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Sample records for 2000-hour wear test

  1. Results of a 2000 hour wear test of the NEXIS ion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, John Steven; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.; Schneider, Analyn C; Sengupta, Anita

    2005-01-01

    The Nuclear Electric Xenon Ion System (NEXIS) ion thruster was developed for potential outer planet robotic missions under NASA's Prometheus program. This engine was designed to operate at power levels ranging from 16 to over 20 kWe at specific impulses of 6000 to 7500 s for burn times of up to 10 years, satisfying the requirements of nuclear electric propulsion systems such as that on the proposed Prometheus 1 mission to explore the icy moons of Jupiter. State-of-the-art performance and life assessment tools were used to design the thruster. Following the successful performance validation of a Laboratory Model thruster, Development Model hardware was fabricated and subjected to vibration and wear testing. The results of a 2000-hour wear test are reported herein. Thruster performance achieved the target requirements and was steady for the duration of the test. Ion optics performance was similarly stable. Discharge loss increases of 6 eV/ion were observed in the first 500 hours of the test and were attributed to primary electron energy decreases due to cathode insert conditioning. Relatively high recycle rates were observed and were identified to be high-voltage-to-ground arcs in the back of the thruster caused by wire insulation outgassing and electron penetration through the plasma screen. Field emission of electrons between the accelerator and screen grids was observed and attributed to evolution of field emitter sites at accelerator grid aperture edges caused by ion bombardment. Preliminary modeling and analysis indicates that the NEXIS engine can meet mission performance requirements over the required lifetime. Finally, successful validation of the NEXIS design methodology, design tools, and technologies with the results of the wear test and companion performance and vibration tests presents significant applicability of the NEXIS development effort to missions of near-term as well as long-term interest for NASA.

  2. Results of a 2000 Hour Wear Tof the NEXIS Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, John Steven; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.; Schneider, Analyn C; Sengupta, Anita

    2005-01-01

    The Nuclear Electric Xenon Ion System (NEXIS) ion thruster was developed for potential outer planet robotic missions under NASA's Prometheus program. This engine was designed to operate at power levels ranging from 16 to over 20 kWe at specific impulses of 6000 to 7500 s for burn times of up to 10 years, satisfying the requirements of nuclear electric propulsion systems such as that on the proposed Prometheus 1 mission to explore the icy moons of Jupiter. State-of-the-art performance and life assessment tools were used to design the thruster. Following the successful performance validation of a Laboratory Model thruster, Development Model hardware was fabricated and subjected to vibration and wear testing. The results of a 2000-hour wear test are reported herein. Thruster performance achieved the target requirements and was steady for the duration of the test. Ion optics performance was similarly stable. Discharge loss increases of 6 eV/ion were observed in the first 500 hours of the test and were attributed to primary electron energy decreases due to cathode insert conditioning. Relatively high recycle rates were observed and were identified to be high-voltage-to-ground arcs in the back of the thruster caused by wire insulation outgassing and electron penetration through the plasma screen. Field emission of electrons between the accelerator and screen grids was observed and attributed to evolution of field emitter sites at accelerator grid aperture edges caused by ion bombardment. Preliminary modeling and analysis indicates that the NEXIS engine can meet mission performance requirements over the required lifetime. Finally, successful validation of the NEXIS design methodology, design tools, and technologies with the results of the wear test and companion performance and vibration tests presents significant applicability of the NEXIS development effort to missions of near-term as well as long-term interest for NASA.

  3. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been baselined for use on the Space Station to reduce station charging. The plasma contactor provides a low impedance connection to space plasma via a plasma produced by an arc discharge. The hollow cathode of the plasma contactor is a refractory metal tube, through which xenon gas flows, which has a disk-shaped plate with a centered orifice at the downstream end of the tube. Within the cathode, arc attachment occurs primarily on a Type S low work function insert that is next to the orifice plate. This low work function insert is used to reduce cathode operating temperatures and energy requirements and, therefore, achieve increased efficiency and longevity. The operating characteristics and lifetime capabilities of this hollow cathode, however, are greatly reduced by oxygen bearing contaminants in the xenon gas. Furthermore, an optimized activation process, where the cathode is heated prior to ignition by an external heater to drive contaminants such as oxygen and moisture from the insert absorbed during exposure to ambient air, is necessary both for cathode longevity and a simplified power processor. In order to achieve the two year (approximately 17,500 hours) continuous operating lifetime requirement for the plasma contactor, a test program was initiated at NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate the extended lifetime capabilities of the hollow cathode. To date, xenon hollow cathodes have demonstrated extended lifetimes with one test having operated in excess of 8000 hours in an ongoing test utilizing contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey. The objectives of this study were to verify the transportability of the contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey and to evaluate cathode contamination control procedures, activation processes, and cathode-to-cathode dispersions in operating characteristics with time. These were accomplished by conducting a 2000 hour wear test of four hollow

  4. Wear Resistance and Wear Mechanism of a Hot Dip Aluminized Steel in Sliding Wear Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiyong; Hao, Xiaoyang; Huang, Yao; Gu, Lingyun; Ren, Yu; Zheng, Ruipeng

    2016-12-01

    Sliding wear experiments were conducted on a hot dip aluminized steel to investigate its wear resistance and wear mechanism. The wear tests were also carried out on a hot dip galvanized steel and the base material (steel Q345) as a comparison. Results show that the wear resistance and hardness of the hot dip aluminized steel are significantly higher than that of the hot dip galvanized steel and the steel Q345 at room temperature. The better wear resistance of the hot dip aluminized steel attributes mainly to the formation of a transition layer containing abundant Fe-Al intermetallic compounds and the transformation of wear-resisting oxides during the friction process. The main phase in the transition layer is Fe2Al5. The thickness of the transition layer is about 90-120 μm. When the wear load increases from 3 N to 19 N, the wear type of the aluminized layer transform from adhesive wear (3 N) into abrasive wear (7 N) and finally into slight wear mixed with oxidation (higher than 11 N).

  5. Wear Testing of the HERMeS Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, George J., Jr.; Gilland, James H.; Peterson, Peter Y.; Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Ahern, Drew M.; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel A.; Hofer, Richard R.; Sekerak, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Hall-Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) thruster is being developed and tested at NASA GRC and NASA JPL through support of the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) as primary propulsion for the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM). This thruster is advancing the state-of-the-art of Hall-effect thrusters and is intended to serve as a precursor to higher power systems for human interplanetary exploration. A 2000-hour wear test has been initiated at NASA GRC with the HERMeS Technology Demonstration Unit One and three of four test segments have been completed totaling 728 h of operation. This is the first test of a NASA-designed magnetically shielded thruster to extend beyond 300 hr of continuous operation. Trends in performance, component wear, thermal design, plume properties, and back-sputtered deposition are discussed for two wear-test segments of 246 h and 360 h. The first incorporated graphite pole covers in an electrical configuration where cathode was electrically connected to thruster body. The second utilized traditional alumina pole covers with the thruster body floating. It was shown that the magnetic shielding in both configurations completely eliminated erosion of the boron nitride discharge channel but resulted in erosion of the inner pole cover. The volumetric erosion rate of the graphite pole covers was roughly 2/3 that of the alumina pole covers and the thruster exhibited slightly better performance. Buildup of back-sputtered carbon on the BN channel at a rate of roughly 1.5 µm/kh is shown to have negligible impact on the performance.

  6. The 2.3 kW Ion Thruster Wear Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkes, James; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Sovey, James S.; Kussmaul, Michael J.; Patterson, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    A 30-cm diameter xenon ion thruster is under development at NASA to provide an ion propulsion option for auxiliary and primary propulsion on missions of national interest. Specific efforts include thruster design optimizations, component life testing and validation, and performance characterizations. Under this program, the ion thruster will be brought to engineering model development status. This paper describes the results of a 2.3-kW 2000-hour wear test performed to identify life limiting phenomena, measure the performance and characterize the operation of the thruster, and obtain wear, erosion, and surface contamination data. These data are being using as a data base for proceeding with additional life validation tests, and to provide input to flight thruster design requirements.

  7. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing for the Space Station Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A wear test of four hollow cathodes was conducted to resolve issues associated with the Space Station plasma contactor. The objectives of this test were to evaluate unit-to-unit dispersions, verify the transportability of contamination control protocols developed by the project, and to evaluate cathode contamination control and activation procedures to enable simplification of the gas feed system and heater power processor. These objectives were achieved by wear testing four cathodes concurrently to 2000 hours. Test results showed maximum unit-to-unit deviations for discharge voltages and cathode tip temperatures to be +/-3 percent and +/-2 percent, respectively, of the nominal values. Cathodes utilizing contamination control procedures known to increase cathode lifetime showed no trends in their monitored parameters that would indicate a possible failure, demonstrating that contamination control procedures had been successfully transferred. Comparisons of cathodes utilizing and not utilizing a purifier or simplified activation procedure showed similar behavior during wear testing and pre- and post-test performance characterizations. This behavior indicates that use of simplified cathode systems and procedures is consistent with long cathode lifetimes.

  8. Wear testing of crosslinked polyethylene: wear rate variability and microbial contamination.

    PubMed

    Brandt, J-M; Vecherya, A; Guenther, L E; Koval, S F; Petrak, M J; Bohm, E R; Wyss, U P

    2014-06-01

    The wear performance of two types of crosslinked polyethylene (Marathon™ and XLK™, DePuy Synthes Inc., Warsaw, IN) was evaluated in a pin-on-disc wear tester, a hip wear simulator, and a knee wear simulator. Sodium azide was used as the microbial inhibitor in the calf serum-based lubricant. In the pin-on-disc wear tester, the Marathon wear rate of 5.33±0.54mm(3)/Mc was significantly lower (p=0.002) than the wear rate of 6.43±0.60mm(3)/Mc for XLK. Inversely, the Marathon wear rate of 15.07±1.03mm(3)/Mc from the hip wear simulator was 2.2-times greater than the XLK wear rate of 6.71±1.03mm(3)/Mc from the knee wear simulator. Differences in implant design, conformity, GUR type, and kinematic test conditions were suggested to account for the difference between the wear rates generated in the different types of wear testing apparati. In all wear tests, sodium azide was ineffective at inhibiting microbial growth in the lubricant. Eight different organisms were identified in the lubricant samples from the wear tests, which suggested the necessity of using an alternative, more effective microbial inhibitor. Careful sample preparation and thorough cleaning has shown to improve the consistency of the wear results. The wear rates generated in the hip and knee wear simulators closely reflected the wear behaviour of Marathon and XLK reported in published data that were tested under similar conditions.

  9. Vuilleumier Cooler Wear Rate Test Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    such combination would be a silicon carbide or chromium silicide rider sliding against a hardcoated Inconel 718 liner. If rider wear is excessive, the...rupture energy These properties are related to experimental parameters that are easily measured. The elastic energy potential of a material is...ultimate strength. It is only necessary to realize that these bulk material properties depend on test conditions such as deformation rate and temperature

  10. Wear Testing of Moving Components in Ultra-High Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Arnelia; McAlister, T.; Ellis, R.; Mosleh, M.

    2010-11-01

    Wear and friction in moving parts in an Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) environment is a fundamental challenge in the design of mechanical assemblies in fusion experiments. In a reactor-scale experiment, constraints have been placed on the material choices and mechanical motions within the system due to their vacuum environment. Wear and friction only serve to complicate these constraints. Textured surfaces, bonded lubricants, and vacuum compatible greases have shown promise as possible means of reducing friction and wear. We have designed a machine for testing wear in a UHV environment, at room temperature, and elevated temperatures. This poster describes the design of the wear test machine and its operating parameters. We have presented an outline of the material test program along with a discussion of the pros and cons of anti-friction and anti-wear treatments.

  11. Wear testing of materials and surfaces for total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Walker, P S; Blunn, G W; Lilley, P A

    1996-01-01

    A simple wear test was investigated for evaluating the wear and damage of material pairs when used in total knee replacement. The test consisted of an axially loaded metallic femoral indentor and a reciprocating ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) flat disk that represented the tibial component. A number of variables were studied including the effect of conformity by varying the radii of the femoral surface, distilled water or serum as a lubricant, different femoral materials, and different types of UHMWPE. In general, the different morphologies of the surface wear of the UHMWPE were similar to those seen on retrieved total knee replacements. Increased conformity with a cylindrical indentor gave a reduced wear rate initially, compared with that of the lower conformity spherical indentor. However, the wear rates were similar subsequent to this initial wearing in phase. Transfer films of UHMWPE were observed on the cobalt-chrome indentors for both serum and distilled water lubrication, although this film was more extensive for distilled water. The lowest wear rate was observed when oxidized zirconium was used on the femoral side, which was attributed to greater wettability, surface hardness, and immunity to oxidative wear. Tests using cobalt-chrome femoral cylinders and different grades of UHMWPE showed different wear rates. Of these PEs, GUR 415 showed less wear than both RCH 1000 and UHMWPE containing numerous fusion defects. For the latter, wear was attributed to a fatigue mechanism, although in most cases it was associated with surface phenomena rather than subsurface cracking. However, in some specimens of UHMWPE subsurface crack propagations occurred with defects. The test method is discussed in relation to its applicability to the evaluation and comparison of bearing materials and surfaces, with particular application to total knee replacements.

  12. RPP-WTP Slurry Wear Evaluation: Slurry Abrasivity

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.

    2002-06-03

    This report deals with the task of evaluating wear in the cross-flow ultrafiltration system and specifically the need to define a representative slurry in order to obtain prototypic wear rates. The filtration system will treat many different wastes, but it is not practical to run a test for each one. This is especially true when considering that the planned period for testing is 2000 hours long and procurement of appropriate simulants is costly. Considering time and cost, one waste stream needs to be chosen to perform the wear test.

  13. Design and wear testing of a temporomandibular joint prosthesis articulation.

    PubMed

    van Loon, J P; Verkerke, G J; de Vries, M P; de Bont, L G

    2000-02-01

    As part of the development of a total temporomandibular joint prosthesis, a prosthesis articulation was designed. The articulation consists of a spherical head (ball) of the mandibular part, rotating against an enveloping ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disc with a flat cranial side, which slides along the opposing skull part. The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro wear rate of the articulation, and to predict the in vivo wear rate from the results. Based on a disc thickness of 5 mm and a ball diameter of 8 mm, the stresses within the disc were calculated by means of a finite element computer model. The wear rate of the ball-disc articulation was determined by in vitro wear tests, with a stainless-steel ball rotating against a UHMWPE disc in a serum-based lubricant. Eight discs were tested for seven million cycles each. The in vitro wear rate of the disc-skull part articulation was calculated from the test results of the ball-disc articulation. The maximum Von Mises' stress was less than the yield strength of UHMWPE and, therefore, was sufficiently low. The in vitro wear rate of the ball-disc articulation was 0.47 mm3 per million cycles. The in vivo expected total wear rate is 0.65 mm3 per year, corresponding with a yearly decrease of disc thickness of 0.0094 mm. Although it is difficult to judge whether this wear rate is sufficiently low, because the influence of UHMWPE wear particles in the TMJ region is unknown, both the expected wear rate and the decrease of thickness appear to be acceptable.

  14. The biochemical characteristics of wear testing lubricants affect polyethylene wear in orthopaedic pin-on-disc testing.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Leah E; Turgeon, Thomas R; Bohm, Eric R; Brandt, Jan-M

    2015-01-01

    Lubricant protein concentration is known to affect crosslinked polyethylene wear in in vitro testing; however, the biochemical nature of these lubricants may also have a significant effect on wear and dictate its clinical relevance. A modified approach to pin-on-disc testing was implemented to explore the effect of four biochemically different lubricants on the wear of two types of crosslinked polyethylene materials (XLK™ and Marathon™; DePuy Synthes, Warsaw, IN, USA). XLK was associated with higher wear rates than Marathon. In comparison to lubricants containing deionized water, lubricants containing phosphate buffered saline solution and hyaluronic acid increased osmolality by up to 1.2 times and thermal stability by up to 1.4 times. This biochemical change reduced wear by up to 12.5 times. Wear rates for XLK and Marathon differed by a factor of 3.2 using lubricants with phosphate buffered saline solution as the dilutive media, but only 2.0 for lubricants with deionized water. Interestingly, varying the concentration of hyaluronic acid did not have a significant effect on wear, and differences between XLK and Marathon wear rates were not found to be statistically significant when hyaluronic acid was added to the lubricant. The findings of this study showed that increasing the osmolality and thermal stability of lubricants to more clinical levels decreased wear; however, the effect of hyaluronic acid on wear may not be apparent in simplistic pin-on-disc testing. It was suggested that phosphate buffered saline solution be used as the dilutive media of choice in order to better differentiate the ranking of materials while maintaining some clinical relevance.

  15. Cryogenically treated gin saw wear test-Second season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the second year of comparative testing of crygenically treated gin saws versus standard gin saws. Paired sets of standard and experimental saws were installed in Lummus saw gin stands that were operated side by side during the 2015/2016 ginning season. Test criteria will include saw wear e...

  16. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Task 7, Extended wear testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wakenell, J.F.; Fritz, S.G.; Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-07-01

    Over the past several years, interest has arisen in the development of coal-fired diesel engines for the purpose of efficiently utilizing the extensive coal reserves in the United States, and therefore reducing dependence on foreign oil. One process, which is being considered for use in producing clean coal fuel products involves mild gasification. This process produces by-products which can be further refined and, when blended with neat diesel fuel, used as an engine fuel. The purpose of this task was to test a blend of this coal liquid and diesel fuel (referred to as coal-lite) in an engine, and determine if any detrimental results were observed. This was done by performing a back-to-back performance and emission test of neat diesel fuel and the coal-lite fuel, followed by a 500-hour test of the coal-lite fuel, and completed by a back-to-back performance and emission test of the coal-lite fuel and neat diesel fuel.

  17. Testing of a Fiber Optic Wear, Erosion and Regression Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korman, Valentin; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the physical processes and harsh environments associated with erosion and wear in propulsion environments makes their measurement and real-time rate quantification difficult. A fiber optic sensor capable of determining the wear (regression, erosion, ablation) associated with these environments has been developed and tested in a number of different applications to validate the technique. The sensor consists of two fiber optics that have differing attenuation coefficients and transmit light to detectors. The ratio of the two measured intensities can be correlated to the lengths of the fiber optic lines, and if the fibers and the host parent material in which they are embedded wear at the same rate the remaining length of fiber provides a real-time measure of the wear process. Testing in several disparate situations has been performed, with the data exhibiting excellent qualitative agreement with the theoretical description of the process and when a separate calibrated regression measurement is available good quantitative agreement is obtained as well. The light collected by the fibers can also be used to optically obtain the spectra and measure the internal temperature of the wear layer.

  18. Rig for testing the relative wear resistance of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Berdikov, V.F.; Diulin, A.I.; Efimchuk, V.P.; Pushkarev, O.I.; Finogenov, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have developed a simple and compact rig for studying the relative wear resistance of materials subjected to mechanical abrasion and friction. The rig has an electronic control system. It was used to test the relative wear resistance of a wide range of superhard and brittle materials under mechanical abrasion against a counterbody. The counterbody was made of modified iron and the test medium was a diamond suspension in oil. The results showed that specimen wear exhibits a linear relationship with abrasion time (in the range of 0.5-20 min.) at unit pressure from 0.01 to 0.10 MPa. That a standard wear pattern exists within a wide range of parameters indicates that abrasive conditions are highly stable and makes it possible to control conditions. The rig was used to establish the relative wear resistance of several abrasives, minerals, and refractory compounds. The very large difference (15.2 times) between the most and least-resistant materials (tungsten carbide and fluoride) illustrates the sensitivity of the methodology.

  19. Tribology: Wear test selection for design and application

    SciTech Connect

    Ruff, A.W.; Bayer, R.G.

    1993-01-01

    One important area of concern that has not been covered in previous symposia by the ASTM's Committee on Wear and Erosion is the connection between laboratory testing and actual operating performance of systems or components. This connection between laboratory testing, test results, and final design and performance is a crucial one in the practical application of tribology science and engineering. One of the aims of this symposium was to show by example how successful simulative testing has been accomplished. Specific examples are presented from a number of applications involving different forms of wear, including some from such specialized areas as computer peripherals, engines, and prosthetic devices. An important consideration in all the presentations was the identification of critical use conditions. Nine of the papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  20. In Situ Wear Test on Thermal Spray Coatings in a Large Chamber Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weifeng; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Selvadurai, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the determination of the mass loss is usually used for a quantitative evaluation of wear tests, while the analysis of wear tracks is utilized for a qualitative evaluation of wear. Both evaluation methods can only be used after the wear testing process and their results only present the final outcome of the wear test. However, the changes during the wear test and the time-dependent wear mechanisms are of great interest as well. A running wear test in a large chamber scanning electron microscope (SEM) offers the first opportunity to observe the wear process in situ. Different wear mechanisms, such as the adhesive, abrasive wear, surface fatigue and tribochemical reaction, can be recorded with high magnification. Within this research, a special pin-on-disk testing device is designed for a vacuum environment. Using this device, arc-sprayed NiCrBSi coatings and high-velocity-oxygen-fuel-sprayed WC-12Co coatings were tested in a large chamber SEM with Al2O3 ceramic balls as wear counterparts. During the wear testing, different wear mechanisms were determined and the processes were recorded in short video streams.

  1. Wear testing and particle characterisation of sequentially crosslinked polyethylene acetabular liners using different femoral head sizes.

    PubMed

    Zietz, Carmen; Fabry, Christian; Middelborg, Lars; Fulda, Gerhard; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2013-08-01

    Larger femoral heads lead to a decreased risk of total hip dislocation and an improved range of motion. However, the larger diameter is associated with increased wear rates. The low wear rates of crosslinked polyethylene opens up the possibility of using larger heads. The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the wear of conventional non-crosslinked versus sequentially crosslinked polyethylene liners in combination with different ceramic head sizes (28, 36, 44 mm). Wear testing was performed in a hip simulator according to ISO 14242. Wear particles from the polyethylene liners were characterized after wear testing. The wear measurements revealed a significant increase in the wear of crosslinked polyethylene liners with larger heads. By sequential crosslinking, however, the gravimetric wear using larger heads was reduced to a fractional amount of the wear using conventional polyethylene. Significant differences were observed for particle morphology but not for the number of particles when comparing non-crosslinked and crosslinked polyethylene.

  2. Experimental testing of total knee replacements with UHMW-PE inserts: impact of severe wear test conditions.

    PubMed

    Zietz, Carmen; Reinders, Joern; Schwiesau, Jens; Paulus, Alexander; Kretzer, Jan Philippe; Grupp, Thomas; Utzschneider, Sandra; Bader, Rainer

    2015-03-01

    Aseptic implant loosening due to inflammatory reactions to wear debris is the main reason for the revision of total knee replacements (TKR). Hence, the decrease in polyethylene wear particle generation from the articulating surfaces is aimed at improving implant design and material. For preclinical testing of new TKR systems standardized wear tests are required. However, these wear tests do not reproduce the entire in vivo situation, since the pattern and amount of wear and subsequent implant failure are underestimated. Therefore, daily activity, kinematics, implant aging and position, third-body-wear and surface properties have to be considered to estimate the wear of implant components in vivo. Hence, severe test conditions are in demand for a better reproduction of the in vivo situation of TKR. In the present article an overview of different experimental wear test scenarios considering clinically relevant polyethylene wear situations using severe test conditions is presented.

  3. Wear Testing of Moderate Activities of Daily Living Using In Vivo Measured Knee Joint Loading

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Jörn; Sonntag, Robert; Vot, Leo; Gibney, Christian; Nowack, Moritz; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Resumption of daily living activities is a basic expectation for patients provided with total knee replacements. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the impact of different activities on the wear performance. In this study the wear performance under application of different daily activities has been analyzed. In vivo load data for walking, walking downstairs/upstairs, sitting down/standing up, and cycling (50 W & 120 W) has been standardized for wear testing. Wear testing of each activity was carried out on a knee wear simulator. Additionally, ISO walking was tested for reasons of comparison. Wear was assessed gravimetrically and wear particles were analyzed. In vivo walking produced the highest overall wear rates, which were determined to be three times higher than ISO walking. Moderate wear rates were determined for walking upstairs and downstairs. Low wear rates were determined for standing up/sitting down and cycling at power levels of 50 W and 120 W. The largest wear particles were observed for cycling. Walking based on in vivo data has been shown to be the most wear-relevant activity. Highly demanding activities (stair climbing) produced considerably less wear. Taking into account the expected number of loads, low-impact activities like cycling may have a greater impact on articular wear than highly demanding activities. PMID:25811996

  4. Friction and wear in surface micromachined tribological test devices

    SciTech Connect

    Senft, D.C.; Dugger, M.T.

    1997-08-01

    We report on the design, construction, and initial testing of surface micromachined devices for measuring friction and wear. The devices measure friction coefficients on both horizontal deposited polysilicon surfaces and vertical etched polysilicon surfaces. The contact geometry of the rubbing surfaces is well-defined, and a method is presented for the determination of the normal and frictional forces. Initial observations on test devices which have been dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and devices coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane suggest that the coatings increase the lifetime of the devices and the repeatability of the results.

  5. Wear testing of a DJOA finger prosthesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Thomas J

    2010-08-01

    Although the market for replacement of diseased metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints is dominated by single-piece silicone prostheses, several two-piece designs have been implanted. One such is the Digital Joint Operative Arthroplasty (DJOA) which consists of a part-spherical stainless steel metacarpal component which articulates within a matching concave phalangeal component made of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). A DJOA MCP prosthesis was tested using a clinically-validated finger simulator while a second DJOA prosthesis acted as a statically-loaded soak-control. Testing ran to 7.1 million cycles of flexion-extension. It was found that the UHMWPE components, both test and control, gained in weight by a similar amount. Therefore apparently there was no wear of the test components. However, the initial and final surface finish values of the test stainless steel metacarpal head were relatively high. Calculations based on this roughness data, plus recent dynamically-loaded soak data, may explain the apparent lack of wear.

  6. Astronaut Russell Schweickart wears EMU and PLSS for countdown test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot of the Apollo 9 prime crew, wears the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) which he will use during his scheduled Apollo 9 extravehicular activity. In addition to the space suit and bubble helmet, the EMU also includes a portable life support system (PLSS) back pack, an Oxygen Purge System (seen atop the PLSS), and a Remote Control Unit on his chest. When this photograph was taken, Schweickart was suited up to participate in an Apollo 9 Countdown Demonstration Test.

  7. In vitro tests of substitute lubricants for wear testing orthopaedic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Scholes, Susan C; Joyce, Thomas J

    2013-06-01

    Bovine serum is the lubricant recommended by several international standards for the wear testing of orthopaedic biomaterials; however, there are issues over its use due to batch variation, degradation, cost and safety. For these reasons, alternative lubricants were investigated. A 50-station Super-CTPOD (circularly translating pin-on-disc) wear test rig was used, which applied multidirectional motion to ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene test pins rubbing against cobalt chromium discs. Thirteen possible alternative lubricants were tested. The use of soy protein as a lubricant gave statistically higher wear, while soya oil, olive oil, Channel Island milk, whole milk, whey, wheatgerm oil, 11 mg/mL egg white, albumin/globulin mix and albumin/globulin/chondroitin sulphate mix all gave statistically lower wear than bovine serum. The lubricants giving the closest wear results to bovine serum were 20 and 40 mg/mL egg white solutions. A light absorbance assay found that these egg white solutions suffered from a high degradation rate that increased with increasing protein content. While egg white solutions offer the best alternative lubricant to bovine serum due to the wear volumes produced, cost-effectiveness and safety of handling, protein degradation will still occur, leading to the need for regular lubricant replacement. Of the lubricants tested in this study, none were found to be superior to bovine serum.

  8. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels - Diesel Emissions Project (APBF-DEC): 2,000-Hour Performance of a NOx Adsorber Catalyst and Diesel Particle Filter System for a Medium-Duty, Pick-Up Diesel Engine Platform; Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-03-01

    Presents the results of a 2,000-hour test of an emissions control system consisting of a nitrogen oxides adsorber catalyst in combination with a diesel particle filter, advanced fuels, and advanced engine controls in an SUV/pick-up truck vehicle platform.

  9. A study of coal particle shape and three-body wear: Part 1, Design and development of a new three-body wear testing machine: Part 2, Particle shape and three-body wear

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, N.N.; Means, K.H.; James, R.; Thompson, T.

    1991-01-01

    Three-body wear involves two surfaces and an intermediate particle trapped between the two surfaces. A machine has been constructed to measure normal and frictional forces due to three-body wear. This machine accurately positions specimens a predetermined distance apart from each other and introduces particles to the interface between the specimens. Different types of specimen combinations have been tested to give a variety of data. Loads that result from the wear test are sampled and stored. Wear coefficients and rates of wear have been calculated for all specimens. (VC)

  10. Wear of nanofilled dental composites in a newly-developed in vitro testing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C.

    Purpose. In vivo wear of dental composites can lead to loss of individual tooth function and the need to replace a composite restoration. To evaluate the wear performance of new and existing dental composites, we developed a novel system for measuring in vitro wear and we used this system to analyze the mechanisms of wear of nanofilled composite materials. Methods. A modified wear testing device was designed based on the Alabama wear testing machine. The new device consists of: (1) an antagonist which is lowered to and raised from the composite specimen by weight loading, (2) a motorized stage to cause the antagonist to slide 2mm on the composite surface, and (3) pumps for applying lubricant to the specimens. Various testing parameters of the device were examined before testing, including the impulse force, the third-body medium, the lubricant and antagonist. The parameters chosen for this study were 20N at 1Hz with a 33% glycerine lubricant and stainless steel antagonist. Three nano-composites were fabricated with a BisGMA polymer matrix and 40nm SiO2 filler particles at three filler loads (25%, 50% and 65%). The mechanical properties of the composites were measured. The materials were then tested in the modified wear testing device under impact wear, sliding wear and a combination of impact and sliding wear. The worn surfaces were then analyzed with a non-contact profilometer and SEM. Results. The volumetric wear data indicated that increasing filler content beyond 25% decreased the wear resistance of the composites. Increasing filler content increased hardness and decreased toughness. SEM evaluation of the worn specimens indicated that the 25% filled materials failed by fatigue and the 50% and 65% filled materials failed by abrasive wear. Impact wear produced fretting in this device and sliding wear is more aggressive than impact wear. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study and previous studies on this topic, manufacturers are recommended to use a filler

  11. Polyurethane unicondylar knee prostheses: simulator wear tests and lubrication studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholes, S. C.; Unsworth, A.; Jones, E.

    2007-01-01

    Many materials are used as artificial joint bearing surfaces; these include conventional stainless steel or CoCrMo-on-ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), CoCrMo on itself and alumina-on-alumina. However, these joints have a limited lifespan resulting in failure of the prosthesis and the need for revision surgery. A number of materials have been introduced recently in an attempt to overcome these problems. Polycarbonate urethane (PU) is a compliant material that can be used as an artificial joint bearing surface which has been developed to mimic the natural synovial joint more accurately by promoting fluid film lubrication. Tribological tests were performed on CoCrMo-on-PU unicondylar knee prostheses to assess their performance in vitro. The wear produced by these components was considerably lower than that found for conventional joints. They also exhibited low friction and operated close to full-fluid film lubrication with viscosities of lubricant similar to those found in patients with arthritis. These tests gave encouraging results for the tribological performance of this material couple for use as an alternative bearing combination.

  12. Polyurethane unicondylar knee prostheses: simulator wear tests and lubrication studies.

    PubMed

    Scholes, S C; Unsworth, A; Jones, E

    2007-01-07

    Many materials are used as artificial joint bearing surfaces; these include conventional stainless steel or CoCrMo-on-ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), CoCrMo on itself and alumina-on-alumina. However, these joints have a limited lifespan resulting in failure of the prosthesis and the need for revision surgery. A number of materials have been introduced recently in an attempt to overcome these problems. Polycarbonate urethane (PU) is a compliant material that can be used as an artificial joint bearing surface which has been developed to mimic the natural synovial joint more accurately by promoting fluid film lubrication. Tribological tests were performed on CoCrMo-on-PU unicondylar knee prostheses to assess their performance in vitro. The wear produced by these components was considerably lower than that found for conventional joints. They also exhibited low friction and operated close to full-fluid film lubrication with viscosities of lubricant similar to those found in patients with arthritis. These tests gave encouraging results for the tribological performance of this material couple for use as an alternative bearing combination.

  13. Wear tests of polymer composite compressor seal materials in hydrogen environments

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, K.; Bayliss, R.; Hillman, B.

    1999-07-01

    A high-speed reciprocating wear test rig with moisture control facilities has been further developed for undertaking wear tests in hydrogen environments with moisture content of 1--1,OOO ppmV to evaluate the wear performance of four commercial compressor seal materials. The test results are presented and compared to those obtained in nitrogen environment, where available. It was found that the wear rate and the friction coefficient of sample A increased significantly as moisture content decreased below {approximately}150 ppmV, whilst the other three samples showed much less or no dependence of the wear rates and the friction coefficients upon moisture content. Moreover, at moisture content below {approximately}150 ppmV, significant differences in the wear rate as well as friction coefficients were observed for Sample B in hydrogen and in nitrogen. The tests showed that, for a material for compressor applications, it is vitally important to undertake wear tests in the gas to be compressed and at the appropriate moisture levels to obtain a realistic evaluation of wear performance of the material.

  14. Wear Test Results of Candidate Materials for the OK-542 Towed Array Handling Machine Level Winder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-29

    were being considered. Unfortunately, these other options, which included thermal spraying , carbide inserts and wear coatings required long lead...applications. these include various wear-resistant coatings, thermal spraying , and the use of special inserts. 4 TM941159 Based on the testing and

  15. Results of a 1000-hour wear test of 30-cm carbon-carbon ion optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, John Steven; Brophy, John R.; Anderson, John R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a 1000-hour wear test intended to determine the erosion resistance and voltage standoff capability of the optics in a relevant environment, i.e. duration testing on an NSTAR-like thruster.

  16. In vitro wear simulation on the RandomPOD wear testing system as a screening method for bearing materials intended for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa

    2014-08-22

    The 16-station RandomPOD wear test system, previously validated for prosthetic hip wear, was used in the simulation of knee wear mechanisms with a ball-on-flat test configuration. This consisted of a CoCr pin with a ground and polished spherical bearing surface (radius 28 mm) against a conventional, gamma-sterilized UHMWPE disk in serum lubrication. The biaxial motion, consisting of x and y translations, and the load was non-cyclic. Relative to the disk, the center of contact wandered within a circle of 10mm diameter, and the average sliding velocity was 15.5mm/s (ranging from 0 to 31 mm/s). The load varied non-cyclically between 0 and 142 N (average 73 N). In the 60-day test with 16 similar wear couples, moderate adhesive wear, the principal wear mechanism of a well-functioning prosthetic knee, dominated. This showed as a burnished, circular wear mark (diameter 13.2mm, area 137 mm(2)). The wear factor was 2.04 ± 0.03 × 10(-6)mm(3)/Nm (mean ± 95 percent confidence limit). For the first time a truly multidirectional, realistic and uniform, large capacity pin-on-disk simulation of knee wear mechanisms was implemented.

  17. Cryogenically treated gin saw wear test – Third season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saw blades in saw gin stands are replaced at regular intervals due to wear and are a significant expense item. Extending the working life of gin saw blades would result in cost savings for gin repair and maintenance. It was reported that the lumber industry uses cryogenic treatment to significantl...

  18. The High performance of nanocrystalline CVD diamond coated hip joints in wear simulator test.

    PubMed

    Maru, M M; Amaral, M; Rodrigues, S P; Santos, R; Gouvea, C P; Archanjo, B S; Trommer, R M; Oliveira, F J; Silva, R F; Achete, C A

    2015-09-01

    The superior biotribological performance of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings grown by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was already shown to demonstrate high wear resistance in ball on plate experiments under physiological liquid lubrication. However, tests with a close-to-real approach were missing and this constitutes the aim of the present work. Hip joint wear simulator tests were performed with cups and heads made of silicon nitride coated with NCD of ~10 μm in thickness. Five million testing cycles (Mc) were run, which represent nearly five years of hip joint implant activity in a patient. For the wear analysis, gravimetry, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy techniques were used. After 0.5 Mc of wear test, truncation of the protruded regions of the NCD film happened as a result of a fine-scale abrasive wear mechanism, evolving to extensive plateau regions and highly polished surface condition (Ra<10nm). Such surface modification took place without any catastrophic features as cracking, grain pullouts or delamination of the coatings. A steady state volumetric wear rate of 0.02 mm(3)/Mc, equivalent to a linear wear of 0.27 μm/Mc favorably compares with the best performance reported in the literature for the fourth generation alumina ceramic (0.05 mm(3)/Mc). Also, squeaking, quite common phenomenon in hard-on-hard systems, was absent in the present all-NCD system.

  19. Assessments of Hollow Cathode Wear in the Xenon Ion Propulsion System (XIPs(c)) by Numerical Analyses and Wear Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The standard approach presently followed by NASA to qualify electric propulsion for the required mission throughput has been based largely on life tests, which can be costly and time consuming. Revised electric propulsion lifequalification approaches are being formulated that combine analytical and/or computational methods with (shorter-duration) wear tests. As a model case, a wear test is being performed at JPL to assess the lifetime of the discharge hollow cathode in the Xenon Ion Propulsion System (XIPS(c)), a 25-cm ion engine developed by L-3 Communications Electron Technologies, Inc. for commercial applications. Wear and plasma data accumulated throughout this life-assessment program are being used to validate the existing 2-D hollow cathode code OrCa2D. We find that the OrCa2D steady-state solution predicts very well the time-averaged plasma data and the keeper voltage after 5500 hrs of operation in high-power mode. When the wave motion that occurs naturally in these devices is accounted for, based on an estimate of the maximum wave amplitude, the molybdenum-keeper erosion profile observed in the XIPS(c) discharge cathode is also reproduced within a factor of two of the observation. When the same model is applied to predict the erosion of a tantalum keeper we find that erosion is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the molybdenum keeper due the significantly lower sputtering yield of tantalum. A tantalum keeper would therefore allow keeper lifetimes that greatly exceed the present requirements for deep-space robotic missions considered by NASA. Moreover, such large reduction of the erosion renders the largest uncertainties in the models, which are associated with the wave amplitude estimates and the electron transport model, negligible.

  20. Comparative wear tests of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and cross-linked polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Harsha, A P; Joyce, Tom J

    2013-05-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis is a major concern in hip implant failure. Therefore, recent research work has focussed on wear-resistant materials, one of the most important of which is cross-linked polyethylene. In view of this, the objective of this study was to compare the in vitro wear performance of cross-linked polyethylene to traditional ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. In order to mimic appropriate in vivo conditions, a novel high-capacity wear tester called a circularly translating pin-on-disc was used. The results of this in vitro study demonstrated that the wear rate for cross-linked polyethylene was about 80% lower than that of conventional ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. This difference closely matches in vivo results reported in the literature for total hip replacements that use the two biopolymers. The in vitro results were also verified against ASTM F732-00 (standard test method for wear testing of polymeric materials for use in total joint prostheses). The 50-station circularly translating pin-on-disc proved to be a reliable device for in vitro wear studies of orthopaedic biopolymers.

  1. Ferrographic analysis of wear debris generated in accelerated rolling element fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Parker, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The types and quantities of wear particles generated during accelerated ball rolling contact fatigue tests were determined. Ball specimens were made of AMS 5749, a corrosion resistant, high-temperature bearing steel. The lubricant was a super-refined naphthenic mineral oil. Conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 5.215 times 10 to the 9th power Pa and a shaft speed of 10,000 rpm. Four types of wear particles were observed; normal rubbing wear particles, fatigue spall particles, spheres, and friction polymer.

  2. On the mechanism of running-in during wear tests of a babbitt B83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeeva, A. Kh.; Valeev, I. Sh.; Fazlyakhmetov, R. F.; Pshenichnyuk, A. I.

    2015-05-01

    Based on an analysis of changes in the structure of cast babbitt of grade B83 in the process of wear tests and on a comparison of the wear curves of cast babbitt and electroplated coating of the same phase composition, there is proposed a wear mechanism at the running-in stage of B83, which is reduced to the spalling-off of coarse particles of the intermetallic β phase, pressing-in of the cleaved particles into the soft plastic matrix, and the formation of a fairly homogeneous coating uniformly paved by small, hard particles.

  3. Ferrographic analysis of wear debris generated in accelerated rolling element fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Parker, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Ferrographic analysis was used to determine the types and quantities of wear particles generated during accelerated rolling contact fatigue tests. The NASA five-ball rolling contact fatigue tester was used. Ball specimens were made of AMS 5749, a corrosion-resistant high-temperature bearing steel. The lubricant was a super-refined naphthenic mineral oil. Conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 5.52 billion Pa and a shaft speed of 10,000 rpm. Four types of wear particles were observed: normal rubbing wear particles, fatigue spall particles, spheres, and friction polymer.

  4. Characterization of wear debris generated in accelerated rolling-element fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Parker, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    A ferrographic analysis was used to determine the types and quantities of wear debris generated during accelerated rolling contact fatigue tests. The five-ball rolling contact fatigue tester was used. Ball specimens were made of a corrosion resistant, high-temperature bearing steel. The lubricant was a superrefined naphthenic mineral oil. Conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 5.52 10 to the 9th power Pa and a shaft speed of 10,000 rpm. Four types of wear debris were observed: (1) normal rubbing wear particles, (2) fatigue microspall particles, (3) spheres, and (4) friction polymer deposits. The characterization of wear debris as a function of time was of limited use in predicting fatigue failures in these accelerated tests.

  5. How have wear testing and joint simulator studies helped to discriminate among materials and designs?

    PubMed

    McKellop, Harry A; D'Lima, Darryl

    2008-01-01

    Historically, hip joint simulators most often have been used to model wear of a bearing surface against a bearing surface. These simulators have provided highly accurate predictions of the in vivo wear of a broad spectrum of bearing materials, including cross-linked polyethylenes, metal-on-metal, ceramic-on-ceramic, and others in development. In recent years, more severe conditions have been successfully modeled, including jogging, stair climbing, ball-cup micro separation, third-body abrasion, and neck-socket impingement. These tests have served to identify improved materials and to eliminate some with inadequate wear resistance prior to their clinical use. Simulation of the knee joint is inherently more complex than it is for the hip. It is more difficult to compare the results of laboratory tests with actual clinical performance, due to the lack of accurate in vivo measures of wear. Nevertheless, knee simulators, based on force control or motion control, have successfully reproduced the type of surface damage that occurs in vivo (eg, burnishing, scratching, pitting) as well as the size and shapes of the resultant wear particles. Knee simulators have been used to compare molded versus machined polyethylene components, highly cross-linked polyethylenes, fixed versus mobile bearings, and oxidized zirconia and other materials, under optimal conditions as well as more severe wear modes, such as malalignment, higher loading and activity levels, and third-body roughening.

  6. Wear simulation of a sliding system by means of large-scale specimen testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debaets, P.

    1994-04-01

    A problem of severe wear occurred at the guidance system of a door of a sea-lock. The sea-water immersed guidance was a linear system with aluminium bronze bearing material on stainless steel rail material. A satisfactory laboratory simulation of the wear behavior of the guidance system was achieved by testing with large test specimens. The materials were tested under different load and speed conditions and different rail surface roughnesses. Technically and economically, improvement of the bearing will have to be realized by choosing a better material combination, as neither speed and load changes nor surface roughness changes offer sufficient improvement.

  7. Analysis of wear-debris from full-scale bearing fatigue tests using the ferrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    The ferrograph was used to determine the types and quantities of wear particles generated during full-scale bearing fatigue tests. Deep-groove ball bearings made from AISI 52100 steel were used. A MIL-L-23699 tetraester lubricant was used in a recirculating lubrication system containing a 49 mm absolute filter. Test conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 2.4 GPa, a shaft speed of 15,000 rpm, and a lubricant supply temperature of 74 C (165 F). Four fatigue failures were detected by accelerometers in this test set. In general, the ferrograph was more sensitive (up to 23 hr) in detecting spall initiation than either accelerometers or the normal spectrographic oil analysis. Four particle types were observed: normal rubbing wear particles, spheres, nonferrous particles, and severe wear (spall) fragments.

  8. Analysis of wear debris from full-scale bearing fatigue tests using the Ferrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    The Ferrograph was used to determine the types of quantities of wear particles generated during full-scale bearing fatigue tests. Deep-groove ball bearings made from AISI 52100 steel were used. A MIL-L-23699 tetraester lubricant was used in a recirculating lubrication system containing a 49-micron absolute filter. Test conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 2.4 GPa, a shaft speed of 15,000 rpm and a lubricant supply temperature of 74 C (165 F). Four fatigue failures were detected by accelerometers in this test set. In general, the Ferrograph was more sensitive (up to 23 h) in detecting spall initiation than either accelerometers or the normal spectrographic oil analysis (SOAP). Four particle types were observed: normal rubbing wear particles, spheres, nonferrous particles, and severe wear (spall) fragments.

  9. Airborne brake wear debris: size distributions, composition, and a comparison of dynamometer and vehicle tests.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Paul G; Xu, Ning; Dalka, Tom M; Maricq, M Matti

    2003-09-15

    Particle size distributions of light-duty vehicle brake wear debris are reported with careful attention paid to avoid sampling biases. Electrical low-pressure impactor and micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor measurements yield consistent size distributions, and the net particulate matter mass from each method is in good agreement with gravimetric filter measurements. The mass mean diameter of wear debris from braking events representative of urban driving is 6 microm, and the number-weighted mean is 1-2 microm for three currently used classes of lining materials: low metallic, semimetallic, and non-asbestos organic (NAO). In contrast, the wear rates are very material dependent, both in number and mass of particles, with 3-4 times higher emissions observed from the low metallic linings as compared to the semimetallic and NAO linings. Wind tunnel and test track measurements demonstrate the appearance of micron size particles that correlate with braking events, with approximately 50% of the wear debris being airborne for the test vehicle in this study. Elemental analysis of the wear debris reveals a consistent presence of the elements Fe, Cu, and Ba in both dynamometer and test track samples.

  10. The Concomitant Evolution of Wear and Squeaking in Dual-Severity, Lubricated Wear Testing of Ceramic-on-Ceramic Hip Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Anthony; Tibbitts, Ira; Brannon, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic hip bearings were tested in short-term wear tests with a systematically varied contact force. Continuous vibration and intermittent surface roughness measurements were obtained to elucidate potential causes of in vivo hip joint squeaking. The three-phase test comprised alternating cycles of edge loading and concentric articulation, always using ample serum lubricant. A 50,000-cycle wear trial in which the contact force during concentric articulation was distant from the head’s wear patch yielded no squeaking and practically no liner roughening. In 10-cycle trials of an edge-worn head coupled with a pristine liner, the contact force was varied in magnitude and point of application; immediate, recurrent squeaking occurred only when the contact force exceeded a critical threshold value and was centered upon the head’s wear patch. In a 27,000-cycle wear trial with the contact force applied near the margin of the head’s wear patch, recurrent squeaking emerged progressively as the liner’s inner surface was roughened via its articulation with the worn portion of the head. The results reveal key conditions that yield recurrent squeaking in vitro in various scenarios without resorting to implausible dry conditions. A fundamental theory explains that hip squeaking is induced by myriad stress waves emanating from asperity collisions; yet, the root cause is edge loading. PMID:22354674

  11. High pressure slurry pump. Sand slurry test loop design and results. Wear parts lifetime analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fongaro, S.; Severini, P.; Vinciguerra, G.

    2000-07-01

    This paper shows the experimental phase, following previous work presented at the Sixth International Conference on ``Multiphase Flow in Industrial Plants'', Milan, September 98. A Sand Water Slurry Test Loop has been tested using different sand percentages for a total power of 680 HP with a flow-rate of 35,000 [gpm] and pressure of 2300 [psig]. Its design considered, carefully, the particles build-up effect respecting flow velocity and dead space along the loop and into the hydraulics. The test pump is a TRIPLEX SINGLE ACTING that is one third of the COAL SLURRY SEPTUPLEX PUMP designed for a CHINA PROJECT. Wear rate on the main parts of an high pressure slurry pump have been analyzed running at 145 rpm (piston mean speed of 3.3 [ft/s]) with a net flow of 33,290 [gpm] and pressures between 1216 and 1575 [psig]. Tests gave indications of a damaging process on valves, piston seals and the relative weight on the overall damages. Design changes of piston-seal and its material have been done, results being a longer parts lifetime. The authors compared the results with literature on coal slurry and other sand tests. The pump speed, i.e., valve cycle, isn't the main wear factor, while the fluid speed under the valve is. Their goals are to improve the wear parts lifetime and define functions to relate the wear to operating parameters, design choice, and materials used.

  12. Laboratory testing of airborne brake wear particle emissions using a dynamometer system under urban city driving cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagino, Hiroyuki; Oyama, Motoaki; Sasaki, Sousuke

    2016-04-01

    To measure driving-distance-based mass emission factors for airborne brake wear particulate matter (PM; i.e., brake wear particles) related to the non-asbestos organic friction of brake assembly materials (pads and lining), and to characterize the components of brake wear particles, a brake wear dynamometer with a constant-volume sampling system was developed. Only a limited number of studies have investigated brake emissions under urban city driving cycles that correspond to the tailpipe emission test (i.e., JC08 or JE05 mode of Japanese tailpipe emission test cycles). The tests were performed using two passenger cars and one middle-class truck. The observed airborne brake wear particle emissions ranged from 0.04 to 1.4 mg/km/vehicle for PM10 (particles up to 10 μm (in size), and from 0.04 to 1.2 mg/km/vehicle for PM2.5. The proportion of brake wear debris emitted as airborne brake wear particles was 2-21% of the mass of wear. Oxygenated carbonaceous components were included in the airborne PM but not in the original friction material, which indicates that changes in carbon composition occurred during the abrasion process. Furthermore, this study identified the key tracers of brake wear particles (e.g., Fe, Cu, Ba, and Sb) at emission levels comparable to traffic-related atmospheric environments.

  13. Development of a linear pin wear test machine. [304 ss on 3. 50 maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Schmale, D.T.; Bourcier, R.J.

    1987-04-01

    In support of a study of the mechanical properties of amorphous alloys produced by laser surface melting, a linear pin wear test machine has been developed and constructed. The machine repeatedly follows a single straight path in one direction through the use of simple kinematic principles. The wear pin is held in a tone arm-like assembly which rides on an off-center rotating bearing. Wear track length can be adjusted by varying bearing eccentricity and tone-arm offset, while wear track location may be changed by specimen translation via two micrometer mounted ball slides. Frictional force is measured by using a load cell mounted on precision bearings while displacement is monitored by using a precalibrated LVDT. The specimen holder is designed to hold irregular specimens up to 0.46 x 1.90 x 2.54 cm. Selected frictional load and displacement data are recorded using a digital oscilloscope. Results of tests performed on an annealed 304 stainless steel specimen using a 350 maraging steel pin are presented.

  14. Ferrographic analysis of wear debris from full-scale bearing fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Ferrograph was used to determine the types and quantities of wear particles generated during full scale bearing fatigue tests. Deep-groove ball bearings made from steel were used. A tetraester lubricant was used in a recirculating lubricant system containing a 49 micrometers absolute filter. Test conditions include a maximum Hertz stress of 2.4 GPa, a shaft speed of 15,000 rpm, and a lubricant supply temperature of 74 C (165 F). Four fatigue failures were detected by accelerometers in this test set. In general, the Ferrograph was more sensitive (up to 23 hr) in detecting spall initiation than either accelerometers or the normal spectrographic oil analysis. Four particle types were observed: normal rubbing weather particles, spheres, nonferrous particles, and severe wear (spall) fragments.

  15. Interpretation of friction and wear in DLC film: role of surface chemistry and test environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polaki, S. R.; Kumar, N.; Madapu, K.; Ganesan, K.; Krishna, N. G.; Srivastava, S. K.; Abhaya, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2016-11-01

    In spite of the large amount of tribological work carried out to explain the friction and wear mechanism in diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, some of the core issues relating to the evolution of reactive species across sliding interfaces and their role on the friction and wear mechanism remain unclear. The phase composition, film density and hydrogen content present in a DLC film can be tailored by substrate biasing during film deposition to achieve a nearly vanishing friction coefficient. Furthermore, nitrogen doping in DLC films significantly improves wear resistance, and sliding occurs in a nearly wearless regime. Undoped and nitrogen-doped DLC films exhibit a nearly frictionless value with ultra-low wear behavior when tests are performed in argon, nitrogen and methane atmospheres. The antifriction and antiwear properties of the DLC films were improved with the reduction of adsorbed oxygen impurities on the film surface. This behavior was understood by correlating the oxygen impurities present at the surface/subsurface region of the DLC film while using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and depth-resolved Auger electron spectroscopy.

  16. End-of-test Performance and Wear Characterization of NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Long-Duration Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Herman, Daniel Andrew; Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation describes results from the end-of-test performance characterization of NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Long-Duration Test (LDT). Sub-component performance as well as overall thruster performance is presented and compared to results over the course of the test. Overall wear of critical thruster components is also described, and an update on the first failure mode of the thruster is provided.

  17. Fabrication and wear test of a continuous fiber/particulate composite total surface hip replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. C.; Ling, F. F.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Continuous fiber woven E-glass composite femoral shells having the ame elastic properties as bone were fabricated. The shells were then encrusted with filled epoxy wear resistant coatings and run dry against ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in 42,000 and 250,000 cycle were tests on a total hip simulator. The tribological characteristics of these shells atriculating with the acetabular cups are comparable to a vitallium bal articulating with an ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene cup.

  18. In Situ, Time-Resolved Accelerator Grid Erosion Measurements in the NSTAR 8000 Hour Ion Engine Wear Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J.

    1997-01-01

    Time-resolved, in situ measurements of the charge exchange ion erosion pattern on the downstream face of the accelerator grid have been made during an ongoin wear test of the NSTAR 30 cm ion thruster.

  19. Identifying Deformation and Strain Hardening Behaviors of Nanoscale Metallic Multilayers Through Nano-wear Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Economy, David Ross; Mara, Nathan A.; Schoeppner, R.; Schultz, Bradley M.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2016-01-13

    In complex loading conditions (e.g. sliding contact), mechanical properties, such as strain hardening and initial hardness, will dictate the long-term performance of materials systems. With this in mind, the strain hardening behaviors of Cu/Nb nanoscale metallic multilayer systems were examined by performing nanoindentation tests within nanoscratch wear boxes and undeformed, as-deposited regions. Both the architecture and substrate influence were examined by utilizing three different individual layer thicknesses (2, 20, and 100 nm) and two total film thicknesses (1 and 10 μm). After nano-wear deformation, multilayer systems with thinner layers showed less volume loss as measured by laser scanning microscopy. Additionally, the hardness of the deformed regions significantly rose with respect to the as-deposited measurements, which further increased with greater wear loads. Strain hardening exponents for multilayers with thinner layers (2 and 20 nm, n ≈ 0.018 and n ≈ 0.022 respectively) were less than was determined for 100 nm systems (n ≈ 0.041). These results suggest that singledislocation based deformation mechanisms observed for the thinner systems limit the extent of achievable strain hardening. This conclusion indicates that impacts of both architecture strengthening and strain hardening must be considered to accurately predict multilayer performance during sliding contact across varying length scales.

  20. Identifying Deformation and Strain Hardening Behaviors of Nanoscale Metallic Multilayers Through Nano-wear Testing

    DOE PAGES

    Economy, David Ross; Mara, Nathan A.; Schoeppner, R.; ...

    2016-01-13

    In complex loading conditions (e.g. sliding contact), mechanical properties, such as strain hardening and initial hardness, will dictate the long-term performance of materials systems. With this in mind, the strain hardening behaviors of Cu/Nb nanoscale metallic multilayer systems were examined by performing nanoindentation tests within nanoscratch wear boxes and undeformed, as-deposited regions. Both the architecture and substrate influence were examined by utilizing three different individual layer thicknesses (2, 20, and 100 nm) and two total film thicknesses (1 and 10 μm). After nano-wear deformation, multilayer systems with thinner layers showed less volume loss as measured by laser scanning microscopy. Additionally,more » the hardness of the deformed regions significantly rose with respect to the as-deposited measurements, which further increased with greater wear loads. Strain hardening exponents for multilayers with thinner layers (2 and 20 nm, n ≈ 0.018 and n ≈ 0.022 respectively) were less than was determined for 100 nm systems (n ≈ 0.041). These results suggest that singledislocation based deformation mechanisms observed for the thinner systems limit the extent of achievable strain hardening. This conclusion indicates that impacts of both architecture strengthening and strain hardening must be considered to accurately predict multilayer performance during sliding contact across varying length scales.« less

  1. Determining pump wear and remaining life from electric submersible pump test curves. [Wear and service life estimation of oil well pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Divine, D.L.; Lannom, R.W.; Johnson, R.A. )

    1993-08-01

    The remaining useful life of an electric submersible pump (ESP) is an important economic consideration in deciding whether the used pump should be returned to service without repair. This paper presents quantitative and qualitative techniques to determine the type and amount of wear that a pump has experienced from analysis of pump test data. This paper discusses methods of categorizing used pumps, depending on the wear and associated performance deterioration. This work also describes failure modes, pump reliability, and the concept of pump (product) infant mortality. The authors show that a used pump can be more reliable and have a longer run life than a new or rebuilt pump. They use test data, tear-down analysis, and a case history to develop these concepts.

  2. Wear of materials - 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Ludema, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on materials testing to determine wear resistance. Topics considered at the conference included the wear of metals in a magnetic field, ceramics in advanced heat engine applications, wear tests of silicon carbides, microstructure, hardfacing alloys, sliding friction, coated systems, abrasion, erosion, test methods, tribology, stacking fault energy, and adhesion.

  3. Wear of materials 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Ludema, K.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on wear resistance. Topics considered at the conference included erosion in aluminium oxides, abrasive wear tests, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, wear tests of low-cobalt alloys for hardfacing nuclear components, microstructure, the elevated temperature erosion of steels, and steels under cyclic operation in corrosive liquids.

  4. A new test machine for measuring friction and wear in controlled atmospheres to 1200 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a new high-temperature friction and wear test apparatus (tribometer). The tribometer can be used as a pin-on-disk or pin-on-ring configuration and is specially designed to measure the tribological properties of ceramics and high temperature metallic alloys from room temperature to 1200 C. Sliding mode can be selected to be either unidirectional at velocities up to 22 m/sec or oscillating at frequencies up to 4.6 Hz and amplitudes up to + or - 60 deg. The test atmosphere is established by a controlled flow rate of a purge gas. All components within the test chamber are compatible with oxidizing, inert or reducing gases.

  5. A new test machine for measuring friction and wear in controlled atmospheres to 1200 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a new high temperature friction and wear test apparatus (tribometer) at NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. The tribometer can be used as a pin-on-disk or pin-on-ring configuration and is specially designed to measure the tribological properties of ceramics and high temperature metallic alloys from room temperature to 1200 C. Sliding mode can be selected to be either unidirectional at velocities up to 22 m/sec or oscillating at frequencies up 4.5 Hz and amplitudes up to + or - 60 deg. The test atmosphere is established by a controlled flow rate of a purge gas. All components within the test chamber are compatible with oxidizing, inert, or reducing gases.

  6. CR TKA UHMWPE Wear Tested after Artificial Aging of the Vitamin E Treated Gliding Component by Simulating Daily Patient Activities

    PubMed Central

    Schwiesau, Jens; Fritz, Bernhard; Kutzner, Ines; Bergmann, Georg; Grupp, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The wear behaviour of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is dominated by two wear mechanisms: the abrasive wear and the delamination of the gliding components, where the second is strongly linked to aging processes and stress concentration in the material. The addition of vitamin E to the bulk material is a potential way to reduce the aging processes. This study evaluates the wear behaviour and delamination susceptibility of the gliding components of a vitamin E blended, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) cruciate retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty. Daily activities such as level walking, ascending and descending stairs, bending of the knee, and sitting and rising from a chair were simulated with a data set received from an instrumented knee prosthesis. After 5 million test cycles no structural failure of the gliding components was observed. The wear rate was with 5.62 ± 0.53 mg/million cycles falling within the limit of previous reports for established wear test methods. PMID:25506594

  7. Wear Scar Similarities between Retrieved and Simulator-Tested Polyethylene TKR Components: An Artificial Neural Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how representative wear scars of simulator-tested polyethylene (PE) inserts compare with retrieved PE inserts from total knee replacement (TKR). By means of a nonparametric self-organizing feature map (SOFM), wear scar images of 21 postmortem- and 54 revision-retrieved components were compared with six simulator-tested components that were tested either in displacement or in load control according to ISO protocols. The SOFM network was then trained with the wear scar images of postmortem-retrieved components since those are considered well-functioning at the time of retrieval. Based on this training process, eleven clusters were established, suggesting considerable variability among wear scars despite an uncomplicated loading history inside their hosts. The remaining components (revision-retrieved and simulator-tested) were then assigned to these established clusters. Six out of five simulator components were clustered together, suggesting that the network was able to identify similarities in loading history. However, the simulator-tested components ended up in a cluster at the fringe of the map containing only 10.8% of retrieved components. This may suggest that current ISO testing protocols were not fully representative of this TKR population, and protocols that better resemble patients' gait after TKR containing activities other than walking may be warranted. PMID:27597955

  8. Wear Scar Similarities between Retrieved and Simulator-Tested Polyethylene TKR Components: An Artificial Neural Network Approach.

    PubMed

    Orozco Villaseñor, Diego A; Wimmer, Markus A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how representative wear scars of simulator-tested polyethylene (PE) inserts compare with retrieved PE inserts from total knee replacement (TKR). By means of a nonparametric self-organizing feature map (SOFM), wear scar images of 21 postmortem- and 54 revision-retrieved components were compared with six simulator-tested components that were tested either in displacement or in load control according to ISO protocols. The SOFM network was then trained with the wear scar images of postmortem-retrieved components since those are considered well-functioning at the time of retrieval. Based on this training process, eleven clusters were established, suggesting considerable variability among wear scars despite an uncomplicated loading history inside their hosts. The remaining components (revision-retrieved and simulator-tested) were then assigned to these established clusters. Six out of five simulator components were clustered together, suggesting that the network was able to identify similarities in loading history. However, the simulator-tested components ended up in a cluster at the fringe of the map containing only 10.8% of retrieved components. This may suggest that current ISO testing protocols were not fully representative of this TKR population, and protocols that better resemble patients' gait after TKR containing activities other than walking may be warranted.

  9. Polymer wear and its control

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances in polymer (P) tribology are discussed in reviews and reports based on contributions to a symposium held by the Division of Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering of the Americal Chemical Society in St. Louis in spring 1984. Topics examined are mechanisms of P wear, controls of P wear, the tribological behavior of Ps, wear of biomaterials and P composites, characterization and measurements of P wear, and degradation and wear of polymeric films and filaments. Consideration is given to the fracture and surface energetics of P wear, fatigue-abrasive mechanisms of P wear, plasma modification of P surfaces, the wear characteristics of articular cartilage, the role of fillers in the wear of high-density polyethylene, the tribology of fiber-reinforced polyimides sliding against steel and Si3N4, laboratory and in-service wear tests of Ps, and the effect of degree of crystallinity on wear of poly(ethylene terephthalate).

  10. Wearing test with 2 different types of latex gloves with and without the use of a skin protection cream.

    PubMed

    Allmers, H

    2001-01-01

    72 subjects reporting symptoms indicating Type I hypersensitivity reactions to natural rubber latex (NRL) gloves were included in this study. 44 of them had a positive prick test to NRL. They underwent wearing tests using 2 types of NRL gloves with high (n=63) and low (n=70) allergen contents. Unigloves Malaysia with a high allergen content caused positive skin reactions in 47% of SPT-positive and no IgE-negative subjects. After application of Hand Sense skin protection cream, the frequency of positive skin responses in wearing tests decreased to 30% in prick-test-positive subjects. The Biogel Diagnostic gloves with low allergen caused hypersensitivity with and without Hand Sense in 2 cases (5%) of the prick-test-positive. 60% of all test participants had a positive prick test to NRL. No prick-test-negative subjects showed any urticaria during the glove-wearing test. Our study demonstrates that high allergen contents in latex gloves frequently elicit skin responses in NRL-sensitized subjects. Since other skin protection creams have shown to increase allergic symptoms, it is encouraging to report that Hand Sense skin cream may hamper the uptake of allergens from gloves, thus decreasing allergic reactions.

  11. Testing and Analysis of NEXT Ion Engine Discharge Cathode Assembly Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Foster, John E.; Soulas, George C.; Nakles, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Experimental and analytical investigations were conducted to predict the wear of the discharge cathode keeper in the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster. The ion current to the keeper was found to be highly dependent upon the beam current, and the average beam current density was nearly identical to that of the NSTAR thruster for comparable beam current density. The ion current distribution was highly peaked toward the keeper orifice. A deterministic wear assessment predicted keeper orifice erosion to the same diameter as the cathode tube after processing 375 kg of xenon. A rough estimate of discharge cathode assembly life limit due to sputtering indicated that the current design exceeds the qualification goal of 405 kg. Probabilistic wear analysis showed that the plasma potential and the sputter yield contributed most to the uncertainty in the wear assessment. It was recommended that fundamental experimental and modeling efforts focus on accurately describing the plasma potential and the sputtering yield.

  12. Characterization of protein degradation in serum-based lubricants during simulation wear testing of metal-on-metal hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Maskiewicz, Victoria K; Williams, Paul A; Prates, Sarah J; Bowsher, John G; Clarke, Ian C

    2010-08-01

    A size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SEC-HPLC) method has been developed which is capable of separation and quantitation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine serum globulin (BSG) components of serum-based lubricant (SBL) solutions. This allowed characterization of the stability profiles of these proteins when acting as lubricants during hip wear simulation, and identification of wear-specific mechanisms of degradation. Using cobalt-chromium metal-on-metal (MOM) hip joints, it was observed that BSA remained stable for up to 3 days (215K cycles) of wear testing after which the protein degraded in a fairly linear fashion. BSG on the other hand, began to degrade immediately and in a linear fashion with a rate constant of 5% per day. Loss of both proteins occurred via the formation of high molecular weight aggregates which precipitated out of solution. No fragmentation of the polypeptide backbone of either protein was observed. Data obtained suggest that protein degradation was not due to microbial contamination, denaturation at the air-water interface, or frictional heating of articulating joint surfaces in these studies. We conclude that the primary source of protein degradation during MOM simulation testing occurs via high shear rates experienced by SBL solutions at articulating surfaces, possibly coupled with metal-protein interactions occurring as new and reactive metal surfaces are generated during wear testing. The development of this analytical methodology will allow new studies to clarify the role of SBL solutions in wear simulation studies and the interactions and lubricating properties of serum proteins with prosthetic surfaces other than MOM.

  13. End-of-Test Performance and Wear Characterization of NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Long-Duration Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) program is developing the next-generation solar electric ion propulsion system with significant enhancements beyond the state-of-the-art NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Application Readiness (NSTAR) ion propulsion system to provide future NASA science missions with enhanced capabilities. A Long-Duration Test (LDT) was initiated in June 2005 to validate the thruster service life modeling and to quantify the thruster propellant throughput capability. Testing was recently completed in February 2014, with the thruster accumulating 51,184 hours of operation, processing 918 kg of xenon propellant, and delivering 35.5 MN-s of total impulse.As part of the test termination procedure, a comprehensive performance characterization was performed across the entire NEXT throttle table. This was performed prior to planned repairs of numerous diagnostics that had become inoperable over the course of the test. After completion of these diagnostic repairs in November 2013, a comprehensive end-of-test performance and wear characterization was performed on the test article prior to exposure to atmosphere. These data have confirmed steady thruster performance with minimal degradation as well as mitigation of numerous life limiting mechanisms encountered in the NSTAR design. Component erosion rates compare favorably to pretest predictions based on semi-empirical models used for the thruster service life assessment. Additional data relating to ion beam density profiles, facility backsputter rates, facility backpressure effects on thruster telemetry, and modulation of the neutralizer keeper current are presented as part of the end-of-test characterization. Presently the test article for the NEXT LDT has been exposed to atmosphere and placed within a clean room environment, with post-test disassembly and inspection underway.

  14. Modified Balance Error Scoring System (M-BESS) test scores in athletes wearing protective equipment and cleats

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Aftab Mohammad; Al Juma, Saad; Bhatti, Junaid Ahmad; Delaney, J Scott

    2016-01-01

    Background Balance testing is an important part of the initial concussion assessment. There is no research on the differences in Modified Balance Error Scoring System (M-BESS) scores when tested in real world as compared to control conditions. Objective To assess the difference in M-BESS scores in athletes wearing their protective equipment and cleats on different surfaces as compared to control conditions. Methods This cross-sectional study examined university North American football and soccer athletes. Three observers independently rated athletes performing the M-BESS test in three different conditions: (1) wearing shorts and T-shirt in bare feet on firm surface (control); (2) wearing athletic equipment with cleats on FieldTurf; and (3) wearing athletic equipment with cleats on firm surface. Mean M-BESS scores were compared between conditions. Results 60 participants were recruited: 39 from football (all males) and 21 from soccer (11 males and 10 females). Average age was 21.1 years (SD=1.8). Mean M-BESS scores were significantly lower (p<0.001) for cleats on FieldTurf (mean=26.3; SD=2.0) and for cleats on firm surface (mean=26.6; SD=2.1) as compared to the control condition (mean=28.4; SD=1.5). Females had lower scores than males for cleats on FieldTurf condition (24.9 (SD=1.9) vs 27.3 (SD=1.6), p=0.005). Players who had taping or bracing on their ankles/feet had lower scores when tested with cleats on firm surface condition (24.6 (SD=1.7) vs 26.9 (SD=2.0), p=0.002). Conclusions Total M-BESS scores for athletes wearing protective equipment and cleats standing on FieldTurf or a firm surface are around two points lower than M-BESS scores performed on the same athletes under control conditions. PMID:27900181

  15. Monitoring of Wind Turbine Gearbox Condition through Oil and Wear Debris Analysis: A Full-Scale Testing Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Shuangwen

    2016-10-01

    Despite the wind industry's dramatic development during the past decade, it is still challenged by premature turbine subsystem/component failures, especially for turbines rated above 1 MW. Because a crane is needed for each replacement, gearboxes have been a focal point for improvement in reliability and availability. Condition monitoring (CM) is a technique that can help improve these factors, leading to reduced turbine operation and maintenance costs and, subsequently, lower cost of energy for wind power. Although technical benefits of CM for the wind industry are normally recognized, there is a lack of published information on the advantages and limitations of each CM technique confirmed by objective data from full-scale tests. This article presents first-hand oil and wear debris analysis results obtained through tests that were based on full-scale wind turbine gearboxes rated at 750 kW. The tests were conducted at the 2.5-MW dynamometer test facility at the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The gearboxes were tested in three conditions: run-in, healthy, and damaged. The investigated CM techniques include real-time oil condition and wear debris monitoring, both inline and online sensors, and offline oil sample and wear debris analysis, both onsite and offsite laboratories. The reported results and observations help increase wind industry awareness of the benefits and limitations of oil and debris analysis technologies and highlight the challenges in these technologies and other tribological fields for the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers and other organizations to help address, leading to extended gearbox service life.

  16. A simple surrogate test method to rank the wear performance of prospective ceramic materials under hip prosthesis edge-loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Anthony P; Brannon, Rebecca M

    2014-02-01

    This research has developed a novel test method for evaluating the wear resistance of ceramic materials under severe contact stresses simulating edge loading in prosthetic hip bearings. Simply shaped test specimens - a cylinder and a spheroid - were designed as surrogates for an edge-loaded, head/liner implant pair. Equivalency of the simpler specimens was assured in the sense that their theoretical contact dimensions and pressures were identical, according to Hertzian contact theory, to those of the head/liner pair. The surrogates were fabricated in three ceramic materials: Al2 O3 , zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA), and ZrO2 . They were mated in three different material pairs and reciprocated under a 200 N normal contact force for 1000-2000 cycles, which created small (<1 mm(2) ) wear scars. The three material pairs were ranked by their wear resistance, quantified by the volume of abraded material measured using an interferometer. Similar tests were performed on edge-loaded hip implants in the same material pairs. The surrogates replicated the wear rankings of their full-scale implant counterparts and mimicked their friction force trends. The results show that a proxy test using simple test specimens can validly rank the wear performance of ceramic materials under severe, edge-loading contact stresses, while replicating the beginning stage of edge-loading wear. This simple wear test is therefore potentially useful for screening and ranking new, prospective materials early in their development, to produce optimized candidates for more complicated full-scale hip simulator wear tests.

  17. Fabrication and Wear Behavior Analysis on AlCrFeNi High Entropy Alloy Coating Under Dry Sliding and Oil Lubrication Test Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yipin; Wang, Shouren; Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Qiao, Yang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, AlCrFeNi high entropy alloy coating was fabricated on the surface of Q235 steel using hot pressing sintering process. The coating has the controlled thickness size and excellent mechanical properties. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), XRD and hardness testing method were used to study the morphology, phase structure and hardness of high entropy alloys coating. The lattice distortion plays a significant role in increasing the hardness. Coating formation mechanism caused by the element diffusion under the hot pressing effect is also discussed in the paper. Simultaneously, the dry sliding and oil lubrication wear tests, wear morphology observation and wear mechanism discussion were completed. As the result shows, AlCrFeNi high entropy alloys coating exhibits superior wear resistance either at dry sliding or oil lubrication tests owing to its hard high entropy solid solution structure.

  18. High frequency circular translation pin-on-disk method for accelerated wear testing of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa

    2015-01-21

    The temporal change of the direction of sliding relative to the ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) component of prosthetic joints is known to be of crucial importance with respect to wear. One complete revolution of the resultant friction vector is commonly called a wear cycle. It was hypothesized that in order to accelerate the wear test, the cycle frequency may be substantially increased if the circumference of the slide track is reduced in proportion, and still the wear mechanisms remain realistic and no overheating takes place. This requires an additional slow motion mechanism with which the lubrication of the contact is maintained and wear particles are conveyed away from the contact. A three-station, dual motion high frequency circular translation pin-on-disk (HF-CTPOD) device with a relative cycle frequency of 25.3 Hz and an average sliding velocity of 27.4 mm/s was designed. The pins circularly translated at high frequency (1.0 mm per cycle, 24.8 Hz, clockwise), and the disks at low frequency (31.4mm per cycle, 0.5 Hz, counter-clockwise). In a 22 million cycle (10 day) test, the wear rate of conventional gamma-sterilized UHMWPE pins against polished CoCr disks in diluted serum was 1.8 mg per 24 h, which was six times higher than that in the established 1 Hz CTPOD device. The wear mechanisms were similar. Burnishing of the pin was the predominant feature. No overheating took place. With the dual motion HF-CTPOD method, the wear testing of UHMWPE as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty can be substantially accelerated without concerns of the validity of the wear simulation.

  19. Wear Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed a tribometer for in-house wear tests. Implant Sciences Corporation (ISC), working on a NASA contract to develop coatings to enhance the wear capabilities of materials, adapted the tribometer for its own use and developed a commercial line of user-friendly systems. The ISC-200 is a pin-on-disk type of tribometer, functioning like a record player and creating a wear groove on the disk, with variables of speed and load. The system can measure the coefficient of friction, the wear behavior between materials, and the integrity of thin films or coatings. Applications include measuring wear on contact lenses and engine parts and testing disk drives.

  20. Effects of Surface Modification and Bulk Geometry on the Biotribological Behavior of Cross-Linked Polyethylene: Wear Testing and Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kenichi; Kyomoto, Masayuki; Saiga, Kenichi; Taketomi, Shuji; Inui, Hiroshi; Kadono, Yuho; Takatori, Yoshio; Tanaka, Sakae; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Moro, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The wear and creep deformation resistances of polymeric orthopedic bearing materials are both important for extending their longevity. In this study, we evaluated the wear and creep deformation resistances, including backside damage, of different polyethylene (PE) materials, namely, conventional PE, cross-linked PE (CLPE), and poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)- (PMPC-) grafted CLPE, through wear tests and finite element analysis. The gravimetric and volumetric degrees of wear of disks (3 or 6 mm in thickness) of these materials against a cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy pin were examined using a multidirectional pin-on-disk tester. Cross-linking and PMPC grafting decreased the gravimetric wear of the PE disks significantly. The volumetric wear at the bearing surface and the volumetric penetration in the backside of the 3-mm thick PE disk were higher than those of the 6-mm thick PE disk, regardless of the bearing material. The geometrical changes induced in the PE disks consisted of creep, because the calculated internal von Mises stress at the bearing side of all disks and that at the backside of the 3-mm thick disks exceeded their actual yield strengths. A highly hydrated bearing surface layer, formed by PMPC grafting, and a cross-linking-strengthened substrate of adequate thickness are essential for increasing the wear and creep deformation resistances. PMID:26583106

  1. NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Prototype Model 1R (PM1R) Ion Thruster and Propellant Management System Wear Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanNoord, Jonathan L.; Soulas, George C.; Sovey, James S.

    2010-01-01

    The results of the NEXT wear test are presented. This test was conducted with a 36-cm ion engine (designated PM1R) and an engineering model propellant management system. The thruster operated with beam extraction for a total of 1680 hr and processed 30.5 kg of xenon during the wear test, which included performance testing and some operation with an engineering model power processing unit. A total of 1312 hr was accumulated at full power, 277 hr at low power, and the remainder was at intermediate throttle levels. Overall ion engine performance, which includes thrust, thruster input power, specific impulse, and thrust efficiency, was steady with no indications of performance degradation. The propellant management system performed without incident during the wear test. The ion engine and propellant management system were also inspected following the test with no indication of anomalous hardware degradation from operation.

  2. Wear Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Acetal Spur, Helical, Bevel and Worm Gears Using a TS Universal Test Rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Samy; Osman, T. A.; Abdalla, Abdelrahman H.; Zohdy, Gamal A.

    2015-12-01

    Although the applications of nanotechnologies are increasing, there remains a significant barrier between nanotechnology and machine element applications. This work aims to remove this barrier by blending carbon nanotubes (CNT) with common types of acetal polymer gears (spur, helical, bevel and worm). This was done by using adhesive oil (paraffin) during injection molding to synthesize a flange and short bars containing 0.02% CNT by weight. The flanges and short bars were machined using hobbing and milling machines to produce nanocomposite polymer gears. Some defects that surfaced in previous work, such as the appearance of bubbles and unmelted pellets during the injection process, were avoided to produce an excellent dispersion of CNT in the acetal. The wear resistances of the gears were measured by using a TS universal test rig using constant parameters for all of the gears that were fabricated. The tests were run at a speed of 1420 rpm and a torque of 4 Nm. The results showed that the wear resistances of the CNT/acetal gears were increased due to the addition of CNT, especially the helical, bevel and worm gears.

  3. Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris generated in vivo and in laboratory tests; the influence of counterface roughness.

    PubMed

    Hailey, J L; Ingham, E; Stone, M; Wroblewski, B M; Fisher, J

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of counterface roughness and lubricant on the morphology of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear debris generated in laboratory wear tests, and to compare this with debris isolated from explanted tissue. Laboratory tests used UHMWPE pins sliding against stainless steel counterfaces. Both water and serum lubricants were used in conjunction with rough and smooth counterfaces. The lubricants and tissue from revision hip surgery were processed to digest the proteins and permit filtration. This involved denaturing the proteins with potassium hydroxide (KOH), sedimentation of any remaining proteins, and further digestion of these proteins with chromic acid. All fractions were then passed through a 0.2 micron membrane, and the debris examined using scanning electron microscopy. The laboratory studies showed that the major variable influencing debris morphology was counterface roughness. The rougher counterfaces produced larger numbers of smaller particles, with a size range extending below 1 micron. For smooth counterfaces there were fewer of these small particles, and evidence of larger platelets, greater than 10 microns in diameter. Analysis of the debris from explanted tissues showed a wide variation in the particle size distribution, ranging from below 1 micron up to several millimetres in size. Of major clinical significance in relation to osteolysis and loosening is roughening of the femoral components, which may lead to greater numbers of the sub-micron-sized particles.

  4. Can pin-on-disk testing be used to assess the wear performance of retrieved UHMWPE components for total joint arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Steven M; MacDonald, Daniel W; Kocagöz, Sevi; Tohfafarosh, Mariya; Baykal, Doruk

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the suitability of using multidirectional pin-on-disk (POD) testing to characterize wear behavior of retrieved ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). The POD wear behavior of 25 UHMWPE components, retrieved after 10 years in vivo, was compared with 25 that were shelf aged for 10-15 years in their original packaging. Components were gamma sterilized (25-40 kGy) in an air or reduced oxygen (inert) package. 9 mm diameter pins were fabricated from each component and evaluated against CoCr disks using a super-CTPOD with 100 stations under physiologically relevant, multidirectional loading conditions. Bovine serum (20 g/L protein concentration) was used as lubricant. Volumetric wear rates were found to vary based on the aging environment, as well as sterilization environment. Volumetric wear rates were the lowest for the pins in the gamma inert, shelf aged cohort. These results support the utility of using modern, multidirectional POD testing with a physiologic lubricant as a novel method for evaluating wear properties of retrieved UHMWPE components. The data also supported the hypothesis that wear rates of gamma-inert liners were lower than gamma-air liners for both retrieved and shelf aging conditions. However, this difference was not statistically significant for the retrieved condition.

  5. Adhesion and wear behaviour of NCD coatings on Si3N4 by micro-abrasion tests.

    PubMed

    Silva, F G; Neto, M A; Fernandes, A J S; Costa, F M; Oliveira, F J; Silva, R F

    2009-06-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings offer an excellent alternative for tribological applications, preserving most of the intrinsic mechanical properties of polycrystalline CVD diamond and adding to it an extreme surface smoothness. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramics are reported to guarantee high adhesion levels to CVD microcrystalline diamond coatings, but the NCD adhesion to Si3N4 is not yet well established. Micro-abrasion tests are appropriate for evaluating the abrasive wear resistance of a given surface, but they also provide information on thin film/substrate interfacial resistance, i.e., film adhesion. In this study, a comparison is made between the behaviour of NCD films deposited by hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) and microwave plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD) techniques. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic discs were selected as substrates. The NCD depositions by HFCVD and MPCVD were carried out using H2-CH4 and H2-CH4-N2 gas mixtures, respectively. An adequate set of growth parameters was chosen for each CVD technique, resulting in NCD films having a final thickness of 5 microm. A micro-abrasion tribometer was used, with 3 microm diamond grit as the abrasive slurry element. Experiments were carried out at a constant rotational speed (80 r.p.m.) and by varying the applied load in the range of 0.25-0.75 N. The wear rate for MPCVD NCD (3.7 +/- 0.8 x 10(-5) mm3 N(-1) m(-1)) is compatible with those reported for microcrystalline CVD diamond. The HFCVD films displayed poorer adhesion to the Si3N4 ceramic substrates than the MPCVD ones. However, the HFCVD films show better wear resistance as a result of their higher crystallinity according to the UV Raman data, despite evidencing premature adhesion failure.

  6. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Infection control - wearing gloves; Patient safety - wearing gloves; Personal protective equipment - wearing gloves; PPE - wearing gloves; Nosocomial infection - wearing gloves; Hospital acquired infection - wearing gloves

  7. Wear properties of polyethylene-metal and polyethylene-ceramic bearings for hip joint replacements: The effect of temperature and protein precipitation in hip simulator tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yen-Shuo

    Ultra-high-molecular weight polyethylene (PE) cups bearing against metal or ceramic balls are the most commonly used combinations of materials for human hip joint replacements. The wear properties of these materials are typically evaluated in the laboratory using hip joint wear simulators, while lubricated with bovine serum. A previous test evaluating the PE cups against cobalt-chrome (CoCr), zirconia (Zr) and alumina balls demonstrated the sensitivity of serum proteins to elevated temperature; especially for Zr/PE, which showed the highest protein precipitation and bulk lubricant temperature but the lowest cup wear. In the present investigation, a temperature control system was used on a hip simulator to systematically evaluate the relationship between temperature and denaturation of the serum proteins which, in turn, affects the friction and wear properties of the prosthetic materials being tested. In order to control protein precipitation, the interface was temperature reduced by circulating coolant at 4°C through the center of the CoCr or Zr balls during a wear test. With cooling, protein assay of the serum showed 66% and 50% reductions in protein precipitation with the CoCr and Zr balls, respectively. The wear rate of the PE cups against the CoCr balls decreased by an average of 44%, whereas two of the three PE cups running against Zr balls exhibited slight increases in their wear rates, and the third showed a two fold increase. Under scanning electron microscopy, there were marked differences in the worn surfaces of the cups for the various conditions, and differences in the morphology of the PE wear debris recovered from the serum. For example, granular particles predominated without cooling, whereas fibrous particles predominated with cooling. Since particles generated in vivo (i.e., retrieved from periprosthetic tissues) typically show approximately equal proportions of granules and fibrils, the use of an intermediate coolant temperature might provide

  8. Effect of acetabular cup abduction angle on wear of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene in hip simulator testing.

    PubMed

    Korduba, Laryssa A; Essner, Aaron; Pivec, Robert; Lancin, Perry; Mont, Michael A; Wang, Aiguo; Delanois, Ronald E

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acetabular component positioning on the wear rates of metal-on-polyethylene articulations has not been extensively studied. Placement of acetabular cups at abduction angles of more than 40° has been noted as a possible reason for early failure caused by increased wear. We conducted a study to evaluate the effects of different acetabular cup abduction angles on polyethylene wear rate, wear area, contact pressure, and contact area. Our in vitro study used a hip joint simulator and finite element analysis to assess the effects of cup orientation at 4 angles (0°, 40°, 50°, 70°) on wear and contact properties. Polyethylene bearings with 28-mm cobalt-chrome femoral heads were cycled in an environment mimicking in vivo joint fluid to determine the volumetric wear rate after 10 million cycles. Contact pressure and contact area for each cup abduction angle were assessed using finite element analysis. Results were correlated with cup abduction angles to determine if there were any differences among the 4 groups. The inverse relationship between volumetric wear rate and acetabular cup inclination angle demonstrated less wear with steeper cup angles. The largest abduction angle (70°) had the lowest contact area, largest contact pressure, and smallest head coverage. Conversely, the smallest abduction angle (0°) had the most wear and most head coverage. Polyethylene wear after total hip arthroplasty is a major cause of osteolysis and aseptic loosening, which may lead to premature implant failure. Several studies have found that high wear rates for cups oriented at steep angles contributed to their failure. Our data demonstrated that larger cup abduction angles were associated with lower, not higher, wear. However, this potentially "protective" effect is likely counteracted by other complications of steep cup angles, including impingement, instability, and edge loading. These factors may be more relevant in explaining why implants fail at a higher rate if

  9. Wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Y. S.; Kingsbury, G. R.

    1998-02-01

    A detailed review of wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI) was undertaken to examine the potential applications of this material for wear parts, as an alternative to steels, alloyed and white irons, bronzes, and other competitive materials. Two modes of wear were studied: adhesive (frictional) dry sliding and abrasive wear. In the rotating dry sliding tests, wear behavior of the base material (a stationary block) was considered in relationship to countersurface (steel shaft) wear. In this wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was only one-fourth that of pearlitic ductile iron (DI) grade 100-70-03; the wear rates of aluminum bronze and leaded-tin bronze, respectively, were 3.7 and 3.3 times greater than that of ADI. Only quenched DI with a fully martensitic matrix slightly outperformed ADI. No significant difference was observed in the wear of steel shafts running against ADI and quenched DI. The excellent wear performance of ADI and its countersurface, combined with their relatively low friction coefficient, indicate potential for dry sliding wear applications. In the abrasive wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was comparable to that of alloyed hardened AISI 4340 steel, and approximately one-half that of hardened medium-carbon AISI 1050 steel and of white and alloyed cast irons. The excellent wear resistance of ADI may be attributed to the strain-affected transformation of high-carbon austenite to martensite that takes place in the surface layer during the wear tests.

  10. Wear performance of neat and vitamin E blended highly cross-linked PE under severe conditions: The combined effect of accelerated ageing and third body particles during wear test.

    PubMed

    Affatato, Saverio; De Mattia, Jonathan Salvatore; Bracco, Pierangiola; Pavoni, Eleonora; Taddei, Paola

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of third-body particles on the in vitro wear behaviour of three different sets of polyethylene acetabular cups after prolonged testing in a hip simulator and accelerated ageing. Vitamin E-blended, cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE_VE), cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) and conventional polyethylene (STD_PE) acetabular cups were simulator tested for two million cycles under severe conditions (i.e. by adding third-body particles to the bovine calf serum lubricant). Micro-Fourier Transform Infrared and micro-Raman spectroscopic analyses, differential scanning calorimetry, and crosslink density measurements were used to characterize the samples at a molecular level. The STD_PE cups had twice mass loss than the XLPE_VE components and four times than the XLPE samples; statistically significant differences were found between the mass losses of the three sets of cups. The observed wear trend was justified on the basis of the differences in cross-link density among the samples (XLPE>XLPE_VE>STD_PE). FTIR crystallinity profiles, bulk DSC crystallinity and surface micro-Raman crystallinity seemed to have a similar behaviour upon testing: all of them (as well as the all-trans and ortho-trans contents) revealed the most significant changes in XLPE and XLPE_VE samples. The more severe third-body wear testing conditions determined more noticeable changes in all spectroscopic markers with respect to previous tests. Unexpectedly, traces of bulk oxidation were found in both STD_PE (unirradiated) and XLPE (remelting-stabilized), which were expected to be stable to oxidation; on the contrary, XLPE_VE demonstrated a high oxidative stability in the present, highly demanding conditions.

  11. The influence of bone and bone cement debris on counterface roughness in sliding wear tests of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene on stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Caravia, L; Dowson, D; Fisher, J; Jobbins, B

    1990-01-01

    Studies of explanted hip prostheses have shown high wear rates of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) acetabular cups and roughening of the surface of the metallic femoral head. Bone and bone cement particles have also been found in the articulating surfaces of some joints. It has been proposed that bone or bone cement particles may cause scratching and deterioration in the surface finish of metallic femoral heads, thus producing increased wear rates and excessive amounts of wear debris. Sliding wear tests of UHMWPE pins on stainless steel have been performed with particles of different types of bone and bone cement added. Damage to the stainless steel counterface and the motion of particles through the interface have been studied. Particles of bone cement with zirconium and barium sulphate additives and particles of cortical bone scratched the stainless steel counterface. The cement particles with zirconium additive produced significantly greater surface damage. The number of particles entering the contact and embedding in the UHMWPE pin was dependent on particle size and geometry, surface roughness and contact stress. Particles are likely to cause surface roughening and increased wear rates in artificial joints.

  12. Refractory Wear Mechanisms in the Nonferrous Metal Industry: Testing and Modeling Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregurek, D.; Ressler, A.; Reiter, V.; Franzkowiak, A.; Spanring, A.; Prietl, T.

    2013-11-01

    Nonferrous pyrometallurgical processes today operate at a high intensity requiring the best standards for the furnace refractory systems. From one plant to another, there is a range of process conditions such as temperature, slag chemistry, and feed types, and each of these parameters can influence refractory life. It is generally understood that process changes at plants can impact refractory life. The ability to test and understand refractory responses to a wide range of furnace operating conditions is therefore important. The RHI Technology Centre in Leoben, Austria is well equipped with laboratory and pilot plant facilities to evaluate refractory suitability over the range of conditions encountered in modern nonferrous pyrometallurgical systems. This article describes refractory testing at the RHI Technology Centre of the impact of two metallurgical slags on a number of different RHI test bricks. The slags were a fayalite slag and a calcium ferrite slag supplied by two smelter plants. High-temperature corrosion tests were carried out in a 250-mm-diameter induction furnace and a 165-mm-diameter short rotary kiln; each unit was lined with a number of refractory bricks and tested against attack by the particular slag. After testing, the refractory bricks were subjected to several laboratory tests to determine the extent of corrosion. Optimal refractory choices for the customers' plants were developed based on the test results.

  13. A 100 Hour Wear Test of the NASA NSTAR Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, J. E.; Patterson, M. J.; Brown, J. R.; Rawlin, V. K.; Sovey, J. S.; Myers, R. M.; Blandino, J. J.; Goodfellow, K. D.; Garner, C. E.

    1996-01-01

    In a NASA program to validate 30 cm Xenon ion thruster technology for use in planetary missions a combination of analysis and testing is being used to establish engine reliability. Five long duration tests are planned to identify new failure mechanisms and characterize the parameters which drive known damage accumulation failure modes.

  14. Development of wear-resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components. Volume 1, Coating development and tribological testing: Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, M.G.S.

    1992-06-01

    The tribological properties of a variety of advanced coating materials have been evaluated under conditions which simulate the piston ring -- cylinder liner environment near top ring reversal in a heavy duty diesel engine. Coated ``ring`` samples were tested against a conventional pearlitic grey cast iron liner material using a high temperature reciprocating wear test rig. Tests were run with a fresh CE/SF 15W40lubricant at 200 and 350{degrees}C, with a high-soot, engine-tested oil at 200{degrees}C and with no lubrication at 200{degrees}C. For lowest wear under boundary lubricated conditions, the most promising candidates to emerge from this study were high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) Cr{sub 3} C{sub 2} - 20% NiCr and WC - 12% Co cermets, low temperature arc vapor deposited (LTAVD) CrN and plasma sprayed chromium oxides. Also,plasma sprayed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} materials were found to give excellent wear resistance in unlubricated tests and at extremely high temperatures (450{degrees}C) with a syntheticoil. All of these materials would offer substantial wear reductions compared to the conventional electroplated hard chromium ring facing and thermally sprayed metallic coatings, especially at high temperatures and with high-soot oils subjected to degradation in diesel environments. The LTAVD CrN coating provided the lowest lubricated wear rates of all the materials evaluated, but may be too thin (4 {mu}m) for use as a top ring facing. Most of the coatings evaluated showed higher wear rates with high-soot, engine-tested oil than with fresh oil, with increases of more than a factor of ten in some cases. Generally, metallic materials were found to be much more sensitive to soot/oil degradation than ceramic and cermet coatings. Thus, decreased ``soot sensitivity`` is a significant driving force for utilizing ceramic or cermet coatings in diesel engine wear applications.

  15. Development of a synovial fluid analogue with bio-relevant rheology for wear testing of orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alan M; Fleming, Leigh; Wudebwe, Uchena; Bowen, James; Grover, Liam M

    2014-04-01

    The rheological properties of synovial fluid (SF) are crucial to the performance of joint prostheses. During the development of joint prostheses, wear tests are performed, which simulate joint movements in diluted solutions (usually between 25 and 33% v/v) of bovine serum which has very different rheological properties compared with native SF, where rheology is maintained by hyaluronan. Consequently, there is a need to develop a more suitable artificial SF. In this study, we used rheological techniques to understand SF flow properties which provided an insight into the mechanical behaviour required of a practical SF analogue. Steady-shear viscosity measurements were performed to reveal changes as a function of shear rate. To analyse the viscoelastic properties small deformation oscillatory measurements of storage modulus (G') loss modulus (G″) and complex viscosity (η(⁎)) were made. The rheological properties of the SF where compared with those of the polysaccharides sodium alginate, gellan gum and mixtures of both polymers. Initial results revealed classic shear thinning behaviour for the SF with a small Newtonian plateau at low shear rates with a gradual reduction in viscosity with increasing shear rate. Viscoelasticity measurements also showed that at low frequencies of oscillation there was a viscous response with G″ greater than G' and at higher frequencies there was an elastic response. Rheological properties were found to be similar to that of a 50:50 mix of 2% w/v high molecular weight alginate and 0.75% w/v gellan gum. Importantly, the lubricating behaviour of the serum differed significantly from the biopolymer blend over a full range of sliding velocities. The biopolymer blend was shown to lubricate the opposing surfaces more effectively. This difference was attributed to the more rapid alignment of the polysaccharide during shear when compared with the bovine albumin (the most abundant protein in serum), which typically exhibits a globular

  16. Wear particle analysis using the ferrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The use of the Ferrograph in analyzing wear particles from a variety of different sources is reported. Examples of wear particles from gas turbine engines, bearing tests, friction and wear tests, hydraulic systems, and human joints are illustrated. In addition, the separation of bacteria and human cells is described.

  17. Wear characteristics from the extended lift test of the DS1 flight spare ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, A.; Brophy, J. R.; Goodfellow, K. D.

    2003-01-01

    An on-going life test of the Deep Space One flight spare ion thruster, is being conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The thruster has operated for over 27,290 hours and processed in excess of 219 kg of xenon propellant.

  18. 16 CFR 1610.34 - Only uncovered or exposed parts of wearing apparel to be tested.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... procedures set forth in § 1610.6. (b) If the outer layer of plastic film or plastic-coated fabric of a...—Standard for the Flammability of Vinyl Plastic Film. If the outer layer adheres to all or a portion of one... characteristics of the film or coating, the uncovered or exposed layer shall be tested in accordance with...

  19. 16 CFR 1610.34 - Only uncovered or exposed parts of wearing apparel to be tested.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... procedures set forth in § 1610.6. (b) If the outer layer of plastic film or plastic-coated fabric of a...—Standard for the Flammability of Vinyl Plastic Film. If the outer layer adheres to all or a portion of one... characteristics of the film or coating, the uncovered or exposed layer shall be tested in accordance with...

  20. The John Deere E diesel Test & Research Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Nathan; Mitchell, William E.

    2008-09-23

    Three non-road Tier II emissions compliant diesel engines manufactured by John Deere were placed on a durability test plan of 2000 hours each at full load, rated speed (FLRS). The fuel was a blend of 10% fuel ethanol and 90% low sulfur #2 diesel fuel. Seven operational failures involving twenty seven fuel system components occurred prior to completion of the intended test plan. Regulated emissions measured prior to component failure indicated compliance to Tier II certification goals for the observed test experience. The program plan included operating three non-road Tier II diesel engines for 2000 hours each monitoring the regulated emissions at 500 hour intervals for changes/deterioration. The program was stopped prematurely due to number and frequency of injection system failures. The failures and weaknesses observed involved injector seat and valve wear, control solenoid material incompatibility, injector valve deposits and injector high pressure seal cavitation erosion. Future work should target an E diesel fuel standard that emphasizes minimum water content, stability, lubricity, cetane neutrality and oxidation resistance. Standards for fuel ethanol need to require water content no greater than the base diesel fuel standard. Lubricity bench test standards may need new development for E diesel.

  1. Gin saw wear test

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most current gin saw manufacturers use a 1074 steel or similar as a basis to manufacture their saw blades. The saw teeth are individually punched on the edges of the blades and then the blade goes through a heat treating process prior to use. There are indications from other industries with similar ...

  2. Experimental Study of the Rolling-Sliding Contact Conditions in a PA66/STEEL Gear Using Twin-Disc Test Rig: Friction and Wear Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbarek, Meftah; Rhaiem, Sadok; Kharrat, Mohamed; Dammak, Maher

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of sliding ratio on the tribological response of the contact between the teeth of a metal/polymer gear in the regions close to the pitch point. For this purpose, a new twin-disc test rig was developed on the basis of two discs of different diameters rotating one above the other at the same angular speed. Two different materials were used: non-alloyed structural steel (C45) and polyamide (PA66). The effect of the slip ratio (4%, 12%, 20% and 28%) was studied at a constant pressure of 34 MPa and a constant angular speed of 300 rpm. In addition, the contact conditions were controlled with measurements of the two discs surface temperatures. The results indicate that the wear and the friction are closely related to the contact temperature generated by the sliding phenomenon. At low slip ratio (4% and 12%), the coefficient of friction and the temperature are characterized by a quasi-linear increase with time, and the wear increases slowly. At higher slip ratio (20% and 28%), the coefficient of friction and the temperature presents a steady state, and the wear increases dramatically. During the test, a film of transferred PA66 is formed on the steel surface causing the development of adhesive interactions between the contacting discs which increase the friction coefficient and the contact temperature. The high thermal conductivity of steel as compared to that of the polymer can reduce enormously the contact temperature generated by the sliding process.

  3. Needs and challenges in precision wear measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.

    1996-01-10

    Accurate, precise wear measurements are a key element in solving both current wear problems and in basic wear research. Applications range from assessing durability of micro-scale components to accurate screening of surface treatments and thin solid films. Need to distinguish small differences in wear tate presents formidable problems to those who are developing new materials and surface treatments. Methods for measuring wear in ASTM standard test methods are discussed. Errors in using alterate methods of wear measurement on the same test specimen are also described. Human judgemental factors are a concern in common methods for wear measurement, and an experiment involving measurement of a wear scar by ten different people is described. Precision in wear measurement is limited both by the capabilities of the measuring instruments and by the nonuniformity of the wear process. A method of measuring wear using nano-scale indentations is discussed. Current and future prospects for incorporating advanced, higher-precision wear measurement methods into standards are considered.

  4. Low stress abrasive wear behavior of a hardfaced steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Prasad, B. K.; Jha, A. K.; Modi, O. P.; Das, S.; Yegneswaran, A. H.

    1998-04-01

    A plain carbon steel was overlayed with a wear-resistant hardfacing alloy by manual arc welding. Low stress abrasive wear tests were conducted with an ASTM rubber wheel abrasion tester using crushed silica and as the abrasive medium. The wear rate decreased with sliding distance, and there was an overall improvement in the abrasive wear resistance as a result of overlaying. The wear behavior of the samples has been discussed in terms of microstructural features while the examination of wear surface and subsurface regions provides insight into the wear mechanisms.

  5. Wear resistance of ductile irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Y. S.

    1994-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the wear resistance of different grades of ductile iron as alterna-tives to high- tensile- strength alloyed and inoculated gray irons and bronzes for machine- tool and high-pressure hydraulic components. Special test methods were employed to simulate typical conditions of reciprocating sliding wear with and without abrasive- contaminated lubricant for machine and press guideways. Quantitative relationships were established among wear rate, microstructure and micro-hardness of structural constituents, and nodule size of ductile iron. The frictional wear resistance of duc-tile iron as a bearing material was tested with hardened steel shafts using standard test techniques under continuous rotating movement with lubricant. Lubricated sliding wear tests on specimens and compo-nents for hydraulic equipment and apparatus were carried out on a special rig with reciprocating motion, simulating the working conditions in a piston/cylinder unit in a pressure range from 5 to 32 MPa. Rig and field tests on machine- tool components and units and on hydraulic parts have confirmed the test data.

  6. Wear of engineering materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    Nearly 60 papers discuss fundamental and applied research in the areas of wear, erosion and wear-corrosion of materials. Focus is on ceramics, ceramic and polymer-matrix composites, and coatings; the effect of sliding wear and wear-corrosion of materials in manufacturing processes, automobiles and bearings; and wear and erosion of materials used in fossil-fuel power plants, minerals processing and heavy manufacturing.

  7. Corrosive wear principles

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    The dual effects of corrosion and wear operate together in such industries as paper and pulp, coal handling, mining, and sugar beet extraction. There is a synergistic effect that causes far greater wastage to carbon steels, alloy steels, and even much more abrasion resistant cast irons. Several laboratory and in situ studies have been conducted to better understand the contributions of corrosion and wear to the wastage process. The environmental conditions are usually set by the process. However, there are a few instances where inhibitors as sodium nitrite, sodium chromate, and sodium metasilicate have been successfully used to reduce metal wastage of carbon steels. Hardness has been found to be an unreliable guide to performance under wet sliding conditions. Heat treated alloy steels and cast irons are inferior to stainless steels. Even distilled water is too severe a corrodent for steels. While the austenitic stainlesses perform the best, cold rolling to increase hardness does not further improve their performance. The surface roughness of stainless steels gets smoother during corrosive wear testing while it gets rougher for the alloy steels. This observation substantiated the reputation of improved slideability for stainless alloys over alloy steels.

  8. A Review of Sub-Scale Test Methods to Evaluate the Friction and Wear of Ring and Liner Materials for Spark- and Compression Ignition Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.

    2002-01-22

    A review was conducted of past laboratory-scale test methods and to assess their validity for ranking materials and lubricants for use as piston and liner materials in compression-ignition (CI) and spark-ignition (SI) engines. Most of the previous work was aimed at simulating SI engine environments. This report begins with a discussion of the numerous factors that can affect the validity of an approach to simulating engine conditions in a laboratory. These include not only mechanical, chemical and thermal factors, but also human factors as regards how the vehicle is operated and maintained. The next section provides an annotated review of open literature publications that address the issues of laboratory simulation of engine components. A comparison of these studies indicates a lack of sufficient standardization in procedures to enable a systematic comparison of one publication to another. There were just a few studies that compared several laboratory test methods to engine test results, and these indicated that some test methods correlate, at least qualitatively, better than others. The last section provides a series of recommendations for improving the accuracy and validity of laboratory-scale simulations of engine behavior. It became clear that much of the engine wear damage occurs during start-up when the engine is cold, and this calls into the question the usefulness of test methods that attempt to simulate steady-state running conditions. It is recommended that a new standard test method, perhaps developed with the help of the ASTM wear and erosion committee, be developed. It would use cold start-up conditions in the presence of degraded oil, or simulated degraded oil.

  9. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Task 3, Traditional approaches to wear prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Contamination of the lube-oil with hard abrasive particles leads to a three-body abrasive wear mechanism that highly accelerates piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-fueled diesel engines. One approach to reducing that wear is to modify the size and orientation of surface asperities on the cylinder to enhance the formation of a hydrodynamic film, and to provide avenues of escape for particles that would otherwise be trapped in the wear zone. Another approach is to introduce additives into the contaminated lube-oil that further enhance hydrodynamic film formation, form chemical films on the wearing surfaces, or form films on the contaminant particles. This work focuses on defining the effects of cylinder liner surface finish, various configurations of slots in the cylinder liner surface, and various additives in the contaminated lube-oil on the wear process. Wear tests were initiated in a bench apparatus using coal-ash contaminated lube-oil to test the various wear configurations. The results of these tests indicate that the formation of a hydrodynamic film between the ring and cylinder specimens is enhanced by increasing surface roughness, and by orienting the surface asperities normal to the direction of ring travel but modifications to the cylinder liner surface did not greatly reduce the wear rate. Additives to the lubricant seemed to have a much more significant effect on wear, with a dispersant additive highly accelerating the wear, while a detergent additive was able to reduce the wear almost to the rate achieved where there was no contaminant.

  10. NEXT Long-Duration Test Plume and Wear Characteristics after 16,550 h of Operation and 337 kg of Xenon Processed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) program is developing the next-generation ion propulsion system with significant enhancements beyond the state-of-the-art. The NEXT ion propulsion system provides improved mission capabilities for future NASA science missions to enhance and enable Discovery, New Frontiers, and Flagship-type NASA missions. As part of a comprehensive thruster service life assessment utilizing both testing and analyses, a Long-Duration Test (LDT) was initiated to validate and qualify the NEXT propellant throughput capability to a qualification-level of 450 kg, 1.5 times the mission-derived throughput requirement of 300 kg. This wear test is being conducted with a modified, flight-representative NEXT engineering model ion thruster, designated EM3. As of June 25, 2008, the thruster has accumulated 16,550 h of operation: the first 13,042 h at the thruster full-input-power of 6.9 kW with 3.52 A beam current and 1800 V beam power supply voltage. Operation since 13,042 h, i.e., the most recent 3,508 h, has been at an input power of 4.7 kW with 3.52 A beam current and 1180 V beam power supply voltage. The thruster has processed 337 kg of xenon (Xe) surpassing the NSTAR propellant throughput demonstrated during the extended life testing of the Deep Space 1 flight spare. The NEXT LDT has demonstrated a total impulse of 13.3 106 N s; the highest total impulse ever demonstrated by an ion thruster. Thruster plume diagnostics and erosion measurements are obtained periodically over the entire NEXT throttle table with input power ranging 0.5 to 6.9 kW. Observed thruster component erosion rates are consistent with predictions and the thruster service life assessment. There have not been any observed anomalous erosion and all erosion estimates indicate a thruster throughput capability that exceeds 750 kg of Xe, an equivalent of 36,500 h of continuous operation at the full-power operating condition. This paper presents the erosion measurements and plume

  11. Wear and Tear - Mechanical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this chapter is on the long term wear and tear, or aging, of the mechanical subsystem of a spacecraft. The mechanical subsystem is herein considered to be the primary support structure (as in a skeleton or exoskeleton) upon which all other spacecraft systems rest, and the associated mechanisms. Mechanisms are devices which have some component that moves at least once, in response to some type of passive or active control system. For the structure, aging may proceed as a gradual degradation of mechanical properties and/or function, possibly leading to complete structural failure over an extended period of time. However, over the 50 years of the Space Age such failures appear to be unusual. In contrast, failures for mechanisms are much more frequent and may have a very serious effect on mission performance. Just as on Earth, all moving devices are subject to normal (and possibly accelerated) degradation from mechanical wear due to loss or breakdown of lubricant, misalignment, temperature cycling effects, improper design/selection of materials, fatigue, and a variety of other effects. In space, such environmental factors as severe temperature swings (possibly 100's of degrees C while going in and out of direct solar exposure), hard vacuum, micrometeoroids, wear from operation in a dusty or contaminated environment, and materials degradation from radiation can be much worse. In addition, there are some ground handling issues such as humidity, long term storage, and ground transport which may be of concern. This chapter addresses the elements of the mechanical subsystem subject to wear, and identifies possible causes. The potential impact of such degradation is addressed, albeit with the recognition that the impact of such wear often depends on when it occurs and on what specific components. Most structural elements of the mechanical system typically are conservatively designed (often to a safety factor of greater than approximately 1.25 on yield for

  12. Wear Performance of Laser Processed Tantalum Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Dittrick, Stanley; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2011-01-01

    This first generation investigation evaluates the in vitro tribological performance of laser-processed Ta coatings on Ti for load-bearing implant applications. Linear reciprocating wear tests in simulated body fluid showed one order of magnitude less wear rate, of the order of 10−4mm3(N.m)−1, for Ta coatings compared to Ti. Our results demonstrate that Ta coatings can potentially minimize the early-stage bone-implant interface micro-motion induced wear debris generation due to their excellent bioactivity comparable to that of hydroxyapatite (HA), high wear resistance and toughness compared to popular HA coatings. PMID:22058608

  13. Wear Characteristics of Polymer -Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Y.; Mirzayev, H.

    2015-11-01

    The dry wear of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-based composites, including bronze-filled composites (B60), glass-filled composites (G15), and carbon-filled composites (C25), produced by the mold casting method were investigated under different sliding conditions. The Taguchi L27 method and the analysis of variance were used to identify the effect of process parameters on the wear of tested materials. Experimental results showed that the wear resistance of G15 polymer composites was better than those of C25 and B60 ones. The specific wear rate decreased with increasing sliding distance and load, but partly decreased with increasing tensile strength.

  14. Improved single- and multi-contact life-time testing of dental restorative materials using key characteristics of the human masticatory system and a force/position-controlled robotic dental wear simulator.

    PubMed

    Raabe, D; Harrison, A; Ireland, A; Alemzadeh, K; Sandy, J; Dogramadzi, S; Melhuish, C; Burgess, S

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a new in vitro wear simulator based on spatial parallel kinematics and a biologically inspired implicit force/position hybrid controller to replicate chewing movements and dental wear formations on dental components, such as crowns, bridges or a full set of teeth. The human mandible, guided by passive structures such as posterior teeth and the two temporomandibular joints, moves with up to 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) in Cartesian space. The currently available wear simulators lack the ability to perform these chewing movements. In many cases, their lack of sufficient DOF enables them only to replicate the sliding motion of a single occlusal contact point by neglecting rotational movements and the motion along one Cartesian axis. The motion and forces of more than one occlusal contact points cannot accurately be replicated by these instruments. Furthermore, the majority of wear simulators are unable to control simultaneously the main wear-affecting parameters, considering abrasive mechanical wear, which are the occlusal sliding motion and bite forces in the constraint contact phase of the human chewing cycle. It has been shown that such discrepancies between the true in vivo and the simulated in vitro condition influence the outcome and the quality of wear studies. This can be improved by implementing biological features of the human masticatory system such as tooth compliance realized through the passive action of the periodontal ligament and active bite force control realized though the central nervous system using feedback from periodontal preceptors. The simulator described in this paper can be used for single- and multi-occlusal contact testing due to its kinematics and ability to exactly replicate human translational and rotational mandibular movements with up to 6 DOF without neglecting movements along or around the three Cartesian axes. Recorded human mandibular motion and occlusal force data are the reference inputs of the simulator

  15. Simple isolation method for the bulk isolation of wear particles from metal on metal bearing surfaces generated in a hip simulator test.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang; Royle, Matt; Lali, Ferdinand V; Hart, Alister J; Collins, Simon; Housden, Jonathan; Shelton, Julia C

    2012-04-01

    Isolation and characterization of metal-on-metal (MoM) wear particles from simulator lubricants is essential to understand wear behaviour, ion release and associated corrosive activity related to the wear particles. Substantial challenges remain to establish a simple, precise and repeatable protocol for the isolation and analysis of wear particles due to their extremely small size, their tendency to agglomerate and degrade. In this paper, we describe a simple and efficient method for the bulk isolation and characterisation of wear particles from MoM bearings. Freeze drying was used to remove the large volume of water from the serum lubricant, enzymes used to digest the proteins and ultracentrifugation to finally isolate and purify the particles. The present study involved a total of eight steps for the isolation process and a wear particle extraction efficiency of 45% was achieved.

  16. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  17. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  18. Conjoint corrosion and wear in titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Williams, R L; Williams, D F

    1999-04-01

    When considering titanium alloys for orthopaedic applications it is important to examine the conjoint action of corrosion and wear. In this study we investigate the corrosion and wear behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-7Nb and Ti-13Nb-13Zr in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), bovine albumin solutions in PBS and 10% foetal calf serum solutions in PBS. The tests were performed under four different conditions to evaluate the influence of wear on the corrosion and corrosion on the wear behaviour as follows: corrosion without wear, wear-accelerated corrosion, wear in a non-corrosive environment and wear in a corrosive environment. The corrosion behaviour was investigated using cyclic polarisation studies to measure the ability of the surface to repassivate following breakdown of the passive layer. The properties of the repassivated layer were evaluated by measuring changes in the surface hardness of the alloys. The amount of wear that had occurred was assessed from weight changes and measurement of the depth of the wear scar. It was found that in the presence of wear without corrosion the wear behaviour of Ti-13Nb-13Zr was greater than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb or Ti-6Al-4V and that in the presence of proteins the wear of all three alloys is reduced. In the presence of corrosion without wear Ti-13Nb-13Zr was more corrosion resistant than Ti-6Al-7Nb which was more corrosion resistant than Ti-6Al-4V without proteins whereas in the presence of protein the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr and Ti-6Al-7Nb was reduced and that of Ti-6Al-4V increased. In the presence of corrosion and wear the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr is higher than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb or Ti-6Al-4V in PBS but in the presence of proteins the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr and Ti-6Al-7Nb are very similar but higher than that of Ti-6Al-4V. The wear of Ti-13Nb-13Zr is lower than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb and Ti-6Al-4V with or without the presence of proteins in a corrosive environment. Therefore the overall

  19. Wear-mechanism modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, M.F. . Dept. of Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    Goals of the program are to calculate the surface temperatures in dry sliding, develop a soft wear tester for ceramics, survey the wear mechanisms in brittle solids, and couple the temperature calculations with models to give wear maps for brittle solids. (DLC)

  20. 46 CFR 169.825 - Wearing of safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wearing of safety belts. 169.825 Section 169.825... Operations § 169.825 Wearing of safety belts. The master of each vessel shall ensure that each person wears an approved safety harness when aloft or working topside in heavy weather. Tests, Drills,...

  1. Engine wear and lubricating oil contamination from plant oil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Darcey, C.L.; LePori, W.A.; Yarbrough, C.M.

    1982-12-01

    Engine disassembly with wear measurements, and lubricating oil analysis were used to determine wear rates on a one cylinder diesel engine. Results are reported from short duration tests on the wear rates of various levels of processed sunflower oil, a 25% blend with diesel fuel, and processed cottonseed oil.

  2. Enamel wear opposing polished and aged zirconia.

    PubMed

    Burgess, J O; Janyavula, S; Lawson, N C; Lucas, T J; Cakir, D

    2014-01-01

    Aging of dental zirconia roughens its surface through low temperature degradation. We hypothesized that age-related roughening of zirconia crowns may cause detrimental wear to the enamel of an opposing tooth. To test our hypothesis, we subjected artificially aged zirconia and reference specimens to simulated mastication in a wear device and measured the wear of an opposing enamel cusp. Additionally, the roughness of the pretest surfaces was measured. The zirconia specimens, artificially aged by autoclave, showed no significant increase in roughness compared to the nonaged specimens. Furthermore, no significant difference in material or opposing enamel wear between the aged and nonaged zirconia was seen. All zirconia specimens showed less material and opposing enamel wear than the enamel to enamel control or veneering porcelain specimens. Scanning electron micrographs showed relatively smooth surfaces of aged and nonaged zirconia following wear testing. The micrographs of the veneering ceramic showed sharp fractured edges and fragments of wear debris. Zirconia may be considered a wear-friendly material for restorations opposing enamel, even after simulated aging.

  3. The WAFTER: A versatile wear and friction tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewsbury, P.

    1987-06-01

    Described are the design and use of a pins-on-disc wear and friction testing machine, constructed for use in the Wear Technology Group. The tester is capable of assessing sliding wear at speeds up to 4 m/sec and loads up to 40 N. During a wear run the friction and contact resistance are constantly monitored giving a clear picture of the condition of the surfaces.

  4. Wear characteristics of UHMW polyethylene: a method for accurately measuring extremely low wear rates.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H; Clarke, I C; Markolf, K L; Amstutz, H C

    1978-11-01

    The wear of UHMW polyethylene bearing against 316 stainless steel or cobalt chrome alloy was measured using a 12-channel wear tester especially developed for the evaluation of candidate materials for prosthetic joints. The coefficient of friction and wear rate was determined as a function of lubricant, contact stress, and metallic surface roughness in tests lasting two to three million cycles, the equivalent of several years' use of a prosthesis. Wear was determined from the weight loss of the polyethylene specimens corrected for the effect of fluid absorption. The friction and wear processes in blood serum differed markedly from those in saline solution or distilled water. Only serum lubrication produced wear surfaces resembling those observed on removed prostheses. The experimental method provided a very accurate reproducible measurement of polyethylene wear. The long-term wear rates were proportional to load and sliding distance and were much lower than expected from previously published data. Although the polyethylene wear rate increased with increasing surface roughness, wear was not severe except with very coarse metal surfaces. The data obtained in these studies forms a basis for the subsequent comparative evaluation of potentially superior materials for prosthetic joints.

  5. Casing wear caused by tooljoint hardfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Best, B.

    1983-10-01

    Casing wear due to new tooljoint hardfacings such as fine-mesh tungsten-carbide hardfacing and a hardfacing covered with a layer of relatively soft material have been tested in the laboratory. The tests have been performed on a full-scale test facility simulating field conditions in terms of forces, motions and fluids as closely as possible. The test equipment and procedure are described. The major casing wear mechanisms by tooljoints are given. Wear mechanisms can be classified in terms of mild, normal and severe. In this paper it is shown that proper understanding of these mechanisms could lead to measures to achieve mild casing wear. These mechanisms are illustrated with test results.

  6. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Contamination of the lube-oil with hard abrasive particles leads to a three-body abrasive wear mechanism that highly accelerates piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-fueled diesel engines. One approach to reducing that wear is to modify the size and orientation of surface asperities on the cylinder to enhance the formation of a hydrodynamic film, and to provide avenues of escape for particles that would otherwise be trapped in the wear zone. Another approach is to introduce additives into the contaminated lube-oil that further enhance hydrodynamic film formation, form chemical films on the wearing surfaces, or form films on the contaminant particles. This work focuses on defining the effects of cylinder liner surface finish, various configurations of slots in the cylinder liner surface, and various additives in the contaminated lube-oil on the wear process. Wear tests were initiated in a bench apparatus using coal-ash contaminated lube-oil to test the various wear configurations. The results of these tests indicate that the formation of a hydrodynamic film between the ring and cylinder specimens is enhanced by increasing surface roughness, and by orienting the surface asperities normal to the direction of ring travel but modifications to the cylinder liner surface did not greatly reduce the wear rate. Additives to the lubricant seemed to have a much more significant effect on wear, with a dispersant additive highly accelerating the wear, while a detergent additive was able to reduce the wear almost to the rate achieved where there was no contaminant.

  7. Adhesive Wear of Rollers in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaeef, Iqbal; Krantz, Timothy L.

    2012-01-01

    This work was done to support NASA's James Webb Space Telescope that is equipped with a Near Infrared Camera and Spectrograph and Micro Shutter Assembly (MSA). A MSA mechanism's qualification test in cryogenic vacuum at 30deg K for 96K cycles resulted in roller wear and formation of some debris. Lab tests in vacuum were conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to understand the wear of Ti6Al4V mated with 440F steel rollers. Misalignment angle was found to have the most significant effect on debris formation. At misalignment angle of 1.4deg, significant amount of wear debris were formed within 50,000 cycles. Very few wear particles were found for a zero misalignment angle, and the total wear was small even after 367,000 cycles. The mode of wear in all the tests was attributed to adhesion, which was clearly evident from video records as well as the plate-like amalgamated debris material from both rollers. The adhesive wear rate was found to be approximately proportional to the misalignment angle. The wear is a two-way phenomenon, and the mixing of both roller materials in wear debris was confirmed by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and EDX spectra. While there was a net loss of mass from the steel rollers, XRF and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectra showed peaks of Ti on steel rollers, and peaks of Fe on Ti rollers. These results are useful for designers in terms of maintaining appropriate tolerances to avoid misalignment of rolling elements and the resulting severe wear

  8. An energy dissipation and cross shear time dependent computational wear model for the analysis of polyethylene wear in total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Sean T; Bohm, Eric R; Petrak, Martin J; Wyss, Urs P; Brandt, Jan-M

    2014-03-21

    The cost and time efficiency of computational polyethylene wear simulations may enable the optimization of total knee replacements for the reduction of polyethylene wear. The present study proposes an energy dissipation wear model for polyethylene which considers the time dependent molecular behavior of polyethylene, aspects of tractive rolling and contact pressure. This time dependent - energy dissipation wear model was evaluated, along with several other wear models, by comparison to pin-on-disk results, knee simulator wear test results under various kinematic conditions and knee simulator wear test results that were performed following the ISO 14243-3 standard. The proposed time dependent - energy dissipation wear model resulted in improved accuracy for the prediction of pin-on-disk and knee simulator wear test results compared with several previously published wear models.

  9. A comparative study of sliding wear of nonmetallic dental restorative materials with emphasis on micromechanical wear mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dupriez, Nataliya Deyneka; von Koeckritz, Ann-Kristin; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the in vitro tribological behavior of modern nonmetallic restorative materials. Specimen prepared of IPS e.max Press lithium disilicate glass ceramic, IPS Empress Esthetic leucite-reinforced glass ceramic, Everest ZS Blanks yttria-stabilized zirconia and Lava Ultimate composite were subjected to wear using a wear machine designed to simulate occlusal loads. The wear of the investigated materials and antagonists were evaluated by a three-dimensional surface scanner. The quantitative wear test results were used to compare and rank the materials. Specimens were divided into two groups with steatite and alumina antagonists. For each antagonist material an analysis of variance was applied. As a post hoc test of the significant differences, Tukey's honest significant difference test was used. With steatite antagonist: wear of zirconia < wear of leucite-reinforced ceramic < wear of lithium disilicate ceramic < wear of Lava Ultimate composite. No significant wear difference was found for steatite antagonist. The wear of IPS e.max Press and Lava Ultimate against hard alumina was found to be twice lower as compared to their wear when opposing to steatite. The differences were associated with materials mechanical properties (hardness and fracture toughness) and with materials microstructure. Wear mechanisms are discussed.

  10. Wear characteristics of bonded solid film lubricant under high load condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiraoka, Naofumi; Sasaki, Akira; Kawashima, Noritsugu; Honda, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    Wear properties of phenolic resin bonded molybdenum disulfide film lubricant were studied. In-vacuo journal bearing tests were performed to evaluate the wear-life of this film lubricant. The wear-life depends on substrate materials and on sliding velocity. Pretreated substrate surfaces were examined to reveal the reasons for these results. Additionally, investigations on film wear mechanisms were made.

  11. Wear behavior of austenite containing plate steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Christina E.

    As a follow up to Wolfram's Master of Science thesis, samples from the prior work were further investigated. Samples from four steel alloys were selected for investigation, namely AR400F, 9260, Hadfield, and 301 Stainless steels. AR400F is martensitic while the Hadfield and 301 stainless steels are austenitic. The 9260 exhibited a variety of hardness levels and retained austenite contents, achieved by heat treatments, including quench and tempering (Q&T) and quench and partitioning (Q&P). Samples worn by three wear tests, namely Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel (DSRW), impeller tumbler impact abrasion, and Bond abrasion, were examined by optical profilometry. The wear behaviors observed in topography maps were compared to the same in scanning electron microscopy micrographs and both were used to characterize the wear surfaces. Optical profilometry showed that the scratching abrasion present on the wear surface transitioned to gouging abrasion as impact conditions increased (i.e. from DSRW to impeller to Bond abrasion). Optical profilometry roughness measurements were also compared to sample hardness as well as normalized volume loss (NVL) results for each of the three wear tests. The steels displayed a relationship between roughness measurements and observed wear rates for all three categories of wear testing. Nanoindentation was used to investigate local hardness changes adjacent to the wear surface. DSRW samples generally did not exhibit significant work hardening. The austenitic materials exhibited significant hardening under the high impact conditions of the Bond abrasion wear test. Hardening in the Q&P materials was less pronounced. The Q&T microstructures also demonstrated some hardening. Scratch testing was performed on samples at three different loads, as a more systematic approach to determining the scratching abrasion behavior. Wear rates and scratch hardness were calculated from scratch testing results. Certain similarities between wear behavior in scratch testing

  12. Characterization of the resistance of pyrolytic carbon to abrasive wear.

    PubMed

    Vitale, E; Giusti, P

    1995-12-01

    Si-alloyed pyrolitic carbon (PyC) is currently employed in many biomedical devices, due to its fairly good biological compatibility and non biodegradeability. For prosthetic heart valve applications, required to operate safely for many years, the resistance to abrasive wear is one of the limiting factors which must be accurately evaluated. The present study reports on abrasive wear testing of Ti/PyC and PyC/PyC sliding couples. For both couples it was found that the wear behaviour can be shifted from a low wear regime, characterised by very small wear rates and reduced scatter, to a high wear regime, characterised by high wear rates and high scatter, due to the presence of particle contamination coming from the environment and/or from the specimen polishing process. Actual biomedical devices, particularly heart valves, should not experience the high wear regime, due to the absence of any hard particle contamination source. The wear observed in these items is in fact minimal and may depend on mechanisms other than abrasive wear. In these conditions the experimental evaluation of the wear behaviour should definetely be performed by tests on actual devices.

  13. Wear and wear mechanism simulation of heavy-duty engine intake valve and seat inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. S.; Narasimhan, S.; Larson, J. M.; Schaefer, S. K.

    1998-02-01

    A silicon-chromium alloy frequently used for heavy-duty diesel engine intake valves was tested against eight different insert materials with a valve seat wear simulator. Wear resistance of these combinations was ranked. For each test, the valve seat temperature was controlled at approximately 510 °C, the number of cycles was 864,000 (or 24 h), and the test load was 17,640 N. The combination of the silicon-chromium valve against a cast iron insert produced the least valve seat wear, whereas a cobalt-base alloy insert produced the highest valve seat wear. In the overall valve seat recession ranking, however, the combination of the silicon-chromium valve and an iron-base chromium-nickel alloy insert had the least total seat recession, whereas the silicon-chromium valve against cobalt-base alloy, cast iron, and nickel-base alloy inserts had significant seat recession. Hardness and microstructure compatibility of valve and insert materials are believed to be significant factors in reducing valve and insert wear. The test results indicate that the mechanisms of valve seat and insert wear are a complex combination of adhesion and plastic deformation. Adhesion was confirmed by material transfer, while plastic deformation was verified by shear strain (or radial flow) and abrasion. The oxide films formed during testing also played a significant role. They prevented direct metal-to-metal contact and reduced the coefficient of friction on seat surfaces, thereby reducing adhesive and deformation-controlled wear.

  14. Inspection of wear particles in oils by using a fuzzy classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamalainen, Jari J.; Enwald, Petri

    1994-11-01

    The reliability of stand-alone machines and larger production units can be improved by automated condition monitoring. Analysis of wear particles in lubricating or hydraulic oils helps diagnosing the wear states of machine parts. This paper presents a computer vision system for automated classification of wear particles. Digitized images from experiments with a bearing test bench, a hydraulic system with an industrial company, and oil samples from different industrial sources were used for algorithm development and testing. The wear particles were divided into four classes indicating different wear mechanisms: cutting wear, fatigue wear, adhesive wear, and abrasive wear. The results showed that the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor classifier utilized gave the same distribution of wear particles as the classification by a human expert.

  15. On the wear mechanism of human dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Arsecularatne, J A; Hoffman, M

    2010-05-01

    The mechanisms and controlling factors in human enamel wear are not fully understood yet. To address this problem, we have used focused ion beam (FIB) milling and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) to investigate the processes taking place below the wear surface of enamel specimens from in vitro wear tests. These reveal the generation of subsurface cracks during wear of enamel. An analysis of published qualitative and quantitative experimental wear results for enamel as well as for ceramics shows the similarities of the wear processes taking place under similar contact conditions, despite the differences that exist between these two materials. It is shown that, for the considered conditions, fracture under elastic contact is responsible for enamel wear.

  16. Esthetic restorative materials and opposing enamel wear.

    PubMed

    Olivera, Anna Belsuzarri; Marques, Márcia Martins

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study compared the effects of a gold alloy (Degulor M), four dental ceramics (IPS Empress, IPS Empress 2, Duceram Plus, Duceram LFC) and a laboratory-processed composite (Targis) on the wear of human enamel. The amount of wear of the enamel (dental cusps) and restorative materials (disks) were tested in water at 37 degrees C under standard load (20 N), with a chewing rate of 1.3 Hz and was determined after 150,000 and 300,000 cycles. Before the test, the average surface roughness of the restorative materials was analyzed using the Ra parameter. The results of this study indicate that Targis caused enamel wear similar to Degulor M and resulted in significantly less wear than all the ceramics tested. IPS Empress provoked the greatest amount of enamel wear and Degulor M caused less vertical dimension loss. Targis could be an appropriate alternative material to ceramic, because it is esthetic and produces opposing enamel wear comparable to gold alloy.

  17. Wear characterization of abrasive waterjet nozzles and nozzle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanduri, Madhusarathi

    Parameters that influence nozzle wear in the abrasive water jet (AWJ) environment were identified and classified into nozzle geometric, AWJ system, and nozzle material categories. Regular and accelerated wear test procedures were developed to study nozzle wear under actual and simulated conditions, respectively. Long term tests, using garnet abrasive, were conducted to validate the accelerated test procedure. In addition to exit diameter growth, two new measures of wear, nozzle weight loss and nozzle bore profiles were shown to be invaluable in characterizing and explaining the phenomena of nozzle wear. By conducting nozzle wear tests, the effects of nozzle geometric, and AWJ system parameters on nozzle wear were systematically investigated. An empirical model was developed for nozzle weight loss rate. To understand the response of nozzle materials under varying AWJ system conditions, erosion tests were conducted on samples of typical nozzle materials. The effect of factors such as jet impingement angle, abrasive type, abrasive size, abrasive flow rate, water pressure, traverse speed, and target material was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on eroded samples as well as worn nozzles to understand the wear mechanisms. The dominant wear mechanism observed was grain pullout. Erosion models were reviewed and along the lines of classical erosion theories a semi-empirical model, suitable for erosion of nozzle materials under AWJ impact, was developed. The erosion data correlated very well with the developed model. Finally, the cutting efficiency of AWJ nozzles was investigated in conjunction with nozzle wear. The cutting efficiency of a nozzle deteriorates as it wears. There is a direct correlation between nozzle wear and cutting efficiency. The operating conditions that produce the most efficient jets also cause the most wear in the nozzle.

  18. Fretting friction and wear characteristics of magnetorheological fluid under different magnetic field strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Lee, K. H.; Lee, C. H.

    2017-01-01

    A magnetorheological fluid (MRF) performs differently under different magnetic field strength. This study examined the fretting friction and wear characteristics of MRFs under a range of magnetic field strengths and oscillation frequencies. The fretting friction and wear behaviors of MRF are investigated using a fretting friction and wear tester. The surfaces of specimen are examined by optical microscopy and 3D surface profilometer before and after the tests and wear surface profiles, the wear volume loss and wear coefficient for each magnetic field strength are evaluated. The results show that the friction and wear properties of MRF change according to the magnetic field strength and oscillation frequency.

  19. Casing wear caused by tooljoint hardfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Best, B.

    1986-02-01

    Casing wear caused by new tooljoint hardfacings, such as fine-mesh tungsten-carbide hardfacing and a hardfacing covered with a layer of relatively soft material, has been investigated in the laboratory. The tests were performed on a full-scale test facility with field conditions-forces, motions, and fluids-simulated as closely as possible. It was found that the major mechanisms responsible for casing wear by tooljoints are adhesive wear, abrasive wear, and ploughing. Wear mechanisms can be classified as mild, normal, and severe. A thorough understanding of these mechanisms could lead to measures for lessening casing wear. This can be achieved with (1) tooljoints that have a sufficiently large, smooth, round, and uniform surface and (2) an appropriate mud that has a sufficiently high content of soft solid particles, such as barites, to form a layer in the tooljoint/casing contact area so that metal-to-metal contact is avoided and small, hard mud particles are embedded.

  20. Effect of bionic coupling units' forms on wear resistance of gray cast iron under dry linear reciprocating sliding condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Xie, Guofeng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Ren, Luquan

    2015-07-01

    In order to get close to the wear form of guide rails, the homemade linear reciprocating wear testing machine was used for the wear test. In order to improve the wear-resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, bionic coupling units of different forms were manufactured by a laser. Wear behavior of gray-cast-iron with bionic-coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using the wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that bionic coupling unit could improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron. The wear resistance of gray cast iron with reticulation bionic coupling unit is the best. When the load and speed changed, reticulation bionic coupling unit still has excellent performance in improving the wear resistance of gray cast iron.

  1. Wear of Spur Gears Having a Dithering Motion and Lubricated with a Perfluorinated Polyether Grease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy; Oswald, Fred; Handschuh, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Gear contact surface wear is one of the important failure modes for gear systems. Dedicated experiments are required to enable precise evaluations of gear wear for a particular application. The application of interest for this study required evaluation of wear of gears lubricated with a grade 2 perfluorinated polyether grease and having a dithering (rotation reversal) motion. Experiments were conducted using spur gears made from AISI 9310 steel. Wear was measured using a profilometer at test intervals encompassing 10,000 to 80,000 cycles of dithering motion. The test load level was 1.1 GPa maximum Hertz contact stress at the pitch-line. The trend of total wear as a function of test cycles was linear, and the wear depth rate was approximately 1.2 nm maximum wear depth per gear dithering cycle. The observed wear rate was about 600 times greater than the wear rate for the same gears operated at high speed and lubricated with oil.

  2. Corneal epithelial permeability during extended wear of disposable contact lenses versus daily wear of soft contact lenses.

    PubMed Central

    Schurmans, L R; Boets, E P; van Best, J A

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--The corneal epithelial permeability during extended wear of disposable contact lenses was compared with that during daily wear of soft contact lenses. The study was performed to verify whether the extended wear of disposable contact lenses would result in a higher permeability value than the daily wear of soft contact lenses. A higher permeability makes the cornea more vulnerable for bacterial infections and thus could explain the higher incidence of bacterial keratitis found in extended wear of disposable contact lenses in comparison with the daily wear of soft contact lenses. METHOD--The corneal epithelial permeability was determined by fluorophotometry in 33 healthy volunteers after the wear of soft, daily wear contact lenses for at least 6 months. Thereafter the determination was repeated in each volunteer after extended wear of disposable contact lenses for 1 month. The permeability in 34 healthy non-contact lens wearing volunteers was determined as a control. The permeability value was calculated from the amount of fluorescein that passed into the cornea after application by means of an eyebath. RESULTS--The mean permeability values after daily and extended wear were 0.032 nm/s and 0.031 nm/s, respectively. The values were not significantly different (Wilcoxon paired test p > 0.5). The mean permeability for the non-contact lens wearing controls was 0.042 nm/s. CONCLUSION--The results do not sustain the explanation that a difference in permeability value is the main cause of the increased incidence of keratitis during extended wear of disposable contact lenses in comparison with daily wear. PMID:7742282

  3. A model for predicting wear rates in tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Borrero-Lopez, Oscar; Pajares, Antonia; Constantino, Paul J; Lawn, Brian R

    2014-09-01

    It is hypothesized that wear of enamel is sensitive to the presence of sharp particulates in oral fluids and masticated foods. To this end, a generic model for predicting wear rates in brittle materials is developed, with specific application to tooth enamel. Wear is assumed to result from an accumulation of elastic-plastic micro-asperity events. Integration over all such events leads to a wear rate relation analogous to Archard׳s law, but with allowance for variation in asperity angle and compliance. The coefficient K in this relation quantifies the wear severity, with an arbitrary distinction between 'mild' wear (low K) and 'severe' wear (high K). Data from the literature and in-house wear-test experiments on enamel specimens in lubricant media (water, oil) with and without sharp third-body particulates (silica, diamond) are used to validate the model. Measured wear rates can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on contact asperity conditions, accounting for the occurrence of severe enamel removal in some human patients (bruxing). Expressions for the depth removal rate and number of cycles to wear down occlusal enamel in the low-crowned tooth forms of some mammals are derived, with tooth size and enamel thickness as key variables. The role of 'hard' versus 'soft' food diets in determining evolutionary paths in different hominin species is briefly considered. A feature of the model is that it does not require recourse to specific material removal mechanisms, although processes involving microplastic extrusion and microcrack coalescence are indicated.

  4. Wear behavior of pressable lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Izzat Abdul Rahman, Muhammad; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Ling

    2016-07-01

    This article reports effects of surface preparation and contact loads on abrasive wear properties of highly aesthetic and high-strength pressable lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (LDGC). Abrasive wear testing was performed using a pin-on-disk device in which LDGC disks prepared with different surface finishes were against alumina pins at different contact loads. Coefficients of friction and wear volumes were measured as functions of initial surface finishes and contact loads. Wear-induced surface morphology changes in both LDGC disks and alumina pins were characterized using three-dimensional laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results show that initial surface finishes of LDGC specimens and contact loads significantly affected the friction coefficients, wear volumes and wear-induced surface roughness changes of the material. Both wear volumes and friction coefficients of LDGC increased as the load increased while surface roughness effects were complicated. For rough LDGC surfaces, three-body wear was dominant while for fine LDGC surfaces, two-body abrasive wear played a key role. Delamination, plastic deformation, and brittle fracture were observed on worn LDGC surfaces. The adhesion of LDGC matrix materials to alumina pins was also discovered. This research has advanced our understanding of the abrasive wear behavior of LDGC and will provide guidelines for better utilization and preparation of the material for long-term success in dental restorations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 968-978, 2016.

  5. Fret wear mediation of NIRCam filter wheel assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privári, Béla I.

    2011-10-01

    We will discuss a fret wear solution developed for the James Webb Space Telescope NIRCam filter wheel assembly by implementation of a hard coating. With mechanisms and structures designed for space flight application, titanium is often selected as the choice material of construction. Titanium offers a low-density high strength material that is good for use with many optical instruments due to its' favorable thermal properties. An important factor to consider with titanium mechanisms and structures are component fits and the vibration environment that must be survived during launch. In many instances, small (slip) fits between titanium components can cause fret wear during launch induced vibration. Titanium is particularly susceptible to fret wear, although other materials also demonstrate the fret wear. Fretting is adhesive failure of a material that experiences impact and micro-slip with an adjacent part. The mechanism of fret wear involves small particles that are pulled from the surface of parts that turn into hard oxides that further accelerate the wear between the parts. To mitigate fret wear, the mechanism or structure can be designed to eliminate all slip fits altogether, lubricants may be added to the wear surfaces or hard coatings can be applied to the wear surfaces when the other approaches are not feasible. For the NIRCam filter wheel assembly, which must operate at 35K and remain optically clean, only hard coatings are feasible. A discussion of several coating alternatives and associated wear testing will be presented along with the selection of an optimal solution.

  6. Wear Behaviour of Pressible Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Rahman, Muhammad Izzat Abdul; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports effects of surface preparation and contact loads on abrasive wear properties of highly aesthetic and high-strength pressible lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (LDGC). Abrasive wear testing was performed using a pin-on-disk device in which LDGC disks prepared with different surface finishes were against alumina pins at different contact loads. Coefficients of friction and wear volumes were measured as functions of initial surface finishes and contact loads. Wear-induced surface morphology changes in both LDGC disks and alumina pins were characterized using 3D laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results show that initial surface finishes of LDGC specimens and contact loads significantly affected the friction coefficients, wear volumes and wear-induced surface roughness changes of the material. Both wear volumes and friction coefficients of LDGC increased as the load increased while surface roughness effects were complicated. For rough LDGC surfaces, three-body wear was dominant while for fine LDGC surfaces, two-body abrasive wear played a key role. Delamination, plastic deformation and brittle fracture were observed on worn LDGC surfaces. The adhesion of LDGC matrix materials to alumina pins was also discovered. This research has advanced our understanding of the abrasive wear behaviour of LDGC and will provide guidelines for better utilisation and preparation of the material for long-term success in dental restorations. PMID:25980530

  7. Sliding Wear of TiCN PVD Coated Prealloyed Chromium Sintered Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidulský, Róbert; Bidulská, Jana; Actis Grande, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The present paper deals with the sliding wear behaviour of prealloyed chromium sintered steel (Fe-1.5Cr-0.2Mo) with graphite powder added in the amount of 0.7%. The wear characteristics, such as profilograms, wear tracks morphology and wear curves of the as sintered specimens and TiCN coating were investigated through pin-on-disk tests. The specimens were sintered in pusher furnace at the temperature of 1453 K for 2400 s in a nitrogen-hydrogem atmosphere. Dominant bainitic microstructures with evident features of plastic deformation at the worn surface were detected. The coating of the investigated prealloyed steels increases the wear resistance in comparison with the as-sintered state according to the wear curves. Microstructural and EDX analyses confirmed that delamination and oxidation wear are the main wear mechanism in wear tests.

  8. 3D finite element modeling of sliding wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buentello Hernandez, Rodolfo G.

    Wear is defined as "the removal of material volume through some mechanical process between two surfaces". There are many mechanical situations that can induce wear and each can involve many wear mechanisms. This research focuses on the mechanical wear due to dry sliding between two surfaces. Currently there is a need to identify and compare materials that would endure sliding wear under severe conditions such as high velocities. The high costs associated with the field experimentation of systems subject to high-speed sliding, has prevented the collection of the necessary data required to fully characterize this phenomena. Simulating wear through Finite Elements (FE) would enable its prediction under different scenarios and would reduce experimentation costs. In the aerospace, automotive and weapon industries such a model can aid in material selection, design and/or testing of systems subjected to wear in bearings, gears, brakes, gun barrels, slippers, locomotive wheels, or even rocket test tracks. The 3D wear model presented in this dissertation allows one to reasonably predict high-speed sliding mechanical wear between two materials. The model predictions are reasonable, when compared against those measured on a sled slipper traveling over the Holloman High Speed Tests Track. This slipper traveled a distance of 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s.

  9. Optical wear monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kidane, Getnet S; Desilva, Upul P.; He, Chengli; Ulerich, Nancy H.

    2016-07-26

    A gas turbine includes first and second parts having outer surfaces located adjacent to each other to create an interface where wear occurs. A wear probe is provided for monitoring wear of the outer surface of the first part, and includes an optical guide having first and second ends, wherein the first end is configured to be located flush with the outer surface of the first part. A fiber bundle includes first and second ends, the first end being located proximate to the second end of the optical guide. The fiber bundle includes a transmit fiber bundle comprising a first plurality of optical fibers coupled to a light source, and a receive fiber bundle coupled to a light detector and configured to detect reflected light. A processor is configured to determine a length of the optical guide based on the detected reflected light.

  10. Ceramic-like wear behaviour of human dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Arsecularatne, J A; Hoffman, M

    2012-04-01

    This paper reports a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of subsurfaces of enamel specimens following in vitro reciprocating wear tests with an enamel cusp sliding on a flat enamel specimen under hydrated conditions. The obtained results show that crack formation occurred in the wear scar subsurface. The path followed by these cracks seems to be dictated either by the histological structure of enamel or by the contact stress field. Moreover, the analysis of a set of enamel wear results obtained from the literature and application of fracture-based models, originally developed for ceramics, correlate well, confirming the similar wear processes taking place in these materials. This analysis also reveals a marked influence of coefficient of friction on the enamel wear rate: for a higher coefficient of friction value, enamel wear can be severe even under forces generated during normal operation of teeth.

  11. A physically-based abrasive wear model for composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gun Y.; Dharan, C.K.H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2001-05-01

    A simple physically-based model for the abrasive wear of composite materials is presented based on the mechanics and mechanisms associated with sliding wear in soft (ductile) matrix composites containing hard (brittle) reinforcement particles. The model is based on the assumption that any portion of the reinforcement that is removed as wear debris cannot contribute to the wear resistance of the matrix material. The size of this non-contributing portion of the reinforcement is estimated by modeling the three primary wear mechanisms, specifically plowing, interfacial cracking and particle removal. Critical variables describing the role of the reinforcement, such as its relative size and the nature of the matrix/reinforcement interface, are characterized by a single contribution coefficient, C. Predictions are compared with the results of experimental two-body (pin-on drum) abrasive wear tests performed on a model aluminum particulate-reinforced epoxy matrix composite material.

  12. Wear behaviour of epoxy resin filled with hard powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formisano, A.; Boccarusso, L.; Minutolo, F. Capece; Carrino, L.; Durante, M.; Langella, A.

    2016-10-01

    The development of high performance materials based on epoxy resin finds a growing number of applications in which high wear resistance is required. One major drawback in many of these applications is the relatively poor wear resistance of the epoxy resin. Therefore, in order to investigate on the possibility of increasing wear resistance of thermoset polymers filled with hard powders, sliding tests are carried out by means of a pin on disc apparatus. In particular, composite resins, constituted by an epoxy resin filled with different contents and sizes of Silicon Carbide powder, are analyzed; the wear resistance, in terms of volume loss, is measured for different abrasive counterfaces and loads.

  13. Clinical pulmonary function and industrial respirator wear

    SciTech Connect

    Raven, P.B.; Moss, R.F.; Page, K.; Garmon, R.; Skaggs, B.

    1981-12-01

    This investigation was the initial step in determining a clinical pulmonary test which could be used to evaluate workers as to their suitability to industrial respirator wear. Sixty subjects, 12 superior, 37 normal, and 11 moderately impaired with respect to lung function tests were evaluated with a battery of clinical pulmonary tests while wearing an industrial respirator. The respirator was a full-face mask (MSA-Ultravue) demand breathing type equipped with an inspiratory resistance of 85mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow and an expiratory resistance of 25mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow. Comparisons of these tests were made between the three groups of subjects both with and without a respirator. It appears that those lung tests which measure the flow characteristics of the lung especially those that are effort dependant are more susceptible to change as a result of respirator wear. Hence, the respirator affects the person with superior lung function to a greater degree than the moderately impaired person. It was suggested that the clinical test of 15 second maximum voluntary ventilations (MVV./sub 25/) may be the test of choice for determining worker capability in wearing an industrial respirator.

  14. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  15. Magnetic Fluid Friction and Wear Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The friction and wear properties of two groups of magnetic fluids, one developed at NASA Lewis Research Center and a commercial fluid, were evaluated for boundary lubrication. Friction and wear measurements were made using a pin-on-disk apparatus. Three different ball materials were evaluated, (1) 440C, (2) Al2O3, and (3) Si3N4 against 440C disks. The first class of magnetic fluids have a low vapor pressure hydrocarbon base oil and are suitable for space application. Four variations of this fluid were evaluated: (1) the base oil, (2) base oil with anti-wear additives, (3) a 100 Gauss strength magnetic fluid, and (4) a 400 gauss magnetic fluid. The commercial fluid base oil and four different magnetic particle concentration levels have been evaluated. A space qualified fluorinated lubricant was tested for base line comparison. Hardness, optical microscopy, surface profilometry, and surface analysis were used to characterize the test specimens. Friction was unaffected by the concentration of magnetic particles. Wear rates for magnetic fluids were slightly higher than the base oil. The low vapor pressure magnetic fluid has better wear characteristics than the space qualified fluorinated lubricant.

  16. Incisor wear and age in Yellowstone bison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christianson, D.A.; Gogan, P.J.P.; Podruzny, K.M.; Olexa, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    Biologists commonly use tooth eruption and wear patterns or cementum annuli techniques to estimate age of ungulates. However, in some situations the accuracy or sampling procedures of either approach are undesirable. We investigated the progression of several quantitative measures of wear with age, using permanent first incisors from Yellowstone bison (Bison bison), and tested for differences between sexes and herds. We further investigated the relationship of wear and age to explore an age-estimation method. Labial-lingual width (LLW) correlated best with assigned age (r2=0.66, males; r2=0.76 females). Labial-lingual width differed between sexes, with females showing ∼0.2 mm more wear than males. Additionally, differences in rate of wear existed between bison of the northern and central Yellowstone herds (1.2 and 0.9 mm/year, respectively). We developed a regression formula to test the power of LLW as an estimator of Yellowstone bison age. Our method provided estimated ages within 1 year of the assigned age 73% and 82% of the time for female and male bison, respectively.

  17. Development of wear-resistant coatings for cobalt-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-10-22

    The level of nuclear plant radiation exposure due to activated cobalt wear debris could potentially be reduced by covering the cobalt-base materials with a wear resistant coating. Laboratory pin-on-disc and rolling contact wear tests were used to evaluate the wear performance of several coatings. Based on the results of these tests, multilayer Cr-nitride coatings and ion nitriding are the most promising approaches.

  18. Research on grinding block wear in grinding of SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feihu; Lu, Guodong; Liu, Minhui; Luan, Dianrong

    2014-09-01

    Silicon carbide is being the main ceramics material to make aspherical optical reflectors because of its good physical and chemical performance. But, because of the particularity of wheel structure, wheel wear form and wear loss is changing with time going, which limits the wheel wear researchment. In order to make a better research to wheel grinding, the author experimented many researches on diamond grinding blocks in grinding of SiC in the surface grinding machine, finding the relationship between diamond grinding block wear form and wear loss and grinding force, surface quality and surface precision of workpiece, including the principle of diamond grinding block wear form and wear loss changing with time going, the influencing law of surface quality and surface accuracy because of wheel wear. By changing some grinding parameters in the grinding experiments, the author gets the order of the influencing factors of grinding parameters to wheel wear by orthogonal test.

  19. Employees Wearing Religious Attire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry

    2004-01-01

    While adherents to many religions can be identified by distinctive clothing or accessories, the wearing of such garb by teachers is not necessarily related to evangelism in the classroom. The following case and the accompanying question-and-answer discussion illustrate the problem of the principal caught between the rock of First Amendment…

  20. Wear resistant valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A valve which is resistant to wear caused by particles trapped between the valve seat and the valve member or poppet when the valve closes, including an outlet for directing washing fluid at the valve seat and/or sealing face of the poppet and means for supplying pressured fluid to the outlet at the time when the valve is closing.

  1. In vitro wear of flowable resin composite for posterior restorations.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, Koichi; Taira, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shiro; Suzuki, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine three- and two-body wear values of flowable resin composites for posterior restorations, using a mechanical loading device. The cavities prepared on flattened extracted molars were restored with flowable resin composites (Clearfil Majesty LV: MLV, Estelite Flow Quick: EFQ, Beautifil Flow Plus F00: BFP, and MI Fill: MIF) using accompanying adhesive systems. A universal resin composite (Clearfil Majesty) was used as a control. The specimens were subjected to in vitro three- and two-body wear testing. MLV showed high wear value (three-body: 14.69 µm, two-body: 0.268 mm(3)) compared with other materials tested in both three- and two-body wear tests. BFP showed high three-body wear value (5.78 µm), whereas low two-body wear value (0.008 mm(3)). MIF and EFQ showed equivalent wear values (MIF, three-body: 0.42 µm, two-body: 0.026 mm(3); EFQ, three-body: 1.15 µm, two-body: 0.14 mm(3)) to that of the control in both wear tests.

  2. Tribological bench and engine dynamometer tests of a low viscosity SAE 0W-16 engine oil using a combination of ionic liquid and ZDDP as anti-wear additives

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, William C.; Gao, Hong; Kheireddin, Bassem; Papke, Brian L.; Luo, Huimin; West, Brian H.; Qu, Jun

    2015-09-29

    We have previously reported an oil-miscible phosphonium-organophosphate ionic liquid (IL) with an effective anti-wear (AW) functionality when added to a base oil by itself or combined with a conventional zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) for a synergistic effect. In this research, we investigated whether this synergy manifests in formulated engine oils. An experimental SAE 0W-16 engine oil was generated containing a combination of IL and ZDDP with equal phosphorus contribution. The prototype engine oil was first evaluated using tribological bench tests: AW performance in boundary lubrication (BL) and friction behavior (Stribeck curves) in elastohydrodynamic, mixed, and BL. In addition, the forthcoming standard Sequence VIE engine dynamometer test was then conducted to demonstrate improved fuel economy. Results were benchmarked against those of another experimental engine oil with almost the same formulation except using ZDDP only without the IL (similar total phosphorus content). The IL-ZDDP formulation consistently outperforms the ZDDP-only formulation in friction reduction and wear protection, and results from the bench and engine tests are well correlated.

  3. Tribological bench and engine dynamometer tests of a low viscosity SAE 0W-16 engine oil using a combination of ionic liquid and ZDDP as anti-wear additives

    DOE PAGES

    Barnhill, William C.; Gao, Hong; Kheireddin, Bassem; ...

    2015-09-29

    We have previously reported an oil-miscible phosphonium-organophosphate ionic liquid (IL) with an effective anti-wear (AW) functionality when added to a base oil by itself or combined with a conventional zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) for a synergistic effect. In this research, we investigated whether this synergy manifests in formulated engine oils. An experimental SAE 0W-16 engine oil was generated containing a combination of IL and ZDDP with equal phosphorus contribution. The prototype engine oil was first evaluated using tribological bench tests: AW performance in boundary lubrication (BL) and friction behavior (Stribeck curves) in elastohydrodynamic, mixed, and BL. In addition, the forthcoming standardmore » Sequence VIE engine dynamometer test was then conducted to demonstrate improved fuel economy. Results were benchmarked against those of another experimental engine oil with almost the same formulation except using ZDDP only without the IL (similar total phosphorus content). The IL-ZDDP formulation consistently outperforms the ZDDP-only formulation in friction reduction and wear protection, and results from the bench and engine tests are well correlated.« less

  4. Consideration of wear rates at high velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Chad S.

    The development of the research presented here is one in which high velocity relative sliding motion between two bodies in contact has been considered. Overall, the wear environment is truly three-dimensional. The attempt to characterize three-dimensional wear was not economically feasible because it must be analyzed at the micro-mechanical level to get results. Thus, an engineering approximation was carried out. This approximation was based on a metallographic study identifying the need to include viscoplasticity constitutive material models, coefficient of friction, relationships between the normal load and velocity, and the need to understand wave propagation. A sled test run at the Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) was considered for the determination of high velocity wear rates. In order to adequately characterize high velocity wear, it was necessary to formulate a numerical model that contained all of the physical events present. The experimental results of a VascoMax 300 maraging steel slipper sliding on an AISI 1080 steel rail during a January 2008 sled test mission were analyzed. During this rocket sled test, the slipper traveled 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s. This type of environment was never considered previously in terms of wear evaluation. Each of the features of the metallography were obtained through micro-mechanical experimental techniques. The byproduct of this analysis is that it is now possible to formulate a model that contains viscoplasticity, asperity collisions, temperature and frictional features. Based on the observations of the metallographic analysis, these necessary features have been included in the numerical model, which makes use of a time-dynamic program which follows the movement of a slipper during its experimental test run. The resulting velocity and pressure functions of time have been implemented in the explicit finite element code, ABAQUS. Two-dimensional, plane strain models

  5. Wear Analysis of Thermal Spray Coatings on 3D Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Luo, W.; Selvadurai, U.

    2014-01-01

    Even though the application of thermal spray coatings on complex geometries gained a greater interest in the last decade, the effect of different geometrical features on the wear behavior is still ill-defined. In this study, the wear resistance of FTC-FeCSiMn coated 3D surfaces was investigated. The wear test was carried out by means of two innovative testing procedures. The first test is a Pin-on-Tubes test where the rotating motion is realized by a lathe chuck. The specimens in the second test were fixed on the table and a robot arm operated the pin. This wear test was applied on specimens with concave or convex surfaces. The residual stresses, which were determined by means of an incremental hole-drilling method, show a dependency on the substrate geometry. The obtained stresses were put in relation to the different radii. After the wear test, a 3D-profilometer determined the wear volume and the sections of the coatings were characterized by a scanning electron microscope. The results indicate that the wear resistance is strongly influenced by the geometry of the substrate.

  6. On the Prospects of Using Nanoindentation and Wear Test to Study the Mechanical Behavior of Fe-Based Metallic Glass Coating Reinforced by B4C Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahedi, Behrooz

    2017-01-01

    In this study, Fe-based metallic glass was served as the matrix in which various ratios of hard B4C nanoparticles as reinforcing agents were prepared using a high-energy mechanical milling. The feedstock nanocomposite powders were transferred to the coatings using a high-velocity oxygen fuel process. The results showed that the microstructure of the nanocomposite coating was divided into two regions, namely a full amorphous phase region and homogeneous dispersion of B4C nanoparticles with a scale of 10 to 50 nm in a residual amorphous matrix. As the B4C content is increased, the hardness of the composite coatings is increased too, but the fracture toughness begins to be decreased at the B4C content higher than 20 vol pct. The optimal mechanical properties are obtained with 15 vol pct B4C due to the suitable content and uniform distribution of nanoparticles. The addition of 15 vol pct B4C to the Fe-based metallic glass matrix reduced the friction coefficient from 0.49 to 0.28. The average specific wear rate of the nanocomposite coating (0.48 × 10-5 mm3 Nm-1) was much less than that for the single-phase amorphous coating (1.23 × 10-5 mm3Nm-1). Consequently, the changes in wear resistance between both coatings were attributed to the changes in the brittle to ductile transition by adding B4C reinforcing nanoparticles.

  7. On the Prospects of Using Nanoindentation and Wear Test to Study the Mechanical Behavior of Fe-Based Metallic Glass Coating Reinforced by B4C Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahedi, Behrooz

    2017-03-01

    In this study, Fe-based metallic glass was served as the matrix in which various ratios of hard B4C nanoparticles as reinforcing agents were prepared using a high-energy mechanical milling. The feedstock nanocomposite powders were transferred to the coatings using a high-velocity oxygen fuel process. The results showed that the microstructure of the nanocomposite coating was divided into two regions, namely a full amorphous phase region and homogeneous dispersion of B4C nanoparticles with a scale of 10 to 50 nm in a residual amorphous matrix. As the B4C content is increased, the hardness of the composite coatings is increased too, but the fracture toughness begins to be decreased at the B4C content higher than 20 vol pct. The optimal mechanical properties are obtained with 15 vol pct B4C due to the suitable content and uniform distribution of nanoparticles. The addition of 15 vol pct B4C to the Fe-based metallic glass matrix reduced the friction coefficient from 0.49 to 0.28. The average specific wear rate of the nanocomposite coating (0.48 × 10-5 mm3 Nm-1) was much less than that for the single-phase amorphous coating (1.23 × 10-5 mm3Nm-1). Consequently, the changes in wear resistance between both coatings were attributed to the changes in the brittle to ductile transition by adding B4C reinforcing nanoparticles.

  8. Wear Modalities and Mechanisms of the Mining Non-asbestos Composite Brake Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jiusheng; Yin, Yan; Zhu, Zhencai; Tong, Minming; Lu, Yuhao; Peng, Yuxing

    2013-08-01

    The mining brake material is generally made of composite materials and its wear has important influences on the braking performance of disc brakes. In order to improve the braking reliability of mine hoisters, this paper did some tribological investigations on the mining brake material to reveal its wear modalities and mechanisms. The mining non-asbestos brake shoe and 16Mn steel were selected as braking pairs and tested on a pad-on-disc friction tester. And a SEM was used to observe the worn surface of the brake shoe. It is shown that the non-asbestos brake material has mainly five wear modalities: adhesive wear, abrasive wear, cutting wear, fatigue wear and high heat wear. At the front period of a single braking the wear modality is mainly composed of some light mechanical wear such as abrasive, cutting and point adhesive. With the temperature rising at the back period it transforms to some heavy mechanical wear such as piece adhesive and fatigue. While in several repeated brakings once the surface temperature rises beyond the thermal-decomposition point of the bonding material, the strong destructive high heat wear takes leading roles on the surface. And a phenomenon called friction catastrophe (FC) occurs easily, which as a result causes a braking failure. It is considered that the friction heat has important influences on the wear modalities of the brake material. And the reduction of friction heat must be an effective technical method for decreasing wear and avoiding braking failures.

  9. Laboratory evaluation of low cobalt wear materials for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shiels, S.A.; Wilson, W.L.; Rosengarth, K.W.; Wire, G.L.

    1994-09-01

    Laboratory wear and corrosion screening tests were conducted on several commercially available, low-cobalt and cobalt-free hardsurfacing alloys to evaluate their relative wear and corrosion performance under simulated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary heat transport circuit conditions. Wear tests were performed under reciprocating, sliding contact. Corrosion performance was evaluated in both steady state and off-normal chemistry conditions. The wear behavior of the candidate hardsurfacing alloys was generally comparable to or better than that of Stellite 6, a material of proven wear performance under PWR operating conditions. With the exception of Tristelle 5183, the iron base alloys exhibited unacceptable corrosion behavior under wet layup conditions. The Tristelle 5183 experienced minor corrosion attack in primary coolant having elevated oxygen levels. The twelve percent cobalt alloy, Tristelle TS-2, performed well but exhibited some attack after a simulated decontamination treatment.

  10. How to qualify and validate wear simulation devices and methods.

    PubMed

    Heintze, S D

    2006-08-01

    The clinical significance of increased wear can mainly be attributed to impaired aesthetic appearance and/or functional restrictions. Little is known about the systemic effects of swallowed or inhaled worn particles that derive from restorations. As wear measurements in vivo are complicated and time-consuming, wear simulation devices and methods had been developed without, however, systematically looking at the factors that influence important wear parameters. Wear simulation devices shall simulate processes that occur in the oral cavity during mastication, namely force, force profile, contact time, sliding movement, clearance of worn material, etc. Different devices that use different force actuator principles are available. Those with the highest citation frequency in the literature are - in descending order - the Alabama, ACTA, OHSU, Zurich and MTS wear simulators. When following the FDA guidelines on good laboratory practice (GLP) only the expensive MTS wear simulator is a qualified machine to test wear in vitro; the force exerted by the hydraulic actuator is controlled and regulated during all movements of the stylus. All the other simulators lack control and regulation of force development during dynamic loading of the flat specimens. This may be an explanation for the high coefficient of variation of the results in some wear simulators (28-40%) and the poor reproducibility of wear results if dental databases are searched for wear results of specific dental materials (difference of 22-72% for the same material). As most of the machines are not qualifiable, wear methods applying the machine may have a sound concept but cannot be validated. Only with the MTS method have wear parameters and influencing factors been documented and verified. A good compromise with regard to costs, practicability and robustness is the Willytec chewing simulator, which uses weights as force actuator and step motors for vertical and lateral movements. The Ivoclar wear method run on

  11. Fundamental approach for the developing of cobalt-free wear resistant alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, T.; Enomoto, Y.

    1995-12-31

    As one of the process for reducing radioactivity in light water reactors, it is desirable to use cobalt-free wear resistant alloys for valve seats, bushings and other sliding parts of light water reactors. In order to develop cobalt free wear resistant new alloys which are superior wear and corrosion resistance to Stellite No. 6 in various wear conditions, the Japan Research and Development Center for Metals conducted the fundamental research on the wear properties of the Stellite No. 6 and Japanese originated wear resistant materials, as a cooperative research with Japanese steel, metal, and mining companies as well as a PWR fabricator. This paper summarizes the correlation between the various wear properties and fundamental metallurgical and tribological characteristics of the test materials obtained as a result of this cooperative research from fiscal 1991 to 1994. From these test data, the basic concept for developing a cobalt-free wear resistant alloy was obtained.

  12. Improvement of wear resistance for C45 steel using plasma nitriding, nitrocarburizing and nitriding/ manganese phosphating duplex treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, T. V.; Kusmič, D.; Pospíchal, M.; Dobrocký, D.

    2017-02-01

    This article focuses on effect of plasma nitriding, nitrocarburizing and nitriding/manganese phosphating duplex treatments to wear resistance of C45 steel substrate. The wear test “ball on disc” was conducted to evaluate the coefficient of friction and wear rate using the BRUKER UMT-3 tribometer. The analysis results indicated that nitrocarburizing obtained the best wear resistance; the worst wear resistance was plasma nitriding. Manganese phosphating coating enabled to reduce the coefficient of friction enhanced wear resistance nitrided layer. The used surface treatments also improve non-equal wear of tempered surface over the sliding track.

  13. WEAR BEHAVIOR OF CARBON NANOTUBE/HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE COMPOSITES

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brian B.; Novotny, John E.; Advani, Suresh G.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon Nanotube/High Density Polyethylene (CNT/HDPE) composites were manufactured and tested to determine their wear behavior. The nanocomposites were made from untreated multi-walled carbon nanotubes and HDPE pellets. Thin films of the precursor materials were created with varying weight percentages of nanotubes (1%, 3%, and 5%), through a process of mixing and extruding. The precursor composites were then molded and machined to create test specimens for mechanical and wear tests. These included small punch testing to compare stiffness, maximum load and work-to-failure and block-on-ring testing to determine wear behavior. Each of the tests was conducted for the different weight percentages of composite as well as pure HDPE as the baseline. The measured mechanical properties and wear resistance of the composite materials increased with increasing nanotube content in the range studied. PMID:20161101

  14. Friction and wear behaviour of self lubricating bearing liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Russell

    The thesis describes a numerical model for evaluating the variation of friction and wear of a self lubricating bearing liner over its useful wear life. Self-lubricating bearings have been in widespread use since the mid-1950s, particularly in the aerospace industry where they have the advantage of being low maintenance components. They are commonly used in relatively low speed, reciprocating applications such as control surface actuators, and usually consist of a spherical bearing with the inner and outer elements separated by a composite textile resin-bonded liner. A finite element model has been developed to predict the local stiffness of a particular liner at different states of wear. Results obtained using the model were used to predict the overall friction coefficient as it evolves due to wear, which is a novel approach. Experimental testing was performed on a bespoke flat-on-flat wear test rig with a reciprocating motion to validate the results of the friction model.. These tests were carried out on a commercially-available bearing liner, predominantly at a high contact pressure and an average sliding speed of 0.2 ms-1. Good agreement between predicted and experimentally measured wear was obtained when appropriate coefficients of friction were used in the friction model, and when the reciprocating sliding distance was above a critical value. A numerical wear model was also developed to predict the trend of backlash development in real bearing geometries using a novel approach. Results from the wear model were validated against full-scale bearing tests carried out elsewhere by the sponsoring company. Good agreement was obtained between the model predictions and the experimental results for the first 80% of the bearing wear life, and explanations for the discrepancy during the last 20% of the wear life have been proposed..

  15. Friction and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomey, Jacques

    1952-01-01

    From the practical point of view, this analysis shows that each problem of friction or wear requires its particular solution. There is no universal solution; one or other of the factors predominates and defines the choice of the solution. In certain cases, copper alloys of great thermal conductivity are preferred; in others, plastics abundantly supplied with water. Sometimes, soft antifriction metals are desirable to distribute the load; at other times, hard metals with high resistance to abrasion or heat.

  16. Polymer Wear Modes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    first was the rubbing of Nylon 6—6, Nylon 11, Delrin 500, Delrin AF, and ultra—high molecular weight polyethylene ( UHMWPE ) against 440C stainless steel...strength at* T T Measured Time to Temperature ofPolymer . room temp. _~~ _i ~2!~ U severe wear counterface substrate UHMWP E 24.1 MPa 140°C 400°C -1.47 rn/s

  17. Communication research between working capacity of hard- alloy cutting tools and fractal dimension of their wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefiev, K.; Nesterenko, V.; Daneykina, N.

    2016-06-01

    The results of communication research between the wear resistance of the K applicability hard-alloy cutting tools and the fractal dimension of the wear surface, which is formed on a back side of the cutting edge when processing the materials showing high adhesive activity are presented in the paper. It has been established that the wear resistance of tested cutting tools samples increases according to a fractal dimension increase of their wear surface.

  18. Ultralow wear of gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Guosong; Tan, Chee-Keong; Tansu, Nelson; Krick, Brandon A.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we reveal a remarkable (and surprising) physical property of GaN: it is extremely wear resistant. In fact, we measured the wear rate of GaN is approaching wear rates reported for diamond. Not only does GaN have an ultralow wear rate but also there are quite a few experimental factors that control the magnitude of its wear rate, further contributing to the rich and complex physics of wear of GaN. Here, we discovered several primary controlling factors that will affect the wear rate of III-Nitride materials: crystallographic orientation, sliding environment, and coating composition (GaN, InN and InGaN). Sliding in the ⟨ 1 2 ¯ 10 ⟩ is significantly lower wear than ⟨ 1 1 ¯ 00 ⟩ . Wear increases by 2 orders of magnitude with increasing humidity (from ˜0% to 50% RH). III-Nitride coatings are promising as multifunctional material systems for device design and sliding wear applications.

  19. Novel method to evaluate the net wear volume of bag-filter by fly ash.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yoshimi; Sato, Hisashi; Hirai, Yu; Kim, Ick-Soo; Hinata, Shigeru; Kim, Jooyong

    2009-01-30

    In order to study the wear of bag-filter by ash dust, sintered magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) compact was used for counter material for sliding wear test. The precise amount of magnetite particles embedded into bag-filter was determined by a vibration sample magnetometer (VSM) measurement. It is found that net amount of wear of the bag-filter could be precisely determined by the magnetic measurement. It is also found that the net amount of sliding wear of the bag-filter increases with increasing the wear distance, sliding speed and applied load. To discuss the validity of proposed method, shot peening test with deoxidized iron particles was also carried out for bag-filter sample. The data obtained by the shot peening test is consistent with that obtained by the sliding wear test. The proposed method is, thus, very useful to evaluate the net amount of wear of bag-filter by the fly ash.

  20. Wear resistance of TiAlSiN thin coatings.

    PubMed

    Silva, F J G; Martinho, R P; Alexandre, R J D; Baptista, A P M

    2012-12-01

    In the last decades TiAIN coatings deposited by PVD techniques have been extensively investigated but, nowadays, their potential development for tribological applications is relatively low. However, new coatings are emerging based on them, trying to improve wear behavior. TiAlSiN thin coatings are now investigated, analyzing if Si introduction increases the wear resistance of PVD films. Attending to the application, several wear test configurations has been recently used by some researchers. In this work, TiAISiN thin coatings were produced by PVD Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering technique and they were conveniently characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) provided with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Electron Probe Micro-Analyzer (EPMA), Micro Hardness (MH) and Scratch Test Analysis. Properties as morphology, thickness, roughness, chemical composition and structure, hardness and film adhesion to the substrate were investigated. Concerning to wear characterization, two very different ways were chosen: micro-abrasion with ball-on-flat configuration and industrial non-standardized tests based on samples inserted in a feed channel of a selected plastic injection mould working with 30% (wt.) glass fiber reinforced polypropylene. TiAISiN coatings with a small amount of about 5% (wt.) Si showed a similar wear behavior when compared with TiAIN reported performances, denoting that Si addition does not improve the wear performance of the TiAIN coatings in these wear test conditions.

  1. Steady-state wear and friction in boundary lubrication studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A friction and wear study was made at 20 C to obtain improved reproducibility and reliability in boundary lubrication testing. Ester-base and C-ether-base fluids were used to lubricate a pure iron rider in sliding contact with a rotating M-50 steel disk in a friction and wear apparatus. Conditions included loads of 1/2 and 1 kg and sliding velocities of 3.6 to 18.2 m/min in a dry air atmosphere and stepwise time intervals from 1 to 250 min for wear measurements. The wear rate results were compared with those from previous studies where a single 25 min test period was used. Satisfactory test conditions for studying friction and wear in boundary lubrication for this apparatus were found to be 1 kg load; sliding velocities of 7.1 to 9.1 m/min (50 rpm disk speed); and use of a time stepwise test procedure. Highly reproducible steady-state wear rates and steady-state friction coefficients were determined under boundary conditions. Wear rates and coefficients of friction were constant following initially high values during run-in periods.

  2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of surface chemistry of dibenzyl-disulfide on steel under mild and severe wear conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Wear tests were performed on 304 stainless steel lubricated with pure mineral oil with and without dibenzyl-disulfide. Both mild and severe wear were observed. The type of wear was distinguished by a marked change in wear rate, friction coefficient, and wear scar appearance. The chemical composition of the wear scar surface was examined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in conjunction with argon ion sputter etching. In severe wear scars, a sulfide was formed at the expense of the normal oxide layer. In mild wear scars, there were only superficial sulfur compounds, but there was a substantial increase in the oxide thickness.

  3. Wear mechanisms maps of Si3N4/carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koncsik, Zs; Maros, MB; Kuzsella, L.; Kovacs, A.

    2016-04-01

    Silicon nitride-based nanocomposites with different amount (0, 1, 2 wt%) of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Tribological tests were carried out at room temperature, in dry sliding condition using pin-on-disc test apparatus, applying different normal loads and sliding speeds. Wear phenomena was analysed by scanning electron microscopic investigations of the wear tracks. Based on the controlling wear mechanisms and wear types two-dimensional wear mechanisms maps were created for all composition of the investigated ceramic nanocomposites.

  4. Wear resistance of quenched and tempered AISI 4137H steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumuluru, Murali D.

    1986-02-01

    Abrasive wear resistance of quenched and tempered AISI 4137H steel was studied using the dry sand/rubber wheel test. The variables studied included hardness, tempering temperature, and cleanliness of the steel. The effect of sulfide inclusions on the relative wear performance of the steel was examined. Debris from the wear tests was analyzed using SEM and sieve analysis. The effects of steel cleanliness and sulfide inclusion shape on abrasion resistance are explained in terms of the relative ease for chip formation and its subsequent detachability during the abrasion process.

  5. Sensitivity of Dielectric Properties to Wear Process on Carbon Nanofiber/High-Density Polyethylene Composites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Wood, Weston; Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2011-12-01

    We examined the correlation of wear effects with dielectric properties of carbon nanofibers (CNFs; untreated and organosilane-treated)-reinforced high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. Wear testing for the nanocomposites over up to 120 h was carried out, and then, dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss factor of the polymer composites with the increased wear time were studied. Scanning electron microscope and optical microscope observations were made to analyze the microstructure features of the nanocomposites. The results reveal that there exist approximate linear relationships of permittivity with wear coefficient for the nanocomposites. Composites containing silanized CNFs with the sufficiently thick coating exhibited high wear resistance. The change in permittivity was more sensitive to the increased wear coefficient for the nanocomposites with lower wear resistance. This work provides potential for further research on the application of dielectric signals to detect the effects of wear process on lifetime of polymeric materials.

  6. Improvement in high stress abrasive wear property of steel by hardfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Mondal, D.P.; Khaira, H.K.; Jha, A.K.

    1999-12-01

    High stress abrasive wear behavior of mild steel, medium carbon steel, and hardfacing alloy has been studied to ascertain the extent of improvement in the wear properties after hardfacing of steel. High stress abrasive wear tests were carried out by sliding the specimen against the abrasive media consisting of silicon carbide particles, rigidly bonded on paper base and mounted on disk. Maximum wear was found in the case of mild steel followed by a medium carbon alloy steel and a hardfacing alloy. Different compositions of steels and constituent phases present led to different wear rates of the specimen. The extent of improvement in wear performance of steel due to hardfacing is quite appreciable (twice compared to mild steel). Microstructural examination of the wear surface has been carried out to understand the wear mechanism.

  7. Sensitivity of Dielectric Properties to Wear Process on Carbon Nanofiber/High-Density Polyethylene Composites

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We examined the correlation of wear effects with dielectric properties of carbon nanofibers (CNFs; untreated and organosilane-treated)-reinforced high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. Wear testing for the nanocomposites over up to 120 h was carried out, and then, dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss factor of the polymer composites with the increased wear time were studied. Scanning electron microscope and optical microscope observations were made to analyze the microstructure features of the nanocomposites. The results reveal that there exist approximate linear relationships of permittivity with wear coefficient for the nanocomposites. Composites containing silanized CNFs with the sufficiently thick coating exhibited high wear resistance. The change in permittivity was more sensitive to the increased wear coefficient for the nanocomposites with lower wear resistance. This work provides potential for further research on the application of dielectric signals to detect the effects of wear process on lifetime of polymeric materials. PMID:27502631

  8. Wear Behavior of Newly Developed Bainitic Wheel Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Sangal, S.; Mondal, K.

    2015-02-01

    The present work concentrates on the analysis of wear behavior of bainitic steels made by austempering from a microalloyed steel MAS2, meant for making railway wheel, and comparison with that of a conventional railway wheel steel, wheel-R19. Austempering of the MAS2 steel samples has been performed at different times and temperatures to obtain different morphologies of bainite. Linearly reciprocating dry sliding wear tests of these samples have been carried out at laboratory scale using five different loads. The wear behavior of the bainitic steels has been compared with that of the ferritic-pearlitic steel, wheel-R19. Mechanical properties of the bainitic MAS2 steels are found to be more than that of the wheel-R19 steel. Considerable enhancement in wear resistance of the bainitic steels is attributed to high hardness and strength of the steels. The wear mechanism has been critically analyzed by examining wear track morphology. The wear data gathered have been graphically presented in the form of wear mechanism map to understand the material behavior under different sliding conditions and subsequent morphological variations.

  9. Development of a six station knee wear simulator and preliminary wear results.

    PubMed

    Burgess, I C; Kolar, M; Cunningham, J L; Unsworth, A

    1997-01-01

    In order to assess the wear performance of different designs of total knee replacements (TKR), a six station multi-axis knee simulator has been designed, built and commissioned. The most important features of a knee simulator are representative angles of flexion-extension synchronized with a dynamically applied load, and a combination of rolling and sliding motion. The simulator typically applies flexion-extension of 0-65, anterior-posterior translation of up to 15 mm, a dynamic load of up to 5.0 kN, and operates at 1.0 Hz. The loads and motions are applied using computer controlled servohydraulic actuators and hence their profiles are easily modified. A preliminary wear test has been conducted using a Kinemax (Howmedica, United Kingdom) TKR. The test was conducted in 30 per cent bovine serum which was changed every 150,000 cycles, at which time the bearing surfaces were examined and the UHMWPE tibial component was weighed. Over eight million cycles, a tibial wear rate of 2.62 mg/10(6) cycles was measured. The mild wear observed was characterized by burnishing and slight scratching in the anterior posterior direction. These observations are broadly in line with both in vitro and ex vivo studies reported in the literature for this type of prosthesis. Delamination wear sometimes observed in vivo was not seen.

  10. Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene/graphene oxide nanocomposites: wear characterization and biological response to wear particles.

    PubMed

    Suñer, S; Gowland, N; Craven, R; Joffe, R; Emami, N; Tipper, J L

    2016-12-09

    In the field of total joint replacements, polymer nanocomposites are being investigated as alternatives to ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) for acetabular cup bearings. The objective of this study was to investigate the wear performance and biocompatibility of UHMWPE/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites. This study revealed that low concentrations of GO nanoparticles (0.5 wt %) do not significantly alter the wear performance of UHMWPE. In contrast, the addition of higher concentrations (2 wt %) led to a significant reduction in wear. In terms of biocompatibility, UHMWPE/GO wear particles did not show any adverse effects on L929 fibroblast and PBMNC viability at any of the concentrations tested over time. Moreover, the addition of GO to a UHMWPE matrix did not significantly affect the inflammatory response to wear particles. Further work is required to optimize the manufacturing processes to improve the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites and additional biocompatibility testing should be performed to understand the potential clinical application of these materials. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  11. Wearing someone else's shoes.

    PubMed

    Rae, Kym

    2010-06-01

    This paper recounts a journey of discovery by a scientist who inadvertently takes on coordination of an ArtsHealth programme. The dynamics of role change are explored showcasing the vulnerabilities and fears that often accompany these career adjustments. The associated ArtsHealth programme (Gomeroi gaaynggal) works with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in Australia throughout their pregnancy to improve understanding of issues that impact the health of themselves and their developing baby. By wearing someone else shoes, the scientist is immersed in the project and must confront issues including skill mix, learning and cultural diversity.

  12. Investigation on the Tribological Behavior and Wear Mechanism of Five Different Veneering Porcelains

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jie; Zhang, Qianqian; Qiu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Minhao; Yu, Haiyang; Gao, Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this research was to investigate the wear behavior and wear mechanism of five different veneering porcelains. Methods Five kinds of veneering porcelains were selected in this research. The surface microhardness of all the samples was measured with a microhardness tester. Wear tests were performed on a ball-on-flat PLINT fretting wear machine, with lubrication of artificial saliva at 37°C. The friction coefficients were recorded by the testing system. The microstructure features, wear volume, and damage morphologies were recorded and analyzed with a confocal laser scanning microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The wear mechanism was then elucidated. Results The friction coefficients of the five veneering porcelains differ significantly. No significant correlation between hardness and wear volume was found for these veneering porcelains. Under lubrication of artificial saliva, the porcelain with higher leucite crystal content exhibited greater wear resistance. Additionally, leucite crystal size and distribution in glass matrix influenced wear behavior. The wear mechanisms for these porcelains were similar: abrasive wear dominates the early stage, whereas delamination was the main damage mode at the later stage. Furthermore, delamination was more prominent for porcelains with larger crystal sizes. Significance Wear compatibility between porcelain and natural teeth is important for dental restorative materials. Investigation on crystal content, size, and distribution in glass matrix can provide insight for the selection of dental porcelains in clinical settings. PMID:26368532

  13. The wear of two orthopaedic biopolymers against each other.

    PubMed

    Joyce, T J

    2005-01-01

    The potential for all-polymer prostheses has not been widely investigated. It might be expected that the wear of such biomaterial combinations would be excessive, but an in vivo study of all polymer knee prostheses reported that there were no failures due to wear, even after ten years of clinical use. This design of knee prosthesis used polyacetal and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) as the biopolymers. Similarly, an earlier in vitro study of polyacetal and UHMWPE hip prostheses indicated lower wear than for a cobalt chrome and UHMWPE combination. Therefore this study set out to test the poly-acetal and UHMWPE combination in a wear screening rig which had previously been validated against clinical data for artificial hip joints. Two different motion conditions were applied to the test samples and each biopolymer was tested as both pin and plate. Interestingly it was found that, whatever the contribution from pin or plate, the total mean wear factors were 1.5 10 -6 mm 3/Nm under reciprocation-only, and 4.1 10 -6 mm 3 /Nm under multi-directional motion. These wear factors were greater than those found when a conventional metal-on-UHMWPE couple was tested under the same loading, motion and lu-bricant conditions. A comparison was also undertaken with the wear of other orthopaedic biopolymer combinations, namely cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) against itself, and UHMWPE against itself. The XLPE pairing showed somewhat lower wear than the polyacetal and UHMWPE couple, while the UHMWPE pairing showed the highest wear of all, approximately an or-der of magnitude greater than the polyacetal and UHMWPE combination.

  14. Elucidation of wear mechanisms by ferrographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ferrographic analysis in conjunction with light and scanning electron microscopy is described for the elucidation of wear mechanisms taking place in operating equipment. Example of adhesive wear, abrasive wear, corrosive wear, rolling element fatigue, lubricant breakdown, and other wear modes are illustrated. In addition, the use of magnetic solutions to precipitate nonmagnetic debris from aqueous and nonaqueous fluids is described.

  15. Wear particle analysis from grease lubricated bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenlieb, W.; Maciejewski, A.S.

    1980-11-01

    Ferrographic analysis has been shown to be useful in evaluating the wear/state condition of grease lubricated components. The major achievement was the successful application of dissolving the grease utilizing a solvent mixture and making ferrograms of equal quality as to that found in oil analysis. The types of wear particles found in used grease samples are comparative to those found in oil lubricated systems. Work is presently being performed on grease lubricated taper roller bearings, similar to the test conditions utilized in this study. The analysis of the grease samples was qualitative vs quantitative. Due to the uneven distribution of wear particulate in the grease and the relatively small amount of grease used in making the ferrograms. The primary emphasis was placed upon size distribution, morphology and elemental composition. The results of the ferrogram analysis showed a good correlation to those of the SKF personnel in terms of monitoring the wear state/condition of the bearings throughout their life. However, the on-condition monitoring of grease lubricated components in the field, is complicated by the physical location of the components and inaccessibility by maintenance personnel to remove grease samples. Where accessibility is no problem, this technique is highly recommended. As it appears presently, this analysis technique seems best suited to the examination of grease obtained from dismantled grease lubricated components or in design applications.

  16. Wear of Cast Chromium Steels With TiC Reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan,O.N.; Hawk, J.A.; Tylczak, J.H.

    2001-10-01

    Wear resistance of a series of new titanium carbide reinforced cast chromium steels was investigated under various wear conditions. The steels which were melted in a vacuum induction furnace contained 12 Cr, 3-5 Ti, 1-2 C in weight percent. Microstructure of these materials was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, light optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Microstructure of steels consisted of TiC phase dispersed in a martensitic matrix. High-stress and low-stress abrasion tests, and an erosion test, were utilized to understand the wear behavior of these materials under different environments. The steels were tested in as-cast and heat treated conditions. Wear rates of the cast Cr/TiC steels were compared to those of an AISI type 440C steel and P/M composites reinforced with TiC.

  17. Prevalence and Indicators of Tooth Wear among Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhao; Du, Yangge; Zhang, Jing; Tai, Baojun

    2016-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have focused on the prevalence and related indicators of tooth wear. However, no sufficient studies have been conducted with Chinese adults. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of tooth wear and identify related indicators among adults aged 36 to 74 years in Wuhan City, P.R. China. A cross-sectional and analytic study was conducted with 720 participants, aged 35–49 yrs and 50–74 yrs, in 2014. Each age group included 360 participants, of which 50% were males and 50% were females. All participants completed a questionnaire before examination. Tooth wear was assessed using the modified Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) index. The data were analyzed using the chi-square test and binary logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of tooth wear was 67.5% and 100% in the 35–49 and 50–74 age groups, respectively. The prevalence of dentin exposure was 64.7% and 98.3%, respectively. A significantly higher prevalence of tooth wear and dentin exposure was found in the 50–74 yr group than in the 35–49 yr group (p < 0.05). Critical indicators of tooth wear and dentin exposure included high frequency of acidic drinks and foods consumption, low socio-economic status, and unilateral chewing. The frequency of changing toothbrushes and the habit of drinking water during meals were associated with tooth wear. In addition, the usage of hard-bristle toothbrushes and consuming vitamin C and aspirin were found to be linked with dentin exposure. In conclusion, the prevalence of tooth wear and dentin exposure observed in Chinese adults was high, and the results revealed an association between tooth wear and socio-behavioral risk indicators. PMID:27583435

  18. Wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) in total knee prostheses: a review of key influences.

    PubMed

    McGloughlin, T M; Kavanagh, A G

    2000-01-01

    The formation and development of wear is now widely accepted as one of the major concerns in the long-term survivorship of contemporary knee prostheses in vivo. This review examines the role of surface topography, third-body debris, load, contact mechanics and material quality in the wear process. Some of the kinematic and physiological issues that need to be modelled in the development of wear testing regimes for evaluation of material combinations and geometrical combinations in total knee implant designs are considered. Wear testing procedures and some of the results from wear tests are discussed and the need to consider the impact of rolling and sliding in the study of wear in total knee components is highlighted. The dominant wear mechanisms that occur in vivo are identified and the role of these mechanisms is currently being examined experimentally at the University of Limerick wear testing machine.

  19. Use of GPR technique in surveying gravel road wearing course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarenketo, Timo; Vesa, Heikki

    2000-04-01

    During summer 1998 a series of tests were conducted in Finland in order to find out how Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) technology can be utilized at both the project and network level, when surveying the wearing course thickness of gravel roads. The second objective was to investigate the possibilities of applying dielectricity information obtained using the GPR surface reflection method when determining the quality of the gravel road wearing course. In this study GPR was tested at the project level on highway 9241 Simo in Northern Finland, where the information provided by the GPR and laboratory research was used in designing and proportioning a new wearing course. In the network level studies, performed in the maintenance areas of Kemi and Karstula in Northern and Central Finland the goal for using GPR was to inspect the condition and thickness of the wearing course and evaluate the need for additional wearing course material. The total length of the roads under survey was approximately 200 km and both a 1.5 GHz ground-coupled antenna and a 1.0 GHz horn antenna were tested in this study. The research results show that GPR can be used to measure the thickness of the wearing course, the average measuring error against reference drilling measurements being 25 mm, which is considerably larger than the error of radar measurements in paved roads. To a great extent this is due to the fact that the thickness of the wearing course varies greatly even in the road's cross-section and thus a single reference thickness does not represent the actual thickness of the area measured with the GPR. The wearing course can often get mixed up with lower layers, which makes it difficult to determine the exact layer interfaces. For this reason reference information must always be used along with the GPR measurement results. Of the two GPR antennae tested, the horn antenna proved to be the more effective in measurements. The dielectric value of the wearing course, measured using the horn

  20. Techniques Suitable for a Portable Wear Metal Analyzer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    fsundamental limitations of each technique for D00jAT 1473 EIItON or I Nov0 s toOS~ flhs1lnsifie 7W~~7WI .- . Unclassified " c m ,Y LAISllPlS i?.eOu OP ti...reviewed during this program. Based on this in- formation, three suitable techniques are identified f or the development of a portable wear metal...m __-_...._,___-_______--__,__ 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 WEAR METAL MIALYSIS. The analysis of wear metals in oil is a test- ing technique to monitor the

  1. Wear mechanisms and improvements of wear resistance in cobalt-chromium alloy femoral components in artificial total knee joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Que, Like

    Wear is one of the major causes of artificial total knee arthroplasty (TKA) failure. Wear debris can cause adverse reactions to the surrounding tissue which can ultimately lead to loosening of the prosthesis. The wear behavior of UHMWPE tibial components have been studied extensively, but relatively little attention has been paid to the CoCrMo femoral component. The goal of the present study was to investigate the wear mechanisms of CoCrMo femoral components, to study the effect of CoCrMo alloy surface roughness on the wear of UHMWPE, and to determine the effect of heat treatments on the wear resistance of the CoCrMo implant alloys. The surface roughness of twenty-seven retrieved CoCrMo femoral components was analyzed. A multiple station wear testing machine and a wear fixture attached to an MTS 858 bionix system were built and used for in vitro wear studies of the CoCrMo/UHMWPE bearing couple. Solution and aging treatments were applied to the CoCrMo alloys. A white light interference surface profilometer (WLISP) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to measure the surface roughness and to study wear mechanisms of CoCrMo alloy. An optical microscope was used for alloy microstructure study. X-ray diffraction tests were performed to identify alloy phase transformation after aging. The micro-structure, hardness, and wear resistance of the alloys were studied. Surface roughness was used to quantify alloy wear, and the minimum number of surface roughness measurements required to obtain a reliable and repeatable characterization of surface roughness for a worn alloy surface was determined. The surfaces of the retrieved CoCrMo femoral components appeared to be damaged by metal particles embedded in the UHMWPE tibial component and metal-on-metal wear due to UHMWPE tibial component through-wear. Surface roughness of the femoral components was not correlated with patient age, weight, sex, or length of implantation. In vitro wear tests showed that when the Co

  2. Risk Assessment for Tooth Wear.

    PubMed

    Kontaxopoulou, Isavella; Alam, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Tooth wear has an increasing prevalence in the UK population. The aetiology is commonly multifactorial, and the aetiopathology is through a combination of erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is associated with intrinsic or extrinsic acids, and therefore subjects with reflux disease and eating disorders are at increased risk. Fruit juice, fruits and carbonated drink consumption, frequency of consumption and specific habits are also risk factors. Attrition is more prevalent in bruxists. Other habits need to be considered when defining the risk of tooth wear. Abrasion is usually associated with toothbrushing and toothpastes, especially in an already acidic environment. Patients with extensive lesions that affect dentin may be at higher risk, as well as those presenting with unstained lesions. Monitoring of the progress of tooth wear is recommended to identify those with active tooth wear. Indices for tooth wear are a helpful aid.

  3. Low friction wear resistant graphene films

    DOEpatents

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Berman, Diana; Erdemir, Ali

    2017-02-07

    A low friction wear surface with a coefficient of friction in the superlubric regime including graphene and nanoparticles on the wear surface is provided, and methods of producing the low friction wear surface are also provided. A long lifetime wear resistant surface including graphene exposed to hydrogen is provided, including methods of increasing the lifetime of graphene containing wear surfaces by providing hydrogen to the wear surface.

  4. Switch wear leveling

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  5. Consideration of Wear Rates at High Velocity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Mild wear “involves the relatively slow removal of the tops of the highest contacting asperities with little substrate distortion”. They indicated...introduced pressure velocity, the product of bearing pressure and slid- ing velocity, Pv, as a parameter for presenting results. Units for Pv are (Pa)(m...the pin. Length loss was measured for each test. However, the soft copper pins had a tendency to “ mushroom ” during sliding under the applied load

  6. SRAT/SME components, wear: Area metallurgical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, C.F.

    1987-03-25

    Severe material wear problems in the slurry receipt adjustment tank/slurry mix evaporator (SRAT/SME) have been documented. The wear is of concern. A test program was initiated to provide guidance for design of component configurations and materials. Internal components of prototypic design were fabricated and installed in the SRAT/SME test vessel. These include upper and lower agitator assemblies, heating coil assembly, drive shaft slap ring, and coil placement guides. Stellite{sup R} wear resistant material is applied at carefully selected sites. A modification of the prototypic agitator blade is also being evaluated. All changes are designed to provide information about wear and life of the components in actual service.

  7. Evaluation of the wear properties of high interstitial stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, J.H.; Rawers, J.C.; Alman, D.E.

    2007-04-01

    Adding carbon to high nitrogen steels increases interstitial concentrations over what can be obtained with nitrogen addition alone. This can results in an increase in hardness, strength, and wear resistance. The alloys produced for this study were all based on commercially available high-nitrogen Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steel. This study is the first significant wear study of these new high interstitial nitrogen-carbon stainless steel alloys. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk abrasion, dry sand/rubber wheel abrasion, impeller impact, and jet erosion. Increasing interstitial concentration increased strength and hardness and improved wear resistance under all test conditions. The results are discussed in terms of overall interstitial alloy concentration.

  8. Dry Sliding Wear Behaviour of Flyash Reinforced ZA-27 Alloy Based Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. C.; Krishna, M.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to evaluate the wear rate of ZA-27 alloy composites reinforced with fly ash particles from 1 to 3 wt% in steps of 1 wt%. The compo-casting method has been used to fabricate the composites using Raichur fly ash of average size 3-5 microns. The wear specimens are tested under dry conditions using a pin-on-disc sliding wear testing machine with wear loads of 20-120 N in steps of 20 N, and the sliding distances in the range of 0.5 km to 2.5 km. The results indicate that the wear rate of the composites is less than that of the matrix alloy and it further decreases with the increase in fly ash content. However, the material loss in terms of wear rate and wear volume increases with the increase in load and sliding distance, both in the cases of composites and the matrix alloy. An increase in the applied load increases the wear severity by changing the wear mechanism from abrasion to particle-cracking induced delamination wear. It is found that with the increase in fly ash content, the wear resistance increases monotonically. The observations have been explained using scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of the worn surfaces of the composites.

  9. Effect of the microhardness difference between base metal and bionic coupling unit on wear resistance of gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Chang, Fang; Zhang, Peng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Wang, Chuanwei; Ren, Luquan

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, the samples with different microhardness difference between bionic coupling units and base metal were manufactured by laser surface remelting. Wear behavior of gray cast iron with bionic coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using a homemade liner reciprocating wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that when the microhardness difference is 561 HV0.2, the wear resistance of sample is the best.

  10. Wear resistance and wear mechanisms in polymer + metal composites.

    PubMed

    Olea-Mejia, Oscar; Brostow, Witold; Buchman, Eli

    2010-12-01

    We have investigated composites containing metallic micro-size and nano-sized particles as the 10 wt% dispersed phase. Branched low density polyethylene (LDPE) was the matrix. Microsized metals were Al, Ag and Ni; nanosized metals were Al and Ag. Several mechanisms of wear are observed in function of the kind and size of metal used: deformation, delamination, abrasion, adhesion and rolls formation. The presence of Ag particles increases the wear rate as compared to neat LDPE. The presence of Al particles lowers the wear of LDPE significantly; nanoparticles are more effective than microparticles.

  11. Copper leaching from brake wear debris in standard extraction solutions.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Yim, Soobin; Schlautman, Mark A

    2003-10-01

    Quantification of the copper content of and copper leaching from a disc brake wear debris sample was performed using microwave-assisted acid digestion, the Federal Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the State of California Waste Extraction Test (WET). The brake wear debris tested was a composite sample obtained from a brake dynamometer test of one brake pad source material. Comparative digestion studies demonstrated that a modified aqua regia matrix (HNO3:HCl:H2O2 = 1:3:0.5) optimized the digestion effectiveness for determining the total copper content in the brake wear debris. No significant sample heterogeneity within the brake wear debris was observed, based on statistically indistinguishable total copper content results for subsamples with a wide range of sample masses. Upon pooling all subsample results, an overall total copper content for the composite brake wear debris sample was determined to be 10.8% (g/g), with a 95% confidence limit of +/- 0.5% (g/g). Copper leaching increased with decreasing solid-to-liquid ratios in TCLP tests, but was unaffected by the solid-to-liquid ratio in the WET. For a 1:10(4) (g/g) solid-to-liquid ratio, 85% and 99% of the total mass of copper present in the composite brake wear debris sample was leached into solution during the TCLP and WET, respectively. Rate studies also demonstrated that the WET resulted in a faster rate and higher extent of copper leaching relative to the TCLP. Compared to reference copper-containing materials, the composite brake wear debris sample exhibited relatively higher TCLP and WET copper leaching characteristics. The higher copper leaching exhibited by the brake wear debris sample may have resulted from its higher specific surface area and/or from changes in the chemical form of copper that occurred during the braking process.

  12. Analysis of wear track and debris of stir cast LM13/Zr composite at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Panwar, Ranvir Singh Pandey, O.P.

    2013-01-15

    Particulate reinforced aluminum metal matrix composite is in high demand in automobile industry where the operational conditions vary from low to high temperature. In order to understand the wear mode at elevated temperature, this study was planned. For this purpose we developed a metal matrix composite containing aluminum alloy (LM13) as matrix and zircon sand as particulate reinforcement by stir casting process. Different amounts of zircon sand (5, 10, 15 and 20 wt.%) were incorporated in the matrix to study the effect of reinforcement on the wear resistance. Dispersion of zircon sand particles in the matrix was confirmed by using optical microscopy. Sliding wear tests were done to study the durability of the composite with respect to the base alloy. The effects of load and temperature on wear behavior from room temperature to 300 Degree-Sign C were studied to understand the wear mechanism deeply. Surface morphology of the worn surfaces after the wear tests as well as wear debris was observed under scanning electron microscope. Mild to severe wear transition was noticed in tests at high temperature and high load. However, there is interesting change in wear behavior of the composite near the critical temperature of the composite. All the observed behavior has been explained with reference to the observed microstructure of the wear track and debris. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good interfacial bonding between zircon sand particles and Al matrix was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of temperature on the wear behavior of LM13/Zr composites was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wear resistance of the composite was improved with addition of zircon sand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transition temperature from mild to severe wear also improved in composite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEM analysis of the tracks and debris was done to establish wear mechanism.

  13. Wear resistant alloys for coal handling equipment. Final technical report, October 1, 1977-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W.M.; Parker, E.R.; Misra, A.; Finnie, I.

    1981-01-01

    In the progress report for 1977-1979, an extensive literature survey was completed in the areas of abrasive wear mechanisms, wear testing and microstructural effects on abrasive wear. Definitions of the various abrasive wear processes were clarified. A laboratory wear tester capable of simulating high stress two-body abrasive wear and low stress three-body wear was designed, constructed and calibrated. Experiments were run on some standard metals and alloys in the annealed, work hardened, and heat treated conditions under both two-body and three-body wear. In the 1979 to 1980 period, a detailed analysis of the abrasive size effect was performed based on the observations made on two- and three-body abrasion and erosion. It was concluded that the size effect was due to a shallow surface layer exhibiting higher flow stress than the bulk material when the material is abraded or eroded. The effect of certain variables on the wear resistance of different pure metals was compared for two-body abrasion, three-body abrasion and erosion. The variables studied are annealed hardness of the worn metal, the increase in hardness of the worn metal before the wear process due to work hardening and heat treatment, applied load, distance travelled, the abrasive particle size and abrasive hardness. The effect of most of these variables is similar for the three different wear processes. The existing low-stress, open three-body abrasive wear tester was modified and calibrated for testing abrasive wear up to 600/sup 0/C. Some standard materials were tested and in the case of pure aluminum it was found that the wear rate decreased with increase in temperature.

  14. The effect of glazed and polished ceramics on human enamel wear.

    PubMed

    Olivera, Anna Belsuzarri; Matson, Edmir; Marques, Márcia Martins

    2006-01-01

    This in vitro study compared the effect of glazed and polished dental ceramic on the wear of human enamel. Five ceramics were tested under standard load after 150,000 and 300,000 simulated chewing cycles. Wear was determined from collected digital data and analyzed before and after loading. Statistical comparisons were analyzed. Polished ceramics produced less enamel wear. The amount of enamel wear for opposing IPS Empress ceramic was significantly higher (P < .001) than wear provoked by the other ceramics. The enamel wear rate was higher at the first 150,000 cycles, and polishing increased ceramic roughness, except for the IPS Empress ceramic. Polishing of dental ceramics at the contact area produces less antagonistic enamel wear.

  15. Dynamic and wear study of an extremely bidisperse magnetorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, G. R.; Fernández Ruiz-Morón, L.; Durán, J. D. G.; Delgado, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    In this work the friction and wear properties of five magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) with varying compositions are investigated. Considering that many of the proposed applications for these fluids involve lubricated contact between mobile metal-metal or polymer-metal parts, the relationship between MR response and wear behavior appears to be of fundamental importance. One of the fluids (MR#1) contains only the iron microparticles and base oil; the second and third ones (MR#2 and MR#3) contain an anti-wear additive as well. The fourth one (MR#4) is a well known commercial MRF. Finally, MR#5 is stabilized by dispersing the iron particles in a magnetite ferrofluid. The MR response of the latter fluid is better (higher yield stress and post-yield viscosity) than that of the others. More importantly, it remains (and even improves) after the wear test: the pressure applied in the four-ball apparatus produces a compaction of the magnetite layer around the iron microparticles. Additionally, the friction coefficient is larger, which seems paradoxical in principle, but can be explained by considering the stability of MR#5 in comparison to the other four MRs, which appear to undergo partial phase separation during the test. In fact, electron and optical microscope observations confirm a milder wear effect of MR#5, with almost complete absence of scars from the steel test spheres and homogeneous and shallow grooves on them. Comparatively, MR#2, MR#3 and, particularly, MR#1 produce a much more significant wear.

  16. Friction and wear behavior of aluminum and composite airplane skins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, K. E.

    1984-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior was determined for small skin specimens under abrasive loading conditions typical of those occurring on the underside of a transport airplane during emergency belly landing. A test apparatus consisting of a standard belt sander provided the sliding surface. Small test specimens constructed of aluminum, standard graphite-epoxy composite, aramid-epoxy composite, and toughened-resin composites were tested undar a range of pressures, belt velocities, and belt-surface textures. The effects of these test variables on the wear rate and the coefficient of friction are discussed and comparisons are made between the composite materials and aluminum. The effect of fiber orientation in the composite materials on wear rate was also investigated. In addition, tests were performed in which thermocouples were imbedded into the various test specimens to obtain temperature-time histories during abrasion.

  17. Clinical assessment of enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Schwindling, F S; Schmitter, M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure enamel wear caused by antagonistic monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia full molar crowns were placed in 20 patients. Patients with high activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were excluded. For analysis of wear, vinylpolysiloxane impressions were prepared after crown incorporation and at 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up. Wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists, and of two contralateral natural antagonists (control teeth) was measured by use of plaster replicas and a 3D laser-scanning device. Differences of wear between the zirconia crown antagonists and the control teeth were investigated by means of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and linear regression analysis. After 2 years, mean vertical loss was 46 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 19-26 μm for contralateral control teeth and 14 μm for zirconia crowns. Maximum vertical loss was 151 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 75-115 μm for control teeth and 60 μm for zirconia crowns. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between wear of enamel by zirconia-opposed teeth and by control teeth. Gender, which significantly affected wear, was identified as a possible confounder. Monolithic zirconia crowns generated more wear of opposed enamel than did natural teeth. Because of the greater wear caused by other dental ceramics, the use of monolithic zirconia crowns may be justified.

  18. Localized and generalized simulated wear of resin composites.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, W W; Takamizawa, T; Erickson, R L; Tsujimoto, A; Latta, M; Miyazaki, M

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to examine the wear of resin composite materials using both a localized and generalized wear simulation model. Twenty specimens each of seven resin composites (Esthet•X HD [HD], Filtek Supreme Ultra [SU], Herculite Ultra [HU], SonicFill [SF], Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill [TB], Venus Diamond [VD], and Z100 Restorative [Z]) were subjected to a wear challenge of 400,000 cycles for both localized and generalized wear in a Leinfelder-Suzuki wear simulator (Alabama machine). The materials were placed in custom cylinder-shaped stainless steel fixtures. A stainless steel ball bearing (r=2.387 mm) was used as the antagonist for localized wear, and a stainless steel, cylindrical antagonist with a flat tip was used for generalized wear. A water slurry of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads was used as the abrasive media. A noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2100) with Proscan software was used to digitize the surface contours of the pretest and posttest specimens. AnSur 3D software was used for wear assessment. For localized testing, maximum facet depth (μm) and volume loss (mm(3)) were used to compare the materials. The mean depth of the facet surface (μm) and volume loss (mm(3)) were used for comparison of the generalized wear specimens. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test were used for data analysis of volume loss for both localized and generalized wear, maximum facet depth for localized wear, and mean depth of the facet for generalized wear. The results for localized wear simulation were as follows [mean (standard deviation)]: maximum facet depth (μm)--Z, 59.5 (14.7); HU, 99.3 (16.3); SU, 102.8 (13.8); HD, 110.2 (13.3); VD, 114.0 (10.3); TB, 125.5 (12.1); SF, 195.9 (16.9); volume loss (mm(3))--Z, 0.013 (0.002); SU, 0.026 (0.006); HU, 0.043 (0.008); VD, 0.057 (0.009); HD, 0.058 (0.014); TB, 0.061 (0.010); SF, 0.135 (0.024). Generalized wear simulation results were as follows: mean depth of facet (μm)--Z, 9.3 (3

  19. Evaluation Of Saltstone Mixer Paddle Configuration For Improved Wear Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M. M.; Fowley, M. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

    2012-09-27

    A soft metal with low wear resistance (6000 series aluminum), was used to minimize run time while maximizing wear rate. Two paddle configurations were tested, with the first four paddles after the augers replaced by the wear paddles. The first configuration was all flat paddles, with the first paddle not aligned with the augers and is consistent with present SPF mixer. The second configuration had helical paddles for the first three stages after the augers and a flat paddle at the fourth stage. The first helical paddle was aligned with the auger flight for the second configuration. The all flat paddle configuration wear rate was approximately double the wear rate of the helical paddles for the first two sets of paddles after the augers. For both configurations, there was little or no wear on the third and fourth paddle sets based on mass change, indicating that the fully wetted premix materials are much less abrasive than the un-wetted or partially wetted premix. Additionally, inspection of the wear surface of the paddles at higher magnification showed the flat paddles were worn much more than the helical and is consistent with the wear rates. Aligning the auger discharge flight with the first set of helical paddles was effective in reducing the wear rate as compared to the flat paddle configuration. Changing the paddle configuration from flat to helical resulted in a slight increase in rheological properties. Although, both tests produced grout-like material that is within the processing rage of the SPF, it should be noted that cement is not included in the premix and water was used rather than salt solution, which does affect the rheology of the fresh grout. The higher rheological properties from the helical wear test are most likely due to the reduced number of shearing paddles in the mixer. In addition, there is variation in the rheological data for each wear test. This is most likely due to the way that the dry feeds enter the mixer from the dry feeder. The

  20. Graphitic polymer nanocomposites: Wear performance and wear debris analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tian

    With the addition of appropriate nanofillers, nanocomposites have been shown to be an effective avenue to achieve a multitude of enhanced properties, even extending to multi-functionalities not normally considered possible for conventional polymer materials. However, the structure and properties of polymeric nanocomposites can be influenced by some environmental factors in practical use, such as wear and temperature, due to the nature of viscoelasticity of polymer matrix. The large interfacial areas exist between matrix and nanofillers are also susceptible to the wear/temperature-related changes. In this work, I was devoted to developing high wear and/or thermal performance graphitic nanofiller reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. Two critical issues, including appropriate filler-matrix interactions and proper dispersion of the nano-reinforcement, were addressed through the effective nanofiller surface modification. Wear, thermal and mechanical properties of the resultant nanocomposites were systematically investigated. Meanwhile, the wear debris generated on the sliding surface of composite materials was analyzed morphologically and quantitatively. In particular, the research regarding the possibility of determining the effects of wear and thermal processes on the nanocomposites by detecting dielectric signals over the lifetime of polymeric materials was conducted. Correlations that exist between effects of wear or thermal processes and dielectric properties of the nanocomposites were then explored. Based on the studies of HDPE nanocomposites, high quality ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) nanocomposite reinforced by graphitic nanofillers was finally extended in this thesis. UHMWPE is an extremely viscous polymer and thus cannot be processed conventionally, typically resulting in dispersion issues far worse than that of other composite systems. The research presented aims at solving the issue by using ultrasonication-assisted melt

  1. The wear of cross-linked polyethylene against itself.

    PubMed

    Joyce, T J; Ash, H E; Unsworth, A

    1996-01-01

    Cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) may have an application as a material for an all-plastic surface replacement finger joint. It is inexpensive, biocompatible and can be injection-moulded into the complex shapes that are found on the ends of the finger bones. Further, the cross-linking of polyethylene has significantly improved its mechanical properties. Therefore, the opportunity exists for an all-XLPE joint, and so the wear characteristics of XLPE sliding against itself have been investigated. Wear tests were carried out on both reciprocating pin-on-plate machines and a finger function simulator. The reciprocating pin-on-plate machines had pins loaded at 10 N and 40 N. All pin-on-plate tests show wear factors from the plates very much greater than those of the pins. After 349 km of sliding, a mean wear factor of 0.46 x 10(-6) mm3/N m was found for the plates compared with 0.021 x 10(-6) mm3/N m for the pins. A fatigue mechanism may be causing this phenomenon of greater plate wear. Tests using the finger function simulator give an average wear rate of 0.22 x 10(-6) mm3/N m after 368 km. This sliding distance is equivalent to 12.5 years of use in vivo. The wear factors found were comparable with those of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) against a metallic counterface and, therefore, as the loads across the finger joint are much less than those across the knee or the hip, it is probable that an all-XLPE finger joint will be viable from a wear point of view.

  2. Wear aspects of internal combustion engine valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panţuru, M.; Chicet, D.; Paulin, C.; Alexandru, A.; Munteanu, C.

    2016-08-01

    Because the surface engineering is becoming an increasingly viable alternative to the constructive changes made to improve the efficiency of internal combustion engines, have been proposed and tested various types of coatings of some organs of internal combustion engines. One vital organ is the engine valves, which is subjected during operation to combined thermal, mechanical, corrosion and wear solicitations, which are leading to severe corrosion and complete breakdown. In this paper were analyzed aspects of valves wear and the active surfaces were coated using the atmospheric plasma spraying method (APS) with two commercial powders: Ni-Al and YSZ. Microstructural analyzes were made on these layers and also observations regarding the possibility of using them as thermal barrier and anti-oxidant coatings.

  3. Computational prediction and experimental validation of revolute joint clearance wear in the low-velocity planar mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Xiongming; He, Huang; Lai, Qinfang; Wang, Cheng; Yang, Jianhong; Zhang, Yong; Fang, Huaiying; Liao, Shuirong

    2017-02-01

    Within the multibody dynamics framework, the paper proposed an efficient procedure to calculate revolute joint wear of planar mechanism with low velocity. Firstly, based on the wear test data, a method to calculate the wear coefficient that corresponds to the actual working condition of the mechanism is proposed. Then, an efficient iterative prediction method for joint clearance wear evolving in the multibody dynamic system in is proposed based on the Archard's wear model. Meanwhile, the wear tests of the typical mechanism have verified the method proposed in this paper. The research shows that when the increments of the wear depth of revolute joints are not big, the method can provide high prediction accuracy; however, as the predicted wear depth increases, the prediction error increases as well.

  4. Wear Behavior and Mechanism of H13 Steel in Different Environmental Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinxing; Zhou, Yin; Cao, Huan; Li, Yixian; Wang, Lan; Wang, Shuqi

    2016-10-01

    Sliding wear tests were performed for H13 steel in atmosphere, distilled water, 3.5% NaCl, and 5% NaOH water solutions under various loads on a pin-on-disk wear tester. The results showed that for different environmental media, the wear rate of H13 steel in atmosphere was the maximum and that in 3.5% NaCl solution was the minimum. The maximum wear rate in atmosphere was caused by a larger quantity of heat produced in the friction process. In this case, the adhesive wear prevailed. In three wet environments, the mild wear prevailed due to the good lubrication and cooling capacity of media as well as corrosion product film on worn surface. In distilled water, the wear mechanism was a typical fatigue wear. On the other hand, in 3.5% NaCl and 5% NaOH solutions, corrosive wear prevailed. The minimum wear rate in 3.5% NaCl solution was attributed to the protective function of corrosion product film. On the contrary, noncompact corrosion product film in 5% NaOH solution resulted in higher wear rate.

  5. Wear mechanisms of milling inserts: Dry and wet cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, J.; Tung, S.C.; Barber, G.C.

    1998-07-01

    There is less literature on wear of milling tools than on wear of turning tools because milling is one of the most complicated machining operations. The intermittent milling action creates mechanical and thermal surges that distinguish milling from single-point machining. A systematic tool life study for face milling inserts was conducted with and without coolant. Workpieces made of 4140 steel were cut by C5 grade carbide inserts under various cutting conditions. The comparison between dry and wet cutting shows that caution should be taken when applying a coolant for milling operations. Special tests should be carried out in evaluating potential coolant candidates. It is not always true that coolant enhances tool life for milling. Wear mechanisms are presented by means of war maps. Identified wear mechanisms are: micro-attrition, micro-abrasion, mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, thermal pitting, and edge chipping.

  6. Abrasive wear of alumina fibre-reinforced aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axen, N.; Alahelisten, A.; Jacobson, S.

    1994-04-01

    The friction and abrasive wear behaviour of an Al-Si1MgMn aluminium alloy reinforced with 10, 15 and 30 vol.% of alumina fibers has been evaluated. The influence of fiber content, matrix hardness, applied load as well as the hardness and size of the abrasive grits was investigated. The tests were performed with a pin-on-drum two-body abrasion apparatus. The wear mechanisms were studied using scanning electron microscopy. It is shown that fiber reinforcement increases the wear resistance in milder abrasive situations, i.e. small and soft abrasives and low loads. However, in tougher abrasive situations, meaning coarse and hard abrasives and high loads, the wear resistance of the composites is equal to or, in some cases, even lower than that of the unreinforced material. It is also shown that the coefficient of friction decreases with increasing fiber content and matrix hardness of the composites.

  7. They shall wear fringes.

    PubMed

    Sugar, M

    1999-01-01

    The multiple functions of clothes include utility, protection, rivalry, disguise, camouflage, display for seduction purposes, aggression, totemism, and status. Here the focus is on a decorative and distinctive hierarchical aspect of ancient dress, the tsitsit or fringes, whose original function is long absent, but that has endured for 3,500 years in Judaism. The beginning of their use beyond the totemic appears related to issues of changing identity from slavery to liberty, endowing noble status, exhibitionism, a symbol of identity, identification with the aggressor, a talisman, and potency. It is conceptualized that they became a symbol, or a specifier, that helped promote group cohesion in ex-slaves who were frightened, dependent, anxious, and not hopeful about their future. The tsitsit aided the development of a new identity and made all Israelites equal and noble to the observer. The durability of this symbol to the present is evident in its daily wear, as an accompaniment to daily prayers, as well as in its use as a burial shroud for males. It appears that the tsitsit have additional multiple functions. These are the promise of oral and genital satisfaction, and the pleasure of the after-life, superego warnings and control of sexual impulses, protection, survival value, and affirmation. Since they offer sublimation with acceptable gratification of instincts, the tsitsit have become ritualized and endure.

  8. The friction and wear of carbon-carbon composites for aircraft brakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Toby

    Many carbon-carbon composite aircraft brakes encounter high wear rates during low energy braking operations. The work presented in this thesis addresses this issue, but it also elucidates the microstructural changes and wear mechanisms that take place in these materials during all braking conditions encountered by aircraft brakes. A variety of investigations were conducted using friction and wear testing, as well as examination of wear surfaces and wear debris using OM, SEM, X-RD, TGA and Density Gradient Separation (DOS). Friction and wear tests were conducted on a PAN fibre/CVI matrix carbon-carbon composite (Dunlop) and a pitch fibre/Resin-CVI matrix carbon-carbon composite (Bendix). Extensive testing was undertaken on the Dunlop composites to asses the effects of composite architecture, fibre orientation and heat treatment temperatures on friction and wear. Other friction and wear tests, conducted on the base Dunlop composite, were used to investigate the relative influences of temperature and sliding speed. It was found that the effect of temperature was dominant over composite architecture, fibre orientation and sliding speed in governing the friction and wear performance of the Dunlop composites. The development of bulk temperatures in excess of 110 C by frictional heating resulted in smooth friction and a low wear rate. Reducing heat treatment temperature also reduced the thermal conductivity producing high interface temperatures, low smooth friction coefficients and low wear rates under low energy braking conditions. However, this was at the expense of high oxidative wear rates under higher energy braking conditions. The Bendix composites had lower thermal conductivities than the fully heat treated Dunlop composite and exhibited similar friction and wear behaviour to Dunlop composites heat treated to lower temperatures. Examination of the wear surfaces using OM and SEM revealed particulate or Type I surface debris on wear surfaces tested under low energy

  9. Wear mechanism evaluation and measurement in fuel-lubricated components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Paul I.

    1994-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the durability of some fuel injection systems on compression-ignition engines will be adversely affected by fuels of sufficiently low lubricity. However, no widely accepted lubricity measure is available; indeed, the wear mechanisms present have not been conclusively defined. The results of the present study indicate that oxidative corrosion is the predominant mechanism with very highly processed fuels, resulting in catastrophic wear and rapid failure. A laboratory test procedure directed toward the oxidative wear mechanism was evaluated and a number of modifications suggested. Two closely related laboratory wear test procedures that rely on the transition from mild boundary lubricated wear to adhesive scuffing were also developed. The resulting procedures allow the fuels to be either ranked using a continuous scale or separated using a simple pass/fail criteria. All the procedures are sensitive to the addition of trace quantities of lubricity additives and show directional correlation with refinery severity, as measured by sulfur and aromatic content. As a result, the tests produced excellent correlation with full-scale equipment tests performed at a number of locations, as well as the criteria necessary for oxidative corrosion. However, the scuffing load tests show greatly increased separation between good and unacceptable fluids compared to the oxidative corrosion tests. Evaluation of commercially available fuels indicates that fuel lubricity is decreasing and that very poor lubricity fuels are occasionally observed.

  10. Intelligent Detection of Drill Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. I.; Chen, W. Y.; Anatharaman, K. S.

    1998-11-01

    Backpropagation neural networks (BPNs) were used for on-line detection of drill wear. The neural network consisted of three layers: input, hidden, and output. The input vector comprised drill size, feed rate, spindle speed, and eight features obtained by processing the thrust and torque signals. The output was the drill wear state which either usable or failure. Drilling experiments with various drill sizes, feed rates and spindle speeds were carried out. The learning process was performed effectively by utilising backpropagation with smoothing and an activation function slope. The on-line detection of drill wear states using BPNs achieved 100% reliability even when the drill size, feed rate and spindle speed were changed. In other words, the developed on-line drill wear detection systems have very high robustness and hence can be used in very complex production environments, such as flexible manufacturing systems.

  11. Wear of hot rolling mill rolls: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuzic, S.; Strafford, K. N.; Subramanian, C.; Savage, G.

    1994-08-01

    Rolling is today one of the most important industrial processes because a greater volume of material is worked by rolling than by any other technique. Roll wear is a multiplex process where mechanical and thermal fatigue combines with impact, abrasion, adhesion and corrosion, which all depend on system interactions rather than material characteristics only. The situation is more complicated in section rolling because of the intricacy of roll geometry. Wear variables and modes are reviewed along with published methods and models used in the study and testing of roll wear. This paper reviews key aspects of roll wear control - roll material properties, roll pass design, and system factors such as temperature, loads and sliding velocity. An overview of roll materials is given including adamites, high Cr materials, high speed tool steels and compound rolls. Non-uniform wear, recognized as the most detrimental phenomenon in section rolling, can be controlled by roll pass design. This can be achieved by computer-aided graphical and statistical analyses of various pass series. Preliminary results obtained from pilot tests conducted using a two-disc hot wear rig and a scratch tester are discussed.

  12. Wear of Steel and Ti6Al4V Rollers in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L.; Shareef, Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    This investigation was prompted by results of a qualification test of a mechanism to be used for the James Webb Space Telescope. Post-test inspections of the qualification test article revealed some loose wear debris and wear of the steel rollers and the mating Ti6Al4V surfaces. An engineering assessment of the design and observations from the tested qualification unit suggested that roller misalignment was a controlling factor. The wear phenomena were investigated using dedicated laboratory experiments. Tests were done using a vacuum roller rig for a range of roller misalignment angles. The wear in these tests was mainly adhesive wear. The measured wear rates were highly correlated to the misalignment angle. For all tests with some roller misalignment, the steel rollers lost mass while the titanium rollers gained mass indicating strong adhesion of the steel with the titanium alloy. Inspection of the rollers revealed that the adhesive wear was a two-way process as titanium alloy was found on the steel rollers and vice versa. The qualification test unit made use of 440F steel rollers in the annealed condition. Both annealed 440F steel rollers and hardened 440C rollers were tested in the vacuum roller rig to investigate possibility to reduce wear rates and the risk of loose debris formation. The 440F and 440C rollers had differing wear behaviors with significantly lesser wear rates for the 440C. For the test condition of zero roller misalignment, the adhesive wear rates were very low, but still some loose debris was formed

  13. Fractal characterization of wear-erosion surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.; Tylczak, J.

    1999-12-01

    Wear erosion is a complex phenomenon resulting in highly distorted and deformed surface morphologies. Most wear surface features have been described only qualitatively. In this study wear surfaces features were quantified using fractal analysis. The ability to assign numerical values to wear-erosion surfaces makes possible mathematical expressions that will enable wear mechanisms to be predicted and understood. Surface characterization came from wear-erosion experiments that included varying the erosive materials, the impact velocity, and the impact angle. Seven fractal analytical techniques were applied to micrograph images of wear-erosion surfaces. Fourier analysis was the most promising. Fractal values obtained were consistent with visual observations and provided a unique wear-erosion parameter unrelated to wear rate. In this study stainless steel was evaluated as a function of wear erosion conditions.

  14. Two-body wear of dental porcelain and substructure oxide ceramics.

    PubMed

    Rosentritt, Martin; Preis, Verena; Behr, Michael; Hahnel, Sebastian; Handel, Gerhard; Kolbeck, Carola

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the two-body wear of different ceramics. Two-body wear tests were performed in a chewing simulator with steatite and enamel antagonists, respectively. Specimens were loaded in a pin-on-block design with a vertical load of 50 N for 1.2 × 10(5) cycles; (f = 1.6 Hz; lateral movement, 1 mm; mouth opening: 2 mm). Human enamel was used as a reference. Three zirconia ceramics, three veneering porcelains, two glass-infiltrated and one lithium disilicate ceramic were investigated. Veneering and lithium disilicate ceramics were glazed before testing. Surface roughness Ra (SP6, Perthen-Feinprüf, G) and wear depth were determined using a 3D scanner (Laserscan 3D, Willytec, G). SEM (Quanta FEG 400, FEI, USA) pictures of the worn specimens and antagonists were made for evaluating wear performance. Veneering porcelain provided wear traces between 71.2 and 124.1 μm (enamel antagonist) and 117.4 and 274.1 μm (steatite). Wear of the steatite antagonists varied between 0.618 and 2.85 mm². No wear was found for zirconia and glass-infiltrated substructure ceramics. Also, no wear was found for the corresponding antagonists. Wear of specimens and antagonists was strongly material dependent. No visible wear was found on zirconia and glass-infiltrated ceramics. Porcelain and lithium disilicate ceramic showed a comparable or lower wear than the enamel reference. Antagonist wear was found to be lower when specimens were made of substructure oxide ceramics instead of veneering porcelain. From the point of wear testing, zirconia may be used for the fabrication of fixed dental prosthesis without veneering.

  15. Reciprocating sliding wear of in-situ reinforced silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Yust, C.S.

    1995-10-01

    The reciprocating sliding wear response of two in-situ reinforced-silicon nitride compositions provided by AlliedSignal have been evaluated. The materials were prepared by AlliedSignal-Ceramic Components Division and were tested at conditions of interest to the Bendix Engine Controls Division (South Bend, IN) and AlliedSignal Research and Technology (Des Plaines, IL). The materials are being considered for a variety of new applications, and the current tests provide critical friction and wear values under anticipated operating conditions. Both pin and disk specimens of GS-44 and GN-10 in-situ reinforced silicon nitride of specified dimensions for wear testing were provided by the AlliedSignal participants. An initial series of tests examined the unlubricated behavior of these materials at elevated temperature (up to 900 C) in an inert atmosphere. The results revealed excessive levels of both friction and wear in the unlubricated condition. The test conditions were modified to include the use of jet fuel as a lubricant because of an intended application in that medium. The introduction of the lubricant resulted in very limited wear of both the pin and disk specimens.

  16. Elastomer Compound Developed for High Wear Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D.; Feuer, H.; Flanagan, D.; Rodriguez, G.; Teets, A.; Touchet, P.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Army is currently spending 300 million dollars per year replacing rubber track pads. An experimental rubber compound has been developed which exhibits 2 to 3 times greater service life than standard production pad compounds. To improve the service life of the tank track pads various aspects of rubber chemistry were explored including polymer, curing and reinforcing systems. Compounds that exhibited superior physical properties based on laboratory data were then fabricated into tank pads and field tested. This paper will discuss the compounding studies, laboratory data and field testing that led to the high wear elastomer compound.

  17. The microstructural dependence of wear resistance in austenite containing plate steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfram, Preston Charles

    The purpose of this project was to examine the microstructural dependence of wear resistance of various plate steels, with interests in exploring the influence of retained austenite (RA). Materials resistant to abrasive wear are desirable in the industrial areas of agriculture, earth moving, excavation, mining, mineral processing, and transportation. Abrasive wear contributes to significant financial cost associated with wear to the industry. The motivation for the current study was to determine whether it would be beneficial from a wear resistance perspective to produce plate steels with increased amounts of retained austenite. This thesis investigates this motivation through a material matrix containing AR400F, Abrasive (0.21 wt pct C, 1.26 wt pct Mn, 0.21 wt pct Si, 0.15 wt pct Ni, 0.18 wt pct Mo), Armor (0.46 wt pct C, 0.54 wt pct Mn, 0.36 wt pct Si, 1.74 wt pct Ni, 0.31 wt pct Mo), 9260, 301SS, Hadfield, and SAE 4325 steels. The Abrasive, Armor and 9260 steels were heat treated using different methods such as quench and temper, isothermal bainitic hold, and quench and partitioning (Q&P). These heat treatments yielded various microstructures and the test matrix allowed for investigation of steels with similar hardness and varying levels of RA. The wear test methods used consisted of dry sand rubber wheel (DSRW), impeller-tumbler impact-abrasion (impeller), and Bond abrasion wear testing. DSRW and impeller wear resistance was found to increase with hardness and retained austenite levels at certain hardness levels. Some Q&P samples exhibited similar or less wear than the Hadfield steels in DSRW and impeller tests. Scanning electron microscopy investigation of wear surfaces revealed different wear mechanisms for the different wear test methods ranging from micro-plowing, to micro-cutting and to fragmentation.

  18. Mechanical and wear properties of aluminum coating prepared by cold spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Yusof, Siti Nurul Akmal Manap, Abreeza Afandi, Nurfanizan Mohd; Salim, Musdalilah; Misran, Halina

    2015-07-22

    In this study, aluminum (Al) powders were deposited onto Al substrates using cold spray to form a coating. The main objective is to investigate and compare the microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of Al coating to that of the Al substrate. The microstructure of the coating and substrate were observed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Hardness was evaluated using the Vickers Hardness test and wear properties were investigated using a pin-on-disk wear test machine. The elemental composition of the coating and substrate was determined using Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Results showed that the friction coefficient and specific wear rate decreased while wear rate increased linearly with increasing load. It was found that the coating exhibit slightly better mechanical and wear properties compared to the substrate.

  19. New Mechanisms of rock-bit wear in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Macini, Paolo

    1996-01-24

    This paper presents recent results of an investigation on failure mode and wear of rock-bits used to drill geothermal wells located in the area of Larderello (Italy). A new wear mechanism, conceived from drilling records and dull bit evaluation analysis, has been identified and a particular configuration of rock-bit has been developed and tested in order to reduce drilling costs. The role of high Bottom Hole Temperature (BHT) on rock-bit performances seems not yet very well understood: so far, only drillability and formation abrasiveness are generally considered to account for poor drilling performances. In this paper, the detrimental effects of high BHT on sealing and reservoir system of Friction Bearing Rock-bits (FBR) have been investigated, and a new bearing wear pattern for FBR's run in high BHT holes has been identified and further verified via laboratory inspections on dull bits. A novel interpretation of flat worn cutting structure has been derived from the above wear pattern, suggesting the design of a particular bit configuration. Test bits, designed in the light of the above criteria, have been prepared and field tested successfully. The paper reports the results of these tests, which yielded a new rock-bit application, today considered as a standad practice in Italian geothermal fields. This application suggests that the correct evaluation of rock-bit wear can help to improve the overall drilling performances and to minimize drilling problems through a better interpretation of the relationships amongst rock-bits, formation properties and downhole temperature.

  20. Wear Performance of Cu-Alloyed Austempered Ductile Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Uma; Batra, Nimish; Sharma, J. D.

    2013-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of structural and mechanical properties on wear behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI). Ductile iron (DI) samples were austenitized at 900 °C for 60 min and subsequently austempered for 60 min at three temperatures: 270, 330, and 380 °C. Microstructures of the as-cast DI and ADIs were characterized using optical and scanning microscopy, respectively. The structural parameters, volume fraction of austenite, carbon content of austenite, and ferrite particle size were determined using x-ray diffraction technique. Mechanical properties including Vicker's hardness, 0.2% proof strength, ultimate tensile strength, ductility, and strain hardening coefficient were determined. Wear tests were carried out under dry sliding conditions using pin-on-disk machine with a linear speed of 2.4 m/s. Normal load and sliding distance were 45 N and 1.7 × 104 m, respectively. ADI developed at higher austempering temperature has large amounts of austenite, which contribute toward improvement in the wear resistance through stress-induced martensitic transformation, and strain hardening of austenite. Wear rate was found to depend on 0.2% proof strength, ductility, austenite content, and its carbon content. Study of worn surfaces and nature of wear debris revealed that the fine ausferrite structure in ADIs undergoes oxidational wear, but the coarse ausferrite structure undergoes adhesion, delamination, and mild abrasion too.

  1. Investigation on the Surface Integrity and Tool Wear in Cryogenic Machining

    SciTech Connect

    Dutra Xavier, Sandro E.; Delijaicov, Sergio; Farias, Adalto de; Stipkovic Filho, Marco; Ferreira Batalha, Gilmar

    2011-01-17

    This work aimed to study the influences of cryogenic cooling on tool wear, comparing it to dry machining during on the surface integrity of test circular steel SAE 52100 hardened to 62 HRC, during the turning of the face, with the use of special PcBN, using liquid nitrogen with cooler. The surface integrity parameters analyzed were: surface roughness and white layer and tool wear. The results of the present work indicated reduction in tool wear, which enhance the tool life.

  2. Wear, friction, and temperature characteristics of an aircraft tire undergoing braking and cornering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, J. L.; Yager, T. J.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation to evaluate the wear, friction, and temperature characteristics of aircraft tire treads fabricated from different elastomers is presented. The braking and cornering tests performed on aircraft tires retreaded with currently employed and experimental elastomers are described. The tread wear rate is discussed in relation to the slip ratio during braking and yaw angle during cornering. The extent of wear in either operational mode is examined in relation to the runway surface.

  3. Effect of slide track shape on the wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene in a pin-on-disk wear simulation of total hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa; Calonius, Olof; Keränen, Jaakko

    2004-05-15

    Prosthetic joints appear to show a strong relationship between the type of relative motion and wear, requiring careful consideration in the design of wear simulators. This relationship was studied with a 12-station pin-on-disk device, specifically adapted for the wear simulation of prosthetic hip joints. Each station had a unique motion, characterized by the so-called slide track, the track of the pin on the disk. The slide track shapes included 10 ellipses, their aspect ratio (AR) varying from 1.1 to 11.0, and a circle and a straight line as extreme cases. Hence for the first time in hip wear simulation, the motion was systematically varied over a wide range. Conventional UHMWPE pins were tested against polished CoCr disks in diluted calf serum three times for 3 million cycles. Below the AR value of 5.5, the polyethylene wear factor and wear mechanisms agreed with clinical observations. Above this value, the wear factor decreased to unrealistically low values, and the wear surface topography differed from that of retrieved acetabular cups. The wear particles, however, were similar to those isolated from periprosthetic tissues, irrespective of the AR value. In conclusion, it is recommended that the AR value be kept well below the critical point of 5.5.

  4. Impact of Advertising on Tampon Wear-time Practices

    PubMed Central

    Woeller, Kara E.; Miller, Kenneth W.; Robertson-Smith, Amy L.; Bohman, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES (1) To determine whether advertising nighttime tampon use for up to eight hours was understood to be consistent with label recommendations and (2) to determine whether television and print advertising with this message affected tampon wear times in adults and teens. METHODS (1) A comprehension study (online advertising and follow-up questionnaire) among women aged 14–49 years (300 per group) who viewed either the test or a control advertising message; (2) Diary-based surveys of tampon wear times performed prior to (n = 292 adults, 18–49 years, 74 teens, 12–17 years) and after (n = 287 adults, 104 teens) the launch of national advertising. RESULTS Significantly more test message viewers than controls stated tampons should be worn less than or equal to eight hours (93.6% vs. 88.6%, respectively, P = 0.049). A directionally higher percentage of test message viewers said they would use a pad if sleeping longer than eight hours (52% vs. 42% of controls). Among the women who used tampons longer than eight hours when sleeping, 52% reported they would wake up and change compared with 45% of controls. No significant difference between baseline and follow-up diary surveys was found among teens or adults in various measures of tampon wear time (mean wear times; usage intervals from less than two hours to more than 10 hours; percentage of tampons used for more than or equal to eight hours; frequency of wearing at least one tampon more than eight hours). CONCLUSIONS Advertising nighttime tampon wear for up to eight hours effectively communicated label recommendations but did not alter tampon wear times. The informational intervention had limited impact on established habits. PMID:26688668

  5. Fractal characterization of wear-erosion surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, James C.; Tylczak, Joseph H.

    1999-12-01

    Wear erosion is a complex phenomenon resulting in highly distorted and deformed surface morphologies. Most wear surface features have been described only qualitatively. In this study wear surfaces features were quantified using fractal analysis. The ability to assign numerical values to wear-erosion surfaces makes possible mathematical expressions that will enable wear mechanisms to be predicted and understood. Surface characterization came from wear-erosion experiments that included varying the erosive materials, the impact velocity, and the impact angle. Seven fractal analytical techniques were applied to micrograph images of wear-erosion surfaces. Fourier analysis was the most promising. Fractal values obtained were consistent with visual observations and provided a unique wear-erosion parameter unrelated to wear rate.

  6. High stress abrasive wear behavior of some hardfaced surfaces produced by thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, A. K.; Gachake, Arati; Prasad, B. K.; Dasgupta, Rupa; Singh, M.; Yegneswaran, A. H.

    2002-02-01

    Steel surfaces were thermally sprayed with nickel chromium boron (NCB) powder (with and without tungsten carbide) using an oxy-acetylene torch. The sprayed (hard) surfaces and substrate were characterized for abrasive wear properties. Test parameters such as load and sliding distance were varied. A significant improvement in the abrasive wear resistance (inverse of wear rate) was noted for the thermally sprayed surfaces as compared to that of the substrate. Wear surfaces, subsurface regions, and debris were examined in order to ascertain the operating wear mechanisms. Substrate (mild steel), because of its low hardness, suffered severe wear through the cutting, ploughing, and wedging action of the hard abrasive (silicon carbide). Deep cuts on the worn surface, a bulky transfer layer, subsurface cracks, and large-size debris were observed. However, wear was reduced due to high hardness of the layer of NCB powder on the substrate, which resisted the penetration of abrasive into the surface. Presence of tungsten carbide in the layer of NCB powder further reduced the wear of the corresponding specimen because of very high hardness of the tungsten carbide. Shallow wear grooves and finer debris were observed for the NCB coating with and without tungsten carbide. Cutting was the predominating wear mechanism in the case of coatings.

  7. Wear of sequentially enhanced 9-Mrad polyethylene in 10 million cycle knee simulation study.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Riichiro; Williams, Paul Allen; Shoji, Hiromu; Hirakawa, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Kengo; Tsukamoto, Mikiko; Clarke, Ian C

    2008-07-01

    Highly crosslinked polyethylene (HXPE) has been shown to be effective in reducing wear in total hip replacements. HXPE has not found widespread use in TKR, because the crosslinking inevitably leads to reductions in critical properties such as toughness and fatigue strength. Sequentially enhanced crosslinking (SXPE) have been suggested for improved wear resistance for tibial inserts with maintenance of mechanical properties and anticipated high oxidation resistance superior to conventional polyethylene (XLPE). We compared the wear of SXPE (9Mrad) to XLPE inserts (3Mrad) to 10 million cycles. Triathlon femoral condyles were identical in both. This is the first wear study of SXPE inserts. According to the power law relating irradiation dose to wear of XLPE inserts, wear of 9 Mrad inserts should be reduced by 70% compared to 3Mrad controls. The wear rates of the SXPE inserts were reduced by 86% at 10 million cycles duration, somewhat greater than predicted. The one prior investigation by the manufacturer reported a 79% wear reduction for SXPE compared to controls in a 5 million cycle simulator study in knee design and test parameters. There were important differences between the two studies. Nevertheless there clearly appeared to be a major benefit for sequentially enhanced polyethylene in tibial inserts. This combined wear reduction of 80-85% with improved oxidation resistance and retention of mechanical properties may prove beneficial for active patients who may otherwise risk high wear rates over many years of use.

  8. Prevalence, severity and etiology of dental wear in patients with eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena; Araújo, Juliana J.; Marsicano, Juliane A.; Santos, José E.; Bastos, José R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, distribution and associated factors of dental wear among patients with eating disorders (EDs). Materials and Methods: An epidemiological cross-sectional survey was conducted by trained, calibrated examiners, using the dental wear index. The sample was composed of 30 patients with EDs (experimental group – G1) and 30 control patients without current or previous history of EDs (G2). A questionnaire was used to assess the etiological factors of dental wear. The univariate analyses using the Chi-square (χ2) test were used to compare the tooth wear prevalence between groups according to the surface and tooth (P > 0.05). Results: The dental wear was similar for both group; however, the G1 presented more moderate wear in molars when compared with G2 (P = 0.048). The majority of EDs patients related have one or more oral habits (n = 26; 86.6%) and only 13.4% (n = 4) affirmed did not have oral habits. The etiological factors of tooth wear related with dental wear were biting objects (P = 0.04) and pain in temporomandibular disorders (P = 0.03). Conclusion: The highest prevalence of dental wear was observed in the molars teeth. Differences in the extent and pattern of dental wear were found in an individual, emphasized the relevance of clinical parameter. PMID:24966749

  9. Investigation of austenitizing temperature on wear behavior of austempered gray iron (AGI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, T.; Sutradhara, G.

    2016-09-01

    This study is about finding the effect of austenitizing temperature on microstructure and wear behavior of copper alloyed austempered gray iron (AGI), and then comparing it with an as- cast (solidified) state. Tensile and wear tests specimens are prepared from as-cast gray iron material, and austenitized at different temperatures and then austempered at a fixed austempering temperature. Resulting microstructures are characterized through optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-Ray diffraction. Wear test is carried out using a block-on-roller multi-tribotester with sliding speed of 1.86 m/sec. In this investigation, wear behavior of all these austempered materials are determined and co-related with the micro structure. Hence the wear surface under scanning electron microscope showed that wear occurred mainly due to adhesion and delamination under dry sliding condition. The test results indicate that the austenitizing temperature has remarkable effect on resultant micro structure and wear behavior of austempered materials. Wear behavior is also found to be dependent on the hardness, tensile strength, austenite content and carbon content in austenite. It is shown that coarse ausferrite micro structure exhibited higher wear depth than fine ausferrite microstructure.

  10. RPP-WPT Slurry Wear Evaluation: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.

    2001-06-12

    Tests are planned to measure the wear rates in scaled flow loops that represent full-scale systems in Pretreatment sections of the Waste Treatment Plant to be built as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) River Protection Project. Those tests are to be done in the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center at the DOE Savannah River Site.

  11. Alternate paddle configuration for improved wear resistance in the saltstone mixer

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Fowley, M.

    2013-09-23

    The Saltstone Production Facility has a 10-inch Readco-Kurimoto continuous mixer that mixes the premix dry feeds and low-level waste salt solution to make fresh (uncured) saltstone. Inspection of the mixer in January 2013 showed significant wear on the third, fourth and fifth paddle pairs after the conveying augers. A 2-inch Readco-Kurimoto continuous mixer was used to test alternate paddle configurations for use in the 10-inch mixer to decrease the wear rate on the paddles. Two wear tests were conducted to investigate a method of reducing wear on the mixer paddles. The first test (wear test 2a) had a paddle configuration similar to the currently installed 10-inch mixer in the SPF. This test established baseline wear. The second test (wear test 2b) had a reconfigured paddle arrangement that replaced the flat paddles with helical paddles for paddle pairs 2 - 6 and aligned paddle pair 1 with the augers. The intent of the reconfiguration was to more effectively convey the partially wetted dry feeds through the transition region and into the liquid feed where paddle wear is reduced due to dry feeds and salt solution being mixed at the intended water to premix ratio. The design of the helical paddles provides conveyance through the transition region to the liquid feed inlet. The alignment with the auger is aimed to provide a smoother transition (minimizing the discontinuity between the auger and paddle pair 1) into the downstream paddles. A soft metal with low wear resistance (6000 series aluminum) was used for the wear testing paddles to determine wear patterns while minimizing run time and maximizing wear rate. For the two paddle configurations tested using the scaled 2-inch Readco-Kurimoto continuous mixer, with the first six paddles after the augers replaced by the wear paddles and the remaining paddles were stainless steel. Since the 10-inch SPF mixer is designed with the liquid inlet centered over paddle pairs 5 and 6, the scaled 2-inch mixer was configured the

  12. Friction and Wear Behavior of Silicon Under Conditions of Sliding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadimpalli, Chandrasekhar Venkata

    Silicon is gaining importance as a material in micromechanical applications such as micromotors and microactuators. Friction and wear can affect the performance of these devices and hence it is important to study the friction and wear behavior of silicon. The deformation behavior of n-type silicon is fundamentally different from p-type. On deformation, n -type silicon may convert to p-type, but p-type silicon does not convert to n-type on deformation. This is related to the effect of dislocations interacting with the electrical charge carriers. Friction and wear behavior of n and p-type silicon was studied under conditions of sliding wear. Sliding was selected because the stress system associated with sliding introduces large plastic strains at the surface. The friction and wear behavior of n and p-type silicon is expected to be different due to the differences in their deformation behavior. Also, the n to p transition may show up in the friction and wear behavior. The samples were tested in air and in vacuum. Diamond was used as the slider. The wear tracks showed evidence of plastic flow. The morphology of this material was similar to that seen in more ductile materials. The coefficient of friction was also high. Other researchers have reported that DC Silicon transforms to a more ductile phase when sufficient pressure is applied. When shear stresses are present, as in sliding wear, the pressure for phase transformation has been reported to be about 8 GPa. The maximum pressure under the slider in the present set of experiments was estimated to be 8.2 GPa. Therefore, it is possible that transformed material extruded during sliding to produce the flow-like features observed at the wear track. The work involved in this phase transformation, as well as the work in deforming DC Silicon and/or the ductile product phase would contribute to the frictional energy. The debris from the air tests was DC silicon (as determined by XRD and TEM). No significant differences were

  13. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Beardsley, M. Brad; Sebright, Jason L.

    2008-11-18

    techniques, balanced with overall materials performance. State-of-the-art design and simulation capabilities were used to guide materials and process refinement. Caterpillar was the lead of the multi-partner collaborative project. Specific tasks were performed by the partners base on their unique capabilities. The project team was selected to include leaders in the field of material development, processing, modeling, and material characterization. Specifically, industrial members include the suppliers Deloro Stellite and Powder Alloy Corporation., who provided the experimental alloys and who aided in the development of the costs for the alloys, the Missouri University of Science and Technology and Iowa State University, who provided help in the alloy development and material characterization, QuesTek Innovations, a small company specializing the microstructural modeling of materials, and the DOE laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and National Energy Technology Laboratory (Albany), who provided unique coating process capability and wear characterization testing. The technologies developed in this program are expected to yield energy savings of about 50% over existing technologies, or 110 trillion BTUs per year by 2020 when fully implemented. Primary applications by Caterpillar are to replace the surface of machine components which are currently carburized and heat treated with new cladding materials with double the wear life. The new cladding technologies will consume less energy than carburizing. Thus, nearly 50% energy savings can be expected as a result from elimination of the heat treat process and the reduce wear of the materials. Additionally, when technologies from this project are applied on titanium or other non-ferrous substrates to make lighter weight, more wear resistant, and more efficient structures, significant fuel savings can be realized. With the anticipated drastic reduction in cost for refining titanium-containing ores, the usage of titanium

  14. REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Matthews

    2005-05-01

    This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston

  15. Method For Testing Properties Of Corrosive Lubricants

    DOEpatents

    Ohi, James; De La Cruz, Jose L.; Lacey, Paul I.

    2006-01-03

    A method of testing corrosive lubricating media using a wear testing apparatus without a mechanical seal. The wear testing apparatus and methods are effective for testing volatile corrosive lubricating media under pressure and at high temperatures.

  16. An Experimental Investigation of the Influence of the Lubricant Viscosity and Additives on Gear Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L.; Kahraman, Ahmet

    2005-01-01

    The influence of lubricant viscosity and additives on the average wear rate of spur gear pairs was investigated experimentally. The gear specimens of a comprehensive gear durability test program that made use of seven lubricants covering a range of viscosities were examined to measure gear tooth wear. The measured wear was related to the as-manufactured surface roughness, the elastohydrodynamic film thickness, and the experimentally determined contact fatigue lives of the same specimens. In general, the wear rate was found to be inversely proportional to the viscosity of the lubricant and to the lambda ratio (also sometimes called the specific film thickness). The data also show an exponential trend between the average wear rates and the surface fatigue lives. Lubricants with similar viscosities but differing additives and compositions had somewhat differing gear surface fatigue lives and wear rates.

  17. [Research on monitoring mechanical wear state based on oil spectrum multi-dimensional time series model].

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Zhang, Pei-lin; Ren, Guo-quan; Li, Bing; Yang, Ning

    2010-11-01

    A new method using oil atomic spectrometric analysis technology to monitor the mechanical wear state was proposed. Multi-dimensional time series model of oil atomic spectrometric data of running-in period was treated as the standard model. Residues remained after new data were processed by the standard model. The residues variance matrix was selected as the features of the corresponding wear state. Then, high dimensional feature vectors were reduced through the principal component analysis and the first three principal components were extracted to represent the wear state. Euclidean distance was computed for feature vectors to classify the testing samples. Thus, the mechanical wear state was identified correctly. The wear state of a specified track vehicle engine was effectively identified, which verified the validity of the proposed method. Experimental results showed that introducing the multi-dimensional time series model to oil spectrometric analysis can fuse the spectrum data and improve the accuracy of monitoring mechanical wear state.

  18. Wear performance of bovine tooth enamel against translucent tetragonal zirconia polycrystals after different surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Hara, Mai; Takuma, Yusuke; Sato, Toru; Koyama, Taku; Yoshinari, Masao

    2014-01-01

    The wear performances of bovine tooth enamel (BTE) against translucent tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (TZP) compared to that of feldspar porcelain and the influence of surface treatments of translucent TZP were investigated by the two-body wear test. Translucent TZP and feldspar porcelain were used as hemisphere abrader specimens with a radius of curvature of 5 mm; flat BTE surfaces were used as substrate specimens. The cross-sectional area of the worn surfaces of the substrates and the wear volume of the antagonist abraders were measured. Surface roughness, hardness and coefficient of friction as well as SEM observations and EPMA analyses were also performed to investigate the underlying mechanism of wear. The results suggested that BTE is less susceptible to wear when translucent TZP is used as the antagonist in contrast to the use of feldspar porcelain, and that surface treatment of the TZP abraders significantly influenced the wear of BTE substrates.

  19. Competition between fatigue crack propagation and wear

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, H.; Keer, L.M.; Cheng, W.; Cheng, H.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Based on a semi-empirical derivation of the Paris fatigue law, the fatigue crack length a is related to the yield limit or flow stress, which ultimately is related to the hardness of the material. The analysis considers together the cyclic loading, which tends to increase the surface crack length, and the wear, which tends to decrease the crack length at the surface, and shows that under certain conditions a stable crack length may be developed. Experiments conducted on two test groups (Rc = 58.5 and Rc = 62.7) tend to support the present analysis. 10 refs.

  20. Abrasive wear by coal-fueled diesel engine and related particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, L.K.

    1992-09-01

    The development of commercially viable diesel engines that operate directly on pulverized coal-fuels will require solution to the problem of severe abrasive wear. The purpose of the work described in this report was to investigate the nature of the abrasive wear problem. Analytical studies were carried out to determine the characteristics of the coal-fuel and associated combustion particles responsible for abrasion. Laboratory pinon-disk wear tests were conducted on oil-particle mixtures to determine the relationship between wear rate and a number of different particle characteristics, contact parameters, specimen materials properties, and other relevant variables.

  1. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices

    PubMed Central

    López-Frías, Francisco J.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction. PMID:24558525

  2. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices.

    PubMed

    López-Frías, Francisco J; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M; Segura-Egea, Juan J

    2012-02-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction.

  3. Backside Wear Analysis of Retrieved Acetabular Liners with a Press-Fit Locking Mechanism in Comparison to Wear Simulation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Puente Reyna, Ana Laura; Jäger, Marcus; Floerkemeier, Thilo; Frecher, Sven; Delank, Karl-Stefan; Schilling, Christoph; Grupp, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Backside wear due to micromotion and poor conformity between the liner and its titanium alloy shell may contribute to the high rates of retroacetabular osteolysis and consequent aseptic loosening. The purpose of our study was to understand the wear process on the backside of polyethylene liners from two acetabular cup systems, whose locking mechanism is based on a press-fit cone in combination with a rough titanium conical inner surface on the fixation area. A direct comparison between in vitro wear simulator tests (equivalent to 3 years of use) and retrieved liners (average 13.1 months in situ) was done in order to evaluate the backside wear characteristics and behavior of these systems. Similar wear scores between in vitro tested and retrieved liners were observed. The results showed that this locking mechanism did not significantly produce wear marks at the backside of the polyethylene liners due to micromotion. In all the analyzed liners, the most common wear modes observed were small scratches at the cranial fixation zone directly below the rough titanium inner surface of the shell. It was concluded that most of the wear marks were produced during the insertion and removal of the liner, rather than during its time in situ.

  4. Backside Wear Analysis of Retrieved Acetabular Liners with a Press-Fit Locking Mechanism in Comparison to Wear Simulation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Marcus; Floerkemeier, Thilo; Frecher, Sven; Delank, Karl-Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Backside wear due to micromotion and poor conformity between the liner and its titanium alloy shell may contribute to the high rates of retroacetabular osteolysis and consequent aseptic loosening. The purpose of our study was to understand the wear process on the backside of polyethylene liners from two acetabular cup systems, whose locking mechanism is based on a press-fit cone in combination with a rough titanium conical inner surface on the fixation area. A direct comparison between in vitro wear simulator tests (equivalent to 3 years of use) and retrieved liners (average 13.1 months in situ) was done in order to evaluate the backside wear characteristics and behavior of these systems. Similar wear scores between in vitro tested and retrieved liners were observed. The results showed that this locking mechanism did not significantly produce wear marks at the backside of the polyethylene liners due to micromotion. In all the analyzed liners, the most common wear modes observed were small scratches at the cranial fixation zone directly below the rough titanium inner surface of the shell. It was concluded that most of the wear marks were produced during the insertion and removal of the liner, rather than during its time in situ. PMID:27722174

  5. Influence on the wear resistance of the particle size used in coatings of Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A.; Guzmán, R.; Ramirez, Z. Y.

    2017-01-01

    In the literature, it is common to find that the size of the particles used in coatings through thermal spraying processes influences the hardness and wear resistance thereof; this project aimed to quantify the importance of this parameter in the adhesive and abrasive wear resistance when aluminium oxide is deposited on a substrate of AISI 1020 steel, through a thermal spraying by flame process. The methodology consisted of: a) morphological characterization of the powder used in the coatings by scanning electron microscopy, b) deposition of coatings, c) testing of adhesive and abrasive wear (ASTM G99-05 Standard test method for wear testing with a pin-on-disk apparatus and ASTM G65–04 Standard test method for measuring abrasion using dry sand/rubber wheel apparatus), and d) statistical analysis to determine the influence of particle size on wear resistance. The average size of the powder used for coatings was 92, 1690, 8990 and 76790nm. The obtained results allow to identify an inversely proportional behaviour between particle size and wear resistance, in both types of wear (adhesive and abrasive) is shown a logarithmic trend indicating an increase in loss mass during the test as the particle size is also increased and therefore a decrease in wear resistance of the coating.

  6. Simulated Wear of Self-Adhesive Resin Cements.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, T; Barkmeier, W W; Latta, M A; Berry, T P; Tsujimoto, A; Miyazaki, M

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary areas of concern with luting agents is marginal gap erosion and attrition. The purpose of this laboratory study was to evaluate bulk and marginal slit (gap) generalized wear of self-adhesive resin cements. Three self-adhesive resin cements were used in this study: G-CEM LinkAce (LA), Maxcem Elite (ME), and RelyX Unicem2 Automix (RU). A custom stainless-steel fixture with a cavity 4.5 mm in diameter and 4 mm deep was used for simulated generalized (bulk) wear. For simulated marginal gap wear, a two-piece stainless-steel custom fixture was designed with a slit (gap) 300 μm wide and 3 mm in length. For both wear models, 20 specimens each for each of the three adhesive cements were made for both light-cure and chemical-cure techniques. The cured cements were polished with a series of carbide papers to a 4000-grit surface and subjected to 100,000 cycles using the slit (gap) wear model and 400,000 cycles for generalized (bulk) wear in a Leinfelder-Suzuki (Alabama machine) wear simulator (maximum load of 78.5 N). Flat-ended stainless-steel antagonists were used in a water slurry of poly(methylmethacrylate) beads for simulation of generalized contact-free area wear with both wear models. Before and after the wear challenges, the specimens were profiled with a Proscan 2100 noncontact profilometer, and wear (volume loss [VL] and mean facet depth [FD]) was determined using AnSur 3D software. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc tests were used for data analysis for the two wear models. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine polished surfaces of the resin cements and the worn surfaces after the wear challenges. The two-way ANOVA of VL using the generalized (bulk) wear model showed a significant effect among the three resin cement materials for the factor of resin cement (p<0.001) and the interaction of the cement and cure method (p<0.001), but not for the cure method (p=0.465). The two-way ANOVA for FD also found a

  7. Effect of Deformation Mode on the Wear Behavior of NiTi Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lina; Liu, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Owing to good biocompatibility, good fatigue resistance, and excellent superelasticity, various types of bio-medical devices based on NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) have been developed. Due to the complexity in deformation mode in service, for example NiTi implants, accurate assessment/prediction of the surface wear process is difficult. This study aims at providing a further insight into the effect of deformation mode on the wear behavior of NiTi SMA. In the present study, two types of wear testing modes were used, namely sliding wear mode and reciprocating wear mode, to investigate the effect of deformation mode on the wear behavior of NiTi SMA in both martensitic and austenitic states. It was found that, when in martensitic state and under high applied loads, sliding wear mode resulted in more surface damage as compared to that under reciprocating wear mode. When in austenitic state, although similar trends in the coefficient of friction were observed, the coefficient of friction and surface damage in general is less under reciprocating mode than under sliding mode. These observations were further discussed in terms of different deformation mechanisms involved in the wear tests, in particular, the reversibility of martensite variant reorientation and stress-induced phase transformation, respectively.

  8. A comparative wear study on Al-Li and Al-Li/SiC composite

    SciTech Connect

    Okumus, S. Cem Karslioglu, Ramazan Akbulut, Hatem

    2013-12-16

    Aluminum-lithium based unreinforced (Al-8090) alloy and Al-8090/SiCp/17 vol.% metal matrix composite produced by extrusion after spray co-deposition. A dry ball-on disk wear test was carried out for both alloy and composite. The tests were performed against an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ball, 10 mm in diameter, at room temperature and in laboratory air conditions with a relative humidity of 40-60%. Sliding speed was chosen as 1.0 ms{sup −1} and normal loads of 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0 N were employed at a constant sliding distance of 1000 m. The wear damage on the specimens was evaluated via measurement of wear depth and diameter. Microstructural and wear characterization was carried out via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that wear loss of the Al-8090/SiC composite was less than that of the Al-8090 matrix alloy. Plastic deformation observed on the wear surface of the composite and the matrix alloy, and the higher the applied load the greater the plastic deformation. Scanning electron microscopy examinations of wear tracks also reveal that delamination fracture was the dominant wear mechanism during the wear progression. Friction coefficient was maximum at the low applied load in the case of the Al-8090/SiC composite while a gradual increase was observed with applied load for the matrix alloy.

  9. Sliding Wear Response of Beryl Reinforced Aluminum Composite - A Factorial Design Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharat, V.; Durga Prasad, B.; Prabhakar, M. Bhovi; Venkateswarlu, K.

    2016-02-01

    Al-Beryl MMCs were successfully fabricated using powder metallurgy route. Processing conditions such as beryl content and particle size were varied and its influence on dry sliding wear response was studied. Effect of test parameters like applied load and sliding distance on wear performance of Al-Beryl MMCs were discussed detail. Sliding wear tests were conducted using a pin on disc machine based on the 24 (4 factors at 2 levels) factorial design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to obtain the contribution of control parameters on wear rate. The present study shows that wear resistance of Al-beryl MMCs not only depends on the beryl content but also influenced by normal load, sliding distance and particle size. The results show that most significant variables affecting wear rate of Al - beryl MMCs are size of the beryl particles (22%), beryl content (19.60%), sliding distance (18.47%), and normal load (10.30%). The interaction effects of these parameters are less significant in influencing wear rate compared to the individual parameters. The correlation between sliding wear and its parameters was obtained by multiple regression analysis. Regression model developed in the present study can be successfully implemented to predict the wear response of Al-Beryl MMCs.

  10. Corrosive wear of SiC whisker- and particulate-reinforced 6061 aluminum alloy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.Y.; Ishii, H.; Chuang, T.H.

    1996-09-01

    Wear tests on SiC whisker- and SiC particulate-reinforced 6061-T6 aluminum matrix composites (SiCw/Al and SiCp/Al), fabricated using a high pressure infiltration method, were performed in laboratory air, ion-exchanged water and a 3 pct NaCl aqueous solution using a block-on-ring type apparatus. The effects of environment, applied load, and rotational (sliding) speed on the wear properties against a sintered alumina block were evaluated. Electrochemical measurements in ion-exchanged water and a 3 pct NaCl aqueous solution were also made under the same conditions as the wear tests. A comparison was made with the properties of the matrix aluminum alloy 6061-T6. The SiC-reinforced composites exhibited better wear resistance compared with the monolithic 6061 Al alloy even in a 3 pct NaCl aqueous solution. Increase in the wear resistance depended on the shape, size, and volume fraction of the SiC reinforcement. Good correlation was obtained between corrosion resistance and corrosion wear. The ratios of wear volume due to the corrosive effect to noncorrosive wear were 23 to 83 pct, depending on the wear conditions.

  11. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the performance of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W. G.; Li, Y. B.; Wang, X. Y.; Sun, J. P.; Wu, G. X.

    2012-11-01

    In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump. The existence of wear-ring not only has an effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump. Relative to the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some advantages, such as low cost, fast and efficient, and easy to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump.

  12. Study on quantitative relation between characteristics of striature bionic coupling unit and wear resistance of gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Wang, Chuanwei; Ren, Luquan

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, striature bionic coupling units of different characteristics were manufactured by laser surface remelting. Wear behavior of gray cast iron with striature bionic coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using a homemade linear reciprocating wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that there is a relationship between weight loss and the area of striature bionic coupling units and α: Δm = Δm0 - 0.0212S × cos α - 0.0241S × sin α.

  13. Impact wear of iron rich superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayne, S. F.; Nowotny, H.; Rice, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    The impact-sliding wear resistance of chill cast and aligned eutectic Fe-base superalloys against M42 and 17-4 PH steel counterface materials is examined. The aligned material tests were run with carbide fibers perpendicular to the counterface contact surface and the characterization focused on fracture processes as observed in the subsurface microstructure of the worn materials. Metallographic analyses were performed on specimens exposed to various numbers of repetitive impact load cycles, and for comparison, two other aligned composites were tested with the same fiber orientation under identical test conditions against hardened M42 tool steel. A strong improvement was found in wear resistance of an aligned eutectic structure as compared to the corresponding randomized chill cast structure. Experiments with the softer 17-4 counterface were characterized by transfer onto the Fe-base superalloy, and the cracks formed were oriented transverse to the relative sliding direction and occurred in a periodic fashion. Observations in subsurface regions of the worn materials indicated crack intergranularity with an occasional transgranular fracture of the M7C3 carbide phase.

  14. Characterization of polyethylene wear particle: The impact of methodology.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Christian; Reinders, Jörn; Zietz, Carmen; Utzschneider, Sandra; Bader, Rainer; Kretzer, J Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Due to the prevalence of problems caused by wear particles, the reduced durability of total joint replacements is well documented. The characterization of wear debris enables the size and morphology of these wear particles to be measured and provides an assessment of the biological response in vivo. However, the impact of different methodologies of particle analysis is not yet clear. Hence, the aim of this investigation was to analyze the influence of different particle characterization methods performed by three research centers within the scope of a "round robin test". To obtain knowledge about possible pitfalls, single steps of the particle characterization process (storage, pore size of the filter, coating durations by gold sputtering and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) magnification) were analyzed. The round robin test showed significant differences between the research groups, especially for the morphology of the particles. The SEM magnification was identified as having the greatest influence on the size and shape of the particles, followed by the storage conditions of the wear particle containing lubricant. Gold sputter coating and filter pore size also exhibit significant effects. However, even though they are statistically significant, it should be emphasized that the differences are small. In conclusion, particle characterization is a complex analytical method with a multiplicity of influencing factors. It becomes apparent that a comparison of wear particle results between different research groups is challenging.

  15. Wear of nanofilled dental composites at varying filler concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of nanofiller concentration on the mechanisms of wear of a dental composite. Nanofilled composites were fabricated with a bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate polymer and 40 nm SiO2 filler particles at three filler loads (25, 50, and 65 wt %). The elastic modulus, flexural strength, and hardness of the composites and the unfilled resin were measured. The materials (n = 8) were tested in the modified wear testing device at 50,000, 100,000, and 200,000 cycles with 20N force at 1 Hz. A 33% glycerine lubricant and stainless steel antagonist were used. The worn composite and antagonist surfaces were analyzed with noncontact profilometry and SEM. The volumetric wear data indicated that there are significant differences between filler concentrations and cycles (p < 0.05). A trend was noted that increasing filler content beyond 25% decreased the wear resistance of the composites. Increasing filler content increased hardness and modulus and increased flexural strength up to 50% fill. SEM evaluation of the worn specimens indicated that the resin and 25% filled materials exhibited cracking and failed by fatigue and the 50 and 65% filled materials exhibited microcutting and failed by abrasive wear. Based on the results of this study, composite manufacturers are recommended to use a filler concentration between 25 and 50% when using nanosized filler particles.

  16. Investigation of the time-dependent wear behavior of veneering ceramic in porcelain fused to metal crowns during chewing simulations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiawen; Tian, Beimin; Wei, Ran; Wang, Weiguo; Zhang, Hongyun; Wu, Xiaohong; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2014-12-01

    The excessive abrasion of occlusal surfaces in ceramic crowns limits the service life of restorations and their clinical results. However, little is known about the time-dependent wear behavior of ceramic restorations during the chewing process. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the dynamic evolution of the wear behavior of veneering porcelain in PFM crowns as wear progressed, as tested in a chewing simulator. Twenty anatomical metal-ceramic crowns were prepared using Ceramco III as the veneering porcelain. Stainless steel balls served as antagonists. The specimens were dynamically loaded in a chewing simulator with 350N up to 2.4×10(6) loading cycles, with additional thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C. During the testing, several checkpoints were applied to measure the substance loss of the crowns' occlusal surfaces and to evaluate the microstructure of the worn areas. After 2.4×10(6) cycles, the entire wear process of the veneering porcelain in the PFM crowns revealed three wear stages (running-in, steady and severe wear stages). The occlusal surfaces showed traces of intensive wear on the worn areas during the running-in wear stage, and they exhibited the propagation of cracks in the subsurface during steady wear stage. When the severe wear stage was reached, the cracks penetrated the ceramic layer, causing the separation of porcelain pieces. It also exhibited a good correlation among the microstructure, the wear loss and the wear rate of worn ceramic restorations. The results suggest that under the conditions of simulated masticatory movement, the wear performance of the veneering porcelain in PFM crowns indicates the apparent similarity of the tribological characteristics of the traditional mechanical system. Additionally, the evaluation of the wear behavior of ceramic restorations should be based on these three wear stages.

  17. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  18. Should School Nurses Wear Uniforms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of School Health, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper questions whether school nurses should wear uniforms (specifically, white uniforms). It concludes that white uniforms are often associated with the treatment of ill people, and since many people have a fear reaction to them, they are not necessary and are even undesirable. Since school nurses are school staff members, they should…

  19. Rigid gas permeable extended wear.

    PubMed

    Maehara, J R; Kastl, P R

    1994-04-01

    We have reviewed the pertinent literature on rigid gas permeable (RGP) extended wear contact lenses, and we discuss the benefits and adverse reactions of this contact lens modality, drawing conclusions from reviewed studies. We suggest parameters for success with these lenses and guidelines for the prevention of adverse reactions.

  20. Ion implantation to reduce wear on polyethylene prosthetic devices. Rept. for Aug 89-Jan 91

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    Researchers studied the use of ion implantation to improve the wear performance of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). UHMWPE samples were implanted with high energy ions, tested for wear performance, and compared to unimplanted control samples. Surface friction and hardness measurements, Raman scattering, Rutherford backscattering (RBS), water contact angle, and film transfer tests were performed to characterize the surface property changes of implanted UHMWPE samples. Results indicated a 90% reduction in wear on implanted UHMWPE disks. Implantation increased surface microhardness and surface energy. The Raman spectrum revealed a diamond-like signature, indicting carbon bonds of a different nature than those found in unimplanted polyehtylene. Photographic analysis of pins used in wear testing revealed differences between implanted and unimplanted samples in the polyethylene film transferred in the initial stages of wear from the disk to the pin.

  1. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm2 and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm2of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics. PMID:27651887

  2. Ignition of a Combustible Atmosphere by Incandescent Carbon Wear Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Swikert, Max A.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1960-01-01

    A study was made to determine whether carbon wear particles from carbon elements in sliding contact with a metal surface were sufficiently hot to cause ignition of a combustible atmosphere. In some machinery, electric potential differences and currents may appear at the carbon-metal interface. For this reason the effect of these voltages and currents on the ability of carbon wear particles to cause ignition was evaluated. The test specimens used in the investigation were carbon vanes taken from a fuel pump and flat 21-inch-diameter 2 metal disks (440-C stainless steel) representing the pump housing. During each experiment a vane was loaded against a disk with a 0.5-pound force, and the disk was rotated to give a surface speed of 3140 feet per minute. The chamber of the apparatus that housed the vane and the disk was filled with a combustible mixture of air and propane. Various voltages and amperages were applied across the vane-disk interface. Experiments were conducted at temperatures of 75, 350, 400, and 450 F. Fires were produced by incandescent carbon wear particles obtained at conditions of electric potential as low as 106 volts and 0.3 ampere at 400 F. Ignitions were obtained only with carbon wear particles produced with an electric potential across the carbon-vane-disk interface. No ignitions were obtained with carbon wear particles produced in the absence of this potential; also, the potential difference produced no ignitions in the absence of carbon wear particles. A film supplement showing ignition by incandescent wear particles is available.

  3. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins.

    PubMed

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm(2) and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm(2)of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  4. Abrasive wear behavior of heat-treated ABC-silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Lee, Gun Y.; Chen, Da; Ritchie, Robert O.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2002-06-17

    Hot-pressed silicon carbide, containing aluminum, boron, and carbon additives (ABC-SiC), was subjected to three-body and two-body wear testing using diamond abrasives over a range of sizes. In general, the wear resistance of ABC-SiC, with suitable heat treatment, was superior to that of commercial SiC.

  5. EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATION OF SALTSTONE MIXER AUGER/PADDLES MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION FOR IMPROVED WEAR RESISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Torres, R.

    2012-08-15

    Wear and corrosion testing were conducted to evaluate alternate materials of construction for the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles. These components have been degraded by wear from the slurry processed in the mixer. Material test options included PVD coatings (TiN, TiCN, and ZrN), weld overlays (Stellite 12 and Ultimet) and higher hardness steels and carbides (D2 and tungsten carbide). The corrosion testing demonstrated that the slurry is not detrimental to the current materials of construction or the new candidates. The ASTM G75 Miller wear test showed that the high hardness materials and the Stellite 12 weld overlay provide superior wear relative to the Astralloy and CF8M stainless steel, which are the current materials of construction, as well as the PVD coatings and Ultimet. The following recommendations are made for selecting new material options and improving the overall wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer components: A Stellite 12 weld overlay or higher hardness steel (with toughness equivalent to Astralloy) be used to improve the wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer paddles; other manufacturing specifications for the mixer need to be considered in this selection. The current use of the Stellite 12 weld overlay be evaluated so that coverage of the 316 auger can be optimized for improved wear resistance of the auger. The wear surfaces of the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles be evaluated so that laboratory data can be better correlated to actual service. The 2-inch Saltstone mixer prototype be used to verify material performance.

  6. Two-body wear of occlusal splint materials.

    PubMed

    Kurt, H; Erdelt, K-J; Cilingir, A; Mumcu, E; Sülün, T; Tuncer, N; Gernet, W; Beuer, F

    2012-08-01

    This study investigates the wear resistance of four different types of occlusal splint materials based on two-body wear simulations under wet and dry conditions. Twenty specimens of each splint material (Dentalon Plus, Orthoplast, Biocryl C, and Eclipse), each with a diameter of 16 mm and a thickness of 3 mm, were tested, half under wet and half under dry conditions. Each wear test was performed using a device called chewing simulator CS-4 (n=10; test load: 50 N; number of cycles: 10000, 20000, and 30000; continuous rinsing with 30°C water for wet conditions); the antagonists were simulated using steel balls. Wear was determined using a 3D laser scanner and a surface analysis program. To detect significant statistical differences, wear data after 10000; 20000; and 30000 cycles were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. The level of significance was set at 5%. Significant differences were found between the groups of different materials tested under wet conditions (P<0.05), whereas no differences between them were found under dry conditions (P>0.05). No significant difference was found between the wet and dry conditions for all materials and cycles (P>0.05). For groups of different materials tested under wet conditions, the degree of volume loss generated in the Chewing Simulator CS-4 was found to differ significantly for different numbers of cycles. The presence of water had no effect on the volume loss in the different material groups that were tested.

  7. A Novel Method to Assess Wear Rates of Retrieved Tibial Inserts Following in-vivo Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paniogue, Tanille J.

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) on cobalt chrome is the bearing couple of choice for total knee arthroplasty. The number of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty has been steadily growing and is projected to continue increasing rapidly in the near future. Many of these patients are younger and more active and therefore need a longer lasting device. However, many of these devices fail prematurely and often the primary reason for failure and ultimately revision is due to wear related issues. Therefore, examining how wear rates of the UHMWPE tibial insert change during in-vivo use can help elucidate the mechanisms of accelerated wear and hopefully aid in finding solutions to combat wear related failures. Different crosslinking treatments have been employed by manufacturers to improve wear resistance of the polyethylene. While this has been shown to be an effective way to reduce wear, crosslinking has led to other issues such as oxidative instability and a decline in mechanical properties. The purpose of this body of work is to examine how changes in oxidation, after in-vivo use, affect wear resistance. A novel testing method was developed to test the native articular surface from retrieved tibial inserts in a laboratory Pin-on-Disk (POD) simulator. The method was validated using short-duration implant articular surfaces and non-articular control pins. In the absence of high surface oxidation or severe surface damage, the articular surface pins had comparable steady state wear rates to their bulk counterparts. Tests of devices with longer in-vivo service show chemical changes consistent with a free-radical mediated oxidation mechanism. Tribological assessment of the articular surfaces shows increasing wear rates as a function of oxidation. While this relationship has been hypothesized in the literature, these experiments represent the first physical demonstration of the phenomenon. The wear mechanism is further explored through infrared

  8. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Steel Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, Daniel James; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C; Fincke, James Russell; Sordelet, D.

    2001-10-01

    In this article, amorphous and nanocomposite thermally deposited steel coatings have been formed by using both plasma and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying techniques. This was accomplished by developing a specialized iron-based composition with a low critical cooling rate (?104 K/s) for metallic glass formation, processing the alloy by inert gas atomization to form micron-sized amorphous spherical powders, and then spraying the classified powder to form coatings. A primarily amorphous structure was formed in the as-sprayed coatings, independent of coating thickness. After a heat treatment above the crystallization temperature (568°C), the structure of the coatings self-assembled (i.e., devitrified) into a multiphase nanocomposite microstructure with 75 to 125 nm grains containing a distribution of 20 nm second-phase grain-boundary precipitates. Vickers microhardness testing revealed that the amorphous coatings were very hard (10.2 to 10.7 GPa), with further increases in hardness after devitrification (11.4 to 12.8 GPa). The wear characteristics of the amorphous and nanocomposite coatings were determined using both two-body pin-on-disk and three-body rubber wheel wet-slurry sand tests. The results indicate that the amorphous and nanocomposite steel coatings are candidates for a wide variety of wear-resistant applications.

  9. The influence of third-body particles on wear rate in unicondylar knee arthroplasty: a wear simulator study with bone and cement debris.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Christian; Grupp, Thomas M; Fritz, Bernhard; Schilling, Christoph; Chevalier, Yan; Utzschneider, Sandra; Jansson, Volkmar

    2013-05-01

    The reduced intraoperative visibility of minimally invasive implanted unicondylar knee arthroplasty makes it difficult to remove bone and cement debris, which have been reported on the surface of damaged and retrieved bearings. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of bone and cement particles on the wear rate of unicompartmental knee prostheses in vitro. Fixed bearing unicompartmental knee prostheses were tested using a knee-wear-simulator according to the ISO standard 14243-1:2002(E) for 5.0 million cycles. Afterwards bone debris (particle size 671 ± 262 μm) were added to the test fluid in a concentration of 5 g/l for 1.5 million cycles, followed by 1.5 million cycles blended with cement debris (particle size 644 ± 186 μm) in the same concentration. Wear rate, knee-kinematics and wear-pattern were analyzed. The wear rate reached 12.5 ± 1.0 mm³/million cycles in the running-in and decreased during the steady state phase to 4.4 ± 0.91 mm³/million cycles. Bone particles resulted in a wear rate of 3.0 ± 1.27 mm³/million cycles with no influence on the wear rate compared to the steady state phase. Cement particles, however, lead to a significantly higher wear rate (25.0 ± 16.93 mm³/million cycles) compared to the steady state phase. The careful removal of extruded cement debris during implantation may help in reducing wear rate. Bone debris are suggested to have less critical influence on the prostheses wear rate.

  10. Effect of Particle Size on Wear of Particulate Reinforced Aluminum Alloy Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Suresh; Pandey, Ratandeep; Panwar, Ranvir Singh; Pandey, O. P.

    2013-11-01

    The present paper describes the effect of particle size on operative wear mechanism in particle reinforced aluminum alloy composites at elevated temperatures. Two composites containing zircon sand particles of 20-32 μm and 106-125 μm were fabricated by stir casting process. The dry sliding wear tests of the developed composites were performed at low and high loads with variation in temperatures from 50 to 300 °C. The transition in wear mode from mild-to-severe was observed with variation in temperature and load. The wear at 200 °C presented entirely different wear behavior from the one at 250 °C. The wear rate of fine size reinforced composite at 200 °C at higher load was substantially lower than that of coarse size reinforced composite. Examination of wear tracks and debris revealed that delamination occurs after run in wear mode followed by formation of smaller size wear debris, transfer of materials from the counter surfaces and mixing of these materials on the contact surfaces. The volume loss was observed to increase with increase in load and temperature. Composite containing bigger size particles exhibit higher loss under similar conditions.

  11. Agave Chewing and Dental Wear: Evidence from Quids

    PubMed Central

    Hammerl, Emily E.; Baier, Melissa A.; Reinhard, Karl J.

    2015-01-01

    Agave quid chewing is examined as a potential contributing behavior to hunter-gatherer dental wear. It has previously been hypothesized that the contribution of Agave quid chewing to dental wear would be observed in communities wherever phytolith-rich desert succulents were part of subsistence. Previous analysis of coprolites from a prehistoric agricultural site, La Cueva de los Muertos Chiquitos in Durango, Mexico, showed that Agave was a consistent part of a diverse diet. Therefore, quids recovered at this site ought to be useful materials to test the hypothesis that dental wear was related to desert succulent consumption. The quids recovered from the site were found to be largely derived from chewing Agave. In this study, the quids were found to be especially rich in phytoliths, and analysis of dental casts made from impressions left in the quids revealed flat wear and dental attrition similar to that of Agave-reliant hunter-gatherers. Based on evidence obtained from the analysis of quids, taken in combination with results from previous studies, it is determined that Agave quid chewing was a likely contributing factor to dental wear in this population. As such, our method provides an additional avenue of dental research in areas where quids are present. PMID:26230855

  12. Modeling and Tool Wear in Routing of CFRP

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, D.; Fernandez, A.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.

    2011-01-17

    This paper presents the prediction and evaluation of feed force in routing of carbon composite material. In order to extend tool life and improve quality of the machined surface, a better understanding of uncoated and coated tool behaviors is required. This work describes (1) the optimization of the geometry of multiple teeth tools minimizing the tool wear and the feed force, (2) the optimization of tool coating and (3) the development of a phenomenological model between the feed force, the routing parameters and the tool wear. The experimental results indicate that the feed rate, the cutting speed and the tool wear are the most significant factors affecting the feed force. In the case of multiple teeth tools, a particular geometry with 14 teeth right helix right cut and 11 teeth left helix right cut gives the best results. A thick AlTiN coating or a diamond coating can dramatically improve the tool life while minimizing the axial force, roughness and delamination. A wear model has then been developed based on an abrasive behavior of the tool. The model links the feed rate to the tool geometry parameters (tool diameter), to the process parameters (feed rate, cutting speed and depth of cut) and to the wear. The model presented has been verified by experimental tests.

  13. Agave Chewing and Dental Wear: Evidence from Quids.

    PubMed

    Hammerl, Emily E; Baier, Melissa A; Reinhard, Karl J

    2015-01-01

    Agave quid chewing is examined as a potential contributing behavior to hunter-gatherer dental wear. It has previously been hypothesized that the contribution of Agave quid chewing to dental wear would be observed in communities wherever phytolith-rich desert succulents were part of subsistence. Previous analysis of coprolites from a prehistoric agricultural site, La Cueva de los Muertos Chiquitos in Durango, Mexico, showed that Agave was a consistent part of a diverse diet. Therefore, quids recovered at this site ought to be useful materials to test the hypothesis that dental wear was related to desert succulent consumption. The quids recovered from the site were found to be largely derived from chewing Agave. In this study, the quids were found to be especially rich in phytoliths, and analysis of dental casts made from impressions left in the quids revealed flat wear and dental attrition similar to that of Agave-reliant hunter-gatherers. Based on evidence obtained from the analysis of quids, taken in combination with results from previous studies, it is determined that Agave quid chewing was a likely contributing factor to dental wear in this population. As such, our method provides an additional avenue of dental research in areas where quids are present.

  14. Wear and related characteristics of an aircraft tire during braking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Wear and related characteristics of friction and temperature developed during braking of size 22 x 5.5, type aircraft tires are studied. The testing technique involved gearing the tire to a driving wheel of a ground vehicle to provide operations at constant slip ratios on asphalt, concrete, and slurry-seal surfaces. Data were obtained over the range of slip ratios generally attributed to an aircraft braking system during dry runway operations. The results show that the cumulative tire wear varies linearly with distance traveled and the wear rate increases with increasing slip ratio and is influenced by the runway-surface character. Differences in the wear rates associated with the various surfaces suggest that runways can be rated on the basis of tire wear. The results also show that the friction coefficients developed during fixed-slip-ratio operations are in good agreement with those obtained by other investigators during cyclic braking, in that the dry friction is insensitive to the tire tread temperature is shown to increase with increasing slip ratio and, at the higher ratios, to be greater during braking on asphalt and slurry seal than on concrete.

  15. Commissioning of a displacement-controlled knee wear simulator and exploration of some issues related to the lubricant.

    PubMed

    Brandt, J-M; Charron, K D J; Zhao, L; MacDonald, S J; Medley, J B

    2011-08-01

    A six-station displacement-controlled knee simulator with separately controlled left (L) and right (R) banks (three wear implants per bank) was commissioned for a total of three million cycles (Mc) following ISO 14243-3. A commissioning protocol was applied to compare the polyethylene wear among the six wear stations by exchanging the implants between wear stations. Changes in lubricant characteristics during wear testing, such as polypeptide degradation, low-molecular-weight polypeptide concentration, and possible microbial contamination were also assessed. The total mean wear rate for the implants was 23.60 +/- 1.96 mm3/Mc and this was of a similar magnitude to the mean wear rate for the same implant tested under similar conditions by DePuy Orthopaedics Inc. (Warsaw, IN). Repeated run-in wear was observed when the implants were exchanged between wear stations, suggesting that implants should be subjected to the same wear station throughout the duration of a wear test. The total polypeptide degradation for the implants measured 30.53 +/- 3.96 percent; the low-molecular-weight polypeptide concentration of the "used" lubricant for implants (0.131 +/- 0.012 g/L) was 3.3 times greater than the mean polypeptide concentration of the fresh, "unused" lubricant (0.039 +/- 0.004 g/L). This increase in low-molecular weight polypeptide concentration was suggested to be attributable to protein shear in the articulation of the implant, the circulation of the lubricant, and some proteolytic activity. Sodium azide was ineffective in maintaining a sterile environment for wear testing as a single, highly motile Gram-negative micro-organism was identified in the lubricant from wear tests.

  16. Wear resistance of a metal surface modified with minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislov, S. V.; Kislov, V. G.; Balasch, P. V.; Skazochkin, A. V.; Bondarenko, G. G.; Tikhonov, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    The article describes the advantages of the new technology of mineral coating of metal products for the friction pair of mechanical systems. It presents the research results of the wear rate of the samples made of 12X13 steel (X12Cr13) with mineral layers, in the experiments with a piston ring sliding inside a cylinder liner with grease. The wear rate of the samples with mineral layers is lower almost by two factors than that of the samples made of grey foundry iron and untreated samples. As the result of slip/rolling abrasion tests of parts with mineral layers under conditions of high contact pressure, a suggestion was made concerning probable mechanics of surface wear.

  17. Corrosive Wear in Wet Ore Grinding Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Denny A.

    1985-06-01

    Wear processes in ball and rod mills have recently received increased attention in order to increase efficiency and conserve grinding media. Direct removal of metal from the grinding media surface by abrasive wear occurs in both dry and wet grinding. Additional corrosive wear is apparent during wet grinding, in which less resistant corrosion product films are abraded away. Inhibitors and higher pH solutions, in which corrosion product films are more tenacious, improve wear resistance during wet grinding. Softer surfaces are less resistant to corrosive wear, suggesting that film formation and subsequent film abrasion on newly furrowed surfaces must be a factor.

  18. Tribological investigations of the wear couple alumina-CFRP for total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Früh, H J; Willmann, G

    1998-07-01

    Wear debris is the main reason for aseptic loosening in total hip. Most troublesome is the wear of polyethylene cups. Ceramic femoral heads were introduced about 20 years ago. The combination ceramic-on-polyethylene reduces the wear rate and the loosening rate. But cups of polyethylene are still the weakest link in a hip prosthesis. Carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) was proposed as an alternative for polyethylene. Various test were performed to study the combination metal-on-CFRP, zirconia-on-CFRP, and alumina-on-CFRP. The simulator tests showed that the wear rate of alumina-on-CFRP is in the order of 1-3 microm per year. Based on investigation of retrieved implants the wear rate is 6.3 microm per year. Based on these results the combination alumina femoral heads (Biolox-forte) and CFRP cups (Caproman) could be approved for total hip replacement.

  19. Wear mechanisms in a nonrotating wire rope

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, K.K.; Dogan, C.P.; Hawk, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    A nonrotating wire rope used in main hoist operations is being examined by the US Bureau of Mines to determine operative wear mechanisms. Typically, bending and loading the ropes during service cause small, localized movements at interwire contacts, leading to material loss through wear.The cumulative effect of both material loss by wear and wire breakage by fatigue failure accelerates rope retirement. If the macroscopic mechanics of wire rope failure are to be understood, microscopic deformation and degradation processes must be identified and quantified. As a first step in this study, interwire wear and deformation were studied using a combination of scanning electron microscopy and hardness measurements. Both fretting and abrasive wear were identified as wear mechanisms. Preferential sites for fretting and abrasive wear were identified and are discussed regarding rope construction and geometry and the tribo-system.

  20. Low wear partially fluorinated polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.; Hady, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    Tribological studies were conducted on five different polyimide solid bodies formulated from the diamine 2,2-bis 4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl hexafluoropropane (4-BDAF) and the dianhydrides pyromellitic acid (PMDS) and benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDA). The following polyimides were evaluated 4-BDAF/PMDA, 4-BDAF/BTDA, 4-BDAF/80 mole percent PMDA, 20 mole percent BTDA, 4-BDAF/60 mole percent BTDA. Friction coefficients, polyimide wear rates, polyimide surface morphology and transfer films were evaluated at sliding speeds of 0.31 to 11.6 m/s and at temperatures of 25 C to 300 C. The results indicate that the tribological properties are highly dependent on the composition of the polyimide and on the experimental conditions. Two polyimides were found which produced very low wear rates but very high friction coefficients (greater than 0.85) under ambient conditions. They offer considerable potential for high traction types of application such as brakes.

  1. Nuclear fuel assembly wear sleeve

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwell, D.J.; Kmonk, S.

    1983-03-08

    An improved control rod guide tube for use in a fuel assembly in a nuclear reactor. The guide tube extends the complete length of the fuel assembly and has its upper end fastened in a cylindrical housing by swaging the guide tube material into grooves formed in the housing walls. To eliminate wear on the guide tube inner walls caused by hydraulic induced vibratory forces on a control rod adapted to move therein, a thin-walled chrome plated sleeve is threaded into the top end of the guide thimble and extends downwardly a distance sufficient to be engaged by the control rod during reactor operation. The sleeve serves as a highly resistant wear surface between the control rod and walls on the guide tube in the fuel assembly.

  2. Coatings for wear and lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in the tribological uses of rf-sputtered and ion plated films of solid film lubricants (laminar solids, soft metals, organic polymers) and wear resistant refractory compounds (carbides, nitrides, silicides) are reviewed. The sputtering and ion plating potentials and the corresponding coatings formed were evaluated relative to the friction coefficient, wear endurance life and mechanical properties. The tribological and mechanical properties for each kind of film are discussed in terms of film adherence, coherence, density, grain size, morphology, internal stresses, thickness, and substrate conditions such as temperature, topography, chemistry and dc-biasing. The ion plated metallic films in addition to improved tribological properties also have better mechanical properties such as tensile strength and fatigue life.

  3. Coatings for wear and lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper we review the recent advances in the tribological uses of R.F.-sputtered and ion-plated films of solid film lubricants (laminar solids, soft metals, organic polymers) and wear-resistant refractory compounds (carbides, nitrides, silicides). The sputtering and ion-plating potentials and the corresponding coatings formed are evaluated relative to the friction coefficient, wear endurance life and mechanical properties. The tribological and mechanical properties of each kind of film are discussed in terms of film adherence, coherence, density, grain size, morphology, internal stresses and thickness and substrate conditions such as temperature, topography, chemistry and d.c. biasing. The ion-plated metallic films in addition to improved tribological properties also have better mechanical properties such as tensile strength and fatigue life.

  4. Hydraulic System Wear Debris Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-03

    drawn. Each one-=L sample was drawn with a clean plastic pipette of one-mL capacity. The samples were placed in clean Ferrogram preparation bottles ...and from cavities in a block which held linear seals into sampling bottles . Several photographs of this debris , which was deposited on Ferro- grams...silicon in the glass overshadowed the elements of the wear debris . To overcome this difficulty, the Ferrogram should be pre- pared on a carbon-filled

  5. Wear of steel by rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.; Pulford, C. T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Wear of a steel blade used as a scraper to abrade rubber surfaces has been found to take place much more rapidly on a cis-polyisoprene (natural rubber) surface than on a cis-polybutadiene surface, and much more rapidly in an inert atmosphere than in air. These observations are attributed to the direct attack upon steel of free-radical species generated by mechanical rupture of elastomer molecules during abrasion.

  6. Exposure and risks from wearing asbestos mitts

    PubMed Central

    Cherrie, John W; Tindall, Matthew; Cowie, Hilary

    2005-01-01

    Background Very high fibre inhalation exposure has been measured while people were wearing personal protective equipment manufactured from chrysotile asbestos. However, there is little data that relates specifically to wearing asbestos gloves or mitts, particularly when used in hot environments such as those found in glass manufacturing. The aim of this study was to assess the likely personal exposure to asbestos fibres when asbestos mitts were used. Results Three types of work activity were simulated in a small test room with unused mitts and artificially aged mitts. Neither pair of mitts were treated to suppress the dust emission. The measured respirable fibre exposure levels ranged from <0.06 to 0.55 fibres/ml, with no significant difference in fibre exposure between aged and unused mitts. The use of high localised ventilation to simulate convective airflows from a furnace reduced exposure levels by about a factor of five. Differences between tasks were statistically significant, with simulated "rowing" of molten glass lowest and replacement of side seals on the furnace highest. Estimated lifetime cancer risk from 20 years exposure at the upper end of the exposure range measured during the study is less than 22 per 100,000. Conclusion People who wore asbestos mitts were likely to have been exposed to relatively low levels of airborne chrysotile asbestos fibres, certainly much lower than the standards that were accepted in the 1960's and 70's. The cancer risks from this type of use are likely to be very low. PMID:16202137

  7. Comparative study of the wear behavior of composites for posterior restorations.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia P; Faraoni-Romano, Juliana J; de Menezes, Márcio; Serra, Mônica C

    2007-01-01

    This investigation sought to compare the abrasive wear rates of resin composites designed for posterior applications. Seventy-five specimens were fabricated with conventional hybrid (Charisma and Filtek Z250) or packable composites (Filtek P60, Solitaire II and Tetric Ceram HB), according to a randomized complete block design (n = 15). Specimens were finished and polished metallographically and subjected to abrasive wear which was performed under a normal load of 13N at a frequency of 2 Hz using a pneumatic device (MSM/Elquip) in the presence of a mucin-containing artificial saliva. Wear was quantified profilometrically in five different locations of each specimen after 1,000, 5,000, 10,000, 50,000 and after every each 50,000 through 250,000 cycles. A split-plot ANOVA showed a significant difference between the wear resistance of composites (alpha = 0.05). Tukey's test ascertained that while the composites Filtek Z250 and Charisma wore significantly less than any other of the materials tested, Tetric Ceram HB experienced the greatest wear rates. Filtek P60 and Solitaire II showed intermediate rates of material removal. The wear pattern of composites proved to be biphasic with the primary phase having the faster wear rate. In conclusion, packable resin composites may not have superior wear compared to conventional hybrid composites.

  8. Wear performance of large-diameter differential-hardness hip bearings.

    PubMed

    Barnes, C Lowry; DeBoer, David; Corpe, R Scott; Nambu, Satya; Carroll, Michael; Timmerman, Irina

    2008-09-01

    We hypothesized that differential-hardness hard-on-hard bearings would generate less wear debris compared with like-hardness metal-on-metal (M-o-M) bearings. We conducted wear testing on 3 types of large-diameter hard hip bearings: (1) contemporary cast-on-cast ("like" hardness) M-o-M; (2) differential-hardness M-o-M; and (3) differential-hardness ceramic-on-metal. A simulated gait profile ranging from 200 to 2000 N was applied to the bearings at a frequency of 1 Hz for 5 Mc. All bearings were tested in an anatomically inverted position in 90% alpha calf serum. Both differential-hardness bearing systems produced lower run-in wear rates (90%-97%), steady-state wear rate (45%-84%), and total metal wear (68%-88%) compared with the like-hardness bearing system. The ceramic-on-metal bearings exhibited the least wear followed by differential-hardness M-o-M bearings; like-hardness M-o-M bearings exhibited the greatest amount of wear. These findings support our hypothesis that differential-hardness hip bearing systems produce less metallic wear debris than those with like hardness and may result in lower metal ion release in vivo.

  9. Preliminary study on the effect of wear process on drug release of ALN-loaded UHMWPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dan; Qu, Shuxin; Lin, Sunzhong; Huang, Jie; Fu, Rong; Zhou, Zhongrong

    2012-12-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with alendronate sodium (ALN) for anti-osteolysis was developed in our previous study. As a potential material of artificial joints, ALN-loaded UHMWPE is subjected to friction and wear which probably affect the ALN release in vivo. This study aims to explore the influence of friction and wear on the ALN release rate. For comparison, the specimens of control group, immersed motionlessly in distilled water, were not applied any friction. The morphological change of worn surface of ALN-loaded UHMWPE was observed through an independent wear test and was compared with that of control UHMWPE. The ALN release rate in the friction and wear process was higher than that of non-friction test. The cumulative mass of ALN increased slowly at the onset of wear process and then speeded up. The fibrils-like wear debris accumulated on the worn surface of ALN-loaded UHMWPE but did not appear on that of UHMWPE. The micro-pores formed during wear process, were probably favorable of the dissolution of ALN. It indicated that the ALN release of ALN-loaded UHMWPE was affected by the friction and wear. The frictional factors should be taken into account in predicting the ALN release rate of ALN-loaded UHMWPE.

  10. Nonidentical and outlier duty cycles as factors accelerating UHMWPE wear in THA: a finite element exploration.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Hannah J; Stewart, Kristofer J; Pedersen, Douglas R; Callaghan, John J; Brown, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Wear rate and wear direction vary considerably within total hip arthroplasty (THA) patient cohorts. Third body effects and wide-ranging differences in patient activity levels are two factors suspected of contributing to wear variability. A sliding-distance-coupled contact finite element formulation was used to test the hypothesis that nonidentical duty cycles (differing activities, or change of third body challenge) produce accelerations in polyethylene wear. Effects of nonidentical duty cycles, time-variant femoral head roughening, and outlier gait inputs were investigated. Without femoral head roughening, combination walk/stair-climb wear simulations did not result in appreciably higher volumetric wear than a walk-only simulation, but when a roughened zone was included, walk/stair-climb volumetric wear increased by approximately 57% above that of a similarly roughened walk-only simulation. To investigate time-variant femoral head roughening, wear simulations were begun with femoral head roughening at one location on the femoral head, switching to another location halfway through the simulation. Results varied depending on roughening sites, but cases of substantial increase in wear involved a transient jump in wear rate shortly after the change of head roughening location. Outlier duty cycles were simulated by increasing or decreasing the joint contact force and range of motion inputs, to levels at the 97.5th and 2.5th percentiles of a population of normal subjects. The resulting wear showed an increase or decrease closely proportional to the percentage by which each input (force or range of motion) was changed.

  11. Wear evaluation of a cross-linked medical grade polyethylene by ultra thin layer activation compared to gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroosnijder, Marinus F.; Hoffmann, Michael; Sauvage, Thierry; Blondiaux, Gilbert; Vincent, Laetitia

    2005-01-01

    Most of today's artificial joints rely on an articulating couple consisting of a CoCrMo alloy and a medical grade polyethylene. The wear of the polyethylene component is the major cause for long-term failure of these prostheses since the wear debris leads to adverse biological reactions. The polyethylene wear is usually measured by gravimetric methods, which are limited due to a low sensitivity and accuracy. To demonstrate the reliability of ultra thin layer activation (UTLA) as an alternative technique, wear tests on a cross-linked ultra-high-molecular weight polyethylene (XLPE) sliding against CoCrMo were performed on a wear tester featuring multi-directional sliding motion. The amount of polyethylene wear was evaluated by both UTLA and gravimetry. The particular TLA method used in this work employed the implantation of 7Be radioactive recoils into the polyethylene surface by means of a light mass particle beam. The results indicate that apart from its relatively high sensitivity, UTLA also offers the possibility for on-line measurements of polyethylene wear. This makes it a viable and complementary technique in wear test studies for medical implant purposes especially for those involving wear resistant materials and for rapid wear screening.

  12. Wear Behavior Characterization for the Screening of Magnesium-based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGhee, Paul R.

    This research is focused on the development of a systematic approach to evaluate the selection of materials for Mg-based alloys under wear conditions for biomedical applications. A pilot study was carried out in order to establish an accurate and reliable wear testing technique for magnesium and its alloys. This pilot study was conducted on aluminum (Al) and pure Mg, and showed that aluminum has a lower wear rate compared to Mg. The technique displayed good repeatability and high precision. For the main study, an ERC Mg-based alloy was to be compared with pure Mg. The same technique, when applied to pure Mg from a different vendor, produced up to 90% scatter in the data. Microstructure was studied to see if it had any correlation with the scatter. It was discovered that Mg ingot from the second vendor had outsized grains that contributed to the disproportional scatter in the wear data. Increasing the stroke length during wear testing was required so that the wear data would be averaged over multiple grains and reduces the variation in computed wear rates. In the main study, wear behavior and friction properties were analyzed using microtribometery, mechanical stylus profilometry, and microindentation. Surface morphology and microstructure were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. For the main study, pure Mg and the ERC alloy as-cast and extruded conditions were compared. Pure Mg and MZCR alloys were extruded at 350°C and 400°C, respectively. Mg and MZCR alloy were cast at 350°C and heat treated at 510°C. The extruded specimens were divided into two sections, cross-section and longitudinal section. Wear tests were carried out under the applied normal load 0.5 N - 2.5 N in 0.5 N increments sliding at a rate of 0.2 Hz for 240 passes. The results show that the alloying and extrusion processes increase the hardness of the MZCR alloy significantly up to 80%. The as-cast MZCR has a lower resistance to wear

  13. Microstructure and wear resistance of in situ porous TiO/Cu composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qingdong; Huang, Bowei; Li, Wei

    2016-07-01

    An in situ porous TiO/Cu composite is successfully prepared using powder metallurgy by the reaction of Ti2CO and Cu powder. Morphological examination of the composite shows that the porosity of composites lies in the range between 10.2% and 35.2%. Dry sliding un-lubricated wear tests show that the wear resistance of the composite is higher than that of the Cu-Al alloy ingot. The coefficient of friction test shows that, as the volume fraction of the reinforced phase increases, the coefficient of friction decreases. The wear rate variation trend of the oil-lubricated wear test results is similar to that of the un-lubricated wear test results. The coefficient of friction for oil lubrication is similar for different volume fractions of the reinforced phase. The wear resistance of the composite at a sliding velocity of 200 rpm is slightly larger than that at 50 rpm. The porosity of the composites enhances the high-velocity oil-lubricated sliding wear resistance.

  14. Modeling of Complex Wear Behavior Associated with Grid-to-Rod Fretting in Light Water Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blau, P. J.; Qu, J.; Lu, R.

    2016-11-01

    Fretting wear damage to fuel cladding from flow-induced vibrations can be a significant concern in the operation of light water nuclear reactors. For years, research on the grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) phenomena has been underway in countries where nuclear power production is a significant industry. Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, an effort has been underway to develop and test an engineering wear model for zirconium alloy fuel rod cladding against a supporting grid. The multi-stage model accounts for oxide layers and wear rate transitions. This paper describes the basis for a GTRF engineering wear model, the physical significance of the wear factor it contains, and recent progress toward model validation based on a fretting wear testing apparatus that accounts for coolant temperature, pressure, and the presence of periodic impacts (gaps) in grid/rod contact.

  15. Modeling of complex wear behavior associated with grid-to-rod fretting in light water nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P. J.; Qu, J.; Lu, R.

    2016-09-21

    One significant concern in the operation of light water nuclear reactors is the fretting wear damage to fuel cladding from flow-induced vibrations. For years, research on the grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) phenomena has been underway in countries where nuclear power production is a significant industry. Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, an effort has been underway to develop and test an engineering wear model for zirconium alloy fuel rod cladding against a supporting grid. Furthermore, the multi-stage model accounts for oxide layers and wear rate transitions. Our paper describes the basis for a GTRF engineering wear model, the physical significance of the wear factor it contains, and recent progress toward model validation based on a fretting wear testing apparatus that accounts for coolant temperature, pressure, and the presence of periodic impacts (gaps) in grid/rod contact.

  16. Modeling of complex wear behavior associated with grid-to-rod fretting in light water nuclear reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Blau, P. J.; Qu, J.; Lu, R.

    2016-09-21

    One significant concern in the operation of light water nuclear reactors is the fretting wear damage to fuel cladding from flow-induced vibrations. For years, research on the grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) phenomena has been underway in countries where nuclear power production is a significant industry. Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, an effort has been underway to develop and test an engineering wear model for zirconium alloy fuel rod cladding against a supporting grid. Furthermore, the multi-stage model accounts for oxide layers and wear rate transitions. Our paper describes themore » basis for a GTRF engineering wear model, the physical significance of the wear factor it contains, and recent progress toward model validation based on a fretting wear testing apparatus that accounts for coolant temperature, pressure, and the presence of periodic impacts (gaps) in grid/rod contact.« less

  17. High-temperature wear and deformation processes in metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J.; Alpas, A. T.

    1996-10-01

    Dry-sliding wear behaviors of a particulate-reinforced aluminum matrix composite 6061 Al-20 pet A12O3 and an unreinforced 6061 Al alloy were investigated in the temperature range 25 °C to 500 °C against a SAE 52100 bearing steel counterface. Experiments were carried out at a constant sliding speed of 0.2 m·s- at different test loads. The deformation behavior of the materials was studied by performing uniaxial compression tests in the same temperature range as the wear tests. Both alloys showed a mild-to-severe wear transition above a certain test temperature. In the mild wear regime, the wear rate and the coefficient of friction of the unreinforced 6061 Al decreased slightly with temperature, but the temperature had almost no effect on the wear rate and the coefficient of friction of the 6061 Al-20 pet Al2O3 in the same regime. Particulate reinforcement led to an increase in the transition temperature and a 50 to 70 pet improvement in the wear resistance in the severe wear regime. This was attributed to the formation of tribological layers consisting of comminuted A12O3 particles at the contact surface. High-temperature compression tests showed that the flow strength of 6061 Al-20 pet A12O3 and 6061 Al decreased monotonically with temperature and both alloys exhibited a work-softening behavior at temperatures higher than the inflection point on the flow stress vs temperature curves. The logarithmic maximum stress vs reciprocal temperature relationship was not linear, indicating that the deformation processes were too complicated to be characterized by a single activation energy over the whole temperature range. For the range of 250 °C to 450 °C, the activation energy for deformation was estimated to be 311 kJ·mol-1; for both the matrix alloy and the composite. Severe wear proceeded by thermally activated deformation processes involving dynamic recrystallization along a subsurface strain gradient. A power-Arrhenius type relationship was found to describe well

  18. Effect of microseparation and third-body particles on dual-mobility crosslinked hip liner wear.

    PubMed

    Netter, Jonathan D; Hermida, Juan C; Chen, Peter C; Nevelos, James E; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2014-09-01

    Large heads have been recommended to reduce the risk of dislocation after total hip arthroplasty. One of the issues with larger heads is the risk of increased wear and damage in thin polyethylene liners. Dual-mobility liners have been proposed as an alternative to large heads. We tested the wear performance of highly crosslinked dual-mobility liners under adverse conditions simulating microseparation and third-body wear. No measurable increase in polyethylene wear rate was found in the presence of third-body particles. Microseparation induced a small increase in wear rate (2.9mm(3)/million cycles). A finite element model simulating microseparation in dual-mobility liners was validated using these experimental results. The results of our study indicate that highly crosslinked dual-mobility liners have high tolerance for third-body particles and microseparation.

  19. Effect of design factors on surface temperature and wear in disk brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santini, J. J.; Kennedy, F. E.; Ling, F. F.

    1976-01-01

    The temperatures, friction, wear and contact conditions that occur in high energy disk brakes are studied. Surface and near surface temperatures were monitored at various locations in a caliper disk brake during drag type testing, with friction coefficient and wear rates also being determined. The recorded transient temperature distributions in the friction pads and infrared photographs of the rotor disk surface both showed that contact at the friction surface was not uniform, with contact areas constantly shifting due to nonuniform thermal expansion and wear. The effect of external cooling and of design modifications on friction, wear and temperatures was also investigated. It was found that significant decreases in surface temperature and in wear rate can be achieved without a reduction in friction either by slotting the contacting face of the brake pad or by modifying the design of the pad support to improve pad compliance. Both design changes result in more uniform contact conditions on the friction surface.

  20. Friction and wear properties of three hard refractory coatings applied by radiofrequency sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    The adherence, friction, and wear properties of thin hard refractory compound coatings applied to 440C bearing steel by radiofrequency sputtering were investigated. Friction and wear tests were done with nonconforming pin on disk specimens. The compounds examined were chromium carbide, molybdenum silicide, and titanium carbide. The adherence, friction, and wear were markedly improved by the application of a bias voltage to the bearing steel substrate during coating deposition. Analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the improvement may be due to a reduction in impurities in bias deposited coatings. A fivefold reduction in oxygen concentration in MoSi2 coating by biasing was noted. Chromium carbide was not effective as an antiwear coating. Molybdenum silicide provided some reduction in both friction and wear. Titanium carbide exhibited excellent friction and antiwear properties at light loads. Plastic flow and transfer of the coating material onto the pin specimen appears to be important in achieving low friction and wear.

  1. Friction and wear of radiofrequency-sputtered borides, silicides, and carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The friction and wear properties of several refractory compound coatings were examined. These compounds were applied to 440 C bearing steel surfaces by radiofrequency (RF) sputtering. The refractory compounds were the titanium and molybdenum borides, the titanium and molybdenum silicides, and the titanium, molybdenum, and boron carbides. Friction testing was done with a pin-on-disk wear apparatus at loads from 0.1 to 5.0 newtons. Generally, the best wear properties were obtained when the coatings were bias sputtered onto 440 C disks that had been preoxidized. Adherence was improved because of the better bonding of the coatings to the iron oxide formed during preoxidation. As a class the carbides provided wear protection to the highest loads. Titanium boride coatings provided low friction and good wear properties to moderate loads.

  2. Wear of double crown systems - electroplated vs. casted female part

    PubMed Central

    BAYER, Stefan; KRAUS, Dominik; KEILIG, Ludger; GÖLZ, Lina; STARK, Helmut; ENKLING, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The wear of telescopic crowns is a common problem often reducing the patient's satisfaction with the denture and resulting in a renewal of the denture. The study aims to compare the wear behavior of conical crowns using electroplated copings (group E) with standard telescopic crowns with cast female parts (group C). Material and Methods 10 conical crowns were milled for each group of a cast gold alloy. The specimen of group E had a conicity of 2º. The cast secondary crowns of group C had a 0º design. The electroplated coping was established by direct electroforming. An apparatus accomplishing 10,000 wear cycles performed the wear test. The retentive forces and the correlating distance during insertion and separation were measured. The wear test was separated in a start phase, an initial wear phase and the long term wear period. The retention force value and the force-distance integral of the first 0.33 mm of each cycle were calculated. Results The retentive forces were significantly higher for group E and the integrals were significantly lower for this group except the integral at cycle 10,000. The changes of retention force and integral did not differ significantly between both groups in all phases. The change of the integrals as well as the integral at the particular cycles showed higher interquartile distances for group C. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study the tested conical crowns showed clinically acceptable retentive properties. The values reached a range comparable to retentive elements tested in recent literature. The values of group C showed higher ranges. The force measured for group E was significantly higher than for group C but the integrals showed an opposite tendency. The results indicate that an exclusive analysis of the force is not sufficient as the integral is not equivalent to the force although it describes the retentive property of the system in a better way than the force over a distance is described. Both systems

  3. Wear rate control of peek surfaces modified by femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouti, S.; Pascale-Hamri, A.; Faure, N.; Beaugiraud, B.; Guibert, M.; Mauclair, C.; Benayoun, S.; Valette, S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the effect of laser texturing on the tribological properties of PEEK surfaces under a ball-on-flat contact configuration. Thus, surfaces with circular dimples of various diameters and depth were created. Tests were conducted with a normal load of 5 N and a sliding velocity of 0.01 m s-1, using bovine calf serum at 37.5 °C as a lubricant. The tribological conditions including the sliding frequency and the lubricant viscosity indicate that tests were performed under boundary lubrication regime. Results showed that discs with higher dimple depth exhibited higher friction coefficient and caused more abrasive wear on the ball specimen. Nevertheless, tribosystems (ball and disc) with dimpled disc surfaces showed a higher wear resistance. In the frame of our experiments, wear rates obtained for tribosystems including dimpled surfaces were 10 times lower than tribosystems including limited patterned or untextured surfaces. Applications such as design of spinal implants may be concerned by such a surface treatment to increase wear resistance of components.

  4. Wear resistance of diffusion coatings on the working parts of impact-rebound crushers

    SciTech Connect

    Nedzel'skii, M.D.; Katkov, Y.K.

    1984-01-01

    Impact-rebound crushers used in the chemical industry suffer intensive wear of the crusher blades when crushing materials like quartz sand, corundum, and diabase. A special impact-rebound crushers has been made for testing the wear resistance of hardened prototype blades, andi it is described in detail in this paper. Tests were done to determine the most effective methods of surface hardening for the replaceable inserts made of readily available steel and it is found that the carbonitriding of steel gives a hardened layer to increase the wear resistance of the crusher body and rotor surfaces.

  5. Increased conformity offers diminishing returns for reducing total knee replacement wear.

    PubMed

    Fregly, Benjamin J; Marquez-Barrientos, Carlos; Banks, Scott A; DesJardins, John D

    2010-02-01

    Wear remains a significant problem limiting the lifespan of total knee replacements (TKRs). Though increased conformity between TKR components has the potential to decrease wear, the optimal amount and planes of conformity have not been investigated. Furthermore, differing conformities in the medial and lateral compartments may provide designers the opportunity to address both wear and kinematic design goals simultaneously. This study used a computational model of a Stanmore knee simulator machine and a previously validated wear model to investigate this issue for simulated gait. TKR geometries with different amounts and planes of conformity on the medial and lateral sides were created and tested in two phases. The first phase utilized a wide range of sagittal and coronal conformity combinations to blanket a physically realistic design space. The second phase performed a focused investigation of the conformity conditions from the first phase to which predicted wear volume was sensitive. For the first phase, sagittal but not coronal conformity was found to have a significant effect on predicted wear volume. For the second phase, increased sagittal conformity was found to decrease predicted wear volume in a nonlinear fashion, with reductions gradually diminishing as conformity increased. These results suggest that TKR geometric design efforts aimed at minimizing wear should focus on sagittal rather than coronal conformity and that at least moderate sagittal conformity is desirable in both compartments.

  6. Development of a gear vibration indicator and its application in gear wear monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chongqing; Smith, Wade A.; Randall, Robert B.; Peng, Zhongxiao

    2016-08-01

    Gear tooth wear is an inevitable phenomenon and has a significant influence on gear dynamic features. Although vibration analysis has been widely used to diagnose localised gear tooth faults, its techniques for gear wear monitoring have not been well-established. This paper aims at developing a vibration indicator to evaluate the effects of wear on gear performance. For this purpose, a gear state vector is extracted from time synchronous averaged gear signals to describe the gear state. This gear state vector consists of the sideband ratios obtained from a number of tooth meshing harmonics and their sidebands. Then, two averaged logarithmic ratios, ALR and mALR, are defined with fixed and moving references, respectively, to provide complementary information for gear wear monitoring. Since a fixed reference is utilised in the definition of ALR, it reflects the cumulated wear effects on the gear state. An increase in the ALR value indicates that the gear state deviates further from its reference condition. With the use of a moving reference, the indicator mALR shows changes in the gear state within short time intervals, making it suitable for wear process monitoring. The efficiency of these vibration indicators is demonstrated using experimental results from two sets of tests, in which the gears experienced different wear processes. In addition to gear wear monitoring, the proposed indicators can be used as general parameters to detect the occurrence of other faults, such as a tooth crack or shaft misalignment, because these faults would also change the gear vibrations.

  7. Shape classification of wear particles by image boundary analysis using machine learning algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Chin, K. S.; Hua, Meng; Dong, Guangneng; Wang, Chunhui

    2016-05-01

    The shape features of wear particles generated from wear track usually contain plenty of information about the wear states of a machinery operational condition. Techniques to quickly identify types of wear particles quickly to respond to the machine operation and prolong the machine's life appear to be lacking and are yet to be established. To bridge rapid off-line feature recognition with on-line wear mode identification, this paper presents a new radial concave deviation (RCD) method that mainly involves the use of the particle boundary signal to analyze wear particle features. Signal output from the RCDs subsequently facilitates the determination of several other feature parameters, typically relevant to the shape and size of the wear particle. Debris feature and type are identified through the use of various classification methods, such as linear discriminant analysis, quadratic discriminant analysis, naïve Bayesian method, and classification and regression tree method (CART). The average errors of the training and test via ten-fold cross validation suggest CART is a highly suitable approach for classifying and analyzing particle features. Furthermore, the results of the wear debris analysis enable the maintenance team to diagnose faults appropriately.

  8. Evaluation of silicon nitride as a wear resistant and resorbable alternative for total hip joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Johanna; Grehk, T. Mikael; Berlind, Torun; Persson, Cecilia; Jacobson, Staffan; Engqvist, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Many of the failures of total joint replacements are related to tribology, i.e., wear of the cup, head and liner. Accumulation of wear particles at the implants can be linked to osteolysis which leads to bone loss and in the end aseptic implant loosening. Therefore it is highly desirable to reduce the generation of wear particles from the implant surfaces. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) has shown to be biocompatible and have a low wear rate when sliding against itself and is therefore a good candidate as a hip joint material. Furthermore, wear particles of Si3N4 are predicted to slowly dissolve in polar liquids and they therefore have the potential to be resorbed in vivo, potentially reducing the risk for aseptic loosening. In this study, it was shown that α-Si3N4-powder dissolves in PBS. Adsorption of blood plasma indicated a good acceptance of Si3N4 in the body with relatively low immune response. Si3N4 sliding against Si3N4 showed low wear rates both in bovine serum and PBS compared with the other tested wear couples. Tribofilms were built up on the Si3N4 surfaces both in PBS and in bovine serum, controlling the friction and wear characteristics. PMID:23507807

  9. Orbital transfer rocket engine technology program: Soft wear ring seal technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid oxygen (LOX) compatibility tests, including autogenous ignition, promoted ignition, LOX impact tests, and friction and wear tests on different PV products were conducted for several polymer materials as verification for the implementation of soft wear ring seals in advanced rocket engine turbopumps. Thermoplastics, polyimide based materials, and polyimide-imide base materials were compared for oxygen compatibility, specific wear coefficient, wear debris production, and heat dissipation mechanisms. A thermal model was generated that simulated the frictional heating input and calculated the surface temperature and temperature distribution within the seal. The predictions were compared against measured values. Heat loads in the model were varied to better match the test data and determine the difference between the measured and the calculated coefficients of friction.

  10. Cornering and wear characteristics of the Space Shuttle Orbiter nose-gear tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Pamela A.; Stubbs, Sandy M.; Vogler, William A.

    1989-01-01

    Tests of the Space Shuttle Orbiter nose-gear tire have been completed at NASA Langley's Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility. The purpose of these tests was to determine the cornering and wear characteristics of the Space Shuttle Orbiter nose-gear tire under realistic operating conditions. The tire was tested on a simulated Kennedy Space Center runway surface at speeds from 100 to 180 kts. The results of these tests defined the cornering characteristics which included side forces and associated side force friction coefficient over a range of yaw angles from 0 deg to 12 deg. Wear characteristics were defined by tire tread and cord wear over a yaw angle range of 0 deg to 4 deg under dry and wet runway conditions. Wear characteristics were also defined for a 15 kt crosswind landing with two blown right main-gear tires and nose-gear steering engaged.

  11. Wear resistance of composite materials. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning wear resistance of composite materials. References discuss polymer, ceramic and metal composites. Tribological testing and failure analyses are included. (Contains a minimum of 200 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Alumina-alumina artificial hip joints. Part II: characterisation of the wear debris from in vitro hip joint simulations.

    PubMed

    Tipper, J L; Hatton, A; Nevelos, J E; Ingham, E; Doyle, C; Streicher, R; Nevelos, A B; Fisher, J

    2002-08-01

    Until recently it was not possible to reproduce clinically relevant wear rates and wear patterns in in vitro hip joint simulators for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic hip prostheses. The introduction of microseparation of the prosthesis components into in vitro wear simulations produced clinically relevant wear rates and wear patterns for the first time. The aim of this study was to characterise the wear particles generated from standard simulator testing and microseparation simulator testing of hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) and non-HIPed alumina ceramic-on-ceramic hip prostheses, and compare these particles to those generated in vivo. Standard simulation conditions produced wear rates of approximately 0.1 mm3 per million cycles for both material types. No change in surface roughness was detected and very few wear features were observed. In contrast, when microseparation was introduced into the wear simulation, wear rates of between 1.24 (HIPed) and 1.74 mm3 per million cycles (non-HIPed) were produced. Surface roughness increased and a wear stripe often observed clinically on retrieved femoral heads was also reproduced. Under standard simulation conditions only nanometre-sized wear particles (2-27.5 nm) were observed by TEM, and it was thought likely that these particles resulted from relief polishing of the alumina ceramic. However, when microseparation of the prosthesis components was introduced into the simulation, a bi-modal distribution of particle sizes was observed. The nanometre-sized particles produced by relief polishing were present (1-35nm). however, larger micrometre-sized particles were also observed by both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) (0.021 microm) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) (0.05-->10 microm). These larger particles were thought to originate from the wear stripe and were produced by trans-granular fracture of the alumina ceramic. In Part I of this study, alumina ceramic wear particles were isolated from the periprosthetic

  13. The effect of insert conformity and material on total knee replacement wear

    PubMed Central

    Abdelgaied, Abdellatif; Brockett, Claire L; Liu, Feng; Jennings, Louise M; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2013-01-01

    The mean average life is increasing; therefore, there is a need to increase the lifetime of the prostheses. To fulfil this requirement, new prosthetic designs and materials are being introduced. Two of the design parameters that may affect wear of total knee replacements, and hence the expected lifetime, are the insert conformity and material. Computational models have been used extensively for wear prediction and optimisation of artificial knee designs. The objective of the present study was to use a previously validated non-dimensional wear coefficient-based computational wear model to investigate the effect of insert conformity and material on the predicted wear in total knee replacements. Four different inserts (curved, lipped, partial flat and custom flat), with different conformity levels, were tested against the same femoral and under two different kinematic inputs (intermediate and high), with different levels of cross-shear. The insert bearing materials were either conventional or moderately cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear predictions were validated against the experimental data from Leeds knee simulation tests. The predicted wear rates for the curved insert (most conformed) were more than three times those for the flat insert (least conformed). In addition, the computationally predicted average volumetric wear rates for moderately cross-linked UHMWPE bearings were less than half of their corresponding conventional UHMWPE bearings. Moreover, the wear of the moderately cross-linked UHMWPE was shown to be less dependent on the degree of cross-shear, compared to conventional UHMWPE. These results along with supporting experimental studies provide insight into the design variables, which may reduce wear in knee replacements. PMID:24297773

  14. The effect of insert conformity and material on total knee replacement wear.

    PubMed

    Abdelgaied, Abdellatif; Brockett, Claire L; Liu, Feng; Jennings, Louise M; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2014-01-01

    The mean average life is increasing; therefore, there is a need to increase the lifetime of the prostheses. To fulfil this requirement, new prosthetic designs and materials are being introduced. Two of the design parameters that may affect wear of total knee replacements, and hence the expected lifetime, are the insert conformity and material. Computational models have been used extensively for wear prediction and optimisation of artificial knee designs. The objective of the present study was to use a previously validated non-dimensional wear coefficient-based computational wear model to investigate the effect of insert conformity and material on the predicted wear in total knee replacements. Four different inserts (curved, lipped, partial flat and custom flat), with different conformity levels, were tested against the same femoral and under two different kinematic inputs (intermediate and high), with different levels of cross-shear. The insert bearing materials were either conventional or moderately cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear predictions were validated against the experimental data from Leeds knee simulation tests. The predicted wear rates for the curved insert (most conformed) were more than three times those for the flat insert (least conformed). In addition, the computationally predicted average volumetric wear rates for moderately cross-linked UHMWPE bearings were less than half of their corresponding conventional UHMWPE bearings. Moreover, the wear of the moderately cross-linked UHMWPE was shown to be less dependent on the degree of cross-shear, compared to conventional UHMWPE. These results along with supporting experimental studies provide insight into the design variables, which may reduce wear in knee replacements.

  15. Wear behaviour of cross-linked polyethylene assessed in vitro under severe conditions.

    PubMed

    Affatato, Saverio; Bersaglia, Gianluca; Rocchi, Mirko; Taddei, Paola; Fagnano, Concezio; Toni, Aldo

    2005-06-01

    The polyethylene (PE) for hip implants presents serious clinical problems; the production of debris may induce adverse tissue reactions that may lead to extensive bone loss around the implant and consequently osteolysis and implant loosening. Several attempts have been made to improve the wear properties of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). More recently the attention of various researchers has been focused on cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), due to its improved wear resistance with respect to conventional UHMWPE. This study was aimed at comparing the wear performances of clinically available acetabular liners (Zimmer Inc.) made of electron beam XLPE and conventional UHMWPE. To evaluate the influence of the material properties on wear, conventional UHMWPE and XLPE acetabular cups were tested against deliberately scratched CoCrMo femoral heads (Ra = 0.12-0.14 microm) in a hip joint wear simulator run for 3 million cycles with bovine calf serum as lubricant. Gravimetric measurements revealed significant differences between the wear behaviours of the two sets of acetabular cups: XLPE exhibited a wear rate about 40 times lower than conventional UHMWPE. Raman spectroscopy coupled to partial least-squares analysis was used to evaluate the possible crystallinity changes induced by mechanical stress (and thus the material wear resistance): only the UHMWPE cup which showed the highest weight loss displayed significant crystallinity changes. These results were correlated to the thickness of the plasticity-induced damage layer. The wear debris produced during the tests were isolated according to a validated protocol and imaged by scanning electron microscopy . The wear particles produced by XLPE were smaller than those produced by UHMWPE; the latter were observed as fibrillar and agglomerated particles. The mean equivalent circle diameter was 0.71 and 0.26 microm for UHMWPE and XLPE, respectively.

  16. Mechanical Properties and Simulated Wear of Provisional Resin Materials.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, T; Barkmeier, W W; Tsujimoto, A; Scheidel, D; Erickson, R L; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine flexural properties and erosive wear behavior of provisional resin materials. Three bis-acryl base provisional resins-1) Protemp Plus (PP), 2) Integrity (IG), 3) Luxatemp Automix Plus (LX)-and a conventional poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) resin, UniFast III (UF), were evaluated. A resin composite, Z100 Restorative (Z1), was included as a benchmark material. Six specimens for each of the four materials were used to determine flexural strength and elastic modulus according to ISO Standard 4049. Twelve specimens for each material were used to examine wear using a generalized wear simulation model. The test materials were each subjected to wear challenges of 25,000, 50,000, 100,000, and 200,000 cycles in a Leinfelder-Suzuki (Alabama) wear simulator. The materials were placed in custom cylinder-shaped stainless-steel fixtures, and wear was generated using a cylindrical-shaped flat-ended stainless-steel antagonist in a slurry of nonplasticized PMMA beads. Wear (mean facet depth [μm] and volume loss [mm(3)]) was determined using a noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2100) with Proscan and AnSur 3D software. The laboratory data were evaluated using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; factors: 1) material and 2) cycles) followed by Tukey HSD post hoc test (α=0.05). The flexural strength ranged from 68.2 to 150.6 MPa, and the elastic modulus ranged from 2.0 to 15.9 GPa. All of the bis-acryl provisional resins (PP, IG, and LX) demonstrated significantly higher values than the PMMA resin (UF) in flexural strength and elastic modulus (p<0.05). However, there was no significant difference (p>0.05) in flexural properties among three bis-acryl base provisional resins (PP, IG, and LX). Z1 demonstrated significantly (p<0.05) higher flexural strength and elastic modulus than the other materials tested. The results for mean facet wear depth (μm) and standard deviations (SD) for 200,000 cycles were as follows: PP, 22.4 (5.0); IG, 51.0 (6

  17. Surface Wear Measurement Using Optical Correlation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acinger, Kresimir

    1983-12-01

    The coherent optical correlation technique was applied for measuring the surface wear of a tappet (part of car engine), worn by friction with the camshaft. It was found that maximum correlation intensity decays exponentially with the number of wear cycles (i.e. camshaft revolutions). Tappets of the same make have an identical rate of correlation decay. Tappets of different makes have different rates of correlation decay which are in agreement with observed long term wear.

  18. Investigation of wear phenomena by microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved in the loss of material from metallic and nonmetallic surfaces are discussed. The results presented indicate how various microscopy techniques used in conjunction with other analytical tools can assist in the elucidation of a wear mechanism. Without question, microscopy is the single most important tool for the study of the wear of surfaces, to assess and address inherent mechanisms of the material removal process.

  19. Dry sliding wear behavior of epoxy composite reinforced with short palmyra fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Somen; Satapathy, Alok

    2016-02-01

    The present work explores the possibility of using palmyra fiber as a replacement for synthetic fiber in conventional polymer composites for application against wear. An attempt has been made in this work to improve the sliding wear resistance of neat epoxy by reinforcing it with short palmyra fibers (SPF). Epoxy composites with different proportions (0, 4, 8 and 12 wt. %) of SPF are fabricated by conventional hand lay-up technique. Dry sliding wear tests are performed on the composite samples using a pin-on-disc test rig as per ASTM G 99-05 standards under various operating parameters. Design of experiment approach based on Taguchi's L16 Orthogonal Arrays is used for the analysis of the wear. This parametric analysis reveals that the SPF content is the most significant factor affecting the wear process followed by the sliding velocity. The sliding wear behavior of these composites under an extensive range of test conditions is predicted by a model based on the artificial neural network (ANN). A well trained ANN has been used to predict the sliding wear response of epoxy based composites over a wide range.

  20. Initial enamel wear of glazed and polished leucite-based porcelains with different fusing temperatures.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa; Saiki, Mitiko; de Campos, Tomie Nakakuki; Adachi, Eduardo Makoto; Shinkai, Rosemary Sadami

    2009-01-01

    This study used the radiotracer method to measure the initial enamel wear caused by low- and high-fusing porcelains after glazing or polishing. It also tested the correlation between enamel wear and porcelain surface roughness (Ra). Surface morphology was assessed by optical microscopy. Cylindrical specimens of three porcelains (two high-fusing, one low-fusing) were either autoglazed or polished. Flattened enamel specimens were irradiated with neutrons and submitted to the wear assay for 2,500 cycles in distilled water using a 285 g load; the released beta 32P particles were measured for 10 minutes. For all samples, Ra was recorded with a profilometer before and after testing. Enamel wear was not significantly different for porcelain or finishing method but there was a trend of interaction between the two variables (p = 0.08). A positive correlation was found between enamel wear and the initial Ra of porcelain (r = 0.71). The glazed surfaces of high-fusing porcelains were wavy and had a greater Ra, while the polished surfaces had grooves and pores prior to wear testing. The low-fusing porcelain demonstrated lower Ra and a more homogeneous surface. All abraded surfaces had similar morphology after the wear assay.

  1. Effect of mouthrinses on microhardness and wear of composite and compomer restoratives.

    PubMed

    Yap, Adrian U J; Tan, Bernard W Y; Tay, L C; Chang, K M; Loy, T K; Mok, Betty Y Y

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of commercially available mouthrinses on the microhardness and wear of composite (Esthet-X, Dentsply) and compomer (Dyract Posterior, Dentsply) restoratives. Fifty-four hardness and 36 wear specimens of each material were fabricated and stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for two weeks. The specimens were then randomly divided into six equal groups and exposed to the following solutions for 24 hours at 37 degrees C: distilled water [WC] (control); Listerine Original [AP] (alcohol-containing essential oil/phenolic compound mouthrinse); Colgate Chloropharm [AC] (alcohol-containing chlorhexidine mouthrinse); Oral B Tooth & Gum Care [AF] (alcohol-containing fluoride mouthrinse); Oral B Tooth & Gum Care Alcohol Free [OF] (alcohol free fluoride mouthrinse) and Oral B Sensitive [PF] (phosphoric acid containing fluoride mouthrinse). After conditioning, the specimens were subjected to hardness testing using a digital microhardness tester (load = 500 gf; dwell time = 15 seconds) and wear testing with a reciprocal compression-sliding system (contact stress = 20 MPa). Wear depth was measured every 1,000 cycles up to 10,000 cycles using profilometry. Data was analyzed using ANOVA/Scheffe's test at significance level 0.05. Dyract was significantly softened by AP, while Esthet-X was significantly softened by AC and AP. The wear resistance of Dyract was significantly reduced after exposure to PF, while the wear resistance of Esthet-X was significantly reduced by AC. The effect of mouthrinses on hardness and wear was material dependent.

  2. A new method to make 2-D wear measurements less sensitive to projection differences of cemented THAs.

    PubMed

    The, Bertram; Flivik, Gunnar; Diercks, Ron L; Verdonschot, Nico

    2008-03-01

    Wear curves from individual patients often show unexplained irregular wear curves or impossible values (negative wear). We postulated errors of two-dimensional wear measurements are mainly the result of radiographic projection differences. We tested a new method that makes two-dimensional wear measurements less sensitive for radiograph projection differences of cemented THAs. The measurement errors that occur when radiographically projecting a three-dimensional THA were modeled. Based on the model, we developed a method to reduce the errors, thus approximating three-dimensional linear wear values, which are less sensitive for projection differences. An error analysis was performed by virtually simulating 144 wear measurements under varying conditions with and without application of the correction: the mean absolute error was reduced from 1.8 mm (range, 0-4.51 mm) to 0.11 mm (range, 0-0.27 mm). For clinical validation, radiostereometric analysis was performed on 47 patients to determine the true wear at 1, 2, and 5 years. Subsequently, wear was measured on conventional radiographs with and without the correction: the overall occurrence of errors greater than 0.2 mm was reduced from 35% to 15%. Wear measurements are less sensitive to differences in two-dimensional projection of the THA when using the correction method.

  3. Tribological Wear Behaviour and Hardness Measurement of SiC, Al2O3 Reinforced Al. Matrix Hybrid Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Senthil Murugan; Vijayan, Jegan; Muthaiah, Velmurugan

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, Aluminium Matrix Hybrid Composite (AMHC) of 6061-T6 alloy reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC) particulate and further addition of aluminium oxide (Al2O3) particulate was fabricated by stir casting process. The wear resistance and frictional properties of that AMHC were studied by performing dry sliding wear test using a pin on disk wear tester. The experiments were conducted at a constant sliding velocity of 1.57 m/s and sliding distance of 1800 m under loading conditions of 10 and 20 N. Further tests were also carried out by keeping Al2O3 percentage (7%) constant and increasing the SiC percentage (10, 15, and 20%). The results show that the reinforcement of the metal matrix with SiC and Al2O3 reduces the wear rate range and also indicate that the wear of the test specimen increases with the increasing load and sliding distance. The coefficient of friction increases with load and increasing volume content of reinforcement. The worn surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscope to study the wear mechanism. By using wear mechanism analysis, the wear surfaces and wear properties of AMHC were determined.

  4. The relationship between fuel lubricity and diesel injection system wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Paul I.

    1992-01-01

    Use of low-lubricity fuel may have contributed to increased failure rates associated with critical fuel injection equipment during the 1991 Operation Desert Storm. However, accurate quantitative analysis of failed components from the field is almost impossible due to the unique service history of each pump. This report details the results of pump stand tests with fuels of equal viscosity, but widely different lubricity. Baseline tests were also performed using reference no. 2 diesel fuel. Use of poor lubricity fuel under these controlled conditions was found to greatly reduce both pump durability and engine performance. However, both improved metallurgy and fuel lubricity additives significantly reduced wear. Good correlation was obtained between standard bench tests and lightly loaded pump components. However, high contact loads on isolated components produced a more severe wear mechanism that is not well reflected by the Ball-on-Cylinder Lubricity Evaluator.

  5. Wear and surface roughness of bovine enamel submitted to bleaching.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Azevedo, Juliana Felippi David E Góes De; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Mondelli, José

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated surface roughness and wear of bovine enamel following three different bleaching techniques and simulated brushing. Initial surface roughness (Ra) was evaluated and teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 10): Group 1, control; Group 2, 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) activated by a hybrid light; Group 3, 35% HP activated by a halogen light; and Group 4, 16% carbamide peroxide. After bleaching, surface roughness was measured and teeth were subjected to 100,000 cycles of simulated brushing. After brushing, the final roughness and wear was determined. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences among groups comparing initial and postbleaching roughness. After brushing, significant differences were found between the control and experimental groups. Group 4 showed a significant increase in roughness values compared with Group 2. The control group showed significantly less wear than other groups. Bleaching techniques promoted increased roughness and wear of bovine enamel, when submitted to simulated brushing. Tooth enamel after bleaching can present a larger alteration in the amount of roughness due to brushing.

  6. Screening of stabilized crosslinked polyethylene using a novel wear tester.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, M; Gonzalez-Mora, V; Chiesa, R; Cigada, A; Stroosnijder, M F

    2002-01-01

    A novel pin-on-disk type wear tester is described allowing a rapid screening of different types of polyethylene under both unidirectional and multidirectional sliding motion. The wear of four polyethylene materials sliding against a roughened CoCrMo alloy was evaluated: a non-irradiated UHMWPE, a UHMWPE irradiated with a dose of 25 kGy in air, and two types of crosslinked UHMWPE (100 kGy, air), which were subjected to a stabilization heat treatment in nitrogen at 155 degrees C for 72 hours (XLPE I) and in water at 130 degrees C for 72 hours (XLPE II), respectively.Under multidirectional sliding conditions both types of XLPE exhibited significantly less wear with respect to the 25 kGy irradiated UHMWPE and the non-irradiated UHMWPE, even under the rough counterface conditions applied. Under unidirectional sliding motion both types of XLPE exhibited the highest wear of all materials tested, because the orientation hardening effect acting under linear lubricated condition is less pronounced for crosslinked polyethylene.

  7. Effect of load on the friction-wear behavior of magnetron sputtered DLC film at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ze, Sun; Dejun, Kong

    2017-01-01

    A DLC (diamond-like carbon) film was deposited on a YT14 cemented carbide cutting tool by using magnetron sputtering. The surface-interfacial morphologies, chemical composition, and phases of the obtained DLC film were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction, respectively. The friction and wear characteristics of the DLC film were investigated under different loads, the distribution of the chemical elements on the worn tracks were analyzed by using a plane scan analysis, and the wear mechanism of the DLC film was also examined. The results showed that the DLC particles were uniformly covered on the substrate with a thickness of about 600 nm, and the diamond peaks at the crystal face of (1 1 1), and (2 2 0) appear at diffraction angles of 44.40, and 75.52°, respectively. The average coefficients of friction of the DLC film under loads of 2, 4, and 6 N were 0.65, 0.65, and 0.49, respectively, and the corresponding wear rates were 0.33  ×  10‑9, 0.26  ×  10‑9, and 0.25  ×  10‑9 mm3 N‑1 s‑1, respectively. Therefore, the film represents outstanding reducing friction and wear resistance. With the increasing wear loads, the atomic fraction of C decreased, while that of O increased; the oxidation reaction occurred in the wear test. The wear mechanisms under a load of 2 N were abrasive wear, adhesive wear and oxidation wear, while that under a load of 4 N were adhesive wear and oxidation wear, and that under the load of 6 N were only oxidation wear.

  8. Effects of potassium titanate fiber on the wear of automotive brake linings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halberstadt, M. L.; Mansfield, J. A.; Rhee, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    Asbestos reinforcing fiber in an automotive friction material was replaced by an experimental ingredient having better thermal stability, and the effects on wear and friction were studied. A friction materials test machine (SAE J661a) was used to determine friction and wear, under constant energy output conditions, as a function of temperature between 121 and 343 C (250 and 650 F). When potassium titanate fiber replaced one half of the asbestos in a standard commercial lining, with a 40 percent upward adjustment of phenolic resin content, wear above 204 C (400 F) was improved by 40% and friction by 30%. Tests on a full-scale inertial dynamometer supported the findings of the sample dynamometer tests. It was demonstrated that the potassium titanate fiber contributes directly to the improvement in wear and friction.

  9. Fault Wear and Friction Evolution: Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneh, Y.; Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Wear is an inevitable product of frictional sliding of brittle rocks as evidenced by the ubiquitous occurrence of fault gouge and slickenside striations. We present here experimental observations designed to demonstrate the relationship between wear and friction and their governing mechanisms. The experiments were conducted with a rotary shear apparatus on solid, ring-shaped rock samples that slipped for displacements up to tens of meters. Stresses, wear and temperature were continuously monitored. We analyzed 86 experiments of Kasota dolomite, Sierra White granite, Pennsylvania quartzite, Karoo gabbro, and Tennessee sandstone at slip velocities ranging from 0.002 to 0.97 m/s, and normal stress from 0.25 to 6.9 MPa. We conducted two types of runs: short slip experiments (slip distance < 25 mm) primarily on fresh, surface-ground samples, designed to analyze initial wear mechanisms; and long slip experiments (slip distance > 3 m) designed to achieve mature wear conditions and to observe the evolution of wear and friction as the fault surfaces evolved. The experiments reveal three wear stages: initial, running-in, and steady-state. The initial stage is characterized by (1) discrete damage striations, the length of which is comparable to total slip , and local pits or plow features; (2) timing and magnitude of fault-normal dilation corresponds to transient changes of normal and shear stresses; and (3) surface roughness increasing with the applied normal stress. We interpret these observations as wear mechanisms of (a) plowing into the fresh rock surfaces; (b) asperity breakage; and (c) asperity climb. The running-in stage is characterized by (1) intense wear-rate over a critical wear distance of Rd = 0.3-2 m; (2) drop of friction coefficient over a weakening distance of Dc = 0.2-4 m; (3) Rd and Dc display positive, quasi-linear relation with each other. We interpret these observations as indicating the organizing of newly-created wear particles into a 'three

  10. Wear of highly crosslinked polyethylene acetabular components

    PubMed Central

    Callary, Stuart A; Solomon, Lucian B; Holubowycz, Oksana T; Campbell, David G; Munn, Zachary; Howie, Donald W

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Wear rates of highly crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) acetabular components have varied considerably between different published studies. This variation is in part due to the different techniques used to measure wear and to the errors inherent in measuring the relatively low amounts of wear in XLPE bearings. We undertook a scoping review of studies that have examined the in vivo wear of XLPE acetabular components using the most sensitive method available, radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Methods A systematic search of the PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane databases was performed to identify published studies in which RSA was used to measure wear of XLPE components in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Results 18 publications examined 12 primary THA cohorts, comprising only 260 THAs at 2–10 years of follow-up. The mean or median proximal wear rate reported ranged from 0.00 to 0.06 mm/year. However, differences in the manner in which wear was determined made it difficult to compare some studies. Furthermore, differences in RSA methodology between studies, such as the use of supine or standing radiographs and the use of beaded or unbeaded reference segments, may limit future meta-analyses examining the effect of patient and implant variables on wear rates. Interpretation This scoping review confirmed the low wear rates of XLPE in THA, as measured by RSA. We make recommendations to enhance the standardization of reporting of RSA wear results, which will facilitate early identification of poorly performing implants and enable a better understanding of the effects of surgical and patient factors on wear. PMID:25301435

  11. Enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns after 6 months of clinical use.

    PubMed

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Rammelsberg, P; Schmitter, M

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia crowns were placed in 20 patients requiring full molar crowns. For measurement of wear, impressions of both jaws were made at baseline after crown cementation and at 6-month follow-up. Mean and maximum wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists and of the two contralateral natural antagonists were measured by the use of plaster replicas and 3D laser scanning methods. Wear differences were investigated by the use of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and by linear regression analysis. Mean vertical loss (maximum vertical loss in parentheses) was 10 (43) μm for the zirconia crowns, 33 (112) μm for the opposing enamel, 10 (58) μm for the contralateral teeth and 10 (46) μm for the contralateral antagonists. Both mean and maximum enamel wear were significantly different between the antagonists of the zirconia crowns and the contralateral antagonists. Gender and activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were identified as possible confounders which significantly affected wear. Under clinical conditions, monolithic zirconia crowns seem to be associated with more wear of opposed enamel than are natural teeth. With regard to wear behaviour, clinical application of monolithic zirconia crowns is justifiable because the amount of antagonistic enamel wear after 6 months is comparable with, or even lower than, that caused by other ceramic materials in previous studies.

  12. Three years in vivo wear: core-ceramic, veneers, and enamel antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F.; Rose, William F.; Barrett, Allyson A.; Oliveira, Erica R.; Yang, Mark C.K.; Clark, Arthur E.; Anusavice, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Test the hypotheses that there are equivalent wear rates for enamel-versus-enamel and ceramic-versus-enamel, analyzing the in vivo wear of crown ceramics, their natural enamel antagonists, and the corresponding two contralateral teeth; and, that bite force does not correlate with the wear. Methods A controlled, clinical trial was conducted involving patients needing full coverage crowns opposing enamel antagonists. Bite forces were measured using a bilateral gnathodynamometer. Single-unit restorations of metal/ceramic (Argedent 62, Argen Corp/IPS d.SIGN veneer); or, core-ceramic/veneer from either, Empress2/Eris, or e.maxPress core/e.maxCeram glaze (ceramics: Ivoclar Vivadent, USA) were randomly assigned, fabricated and cemented. Impressions were made of the ceramic crowns, as well as each maxillary and mandibular quadrant at one week (baseline) and one, two and three years. Resulting models were scanned (3D laser scanner). Maximum wear was calculated by superimposing baseline with annual images. Results There were a total of thirty-six crowns required for thirty-one patients. Each restoration had three associated enamel teeth; 1) crown, 2) antagonist, 3) contralateral, and 4) contralateral-antagonist. SAS PROC MIXED (α=0.05) indicated no statistical significance for mean maximum wear among crown ceramics, enamel antagonists and contralaterals. However, enamel wear was statistically significant in relation to intraoral location (p=0.04) and among years (p<0.02). Analyzed alone, the enamel contralateral-antagonist exhibited significantly greater wear (p<0.001). Considering all wear sites, there was no correlation with bite force (p=0.15). Significance The ceramics and their antagonists exhibited in vivo wear rates within the range of normal enamel. Future studies should examine the wear implications of the contralateral-antagonist enamel. PMID:22410113

  13. Wear resistance of a pressable low-fusing ceramic opposed by dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Faria, Adriana Cláudia Lapria; de Oliveira, André Almeida; Alves Gomes, Erica; Silveira Rodrigues, Renata Cristina; Faria Ribeiro, Ricardo

    2014-04-01

    Dental alloys have increasingly replaced by dental ceramics in dentistry because of aesthetics. As both dental alloys and ceramics can be present in the oral cavity, the evaluation of the wear resistance of ceramics opposed by dental alloys is important. The aim of the present study was to evaluate wear resistance of a pressable low-fusing ceramic opposed by dental alloys as well as the microhardness of the alloys and the possible correlation of wear and antagonist microhardness. Fifteen stylus tips samples of pressable low-fusing ceramic were obtained, polished and glazed. Samples were divided into three groups according to the disk of alloy/metal to be used as antagonist: Nickel-Chromium (Ni-Cr), Cobalt-Chromium (Co-Cr) and commercially pure titanium (cp Ti). Vickers microhardness of antagonist disks was evaluated before wear tests. Then, antagonist disks were sandblasted until surface roughness was adjusted to 0.75μm. Wear tests were performed at a speed of 60 cycles/min and distance of 10mm, in a total of 300,000 cycles. Before and after wear tests, samples were weighted and had their profile designed in an optical comparator to evaluate weight and height loss, respectively. Ni-Cr and cp Ti caused greater wear than Co-Cr, presenting greater weight (p=.009) and height (p=.002) loss. Cp Ti microhardness was lower than Ni-Cr and Co-Cr (p<.05). There is a positive correlation between weight and height loss (p<.05), but weight (p=.204) and height (p=.05) loss are not correlated to microhardness. The results suggest that pressable low-fusing ceramic presents different wear according to the dental alloy used as antagonist and the wear is not affected by antagonist microhardness.

  14. Fretting wear behaviors of a dual-cooled nuclear fuel rod under a simulated rod vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Kang, Heung-Seok; Yoon, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Kang-Hee

    2012-06-06

    Recently, a dual-cooled fuel (i.e., annular fuel) that is compatible with current operating PWR plants has been proposed in order to realize both a considerable amount of power uprating and an increase of safety margins. As the design concept should be compatible with current operating PWR plants, however, it shows a narrow gap between the fuel rods when compared with current solid nuclear fuel arrays and needs to modify the spacer grid shapes and their positions. In this study, fretting wear tests have been performed to evaluate the wear resistance of a dual-cooled fuel by using a proposed spring and dimple of spacer grids that have a cantilever type and hemispherical shape, respectively. As a result, the wear volume of the spring specimen gradually increases as the contact condition is changed from a certain gap, just contact to positive force. However, in the dimple specimen, just contact condition shows a large wear volume. In addition, a circular rod motion at upper region of contact surface is gradually increased and its diametric size depends on the wear depth increase. Based on the test results, the fretting wear resistance of the proposed spring and dimple is analyzed by comparing the wear measurement results and rod motion in detail.

  15. Effect of periwinkles shell particle size on the wear behavior of asbestos free brake pad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaren, S. G.; Yawas, D. S.; Aku, S. Y.

    The effect of periwinkle shell particle size on the wear behavior of asbestos free brake pad has been investigated. The asbestos free brake pad produced by varying the periwinkle shell particles was from +125 to +710 μm with phenolic resin as the binder. The wear test was performed using pin on disk machine by varying the sliding speed, applied load, temperatures and periwinkle shell particle size. Full factorial design of four factor-two levels and analysis of variance were used in the study of the wear test. The results shown that wear rate increases with increasing the sliding speed, load, temperatures and periwinkle particle size. The co-efficient of friction obtained is within the recommended standard for automobile brake pad. The +125 μm particles of periwinkles gave the best wear resistance. Factorial design of the experiment can be successfully employed to describe the wear behavior of the samples and developed linear equation for predicting wear rate within selected experimental conditions. The results of this research indicate that periwinkle shell particles can be effectively used as a replacement for asbestos in brake pad manufacture.

  16. Wear properties of a novel resin composite compared to human enamel and other restorative materials.

    PubMed

    D'Arcangelo, C; Vanini, L; Rondoni, G D; Pirani, M; Vadini, M; Gattone, M; De Angelis, F

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the two-body wear resistance of human enamel, a pressable glass-ceramic (Imagine PressX), a type 3 gold alloy (Aurocast8), three resins composites currently available on the market (Enamel plus HRi, Filtek Supreme XTE, Ceram.X duo), and one recently introduced resin composite (Enamel plus HRi-Function). Resin composites were tested after simple light curing and after a further heat polymerization cycle. Ten cylindrical specimens (7 mm in diameter) were manufactured with each dental material according to standard laboratory procedures. Ten flat enamel specimens were obtained from freshly extracted human molars and included in the control group. All samples were subjected to a two-body wear test in a dual-axis chewing simulator over up to 120,000 loading cycles, against yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal cusps. Wear resistance was analyzed by measuring the vertical substance loss (mm) and the volume loss (mm(3)). Antagonist wear (mm) was also recorded. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (wear depth and volume loss) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA on ranks (antagonist wear). Heat-cured HRi function and Aurocast8 showed similar mean values for wear depth and volumetric loss, and their results did not statistically differ in comparison with the human enamel.

  17. Quantification of the effect of cross-shear and applied nominal contact pressure on the wear of moderately cross-linked polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Abdelgaied, Abdellatif; Brockett, Claire L; Liu, Feng; Jennings, Louise M; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2013-01-01

    Polyethylene wear is a great concern in total joint replacement. It is now considered a major limiting factor to the long life of such prostheses. Cross-linking has been introduced to reduce the wear of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Computational models have been used extensively for wear prediction and optimization of artificial knee designs. However, in order to be independent and have general applicability and predictability, computational wear models should be based on inputs from independent experimentally determined wear parameters (wear factors or wear coefficients). The objective of this study was to investigate moderately cross-linked UHMWPE, using a multidirectional pin-on-plate wear test machine, under a wide range of applied nominal contact pressure (from 1 to 11 MPa) and under five different kinematic inputs, varying from a purely linear track to a maximum rotation of +/- 55 degrees. A computational model, based on a direct simulation of the multidirectional pin-on-plate wear tester, was developed to quantify the degree of cross-shear (CS) of the polyethylene pins articulating against the metallic plates. The moderately cross-linked UHMWPE showed wear factors less than half of that reported in the literature for, the conventional UHMWPE, under the same loading and kinematic inputs. In addition, under high applied nominal contact stress, the moderately crosslinked UHMWPE wear showed lower dependence on the degree of CS compared to that under low applied nominal contact stress. The calculated wear coefficients were found to be independent of the applied nominal contact stress, in contrast to the wear factors that were shown to be highly pressure dependent. This study provided independent wear data for inputs into computational models for moderately cross-linked polyethylene and supported the application of wear coefficient-based computational wear models.

  18. Dynamic and kinematic effects in the friction and wear of rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerrard, David Peter

    Research is presented which focuses on the micro-mechanical processes that dominate the friction and wear of rubber. New test concepts and equipment were developed to study the dynamic and kinematic effects involved in these processes. Several new analytical tools were presented to explain the observed results in quantifiable terms. Experiments conducted on filled NR confirmed that a transition in wear behavior does not occur across a wide range of power inputs. Examination of the debris distributions across the contact revealed that an agglomeration process of intrinsic particles occurs, the extent of which is purely a function of distance from the contact's leading edge. This revelation is used to explain the commonly reported bimodal size distribution of debris generated during rubber wear and to expose the mechanical process that generates intrinsic debris as the primary cause of wear. The effect of contact length (i.e. extent of agglomeration) on corresponding friction and wear levels was studied. The effects of dynamically changing slip orientation on the properties of a coated abrasive and the friction and wear of a filled SBR were studied. The process of removal of intrinsic debris from a rubber surface was described in terms of a micro-mechanical fatigue fracture process that occurs at varying rates that are dependent on the frictional work acting on the average intrinsic nodule. The model was successfully tested against previously published data and new data and was shown to account for pressure and abrasive effects with one set of two constants. The potential effects of pattern morphologies on rubber friction and wear were examined as well. The wear patterns showed a clear tendency to roll up as opposed to peeling back. The intrinsic wear model was then applied to a description of pattern wear by assuming that the rate of intrinsic abrasion across a pattern is simply a function of the local pressure distribution which varies from the front to the back

  19. Can physical joint simulators be used to anticipate clinical wear problems of new joint replacement implants prior to market release?

    PubMed

    Medley, John B

    2016-05-01

    One of the most important mandates of physical joint simulators is to provide test results that allow the implant manufacturer to anticipate and perhaps avoid clinical wear problems with their new products. This is best done before market release. This study gives four steps to follow in conducting such wear simulator testing. Two major examples involving hip wear simulators are discussed in which attempts had been made to predict clinical wear performance prior to market release. The second one, involving the DePuy ASR implant systems, is chosen for more extensive treatment by making it an illustrative example to explore whether wear simulator testing can anticipate clinical wear problems. It is concluded that hip wear simulator testing did provide data in the academic literature that indicated some risk of clinical wear problems prior to market release of the ASR implant systems. This supports the idea that physical joint simulators have an important role in the pre-market testing of new joint replacement implants.

  20. The hardness, adhesion, and wear resistance of coatings developed for cobalt-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.; Wilson, W.L.

    2000-05-01

    One potential approach for reducing the level of nuclear plant radiation exposure that results from activated cobalt wear debris is the use of a wear resistant coating. However, large differences in stiffness between a coating/substrate can result in high interfacial stresses that produce coating de-adhesion when a coated substrate is subjected to high stress wear contact. Scratch adhesion and indentation tests have been used to identify four promising coating processes [1,2]: (1) the use of a thin Cr-nitride coating with a hard and less-stiff interlayer, (2) the use of a thick, multilayered Cr-nitride coating with graded layers, (3) use of the duplex approach, or nitriding to harden the material subsurface followed by application of a multilayered Cr-nitride coating, and (4) application of nitriding alone. The processing, characterization, and adhesion of these coating systems are discussed. The wear resistance and performance has been evaluated using laboratory pin-on-disc, 4-ball, and high stress rolling contact tests. Based on the results of these tests, the best coating candidate from the high-stress rolling contact wear test was the thin duplex coating, which consists of ion nitriding followed deposition of a thin Cr-nitride coating, while the thin Cr-nitride coating exhibited the best results in the 4-ball wear test.

  1. Studies of the Nature of Wear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-28

    hemispherical particles. Investigations using Ferrography have shown that most sliding wear is caused by the exfoliation or flaking off of the Beilby...parts as gear teeth and ball bearing balls and races. Such particles are not always generated as a result of the wear of hard steels and the

  2. Improved wear resistance by phase transformation of surface nanocrystalline 1090 steel prepared by sandblasting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Rong; Fu, Licai; Zhou, Lingping

    2016-12-01

    A surface nanocrystalline 1090 steel has been fabricated by using sandblasting technique. The surface average grain size was about 78 nm. The high strain rate and strain in sandblasting were main reasons for surface nanocrystallization. The wear resistance of 1090 steel was considerably enhanced as grain size decreased. The microstructure and hardness of contact zones before and after wear tests have been examined by XRD, SEM and TEM. Except the higher hardness, the results demonstrated that parts of ferrite transferred to cementite and martensite. It was additional beneficial for improving the wear resistance of 1090 steel as the grain size decreased.

  3. Characterization of Wear Particles Generated from CoCrMo Alloy under Sliding Wear Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pourzal, R.; Catelas, I.; Theissmann, R.; Kaddick, C.; Fischer, A.

    2011-01-01

    Biological effects of wear products (particles and metal ions) generated by metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements made of CoCrMo alloy remain a major cause of concern. Periprosthetic osteolysis, potential hypersensitivity response and pseudotumour formation are possible reactions that can lead to early revisions. To accurately analyse the biological response to wear particles from MoM implants, the exact nature of these particles needs to be characterized. Most previous studies used energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis for characterization. The present study used energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction pattern analysis to allow for a more precise determination of the chemical composition and to gain knowledge of the crystalline structure of the wear particles. Particles were retrieved from two different test rigs: a reciprocating sliding wear tribometer (CoCrMo cylinder vs. bar) and a hip simulator according to ISO 14242-1 (CoCrMo head vs. CoCrMo cup). All tests were conducted in bovine serum. Particles were retrieved from the test medium using a previously published enzymatic digestion protocol. Particles isolated from tribometer samples had a size of 100 – 500 nm. Diffraction pattern analysis clearly revealed the lattice structure of strain induced hcp ε-martensite. Hip simulator samples revealed numerous particles of 15 – 30 nm and 30 – 80 nm size. Most of the larger particles appeared to be only partially oxidized and exhibited cobalt locally. The smallest particles were Cr2O3 with no trace of cobalt. It optically appeared that these Cr2O3 particles were flaking off the surface of larger particles that depicted a very high intensity of oxygen, as well as chromium, and only background noise of cobalt. The particle size difference between the two test rigs is likely related to the conditions of the two tribosystems, in particular the difference in the sample geometry and in the type of sliding

  4. Modeling wear of cast Ti alloys.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kwai S; Koike, Marie; Okabe, Toru

    2007-05-01

    The wear behavior of Ti-based alloys was analyzed by considering the elastic-plastic fracture of individual alloys in response to the relevant contact stress field. Using the contact stresses as the process driving force, wear was computed as the wear rate or volume loss as a function of hardness and tensile ductility for Ti-based cast alloys containing an alpha, alpha+beta or beta microstructure with or without the intermetallic precipitates. Model predictions indicated that wear of Ti alloys increases with increasing hardness but with decreasing fracture toughness or tensile ductility. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data to elucidate the roles of microstructure in wear and contrasted against those in grindability.

  5. Biologically Based Restorative Management of Tooth Wear

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Martin G. D.; Bomfim, Deborah I.; Austin, Rupert S.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of tooth wear is increasing in industrialised nations. Yet, there is no high-level evidence to support or refute any therapeutic intervention. In the absence of such evidence, many currently prevailing management strategies for tooth wear may be failing in their duty of care to first and foremost improve the oral health of patients with this disease. This paper promotes biologically sound approaches to the management of tooth wear on the basis of current best evidence of the aetiology and clinical features of this disease. The relative risks and benefits of the varying approaches to managing tooth wear are discussed with reference to long-term follow-up studies. Using reference to ethical standards such as “The Daughter Test”, this paper presents case reports of patients with moderate-to-severe levels of tooth wear managed in line with these biologically sound principles. PMID:22315608

  6. Modeling wear of cast Ti alloys

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kwai S.; Koike, Marie; Okabe, Toru

    2007-01-01

    The wear behavior of Ti-based alloys was analyzed by considering the elastic–plastic fracture of individual alloys in response to the relevant contact stress field. Using the contact stresses as the process driving force, wear was computed as the wear rate or volume loss as a function of hardness and tensile ductility for Ti-based cast alloys containing an α, α+β or β microstructure with or without the intermetallic precipitates. Model predictions indicated that wear of Ti alloys increases with increasing hardness but with decreasing fracture toughness or tensile ductility. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data to elucidate the roles of microstructure in wear and contrasted against those in grindability. PMID:17224314

  7. Friction, wear, transfer, and wear surface morphology of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Tribological studies at 25 C in a 50-percent-relative-humidity air atmosphere were conducted using hemispherically tipped 440 C HT (high temperature) stainless steel pins sliding against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disks. The results indicate that sliding speed, sliding distance, contact stress and specimen geometry can markedly affect friction, UHMWPE wear, UHMWPE transfer and the type of wear mechanisms that occur. Adhesion appears to be the predominant wear mechanism; but after long sliding distances at slow speeds, heavy ridges of transfer result which can induce fatigue-like wear on the UHMWPE disk wear track. In one instance, abrasive wear to the metallic pin was observed. This was caused by a hard particle embedded in the UHMWPE disk wear track.

  8. Friction, wear, transfer and wear surface morphology of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Tribological studies at 25 C in a 50-percent-relative-humidity air atmosphere were conducted using hemispherically tipped 440 C HT (high temperature) stainless steel pins sliding against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disks. The results indicate that sliding speed, sliding distance, contact stress and specimen geometry can markedly affect friction, UHMWPE wear, UHMWPE transfer and the type of wear mechanisms that occur. Adhesion appears to be the predominant wear mechanism; but after long sliding distances at slow speeds, heavy ridges of transfer result which can induce fatigue-like wear on the UHMWPE disk wear track. In one instance, abrasive wear to the metallic pin was observed. This was caused by a hard particle embedded in the UHMWPE disk wear track.

  9. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets. [friction and wear experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined, and etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the tungsten carbide (WC) and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation, and the wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation, and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  10. Wear-resistant ball bearings for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boving, H.; Hintermann, H. E.; Hanni, W.; Bondivenne, E.; Boeto, M.; Conde, E.

    1977-01-01

    Ball bearings consisting of steel parts of which the rings are coated with hard, wear resistant, chemical vapor deposited TiC are described. Experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum, using cages of various materials with self-lubricating properties, show that such bearings are suitable for space applications. The results of laboratory tests on the ESA Meteosat Radiometer Focalizing mechanism, which contains six coated bearings, are summarized.

  11. Wear Debris Analysis of Grease-Lubricated Spur Gear.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-30

    I& SUPPLEMGNTARY MOTES Gear testing performed by SKF Technology Services, SKF Industties, King of Prussia, PA. Is. KEY WORDS (CauM.. an rverm...Ifilal p s of an investigation of the wear de- bris generation characteristics of g8ease-lubricated mechanical components. SKF Technology Services...conducted at the Naval Air Engin- eering Center’s (NAVAIRENGCEN’s) Tribology Laboratory, in conjunction with SKF 1Technology Services, in a combined

  12. Effects of gender and body adiposity on physiological responses to physical work while wearing body armor.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Richard; Deuster, Patricia A; Talbot, Laura A

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of gender and body adiposity on physiological responses to the stress of wearing body armor. Using a within-subject, repeated-measures design, 37 military personnel volunteered to undergo two experimental conditions, with body armor and without body armor. Female and male subjects with body armor, compared to those without body armor, had no significant differences in percentage increases in aerobic capacity, heart rate, or respiratory rate while walking at slow or moderate pace. However, women, as compared to men, had a significantly increased difference in the rating of perceived physical exertion between wearing and not wearing body armor at a slow pace. Fourteen subjects were not able to complete treadmill testing while wearing body armor because of volitional fatigue and/or limiting dyspnea. Body fat was the best single predictor of treadmill test completion.

  13. Influence of the microstructure of ceramic materials on their wear behavior in mechanical seals

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, R.

    1994-10-01

    Ceramic materials such as aluminium oxide and silicon carbide are regularly used as one of the counterfaces to oppose carbon graphite in a mechanical seal. Under nominally identical test conditions, the same carbon graphite face can show high wear rates against a material from one supplier but a significantly lower wear rate on a similar material from another. The general descriptions of aluminium oxide and silicon carbide can cover significant differences in properties between materials from various suppliers. Ceramic counterfaces from several manufacturers have been examined, after testing under similar conditions, in order to understand the microstructural factors that influence the wear of the carbon graphite and hence the lift of the mechanical seal. There is evidence to suggest that the wear resistance of the system depends on the grain size distribution, the integrity of the grain bonding and the presence of additional phases. 13 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Effect Of Temperature Variation On Wear Behaviour Of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alias, S. K.; Ahmad, S.; Abdullah, B.; Pahroraji, H. F.; Hamami, G.

    2016-11-01

    The effects of boronizing temperatures on the wear and hardness properties of austenitic stainless steel were investigated in this study. The samples were prepared in accordance to standard samples preparation for wear and hardness test. Pack boronizing were conducted using EKabor®1 powder medium at two different temperatures which are 850°C and 950°C. The wear resistance properties were evaluated though pin on disk test and the surface characterization was analyzed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), observation. Vickers microhardness tester was performed to obtain the hardness of the samples. The results indicated that there are presences of FeB and Fe2B phases on both samples, but thicker FeB phase was produced at Po-950 samples. This resulted in reduction of abrasion wear properties but major improvement of the hardness properties of boronized stainless steel.

  15. A multi-directional wear screening device and preliminary results of UHMWPE articulating against stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Joyce, T J; Monk, D; Scholes, S C; Unsworth, A

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a pin on plate rig which has been modified to give multi-directional motion to the test pins, resulting in elliptical and quasi-elliptical wear paths. Such paths are closer to those seen in vivo by a femoral head articulating against an acetabular cup. The description of the rig is augmented by the results of a test of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene pins rubbing against stainless steel plates. with dilute bovine serum at 37 degrees C being used as the lubricant. With standard reciprocating motion, a mean wear factor of 0.085 x 10(-6) mm3/N m was found, but with multi-directional motion, the mean wear factor increased to 1.10 x 10(-6) mm3/N m, which is very similar to in vivo wear factors.

  16. An Investigation of Abrasive Wear Behaviour of Al 2014-SiC Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çalin, Recep; Cilasun, Niyazi Selçuk

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the effects of SiC reinforcement volume fractions on hardness, porosity and abrasive wear behaviour were examined in Al 2014-SiC (<92.3 μm) reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) of 3%, 6% and 12% reinforcement-volume (R-V) ratios produced by melt-stirring. Abrasive wear tests were carried out by 320 mesh Al2O3 abrasive paper and a pin-on-disc wear test apparatus, under 10N, 20N and 30N load, and at 0.2 ms-1 sliding speed. The same specimens were tested by 150, 240 and 320 mesh abrasive paper at 0.2 ms-1 sliding speed, under 10N, 20N and 30N load. After the tests, the microstructures of the worn surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies and EDS analyses. Besides, the amount of hardness and porosity of the specimens were identified. It was recorded that the amounts of hardness and porosity increases as the SiC reinforcement in the composite increases. The highest amount of abrasive wear was recorded in the specimens with 3% reinforcements. It was identified that the amount of abrasive wear decreases while the SiC reinforcement in the composite structure increases by volume, and that the amount of porosity and reinforcement volume (R-V) ratio are important parameters in abrasive wear.

  17. Friction and wear behavior of short fiber-reinforced poly(amide-imide) composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Youn, J.R. )

    1992-06-01

    Tribological behavior of short fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Short carbon fiber and glass fiber reinforced poly(amide-imide) composites were tested. Titanium oxide powder-filled composite was also tested for comparison with the fiber composites. Block-on-ring type wear testing was performed for 24 h at three different sliding conditions. Frictional force was measured and stored by a data acquisition system and wear was measured as weight loss after the test. Wear tracks on the specimen and the counterface were examined with an optical microscope to observe fiber damage and formation of wear film. The equivalent stress distribution around each fiber at the sliding surface was calculated by employing a finite element program. The lowest friction and wear was obtained for the carbon fiber composite, the highest friction for the glass fiber composite, and the highest wear for TiO2-filled one. It was observed that the glass fibers are damaged and removed from the surface more easily than the carbon fibers, and the finite element analysis also suggests easier debonding of glass fibers. 23 refs.

  18. Using a surrogate contact pair to evaluate polyethylene wear in prosthetic knee joints.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Anthony P; Lockard, Carly A; Weisenburger, Joel N; Haider, Hani; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2016-01-01

    With recent improvements to the properties of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) used in joint replacements, prosthetic knee and hip longevity may extend beyond two decades. However, it is difficult and costly to replicate such a long in vivo lifetime using clinically relevant in vitro wear testing approaches such as walking gait joint simulators. We advance a wear test intermediate in complexity between pin-on-disk and knee joint simulator tests. The test uses a surrogate contact pair, consisting of a surrogate femoral and tibial specimen that replicate the contact mechanics of any full-scale knee condyle contact pair. The method is implemented in a standard multi-directional pin-on-disk wear test machine, and we demonstrate its application via a two-million-cycle wear test of three different UHMWPE formulations. Further, we demonstrate the use of digital photography and image processing to accurately quantify fatigue damage based on the reduced transmission of light through a damage area in a UHMWPE specimen. The surrogate contact pairs replicate the knee condyle contact areas within -3% to +12%. The gravimetric wear test results reflect the dose of crosslinking radiation applied to the UHMWPE: 35 kGy yielded a wear rate of 7.4 mg/Mcycles, 55 kGy yielded 1.0 mg/Mcycles, and 75 kGy (applied to a 0.1% vitamin E stabilized UHMWPE) yielded 1.5 mg/Mcycles. A precursor to spalling fatigue is observed and precisely measured in the radiation-sterilized (35 kGy) and aged UHMWPE specimen. The presented techniques can be used to evaluate the high-cycle fatigue performance of arbitrary knee condyle contact pairs under design-specific contact stresses, using existing wear test machines. This makes the techniques more economical and well-suited to standardized comparative testing.

  19. The Effect of Carbides Precipitation on the Sliding Wear Characteristics According to Heat Treatment Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Chang-Min; Choi, Gye-Won; Kim, Kyung-Ryul; Han, Moon-Sik

    This study investigated the effect of carbide precipitation hardening of heat-treated SK5M steel on the sliding wear resistance. The cold rolled carbon steel strip samples (J, G, and S-type) were oil quenched after tempering for optimal durations. The wear resistance was evaluated using a pin-on-disk wear test with an alumina counterface against different samples at various loads and distances with a constant running speed. The size and distribution of the precipitated carbides were observed using an image analyzer at various heat treatments. The heat-treated samples presented more dense carbide distribution in an area fraction and the decreased size of carbides. It is confirmed that the wear rate is minimum at an optimized austenitizing temperature of around 800°C. The specific wear rate indicates that the S-type sample has high wear resistance compared to that of J-Type. This is understood by stable wear behavior of S-type sample containing evenly distributed carbide precipitation.

  20. The Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of HVOF-Sprayed WC: Metal Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Liam P.; Pilkington, Antony

    2014-09-01

    WC-based cermet coatings containing various metallic binders such as Ni, Co, and Cr are known for their superior tribological properties, particularly abrasion resistance and enhanced surface hardness. Consequently, these systems are considered as replacements for traditional hard chrome coatings in critical aircraft components such as landing gear. The purpose of this investigation was to conduct a comparative study on the dry sliding wear behavior of three WC-based cermet coatings (WC-12Ni, WC-20Cr2C3-7Ni, and WC-10Co-4Cr), when deposited on carbon steel substrates. Ball on disk wear tests were performed on the coatings using a CSEM Tribometer (pin-on-disk) with a 6-mm ruby ball at 20 N applied load, 0.2 m/s sliding velocity, and sliding distances up to 2000 m. Analysis of both the coating wear track and worn ruby ball was performed using optical microscopy and an Alphastep-250 profilometer. The results of the study revealed both wear of the ruby ball and coated disks allowed for a comparison of both the ball wear and coating wear for the systems considered. Generally, the use of Co and Cr as a binder significantly improved the sliding wear resistance of the coating compared to Ni and/or Cr2C3.

  1. Friction and wear performance of bearing ball sliding against diamond-like carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shenjiang; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Kar, Satyananda; Li, Dangjuan; Su, Junhong

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the tribological properties of bearing steel ball (Japan standard, SUJ2) sliding against tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) coatings and amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) coatings. The reciprocating sliding testes are performed with ball-on-plate friction tester in ambient air condition. Analysis of friction coefficient, wear volume and microstructure in wear scar are carried out using optical microscopy, atom force morphology (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results show the SUJ2 on ta-C coating has low friction coefficient (around 0.15) but high wear loss. In contrast, the low wear loss of SUJ2 on a-C:H coating with high (around 0.4) and unsteady friction coefficient. Some Fe2O3, FeO and graphitization have been found on the wear scar of SUJ2 sliding against ta-C coating. Nearly no oxide materials exist on the wear scar of SUJ2 against a-C:H coating. The mechanism and hypothesis of the wear behavior have been investigated according to the measurement results. This study will contribute to proper selection and understand the tribological performance of bearing steels against DLC coatings.

  2. A Fractional Factorial Design Study of Reciprocating Wear Behavior of Al-Si-SiCp Composites at Lubricated Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, V. R.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Jain, S. C.

    2011-04-01

    The lubricated reciprocating wear behavior of two composites A319/15%SiCp and A390/15%SiCp produced by the liquid metallurgy route was investigated by means of an indigenously developed reciprocating friction wear test rig using a fractional factorial-design approach. The main purpose was to study the influence of wear and friction test parameters such as applied load, sliding distance, reciprocating velocity, counter surface temperature and silicon content in composites, as well as their interactions on the wear and friction characteristics of these composites. Two output responses (wear loss and coefficient of friction) were measured. The input parameter levels were fixed through pilot experiment conducted in the newly developed reciprocating friction and wear test rig. The counter surface material used for the wear study was cast iron having Vickers hardness of 244 HVN. It had been demonstrated through established equations that A390/15%SiCp composite is subjected to low wear compared to the A319/15%SiCp composite. The experimental results indicate that the proposed mathematical models suggested could adequately describe the performance indicators within the limits of the factors that are being investigated. The applied load, sliding distance, reciprocating velocity, counter surface temperature, and silicon content in composite are the five important factors controlling the friction and wear characteristics of the composite in lubricated condition. Moreover, the two factor interactions have a strong effect on the wear of composites. The results give a comprehensive insight into the wear of the composites.

  3. Wear behavior of Al-Si alloy based metal matrix composite reinforced with TiB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, J. K.; Sahoo, S. K.; Sutar, H.; Sarangi, B.

    2017-02-01

    Al-Si alloy based composites are widely used in automotive, aerospace and for structural application due to improved strength to weight ratio, low density, and better wear resistance. In the present work, Al-xSi-5TiB2 (x=7, 11, 12.6) in-situ composite was synthesized successfully by stir casting method. Here the composites were prepared by the exothermic reaction of K2TiF6 and KBF4 salts with the molten Al-x Si alloy. The dry sliding wear behavior of Al-Si matrix composites reinforced with 5 % TiB2 was studied using a pin-on-disc wear testing machine to study the effect of % Si, load (10, 20, 30 N), sliding speed (1.36, 1.82, 2.27 m.s-1) and sliding distance on stir cast Al–xSi-5TiB2 composites. The Al-Si alloy and the reinforcement mixers were confirmed by the X-ray Diffraction analysis. The microstructure of Al-xSi-5TiB2 composite was investigated by using Optical Microscope to determine the phases present in the prepared composites. The prepared AMC composites were tested for hardness using Vickers Hardness tester with the variation of Si. Wear rate (mm3/m), Wear resistance (m/mm3), Specific Wear rate (m3/N.m) and were analyzed with various conditions. The worn surfaces of the specimens were analyzed before and after wear testing by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to determine the governing wear mechanisms in the composites. Wear rate and specific wear rate decreases at all the operating condition with increase in wt% Si. Wear resistance all most increases with increase in wt% Si. Hardness values are increased with increase in amount of Si.

  4. Wear in carbon fiber-reinforced polyethylene (poly-two) knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Busanelli, L; Squarzoni, S; Brizio, L; Tigani, D; Sudanese, A

    1996-01-01

    The authors report a case of massive wear of carbon fiber-reinforced polyethylene used as an insert in a knee prosthesis. The finding, which was studied under a scanning electron microscope, in agreement with mechanical resistance and laboratory testing reported in the literature, confirms that this composite material (poly-two) is not more advantageous to use that ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene in terms of wear, despite favorable experimental premises.

  5. Improved Submariner Eyewear for Routine Wear and Emergency Equipment Use Underway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-15

    participants’ eyeglass prescription. The new test eyewear was delivered to the subjects just prior to underway. Participants received two pairs of...to wear, but my own eyeglasses work better for me. • I felt that overall the wired frames were well suited to boat use, though I would change a...EAB) mask 1.0 SUBJECT Request for Information (RFI) for eyewear designed to provide prescription eyeglasses that are compatible when wearing an

  6. Effect of Experimental Variables of Abrasive Wear on 3D Surface Roughness and Wear Rate of Al-4.5 % Cu Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Mallik, Manab; Mandal, Nilrudra; Dutta, Samik; Roy, Himadri; Lohar, Aditya Kumar

    2017-04-01

    This investigation was primarily carried out to examine the abrasive wear behavior of as cast Al-4.5 % Cu alloy. Wear tests have been carried out using an abrasive wear machine with emery paper embedded with SiC particles acting as abrasive medium. The experiments were planned using central composite design, with, load, cycle and grit size as input variables, whereas wear rate and 3D roughness were considered as output variable. Analysis of variance was applied to check the adequacy of the mathematical model and their respective parameters. Microstructural investigations of the worn surfaces have been carried out to explain the observed results and to understand the wear micro-mechanisms as per the planned experiments. Desirability function optimization technique was finally employed to optimize the controlling factors. The observed results revealed that, grit size plays a significant role in the variation of wear rate and 3D roughness as compared to load and cycles. Based on the significance of interactions, the regression equations were derived and verified further with a number of confirmation runs to assess the adequacy of the model. A close agreement (±10 %) between the predicted and experimentally measured results was obtained from this investigation.

  7. A Multidirectional Tribo-System: Wear of UHMWPE under Sliding, Rolling, and Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patten, Elias Wolfgang

    Total knee replacements (TKR) have become a successful surgical procedure for addressing end-stage osteoarthritis, with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and cobalt chrome alloy (UHMWPE/Co-Cr) serving as the bearing materials of choice for decades. However, more than 10% of TKRs fail and require revision surgery. The predominant challenge with UHMWPE is the particulate debris generated through wear-mediated processes; wear debris from the UHMWPE tibial bearing surface leading to loosening is still the main cause for post-fifth-year revisions. UHMWPE wear in hip arthroplasty has been linked to microstructural evolution at the surface from multidirectional sliding in the hip joint but little is known about how the microstructure responds to clinically relevant sliding conditions in the knee. This is likely because wear tests are typically performed under basic motion parameters with simplified geometry (pin-on-disk tests) while the knee has more complex kinematics: it is neither a ball-and-socket joint nor a simple hinge joint, but has 2D sliding, rolling/slip motion, and rotation. There is also disagreement over how to best quantify cross-shear and how to model how much wear it will cause. A custom multidirectional tribo-system was used to investigate the individual and combined effects of the different motions in TKR: 2D sliding, rolling, and rotation, for a total of eight separate kinematic conditions. The trends in wear rates and wear factors for these different motions were compared with many different definitions for magnitudes and ratios of cross-shear. Additionally, the wear surfaces were examined for wear mechanism and the microstructural changes in lamellae orientation for the different motions were analyzed. To mimic the tribological conditions of a condyle in a TKR, polished Co-Cr spheres were articulated against flat, smooth UHMWPE disks with physiologically relevant loading, speed, and lubrication conditions. The motion parameters were selected

  8. Effect of SiC and Graphite Particulates Addition on Wear Behaviour of Al2219 Alloy Hybrid Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaral, Madeva; Shivananda, B. K.; Jayachandran; Auradi, V.; Kori, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    In this investigation wear behaviour of A12219 alloy reinforced with SiC and graphite particulates were studied. The percentage of silicon carbide and graphite as reinforcements were varied from 2 wt.% to 4 wt.% in steps of 2. Energy dispersive spectroscopy and scanning electron microphotographs were used to confirm the presence of SiC and graphite particulates and its uniform distribution over the aluminum matrix. Wear behaviour of aluminum alloy Al2219 reinforced with silicon carbide and graphite fabricated by stir casting process was investigated. The wear properties of the metal matrix composites were studied by performing dry sliding wear test using a pin-on-disc wear tester. The experiments were conducted at a constant sliding velocity of 1.73m/s over a load of 2kg. The results showed that the wear resistance of Al2219-2%SiC-2% graphite and Al2219-4%SiC-4% graphite composites were better than the unreinforced alloy. The wear in terms of weight loss and wear rate was found to decrease with the increasing the weigh percentages of SiC and graphite. To study the dominant sliding wear mechanism worn surfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy.

  9. FIBROUS MONOLITH WEAR RESISTANT COMPONENTS FOR THE MINING INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Fulcher; Kenneth L. Knittel

    2004-06-08

    The work performed on this program was to develop wear resistant, tough FM composite materials with efforts focused on WC-Co based FM systems. The materials were developed for use in mining industry wear applications. Components of interest were drill bit inserts for drilling blast holes. Other component applications investigated included wear plates for a variety of equipment such as pit shovels, wear surfaces for conveyors, milling media for ball milling operations, hydrocyclone cones, grader blades and dozer teeth. Cross-cutting technologies investigated included hot metal extrusion dies, drill bits for circuit board fabrication, cutting tools for cast iron and aluminum machining. An important part of the work was identification of the standard materials used in drilling applications. A materials trade study to determine those metals and ceramics used for mining applications provided guidance for the most important materials to be investigated. WC-Co and diamond combinations were shown to have the most desirable properties. Other considerations such as fabrication technique and the ability to consolidate shifted the focus away from diamond materials and toward WC-Co. Cooperating partners such as Kennametal and Kyocera assisted with supplies, evaluations of material systems, fabricated parts and suggestions for cross-cutting technology applications for FM architectures. Kennametal provided the raw materials (WC-Co and Al-TiCN powders) for the extent of the material evaluations. Kyocera shared their research into various FM systems and provided laboratory testing of fabricated materials. Field testing provided by partners Superior Rock Bit and Brady Mining and Construction provided insight into the performance of the fabricated materials under actual operational conditions. Additional field testing of cross-cutting technology, the extrusion of hot metals, at Extruded Metals showed the potential for additional market development.

  10. Wear of two pit and fissure sealants in contact with primary teeth

    PubMed Central

    Galo, Rodrigo; Contente, Marta Maria Martins Giamatei; Borsatto, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Wear simulations may provide an indication of the clinical performance of pit-and-fissure sealants when associated with primary teeth as counterbody, restricting the involved variables. The aim of this study was to evaluate wear of dental materials used as pit-and-fissure sealants in contact with primary teeth. Materials and Methods: A resinous sealant (Fluroshield®) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer®) were selected in a post-plate design, using as counterbody primary tooth pins (4 × 4 × 2 mm) at 3 and 10 N vertical load, 1 Hz frequency, 900 wear cycles in artificial saliva (n = 15). Attrition coefficient values were obtained and the material and primary tooth volumes were analyzed. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Duncan's test (P < 0.05). Results: Fluroshield® presented the highest attrition coefficient values for the 3 N but these values decreased significantly for the 10 N load. The means for volume loss (3 mm) of the different samples after the wear test were not statistically different for the materials. The volume loss values for the primary teeth were statistically different and there was an increase in volume loss with the increase of the load applied in the wear tests. Conclusions: Differences were also observed with regard to the surface deformation characteristics. The wear rates of primary tooth enamel vary according to the type of material and the load applied during mastication. PMID:24966777

  11. Heat treatment effect on microstructure, hardness and wear resistance of Cr26 white cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shaoping; Shen, Yehui; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Dequan

    2015-01-01

    High chromium cast iron(HCCI) is taken as material of coal water slurry pump impeller, but it is susceptible to produce serious abrasive wear and erosion wear because of souring of hard coal particles. The research on optimization of heat treatments to improve abrasive wear properties of HCCI is insufficient, so effect of heat treatments on the microstructure, hardness, toughness, and wear resistance of Cr26 HCCI is investigated to determine the optimal heat treatment process for HCCI. A series of heat treatments are employed. The microstructures of HCCI specimens are examined by using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and impact fracture toughness of as-cast and heat treated specimens are measured. The wear tests are assessed by a Type M200 ring-on block wear tester. The results show the following: With increase of the quenching temperature from 950 °C to 1050 °C, the hardness of Cr26 HCCI increased to a certain value, kept for a time and then decreased. The optimal heat treatment process is 2 h quenching treatment at 1000 °C, followed by a subsequent 2 h tempering at 400 °C. The hardness of HCCI is related to the precipitation and redissolution of secondary carbides in the process of heat treatment. The subsequent tempering treatment would result in a slight decrease of hardness but increase of toughness. The wear resistance is much related to the "supporting" effect of the matrix and the "protective" effect of the hard carbide embedded in the matrix, and the wear resistance is further dependent on the hardness and the toughness of the matrix. This research can provide an important insight on developing an optimized heat treatment method to improve the wear resistance of HCCI.

  12. Three-body wear of a hand-consolidated silver alternative to amalgam.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Eichmiller, F C; Giuseppetti, A A; Ives, L K; Parry, E E; Schumacher, G E

    1999-09-01

    Recent studies have investigated a mercury-free silver alternative to amalgam, but the silver powders required a relatively high compaction pressure to consolidate. The aim of the present study was to consolidate a precipitated silver powder into a cohesive solid using an air-driven pneumatic condenser fitted with an amalgam plugger at a clinically realistic load, and to study the mechanisms and rates of three-body wear of the consolidated silver in comparison with that of an amalgam. The silver powder was annealed, rinsed with a dilute acid, and consolidated either in a prepared tooth cavity or in a specimen mold at a load of 15 N. A four-station wear machine was used where each specimen was immersed in a slurry containing polymethyl methacrylate beads, then a steel pin was loaded and rotated against the specimen at a maximum load of 76 N. The flexural strength in MPa (mean +/- SD; n = 10) was 86 +/- 20 for amalgam, 181 +/- 45 for silver with a polished surface, and 202 +/- 21 for silver with a burnished surface. After 4 x 10(5) wear cycles, the wear scar depth in microm was 134 +/- 54 for amalgam, 143 +/- 8 for polished silver, and 131 +/- 9 for burnished silver, which were not significantly different (Tukey's multiple comparison test; family confidence coefficient = 0.95). SEM examination revealed cracks and fracture pits in the worn surface of amalgam, in contrast to a smooth surface in silver. Wear and material removal in amalgam occurred by microfracture and dislodgement of cracked segments, while wear in the silver occurred by ductile deformation and flow of materials. To conclude, the consolidated silver possesses a three-body wear resistance similar to that of amalgam, and a higher resistance to wear-induced damage and cracking than amalgam. The mechanism of wear in amalgam is microfracture and material dislodgement, while that in consolidated silver is ductile deformation and flow of material.

  13. Failure mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament prostheses: in vitro wear study.

    PubMed

    Poddevin, N; King, M W; Guidoin, R G

    1997-01-01

    Previous retrieval studies analyzing the cause of failure of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) prostheses identified a wear mechanism. However, the relative importance of yarn on bone compared to yarn on yarn wear has not been clearly understood. Therefore, the objective of this study was to elucidate which type of wear is the dominant cause of clinical failure. A variety of ACL prosthetic structures were exposed to two in vitro tests: one for yarn on yarn and the other for a novel yarn on bone wear test system. The latter included the use of both smooth (uncut) and rough (cut) bone surfaces to simulate the conditions around the condyle and at the exit of the tibial tunnel, respectively. The damaged textile structures were viewed by SEM. The various fiber fracture morphologies were identified and classified for the two types of wear tests; for the smooth and rough bone surfaces; for the braided, knitted, woven, and twisted textile structures; and for the three types of fibers that were included: polyethylene terephthalate, polypropylene, and ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene. The results confirmed that yarn on bone and yarn on yarn wear phenomena are associated with significantly different failure mechanisms. While the more aggressive rough (or cut) bone causes more rapid and intense fiber damage and faster ACL failure than the smooth (uncut) osseous surface, both abradants cause the same type of abrasive wear phenomenon. Differences in failure mechanisms were identified between the different textile structures and the different fiber types. By interpreting the damaged fiber images from clinically failed and retrieved ACL prostheses, we are now able to confirm that the predominant cause of synthetic ACL failure is yarn on bone abrasion. Improvements in future ACL prosthesis designs will only be possible by eliminating or minimizing the effect of this type of abrasive wear.

  14. Study on mild and severe wear of 7075 aluminum alloys by high-speed wire electrical discharge machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinkai; Qiu, Rongxian; Xia, Kui; Wang, Zhichao; Xu, Lining; Yu, Huadong

    2017-01-01

    The recast and the carbon layers were fabricated on 7075Al alloys surface by the high-speed wire electrical discharge machining (HS-WEDM) technologyunder various working parameters. The mechanical properties and friction behaviors of the layers were investigated by UMT. 7075 Al alloys were used to do dry sliding wear tests on a pin-ondisk wear tester at room temperature under various contact pressures. 7075 Al alloys had almost the same wear regularity as a function of sliding velocity and rated frequency. The hardness of recast layer was improved. And this method can enhance durability of 7075 Al alloy effectively.The transition to severe wear occurred at a higher load (12N) for asmachined samples, compared with 7075 matrix (9N), the as-machined samples exhibited lower wear rates within the tested loading range.

  15. Evaluating lubricant performance by 3D profilometry of wear scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, C.; Deleanu, L.; Pirvu, C.

    2016-08-01

    Due to improvement in analysing surface texture and optical instruments for investigating the texture surface, the authors propose to evaluate the lubricant performance by analysing the change in several 3D parameters in comparison to an analysis on 2D profile. All the surface of the wear scar generated on the four ball machine is investigated and the conclusion is that from the tribological point of view, the 3D parameters reflect better the surface quality evolution after testing. Investigation was done on the wear scars generated on the three fixed balls, for five lubricants: a non-additivated transmission mineral oil (T90), two grades of rapeseed oil (coarse degummed and refined) and two grades of soybean oil (coarse and degummed).

  16. Characterization of cathode keeper wear by surface layer activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the erosion rates of the discharge cathode keeper in a 30 cm NSTAR configuration ion thruster were measured using a technique known as Surface Layer Activation (SLA). This diagnostic technique involves producing a radioactive tracer in a given surface by bombardment with high energy ions. The decrease in activity of the tracer material may be monitored as the surface is subjected to wear processes and correlated to a depth calibration curve, yielding the eroded depth. Analysis of the activities was achieved through a gamma spectroscopy system. The primary objectives of this investigation were to reproduce erosion data observed in previous wear studies in order to validate the technique, and to determine the effect of different engine operating parameters on erosion rate. The erosion profile at the TH 15 (23 kw) setting observed during the 8200 hour Life Demonstration Test (LDT) was reproduced. The maximum keeper erosion rate at this setting was determined to be 0.085 pm/hr. Testing at the TH 8 (1.4 kw) setting demonstrated lower erosion rates than TH 15, along with a different wear profile. Varying the keeper voltage was shown to have a significant effect on the erosion, with a positive bias with respect to cathode potential decreasing the erosion rate significantly. Accurate measurements were achieved after operating times of only 40 to 70 hours, a significant improvement over other erosion diagnostic methods.

  17. Wear and friction of oxidation-resistant mechanical carbon graphites at 650 C in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. P.; Wisnader, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the friction and wear properties of experimental carbon-graphites. Hemispherically tipped carbon-graphite rider specimens were tested in sliding contact with rotating Inconel X-750 disks in air. A surface speed of 1.33 m/sec, a load of 500 g, and a specimen temperature of 650 C were used. Results indicate: (1) hardness is not a major factor in determining friction and wear under the conditions of these studies. (2) Friction and wear as low as or lower than those observed for a good commercial seal material were attained with some of the experimental materials studied. (3) The inclusion of boron carbide (as an oxidation inhibitor) has a strong influence on wear rate. (4) Phosphate treatment reduces the friction coefficient when boron carbide is not present in the base material.

  18. Effects of self-assembled monolayer and PFPE lubricant on wear characteristics of flat silicon tips.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H. J.; Jang, C. E.; Kim, D. E.; Kim, Y. K.; Choa, S. H.; Hong, S.; Materials Science Division; Yonsei Univ.; Samsung Adv. Inst. Science and Technology; Seoul National Univ. of Technology

    2009-01-01

    The effects of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and perfluoropolyether (PFPE) lubricant on the wear characteristics of flat silicon tips were investigated. The wear test consisted of sliding the silicon tips fabricated on a flat silicon specimen against SAM and PFPE (Z-tetraol) coated silicon (100) wafer. The tips were slid at a low speed for about 15 km under an applied load of 39.2 {micro}N. The wear volume of the tip was obtained by measuring the tip profile using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). It was found that the coatings were effective in reducing the wear of the tips by an order of magnitude from 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -7}.

  19. Cold-Sprayed Cu-MoS2 and Its Fretting Wear Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinyin; Descartes, Sylvie; Vo, Phuong; Chromik, Richard R.

    2016-02-01

    Cu and Cu-MoS2 coatings were fabricated by cold spray, and the fretting wear performance of the two coatings was compared. A mixture (95 wt.% Cu + 5 wt.% MoS2) was used as feedstock for the composite coating. Coatings were sprayed with identical gas flow conditions on the substrates pre-heated to approximately 170 °C. The morphology of coating top surface and polished cross sections was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and light optical microscopy (LOM). The influence of MoS2 on Cu deposition was examined. The local MoS2 concentration within the coating was found to affect the hardness. Fretting tests were carried out at two different normal loads, and the influence of MoS2 on friction and wear was studied. The morphology and elemental compositions of the wear scars and wear debris were observed by SEM and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively.

  20. Friction coefficients and wear rates of different orthodontic archwires in artificial saliva.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, M V; Espinar, E; Llamas, J M; Rupérez, E; Manero, J M; Barrera, J M; Solano, E; Gil, F J

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the influence of the nature of the orthodontic archwires on the friction coefficient and wear rate against materials used commonly as brackets (Ti-6Al-4V and 316L Stainless Steel). The materials selected as orthodontic archwires were ASI304 stainless steel, NiTi, Ti, TiMo and NiTiCu. The array archwire's materials selected presented very similar roughness but different hardness. Materials were chosen from lower and higher hardness degrees than that of the brackets. Wear tests were carried out at in artificial saliva at 37 °C. Results show a linear relationship between the hardness of the materials and the friction coefficients. The material that showed lower wear rate was the ASI304 stainless steel. To prevent wear, the wire and the brackets have high hardness values and in the same order of magnitude.

  1. Wear of ceramic-on-carbon fiber-reinforced poly-ether ether ketone hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Brockett, Claire L; John, Gemma; Williams, Sophie; Jin, Zhongmin; Isaac, Graham H; Fisher, John

    2012-08-01

    Total hip replacement has been a successful surgical intervention for over 50 years, with the majority of bearings using a polyethylene cup. Long-term failure due to osteolysis and loosening has been widely documented and alternative bearings have been sought. A novel carbon fiber-reinforced poly-ether ether ketone (CFR-PEEK) cup was investigated through experimental friction and wear studies. Friction studies demonstrated the bearings operated in a boundary lubrication condition, with friction factors higher than those for other hip replacement bearings. The wear study was conducted with 36 mm diameter bearings tested against Biolox Delta heads for a period of 10 million cycles. The mean volumetric wear rate was 0.3 mm(3)/Mc, indicating the ceramic-on-CFR-PEEK bearing to be a very low wearing option for total hip replacement.

  2. Optimization of Wear Behavior of Magnesium Alloy AZ91 Hybrid Composites Using Taguchi Experimental Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girish, B. M.; Satish, B. M.; Sarapure, Sadanand; Basawaraj

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, the statistical investigation on wear behavior of magnesium alloy (AZ91) hybrid metal matrix composites using Taguchi technique has been reported. The composites were reinforced with SiC and graphite particles of average size 37 μm. The specimens were processed by stir casting route. Dry sliding wear of the hybrid composites were tested on a pin-on-disk tribometer under dry conditions at different normal loads (20, 40, and 60 N), sliding speeds (1.047, 1.57, and 2.09 m/s), and composition (1, 2, and 3 wt pct of each of SiC and graphite). The design of experiments approach using Taguchi technique was employed to statistically analyze the wear behavior of hybrid composites. Signal-to-noise ratio and analysis of variance were used to investigate the influence of the parameters on the wear rate.

  3. NOREM wear-resistant, iron-based hard-facing alloys: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grobner, P.; Ohriner, E.K.; Wada, T.; Whelan, E.P.

    1989-07-01

    Wear-resistance cobalt-free hardfacing alloys are needed to replace the cobalt-base alloys used to hardface nuclear valves in order to reduce the exposure of maintenance personnel. Some thirty heats of cast iron-base alloys were prepared and characterized. Selected heats were prepared and applied as hardfacing overlays on austenitic steel substrates using both GTA and PTA welding processes. Some of the iron-base alloys exhibited galling wear resistance as high as that of cobalt-base standards both in the cast condition and in the PTA overlays. Hardness, mechanical properties, and galling wear resistance were determined on weld overlays and on cast alloys. Dilution and thermal expansivity were determined for weld overlays. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to determine the alloys' microstructures. Other commercially available alloys were tested for galling wear resistance and compared to iron-base alloys. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. New Oxide Ceramic Developed for Superior High-Temperature Wear Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Farmer, Serene C.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramics, for the most part, do not have inherently good tribological properties. For example friction coefficients in excess of 0.7 have been reported for silicon nitride sliding on silicon nitride or on bearing steel (ref. 1). High friction is always accompanied by considerable wear. Despite their inherently poor tribological properties, the high strength and high toughness of silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramics has led to their successful use in tribological applications (refs. 1 to 4). The upper temperature limit for the application of Si3N4 as wear-resistant material is limited by reaction with the tribological environment (ref. 3). Silicon nitride is known to produce a thin silicon dioxide film with easy shear capability that results in low friction and low wear in a moist environment (ref. 5). At elevated temperatures, the removal of the reaction product that acts as lubricant causes the friction coefficient to increase and, consequently, the wear performance to become poor. New materials are sought that will have wear resistance superior to that of Si3N4 at elevated temperatures and in harsh environments. A new class of oxide ceramic materials has been developed with potential for excellent high-temperature wear resistance. The new material consists of a multicomponent oxide with a two-phase microstructure, in which the wear resistance of the mixed oxide is significantly higher than that of the individual constituents. This is attributed to the strong constraining effects provided by the interlocking microstructures at different length scales, to the large aspect ratio of the phases, to the strong interphase bonding, and to the residual stresses. Fretting wear tests were conducted by rubbing the new ceramic material against boron carbide (B4C). The new ceramic material produced a wear track groove on B4C, suggesting significantly higher wear resistance for the oxide ceramic. The new material did not suffer from any microstructural degradation after the wear

  5. Experimental Evaluation of Oxide Nanoparticles as Friction and Wear Improvement Additives in Motor Oil

    DOE PAGES

    Demas, Nicholaos G.; Erck, Robert A.; Lorenzo-Martin, Cinta; ...

    2017-01-01

    The effect of two nanoparticle oxides on friction and wear was studied under laboratory test conditions using a reciprocating test machine and two test configurations. The addition of these nanoparticles in base stock oil under certain conditions reduced the coefficient of friction and improved wear, but that depended on the test configuration. Examination of the rubbed surfaces showed the pronounced formation of a tribofilm in some cases, while polishing on the surface was also observed in other cases. Contact configuration is important when oxide nanoparticles are being evaluated and the conclusions about their efficacy can be vastly different.

  6. Reducing Wear of Steel Rolling Against Ti6Al4V Operating in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    This work was motivated by a qualification test of a mechanism for a space telescope. During the test undesired wear debris was formed. In this project alterative materials and coatings were tested with intent to reduce wear and debris when steel has a misaligned rolling contact against Ti6Al4V. Testing was done using a vacuum roller rig mimicking the mechanism's contact conditions. Ten configurations were tested. Most configurations resulted in significant debris. A sputtered 1-micrometer-thick nan-ocomposite molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) film provided the best wear protection. The best configuration made use of the MoS2 coating on both materials, and in preparing for sputtering the anodized Ti6Al4V working surface was smoothed using an ultrasonic process.

  7. The Wearing Out of Genre Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ, Joanna

    1971-01-01

    Scenes and plots wear out in three distinct stages: Innocence, Plausibility, and Decadence. Examines westerns, spy stories, nurse novels, detective stories, science fiction, pornography, avant-garde fiction, etc. (Author/RB)

  8. The wear behavior between hardfacing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.; Wu, L.T.

    1996-11-01

    Hardface weld cladding in industry most commonly uses cobalt-based STELLITE Nos. 6 and 12 and nickel-based Colmonoy Nos. 56, 83, and 88 for plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding of 4140 steel. Frictional and abrasion wear of weld layers are compared with that of the widely used nitridized, low-level SKD6, SACM1 steel alloys and with centrifugal-cast nickel-based Colmonoy No. 68 bimetal. Experimental results show that cobalt alloys are not suitable for low-alloy steel frictional wear. However, nickel alloys are quite compatible. Resistance to abrasive wear increased in the experimental materials according to the level of hardness. Wear resistance was compromised in experimental materials when the hard phase was too dispersed.

  9. Diagnosis and management of dental wear.

    PubMed

    Harpenau, Lisa A; Noble, Warden H; Kao, Richard T

    2012-01-01

    Dental wear is loss of tooth structure resulting from erosion, attrition, abrasion and, possibly, abfraction. Clinical/experimental data suggest no single damaging mechanism, but rather simultaneous interaction of these destructive processes. The most important interaction is abrasion/attrition potentiated by dental erosion. Awareness of this pathosis is not well-appreciated by the public and dental professionals because the signs may be subtle. This article focuses on recognizing, diagnosing and managing dental wear. Dental wear is a challenging problem for clinicians because of the subtlety of early changes; confusion about the etiology of the problem; and the dilemma of when or how to manage the etiology. Unfortunately, failure to recognize and manage the process often results in inaction until the breakdown is severe. At that point, the structural breakdown is so advanced that major rehabilitative treatment often is needed. This introductory article discusses diagnosing and managing dental wear.

  10. 19 CFR 10.35 - Models of women's wearing apparel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Models of women's wearing apparel. 10.35 Section... Temporary Importations Under Bond § 10.35 Models of women's wearing apparel. (a) Models of women's wearing... the importer or his employees. (b) Invoices covering models of women's wearing apparel entered...

  11. Wear and Corrosion Behavior of Functionally Graded Nano-SiC/2014Al Composites Produced by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Guo; Li, Chuan-Peng; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Zhu, Jia-Ning; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2017-02-01

    Functionally graded 2014Al/SiC composites (FGMs) with varying volume fractions (1-7%) of nano-SiC particulates (n-SiCp) were fabricated by powder metallurgy. The effect of n-SiCp content on corrosion and wear behaviors was studied. The microstructures of composites were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion behavior of the composites was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization scans in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Corrosion results show that corrosion current of composite layer with 3 vol.% n-SiC was much lower than that of 2014Al matrix. Mechanical properties of the composites were assessed by microhardness tests and ball-on-disk wear tests. As the applied load changed from 15 to 30 N, wear rates of the composites increased significantly and the wear mechanism transformed from mild to severe wear regime. It also shows that 3 vol.% n-SiCp/2014Al composite layer observed the lowest wear rate where adhesive and abrasive wear mechanisms played a major role. These results suggest that the n-SiCp are effective candidates for fabricating FGMs for the applications demanding a tough core and a hard, wear or corrosion resisting surface.

  12. Wear and Corrosion Behavior of Functionally Graded Nano-SiC/2014Al Composites Produced by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Guo; Li, Chuan-Peng; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Zhu, Jia-Ning; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2016-12-01

    Functionally graded 2014Al/SiC composites (FGMs) with varying volume fractions (1-7%) of nano-SiC particulates (n-SiCp) were fabricated by powder metallurgy. The effect of n-SiCp content on corrosion and wear behaviors was studied. The microstructures of composites were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion behavior of the composites was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization scans in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Corrosion results show that corrosion current of composite layer with 3 vol.% n-SiC was much lower than that of 2014Al matrix. Mechanical properties of the composites were assessed by microhardness tests and ball-on-disk wear tests. As the applied load changed from 15 to 30 N, wear rates of the composites increased significantly and the wear mechanism transformed from mild to severe wear regime. It also shows that 3 vol.% n-SiCp/2014Al composite layer observed the lowest wear rate where adhesive and abrasive wear mechanisms played a major role. These results suggest that the n-SiCp are effective candidates for fabricating FGMs for the applications demanding a tough core and a hard, wear or corrosion resisting surface.

  13. Studies of friction and wear characteristics of various wires for wire-brush skids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The friction and wear characteristics of 22 types and sizes of wires for potential use in wire-brush skids were studied. These characteristics were determined by placing brushes made from candidate wires on a belt sander whose moving belt simulated landing roll-out distance. At the same time, the drag force and wear behavior were monitored. Data were obtained over distances up to 3048 m (10,000 ft) at preselected bearing pressures of 172 to 1034 kPa (25 to 150 psi). In general, the friction coefficient developed by the candidate wires was found to be independent of bearing pressure and ranged between 0.4 and 0.6 under the test conditions of this investigation. The friction coefficient was not degraded when the surface was wetted and appears to be independent of wire diameter except perhaps when wire size is relatively large compared with the surface asperities. Generally, the high friction demonstrated by the soft materials was accompanied by high wear rates; conversely, the hard materials provided greater wear resistance but offered lower friction. For all test wires, the wear was shown to increase with increasing bearing pressure, in general, for the same bearing pressure, wear increased with increasing wire diameter and decreased when the surface was wetted.

  14. Epoxy matrix composites filled with micro-sized LD sludge: wear characterization and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Abhilash; Satapathy, Alok

    2016-02-01

    Owing to the very high cost of conventional filler materials in polymer composites, exploring the possibility of using low cost minerals and industrial wastes for this purpose has become the need of the hour. In view of this, the present work includes the development and the wear performance evaluation of a new class of composites consisting of epoxy and microsized LD sludge. LD sludge or the Linz-Donawitz Sludge (LDS) are the fine solid particles recovered after wet cleaning of the gas emerging from LD convertors during steel making. Epoxy composites filled with different proportions (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt %) of LDS are fabricated by conventional hand lay-up technique. Dry sliding wear trials are performed on the composite specimens under different test conditions as per ASTM G 99 following a design of experiment approach based on Taguchi's orthogonal arrays. The Taguchi approach leads to the recognition of most powerful variables that predominantly control the wear rate. This parametric analysis reveals that LDS content and sliding velocity affects the specific wear rate more significantly than normal load and sliding distance. Furthermore with increase in LDS content specific wear rate of the composite decreases for a constant sliding velocity. The sliding wear behavior of these composites under an extended range of test conditions is predicted by a model based on the artificial neural network (ANN).

  15. Effect of laser surface texturing (LST) on tribochemical films dynamics and friction and wear performance

    SciTech Connect

    Olofinjana, Bolutife; Lorenzo-Martin, Cinta; Ajayi, Oyelayo O.; Ajayi, Ezekiel O.

    2015-06-06

    Surface texturing or topographical design is one of the primary techniques to control friction and wear performance of surfaces in tribological contact. Laser surface texturing (LST), whereby a laser beam is used to produce regular arrays of dimples on a surface, has been demonstrated to reduce friction in conformal lubricated contacts. Friction and wear behavior under boundary lubrication is also known to be dependent on the formation and durability of the tribochemical film formed from lubricant additives. In this paper, the effects of LST on the formation and durability of tribochemical films and its consequent impacts on friction and wear behavior in various lubrication regimes were evaluated. Friction and wear tests that cycled through different lubrication regimes were conducted with both polished and LST treated surfaces using a synthetic lubricant with and without model additives of ZDDP and MoDTC mixture. In the base oil without additives, LST produced noticeable reduction in friction in all lubrication regimes. However, with low-friction model additives, friction was higher in tests with LST due to significant differences in the tribochemical film formation in the polished and LST surfaces, as well as the sliding counterface. Continuous tribo-films were formed on ball conterface rubbed against polished surfaces while the films were streaky and discontinuous in ball rubbed against LST surfaces. LST produced more wear on the ball counterface in both base and additized oils. Lastly, no measurable wear was observed in both the polished and LST flat specimens.

  16. Effects of long-term corset wearing on chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoto; Sekiguchi, Miho; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Shishido, Hiroaki; Sato, Katsuhiko; Konno, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    There are few studies of the therapeutic effects of long-term corset wearing in patients with chronic low back pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term corset wearing on chronic low back pain and to examine the myoelectrical activities of the paravertebral muscles. Forty subjects with chronic low back pain were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups: a group wearing corsets for 6 months (CW) group and a group not wearing corsets (NW). The treatment effects were measured using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score. Muscle endurance was evaluated during the Biering-Sorensen test (S-test), and the degree of muscle fatigue was evaluated by the change in percent mean power frequency (%MPF) of the paravertebral muscles. Corset treatment for chronic low back pain improved low back pain and increased muscle endurance for a short period of time. Paravertebral muscle fatigue was not increased by long-term corset wearing for chronic low back pain, and weakening of the paravertebral muscles was not observed up to 6 months after the start of corset wearing.

  17. In vitro wear of four ceramic materials and human enamel on enamel antagonist.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Jun; Taira, Yohsuke; Sawase, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the wear of four different ceramics and human enamel. The ceramics used were lithium disilicate glass (e.max Press), leucite-reinforced glass (GN-Ceram), yttria-stabilized zirconia (Aadva Zr), and feldspathic porcelain (Porcelain AAA). Hemispherical styli were fabricated with these ceramics and with tooth enamel. Flattened enamel was used for antagonistic specimens. After 100,000 wear cycles of a two-body wear test, the height and volume losses of the styli and enamel antagonists were determined. The mean and standard deviation for eight specimens were calculated and statistically analyzed using a non-parametric (Steel-Dwass) test (α = 0.05). GN-Ceram exhibited greater stylus height and volume losses than did Porcelain AAA. E.max Press, Porcelain AAA, and enamel styli showed no significant differences, and Aadva Zr exhibited the smallest stylus height and volume losses. The wear of the enamel antagonist was not significantly different among GN-Ceram, e.max Press, Porcelain AAA, and enamel styli. Aadva Zr resulted in significantly lower wear values of the enamel antagonist than did GN-Ceram, Porcelain AAA, and enamel styli. In conclusion, leucite-reinforced glass, lithium disilicate glass, and feldspathic porcelain showed wear values closer to those for human enamel than did yttria-stabilized zirconia.

  18. Wear and Cohesion During Frictional Slip Along Carbonate Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Z.; Chen, X.; Boneh, Y.; Madden, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    Our recent experiments with rotary shear of solid rock blocks showed that smoothening of carbonate faults during high-velocity slip leads to significant reduction of both friction and wear-rate. Chen et al. (2013) characterized roughness and friction down to sub-micron scale, and found that smoothing leads to friction reduction. They showed that friction coefficient correlates with surface roughness below 100 nm RMS roughness whereas no weakening occurred with higher roughness. Boneh et al. (2013) sheared limestone and dolomite fault at normal stress up to 7 MPa and slip-velocity up to 1 m/s during steady-state. At low velocities (V < 0.3 m/s), the wear-rate depends on the normal stress, as expected, but at higher velocities the wear-rates are low to vanishing with no dependence on the normal stress. Faults run at high-velocity displayed smooth, hard surfaces. These results allow quantifying the relations between wear, cohesion and friction. Frictional strength is the integrated effect of adhesion (= cohesion), fracturing (= wear), and plastic deformation along a slipping fault. The above results indicate that during the steady-state slip along the smooth, hard, wear-resistant surfaces of the experimental faults occurred with negligible fracturing and plastic deformation. Thus, adhesion became the dominant contributor to the frictional resistance. To test this hypothesis, the experimental cohesion, C, is compared with independently measured calcite adhesion. We use the Mohr diagram to calculate the cohesion of 22 experiments with Dover limestone, ran at velocities 0.005-0.31 m/s and normal stress up to 3 MPa, and 66 experiments with Kasota dolomite, ran at velocities 0.01-0.97 m/s and normal stress up to 7 MPa,. These calculations yielded C = 0.054 +/- 0.055 MPa for the limestone, and C = 0.463 +/- 0.190 MPa for the dolomite. Adhesion can be measured directly with Atomic-Force-Microscope (AFM) by using tiny cantilever with tips with tens of nm radius of curvature

  19. The use of analytical surface tools in the fundamental study of wear. [atomic nature of wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Various techniques and surface tools available for the study of the atomic nature of the wear of materials are reviewed These include chemical etching, x-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe. Properties of the surface and wear surface regions which affect wear, such as surface energy, crystal structure, crystallographic orientation, mode of dislocation behavior, and cohesive binding, are discussed. A number of mechanisms involved in the generation of wear particles are identified with the aid of the aforementioned tools.

  20. Diagnosis and management of dental wear.

    PubMed

    Harpenau, Lisa A; Noble, Warden H; Kao, Richard T

    2011-04-01

    Dental wear is loss of tooth structure resulting from erosion, attrition, abrasion, and, possibly, abfraction. Clinical/experimental data suggest no single damaging mechanism but rather simultaneous interaction of these destructive processes. The most important interaction is abrasion/attrition potentiated by dental erosion. Awareness of this pathosis is not well-appreciated by the public and dental professionals because the signs may be subtle. This article focuses on the recognition, diagnosis, and management of dental wear.

  1. Consideration of Wear Rates at High Velocities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    evaluations were performed for different velocity ranges depending on the interest of the individual researcher. As a result, an inconsistency 4 W L...together will produce heat. The slipper-rail interaction being studied is no different . The amount of heat generated is a function of the frictional...the one which provides the highest wear rate. To correlate specimens from different sources and of varying sizes and shapes, the wear rate, normal

  2. Characterization and measurement of polymer wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Aron, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical tools which characterize the polymer wear process are discussed. The devices discussed include: visual observation of polymer wear with SEM, the quantification with surface profilometry and ellipsometry, to study the chemistry with AES, XPS and SIMS, to establish interfacial polymer orientation and accordingly bonding with QUARTIR, polymer state with Raman spectroscopy and stresses that develop in polymer films using a X-ray double crystal camera technique.

  3. Characterization and measurement of polymer wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Aron, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical tools which characterize the polymer wear process are discussed. The devices discussed include: visual observation of polymer wear with SEM, the quantification with surface profilometry and ellipsometry, to study the chemistry with AES, XPS and SIMS, to establish interfacial polymer orientation and accordingly bonding with QUARTIR, polymer state with Raman spectroscopy and stresses that develop in polymer films using a X-ray double crystal camera technique.

  4. Wear Characteristics of a Novel Bearing System for Artificial Knee Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciu, Aneta Nicoleta; Iwatsubo, Takuzo; Matsuda, Mitsumasa; Nishino, Takashi

    This paper presents an experimental investigation upon the wear characteristics of a novel bearing system proposed for the artificial knee joints. Such bearing system is original in the meaning that micro-pockets are machined on surface of the rigid femoral component; a poro-elastic-hydrated layer, called artificial cartilage, covers the rigid tibial substrate. Under compression, the fluid exudes from the artificial cartilage, fills and pressurizes the micro-pockets. In this way, a poro-elasto-hydrodynamic regime of lubrication is developed. Wear tests are performed with different types of artificial cartilages made in PVA hydrogel, articulating against smooth and micro-pocket-covered femoral components. Influence of the number of walking cycles, femoral porosity, depth of the micro-pockets, water content and polymerization degree of the PVA hydrogel upon its wear factor is illustrated. For wear tests performed until 106 walking cycles, in the case of PVA hydrogel with 12300 polymerization degree and 77% water content versus smooth component, the wear factor is on order of 10-6-10-5mm3/Nm for the same artificial cartilage against a femoral component uniformly covered by identical micro-pockets of 50µm depth, on 15% of its surface, the wear factor drops in the range 10-7-10-6mm3/Nm, i. e., the wear factor reduces with 80%. The highest wear reduction due to the micro-pockets presence is obtained in the case of PVA hydrogel with 77% water content, i. e., for a fluid amount similar to that of the natural cartilage.

  5. Wear measurement of highly cross-linked UHMWPE using a 7Be tracer implantation technique.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Markus A; Laurent, Michel P; Dwiwedi, Yasha; Gallardo, Luis A; Chipps, Kelly A; Blackmon, Jeffery C; Kozub, Raymond L; Bardayan, Daniel W; Gross, Carl J; Stracener, Daniel W; Smith, Michael S; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Erikson, Luke; Patel, Nidhi; Rehm, Karl E; Ahmad, Irshad; Greene, John P; Greife, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    The very low wear rates achieved with the current highly cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylenes (UHMWPE) used in joint prostheses have proven to be difficult to measure accurately by gravimetry. Tracer methods are therefore being explored. The purpose of this study was to perform a proof-of-concept experiment on the use of the radioactive tracer beryllium-7 ((7)Be) for the determination of in vitro wear in a highly cross-linked orthopedic UHMWPE. Three cross-linked and four conventional UHMWPE pins made from compression-molded GUR 1050, were activated with 10(9) to 10(10) (7)Be nuclei using a new implantation setup that produced a homogenous distribution of implanted nuclei up to 8.5 μm below the surface. The pins were tested for wear in a six-station pin-on-flat apparatus for up to 7.1 million cycles (178 km). A Germanium gamma detector was employed to determine activity loss of the UHMWPE pins at preset intervals during the wear test. The wear of the cross-linked UHMWPE pins was readily detected and estimated to be 17 ± 3 μg per million cycles. The conventional-to-cross-linked ratio of the wear rates was 13.1 ± 0.8, in the expected range for these materials. Oxidative degradation damage from implantation was negligible; however, a weak dependence of wear on implantation dose was observed limiting the number of radioactive tracer atoms that can be introduced. Future applications of this tracer technology may include the analysis of location-specific wear, such as loss of material in the post or backside of a tibial insert.

  6. Friction and wear of hydroxyapatite reinforced high density polyethylene against the stainless steel counterface.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Chandrasekaran, M; Bonfield, W

    2002-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) was invented as a biomaterial for skeletal applications. In this investigation, tribological properties (e.g. wear rate and coefficient of friction) of unfilled HDPE and HA/HDPE composites were evaluated against the duplex stainless steel in dry and lubricated conditions, with distilled water or aqueous solutions of proteins (egg albumen or glucose) being lubricants. Wear tests were conducted in a custom-built test rig for HDPE and HA/HDPE containing up to 40 vol % of HA. It was found that HA/HDPE composites had lower coefficients of friction than unfilled HDPE under certain conditions. HA/HDPE also exhibited less severe fatigue failure marks than HDPE. The degradation and fatigue failure of HDPE due to the presence of proteins were severe for low speed wear testing (100 rpm) as compared to high speed wear testing (200 rpm). This was due possibly to the high shear rate at the contact which could remove any degraded film instantaneously at high sliding speed, while with a low sliding speed the build-up of a degraded layer of protein could occur. The degraded protein layer would stay at the contact for a longer time and mechanical activation would induce adverse reactions, weakening the surface layer of HDPE. Both egg albumen and glucose were found to be corrosive to steel and adversely reactive for HDPE and HA/HDPE composites. The wear modes observed were similar to that of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Specimens tested with egg albumen also displayed higher wear rates, which was again attributed to corrosion accelerated wear.

  7. Are there biological markers of wear?

    PubMed

    Bauer, Thomas W; Shanbhag, Arun S

    2008-01-01

    Potential systemic markers of implant wear include products of the wear process (particles and ions) and mediators of the inflammatory reaction that can be induced by wear. Ions from polymers used in arthroplasty are not specific, but high metal ion levels may help identify patients with unexpectedly high wear of metal-on-metal implants. The kinetics of ion production, transport, and excretion are complex, however, so it is currently difficult to interpret the significance of mild elevations in metal ions. Indices of bone turnover (eg, collagen fragments) and mediators involved in the inflammatory reaction to particles (eg, osteoprotegerin, RANKL, interleukins) may be associated with osteolysis, but systemic disorders (eg, osteoarthritis) and the use of medications that influence bone remodeling limit the predictive value of these analytes with respect to the consequences of implant wear. Using genomic and proteomic methods to measure multiple analytes offers promise, but the challenge is to identify markers specifically associated with wear that are not elevated by other conditions that often coexist in this patient population.

  8. Predicting abrasive wear with coupled Lagrangian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Florian; Eberhard, Peter

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a mesh-less approach for the simulation of a fluid with particle loading and the prediction of abrasive wear is presented. We are using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method for modeling the fluid and the discrete element method (DEM) for the solid particles, which represent the loading of the fluid. These Lagrangian methods are used to describe heavily sloshing fluids with their free surfaces as well as the interface between the fluid and the solid particles accurately. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations model is applied for handling turbulences. We are predicting abrasive wear on the boundary geometry with two different wear models taking cutting and deformation mechanisms into account. The boundary geometry is discretized with special DEM particles. In doing so, it is possible to use the same particle type for both the calculation of the boundary conditions for the SPH method as well as the DEM and for predicting the abrasive wear. After a brief introduction to the SPH method and the DEM, the handling of the boundary and the coupling of the fluid and the solid particles are discussed. Then, the applied wear models are presented and the simulation scenarios are described. The first numerical experiment is the simulation of a fluid with loading which is sloshing inside a tank. The second numerical experiment is the simulation of the impact of a free jet with loading to a simplified pelton bucket. We are especially investigating the wear patterns inside the tank and the bucket.

  9. IN VITRO WEAR RESISTANCE OF THREE TYPES OF POLYMETHYL METHACRYLATE DENTURE TEETH

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Katia Rodrigues; Bonfante, Gerson; Pegoraro, Luiz Fernando; Conti, Paulo Cesar Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Pedro Cesar Garcia; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan

    2008-01-01

    The wear resistance of denture teeth is important to the longevity of removable prostheses of edentulous patients. The ability of denture teeth to maintain a stable occlusal relationship over time may be influenced by this property. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the wear resistance of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture teeth based on their chemical composition when opposed by a ceramic antagonist. The maxillary canines (n=10) of 3 PMMA denture teeth (Trubyte Biotone, cross-linked PMMA; Trilux, highly cross-linked IPN (interpenetrating polymer network)-PMMA; and Vivodent, highly cross-linked PMMA) were secured in an in vitro 2-body wear-testing apparatus that produced sliding contact of the specimens (4.5 cycles/s, sliding distance of 20 mm, under 37°C running water) against glazed or airborne particle abraded ceramic. Wear resistance was measured as height loss (mm) under 300 g (sliding force) after 100,000 cycles, using a digital measuring microscope. Mean values were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The wear of Trubyte Biotone (0.93 ± 0.14 mm) was significantly higher than that of both other types of teeth tested against abraded ceramic (p<0.05). The Vivodent tooth (0.64 ± 0.17 mm) exhibited the best wear resistance among the denture teeth tested against airborne particle abraded ceramic. There were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) in wear among the 3 denture teeth evaluated against glazed ceramic. Trilux and Vivodent teeth tested against either glazed or airborne particle abraded ceramic did not differ significantly from each other (p<0.05). All teeth showed significantly more wear against airborne particle abraded ceramic than against glazed ceramic (p<0.05). In conclusion, the three types of PMMA denture teeth presented significantly different wear resistance against the abraded ceramic. The high-strength PMMA denture teeth were more wear-resistant than the conventional PMMA denture tooth. PMID

  10. Wear simulation of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene hip implants by incorporating the effects of cross-shear and contact pressure.

    PubMed

    Kang, L; Galvin, A L; Brown, T D; Fisher, J; Jin, Z-M

    2008-10-01

    The effect of multi-directional cross-shear (CS) motion and contact pressure on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear was investigated in this study, based on an integrated experimental and computational approach. The wear factor as a function of CS was determined experimentally from a multi-directional pin-on-plate wear tester under a nominal contact pressure of 1 MPa. A computational wear model was developed which included the effects of CS as well as the load and sliding distance imposed on the hip joint employing a UHMWPE cup against a metallic femoral head under both gait and Leeds ProSim hip joint simulator conditions. The CS ratios were quantified over the articular surface of the UHMWPE cup and the CS-dependent wear factors derived from multi-directional pin-on-plate studies were applied in the computational wear model. Outputs from the computational wear model were validated independently against an experimental hip simulator study. Comparisons of linear and volumetric wear were made between the computational wear model and the hip simulator testing for a nominal conventional (0 MRad) UHMWPE cup of 28mm diameter and a highly cross-linked (10 MRad) UHMWPE cup. The difference between the computed and experimental volumetric wear was approximately 30 per cent for the 0 MRad UHMWPE, although the worn areas between the prediction and the measurement were similar. For the 10 MRad UHMWPE, the discrepancy was reduced to 16 per cent. In both cases, the computational model predicted a lower wear rate than the experimental simulator testing. The effect of using alternative wear factors under a different nominal contact pressure of 3MPa was also considered. The input wear factor to the computational model, derived from a constant loaded pin-on-plate test configuration, may underestimate the dynamic effect due to the variation in the load in the hip joint simulator.

  11. Wear and Life Characteristics of Microwave-Sintered Copper-Graphite Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajkumar, K.; Aravindan, S.; Kulkarni, M. S.

    2012-11-01

    Copper-graphite composite is an important tribological material used in electrical sliding contact applications like electrical brushes in motors and generators. The electrical sliding contact experiences multiple stresses such as mechanical pressure and temperature. Traditional life tests under normal operating condition would be a time-consuming process due to the longer expected life of the composite. Accelerated wear testing was carried out to evaluate the life characteristics of the composite. This work focuses on evaluation of tribological performance of microwave-sintered copper-graphite composite using accelerated wear testing methodology using high temperature pin-on-disc tribometer. Microstructural studies of worn out surfaces were carried out using SEM with EDAX. Reliability and analysis on life characteristics were performed on the time-to-failure data using temperature-nonthermal-accelerated life-stress model. The obtained times-to-failure data from the accelerated wear testing was extrapolated to normal usage condition. Temperature and pressure are significantly affecting the wear performance. Self-lubricating action of graphite and improvement in wear resistance is helpful in extending the life of copper graphite composite. The life of the composite obtained through testing at mean and 99% reliability are 18,725 and 16,950 h, respectively.

  12. Brief communication: Comparative patterns of enamel thickness topography and oblique molar wear in two Early Neolithic and medieval population samples.

    PubMed

    Le Luyer, Mona; Rottier, Stéphane; Bayle, Priscilla

    2014-09-01

    Enamel thickness has been linked to functional aspects of masticatory biomechanics and has been demonstrated to be an evolutionary plastic trait, selectively responsive to dietary changes, wear and tooth fracture. European Late Paleolithic and Mesolithic hunter-gatherers mainly show a flat wear pattern, while oblique molar wear has been reported as characteristic of Neolithic agriculturalists. We investigate the relationships between enamel thickness distribution and molar wear pattern in two Neolithic and medieval populations. Under the assumption that dietary and/or non-dietary constraints result in directional selective pressure leading to variations in enamel thickness, we test the hypothesis that these two populations will exhibit significant differences in wear and enamel thickness patterns. Occlusal wear patterns were scored in upper permanent second molars (UM2) of 64 Neolithic and 311 medieval subadult and adult individuals. Enamel thickness was evaluated by microtomography in subsamples of 17 Neolithic and 25 medieval individuals. Eight variables describing enamel thickness were assessed. The results show that oblique molar wear is dominant in the Neolithic sample (87%), while oblique wear affects only a minority (42%) of the medieval sample. Moreover, in the Neolithic molars, where buccolingually directed oblique wear is dominant and greatest enamel lost occurs in the distolingual quadrant, thickest enamel is found where occlusal stresses are the most important-on the distolingual cusp. These results reveal a correlation between molar wear pattern and enamel thickness that has been associated to dietary changes. In particular, relatively thicker molar enamel may have evolved as a plastic response to resist wear.

  13. Wear mechanisms in thermally-sprayed Mo-based coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, S. F.; Sampath, S.; Anand, V.

    1994-07-01

    The successful development of advanced diesel engines relies heavily on piston ring coating materials which can withstand elevated temperatures and reduce friction. Traditional hard chrome plating and flame-sprayed Mo-wire materials have reached their potential in the diesel engine environment, and alternatives are needed. Thermally-sprayed Mo-based alloys and composites are being evaluated for applications as next-generation ring-face coatings. The alloy development task of producing complex Mo-based alloy powders for use as thermally-sprayed coating materials requires an understanding of their wear resistance under contact stress conditions. In this paper, the wear behavior of Mo and Mo + NiCrBSi thermally sprayed coatings is exmined by pin-on-disc and single-point scratch-test methods. Microstructural analysis beneath worn regions have revealed that fracture of splats and their decohesion constitute the mode of failure. Improved wear resistance and stability of low friction coefficient was obtained by prealloying Mo with NiCrBSi prior to thermal spraying.

  14. Characterization of nano-wear mechanisms of hard disk coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo Seok; Kim, Jang-Kyo; Hwang, Pyung

    2001-05-01

    The wear mechanisms of carbon coated computer hard disks with laser-textured (LT) and mechanically-textured (MT) surfaces were characterized after contact start/stop (CSS) cyclic tests. Various analytical and mechanical testing techniques were employed to study the changes in topography, roughness, chemical elements, mechanical properties, and friction characteristics of the coating and lubricant. These techniques include: the atomic force microscopy (AFM), continuous nano-indentation test, nano-scratch test, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The CSS test at 15 k cycles resulted in tangible reductions of surface roughness of approximately 3.0 nm and 5.8 nm, respectively, for the LT bump and MT zone. The elastic modulus and hardness values increased after the CSS test, indicating strain hardening of the top coating layer. A critical load was identified for adhesion failure between the magnetic layer and the Ni-P layer. The TOF-SIMS analysis also revealed reductions in the intensities of all lubricant elements, indicating wear of the lubricant applied on the disk surface. All foregoing results confirm the usefulness of the characterization techniques employed to detect the subtle changes in disk surface characteristics.

  15. Effect of QPQ nitriding time on microstructure and wear resistance of SAF2906 duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Wu, G. X.; Shen, L. X.

    2017-01-01

    QPQ salt bath treatment of SAF2906 duplex stainless steel was conducted at 570 °C for 60 min, 90 min,120 min,150 min and 180 min, followed by post-oxidation process with heating temperature of 400°C and holding duration of 30 min. The effect of QPQ nitriding time on microstructure and wear resistance of SAF2906 duplex stainless steel was investigated by means of OM, SEM, XRD, microhardness test, adhesion strength test and wear resistance test. Microstructure observation showed outer layer was composed of Fe3O4. The main phase of the intermediate layer was CrN, αN and Fe2-3N. The main phase of the inner layer was CrN and S. The adhesion strength test of the surface layer-substrate showed the QPQ treated samples have favorable adhesion strength of HF-1 level. With the increase of nitriding time, the growth rate of the compound layer gradually slowed down and the surface hardness first increased and then decreased, and the maximum hardness was 1283 HV0.2 at 150 min. The dry siliding results showed that the wear resistance of the QPQ treated samples was at least 20 times than that of the substrate, and the optimum nitriding time to obtain the best wear resistance is 150 min. The worn surface morphology observation showed the main wear mechanism of the substrate was plough wear, while micro-cutting is the main wear mechanism that causes the damage of the QPQ treated samples.

  16. Two-body, dry abrasive wear of Fe/Cr/C experimental alloys - relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.K.S.

    1982-01-01

    A systematic study of abrasive wear resistance of Fe/Cr/Mn based alloys has been carried out using a two body pin-on-disc wear machine. Abrasives used were silicon carbide, alumina and quartz. The objective of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear resistance and to investigate the relationships between microstructure, mechanical properties, and abrasive wear resistance for these experimental alloys. Several commercial alloys were also tested to provide a basis for comparison. The goal of this study was to develop information so as to improve wear resistance of these experimental alloys by means of thermal treatments. Grain-refinement by double heat treatment was carried out in this research.

  17. Simulation of enamel wear for reconstruction of diet and feeding behavior in fossil animals: A micromechanics approach.

    PubMed

    Constantino, Paul J; Borrero-Lopez, Oscar; Pajares, Antonia; Lawn, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    The deformation and wear events that underlie microwear and macrowear signals commonly used for dietary reconstruction in fossil animals can be replicated and quantified by controlled laboratory tests on extracted tooth specimens in conjunction with fundamental micromechanics analysis. Key variables governing wear relations include angularity, stiffness (modulus), and size of the contacting particle, along with material properties of enamel. Both axial and sliding contacts can result in the removal of tooth enamel. The degree of removal, characterized by a "wear coefficient," varies strongly with particle content at the occlusal interface. Conditions leading to a transition from mild to severe wear are discussed. Measurements of wear traces can provide information about contact force and particle shape. The potential utility of the micromechanics methodology as an adjunct for investigating tooth durability and reconstructing diet is explored.

  18. A WEAR MODEL FOR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST VALVES

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2009-11-01

    The work summarized here comprises the concluding effort of a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies. It supports the development of a better understanding of advanced diesel engine designs in which enhanced power density, energy efficiency, and emissions control place increasing demands upon the durability of engine materials. Many kinds of metallic alloys are used in engines depending on the operating stresses, temperatures, and chemical environments. Exhaust valves, for example, are subjected to high temperatures and repetitive surface contacts that place demands on durability and frictional characteristics of the materials. Valves must continue to seal the combustion chamber properly for thousands of hours of cyclic engine operation and under varying operating conditions. It was the focus of this effort to understand the wear processes in the valve-seat area and to develop a model for the surface deformation and wear of that important interface. An annotated bibliography is provided to illustrate efforts to understand valve wear and to investigate the factors of engine operation that affect its severity and physical manifestation. The project for which this modeling effort was the final task, involved construction of a high-temperature repetitive impact test system as well as basic tribology studies of the combined processes of mechanical wear plus oxidation at elevated temperatures. Several publications resulted from this work, and are cited in this report. The materials selected for the experimental work were high-performance alloys based on nickel and cobalt. In some cases, engine-tested exhaust valves were made available for wear analysis and to ensure that the modes of surface damage produced in experiments were simulative of service. New, production-grade exhaust valves were also used to prepare test specimens for experimental work along with the other alloy samples. Wear analysis of valves and seats

  19. Atomic-scale wear of amorphous hydrogenated carbon during intermittent contact: a combined study using experiment, simulation, and theory.

    PubMed

    Vahdat, Vahid; Ryan, Kathleen E; Keating, Pamela L; Jiang, Yijie; Adiga, Shashishekar P; Schall, J David; Turner, Kevin T; Harrison, Judith A; Carpick, Robert W

    2014-07-22

    In this study, we explore the wear behavior of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM, an intermittent-contact AFM mode) tips coated with a common type of diamond-like carbon, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H), when scanned against an ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) sample both experimentally and through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Finite element analysis is utilized in a unique way to create a representative geometry of the tip to be simulated in MD. To conduct consistent and quantitative experiments, we apply a protocol that involves determining the tip-sample interaction geometry, calculating the tip-sample force and normal contact stress over the course of the wear test, and precisely quantifying the wear volume using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. The results reveal gradual wear of a-C:H with no sign of fracture or plastic deformation. The wear rate of a-C:H is consistent with a reaction-rate-based wear theory, which predicts an exponential dependence of the rate of atom removal on the average normal contact stress. From this, kinetic parameters governing the wear process are estimated. MD simulations of an a-C:H tip, whose radius is comparable to the tip radii used in experiments, making contact with a UNCD sample multiple times exhibit an atomic-level removal process. The atomistic wear events observed in the simulations are correlated with under-coordinated atomic species at the contacting surfaces.

  20. An in vitro investigation of wear resistance and hardness of composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Liqun; Zhao, Xinyi; Gong, Xu; Zhao, Shouliang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate the wear resistance and hardness of five kinds of composite resins. Materials and Methods: Sixty-five specimens were fabricated with one nano-hybrid (Charisma Diamond), two micro-hybrid (3MZ250, Clearfil AP-X) and two packable (3MP60, Surefil) composite resins, according to a randomized complete block design (n=13, 8 for wear test; 5 for hardness test). The composites were filled in a rectangular mold, and light polymerization. After storage in 37°C deionized water for 24h, all specimens were tested with a custom-made toothbrush machine with a stainless-steel ball as antagonist (3N loads, 1Hz, 6×105 cycles) immersed in calcium fluoride slurry. Wear volume, hardness and surface structure of each tested material was examined by a three-dimensional non-contact optical profilometer, Vickers indentation technique and scanning electron microscope. Results: The volume loss ranked from least to most as follows: Charisma Diamond, P60, Z250, Clearfil AP-X and Surefil. Regarding hardness, the rank from highest to lowest as follows: Clearfil AP-X, P60, Surefil, Z250, Charisma Diamond. The interactions between wear resistance and microhardness were not significant. Conclusions: The custom-made machine is considered suitable to simulate sliding of an antagonist cusp on an opposing occlusal composite restoration. Nanofilled composite may have superior wear compared to other composite resins. PMID:23844265

  1. Evaluation of boundary lubricants using steady-state wear and friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A friction and wear study was made at 20 C to establish operating limits and procedures for obtaining improved reproducibility and reliability in boundary lubrication testing. Ester base and C-other base fluids were used to lubricate a pure iron rider in sliding contact with a rotating M-50 steel disk in a pin-on-disk apparatus. Results of a parametric study with varying loads and speeds slowed that satisfactory test conditions for studying the direction and wear characteristics in the boundary lubrication regime with this test device were found to be 1 kilogram load; 7 to 9 meters-per-minute (50 rpm) surface speed; dry air test atmosphere (less than 100 ppm H2O); and use of a time stepwise procedure for measuring wear. Highly reproducible steady-state wear rates resulted from the two fluid studies which had a linearity of about 99 percent after initially higher wear rates and friction coefficients during run-in periods of 20 to 40 minutes.

  2. Effect of gamma irradiation on the friction and wear of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R.; Hady, W. F.; Crugnola, A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of sterilization gamma irradiation on the friction and wear properties of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) sliding against stainless steel 316L in dry air at 23 C is investigated, the results to be used in the development of artificial joints which are to surgically replace diseased human joints. A pin-on-disk sliding friction apparatus is used, a constant sliding speed in the range 0.061-0.27 m/s is maintained, a normal load of 1 kgf is applied with dead weight, and the irradiation dose levels are: 0, 2.5, and 5.0 Mrad. Wear and friction data and conditions for each of the ten tests are summarized, and include: (1) wear volume as a function of the sliding distance for the irradiation levels, (2) incremental wear rate, and (3) coefficient of friction as a function of the sliding distance. It is shown that (1) the friction and wear properties of UHMWPE are not significantly changed by the irradiation doses of 2.5 and 5.0 Mrad, (2) the irradiation increases the amount of insoluble gel as well as the amount of low molecular weight material, and (3) after run-in the wear rate is either steady or gradually decreases as a function of the sliding distance.

  3. Contrasting Effects of Physical Wear on Elution of Two Antibiotics from Orthopedic Cement

    PubMed Central

    Dodds, S.; Akid, R.; Stephenson, J.; Nichol, T.; Banerjee, R. D.; Stockley, I.; Townsend, R.

    2012-01-01

    The use of antibiotics as a supplement to bone cement for the purposes of providing a local release of antibiotics is common practice in arthroplasty surgery and the kinetics of elution of the antibiotics in such systems have been investigated previously. However, in these previous studies no account was taken of the potential effects that wear may have on the elution kinetics of the antibiotic. Here, we have modified an existing wear testing rig to allow the simultaneous study of the elution kinetics of bone cement samples containing antibiotics being subjected to immersion only and immersion and conjoint wear. The results show contrasting effects with two commonly used antibiotics. Bone cement containing daptomycin showed no substantial change in antibiotic elution due to wear, while cement containing gentamicin (the most commonly used antibiotic in this application) in contrast demonstrated a substantial reduction in the rate of antibiotic elution when wear was applied. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a possible explanation for these diverse results, due to wear-induced “sealing” of the surface in conjunction with the crystal morphology of the antibiotic. PMID:22155831

  4. Dental topography and molar wear in Alouatta palliata from Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Dennis, John C; Ungar, Peter S; Teaford, Mark F; Glander, Kenneth E

    2004-10-01

    Paleoprimatologists depend on relationships between form and function of teeth to reconstruct the diets of fossil species. Most of this work has been limited to studies of unworn teeth. A new approach, dental topographic analysis, allows the characterization and comparison of worn primate teeth. Variably worn museum specimens have been used to construct species-specific wear sequences so that measurements can be compared by wear stage among taxa with known differences in diet. This assumes that individuals in a species tend to wear their molar teeth in similar ways, a supposition that has yet to be tested. Here we evaluate this assumption with a longitudinal study of changes in tooth form over time in primates. Fourteen individual mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata) were captured and then recaptured after 2, 4, and 7 years when possible at Hacienda La Pacifica in Costa Rica between 1989-1999. Dental impressions were taken each time, and molar casts were produced and analyzed using dental topographic analysis. Results showed consistent decreases in crown slope and occlusal relief. In contrast, crown angularity, a measure of surface jaggedness, remained fairly constant except with extreme wear. There were no evident differences between specimens collected in different microhabitats. These results suggest that different individual mantled howling monkeys wear their teeth down in similar ways, evidently following a species-specific wear sequence. Dental topographic analysis may therefore be used to compare morphology among similarly worn individuals from different species.

  5. Wear behaviors of HVOF sprayed WC-12Co coatings by laser remelting under lubricated condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejun, Kong; Tianyuan, Sheng

    2017-03-01

    A HVOF (high velocity oxygen fuel) sprayed WC-12Co coating was remelted with a CO2 laser. The surface-interface morphologies and phases were analyzed by means of SEM (scanning electron microscopy), and XRD (X-ray diffraction), respectively. The friction and wear behaviors of WC-12Co coating under the dry and lubricated conditions were investigated with a wear test. The morphologies and distributions of chemical elements on worn scar were analyzed with a SEM, and its configured EDS (energy diffusive spectrometer), respectively, and the effects of lubricated condition on COFs (coefficient of friction) and wear performance were also discussed. The results show that the adhesion between the coating and the substrate is stronger after laser remetling (LR), in which mechanical bonding, accompanying with metallurgical bonding, was found. At the load of 80 N, the average COF under the dry and lubricated friction conditions is 0.069, and 0.052, respectively, the latter lowers by 23.3% than the former, and the wear rate under the lubricated condition decreases by 302.3% than that under the dry condition. The wear mechanism under the dry and lubrication conditions is primarily composed of abrasive wear, cracking, and fatigue failure.

  6. The abrasive wear of plasma sprayed nanoscale tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewksbury, Graham Alfred

    Thermal spray coatings composed of a variety of carbide sizes and cobalt contents were sprayed with a high energy plasma spray system. The size of the carbides used fell into three rough groupings, micrometer scale carbides (1--2 mum), submicrometer (700--300 nm), and nanoscale (≈100 nm). The feedstock powder was evaluated in terms of their size distribution, external morphology, internal morphology, and initial carbide size. Two different fixtures were used in spraying to evaluate the effect of cooling rate on the wear resistance of the coatings. The microstructures of the sprayed coatings were examined using optical metallography, SEM, FESEM, TEM, XRD and chemical analysis. The coatings were evaluated in low stress abrasive wear by the ASTM G-65 Dry Sand Rubber Wheel test. Furthermore, the porosity and hardness of the coatings were evaluated. The cobalt content was found to be the predominant influence on the wear rate of the coatings. The decrease in the carbide size was not found to effect the wear rate of the coatings. Coatings sprayed on the 'hot' fixture were found to have slightly improved wear resistance as compared to coatings sprayed on the 'cold' fixture. The wear rates of the coatings were found to be a function of the WC/Co volume ratio.

  7. Friction and Wear Behavior of Carbon Fabric-Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Y.; De Baets, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    Besides intrinsic material properties, weight/energy savings and wear performance play an important role in the selection of materials for any engineering application. The tribological behavior of carbon fabric-reinforced epoxy composites produced by molding technique was investigated using a reciprocating pin-on-plate configuration. It was shown that the wear rate considerably decreased (by a factor of approx. 8) with the introduction of the reinforcing carbon fabric into the epoxy matrix. It was observed that the wear rate of the tested composites increased with an increase in normal load. Moreover, the coefficient of friction for epoxy/steel and composites/steel tribo-pairs was also determined and decreased with increasing load. By means of scanning electron microscopy of the wear tracks, different wear mechanisms such as matrix wear, matrix fatigue and cracking, matrix debris formation for neat epoxy together with fabric/fiber thinning, fabric breakage and fabric/matrix debonding for the reinforced epoxy could be distinguished.

  8. Friction and wear characteristics of polymer-matrix friction materials reinforced by brass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Jia; Xiaomei, Ling

    2004-10-01

    This study is an investigation of friction materials reinforced by brass fibers, and the influence of the organic adhesion agent, cast-iron debris, brass fiber, and graphite powder on the friction-wear characteristics. Friction and wear testing was performed on a block-on-ring tribometer (MM200). The friction pair consisted of the friction materials and gray cast iron (HT200). The worn surface layers formed by sliding dry friction were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray energy-dispersive analysis (EDX), and differential thermal analysis-thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TAG). The experimental results showed that the friction coefficient and the wear loss of the friction materials increased with the increase of cast-iron debris, but decreased with the increase of graphite powder content. The friction coefficient and wear loss also increased slightly when the mass fraction of brass fibers was over 19%. When the mass fraction of organic adhesion agent was about 10 11%, the friction materials had excellent friction-wear performance. Surface heating from friction pyrolyzes the organic ingredient in the worn surface layer of the friction materials, with the pyrolysis depth being about 0.5 mm. The surface layers were rich in iron but poor in copper, and they were formed on the worn surface of the friction material. When the mass fraction of brass fibers was about 16 20%, the friction materials possessed better wear resistance and a copper transfer film formed on the friction surface of counterpart. Fatigue cracks were also found in the worn surface of the gray cast-iron counterpart, with fatigue wear being the prevailing wear mechanism.

  9. Tread wear and footprint geometrical characters of truck bus radial tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chen; Wang, Guolin; An, Dengfeng; Ma, Yinwei

    2013-05-01

    Wear and mileage performance are the foremost performances for truck bus radial (TBR) tires. There are a lot of researches about the tire wear performance as well as the contact patch phenomenon by using finite element analysis (FEA) method or testing. But there is little published data on the correlations between the footprint geometry and the tread wear performance of tires. In this paper, an experiment on tire-ground performance of TBR tires is carried out by using Tekscan. The real-time changes of contact-area pressure distribution that occurred during the process of continuous load and unload are recorded. Three types of tires that act differently in behavior under normal usage are analyzed. A new method of researching in tire tread wear, which focuses on the geometrical characters of the footprint, is put forward. The experimental results of the three tires are described by using footprint geometrical characters. On the basis of studying the changing laws of footprint geometrical characters during the loading process and considering consumer survey and factory feedback information, the correlations between the geometrical character of footprints and tread destruction form are built. The analyzed results show that a greater contact area coefficient and a steady coefficient of contact result in a better wear performance for TBR tires. The footprint-shape coefficient changing laws in the process of loading are found to have a very good coincidence with the tread wear of the three types of tires. Tires with a smaller footprint-shape coefficient are likely to have an average tread wear while avoiding the shoulder wear first. The proposed research provides a new solution to predict tire-ground performance at the point of footprint and several useful references for improving tire design.

  10. Wear and Reactivity Studies of Melt infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarmon, David C.; Ojard, Greg; Brewer, David N.

    2013-01-01

    As interest grows in the use of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for critical gas turbine engine components, the effects of the CMCs interaction with the adjoining structure needs to be understood. A series of CMC/material couples were wear tested in a custom elevated temperature test rig and tested as diffusion couples, to identify interactions. Specifically, melt infiltrated silicon carbide/silicon carbide (MI SiC/SiC) CMC was tested in combination with a nickel-based super alloy, Waspaloy, a thermal barrier coating, Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ), and a monolithic ceramic, silicon nitride (Si3N4). To make the tests more representative of actual hardware, the surface of the CMC was kept in the as-received state (not machined) with the full surface features/roughness present. Test results include: scanning electron microscope characterization of the surfaces, micro-structural characterization, and microprobe analysis.

  11. Abrasive Wear Performance of Aluminium Modified Epoxy-Glass Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Vikram G.; Mishra, Punyapriya; Al Dabbas, Hassan A.; Panda, H. S.; Fernandez, Johnathan Bruce

    2015-07-01

    For a long time, Aluminum filled epoxies molds have been used in rapid tooling process. These molds are very economical when applied in manufacturing of low volume of plastic parts. To improve the thermal conductivity of the material, the metallic filler material is added to it and the glass fiber improves the wear resistance of the material. These two important parameters establish the life of composites. The present work reports on abrasive wear behavior of Aluminum modified epoxy and glass fiber composite with 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% of aluminum particles. Through pin on disc wear testing machine, we studied the wear behaviors of composites, and all these samples were fabricated by using hand layup process. Epoxy resin was used as matrix material which was reinforced with Glass fiber and Aluminum as filler. The composite with 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% of Al was cast with dimensions 100 × 100 × 6 mm. The specimens were machined to a size of 6 × 6 × 4 mm for abrasive testing. Abrasive tests were carried out for different grit paper sizes, i.e., 150, 320, 600 at different sliding distance, i.e., 20, 40, 60 m at different loads of 5, 10 and 15 N and at constant speed. The weight loss due to wear was calculated along with coefficient of friction. Hardness was found using Rockwell hardness machine. The SEM morphology of the worn out surface wear was analyzed to understand the wear mechanism. Results showed that the addition of Aluminum particles was beneficial for low abrasive conditions.

  12. Wear of gamma-crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups against roughened femoral balls.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H; Shen, F W; DiMaio, W; Lancaster, J G

    1999-12-01

    Crosslinking of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene has been shown to markedly improve its wear resistance in clinical studies and laboratory tests using hip joint simulators. However, because most of the laboratory studies have been done under clean conditions using prosthesis-quality, highly polished counterfaces, there is concern regarding how well an intentionally crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cup will resist abrasion by a femoral ball that has been damaged by third-body abrasion in vivo. To investigate this, conventional and radiation crosslinked-remelted acetabular cups of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene were tested in a hip joint simulator bearing against smooth femoral balls and against balls with moderate and severe roughening. Cups were tested with and without aging to accelerate any oxidative degradation. The crosslinked cups were produced by exposing extruded GUR 4150 bar stock of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene to 5 Mrad gamma radiation under a partial vacuum and then the bars were remelted to extinguish residual free radicals. Artificial aging at 70 degrees C under 5 atm oxygen for 14 days induced negligible oxidation in the crosslinked and remelted material. Against smooth balls, the wear of the crosslinked cups, with or without aging, averaged approximately 15% of that of the conventional cups. Against the moderately rough balls, the wear rate of the conventional cups was unchanged, whereas the wear rate increased slightly for the nonaged and aged crosslinked cups, but was still only 26% and 20% of that of the conventional cups, respectively. Against extremely rough balls, the mean wear rates increased markedly for each material such that during the final 1 million cycle interval, the average wear rates of the nonaged and the aged crosslinked cups were 72% and 47% of that of the conventional cups, respectively. That is, the crosslinked polyethylene showed substantially better wear resistance than conventional polyethylene

  13. The effects of three different food acids on the attrition-corrosion wear of human dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yichi; Arsecularatne, Joseph A.; Hoffman, Mark

    2015-07-01

    With increased consumption of acidic drinks and foods, the wear of human teeth due to attrition in acidic environments is an increasingly important issue. Accordingly, the present paper investigates in vitro the wear of human enamel in three different acidic environments. Reciprocating wear tests in which an enamel cusp slides on an enamel flat surface were carried out using acetic, citric and lactic acid lubricants (at pH 3-3.5). Distilled water was also included as a lubricant for comparison. Focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy imaging were then used to investigate the enamel subsurfaces following wear tests. Nanoindentation was used to ascertain the changes in enamel mechanical properties. The study reveals crack generation along the rod boundaries due to the exposure of enamel to the acidic environments. The wear mechanism changes from brittle fracture in distilled water to ploughing or shaving of the softened layer in acidic environments, generating a smooth surface with the progression of wear. Moreover, nanoindentation results of enamel samples which were exposed to the above acids up to a duration of the wear tests show decreasing hardness and Young’s modulus with exposure time.

  14. Wear studies on the likely performance of CFR-PEEK/CoCrMo for use as artificial joint bearing materials.

    PubMed

    Scholes, S C; Unsworth, A

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that a reduction in the volume of wear produced by articulating surfaces in artificial joints is likely to result in a lower incidence of failure due to wear particle induced osteolysis. Therefore, new materials have been introduced in an effort to produce bearing surfaces with lower, more biologically acceptable wear. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK-OPTIMA) has been successfully used in a number of implant applications due to its combination of mechanical strength and biocompatibility. Pin-on-plate wear tests were performed on various combinations of PEEK-OPTIMA and carbon fibre reinforced PEEK-OPTIMA (CFR-PEEK) against various CoCrMo alloys to assess the potential of this material combination for use in orthopaedic implants. The PEEK/low carbon CoCrMo produced the highest wear. CFR-PEEK against high carbon or low carbon CoCrMo provided low wear factors. Pin-on-plate tests performed on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) against CoCrMo (using comparable test conditions) have shown similar or higher wear than that found for CFR-PEEK/CoCrMo. This study gives confidence in the likelihood of this material combination performing well in orthopaedic applications.

  15. Studies on the Sliding Wear Performance of Plasma Spray Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Maninder; Singh, Harpreet; Singh, Balraj; Singh, Bhupinder

    2010-01-01

    Two metallic powders namely Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al were coated on AISI 309 SS steel by shrouded plasma spray process. The wear behavior of the bare, Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al-coated AISI 309 SS steel was investigated according to ASTM Standard G99-03 on a Pin-on-Disc Wear Test Rig. The wear tests were carried out at normal loads of 30 and 50 N with a sliding velocity of 1 m/s. Cumulative wear rate and coefficient of friction (μ) were calculated for all the cases. The worn-out surfaces were then examined by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Both the as-sprayed coatings exhibited typical splat morphology. The XRD analysis indicated the formation of Ni phase for the Ni-20Cr coating and Ni3Al phase for the Ni3Al coating. It has been concluded that the plasma-sprayed Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al coatings can be useful to reduce the wear rate of AISI 309 SS steel. The coatings were found to be adherent to the substrate steel during the wear tests. The plasma-sprayed Ni3Al coating has been recommended as a better choice to reduce the wear of AISI 309 SS steel, in comparison with the Ni-20Cr coating.

  16. The interactions between attrition, abrasion and erosion in tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Shellis, R Peter; Addy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Tooth wear is the result of three processes: abrasion (wear produced by interaction between teeth and other materials), attrition (wear through tooth-tooth contact) and erosion (dissolution of hard tissue by acidic substances). A further process (abfraction) might potentiate wear by abrasion and/or erosion. Knowledge of these tooth wear processes and their interactions is reviewed. Both clinical and experimental observations show that individual wear mechanisms rarely act alone but interact with each other. The most important interaction is the potentiation of abrasion by erosive damage to the dental hard tissues. This interaction seems to be the major factor in occlusal and cervical wear. The available evidence is insufficient to establish whether abfraction is an important contributor to tooth wear in vivo. Saliva can modulate erosive/abrasive tooth wear, especially through formation of pellicle, but cannot prevent it.

  17. Shuttle landing runway modification to improve tire spin-up wear performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Yager, Thomas J.; Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of tire spin-up wear tests on a simulated Kennedy Space Center (KSC) runway that were carried out to investigate the tire wear problem for Space Shuttle landings on the KSC runway and to test several modifications of the runway surface designed to alleviate the problem. It was found that the runway surface produced by a concrete smoothing machine using cutters spaced one and three-quarters blades per centimeter provided adequate wet cornering while limiting spin-up wear. Based on the test results, the KSC runway was smoothed for about 1066 m at each end, leaving the original high friction surface, for better wet steering and braking, in the 2438-m central section.

  18. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    PubMed Central

    Levrini, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction) studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp), to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders). It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction. PMID:25548769

  19. Dental wear: a scanning electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Levrini, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giulia; Raspanti, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction) studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp), to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders). It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction.

  20. Tooth wear: diet analysis and advice.

    PubMed

    Young, William George

    2005-04-01

    Diet analysis and advice for patients with tooth wear is potentially the most logical intervention to arrest attrition, erosion and abrasion. It is saliva that protects the teeth against corrosion by the acids which soften enamel and make it susceptible to wear. Thus the lifestyles and diet of patients at risk need to be analysed for sources of acid and reasons for lost salivary protection. Medical conditions which put patients at risk of tooth wear are principally: asthma, bulimia nervosa, caffeine addiction, diabetes mellitus, exercise dehydration, functional depression, gastroesophageal reflux in alcoholism, hypertension and syndromes with salivary hypofunction. The sources of acid are various, but loss of salivary protection is the common theme. In healthy young Australians, soft drinks are the main source of acid, and exercise dehydration the main reason for loss of salivary protection. In the medically compromised, diet acids and gastroesophageal reflux are the sources, but medications are the main reasons for lost salivary protection. Diet advice for patients with tooth wear must: promote a healthy lifestyle and diet strategy that conserves the teeth by natural means of salivary stimulation; and address the specific needs of the patients' oral and medical conditions. Individualised, patient-empowering erosion WATCH strategies; on Water, Acid, Taste, Calcium and Health, are urgently required to combat the emerging epidemic of tooth wear currently being experienced in westernised societies.

  1. Low wear rate of UHMWPE against zirconia ceramic (Y-PSZ) in comparison to alumina ceramic and SUS 316L alloy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Oka, M; Ikeuchi, K; Shimizu, K; Yamamuro, T; Okumura, H; Kotoura, Y

    1991-07-01

    Partially stabilized zirconia ceramic is being recognized among ceramics for its high strength and toughness. With this ceramic, is possible to manufacture a 22-mm-size femoral head for low friction arthroplasty of the hip joint in association with an ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene socket. Wear-resistant properties of zirconia ceramic were screened on two principally different wear devices. Sterile calf bovine serum, physiological saline, and distilled water were chosen as the lubricant fluid media. Depending on the lubricant medium, the wear factor of polyethylene against zirconia ceramic counterfaces was 40 to 60% less than that against alumina ceramic counterfaces, and 5 to 10 times lower than with the SUS316L metal counterfaces. Polyethylene wear against metal was more susceptible in saline in which it had 2 to 3 times higher wear rate than with serum. On the other hand, different fluid media had little effect on polyethylene wear against ceramic counterfaces. In each set of tests, the wear factor obtained on an unidirectional wear device showed 10 to 15 times higher values, in comparison to the wear factor estimated on a reciprocating wear device.

  2. Braking, steering, and wear performance of radial-belted and bias-ply aircraft tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Davis, Pamela A.; Stubbs, Sandy M.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary steering, braking, and tread wear performance results from testing of radial-belted and bias-ply aircraft tires at NASA Langley are described. An overview of the joint NASA/FAA/industry START program is presented. Attention is given to the Langley Test Facility, equipment and future activities.

  3. Wear materials; 2: Optimizing liner alloy choice

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanovic, T. )

    1993-12-01

    This paper describes a new liner designed for a copper ore crusher in Yugoslavia. The experience gained over the past ten years of operation at the Bor copper mines has shown that correct selection of wear material for crusher liners is critical to successful plant performance. With the new wear resistant liners, the crusher development program has increased the concentrator throughput from 8.0 to 9.6 million tons/year. The ultimate goal of the project is to identify the proper liner material that will extend liner life, reduce cyclic stress on major crusher components, and simplify crusher control and adjustment. This paper describes the various liners materials and the mechanisms of wear.

  4. Overview of surface engineering and wear

    SciTech Connect

    Budinski, K.G.

    1996-12-31

    Surface engineering is a multidiscipline activity aimed at tailoring the properties or surfaces of engineering materials to improve their function or service life. As applied to metals, surface engineering includes processes such as plating, diffusion treatment, physical and chemical vapor deposition, ion implantation, thermal spray coatings, selective hardening, hardfacing, and a variety of less-used and proprietary processes. These processes will be described briefly and it is shown that each process has a niche where it works better or is more cost effective than competing surface engineering treatments or bulk materials. This paper reviews the various forms of wear that occur in industrial environments. Techniques are described to match available surface engineering processes with wear situations. The goal is to present selection guidelines for machine designers and industrial operating personnel on the use of surface engineering to solve wear problems.

  5. Hardfacing and wear plates battle abrasion

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.F.

    1983-06-01

    This article examines abrasion-resistant steels and hardfacing as two effective weapons at the disposal of material handlers. It points out that abrasion is probably the single most destructive form of wear in the mixing and processing of coal. Particulate matter such as quartz sand and other minerals including coal curtail in-service life of dragline buckets, chute, crusher rolls, gates and valves, exhauster fan blades, target plates, truck beds, hoppers, vibrating pans, grinding mills, piping elbows, etc. The advantages of abrasion-resistant steels and hardfacing can be obtained in the form of a composite wear plate-hardfacing on a carbon steel backup plate. It concludes that the composite wear plate represents a major innovation since its advantages include ease of handling, low cost and easy installation, minimum on-site welding time and versatility. Its use is limited only to the consumer's creativity in application.

  6. Some wear studies on aircraft brake systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    An initial investigation of worn surfaces in friction pads and steel rotors used in current aircraft brakes was carried out using electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction analysis. It consists of the topographical study and the analysis of chemical element distribution. Based upon this initial examination, two approaches, microscopic and macroscopic have been conducted to interpret and formulate the wear mechanism of the aircraft brake materials. Microscopically, the wear particles were examined. The initiation and growth of surface cracks and the oxidation were emphasized in this investigation. Macroscopically, it has been found that, for the current copper based brake material sliding against 17-22 AS steel in a caliper brake, the surface temperature raised due to frictional heat is nonlinearly proportional to the load applied and slide time with speed at 1750 rpm. The wear of brake materials is then proportional to this temperature and is also a function of the melting temperature for copper.

  7. Adhesion and wear resistance of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies into the nature of bonding at the interface between two solids in contact or a solid and deposited film have provided a better understanding of those properties important to the adhesive wear resistance of materials. Analytical and experimental progress are reviewed. For simple metal systems the adhesive bond forces are related to electronic wave function overlap. With metals in contact with nonmetals, molecular-orbital energy, and density of states, respectively can provide insight into adhesion and wear. Experimental results are presented which correlate adhesive forces measured between solids and the electronic surface structures. Orientation, surface reconstruction, surface segregation, adsorption are all shown to influence adhesive interfacial strength. The interrelationship between adhesion and the wear of the various materials as well as the life of coatings applied to substrates are discussed. Metallic systems addressed include simple metals and alloys and these materials in contact with themselves, both oxide and nonoxide ceramics, diamond, polymers, and inorganic coating compounds, h as diamondlike carbon.

  8. The effect of lubrication on the friction and wear of Biolox®delta.

    PubMed

    Ma, L; Rainforth, W M

    2012-07-01

    The performance of total hip-joint replacements depends strongly on the state of lubrication in vivo. In order to test candidate prosthetic materials, in vitro wear testing requires a lubricant that behaves in the same manner as synovial fluid. The current study investigated three lubricants and looked in detail at the lubrication conditions and the consequent effect on ball-on-flat reciprocating wear mechanisms of Biolox®delta against alumina. Biolox®delta, the latest commercial material for artificial hip-joint replacements, is an alumina-matrix composite with improved mechanical properties through the addition of zirconia and other mixed oxides. Three commonly used laboratory lubricants, ultra pure water, 25 vol.% new-born calf serum solution and 1 wt.% carboxymethyl cellulose sodium salt (CMC-Na) solution, were used for the investigation. The lubrication regimes were defined by constructing Stribeck curves. Full fluid-film lubrication was observed for the serum solution whereas full fluid-film and mixed lubrications were observed in both water and the CMC-Na solution. The wear rates in the CMC-Na and new-born calf serum were similar, but were an order of magnitude higher in water. The worn surfaces all exhibited pitting, which is consistent with the transition from mild wear to severe or "stripe" wear. The extent of pitting was greatest in the serum solution, but least in the water. On all worn surfaces, the zirconia appeared to have fully transformed from tetragonal to monoclinic symmetry. However, there was no evidence of microcracking associated with the transformed zirconia. Nevertheless, AFM indicated that zirconia was lost preferentially to the alumina grains during sliding. Thus, the current study has shown conclusively that the wear mechanisms for Biolox®delta clearly depend on the lubricant used, even where wear rates were similar.

  9. Wear Behaviour of Al-6061/SiC Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashok Kumar; Srivastava, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Aluminium Al-6061 base composites, reinforced with SiC particles having mesh size of 150 and 600, which is fabricated by stir casting method and their wear resistance and coefficient of friction has been investigated in the present study as a function of applied load and weight fraction of SiC varying from 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 %. The dry sliding wear properties of composites were investigated by using Pin-on-disk testing machine at sliding velocity of 2 m/s and sliding distance of 2000 m over a various loads of 10, 20 and 30 N. The result shows that the reinforcement of the metal matrix with SiC particulates up to weight percentage of 35 % reduces the wear rate. The result also show that the wear of the test specimens increases with the increasing load and sliding distance. The coefficient of friction slightly decreases with increasing weight percentage of reinforcements. The wear surfaces are examined by optical microscopy which shows that the large grooved regions and cavities with ceramic particles are found on the worn surface of the composite alloy. This indicates an abrasive wear mechanism, which is essentially a result of hard ceramic particles exposed on the worn surfaces. Further, it was found from the experimentation that the wear rate decreases linearly with increasing weight fraction of SiC and average coefficient of friction decreases linearly with increasing applied load, weight fraction of SiC and mesh size of SiC. The best result has been obtained at 35 % weight fraction and 600 mesh size of SiC.

  10. Effect of deep cryogenic treatment on the microstructure and wear performance of Cr-Mn-Cu white cast iron grinding media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyarthi, M. K.; Ghose, A. K.; Chakrabarty, I.

    2013-12-01

    The phase transformation and grinding wear behavior of Cr-Mn-Cu white cast irons subjected to destabilization treatment followed by air cooling or deep cryogenic treatment were studied as a part of the development program of substitute alloys for existing costly wear resistant alloys. The microstructural evolution during heat treatment and the consequent improvement in grinding wear performance were evaluated with optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, bulk hardness, impact toughness and corrosion rate measurements, laboratory ball mill grinding wear test etc. The deep cryogenic treatment has a significant effect in minimizing the retained austenite content and converts it to martensite embedded with fine M7C3 alloy carbides. The cumulative wear losses in cryotreated alloys are lesser than those with conventionally destabilized alloys followed by air cooling both in wet and dry grinding conditions. The cryotreated Cr-Mn-Cu irons exhibit comparable wear performance to high chromium irons.

  11. Diamond wheel wear sensing with acoustic emission --wheel wear mechanisms and the effects of process variables

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jianshe; Dornfeld, D.; Syoji, Katsuo

    1996-12-31

    The wear of diamond wheels has significant influence on the surface finish of ground ceramics and the resulting subsurface fracture damage. For optimization and control of the grinding process it is necessary to monitor the wear states of the grinding wheels. A project on diamond wheel wear sensing with acoustic emission was started recently in the Laboratory of Manufacturing Automation at the University of California at Berkeley. The main aims of the project are: (a) to identify the possible wheel wear patterns at different combinations of bond materials, grits, and grinding conditions; (b) to develop suitable AE signal processing methods to extract the AE features to represent the wheel wear characteristics, and establish a strategy for using AE for in-process monitoring of diamond wheel wear in grinding of ceramics. This paper presents the results of part of the project. It mainly focuses on the diamond wheel wear mechanisms, the effects of process variables including basic wheel elements and grinding parameters, and the relationship with AErms and AE frequency content.

  12. Influence of hip joint simulator design and mechanics on the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene bearings

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Murat; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Partridge, Susan; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    Hip joint simulators are used extensively for preclinical testing of hip replacements. The variation in simulator design and test conditions used worldwide can affect the tribological performance of polyethylene. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of simulator mechanics and design on the wear and creep of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene. In the first part of this study, an electromechanical simulator and pneumatic simulator were used to compare the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene components under the same standard gait conditions. In the second part of the study, the same electromechanical hip joint simulator was used to investigate the influence of kinematics on wear. Higher wear rates and penetration depths were observed from the electromechanical simulator compared with the pneumatic simulator. When adduction/abduction was introduced to the gait cycle, there was no significant difference in wear with that obtained under the gait cycle condition without adduction/abduction. This study confirmed the influence of hip simulator design and loading conditions on the wear of polyethylene, and therefore direct comparisons of absolute wear rates between different hip joint simulators should be avoided. This study also confirmed that the resulting wear path was the governing factor in obtaining clinically relevant wear rates, and this can be achieved with either two axes or three axes of rotations. However, three axes of rotation (with the inclusion of adduction/abduction) more closely replicate clinical conditions and should therefore be the design approach for newly developed hip joint simulators used for preclinical testing. PMID:27160559

  13. Microstructure and Wear Behavior of Laser-Aided Direct Metal Deposited Co-285 and Co-285 + WC Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, G. F.; Liu, C. S.; Song, L. J.; Mazumder, J.

    2010-04-01

    The laser-aided direct metal deposition technique was used to form Co-285 superalloy (A) and Co-285 + 30 wt pct WC (B) wear-resistant coatings on 1018 mild steel. Microstructure, element distribution, phases, microhardness distribution, and wear properties of the two coatings were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry, scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), microhardness testing, and wear testing. Results indicate that both of the coatings had dense structures, as well as a metallurgical bonding with the substrate. In addition, coating B had microcracks and randomly distributed undissolved WC particles in it. Coating A was composed of α-Co dendrites, Co3W precipitates, and eutectics, while coating B was composed of undissolved WC, Co-rich dendrites, eutectics, and the W-rich third phases with various shapes. Crack behavior in coating B was also discussed. The average microhardness of the matrix in coating B was 751 HV0.5, which was almost 1.8 times that of coating A (420 HV0.5). Wear results indicate that the wear resistance of coating B was improved by 6.8 times compared with that of coating A. The improvement in wear resistance is believed to be partially due to the undissolved WC and the formation of large numbers of carbides in the matrix working as wear-resistant phases and partially due to the good bonding between the hard phases and the tough matrix.

  14. Disposable hydrogel contact lenses for extended wear.

    PubMed

    Donshik, P; Weinstock, F J; Wechsler, S; Asbell, P; Atwood, J; Davis, H; Farkas, B; Farris, R L; Gruber, E; Hartstein, J

    1988-01-01

    Nine ophthalmologists and nine optometrists conducted a premarket study of the Acuvue disposable contact lens manufactured by Vistakon, Inc. Of the 812 patients offered the lens, 733 accepted it and were enrolled in the study. These patients were fitted with the lens and followed for a period of 8 months. Over 98% of these patients had 20/25 or better vision on initial fitting; and subjective ratings of lens comfort were very good. Only 3.7% (27 of 733) discontinued wearing their lenses during the study period. Thirty-four patients (5.6%) experienced a problem while wearing their contact lenses.

  15. Saliva parameters and erosive wear in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zwier, N; Huysmans, M C D N J M; Jager, D H J; Ruben, J; Bronkhorst, E M; Truin, G J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between several parameters of saliva and erosive wear in adolescents. (Un-)stimulated saliva was collected from 88 adolescents with erosion and 49 controls (age 16 ± 1 years). Flow rate, pH and buffer capacity were determined immediately. Total protein content, carbonic anhydrase VI, amylase, albumin, calcium, phosphate, urea, sodium, chloride and potassium were measured at a later time. Unstimulated flow rate was found to be significantly lower in subjects with erosive wear (p = 0.016). The chloride concentration in unstimulated saliva was found to be significantly higher in the erosion group (p = 0.019).

  16. Wear Analysis of Wind Turbine Gearbox Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Walker, Larry R; Xu, Hanbing; Parten, Randy J; Qu, Jun; Geer, Tom

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this effort was to investigate and characterize the nature of surface damage and wear to wind turbine gearbox bearings returned from service in the field. Bearings were supplied for examination by S. Butterfield and J. Johnson of the National Wind Technology Center (NREL), Boulder, Colorado. Studies consisted of visual examination, optical and electron microscopy, dimensional measurements of wear-induced macro-scale and micro-scale features, measurements of macro- and micro-scale hardness, 3D imaging of surface damage, studies of elemental distributions on fracture surfaces, and examinations of polished cross-sections of surfaces under various etched and non-etched conditions.

  17. Effect of Heat Treatment on Wear Resistance of Nickel Aluminide Coatings Deposited by HVOF and PTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benegra, M.; Santana, A. L. B.; Maranho, O.; Pintaude, G.

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to compare the wear resistance of nickel aluminide coatings deposited using plasma transferred arc (PTA) and high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) processes. Wear resistance was measured in rubber wheel abrasion tests. In both deposition processes, the same raw material (nickel aluminide powder) was atomized and deposited on a 316L steel plate substrate. After deposition, specimens were subjected to thermal cycling, aiming solubilization and precipitation. Coatings deposited using PTA developed different microstructures as a result of the incorporation of substrate elements. However, despite the presence of these microstructures, they performed better than coatings processed using HVOF before the heat treatment. After thermal cycling, the superficial hardness after the wear tests for both processes was similar, resulting in similar mass losses.

  18. Composition, microstructure, hardness, and wear properties of high-speed steel rolls

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.W.; Lee, H.C.; Lee, S.

    1999-02-01

    The effects of alloying elements on the microstructural factors, hardness, and wear properties of four high-speed steel (HSS) rolls fabricated by centrifugal casting were investigated. A hot-rolling simulation test was carried out using a high-temperature wear tester capable of controlling speed, load, and temperature. The test results revealed that the HSS roll containing a larger amount of vanadium showed the best wear resistance because it contained a number of hard MC-type carbides. However, it showed a very rough roll surface because of cracking along cell boundaries, the preferential removal of the matrix, and the sticking of the rolled material onto the roll surface during the wear process, thereby leading to an increase in the friction coefficient and rolling force. In order to improve wear resistance with consideration to surface roughness, it is suggested that a reduction in the vanadium content, an increase in solid-solution hardening by adding alloying elements, an increase in secondary hardening by precipitation of fine carbides in the matrix, and formation of refined prior austenite grains by preaustenitization treatment be employed to strengthen the matrix, which can hold hard carbides in it.

  19. "Severe" wear challenge to 36 mm mechanically enhanced highly crosslinked polyethylene hip liners.

    PubMed

    Bowsher, J G; Williams, P A; Clarke, I C; Green, D D; Donaldson, T K

    2008-07-01

    Our purpose was to compare the wear performance of mechanically enhanced 5Mrad highly crosslinked polyethylene (MEP, ArComXL) hip liners to (control) 3Mrad UHMWPE liners (ArCom) in 36 mm head size. As a more severe synergy of clinically relevant test models, we contrasted wear with custom roughened Co-Cr surfaces (Ra 500 nm) to the standard pristine Co-Cr heads (Ra < 20 nm) using a severe microseparation test mode in our hip simulator. We adopted a previously published model to estimate potential biological activity. On new Co-Cr heads, the MEP liners showed a 47% reduction in volumetric wear a 13% reduction in wear particle size and a 27% reduction in Functional Biological Activity (FBA) compared to our control. On rough Co-Cr heads, the MEP liners showed little advantage in terms of volumetric wear compared with the control. However, the MEP liners overall showed a 38% reduction in FBA compared to the control owing to a larger volume fraction of larger particles. Thus overall the MEP liners appeared to offer advantages in terms of reduced FBA indices.

  20. Wear rate quantifying in real-time using the charged particle surface activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Popa-Simil, L.; Voiculescu, D.; Racolta, P. M.

    1997-02-01

    Surface activation, commonly known as Thin Layer Activation (TLA), is currently employed in over 30 accelerator laboratories around the world for wear and/or corrosion monitoring in industrial plants [1-6]. TLA was primarily designed and developed to meet requirements of potential industrial partners, in order to transfer this technique from research to industry. The method consists of accelerated ion bombardment of a surface of interest, e.g., a machine part subjected to wear. Loss of material owing to wear, erosive corrosion or abrasion is characterized by monitoring the resultant changes in radioactivity. In principle, depending upon the case at hand, one may choose to measure either the remnant activity of the component of interest or to monitor the activity of the debris. For applications of the second type, especially when a lubricating agent is involved, dedicated installations have been constructed and adapted to an engine or a tribological testing stand in order to assure oil circulation around an externally placed detection gauge. This way, the wear particles suspended in the lubricant can be detected and the material loss rates quantified in real time. Moreover, in specific cases, such as the one presented in this paper, remnant activity measurements prove to be useful tools for complementary results. This paper provides a detailed presentation of such a case: in situ resistance-to-wear testing of two types of piston rings.

  1. Preparation and wear resistance of Ti-Zr-Ni quasicrystal and polyamide composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinlu; Li, Xuesong; Zhang, Zhenjiang; Zhang, Shanshan; Liu, Wanqiang; Wang, Limin

    2011-07-01

    Ti-Zr-Ni icosahedral quasicrystal powders (Ti-QC), prepared by mechanical alloying and then annealing in a vacuum furnace, were used as a novel filler material in polyamide 12 (PA12). The melt processability of the composite was studied using a Haake torque rheometer. This indicates that PA12/Ti-QC composites can be melt-processed into a wear-resistant material. Further, these composites, fabricated by compression molding, were tested in sliding wear against a polished bearing steel counterface. The results from wear testing show that the addition of Ti-QC filler to PA12 enhances wear resistance and reduces volume loss by half compared with neat PA12. Furthermore, it is found that the hardness of the composite increases with increasing content of Ti-QC filler. In addition, PA12/Ti-QC composites exhibit a slightly higher crystallization temperature and better thermal stability than PA12. These combined results demonstrate that Ti-QC filler may be a desirable alternative when attempting to increase the wear resistance of PA12.

  2. Effect of laser surface texturing (LST) on tribochemical films dynamics and friction and wear performance

    DOE PAGES

    Olofinjana, Bolutife; Lorenzo-Martin, Cinta; Ajayi, Oyelayo O.; ...

    2015-06-06

    Surface texturing or topographical design is one of the primary techniques to control friction and wear performance of surfaces in tribological contact. Laser surface texturing (LST), whereby a laser beam is used to produce regular arrays of dimples on a surface, has been demonstrated to reduce friction in conformal lubricated contacts. Friction and wear behavior under boundary lubrication is also known to be dependent on the formation and durability of the tribochemical film formed from lubricant additives. In this paper, the effects of LST on the formation and durability of tribochemical films and its consequent impacts on friction and wearmore » behavior in various lubrication regimes were evaluated. Friction and wear tests that cycled through different lubrication regimes were conducted with both polished and LST treated surfaces using a synthetic lubricant with and without model additives of ZDDP and MoDTC mixture. In the base oil without additives, LST produced noticeable reduction in friction in all lubrication regimes. However, with low-friction model additives, friction was higher in tests with LST due to significant differences in the tribochemical film formation in the polished and LST surfaces, as well as the sliding counterface. Continuous tribo-films were formed on ball conterface rubbed against polished surfaces while the films were streaky and discontinuous in ball rubbed against LST surfaces. LST produced more wear on the ball counterface in both base and additized oils. Lastly, no measurable wear was observed in both the polished and LST flat specimens.« less

  3. Wear behaviour of UHMWPE reinforced by carbon nanofiller and paraffin oil for joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Samy; Visco, Annamaria; Galtieri, Giovanna; Nocita, Davide; Espro, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    The majority of artificial joints incorporate biomedical grade Ultra High Molecular Weight Poly Ethylene (UHMWPE), whose wear is considered most important in controlling service time of the whole joint. The aim of this work was to improve wear resistance of UHMWPE through the addition of 0.5-2.0wt% of Carbon Nano Filler (CNF) and 2% wt of Paraffin Oil (PO) using ball milling (BM) and extrusion techniques (EX). The wear tests on these nanocomposites were conducted by a pin on disc in dry (air) and wet media (simulated synovial fluid or artificial lubricant, and bovine synovial fluid or natural lubricant). Mechanical tests (tensile and hardness), physical analysis (calorimetric, density, wet ability, roughness) and morphological observations were also performed. The experimental results showed that natural lubricant provides the greatest reduction in wear rate while the largest one occurred in air. Furthermore, the BM mixed nanocomposites with a filler load of 1.0% exhibited the best wear resistance among all the samples with an improvement of 42%, 64% and 83% in air, artificial and natural lubricant, respectively. This is due to its higher ductility and thermal features, and lower wet ability in the two lubricants.

  4. Effect of fullerene containing lubricants on wear resistance of machine components in boundary lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Andriy

    Fullerenes, a new form of carbon nanomaterials, possess unique physical and mechanical properties that make their use as additives to liquid lubricants potentially beneficial. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of fullerene containing lubricants on wear resistance of steel-bronze couples operating under boundary lubrication conditions. A mathematical model of deformed asperity contact was built to calculate real contact area and real contact pressure. Computer controlled wear friction testing methodology and equipment were designed, developed and implemented for obtaining reliable and objective experimental data. In addition, optical and scanning electron microscopy and standard surface texture analysis were employed. Heavy duty motor oil SAE 10 was modified by admixing fullerenes C60, a fullerene mixture of C60 and C70, fullerene containing soot, and graphite powder. The experiments showed that all of the selected fullerene additives dissolved in liquid lubricants reduce wear of the tested materials. In addition, it was found that despite improvements in wear resistance, the selected modified lubricants did not significantly change friction characteristics. Improvement of wear resistance of contact surfaces operating with fullerene modified lubricants can be explained by the presence of fullerenes in real contact while the liquid lubricant is squeezed out. Fullerenes are considered to function as minute hard particles that do not break down under applied normal force, and tend to separate direct contact of functional surfaces of selected materials.

  5. Wear characteristics of polished and glazed lithium disilicate ceramics opposed to three ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Akazawa, Nobutaka; Kodaira, Akihisa; Okamura, Kentaro; Matsumura, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the wear characteristics of a heat-pressed lithium disilicate ceramic material opposed to feldspathic porcelain, a lithium disilicate glass ceramic, and zirconia materials. Ceramic plate specimens were prepared from feldspathic porcelain (EX-3 nA1B), lithium disilicate glass ceramics (e.max CAD MO1/C14), and zirconia (Katana KT 10) and then ground or polished. Rounded rod specimens were fabricated from heat-pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramic (e.max press LT A3) and then glazed or polished. A sliding wear testing apparatus was used for wear testing. Wear of glazed rods was greater than that of polished rods when they were abraded with ground zirconia, ground porcelain, polished porcelain, or polished lithium disilicate ceramics. For both glazed and polished rods, wear was greater when the rods were abraded with ground plates. The findings indicate that application of a polished surface rather than a glazed surface is recommended for single restorations made of heat-pressed lithium disilicate material. In addition, care must be taken when polishing opposing materials, especially those used in occlusal contact areas. (J Oral Sci 58, 117-123, 2016).

  6. Effects of cryogenic treatment on the wear properties of brake discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadig, D. S.; Shivakumar, P.; Anoop, S.; Chinmay, Kulkarni; Divine, P. V.; Harsha, H. P.

    2017-02-01

    Disc brakes are invariably used in all the automobiles either to reduce the rotational speed of the wheel or to hold the vehicle stationary. During the braking action, the kinetic energy is converted into heat which can result in high temperatures resulting in fading of brake effects. Brake discs produced out of martensite stainless steel (SS410) are expected to exhibit high wear resistance properties with low value of coefficient of friction. These factors increase the useful life of the brake discs with minimal possibilities of brake fade. To study the effects of cryogenic treatment on the wear behaviour, two types of brake discs were cryotreated at 98K for 8 and 24 hours in a specially developed cryotreatment system using liquid nitrogen. Wear properties of the untreated and cryotreated test specimens were experimentally determined using the pin on disc type tribometer (ASTM G99-95). Similarly, the Rockwell hardness (HRC) of the specimens were tested in a hardness tester in accordance with ASTM E18. In this paper, the effects of cryotreatment on the wear and hardness properties of untreated and cryotreated brake discs are presented. Results indicate enhancement of wear properties and hardness after cryogenic treatment compared with the normal brakes discs.

  7. Tantalum-based thin film coatings for wear resistant arthroprostheses.

    PubMed

    Balagna, C; Faga, M G; Spriano, S

    2011-10-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys with high carbon content (HC-CoCrMo) are widely used as materials for arthroprosthesis, in particular in metal-on-metal (MoM) hip joints. In spite of their good wear and corrosion resistance, production of metallic wear particles and metal ion release will occur on a large time-scale. An enhancement of the metal ion level in the patient's blood and urine is often reported in clinical data. Hypersensitivity, inflammatory response and cell necrosis can occur as consequence. So implants on young patients and women on childbearing age are not so widespread. The aim of this research is the realization of a thin film coating in order to improve the biocompatibility of Co-based alloys and to reduce debris production, ion release and citotoxicity. The innovative process consists of a thermal treatment in molten salts, in order to obtain a tantalum enriched thin film coating. Tantalum is chosen because it is considered a biocompatible metal with high corrosion resistance and low ion release. Three HC-CoCrMo alloys, produced by different manufacturing processes, are tested as substrates. The coating is a thin film of TaC or it can be composed by a multilayer of two tantalum carbides and metallic tantalum, depending on the temperature of the treatment and on the carbon content of the substrate. The thin films as well the substrates are characterized from the structural, chemical and morphological point of view. Moreover mechanical behaviour of treated and untreated materials is analyzed by means of nanohardness, scratch and ball-on-disc wear tests. The coating increases the mechanical and tribological properties of HC-CoCrMo.

  8. Galling wear of cobalt-free hardfacing alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vikstroem, J.

    1994-05-01

    Cobalt-base alloys have been used as hardfacing materials for nuclear power plant valves, turbines and pumps. In nuclear power plants cobalt is transported to reactor core region due to wear of valves and pumps; it is transmuted to Co{minus}60. Objective of this work was to find a cobalt-free hardfacing material that has better wear-resistance than the widely used cobalt-base alloy Stellite 6{sup TM} Six iron-base and four nickel-base alloys were compared to Stellite 6. The alloys were deposited on austenitic stainless steel by GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), PTAW (Plasma Transferred Arc Welding), plasma spray fuse and laser processes. One alloy was in HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressed) condition. All alloys were tested for galling resistance in air at room temperature at applied stresses were 140, 275 and 415 MPa. Alloy microstructure and hardness values were post-test wear surfaces, were examined using a light and scanning electron microscopy, and microhardness measurements. Crack-free deposits can be manufactured from all of the alloys, and no problems were encountered during machining of the deposits. Self-mated galling resistance of Stellite 6 was comparable to galling resistance in earlier studies for this alloy. Self-mated iron-base Elmax, APM 2311, NOREM A, Nelsit, Everit 50 So alloys and Ni-/Fe-base alloy combination showed significantly better galling behaviour than Stellite 6, especially Elmax and APM 2311 alloys. Nickel-base Deloro alloys showed galling resistance inferior to Stellite 6. No correlation was observed between the microstructural characteristics and galling resistance. Further, the galling resistance is not related to the hardness of the deposit.

  9. Use of silicone hydrogel material for daily wear.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Michel; Maissa, Cécile

    2007-03-01

    Silicone hydrogel contact lenses were initially developed to optimise oxygen transmissibility for extended wear use. The concerns with such contact lenses have been their higher elastomeric and hydrophobic characteristics associated with the incorporation of silicone type monomers. The use of silicone hydrogel has most recently been suggested for daily wear to eliminate all hypoxic related problems. The primary aim of the investigation was to test in vivo wetting performance and subjective acceptance of the first silicone hydrogel contact lens developed for daily wear, ACUVUE ADVANCE with HYDRACLEAR (galyfilcon A), compared to a conventional hydrogel contact lens for the same application SofLens 66 (alphafilcon A). The investigation was a randomised, subject masked bilateral cross over investigation testing of the two contact lens materials over their approved replacement periods (galyfilcon A 2 weeks and alphafilcon A 2 weeks (USA) and 4 weeks (Europe)). In all cases ReNu Multiplus lens care system was used. The investigation carried out on 24 contact lens wearers showed that: (i) in vivo wettability was superior for galyfilcon A which had a thicker lipid layer (thin layer incidence: galyfilcon A 54%; alphafilcon A 70-86%, p<0.05), a thicker aqueous layer (thick layer incidence: galyfilcon A 88%; alphafilcon A 35-64%, p<0.05) and a more stable tear film (galyfilcon A 7.8s; alphafilcon A 2 weeks 5.6s, p=0.022; 4 weeks 7.4s, p=0.276); (ii) for the intended replacement period, comfort was better with galyfilcon A (2 weeks) compared to alphafilcon A (4 weeks) at insertion (p=0.001) and, throughout the day (daytime and evening p=0.008). Contact lenses made from galyfilcon A and replaced two weekly achieved better in vivo wettability than contact lenses made from alphafilcon A and replaced either two and four weekly; the better wettability was associated with an overall better comfort for galyfilcon A.

  10. Abrasive wear by diesel engine coal-fuel and related particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, L.K.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of the work summarized in this report was to obtain a basic understanding of the factors which are responsible for wear of the piston ring and cylinder wall surfaces in diesel engines utilizing coal-fuel. The approach included analytical studies using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyses to characterize coal-fuel and various combustion particles, and two different wear tests. The wear tests were a modified pin-on-disk test and a block-on-ring test capable of either unidirectional or reciprocating-rotational sliding. The wear tests in general were conducted with mixtures of the particles and lubricating oil. The particles studied included coal-fuel, particles resulting from the combustion of coal fuel, mineral matter extracted during the processing of coal, and several other common abrasive particle types among which quartz was the most extensively examined. The variables studied included those associated with the particles, such as particle type, size, and hardness; variables related to contact conditions and the surrounding environment; and variables related to the type and properties of the test specimen materials.

  11. Interaction between attrition,abrasion and erosion in tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; Shellis, R P

    2006-01-01

    Tooth wear is the result of three processes: abrasion (wear produced by interaction between teeth and other materials), attrition (wear through tooth-tooth contact) and erosion (dissolution of hard tissue by acidic substances). A further process (abfraction) might potentiate wear by abrasion and/or erosion. Both clinical and experimental observations show that individual wear mechanisms rarely act alone but interact with each other. The most important interaction is the potentiation of abrasion by erosive damage to the dental hard tissues. This interaction seems to be the major factor in occlusal and cervical wear. The available evidence seems insufficient to establish whether abfraction is an important contributor to tooth wear in vivo. Saliva can modulate erosive/abrasive tooth wear through formation of pellicle and by remineralisation but cannot prevent it.

  12. Interactions between nonlinear spur gear dynamics and surface wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Huali; Kahraman, Ahmet

    2007-11-01

    In this study, two different dynamic models, a finite elements-based deformable-body model and a simplified discrete model, and a surface wear model are combined to study the interaction between gear surface wear and gear dynamic response. The proposed dynamic gear wear model includes the influence of worn surface profiles on dynamic tooth forces and transmission error as well as the influence of dynamic tooth forces on wear profiles. This paper first introduces the nonlinear dynamic models that include gear backlash and time-varying gear mesh stiffness, and a wear model separately. It presents a comparison to experiments for validation of the dynamic models. The dynamic models are combined with the wear model to study the interaction of surface wear and dynamic behavior in both linear and nonlinear response regimes. At the end, several sets of simulation results are used to demonstrate the two-way relationship between nonlinear gear dynamics and surface wear.

  13. An Additive to Improve the Wear Characteristics of Perfluoropolyether Based Greases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, David G. V.; Fowzy, Mahmoud A.; Landry, James F.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Nguyen, QuynhGiao

    1999-01-01

    The friction and wear characteristics of two formulated perfluoropolyether based greases were compared to their non-additive base greases. One grease was developed for the electronics industry (designated as GXL-296A) while the other is for space applications (designated as GXL-320A). The formulated greases (GXL-296B and GXL-320B) contained a proprietary antiwear additive at an optimized concentration. Tests were conducted using a vacuum four-ball tribometer. AISI 52100 steel specimens were used for all GXL-296 tests. Both AISI 52100 steel and 440C stainless steel were tested with the GXL-320 greases. Test conditions included: a pressure less than 6.7 x 10(exp )-4 Pa, a 200N load, a sliding velocity of 28.8 mm/sec (100 rpm) and room temperature (approximately equal to 23 C). Wear rates for each grease were determined from the slope of the wear volume as a function of sliding distance. Both non-additive base greases yielded relatively high wear rates on the order of 10(exp -8) cu mm using AISI 52100 steel specimens. Formulated grease GXL-296B yielded a reduction in wear rate by a factor of approximately 21, while grease GXL-320B had a reduction of approximately 12 times. Lower wear rates (-50%) were observed with both GXL-320 greases using 440C stainless steel. Mean friction coefficients were slightly higher for both formulated greases compared to their base greases. The GXL-296 series (higher base oil viscosity) yielded much higher friction coefficients compared to their GXL-320 series (lower base oil viscosity) counterparts.

  14. Wear properties of alumina/zirconia composite ceramics for joint prostheses measured with an end-face apparatus.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yusuke; Nakata, Kenichi; Kim, Yoon-Ho; Sekino, Tohru; Niihara, Koichi; Ikeuchi, Ken

    2004-01-01

    While only alumina is applied to all-ceramic joint prostheses at present, a stronger ceramic is required to prevent fracture and chipping due to impingement and stress concentration. Zirconia could be a potential substitute for alumina because it has high strength and fracture toughness. However, the wear of zirconia/zirconia combination is too high for clinical use. Although some investigations on composite ceramics revealed that mixing of different ceramics was able to improve the mechanical properties of ceramics, there are few reports about wear properties of composite ceramics for joint prosthesis. Since acetabular cup and femoral head of artificial hip joint are finished precisely, they indicate high geometric conformity. Therefore, wear test under flat contact was carried out with an end-face wear testing apparatus for four kinds of ceramics: alumina monolith, zirconia monolith, alumina-based composite ceramic, and zirconia based composite ceramic. Mean contact pressure was 10 MPa and sliding velocity was 40 mm/s. The wear test continued for 72 hours and total sliding distance was 10 km. After the test, the wear factor was calculated. Worn surfaces were observed with a scanning electron micrograph (SEM). The results of this wear test show that the wear factors of the both composite ceramics are similarly low and their mechanical properties are much better than those of the alumina monolith and the zirconia monolith. According to these results, it is predicted that joint prostheses of the composite ceramics are safer against break down and have longer lifetime compared with alumina/alumina joint prostheses.

  15. A comparative study of tribological behavior of plasma and D-gun sprayed coatings under different wear