lethal infections caused by both Gram-negative and -positive drug-resistant strains. The peptide presented here directly kills bacteria and further helps resolve infections through its immune modulatory properties. Peptide anti-infective therapeutics with combined antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties represent a new approach to treat antibiotic-resistant infections. PMID:27804992

  17. Early peptidic enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, André; Barbier, Bernard

    Oligopeptides supposed to be essential to primitive living cells could not be obtained by a prebiotic organic chemistry working mainly at random. Selection pathways were required. Experimental evidence is given for selective condensation of amino-acids in water as well as for selective resistance to degradation. Polycationic polypeptides containing lysyl (or arginyl) and hydrophobic residues strongly accelerate the hydrolysis of oligoribonucleotides. A ionic complex is first formed and the polypeptides are particularly active when they adopt a stable conformation, β-sheet or α-helix, in the complex. Well-defined short peptides were synthesized in order to determine the critical chain-length required for chemical activity. In a contemporary cell, proteins represent about 40 % of the dry weight. They fulfil a structural role and they are particularly helpful as chemical catalysts (enzymes). They can be represented as long chains made of twenty different building blocks, the amino-acids NH2-CHR-COOH, which differ by the side-chain R. Proteins are remarkable in the sense that they use amino-acids having only one carbon atom between the -NH2 and -COOH functions. The central carbon atom has always the same spatial asymmetry (chirality) and always bears a hydrogen atom. When the side-chain R is a hydrocarbon, it is branched. When R contains a chemical function, the side functions do not participate to the peptide bond construction. The protein chain results from the condensation of amino-acids, i.e. water molecules are removed between molecules in a medium which is mainly aqueous (the cell contains 75 % of water). The protein chains adopt rigid asymmetric conformations (α-helices, β-sheet structures) which are essential for the protein functions. Proteins, even the smallest ones, are too sophisticated entities to be considered as the products of an organic chemistry working at random, without any chemical selection. The chemist has therefore to understand, with simple

  18. Structure-based design and confirmation of peptide ligands for neuronal polo-like kinase to promote neuroregeneration.

    PubMed

    Cao, He-Li; Chen, Hao; Cui, Yu-Hui; Tian, Heng-Li; Chen, Jiong

    2016-04-01

    Neuronal polo-like kinase (nPLK) is an essential regular of cell cycle and differentiation in nervous system, and targeting nPLK has been established as a promising therapeutic strategy to treat neurological disorders and to promote neuroregeneration. The protein contains an N-terminal kinase domain (KD) and a C-terminal Polo-box domain (PBD) that are mutually inhibited by each other. Here, the intramolecular KD-PBD complex in nPLK was investigated at structural level via bioinformatics analysis, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and binding affinity scoring. From the complex interface two regions representing separately two continuous peptide fragments in PBD domain were identified as the hot spots of KD-PBD interaction. Structural and energetic analysis suggested that one (PBD peptide 1) of the two peptides can bind tightly to a pocket nearby the active site of KD domain, which is thus potential as self-inhibitory peptide to target and suppress nPLK kinase activity. The knowledge harvesting from computational studies were then used to guide the structural optimization and mutation of PBD peptide 1. Consequently, two of three peptide mutants separately exhibited moderately and considerably increased affinity as compared to the native peptide. The computationally modeled complex structures of KD domain with these self-inhibitory peptides were also examined in detail to unravel the structural basis and energetic property of nPLK-peptide recognition and interaction.

  19. Facile Synthetic Access to Glycopeptide Antibiotic Precursor Peptides for the Investigation of Cytochrome P450 Action in Glycopeptide Antibiotic Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Brieke, Clara; Kratzig, Veronika; Peschke, Madeleine; Cryle, Max J

    2016-01-01

    The glycopeptide antibiotics are an important class of complex, medically relevant peptide natural products. Given that the production of such compounds all stems from in vivo biosynthesis, understanding the mechanisms of the natural assembly system--consisting of a nonribosomal-peptide synthetase machinery (NRPS) and further modifying enzymes--is vital. In order to address the later steps of peptide biosynthesis, which are catalyzed by Cytochrome P450s that interact with the peptide-producing nonribosomal peptide synthetase, peptide substrates are required: these peptides must also be in a form that can be conjugated to carrier protein domains of the nonribosomal peptide synthetase machinery. Here, we describe a practical and effective route for the solid phase synthesis of glycopeptide antibiotic precursor peptides as their Coenzyme A (CoA) conjugates to allow enzymatic conjugation to carrier protein domains. This route utilizes Fmoc-chemistry suppressing epimerization of racemization-prone aryl glycine derivatives and affords high yields and excellent purities, requiring only a single step of simple solid phase extraction for chromatographic purification. With this, comprehensive investigations of interactions between various NRPS-bound substrates and Cytochrome P450s are enabled.

  20. Moonlighting Peptides with Emerging Function

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Villalón Rojas, Amanda; Herrera, Sur; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Torres Larios, Alfredo; Amero, Carlos; Zarraga Granados, Gabriela; Gutiérrez Aguilar, Manuel; Lara Ortiz, María Teresa; Polanco Gonzalez, Carlos; Uribe Carvajal, Salvador; Coria, Roberto; Peña Díaz, Antonio; Bredesen, Dale E.; Castro-Obregon, Susana; del Rio, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Hunter-killer peptides combine two activities in a single polypeptide that work in an independent fashion like many other multi-functional, multi-domain proteins. We hypothesize that emergent functions may result from the combination of two or more activities in a single protein domain and that could be a mechanism selected in nature to form moonlighting proteins. We designed moonlighting peptides using the two mechanisms proposed to be involved in the evolution of such molecules (i.e., to mutate non-functional residues and the use of natively unfolded peptides). We observed that our moonlighting peptides exhibited two activities that together rendered a new function that induces cell death in yeast. Thus, we propose that moonlighting in proteins promotes emergent properties providing a further level of complexity in living organisms so far unappreciated. PMID:22808104

  1. Peptide nanostructures in biomedical technology.

    PubMed

    Feyzizarnagh, Hamid; Yoon, Do-Young; Goltz, Mark; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2016-09-01

    Nanostructures of peptides have been investigated for biomedical applications due to their unique mechanical and electrical properties in addition to their excellent biocompatibility. Peptides may form fibrils, spheres and tubes in nanoscale depending on the formation conditions. These peptide nanostructures can be used in electrical, medical, dental, and environmental applications. Applications of these nanostructures include, but are not limited to, electronic devices, biosensing, medical imaging and diagnosis, drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. This review offers a discussion of basic synthesis methods, properties and application of these nanomaterials. The review concludes with recommendations and future directions for peptide nanostructures. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:730-743. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1393 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Synthetic Peptides as Protein Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Hashimoto, Chie; Sticht, Heinrich; Eichler, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    The design and generation of molecules capable of mimicking the binding and/or functional sites of proteins represents a promising strategy for the exploration and modulation of protein function through controlled interference with the underlying molecular interactions. Synthetic peptides have proven an excellent type of molecule for the mimicry of protein sites because such peptides can be generated as exact copies of protein fragments, as well as in diverse chemical modifications, which includes the incorporation of a large range of non-proteinogenic amino acids as well as the modification of the peptide backbone. Apart from extending the chemical and structural diversity presented by peptides, such modifications also increase the proteolytic stability of the molecules, enhancing their utility for biological applications. This article reviews recent advances by this and other laboratories in the use of synthetic protein mimics to modulate protein function, as well as to provide building blocks for synthetic biology. PMID:26835447

  3. Antimicrobial peptides: properties and applicability.

    PubMed

    van 't Hof, W; Veerman, E C; Helmerhorst, E J; Amerongen, A V

    2001-04-01

    All organisms need protection against microorganisms, e. g. bacteria, viruses and fungi. For many years, attention has been focused on adaptive immunity as the main antimicrobial defense system. However, the adaptive immune system, with its network of humoral and cellular responses is only found in higher animals, while innate immunity is encountered in all living creatures. The turning point in the appreciation of the innate immunity was the discovery of antimicrobial peptides in the early eighties. In general these peptides act by disrupting the structural integrity of the microbial membranes. It has become clear that membrane-active peptides and proteins play a crucial role in both the innate and the adaptive immune system as antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the functional and structural features of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides, and discusses their potential as therapeutics.

  4. Larger scale multipin peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Maeji, N J; Bray, A M; Valerio, R M; Wang, W

    1995-01-01

    The multipin peptide synthesis approach originated as an immunological tool for epitope mapping. However, continuing evolution of the basic technology has allowed synthesis at scales up to 10 mumol per pin. At this loading, the methodology can no longer be considered just a screening tool. The overall synthesis efficiency of this approach was assessed by the synthesis of 2913 different peptides having little or no sequence homology and ranging up to a 46-mer in length. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of the crude peptides indicates overall quality of synthesis was high. The method is suitable for multi-milligram synthesis of peptides without sacrificing any of the inherent advantages of the 96-well format.

  5. Peptides and proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopy make it possible to derive detailed structural information about biomolecular structures in solution. These techniques are critically dependent on the availability of labeled compounds. For example, NMR techniques used today to derive peptide and protein structures require uniformity {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled samples that are derived biosynthetically from (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. These experiments are possible now because, during the 1970s, the National Stable Isotope Resource developed algal methods for producing (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. If NMR techniques are to be used to study larger proteins, we will need sophisticated labelling patterns in amino acids that employ a combination of {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N labeling. The availability of these specifically labeled amino acids requires a renewed investment in new methods for chemical synthesis of labeled amino acids. The development of new magnetic resonance or vibrational techniques to elucidate biomolecular structure will be seriously impeded if we do not see rapid progress in labeling technology. Investment in labeling chemistry is as important as investment in the development of advanced spectroscopic tools.

  6. Biodegradable Peptide-Silica Nanodonuts.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Travaglini, Leana; Cabrera, Ingrid; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-07

    We report hybrid organosilica toroidal particles containing a short peptide sequence as the organic component of the hybrid systems. Once internalised in cancer cells, the presence of the peptide allows for interaction with peptidase enzymes, which attack the nanocarrier effectively triggering its structural breakdown. Moreover, these biodegradable nanovectors are characterised by high cellular uptake and exocytosis, showing great potential as biodegradable drug carriers. To demonstrate this feature, doxorubicin was employed and its delivery in HeLa cells investigated.

  7. Peptide Arrays on Planar Supports.

    PubMed

    Tapia Mancilla, Victor Eduardo; Mancilla, Víctor Tapia; Volkmer, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    On a past volume of this monograph we have reviewed general aspects of the varied technologies available to generate peptide arrays. Hallmarks in the development of the technology and a main sketch of preparative steps and applications in binding assays were used to walk the reader through details of peptide arrays. In this occasion, we resume from that work and bring in some considerations on quantitative evaluation of measurements as well as on selected reports applying the technology.

  8. Borinic acid catalysed peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    El Dine, Tharwat Mohy; Rouden, Jacques; Blanchet, Jérôme

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic synthesis of peptides is a major challenge in the modern organic chemistry hindered by the well-established use of stoichiometric coupling reagents. Herein, we describe for the first time that borinic acid is able to catalyse this reaction under mild conditions with an improved activity compared to our recently developed thiophene-based boronic acid. This catalyst is particularly efficient for peptide bond synthesis affording dipeptides in good yields without detectable racemization.

  9. Triiodothyronine and Brain Natriuretic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Kozdag, Guliz; Ertas, Gokhan; Kilic, Teoman; Acar, Eser; Sahin, Tayfun; Ural, Dilek

    2010-01-01

    Although low levels of free triiodothyronine and high levels of brain natriuretic peptide have been shown as independent predictors of death in chronic heart failure patients, few studies have compared their prognostic values. The aim of this prospective study was to measure free triiodothyronine and brain natriuretic peptide levels and to compare their prognostic values among such patients. A total of 334 patients (mean age, 62 ± 13 yr; 218 men) with ischemic and nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy were included in the study. The primary endpoint was a major cardiac event. During the follow-up period, 92 patients (28%) experienced a major cardiac event. Mean free triiodothyronine levels were lower and median brain natriuretic peptide levels were higher in patients with major cardiac events than in those without. A significant negative correlation was found between free triiodothyronine and brain natriuretic peptide levels. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the predictive cutoff values were <2.12 pg/mL for free triiodothyronine and >686 pg/mL for brain natriuretic peptide. Cumulative survival was significantly lower among patients with free triiodothyronine <2.12 pg/mL and among patients with brain natriuretic peptide >686 pg/mL. In multivariate analysis, the significant independent predictors of major cardiac events were age, free triiodothyronine, and brain natriuretic peptide. In the present study, free triiodothyronine and brain natriuretic peptide had similar prognostic values for predicting long-term prognosis in chronic heart failure patients. These results also suggested that combining these biomarkers may provide an important risk indicator for patients with heart failure. PMID:20978564

  10. Enhancement of humoral and cell mediated immune response to HPV16 L1-derived peptides subsequent to vaccination with prophylactic bivalent HPV L1 virus-like particle vaccine in healthy females.

    PubMed

    Yokomine, Masato; Matsueda, Satoko; Kawano, Kouichiro; Sasada, Tetsuro; Fukui, Akimasa; Yamashita, Takuto; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Shichijo, Shigeki; Tasaki, Kazuto; Matsukuma, Ken; Itoh, Kyogo; Kamura, Toshiharu; Ushijima, Kimio

    2017-04-01

    Currently prophylactic HPV16/18 L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines are employed with great success for the prevention of HPV infection. However, limited information is available regarding the immune responses against human papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 L1 subsequent to HPV16/18 L1 VLP vaccination, primarily due to the lack of widely used assays for immune monitoring. The aim of the present study was to identify HPV16 L1-derived B and T cell epitopes for monitoring the immune responses after HPV16/18 L1 VLP vaccination in healthy females. The levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgE, IgA and IgM reactive to HPV16 L1-derived peptides were measured by multiplex bead suspension assay. Following detailed B cell epitope mapping, T cell responses specific to HPV16 L1-derived peptides were evaluated by an IFN-γ ELISPOT assay. The levels of IgG, IgM and IgA reactive to 20-mer peptides (PTPSGSMVTSDAQIFNKPYW) at positions 293-312 and 300-319 of HPV16 L1 were significantly increased in the plasma after 2, 7, and 12 months after first vaccination. Detailed epitope mapping identified the amino acid sequence (TSDAQIFNKP) at position 301-310 of HPV16 L1 as an immunogenic B cell epitope. In addition, T cell responses to an HLA-A2- and HLA-A24-restricted epitope (QIFNKPYWL) at position 305-313 of HPV16 L1 were increased following immunization, suggesting that the HPV16/18 L1-VLP vaccination as able to induce specific immune responses in T and B cells simultaneously. The identified B and T cell epitopes may be useful as a biomarker for monitoring the immune responses subsequent to HPV16/18 L1 VLP vaccination. Thus, the present study may provide novel information to improve the understanding of the immune responses to HPV16 L1.

  11. Antibiofilm peptides against oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhejun; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The oral cavity is a major entry point for bacteria and other microorganisms. Oral biofilms are formed by mixed communities of microorganisms embedded in an exopolysaccharide matrix. Biofilms forming on dental hard or soft tissue are the major cause of caries and endodontic and periodontal disease. Human oral biofilms exhibit high resistance to antimicrobial agents. Antibiofilm peptides constitute a diverse class of host-defense molecules that act to combat invasion and infection with biofilms. Different in vitro and in vivo biofilm models with quantitative analysis have been established to provide predictable platforms for the evaluation of the antibiofilm effect of oral antibiofilm peptides. These peptides have engendered considerable interest in the past decades as potential alternatives to traditional disinfecting agents due to their ability to target bacterial biofilms specifically, leading to the prevention of biofilm formation and destruction of pre-existing biofilms by Gram-positive and -negative bacterial pathogens and fungi. At the same time, challenges associated with the application of these antibiofilm peptides in dental practice also exist. The production of effective, nontoxic, and stable antibiofilm peptides is desired in both academic and industrial fields. This review focuses on the antibiofilm properties of current synthetic peptides and their application in different areas of dentistry. PMID:28748031

  12. Peptide Aggregation in Finite Systems

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurpreet; Brovchenko, Ivan; Oleinikova, Alla; Winter, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Universal features of the peptide aggregation process suggest a common mechanism, with a first-order phase transition in aqueous solutions of the peptides being the driving force. Small system sizes strongly affect the stability of the minor phase in the two-phase region. We show manifestations of this effect in aqueous solutions of fragments of the islet amyloid polypeptide, using computer simulation methods and invoking various approaches in characterizing clustering and aggregate formation. These systems with peptide concentrations deeply inside the immiscibility region show two distinct stable states, which interchange with time: one state contains a peptide aggregate; and the other state has an aggregate that is noticeably dissolved. The first state is relevant for macroscopic systems, whereas the second one is artificial. At a fixed concentration, the occurrence probability of the aggregate state vanishes upon decreasing the system size, thus indicating the necessity to apply a finite size-scaling for meaningful studies of peptide aggregation by simulations. The effect observed may be one of the factors responsible for the difference between intracellular and extracellular aggregation and fibrillization of polypeptides. The finite size of biological cells or their compartments may be playing a decisive role in hampering intracellular aggregation of highly insoluble amyloidogenic proteins, whereas aggregation is unavoidable in the extracellular space at the same peptide concentration. PMID:18621830

  13. Facile synthesis of peptide nucleic acids and peptide nucleic acid-peptide conjugates on an automated peptide synthesizer.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rajendra; Jha, Deepti; Su, Wu; Engelmann, Joern

    2011-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are DNA mimics with a neutral peptide backbone instead of the negatively charged sugar phosphates. PNAs exhibit several attractive features such as high chemical and thermal stability, resistance to enzymatic degradation, and stable binding to their RNA or DNA targets in a sequence-specific manner. Therefore, they are widely used in molecular diagnosis of antisense-targeted therapeutic drugs or probes and in pharmaceutical applications. However, the main hindrance to the effective use of PNAs is their poor uptake by cells as well as the difficult and laborious chemical synthesis. In order to achieve an efficient delivery of PNAs into cells, there are already many published reports of peptides being used for transport across the cell membrane. In this protocol, we describe the automated as well as cost-effective semi-automated synthesis of PNAs and PNA-peptide constructs on an automated peptide synthesizer. The facile synthesis of PNAs will be helpful in generating PNA libraries usable, e.g. for high-throughput screening in biomolecular studies. Efficient synthetic schemes, the automated procedure, the reduced consumption of costly reagents, and the high purity of the products are attractive features of the reported procedure. Copyright © 2010 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Liposome-encapsulated peptides protect against experimental allergic encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Belogurov, Alexey A.; Stepanov, Alexey V.; Smirnov, Ivan V.; Melamed, Dobroslav; Bacon, Andrew; Mamedov, Azad E.; Boitsov, Vitali M.; Sashchenko, Lidia P.; Ponomarenko, Natalia A.; Sharanova, Svetlana N.; Boyko, Alexey N.; Dubina, Michael V.; Friboulet, Alain; Genkin, Dmitry D.; Gabibov, Alexander G.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease with an autoimmune background. Despite the variety of therapeutics available against MS, the development of novel approaches to its treatment is of high importance in modern pharmaceutics. In this study, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in Dark Agouti rats has been treated with immunodominant peptides of the myelin basic protein (MBP) encapsulated in mannosylated small unilamellar vesicles. The results show that liposome-encapsulated MBP46–62 is the most effective in reducing maximal disease score during the first attack, while MBP124–139 and MBP147–170 can completely prevent the development of the exacerbation stage. Both mannosylation of liposomes and encapsulation of peptides are critical for the therapeutic effect, since neither naked peptides nor nonmannosylated liposomes, loaded or empty, have proved effective. The liposome-mediated synergistic effect of the mixture of 3 MBP peptides significantly suppresses the progression of protracted EAE, with the median cumulative disease score being reduced from 22 to 14 points, compared to the placebo group; prevents the production of circulating autoantibodies; down-regulates the synthesis of Th1 cytokines; and induces the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the central nervous system. Thus, the proposed formulation ameliorates EAE, providing for a less severe first attack and rapid recovery from exacerbation, and offers a promising therapeutic modality in MS treatment.—Belogurov, A. A., Jr., Stepanov, A. V., Smirnov, I. V., Melamed, D., Bacon, A., Mamedov, A. E., Boitsov, V. M., Sashchenko, L. P., Ponomarenko, N. A., Sharanova, S. N., Boyko, A. N., Dubina, M. V., Friboulet, A., Genkin, D. D., Gabibov, A. G. Liposome-encapsulated peptides protect against experimental allergic encephalitis. PMID:23047895

  15. Regulation of Airway Inflammation by G-protein Regulatory Motif Peptides of AGS3 protein

    PubMed Central

    Choi, IL-Whan; Ahn, Do Whan; Choi, Jang-Kyu; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ock, Mee Sun; You, EunAe; Rhee, SangMyung; Kim, Kwang Chul; Choi, Yung Hyun; Song, Kyoung Seob

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung infections have critical consequences on mortality and morbidity in humans. The aims of the present study were to examine the mechanisms by which CXCL12 affects MUC1 transcription and airway inflammation, which depend on activator of G-protein signaling (AGS) 3 and to identify specific molecules that suppress CXCL12-induced airway inflammation by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors. Herein, AGS3 suppresses CXCL12-mediated upregulation of MUC1 and TNFα by regulating Gαi. We found that the G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif peptide in AGS3 binds to Gαi and downregulates MUC1 expression; in contrast, this motif upregulates TNFα expression. Mutated GPR Q34A peptide increased the expression of MUC1 and TGFβ but decreased the expression of TNFα and IL-6. Moreover, CXCR4-induced dendritic extensions in 2D and 3D matrix cultures were inhibited by the GPR Q34A peptide compared with a wild-type GPR peptide. The GPR Q34A peptide also inhibited CXCL12-induced morphological changes and inflammatory cell infiltration in the mouse lung, and production of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the lungs. Our data indicate that the GPR motif of AGS3 is critical for regulating MUC1/Muc1 expression and cytokine production in the inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27270970

  16. Inhibition of Hepatocyte Apoptosis: An Important Mechanism of Corn Peptides Attenuating Liver Injury Induced by Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhili; Hou, Tao; Shi, Wen; Liu, Weiwei; He, Hui

    2015-09-11

    In this study, the effects of mixed corn peptides and synthetic pentapeptide (QLLPF) on hepatocyte apoptosis induced by ethanol were investigated in vivo. QLLPF, was previously characterized from corn protein hydrolysis, which had been shown to exert good facilitating alcohol metabolism activity. Mice were pre-treated with the mixed corn peptides and the pentapeptide for 1 week and then treated with ethanol. After treatment of three weeks, the biochemical indices and the key ethanol metabolizing enzymes, the serum TNF-α, liver TGF-β1 concentrations and the protein expressions related to apoptosis were determined. We found that the Bcl-2, Bax and cytochrome c expressions in the intrinsic pathway and the Fas, FasL and NF-κB expressions in the extrinsic pathway together with higher TNF-α and TGF-β1 concentrations were reversed compared with the model group by both the mixed corn peptides and the pentapeptide. The activation of caspase3 was also suppressed. Additionally, apoptosis was further confirmed with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and the TUNEL assay demonstrated peptides suppressed hepatocyte apoptosis. Our results suggest that apoptosis induced by ethanol is alleviated in response to the treatment of corn peptides, potentially due to reversing the related protein expression.

  17. Thiol-disulfide exchange in peptides derived from human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Saradha; Epling, Daniel E; Sophocleous, Andreas M; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds stabilize proteins by cross-linking distant regions into a compact three-dimensional structure. They can also participate in hydrolytic and oxidative pathways to form nonnative disulfide bonds and other reactive species. Such covalent modifications can contribute to protein aggregation. Here, we present experimental data for the mechanism of thiol-disulfide exchange in tryptic peptides derived from human growth hormone in aqueous solution. Reaction kinetics was monitored to investigate the effect of pH (6.0-10.0), temperature (4-50°C), oxidation suppressants [ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and N2 sparging], and peptide secondary structure (amide cyclized vs. open form). The concentrations of free thiol containing peptides, scrambled disulfides, and native disulfide-linked peptides generated via thiol-disulfide exchange and oxidation reactions were determined using reverse-phase HPLC and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Concentration versus time data were fitted to a mathematical model using nonlinear least squares regression analysis. At all pH values, the model was able to fit the data with R(2) ≥ 0.95. Excluding oxidation suppressants (EDTA and N2 sparging) resulted in an increase in the formation of scrambled disulfides via oxidative pathways but did not influence the intrinsic rate of thiol-disulfide exchange. In addition, peptide secondary structure was found to influence the rate of thiol-disulfide exchange.

  18. Menstrual suppression in special circumstances.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Yolanda A; Ornstein, Melanie P; Aggarwal, Anjali; McQuillan, Sarah

    2014-10-01

    To provide a Canadian consensus document for health care providers with recommendations for menstrual suppression in patients with physical and/or cognitive challenges or those who are undergoing cancer treatment in whom menstruation may have a deleterious effect on their health. This document reviews the options available for menstrual suppression, its specific indications, contraindications, and side effects, both immediate and long-term, and the investigations and monitoring necessary throughout suppression. Clinicians will be better informed about the options and indications for menstrual suppression in patients with cognitive and/or physical disabilities and patients undergoing chemotherapy, radiation, or other treatments for cancer. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline, EMBASE, OVID, and the Cochrane Library using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words (heavy menstrual bleeding, menstrual suppression, chemotherapy/radiation, cognitive disability, physical disability, learning disability). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, observation studies, and pilot studies. There were no language or date restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and new material was incorporated into the guideline until September 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). There is a need for specific guidelines on menstrual suppression in at-risk populations for health care providers. Recommendations 1. Menstrual suppression and therapeutic amenorrhea should be considered safe and viable options for women who need or want to have

  19. Insect gonadotropic peptide hormones: some recent developments.

    PubMed

    Kuczer, Mariola; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Konopińska, Danuta

    2007-01-01

    Gonadotropic peptides are a new generation of peptide hormone regulators of insect reproduction. They have been isolated from ovaries, oviducts, or brains of insects. The subject of this paper is insect peptides that exert stimulatory or inhibitory effects on ovarian development and oocyte maturation. On the basis of the literature data and the results of our investigations, the structure and biological properties of different groups of peptides are presented. (c) 2006 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Daily subcutaneous injections of peptide induce CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, P E; Schartner, J M; Timmel, A; Seroogy, C M

    2007-01-01

    Peptide immunotherapy is being explored to modulate varied disease states; however, the mechanism of action remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the ability of a subcutaneous peptide immunization schedule to induce of CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells. DO11·10 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice on a Rag 2–/– background were injected subcutaneously with varied doses of purified ovalbumin (OVA323−339) peptide daily for 16 days. While these mice have no CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells, following this injection schedule up to 30% of the CD4+ cells were found to express CD25. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis of the induced CD4+ CD25+ T cells revealed increased expression of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), suggesting that these cells may have a regulatory function. Proliferation and suppression assays in vitro utilizing the induced CD4+ CD25+ T cells revealed a profound anergic phenotype in addition to potent suppressive capability. Importantly, co-injection of the induced CD4+ CD25+ T cells with 5,6-carboxy-succinimidyl-fluorescence-ester (CFSE)-labelled naive CD4+ T cells (responder cells) into BALB/c recipient mice reduced proliferation and differentiation of the responder cells in response to challenge with OVA323−339 peptide plus adjuvant. We conclude that repeated subcutaneous exposure to low-dose peptide leads to de novo induction of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory cells with potent in vitro and in vivo suppressive capability, thereby suggesting that one mechanism of peptide immunotherapy appears to be induction of CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T regulatory cells. PMID:17490400

  1. Daily subcutaneous injections of peptide induce CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, P E; Schartner, J M; Timmel, A; Seroogy, C M

    2007-08-01

    Peptide immunotherapy is being explored to modulate varied disease states; however, the mechanism of action remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the ability of a subcutaneous peptide immunization schedule to induce of CD4(+) CD25(+) T regulatory cells. DO11.10 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice on a Rag 2(-/-) background were injected subcutaneously with varied doses of purified ovalbumin (OVA(323-339)) peptide daily for 16 days. While these mice have no CD4(+) CD25(+) T regulatory cells, following this injection schedule up to 30% of the CD4(+) cells were found to express CD25. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis of the induced CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells revealed increased expression of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), suggesting that these cells may have a regulatory function. Proliferation and suppression assays in vitro utilizing the induced CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells revealed a profound anergic phenotype in addition to potent suppressive capability. Importantly, co-injection of the induced CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells with 5,6-carboxy-succinimidyl-fluorescence-ester (CFSE)-labelled naive CD4(+) T cells (responder cells) into BALB/c recipient mice reduced proliferation and differentiation of the responder cells in response to challenge with OVA(323-339) peptide plus adjuvant. We conclude that repeated subcutaneous exposure to low-dose peptide leads to de novo induction of CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells with potent in vitro and in vivo suppressive capability, thereby suggesting that one mechanism of peptide immunotherapy appears to be induction of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells.

  2. Effect of structural parameters on the electron capture dissociation and collision-induced dissociation pathways of copper(II)-peptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangfeng; Wang, Ze; Li, Wan; Wong, Y L Elaine; Chan, T-W Dominic

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase dissociation pathways of proteins/peptides are usually affected by the nature of the charge carrier and the sequence of amino acid residues. The effects of peptide structural parameters, including peptide composition, chain length and amide hydrogen, on the gas-phase dissociation of Cu(II)-model peptide complexes were explored in this study. Polyglycine peptides with flexible frames were used as probes to reduce the complexity of the system and illustrate the mechanism. Results revealed that the types of fragment ions generated in the electron capture dissociation (ECD) of Cu(II)-adducted peptides changed according to the basic amino acid residue composition. Charged or neutral tryptophan side-chain losses were observed in the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of Cu(II)-peptide complexes. Internal electron transfer between tryptophan and metal ion within the complex occurred during the CID reaction, leaving the charge-reduced Cu(+) as a closed d-shell stable electron configuration. The choice of the reaction channel was then determined by the gas-phase basicity of the peptide. Amide hydrogen was critical in the formation of metalated b-/y-ions in the ECD process as determined through mutation of the backbone amide group. Increasing the chain length suppressed the ECD of Cu-metalated peptide species. Our results indicate that the structural parameters of peptides play important roles in the gas-phase dissociation processes of Cu-peptide complexes.

  3. The TRPA1 agonist, methyl syringate suppresses food intake and gastric emptying.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Son, Hee Jin; Song, Seo Hyeon; Jung, Myungji; Kim, Yiseul; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channel ankryn 1 (TRPA1) expressed in the gastrointestinal tract is associated with gastric motility, gastric emptying, and food intake. In this study, we investigated the effects of methyl syringate, a specific and selective TRPA1 agonist, on food intake, gastric emptying, and gut hormone levels in imprinting control region (ICR) mice. The administration of methyl syringate suppressed cumulative food intake and gastric emptying. In addition, treatment with ruthenium red (RR), a general cation channel blocker, and HC-030031, a selective TRPA1 antagonist, inhibited methyl syringate-induced reduction of food intake and delayed gastric emptying in ICR mice. Methyl syringate also increased plasma peptide YY (PYY) levels, but not glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels. The elevation in PYY was blocked by treatment with RR and HC-030031. The present findings indicate that methyl syringate regulates food intake and gastric emptying through a TRPA1-mediated pathway and, by extension, can contribute to weight suppression.

  4. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Excites Firing and Increases GABAergic Miniature Postsynaptic Currents (mPSCs) in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons of the Male Mice via Activation of Nitric Oxide (NO) and Suppression of Endocannabinoid Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Imre; Vastagh, Csaba; Farkas, Erzsébet; Bálint, Flóra; Skrapits, Katalin; Hrabovszky, Erik; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a metabolic signal molecule, regulates reproduction, although, the involved molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated, yet. Therefore, responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the GLP-1 analog Exendin-4 and elucidation of molecular pathways acting downstream to the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) have been challenged. Loose patch-clamp recordings revealed that Exendin-4 (100 nM–5 μM) elevated firing rate in hypothalamic GnRH-GFP neurons of male mice via activation of GLP-1R. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements demonstrated increased excitatory GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) frequency after Exendin-4 administration, which was eliminated by the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-3(9–39) (1 μM). Intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-β-S (2 mM) impeded action of Exendin-4 on mPSCs, suggesting direct excitatory action of GLP-1 on GnRH neurons. Blockade of nitric-oxide (NO) synthesis by Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; 100 μM) or N5-[Imino(propylamino)methyl]-L-ornithine hydrochloride (NPLA; 1 μM) or intracellular scavenging of NO by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO; 1 mM) partially attenuated the excitatory effect of Exendin-4. Similar partial inhibition was achieved by hindering endocannabinoid pathway using cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) inverse-agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(1-piperidyl) pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 1 μM). Simultaneous blockade of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms eliminated action of Exendin-4 suggesting involvement of both retrograde machineries. Intracellular application of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-antagonist 2E-N-(2, 3-Dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-6-yl)-3-[4-(1, 1-dimethylethyl)phenyl]-2-Propenamide (AMG9810; 10 μM) or the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)-inhibitor PF3845 (5 μM) impeded the GLP-1-triggered endocannabinoid

  5. Visual Surround Suppression in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tibber, Marc S.; Anderson, Elaine J.; Bobin, Tracy; Antonova, Elena; Seabright, Alice; Wright, Bernice; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Dakin, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia (SZ) show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgments of contrast – a manifestation of weaker surround suppression (SS). To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with SZ to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation, and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with SZ demonstrated weaker SS compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation SS in SZ may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies. PMID:23450069

  6. Vibration suppression using smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim; Inman, Daniel J.; Dosch, Jeffrey

    The control of structures for vibration suppression is discussed in the context of using smart materials and structures. Here the use of smart structures refers to using embedded piezoelectric devices as both control actuators and sensors. Using embedded sensors and actuators allows great improvements in performance over traditional structures (both passive and active) for vibration suppression. The application of smart structures to three experimental flexible structures is presented. The first is a flexible beam, the second is a flexible beam undergoing slewing motion, the third is a ribbed antenna. A simple model of a piezoelectric actuator/sensor is presented. The equations of motion for each structure is presented. The control issues considered as those associated with multi-input, multi-output control, PID control and LQR control implementation. A modern control analysis illustrates the usefulness of smart structures for vibration suppression.

  7. Vibration suppression using smart structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim; Inman, Daniel J.; Dosch, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    The control of structures for vibration suppression is discussed in the context of using smart materials and structures. Here the use of smart structures refers to using embedded piezoelectric devices as both control actuators and sensors. Using embedded sensors and actuators allows great improvements in performance over traditional structures (both passive and active) for vibration suppression. The application of smart structures to three experimental flexible structures is presented. The first is a flexible beam, the second is a flexible beam undergoing slewing motion, the third is a ribbed antenna. A simple model of a piezoelectric actuator/sensor is presented. The equations of motion for each structure is presented. The control issues considered as those associated with multi-input, multi-output control, PID control and LQR control implementation. A modern control analysis illustrates the usefulness of smart structures for vibration suppression.

  8. The amphetamine appetite suppressant saga.

    PubMed

    2004-02-01

    (1) In 1999, all amphetamine derivatives still sold in France as appetite suppressants were withdrawn from the market because of serious cardiovascular adverse effects. Sibutramine, marketed in France since 2001, is closely related to this group of drugs. (2) The adverse effects shared by these drugs are mainly neuropsychiatric (due to a psychostimulant action) and cardiovascular (arterial hypertension and tachycardia). (3) More specific cardiovascular adverse effects, such as pulmonary hypertension and severe cardiac valve damage, emerged after several years of use. The first reports date back to the 1960s. (4) The pulmonary hypertension associated with appetite suppressants can be fatal or necessitate transplantation. (5) Cardiac valve damage due to appetite suppressants is generally irreversible and sometimes requires surgery.

  9. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-01-01

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a Kd value of 2.6 μM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases. PMID:24742982

  10. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-04-30

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a K(d) value of 2.6 µM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases.

  11. Endomorphin-suppressed nitric oxide release from mice peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Balog, Tihomir; Sarić, Ana; Sobocanec, Sandra; Kusić, Borka; Marotti, Tatjana

    2010-02-01

    Endomorphins are newly discovered mu-opioid receptor selective immunocompetent opioid peptides. Endomorphin 1 is predominantly distributed in brain, while endomorphin 2 is widely allocated in the spinal cord. Lately, endomorphins have been investigated as modulators of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Nitric oxide is short lived radical involved in various biological processes such as regulation of blood vessel contraction, inflammation, neurotransmission and apoptosis. The aim of this work was to investigate the in vivo effects of endomorphins on nitric oxide release and NOS 2 isoenzyme upregulation in mice peritoneal macrophages additionally challenged ex vivo with lipopolysaccharide. The results showed that endomorphin 1 or endomorphin 2 in vitro did not change NO release from peritoneal mouse macrophages during a 48 h incubation period. On the other hand in vivo endomorphins had suppressive effect on NO release as well as on NOS 2 and IL-1 protein concentration. The most of suppressive effect in vivo of both endomorphins was blocked with 30 min pretreatment with mu-receptor selective antagonist beta-FNA, which proved involvement of opioid receptor pathway in suppressive effects of endomorphins.

  12. Recombinant probiotics with antimicrobial peptides: a dual strategy to improve immune response in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Silva, Osmar N; Franco, Octavio L

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infectious diseases are currently a serious health problem, especially in patients compromised by illness or those receiving immune-suppressant drugs. In this context, it is not only essential to improve the understanding of infectious mechanisms and host response but also to discover novel therapies with extreme urgency. Probiotics and antimicrobial peptides are also favorably viewed as novel strategies in the control of resistant bacteria. The present review will shed some light on the use of probiotic microorganisms expressing antimicrobial peptides as a dual therapy to control bacterial infectious diseases.

  13. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  14. Peptides controlling behavior in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Strumwasser, F; Kaczmarek, L K; Chiu, A Y; Heller, E; Jennings, K R; Viele, D P

    1980-01-01

    Figure 11 summarizes our present understanding of the relationships between the bag cells, the atrial gland, their respective peptides, the central nervous system, and reproductive behavior. There are some interesting aspects of the overall organization of the system. The three hormonal peptides (ELH and the two atrial gland peptides) have specific actions on the central nervous system not unlike what we are currently learning from mammalian systems (e.g., LHRH and TRH). ELH, in addition, has several specific peripheral targets, the details of which remain to be worked out. The fact that ELH and other hormones have multiple targets within the central nervous system as well as nonnervous peripheral targets raises the question of whether one or more different receptors exist for single hormone. We suggest that peptides larger than perhaps five residues may carry several "messages" or receptor binding sites encoded within the one molecule. Large peptides such as ELH could obviously have separate domains of charge distribution within the molecule, and these would have the advantage, over the classical small molecule transmitters, of activating a variety of very different targets. The atrial gland is a peripheral source of peptides with potent nervous system actions; this is reminiscent of peptides in mammals, e.g., substance P, gastrin, and somatostatin, all of which were initially isolated from the gut and which are now being found in and also have actions on the central nervous system. Such resemblances in the principles of organization between mammals and molluscs are constant reminders that neuropeptidergic systems are old tricks in the evolutionary bag and that what we learn from molluscs and other invertebrates about mechanisms and organization will likely apply to mammals.

  15. Coiled-coil forming peptides for the induction of silver nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Božič Abram, Sabina; Aupič, Jana; Dražić, Goran; Gradišar, Helena; Jerala, Roman

    2016-04-08

    Biopolymers with defined sequence patterns offer an attractive alternative for the formation of silver nanoparticle (AgNP). A set of coiled-coil dimer forming peptides was tested for their AgNP formation ability. Seventeen of those peptides mediated the formation of AgNPs in aqueous solution at neutral pH, while the formation of a coiled-coil dimer inhibited the nanoparticle generation. A QSAR regression model on the relationship between sequence and function suggests that in this peptide type the patterns KXQQ and KXEE are favorable, whereas Ala residues appear to have an inhibitory effect. UV–VIS spectra of the obtained nanoparticles gave a peak at around 420 nm, typical for AgNPs in the size range around 40 nm, which was confirmed by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Peptide-induced AgNPs exhibited good antibacterial activity, even after a 15 min contact time, while they had low toxicity to human cells at the same concentrations. These results show that our designed peptides generate AgNPs with antibacterial activity at mild conditions and might be used for antibacterial coatings. - Highlights: • 17 of the 30 tested coiled-coil forming peptides induce AgNP formation. • Coiled-coil dimer formation suppresses AgNP generation of individual peptides. • Size of the peptide-induced silver nanoparticles is around 40 nm. • QSAR analysis points to the importance of KXQQ and KXEE motifs for AgNP generation. • Peptide-induced silver nanoparticles exhibit antibacterial activity.

  16. Detection of secreted peptides by using hypothesis-driven multistage mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kalkum, Markus; Lyon, Gholson J.; Chait, Brian T.

    2003-01-01

    A method is presented for the rapid detection and characterization of trace amounts of peptides secreted from microorganisms, including pheromones, virulence factors, and quorum-sensing peptides. The procedure, based on targeted multistage MS, uses a novel matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-ion trap mass spectrometer to overcome limitations of current MS methods (limited dynamic range, signal suppression effects, and chemical noise) that impair observation of low abundance peptides from complex biological matrixes. Here, secreted peptides that are hypothesized to be present in the supernatant, but that may not be sufficiently abundant to be observed in single-stage mass spectra, are subjected to multistage MS. Highly specific fragmentation signatures enable unambiguous identification of the peptides of interest and differentiation of the signals from the background. As examples, we demonstrate the rapid (<1 min) determination of the mating type of cells in colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the elucidation of autoinducing peptides (AIPs) from supernatants of pathogenic Staphylococci. We confirm the primary structures of the agrD encoded cyclic AIPs of Staphylococcus aureus for groups I, II, and IV and provide direct evidence that the native group-III AIP is a heptapeptide (INCDFLL). We also show that the homologous peptide from Staphylococcus intermedius is a nonapeptide (RIPTSTGFF) with a lactone ring formed through condensation of the serine side chain with the C terminus of the peptide. This is the first demonstration of cyclization in a staphylococcal AIP that occurs via lactone formation. These examples demonstrate the analytical power of the present procedure for characterizing secreted peptides and its potential utility for identifying microorganisms. PMID:12591958

  17. Protein transduction domain-mediated delivery of QBP1 suppresses polyglutamine-induced neurodegeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Popiel, H Akiko; Nagai, Yoshitaka; Fujikake, Nobuhiro; Toda, Tatsushi

    2007-02-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and the polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases share common features including abnormal aggregation of misfolded proteins and their deposition as inclusion bodies in the brain. The polyQ diseases are caused by abnormal expansion of a polyQ stretch in each disease-causing protein, which triggers these proteins to form aggregates. We previously showed that genetic expression of the aggregate inhibitor peptide polyQ binding peptide 1 (QBP1) suppresses polyQ-induced neurodegeneration in Drosophila. However, to establish a molecular therapy using QBP1, QBP1 needs to be delivered into cells by its administration. In this study, we employed protein transduction domains (PTDs) to enable the efficient intracellular delivery of QBP1. We show here that fusion with a PTD enables the efficient intracellular delivery of QBP1, and that PTD-QBP1 treatment suppressed polyQ-induced cytotoxicity in cultured cells. Most importantly, oral administration of PTD-QBP1 successfully suppressed polyQ-induced premature death as well as polyQ inclusion body formation in a Drosophila model of the polyQ diseases, demonstrating its therapeutic effect against polyQ-induced neurodegeneration in vivo. Our study indicates that PTD-mediated delivery of aggregate inhibitor peptides is a promising therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases with abnormal aggregation of misfolded proteins.

  18. Perspectives and Peptides of the Next Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogden, Kim A.

    Shortly after their discovery, antimicrobial peptides from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were recognized as the next potential generation of pharmaceuticals to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections and septic shock, to preserve food, or to sanitize surfaces. Initial research focused on identifying the spectrum of antimicrobial agents, determining the range of antimicrobial activities against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, and assessing the antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides versus their natural counterparts. Subsequent research then focused on the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in model membrane systems not only to identify the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in microorganisms but also to discern differences in cytotoxicity for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Recent, contemporary work now focuses on current and future efforts to construct hybrid peptides, peptide congeners, stabilized peptides, peptide conjugates, and immobilized peptides for unique and specific applications to control the growth of microorganisms in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Mechanisms and Strategies Shaping Plant Peptide Hormones.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Yuki; Torii, Keiko U; Uchida, Naoyuki

    2017-08-01

    Plant genomes encode a variety of short peptides acting as signaling molecules. Since the discovery of tomato systemin, a myriad of peptide signals, ranging in size, structure and modifications, have been found in plants. Moreover, new peptides are still being identified. Surprisingly, non-plant organisms, especially pathogens, also produce peptides which exert hormonal activities against host plants by hijacking their endogenous reception systems. In this review, we focus on short secretory peptides ranging from five to 20 amino acids. We first summarize recent advances in understanding relationships between the bioactivities and structures of plant peptide hormones. Subsequently, we introduce the topic of peptides produced by non-plant organisms. Lastly, we describe artificial peptides synthesized in laboratories, which possess intriguing bioactive properties beyond those of natural peptide hormones. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Cyclic peptide therapeutics: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Deyle, Kaycie; Heinis, Christian

    2017-02-26

    Cyclic peptides combine several favorable properties such as good binding affinity, target selectivity and low toxicity that make them an attractive modality for the development of therapeutics. Over 40 cyclic peptide drugs are currently in clinical use and around one new cyclic peptide drug enters the market every year on average. The vast majority of clinically approved cyclic peptides are derived from natural products, such as antimicrobials or human peptide hormones. New powerful techniques based on rational design and in vitro evolution have enabled the de novo development of cyclic peptide ligands to targets for which nature does not offer solutions. A look at the cyclic peptides currently under clinical evaluation shows that several have been developed using such techniques. This new source for cyclic peptide ligands introduces a freshness to the field, and it is likely that de novo developed cyclic peptides will be in clinical use in the near future.

  1. Exploration of the Medicinal Peptide Space.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; D'Hondt, Matthias; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The chemical properties of peptide medicines, known as the 'medicinal peptide space' is considered a multi-dimensional subset of the global peptide space, where each dimension represents a chemical descriptor. These descriptors can be linked to biofunctional, medicinal properties to varying degrees. Knowledge of this space can increase the efficiency of the peptide-drug discovery and development process, as well as advance our understanding and classification of peptide medicines. For 245 peptide drugs, already available on the market or in clinical development, multivariate dataexploration was performed using peptide relevant physicochemical descriptors, their specific peptidedrug target and their clinical use. Our retrospective analysis indicates that clusters in the medicinal peptide space are located in a relatively narrow range of the physicochemical space: dense and empty regions were found, which can be explored for the discovery of novel peptide drugs.

  2. MHC-derived allopeptide activates TCR-biased CD8+ Tregs and suppresses organ rejection

    PubMed Central

    Picarda, Elodie; Bézie, Séverine; Venturi, Vanessa; Echasserieau, Klara; Mérieau, Emmanuel; Delhumeau, Aurélie; Renaudin, Karine; Brouard, Sophie; Bernardeau, Karine; Anegon, Ignacio; Guillonneau, Carole

    2014-01-01

    In a rat heart allograft model, preventing T cell costimulation with CD40Ig leads to indefinite allograft survival, which is mediated by the induction of CD8+CD45RClo regulatory T cells (CD8+CD40Ig Tregs) interacting with plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). The role of TCR-MHC-peptide interaction in regulating Treg activity remains a topic of debate. Here, we identified a donor MHC class II–derived peptide (Du51) that is recognized by TCR-biased CD8+CD40Ig Tregs and activating CD8+CD40Ig Tregs in both its phenotype and suppression of antidonor alloreactive T cell responses. We generated a labeled tetramer (MHC-I RT1.Aa/Du51) to localize and quantify Du51-specific T cells within rat cardiac allografts and spleen. RT1.Aa/Du51-specific CD8+CD40Ig Tregs were the most suppressive subset of the total Treg population, were essential for in vivo tolerance induction, and expressed a biased, restricted Vβ11-TCR repertoire in the spleen and the graft. Finally, we demonstrated that treatment of transplant recipients with the Du51 peptide resulted in indefinite prolongation of allograft survival. These results show that CD8+CD40Ig Tregs recognize a dominant donor antigen, resulting in TCR repertoire alterations in the graft and periphery. Furthermore, this allopeptide has strong therapeutic activity and highlights the importance of TCR-peptide-MHC interaction for Treg generation and function. PMID:24789907

  3. Preparation of peptide microspheres using tumor antigen-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Santwana; Naqvi, Raza Ali; Ali, Riyasat; Rao, D N

    2014-01-01

    Due to its distinct biological attributes, poly(D,L lactide-co glycolide) (PLGA) is one of the most preferred methods for DNA/protein/peptide encapsulation for therapeutics. Importantly, PLGA acts as an adjuvant for weakly immunogenic antigens and mimics booster responses after a single dose of administration, thereby serving as a single-shot vaccine delivery vehicle. Efficient delivery of antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APC) has been made possible by the use of a PLGA particle-based vaccine delivery system. Also, the plasma half-life of the PLGA-encapsulated vaccine increases as it is protected from degradation, prior to its further release. PLGAs are reported to be catabolized into individual nontoxic units once inside the host and further degraded via normal metabolic pathways. In this chapter, we have described the preparation and characterization of tumor peptide encapsulated PLGA microparticles as a model for controlled-release peptide delivery system.

  4. Signal Peptide Hydrophobicity Modulates Interaction with the Twin-Arginine Translocase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qi; Palmer, Tracy

    2017-08-01

    The general secretory pathway (Sec) and twin-arginine translocase (Tat) operate in parallel to export proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of prokaryotes and the thylakoid membrane of plant chloroplasts. Substrates are targeted to their respective machineries by N-terminal signal peptides that share a tripartite organization; however, Tat signal peptides harbor a conserved and almost invariant arginine pair that is critical for efficient targeting to the Tat machinery. Tat signal peptides interact with a membrane-bound receptor complex comprised of TatB and TatC components, with TatC containing the twin-arginine recognition site. Here, we isolated suppressors in the signal peptide of the Tat substrate, SufI, that restored Tat transport in the presence of inactivating substitutions in the TatC twin-arginine binding site. These suppressors increased signal peptide hydrophobicity, and copurification experiments indicated that they restored binding to the variant TatBC complex. The hydrophobic suppressors could also act in cis to suppress substitutions at the signal peptide twin-arginine motif that normally prevent targeting to the Tat pathway. Highly hydrophobic variants of the SufI signal peptide containing four leucine substitutions retained the ability to interact with the Tat system. The hydrophobic signal peptides of two Sec substrates, DsbA and OmpA, containing twin lysine residues, were shown to mediate export by the Tat pathway and to copurify with TatBC. These findings indicate that there is unprecedented overlap between Sec and Tat signal peptides and that neither the signal peptide twin-arginine motif nor the TatC twin-arginine recognition site is an essential mechanistic feature for operation of the Tat pathway.IMPORTANCE Protein export is an essential process in all prokaryotes. The Sec and Tat export pathways operate in parallel, with the Sec machinery transporting unstructured precursors and the Tat pathway transporting folded proteins. Proteins are

  5. Peptide Vaccine: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidang; Joshi, Medha D.; Singhania, Smita; Ramsey, Kyle H.; Murthy, Ashlesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional vaccine strategies have been highly efficacious for several decades in reducing mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases. The bane of conventional vaccines, such as those that include whole organisms or large proteins, appear to be the inclusion of unnecessary antigenic load that, not only contributes little to the protective immune response, but complicates the situation by inducing allergenic and/or reactogenic responses. Peptide vaccines are an attractive alternative strategy that relies on usage of short peptide fragments to engineer the induction of highly targeted immune responses, consequently avoiding allergenic and/or reactogenic sequences. Conversely, peptide vaccines used in isolation are often weakly immunogenic and require particulate carriers for delivery and adjuvanting. In this article, we discuss the specific advantages and considerations in targeted induction of immune responses by peptide vaccines and progresses in the development of such vaccines against various diseases. Additionally, we also discuss the development of particulate carrier strategies and the inherent challenges with regard to safety when combining such technologies with peptide vaccines. PMID:26344743

  6. Twilight reloaded: the peptide experience

    PubMed Central

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Pozharski, Edwin; Rupp, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The de facto commoditization of biomolecular crystallography as a result of almost disruptive instrumentation automation and continuing improvement of software allows any sensibly trained structural biologist to conduct crystallo­graphic studies of biomolecules with reasonably valid outcomes: that is, models based on properly interpreted electron density. Robust validation has led to major mistakes in the protein part of structure models becoming rare, but some depositions of protein–peptide complex structure models, which generally carry significant interest to the scientific community, still contain erroneous models of the bound peptide ligand. Here, the protein small-molecule ligand validation tool Twilight is updated to include peptide ligands. (i) The primary technical reasons and potential human factors leading to problems in ligand structure models are presented; (ii) a new method used to score peptide-ligand models is presented; (iii) a few instructive and specific examples, including an electron-density-based analysis of peptide-ligand structures that do not contain any ligands, are discussed in detail; (iv) means to avoid such mistakes and the implications for database integrity are discussed and (v) some suggestions as to how journal editors could help to expunge errors from the Protein Data Bank are provided. PMID:28291756

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides Under Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Greber, Katarzyna E; Dawgul, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Today microbial drug resistance has become a serious problem not only within inpatient setting but also within outpatient setting. Repeated intake and unnecessary usage of antibiotics as well as the transfer of resistance genes are the most important factors that make the microorganisms resistant to conventional antibiotics. A large number of antimicrobials successfully used for prophylaxis and therapeutic purposes have now become ineffective [1, 2]. Therefore, new molecules are being studied to be used in the treatment of various diseases. Some of these molecules are structural compounds based on a combination of peptides, for example, naturally occurring endogenous peptide antibiotics and their synthetic analogues or molecules designed de novo using QSAR (quantitative structureproperty relationships)-based methods [3]. Trying to exploit numerous advantages of antimicrobial peptides such as high potency and selectivity, broad range of targets, potentially low toxicity and low accumulation in tissues, pharmaceutical industry aims to develop them as commercially available drugs and appropriate clinical trials are being conducted [4]. In this paper we define clinical trials steps and describe current status of several antimicrobial peptides under clinical development as well as briefly depict peptide drug formulation.

  8. Conditioned suppression, punishment, and aversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme-Johnson, D. W.; Yarczower, M.

    1974-01-01

    The aversive action of visual stimuli was studied in two groups of pigeons which received response-contingent or noncontingent electric shocks in cages with translucent response keys. Presentation of grain for 3 sec, contingent on key pecking, was the visual stimulus associated with conditioned punishment or suppression. The responses of the pigeons in three different experiments are compared.

  9. Suppressing explosive synchronization by contrarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiyun; Guan, Shuguang; Zou, Yong; Chen, Xiaosong; Liu, Zonghua

    2016-01-01

    Explosive synchronization (ES) has recently received increasing attention and studies have mainly focused on the conditions of its onset so far. However, its inverse problem, i.e. the suppression of ES, has not been systematically studied so far. As ES is usually considered to be harmful in certain circumstances such as the cascading failure of power grids and epileptic seizure, etc., its suppression is definitely important and deserves to be studied. We here study this inverse problem by presenting an efficient approach to suppress ES from a first-order to second-order transition, without changing the intrinsic network structure. We find that ES can be suppressed by only changing a small fraction of oscillators into contrarians with negative couplings and the critical fraction for the transition from the first order to the second order increases with both the network size and the average degree. A brief theory is presented to explain the underlying mechanism. This finding underlines the importance of our method to improve the understanding of neural interactions underlying cognitive processes.

  10. Natriuretic peptide metabolism, clearance and degradation.

    PubMed

    Potter, Lincoln R

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide constitute a family of three structurally related, but genetically distinct, signaling molecules that regulate the cardiovascular, skeletal, nervous, reproductive and other systems by activating transmembrane guanylyl cyclases and elevating intracellular cGMP concentrations. This review broadly discusses the general characteristics of natriuretic peptides and their cognate signaling receptors, and then specifically discusses the tissue-specific metabolism of natriuretic peptides and their degradation by neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme, and natriuretic peptide receptor-C.

  11. Natriuretic Peptide Metabolism, Clearance and Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Lincoln R.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide compose a family of three structurally related, but genetically distinct, signaling molecules that regulate the cardiovascular, skeletal, nervous, reproductive and other systems by activating transmembrane guanylyl cyclases and elevating intracellular cGMP concentrations. This review broadly discusses the general characteristics of natriuretic peptides and their cognate signaling receptors, then specifically discusses the tissue specific metabolism of natriuretic peptides and their degradation by neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme and natriuretic peptide receptor-C. PMID:21375692

  12. High temperature suppression of dioxins.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Ming-Xiu; Chen, Tong; Fu, Jian-Ying; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2016-03-01

    Combined Sulphur-Nitrogen inhibitors, such as sewage sludge decomposition gases (SDG), thiourea and amidosulphonic acid have been observed to suppress the de novo synthesis of dioxins effectively. In this study, the inhibition of PCDD/Fs formation from model fly ash was investigated at unusually high temperatures (650 °C and 850 °C), well above the usual range of de novo tests (250-400 °C). At 650 °C it was found that SDG evolving from dried sewage sludge could suppress the formation of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs with high efficiency (90%), both in weight units and in I-TEQ units. Additionally, at 850 °C, three kinds of sulphur-amine or sulphur-ammonium compounds were tested to inhibit dioxins formation during laboratory-scale tests, simulating municipal solid waste incineration. The suppression efficiencies of PCDD/Fs formed through homogeneous gas phase reactions were all above 85% when 3 wt. % of thiourea (98.7%), aminosulphonic acid (96.0%) or ammonium thiosulphate (87.3%) was added. Differences in the ratio of PCDFs/PCDDs, in weight average chlorination level and in the congener distribution of the 17 toxic PCDD/Fs indicated that the three inhibitors tested followed distinct suppression pathways, possibly in relation to their different functional groups of nitrogen. Furthermore, thiourea reduced the (weight) average chlorinated level. In addition, the thermal decomposition of TUA was studied by means of thermogravimetry-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR) and the presence of SO2, SO3, NH3 and nitriles (N≡C bonds) was shown in the decomposition gases; these gaseous inhibitors might be the primary dioxins suppressants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitory peptide attenuates Helicobacter pylori-mediated hyper-proliferation in AGS enteric epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Himaya, S.W.A.; Dewapriya, Pradeep; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-06-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most critical causes of stomach cancer. The current study was conducted to explore the protective effects of an isolated active peptide H-P-6 (Pro-Gln-Pro-Lys-Val-Leu-Asp-Ser) from microbial hydrolysates of Chlamydomonas sp. against H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis. The peptide H-P-6 has effectively suppressed H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of gastric epithelial cells (AGS). However, the peptide did not inhibit the viability of the bacteria or invasion into AGS cells. Therefore, the effect of the peptide on regulating H. pylori-induced molecular signaling was investigated. The results indicated that H. pylori activates the EGFR tyrosine kinase signaling and nuclear translocation of the β-catenin. The EGFR activation has led to the up-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Moreover, the nuclear translocation levels of β-catenin were significantly increased as a result of Akt mediated down-regulation of GSK3/β protein levels in the cytoplasm. Both of these consequences have resulted in increased expression of cell survival and migration related genes such as c-Myc, cyclin-D, MMP-2 and matrilysin. Interestingly, the isolated peptide potently inhibited H. pylori-mediated EGFR activation and thereby down-regulated the subsequent P13K/Akt signaling leading to β-catenin nuclear translocation. The effect of the peptide was confirmed with the use of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1487 and molecular docking studies. Collectively this study identifies a potent peptide which regulates the H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of AGS cells at molecular level. - Highlights: • Chlamydomonas sp. derived peptide H-P-6 inhibits H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. • H-P-6 suppresses H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of AGS cells. • The peptide inhibits H. pylori-induced EGFR activation.

  14. A new C-Peptide correction model used to assess bioavailability of regular human insulin.

    PubMed

    Marino, M T; Cassidy, J P; Baughman, R A; Boss, A H; Richardson, P C

    2010-10-01

    The clinical assessment of new formulations of human insulin is problematic due to the inability to distinguish between endogenous insulin and exogenously administered insulin. The usual methods to surmount the problem of distinguishing between endogenous and exogenous human insulin include evaluation in subjects with no or little endogenous insulin, hyper-insulinemic clamp studies or the administration of somatostatin to suppress endogenous insulin secretion. All of these methods have significant drawbacks. This paper describes a method for C-Peptide correction based upon a mixed effects linear regression of multiple time point sampling of C-Peptide and insulin. This model was able to describe each individual's insulin to C-Peptide relationship using the data from four different phase I clinical trials involving both subjects with and without type 2 diabetes in which insulin and C-Peptide were measured. These studies used hyper-insulinemic euglycemic clamps or meal challenges and subjects received insulin or Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). It was possible to determine the exogenously administered insulin concentration from the measured total insulin concentration. A simple statistical technique can be used to determine each individual's insulin to C-Peptide relationship to estimate exogenous and endogenous insulin following the administration of regular human insulin. This technique will simplify the assessment of new formulations of human insulin.

  15. Computer-aided designing of immunosuppressive peptides based on IL-10 inducing potential

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Gandharva; Usmani, Salman Sadullah; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Kaur, Harpreet; Singh, Sandeep; Sharma, Meenu; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2017-01-01

    In the past, numerous methods have been developed to predict MHC class II binders or T-helper epitopes for designing the epitope-based vaccines against pathogens. In contrast, limited attempts have been made to develop methods for predicting T-helper epitopes/peptides that can induce a specific type of cytokine. This paper describes a method, developed for predicting interleukin-10 (IL-10) inducing peptides, a cytokine responsible for suppressing the immune system. All models were trained and tested on experimentally validated 394 IL-10 inducing and 848 non-inducing peptides. It was observed that certain types of residues and motifs are more frequent in IL-10 inducing peptides than in non-inducing peptides. Based on this analysis, we developed composition-based models using various machine-learning techniques. Random Forest-based model achieved the maximum Matthews’s Correlation Coefficient (MCC) value of 0.59 with an accuracy of 81.24% developed using dipeptide composition. In order to facilitate the community, we developed a web server “IL-10pred”, standalone packages and a mobile app for designing IL-10 inducing peptides (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/IL-10pred/). PMID:28211521

  16. Cholesterol-Enriched Domain Formation Induced by Viral-Encoded, Membrane-Active Amphipathic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Joshua M.; Gettel, Douglas L.; Tabaei, Seyed R.; Jackman, Joshua; Kim, Min Chul; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Groves, Jay T.; Liedberg, Bo; Cho, Nam-Joon; Parikh, Atul N.

    2016-01-01

    The α-helical (AH) domain of the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A, anchored at the cytoplasmic leaflet of the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a role in viral replication. However, the peptides derived from this domain also exhibit remarkably broad-spectrum virocidal activity, raising questions about their modes of membrane association. Here, using giant lipid vesicles, we show that the AH peptide discriminates between membrane compositions. In cholesterol-containing membranes, peptide binding induces microdomain formation. By contrast, cholesterol-depleted membranes undergo global softening at elevated peptide concentrations. Furthermore, in mixed populations, the presence of ∼100 nm vesicles of viral dimensions suppresses these peptide-induced perturbations in giant unilamellar vesicles, suggesting size-dependent membrane association. These synergistic composition- and size-dependent interactions explain, in part, how the AH domain might on the one hand segregate molecules needed for viral assembly and on the other hand furnish peptides that exhibit broad-spectrum virocidal activity. PMID:26745420

  17. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Masaki; Baranyi, Lajos; Okada, Noriko; Okada, Hidechika; E-mail: hiokada@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp

    2007-02-23

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1{sub IIIB} infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent.

  18. A broad-spectrum antibiofilm peptide enhances antibiotic action against bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Reffuveille, Fany; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Mansour, Sarah; Hancock, Robert E W

    2014-09-01

    Biofilm-related infections account for at least 65% of all human infections, but there are no available antimicrobials that specifically target biofilms. Their elimination by available treatments is inefficient since biofilm cells are between 10- and 1,000-fold more resistant to conventional antibiotics than planktonic cells. Here we describe the synergistic interactions, with different classes of antibiotics, of a recently characterized antibiofilm peptide, 1018, to potently prevent and eradicate bacterial biofilms formed by multidrug-resistant ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogens. Combinations of peptide 1018 and the antibiotic ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, or tobramycin were synergistic in 50% of assessments and decreased by 2- to 64-fold the concentration of antibiotic required to treat biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, in flow cell biofilm studies, combinations of low, subinhibitory levels of the peptide (0.8 μg/ml) and ciprofloxacin (40 ng/ml) decreased dispersal and triggered cell death in mature P. aeruginosa biofilms. In addition, short-term treatments with the peptide in combination with ciprofloxacin prevented biofilm formation and reduced P. aeruginosa PA14 preexisting biofilms. PCR studies indicated that the peptide suppressed the expression of various antibiotic targets in biofilm cells. Thus, treatment with the peptide represents a novel strategy to potentiate antibiotic activity against biofilms formed by multidrug-resistant pathogens. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Genes and associated peptides involved with aestivation in a land snail.

    PubMed

    Adamson, K J; Wang, T; Rotgans, B A; Kruangkum, T; Kuballa, A V; Storey, K B; Cummins, S F

    2015-10-20

    Some animals can undergo a remarkable transition from active normal life to a dormant state called aestivation; entry into this hypometabolic state ensures that life continues even during long periods of environmental hardship. In this study, we aimed to identify those central nervous system (CNS) peptides that may regulate metabolic suppression leading to aestivation in land snails. Mass spectral-based neuropeptidome analysis of the CNS comparing active and aestivating states, revealed 19 differentially produced peptides; 2 were upregulated in active animals and 17 were upregulated in aestivated animals. Of those, the buccalin neuropeptide was further investigated since there is existing evidence in molluscs that buccalin modulates physiology by muscle contraction. The Theba pisana CNS contains two buccalin transcripts that encode precursor proteins that are capable of releasing numerous buccalin peptides. Of these, Tpi-buccalin-2 is most highly expressed within our CNS transcriptome derived from multiple metabolic states. No significant difference was observed at the level of gene expression levels for Tpi-buccalin-2 between active and aestivated animals, suggesting that regulation may reside at the level of post-translational control of peptide abundance. Spatial gene and peptide expression analysis of aestivated snail CNS demonstrated that buccalin-2 has widespread distribution within regions that control several physiological roles. In conclusion, we provide the first detailed molecular analysis of the peptides and associated genes that are related to hypometabolism in a gastropod snail known to undergo extended periods of aestivation.

  20. Dietary bioactive peptides: Human studies.

    PubMed

    Bouglé, Dominique; Bouhallab, Saïd

    2017-01-22

    Current opinion strongly links nutrition and health. Among nutrients, proteins, and peptides which are encrypted in their sequences and released during digestion could play a key role in improving health. These peptides have been claimed to be active on a wide spectrum of biological functions or diseases, including blood pressure and metabolic risk factors (coagulation, obesity, lipoprotein metabolism, and peroxidation), gut and neurological functions, immunity, cancer, dental health, and mineral metabolism. A majority of studies involved dairy peptides, but the properties of vegetal, animal, and sea products were also assessed. However, these allegations are mainly based on in vitro and experimental studies which are seldom confirmed in humans. This review focused on molecules which were tested in humans, and on the mechanisms explaining discrepancies between experimental and human studies.

  1. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  2. Peptide-based synthetic vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Classically all vaccines were produced using live or attenuated microorganisms or parts of them. However, the use of whole organisms, their components or the biological process for vaccine production has several weaknesses. The presence of immunologically redundant biological components or biological impurities in such vaccines might cause major problems. All the disadvantageous of traditional vaccines might be overcome via the development of fully synthetic peptide-based vaccines. However, once minimal antigenic epitopes only are applied for immunisation, the immune responses are poor. The use of an adjuvant can overcome this obstacle; however, it may raise new glitches. Here we briefly summarise the current stand on peptide-based vaccines, discuss epitope and adjuvant design, and multi-epitope and nanoparticle-based vaccine approaches. This mini review discusses also the disadvantages and benefits associated with peptide-based vaccines. It proposes possible methods to overcome the weaknesses of the synthetic vaccine strategy and suggests future directions for its development. PMID:28791117

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides from Marine Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Desriac, Florie; Jégou, Camille; Balnois, Eric; Brillet, Benjamin; Le Chevalier, Patrick; Fleury, Yannick

    2013-01-01

    After years of inadequate use and the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, the efficiency of “classical” antibiotics has decreased significantly. New drugs to fight MDR strains are urgently needed. Bacteria hold much promise as a source of unusual bioactive metabolites. However, the potential of marine bacteria, except for Actinomycetes and Cyanobacteria, has been largely underexplored. In the past two decades, the structures of several antimicrobial compounds have been elucidated in marine Proteobacteria. Of these compounds, polyketides (PKs), synthesised by condensation of malonyl-coenzyme A and/or acetyl-coenzyme A, and non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs), obtained through the linkage of (unusual) amino acids, have recently generated particular interest. NRPs are good examples of naturally modified peptides. Here, we review and compile the data on the antimicrobial peptides isolated from marine Proteobacteria, especially NRPs. PMID:24084784

  4. Antimicrobial peptides from marine proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Desriac, Florie; Jégou, Camille; Balnois, Eric; Brillet, Benjamin; Le Chevalier, Patrick; Fleury, Yannick

    2013-09-30

    After years of inadequate use and the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, the efficiency of "classical" antibiotics has decreased significantly. New drugs to fight MDR strains are urgently needed. Bacteria hold much promise as a source of unusual bioactive metabolites. However, the potential of marine bacteria, except for Actinomycetes and Cyanobacteria, has been largely underexplored. In the past two decades, the structures of several antimicrobial compounds have been elucidated in marine Proteobacteria. Of these compounds, polyketides (PKs), synthesised by condensation of malonyl-coenzyme A and/or acetyl-coenzyme A, and non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs), obtained through the linkage of (unusual) amino acids, have recently generated particular interest. NRPs are good examples of naturally modified peptides. Here, we review and compile the data on the antimicrobial peptides isolated from marine Proteobacteria, especially NRPs.

  5. Novel mode of action of plant defense peptides - hevein-like antimicrobial peptides from wheat inhibit fungal metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Slavokhotova, Anna A; Naumann, Todd A; Price, Neil P J; Rogozhin, Eugene A; Andreev, Yaroslav A; Vassilevski, Alexander A; Odintsova, Tatyana I

    2014-10-01

    The multilayered plant immune system relies on rapid recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns followed by activation of defense-related genes, resulting in the reinforcement of plant cell walls and the production of antimicrobial compounds. To suppress plant defense, fungi secrete effectors, including a recently discovered Zn-metalloproteinase from Fusarium verticillioides, named fungalysin Fv-cmp. This proteinase cleaves class IV chitinases, which are plant defense proteins that bind and degrade chitin of fungal cell walls. In this study, we investigated plant responses to such pathogen invasion, and discovered novel inhibitors of fungalysin. We produced several recombinant hevein-like antimicrobial peptides named wheat antimicrobial peptides (WAMPs) containing different amino acids (Ala, Lys, Glu, and Asn) at the nonconserved position 34. An additional Ser at the site of fungalysin proteolysis makes the peptides resistant to the protease. Moreover, an equal molar concentration of WAMP-1b or WAMP-2 to chitinase was sufficient to block the fungalysin activity, keeping the chitinase intact. Thus, WAMPs represent novel protease inhibitors that are active against fungal metalloproteases. According to in vitro antifungal assays WAMPs directly inhibited hyphal elongation, suggesting that fungalysin plays an important role in fungal development. A novel molecular mechanism of dynamic interplay between host defense molecules and fungal virulence factors is suggested. © 2014 FEBS.

  6. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  7. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; Carrasco, Letícia Dias de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:25302615

  8. Novel formulations for antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; de Melo Carrasco, Letícia Dias

    2014-10-09

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  9. Peptides and the new endocrinology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwyzer, Robert

    1982-01-01

    The discovery of regulatory peptides common to the nervous and the endocrine systems (brain, gut, and skin) has brought about a revolution in our concepts of endocrinology and neurology. We are beginning to understand some of the complex interrelationships between soma and psyche that might, someday, be important for an integrated treatment of diseases. Examples of the actions of certain peptides in the periphery and in the central nervous system are given, and their biosynthesis and molecular anatomy as carriers for information are discussed.

  10. Specific pools of endogenous peptides are present in gametophore, protonema, and protoplast cells of the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Fesenko, Igor A; Arapidi, Georgij P; Skripnikov, Alexander Yu; Alexeev, Dmitry G; Kostryukova, Elena S; Manolov, Alexander I; Altukhov, Ilya A; Khazigaleeva, Regina A; Seredina, Anna V; Kovalchuk, Sergey I; Ziganshin, Rustam H; Zgoda, Viktor G; Novikova, Svetlana E; Semashko, Tatiana A; Slizhikova, Darya K; Ptushenko, Vasilij V; Gorbachev, Alexey Y; Govorun, Vadim M; Ivanov, Vadim T

    2015-03-15

    Protein degradation is a basic cell process that operates in general protein turnover or to produce bioactive peptides. However, very little is known about the qualitative and quantitative composition of a plant cell peptidome, the actual result of this degradation. In this study we comprehensively analyzed a plant cell peptidome and systematically analyzed the peptide generation process. We thoroughly analyzed native peptide pools of Physcomitrella patens moss in two developmental stages as well as in protoplasts. Peptidomic analysis was supplemented by transcriptional profiling and quantitative analysis of precursor proteins. In total, over 20,000 unique endogenous peptides, ranging in size from 5 to 78 amino acid residues, were identified. We showed that in both the protonema and protoplast states, plastid proteins served as the main source of peptides and that their major fraction formed outside of chloroplasts. However, in general, the composition of peptide pools was very different between these cell types. In gametophores, stress-related proteins, e.g., late embryogenesis abundant proteins, were among the most productive precursors. The Driselase-mediated protonema conversion to protoplasts led to a peptide generation "burst", with a several-fold increase in the number of components in the latter. Degradation of plastid proteins in protoplasts was accompanied by suppression of photosynthetic activity. We suggest that peptide pools in plant cells are not merely a product of waste protein degradation, but may serve as important functional components for plant metabolism. We assume that the peptide "burst" is a form of biotic stress response that might produce peptides with antimicrobial activity from originally functional proteins. Potential functions of peptides in different developmental stages are discussed.

  11. Inhibitory Effects of Synthetic Peptides Containing Bovine Lactoferrin C-lobe Sequence on Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woan-Sub; Ohashi, Midori; Shimazaki, Kei-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a glycoprotein with various biological effects, with antibacterial activity being one of the first effects reported. This glycoprotein suppresses bacterial growth through bacteriostatic or bactericidal action. It also stimulates the growth of certain kinds of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria. In this study, Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg was selected and chemically synthesized based on the partial sequences of bovine lactoferrin tryptic fragments. Synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg suppressed the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. syringae and Escherichia coli. P. fluorescens is a major psychrotrophic bacteria found in raw and pasteurized milk, which decreases milk quality. P. syringae is a harmful infectious bacterium that damages plants. However, synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg did not inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus. It is expected that this synthetic peptide would be the first peptide sequence from the bovine lactoferrin C-lobe that shows antibacterial activity. PMID:27621684

  12. Obestatin, a peptide encoded by the ghrelin gene, opposes ghrelin's effects on food intake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian V; Ren, Pei-Gen; Avsian-Kretchmer, Orna; Luo, Ching-Wei; Rauch, Rami; Klein, Cynthia; Hsueh, Aaron J W

    2005-11-11

    Ghrelin, a circulating appetite-inducing hormone, is derived from a prohormone by posttranslational processing. On the basis of the bioinformatic prediction that another peptide also derived from proghrelin exists, we isolated a hormone from rat stomach and named it obestatin-a contraction of obese, from the Latin "obedere," meaning to devour, and "statin," denoting suppression. Contrary to the appetite-stimulating effects of ghrelin, treatment of rats with obestatin suppressed food intake, inhibited jejunal contraction, and decreased body-weight gain. Obestatin bound to the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR39. Thus, two peptide hormones with opposing action in weight regulation are derived from the same ghrelin gene. After differential modification, these hormones activate distinct receptors.

  13. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Inhibits Human Small-Cell Lung Cancer Proliferation in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruno, Kaname; Absood, Afaf; Said, Sami I.

    1998-11-01

    Small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is an aggressive, rapidly growing and metastasizing, and highly fatal neoplasm. We report that vasoactive intestinal peptide inhibits the proliferation of SCLC cells in culture and dramatically suppresses the growth of SCLC tumor-cell implants in athymic nude mice. In both cases, the inhibition was mediated apparently by a cAMP-dependent mechanism, because the inhibition was enhanced by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine in proportion to increases in intracellular cAMP levels, and the inhibition was abolished by selective inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. If confirmed in clinical trials, this antiproliferative action of vasoactive intestinal peptide may offer a new and promising means of suppressing SCLC in human subjects, without the toxic side effects of chemotherapeutic agents.

  14. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Douglas G. . E-mail: Douglas.G.Johns@gsk.com; Ao, Zhaohui; Heidrich, Bradley J.; Hunsberger, Gerald E.; Graham, Taylor; Payne, Lisa; Elshourbagy, Nabil; Lu, Quinn; Aiyar, Nambi; Douglas, Stephen A.

    2007-06-22

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) is a newly-described natriuretic peptide which lowers blood pressure via vasodilation. The natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C) removes natriuretic peptides from the circulation, but whether DNP interacts with human NPR-C directly is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that DNP binds to NPR-C. ANP, BNP, CNP, and the NPR-C ligands AP-811 and cANP(4-23) displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with pM-to-nM K {sub i} values. DNP displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with nM potency, which represents the first direct demonstration of binding of DNP to human NPR-C. DNP showed high pM affinity for the GC-A receptor and no affinity for GC-B (K {sub i} > 1000 nM). DNP was nearly 10-fold more potent than ANP at stimulating cGMP production in GC-A expressing cells. Blockade of NPR-C might represent a novel therapeutic approach in augmenting the known beneficial actions of DNP in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and heart failure.

  15. PHEX Mimetic (SPR4-Peptide) Corrects and Improves HYP and Wild Type Mice Energy-Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zelenchuk, Lesya V.; Hedge, Anne-Marie; Rowe, Peter S. N.

    2014-01-01

    Context PHEX or DMP1 mutations cause hypophosphatemic-rickets and altered energy metabolism. PHEX binds to DMP1-ASARM-motif to form a complex with α5β3 integrin that suppresses FGF23 expression. ASARM-peptides increase FGF23 by disrupting the PHEX-DMP1-Integrin complex. We used a 4.2 kDa peptide (SPR4) that binds to ASARM-peptide/motif to study the DMP1-PHEX interaction and to assess SPR4 for the treatment of energy metabolism defects in HYP and potentially other bone-mineral disorders. Design Subcutaneously transplanted osmotic pumps were used to infuse SPR4-peptide or vehicle (VE) into wild-type mice (WT) and HYP-mice (PHEX mutation) for 4 weeks. Results SPR4 partially corrected HYP mice hypophosphatemia and increased serum 1.25(OH)2D3. Serum FGF23 remained high and PTH was unaffected. WT-SPR4 mice developed hypophosphatemia and hypercalcemia with increased PTH, FGF23 and 1.25(OH)2D3. SPR4 increased GAPDH HYP-bone expression 60× and corrected HYP-mice hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia. HYP-VE serum uric-acid (UA) levels were reduced and SPR4 infusion suppressed UA levels in WT-mice but not HYP-mice. SPR4 altered leptin, adiponectin, and sympathetic-tone and increased the fat mass/weight ratio for HYP and WT mice. Expression of perlipin-2 a gene involved in obesity was reduced in HYP-VE and WT-SPR4 mice but increased in HYP-SPR4 mice. Also, increased expression of two genes that inhibit insulin-signaling, ENPP1 and ESP, occurred with HYP-VE mice. In contrast, SPR4 reduced expression of both ENPP1 and ESP in WT mice and suppressed ENPP1 in HYP mice. Increased expression of FAM20C and sclerostin occurred with HYP-VE mice. SPR4 suppressed expression of FAM20C and sclerostin in HYP and WT mice. Conclusions ASARM peptides and motifs are physiological substrates for PHEX and modulate osteocyte PHEX-DMP1-α5β3-integrin interactions and thereby FGF23 expression. These interactions also provide a nexus that regulates bone and energy metabolism. SPR4 suppression of

  16. Role of peptide--peptide interactions in stabilizing peptide-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chi-Cheng; Dieckmann, Gregg R; Nielsen, Steven O

    2009-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have unique properties and are projected to have a major impact in nanoscale electronics, materials science, and nanomedicine. Yet, these potential applications are hindered by the need for sample purification to separate SWNTs from each other and from metallic catalyst and amorphous carbon present in as-synthesized samples. Common purification strategies involve dispersing SWNTs as individual tubes in aqueous solution. Towards this end, a designed helical peptide was shown to be excellent at dispersing SWNTs. However, the molecular details of the peptide-SWNT and peptide-peptide interactions await elucidation. Here we explore these molecular interactions using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of peptide-wrapped SWNTs. We characterize the interactions by measuring the aromatic residue-to-SWNT surface distance, the peptide amphiphilicity, the peptide-SWNT crossing angle, the peptide-SWNT contact area, the peptide helix axis-to-axis distance, and the inter-peptide hydrogen bonding. We find that the peptides collectively tilt with respect to the SWNT long axis, are alpha-helical, and form interpeptide hydrogen bonds through their lysine and glutamate residues, which helps to stabilize the multipeptide/SWNT complex. All hydrophobic residues interact with the SWNT and are sequestered from water. The picture that emerges from this study gives insight into subsequent peptide design. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Digesting New Elements in Peptide Transport.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph A; Nissen, Poul

    2015-10-06

    In this issue of Structure, Beale et al. (2015) define structurally and functionally a large extracellular domain unique to mammalian peptide transporters and its implications for the transport of basic di- and tri-peptides (Beale et al., 2015).

  18. Carbohydrates in peptide and protein design.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Knud J; Brask, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Monosaccharides and amino acids are fundamental building blocks in the assembly of nature's polymers. They have different structural aspects and, to a significant extent, different functional groups. Oligomerization gives rise to oligosaccharides and peptides, respectively. While carbohydrates and peptides can be found conjoined in nature, e.g., in glycopeptides, the aim of this review is the radical redesign of peptide structures using carbohydrates, particularly monosaccharides and cyclic oligosaccharides, to produce novel peptides, peptidomimetics, and abiotic proteins. These hybrid molecules, chimeras, have properties arising largely from the combination of structural characteristics of carbohydrates with the functional group diversity of peptides. This field includes de novo designed synthetic glycopeptides, sugar (carbohydrate) amino acids, carbohydrate scaffolds for nonpeptidal peptidomimetics of cyclic peptides, cyclodextrin functionalized peptides, and carboproteins, i.e., carbohydrate-based proteinmimetics. These successful applications demonstrate the general utility of carbohydrates in peptide and protein architecture.

  19. Investigating Endogenous Peptides and Peptidases using Peptidomics

    PubMed Central

    Tinoco, Arthur D.; Saghatelian, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Rather than simply being protein degradation products, peptides have proven to be important bioactive molecules. Bioactive peptides act as hormones, neurotransmitters and antimicrobial agents in vivo. The dysregulation of bioactive peptide signaling is also known to be involved in disease, and targeting peptide hormone pathways has been successful strategy in the development of novel therapeutics. The importance of bioactive peptides in biology has spurred research to elucidate the function and regulation of these molecules. Classical methods for peptide analysis have relied on targeted immunoassays, but certain scientific questions necessitated a broader and more detailed view of the peptidome–all the peptides in a cell, tissue or organism. In this review we discuss how peptidomics has emerged to fill this need through the application of advanced liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods that provide unique insights into peptide activity and regulation. PMID:21786763

  20. Stapled peptide induces cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jo

    2004-11-01

    Hydrocarbon stapling could enable peptides from the key domains of natural proteins to be used therapeutically. Using the technique on a peptide involved in apoptosis, researchers have succeeded in destroying cancer cells in a mouse model of leukaemia.

  1. Membrane disruption mechanism of antimicrobial peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ka Yee

    2012-04-01

    Largely distributed among living organisms, antimicrobial peptides are a class of small (<100 residues) host defense peptides that induce selective membrane lytic activity against microbial pathogens. The permeabilizing behavior of these diverse peptides has been commonly attributed to the formation of pores, and such pore formation has been categorized as barrel-stave, toroidal, or carpet-like. With the continuing discovery of new peptide species, many are uncharacterized and the exact mechanism is unknown. Through the use of atomic force microscopy, the disruption of supported lipid bilayer patches by protegrin-1 is concentration-dependent. The intercalation of antimicrobial peptide into the bilayer results in structures beyond that of pore formation, but with the formation of worm-like micelles at high peptide concentration. Our results suggest that antimicrobial peptide acts to lower the interfacial energy of the bilayer in a way similar to detergents. Antimicrobial peptides with structural differences, magainin-1 and aurein 1.1, exhibit a mechanistic commonality.

  2. Strategic approaches to optimizing peptide ADME properties.

    PubMed

    Di, Li

    2015-01-01

    Development of peptide drugs is challenging but also quite rewarding. Five blockbuster peptide drugs are currently on the market, and six new peptides received first marketing approval as new molecular entities in 2012. Although peptides only represent 2% of the drug market, the market is growing twice as quickly and might soon occupy a larger niche. Natural peptides typically have poor absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties with rapid clearance, short half-life, low permeability, and sometimes low solubility. Strategies have been developed to improve peptide drugability through enhancing permeability, reducing proteolysis and renal clearance, and prolonging half-life. In vivo, in vitro, and in silico tools are available to evaluate ADME properties of peptides, and structural modification strategies are in place to improve peptide developability.

  3. Identification of tissue-specific targeting peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunkyoung; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Daejin; Park, Kisoo; Choi, Kihang; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Jung, Dong Hyun

    2012-11-01

    Using phage display technique, we identified tissue-targeting peptide sets that recognize specific tissues (bone-marrow dendritic cell, kidney, liver, lung, spleen and visceral adipose tissue). In order to rapidly evaluate tissue-specific targeting peptides, we performed machine learning studies for predicting the tissue-specific targeting activity of peptides on the basis of peptide sequence information using four machine learning models and isolated the groups of peptides capable of mediating selective targeting to specific tissues. As a representative liver-specific targeting sequence, the peptide "DKNLQLH" was selected by the sequence similarity analysis. This peptide has a high degree of homology with protein ligands which can interact with corresponding membrane counterparts. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the prediction of tissue-specific targeting peptides which can recognize the endothelial markers of target tissues.

  4. Computational approach for designing tumor homing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arun; Kapoor, Pallavi; Gautam, Ankur; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Rahul; Chauhan, Jagat Singh; Tyagi, Atul; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor homing peptides are small peptides that home specifically to tumor and tumor associated microenvironment i.e. tumor vasculature, after systemic delivery. Keeping in mind the huge therapeutic importance of these peptides, we have made an attempt to analyze and predict tumor homing peptides. It was observed that certain types of residues are preferred in tumor homing peptides. Therefore, we developed support vector machine based models for predicting tumor homing peptides using amino acid composition and binary profiles of peptides. Amino acid composition, dipeptide composition and binary profile-based models achieved a maximum accuracy of 86.56%, 82.03%, and 84.19% respectively. These methods have been implemented in a user-friendly web server, TumorHPD. We anticipate that this method will be helpful to design novel tumor homing peptides. TumorHPD web server is freely accessible at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/tumorhpd/. PMID:23558316

  5. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  6. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  7. Peptide Antibodies: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibodies recognize epitopes with amino acid residues adjacent in sequence ("linear" epitopes). Such antibodies can be made to virtually any sequence and have been immensely important in all areas of molecular biology and diagnostics due to their versatility and to the rapid growth in protein sequence information. Today, peptide antibodies can be routinely and rapidly made to large numbers of peptides, including peptides with posttranslationally modified residues, and are used for immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunoassays. In the future, peptide antibodies will continue to be immensely important for molecular biology, TCR- and MHC-like peptide antibodies may be produced routinely, peptide antibodies with predetermined conformational specificities may be designed, and peptide-based vaccines may become part of vaccination programs.

  8. Boosting production yield of biomedical peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique is employed to monitor synthesis of biomedical peptides. Application of NMR technique may improve production yields of insulin, ACTH, and growth hormones, as well as other synthesized biomedical peptides.

  9. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence peptide-based biosensor for the determination of prostate-specific antigen based on target-induced cleavage of peptide.

    PubMed

    Qi, Honglan; Li, Min; Dong, Manman; Ruan, Sanpeng; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2014-02-04

    A novel electrogenerated chemiluminescence peptide-based biosensor (ECL-PB) for the determination of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was developed on the basis of target-induced cleavage of a specific peptide within Nafion film incorporated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and ECL emitting species. A specific peptide (CHSSKLQK) was used as a molecular recognition element; tris(2,2'-ripyridine) dichlororuthenium(II) (Ru(bpy)3(2+)) was used as ECL emitting species, and ferrocene carboxylic acid (Fc) was employed as ECL quencher. The ECL-PB biosensor was fabricated by casting the mixture of Nafion and AuNPs onto the surface of glassy carbon electrode to form AuNPs/Nafion film, and then, Ru(bpy)3(2+) was electrostatically adsorbed into the AuNPs/Nafion film; finally, the peptide-tagged with ferrocene carboxylic acid (Fc-peptide) was self-assembled onto the surface of the AuNPs. When PSA was present, it specifically cleaved the Fc-peptide, leading the quencher to leave the electrode and resulting in the increase of the ECL intensity obtained from the resulted electrode in 0.1 M phosphate buffer saline (pH 7.4) containing tri-n-propylamine. The results showed that the increased ECL intensity was directly linear to the logarithm of the concentration of PSA in the range from 5.0 × 10(-12) to 5.0 × 10(-9) g/mL. An extremely low detection limit of 8 × 10(-13) g/mL was achieved because of the signal amplification through AuNPs and the ECL background suppression through Fc as ECL quencher. This work demonstrates that the combination of the direct transduction of peptide cleavage events with the highly sensitive ECL method is a promising strategy for the design of enzymatic cleavage-based ECL biosensors with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  10. [Use of peptide bioregulators in intoxication with the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid].

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, S N; Zhamsaranova, S D

    2004-01-01

    The paper shows it promising to use peptide bioregulators--fractions obtained from the cattle immune system (thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes) during immunotherapy for intoxication experimentally caused by the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Oral administration of the fractions in a dose of 0.1 mg/kg body weight eliminated the suppressive effect of the herbicide on murine cellular and humoral immune reactions, which manifested by the recovery of the studied parameters to those in control animals.

  11. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  12. Limenin, a defensin-like peptide with multiple exploitable activities from shelf beans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jack H; Ng, T B

    2006-05-01

    From the seeds of the shelf bean, an antifungal peptide with a molecular mass of 6.5 kDa was isolated. The isolation procedure comprised affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on Mono S, and gel filtration on Superdex 75. The peptide was adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and Mono S. It potently suppressed mycelial growth in Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum, and Mycosphaerella arachidicola with an IC(50) of 2.9, 2.1, and 0.34 microM, respectively. It exerted antibacterial activity toward several bacterial species with an IC(50) approximating 100 microM. [Methyl-(3)H]-thymidine incorporation into isolated mouse splenocytes was stimulated. [Methyl-(3)H]-thymidine incorporation into M1 (myeloma) and L1210 (leukemia) cells was inhibited. The peptide reduced the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and also inhibited translation in a cell-free rabbit reticulocyte lysate system.

  13. Structural analysis of a functional DIAP1 fragment bound to grim and hid peptides.

    PubMed

    Wu, J W; Cocina, A E; Chai, J; Hay, B A; Shi, Y

    2001-07-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein DIAP1 suppresses apoptosis in Drosophila, with the second BIR domain (BIR2) playing an important role. Three proteins, Hid, Grim, and Reaper, promote apoptosis, in part by binding to DIAP1 through their conserved N-terminal sequences. The crystal structures of DIAP1-BIR2 by itself and in complex with the N-terminal peptides from Hid and Grim reveal that these peptides bind a surface groove on DIAP1, with the first four amino acids mimicking the binding of the Smac tetrapeptide to XIAP. The next 3 residues also contribute to binding through hydrophobic interactions. Interestingly, peptide binding induces the formation of an additional alpha helix in DIAP1. Our study reveals the structural conservation and diversity necessary for the binding of IAPs by the Drosophila Hid/Grim/Reaper and the mammalian Smac proteins.

  14. Optimizing the MALDI-TOF-MS Observation of Peptides Containing Disulfide Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Huwiler, Kristin G.; Mosher, Deane F.; Vestling, Martha M.

    2003-01-01

    The observation of peaks corresponding to both disulfide-bonded and reduced peptides in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra of disulfides could suggest that the samples are either mixtures prior to analysis or that the measurement process has converted single compounds into mixtures. This is an important distinction when characterizing potentially disulfide-bonded peptides obtained from proteolyzed proteins or from oxidized synthetic peptides. It is well documented that disulfides can undergo in-source decay (ISD) when using a 337-nm laser. However, the mixed matrix 2-(4-hydroxyphenylazo)benzoic acid:α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (1:10) not only suppresses the ISD reduction of disulfides to thiols but allows the same low threshold laser power generally used with α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid to be applied. PMID:14715887

  15. Peptide Ligand Structure and I-Aq Binding Avidity Influence T Cell Signaling Pathway Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Linda K; Cullins, David L; Park, Jeoung-Eun; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Brand, David D; Rosloniec, Edward F; Stuart, John M; Kang, Andrew H

    2015-01-01

    Factors that drive T cells to signal through differing pathways remain unclear. We have shown that an altered peptide ligand (A9) activates T cells to utilize an alternate signaling pathway which is dependent upon FcRγ and Syk. However, it remains unknown whether the affinity of peptide binding to MHC drives this selection. To answer this question we developed a panel of peptides designed so that amino acids interacting with the p6 and p9 predicted MHC binding pockets were altered. Analogs were tested for binding to I-Aq using a competitive binding assay and selected analogs were administered to arthritic mice. Using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model, arthritis severity was correlated with T cell cytokine production and molecular T cell signaling responses. We establish that reduced affinity of interaction with the MHC correlates with T cell signaling through the alternative pathway, leading ultimately to secretion of suppressive cytokine and attenuation of arthritis. PMID:25982319

  16. Polymeric strong cation-exchange monolithic column for capillary liquid chromatography of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Tolley, H Dennis; Lee, Milton L

    2009-08-01

    A strong cation-exchange (SCX) monolithic stationary phase was prepared in 75 microm id capillaries by direct in situ polymerization of sulfopropyl methacrylate and polyethylene glycol diacrylate in a ternary porogen system consisting of methanol, cyclohexanol, and water. The resulting monolith exhibited good dynamic binding capacity, fast kinetic adsorption of proteins, and high permeability. The monolith had a dynamic binding capacity of approximately 52 mg/mL of column volume for lysozyme and cytochrome C. The monolith was evaluated for SCX capillary LC of synthetic peptides, natural peptides, and protein standards. Fast separation of proteins was achieved in less than 4 min. The average peak capacity for peptides was 28 using a relatively steep gradient when hydrophobic interactions were suppressed with 40% acetonitrile.

  17. Insect peptides - perspectives in human diseases treatment.

    PubMed

    Chowański, Szymon; Adamski, Zbigniew; Lubawy, Jan; Marciniak, Paweł; Pacholska-Bogalska, Joanna; Słocińska, Małgorzata; Spochacz, Marta; Szymczak, Monika; Urbański, Arkadiusz; Walkowiak-Nowicka, Karolina; Rosiński, Grzegorz

    2017-05-26

    Insects are the largest and the most widely distributed group of animals in the world. Their diversity gives rise to an incredible variety of different mechanisms for the regulation of life processes. There are many agents that regulate immunology, reproduction, growth and development or metabolism. Hence, it seems that insects may be a source of numerous substances with utility for the treatment human diseases. Of particular importance in the regulation of insect physiology are peptides, including neuropeptides, peptide hormones and antimicrobial peptides. There are two main ways in which these peptides may be useful. 1) Peptides isolated from insects may become potential therapeutic drugs for different diseases. 2) Many insect peptide hormones show structural or functional homology to mammalian peptide hormones, and comparative studies may provide a new perspective on human disorders. In our review, we focused on three groups of insect-derived peptides: 1) immune-active peptides, 2) peptide hormones and 3) peptides present in venoms. In our review, we show the considerable potential of insect peptides in the search for new solutions for mammalian diseases treatment. We summarize knowledge about the properties of insect peptides against different virulent agents, and their anti-inflammatory or anti-nociceptive properties as well as compare the insect and mammalian/vertebrate peptide endocrine systems to determine the usefulness of knowledge about insect peptide hormones in drug design. The field of possible uses of insect-delivered peptides for the treatment of various human diseases has still not been sufficiently explored. Undoubtedly, more attention should be paid to insects in the search for new drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Fusion peptide P15-CSP shows antibiofilm activity and pro-osteogenic activity when deposited as a coating on hydrophilic but not hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian; Contreras-Garcia, Angel; LoVetri, Karen; Yakandawala, Nandadeva; Wertheimer, Michael R; De Crescenzo, Gregory; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2015-12-01

    In the context of porous bone void filler for oral bone reconstruction, peptides that suppress microbial growth and promote osteoblast function could be used to enhance the performance of a porous bone void filler. We tested the hypothesis that P15-CSP, a novel fusion peptide containing collagen-mimetic osteogenic peptide P15, and competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), a cationic antimicrobial peptide, has emerging properties not shared by P15 or CSP alone. Peptide-coated surfaces were tested for antimicrobial activity toward Streptoccocus mutans, and their ability to promote human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) attachment, spreading, metabolism, and osteogenesis. In the osteogenesis assay, peptides were coated on tissue culture plastic and on thin films generated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to have hydrophilic or hydrophobic character (water contact angles 63°, 42°, and 92°, respectively). S. mutans planktonic growth was specifically inhibited by CSP, whereas biofilm formation was inhibited by P15-CSP. MSC adhesion and actin stress fiber formation was strongly enhanced by CSP, P15-CSP, and fibronectin coatings and modestly enhanced by P15 versus uncoated surfaces. Metabolic assays revealed that CSP was slightly cytotoxic to MSCs. MSCs developed alkaline phosphatase activity on all surfaces, with or without peptide coatings, and consistently deposited the most biomineralized matrix on hydrophilic surfaces coated with P15-CSP. Hydrophobic thin films completely suppressed MSC biomineralization, consistent with previous findings of suppressed osteogenesis on hydrophobic bioplastics. Collective data in this study provide new evidence that P15-CSP has unique dual capacity to suppress biofilm formation, and to enhance osteogenic activity as a coating on hydrophilic surfaces. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Resistance to endotoxic shock in mice lacking natriuretic peptide receptor-A.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Catherine M; Baliga, Reshma; Stidwill, Raymond; Taylor, Valerie; Singer, Mervyn; Hobbs, Adrian J

    2010-08-01

    Excessive production of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) is thought to underlie the vascular dysfunction, systemic hypotension and organ failure that characterize endotoxic shock. Plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) are raised in animal models and humans with endotoxic shock and correlate with the associated cardiovascular dysfunction. Since both NO and natriuretic peptides play important roles in cardiovascular homeostasis via activation of guanylate cyclase-linked receptors, we used mice lacking natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A (NPR1) to establish if natriuretic peptides contribute to the cardiovascular dysfunction present in endotoxic shock. Wild-type (WT) and NPR-A knockout (KO) mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and vascular dysfunction (in vitro and in vivo), production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and iNOS expression and activity were evaluated. LPS-treated WT animals exhibited a marked fall in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) whereas NPR-A KO mice maintained MABP throughout. LPS administration caused a greater suppression of vascular responses to the thromboxane-mimetic U46619, ANP, acetylcholine and the NO-donor spermine-NONOate in WT versus NPR-A KO mice. This differential effect on vascular function was paralleled by reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine production, iNOS expression and activity (plasma [NO(x)] and cyclic GMP). These observations suggest that NPR-A activation by natriuretic peptides facilitates iNOS expression and contributes to the vascular dysfunction characteristic of endotoxic shock. Pharmacological interventions that target the natriuretic peptide system may represent a novel approach to treat this life-threatening condition.

  20. Macrocyclized Extended Peptides: Inhibiting the Substrate-Recognition Domain of Tankyrase

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We report a double-click macrocyclization approach for the design of constrained peptide inhibitors having non-helical or extended conformations. Our targets are the tankyrase proteins (TNKS), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP) that regulate Wnt signaling by targeting Axin for degradation. TNKS are deregulated in many different cancer types, and inhibition of TNKS therefore represents an attractive therapeutic strategy. However, clinical development of TNKS-specific PARP catalytic inhibitors is challenging due to off-target effects and cellular toxicity. We instead targeted the substrate-recognition domain of TNKS, as it is unique among PARP family members. We employed a two-component strategy, allowing peptide and linker to be separately engineered and then assembled in a combinatorial fashion via click chemistry. Using the consensus substrate-peptide sequence as a starting point, we optimized the length and rigidity of the linker and its position along the peptide. Optimization was further guided by high-resolution crystal structures of two of the macrocyclized peptides in complex with TNKS. This approach led to macrocyclized peptides with submicromolar affinities for TNKS and high proteolytic stability that are able to disrupt the interaction between TNKS and Axin substrate and to inhibit Wnt signaling in a dose-dependent manner. The peptides therefore represent a promising starting point for a new class of substrate-competitive inhibitors of TNKS with potential for suppressing Wnt signaling in cancer. Moreover, by demonstrating the application of the double-click macrocyclization approach to non-helical, extended, or irregularly structured peptides, we greatly extend its potential and scope, especially given the frequency with which such motifs mediate protein–protein interactions. PMID:28084734

  1. Macrocyclized Extended Peptides: Inhibiting the Substrate-Recognition Domain of Tankyrase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenshu; Lau, Yu Heng; Fischer, Gerhard; Tan, Yaw Sing; Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; de la Roche, Marc; Hyvönen, Marko; Verma, Chandra; Spring, David R; Itzhaki, Laura S

    2017-02-15

    We report a double-click macrocyclization approach for the design of constrained peptide inhibitors having non-helical or extended conformations. Our targets are the tankyrase proteins (TNKS), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP) that regulate Wnt signaling by targeting Axin for degradation. TNKS are deregulated in many different cancer types, and inhibition of TNKS therefore represents an attractive therapeutic strategy. However, clinical development of TNKS-specific PARP catalytic inhibitors is challenging due to off-target effects and cellular toxicity. We instead targeted the substrate-recognition domain of TNKS, as it is unique among PARP family members. We employed a two-component strategy, allowing peptide and linker to be separately engineered and then assembled in a combinatorial fashion via click chemistry. Using the consensus substrate-peptide sequence as a starting point, we optimized the length and rigidity of the linker and its position along the peptide. Optimization was further guided by high-resolution crystal structures of two of the macrocyclized peptides in complex with TNKS. This approach led to macrocyclized peptides with submicromolar affinities for TNKS and high proteolytic stability that are able to disrupt the interaction between TNKS and Axin substrate and to inhibit Wnt signaling in a dose-dependent manner. The peptides therefore represent a promising starting point for a new class of substrate-competitive inhibitors of TNKS with potential for suppressing Wnt signaling in cancer. Moreover, by demonstrating the application of the double-click macrocyclization approach to non-helical, extended, or irregularly structured peptides, we greatly extend its potential and scope, especially given the frequency with which such motifs mediate protein-protein interactions.

  2. Free-living nematode peptides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    All nematodes employ a wide array of peptide messengers to control nearly all aspects of the life cycle, including hatching, locomotion, feeding, defense, mating, reproduction, and other behavioral and metabolic events. There are molecular and biological similarities, as well as significant differen...

  3. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  4. The evolution of peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Niall, H D

    1982-01-01

    Despite limitations in our present knowledge it is already possible to discern the main features of peptide hormone evolution, since the same mechanisms (and indeed the same hormone molecules) function in many different ways. This underlying unity of organization has its basis in the tendency of biochemical networks, once established, to survive and diversify. The most surprising recent findings in endocrinology have been the discovery of vertebrate peptide hormones in multiple sites within the same organism, and the reports, persuasive but requiring confirmation, of vertebrate hormones in primitive unicellular organisms (20, 20a). Perhaps the major challenge for the future is to define the roles and interactions of the many peptide hormones identified in brain (18). The most primitive bacteria and the human brain, though an enormous evolutionary distance apart, may have more in common than we have recognized until now. As Axelrod & Hamilton have pointed out in a recent provocative article, "The Evolution of Cooperation" (1), bacteria, though lacking a brain, are capable of adaptive behavior that can be analysed in terms of game theory. It is clear that we can learn a great deal about the whole evolutionary process from a study of the versatile and durable peptide hormones molecules.

  5. Metabolism of Peptides by Rumen Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. E.

    1967-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms utilize tryptic peptides from Chlorella protein, forming carbon dioxide, volatile fatty acids, and bacterial protein. Peptide carbon is more efficiently converted into bacterial protein than is amino acid carbon. A progressive degradation of the peptides was demonstrated by use of columns of Sephadex G-25. PMID:6035045

  6. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of <200-nm bilayer vesicles composed of anionic and neutral lipids as well as cholesterol. Vesicle disruption, or peptide potency, was monitored with a sensitive fluorescence leakage assay. Detailed molecular information on peptidemembrane interactions and peptide structure was further gained through vibrational spectroscopy combined with circular dichroism. Finally, steady-state fluorescence experiments yielded insight into the local environment of native or engineered tryptophan residues in melittin and human cathelicidin embedded in bilayer vesicles. Collectively, our results provide clues to the functional structures of the engineered and toxic peptides and may impact the design of synthetic antibiotic peptides that can be used against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  7. Identification of multifunctional peptides from human milk.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Bharti, Rashmi; Porto, William F; Gauri, Samiran S; Mandal, Mahitosh; Franco, Octavio L; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceutical industries have renewed interest in screening multifunctional bioactive peptides as a marketable product in health care applications. In this context, several animal and plant peptides with potential bioactivity have been reported. Milk proteins and peptides have received much attention as a source of health-enhancing components to be incorporated into nutraceuticals and functional foods. By using this source, 24 peptides have been fractionated and purified from human milk using RP-HPLC. Multifunctional roles including antimicrobial, antioxidant and growth stimulating activity have been evaluated in all 24 fractions. Nevertheless, only four fractions show multiple combined activities among them. Using a proteomic approach, two of these four peptides have been identified as lactoferrin derived peptide and kappa casein short chain peptide. Lactoferrin derived peptide (f8) is arginine-rich and kappa casein derived (f12) peptide is proline-rich. Both peptides (f8 and f12) showed antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fraction 8 (f8) exhibits growth stimulating activity in 3T3 cell line and f12 shows higher free radical scavenging activity in comparison to other fractions. Finally, both peptides were in silico evaluated and some insights into their mechanism of action were provided. Thus, results indicate that these identified peptides have multiple biological activities which are valuable for the quick development of the neonate and may be considered as potential biotechnological products for nutraceutical industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diverse CLE peptides from cyst nematode species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant CLAVATA3/ESR (CLE)-like peptides play diverse roles in plant growth and development including maintenance of the stem cell population in the root meristem. Small secreted peptides sharing similarity to plant CLE signaling peptides have been isolated from several cyst nematode species including...

  9. [Effect of opioid peptides on oxygen-dependent microbicidity of peripheral blood neutrophils].

    PubMed

    Geĭn, S V; Gorshkova, K G

    2012-01-01

    Investigation ofopioid peptide effect on the production of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils in non-fractionated leukocyte suspension and in purified fraction of peripheral blood neutrophils is disclosed in this work. It was determined that selective delta- and micro-agonists of peptide origin stimulated the spontaneous and suppressed 15 mkg/ml zymosan-induced LDCL (luminol-dependent chemiluminescence) reaction of neutrophils in leukocyte suspension. beta-endorphin was found to render less marked suppressive action on 15 mkg/ml zymosan-induced LDCL, and delta2-agonist deltorphin 2 promoted 15 mkg/ml zymosan-induced LDCL only toward the 25 minutes of the experiment. beta-endorphin and selective d- and m- agonists did not affect the spontaneous and suppressed 15 mkg/ml and 150 mkg/ml zymosan-induced neutrophil LDCL. Therefore, opioid peptides play essential role in the process of direct and indirect regulation of oxygen-dependent system of neutrophil granulocyte bactericidal activity.

  10. Reduction of antibody response against botulinum neurotoxin A by synthetic monomethoxypolyethylene glycol-peptide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Dolimbek, Behzod Z; Aoki, K Roger; Atassi, M Zouhair

    2011-06-30

    Recently, we determined the molecular locations on BoNT/A of the antigenic regions recognized by blocking Abs of cervical dystonia patients immunoresistant to BoNT/A treatment. In the present work we tested the possibility of reducing the levels of the Ab response against immunodominant antigenic sites on the heavy chain of BoNT/A in order to diminish immunoresistance caused by blocking Abs. Four antigenic regions on BoNT/A represented by peptides N8 (residues 547-565), N25 (785-803), C15 (1051-1069) and C31 (1275-1296) were tested for suppressing Ab responses against the correlate regions. The conjugates were synthesized with monomethoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG) attached to the peptide N-termini. Tolerization with a given mPEG-peptide reduced the Ab levels against the correlate region and the antisera became less protective than antisera of untolerized controls that were immunized only with inactive BoNT/A. On days 31 and 52 in the immunization course mPEG-N8 was most effective and the antisera of tolerized mice were weaker and less protective relative to controls. Other mPEG-peptides were also suppressed the Ab responses to various extents. Bleeds up to 5 months showed that tolerization can be made to persist for the entire period. The results indicated that the tolerization procedure might be potentially useful for clinical applications to immunoresistant patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Coumarin tags for analysis of peptides by MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS. 2. Alexa Fluor 350 tag for increased peptide and protein Identification by LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Pashkova, Anna; Chen, Hsuan-Shen; Rejtar, Tomas; Zang, Xin; Giese, Roger; Andreev, Victor; Moskovets, Eugene; Karger, Barry L

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this study was the development of N-terminal tags to improve peptide identification using high-throughput MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Part 1 of the study was focused on the influence of derivatization on the intensities of MALDI-TOF MS signals of peptides. In part 2, various derivatization approaches for the improvement of peptide fragmentation efficiency in MALDI-TOF/TOF MS are explored. We demonstrate that permanent cation tags, while significantly improving signal intensity in the MS mode, lead to severe suppression of MS/MS fragmentation, making these tags unsuitable for high-throughput MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis. In the present work, it was found that labeling with Alexa Fluor 350, a coumarin tag containing a sulfo group, along with guanidation of epsilon-amino groups of Lys, could enhance unimolecular fragmentation of peptides with the formation of a high-intensity y-ion series, while the peptide intensities in the MS mode were not severely affected. LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis of tryptic peptides from the SCX fractions of an E. coli lysate revealed improved peptide scores, a doubling of the total number of peptides, and a 30% increase in the number of proteins identified, as a result of labeling. Furthermore, by combining the data from native and labeled samples, confidence in correct identification was increased, as many proteins were identified by different peptides in the native and labeled data sets. Additionally, derivatization was found not to impair chromatographic behavior of peptides. All these factors suggest that labeling with Alexa Fluor 350 is a promising approach to the high-throughput LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis of proteomic samples.

  12. Effect of the addition of diammonium citrate to alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) matrix for the detection of phosphorylated peptide in phosphorylation reactions using cell and tissue lysates.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong-Hun; Toita, Riki; Oishi, Jun; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2007-11-01

    The ionization of phosphorylated peptides is usually suppressed by non-phosphorylated peptides when alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) is used as a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis. In the present study, we examined the effect of diammonium citrate addition to the CHCA matrix on the detection of phosphorylated peptides. Substrates for protein kinase C (PKC) and c-Src were synthesized and phosphorylated by reaction with cell and tissue lysate samples. The addition of diammonium citrate to the CHCA matrix increased the sensitivity for distinguishing phosphorylated peptides from background noise. However, the effect depended on substrate concentration.

  13. Peptide array-based characterization and design of ZnO-high affinity peptides.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Mina; Sugita, Tomoya; Furusawa, Seiji; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-15

    Peptides with both an affinity for ZnO and the ability to generate ZnO nanoparticles have attracted attention for the self-assembly and templating of nanoscale building blocks under ambient conditions with compositional uniformity. In this study, we have analyzed the specific binding sites of the ZnO-binding peptide, EAHVMHKVAPRP, which was identified using a phage display peptide library. The peptide binding assay against ZnO nanoparticles was performed using peptides synthesized on a cellulose membrane using the spot method. Using randomized rotation of amino acids in the ZnO-binding peptide, 125 spot-synthesized peptides were assayed. The peptide binding activity against ZnO nanoparticles varied greatly. This indicates that ZnO binding does not depend on total hydrophobicity or other physical parameters of these peptides, but rather that ZnO recognizes the specific amino acid alignment of these peptides. In addition, several peptides were found to show higher binding ability compared with that of the original peptides. Identification of important binding sites in the EAHVMHKVAPRP peptide was investigated by shortened, stepwise sequence from both termini. Interestingly, two ZnO-binding sites were found as 6-mer peptides: HVMHKV and HKVAPR. The peptides identified by amino acid substitution of HKVAPR were found to show high affinity and specificity for ZnO nanoparticles.

  14. Fabrication of Odor Sensor Using Peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokebuchi, Yuta; Hayashi, Kenshi; Toko, Kiyoshi; Chen, Ronggang; Ikezaki, Hidekazu

    We report fabrication of an odor sensor using peptides. Peptides were designed to acquire the specific reception for a target odor molecule. Au surface of the sensor electrode was coated by the designed peptide using the method of self assembled monolayers (SAMs). Functionalized Au surfaces by the peptides were confirmed by ellipsometry and cyclic voltammetry. The odorants of vanillin, phenethyl alcohol and hexanol were discriminated by QCM sensor with the peptide surface. Moreover, we verified specific interaction between amino acid (Trp) and vanillin by fluorescence assay.

  15. Isoelectric focusing of proteins and peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egen, N.

    1979-01-01

    Egg-white solution was chosen as the reference solution in order to assess the effects of operational parameters (voltage, flow rate, ampholine pH range and concentration, and protein concentration) of the RIEF apparatus on protein resolution. Topics of discussion include: (1) comparison of RIEF apparatus to conventional IEF techniques (column and PAG) with respect to resolution and throughput; (2) peptide and protein separation (AHF, Thymosin - Fraction 5, vasoactive peptide, L-asparaginase and ACP); and (3) detection of peptides - dansyl derivatives of amino acids and peptides, post-focusing fluorescent labeling of amino acids, peptides and proteins, and ampholine extraction from focused gels.

  16. Peptides and Peptidomimetics for Antimicrobial Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Mojsoska, Biljana; Jenssen, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce and highlight a few classes of traditional antimicrobial peptides with a focus on structure-activity relationship studies. After first dissecting the important physiochemical properties that influence the antimicrobial and toxic properties of antimicrobial peptides, the contributions of individual amino acids with respect to the peptides antibacterial properties are presented. A brief discussion of the mechanisms of action of different antimicrobials as well as the development of bacterial resistance towards antimicrobial peptides follows. Finally, current efforts on novel design strategies and peptidomimetics are introduced to illustrate the importance of antimicrobial peptide research in the development of future antibiotics. PMID:26184232

  17. Future directions for peptide therapeutics development.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Allan A; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-09-01

    The notable expansion of peptide therapeutics development in the late 1990s and the 2000s led to an unprecedented number of marketing approvals in 2012 and has provided a robust pipeline that should deliver numerous approvals during the remainder of the 2010s. To document the current status of the pipeline, we collected data for peptide therapeutics in clinical studies and regulatory review, as well as those recently approved. In this Foundation review, we provide an overview of the pipeline, including therapeutic area and molecular targets, with a focus on glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists. Areas for potential expansion, for example constrained peptides and peptide-drug conjugates, are profiled.

  18. Identification of peptide targets in neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoli; Green, Miyoko; Gilden, Don; Lam, Chiwah; Bautista, Katherine; Bennett, Jeffrey L

    2011-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease that predominantly affects the optic nerves and spinal cord. Recombinant antibodies (rAbs) generated from clonally expanded plasma cells in an NMO patient are specific to AQP4 and pathogenic. We screened phage-displayed peptide libraries with these rAbs, and identified 14 high affinity linear and conformational peptides. The linear peptides shared sequence homologies with NMO autoantigen AQP4 on the extracellular surface. Competitive inhibition ELISA and immunocytochemistry demonstrated that these peptides represent epitopes of NMO autoantigen AQP4. Peptide epitopes/mimotopes may have potential uses for disease prognosis, monitoring, and therapy. PMID:21621279

  19. Antimicrobial peptides in insects; structure and function.

    PubMed

    Bulet, P; Hetru, C; Dimarcq, J L; Hoffmann, D

    1999-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides appear to be ubiquitous and multipotent components of the innate immune defense arsenal used by both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. During the past 15 years a multitude of these peptides have been isolated largely from insects. In spite of great differences in size, amino acid composition and structure, most of the antimicrobial peptides from insects can be grouped into one of three categories. The largest category in number contains peptides with intramolecular disulfide bonds forming hairpin-like beta-sheets or alpha-helical-beta-sheet mixed structures. The second most important group is composed of peptides forming amphipathic alpha-helices. The third group comprises peptides with an overrepresentation in proline and/or glycine residues. In general, the insect antimicrobial peptides have a broad range of activity and are not cytotoxic. Despite a wealth of information on structural requirements for their antimicrobial activity, the mode of action of these peptides is not yet fully understood. However, some data suggest the existence of two types of mode of action: 1. through peptide-lipid interaction or 2. through receptor-mediated recognition processes. This review presents the main results obtained during the last four years in the field of antimicrobial peptides from insects with a special focus on the proline-rich and cysteine-rich peptides.

  20. Therapeutic uses of gastrointestinal peptides.

    PubMed

    Redfern, J S; O'Dorisio, T M

    1993-12-01

    The GI tract is one of nature's great pharmacies. Most, if not all, biologically active peptides can be found there, and it is quite likely that others remain to be discovered. Our ability to exploit this resource has expanded considerably over the past two decades. Advances in analytical techniques have allowed investigators to rapidly isolate and purify new compounds from tissue extracts. Sequencing and de novo synthesis of newly discovered peptides are now routine, and the structural modifications required to alter activity and tailor a compound to a particular use are easily made. A number of gastrointestinal peptides or their analogues for use in clinical studies are available from commercial sources (see Table 7). Somatostatin is the first gut peptide to successfully complete development and yield a pharmaceutical compound with a broad range of action. Several of the peptides discussed in this article have similar potential. TRH stands out as a candidate because of its effectiveness in the treatment of experimental spinal cord injury and a variety of shock states. Such a broad range of action in critical fields may justify the intensive development required to yield potent, long-acting, and highly specific analogues. Similarly, the antimetastatic and immunostimulant properties of the enkephalins offer promise for new therapies in the treatment of AIDS, ARC, and cancer. Studies with amylin may lead to new and more precise regimens of blood sugar control in insulin-dependent diabetics and could in turn, prevent some of the worst long-term effects of the disease. The development of effective intranasal forms of GHRH could spare children with GH-GHRH deficiency the distress of repeated injections and help to prevent excessive GH blood levels. Secretin, glucagon, or CGRP might be used one day in cardiovascular emergencies, and VIP or its analogues could prove effective in the treatment of asthma. Although preliminary results with many of these peptides are

  1. Proposal for novel curcumin derivatives as potent inhibitors against Alzheimer's disease: Ab initio molecular simulations on the specific interactions between amyloid-beta peptide and curcumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Shintaro; Fujimori, Mitsuki; Ishimura, Hiromi; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2017-10-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain is closely related with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, we propose novel curcumin derivatives and investigate their binding properties with the amyloid precursor protein (APP), using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations. Our proposed derivative (curcumin XIV) is found to have a large binding energy with APP and interacts strongly with the cleavage site Ala19 by secretase. It is thus expected that curcumin XIV can protect APP from the secretase attack and be a potent inhibitor against the production of Aβ peptides.

  2. The First Salamander Defensin Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ke; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been widely identified from amphibian skins except salamanders. A novel antimicrobial peptide (CFBD) was isolated and characterized from skin secretions of the salamander, Cynops fudingensis. The cDNA encoding CFBD precursor was cloned from the skin cDNA library of C. fudingensis. The precursor was composed of three domains: signal peptide of 17 residues, mature peptide of 41 residues and intervening propeptide of 3 residues. There are six cysteines in the sequence of mature CFBD peptide, which possibly form three disulfide-bridges. CFBD showed antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli. This peptide could be classified into family of β-defensin based on its seqeuence similarity with β-defensins from other vertebrates. Evolution analysis indicated that CFBD was close to fish β-defensin. As far as we know, CFBD is the first β-defensin antimicrobial peptide from salamanders. PMID:24386139

  3. Effect of muramyl peptides on mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    El-Jamal, N; Bahr, G M; Echtay, K S

    2009-01-01

    Muramyl peptides have been shown to exert several biological activities including potentiation of humoral and cell-mediated immunity and stimulation of natural resistance. The mode of action of muramyl peptides has not been elucidated fully and the immunological activities of some derivatives have been associated with toxic effects, including pyrogenicity and inflammatory reactions. Nevertheless, the impact of muramyl peptides on mitochondrial respiration has never been addressed. In this study, the in vitro effects of muramyl peptides on rat liver mitochondria were examined. Toxic muramyl peptides induced a significant decrease in respiratory control ratio versus non-toxic analogues. These results were confirmed by in vivo studies in mice and were extended to mitochondria isolated from spleens. Our data address, for the first time, the effect of muramyl peptides on mitochondrial bioenergetics. Further studies are required to reveal the mechanism of mitochondrial toxicity in relation to the damaging effects of toxic muramyl peptides.

  4. Biology of the CAPA peptides in insects.

    PubMed

    Predel, R; Wegener, C

    2006-11-01

    CAPA peptides have been isolated from a broad range of insect species as well as an arachnid, and can be grouped into the periviscerokinin and pyrokinin peptide families. In insects, CAPA peptides are the characteristic and most abundant neuropeptides in the abdominal neurohemal system. In many species, CAPA peptides exert potent myotropic effects on different muscles such as the heart. In others, including blood-sucking insects able to transmit serious diseases, CAPA peptides have strong diuretic or anti-diuretic effects and thus are potentially of medical importance. CAPA peptides undergo cell-type-specific sorting and packaging, and are the first insect neuropeptides shown to be differentially processed. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on the structure, distribution, receptors and physiological actions of the CAPA peptides.

  5. The first salamander defensin antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ping; Yang, Shilong; Shen, Chuanbin; Jiang, Ke; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been widely identified from amphibian skins except salamanders. A novel antimicrobial peptide (CFBD) was isolated and characterized from skin secretions of the salamander, Cynops fudingensis. The cDNA encoding CFBD precursor was cloned from the skin cDNA library of C. fudingensis. The precursor was composed of three domains: signal peptide of 17 residues, mature peptide of 41 residues and intervening propeptide of 3 residues. There are six cysteines in the sequence of mature CFBD peptide, which possibly form three disulfide-bridges. CFBD showed antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli. This peptide could be classified into family of β-defensin based on its sequence similarity with β-defensins from other vertebrates. Evolution analysis indicated that CFBD was close to fish β-defensin. As far as we know, CFBD is the first β-defensin antimicrobial peptide from salamanders.

  6. Suppression of operant vs consummatory behavior.

    PubMed

    DeCosta, M J; Ayres, J J

    1971-07-01

    The magnitude and variability of conditioned suppression of bar pressing and dipper licking were compared. In two steady-state experiments, suppression of bar pressing was more profound and more stable from day to day. The two measures of suppression were uncorrelated as indexed by Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients computed for adjacent trials. Correlations within measures (internal consistency) were somewhat higher for the bar-press system except when a high proportion of rats completely suppressed on one of the correlated trials. In a transient state experiment in which possible adventitious punishment of both response systems was eliminated, suppression of bar pressing was again more profound and considerably slower to extinguish.

  7. Appetite suppression based on selective inhibition of NPY receptors.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, S; Della-Zuana, O; Fauchère, J-L; Félétou, M; Galizzi, J-P; Levens, N

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this review is to critically assess available evidence that blockade of the actions of NPY at one of the five NPY receptor subtypes represents an attractive new drug discovery target for the development of an appetite suppressant drug. Blockade of the central actions of NPY using anti-NPY antibodies, antisense oligodeoxynucleotides against NPY and NPY receptor antagonists results in a decrease in food intake in energy-deprived animals. These results appear to show that endogenous NPY plays a role in the control of appetite. The fact that NPY receptors exist as at least five different subtypes raises the possibility that the actions of endogenous NPY on food intake can be adequately dissociated from other effects of the peptide. Current drug discovery has produced a number of highly selective NPY receptor antagonists which have been used to establish the NPY Y(1) receptor subtype as the most critical in regulating short-term food intake. However, additional studies are now needed to more clearly define the relative contribution of NPY acting through the NPY Y2 and NPY Y5 receptors in the complex sequence of physiological and behavioral events that underlie the long-term control of appetite. Blockade of the NPY receptor may produce appetite-suppressing drugs. However, it is too early to state with certainty whether a single subtype selective drug used alone or a combination of NPY receptor selective antagonists used in combination will be necessary to adequately influence appetite regulation.

  8. Prostaglandin signaling suppresses beneficial microglial function in Alzheimer's disease models.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jenny U; Woodling, Nathaniel S; Wang, Qian; Panchal, Maharshi; Liang, Xibin; Trueba-Saiz, Angel; Brown, Holden D; Mhatre, Siddhita D; Loui, Taylor; Andreasson, Katrin I

    2015-01-01

    Microglia, the innate immune cells of the CNS, perform critical inflammatory and noninflammatory functions that maintain normal neural function. For example, microglia clear misfolded proteins, elaborate trophic factors, and regulate and terminate toxic inflammation. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, beneficial microglial functions become impaired, accelerating synaptic and neuronal loss. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that contribute to microglial dysfunction is an important objective for identifying potential strategies to delay progression to AD. The inflammatory cyclooxygenase/prostaglandin E2 (COX/PGE2) pathway has been implicated in preclinical AD development, both in human epidemiology studies and in transgenic rodent models of AD. Here, we evaluated murine models that recapitulate microglial responses to Aβ peptides and determined that microglia-specific deletion of the gene encoding the PGE2 receptor EP2 restores microglial chemotaxis and Aβ clearance, suppresses toxic inflammation, increases cytoprotective insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling, and prevents synaptic injury and memory deficits. Our findings indicate that EP2 signaling suppresses beneficial microglia functions that falter during AD development and suggest that inhibition of the COX/PGE2/EP2 immune pathway has potential as a strategy to restore healthy microglial function and prevent progression to AD.

  9. Flt1 peptide-hyaluronate conjugate micelle-like nanoparticles encapsulating genistein for the treatment of ocular neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyemin; Choi, Jun-Sub; Kim, Ki Su; Yang, Jeong-A; Joo, Choun-Ki; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2012-11-01

    Flt1 peptide of GNQWFI is an antagonistic peptide for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1 or Flt1). In this work, Flt1 peptide-hyaluronate (HA) conjugates were successfully synthesized and the resulting micelle-like nanoparticles were exploited to encapsulate genistein, an inhibitor of tyrosine-specific protein kinases, for the treatment of ocular neovascularization. The mean diameter of genistein-loaded Flt1 peptide-HA conjugate micelles was measured to be 172.0±18.7 nm, with a drug-loading efficiency of 40-50%. In vitro release tests of genistein from the genistein-loaded Flt1 peptide-HA conjugate micelles exhibited the controlled release for longer than 24h. In vitro biological activity of genistein/Flt1 peptide-HA micelles was corroborated from the synergistic anti-proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Furthermore, we could confirm the anti-angiogenic effect of genistein/Flt1 peptide-HA micelles from the statistically significant suppression of corneal neovascularization in silver nitrate cauterized corneas of SD rats. The retinal vascular hyperpermeability was also drastically reduced by the treatment in diabetic retinopathy model rats. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Wakefield suppression using beatwave structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.; Kim, J.S.

    1991-12-31

    A proposed method of suppressing transverse wakefields in an accelerating structure makes use of the fact that superposition of long-range wakes excited by an electron bunch transversing a series of accelerating cells with different transverse frequencies can produce interference cancellation, thereby significantly reducing the magnitudes of the harmful wake potentials. Analytic calculations as well as time-domain and modal sum simulations are performed to the beatwave effects produced by detuned, disk-loaded cavities as function of their transverse frequency spread and the population density.

  11. Fire suppression and detection equipment

    SciTech Connect

    E.E. Bates

    2006-01-15

    Inspection and testing guidelines go beyond the 'Code of Federal Regulation'. Title 30 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (30 CFR) contains requirements and references to national standards for inspection, testing and maintenance of fire suppression and detection equipment for mine operators. However, federal requirements have not kept pace with national standards and best practices. The article lists National Fire Protection (NFPA) standards that are referenced by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 30 CFR. It then discusses other NFPA Standards excluded from 30 CFR and explains the NFPA standard development process. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 5 photos.

  12. Anionic phospholipids modulate peptide insertion into membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, L P; Deber, C M

    1997-05-06

    While the insertion of a hydrophobic peptide or membrane protein segment into the bilayer can be spontaneous and driven mainly by the hydrophobic effect, anionic lipids, which comprise ca. 20% of biological membranes, provide a source of electrostatic attractions for binding of proteins/peptides into membranes. To unravel the interplay of hydrophobicity and electrostatics in the binding of peptides into membranes, we designed peptides de novo which possess the typical sequence Lys-Lys-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Trp-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Al a-Ala-Lys-Lys-Lys-Lys-amide, where X residues correspond to "guest" residues which encompass a range of hydrophobicity (Leu, Ile, Gly, and Ser). Circular dichroism spectra demonstrated that peptides were partially (40-90%) random in aqueous buffer but were promoted to form 100% alpha-helical structures by anionic lipid micelles. In neutral lipid micelles, only the relatively hydrophobic peptides (X = L and I) spontaneously adopted the alpha-helical conformation, but when 25% of negatively charged lipids were mixed in to mimic the content of anionic lipids in biomembranes, the less hydrophobic (X = S and G) peptides then formed alpha-helical conformations. Consistent with these findings, fluorescence quenching by the aqueous-phase quencher iodide indicated that in anionic (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) vesicles, the peptide Trp residue was buried in the lipid vesicle hydrophobic core, while in neutral (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) vesicles, only hydrophobic (X = L and I) peptides were shielded from the aqueous solution. Trp emission spectra of peptides in the presence of phospholipids doxyl-labeled at the 5-, 7-, 10-, 12-, and 16-fatty acid positions implied not only a transbilayer orientation for inserted peptides but also that mixed peptide populations (transbilayer + surface-associated) may arise. Overall results suggest that for hydrophobic peptides with segmental threshold hydrophobicity below that which

  13. RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates.

    PubMed

    Osugi, Tomohiro; Son, You Lee; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Satake, Honoo; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Since a peptide with a C-terminal Arg-Phe-NH2 (RFamide peptide) was first identified in the ganglia of the venus clam in 1977, RFamide peptides have been found in the nervous system of both invertebrates and vertebrates. In vertebrates, the RFamide peptide family includes gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), neuropeptide FF (NPFF), prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide/26RFamide peptide (QRFP/26RFa), and kisspeptins (kiss1 and kiss2). They are involved in important functions such as the release of hormones, regulation of sexual or social behavior, pain transmission, reproduction, and feeding. In contrast to tetrapods and jawed fish, the information available on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates is limited, thus preventing further insights into the evolution of RFamide peptides in vertebrates. In this review, we focus on the previous research and recent advances in the studies on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates. In agnathans, the genes encoding GnIH, NPFF, and PrRP precursors and the mature peptides have been identified in lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and hagfish (Paramyxine atami). Putative kiss1 and kiss2 genes have also been found in the genome database of lamprey. In basal chordates, namely, in amphioxus (Branchiostoma japonicum), a common ancestral form of GnIH and NPFF genes and their mature peptides, as well as the ortholog of the QRFP gene have been identified. The studies revealed that the number of orthologs of vertebrate RFamide peptides present in agnathans and basal chordates is greater than expected, suggesting that the vertebrate RFamide peptides might have emerged and expanded at an early stage of chordate evolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antimicrobial Peptides from Amphibian Skin Potently Inhibit Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Transfer of Virus from Dendritic Cells to T Cells

    PubMed Central

    VanCompernolle, Scott E.; Taylor, R. Jeffery; Oswald-Richter, Kyra; Jiang, Jiyang; Youree, Bryan E.; Bowie, John H.; Tyler, Michael J.; Conlon, J. Michael; Wade, David; Aiken, Christopher; Dermody, Terence S.; KewalRamani, Vineet N.; Rollins-Smith, Louise A.; Unutmaz, Derya

    2005-01-01

    Topical antimicrobicides hold great promise in reducing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. Amphibian skin provides a rich source of broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides including some that have antiviral activity. We tested 14 peptides derived from diverse amphibian species for the capacity to inhibit HIV infection. Three peptides (caerin 1.1, caerin 1.9, and maculatin 1.1) completely inhibited HIV infection of T cells within minutes of exposure to virus at concentrations that were not toxic to target cells. These peptides also suppressed infection by murine leukemia virus but not by reovirus, a structurally unrelated nonenveloped virus. Preincubation with peptides prevented viral fusion to target cells and disrupted the HIV envelope. Remarkably, these amphibian peptides also were highly effective in inhibiting the transfer of HIV by dendritic cells (DCs) to T cells, even when DCs were transiently exposed to peptides 8 h after virus capture. These data suggest that amphibian-derived peptides can access DC-sequestered HIV and destroy the virus before it can be transferred to T cells. Thus, amphibian-derived antimicrobial peptides show promise as topical inhibitors of mucosal HIV transmission and provide novel tools to understand the complex biology of HIV capture by DCs. PMID:16140737

  15. Suppression effects on musical and verbal memory.

    PubMed

    Schendel, Zachary A; Palmer, Caroline

    2007-06-01

    Three experiments contrasted the effects of articulatory suppression on recognition memory for musical and verbal sequences. In Experiment 1, a standard/comparison task was employed, with digit or note sequences presented visually or auditorily while participants remained silent or produced intermittent verbal suppression (saying "the") or musical suppression (singing "la"). Both suppression types decreased performance by equivalent amounts, as compared with no suppression. Recognition accuracy was lower during suppression for visually presented digits than during that for auditorily presented digits (consistent with phonological loop predictions), whereas accuracy was equivalent for visually presented notes and auditory tones. When visual interference filled the retention interval in Experiment 2, performance with visually presented notes but not digits was impaired. Experiment 3 forced participants to translate visually presented music sequences by presenting comparison sequences auditorily. Suppression effects for visually presented music resembled those for digits only when the recognition task required sensory translation of cues.

  16. The Use of an IL-1 Receptor Antagonist Peptide to Control Inflammation in the Treatment of Corneal Limbal Epithelial Stem Cell Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fok, E.; Guildford, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Corneal limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) may be treated using ex vivo limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) derived from cadaveric donor tissue. However, continuing challenges exist around tissue availability, inflammation, and transplant rejection. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or recombinant human IL-1β stimulated primary human keratocyte and LESC models were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of a short chain, IL-1 receptor antagonist peptide for use in LESC sheet growth to control inflammation. The peptide was characterized using mass spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. Peptide cytotoxicity, patterns of cell cytokine expression in response to LPS or IL-1β stimulation, and peptide suppression of this response were investigated by MTS/LDH assays, ELISA, and q-PCR. Cell differences in LPS stimulated toll-like receptor 4 expression were investigated using immunocytochemistry. A significant reduction in rIL-1β stimulated inflammatory cytokine production occurred following LESC and keratocyte incubation with anti-inflammatory peptide and in LPS stimulated IL-6 and IL-8 production following keratocyte incubation with peptide (1 mg/mL) (P < 0.05). LESCs produced no cytokine response to LPS stimulation and showed no TLR4 expression. The peptide supported LESC growth when adhered to a silicone hydrogel contact lens indicating potential use in improved LESC grafting through suppression of inflammation. PMID:25705668

  17. Production of a recombinant hybrid molecule of cholera toxin-B-subunit and proteolipid-protein-peptide for the treatment of experimental encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Y; Byun, Y; Fujita, M; Izutani, W; Suzuki, T; Udaka, S; Fujihashi, K; McGhee, J R; Kiyono, H

    2001-07-05

    Mucosal administration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)-specific autoantigens can reduce the onset of disease. To examine whether cholera toxin-B-subunit (CTB)-conjugated EAE-specific T-cell epitope can reduce development of the autoimmune disease in mice, we produced a recombinant hybrid molecule of CTB fusion protein linked with proteolipid-protein (PLP)-peptide139-151(C140S) at levels up to 0.1 gram per liter culture media in Bacillus brevis as a secretion-expression system. Amino acid sequencing and GM1-receptor binding assay showed that this expression system produced a uniformed recombinant hybrid protein. EAE was induced in SJL/J mice by systemic administration with the PLP-peptide. When nasally immunized 5 times with 70 microg rCTB PLP-peptide hybrid protein, mice showed a significantly suppressed development of ongoing EAE and an inhibition of both the PLP-peptide-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses and leukocyte infiltration into the spinal cord. In contrast, all mice given the PLP-peptide alone or the PLP-peptide with the free form of CTB did not suppress the development of EAE and DTH responses. These results suggest that nasal treatment with the recombinant B. brevis-derived hybrid protein of CTB and autoantigen peptide could prove useful in the control of multiple sclerosis.

  18. Peptides and methods against diabetes

    DOEpatents

    Albertini, Richard J.; Falta, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to methods of preventing or reducing the severity of diabetes. In one embodiment, the method involves administering to the individual a peptide having substantially the sequence of a on-conserved region sequence of a T cell receptor present on the surface of T cells mediating diabetes or a fragment thereof, wherein the peptide or fragment is capable of causing an effect on the immune system to regulate the T cells. In particular, the T cell receptor has the V.beta. regional V.beta.6 or V.beta.14. In another embodiment, the method involves gene therapy. The invention also relates to methods of diagnosing diabetes by determining the presence of diabetes predominant T cell receptors.

  19. Analysis of peptide uptake and location of root hair-promoting peptide accumulation in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Yoshiki; Taniguchi, Rikiya; Kubo, Motoki

    2012-03-01

    Peptide uptake by plant roots from degraded soybean-meal products was analyzed in Brassica rapa and Solanum lycopersicum. B. rapa absorbed about 40% of the initial water volume, whereas peptide concentration was decreased by 75% after 24 h. Analysis by reversed-phase HPLC showed that number of peptides was absorbed by the roots during soaking in degraded soybean-meal products for 24 h. Carboxyfluorescein-labeled root hair-promoting peptide was synthesized, and its localization, movement, and accumulation in roots were investigated. The peptide appeared to be absorbed by root hairs and then moved to trichoblasts. Furthermore, the peptide was moved from trichoblasts to atrichoblasts after 24 h. The peptide was accumulated in epidermal cells, suggesting that the peptide may have a function in both trichoblasts and atrichoblasts. Copyright © 2012 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-10-10

    Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins. In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative, approach to assessment of the colloidal stability of both peptide and protein formulations.

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1–3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1–3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1–3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1–3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1–11 (hLF 1–11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections

  2. Leptin suppresses sweet taste responses of enteroendocrine STC-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Jyotaki, Masafumi; Sanematsu, Keisuke; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-09-22

    Leptin is an important hormone that regulates food intake and energy homeostasis by acting on central and peripheral targets. In the gustatory system, leptin is known to selectively suppress sweet responses by inhibiting the activation of sweet sensitive taste cells. Sweet taste receptor (T1R2+T1R3) is also expressed in gut enteroendocrine cells and contributes to nutrient sensing, hormone release and glucose absorption. Because of the similarities in expression patterns between enteroendocrine and taste receptor cells, we hypothesized that they may also share similar mechanisms used to modify/regulate the sweet responsiveness of these cells by leptin. Here, we used mouse enteroendocrine cell line STC-1 and examined potential effect of leptin on Ca(2+) responses of STC-1 cells to various taste compounds. Ca(2+) responses to sweet compounds in STC-1 cells were suppressed by a rodent T1R3 inhibitor gurmarin, suggesting the involvement of T1R3-dependent receptors in detection of sweet compounds. Responses to sweet substances were suppressed by ⩾1ng/ml leptin without affecting responses to bitter, umami and salty compounds. This effect was inhibited by a leptin antagonist (mutant L39A/D40A/F41A) and by ATP gated K(+) (KATP) channel closer glibenclamide, suggesting that leptin affects sweet taste responses of enteroendocrine cells via activation of leptin receptor and KATP channel expressed in these cells. Moreover, leptin selectively inhibited sweet-induced but not bitter-induced glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion from STC-1 cells. These results suggest that leptin modulates sweet taste responses of enteroendocrine cells to regulate nutrient sensing, hormone release and glucose absorption in the gut. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Selective inhibition of miR-21 by phage display screened peptide

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Debojit; Nahar, Smita; Rai, Manish Kumar; Ray, Arjun; Chakraborty, Kausik; Maiti, Souvik

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs are nodal regulators of gene expression and deregulation of miRNAs is causally associated with different diseases, including cancer. Modulation of miRNA expression is thus of therapeutic importance. Small molecules are currently being explored for their potential to downregulate miRNAs. Peptides have shown to have better potency and selectivity toward their targets but their potential in targeting and modulating miRNAs remain unexplored. Herein, using phage display we found a very selective peptide against pre-miR-21. Interestingly, the peptide has the potential to downregulate miR-21, by binding to pre-miR-21 and hindering Dicer processing. It is selective towards miR-21 inside the cell. By antagonising miR-21 function, the peptide is able to increase the expression of its target proteins and thereby increase apoptosis and suppress cell proliferation, invasion and migration. This peptide can further be explored for its anti-cancer activity in vivo and may be even extended to clinical studies. PMID:25824952

  4. Magnetic nanoparticles enhance the anticancer activity of cathelicidin LL-37 peptide against colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Prokop, Izabela; Wilczewska, Agnieszka Z; Wnorowska, Urszula; Piktel, Ewelina; Wątek, Marzena; Savage, Paul B; Bucki, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The pleiotropic activity of human cathelicidin LL-37 peptide includes an ability to suppress development of colon cancer cells. We hypothesized that the anticancer activity of LL-37 would improve when attached to the surface of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Using colon cancer culture (DLD-1 cells and HT-29 cells), we evaluated the effects of MNPs, LL-37 peptide, its synthetic analog ceragenin CSA-13, and two novel nanosystems, ie, MNP@LL-37 and MNP@CSA-13, on cancer cell viability and apoptosis. Treatment of cancer cells with the LL-37 peptide linked to MNPs (MNP@LL-37) caused a greater decrease in cell viability and a higher rate of apoptosis compared with treatment using free LL-37 peptide. Additionally, we observed a strong ability of ceragenin CSA-13 and MNP@CSA-13 to induce apoptosis of DLD-1 cells. We found that both nanosystems were successfully internalized by HT-29 cells, and cathelicidin LL-37 and ceragenin CSA-13 might play a key role as novel homing molecules. These results indicate that the previously described anticancer activity of LL-37 peptide against colon cancer cells might be significantly improved using a theranostic approach. PMID:26082634

  5. Antigenicity of peptides comprising the immunosuppressive domain of the retroviral envelope glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    To achieve persistent infection of the host, viruses often subvert or suppress host immunity through mechanisms that are not entirely understood. The envelope glycoprotein of several retroviruses is thought to possess potent immunosuppressive activity, mapped to a 17-amino acid residue conserved domain. Synthetic peptides corresponding to this immunosuppressive domain can inhibit lymphocyte activation, whereas mutation of key domain residues can increase the lymphocyte response to linked antigenic epitopes. Using three T cell receptors (TCRs) of defined specificity, we examine the effect of the immunosuppressive domain on the T cell response to their respective antigenic peptides. We find that fusion of a T cell epitope to the immunosuppressive domain can greatly modulate its potency. However, the effects heavily depend on the particular combination of TCR and peptide-major histocompatibility complex class II (pMHC II), and are mimicked by sequence-scrambled peptides of similar length, suggesting they operate at the level of TCR-pMHC interaction. These results offer an alternative explanation for the immunogenicity of T cell epitopes comprising the putative immunosuppressive domain, which is more consistent with an effect on peptide antigenicity than true immunosuppressive activity. PMID:28111636

  6. Peptide-modified PELCL electrospun membranes for regulation of vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fang; Jia, Xiaoling; Yang, Yang; Yang, Qingmao; Gao, Chao; Zhao, Yunhui; Fan, Yubo; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2016-11-01

    The efficiency of biomaterials used in small vascular repair depends greatly on their ability to interact with vascular endothelial cells (VECs). Rapid endothelialization of the vascular grafts is a promising way to prevent thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. In this work, modification of electrospun membranes of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PELCL) by three different peptides for regulation of VECs were studied in order to obtain ideal bioactive biomaterials as small diameter vascular grafts. QK (a mimetic peptide to vascular endothelial growth factor), Arg-Glu-Asp-Val (REDV, a specific adhesive peptide to VECs) and Val-Ala-Pro-Gly (VAPG, a specific adhesive peptide to vascular smooth muscle cells) were investigated. Surface properties of the modified membranes and the response of VECs were verified. It was found that protein adsorption and platelet adhesion were effectively suppressed with the introduction of QK, REDV or VAPG peptides on the PELCL electrospun membranes. Both QK- and REDV-modified electrospun membranes could accelerate the proliferation of VECs in the first 9days, and the QK-modified electrospun membrane promoted cell proliferation more significantly than the REDV-modified one. The REDV-modified PELCL membrane was the most favorable for VECs adhesion than QK- and VAPG-modified membranes. It was suggested that QK- or REDV-modified PELCL electrospun membranes may have great potential applications in cardiovascular biomaterials for rapid endothelialization in situ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The mechanism of action of two bradykinin-potentiating peptides on isolated smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Ufkes, J G; Aarsen, P N; van der Meer, C

    1977-07-15

    Bradykinin-induced contractions in the guinea-pig ileum were potentiated by the peptides A-VI-5 (Val-Glu-Ser-Ser-Lys) and BPP5a (Pyr-Lys-Trp-Ala-Pro), while the contractions induced by other agonists were not affected. Neither peptide added alone caused any response. Previous addition of the peptides shortened the latent period following the addition of bradykinin to a value corresponding to the contraction height with an equivalent dose of bradykinin added alone. Bradykinin in contact with a piece of ileum was inactivated at a relatively slow rate. This inactivation was not inhibited by either A-VI-5 or BPP5a in doses causing potentiation. Suppression of the cholinergic activity by cooling, atropine, morphine or tetrodotoxin did not influence the potentiating activity. Addition of the peptides at the moment a submaximal contraction due to bradykinin had been fully established, increased the contraction height within seconds. The two peptides caused a parallel shift to the left of the dose-effect curve of bradykinin, whereas the maximum bradykinin effect remained unchanged. It is concluded that sensitization of bradykinin receptors due to an increased affinity of the receptor for bradykinin is the hypothesis which best fits the experimental findings.

  8. Orientation-tuned suppression in binocular rivalry reveals general and specific components of rivalry suppression.

    PubMed

    Stuit, Sjoerd M; Cass, John; Paffen, Chris L E; Alais, David

    2009-10-16

    During binocular rivalry (BR), conflicting monocular images are alternately suppressed from awareness. During suppression of an image, contrast sensitivity for probes is reduced by approximately 0.3-0.5 log units relative to when the image is in perceptual dominance. Previous studies on rivalry suppression have led to controversies concerning the nature and extent of suppression during BR. We tested for feature-specific suppression using orthogonal rivaling gratings and measuring contrast sensitivity to small grating probes at a range of orientations in a 2AFC orientation discrimination task. Results indicate that suppression is not uniform across orientations: suppression was much greater for orientations close to that of the suppressed grating. The higher suppression was specific to a narrow range around the suppressed rival grating, with a tuning similar to V1 orientation bandwidths. A similar experiment tested for spatial frequency tuning and found that suppression was stronger for frequencies close to that of the suppressed grating. Interestingly, no tuned suppression was observed when a flicker-and-swap paradigm was used, suggesting that tuned suppression occurs only for lower-level, interocular rivalry. Together, the results suggest there are two components to rivalry suppression: a general feature-invariant component and an additional component specifically tuned to the rivaling features.

  9. Antihypertensive Peptides from Milk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jäkälä, Pauliina; Vapaatalo, Heikki

    2010-01-01

    Dietary proteins possess a wide range of nutritional and functional properties. They are used as a source of energy and amino acids, which are needed for growth and development. Many dietary proteins, especially milk proteins, contain physiologically active peptides encrypted in the protein sequence. These peptides may be released during gastrointestinal digestion or food processing and once liberated, cause different physiological functions. Milk-derived bioactive peptides are shown to have antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, antioxidative and mineral-binding properties. During the fermentation of milk with certain lactobacilli, two interesting tripeptides Ile-Pro-Pro and Val-Pro-Pro are released from casein to the final product. These lactotripeptides have attenuated the development of hypertension in several animal models and lowered blood pressure in clinical studies. They inhibit ACE in vitro at micromolar concentrations, protect endothelial function in vitro and reduce arterial stiffness in humans. Thus, milk as a traditional food product can after certain processing serve as a functional food and carry specific health-promoting effects, providing an option to control blood pressure. PMID:27713251

  10. Biopharmaceuticals: From peptide to drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannappel, Margarete

    2017-08-01

    Biologics are therapeutic proteins or peptides that are produced by means of biological processes within living organisms and cells. They are highly specific molecules and play a crucial role as therapeutics for the treatment of severe and chronic diseases (e.g. cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, autoimmune disorders). The development of new biologics and biologics-based drugs gains more and more importance in the fight against various diseases. A short overview on biotherapeutical drug development is given. Cone snails are a large group of poisonous, predatory sea snails with more than 700 species. They use a very powerful venom which rapidly inactivates and paralyzes their prey. Most bioactive venom components are small peptides (conotoxins, conopeptides) which are precisely directed towards a specific target (e.g. ion channel, receptors). Due to their small size, their precision and speed of action, naturally occurring cone snail venom peptides represent an attractive source for the identification and design of novel biological drug entities. The Jagna cone snail project is an encouraging initiative to map the ecological variety of cone snails around the island of Bohol (Philippines) and to conserve the biological information for potential future application.

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides: Versatile Biological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Pushpanathan, Muthuirulan; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are diverse group of biologically active molecules with multidimensional properties. In recent past, a wide variety of AMPs with diverse structures have been reported from different sources such as plants, animals, mammals, and microorganisms. The presence of unusual amino acids and structural motifs in AMPs confers unique structural properties to the peptide that attribute for their specific mode of action. The ability of these active AMPs to act as multifunctional effector molecules such as signalling molecule, immune modulators, mitogen, antitumor, and contraceptive agent makes it an interesting candidate to study every aspect of their structural and biological properties for prophylactic and therapeutic applications. In addition, easy cloning and recombinant expression of AMPs in heterologous plant host systems provided a pipeline for production of disease resistant transgenic plants. Besides these properties, AMPs were also used as drug delivery vectors to deliver cell impermeable drugs to cell interior. The present review focuses on the diversity and broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of AMPs along with its multidimensional properties that could be exploited for the application of these bioactive peptides as a potential and promising drug candidate in pharmaceutical industries. PMID:23935642

  12. Recent Advances in Peptide Immunomodulators.

    PubMed

    Zerfas, Breanna L; Gao, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    With the continued rise in antibiotic-resistant bacteria, there is an immense need for the development of new therapeutic agents. Host-defense peptides (HDPs) offer a unique alternative to many of the current approved antibiotics. By targeting the host rather than the pathogen, HDPs offer several benefits over traditional small molecule drug treatments, such as a slower propensity towards resistance, broad-spectrum activity and lower risk of patients developing sepsis. However, natural peptide structures have many disadvantages as well, including susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, significant costs of synthesis and host toxicity. For this reason, much work has been done to examine peptidomimetic structures, in the hopes of finding a structure with all of the desired qualities of an antibiotic drug. Recently, this research has included synthetic constructs that mimic the behavior of HDPs but have no structural similarity to peptides. This review article focuses on the progression of this field of research, beginning with an analysis of a few prominent examples of natural HDPs and moving on to describe how the information learned by studying them have led to the current design platforms.

  13. Glucose Suppression of Glucagon Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Le Marchand, Sylvain J.; Piston, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Glucagon is released from α-cells present in intact pancreatic islets at glucose concentrations below 4 mm, whereas higher glucose levels inhibit its secretion. The mechanisms underlying the suppression of α-cell secretory activity are poorly understood, but two general types of models have been proposed as follows: direct inhibition by glucose or paracrine inhibition from non-α-cells within the islet of Langerhans. To identify α-cells for analysis, we utilized transgenic mice expressing fluorescent proteins targeted specifically to these cells. Measurements of glucagon secretion from pure populations of flow-sorted α-cells show that contrary to its effect on intact islets, glucose does stimulate glucagon secretion from isolated α-cells. This observation argues against a direct inhibition of glucagon secretion by glucose and supports the paracrine inhibition model. Imaging of cellular metabolism by two-photon excitation of NAD(P)H autofluorescence indicates that glucose is metabolized in α-cells and that glucokinase is the likely rate-limiting step in this process. Imaging calcium dynamics of α-cells in intact islets reveals that inhibiting concentrations of glucose increase the intracellular calcium concentration and the frequency of α-cell calcium oscillations. Application of candidate paracrine inhibitors leads to reduced glucagon secretion but did not decrease the α-cell calcium activity. Taken together, the data suggest that suppression occurs downstream from α-cell calcium signaling, presumably at the level of vesicle trafficking or exocytotic machinery. PMID:20231269

  14. Water Mist fire suppression experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Water Mist commercial research program is scheduled to fly an investigation on STS-107 in 2002. This investigation will be flown as an Experimental Mounting Structure (EMS) insert into the updated Combustion Module (CM-2), a sophisticated combustion chamber plus diagnostic equipment. (The investigation hardware is shown here mounted in a non-flight frame similar to the EMS.) Water Mist is a commercial research program by the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS), a NASA Commercial Space Center located at the Colorado School of Mines, in Golden, CO and Industry Partner Environmental Engineering Concepts. The program is focused on developing water mist as a replacement for bromine-based chemical fire suppression agents (halons). By conducting the experiments in microgravity, interference from convection currents is minimized and fundamental knowledge can be gained. This knowledge is incorporated into models, which can be used to simulate a variety of physical environments. The immediate objective of the project is to study the effect of a fine water mist on a laminar propagating flame generated in a propane-air mixture at various equivalence ratios. The effects of droplet size and concentration on the speed of the flame front is used as a measure of the effectiveness of fire suppression in this highly controlled experimental environment.

  15. Methods of suppressing automotive interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taggart, H. E.

    1981-11-01

    Automotive manufacturers utilize several techniques to reduce EMI emanating from the vehicle. The techniques include resistor spark plugs, resistor spark plug cables, use of silicone lubricant in the distributor, use of capacitors as filters, placement of grounding straps at key locations, conductive fan belt discharge, and tire static-charge reduction. If even further reduction is needed to obtain the maximum capability of a specific mobile communication system, additional suppression techniques are discussed which are effective at frequencies from approximately 30 to 1000 MHz. Measurement results show that the EMI from a new production-line automobile, measured in accordance with SAE Standard J551g, can be reduced as much as 10 to 15 dB by employing these suppression techniques. The amount of degradation to a mobile narrow-band FM receiver, such as the type used by law enforcement agencies, can be measured using the measurement technique described. This same technique can then be used as a tool to further reduce EMI from the vehicle components.

  16. Suppressed epidemics in multirelational networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Elvis H. W.; Wang, Wei; Xu, C.; Tang, Ming; Do, Younghae; Hui, P. M.

    2015-08-01

    A two-state epidemic model in networks with links mimicking two kinds of relationships between connected nodes is introduced. Links of weights w1 and w0 occur with probabilities p and 1 -p , respectively. The fraction of infected nodes ρ (p ) shows a nonmonotonic behavior, with ρ drops with p for small p and increases for large p . For small to moderate w1/w0 ratios, ρ (p ) exhibits a minimum that signifies an optimal suppression. For large w1/w0 ratios, the suppression leads to an absorbing phase consisting only of healthy nodes within a range pL≤p ≤pR , and an active phase with mixed infected and healthy nodes for p pR . A mean field theory that ignores spatial correlation is shown to give qualitative agreement and capture all the key features. A physical picture that emphasizes the intricate interplay between infections via w0 links and within clusters formed by nodes carrying the w1 links is presented. The absorbing state at large w1/w0 ratios results when the clusters are big enough to disrupt the spread via w0 links and yet small enough to avoid an epidemic within the clusters. A theory that uses the possible local environments of a node as variables is formulated. The theory gives results in good agreement with simulation results, thereby showing the necessity of including longer spatial correlations.

  17. Water Mist fire suppression experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Water Mist commercial research program is scheduled to fly an investigation on STS-107 in 2002. This investigation will be flown as an Experimental Mounting Structure (EMS) insert into the updated Combustion Module (CM-2), a sophisticated combustion chamber plus diagnostic equipment. (The investigation hardware is shown here mounted in a non-flight frame similar to the EMS.) Water Mist is a commercial research program by the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS), a NASA Commercial Space Center located at the Colorado School of Mines, in Golden, CO and Industry Partner Environmental Engineering Concepts. The program is focused on developing water mist as a replacement for bromine-based chemical fire suppression agents (halons). By conducting the experiments in microgravity, interference from convection currents is minimized and fundamental knowledge can be gained. This knowledge is incorporated into models, which can be used to simulate a variety of physical environments. The immediate objective of the project is to study the effect o