Science.gov

Sample records for 2001-2005 2000-2001 progress

  1. Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Site : Five-Year Habitat Management Plan, 2001-2005, 2000-2001 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Beilke, Susan G.

    2001-09-01

    Historically the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins were ecologically rich in both the habitat types and the species diversity they supported. This was due in part to the pattern of floods and periodic inundation of bottomlands that occurred, which was an important factor in creating and maintaining a complex system of wetland, meadow, and riparian habitats. This landscape has been greatly altered in the past 150 years, primarily due to human development and agricultural activities including cattle grazing, logging and the building of hydroelectric facilities for hydropower, navigation, flood control and irrigation in the Columbia and Willamette River Basins. The Burlington Bottoms (BB) wetlands contains some of the last remaining bottomlands in the area, supporting a diverse array of native plant and wildlife species. Located approximately twelve miles northwest of Portland and situated between the Tualatin Mountains to the west and Multnomah Channel and Sauvie Island to the east, the current habitats are remnant of what was once common throughout the region. In order to preserve and enhance this important site, a five-year habitat management plan has been written that proposes a set of actions that will carry out the goals and objectives developed for the site, which includes protecting, maintaining and enhancing wildlife habitat for perpetuity.

  2. Focus, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Focus, 2001

    2001-01-01

    These three issues of 2000-2001 "Focus" present a collection of papers focusing on issues related to poverty. The first issue discusses child support enforcement policy and low-income families, highlighting such issues as fragile families and child wellbeing; low-income families and the child support enforcement system; child support…

  3. Insights on the College, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdle, Michael A.; Silverman, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    This document contains the 2000-2001 issues of Mt. San Antonio College's (Mt. SAC's) "Insights on the College." The first issue, "Mt. SAC Progress Report on Partnership for Excellence Goals," is a report on the self-assessment of the Partnership for Excellence (PFE) program conducted by Mt. SAC. The PFE program addresses the…

  4. South Texas Community College Fact Book, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Melissa L., Ed.

    The 2000-2001 Fact Book provides a comprehensive body of facts about South Texas Community College (STCC). Topics addressed include general college profile, access, completion, transfer rate, employment, student retention, TASP Test passage rate, academic progress of students, student and faculty satisfaction, finance, and facilities. Report…

  5. Funding of Schools, 2000-2001 School Year = Financement des ecoles, Annee scolaire 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education and Training, Winnipeg.

    Available in English or French, this reference guide summarizes the funding of Manitoba public schools for the 2000-2001 school year. School funding for operating and capital expenses is administered by the provincial government. Following a list of 2000-2001 revisions to the Schools Finance Program, the first section describes base support. The…

  6. Graduate Assessment Survey Report, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Fe Community Coll., Gainesville, FL. Office of Institutional Research and Planning.

    This report presents the 2000-2001 results of Santa Fe Community College's (SFCC) (Florida) annual survey of outgoing students' opinions and perceptions of their educational experiences and institutional services. Responses were received from 2,397 students, all of whom were candidates for graduation in associate and certificate programs. The 10…

  7. Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M., Ed.; Schafer, William D., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document consists of papers published in the electronic journal "Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation" during 2000-2001: (1) "Advantages of Hierarchical Linear Modeling" (Jason W. Osborne); (2) "Prediction in Multiple Regression" (Jason W. Osborne); (3) Scoring Rubrics: What, When, and How?"…

  8. Institutional Plan FY 2001-2005

    SciTech Connect

    Chartock, Michael; Hansen, Todd, editors

    2000-07-01

    The FY 2001-2005 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab, the Laboratory) mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. To advance the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to define the Integrated Laboratory System, the Berkeley Lab Institutional Plan reflects the strategic elements of our planning efforts. The Institutional Plan is a management report that supports the Department of Energy's mission and programs and is an element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 and complements the performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the Plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions.

  9. Pima Community College Summary of 2000-2001 Student Enrollment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attinasi, Louis; Hennessey, Brendan; Reece, Dee

    This report summarizes the annual unduplicated headcount enrollment and the annual full-time student equivalents (FTSE) generated by students in credit classes and by completers of clock-hour programs during fiscal year 2000-2001 at Pima Community College (Arizona). Highlights include: (1) Pima's total annual unduplicated headcount was 65,221 and…

  10. Section on Cataloguing: Report of the Activities, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Maria

    This paper reports on the activities of the IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions) Section on Cataloging for 2000-2001. The first part discusses the interest in cataloging and its harmonization at the international level that is shared by libraries throughout the world, including the section's work on development…

  11. Glendale Community College: College Services Annual Report, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glendale Community Coll., CA.

    This annual report summarizes the college services activities of Glendale Community College during the 2000-2001 academic year. It describes changes and accomplishments in the following areas: (1) admissions and records; (2) college services division; (3) disabled students programs and services; (4) extended opportunity programs and services; (5)…

  12. PACER Center's Program Evaluation Report, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Ann; Goldberg, Paula F.

    The 2000-2001 annual report of Minnesota's PACER (Parent Advocacy Coalition for Educational Rights) Center, a statewide organization that provides information, training, and assistance to parents of children and youth with disabilities, reports on 24 programs in three categories: parent training (12 programs); programs for students and…

  13. Foundation for Child Development Annual Report, 2000/2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foundation for Child Development, New York, NY.

    This annual report details the activities of the Foundation for Child Development (FCD) for 2000-2001. Beginning the report is a presentation of the Foundation's mission, its funding priorities, and application procedures. The report then lists the members of the Council, Board of Directors, Officers, and staff. This is followed by the joint…

  14. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2001-2005

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Darrell R.; Pearson, Erik W.

    2000-12-29

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan for FY 2001-2005 sets forth the laboratory's mission, roles, technical capabilities, and laboratory strategic plan. In the plan, major initiatives also are proposed and the transitioning initiatives are discussed. The Programmatic Strategy section details our strategic intent, roles, and research thrusts in each of the U.S. Department of Energy's mission areas. The Operations/Infrastructure Strategic Plan section includes information on the laboratory's human resources; environment, safety, and health management; safeguards and security; site and facilities management; information resources management; managaement procatices and standards; and communications and trust.

  15. 76 FR 7590 - Distribution of 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2003 Cable Royalty Funds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ... Copyright Royalty Board Distribution of 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2003 Cable Royalty Funds AGENCY: Copyright... commencement of a proceeding to determine the Phase II distribution of 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2003 royalties... cable royalties collected for 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2003 is confined to Phase II. Commencement of...

  16. Wind River Watershed Restoration : 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2003-02-01

    This report focuses on work conducted in 2000 and 2001 by the U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project. The project started in the early 1990s, and has been funded through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) since 1998. The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the Wind River subbasin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. In addition to USGS-CRRL, other BPA-funded entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). To describe the activities and accomplishments of the USGS-CRRL portion of the project, we partitioned the 2000-2001 annual report into two pieces: Report A and Report B. In Report A, we provide information on flow, temperature, and habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Personnel from CRRL monitored flows at 12 sites in 2000 and 17 sites in 2001. Flow measurements were generally taken every two weeks during June through October, which allowed tracking of the descending limb of the hydrograph in late spring, through the base low flow period in summer, and the start of the ascending limb of the hydrograph in fall. We maintained a large array of water-temperature sites in the Wind River subbasin, including data from 25 thermographs in 2000 and 27 thermographs in 2001. We completed stream reach surveys on 14.0 km in 2000 and 6.1 km in 2001. Our focus for these reach surveys has been on the upper Trout Creek and upper Wind River watersheds, though some reach surveys have occurred in the Panther Creek watershed. Data generated by these reach surveys include stream width, stream gradient, large woody debris frequency, pool frequency, canopy shade

  17. Telecommunication and Technology Infrastructure Program (TTIP) Certification for Expenditures, Fiscal Year 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lindy

    This document presents the guidelines for the California Community College 2000-2001 State-Funded Telecommunication and Technology Infrastructure Program (TTIP) Program. The 2000-2001 State Budget Act contains $44.3 million for expenditures on the TTIP. The Act provides that $31,600,000 be allocated to colleges for the following purposes: (1) data…

  18. Waukesha County Technical College Budget Document, Fiscal Year 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waukesha County Technical Coll., Pewaukee, WI.

    This report presents Waukesha County Area Technical College District's (Wisconsin) fiscal year 2000-2001 budget document. It contains the following sections: table of contents; a reader's guide to the budget document; a quick reference guide; an introduction section, which contains a transmittal letter, a budget message for 2000-2001 combining…

  19. Selected Outcomes Related to Tech Prep Implementation by Illinois Consortia, 2001-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D.; Kirby, Catherine; Zhu, Rongchun

    2006-01-01

    This report is the summary of key aspects of Tech Prep in Illinois over the five year period of 2001-2005 during which all Tech Prep consortia provided annual data based on federal legislative requirements and state-determined essential elements of successful programs. These annual Tech Prep reports enable local educators to monitor student…

  20. Evaluating the Effectiveness of the 2000-2001 NASA CONNECT(TM) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Frank, Kari Lou; Lambert, Matthew A.

    2002-01-01

    This report contains the results of the evaluation conducted for the 2000-2001 NASA CONNECT(TM) program conducted in March 2001. The analysis is based on the results collected from 154 surveys collected from educators registered for the program. Respondents indicated that the objectives for each program were met; the programs were aligned with the national (mathematics, science, and technology) standards; the programs were developmentally (grade level) appropriate; and the programs in the 2000-2001 NASA CONNECT(TM) series enhanced/enriched the teaching of mathematics, science, and technology.

  1. Use of Physician Services by Older Adults: 1991/1992 to 2000/2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Diane E.; Heppner, Petra; Reid, Robert; Bogdanovic, Bogdan; Roos, Noralou P.

    2005-01-01

    Canadians have expressed concern that access to family physicians (FP) has declined. Anonymized physician services data for 1991/1992 to 2000/2001 were used to evaluate changes in supply and age-specific rates of use of FPs and specialists in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Physician-to-population ratios declined 7.5 per cent, FP-to-population ratios declined…

  2. Graduating Student Survey Results Summary Report, 2000-2001. The InfoDigest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton State Coll., GA. Office of Institutional Research and Planning.

    This document is a report on the results of the 2000-2001 graduating student survey administered at Dalton State College (DSC) (Georgia). The survey was used to help assess the community college's overall effectiveness. A total of 185 graduating students (63% of graduating class) responded to the survey. The survey was sorted into five sections:…

  3. Report on Local Investments of Partnership Funds: Investments for 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Debra; Yong, Channing

    This is a report on how California community college districts have been using their allocation of Partnership for Excellence (PFE) dollars for the 2000-2001 fiscal year. Information is gathered from all 108 California community colleges. The colleges report how they have used PFE funds to address the following five community college focus areas…

  4. Honolulu Community College Program Health Indicators: 2000-2001 Program Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Honolulu Community Coll.

    This report presents an overall health summation of 21 programs offered at Honolulu Community College (Hawaii) during 2000-2001. The programs profiled are: (1) Auto Body Repair and Painting; (2) Aeronautics Maintenance Technology; (3) Administration of Justice; (4) Automotive Mechanics Technology; (5) Boat Maintenance Repair; (6) Carpentry; (7)…

  5. Mississippi's Public Community and Junior Colleges Statistical Data, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Board for Community and Junior Colleges, Jackson.

    This document offers statistical data, in table format, for Mississippi's community and junior colleges for fiscal year 2000-2001. Mississippi has 15 community and junior college districts, which are attended by over 60% of Mississippi high school graduates who attend college. Highlights of the data presented are as follows: (1) the total…

  6. FACCCTS: Journal of the Faculty Association of California Community Colleges, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Katherine, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document contains the four issues of the 2000-2001 FACCCTs, the journal of the Faculty Association of California Community Colleges. The September 2000 issue includes a collection of observations on academic integrity and cheating, an article describing a history of opportunities for women in higher education, and editorial comments on a…

  7. Greater Minneapolis Day Care Association 2000-2001 Annual Report: Supporting Quality Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greater Minneapolis Day Care Association, MN.

    This annual report of the Greater Minneapolis Day Care Association (GMDCA) details the accomplishments of the organization for 2000-2001. The report begins with a letter from the executive director focusing on the need to change our thinking about the care and education of young children, then describes components of quality child care and how the…

  8. Evaluation of selected wild plants flowering season 1991 - 2009 (1991 - 2000 & 2001 - 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajkova, L.; Nekovar, J.; Novak, M.; Richterova, D.

    2009-09-01

    The subsequent wild plants are observed by volunteer observers at CHMI phenological network: CALTHA palustris L., ANEMONE nemorosa L., HEPATICA nobilis Mill., RANUNCULUS acer L., FRAGARIA vesca L., TRIFOLIUM repens L., HYPERICUM perforatum L., CHAMAENERION angustifolium L. Holub, VACCINIUM myrtillus L., LAMIUM album L., CHRYSANTHEMUM leucanthemum L., TUSSILAGO farfara L., PETASITES albus (L.) Gaert., PETASITES hybridus (L.) G. M. Sch., CONVALLARIA majalis L., GALANTHUS nivalis L., DACTYLIS glomerata L., ALOPECURUS pratensis L. and others. Some of them start to blossom in early spring, some others in the summer. Part of them belong to very important allergens, part of them have medicinal effects. Phenophases first leaves (FL - BBCH11), inflorescence emergence (IE - BBCH 51), beginning and end of flowering (BF - BBCH 61, EF - BBCH 69) are observed by these species. Statistical parameters (average, median, lower quartile, upper quartile, minimum, maximum, standard deviation, variation range and variation coefficient) of phenophase onset are computed from all of phenological stations in Czechia for the period 1991 - 2009. The phenophase onset and phenophase duration depend not only on genetic base but also on external effects such as weather. We have compiled dynamics of temperature to phenophase onset according CHMI meteorological stations for the same period 1991 - 2009 (especially sums of active temperatures above biological minimum 5°C and progression of extreme temperatures). We have also compared results between two periods (1991 - 2000, 2001 - 2009). Phenological stations are at different altitude. At this case study were used results from 4 phenological stations at altitude (< 300 m asl), 4 phenological stations at altitude (300 - 500 m asl) and 4 phenological stations at altitude (> 500 m asl). GALANTHUS nivalis L. Station: Lednice (165 m n. m.) Period: 1991 - 2000 Statistical parameter/phenophase BBCH 61 BBCH 69 Average 62 94 Median 60 97 Lower quartile 57

  9. [Maternal mortality and impact of dengue in Southeast Brazil: an ecological study, 2001-2005].

    PubMed

    Mota, Anne Karin Madureira da; Miranda Filho, Adalberto Luiz; Saraceni, Valéria; Koifman, Sergio

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the distribution of reproductive outcomes following dengue virus infection during pregnancy (2001-2005). An ecological epidemiological study was conducted in all counties with more than 80,000 inhabitants in Southeast Brazil. The study explored the correlation between dengue incidence rates in women 15-39 years of age and selected mortality indicators (maternal, fetal, perinatal, neonatal, early neonatal, and infant) in these counties, and Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated. A positive correlation was observed between median dengue incidence in women 15-39 years of age and median maternal mortality (r = 0.88; 95%CI: 0.51; 1.00), with a determination coefficient R² = 0.78. The correlation between dengue incidence in childbearing-age women and reproductive outcomes in Southeast Brazil suggests that dengue infection during pregnancy can negatively impact its outcome and increase maternal mortality.

  10. Evaluating the Effectiveness of the 2000-2001 NASA "Why?" Files Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Frank, Kari Lou; Ashcroft, Scott B.; Williams, Amy C.

    2002-01-01

    NASA 'Why?' Files, a research and standards-based, Emmy-award winning series of 60-minute instructional programs for grades 3-5, introduces students to NASA; integrates mathematics, science, and technology by using Problem-Based Learning (PBL), scientific inquiry, and the scientific method; and motivates students to become critical thinkers and active problem solvers. All four 2000-2001 NASA 'Why?' Files programs include an instructional broadcast, a lesson guide, an interactive web site, plus numerous instructional resources. In March 2001, 1,000 randomly selected program registrants participated in a survey. Of these surveys, 185 (154 usable) met the established cut-off date. Respondents reported that (1) they used the four programs in the 2000-2001 NASA 'Why?' Files series; (2) series goals and objectives were met; (3) programs met national mathematics, science, and technology standards; (4) program content was developmentally appropriate for grade level; and (5) programs enhanced/enriched the teaching of mathematics, science, and technology.

  11. Carbon export and cycling by the Yukon, Tanana, and Porcupine rivers, Alaska, 2001-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striegl, R.G.; Dornblaser, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.; Wickland, K.P.; Raymond, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    Loads and yields of dissolved and particulate organic and inorganic carbon (DOC, POC, DIC, PIC) were measured and modeled at three locations on the Yukon River (YR) and on the Tanana and Porcupine rivers (TR, PR) in Alaska during 2001-2005. Total YR carbon export averaged 7.8 Tg C yr-1, 30% as OC and 70% as IC. Total C yields (0.39-1.03 mol C m-2 yr-1) were proportional to water yields (139-356 mm yr-1; r2 = 0.84) at all locations. Summer DOC had an aged component (fraction modern (FM) = 0.94-0.97), except in the permafrost wetland-dominated PR, where DOC was modern. POC had FM = 0.63-0.70. DOC had high concentration, high aromaticity, and high hydrophobic content in spring and low concentration, low aromaticity, and high hydrophilic content in winter. About half of annual DOC export occurred during spring. DIC concentration and isotopic composition were strongly affected by dissolution of suspended carbonates in glacial meltwater during summer.

  12. Chemical Analyses of Ground and Surface Waters, Ester Dome, Cental Alaska, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Mueller, S.H.; Youcha, E.K.; Goldfarb, R.J.; Sanzolone, R.F.; McCleskey, R.B.; Briggs, P.H.; Roller, M.; Adams, M.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    2003-01-01

    Water analyses are reported for ground and surface waters collected at 33 sites on and near Ester Dome, Fairbanks area, central Alaska during 2000-2001. This interdisciplinary study focused on documenting the temporal and spatial chemical variations in arsenic concentrations to elucidate the processes that lead to elevated arsenic concentrations in ground water. Field parameters and water analyses are reported for 17 domestic wells, 13 monitoring well sites, and 3 surface water sites. Sampling occurred during November 2000, February 2001, May 2001, July 2001, and September 2001. Waters in the study area are primarily Ca-HCO3 type, with pH values ranging from 5.97 to 7.87. Dissolved arsenic concentrations ranged from less than 3 to 1160 micrograms per liter.

  13. Respiratory virus surveillance. FluWatch project, 2000-2001. End of season update.

    PubMed

    Macey, J F; Winchester, B; Squires, S G; Tam, T; Zabchuk, P; Li, Y

    2001-06-01

    The 2000-2001 season was a relatively mild season worldwide. In Canada, lower than usual activity was reported for all national indicators of influenza activity, including the rate of influenza-like illness (ILI), the percentage of laboratory-confirmed cases of influenza and provincial/territorial influenza activity levels. However, there were a number of interesting characteristics of this year's influenza season. In contrast to the predominance of influenza A, and in particular the A/Sydney/5/97 (H3N2)-like virus over the past 3 years, influenza B predominated overall this season. Influenza A (H3N2) accounted for < 1% of all characterized isolates (H1N1 accounted for 49% of isolates). Increased laboratory-confirmed influenza activity began in the West (Yukon, prairie provinces and British Columbia) in mid-December, followed by the Atlantic provinces in mid- to late January and Ontario and Quebec in mid- February and March.

  14. Managing water to protect fish: A review of California's environmental water account, 2001-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, L.R.; Kimmerer, W.; Brown, R.

    2009-01-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the landward reach of the San Francisco Estuary, provides habitat for threatened delta smelt, endangered winter-run Chinook salmon, and other species of concern. It is also the location of huge freshwater diversion facilities that entrain large numbers of fish. Reducing the entrainment of listed fishes into these facilities has required curtailment of pumping, reducing the reliability of water deliveries. We reviewed the first 5 years (2001-2005) of the Environmental Water Account (EWA), a program instituted to resolve conflicts between protecting listed fishes and providing a reliable water supply. The EWA provided fishery agencies with control over 0.2-0.4 km3 of water to be used for fish protection at no cost to users of exported water, and fish agencies guaranteed no disruption of water supply for fish protection. The EWA was successful in reducing uncertainty in water supply; however, its contribution to the recovery of listed fishes was unclear. We estimated the effectiveness of the EWA to be modest, increasing the survival of winter-run Chinook salmon by 0-6% (dependent on prescreen mortality), adult delta smelt by 0-1%, and juvenile delta smelt by 2-4%. Allocating EWA water for a single life stage of one species could provide larger gains in survival. An optimally allocated EWA of equal size to the median of the first 5 years could increase abundance of juvenile delta smelt up to 7% in the springs of dry years. If the EWA is to become a long-term program, estimates of efficacy should be refined. If the program is to be held accountable for quantitative increases in fish populations, it will be necessary to integrate scientific, possibly experimental, approaches. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  15. Youth exposure to alcohol advertising in magazines--United States, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    2007-08-03

    Alcohol consumption among persons aged 12-20 years contributes to the three leading causes of death (unintentional injury, homicide, and suicide) in this age group in the United States and is associated with other health-risk behaviors, including high-risk sexual activity, smoking, and physical fighting. Recent studies have documented the contribution of alcohol marketing to underage drinking. In 2000, the trade association for the wine industry changed its voluntary marketing code to stop advertising in magazines in which youths aged 12-20 years were >30% of the audience. In 2003, this threshold was adopted by the trade associations for beer and liquor producers. To determine the proportion of alcohol advertisements placed in magazines with disproportionately large youth readerships (i.e., >15% of readers aged 12-20 years) and to assess the proportion of youths exposed to these advertisements, the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth (Health Policy Institute, Georgetown University, District of Columbia) evaluated the placement of alcohol advertisements in 143 national magazines for which readership composition data were available for 2001-2005; these 143 publications accounted for approximately 90% of expenditures for all alcohol advertising in national print magazines. This report summarizes the results of that study, which indicated that alcohol advertising remained common in magazines with >15% youth readership but decreased substantially in magazines with >30% youth readership. These results suggest that although voluntary industry standards have reduced youth exposure to alcohol advertising in magazines, strengthening these standards by establishing a >15% youth readership threshold would further reduce exposure. In addition, independent monitoring of youth exposure to alcohol advertising should continue, as recommended by the U.S. Congress and Surgeon General.

  16. Managing Water to Protect Fish: A Review of California's Environmental Water Account, 2001-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Larry R.; Kimmerer, Wim; Brown, Randall

    2009-02-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the landward reach of the San Francisco Estuary, provides habitat for threatened delta smelt, endangered winter-run Chinook salmon, and other species of concern. It is also the location of huge freshwater diversion facilities that entrain large numbers of fish. Reducing the entrainment of listed fishes into these facilities has required curtailment of pumping, reducing the reliability of water deliveries. We reviewed the first 5 years (2001-2005) of the Environmental Water Account (EWA), a program instituted to resolve conflicts between protecting listed fishes and providing a reliable water supply. The EWA provided fishery agencies with control over 0.2-0.4 km3 of water to be used for fish protection at no cost to users of exported water, and fish agencies guaranteed no disruption of water supply for fish protection. The EWA was successful in reducing uncertainty in water supply; however, its contribution to the recovery of listed fishes was unclear. We estimated the effectiveness of the EWA to be modest, increasing the survival of winter-run Chinook salmon by 0-6% (dependent on prescreen mortality), adult delta smelt by 0-1%, and juvenile delta smelt by 2-4%. Allocating EWA water for a single life stage of one species could provide larger gains in survival. An optimally allocated EWA of equal size to the median of the first 5 years could increase abundance of juvenile delta smelt up to 7% in the springs of dry years. If the EWA is to become a long-term program, estimates of efficacy should be refined. If the program is to be held accountable for quantitative increases in fish populations, it will be necessary to integrate scientific, possibly experimental, approaches.

  17. Evaluating the Effectiveness of NASA's Destination Tomorrow(Trademark) 2000-2001 Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Perry, Jeannine

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Destination Tomorrow(trademark) series consists of 30-minute educational television programs that focus on NASA research, past, present, and future and are designed for educators, parents, and adult (lifelong) learners. Programs in this award-winning series follow a magazine style format with segments ranging from 3-5 minutes to 6-8 minutes. An associated web site provides summaries of stories and links to related program material. The development of the programs is based on educational theory, principles, and research as they pertain to how adults learn and apply knowledge. The five programs in the 2000-2001 season were produced in English and dubbed in Spanish. Telephone interviews with managers of cable access television stations were conducted in January 2002. NASA's Destination Tomorrow(trademark) interviewees reported that (1) from a programming standpoint, the most appealing aspects of the series are its production quality and educational value, (2) programs in the series are 'better than average' when compared to other education programming, (3) the programs are very credible, (4) the programs are successful in educating people about what NASA does, and (5) the programs have been 'very well received' by their audiences.

  18. Deaths among young, single women in 2000-2001 in the West Bank, Palestinian Occupied Territories.

    PubMed

    Al-Adili, Nadim; Shaheen, Mohammad; Bergström, Staffan; Johansson, Annika

    2008-05-01

    A study in 2000-2001 of causes of death of women of reproductive age (15-49) in the West Bank, Palestinian Occupied Territories, found that 154 of the 411 deceased women aged 15-49 with known marital status were single. Death notification forms for reported deaths were analysed and verbal autopsies carried out, where possible, with relatives of the deceased women. We found important differences in the age at death and causes of death among the single and married women, which can be attributed to the disadvantaged social status of single women in Palestinian society, exacerbated by the current unstable political situation. 41% of the deceased single women were under 25 years of age at death compared to 8% of the married women. The proportion of violent deaths and suicides among the single women was almost twice as high as among the married women, mainly in those below age 25. The single women were also more likely to die from medical conditions which indicated that they faced barriers to accessing health care. The fieldwork was conducted at the height of the Intifada and the Israeli military response, with heavy restrictions on mobility, limiting the possibility of probing deeper into the circumstances surrounding sensitive deaths. More research into the socio-cultural context of single women in Palestine society is needed as a basis for intervention.

  19. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Brian C.; Duke, Bill B.

    2004-02-01

    In the late 1990's, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow measures, and initiating trap and haul efforts. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2000-2001 project year, there were 624 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 24 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), and 47 spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) counted at the Nursery Bridge Dam adult trap between December 27, 2000 and June 7, 2001. The Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap was not operated this year. The project transported 1600 adult spring chinook from Ringold Springs Hatchery to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility and outplanted 1156 for natural spawning in the basin. The project also provided equipment for transportation of juveniles captured during the construction fish salvage at Nursery Bridge Dam.

  20. Distribution of emm genotypes among group A streptococcus isolates from patients with severe invasive streptococcal infections in Japan, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, T; Hirasawa, K; Suzuki, R; Ohya, H; Isobe, J; Tanaka, D; Katsukawa, C; Kawahara, R; Tomita, M; Ogata, K; Endoh, M; Okuno, R; Tada, Y; Okabe, N; Watanabe, H

    2007-10-01

    We surveyed emm genotypes of group A streptococcus (GAS) isolates from patients with severe invasive streptococcal infections during 2001-2005 and compared their prevalence with that of the preceding 5 years. Genotype emm1 remained dominant throughout 2001 to 2005, but the frequency rate of this type decreased compared with the earlier period. Various other emm types have appeared in recent years indicating alterations in the prevalent strains causing severe invasive streptococcal infections. The cover of the new 26-valent GAS vaccine fell from 93.5% for genotypes of isolates from 1996-2000 to 81.8% in 2001-2005.

  1. Changing patterns of initial drug therapy for the treatment of hypertension in a Medicaid population, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Robert; Buckley, Kevin; Clifford, Timothy

    2006-10-01

    Thiazide diuretics have been recommended as one preferred choice for the initial treatment of hypertension. This study was undertaken to determine whether Maine physicians initiating monotherapy for newly diagnosed hypertensive patients from 2001-2005 used this guideline. The Maine Medicaid database was searched for the drug classes used to initiate monotherapy for patients followed for at least 6 months. A total of 5373 patients were included. In 2001, the use of beta-blockers was 23.5%, diuretics 17.5%, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors 37.5%, calcium channel blockers 9.5%, angiotensin receptor blockers 3.8%, and others 8.2%. By 2005, the use of beta-blockers was 27.8%, diuretics 25.5%, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors 30.9%, calcium channel blockers 6.4%, angiotensin receptor blockers 1.6%, and others 7.7%. There was an increase in the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers in diabetics but no other condition affected drug choice. Although there was an increase in the use of diuretics as initial therapy in 2003 and 2004, this decreased in 2005. The increase in initial diuretic use was not reflected in patterns of ongoing antihypertensive use from 1997 to 2005. There appears to have been limited impact from the guidelines on initial drug choice and even less so on ongoing drug therapy.

  2. The Implementation of the California Community Colleges Telecommunications and Technology Infrastructure Program, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    This is the sixth report on the status and progress of the Telecommunications and Technology Infrastructure Program (TTIP), submitted by the California Community Colleges. In California, familiarity with and use of computers is fundamental to economic success. California is home to many of the major companies involved in creating the future of the…

  3. Factors Affecting the Recreational Fishery in Moses Lake, Washington, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, Dave

    2003-02-04

    The Moses Lake Project (project No. 199502800) was first funded by Bonneville Power Administration during the FY 99. Work commenced and proceeded through September 2001 when questions arouse on the Scope of Work. Due to funding issues at the beginning of FY 2001 we were unable to secure monies to continue with our proposed scope of work. Consequently, the Moses Lake Project was reduced to one full-time employee. An extension of fifty thousand dollars was granted in which the project with one remaining member by October 2001 continued to operate. By December 2001 the NWPPC granted an additional 20K in spending to secure an advisor that could assist in providing a proposal that the ISRP would find amenable. By Jan 2002, the Moses Lake staff put Dr. David Bennett, from the University of Idaho on payroll. With the guidance of Dr. Bennett the Moses Lake project staff was successful in turning in a new version of the proposal and ultimately received funding by July of 2002. Consequently, the lack of manpower and time spent revising and resubmitting said proposal hampered progress. Consequently, this report covers work conducted on the original Scope of Work (SOW) to July 2002 and then follows the new and accepted SOW from July 2002 through September 2002. Work on the tasks within the newest proposal began prior to official acceptance so as not to loose the window of opportunity to collect data during the summer field season. As of July 2000 we moved forward and began the appropriate tasks outlined in our scope of work. Therefore, portions of the FY 2001 annual report address tasks outlined in the original (appendix 1, original FY2000 SOW) and newest scope(s) of work (Appendix 2, new FY 2000 SOW).

  4. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Erik

    2009-09-01

    following annual progress reports: Olsen et al. (1994), Olsen et al. (1995), Olsen and French (1996), Olsen et al. (1996), Olsen and French (1999), and Olsen and French (2000). The annual progress reports document information collected on (1) rearing densities of indigenous fish, (2) subbasin steelhead smolt production, (3) post-release survival of acclimated and direct released hatchery summer and winter steelhead smolts, (4) smolt to adult anadromous salmonid survival rates, (5) jack and adult anadromous salmonid escapements and harvest, (6) spatial distribution of adult anadromous salmonid holding in the Hood River subbasin, (7) selected life history patterns and morphological and meristic characteristics of wild, natural, and hatchery resident and anadromous salmonids, and (8) summer streamflows.

  5. PM2.5 source apportionment in the southeastern U.S.: Spatial and seasonal variations during 2001-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingjun; Zheng, Mei; Edgerton, Eric S.; Ke, Lin; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2012-04-01

    The seasonal and spatial variations of source contributions of 112 composite fine particulate matter (PM2.5) samples collected in the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization Study (SEARCH) monitoring network during 2001-2005 using molecular marker-based chemical mass balance (CMB-MM) model were determined. The lowest PM2.5 concentration occurs in January with higher values in warm months (maxima in July at four inland sites versus October at the coastal sites). Sulfate shows a similar pattern and plays a primary role in PM2.5 seasonality. Carbonaceous material (organic matter plus EC) exhibits less seasonality, but more spatial variations between the inland and coastal sites. Compared with the data at coastal sites, source attributions of diesel exhaust, gasoline exhaust, other organic matter (other OM), secondary sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium in PM2.5 mass at inland sites are higher. The difference in source attributions of wood combustion, meat cooking, vegetative detritus, and road dust among the eight sites is not significant. Contributions of eight primary sources to fine OC are wood burning (17 ± 19%), diesel exhaust (9 ± 4%), gasoline exhaust (5 ± 7%), meat cooking (5 ± 5%), road dust (2 ± 3%), vegetative detritus (2 ± 2%), cigarette smoke (2 ± 2% at four urban sites), and coke production (2 ± 1% only at BHM). Primary and secondary sources explain 82-100% of measured PM2.5 mass at the eight sites, including secondary ionic species (SO42-, NH4+, and NO3-; 41.4 ± 5.7%), identified OM (24.9 ± 11.3%), "other OM" (unexplained OM, 23.3 ± 10.3%), and "other mass" (11.4 ± 9.6%). Vehicle exhaust from both diesel and gasoline contributes the lowest fraction to PM2.5 mass in July and higher fractions at BHM and JST than other sites. Wood combustion, in contrast, contributes significantly to a larger fraction in winter than in summer. Road dust shows relatively high levels in July and April across the eight sites, while minor sources such as meat

  6. Within-Farm Changes in Dairy Farm-Associated Salmonella Subtypes and Comparison to Human Clinical Isolates in Michigan, 2000-2001 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Habing, Greg G; Manning, Shannon; Bolin, Carole; Cui, Yuehua; Rudrik, James; Dietrich, Stephen; Kaneene, John B

    2015-09-01

    Temporal changes in the distribution of Salmonella subtypes in livestock populations may have important impacts on human health. The first objective of this research was to determine the within-farm changes in the population of subtypes of Salmonella on Michigan dairy farms that were sampled longitudinally in 2000-2001 and again in 2009. The second objective was to determine the yearly frequency (2001 through 2012) of reported human illnesses in Michigan associated with the same subtypes. Comparable sampling techniques were used to collect fecal and environmental samples from the same 18 Michigan dairy farms in 2000-2001 and 2009. Serotypes, multilocus sequence types (STs), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) banding patterns were identified for isolates from 6 farms where >1 Salmonella isolate was recovered in both 2000-2001 and 2009. The distribution of STs was significantly different between time frames (P < 0.05); only two of 31 PFGE patterns were identified in both time frames, and each was recovered from the same farm in each time frame. Previously reported within-farm decreases in the frequency of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella were due to recovery of MDR subtypes of S. enterica serotypes Senftenberg and Typhimurium in 2000-2001 and genetically distinct, pansusceptible subtypes of the same serotypes in 2009. The annual frequency of human illnesses between 2001 and 2012 with a PFGE pattern matching a bovine strain decreased for patterns recovered from dairy farms in 2000-2001 and increased for patterns recovered in 2009. These data suggest important changes in the population of Salmonella on dairy farms and in the frequency of human illnesses associated with cattle-derived subtypes.

  7. Point-of-purchase alcohol marketing and promotion by store type--United States, 2000-2001.

    PubMed

    2003-04-11

    Alcohol consumption is the third leading preventable cause of death in the United States, accounting for approximately 100,000 deaths annually. Efforts to reduce the adverse health and social consequences from alcohol use include policies to restrict access to alcohol among underaged persons (i.e., persons aged <21 years) and to reduce alcohol-impaired driving among persons of all ages. Recent studies have focused on alcohol marketing as a potentially important contributor to alcohol consumption, particularly among underage drinkers. Point-of-purchase (POP) (i.e., on-site) marketing, including alcohol advertising and placement, can increase alcohol sales and consumption substantially, thereby increasing the risk for various alcohol-related health outcomes, including alcohol-impaired driving and interpersonal violence. To assess the type and frequency of POP alcohol marketing, researchers with the ImpacTeen Project collected and analyzed store observation data during 2000-2001 from 3,961 alcohol retailers in 329 communities throughout the United States. This report summarizes the results of the study, which indicate that POP alcohol marketing is extensive in certain store types frequented by teenagers and young adults. Public health agencies and policy makers should work with liquor control boards to reduce POP marketing that could promote risky or underage drinking.

  8. Positions for the Outer Planets and Many of Their Satellites. V. FASTT Observations Taken in 2000-2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Ronald C.

    2001-11-01

    As part of an ongoing observing program with the Flagstaff Astrometric Scanning Transit Telescope (FASTT), this paper presents 1084 new equatorial positions taken in 2000-2001 for the outer planets Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto, as well as for 17 satellites of Jupiter-Neptune. All the positions were determined using differential reductions with reference stars taken from either the ACT or Tycho-2 star catalog. An improvement in systematic accuracy was made by introducing a correction for small focal-plane errors, and the overall accuracy of FASTT observations has been improved as a result. When new and old FASTT positions are compared with modern Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) ephemerides, there is, in general, good agreement between FASTT positions and theory, wherein mean differences in each coordinate are smaller than 0.03" for the planets, and the agreement is usually better than 0.07" for the planetary satellites. In particular, the new JPL ephemerides for outer satellites of Jupiter (Himalia, Pasiphae, and Elara) are significantly better than their older versions. Finally, Titania and Oberon, satellites of Uranus, continue to show large offsets (>0.1") with respect to their predicted positions.

  9. RF cavity R&D at LBNL for the NLC Damping Rings,FY2000/2001

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.A.; Atkinson, D.; Corlett, J.N.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Rasson, J.; Saleh, T.; Weidenbach, W.

    2001-06-01

    This report contains a summary of the R&D activities at LBNL on RF cavities for the NLC damping rings during fiscal years 2000/2001. This work is a continuation of the NLC RF system R&D of the previous year [1]. These activities include the further optimization and fine tuning of the RF cavity design for both efficiency and damping of higher-order modes (HOMs). The cavity wall surface heating and stresses were reduced at the same time as the HOM damping was improved over previous designs. Final frequency tuning was performed using the high frequency electromagnetic analysis capability in ANSYS. The mechanical design and fabrication methods have been developed with the goals of lower stresses, fewer parts and simpler assembly compared to previous designs. This should result in substantial cost savings. The cavity ancillary components including the RF window, coupling box, HOM loads, and tuners have been studied in more detail. Other cavity options are discussed which might be desirable to either further lower the HOM impedance or increase the stored energy for reduced transient response. Superconducting designs and the use of external ''energy storage'' cavities are discussed. A section is included in which the calculation method is summarized and its accuracy assessed by comparisons with the laboratory measurements of the PEP-II cavity, including errors, and with the beam-sampled spectrum.

  10. Comparison of macroinvertebrate community structure between two riffle-based sampling protocols in Wyoming, Colorado, and Montana, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, David A.; Zumberge, Jeremy R.

    2006-01-01

    Samples of benthic macroinvertebrates were collected side-by-side from riffles at 12 stream sites in Wyoming, Colorado, and Montana during 2000-2001, following protocols established by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). Samples from riffles were collected following NAWQA protocols, using a sampler with 425-micron net mesh-opening size from a total area of 1.25 m2 per sample in multiple riffles. Samples also were collected following EMAP protocols, using a sampler with 500-micron net mesh-opening size from a total area of 0.72 m2 per sample in multiple riffles. The taxonomic identification and enumeration of the samples followed procedures established for each program. Benthic macroinvertebrate community structure was compared between the data sets using individual metrics, a multimetric index, and multivariate analysis. Comparisons between the macroinvertebrate community structures were made after sequentially adjusting both data sets for: (1) ambiguous taxa, (2) taxonomic inconsistencies, and (3) differences in laboratory subsampling. After removal of ambiguous taxa, pair-wise differences in total taxa richness and Ephemeroptera taxa richness were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Differences between the data sets generally were not significant for richness of other taxa, tolerant taxa, semi-voltine taxa, functional feeding groups, diversity, and dominance. Sample scores calculated using the Wyoming Stream Integrity Index were not significantly different between the two data sets. After reconciling both data sets for taxonomic inconsistencies, total taxa richness and Ephemeroptera taxa richness remained significantly different between the data sets. After adjusting the data for differences in laboratory subsampling, the differences in taxa richness were no longer significant. Bray-Curtis similarity coefficients and non

  11. Serological Surveillance of Scrub Typhus, Murine Typhus, and Leptospirosis in Small Mammals Captured at Firing Points 10 and 60, Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea, 2001-2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Province, Republic of Korea, 2001-2005 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR (S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...rodent-borne disease surveillance, including rodent bionom- ics, ecology, and hantaviruses , conducted at other U.S. and Korean operated military...2005 as described by O’Guinn et al (2008), as a result of a hantavirus case reported in October 2000 in a U.S. soldier who trained at these sites

  12. Water movement through thick unsaturated zones overlying the central High Plains aquifer, southwestern Kansas, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, Peter B.; Dennehy, K.F.; Michel, R.L.; Sophocleous, M.A.; Ellett, K.M.; Hurlbut, D.B.

    2003-01-01

    The role of irrigation as a driving force for water and chemical movement to the central High Plains aquifer is uncertain because of the thick unsaturated zone overlying the aquifer. Water potentials and profiles of tritium, chloride, nitrate, and pesticide concentrations were used to evaluate water movement through thick unsaturated zones overlying the central High Plains aquifer at three sites in southwestern Kansas. One site was located in rangeland and two sites were located in areas dominated by irrigated agriculture. In 2000?2001, the depth to water at the rangeland site was 50 meters and the depth to water at the irrigated sites was about 45.4 meters. Irrigation at the study sites began in 1955?56. Measurements of matric potential and volumetric water content indicate wetter conditions existed in the deep unsaturated zone at the irrigated sites than at the rangeland site. Total water potentials in the unsaturated zone at the irrigated sites systematically decreased with depth to the water table, indicating a potential existed for downward water movement from the unsaturated zone to the water table at those sites. At the rangeland site, total water potentials in the deep unsaturated zone indicate small or no potential existed for downward water movement to the water table. Postbomb tritium was not detected below a depth of 1.9 meters in the unsaturated zone or in ground water at the rangeland site. In contrast, postbomb tritium was detected throughout most of the unsaturated zone and in ground water at both irrigated sites. These results indicate post-1953 water moved deeper in the unsaturated zone at the irrigated sites than at the rangeland site. The depth of the interface between prebomb and postbomb tritium and a tritium mass-balance method were used to estimate water fluxes in the unsaturated zone at each site. The average water fluxes at the rangeland site were 5.4 and 4.4 millimeters per year for the two methods, which are similar to the average water

  13. Spatial and temporal distribution of tributyltin (TBT) in seawater, sediments and bivalves from coastal areas of Korea during 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minkyu; Choi, Hee-Gu; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Kim, Gui-Young

    2009-04-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) concentrations were determined in seawater, sediments and bivalve samples collected from Korean coastal areas during 2001-2005, to investigate the levels and temporal variation in TBT contamination in relation to the timing of the imposition of regulations on TBT use in Korea. TBT concentrations ranged from <5.0 to 164 ng/L in seawater, from <7.0 to 9,576 ng/g dry weight in sediments, and from <7.0 to 6,296 ng/g dry weight in bivalves. The highest concentrations of TBT were found at locations close to intensive shipping traffic and industrial complexes, and the contamination at some hot spot areas was high enough to cause harmful effects on marine organisms. TBT concentrations and their occurrence in Korean coastal waters have been decreasing annually. In particular, TBT concentrations in seawater have dramatically decreased. This result is consistent with regulations and bans on the use of TBT in Korea.

  14. Flow-Velocity, Water-Temperature and Conductivity Data Collected in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park, During 1999-2000 and 2000-2001 Wet Seasons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riscassi, Ami L.; Schaffranek, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    A project within the U. S. Geological Survey Place- Based Studies Program is focused on investigation of ?Forcing Effects on Flow Structure in Vegetated Wetlands of the Everglades.? Data-collection efforts conducted within this project at three locations in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park, during the 1999-2000 and 2000-2001 wet seasons are described in this report. Techniques for collecting and processing the data and summaries of daily mean flowvelocity, water-temperature, and conductivity data are presented. The quality-checked and edited data have been compiled and stored on the USGS South Florida Information Access website.

  15. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, J. Chris; Ward, David L.; Farr, Ruth A.

    2002-02-01

    We report on our progress from April 2000 through March 2001 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report D), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report E), and Oregon State University (OSU; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of our work from April 2000 through March 2001 are listed.

  16. Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River; 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, William P.

    2003-02-01

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 2000, 2001, and years previous to aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River basin. The report is divided into sections and self-standing chapters. For detailed summaries, we refer the reader to the abstracts given on the second page of each chapter. The Annual Reporting section includes information provided to fishery managers in-season and post-season, and it contains a detailed summary of life history and survival statistics on wild Snake River fall chinook salmon juveniles for the years 1992-2001. The Journal Manuscripts section includes complete copies of papers submitted or published during 2000 and 2001 that were not included in previous annual reports. Publication is a high priority for this project because it provides our results to a wide audience, it ensures that our work meets high scientific standards, and we believe that it is a necessary obligation of a research project. The Bibliography of Published Journal Articles section provides citations for peer-reviewed papers co-authored by personnel of project 199102900 that were published from 1998 to 2001.

  17. Vaccination coverage levels among Alaska Native children aged 19-35 months--National Immunization Survey, United States, 2000-2001.

    PubMed

    2003-08-01

    In 2000, a total of 118,846 persons indicated that their race/ethnicity was Alaska Native (AN), either alone or in combination with one or more other racial/ethnic groups. AN groups comprise 19% of the population of Alaska and 0.4% of the total U.S. population. The AN grouping includes Eskimos, Aleuts, and Alaska Indians (members of the Alaska Athabaskan, Tlingit, Haida, or other AN tribes). Eskimo represented the largest AN tribal grouping, followed by Tlingit/Haida, Alaska Athabascan, and Aleut. Vaccination coverage levels among AN children have not been reported previously. This report presents data from the National Immunization Survey (NIS) for 2000-2001, which indicate that vaccination coverage levels among AN children aged 19-35 months exceeded the national health objective for 2010 (objective no. 14-22) for the majority of vaccines. This achievement indicates the effectiveness of using multiple strategies to increase vaccination coverage. Similar efforts might increase vaccination coverage in other rural regions with American Indian (AI)/AN populations.

  18. Trustee Quarterly, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trustee Quarterly, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This document contains 4 issues of the Trustee Quarterly: fall 2000, spring 2001, summer 2001, and fall 2001. The fall 2000 issue contains seven features and six departments. Among the features are: "The New Economy: Who Will Lead the Education Movement," by Rucker; "Community Colleges Tackle IT Staffing Challenges," by Matina; and "Looking at…

  19. CEC Today, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Kuren, Lynda, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    Nine issues of the newsletter of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) include articles, news items, meeting announcements, news items of individual divisions, and professional advancement opportunities. Some major articles are: (1) "Home Schooling--A Viable Alternative for Students with Special Needs" (2) "High Stakes Testing…

  20. TASH Newsletter, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Priscilla, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Nine year 2000 issues of the newsletter of TASH, formerly The Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, comprise this document. Each issue typically contains news items, a column by the organization's executive director, reports from special interest groups, legislative testimony, conference information, and several major articles relating to…

  1. Book Reviews 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    Contains reviews of 41 books on career management, job search strategies, entrepreneurship, the Internet job search, self-improvement; specific careers, women and careers, and career development e-business. Eight guides and workbooks are also reviewed. (JOW)

  2. U.S. Department of Energy Integrated Manufacturing & Processing Predoctoral Fellowships. 2000-2001 Annual Progress Report. Reporting period - July 1, 2000 - June 30, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, J.

    2001-08-28

    Administration and management of predoctoral fellowship program for the reporting period. The objective of the program was threefold: to create a pool of PhD's trained in the integrated approach to manufacturing and processing, to promote academic interest in the field, and to attract talented professionals to this challenging area of engineering. It was anticipated that the program would result in the creation of new manufacturing methods that would contribute to improved energy efficiency, to better utilization of scarce resources, and to less degradation of the environment. Emphasis in the competition was on integrated systems of manufacturing and the integration of product design with manufacturing processes.

  3. Ground-based and Space-based Observations of Jovian Mid-Infrared Aurora During the Cassini Flyby of Jupiter 2000-2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostiuk, Theodor; Hewagama, Tilak; Livengood, Timothy A.; Fast, Kelly E.; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Carlson, Ronald; Schmülling, Frank; Nixon, Conor A.

    2015-11-01

    We report on a re-examination and re-analysis of hydrocarbon emission spectra collected from Jupiter using ground-based ultra-high spectral resolution infrared heterodyne spectroscopy (IRHS) and space-based Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) from the Cassini spaceraft during its flyby of Jupiter in 2000-2001. Auroral emission by ethane was measured from Earth with the Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Wind and Composition, HIPWAC, in December 2000 and in February 2001. Shapes of individual emission lines of ethane near 12 µm wavelength were measured from the polar regions of Jupiter at spectral resolving power of 1,000,000. These observations were conducted in concert with scheduled observations of the Jovian auroral region by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) at resolving powers of ~2000 before and after closest approach on December 30, 2000. The HIPWAC measurements complement CIRS' broad spectral and spatial coverage with its uniquely high spectral resolution and spatial discrimination from the ground comparable to that at Cassini’s closest approach. Fully resolved ethane line measurements retrieve both temperature and ethane abundance information at the north and south auroral hot spots. CIRS data at coarser spectral resolution provide extended spatial distributions covering a broad spectral band, including abundances and auroral response of several hydrocarbon constituents in the 8-13 micrometer spectral region (ethane, methane, ethylene, and acetylene). Preliminary studies of both data sets reveal temporal variability and low enhancement of the thermal infrared aurorae during the flyby compared to other periods observed. Analyses of both data sets will be reported and retrievals will be compared. Results will be useful to interpreting the Juno mission, since this work provides complementary information and diagnostics to study Jupiter in a spectral region and altitude range not directly probed by Juno.

  4. Quality of water in domestic wells in the Chicot and Chicot equivalent aquifer systems, southern Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tollett, Roland W.; Fendick, Robert B.; Simmons, Lane B.

    2003-01-01

    In 2000-2001, water-quality data were collected from 60 randomly selected domestic wells in the Acadian-Pontchartrain Study Unit, as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The data were collected from wells screened in shallow sands (less than 350 feet below land surface) in two major aquifer systems--the Chicot aquifer system in southwestern Louisiana and the Chicot equivalent aquifer system in southeastern Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi. The Chicot equivalent aquifer system is part of the Southern Hills regional aquifer system, and both the Chicot aquifer system and the Southern Hills regional aquifer systems are designated as sole-source aquifers by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The well depths ranged from 40 to 340 feet below land surface with a median depth of 120 feet. The ground-water-quality data included 5 physiochemical properties, dissolved solids, 9 major inorganic ions, 24 trace elements, 6 nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, 109 pesticides and degradation products, and 85 volatile organic compounds (VOC's); and a subset of the wells were sampled for radon, chlorofluorocarbons, and stable isotopes. Water from 35 of the 60 domestic wells sampled had pH values less than the USEPA Seconday Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) range of 6.5 to 8.5 standard units. Specific conductance ranged from 17 to 1,420 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius. Dissolved-solids concentrations in water from two wells exceeded the SMCL of 500 mg/L (milligrams per liter); the maximum concentration was 858 mg/L. Sodium and calcium were the dominant cations, and bicarbonate and chloride were the dominant anions. One chloride concentration (264 mg/L) exceeded the SMCL of 250 mg/L. One arsenic concentration (55.3 micrograms per liter) exceeded the USEPA Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10 micrograms per liter. Iron concentrations in water from 22 wells exceeded the SMCL of 300 micrograms per liter; the maximum concentration

  5. Time Series of Trace Gas Profiles of O3, N2o, Ch4, Hf, Hcl, and Hno3 As Retrieved From Ground Based Ftir Observations In Winter 2000/2001 and 2001/2002 At Kiruna (sweden)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesfeller, A.; Blumenstock, T.; Hase, F.; Höpfner, M.; Ruhnke, R.; Arvelius, J.; Raffalski, U.; Kondo, Y.

    Atmospheric absorption spectra using the sun as the source of radiation were recorded by ground based FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed) spectrometers at Kiruna (Swe- den, 68N, 20E) during winter and early spring since winter 1990. Since March 1996 a Bruker 120 HR is in operation at the IRF (Swedish Institute of Space Physics). It is operated permanently and it is part of the NDSC (Network for the Detection of Strato- spheric Change). The FTIR spectra have been analyzed with the radiative transfer code KOPRA (Karlsruhe Optimized and Precise Radiative transfer Algorithm) and the re- trieval code PROFFIT (Profile Fit) using Tikhonov-Phillips approach. Zenith column amounts (ZCA) of several trace gases like O3, N2O, CH4, HF, HCl, ClONO2, NO, NO2, and HNO3 have been derived from these spectra. In case of some important species as O3, N2O, CH4, HF, HCl, and HNO3 also reasonable information on the vertical concentration profiles can be derived. Since winter 1999/2000 data analysis is performed in near real time during the campaigns. These time series of ZCA and profiles will be presented for the winters of 2000/2001 and 2001/2002 and discussed in terms of chlorine activation and deactivation, ozone loss, and sequestration of ni- tric acid in PSCs in the polar vortex. Winter 2000/2001 is of interest due to a long lasting break-up of the polar vortex. Therefore a great variability in many gases is ob- served and will be discussed. In addition the results will be compared to results from KASIMA (Karlsruhe Simulation Model of the Middle Atmosphere).

  6. Changes in ground-water quality in the Canal Creek Aquifer between 1995 and 2000-2001, West Branch Canal Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelan, Daniel J.; Fleck, William B.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Olsen, Lisa D.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1917, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland has been the primary chemical-warfare research and development center for the U.S. Army. Ground-water contamination has been documented in the Canal Creek aquifer because of past disposal of chemical and ordnance manufacturing waste. Comprehensive sampling for volatile organic compounds in ground water by the U.S. Geological Survey in the West Branch Canal Creek area was done in June?October 1995 and June?August 2000. The purpose of this report is (1) to compare volatile organic compound concentrations and determine changes in the ground-water contaminant plumes along two cross sections between 1995 and 2000, and (2) to incorporate data from new piezometers sampled in spring 2001 into the plume descriptions. Along the southern cross section, total concentrations of volatile organic compounds in 1995 were determined to be highest in the landfill area east of the wetland (5,200 micrograms per liter), and concentrations were next highest deep in the aquifer near the center of the wetland (3,300 micrograms per liter at 35 feet below land surface). When new piezometers were sampled in 2001, higher carbon tetrachloride and chloroform concentrations (2,000 and 2,900 micrograms per liter) were detected deep in the aquifer 38 feet below land surface, west of the 1995 sampling. A deep area in the aquifer close to the eastern edge of the wetland and a shallow area just east of the creek channel showed declines in total volatile organic compound concentrations of more than 25 percent, whereas between those two areas, con-centrations generally showed an increase of greater than 25 percent between 1995 and 2000. Along the northern cross section, total concentrations of volatile organic compounds in ground water in both 1995 and 2000 were determined to be highest (greater than 2,000 micrograms per liter) in piezometers located on the east side of the section, farthest from the creek channel, and concentrations were progressively lower

  7. The Edge, Fall 2000/2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Donnalee, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This publication is a national bilingual magazine for Canadian teenagers. It is designed to support and celebrate their career journeys. Youth can learn about options, new possibilities, and the endless opportunities in the changing work environment. The guest editor is a 16-year-old female who joined the magazine staff to help bring employment…

  8. Deaf-Blind Perspectives, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Peggy, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    These three issues of "Deaf-Blind Perspectives" feature the following articles: (1) "A Group for Students with Usher Syndrome in South Louisiana" (Faye Melancon); (2) "Simply Emily," which discusses a budding friendship between a girl with deaf-blindness and a peer; (3) "Intervener Update" (Peggy Malloy and…

  9. Arizona Public Library Statistics, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Jan, Comp.

    These statistics were compiled from information supplied by Arizona's public libraries. The document is divided according to the following county groups: Apache, Cochise; Coconino, Gila; Graham, Greenlee, La Paz; Maricopa; Mohave, Navajo; Pima, Pinal; Santa Cruz, Yavapai; and Yuma. Statistics are presented on the following: general information;…

  10. Selected Reference Books of 2000/2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIlvaine, Eileen

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated list of selected recent scholarly and general reference works under the subject categories of archives; literature; music; psychology; sociology; black studies; women's studies; history and area studies; and new editions and supplements. (LRW)

  11. Selected Reference Books, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIlvaine, Eileen

    2001-01-01

    Presents a selection of recent scholarly and general reference works in these areas: periodical indexes; literature, including theater; religion; festivals; architecture; music; social sciences; women's studies; and history. Provides a brief roundup of new editions of standard works at the end. (AEF)

  12. IMPAC Annual Report, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, Sacramento.

    The Intersegmental Major Preparation Articulated Curriculum (IMPAC) is a faculty-designed, faculty-run project designed to assist the student transfer process from the California Community Colleges (CCC) to the University of California (UC) and the California State University (CSU) systems. In June, 2000, the Chancellor of the California Community…

  13. EDExpress, 2000-2001: Application Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Student Financial Assistance (ED), Washington, DC.

    This trainee workbook, to accompany a one-day workshop at the Student Financial Assistance (SFA) University, is intended for individuals who are processing student financial aid applications using electronic methods such as EDExpress (Electronic Data Exchange) or FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) Express. The first section of the…

  14. Social Science Docket, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Alan, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    A joint publication of the New York and New Jersey State Councils for the Social Studies, "Social Science Docket" presents K-12 teachers with resources covering the social science disciplines, including history, economics, political science, sociology, geography, anthropology, and psychology. Each issue includes theme-related and…

  15. Northwest Education, Volume 6, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Lee, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document contains the four issues of Northwest Education published from fall 2000 through summer 2001. Issue themes are: (1) "New Moves: PE Reinvents Itself" (Fall 2000); (2) "Think Small: Making Education More Personal" (Winter 2000); (3) "The Wild Blue Yonder: Charter Schools Fly into the Unknown" (Spring…

  16. Focus on Basics, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This set of four newsletters contains articles to help adult basic education and literacy teachers connect research and practice. The following are among the articles included: "The Effects of Continuing Goal-Setting on Persistence in a Math Classroom" (Pamela Meader); "Do the Cognitive Skills of Dropouts Matter in the Labor…

  17. English Leadership Quarterly, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiernan, Henry, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This 23rd volume of "English Leadership Quarterly" contains articles on topics of interest to those in positions of leadership in departments (elementary, secondary, or college) where English is taught. Each issue focuses on a different theme. Articles in Volume 23 Number 1 are: "Block Scheduling and Student Achievement"…

  18. Nationwide survey of the development of drug resistance in the pediatric field in 2000-2001, 2004, 2007, 2010, and 2012: evaluation of the changes in drug sensitivity of Haemophilus influenzae and patients' background factors.

    PubMed

    Shiro, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yoshitake; Toyonaga, Yoshikiyo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2015-04-01

    The Drug-Resistant Pathogen Surveillance Group in Pediatric Infectious Disease has conducted surveillance of pediatric patients with respiratory tract infections, meningitis, and sepsis five times (in 2000-2001 [period 1], 2004 [period 2], 2007 [period 3], 2010 [period 4], and 2012 [period 5]). With respect to the clinically isolated Haemophilus influenzae, the drug susceptibility, the frequency of drug-resistant strains, and patients' background factors in each period have already been reported. Here we evaluate trends in the development of drug resistance in H. influenzae, and the relationship between the development of drug resistance and patients' background factors in the aforementioned five periods. H. influenzae derived from pediatric patients with respiratory tract infections that had been previously collected (period 1, 448 isolates; period 2, 376 isolates; period 3, 386 isolates; period 4, 484 isolates; and period 5, 411 isolates) were analyzed. The proportions of ß-lactamase-nonproducing ampicillin (ABPC)-intermediate resistant (BLNAI) strains + β-lactamase-nonproducing ABPC-resistant (BLNAR) strains were 28.8% in period 1, 59.3% in period 2, 61.1% in period 3, 58.1% in period 4, and 63.5% in period 5, showing a rapid increase from period 1 to period 2 followed by an almost constant rate of approximately 60%. The proportion of ß-lactamase-producing ABPC-resistant (BLPAR) strains + ß-lactamase-producing clavulanic acid/amoxicillin-resistant (BLPACR) strains was 4.4% in period 3, which was somewhat low; however, there were no significant changes in the proportions of these strains, which ranged between 6.4% and 8.7% throughout the surveillance period except for period 3. The drugs whose MIC90 values against BLNAR strains were low throughout the surveillance included piperacillin (0.25 μg/mL) and tazobactam/piperacillin (0.125-0.25 μg/mL) in the penicillins; cefditoren and ceftriaxone (0.25-0.5 μg/mL for both) in the cephems; meropenem (0.5-1

  19. The Indigenous World, 2000/2001 = El mundo indigena, 2000/2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molbech, Anette, Ed.

    This annual publication (published separately in English and Spanish) examines political, social, environmental, and educational issues concerning indigenous peoples around the world in 2000-01. Part 1 describes current situations and events in 11 world regions: the Arctic; North America; Mexico and Central America; South America; Australia and…

  20. Astronautics and Aeronautics: A Chronology, 2001-2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivey, William Noel; Lewis, Marieke

    2010-01-01

    This report is a chronological compilation of narrative summaries of news reports and government documents highlighting significant events and developments in U.S. and foreign aeronautics and astronautics. It covers the years 2001 through 2005. These summaries provide a day-by-day recounting of major activities, such as administrative developments, awards, launches, scientific discoveries, corporate and government research results, and other events in countries with aeronautics and astronautics programs. Researchers used the archives and files housed in the NASA History Division, as well as reports and databases on the NASA Web site.

  1. LITERATURE SURVEY ON ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO MEASUREMENTS - 2001-2005

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-13

    Along with my usual weekly review of the published literature for new nuclear data, I also search for new candidates for best measurements of isotopic abundances from a single source. Most of the published articles, that I previously had found in the Research Library at the Brookhaven Lab, have already been sent to the members of the Atomic Weights Commission, by either Michael Berglund or Thomas Walczyk. In the last few days, I checked the published literature for any other articles in the areas of natural variations in isotopic abundance ratios, measurements of isotopic abundance ratios on samples of extra-terrestrial material and isotopic abundance ratio measurements performed using ICPMS instruments. Hopefully this information will be of interest to members of the Commission, the sub-committee on isotopic abundance measurements (SIAM), members of the former sub-committee on natural isotopic fractionation (SNIF), the sub-committee on extra-terrestrial isotope ratios (SETIR), the RTCE Task Group and the Guidelines Task Group, who are dealing with ICPMS and TIMS comparisons. In the following report, I categorize the publications in one of four areas. Measurements performed using either positive or negative ions with Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer, TIMS, instruments; measurements performed on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer, ICPMS, instruments; measurements of natural variations of the isotopic abundance ratios; and finally measurements on extra-terrestrial samples with instrumentation of either type. There is overlap in these areas. I selected out variations and ET results first and then categorized the rest of the papers by TIMS and ICPMS.

  2. South Carolina State Library Annual Report, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Library, Columbia.

    The current strategic plan of the South Carolina State Library contains five goals: (1) Provide information resources and services to meet the needs of the people of South Carolina; (2) Provide statewide programs to support local library services; (3) Serve as the advocate for libraries in South Carolina; (4) Encourage cooperation among libraries…

  3. Community College Exemplary Initiatives. Volume XII, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, Donald, Ed.; Goss, Susan, Ed.

    This is the twelfth annual volume of outstanding campus initiatives published by the National Council of Instructional Administrators (NCIA). The volume contains sections corresponding to the five categories in which programs were originally submitted to NCIA for its annual Exemplary Initiatives Awards. Section 1 includes the descriptions of the…

  4. Attacking Poverty. World Development Report, 2000/2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    This report seeks to expand the understanding of poverty and its causes and sets out actions to create to create a world free of poverty in all its dimensions. The report both builds on past thinking and strategy and substantially broadens and deepens what is judged to be necessary to meet the challenge of reducing poverty. It argues that major…

  5. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn naturally in existing and future available habitat (i.e. natural supplementation), while meeting other program objectives. In addition to the hatchery specific goals detailed above, hatchery personnel will actively participate in the Northwest Power Planning Council program, participate in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Resident Fish Committee, and other associated committees and Ad Hoc groups that may be formed to address resident fish issues in the blocked area above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

  6. Writing Proficiency Examination Instructional Guide, 2000-2001. [Third Edition].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada State Dept. of Education, Carson City.

    The Nevada Writing Assessment Program has been developed, implemented, and facilitated by Nevada classroom teachers, who have adapted, designed, and continually revised the scoring criteria; designed the assessment writing prompts; evaluated and chosen anchor papers; led the scoring sessions and read and scored the student papers; and made the…

  7. Interruption of measles transmission in Brazil, 2000-2001.

    PubMed

    Prevots, D Rebecca; Parise, M Salet; Segatto, Teresa Cristina V; Siqueira, Marilda Mendonça; dos Santos, Elizabeth D; Ganter, Bernardus; Perreira, Maria Carolina C Q; Domingues, Carla A; Lanzieri, Tatiana; Da Silva, Jarbas Barbosa

    2003-05-15

    In 1992, Brazil adopted the goal of measles elimination by the year 2000; however, in 1997, after a 4-year period of good control, there was a resurgence of measles in Brazil. In 1999, to achieve the elimination goal, Brazil implemented the Supplementary Emergency Measles Action plan, with one measles surveillance technician designated to each state. Of 10,007 suspected measles cases reported during 1999, 908 (9.1%) were confirmed, and of them 378 (42%) were confirmed by laboratory analysis. Of 8358 suspected measles cases reported in 2000, 36 (0.4%) were confirmed (30 [83%] by laboratory); 92% of the discarded cases were classified on the basis of laboratory testing. In 2001, only 1 of 5599 suspected measles cases was confirmed, and it was an imported case from Japan. The last outbreak occurred in February 2000, with 15 cases. Current data suggest interruption of indigenous measles transmission in Brazil.

  8. Financial Aid: The Student Guide, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This publication presents a basic summary of student financial assistance programs provided by the federal government and explains how to apply for them. It begins by reviewing sources of information about student aid. A general information section covers student eligibility, financial need, dependency status, applying, special circumstances,…

  9. Journal of the Pennsylvania Counseling Association, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Clifford W., Jr., Ed.; Carey, Andrew L., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    These two journal issues are dedicated to the study and development of the counseling profession. The journal's emphasis on multiculturalism is evident in the article selected for this volume. The first issue contains the following articles: (1) "Message from the Co-Editors: The Strength of Diversity" (Andrew L. Carey and Clifford W.…

  10. Journal of School Social Work, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullagh, James G., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This journal is committed to publishing articles that reflect the diversity of the practice of school social workers. It offers a way for leaders to reflect on their careers in school social work and record information on the growth and development of the field for future generations. The first issue's section on "Leaders in School Social…

  11. MinneTESOL/WITESOL Journal, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upton, John, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    These two journal issues present articles on the following: "Understanding and Teaching American Cultural Thought through English Metaphors" (Carl Zhonggang Gao); "An Alternative Model for Novice-Level Elementary ESL Education" (Karen Duke, Ann Mabbott); "Wisconsin's Approach to Academic Assessment for Limited-English…

  12. Basic Training Materials: 2000-2001 Participant's Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This workbook for financial aid administrators was intended for use at a 4-day workshop and provides information and detailed instructions on how to apply for and document applications for student financial assistance. Each section first outlines some basic rules and timetables, then uses a question-and-answer format and sample documents to guide…

  13. Employer Follow-Up Report (2000-2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Technical Coll. System Board, Madison.

    The employer satisfaction survey is conducted once every four years to collect data on employers' perceptions of recent graduates of the Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS). The primary objective of the survey is for employers to rate how well graduates meet employers' expectations, compared with what the employers expect of an entry-level…

  14. Timing magma ascent at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico, 2000-2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Del Pozzo, A. L.; Cifuentes, G.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Bonifaz, R.; Correa, F.; Mendiola, I. F.

    2003-07-01

    Magnetic anomalies may be used to constrain magma ascent and are useful as precursors to eruptions especially when correlated with other geophysical and geochemical data. In this paper we present multiparameter data on the magnetics, dome morphology, geochemistry and seismicity associated with the December 2000-January 2001 eruptions, the largest of the recent eruptions at Popocatepetl Volcano. A 6-month data period was studied in order to evaluate the precursors and post-eruption processes. Several cycles of dome construction and destruction occurred from September 2000 through February 2001. In December, large amplitude tremor associated with a higher effusion rate resulted in the formation of a large dome which filled the crater to within about 50 m of the lowest part of the crater rim. Seismic activity in December was marked by many volcanotectonic earthquakes and both high frequency and harmonic tremor. On December 12 and 13, an increase in the tremor amplitude was followed by ash eruptions with 1.7-5-km-high columns. Tremor amplitude increased again on December 15 and oscillated for the next four days. Activity remained high until the end of the month. On January 22, an 18-km-high plume produced ash and pumice fall to the east as well as pyroclastic flows and mudflows which reached 6 km from the crater. The eruption left three concentric explosion pits, partially destroying the December dome. Mixing of a mafic olivine-bearing melt with a more evolved magma triggered the larger eruption on January 22 as can be seen from the higher MgO concentrations in some of the ejecta and the presence of a dark andesitic scoria with lower silica content and a white andesitic pumice with higher silica content. Precursory negative magnetic anomalies up to 5 nT (-3.2 nT, -5 nT, -2.9 nT) were associated with the ascent of the larger batches of magma which preceded the increases in seismicity, before the December 2000-January 22 VEI 3-4 eruptions. No significant increases in seismicity were observed prior to the January 22 eruption, except for a magnitude-2.4 earthquake on the day of the eruption. There was, however, a -0.8-nT magnetic anomaly which lasted from January 10 to 12 and possibly to January 17. Most of the magma ascended in three large batches and several smaller ones from October 22 through December 10. Short-lived crater domes with small volumes were formed at Popocatepetl in September-October and November 2000 and in March 2001. Even the smaller negative anomalies from September to February were associated with the ascent of several batches of magma. They preceded the increases observed in the seismicity and growth of a dome by several days.

  15. A Guide to 2000-2001 SARs and ISIRs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Student Financial Assistance (ED), Washington, DC.

    This guide is intended to assist financial aid officers interpret the coding on the Student Aid Report (SAR), which is sent directly to students, and on the Institutional Student Information Record (ISIR), which is sent directly to institutions, in order to help students make the necessary corrections to their financial aid application data. The…

  16. The Idea Book for Educators, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Libby Haight, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    The Fall 2000 and Spring 2001 issues provide ideas for teaching based on Arts and Entertainment and History Channel programming. The Fall issue contains study guides such as: "Inside Story: Street Racing: The Need for Speed" (analyzes the legal and moral implications of street racing); "Longitude" (examines the difficulties of…

  17. Executive Compensation in the California Community Colleges, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    The Chancellor's Office of the California Community Colleges, in compliance with the State Legislature's requirements, issues a yearly report detailing executive compensation in the community colleges. There are three major organizational configurations in the state: (1) 20 multi-college districts administered by chancellors; (2) 56 colleges in…

  18. Distance Learning Fiscal and Statistical Report, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltz, Steve

    This Distance Learning Fiscal and Statistical Report is an annual publication designed to document statistical and financial aspects of the Distance Learning Program at West Valley College (Saratoga, California). In addition to presenting comparative distance learning course statistics for the last 15 years, this report presents a thorough review…

  19. Kids Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 2000-2001 [and] Families Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Kids Count in Delaware.

    This Kids Count Fact Book is combined with the Families Count Fact Book to provide information on statewide trends affecting children and families in Delaware. The Kids Count statistical profile is based on 11 main indicators of child well-being: (1) births to teens 15 to 17 years; (2) births to teens 15 to 19 years; (3) low birth weight babies;…

  20. Providing ART to HIV Seropositive Persons Who Use Drugs: Progress in New York City, Prospects for "Ending the Epidemic".

    PubMed

    Jarlais, Don C Des; Arasteh, Kamyar; McKnight, Courtney; Feelemyer, Jonathan; Hagan, Holly; Cooper, Hannah L F; Campbell, Aimee N C; Tross, Susan; Perlman, David C

    2016-02-01

    New York City has experienced the largest HIV epidemic among persons who use psychoactive drugs. We examined progress in placing HIV seropositive persons who inject drugs (PWID) and HIV seropositive non-injecting drug users (NIDU) onto antiretroviral treatment (ART) in New York City over the last 15 years. We recruited 3511 PWID and 3543 NIDU from persons voluntarily entering drug detoxification and methadone maintenance treatment programs in New York City from 2001 to 2014. HIV prevalence declined significantly among both PWID and NIDU. The percentage who reported receiving ART increased significantly, from approximately 50 % (2001-2005) to approximately 75 % (2012-2014). There were no racial/ethnic disparities in the percentages of HIV seropositive persons who were on ART. Continued improvement in ART uptake and TasP and maintenance of other prevention and care services should lead to an "End of the AIDS Epidemic" for persons who use heroin and cocaine in New York City.

  1. Perinatal Morbidity and Mortality in the U.S. Department of Defense, 2001-2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    decrease in the VBAC rate (28.58% to 16.70%), and decrease in the operative vaginal delivery rate (9.92% to 7.91 %). The decrease in operative vaginal...Repeat Cesarean rate 36.48% 33.33% 36.06% 36.69% 37.61% 38.28% VBACs : 6251 1449 1494 1281 1087 940 VBAC rate 22.39% Yo 22.43% 18.65% 16.70% Total

  2. The United States Air Force Academy: A Bibliography 2001-2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    CHECKPOINTS Fall 2003: 56-57. 88. Mazzarella, Lee. Game of life. CHECKPOINTS Winter 2002: 11. 89. Negroni , Hector. The DODO. CHECKPOINTS Fall 2001: 46-47... Negroni , Hector 89 Netsch, Walter 21 Nettleblad, Kelly 257 Nettleblad, Tracy 106 New, Larry 367 Newman, Richard J 492 Noncommissioned Officers 145

  3. Synthesis of juvenile salmonid passage studies at The Dalles Dam volume II: 2001 - 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, G.E.; Beeman, J.W.; Duran , I.N.; Puls, A.L.

    2007-01-01

    The overall goal of juvenile salmonid research at The Dalles Dam is to provide data to inform decisions on strategies to improve smolt survival rates at the project. Survival improvement strategies address the three primary passage routes at The Dalles Dam -- spillway, sluiceway, and turbines – with the general intent to increase spill and sluice passage and decrease turbine passage. From 2001, when Ploskey et al. (2001a) completed their review of 1982-2000 research, through 2005, the USACE has funded over $20M of research in at least 40 studies. The purpose of this current review is to synthesize juvenile salmonid passage data at The Dalles Dam (TDA) collected from 2001 through 2005.

  4. County-level socioeconomic status and cancer rates in Texas, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Risser, David R; Miller, Eric A; Williams, Melanie A; Foxhall, Lewis E

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that a person's socioeconomic status (SES) (a proxy measure that can incorporate income, wealth, education, and occupation) is associated with cancer incidence and mortality. Examining variation in cancer rates by SES can help identify health disparities and target areas for cancer control activities. The Texas Cancer Registry (TCR) collects data on every newly diagnosed case of cancer in Texas, including personal and demographic data, but does not collect data related directly to SES. Using a county-level measure of SES determined by the 2000 US Census, we compared cancer incidence and mortality rates for selected cancer sites by counties categorized into Low, Intermediate, and High SES. The cancers examined in this analysis included lung, colorectal, female breast, prostate, cervical, and all cancers collected by TCR combined. Consistent with other studies, most incidence and mortality rates were lowest in the High SES counties. However, in general, the highest incidence and mortality rates were found in counties categorized as Intermediate SES, but patterns differed by cancer site and by race and ethnicity. This study provides additional evidence that geographically related SES is associated with cancer incidence and mortality.

  5. Tuberculosis rates among HIV-infected persons in New York City, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Trieu, Lisa; Li, Jiehui; Hanna, David B; Harris, Tiffany G

    2010-06-01

    We calculated population-based tuberculosis (TB) rates among HIV-infected persons in New York City from 2001 through 2005 using data from the city's TB and HIV/AIDS surveillance registries, and we examined those rates using linear trend tests and incidence rate ratios (IRRs). HIV-infected individuals had 16 times the TB rate of a "non-HIV" population (HIV status negative or unknown; IRR = 16.0; 95% confidence interval = 14.9, 17.2). TB rates declined significantly among the US-born HIV-infected population (P (trend) < .001) but not among the foreign-born HIV-infected population (P (trend) = .355). Such disparities must be addressed if further declines are to be achieved.

  6. Publications and Presentations of the Ophthalmology Branch, USAF School of Aerospace Medicine, 2001-2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    International Congress of Aviation and Space Medicine, Sydney, Australia, Sept 17, 2002. 23. CORNEAL TOPOGRAPHY CHANGES AFTER EXPOSURE TO HIGH +GZ Tutt R... CORNEAL TOPOGRAPHY & REFRACTIVE CHANGES AFTER EXPOSURE TO HIGH +GZ R. Tutt, and D. J. Ivan Presented at the Aerospace Medical Association 74h Annual...Scientific Meeting, San Antonio, TX 4-8 May 2003. 7. ANALYSIS OF CORNEAL TOPOGRAPHY PATTERNS IN USAF PILOT APPLICANTS M. Thornsberry, D. J. Ivan, J. M. Gooch

  7. Mexico-United States Dialogue on Migration and Border Issues, 2001-2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-02

    reach a migration accord with Mexico that addresses the key issues of concern in both countries, opens the Mexican petroleum monopoly ( PEMEX ) to reform...Committee-reported provisions related to PEMEX and extradition as an intrusion in the domestic affairs of Mexico. The Office of the Mexican Presidency issued...K. Larry Storrs. exchange for opening up Petróleos Mexicanos (the state oil industry - PEMEX ) to foreign investment would be wholly unacceptable.”7

  8. Observations of Energetic Ions and Electrons in the Distant Heliosphere: 2001 - 2005.0

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Frank B.; Stone, Edward C.; Cummings, Alan C.; Burlaga, Leonard F.; Heikkila, Bryant C.; Lal, Nand; Richardson, John D.; Webber, William R.

    2005-08-01

    As Voyager 1 (V1) moves closer to the heliospheric termination shock (TS), a new energetic particle population is observed: Termination Shock Particle events (TSP). Interplanetary disturbances in the form of merged interaction regions (MIRs) -- identified using Voyager 2 (V2) data -- have a major effect on the V1 TSP events from their onset to termination along with triggering episodic increases in higher energy ions (35 MeV H) and MeV electrons. The nature of these interactions appear to evolve as V1 moves closer to the TS.

  9. The Iron Triangle Manifested: U.S. Air Force Tanker Lease 2001-2005 Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    own experts along with participants from Boeing and Rockwell to perform the KC–135 Economic Service Life Study ( ESLS ). Based on usage at that time...General John D. Ryan stated a replacement program would start in the next 15 years.9 2 Punjani The ESLS pre-dated 9/11 and did not account for...increased flight hours due to homeland defense air patrols and the war in Afghanistan. Usage rates increased from the ESLS -report- ed figure of 308 hours per

  10. Trends and Issues Affecting Economic Development in Ohio, 2001-2005.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jerold R.; Safrit, R. Dale

    Fourteen economic development practitioners were asked to participate in a modified Delphi study that attempted to provide a level of agreement about future trends and issues that affect economic development at the county level in Ohio. Literature from several fields was reviewed to find potential trends and issues and, using a Likert-type scale,…

  11. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Donna

    2001-09-01

    Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

  12. Planning health education: Internet and computer resources in southwestern Nigeria. 2000-2001.

    PubMed

    Oyadoke, Adebola A; Salami, Kabiru K; Brieger, William R

    The use of the Internet as a health education tool and as a resource in health education planning is widely accepted as the norm in industrialized countries. Unfortunately, access to computers and the Internet is quite limited in developing countries. Not all licensed service providers operate, many users are actually foreign nationals, telephone connections are unreliable, and electricity supplies are intermittent. In this context, computer, e-mail, Internet, and CD-Rom use by health and health education program officers in five states in southwestern Nigeria were assessed to document their present access and use. Eight of the 30 organizations visited were government health ministry departments, while the remainder were non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Six NGOs and four State Ministry of Health (MOH) departments had no computers, but nearly two-thirds of both types of agency had e-mail, less than one-third had Web browsing facilities, and six had CD-Roms, all of whom were NGOs. Only 25 of the 48 individual respondents had computer use skills. Narrative responses from individual employees showed a qualitative difference between computer and Internet access and use and type of agency. NGO staff in organizations with computers indicated having relatively free access to a computer and the Internet and used these for both program planning and administrative purposes. In government offices it appeared that computers were more likely to be located in administrative or statistics offices and used for management tasks like salaries and correspondence, limiting the access of individual health staff. These two different organizational cultures must be considered when plans are made for increasing computer availability and skills for health education planning.

  13. ECS Program Unit Funding: A Handbook of ECS Operators, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Special Education Branch.

    This handbook is written specifically for Early Childhood Services (ECS) operators in Alberta, Canada, applying for Program Unit Funding. It is also designed to enhance the understanding of how assistance is provided to ECS children with severe disabilities by teachers, special needs assistants, parents, and supporting agency personnel. ECS…

  14. Final Report on the Airborne Field Mill Project (ABFM) 2000-2001 Field Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, James E.; Lewis, Sharon; Bateman, Monte, G.; Mach, Douglas M.; Merceret, Francis J.; Ward, Jennifer G.; Grainger, Cedric A.

    2004-01-01

    The Airborne Field Mill (ABFM) research program conducted under the direction of the John F. Kennedy Space Center during 2000 and 2001 is described. The purpose, methodology and initial results from the program are presented. Extensive appendices detailing the instrumentation used to collect the data are provided.

  15. The epidemiology of skydiving injuries: World freefall convention, 2000-2001.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Thomas H; Mills, Trevor J; Kassing, Scott D

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence and types of injuries incurred by civilian skydivers using contemporary equipment under conventional conditions. Injury data were collected at the World Freefall skydiving convention (WFFC), during two consecutive periods of operation, August 4-13, 2000 and August 3-12, 2001. During the study periods, 8976 skydivers made 117,000 skydives. The First Aid Station at the WFFC treated 204 patients for injuries related to skydiving, at a rate of 17.4/10,000 (injuries/skydives). Most injuries were minor (66%) and required only simple first aid. Significant injuries, defined as those requiring treatment in the emergency department, occurred at a rate of 6.0/10,000 (injuries/skydives). The rate of hospitalization was 1.8/10,000 skydives. There was one fatality during this study. We believe these results provide a current update regarding the risk and types of injury related to recreational skydiving.

  16. College Education in Korea, 2000-2001: 2-3 Year College Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korean Council for Univ. Education, Seoul (South Korea).

    This document describes two- and three-year colleges in Korea, which produce middle-level technicians equipped with a solid base in both theory and practical skills. The colleges' goals are: (1) to contribute to national development by producing leading technicians to industries; (2) to realize the idea of lifelong education through a variety of…

  17. Oklahoma City FILM Even Start Family Literacy Program Evaluation, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Donna Castle; Shove, Joanie; Brickman, Sharon; Terrell, Sherry; Shields, Jane

    This report presents findings from the evaluation of the Oklahoma City Public Schools Even Start Program, also called the Family Intergenerational Literacy Model (FILM), now in its twelfth full year of operation. The evaluation focuses on the total population of adult students, preschoolers, adult graduates, and preschool graduates. The…

  18. Constructing a Normative National Identity: The "Leitkultur" Debate in Germany, 2000/2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manz, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, public discourse about German national identity has increasingly focussed on the large foreign population within Germany's borders. Whilst right-wing politicians such as Edmund Stoiber foster fears of identity loss ("Uberfremdung"), more liberal observers, and indeed the ruling red-green coalition, acknowledge that…

  19. Classroom Notes Plus: A Quarterly of Teaching Ideas, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Notes Plus, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This 18th volume of "Classroom Notes Plus" contains descriptions of original, unpublished teaching practices, or adapted ideas. Under the Ideas from the Classroom section, the August 2000 issue contains the following materials: "The Thought Pot" (Andrew R. West); "Seeing Is Reading: 'The Hollow Men'" (James Penha);…

  20. Student Financial Aid Handbook, 2000-2001. Volume 8: Direct Loan and FFEL Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Student Financial Assistance.

    The "Student Financial Aid Handbook" explains the policies and procedures required for institutions of higher education to administer federally funded student financial assistance programs properly. This volume clarifies a school's responsibility with respect to Stafford and PLUS loans. These loans are offered through two delivery…

  1. Prekindergarten in U.S. Public Schools: 2000-2001. Statistical Analysis Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Timothy; Kleiner, Anne; Parsad, Basmat; Farris, Elizabeth; Greene, Bernard

    As part of its congressional mandate to collect, analyze, and report statistics on the condition of education in the United States, the National Center for Education Statistics conducted the Survey of Classes That Serve Children Prior to Kindergarten in Public Schools, the first national data collection focused exclusively on prekindergarten…

  2. PSSA Released Reading Items, 2000-2001. The Pennsylvania System of School Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum and Academic Services.

    This document contains materials directly related to the actual reading test of the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA), including the reading rubric, released passages, selected-response questions with answer keys, performance tasks, and scored samples of students' responses to the tasks. All of these items may be duplicated to…

  3. 78 FR 64984 - Distribution of the 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2003 Cable Royalty Funds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ..., noncommercial radio broadcast programs, music on all broadcast programs, and program suppliers. See Distribution... Royalty Distribution Proceeding, Notice of final determination of music controversy, in Docket No. 89-2-87CD, 55 FR 11988 (Mar. 30, 1990) (1987 Music Determination). \\9\\ Determination of the Distribution...

  4. Master's-Level Nurse Practitioner Educational Programs: Findings from the 2000-2001 Collaborative Curriculum Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Linda E.; Harper, Doreen; Werner, Kathryn E.; Stennett, Janis

    Based on a survey of master's level nurse practitioner (NP) educational programs, this report presents data on: (1) types of programs and their characteristics; (2) programs by NP role preparation (single track, dual track, or combined NP/clinical nurse specialist); (3) course content areas included in core master's and clinical (didactic and/or…

  5. Literacy Teaching and Learning: An International Journal of Early Reading and Writing, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Maribeth Cassidy, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This scholarly journal, an official publication of the Reading Recovery Council of North America, was established to provide an interdisciplinary forum on issues related to the acquisition of language, literacy development, and instructional theory and practice. Articles in Volume 5, Number 1 are: "Affinities and Contradictions: The Dynamics…

  6. Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season

    EIA Publications

    2000-01-01

    This special report looks at the capabilities of the national natural gas pipeline network in 2000 and provides an assessment of the current levels of available capacity to transport supplies from production areas to markets throughout the United States during the upcoming heating season. It also examines how completion of currently planned expansion projects and proposed new pipelines would affect the network.

  7. A Reasonably Equal Share: Educational Equity in Vermont. A Status Report, Year 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimerson, Lorna

    Vermont's Equal Educational Opportunity Act of 1997, Act 60, was designed to rectify educational inequities cited in the State Supreme Court ruling that the state's foundation formula was unconstitutional. This study examines the degree to which Act 60 has improved inequitable conditions in the three main areas cited in the court decision.…

  8. More Than One Million Children Served: Reading Recovery Results, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Recovery Council of North America, Columbus, OH.

    A key premise of Reading Recovery is that early intervention in first grade is critical in long-term literacy achievement because the gap between lowest- and highest-achieving children is narrow in lower grades but widens in later elementary school. Reading Recovery closes this gap at the critical time in children's literacy learning before the…

  9. School District of the City of Saginaw Dropout Study, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claus, Richard N.

    The School District of the City of Saginaw (Michigan) has annually reported on the rate and nature of the dropout population; this dropout report is the eleventh edition of the state defined generation of dropout reports. One hundred and fourteen, or 5% of Saginaw's 2,292 students in grades 9-12, terminated their high school education between…

  10. Characteristics of districts in Pakistan with persistent transmission of wild poliovirus, 2000-2001.

    PubMed

    Lowther, S A; Mir, T; Bile, M K; Abdul Hafiz, R; Mounts, A W

    2004-01-01

    We sought to identify factors associated with being a reservoir district for wild poliovirus in Pakistan. Differences between reservoir and non-reservoir districts were identified using acute flaccid paralysis surveillance data, population census statistics and data from a survey of district health officials (DHOs). Of the 11 poliovirus reservoir districts identified, population density was significantly higher (median 550 persons/km2) than the non-reservoirs (median 175 persons/km2). DHOs from reservoir districts more often reported that planning was affected by refugees and they had more frequent DHO transfers compared with non-reservoir districts. Multivariate analysis confirmed that reservoirs more often had high population density and frequent DHO transfers. Assessment of district-level and management characteristics can supplement surveillance methods to further improve health programmes.

  11. Second-Tier Database for Ecosystem Focus, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Holmes, Chris; Muongchanh, Christine; Anderson, James J.

    2001-11-01

    The Second-Tier Database for Ecosystem Focus (Contract 00004124) provides direct and timely public access to Columbia Basin environmental, operational, fishery and riverine data resources for federal, state, public and private entities. The Second-Tier Database known as Data Access in Realtime (DART) does not duplicate services provided by other government entities in the region. Rather, it integrates public data for effective access, consideration and application.

  12. Student Financial Aid Handbook, 2000-2001. Volume 2: Institutional Eligibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Student Financial Assistance.

    The "Student Financial Aid Handbook" explains the policies and procedures required for institutions of higher education to administer federally funded student financial assistance programs properly. This volume focuses on institutional eligibility and explains how a school becomes eligible to participate in the Student Financial Assistance (SFA)…

  13. Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers; Idaho Supplementation Studies, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, Chris; Tabor, R.A.; Kinzer, Ryan

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes brood year 1999 juvenile production and emigration data and adult return information for 2000 for streams studied by the Nez Perce Tribe for the cooperative Idaho Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers (ISS) project. In order to provide inclusive juvenile data for brood year 1999, we include data on parr, presmolt, smolt and yearling captures. Therefore, our reporting period includes juvenile data collected from April 2000 through June 2001 for parr, presmolts, and smolts and through June 2002 for brood year 1999 yearling emigrants. Data presented in this report include; fish outplant data for treatment streams, snorkel and screw trap estimates of juvenile fish abundance, juvenile emigration profiles, juvenile survival estimates to Lower Granite Dam (LGJ), redd counts, and carcass data. There were no brood year 1999 treatments in Legendary Bear or Fishing Creek. As in previous years, snorkeling methods provided highly variable population estimates. Alternatively, rotary screw traps operated in Lake Creek and the Secesh River provided more precise estimates of juvenile abundance by life history type. Juvenile fish emigration in Lake Creek and the Secesh River peaked during July and August. Juveniles produced in this watershed emigrated primarily at age zero, and apparently reared in downstream habitats before detection as age one or older fish at the Snake and Columbia River dams. Over the course of the ISS study, PIT tag data suggest that smolts typically exhibit the highest relative survival to Lower Granite Dam (LGJ) compared to presmolts and parr, although we observed the opposite trend for brood year 1999 juvenile emigrants from the Secesh River. SURPH2 survival estimates for brood year 1999 Lake Creek parr, presmolt, and smolt PIT tag groups to (LGJ) were 27%, 39%, and 49% respectively, and 14%, 12%, and 5% for the Secesh River. In 2000, we counted 41 redds in Legendary Bear Creek, 4 in Fishing Creek, 5 in Slate Creek, 153 in the Secesh River, and 180 in Lake Creek. We recovered 19 carcasses (11 natural 8 hatchery) in Legendary Bear Creek, one hatchery carcass in Fishing Creek, zero carcasses in Slate Creek, 82 carcasses (19 of unknown origin and 63 natural) in the Secesh River, and 178 carcasses (2 hatchery 176 natural) from Lake Creek. In 2000 the majority (82%) of carcasses were recovered in index spawning reaches. Preliminary analysis of brood year 1997 PIT tag return data for the Secesh River and Lake Creek yields LGJ to Lower Granite Dam (LGD) juvenile to adult survival rates of, 0.00% for parr, 0.20% for presmolts, and 3.13% for smolts. LGJ to LGD juvenile to adult return rates for brood year 1997 Legendary Bear Creek were 2.98% for naturally produced PIT tagged smolts and 0.89% for PIT tagged supplementation smolts. No adults were detected at LGD from brood year 1997 parr released in Fishing Creek.

  14. A Profile of the Upward Bound Math-Science Program: 2000-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtin, Thomas R.; Cahalan, Margaret W.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's Strategic Plan 2002-2007 (2002) established an objective to "reduce the gaps in college access and completion among student populations differing by race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and disability while increasing the educational attainment of all." Upward Bound, which made its first awards in 1965, has…

  15. Youth Reintegration Training and Education for Peace (YRTEP) Program: Sierra Leone, 2000-2001. Impact Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauth, Gloria; Daniels, Bonnie

    Management Systems International (MSI), with funding from United States Agency for International Development Office of Transition Initiatives (USAID/OTI) and in coordination with other partners, is implementing a program in Sierra Leone entitled "Youth Reintegration Training and Education for Peace" (YRTEP). The object is to provide…

  16. Student Financial Aid Handbook, 2000-2001. Volume 4: Campus-Based Common Provisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Student Financial Assistance.

    The Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), and Federal Work-Study (FWS) programs are called "campus-based" programs because each school is responsible for administering them on its own campus. A school applies for and receives funds direct from the U.S. Department of Education, and the school's…

  17. Student Financial Aid Handbook, 2000-2001. Volume 6: Federal Work-Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Student Financial Assistance.

    The Federal Work-Study (FWS) Program encourages the part-time employment of undergraduate and graduate students who need the income to help pay the cost of their education and encourages FSW recipients to participate in community service activities. This volume describes the ways schools are required to use money from their FSW Program funds to…

  18. Monitoring Monitoring Evolving Activity at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico, 2000-2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-DelPozzo, A.; Aceves, F.; Bonifaz, R.; Humberto, S.

    2001-12-01

    After 6 years of small eruptions, activity at Mexico's 5,452m high Popocatepetl Volcano in central Mexico, peaked in the December 2000-January 2001 eruptions. Precursors included an important increase in seismicity as well as in magmatic components of spring water and small scale deformation which resulted in growth of a new crater dome from January 16 on. Evacuation of the towns nearest the volcano over Christmas was decided because of the possibility of pyroclastic flows. During the previous years, crater dome growth, contraction and explosive clearing has dominated the activity. The January 22 eruption produced an eruption column approximately 17km high with associated pyroclastic flows. Ejecta was composed of both basic and evolved scoria and pumice and dome lithics. A large proportion of the juvenile material was intermediate between these 2 endmenbers (59-63percent SiO2 and 3.5 to 5.5 MgO) consistent with a small basic pulse entering a more evolved larger batch of magma. The January eruption left a large pit which has been partially infilled by another crater dome this August 2001.

  19. Nebraska Career and Technical Education Consolidated Annual Report, 2000-2001. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska State Dept. of Education, Lincoln.

    Career and technical education (CTE) in Nebraska prepares individuals at the secondary, postsecondary, and adult level for entry, advanced, technical, and managerial positions in business and industry. The Department of Education is the designated agency for administration of CTE and the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of…

  20. Council on Library and Information Resources: Annual Report, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Library and Information Resources, Washington, DC.

    The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) brings together experts from around the country and around the world and asks them to turn their intelligence to the problems that libraries, archives, and information organizations face as they integrate digital resources and services into their well established print-based environments. In…

  1. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shing-Jen, Ed.; Murohashi, Harumitsu, Ed.; Fujino, Yuki, Ed.

    This annual report presents several articles related to the work of the Clinical Center for Child Development at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan. The articles are: (1) "Joint Attention as a System Property of the Infant-Caregiver Interaction System"(Tsuneda Miho and Shing-Jen Chen); (2) "Age-Related Change in Japanese Maternal…

  2. Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Berejikian, Barry A.; Dittman, Andrew H.; Hardy, Ronald W.

    2001-06-01

    It is not yet possible to define a feeding regimen for captively-reared stocks similar to their natural regimen that enhances the post-release fitness of juveniles and improves the reproductive performance of adults. In the natural environment, seasonal differences in food quality and quantity have profound effects on growth and 'wild' attributes, such as external coloration and fin quality. Formulating the right feeds for conservation fish held for long periods in captivity before release is more complicated than formulating diets for farm fish. Recent research in salmonid nutrition shows it is necessary to consider daily dietary protein intake and protein intake relative to total dietary energy level, rather than simply the levels of total dietary lipid.

  3. Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; Idaho Department of Fish and Game, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, Russell B.; Anderson, Dave; Johnson, June

    2001-10-01

    This report covers efforts to monitor age composition of wild adult spring/summer chinook salmon returning to the Snake River Basin. Accurately determining the ocean age proportions of wild adult spring/summer chinook salmon is important information for monitoring the status and trends of these species. During this report period, project personnel selected the preferred structure for aging, set up a database to track all samples collected, developed procedures and ordered equipment for structure preparation and reading, and aged the adults that were sampled in 1999. Chinook salmon carcasses were sampled from representative spawning areas throughout the Snake River Basin. Ocean age proportions were determined for each 5 centimeter fork length group for wild adult spring/summer chinook salmon returning to the Snake River. These ocean age proportions were applied to the number and estimated length frequency distribution of wild chinook salmon adults passing Lower Granite Dam to estimate the number of adult returns for each ocean age group.

  4. Toy Action Guide [and] Media Violence and Children: A Call to Action! 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TRUCE: Teachers Resisting Unhealthy Children's Entertainment, West Somerville, MA.

    Play is essential to children's healthy development and learning, and toys are the tools of children's play. Noting that parents are constantly faced with decisions about what toys to buy and what toys to avoid, this guide is intended to help parents promote their children's creative and constructive play by making informed choices about toys, and…

  5. Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Brian C.; Duke, Bill B.

    2003-02-01

    Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from August 17, 2000 to July 7, 2001. A total of 3,662 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 643 adult, 437 jack, and 4,948 subjack fall chinook (O. tshawytscha); 4,654 adult and 1,276 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 4,382 adult and 185 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 14 summer steelhead and 847 adult and 74 jack spring chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were 3,433 summer steelhead; 71 adult, 298 jack and 4,647 subjack fall chinook; 4,435 adult and 1,180 jack coho; and 2,873 adult and 55 jack spring chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. In addition, 116 summer steelhead; 565 adult and 38 jack fall chinook; and 646 adult and 31 jack spring chinook were collected for brood. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at rivermile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for outmigrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 147 days between February 5 and July 26, 2001. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 127 days and were trapped 18 days. An estimated 350 pounds of juvenile fish were transported from Westland to the Umatilla River boat ramp (RM 0.5). Approximately 92% of the juveniles transported were salmonids. No steelhead kelts were hauled from Westland this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was open throughout the summer of 2000 and continued to run until October 27, 2000. The bypass was reopened March 8, 2001 and ran until July 9, 2001. The juvenile trap was not operated this year.

  6. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Volkman, Jed; Sexton, Amy D.

    2001-01-01

    In 2000, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of these efforts is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. Six projects, two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and one property on the mainstem Walla Walla River were part of the exercise. Several thousand native plants as bare-root stock and cuttings were reintroduced to the sites and 18 acres of floodplain corridor was seeded with native grass seed. Pre and post-project monitoring efforts were included for all projects, incorporating methodologies from CTUIR's Draft Monitoring Plan.

  7. Executive Compensation in California Public Higher Education, 2000-2001. Higher Education Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    This report reviews the policies and resultant compensation levels for executives in California public higher education. The report also contains information on California's community colleges. In responding to the legislative directive, the report focuses on describing changes in policy or compensation levels over the last 12 months. Compensation…

  8. Early Estimates of Public Elementary and Secondary Education Statistics: School Year 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Lena

    2001-01-01

    Provides current-year estimates of selected key statistics for public elementary and secondary schools. Data from the National Center for Education Statistics Common Core of Data indicate enrollment, numbers of teachers, student/teacher ratios, high school graduates, and education revenues and expenditures. (Author/SLD)

  9. Key Elements in Successful Training A Comparative Study of Two Workplaces. Project Report, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Literacy and Numeracy Australian Research Consortium, Alice Springs. Northern Territory Centre.

    This publication presents case studies of two sites--one with and one without a history of involvement in Workplace English Language and Literacy (WELL)-funded training programs. Case study 1, "Partnership, Flexibility, and Experience: Key Elements in Successful Training" (Jenny McGuirk), investigates a food processing company in New South Wales…

  10. Rural Roots: News, Information, and Commentary from the Rural School and Community Trust, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westra, Kathryn E., Ed.; Yaunches, H. Alison, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document contains the first eight issues of "Rural Roots"--two published in 2000 and six published bimonthly in 2001. A newsletter of the Rural School and Community Trust, "Rural Roots" provides news, information, and commentary from the Rural Trust and highlights the wide variety of place-based education work happening in…

  11. Initial Employment Report: Physics PhD Recipients of 2000 & 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Patrick J.; Henly, Megan; Langer, Casey

    Data in this report were collected from physics PhDs in the classes of 2000 and 2001, a time when the U.S. economy reached a peak and then entered a downturn. Data were collected from 72% of the class of 2001, a year in which there were 1,214 physics PhDs conferred. The unemployment rate for these classes remained low, at 3%. The proportion of new…

  12. Fecal-Indicator Bacteria in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers and Selected Tributaries, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 2001-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckwalter, Theodore F.; Zimmerman, Tammy M.; Fulton, John W.

    2006-01-01

    Concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria were determined in 1,027 water-quality samples collected from July 2001 through August 2005 during dry- (72-hour dry antecedent period) and wet-weather (48-hour dry antecedent period and at least 0.3 inch of rain in a 24-hour period) conditions in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers (locally referred to as the Three Rivers) and selected tributaries in Allegheny County. Samples were collected at five sampling sites on the Three Rivers and at eight sites on four tributaries to the Three Rivers having combined sewer overflows. Water samples were analyzed for three fecal-indicator organisms fecal coliform, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and enterococci bacteria. Left-bank and right-bank surface-water samples were collected in addition to a cross-section composite sample at each site. Concentrations of fecal coliform, E. coli, and enterococci were detected in 98.6, 98.5, and 87.7 percent of all samples, respectively. The maximum fecal-indicator bacteria concentrations were collected from Sawmill Run, a tributary to the Ohio River; Sawmill Run at Duquesne Heights had concentrations of fecal coliform, E. coli, and enterococci of 410,000, 510,000, and 180,000 col/100 mL, respectively, following a large storm. The samples collected in the Three Rivers and selected tributaries frequently exceeded established recreational standards and criteria for bacteria. Concentrations of fecal coliform exceeded the Pennsylvania water-quality standard (200 col/100 mL) in approximately 63 percent of the samples. Sample concentrations of E. coli and enterococci exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) water-quality criteria (235 and 61 col/100 mL, respectively) in about 53 and 47 percent, respectively, of the samples. Fecal-indicator bacteria were most strongly correlated with streamflow, specific conductance, and turbidity. These correlations most frequently were observed in samples collected from tributary sites. Fecal-indicator bacteria concentrations and turbidity were correlated to the location of sample collection in the cross section. Most differences were between bank and composite samples; differences between right-bank and left-bank samples were rarely observed. The Allegheny River sites had more significant correlations than the Monongahela or Ohio River sites. Comparisons were made between fecal-indicator bacteria in composite samples collected during dry-weather, wet-weather day-one, wet-weather day-two (tributary sites only), and wet-weather day-three (Three Rivers sites only) events in the Three Rivers and selected tributary sites. The lowest median bacteria concentrations generally were observed in the dry-weather composite samples. All median bacteria concentrations in dry-weather composite samples in the five Three Rivers sites were below water-quality standards and criteria; bacteria concentrations in the upstream tributary sites rarely met all standards or criteria. Only Turtle Creek, Thompson Run, and Chartiers Creek had at least one median bacteria concentration below water-quality standards or criteria. Median bacteria concentrations in the composite samples generally were higher the day after a wet-weather event compared to dry-weather composite samples and other wet-weather composite samples collected. In the five Three Rivers sites, median bacteria concentrations 3 days after a wet-weather event in composite samples tended to fall below the water-quality standards and criteria; in the eight tributary sites, median bacteria concentrations in the dry-weather and wet-weather composite samples generally were above the water-quality standards or criteria. Composite samples collected at the upstream sites on the Three Rivers and selected tributaries generally had lower median bacteria concentrations than composite samples collected at the downstream sites during dry- and wet-weather events. Higher concentrations downstream may be because o

  13. The GRB Detected by Avs-F Apparatus Onboard Coronas-F Satellite in 2001-2005 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, Irene V.; Arkhangelskiy, Andrey I.; Glyanenko, Alexander S.; Kotov, Yuri D.; Kuznetsov, Sergey N.

    2008-09-01

    The AVS-F apparatus onboard CORONAS-F satellite operated from 31.07.2001 up to 06.12.2005. This instrument constitutes the system for data processing from two detectors: SONG-D (CsI(TI) detector Ø200 mm and 100 mm height, fully surrounded by plastic anticoincidence shield) and XSS-1 (CdTe detector 4.9 mm × 4.9 mm). Despite of this satellite was Solar-oriented, over 30 GRB during August 2001 - December 2005 period were registered in the energy band of ~0.1-20 MeV by preliminary data analysis. The characteristics of GRB detected by AVS-F device are discussed.

  14. State and regional water-quality characteristics and trophic conditions of Michigan's inland lakes, 2001-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, L.M.; Minnerick, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality are jointly monitoring selected water-quality constituents of inland lakes through 2015 as part of Michigan’s Lake Water Quality Assessment program. During 2001–2005, 433 lake basins from 364 inland lakes were monitored for baseline water-quality conditions and trophic status. This report summarizes the water-quality characteristics and trophic conditions of those monitored lake basins throughout the State. Regional variation of water quality in lake basins was examined by grouping on the basis of the five Omernik level III ecoregions within Michigan. Concentrations of most constituents measured were significantly different between ecoregions. Less regional variation of phosphorus concentrations was noted between Northern Lakes and Forests (50) and North Central Hardwoods (51) ecoregions during summer possibly because water samples were collected when lake productivity was high; hence the utilization of the limited amount of phosphorus by algae and macrophytes may have resulted in the more uniform concentrations between these two ecoregions. Concentrations of common ions (calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate) measured in the spring typically were higher in the Michigan southern Lower Peninsula in the Eastern Corn Belt Plains (55), Southern Michigan/Northern Indiana Drift Plains (56), and Huron/Erie Lake Plains (57) ecoregions. Most ions whose concentrations were less than the minimum reporting levels or were nondetectable were from lakes in the Michigan northern Lower Peninsula and the Upper Peninsula in the Northern Lakes and Forests (50) and North Central Hardwoods (51) ecoregions. Chlorophyll a concentrations followed a similar distribution pattern. Measured properties such as pH and specific conductance (indicative of dissolved solids) also showed a regional relation. The lakes with the lowest pH and specific conductance were generally in the western Upper Peninsula (Northern Lakes and Forests (50) ecoregion). The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality classifies Michigan lakes on the basis of their primary biological productivity or trophic characteristics using the Carlson Trophic State Index. Trophic evaluations based on data collected from 2001 through 2005 indicate 17 percent of the lakes are oligotrophic, 53 percent are mesotrophic, 22 percent are eutrophic, 4 percent are hypereutrophic, and less than 5 percent are classified into transition classes between each major class. Although the distribution of lakes throughout Michigan or between Omernik level III ecoregions is not uniform, about 85 percent of the lakes classified as oligotrophic are in the Northern Lakes and Forests (50) or North Central Hardwoods (51) ecoregions. Nearly 28 percent of all the lakes in each of these two ecoregions were classified as oligotrophic. Historical trophic-state classes were compared to the current (2001 through 2005) trophic-state classes. Approximately 72 percent of lakes remained in the same trophic-state class, 11 percent moved up a partial or full class (indicating a decrease in water clarity) and 18 percent moved down a partial or full class (indicating an increase in water clarity).

  15. Influences of Stocking Salmon Carcass Analogs on Salmonids in Klickitat River Tributaries, 2001-2005 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Zendt, Joe; Sharp, Bill

    2006-09-01

    This report describes the work completed by the Yakama Nation Fisheries Program (YNFP) in the Klickitat subbasin in south-central Washington under BPA innovative project No.200105500--Influences of stocking salmon carcass analogs on salmonids in Columbia River Tributaries. Salmon carcasses historically provided a significant source of marine-derived nutrients to many stream systems in the Columbia basin, and decreased run sizes have led to a loss of this nutrient source in many streams. Partners in this project developed a pathogen-free carcass analog and stocked the analogs in streams with the following objectives: restoring food availability to streams with reduced anadromous salmon returns; mimicking the natural pathways and timing of food acquisition by salmonids; minimizing unintended negative ecological effects; and increasing the growth and survival of salmonids. In the Klickitat subbasin, carcass analogs were stocked in two streams in 2002 and 2003; a third stream was used as a control. Salmonid fish abundance, growth, and stomach contents were monitored in all three streams before and after carcass analog placement. Fish, invertebrate, and periphyton samples were also collected for stable isotope analysis (to determine if nutrients from carcass analogs were incorporated into the stream food web). Water quality samples were also collected to determine if nutrient overloading occurred in streams. Significant differences in growth were found between fish in treated and untreated stream reaches. Fish in treatment reaches exhibited higher instantaneous growth rates approximately one month after the first carcass analog stocking. Stomach contents sampling indicated that salmonid fish routinely consumed the carcass analog material directly, and that stomach fullness of fish in treatment reaches was higher than in untreated reaches in the first few weeks following carcass analog stockings. No significant differences were detected in fish abundance between treatment and control streams after carcass analog stocking. Stable isotope analysis provided some evidence that nutrients (primarily nitrogen) were incorporated into periphyton and invertebrates, although this evidence is not strong. No significant differences in water quality were observed between treatment and control streams after analog stocking. Although no significant changes were observed in fish abundance, this study does provide evidence that carcass analogs provide a viable and potentially useful alternative to stocking salmon carcasses. The analogs provide a direct food source to salmonids, and show some potential for providing nutrients for stream food webs. They can also increase stomach fullness and growth rates of individual fish. This nutrient source may very well improve individual fish condition sufficiently to improve overwintering or smolt survival. Further refinement of stocking densities and timing, treatment duration, and tailoring analog placement to individual stream characteristics (such as channel confinement and flow) will further improve the usefulness of carcass analogs.

  16. Spatial clustering by disease severity among reported Rocky Mountain spotted fever cases in the United States, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Adjemian, Jennifer Zipser; Krebs, John; Mandel, Eric; McQuiston, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) occurs throughout much of the United States, ranging in clinical severity from moderate to fatal infection. Yet, little is known about possible differences among severity levels across geographic locations. To identify significant spatial clusters of severe and non-severe disease, RMSF cases reported to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were geocoded by county and classified by severity level. The statistical software program SaTScan was used to detect significant spatial clusters. Of 4,533 RMSF cases reported, 1,089 hospitalizations (168 with complications) and 23 deaths occurred. Significant clusters of 6 deaths (P = 0.05, RR = 11.4) and 19 hospitalizations with complications (P = 0.02, RR = 3.45) were detected in southwestern Tennessee. Two geographic areas were identified in north-central North Carolina with unusually low rates of severity (P = 0.001, RR = 0.62 and P = 0.001, RR = 0.45, respectively). Of all hospitalizations, 20% were clustered in central Oklahoma (P = 0.02, RR = 1.43). Significant geographic differences in severity were observed, suggesting that biologic and/or anthropogenic factors may be impacting RMSF epidemiology in the United States.

  17. The Lake Ontario zooplankton community before (1987-1991) and after (2001-2005) invasion-induced ecosystem change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, T.J.; Johannsson, O.E.; Holeck, K.; Sprules, W.G.; O'Gorman, R.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed changes in Lake Ontario zooplankton biomass, production, and community composition before (1987–1991) and after (2001–2005) invasion-induced ecosystem changes. The ecosystem changes were associated with establishment of invasive dreissenid mussels and invasive predatory cladocerans (Bythotrephes and Cercopagis). Whole-lake total epilimnetic plus metalimnetic zooplankton production declined by approximately half from 42.45 (g dry wt∙m−2∙ year−1) during 1987–1991 to 21.91 (g dry wt∙m−2∙ year−1) in 2003 and averaged 21.01 (g dry wt∙m−2∙ year−1) during 2001–2005. Analysis of two independent data sets indicates that the mean biomass and biomass proportion of cyclopoid copepods declined while the same measures increased for the invasive predatory cladocerans. Changes in means and proportions of all other zooplankton groups were not consistent between the data sets. Cyclopoid copepod biomass and production declined by factors ranging from 3.6 to 5.7. Invasive predatory cladoceran biomass averaged from 5.0% to 8.0% of the total zooplankton biomass. The zooplankton community was otherwise resilient to the invasion-induced disruption as zooplankton species richness and diversity were unaffected. Zooplankton production was likely reduced by declines in primary productivity but may have declined further due to increased predation by alewives and invasive predatory cladocerans. Shifts in zooplankton community structure were consistent with increased predation pressure on cyclopoid copepods by alewives and invasive predatory cladocerans. Predicted declines in the proportion of small cladocerans were not evident. This study represents the first direct comparison of changes in Lake Ontario zooplankton production before and after the invasion-induced disruption and will be important to food web-scale investigations of invasion effects.

  18. Survey of roadside alien plants in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park and adjacent residential areas 2001-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bio, Keali'i F.; Pratt, Linda W.; Jacobi, James D.

    2012-01-01

    The sides of all paved roads of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park (HAVO) were surveyed on foot in 2001 to 2005, and the roadside presence of 240 target invasive and potentially invasive alien plant species was recorded in mile-long increments. Buffer zones 5–10 miles (8–16 km) long along Highway 11 on either side of the Kīlauea and Kahuku Units of the park, as well as Wright Road that passed by the disjunct `Ōla`a Tract Unit, were included in the survey. Highway 11 is the primary road through the park and a major island thoroughfare. Three residential subdivisions adjacent to the park were similarly surveyed in 0.5–1 mile (0.8–1.6 km) intervals in 2003, and data were analyzed separately. Two roads to the east and northeast were also surveyed, but data from these disjunct areas were analyzed separately from park roads. In total, 174 of the target alien species were observed along HAVO roads and buffers, exclusive of residential areas, and the mean number of target aliens per mile surveyed was 20.6. Highway 11 and its buffer zones had the highest mean number of target alien plants per mile (26.7) of all park roads, and the Mauna Loa Strip Road had the lowest mean (11.7). Segments of Highway 11 adjacent to HAVO and Wright Road next to `Ōla`a Tract had mean numbers of target alien per mile (24–47) higher than those of any internal road. Alien plant frequencies were summarized for each road in HAVO. Fifteen new records of vascular plants for HAVO were observed and collected along park roads. An additional 28 alien plant species not known from HAVO were observed along the buffer segments of Highway 11 adjacent to the park. Within the adjacent residential subdivisions, 65 target alien plant species were sighted along roadsides. At least 15 potentially invasive species not currently found within HAVO were observed along residential roads, and several other species found there have been previously eliminated from the park or controlled to remnant populations. Data collected from this survey can be used by the park and other landowners to help detect and manage invasive plant species that threaten the natural resources of their lands, and survey findings will inform managers of threats from alien species established along corridors beyond park boundaries. Recommendations were made for refining the list of incipient invasive plant species to search for near the park and for the repetition of periodic roadside weed surveys in the park.

  19. Tracking resistance among bacterial respiratory tract pathogens: summary of findings of the TRUST Surveillance Initiative, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Sahm, Daniel F; Brown, Nina P; Draghi, Deborah C; Evangelista, Alan T; Yee, Y Cheung; Thornsberry, Clyde

    2008-09-01

    Antimicrobial resistance observed among common respiratory tract pathogens--Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis--may complicate empiric therapeutic selection to treat community-acquired respiratory tract infections. The Tracking Resistance in the United States Today (TRUST) study determined the in vitro activities of frequently prescribed antimicrobial agents against isolates collected from all 50 states from 2001 to 2005. For S pneumoniae (N = 27,781), susceptibility of selected agents in ascending order were penicillin (oral) (65.4%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) (69.5%), erythromycin (72.0%), cefuroxime (oral) (75.9%), tetracycline (85.3%), amoxicillinclavulanate (92.6%), ceftriaxone (nonmeningitis) (96.6%), and levofloxacin (99.0%). Susceptibility to levofloxacin, which was used as a representative of the respiratory fluoroquinolones, was near 99% from 2001 to 2005, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (90%) (MIC(90)) remained unchanged at 1 microg/mL. Levofloxacin and the other respiratory fluoroquinolones remained highly effective against penicillin-resistant S pneumoniae(PRSP) (98%-99% susceptible). However, susceptibility of PRSP to amoxicillin-clavulanate decreased from 62%S in 2003 to 48%S in 2005. Haemophilus influenzae susceptibility to ampicillin averaged near 70%, and near 75% to TMP-SMX. Susceptibility rates to levofloxacin and the other respiratory fluoroquinolones for H influenzae and M catarrhalis remained at or near 100%. Although resistance rates among S pneumoniae have stabilized for penicillin (oral) at elevated levels and increased for macrolides, susceptibility to the respiratory fluoroquinolones has consistently remained high, as they have for H influenzae and M catarrhalis.

  20. The effect of fuel sulfur on NH 3 and other emissions from 2000-2001 model year vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Thomas D.; Pisano, John T.; Younglove, T.; Sauer, Claudia G.; Rhee, Sam H.; Huai, Tao; Miller, J. Wayne; MacKay, Gervase I.; Hochhauser, Albert M.; Ingham, Michael C.; Gorse, Robert A.; Beard, Loren K.; DiCicco, Dominic; Thompson, Neville; Stradling, Richard J.; Rutherford, James A.; Uihlein, James P.

    Atmospheric ammonia (NH 3) is an important precursor to secondary particulate matter formation and information is currently scarce on NH 3 emissions from advanced low-emission vehicles using low-sulfur fuels. With the continuing reduction in the level of sulfur in gasoline, it is important to understand how this change could impact NH 3 emissions, particularly for advanced vehicle technologies. For this study, a total of 12 California-certified low-emission vehicles were tested with a gasoline containing 5, 30, and 150 ppmw sulfur and with both as-received and bench-aged catalysts. Vehicles were tested on each fuel/catalyst configuration over the federal test procedure (FTP) and US06 test cycles. Both regulated and NH 3 emissions were measured in real-time. NH 3 emission rates were generally lower than those of other regulated emissions over the FTP and in the range 14-21 mg mi -1 for the fleet. NH 3 emission rates were approximately five times higher over the more aggressive US06 cycle compared to the FTP. NH 3 emissions were primarily observed during transients, with higher emissions for more aggressive accelerations. Overall, the NH 3 emission factors for the newer technology vehicles tested were lower that than those found in previous studies of older vehicle technologies. Sulfur did not affect NH 3 emissions over the FTP, but higher NH 3 emissions were found for increasing fuel sulfur levels over the US06. Sulfur effects were also observed for nitrogen oxides over the FTP and for all regulated emissions over the US06.

  1. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Movements and Growth of Marked Walleye Recaptured in Lake Roosevelt, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Holly; Scholz, Allan

    2002-03-01

    Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) have been marked with floy tags in Lake Roosevelt since 1997 to estimate abundance, distribution and movement trends. In 2000, walleye were collected and marked during the spawning run in the Spokane River through electrofishing and angling to supplement movement and growth data collected in previous years. Walleye were also collected and marked during the 2000 and 2001 Kettle Falls Governor's Cup Walleye Tournaments. Seventy-six tag returns were recovered in 2000 and twenty-three in 2001. Walleye migrated into the Spokane River to spawn in mid April and early May. The majority of marked walleye were recovered within 25 km of their original marking location, with a few traveling long distances between recovery locations. Data also verified earlier results that walleye establish summer home ranges. Some walleye remained in the Spokane River, while others moved downstream, or upstream after entering the mainstem of Lake Roosevelt. Those moving upstream moved as far north as Keenlyside Dam in British Columbia (245 km). Growth data indicated similar trends exhibited in the past. Walleye growth and mortality rates were consistent with other walleye producing waters. Walleye condition was slightly below average when compared to other systems.

  2. Palivizumab prophylaxis of respiratory syncytial virus disease in 2000-2001: results from The Palivizumab Outcomes Registry.

    PubMed

    Parnes, Curt; Guillermin, Judith; Habersang, Rolf; Nicholes, Peggy; Chawla, Vijay; Kelly, Tammy; Fishbein, Judith; McRae, Patty; Goessler, Mary; Gatti, Antoinette; Calcagno, John A; Eki, Cheryl; Harris, Kristen A; Joyave, Joseph; McFarland, Kathy; Protter, Paul; Sullivan, Mary; Stanford, Allan; Lovett, Nancy; Ortiz, Marisol; Rojas, Sharon; Cyrus, Scott; Cyrus, Janell; Cohen, Stuart; Buchin, Debbie; Riordan, Linda; Zuniga, Monica; Shah, Rupa; Minard, Carmen; Quintin, Arden; Douglas, Glenda; van Houten, John; Freutner, Sharyn; Chartrand, Stephen; Nowatzke, Patsy; Romero, Jose; Rhodes, Torunn; Benoit, Michelle; Walter, Emmanuel; Walker, Leslie; DeBonnett, Laurie; Cross, Mia; Free, Teresa; Martin, Sharman; Shank, Karen; Guedes, Ben; Atkinson, Lee Ann; Halpin, George J; Rouse, Kathy; Hand, Ivan; Geiss, Donna; Marshall, James R; Burleson, Lois; Boland, Jim; Seybold, Kelsey; Hunter, Vicki; Unfer, Susan; Schmucker, Jackie; Gley, Margaret; Marcus, Michael; Thompson, Patricia; Milla, Paulino; Young, Connie; Zanni, Robert; Zinno, Virginia; Fetter-Zarzeka, Alexandra; Busey, Amanda; Sokunbi, Modupe A; Airington, Sherrie; Richard, Nancy; Muraligopal, Vellore; Lewis, Stephanie; Weber, F Thomas; Giordano, Beverly P; Linehan, Denise; Roach, Jane; Davis, Randle; Rzepka, Andrew A; Booth, Teri; Smeltzer, David; Walsh, Jeanne; Arispe, Emilio; Rowley, Rhonda; Bolling, Christopher; Botts, Tanya; Haskett, Kateri; Raby, Deana; Batiz, Evelyn; Gelfand, Andrew; Farrell, Lynn; Butler, Stephen; Colby, Linda; Schochet, Peter; Bentler, Julie; Hirsch, David; Wilkinson, Lisa; Aaronson, Allen; Bennett, Eleanora; Wingate, Julie; Quinn, Dawn; Komendowski, Katherine; Deckard, Marcia; Frogel, Michael; Nerwen, Cliff; Copenhaver, Steven; Prater, Michele; Wolsztein, Jacob; Mackey, Kristine; Benbow, Marshall; Naranjo, Marisela; Hensley, Sandra; Hayes, Cindy; Sadeghi, Hossein; Lawson, Sally May; McCall, Mark; Combs, Karla; Ledbetter, Joel; Sarnosky, Karen; Swafford, Cathy; Speer, Michael; Barton, Wendy J; Mink, J W; Lemm, Dianne; Hudak, Mark; Case, Elizabeth; Rowen, Judith; Fuentes, Sandra; Pane, Carly; Richardson, Leslie; Chavarria, Cesar; Cassino, Deanne; Ghaffari, Kourosh; Carroll, Carol; Lee, Haesoon; Guclu, Lydia; Johnson, Christopher; Blum, Valerie; Boron, Marnie L; Sorrentino, Mark; Hirsch, Robert L; Van Veldhuisen, Paul C; Smith, Carol

    2003-06-01

    The objective of the Registry was to characterize the population of infants receiving prophylaxis for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease by describing the patterns and scope of usage of palivizumab in a cross section of US infants. RSV hospitalization outcomes were also described. The Palivizumab (Synagis, MedImmune, Inc., 25 West Watkins Mill Road, Gaithersburg, MD 20878) Outcomes Registry was a prospective multicenter survey conducted at 63 sites. Demographics, injection history, and RSV hospitalization outcomes were collected on 2,116 infants receiving palivizumab. Infants were enrolled in the Registry between September 1, 2000-March 1, 2001, at the time of their first injection. Infants born at less than 32 weeks of gestation accounted for 47% of infants enrolled, and those between 32-35 weeks accounted for 45%; approximately 8% were greater than 35 weeks of gestation. Lower RSV hospitalization rates were observed in infants who had greater adherence to regularly scheduled injections. Nearly one-half of all hospitalizations occurred within the first and second injection intervals, suggesting the importance of early RSV protection. The confirmed RSV hospitalization rate of all infants in the Registry was 2.9%; the rate was 5.8% in infants with chronic lung disease of infancy, and 2.1% in premature infants without chronic lung disease. In conclusion, these data support the continued effectiveness of palivizumab prophylaxis for severe RSV lower respiratory tract disease in a large cohort of high-risk infants from geographically diverse pediatric offices and clinics. The Palivizumab Outcomes Registry provides an opportunity to assess palivizumab utilization and clinical effectiveness in the US.

  3. Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Achord, Stephen; Axel, Gordon A.; Hockersmith, Eric E.

    2002-07-01

    This report details the 2001 results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior of wild spring/summer chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin. The report also discusses trends in the cumulative data collected for this project from Oregon and Idaho streams since 1989. The project was initiated after detection data from passive-integrated-transponder tags (PIT tags) had shown distinct differences in migration patterns between wild and hatchery fish for three consecutive years. National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) investigators first observed these data in 1989. The data originated from tagging and interrogation operations begun in 1988 to evaluate smolt transportation for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

  4. Fish, Benthic-Macroinvertebrate, and Stream-Habitat Data From Two Estuaries Near Galveston Bay, Texas, 2000-2001

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    0 5 Black drum Pogonias cromis 0 0 1 0 0 1 Red drum Sciaenops ocellatus 0 0 2 0 0 2 Livebearers Peociliidae Western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis 151...undulatus 0 0 0 1 18 19 Black drum Pogonias cromis 0 0 1 0 19 20 Red drum Sciaenops ocellatus 0 0 2 0 15 17 Jacks Carangidae Crevalle jack Caranx hippos 0 0

  5. John Day Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Escapement and Productivity Monitoring; Fish Research Project Oregon, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Richard W.; Claire, Glenda M.; Seals, Jason

    2002-01-01

    The four objectives of this report are: (1) Estimate annual spawner escapement and number of spring chinook salmon redds in the John Day River basin; (2) Determine sex ratio, age composition, length-at-age of spawners, and proportion of natural spawners that are hatchery origin strays; (3) Determine adequacy of historic index surveys for indexing spawner abundance and for detecting changes in spawner distribution through time; and (4) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival for spring chinook salmon emigrating from the John Day River basin.

  6. The NASA "Why?" Files: The Case of the Challenging Flight. Program 4 in the 2000-2001 Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has produced a distance learning series of four 60-minute video programs with an accompanying Web site and companion teacher guides. This teacher guide accompanies the fourth video in the series. The story lines of each program involve six ethnically diverse, inquisitive schoolchildren who…

  7. Where Kids Count, Place Matters: Trends in the Well-Being of Iowa Children, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conlow, Mary

    Focusing on the influence of impoverished environments on child outcomes, this Kids Count report examines trends in the well-being of Iowa children. The first section of the report presents an overview essay detailing the presence and location of high risk and moderate risk census tracts in Iowa, based on information from the 2000 Census using…

  8. [Algal blooms at Banderas Bay, México (2000-2001), from SeaWiFS-sensor-data].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Villarreal, María C; Martínez-Gaxiola, Marcos D; Peña-Manjarrez, José L

    2008-12-01

    Algal blooms for the period of 2000 and 2001 at Banderas Bay, México, were analyzed from SeaWiFS-ocean-color-sensor derived information. These events were related with the maximum chlorophyll week anomalies (ASi; a proxy variable constructed for the analysis of chlorophyll temporal variation in the bay). The winter-spring blooms were multispecific, while the summer-fall blooms were monospecific. Two proposals are made: (1) Winter-spring blooms are strongly related with mesoescale processes, due to their apparent temporal synchrony with the high chlorophyll levels in the coastal region from Sinaloa to Jalisco states; (2) Cochlodinium polykrikoides (Margalef 1961) blooms during the summer-fall periods could be induced by local conditions and the influence of previous events on the ecosystem.

  9. Geometry and Algebra: Glow with the Flow. NASA Connect: Program 2 in the 2000-2001 Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    This teaching unit is designed to help students in grades 5 to 8 explore the concepts of geometry and algebra in the context of the force of drag. The units in the series have been developed to enhance and enrich mathematics, science, and technology education and to accommodate different teaching and learning styles. Each unit consists of…

  10. Shallow Ground-Water Quality in Agricultural Areas of Northern Alabama and Middle Tennessee, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kingsbury, James A.

    2003-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program, 32 monitoring wells were installed near cropland in parts of northern Alabama and Middle Tennessee to characterize the effect of row-crop agriculture on shallow ground-water quality. The wells were completed in regolith overlying carbonate bedrock. These geologic units are part of the Mississippian carbonate aquifer, a source of drinking water for domestic and municipal supply in the area. The majority of these wells were sampled in the spring of 2000 for inorganic constituents, nutrients, pesticides, and selected pesticide degradates. Land use and soil characteristics were delineated for a 1,640-foot radius buffer area around each well to relate water quality to environmental factors. A strong association among soil characteristics, land use, and hydrogeology limited the analysis of the effect of these factors on nitrate and pesticide occurrence. Nitrate and pesticide concentrations generally were low, and no samples exceeded established drinking-water maximum contaminant levels. The maximum concentration of nitrate was about 8 milligrams per liter as nitrogen, and the median concentration was 1 milligram per liter. Nitrate concentrations were strongly correlated to dissolved-oxygen concentrations, and ratios of chloride to nitrate indicate nitrate concentrations were affected by denitrification in about a third of the samples. A pesticide or pesticide degradate was detected at concentrations greater than 0.01 microgram per liter in 91 percent of the samples. Pesticides with the highest use typically were detected most frequently and at the highest concentrations; however, glyphosate had the highest estimated use but was not detected in any samples. Fluometuron and atrazine, two high-use pesticides, were detected in 83 and 70 percent, respectively, of the samples from wells where the pesticide was applied in the buffer area. Maximum concentrations of fluometuron and atrazine were 2.13 and 1.83 micrograms per liter, respectively. Detection rates of pesticide degradates were similar to parent pesticides, and concentrations of degradates generally were comparable to or greater than the parent pesticide. Pesticide detections were correlated to dissolved-oxygen concentrations, suggesting that pesticides are most likely to be detected at high concentrations where ground-water residence time is short and the rate of recharge is fast. Nitrate and pesticide data collected in this study were compared to data collected from similar agricultural land-use studies conducted by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program throughout the Nation. Nitrate concentrations generally were lower in this study than in samples from other agricultural areas; however, pesticides were detected more frequently in samples from wells in this study. For example, atrazine and its degradate, deethylatrazine, were detected in 62 and 47 percent, respectively, of water samples in this study but were detected in about 25 percent of the 851 wells sampled for agricultural land-use studies nationwide. In national study areas where atrazine use is greater than in the lower Tennessee River Basin, atrazine was detected in 30 percent of the water samples. Pesticides used on cotton were detected much more frequently in this study, but many of the study areas nationwide have smaller amounts of cotton acreage than the lower Tennessee River Basin. Similarities in nitrate concentrations and the pesticides detected frequently in this agricultural land-use study and a network of drinking-water wells in the same area completed in bedrock in the Mississippian carbonate aquifer (sampled in a previous study) indicate the aquifer is susceptible to contamination from nonpoint sources. Nitrate concentrations were not statistically different for the two well networks and were correlated to total pesticide concentrations in both networks. Although detection frequencies and maximum concentrations

  11. The NASA "Why?" Files: The Case of the Unknown Stink. Program 1 in the 2000-2001 Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has produced a distance learning series of four 60-minute video programs with an accompanying Web site and companion teacher guide. This teacher guide accompanies the first video in the series. The story line of each program involves six ethnically diverse, inquisitive schoolchildren who…

  12. 78 FR 50114 - Distribution of 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 Satellite...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... electronic copy in Portable Document Format (PDF) on a Compact Disc, along with the $150 filing fee, to the... categories of copyrightable content (e.g., movies, music, and sports programming). At Phase II, the royalties... Claimants Group (BCG), and the ``Music Claimants'' consisting of Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI),...

  13. Hands-On English: A Periodical for Teachers and Tutors of Adult English as a Second Language, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silliman, Anna, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This newsletter is designed to help English and a second language teachers and tutors with practical teaching ideas. The articles are contributed by experienced teachers and tutors. Each issue includes some of the following regular features: "Letters"; "Hints and Tips"; "Tools and Techniques"; "From the Field"; "Reading"; "Multilevel Dictation";…

  14. Impact of engine lubricant properties on regulated gaseous emissions of 2000-2001 model-year gasoline vehicles.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Thomas D; Sauer, Claudia G; Pisano, John T; Rhee, Sam H; Huai, Tao; Miller, J Wayne; MacKay, Gervase I; Robbins, John; Gamble, Heather; Hochhauser, Albert M; Ingham, Michael C; Gorse, Robert A; Beard, Loren K

    2004-03-01

    The impact of the sulfur (S) content in lubricating oil was evaluated for four ultra-low-emission vehicles and two super-ultra-low-emission vehicles, all with low mileage. The S content in the lube oils ranged from 0.01 to 0.76%, while the S content of the gasoline was fixed at 0.2 ppmw. Vehicles were configured with aged catalysts and tested over the Federal Test Procedure, at idle and at 50-mph cruise conditions. In all testing modes, variations in the S level of the lubricant did not significantly affect the regulated gas-phase tailpipe emissions. In addition to the regulated gas-phase emissions, a key element of the research was measuring the engine-out sulfur dioxide (SO2) in near-real-time. This research used a new methodology based on a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) to measure SO2 from the lubricants used in this study. With the DOAS, the contribution of SO2 emissions for the highest-S lubricant was found to range from less than 1 to 6 ppm on a gasoline S equivalent basis over the range of vehicles and test cycles used. The development and operation of the DOAS is discussed in this paper.

  15. External quality-assurance results for the national atmospheric deposition program/national trends network, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Latysh, Natalie E.; Gordon, John D.

    2004-01-01

    Five external quality-assurance programs were operated by the U.S. Geological Survey for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) from 2000 through 2001 (study period): the intersite-comparison program, the blind-audit program, the field-audit program, the interlaboratory-comparison program, and the collocated-sampler program. Each program is designed to measure specific components of the total error inherent in NADP/NTN wet-deposition measurements. The intersite-comparison program assesses the variability and bias of pH and specific-conductance determinations made by NADP/NTN site operators with respect to accuracy goals. The accuracy goals are statistically based using the median of all of the measurements obtained for each of four intersite-comparison studies. The percentage of site operators responding on time that met the pH accuracy goals ranged from 84.2 to 90.5 percent. In these same four intersite-comparison studies, 88.9 to 99.0 percent of the site operators met the accuracy goals for specific conductance. The blind-audit program evaluates the effects of routine sample handling, processing, and shipping on the chemistry of weekly precipitation samples. The blind-audit data for the study period indicate that sample handling introduced a small amount of sulfate contamination and slight changes to hydrogen-ion content of the precipitation samples. The magnitudes of the paired differences are not environmentally significant to NADP/NTN data users. The field-audit program (also known as the 'field-blank program') was designed to measure the effects of field exposure, handling, and processing on the chemistry of NADP/NTN precipitation samples. The results indicate potential low-level contamination of NADP/NTN samples with calcium, ammonium, chloride, and nitrate. Less sodium contamination was detected by the field-audit data than in previous years. Statistical analysis of the paired differences shows that contaminant ions are entrained into the solutions from the field-exposed buckets, but the positive bias that results from the minor amount of contamination appears to affect the analytical results by less than 6 percent. An interlaboratory-comparison program is used to estimate the analytical variability and bias of participating laboratories, especially the NADP Central Analytical Laboratory (CAL). Statistical comparison of the analytical results of participating laboratories implies that analytical data from the various monitoring networks can be compared. Bias was identified in the CAL data for ammonium, chloride, nitrate, sulfate, hydrogen-ion, and specific-conductance measurements, but the absolute value of the bias was less than analytical minimum reporting limits for all constituents except ammonium and sulfate. Control charts show brief time periods when the CAL's analytical precision for sodium, ammonium, and chloride was not within the control limits. Data for the analysis of ultrapure deionized-water samples indicated that the laboratories are maintaining good control of laboratory contamination. Estimated analytical precision among the laboratories indicates that the magnitudes of chemical-analysis errors are not environmentally significant to NADP data users. Overall precision of the precipitation-monitoring system used by the NADP/NTN was estimated by evaluation of samples from collocated monitoring sites at CA99, CO08, and NH02. Precision defined by the median of the absolute percent difference (MAE) was estimated to be approximately 10 percent or less for calcium, magnesium, sodium, chloride, nitrate, sulfate, specific conductance, and sample volume. The MAE values for ammonium and hydrogen-ion concentrations were estimated to be less than 10 percent for CA99 and NH02 but nearly 20 percent for ammonium concentration and about 17 percent for hydrogen-ion concentration for CO08. As in past years, the variability in the collocated-site data for sam

  16. Fast Break to Learning School Breakfast Program: A Report of the Second Year Results, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Kristin; Davison, Mark; Wahlstrom, Kyla; Himes, John; Irish, Margaret L.

    This report provides Year 2 data comparing two types of school breakfast programs in Minnesota to schools that did not serve breakfast at all (No Breakfast schools): Fast Break to Learning, a universal free breakfast program (Fastbreak schools), and programs with a sliding fee scale (control schools). Data were collected from 30 Fastbreak, 195…

  17. Snow-Cover Variability in North America in the 2000-2001 Winter as Determined from MODIS Snow Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Salomonson, Vincent V.; Riggs, George A.; Chien, Janet Y. L.; Houser, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow-cover maps have been available since September 13, 2000. These products, at 500 m spatial resolution, are available through the National Snow and Ice Data Center Distributed Active Archive Center in Boulder, Colorado. By the 2001-02 winter, 5 km climate-modeling grid (CMG) products will be available for presentation of global views of snow cover and for use in climate models. All MODIS snow-cover products are produced from automated algorithms that map snow in an objective manner. In this paper, we describe the MODIS snow products, and show snow maps from the fall of 2000 in North America.

  18. Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes in the Pediatric Population in Germany during 2000-2001

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Ralf René; Lütticken, Rudolf; Bryskier, André; Al-Lahham, Adnan

    2003-01-01

    In a nationwide study in Germany covering 13 clinical microbiology laboratories, a total of 307 Streptococcus pyogenes (mainly pharyngitis) and 333 Streptococcus pneumoniae (respiratory tract infections) strains were collected from outpatients less than 16 years of age. The MICs of penicillin G, amoxicillin, cefotaxime, erythromycin A, clindamycin, levofloxacin, and telithromycin were determined by the microdilution method. In S. pyogenes isolates, resistance rates were as follows: penicillin, 0%; erythromycin A, 13.7%; and levofloxacin, 0%. Telithromycin showed good activity against S. pyogenes isolates (MIC90 = 0.25 μg/ml; MIC range, 0.016 to 16 μg/ml). Three strains were found to be telithromycin-resistant (MIC ≥ 4 μg/ml). Erythromycin-resistant strains were characterized for the underlying resistance genotype, with 40.5% having the efflux type mef(A), 38.1% having the erm(A), and 9.5% having the erm(B) genotypes. emm typing of macrolide-resistant S. pyogenes isolates showed emm types 4 (45.2%), 77 (26.2%), and 12 (11.9%) to be predominant. In S. pneumoniae, resistance rates were as follows: penicillin intermediate, 7.5%; penicillin resistant, 0%; erythromycin A, 17.4%; and levofloxacin, 0%. Telithromycin was highly active against pneumococcal isolates (MIC90 ≤ 0.016 μg/ml; range, 0.016 to 0.5 μg/ml). The overall resistance profile of streptococcal respiratory tract isolates is still favorable, but macrolide resistance is of growing concern in Germany. PMID:12543648

  19. Fish, benthic-macroinvertebrate, and stream-habitat data from two estuaries near Galveston Bay, Texas, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hogan, Jennifer L.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents data on the status of fish, macroinvertebrates, and stream habitat collected from 10 sites in the lower (estuarine) parts of Armand and Dickinson Bayous near Galveston Bay, Texas, during summer 2000 and winter 2001. The total number of individual fish caught at the five Armand Bayou sites (2,091) was greater than at the five Dickinson Bayou sites (1,055), but the total number of fish species caught at Dickinson Bayou sites (37) was greater than at Armand Bayou sites (30). The total number of invertebrates (26,641) and the total number of invertebrate taxa (141) were both greater at Armand Bayou sites than at Dickinson Bayou sites (10,467 and 131, respectively). Among habitat data, the average sinuosity of Armand Bayou sites (1.31) was greater than that of Dickinson Bayou sites (1.14). Mean left-bank and right-bank slopes were greater at Armand Bayou sites than at Dickinson Bayou sites, although the Armand Bayou banks were lower and narrower than the Dickinson Bayou banks. The Dickinson Bayou channel was deeper at the sampling sites than the Armand Bayou channel.

  20. Functions and Statistics: International Space Station: Up to Us. NASA Connect: Program 5 in the 2000-2001 Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    This teaching unit is designed to help students in grades 5 to 8 explore the concepts of functions and statistics in the context of the International Space Station (ISS). The units in the series have been developed to enhance and enrich mathematics, science, and technology education and to accommodate different teaching and learning styles. Each…

  1. Patterns, Functions, and Algebra: Wired for Space. NASA Connect: Program 3 in the 2000-2001 Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    This teaching unit is designed to help students in grades 5 to 8 explore the concepts of patterns, functions, and algebra in the context of propelling spacecraft. The units in the series have been developed to enhance and enrich mathematics, science, and technology education and to accommodate different teaching and learning styles. Each unit…

  2. Data Analysis and Measurement: Ahead, above the Clouds. NASA Connect: Program 4 in the 2000-2001 Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    This teaching unit is designed to help students in grades 5 to 8 explore the concepts of data analysis and measurement in the context of meteorology. The units in the series have been developed to enhance and enrich mathematics, science, and technology education and to accommodate different teaching and learning styles. Each unit consists of…

  3. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Genetic Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Busack, Craig A.; Schroder, Steven L.; Young, Sewall F.

    2002-11-01

    Genetic work for 2001 consisted of two major phases, both reported on here. The first is a DNA microsatellite analysis of several hundred juveniles from the experimental spawning channel at the Cle Elum Supplementation Research Facility, using the genetic markers to assign the juveniles to parents, and thus judge reproductive success of individual fish. The second is a reevaluation and revision of plans for studying domestication in the spring chinook supplementation effort. The pedigree analysis was significant in three respects. First, it showed that this approach can be successfully applied to the spawning channel research. Secondly it showed that this approach does indeed yield very useful information about the relative reproductive success of fish in the channel. Finally, it showed that this information can yield additional information about the experimental design. Of the 961 juveniles on which analysis was attempted, 774 yielded enough genetic information to be used in the pedigree analysis. Of these, 754 were assigned to males and females known to have been placed into the channel. Of the other 20, all were assignable to females, but sires were unknown. The genotypes of 17 of these were consistent with a single theoretical male genotype, suggesting a single precocial male sired them. The inferred parentage of the fish demonstrated that there had been substantial leakage of juveniles from one section of the channel into another. Reproductive success of females was fairly even, but success of males varied considerably. In a group of seven males (including the hypothetical one), one contributed 79% of the progeny analyzed, and three contributed none. The domestication experimental design evaluation was prompted by a critical review of the project by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP). The ISRP review set into motion a design revision process which extended beyond the contract period; the report presented here is intended to be an account of our work through the end of the contract period, so does not include developments beyond that point. As such, combined with the upcoming 2002 report, it will provide a complete record of our process through the experimental design revision process. The current report contains the following: (1) An explanation of the general concept of domestication, and why domestication is a concern in the YKFP spring chinook program; (2) A discussion of the basics of experimental design for domestication; (3) A history of domestication experimental design for domestication in the YKFP; (4) A review of potential designs that would answer the ISRP's criticisms; (5) A revised design containing the following elements--A control line under continuous hatchery culture (i.e.; no spawning in the wild); use of the Naches population, where appropriate, as a wild control line; (6) Cryopreservation of sperm for later evaluation of long-term genetic trend; and (7) Continuous monitoring of phenotypic trend in the supplemented line.

  4. Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin, Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect

    White, Tara C.; Jewett, Shannon M.; Hanson, Josh T.

    2003-04-11

    This is the seventh year of a multi-year project, monitoring the outmigration and survival of juvenile salmonids in the lower Umatilla River. This project both supplements and complements ongoing and completed work within the Umatilla River basin. Knowledge gained on juvenile outmigration and survival assists researchers and managers in adapting hatchery practices, flow enhancement strategies, canal and fish ladder operations, and supplementation and enhancement efforts of natural and restored fish populations. Findings from this study also measure the success of upriver habitat improvement projects and provide an overall evaluation of the Umatilla River fisheries restoration program. The general objectives for 2001 were to: (1) Estimate migrant abundance and survival and determine migration parameters of PIT-tagged hatchery and natural juvenile salmonids; (2) Monitor natural production and estimate overall abundance of pacific lamprey, chinook and coho salmon and summer steelhead; (3) Assess the condition and health of migrants and determine length-frequency distributions through time; (4) Investigate the effects of canal and fishway operations and environmental conditions on fish migration and survival; (5) Investigate and implement improved tag monitoring capabilities; and (6) Participate in planning and coordination activities within the basin and disseminate results. More specifically, 2001 objectives included the ongoing evaluation of migrant abundance and survival of tagged hatchery fish groups from various species-specific hatchery, rearing, acclimation and release strategies; fourth year reach survival results; continuation of transport evaluation studies; outmigrant monitoring and estimation of natural abundance, and further investigation of the effects of canal operations, environmental factors, fish condition and health on migration, abundance and survival. Some of the key findings for 2001 are: (1) A significant decline in outmigrant abundance of natural salmonids compared with the upward trend of previous years; (2) An undetermined number of hatchery summer steelhead are overwintering in the Umatilla River and migrating out as 2-year old smolts; (3) Transported fish may have a survival advantage over non-transported fish; (4) Migrant survival of fish from the Little White, Carson and Herman Creek hatcheries may have been influenced by disease in 2001; (5) Acclimation may benefit migrant survival of subyearling fall chinook; (6) Overwintering of spring chinook in acclimation ponds may not provide a survival advantage over standard-acclimated fish; and (7) Fish sampled in 2001 tended to be descaled and injured at a higher rate compared with previous years.

  5. 7 CFR 929.250 - Marketable quantity and allotment percentage for the 2000-2001 crop year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA, OREGON, WASHINGTON, AND LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Assessment Rate... percentage if the total industry sales history increases due to established growers receiving additional sales history on acreage with four years sales or less....

  6. 7 CFR 929.250 - Marketable quantity and allotment percentage for the 2000-2001 crop year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA, OREGON, WASHINGTON, AND LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Assessment Rate... percentage if the total industry sales history increases due to established growers receiving additional sales history on acreage with four years sales or less....

  7. 7 CFR 929.250 - Marketable quantity and allotment percentage for the 2000-2001 crop year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA, OREGON, WASHINGTON, AND LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Assessment Rate... percentage if the total industry sales history increases due to established growers receiving additional sales history on acreage with four years sales or less....

  8. 7 CFR 929.250 - Marketable quantity and allotment percentage for the 2000-2001 crop year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA, OREGON, WASHINGTON, AND LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Assessment Rate... percentage if the total industry sales history increases due to established growers receiving additional sales history on acreage with four years sales or less....

  9. 7 CFR 929.250 - Marketable quantity and allotment percentage for the 2000-2001 crop year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA, OREGON, WASHINGTON, AND LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Assessment Rate... percentage if the total industry sales history increases due to established growers receiving additional sales history on acreage with four years sales or less....

  10. Prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) in Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) adults in New Jersey, 2000-2001.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Terry L; Jordan, Robert A; Hung, Robert W; Puelle, Rose S; Markowski, Daniel; Chomsky, Martin S

    2003-07-01

    Using polymerase chain reaction, we analyzed 529 Ixodes scapularis Say adults collected from 16 of New Jersey's 21 counties for the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agent of Lyme disease. Overall, 261 (49.3%) were positive. B. burgdorferi was detected in ticks obtained from each county and from 53 of the 58 (93.1%) municipalities surveyed. The observed statewide prevalence in New Jersey is similar to those reported from other northeastern and mid-Atlantic states.

  11. Measurement, Ratios, and Graphing: 3...2...1...Crash! NASA Connect: Program 1 in the 2000-2001 Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    This teaching unit is designed to help students in grades 5 to 8 explore the concepts of measurement, ratios, and graphing in the context of designing a dragster. The units in the series have been developed to enhance and enrich mathematics, science, and technology education and to accommodate different teaching and learning styles. Each unit…

  12. The NASA "Why?" Files: The Case of the Electrical Mystery. Program 3 in the 2000-2001 Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has produced a distance learning series of four 60-minute video programs with an accompanying Web site and companion teacher guide. This teacher guide accompanies the third video in the series. The story line of each program involves six ethnically diverse, inquisitive schoolchildren who…

  13. Focus on Infants & Toddlers (Ages 0-3): A Quarterly Newsletter for the Education Community, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Virginia M., Ed.; Cantor, Patricia, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    These four quarterly newsletter issues address various topics of interest to child caregivers. Each issue includes articles on a specific theme, along with regular news or a column by an AECI Executive Board vice president. The Fall 2000 issue focuses on the special features and unique concerns of employer-sponsored child care, with one article…

  14. Hydrologic Data Summary for the Northeast Creek/Fresh Meadow Estuary, Acadia National Park, Maine, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caldwell, James M.; Culbertson, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, collected data in Northeast Creek estuary, Mt. Desert Island, Maine, to establish baseline water-quality conditions including estuarine nutrient concentrations. Five sampling sites in Northeast Creek were established and monitored continuously for temperature and specific conductance during May to November, 2000 and 2001. Stream stage, which was affected by ocean tidal dynamics, was recorded at the most downstream site and at one upstream site. Discrete water samples for nutrient concentrations were collected biweekly during May to November, 2000 and 2001, at the five sampling sites, and an additional site seaward of the estuary mouth. Results indicated that the salinity regime of Northeast Creek estuary is dynamic and highly regulated by strong seasonal variations in freshwater runoff, as well as limited seawater exchange caused by a constriction at the bridge, at the downstream end of the estuary. Oligohaline conditions (0.5-5 practical salinity units) occasionally extend to the estuary mouth. During other periods oligohaline and mesohaline (5-20 practical salinity units) conditions exist in some areas of the estuary; polyhaline/marine (20-35 practical salinity units) conditions occasionally exist near the mouth. A saltwater wedge in the bottom water, due to density stratification, was observed to migrate upstream as fresh surface-water inputs diminished during the onset of summer low-flow conditions. Although specific conductance ranged widely at most sites because of tidal influences, other water-quality constituents, including nutrient and chlorophyll-a concentrations, exhibited seasonal distribution patterns in which maximum levels generally occurred in early to mid-summer and again in the fall over both field seasons.

  15. United States Catholic Elementary and Secondary Schools, 2000-2001: The Annual Statistical Report on Schools, Enrollment and Staffing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Dale

    This document is a statistical report on Catholic elementary and secondary schools in the United States. The first part of this report presents data concerning an overview of the historical dimensions of Catholic education and the context of American education in which private schools operate. The second part includes Catholic school enrollment…

  16. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... clumsiness; progressive weakness; and visual, speech, and sometimes personality changes. The progression of deficits leads to life- ... clumsiness; progressive weakness; and visual, speech, and sometimes personality changes. The progression of deficits leads to life- ...

  17. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Examples of the merits of blue-sky research in the history of science are legion. The invention of the laser, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, is an excellent example. When it was invented it was considered to be 'a solution waiting for a problem', and yet the level to which it has now infiltrated our day-to-day technological landscape speaks volumes. At the same time it is also true to say that the direction of research is also at times rightly influenced by the needs and concerns of the general public. Over recent years, growing concerns about the environment have had a noticeable effect on research in nanotechnology, motivating work on a range of topics from green nanomaterial synthesis [1] to high-efficiency solar cells [2] and hydrogen storage [3]. The impact of the world's energy consumption on the welfare of the planet is now an enduring and well founded concern. In the face of an instinctive reluctance to curtail habits of comfort and convenience and the appendages of culture and consumerism, research into renewable and more efficient energy sources seem an encouraging approach to alleviating an impending energy crisis. Fuel cells present one alternative to traditional combustion cells that have huge benefits in terms of the efficiency of energy conversion and the limited harmful emissions. In last week's issue of Nanotechnology, Chuan-Jian Zhong and colleagues at the State University of New York at Binghamton in the USA presented an overview of research on nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells [4]. The topical review includes insights into the interactions between nanoparticles and between nanoparticles and their substrate as well as control over the composition and nanostructure of catalysts. The review also serves to highlight how the flourishing of nanotechnology research has heralded great progress in the exploitation of catalysts with nanostructures ingeniously controlled to maximize surface area and optimize energetics for synthesis

  18. Primary Progressive Aphasia

    MedlinePlus

    Primary progressive aphasia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Primary progressive aphasia (uh-FAY-zhuh) is a rare nervous system (neurological) syndrome ... your ability to communicate. People with primary progressive aphasia can have trouble expressing their thoughts and understanding ...

  19. Progression of Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Progression of Liver Disease The Progression of Liver Disease There are many different types of liver ... may put your life in danger. The Healthy Liver Your liver helps fight infections and cleans your ...

  20. Reconstructing Progressive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Andy

    2013-01-01

    The work of Colonel Francis W. Parker, the man whom Dewey called "the father of progressive education," provides a starting point for reconstructing the loose ambiguities of progressive education into a coherent social and educational philosophy. Although progressives have claimed their approach is more humane and sensitive to children, we need…

  1. Turbulence investigation and reproduction for assisting downstream migrating juvenile salmonids, Part II of II: Effects of induced turbulence on behavior of juvenile salmon, 2001-2005 final report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, R.; Farley , M.; Hansen, G.; Morse , J.; Rondorf, D.

    2005-01-01

    Passage through dams is a major source of mortality of anadromous juvenile salmonids because some populations must negotiate up to eight dams in Columbia and Snake rivers. Dams cause direct mortality when fish pass through turbines, but dams may also cause indirect mortality by altering migration conditions in rivers. Forebays immediately upstream of dams have decreased the water velocity of rivers and may contribute substantially to the total migration delay of juvenile salmonids. Recently, Coutant (2001a) suggested that in addition to low water velocities, lack of natural turbulence may contribute to migration delay by causing fish to lose directional cues. Coutant (2001a) further hypothesized that restoring turbulence in dam forebays may reduce migration delay by providing directional cues that allow fish to find passage routes more quickly (Coutant 2001a). Although field experiments have yielded proof of the concept of using induced turbulence to guide fish to safe passage routes, little is known about mechanisms actually causing behavioral changes. To test hypotheses about how turbulence influences movement and behavior of migrating juvenile salmonids, we conducted two types of controlled experiments at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. A common measure of migration delay is the elapsed time between arrival at, and passage through, a dam. Therefore, for the first set of experiments, we tested the effect of induced turbulence on the elapsed time needed for fish to traverse through a raceway and pass over a weir at its downstream end (time trial experiment). If turbulence helps guide fish to passage routes, then fish should pass through the raceway quicker in the presence of appropriately scaled and directed turbulent cues. Second, little is known about how the physical properties of water movement provide directional cues to migrating juvenile salmonids. To examine the feasibility of guiding fish with turbulence, we tested whether directed turbulence could guide fish into one of two channels in the raceway, and subsequently cause them to pass disproportionately over the weir where turbulent cues were aimed (guidance experiment). Last, we measured and mapped water velocity and turbulence during the experiments to understand water movement patterns and the spatial distribution of turbulence in the raceways.

  2. One-stop TB-HIV services evaluation in Rwanda: comparison of the 2001-2005 and 2006-2010 cohorts.

    PubMed

    Ndagijimana, A; Rugigana, E; Uwizeye, C B; Ntaganira, J

    2015-12-21

    Contexte : Une co-infection par la tuberculose (TB) et le virus de l'immunodéficience humaine (VIH) reste fréquente au Rwanda. Depuis que des services TB-VIH à guichet unique ont été mis en œuvre afin de prendre en charge cette co-infection TB-VIH, leur fonctionnement et leur impact sur les résultats du traitement de la TB n'ont pas été évalués.Objectif : Evaluer les services TB-VIH à guichet unique du Rwanda, en comparant les résultats du traitement de la TB avant et après leur mise en œuvre, dans les districts de Kicukiro et Rulindo.Méthodes : Un étude descriptive rétrospective et un questionnaire quantitatif ont permis de connaître le fonctionnement du service TB-VIH à guichet unique ; des entretiens approfondis et des discussions en groupes focaux avec les prestataires de soins, les directeurs des structures et les patients co-infectés ont permis de connaître leur opinion à propos du fonctionnement.Résultats : Après la mise en œuvre des services TB-VIH à guichet unique, les 12 structures de santé visitées fonctionnaient selon les critères établis. Cependant, les résultats du traitement de la TB n'ont pas été significativement différents avant et après l'intervention. Les données qualitatives ont mis en évidence un effet positif de l'intervention sur la qualité de service, notamment sur la réduction du temps d'attente, et sur un meilleur respect des rendez-vous en réponse au bon fonctionnement du service.Conclusion : Les services TB-VIH à guichet unique ont amélioré la qualité des services dans les districts de Kicukiro et Rulindo. Cependant, le service doit être renforcé en termes de programme afin d'améliorer les résultats du traitement de la TB.

  3. Risks of drug-related death, suicide, and homicide during the immediate post-release period among people released from New York City jails, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sungwoo; Seligson, Amber Levanon; Parvez, Farah M; Luther, Charles W; Mavinkurve, Maushumi P; Binswanger, Ingrid A; Kerker, Bonnie D

    2012-03-15

    The authors assessed the risks of drug-related death, suicide, and homicide after release from New York City jails in 155,272 people who were incarcerated anytime from 2001 through 2005 and examined whether the mortality rate was associated with homelessness. Using jail records matched with death and single-adult homeless registries in New York City, they calculated standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and relative risks. After adjustment for age, sex, race, and neighborhood, the risks of drug-related death and homicide in formerly incarcerated persons were 2 times higher than those of New York City residents who had not been incarcerated in New York City jails during the study period. These relative risks were greatly elevated during the first 2 weeks after release (for drug-related causes, SMR = 8.0, 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.2, 11.8; for homicide, SMR = 5.1, 95% CI: 3.2, 7.8). Formerly incarcerated people with histories of homelessness had higher rates of drug-related death (RR = 3.4, 95% CI: 2.1, 5.5) and suicide (RR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.2, 3.4) than did persons without such histories. For individuals who died of drug-related causes, longer jail stays were associated with a shorter time until death after release. These results suggest that jail- and community-based interventions are needed to reduce the excess mortality risk among formerly incarcerated people.

  4. Occurrence and distribution of algal biomass and Its relation to nutrients and selected basin characteristics in Indiana streams, 2001-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowe, B. Scott; Leer, Donald R.; Frey, Jeffrey W.; Caskey, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    The seasonal values for nutrients (nitrate, TKN, TN, and TP) and algal biomass (periphyton CHLa, AFDM, seston CHLa, and POC) were compared to published U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) values for their respective ecoregions. Algal biomass values either were greater than the 25th percentile published USEPA values or extended the range of data in Aggregate Nutrient Ecoregions VI, VII, IX and USEPA Level III Ecoregions 54, 55, 56, 71, and 72. If the values for the 25th percentile proposed by the USEPA were adopted as nutrient water-quality criteria, then about 71 percent of the nutrient samples and 57 percent of the CHLa samples within the eight study basins would be considered nutrient enriched.

  5. Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part II of II; Effects of Induced Turbulence on Behavior of Juvenile Salmon, 2001-2005 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Russell W.; Farley, M. Jared; Hansen, Gabriel S.

    2005-07-01

    Passage through dams is a major source of mortality of anadromous juvenile salmonids because some populations must negotiate up to eight dams in Columbia and Snake rivers. Dams cause direct mortality when fish pass through turbines, but dams may also cause indirect mortality by altering migration conditions in rivers. Forebays immediately upstream of dams have decreased the water velocity of rivers and may contribute substantially to the total migration delay of juvenile salmonids. Recently, Coutant (2001a) suggested that in addition to low water velocities, lack of natural turbulence may contribute to migration delay by causing fish to lose directional cues. Coutant (2001a) further hypothesized that restoring turbulence in dam forebays may reduce migration delay by providing directional cues that allow fish to find passage routes more quickly (Coutant 2001a). Although field experiments have yielded proof of the concept of using induced turbulence to guide fish to safe passage routes, little is known about mechanisms actually causing behavioral changes. To test hypotheses about how turbulence influences movement and behavior of migrating juvenile salmonids, we conducted two types of controlled experiments at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. A common measure of migration delay is the elapsed time between arrival at, and passage through, a dam. Therefore, for the first set of experiments, we tested the effect of induced turbulence on the elapsed time needed for fish to traverse through a raceway and pass over a weir at its downstream end (time trial experiment). If turbulence helps guide fish to passage routes, then fish should pass through the raceway quicker in the presence of appropriately scaled and directed turbulent cues. Second, little is known about how the physical properties of water movement provide directional cues to migrating juvenile salmonids. To examine the feasibility of guiding fish with turbulence, we tested whether directed turbulence could guide fish into one of two channels in the raceway, and subsequently cause them to pass disproportionately over the weir where turbulent cues were aimed (guidance experiment). Last, we measured and mapped water velocity and turbulence during the experiments to understand water movement patterns and the spatial distribution of turbulence in the raceways.

  6. Influence of warming tendency on Culex pipiens population abundance and on the probability of West Nile fever outbreaks (Israeli Case Study: 2001-2005).

    PubMed

    Paz, Shlomit; Albersheim, Iris

    2008-03-01

    Climate change and West Nile fever (WNV) are both subjects of global importance. Many mosquitoes and the diseases they carry, including West Nile virus (WNV), are sensitive to temperature increase. The current study analyzes the lag correlations between weather conditions (especially air temperature) and 1) Culex pipiens mosquito population abundance, and 2) WNF frequency in humans, between 2001 and 2005 in Israel. These 5 years follow a long period with a documented tendency for temperature increase in the hot season in the country. Monthly anomalies of minimum and maximum temperatures, relative seasonal rainfall contribution, mosquito samplings (hazard level), and WNF cases (hospital admission dates and patients' addresses) were analyzed. Logistic regression was calculated between the climatic data and the mosquito samples, as Spearman correlations and Pearson cross-correlations were calculated between daily temperature values (or daily precipitation amounts) and the hospital admission dates. It was found that the disease appearance reflects the population distribution, while the risk tends to escalate around the metropolis characterized by an urban heat island. Positive anomalies of the temperature during the study period appear to have facilitated the mosquito abundance and, consequently, the disease emergence in humans. An important finding is the potential influence of extreme heat in the early spring on the vector population increase and on the disease's appearance weeks later. Awareness of such situations at the beginning of the spring may help authorities to reduce the disease risk before it becomes a real danger.

  7. Quality Information--Informed Choices: Advancing the Workforce Information System. Secretary of Labor's Workforce Information System Plan for Federal Fiscal Years 2001-2005.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workforce Information Council (DOL), Washington, DC.

    The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 emphasizes the importance of high quality, accessible, and relevant information about the labor market for making sound decisions. In order to help both workers and employers, as well as the government agencies that serve them, the Workforce Information System was created and is being improved. The action plan…

  8. Progressive dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Hamish; Tannenburg, Anthony; Walker, David G; Coyne, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour (DNET) is a benign tumour characterised by cortical location and presentation with drug resistant partial seizures in children. Recently the potential for malignant transformation has been reported, however progression without malignant transformation remains rare. We report a case of clinical and radiologic progression of a DNET in a girl 10 years after initial biopsy.

  9. Rapidly progressive Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Christian; Wolff, Martin; Weitz, Michael; Bartlau, Thomas; Korth, Carsten; Zerr, Inga

    2011-09-01

    Different rates of progression have been observed among patients with Alzheimer disease. Risk factors that accelerate deterioration have been identified and some are being discussed, such as genetics, comorbidity, and the early appearance of Alzheimer disease motor signs. Progressive forms of Alzheimer disease have been reported with rapid cognitive decline and disease duration of only a few years. This short review aims to provide an overview of the current knowledge of rapidly progressive Alzheimer disease. Furthermore, we suggest that rapid, in this context, should be defined as a Mini-Mental State Examination score decrease of 6 points per year.

  10. Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.; Shu, Huidy; Haman, Aissa; Sejvar, James J.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast with more common dementing conditions that typically develop over years, rapidly progressive dementias can develop subacutely over months, weeks, or even days and be quickly fatal. Because many rapidly progressive dementias are treatable, it is paramount to evaluate and diagnose these patients quickly. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding of the major categories of RPD and outlines efficient approaches to the diagnosis of the various neurodegenerative, toxic-metabolic, infectious, autoimmune, neoplastic, and other conditions that may progress rapidly. PMID:18668637

  11. Progress for the Paralyzed

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: NIBIB Robotics Progress for the Paralyzed Past Issues / Spring 2013 ... Paralyzed —The expanding options for paralyzed individuals include: robotic arms spinal cord stimulation improved prosthetic limbs restored ...

  12. Progressive hemifacial atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sande, Abhijeet; Risbud, Mukund; Kshar, Avinash; Paranjpe, Arati Oka

    2013-01-01

    Progressive hemifacial atrophy, also known as Parry-Romberg Syndrome, is an uncommon degenerative and poorly understood condition. It is characterized by a slow and progressive but self-limited atrophy affecting one side of the face. The incidence and the cause of this alteration are unknown. A cerebral disturbance of fat metabolism has been proposed as a primary cause. Possible factors that are involved in the pathogenesis include trauma, viral infections, heredity, endocrine disturbances and auto-immunity. The most common complications that appear in association to this disorder are: trigeminal neuralgia, facial paresthesia, severe headache and epilepsy. Characteristically, the atrophy progresses slowly for several years and, it becomes stable. The objective of this work is, through the presentation of a clinical case, to accomplish a literature review concerning general characteristics, etiology, physiopathology and treatment of progressive hemifacial atrophy. PMID:23878573

  13. Orion Progress - Spring 2010

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA and contractor teams are designing, building and testing the next generation human spacecraft Orion. Progress on Orion is highlighted by employees working on the project, along with video of t...

  14. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a rare brain disease. It affects brain cells that control the movement of your eyes. This leads to ... speech, vision and swallowing problems. Doctors sometimes confuse PSP with Parkinson's disease or Alzheimer's disease. PSP has ...

  15. Immunotherapy Slows TNBC Progression.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    The experimental monoclonal antibody MPDL3280A extended progression-free survival and produced durable responses in some patients with triple-negative breast cancer, according to preliminary results from a phase I trial.

  16. Progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Kent, Anna

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), or Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome, is a rare, progressive neurodegenerative condition with cognitive and motor involvement. Diagnosis can be challenging as some people do not display the classic symptoms of the condition and there are no specific investigations to confirm diagnosis. Timely discussions and access to symptom management and palliative care services need to be provided from diagnosis throughout the disease trajectory to ensure holistic care of people with PSP.

  17. [Progressive visual agnosia].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Azusa; Futamura, Akinori; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2011-10-01

    Progressive visual agnosia was discovered in the 20th century following the discovery of classical non-progressive visual agnosia. In contrast to the classical type, which is caused by cerebral vascular disease or traumatic injury, progressive visual agnosia is a symptom of neurological degeneration. The condition of progressive visual loss, including visual agnosia, and posterior cerebral atrophy was named posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) by Benson et al. (1988). Progressive visual agnosia is also observed in semantic dementia (SD) and other degenerative diseases, but there is a difference in the subtype of visual agnosia associated with these diseases. Lissauer (1890) classified visual agnosia into apperceptive and associative types, and it in most cases, PCA is associated with the apperceptive type. However, SD patients exhibit symptoms of associative visual agnosia before changing to those of semantic memory disorder. Insights into progressive visual agnosia have helped us understand the visual system and discover how we "perceive" the outer world neuronally, with regard to consciousness. Although PCA is a type of atypical dementia, its diagnosis is important to enable patients to live better lives with appropriate functional support.

  18. Progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ontaneda, Daniel; Fox, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose to Review To highlight the pathological features and clinical aspects of progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS). To highlight results of clinical trial experience to date and review ongoing clinical trials and perspective new treatment options. Explain the challenges of clinical trial design in PMS. Recent Findings MS has been identified as a chronic immune mediated disease, and the progressive phase of the disease appears to have significant neurodegenerative mechanisms. The classification of the course of PMS has been re-organized into categories of active vs. inactive inflammatory disease and the presence vs. absence of gradual disease progression. This differentiation allows clearer conceptualization of PMS and possibly even more efficient recruitment of PMS subjects into clinical trials. Clinical trial experience to date in PMS has been negative with anti-inflammatory medications used in relapsing MS. Simvastatin was recently tested in a phase II trial and showed a 43% reduction on annualized atrophy progression in secondary progressive MS. Ongoing PMS trials are currently being conducted with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor ibudilast, S1P modulator siponimod, and anti-B-cell therapy ocrelizumab. Several efforts for development of outcome measures in PMS are ongoing. Summary PMS represents a significant challenge, as the pathogenesis of the disease is not well understood, no validated outcome metrics have been established, and clinical trial experience to date has been disappointing. Advances in the understanding of the disease and lessons learned in previous clinical trials are paving the way for successful development of disease modifying agents for this disease. PMID:25887766

  19. The Hidden Lives of Galaxies: An Information & Activity Booklet, Grades 9-12, 2000-2001. Imagine the Universe! Probing the Structure & Evolution of the Cosmos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochner, James C.; Williamson, Lisa; Fitzhugh, Ethel

    This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) document presents activities on the properties of galaxies for additional curriculum support. The activities presented in this document include: (1) "How Big Is the Universe"; (2) "Identifying Galaxies"; (3) "Classifying Galaxies Using Hubble's Fork Diagram"; (4) "Identifying Unusual…

  20. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess

    2001-08-01

    The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

  1. Hydrologic Conditions and Quality of Rainfall and Storm Runoff in Agricultural and Rangeland Areas in San Patricio County, Texas, 2000-2001

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Methomyl (µg/L) <.017 <.017 <.017 -- <.017 <.017 <.017 -- <.017 <.017 Methiocarb (µg/L) <.026 <.026 <.026 -- <.026 <.026 <.026 -- <.026 <.026 Molinate

  2. Folic acid awareness and use among women with a history of a neural tube defect pregnancy--Texas, 2000-2001.

    PubMed

    Canfield, Mark A; Anderson, James L; Waller, D Kim; Palmer, Susan E; Kaye, Celia I

    2002-09-13

    The use of folic acid is a critical component in preventing birth defects. Health-care providers should take advantage of all health-care visits to counsel not only women at high risk (i.e., those with a history of having an infant with a neural tube defect [NTD]) but all women regarding the importance of folic acid use. A study conducted in Texas confirmed that white and Hispanic mothers were equally likely to recall receiving postpartum advice to use folic acid; however, Hispanic women were much less likely to use folic acid, compared with white women. This report covers data from May 2000 through November 2001. A study was conducted in Texas to determine whether women at high risk recall and follow recommendations to use folic acid. The study included 195 women at high risk and 223 control mothers who gave birth to infants without birth defects. These women participated in a telephone interview for a population-based case-control study of NTDs. Approximately 56.4% (110 of 195) of mothers who had infants affected by an NTD recalled receiving postpartum advice to use folic acid, compared with 25.6% (57 of 223) of control mothers (p < 0.01). Among nonpregnant case mothers, 54 (32.7%) of 165 reported regular use of supplements containing folic acid, and 53 (25.2%) of 210 nonpregnant control mothers reported this behavior (p = 0.11). Among case mothers, use of folic acid was significantly higher for whites (64.7%) versus Hispanics (16.5%) (p < 0.001); for women with some college education (57.1%) versus no college education (20.2%; p < 0.001); for women who were trying to get pregnant (66.7%) versus those using birth control (38.3%) or reporting using no contraceptive method (18.8%) (p = 0.001); and for women who reported receiving advice to use folic acid (40.9%) versus those who did not (22.2%; p = 0.01). Findings from this study support the need to implement NTD recurrence prevention activities in Texas. Data also identify a need for educational strategies in Texas that target Hispanic women at high risk, especially those who primarily speak Spanish. Further efforts should be made to determine why Hispanic women have low rates of folic acid use (e.g., the cost of vitamins and language and cultural barriers). On the basis of a review of research and current practice, recommendations developed by the Public Health Service include 1) women at risk for a recurrent NTD-affected pregnancy should take 0.4 mg of folic acidper day; and 2) if a woman at high risk is planning a pregnancy, she should consult her physician regarding taking the higher dose of 4.0 mg per day.

  3. Participation and Performance of English Language Learners with Disabilities on Minnesota Standards-Based Assessments, 2000-2001. ELLs with Disabilities Report 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albus, Deb; Barrera, Manuel; Thurlow, Martha; Guven, Kamil; Shyyan, Vitaliy

    2004-01-01

    This report focuses on the performance of students with disabilities and limited English proficiency on the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments (MCAs). The MCAs are used for accountability purposes at the district level for grades 3 and 5 in Reading and Mathematics. Newly developed MCAs in grades 10 (reading) and 11 (mathematics) that were…

  4. What We Know about English Language Arts Teachers: An Analysis of the 1999-2000 SASS and 2000-2001 TFS Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherff, Lisa; Hahs-Vaughn, Debbie L.

    2008-01-01

    Although there is a significant body of work related to overall teacher attrition and mobility, little research has been conducted that is specifically related to English teachers. Given the predominance of high-stakes reading and writing assessments for middle and high school students, studying those who teach literacy is critical for a better…

  5. Nutrient enrichment, phytoplankton algal growth, and estimated rates of instream metabolic processes in the Quinebaug River Basin, Connecticut, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colombo, Michael J.; Grady, Stephen J.; Todd Trench, Elaine C.

    2004-01-01

    A consistent and pervasive pattern of nutrient enrichment was substantiated by water-quality sampling in the Quinebaug River and its tributaries in eastern Connecticut during water years 2000 and 2001. Median total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s recently recommended regional ambient water-qual-ity criteria for streams (0.71 and 0.031 milligrams per liter, respectively). Maximum total phosphorus concentrations exceeded 0.1 milligrams per liter at nearly half the sampled locations in the Quinebaug River Basin. Elevated total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations were measured at all stations on the mainstem of the Quinebaug River, the French River, and the Little River. Nutrient enrichment was related to municipal wastewater point sources at the sites on the mainstem of the Quinebaug River and French River, and to agricultural nonpoint nutrient sources in the Little River Basin. Nutrient enrichment and favorable physical factors have resulted in excessive, nuisance algal blooms during summer months, particularly in the numerous impoundments in the Quinebaug River system. Phytoplankton algal density as high as 85,000 cells per milliliter was measured during such nuisance blooms in water years 2000 and 2001. Different hydrologic conditions during the summers of 2000 and 2001 produced very different seston algal populations. Larger amounts of precipitation sustained higher streamflows in the summer of 2000 (than in 2001), which resulted in lower total algal abundance and inhibited the typical algal succession from diatoms to cyanobacteria. Despite this, nearly half of all seston chlorophyll-a concentrations measured during this study exceeded the recommended regional ambient stream-water-quality criterion (3.75 micrograms per liter), and seston chlorophyll-a concentrations as large as 42 micrograms per liter were observed in wastewa-ter-receiving reaches of the Quinebaug River. Estimates of primary productivity and respiration obtained from diel dissolved oxygen monitoring and from light- and dark-bottle dissolved oxygen measurements demonstrated that instream metabolic processes are consistent with a seston-algae dominant system. The highest estimated maximum primary productivity rate was 1.72 grams of oxygen per cubic meter per hour at the Quinebaug River at Jewett City during September 2001. The observed extremes in diel dissolved oxygen concentrations (less than 5 milligrams per liter) and pH (greater than 9) may periodically stress aquatic organisms in the Quinebaug River Basin.

  6. Summary Public School Indicators for the Provinces and Territories, 2000/2001 to 2006/2007. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockington, Riley

    2009-01-01

    This report provides trends on public school enrolments, educators and expenditures. It uses figures provided by provincial and territorial departments of education on public elementary and secondary schools. Tables and definitions are appended. A cumulative index is included. (Contains 80 charts, 35 tables and 5 endnotes.)

  7. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Holly J.; Scholz, Allan T.

    2001-07-01

    Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 to mitigate for anadromous salmon losses caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The primary objective of the hatchery plantings was to create a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a native stock of kokanee might perform better than the coastal Whatcom strain. Therefore, kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Whatcom stock and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek in late June 2000. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated through three performance measures (1) returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) returns to other tributaries, indicating availability for angler harvest, and (3) returns to the creel. A secondary objective was to evaluate the numbers collected at downstream fish passage facilities. Age 2 kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir, which included 89 tributaries between August 17th and November 7th, 2000. Sherman Creek was sampled once a week because it was the primary egg collection location. A total of 2,789 age 2 kokanee were collected, in which 2,658 (95%) were collected at Sherman Creek. Chi-square analysis indicated the Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers compared to the Whatcom stock ({chi}{sup 2} = 734.4; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries indicated similar results ({chi}{sup 2} = 733.1; P < 0.01). No age 2 kokanee were collected during creel surveys. Age 3 kokanee are expected to recruit to the creel in 2001. No age 2 kokanee were collected at the fish passage facilities due to a 170 mm size restriction at the fish passage centers. Age 3 kokanee are expected to be collected at the fish passage centers during 2001. Stock performance cannot be properly evaluated until 2001, when age 3 kokanee are expected to return to Sherman Creek.

  8. NovaNET, 2000-2001: Analyses of Student Outcomes Relative to a Comparison Group. Eye on Evaluation. E&R Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Kristin; Baenen, Nancy

    NovaNET is an online computerized instructional system that provides students with self-paced instruction for many North Carolina high school courses. This evaluation looks at outcomes for students participating in the NovaNET program and compares them with outcomes for a group of students with similar characteristics who did not participate in…

  9. Department of the Navy Fiscal Year (FY) 2000/2001 Biennial Budget Estimates, Justification of Estimates, February 1999 Research, Development, Test & Evaluation, Navy Budget Activity 7.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-01

    c CO !" ö i £ i: 3 is 8 o S o o 5 ~ to co o co *r £ = £ £ x: £ g «5 .2 o rat ; O), p Q-_ © co o D. Q. CO o Z © CO Ü Q. Q. CO...H H fa fa ’H .fll’riflO 00 U H Id >i fag >irH aSM- dMH cooßrHid CO 0 Q CN <D ua)Q)Q)id

  10. Ground-Water Flow Direction, Water Quality, Recharge Sources, and Age, Great Sand Dunes National Monument, South-Central Colorado, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2004-01-01

    Great Sand Dunes National Monument is located in south-central Colorado along the eastern edge of the San Luis Valley. The Great Sand Dunes National Monument contains the tallest sand dunes in North America; some rise up to750 feet. Important ecological features of the Great Sand Dunes National Monument are palustrine wetlands associated with interdunal ponds and depressions along the western edge of the dune field. The existence and natural maintenance of the dune field and the interdunal ponds are dependent on maintaining ground-water levels at historic elevations. To address these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study, in collaboration with the National Park Service, of ground-water flow direction, water quality, recharge sources, and age at the Great Sand Dunes National Monument. A shallow unconfined aquifer and a deeper confined aquifer are the two principal aquifers at the Great Sand Dunes National Monument. Ground water in the unconfined aquifer is recharged from Medano and Sand Creeks near the Sangre de Cristo Mountain front, flows underneath the main dune field, and discharges to Big and Little Spring Creeks. The percentage of calcium in ground water in the unconfined aquifer decreases and the percentage of sodium increases because of ionic exchange with clay minerals as the ground water flows underneath the dune field. It takes more than 60 years for the ground water to flow from Medano and Sand Creeks to Big and Little Spring Creeks. During this time, ground water in the upper part of the unconfined aquifer is recharged by numerous precipitation events. Evaporation of precipitation during recharge prior to reaching the water table causes enrichment in deuterium (2H) and oxygen-18 (18O) relative to waters that are not evaporated. This recharge from precipitation events causes the apparent ages determined using chlorofluorocarbons and tritium to become younger, because relatively young precipitation water is mixing with older waters derived from Medano and Sand Creeks. Major ion chemistry of water from sites completed in the confined aquifer is different than water from sites completed in the unconfined aquifer, but insufficient data exist to quantify if the two aquifers are hydrologically disconnected. Radiocarbon dating of ground water in the confined aquifer indicates it is about 30,000 years old (plus or minus 3,000 years). The peak of the last major ice advance (Wisconsin) during the ice age occurred about 20,000 years before present; ground water from the confined aquifer is much older than that. Water quality and water levels of the interdunal ponds are not affected by waters from the confined aquifer. Instead, the interdunal ponds are affected directly by fluctuations in the water table of the unconfined aquifer. Any lowering of the water table of the unconfined aquifer would result in an immediate decrease in water levels of the interdunal ponds. The water quality of the interdunal ponds probably results from several factors, including the water quality of the unconfined aquifer, evaporation of the pond water, and biologic activity within the ponds.

  11. Vacation Study Abroad 2000/2001: 50th Anniversary Edition of IIE's Complete Guide to Summer and Short-Term Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sara J., Ed.

    This guide provides descriptions of 2,239 summer and short-term study-abroad opportunities that range in length from one week to several months. Introductory material provides information on the Institute of International Education (IIE), IIE publications, how to use the guide, abbreviations, planning for study abroad, additional resources for…

  12. Department of the Navy Fiscal Year (FY) 2000/2001 Biennial Budget Estimates, Justification of Estimates, February 1999 Research, Development, Test & Evaluation, Navy Budget Activity 4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-01

    W 0) Q to (CD • 4-> . > CD Id ÖI4-) to Ä ( drH g U 0 CD >i O U H . 4J 4J-H Ä •H CO 4-1 O rH 4-1 U- Id Ö-H ft ä-H’O...H 4J W U H fa fa 00 ^1 t~- i-l o ä WCDcd0-H tOU ^Ö-HficO SHPS&C0-H CD b a J en ^i in IO n l4J|gt04JO CDO...ÖHXJ0)HH ß4Jldld4J4->gr4rH< DrH -Htift CD G)r-t & -rl -rl 4->ft’rl<D-HOfi co id O £ M "d

  13. Forging the Army’s Transformation: The Initial Brigade Combat Team and the Road to Initial Operational Capability, AY 2000-2001

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Operational Environment,” URL http://contracting.tacom.army.mil/majorsys/brigade/formalrfp/BCT O and O/Chap 2 18 APR with Apend ABCD(2).doc, accessed 8...Operational Environment.” URL: <http://contracting.tacom.army.mil/majorsys/ brigade/formalrfp/BCT O and O/Chap 2 18 APR with Apend ABCD(2).doc

  14. Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery-and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, S.L.; Knudsen, C.M.; Rau, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    In the Yakima Spring Chinook supplementation program, wild fish are brought into the Cle Elum Hatchery, artificially crossed, reared, transferred to acclimation sites, and released into the upper Yakima River as smolts. When these fish mature and return to the Yakima River most of them will be allowed to spawn naturally; a few, however, will be brought back to the hatchery and used for research purposes. In order for this supplementation approach to be successful, hatchery-origin fish must be able to spawn and produce offspring under natural conditions. Recent investigations on salmonid fishes have indicated that exposure to hatchery environments during juvenile life may cause significant behavioral, physiological, and morphological changes in adult fish. These changes appear to reduce the reproductive competence of hatchery fish. In general, males are more affected than females; species with prolonged freshwater rearing periods are more strongly impacted than those with shorter rearing periods; and stocks that have been exposed to artificial culture for multiple generations are more impaired than those with a relatively short exposure history to hatchery conditions.

  15. Chemical characteristics of ground-water discharge along the south rim of Grand Canyon in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monroe, Stephen A.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Hart, Robert J.; Taylor, Howard E.; Truini, Margot; Rihs, John R.; Felger, Tracey J.

    2005-01-01

    Springs flowing from the south rim of Grand Canyon are an important resource of Grand Canyon National Park, offering refuge to endemic and exotic terrestrial wildlife species and maintaining riparian areas. Population growth on the Coconino Plateau has increased the demand for additional development of ground-water resources, and such development could reduce spring discharge and affect the sustainability of riparian areas within the park. In addition, springs are an important source of drinking water for hikers and are culturally and economically important to Native Americans living in the region. Water samples were collected from May 2000 to September 2001 from 20 spring and creek sites that discharge water from the Redwall-Muav Limestone aquifer along the south rim of Grand Canyon. Sample collection sites were described and samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, trace elements, radioactivity, and selected isotopes, and potential sources of ground-water flow to the springs. Rock samples representing the major stratigraphic units of Grand Canyon were collected near the Bright Angel Fault and analyzed for mineralogy, strontium-87/strontium-86, and carbon-13/carbon-12. The chemical composition of water samples collected from a given spring did not vary appreciably over the course of the study. Although water at each spring had a temporally constant composition, the composition was chemically distinct from that of every other spring sampled, indicating spatial variability in the ground-water composition. Most samples had a calcium magnesium bicarbonate composition; a few had a substantial sulfate component. Concentrations of arsenic, nitrate, selenium, uranium, and gross alpha approached or exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Levels in water discharging from some springs. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions varied little among samples, and for most sites the isotopic data plot close to the global meteoric water line or below the local meteoric water line. Isotopic enrichment indicates fractionation due to evaporation occurs at some sites. The evaporative process may occur prior to recharge or post-discharge. Flow paths are differentiated between the eastern part of the study area where strontium-87/strontium-86 values for water from springs and creeks are more radiogenic than strontium-87/strontium-86 values for water that discharges from sites farther west. Tritium and carbon isotope analyses indicate that residence time of ground-water discharge from springs and creeks ranges from less than 50 years to about 3,400 years. Water with a residence time of less than 50 years is absent at several sites. Discharge of most springs and creeks is a mixture of younger and older waters.

  16. Dissolved pesticide concentrations detected in storm-water runoff at selected sites in the San Joaquin River basin, California, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlando, James L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Whitehead, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    As part of a collaborative study involving the United States Geological Survey Toxics Substances Hydrology Project (Toxics Project) and the University of California, Davis, Bodega Marine Laboratory (BML), water samples were collected at three sites within the San Joaquin River Basin of California and analyzed for dissolved pesticides. Samples were collected during, and immediately after, the first significant rainfall (greater than 0.5 inch per day) following the local application of dormant spray, organophosphate insecticides during the winters of 2000 and 2001. All samples were collected in conjunction with fish-caging experiments conducted by BML researchers. Sites included two locations potentially affected by runoff of agricultural chemicals (San Joaquin River near Vernalis, California, and Orestimba Creek at River Road near Crows Landing, California, and one control site located upstream of pesticide input (Orestimba Creek at Orestimba Creek Road near Newman, California). During these experiments, fish were placed in cages and exposed to storm runoff for up to ten days. Following exposure, the fish were examined for acetylcholinesterase concentrations and overall genetic damage. Water samples were collected throughout the rising limb of the stream hydrograph at each site for later pesticide analysis. Concentrations of selected pesticides were measured in filtered water samples using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) at the U.S. Geological Survey organic chemistry laboratory in Sacramento, California. Results of these analyses are presented.

  17. Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day, and McNary Dams; 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    van der Naald, Wayne; Clark, Roy; Spellman, Bryant

    2002-09-17

    This report describes work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) from 1 October 2000 to 30 September 2001. The work is part of studies to evaluate spawning of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and chum salmon (O. keta) below the four lowermost Columbia River dams under the Bonneville Power Administration's Project 99-003. The purpose of this project is twofold: (1) Document the existence of fall chinook and chum populations spawning below Bonneville Dam (river mile (RM) 145), The Dalles Dam (RM 192), John Day Dam (RM 216), and McNary Dam (RM 292) (Figure 1) and estimate the size of these populations. (2) Profile stocks for important population characteristics; including spawning time, genetic make-up, emergence timing, migration size and timing, and juvenile to adult survival rates. Specific tasks conducted by ODFW and WDFW during this period were: (1) Documentation of fall chinook and chum spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day and McNary dams using on-water observations; (2) Collection of biological data to profile stocks in areas described in Task 1; (3) Determination of spawning population estimates and age composition, average size at return, and sex ratios in order to profile stocks in areas described in Task 1; (4) Collection of data to determine stock origin of adult salmon found in areas described in Task 1; (5) Determination of possible stock origins of adult salmon found in areas described in Task 1 using tag rates based on coded-wire tag recoveries and genetic baseline analysis; (6) Determination of emergence timing and hatching rate of juvenile fall chinook and chum below Bonneville Dam; (7) Determination of migration time and size for juvenile fall chinook and chum rearing in the area described in Task 6; (8) Investigation of feasibility of determining stock composition of juvenile fall chinook and chum rearing in the area described in Task 6; (9) Documentation of entrapment in low-lying areas of juvenile fall chinook and chum rearing in the area described in Task 6; and (10) Investigation of feasibility of determining juvenile to adult survival rate from coded-wire tagged juvenile fall chinook captured and tagged in the area described in Task 6.

  18. Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Calendar Years 2000-2001

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-04-01

    This biennial soil gas monitoring report provides an analysis and summary of site inspections and soil gas monitoring data obtained at the Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit site, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the calendar years December 1999--December 2001 monitoring period. This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 23-56-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit 342. Inspections of the Area 23 Mercury Fire Training pit site are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the site, monitoring well, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed semiannually and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. The objective of the soil gas monitoring program is to determine if the remaining petroleum hydrocarbons beneath the above-ground storage tank area are undergoing natural biodegradation. Comparing initial conditions to those of the first biennial soil gas monitoring event indicate a general increase in concentration of organic analytes, although this trend is not strong. There has been a decrease in the amount of carbon dioxide, with the percentage of nitrogen and oxygen about the same. The increase in organic analytes indicates that mixing of the atmosphere with the air in the monitoring well is occurring. Changes in atmospheric pressure will drive air both in and out of the monitoring well. The change in carbon dioxide in the opposite direction possibly indicates a change in biological parameters between the sampling events. The sampling and analysis of future samples should be consistent with the methods already used. This includes sampling at the same time of year, but not immediately after a significant meteorological event. This means the results to date are not conclusive. Monitoring needs to be continued to make an effective evaluation.

  19. Issues of Education at Community Colleges: Essays by Fellows in the Mid-Career Fellowship Program at Princeton University, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Princeton Univ., NJ. Mid-Career Fellowship Program.

    This document contains 11 essays by fellows in the Mid-Career Fellowship Program at Princeton University (New Jersey). Published in July 2001, the articles in this document include: (1) "Writing for Community College Students--A New Approach" (David Daniels); (2) "The Fourth Paradigm: Establishing Shared Governance at a New Jersey Community…

  20. Progressive supranuclear palsy: progression and survival.

    PubMed

    Arena, Julieta E; Weigand, Stephen D; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Hassan, Anhar; Eggers, Scott D; Höglinger, Günter U; Litvan, Irene; Josephs, Keith A

    2016-02-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by postural instability and falls, vertical supranuclear gaze palsy, parkinsonism with poor levodopa response, pseudobulbar palsy, and frontal release signs. The natural history of the disease has been previously described. However, the time frame of appearance of clinical milestones and how these symptoms may relate to survival in PSP are unknown. The primary objective was to determine the prevalence of symptoms at different stages of PSP and to estimate the time of appearance of clinical symptoms characteristic of the disease. Second, we determined the association between clinical symptoms and survival. We prospectively studied 35 PSP patients during assessments scheduled every 6 months for up to 2 years. We estimated symptoms prevalence and the association between symptoms and survival. The median age of onset was 65.9 years (IQR 60.6-70.0), and the median time from onset to first assessment was 3.0 years (IQR 2.4-3.9). The most commonly reported symptoms at baseline were: motor (100%) followed by cognitive/behavioral (89%), systemic and bulbar (80%), and sleep disturbances (60%). Slowness of movement, falls, neck stiffness and difficulty looking up/down had high prevalence from baseline, while balance and gait impairment were less common at baseline but increased in prevalence over time. The presence of sleep disturbances, and possibly hallucinations, was associated with increased death risk. Improved recognition of the clinical spectrum and milestones of PSP advances knowledge of the disease, helps earlier diagnosis, and allows prognostic predictions.

  1. Pesticide reregistration progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The report is produced by the Special Review and Reregistration Division (SRRD), Office of Pesticide Programs, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), on progress towards pesticide reregistration as mandated under 1988 amendments to the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act. The report shows the status of reregistration through the first quarter of the 1993 fiscal year. SRRD is in the process of re-evaluating the format and information in the Progress Report, as a result of the October 1992 Customer Survey sent to the recipients of the report. Results of the survey will be incorporated in the April 1993 issue of the report.

  2. Mystery in Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kristen

    1989-01-01

    Describes "Mystery in Progress," a traveling exhibit which traces the development of Predynastic Egypt. The exhibit provides a time line for Predynastic Egypt, depicts the history of the Hierakonpolis expedition, documents the formation of Egypt's first centralized nation state, and summarizes the emergence of a unified Egypt. (LS)

  3. [Progress on transgenic mosquitoes].

    PubMed

    Yang, Pin

    2011-04-30

    The genetically modified mosquitoes have been developed aiming to control mosquito-borne diseases by either reducing population sizes or replacing existing populations with vectors unable to transmit the disease. introduces some progress on the generation of transgenic mosquitoes and their fitness in wild population. This paper

  4. 1992 PVUSA progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellyn, W.

    1992-12-31

    Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale photovoltaic (PV) electric generating systems. This report updates the progress of the PVUSA project, reviews the status and performance of the various PV installations during 1992, and summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions from work to date.

  5. Basic Measures of Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calkins, Julia; Ling, Thomson; Moore, Eric; Halle, Tamara; Hair, Beth; Moore, Kris; Zaslow, Marty

    This document provides a compilation of measures of progress toward school readiness and three contributing conditions as used in several local, state, and national surveys. The report begins with a legend listing the surveys examined, their acronyms, and contact information. The remainder of the report, in tabular format, lists measures of…

  6. MCNP Progress & Performance Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.; Bull, Jeffrey S.; Rising, Michael Evan

    2015-04-14

    Twenty-eight slides give information about the work of the US DOE/NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program on MCNP6 under the following headings: MCNP6.1.1 Release, with ENDF/B-VII.1; Verification/Validation; User Support & Training; Performance Improvements; and Work in Progress. Whisper methodology will be incorporated into the code, and run speed should be increased.

  7. Learning Progressions & Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Joyce M.; de los Santos, Elizabeth X.; Anderson, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    Our society is currently having serious debates about sources of energy and global climate change. But do students (and the public) have the requisite knowledge to engage these issues as informed citizenry? The learning-progression research summarized here indicates that only 10% of high school students typically have a level of understanding…

  8. Progress in physiological optics.

    PubMed

    Boynton, R M

    1967-08-01

    A survey is made of the current state of physiological optics, broadly defined as equated with visual science. After a survey of some historical and definitional matters, recent progress in a number of areas is critically reviewed. Finally, seven examples of important recent discoveries in physiological optics are given.

  9. Opportunities and progress.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, John H

    2014-01-01

    In this review, I cover my professional experiences in food science and technology and related areas of applied and industrial microbiology over the span of my career. It emphasizes opportunities and technological problems that I encountered together with my progress in follow-up development of products and processes.

  10. Progressive Response Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, V. J.; Swiler, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Response surface functions are often used as simple and inexpensive replacements for computationally expensive computer models that simulate the behavior of a complex system over some parameter space. Progressive response surfaces are ones that are built up progressively as global information is added from new sample points in the parameter space. As the response surfaces are globally upgraded based on new information, heuristic indications of the convergence of the response surface approximation to the exact (fitted) function can be inferred. Sampling points can be incrementally added in a structured fashion, or in an unstructured fashion. Whatever the approach, at least in early stages of sampling it is usually desirable to sample the entire parameter space uniformly. At later stages of sampling, depending on the nature of the quantity being resolved, it may be desirable to continue sampling uniformly over the entire parameter space (Progressive response surfaces), or to switch to a focusing/economizing strategy of preferentially sampling certain regions of the parameter space based on information gained in early stages of sampling (Adaptive response surfaces). Here we consider Progressive response surfaces where a balanced indication of global response over the parameter space is desired.We use a variant of Moving Least Squares to fit and interpolate structured and unstructured point sets over the parameter space. On a 2-D test problem we compare response surface accuracy for three incremental sampling methods: Progressive Lattice Sampling; Simple-Random Monte Carlo; and Halton Quasi-Monte-Carlo sequences. We are ultimately after a system for constructing efficiently upgradable response surface approximations with reliable error estimates.

  11. The Progressive Era.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    The American College of Dentists was founded in 1920 for the purpose of encouraging young dentists to continue study and to apply science to their practices. This ideal emerged in the Progressive Era, which lasted roughly from 1895 to 1920. The animating spirit of this period was that the human condition could be improved and that the way to achieve this was through science and the use of experts working together. The Progressive Era saw inventions, such as automobiles and airplanes, telephone and radio, that required mass production and brought people together. It also spawned many political and legislative innovations that we now take for granted. Among these are the Food and Drug Administration, the Department of Commerce, and the Federal Trade Commission. Workers' compensation and other social protections were introduced, as were city commissions; the income tax; women's suffrage; and initiative, referendum, and recall. Medicine, for the first time, became an effective way to treat disease as it developed a scientific foundation.

  12. Progress In Holographic Cinematography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smigielski, P.; Fagot, H.; Albe, F.

    1986-06-01

    Two important progresses were achieved for the first time: 1) recording of single exposure cineholograms of living bodies on a 126-mm film, at a frequency of 25 holograms per second. Limitations of 3-D movies by holography are described. 2) recording of double-exposure cineholograms of reflecting objects, a loudspeaker membrane and the vertex cranii of a bald-headed man. These experiments show the interest of interferometric cineholography for industrial applications.

  13. Xenon Feed System Progress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    From - To) 13-06-2006 Technical Paper 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER F04611-00-C-0055 Xenon Feed System Progress (Preprint) 5b. GRANT...propulsion xenon feed system for a flight technology demonstration program. Major accomplishments include: 1) Utilization of the Moog...successfully fed xenon to a 200 watt Hall Effect Thruster in a Technology Demonstration Program. The feed system has demonstrated throttling of xenon

  14. COSMIC monthly progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of January 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are discussed. Marketing and customer service activities in this period are presented as is the progress report of NASTRAN maintenance and support. Tables of disseminations and budget summary conclude the report.

  15. ISABELLE: a progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the ISABELLE project, which has the objective of constructing a high-energy proton colliding beam facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major technical features of the intersecting storage accelerators with their projected performance are described. Application of over 1000 superconducting magnets in the two rings represents the salient characteristic of the machine. The status of the entire project, the technical progress made so far, and difficulties encountered are reviewed.

  16. [Progress in optical imaging].

    PubMed

    Bremer, C; Ntziachristos, V; Mahmood, U; Tung, C H; Weissleder, R

    2001-02-01

    Different optical imaging technologies have significantly progressed over the last years. Besides advances in imaging techniques and image reconstruction, new "smart" optical contrast agents have been developed which can be used to detect molecular targets (such as endogenous enzymes) in vivo. The combination of novel imaging technologies coupled with smart agents bears great diagnostic potential both clinically and experimentally. This overview outlines the basic principles of optical imaging and summarizes the current state of the art.

  17. Progress in Scientific Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N

    2004-11-15

    Visualization of observed data or simulation output is important to science and engineering. I have been particularly interested in visualizing 3-D structures, and report here my personal impressions on progress in the last 20 years in visualizing molecules, scalar fields, and vector fields and their associated flows. I have tried to keep the survey and list of references manageable, so apologize to those authors whose techniques I have not mentioned, or have described without a reference citation.

  18. Topiramate in migraine progression.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Luigi; Ferrandi, Delfina

    2009-12-01

    Increasing evidence shows that migraine, typically considered as an episodic disease, is a chronic and, in some patients, progressive disorder. Among neuromodulators used for migraine prevention, topiramate has a high level of evidence-based efficacy. Through its wide range of mechanisms of action topiramate increases the activation threshold resulting in neuronal stabilization and thereby reducing cortical neurons hyperexcitability, which is believed to be an important electrophysiological feature underlying the pathogenesis of epilepsy and migraine. Recent studies show that migraineurs have subclinical structural brain changes and persistent alteration of pain perception, in some cases correlated with the duration of the disease and the frequency of attacks that might play a role in the transformation of episodic migraine to chronic forms. An early and prolonged preventive treatment might reduce the risk of such transformation. Recent evidence suggests that topiramate, by reducing migraine frequency and use of acute medication, may prevent the negative progression of migraine. Furthermore, two recently completed multicenter, randomised, placebo-controlled trials have shown that treatment with topiramate 100 mg/day is effective and well tolerated in patients already progressed to chronic migraine and difficult to treat conditions associated with medication-overuse. Topiramate seems to be a preventive treatment, which might be able to act at different levels of the migraine cycle: reduction of frequency in episodic migraine, prevention, and treatment of chronic migraine.

  19. Rapidly Progressing Alzheimer's: Something Else?

    MedlinePlus

    ... speed of progression varies, depending on a person's genetic makeup, environmental factors, age at diagnosis and other medical conditions. Still, anyone diagnosed with Alzheimer's whose symptoms seem to be progressing quickly — or ...

  20. Progressive image denoising.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Claude; Zwicker, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Image denoising continues to be an active research topic. Although state-of-the-art denoising methods are numerically impressive and approch theoretical limits, they suffer from visible artifacts.While they produce acceptable results for natural images, human eyes are less forgiving when viewing synthetic images. At the same time, current methods are becoming more complex, making analysis, and implementation difficult. We propose image denoising as a simple physical process, which progressively reduces noise by deterministic annealing. The results of our implementation are numerically and visually excellent. We further demonstrate that our method is particularly suited for synthetic images. Finally, we offer a new perspective on image denoising using robust estimators.

  1. Post Kalman progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnabend, David

    1995-01-01

    In a paper here last year, an idea was put forward that much greater performance could be obtained from an observer, relative to a Kalman filter if more general performance indices were adopted, and the full power spectra of all the noises were employed. The considerable progress since then is reported here. Included are an extension of the theory to regulators, direct calculation of the theory's fundamental quantities - the noise effect integrals - for several theoretical spectra, and direct derivations of the Riccati equations of LQG (Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian) and Kalman theory yielding new insights.

  2. [Progress in eyeglass optics].

    PubMed

    Köppen, W

    1995-08-01

    In this article product developments for ophthalmic lenses are discussed: new materials, designs and coatings. High-index plastic substrates allow to offer corrections which are simultaneously light and thin and for the first time there are high performant plastic photochromic lenses. Head and eye movements with latest generation's progressives are very similar to natural vision behaviour. Special aspheric designs have been developed for comfortable vision for near and intermediate distances. Finally there are new coatings which protect the high quality surfaces of plastic lenses distinctly longer than before.

  3. MEIC Design Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Douglas, D; Hutton, A; Krafft, G A; Li, R; Lin, F; Morozov, V S; Nissen, E W; Pilat, F C; Satogata, T; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Yunn, C; Barber, D P; Filatov, Y; Hyde, C; Kondratenko, A M; Manikonda, S L; Ostroumov, P N; Sullivan, M K

    2012-07-01

    This paper will report the recent progress in the conceptual design of MEIC, a high luminosity medium energy polarized ring-ring electron-ion collider at Jefferson lab. The topics and achievements that will be covered are design of the ion large booster and the ERL-circulator-ring-based electron cooling facility, optimization of chromatic corrections and dynamic aperture studies, schemes and tracking simulations of lepton and ion polarization in the figure-8 collider ring, and the beam-beam and electron cooling simulations. A proposal of a test facility for the MEIC electron cooler will also be discussed.

  4. HSX progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    Brief statements on the progress of the design and construction of the HSX experiment are reported. Topics covered include the modular and auxiliary coil systems, the coil support structure, vacuum vessel, the ECH system, the magnet power supply and site. The proposed budget for Year 2 (August 1, 1994 through July 31, 1995) is presented. The effects of a flat funding profile (based on Year 2 budget level of $1137K) on out-years and the HSX project schedule are discussed. The stretching out of the program to accommodate the reduced funding profile should result in only a slight delay in HSX operations.

  5. Conceptions of Progress: How Is Progress Perceived? Mainstream versus Alternative Conceptions of Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itay, Anat

    2009-01-01

    Progress is a powerful political concept, encompassing different and sometimes contradictory conceptions. This paper examines the results of a survey on progress conducted at the OECD World Forum entitled "Measuring and Fostering the Progress of Societies" held in Istanbul in June 2007. First, a distinction is drawn between the two approaches to…

  6. Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review This article presents a practical and informative approach to the evaluation of a patient with a rapidly progressive dementia (RPD). Recent Findings Prion diseases are the prototypical causes of RPD, but reversible causes of RPD might mimic prion disease and should always be considered in a differential diagnosis. Aside from prion diseases, the most common causes of RPD are atypical presentations of other neurodegenerative disorders, curable disorders including autoimmune encephalopathies, as well as some infections, and neoplasms. Numerous recent case reports suggest dural arterial venous fistulas sometimes cause RPDs. Summary RPDs, in which patients typically develop dementia over weeks to months, require an alternative differential than the slowly progressive dementias that occur over a few years. Because of their rapid decline, patients with RPDs necessitate urgent evaluation and often require an extensive workup, typically with multiple tests being sent or performed concurrently. Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, perhaps the prototypical RPD, is often the first diagnosis many neurologists consider when treating a patient with rapid cognitive decline. Many conditions other than prion disease, however, including numerous reversible or curable conditions, can present as an RPD. This chapter discusses some of the major etiologies for RPDs and offers an algorithm for diagnosis. PMID:27042906

  7. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  8. Progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Golbe, Lawrence I

    2014-04-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy is a disorder of tau protein aggregation. Its clinical spectrum is now known to be wider than originally described, with a phenotype resembling Parkinson disease accounting for a third of cases. However, at least half of the patients with PSP exhibit the classic bradykinesia with disproportionate postural instability, erect posture with nuchal rigidity, frontal behavioral and cognitive changes, vertical gaze palsy, and other disabling brainstem deficits. Nonmendelian genetic risk factors exist, but PSP is almost entirely sporadic, with a prevalence of five to six persons per 100,000, mean onset age of 63, and median survival of 7 years. Clinical diagnostic criteria with excellent specificity and a clinical rating scale sensitive to progression are available. Diagnosis remains clinical, although magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid measures are showing promise as early-stage screening tools. Multiple candidate neuroprotective medications have proven ineffective to date. Treatment remains supportive, although coenzyme Q-10 has shown preliminary symptomatic efficacy and levodopa may provide transient, modest benefit.

  9. [Progressive facial hemiatrophy].

    PubMed

    Naumbaev, A N; Sharipov, A Sh; Iakhontov, B V

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe a case of progressive facial hemiatrophy in a woman aged 26 years, coming from the Isfarin region of Tadzhikistan. The patient views herself as being ill for 14 years, since the moment of an epileptic attack with tonic and clonic convulsions. Approximately at the same time she noted a small dry ulcer on the left on the vertex. The ulcer slowly increased, followed by skin atrophy. The disease progressed for 4 to 5 years. At present to the left there are folds in the form of scars on the face. The skin is thinned, united with the bones in the frontal and parietal areas, the subcutaneous fat is atrophic. The lips and nose at the left are subatrophic. Negligible enophthalmos, hemiatrophy of the tongue at the left. Alopecia. A certain deterioration of memory and reduction of the critical attitude are recorded. The patient is in a state of euphoria. Left-sided anosmia. The left auricular floor is subatrophic, hearing is almost lacking. Diffuse elevation of the tendinous reflexes of the limbs on the left side. X-ray signs of osteoporosis of the bones of the cranial vault on the left.

  10. 1992 PVUSA progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale photovoltaic (PV) electric generating systems. This report updates the progress of the PVUSA project, reviews the status and performance of the various PV installations during 1992, and summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions from work to date. Fall PV module costs and rising environmental pressures could make PV a significant source of large-scale power within the next decade. However, utility acceptance of this technology requires knowledge of PV operational characteristics in a utility system and confidence in predicting PV performance, reliability, and economics. PVUSA consists of two types of demonstrations: Emerging Module Technologies (EMTs), which are unproven but promising state-of-the-art PV technologies in 20-kW (nominal) arrays; and Utility Scale (US) systems, which represent more mature PV technologies in 200- to 500-kW (nominal) turnkey systems.

  11. Progressive Band Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Kevin; Chang, Chein-I

    2009-01-01

    Progressive band selection (PBS) reduces spectral redundancy without significant loss of information, thereby reducing hyperspectral image data volume and processing time. Used onboard a spacecraft, it can also reduce image downlink time. PBS prioritizes an image's spectral bands according to priority scores that measure their significance to a specific application. Then it uses one of three methods to select an appropriate number of the most useful bands. Key challenges for PBS include selecting an appropriate criterion to generate band priority scores, and determining how many bands should be retained in the reduced image. The image's Virtual Dimensionality (VD), once computed, is a reasonable estimate of the latter. We describe the major design details of PBS and test PBS in a land classification experiment.

  12. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, J.D.

    1985-01-10

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  13. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, John D.

    1986-01-01

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock, comprising passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feedstock to glucose; cooling said dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, then feeding said dilute acid stream serially through a plurality of prehydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose; and cooling the dilute acid stream containing glucose after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  14. Progress in Induction Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2000-09-27

    This presentation will be a broad survey of progress in induction technology over the past four years. Much work has been done on accelerators for hydrodynamic test radiography and other applications. Solid-state pulsers have been developed which can provide unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format and accelerating voltage for both ion and electron induction machines. Induction linacs can now be built which can operate with MHz repetition rates. Solid-state technology has also made possible the development of fast kickers for precision control of high current beams. New insulator technology has been developed which will improve conventional induction linacs in addition to enabling a new class of high gradient induction linacs.

  15. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine in cancer progress

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Hong-Wei; Jing, Qing-Chuan; Liu, Ping-Ping; Liu, Jing; Li, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) is a naturally occurring bioactive sphingolipid in blood plasma, metabolizing from the hydrolysis of the membrane sphingolipid. It has been shown to exert multifunctional role in cell physiological regulation either as an intracellular second messenger or as an extracellular agent through G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Because of elevated levels of SPC in malicious ascites of patients with cancer, the role of SPC in tumor progression has prompted wide interest. The factor was reported to affect the proliferation and/or migration of many cancer cells, including pancreatic cancer cells, epithelial ovarian carcinoma cells, rat C6 glioma cells, neuroblastoma cells, melanoma cells, and human leukemia cells. This review covers current knowledge of the role of SPC in tumor. PMID:26550104

  16. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anshu

    2014-03-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a group of rare disorders which are caused by defect in bile secretion and present with intrahepatic cholestasis, usually in infancy and childhood. These are autosomal recessive in inheritance. The estimated incidence is about 1 per 50,000 to 1 per 100,000 births, although exact prevalence is not known. These diseases affect both the genders equally and have been reported from all geographical areas. Based on clinical presentation, laboratory findings, liver histology and genetic defect, these are broadly divided into three types-PFIC type 1, PFIC type 2 and PFIC type 3. The defect is in ATP8B1 gene encoding the FIC1 protein, ABCB 11 gene encoding BSEP protein and ABCB4 gene encoding MDR3 protein in PFIC1, 2 and 3 respectively. The basic defect is impaired bile salt secretion in PFIC1/2 whereas in PFIC3, it is reduced biliary phospholipid secretion. The main clinical presentation is in the form of cholestatic jaundice and pruritus. Serum gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) is normal in patients with PFIC1/2 while it is raised in patients with PFIC3. Treatment includes nutritional support (adequate calories, supplementation of fat soluble vitamins and medium chain triglycerides) and use of medications to relieve pruritus as initial therapy followed by biliary diversion procedures in selected patients. Ultimately liver transplantation is needed in most patients as they develop progressive liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and end stage liver disease. Due to the high risk of developing liver tumors in PFIC2 patients, monitoring is recommended from infancy. Mutation targeted pharmacotherapy, gene therapy and hepatocyte transplantation are being explored as future therapeutic options.

  17. Using Learning Progressions to Monitor Progress across Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Karin K.

    2010-01-01

    Learning progressions (LPs)--descriptive continuums of how students develop and demonstrate more sophisticated understanding over time--have become an increasingly important tool in today's science classrooms. Here the author discusses some of the research behind learning progressions and presents The Science Inquiry Profile for PreK-4. This is a…

  18. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Emmanuel

    2012-09-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) refers to a heterogeneous group of autosomal-recessive disorders of childhood that disrupt bile formation and present with cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. The exact prevalence remains unknown, but the estimated incidence varies between 1/50,000 and 1/100,000 births. Three types of PFIC have been identified and associated with mutations in hepatocellular transport-system genes involved in bile formation. PFIC1 and PFIC2 usually appear in the first months of life, whereas onset of PFIC3 may arise later in infancy, in childhood or even during young adulthood. The main clinical manifestations include cholestasis, pruritus and jaundice. PFIC patients usually develop fibrosis and end-stage liver disease before adulthood. Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity is normal in PFIC1 and PFIC2 patients, but is elevated in PFIC3 patients. Both PFIC1 and PFIC2 are caused by impaired bile salt secretion due to defects in ATP8B1 encoding the FIC1 protein and in ABCB11 encoding bile salt export pump (BSEP) protein, respectively. Defects in ABCB4, encoding multidrug resistance 3 protein (MDR3), impair biliary phospholipid secretion, resulting in PFIC3. Diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations, liver ultrasonography, cholangiography and liver histology, as well as on specific tests to exclude other causes of childhood cholestasis. MDR3 and BSEP liver immunostaining, and analysis of biliary lipid composition should help to select PFIC candidates for whom genotyping could be proposed to confirm the diagnosis. Antenatal diagnosis may be proposed for affected families in which a mutation has been identified. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) therapy should be initiated in all patients to prevent liver damage. In some PFIC1 and PFIC2 patients, biliary diversion may also relieve pruritus and slow disease progression. However, most PFIC patients are ultimately candidates for liver transplantation. Monitoring of liver tumors

  19. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Davit-Spraul, Anne; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Baussan, Christiane; Jacquemin, Emmanuel

    2009-01-08

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) refers to heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders of childhood that disrupt bile formation and present with cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. The exact prevalence remains unknown, but the estimated incidence varies between 1/50,000 and 1/100,000 births. Three types of PFIC have been identified and related to mutations in hepatocellular transport system genes involved in bile formation. PFIC1 and PFIC2 usually appear in the first months of life, whereas onset of PFIC3 may also occur later in infancy, in childhood or even during young adulthood. Main clinical manifestations include cholestasis, pruritus and jaundice. PFIC patients usually develop fibrosis and end-stage liver disease before adulthood. Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity is normal in PFIC1 and PFIC2 patients, but is elevated in PFIC3 patients. Both PFIC1 and PFIC2 are caused by impaired bile salt secretion due respectively to defects in ATP8B1 encoding the FIC1 protein, and in ABCB11 encoding the bile salt export pump protein (BSEP). Defects in ABCB4, encoding the multi-drug resistant 3 protein (MDR3), impair biliary phospholipid secretion resulting in PFIC3. Diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations, liver ultrasonography, cholangiography and liver histology, as well as on specific tests for excluding other causes of childhood cholestasis. MDR3 and BSEP liver immunostaining, and analysis of biliary lipid composition should help to select PFIC candidates in whom genotyping could be proposed to confirm the diagnosis. Antenatal diagnosis can be proposed for affected families in which a mutation has been identified. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) therapy should be initiated in all patients to prevent liver damage. In some PFIC1 or PFIC2 patients, biliary diversion can also relieve pruritus and slow disease progression. However, most PFIC patients are ultimately candidates for liver transplantation. Monitoring of

  20. Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ayman I. Hawari

    2002-10-02

    This report describes the results generated during phase 1 of this project. During this phase, the main tools that are used to compute the thermal neutron scattering kernels for graphite, beryllium, beryllium oxide, zirconium hydride, light water, polyethylene were implemented and tested. This includes a modified NJOY/LEAPR code system, the GASKET code, and the ab initio condensed matter codes VASP and PHONON. Thermal neutron scattering kernels were generated for graphite, beryllium, beryllium oxide. In the case of graphite, new phonon spectra were examined. The first is a spectrum based on experiments performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the early seventies, and the second is generated using the ab initio methods. In the case of beryllium, and beryllium oxide, a synthetic approach for generating the phonon spectra was implemented. In addition, significant progress was made on an experiment to benchmark the graphite scattering kernels was made. The simulations of this experiment show that differences on the order of a few percent, in Pu-239 detector responses, can be expected due to the use of different scattering kernels. (B204) NOT A FINAL REPORT

  1. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report summarizes experimental and theoretical work in basic nuclear physics carried out between October 1, 1995, the closing of our last Progress Report, and September 30, 1996 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under contracts DE-FG03-93ER-40774 and DE-FG03-95ER-40913 with the United States Department of Energy. The experimental contract supports broadly-based experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics. This report includes results from studies of Elementary Systems involving the study of the structure of the nucleon via polarized high-energy positron scattering (the HERMES experiment) and lower energy pion scattering from both polarized and unpolarized nucleon targets. Results from pion- and kaon-induced reactions in a variety of nuclear systems are reported under the section heading Meson Reactions; the impact of these and other results on understanding the nucleus is presented in the Nuclear Structure section. In addition, new results from scattering of high-energy electrons (from CEBAF/TJNAF) and pions (from KEK) from a broad range of nuclei are reported in the section on Incoherent Reactions. Finally, the development and performance of detectors produced by the laboratory are described in the section titled Instrumentation.

  2. 1993 PVUSA progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale photovoltaic (PV) electric generation systems and recent developments in module technology. This report updates the progress of the PVUSA project, review the status and performance of all PV installations during 1993, and summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions for the year. The PVUSA project has five objectives designed to narrow the gap between a large utility industry that is unfamiliar with PV, and a small PV industry that is aware of a potentially large utility market but unfamiliar with how to meet its requirements. The objectives are: to evaluate the performance, reliability, and cost of promising PV modules and balance-of-system (BOS) components side-by-side at a single location; to assess PV system operation and maintenance (O and M) in a utility setting; to compare PV technologies in diverse geographic areas; to provide US utilities with hands-on experience in designing, procuring, and operating PV systems; and to document and disseminate knowledge gained from the project.

  3. Progressive myoclonic epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Michelucci, Roberto; Canafoglia, Laura; Striano, Pasquale; Gambardella, Antonio; Magaudda, Adriana; Tinuper, Paolo; La Neve, Angela; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Visani, Elisa; Panzica, Ferruccio; Avanzini, Giuliano; Tassinari, Carlo Alberto; Bianchi, Amedeo; Zara, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To define the clinical spectrum and etiology of progressive myoclonic epilepsies (PMEs) in Italy using a database developed by the Genetics Commission of the Italian League against Epilepsy. Methods: We collected clinical and laboratory data from patients referred to 25 Italian epilepsy centers regardless of whether a positive causative factor was identified. PMEs of undetermined origins were grouped using 2-step cluster analysis. Results: We collected clinical data from 204 patients, including 77 with a diagnosis of Unverricht-Lundborg disease and 37 with a diagnosis of Lafora body disease; 31 patients had PMEs due to rarer genetic causes, mainly neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. Two more patients had celiac disease. Despite extensive investigation, we found no definitive etiology for 57 patients. Cluster analysis indicated that these patients could be grouped into 2 clusters defined by age at disease onset, age at myoclonus onset, previous psychomotor delay, seizure characteristics, photosensitivity, associated signs other than those included in the cardinal definition of PME, and pathologic MRI findings. Conclusions: Information concerning the distribution of different genetic causes of PMEs may provide a framework for an updated diagnostic workup. Phenotypes of the patients with PME of undetermined cause varied widely. The presence of separate clusters suggests that novel forms of PME are yet to be clinically and genetically characterized. PMID:24384641

  4. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, E

    1999-06-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC), also known as Byler disease, is an inherited disorder of childhood in which cholestasis of hepatocellular origin often presents in the neonatal period and leads to death from liver failure before adolescence. The pattern of appearance of affected children within families is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. Several studies have provided support for the heterogeneity of this clinical entity suggesting the existence of different types due to different disorders affecting the hepatocyte and related to defects of bile acid secretion or bile acid metabolism. Recent molecular and genetic studies have identified genes responsible for three types of PFIC and have shown that PFIC was related to mutations in hepatocellular transport system genes involved in bile formation. These findings now provide specific diagnostic tools for the investigation of children with PFIC and should allow prenatal diagnosis in the future. Genotype-phenotype correlations performed in patients treated with ursodeoxycholic acid or biliary diversion should allow those PFIC patients who could benefit from these therapies to be precisely identified. In the future, other therapies, such as cell and gene therapies, might be considered and could also represent an alternative to liver transplantation.

  5. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Frulloni, Luca; Cerati, Elena; Ribeiro, Luciana Andrea; Corrente, Vincenzo; Sianesi, Mario; Franzè, Angelo; Di Mario, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive childhood cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. PFIC 1, also known as Byler disease, was first described in Amish kindred. It is characterized by cholestasis often arising in the neonatal period and it leads to death due to liver failure. PFIC 1, like Benign Recurrent Intrahepatic Cholestasis (BRIC) which is the benign form of the same disease, recognizes mutations in the ATP8B1 gene. PFIC 2 disease is clinically similar to PFIC 1 but it has a different gene mutation causing a defect in the Bile Salt Export Pump (BSEP), exclusively expressed in the liver and involved in the canalicular secretion of bile acids. PFIC 3 usually appears later in life and it has a higher risk of portal hypertension, gastrointestinal bleeding and liver failure. This particular form of disease (the only one with high serum values of g-glutamil transpeptidase), is associated to a genetic defect in the class III multidrug resistance protein (MDR). External biliary diversion and ursodeoxycholic acid therapy, should be considered as the initial therapy in these patients, even if liver transplantation still seems to be the only solution for most patients.

  6. W7-X Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparotto, M.; Erckmann, V.; Gardebrecht, W.; Rummel, Th.; Schauer, F.; Wanner, M.; Wegener, L.

    2005-04-15

    The WENDELSTEIN 7-X stellarator (W7-X) is the next step device in the stellarator line of IPP and is presently under construction at the Greifswald branch institute. The experiment aims at demonstrating the steady state capability of a stellarator machine at reactor relevant parameters. An important feature of W7-X is the high geometrical accuracy of the magnetic configuration which implies tight tolerances in the construction and assembly phases. The magnetic system consists of 50 non planar and 20 planar superconducting coils. Critical components are the coil support elements connecting the coil to the central mechanical structure and the inter-coil elements connecting the coils one to the other. Efficient thermal insulation of the superconducting coils is achieved by high vacuum and multi-layer insulation. The plasma vessel is composed of 10 half-modules welded together during the assembly phase. A 10 MW ECRH system with CW-capability operation at 140 GHz is required to meet the scientific objective of W7-X.The paper will report the recent progress on W7-X with particular emphasis on the components where high technology solutions have been applied.

  7. Quarterly Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    David Gray; Glen Tomlinson

    1998-11-12

    The Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) at Pittsburgh contracted with the MJTRE Corporation to perform Research Guidance Studies that will assist the Center and other relevant offices in the Department of Energy in evaluating and prioritizing research in the areas of coal and natural gas conversion. MITRE was reorganized in December 1995, which resulted in the formation of Mitretek Systems Inc. Mitretek has been performing this work on MITRE's behalf awaiting completion of contract novation to Mitretek. The contract was novated in February 1998 to Mitretek Systems. The overall objectives of this contract are to provide support to DOE in the following areas: (1) technical and economic analyses of current and future coal-based energy conversion technologies and other similar emerging technologies such as coal-waste coprocessing, natural gas conversion, and biomass conversion technologies for the production of fuels, chemicals and electric power,(2) monitor progress in these technologies with respect to technical, economic, and environmental impact (including climate change), (3) conduct specific and generic project economic and technical feasibility studies based on these technologies, (4) identify long-range R&D areas that have the greatest potential for process improvements, and (5) investigate optimum configurations and associated costs for production of high quality energy products via refining and their performance in end-use applications.

  8. IPY Progress and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, D.

    2008-12-01

    We can summarize the IPY goals as: (a) make major advances in polar knowledge and understanding; (b) leave a legacy of new or enhanced observational systems, facilities and infrastructure; (c) excite a new generation of polar scientists and engineers, and (d) elicit exceptional interest and participation from polar residents, schoolchildren, the general public, and decision-makers, worldwide. This talk reports on the progress and prospects in each of those areas from an overall international view; separate talks will describe details of future researcher and the IPY outreach efforts. To achieve major advances in knowledge, IPY has entrained the intellectual resources of thousands of scientists, many more than expected, often from 'non- polar' nations, and representing an unprecedented breadth of scientific specialties; integration of those efforts across disciplines to achieve integrated system-level understanding remains a substantial challenge. Many national and international organizations prepare plans to sustain new and improved observational systems, but clear outcomes and the necessary resources remain elusive. International outreach networks gradually build breadth and strength, largely through IPY Polar Science Days and other internationally- coordinated IPY events. A new Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) devotes talent and energy to shaping the future of polar research. These activities and networks may, with time and with continued international coordination, achieve an exceptional level of interest and participation. In all areas, much work remains.

  9. Nuclear chemistry progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, V.E.; Kwiatkowski, K.

    1993-08-01

    This is the annual progress report for the Indiana University nuclear chemistry program for the 1992/1993 year. Accomplishments include the construction, testing, and initial experimental runs of the Indiana Silicon Sphere (ISiS) 4{pi} charged particle detector. ISiS is designed to study energy dissipation and multifragmentation phenomena in light-ion-induced nuclear reactions at medium-to-high energies. Its second test run was to examine 3.6 GeV {sup 3}He beam reactions at Laboratoire National Saturne (LNS) in Saclay. The development and deployment of this system has occupied a great deal of the groups effort this reporting period. Additional work includes: calculations of isotopic IMF yields in the {sup 4}He + {sup 116,124}Sn reaction; cross sections for A = 6 - 30 fragments from the {sup 4}He + {sup 28}Si reaction at 117 and 198 MeV; charging effects of passivated silicon detectors; neck emission of intermediate-mass fragments in the fission of hot heavy nuclei.

  10. The Progress of Nations, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.

    This report summarizes the latest available statistics on international progress on children's well-being. Each of the report's sections contains a commentary, related statistics, and a discussion on progress and disparity in the section's particular area. Following a foreword by United Nations Secretary-General Kofi A. Annan, the sections of the…

  11. Progress in NASA Rotorcraft Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Johnson, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation reviews recent progress made under NASA s Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) propulsion research activities. Advances in engines, drive systems and optimized propulsion systems are discussed. Progress in wide operability compressors, modeling of variable geometry turbine performance, foil gas bearings and multi-speed transmissions are presented.

  12. The Progress of Nations, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.

    This report summarizes the latest available statistics on international progress on children's well-being. Each section of the report contains a commentary, related statistics, and a discussion on progress and disparity in the section's particular area. Following a foreword by United Nations Secretary-General Kofi A. Annan, the sections of the…

  13. Scientific progress: Knowledge versus understanding.

    PubMed

    Dellsén, Finnur

    2016-04-01

    What is scientific progress? On Alexander Bird's epistemic account of scientific progress, an episode in science is progressive precisely when there is more scientific knowledge at the end of the episode than at the beginning. Using Bird's epistemic account as a foil, this paper develops an alternative understanding-based account on which an episode in science is progressive precisely when scientists grasp how to correctly explain or predict more aspects of the world at the end of the episode than at the beginning. This account is shown to be superior to the epistemic account by examining cases in which knowledge and understanding come apart. In these cases, it is argued that scientific progress matches increases in scientific understanding rather than accumulations of knowledge. In addition, considerations having to do with minimalist idealizations, pragmatic virtues, and epistemic value all favor this understanding-based account over its epistemic counterpart.

  14. Benchtop Energetics Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo, Mario

    2011-06-01

    We have constructed an apparatus for investigating the reactive chemical dynamics of mg-scale energetic materials samples. We seek to advance the understanding of the reaction kinetics of energetic materials, and of the chemical influences on energetic materials sensitivity. We employ direct laser irradiation, and indirect laser-driven shock, techniques to initiate thin-film explosive samples contained in a high-vacuum chamber. Expansion of the reacting flow into vacuum quenches the chemistry and preserves reaction intermediates for interrogation via time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). By rastering the sample coupon through the fixed laser beam focus, we generate hundreds of repetitive energetic events in a few minutes. A detonation wave passing through an organic explosive, such as pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN, C5H4N4O12) , is remarkably efficient in converting the solid explosive into final thermodynamically-stable gaseous products (e . g . N2, CO2, H2O...). Termination of a detonation at an explosive-to-vacuum interface produces an expanding pulse of hyperthermal molecular species, with leading-edge velocities ~10 km/s. In contrast, deflagration (subsonic combustion) of PETN in vacuum produces mostly reaction intermediates, such as NO and NO2, with much slower molecular velocities; consistent with expansion-quenched thermal decomposition of PETN. We propose to exploit these differences in product chemical identities and molecular species velocities to provide a chemically-based diagnostic for distinguishing between detonation and deflagration events. In this talk we also report recent progress towards the quantitative detection of hyperthermal neutral species produced by direct laser ablation of aluminum metal and of organic energetic materials, as a step towards demonstrating the ability to discriminate slow reaction intermediates from fast thermodynamically-stable final products. Work done in collaboration with Emily Fossum, Christopher Molek, and

  15. The Thermochronologist's Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    We owe our current understanding of thermochronology less to a series of revolutionary insights than to a somewhat uneven intellectual pilgrimage that over fifty years has progressed in fits and starts. Though hampered at times by overenthusiasm, oversimplification, and misunderstandings, on balance the field advanced thanks to a blend of curiosity-driven research, tool-building motivated by new ideas about Earth science, and improvements in technology. But now that we've exploited most radiogenic systems and the major minerals that host them, and now that our models can devour CPU time along with the best of them, are we done? Have we reached peak thermochron? The answer of course is no, and papers in this session will demonstrate what new technologies and techniques might have to offer in the coming years. However, I will argue that the discipline as a whole has matured to a point where if thermochronology is to remain a mainstream tool as opposed to a weekend sport, we need to get serious about several challenges. The most fundamental challenge is that current geodynamic models (and even more complex models we can envision coding) have outpaced our meagre stockpile of kinetic calibrations, our understanding of detailed isotope systematics, and our ability to generate data with sufficient throughput. These issues will not be addressed adequately through the business-as-usual approach that brought us to our current knowledge, and some community effort will probably be needed to coordinate the hard work that will be required. But any serious attempt to answer important questions with accurate thermal histories that have low and well-defined uncertainties will require that we actually know the kinetics for the specific samples we are analyzing, that we fully understand scatter in the data, that we work with the large sample numbers that are required for some problems like landscape evolution, and that inversion tools fully explore the important aspects of both the

  16. PATHWAYS OF MEDICAL PROGRESS.

    PubMed

    Wiggers, C J

    1940-01-12

    During the three decades that have passed, medical science has ascended to a high plateau of achievement. The climb has involved several pathways; among them: (1) the physiological approach toward disease as experiments which nature performs on organisms, (2) the more intelligent interpretation of the functional reactions of the body in disease in accordance with latest discoveries in physiology, (3) the supplementation of observable phenomena through use of laboratory instruments, (4) the assumption of active investigation both on patients and experimental animals by clinicians themselves, (5) the shuttling of problems between clinical and experimental laboratories and (6) correlated research in clinical and physiological departments. As we look down from the heights we have reached, we have reason to be pleased with our progress; but when we look ahead we become aware that there are still high mountain ranges to be climbed. We realize that their ascent can not be accomplished by employing merely the methods, equipment and strategy that have proved successful so far; we must improve the application of principles that are old and well established, and evolve others that are new. Above all, we from laboratories and clinics must join hands to help each other climb; and through correlated team-work overcome the great obstacles that jealous nature places in our way. I have ventured to suggest a few directions which such mutual help may take. They include (1) means by which new fundamental discoveries can be utilized more quickly by clinicians and practitioners of medicine; (2) plans by which younger clinical investigators can be given approximately the same opportunity for training in research technique as their colleagues entering experimental sciences; (3) pleas that the shuttling of problems between hospitals and laboratories of fundamental science may continue in order that the ultimate significance of clinical results may be better understood and that the

  17. Targeting ECM Disrupts Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Venning, Freja A; Wullkopf, Lena; Erler, Janine T

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic complications are responsible for more than 90% of cancer-related deaths. The progression from an isolated tumor to disseminated metastatic disease is a multistep process, with each step involving intricate cross talk between the cancer cells and their non-cellular surroundings, the extracellular matrix (ECM). Many ECM proteins are significantly deregulated during the progression of cancer, causing both biochemical and biomechanical changes that together promote the metastatic cascade. In this review, the influence of several ECM proteins on these multiple steps of cancer spread is summarized. In addition, we highlight the promising (pre-)clinical data showing benefits of targeting these ECM macromolecules to prevent cancer progression.

  18. Targeting ECM Disrupts Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Venning, Freja A.; Wullkopf, Lena; Erler, Janine T.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic complications are responsible for more than 90% of cancer-related deaths. The progression from an isolated tumor to disseminated metastatic disease is a multistep process, with each step involving intricate cross talk between the cancer cells and their non-cellular surroundings, the extracellular matrix (ECM). Many ECM proteins are significantly deregulated during the progression of cancer, causing both biochemical and biomechanical changes that together promote the metastatic cascade. In this review, the influence of several ECM proteins on these multiple steps of cancer spread is summarized. In addition, we highlight the promising (pre-)clinical data showing benefits of targeting these ECM macromolecules to prevent cancer progression. PMID:26539408

  19. Federal Facility Agreement progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The (SRS) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) was made effective by the US. Environmental Protection Agency Region IV (EPA) on August 16, 1993. To meet the reporting requirements in Section XXV of the Agreement, the FFA Progress Report was developed. The FFA Progress Report is the first of a series of quarterly progress reports to be prepared by the SRS. As such this report describes the information and action taken to September 30, 1993 on the SRS units identified for investigation and remediation in the Agreement. This includes; rubble pits, runoff basins, retention basin, seepage basin, burning pits, H-Area Tank 16, and spill areas.

  20. [Domestic violence: any progress?].

    PubMed

    Henrion, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of the French national survey of violence against women in 2000, the fight against domestic violence has made steady progress. Knowledge of the phenomenon has significantly improved. A nationwide study of murders and manslaughters perpetrated by one partner of a couple against the other has been published annually since 2006. In 2012, domestic violence resulted in the deaths of 314 persons: 166 women, 31 men, 25 children, 9 collateral victims, 14 rivals, and two former spouses killed by their ex-fathers in law. In addition, 67 perpetrators committed suicide (51 men and3 women). The number of victims fluctuates from year to year but has remained fairly stable since 2006 (n=168). Legislation has improved significantly: eight new laws have been passed since 2004, all designed to protect women and to ensure that violent men are restrained and treated. New measures to inform and protect women have been implemented and others have been improved, such as the anonymous helpline (phone no 3919, "domestic violence information"). An inter-ministerial committee on the protection of women from violence and the prevention of human trafficking (MIPROF) was created on 3 January 2013. A website entitled "Stop violence against women " (Stop violences faites aux femmes) is now available. The "Imminent Danger" mobile phone system, designed to alert police if a suspected or known perpetrator breaches restraint conditions, will be extended to the entire country from January 2014. Referees charged with coordinating comprehensive long-tern care of women victims have been deployed at the county level. Information centers on the rights of women and families (CIDFF) now form a local nationwide network. Routine interviews with a midwife during the fourth month of pregnancy, focusing on the woman's emotional, economic and social conditions, have been implemented in 21 % of maternity units and should gradually be generalized. The authorities who have enforced the law have

  1. Public Attitudes to Technological Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Eliot

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the probable changes in public attitudes toward science and technology as a result of the engineering accidents of 1979. Results of national polls conducted to identify public confidence in technological progress are included. (HM)

  2. Progress of the Productive Ward.

    PubMed

    Robert, Glenn

    The progress of the Productive Ward programme has been variable. This article outlines a study that investigated the experience of implementing the programme in different hospitals and the lessons that can be learnt.

  3. Arsenic | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  4. Home | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  5. Radon | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  6. Prevention | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  7. Introduction | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  8. Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  9. Diagnosis | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  10. Sunburn | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  11. Weight | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  12. Mortality | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  13. Survival | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  14. Incidence | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  15. Benzene | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  16. Acknowledgements | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  17. Nitrate | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  18. Cadmium | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  19. Annual Progress report - General Task

    SciTech Connect

    Wesnousky, S.G.

    1993-09-30

    This report provides a summary of progress for the project {open_quotes}Evaluation of the Geologic Relations and Seismotectonic Stability of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI).{close_quotes} A similar report was previously provided for the period of 1 October 1991 to 30 September 1992. The report initially covers the activities of the General Task and is followed by sections that describe the progress of the other ongoing tasks.

  20. Monomelic amyotrophy with late progression.

    PubMed

    Rowin, J; Meriggioli, M N; Cochran, E J

    2001-04-01

    Monomelic amyotrophy is a sporadic juvenile-onset disease that presents with gradual onset of weakness and atrophy in the hand muscles unilaterally. Generally, this disease is considered a 'benign' and non-progressive motor neuron disease, which stabilizes within five years of onset. We discuss a case that illustrates that monomelic amyotrophy may rarely exhibit late clinical progression to the lower extremities after a prolonged period of disease stability.

  1. Scientific progress as increasing verisimilitude.

    PubMed

    Niiniluoto, Ilkka

    2014-06-01

    According to the foundationalist picture, shared by many rationalists and positivist empiricists, science makes cognitive progress by accumulating justified truths. Fallibilists, who point out that complete certainty cannot be achieved in empirical science, can still argue that even successions of false theories may progress toward the truth. This proposal was supported by Karl Popper with his notion of truthlikeness or verisimilitude. Popper's own technical definition failed, but the idea that scientific progress means increasing truthlikeness can be expressed by defining degrees of truthlikeness in terms of similarities between states of affairs. This paper defends the verisimilitude approach against Alexander Bird who argues that the "semantic" definition (in terms of truth or truthlikeness alone) is not sufficient to define progress, but the "epistemic" definition referring to justification and knowledge is more adequate. Here Bird ignores the crucial distinction between real progress and estimated progress, explicated by the difference between absolute (and usually unknown) degrees of truthlikeness and their evidence-relative expected values. Further, it is argued that Bird's idea of returning to the cumulative model of growth requires an implausible trick of transforming past false theories into true ones.

  2. Defining secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lorscheider, Johannes; Buzzard, Katherine; Jokubaitis, Vilija; Spelman, Tim; Havrdova, Eva; Horakova, Dana; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Girard, Marc; Duquette, Pierre; Prat, Alexandre; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grand'Maison, François; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Alroughani, Raed; Sola, Patrizia; Boz, Cavit; Pucci, Eugenio; Lechner-Scott, Jeanette; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Iuliano, Gerardo; Van Pesch, Vincent; Granella, Franco; Ramo-Tello, Cristina; Spitaleri, Daniele; Petersen, Thor; Slee, Mark; Verheul, Freek; Ampapa, Radek; Amato, Maria Pia; McCombe, Pamela; Vucic, Steve; Sánchez Menoyo, José Luis; Cristiano, Edgardo; Barnett, Michael H; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Olascoaga, Javier; Saladino, Maria Laura; Gray, Orla; Shaw, Cameron; Moore, Fraser; Butzkueven, Helmut; Kalincik, Tomas

    2016-09-01

    A number of studies have been conducted with the onset of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis as an inclusion criterion or an outcome of interest. However, a standardized objective definition of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis has been lacking. The aim of this work was to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of an objective definition for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, to enable comparability of future research studies. Using MSBase, a large, prospectively acquired, global cohort study, we analysed the accuracy of 576 data-derived onset definitions for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and first compared these to a consensus opinion of three neurologists. All definitions were then evaluated against 5-year disease outcomes post-assignment of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: sustained disability, subsequent sustained progression, positive disability trajectory, and accumulation of severe disability. The five best performing definitions were further investigated for their timeliness and overall disability burden. A total of 17 356 patients were analysed. The best definition included a 3-strata progression magnitude in the absence of a relapse, confirmed after 3 months within the leading Functional System and required an Expanded Disability Status Scale step ≥4 and pyramidal score ≥2. It reached an accuracy of 87% compared to the consensus diagnosis. Seventy-eight per cent of the identified patients showed a positive disability trajectory and 70% reached significant disability after 5 years. The time until half of all patients were diagnosed was 32.6 years (95% confidence interval 32-33.6) after disease onset compared with the physicians' diagnosis at 36 (35-39) years. The identified patients experienced a greater disease burden [median annualized area under the disability-time curve 4.7 (quartiles 3.6, 6.0)] versus non-progressive patients [1.8 (1.2, 1.9)]. This objective definition of secondary progressive multiple

  3. Clinical management of progressive myopia

    PubMed Central

    Aller, T A

    2014-01-01

    Myopia has been increasing in prevalence throughout the world, reaching over 90% in some East Asian populations. There is increasing evidence that whereas genetics clearly have an important role, the type of visual environment to which one is exposed to likely influences the onset, progression, and cessation of myopia. Consequently, attempts to either modify the environment or to reduce the exposure of the eye to various environmental stimuli to eye growth through the use of various optical devices are well under way at research centers around the globe. The most promising of current treatments include low-percentage atropine, bifocal soft contact lenses, orthokeratology, and multifocal spectacles. These methods are discussed briefly and are then categorized in terms of their expected degree of myopia progression control. A clinical strategy is presented for selecting the most effective treatment for the appropriate type of patient at the optimal stage of refractive development to achieve the maximum control of myopia progression. PMID:24357844

  4. Optics of progressive addition lenses.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, J E; Buri, M; Bailey, I L; Azus, J; Borish, I M

    1987-02-01

    The optical characteristics of the major progressive addition lenses were measured using an automated lensometer with a specially designed lens holder to simulate eye rotation. Measurements were made every 3 degrees (about 1.5 mm) and graphs of isospherical equivalent lines and isocylinder lines were developed. Generally the near zone of these lenses is narrower and lower than in bifocal or trifocal lenses. Distinct differences exist between the various progressive lenses. The width of the near zone, rate of power progression, amount of unwanted cylinder (level with the distance center), and clarity of the distance zone are compared for the various lenses. The optical measurements demonstrate an apparent trade-off between the size of the cylinder-free area of the lens and the amount of the cylinder.

  5. Superfund progress. Aficionado's version. Progress as of September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The issue of Superfund Progress Aficionado's Version provides facts and figures as of September 30, 1992, for NPL site distribution, emergency removals, preliminary assessments/site inspections/the NPL, remedial investigations/feasibility studies/RODs, remedial action, and enforcement.

  6. Thematic Progression in a Cardiologist's Text: Context, Frames and Progression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Robert T.

    Thematic progression (TP) is examined in the text of a communication between a cardiologist and a general practitioner concerning a patient, offering a clinical diagnosis of the patient's condition. Analysis of the discourse looks at the field, tenor, and mode of the communication as a context for TP. The methods of analysis are first described,…

  7. Measuring Progressions: Assessment Structures Underlying a Learning Progression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This article describes some of the underlying conceptualizations that have gone into the work of the BEAR Center in the development of learning progressions. The core of all of these developments has been the construct map, which is the first building block in the BEAR Assessment System (BAS). After introducing the concept of a learning…

  8. [Can we accept medical progress without progress in ethics?].

    PubMed

    Benaroyo, Lazare

    2013-01-01

    Since the mid 20th century progress in biomedical science has been punctuated by the emergence of bioethics which has fashioned the moral framework of its application to both research and clinical practice. Can we, however, consider the advent of bioethics as a form of progress marking the advances made in biomedical science with an adequate ethical stamp? The argument put forward in this chapter is based on the observation that, far from being a mark of progess, the development of bioethics runs the risk of favouring, like modern science, a dissolution of the links that unite ethics and medicine, and so of depriving the latter of the humanist dimensions that underlie the responsibilities that fall to it. Faced with this possible pitfall, this contribution proposes to envisage as a figure of moral progress, consubstantial with the development of biomedical science, an ethical approach conceived as a means of social intervention which takes the first steps towards an ethics of responsibility integrating the bioethical perspective within a hermeneutic and deliberative approach. By the yardstick of a prudential approach, it would pay particular attention to the diverse sources of normativity in medical acts. It is suggested that this ethical approach is a source of progress insofar as it constitutes an indispensable attitude of watchfulness, which biomedical science can lean on as it advances, with a view to ensuring that the fundamental link uniting ethics and medicine is maintained.

  9. Progress Report NORSAR Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-11

    1 A I)-A 010 5 86 PROGRriSS REPORT NORSAR PHASE 3 K . /\\ . B c r t c u s s e n Royal Norwegian Council for Scientific and...NORSAR ROYAl NORWEGIAN COUNCIL FOR SCIENTIFIC AND INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH <o<: 00 10’ o H O < F 8606-74-C-0049 PROGRESS REPORT - NORSAR PHASE 3 1...Report NORSAR Phase 3 1st Quarter 1975 5 TYPE OE REPORT « PERIOD COVERED Progress Report 1st Quarter 1975 6 PERFORMING ORG

  10. Shuttle Risk Progression by Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamlin, Teri; Kahn, Joe; Thigpen, Eric; Zhu, Tony; Lo, Yohon

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the early mission risk and progression of risk as a vehicle gains insights through flight is important: . a) To the Shuttle Program to understand the impact of re-designs and operational changes on risk. . b) To new programs to understand reliability growth and first flight risk. . Estimation of Shuttle Risk Progression by flight: . a) Uses Shuttle Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SPRA) and current knowledge to calculate early vehicle risk. . b) Shows impact of major Shuttle upgrades. . c) Can be used to understand first flight risk for new programs.

  11. Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-12-01

    In support of the Obama Administration's Climate Action Plan, the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and U.S. Department of Agriculture jointly released the Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Progress Report, updating the federal government's progress to reduce methane emissions through biogas systems since the Biogas Opportunities Roadmap was completed by the three agencies in July 2014. The report highlights actions taken, outlines challenges and opportunities, and identifies next steps to the growth of a robust biogas industry.

  12. Recent progress on intrinsic charm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, T. J.

    2017-03-01

    Over the past ˜10 years, the topic of the nucleon's nonperturbative or intrinsic charm (IC) content has enjoyed something of a renaissance, largely motivated by theoretical developments involving quark modelers and PDF-fitters. In this talk I will briefly describe the importance of intrinsic charm to various issues in high-energy phenomenology, and survey recent progress in constraining its overall normalization and contribution to the momentum sum rule of the nucleon. I end with the conclusion that progress on the side of calculation has now placed the onus on experiment to unambiguously resolve the proton's intrinsic charm component.

  13. Assessment of Child Progress. Monograph Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaher, Joan, Ed.

    Four author-contributed papers examine issues in assessing child progress in early childhood special education. D. Bricker and S. Gumerlock present "A Three-Level Strategy" which features analysis of daily or weekly progress, analysis of progress toward long- and short-term objectives, and analysis of progress toward program goals. C. Dunst…

  14. Trends in presentation, management and survival of patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer in a Southeast Asian setting.

    PubMed

    Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala; Verkooijen, Helena Marieke; Tan, Ern-Yu; Miao, Hui; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Brand, Judith S; Dent, Rebecca A; See, Mee-Hoong; Subramaniam, ShriDevi; Chan, Patrick; Lee, Soo-Chin; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng-Har

    2015-11-05

    Up to 25% of breast cancer patients in Asia present with de novo metastatic disease. We examined the survival trends of Asian patients with metastatic breast cancer over fifteen years. The impact of changes in patient's demography, tumor characteristics, tumor burden, and treatment on survival trend were examined. Patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer from three hospitals in Malaysia and Singapore (N = 856) were grouped by year of diagnosis: 1996-2000, 2001-2005 and 2006-2010. Step-wise multivariable Poisson regression was used to estimate the contribution of above-mentioned factors on the survival trend. Proportions of patients presenting with metastatic breast cancer were 10% in 1996-2000, 7% in 2001-2005, and 9% in 2006-2010. Patients in 2006-2010 were significantly older, appeared to have higher disease burden, and received more chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, and surgery of primary tumor. The three-year relative survival in the above periods were 20·6% (95% CI: 13·9%-28·2%), 28·8% (95% CI: 23·4%-34·2%), and 33·6% (95% CI: 28·8%-38·5%), respectively. Adjustment for treatment considerably attenuated the relative excess risk of mortality in recent years, compared to other factors. Substantial improvements in survival were observed in patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer in this study.

  15. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    ScienceCinema

    Cody, Tom

    2016-07-12

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  16. Progressive Paraparesis after CABG Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shadvar, Kamran; Eslampoor, Yashar

    2013-01-01

    CABG is one of the most common cardiac surgeries all over the world. Similar to other surgeries, it may be associated with some undesirable complications including neurologic complications which might cause morbidity and mortality after surgery. We will describe a case of Progressive Paraparesis after CABG Surgery and review its etiology, diagnosis and management. PMID:24251008

  17. HARVARD PROJECT PHYSICS PROGRESS REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA.

    THIS REPORT OF HARVARD PROJECT PHYSICS PRESENTS DRAFTS OF THREE SPEECHES DELIVERED TO THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF PHYSICS TEACHERS (AAPT) MEETING, FEBRUARY, 1967. THE ADDRESS BY GERALD HOLTON DEALS WITH THE AIMS AND PROGRESS OF THE PROJECT. DISCUSSED ARE (1) PROJECT PARTICIPANTS, (2) AIMS AND CONTENT, (3) THE NEW EMPHASIS, (4) SURVEY OF COURSE…

  18. Grassroots Excellence: Problems and Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Kenneth H.

    The educational "excellence" movement is hindered by inconsistencies between goals and action and by difficulties in translating national and state goals into local policy; nonetheless, progress has occurred. Examples of "voodoo excellence," in which proposed policies will likely work against their stated objectives, are…

  19. Minority Student Progress Report, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Porfirio R.; Luan, Jing

    This report offers a consolidated systemwide analysis of key issues and recommendations for improvement of minority recruitment and retention at Arizona State Universities and an evaluation of progress toward achieving Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR) approved recruitment and graduation goals. A description of ABOR system goals notes three goals:…

  20. Myopia: attempts to arrest progression

    PubMed Central

    Saw, S M; Gazzard, G; Au Eong, K-G; Tan, D T H

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the efficacy of several interventions to decrease the progression of myopia. These include devices that alter the perception of the visual environment and pharmacological treatments. There is no conclusive evidence thus far that alteration of the pattern of spectacle wear, bifocals, ocular hypotensives, or contact lenses retards the progression of myopia. Several randomised clinical trials have demonstrated that the rate of progression of myopia is lower in children given atropine eye drops than those given placebo. However, atropine is associated with short term side effects such as photophobia and possible long term adverse events including light induced retinal damage and cataract formation. Other more selective antimuscarinic agents such as pirenzipine are presently being evaluated. Further well conducted randomised clinical trials with large sample sizes and adequate follow up designed to evaluate treatments to retard the progression of myopia should be conducted, since the identification of an effective intervention may have a greater public health impact on the burden and morbidity from myopia than the few treatments currently available. PMID:12386095

  1. Katrina's progress with learning mathematics.

    PubMed

    McConnochie, Jan; Sneath, Greg

    2007-07-01

    Katrina is 10 years old and has Down syndrome. She is making good progress with learning and numbers and mathematics. We describe how Katrina has learned number concepts and arithmetic skills over several years. We highlight the influence of early learning habits, visual supports, motivation and practice, and the uses made of different number teaching schemes.

  2. Solar Energy: Progress and Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Environmental Quality, Washington, DC.

    This report discusses many of the economic and policy questions related to the widespread introduction of solar power, presents recent progress in developing solar technologies and advancing their economic feasibility, and reviews some recommendations that have been made for achieving the early introduction and sustained application of solar…

  3. Continuous Progress and Nongraded Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, June

    1983-01-01

    Four schools offering a continuous progress or nongraded approach to pacing for gifted students are reviewed: the Plano (TX) Independent School District, The University of Pittsburgh Laboratory School, the Chesapeake (VA) Demonstration School, and the University of California at Los Angeles Elementary School. (CL)

  4. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  5. Assessing Pupils' Progress in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slade, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Good assessment practice is a fundamental part of good teaching and learning. It puts learners at the heart of the process, helping them to recognise achievement and make progress, and enables teachers to shape and adapt their teaching to individual needs and aspirations. Over the past year, the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) has…

  6. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sanpietro, M.; Kemmer, J.; Dietl, H.; Holl, P.; Klanner, R.; Lutz, G.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements.

  7. Continuous Progress Program Inservice Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago Board of Education, IL.

    The Continuous Progress Program of the Board of Education for the City of Chicago focuses on the improvement of education for the individual child and the upgrading of educational practices and techniques. The philosophy of the program is based on the individualized rate of teaching and learning of the pupil. Its planning and organization is…

  8. Progressive transmission and compression images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiely, A. B.

    1996-01-01

    We describe an image data compression strategy featuring progressive transmission. The method exploits subband coding and arithmetic coding for compression. We analyze the Laplacian probability density, which closely approximates the statistics of individual subbands, to determine a strategy for ordering the compressed subband data in a way that improves rate-distortion performance. Results are presented for a test image.

  9. Significant Ideas and Progressive Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gwen; Mitchell, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Ideas are not one-time "Eureka" moments, but are parts of concepts progressing forward. Sometimes years pass before ideas are implemented. They then resurface, connect with other ideas, and move policies ahead. Meanwhile, the idea remains alive in the field, influencing decisions and goals. Ideas build on one another when implemented. The field of…

  10. Measuring research progress in photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, B.; Mcguire, P.

    1986-01-01

    The role and some results of the project analysis and integration function in the Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project are presented. Activities included supporting the decision-making process, preparation of plans for project direction, setting goals for project activities, measuring progress within the project, and the development and maintenance of analytical models.

  11. Canadian ERTS program progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morley, L. W.; Mcquillan, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    Progress of the Canadian ERTS program is provided along with statistics on the production and role of ERTS images both from the CCRS in Ottawa and from the Prince Albert Saskatchewan satellite station. The types of products, difficulties of production and some of the main applications in Canada are discussed.

  12. The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project : Progress Report, 1999-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Contor, Craig R.; Sexton, Amy D.

    2003-06-02

    The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME) was funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P. L. 96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME). Chapter One provides an overview of the entire report and how the objectives of each statement of work from 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 contract years are organized and reported. Chapter One also provides background information relevant to the aquatic resources of the Walla Walla River Basin. Objectives are outlined below for the statements of work for the 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 contract years. The same objectives were sometimes given different numbers in different years. Because this document is a synthesis of four years of reporting, we gave objectives letter designations and listed the objective number associated with the statement of work for each year. Some objectives were in all four work statements, while other objectives were in only one or two work statements. Each objective is discussed in a chapter. The chapter that reports activities and findings of each objective are listed with the objective below. Because data is often interrelated, aspects of some findings may be reported or discussed in more than one chapter. Specifics related to tasks, approaches, methods, results and discussion are addressed in the individual chapters.

  13. Progress?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scientists who were once protected by the hammer and sickle are now being bludgeoned with them, according to a report published in November by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Thousands of scientists, professors, and science teachers who had been affiliated with the communist regimes of Central and Eastern European nations are being purged from academic institutions under the premise of righting a perceived historical wrong.More than 3,000 scientists in Bulgaria, as well as 884 university professors and 10,000 teachers in the German state of Saxony, have lost their jobs in the past 5 years. Nearly 6% of all Czech faculty members also have been fired. The purges—which are more reminiscent of the communist past than of a democratic future—are the result of government-sanctioned programs to weed out public employees who may have received their positions due to their Communist affiliation.

  14. Geothermal Progress Monitor report No. 5. Progress report, June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Updated information is presented on activities and progress in the areas of electric power plants, direct heat applications, deep well drilling, leasing of federal lands, legislative and regulatory actions, research and development, and others. Special attention is given in this report to 1980 highlights, particularly in the areas of electric and direct heat uses, drilling, and the Federal lands leasing program. This report also includes a summary of the DOE FY 1982 geothermal budget request to Congress.

  15. Geothermal Progress Monitor report No. 8. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-11-01

    Geothermal Progress Monitor (GPM) Report Number 8 presents information concerning ongoing technology transfer activities and the mechanisms used to support these activities within geothermal R and D programs. A state-by-state review of major geothermal development activities for the reporting period 1 February 1983 through 31 July 1983 is provided. Recent drilling and exploration efforts and the current status of geothermal electric power plant development in the United States are summarized.

  16. Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation. 25. Summary of Results and Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water Geochemistry, Red River Valley, Taos County, New Mexico, 2001-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2008-01-01

    Active and inactive mine sites are challenging to remediate because of their complexity and scale. Regulations meant to achieve environmental restoration at mine sites are equally challenging to apply for the same reasons. The goal of environmental restoration should be to restore contaminated mine sites, as closely as possible, to pre-mining conditions. Metalliferous mine sites in the Western United States are commonly located in hydrothermally altered and mineralized terrain in which pre-mining concentrations of metals were already anomalously high. Typically, those pre-mining concentrations were not measured, but sometimes they can be reconstructed using scientific inference. Molycorp?s Questa molybdenum mine in the Red River Valley, northern New Mexico, is located near the margin of the Questa caldera in a highly mineralized region. The State of New Mexico requires that ground-water quality standards be met on closure unless it can be shown that potential contaminant concentrations were higher than the standards before mining. No ground water at the mine site had been chemically analyzed before mining. The aim of this investigation, in cooperation with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED), is to infer the pre-mining ground-water quality by an examination of the geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical controls on ground-water quality in a nearby, or proximal, analog site in the Straight Creek drainage basin. Twenty-seven reports contain details of investigations on the geological, hydrological, and geochemical characteristics of the Red River Valley that are summarized in this report. These studies include mapping of surface mineralogy by Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometry (AVIRIS); compilations of historical surface- and ground- water quality data; synoptic/tracer studies with mass loading and temporal water-quality trends of the Red River; reaction-transport modeling of the Red River; environmental geology of the Red River Valley; lake-sediment chemistry; geomorphology and its effect on ground-water flow; geophysical studies on depth to ground-water table and depth to bedrock; bedrock fractures and their potential influence on ground-water flow; leaching studies of scars and waste-rock piles; mineralogy and mineral chemistry and their effect on ground-water quality; debris-flow hazards; hydrology and water balance for the Red River Valley; ground-water geochemistry of selected wells undisturbed by mining in the Red River Valley; and quality assurance and quality control of water analyses. Studies aimed specifically at the Straight Creek natural-analog site include electrical surveys; high-resolution seismic survey; age-dating with tritium/helium; water budget; ground-water hydrology and geochemistry; and comparison of mineralogy and lithology to that of the mine site. The highly mineralized and hydrothermally altered volcanic rocks of the Red River Valley contain several percent pyrite in the quartz-sericite-pyrite (QSP) alteration zone, which weather naturally to acid-sulfate surface and ground waters that discharge to the Red River. Weathering of waste-rock piles containing pyrite also contributes acid water that eventually discharges into the Red River. These acid discharges are neutralized by circumneutral-pH, carbonate-buffered surface and ground waters of the Red River. The buffering capacity of the Red River, however, decreases from the town of Red River to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) gaging station near Questa. During short, but intense, storm events, the buffering capacity is exceeded and the river becomes acid from the rapid flushing of acidic materials from natural scar areas. The lithology, mineralogy, elevation, and hydrology of the Straight Creek proximal analog site were found to closely approximate those of the mine site with the exception of the mine site?s Sulphur Gulch catchment. Sulphur Gulch contains three subcatchments?upper Sulphur Gulch, Blind Gulch, and Spring Gulc

  17. Epidemiology of visceral mycoses in autopsy cases in Japan: comparison of the data from 1989, 1993, 1997, 2001, 2005 and 2007 in Annual of Pathological Autopsy Cases in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kume, Hikaru; Yamazaki, Toshikazu; Togano, Tomiteru; Abe, Michiko; Tanuma, Hiroyuki; Kawana, Seiji; Okudaira, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    The data on visceral mycoses reported in the " Annual of Pathological Autopsy Cases in Japan " were analyzed epidemiologically every four years from 1989 to 2005, and in 2007. The frequency rates of visceral mycoses dropped sharply between 1989 (4.5%) and 1994 (3.2%), but by 2001 had risen again and have remained (4.4-4.6%) generally stable since then. The predominant causative agents were Candida and Aspergillus. Although the rate of candidosis showed a gradual decrease, the rate of aspergillosis showed an increase by degrees. Furthermore, the rate of aspergillosis exceeded that of candidosis in 1994, and the difference in the rates between the two conditions apparently further increased until 2001. After 2005, however no changes in this difference were observed. For complicated infections, the incidence of coinfection with Aspergillus and Candida showed a decreasing, and that with Aspergillus and Zygomycetes showed an increasing tendency. Severe infections with Zygomycetes showed a clear increase from 57.4% in 1989 to 88.9% in 2007. Comparing underlying diseases with mycoses in 1989 and 2007, leukemia (including myelodysplastic syndrome) decreased from 26.1% to 18.8% and bacterial infections (including interstitial pneumonia) increased from 11.1% to 22.1%. By age, the highest frequency rate of mycoses was observed in the range of 60-79 years, and the frequency rate of exogenous fungal infections such as aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, zygomycosis and trichosporonosis showed an increasing trend in the less than one-year old group.

  18. Progress on alternative energy resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, H. T.

    1982-03-01

    Progress in the year 1981 toward the development of energy systems suitable for replacing petroleum products combustion and growing in use to fulfill a near term expansion in energy use is reviewed. Coal is noted to be a potentially heavy pollution source, and the presence of environmentally acceptable methods of use such as fluidized-bed combustion and gasification and liquefaction reached the prototype stage in 1981, MHD power generation was achieved in two U.S. plants, with severe corrosion problems remaining unsolved for the electrodes. Solar flat plate collectors sales amounted to 20 million sq ft in 1981, and solar thermal electric conversion systems with central receivers neared completion. Solar cells are progressing toward DOE goals of $.70/peak W by 1986, while wind energy conversion sales were 2000 machines in 1981, and the industry is regarded as maturing. Finally, geothermal, OTEC, and fusion systems are reviewed.

  19. Progress of MICE RFCC Module

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Green, M.; Li, N.; Niinikoski, T.; Pan, H.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Bross, A.; Carcagno, R.; Kashikhin, V.; Sylvester, C.; Chen, A. B.; Guo, Bin; Li, Liyi; Xu, Fengyu; Cao, Y.; Sun, S.; Wang, Li; Yin, Lixin; Luo, Tianhuan; Summers, Don; Smith, B.; Radovinsky, A.; Zhukovsky, A.; Kaplan, D.

    2012-05-20

    Recent progress on the design and fabrication of the RFCC (RF and superconducting Coupling Coil) module for the international MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment) are reported. The MICE ionization cooling channel has two RFCC modules, each having four 201- MHz normal conducting RF cavities surrounded by one superconducting coupling coil (solenoid) magnet. The magnet is designed to be cooled by three cryocoolers. Fabrication of the RF cavities is complete; preparation for the cavity electro-polishing, low power RF measurements, and tuning are in progress at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Fabrication of the cold mass of the first coupling coil magnet has been completed in China and the cold mass arrived at LBNL in late 2011. Preparations for testing the cold mass are currently under way at Fermilab. Plans for the RFCC module assembly and integration are being developed and are described.

  20. Recent Progress in Terahertz Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Naib, Ibraheem; Withayachumnankul, Withawat

    2017-03-01

    In the past decade, the concept of metasurfaces has gradually dominated the field of metamaterials owing to their fascinating optical properties and simple planar geometries. At terahertz frequencies, the concept has been driven further by the availability of advanced micro-fabrication technologies that deliver sub-micron accuracy, well below the terahertz wavelengths. Furthermore, terahertz spectrometers with high dynamic range and amplitude and phase sensitivity provide valuable information for the study of metasurfaces in general. In this paper, we review recent progress in terahertz metasurfaces mainly in the last 5 years. The first part covers nonuniform metasurfaces that perform beamforming in reflection and transmission. In addition, we briefly overview four different methodologies that can be utilized in realizing high-quality-factor metasurfaces. We also describe two recent approaches to tuning the frequency response of terahertz metasurfaces using graphene as an active medium. Finally, we provide a brief summary and outlook for future developments in this rapidly progressing field.

  1. Damage Progression in Bolted Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos; Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1998-01-01

    Structural durability,damage tolerance,and progressive fracture characteristics of bolted graphite/epoxy composite laminates are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties and stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for bolted composites. Single and double bolted composite specimens with various widths and bolt spacings are evaluated. The effect of bolt spacing is investigated with regard to the structural durability of a bolted joint. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture are included in the simulations. Results show the damage progression sequence and structural fracture resistance during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for the use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of experimental results with insight for design decisions.

  2. Damage Progression in Bolted Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C.; Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1998-01-01

    Structural durability, damage tolerance, and progressive fracture characteristics of bolted graphite/epoxy composite laminates are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties and stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for bolted composites. Single and double bolted composite specimens with various widths and bolt spacings are evaluated. The effect of bolt spacing is investigated with regard to the structural durability of a bolted joint. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture are included in the simulations. Results show the damage progression sequence and structural fracture resistance during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for the use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of experimental results with insight for design decisions.

  3. Progress Toward National Aeronautics Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, Carlo J.; Sehra, Arun K.

    1999-01-01

    NASA has made definitive progress towards achieving several bold U.S. goals in aeronautics related to air breathing engines. The advanced technologies developed towards these goals span applications from general aviation to large subsonic and supersonic aircraft. The proof of successful technology development is demonstrated through successful technology transfer to U.S. industry and projected fleet impact. Specific examples of progress are discussed that quantifies the achievement towards these goals. In addition, a more detailed vision for NASA aeronautics is defined and key strategic issues are explored which invite international and national debate and involvement especially in reduced environmental impact for subsonic and supersonic aircraft, dramatic new capabilities in general aviation engines, and reduced development cycle time and costs.

  4. Progress in Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1988-09-01

    The progress of the field of Heavy Ion Fusion has been documented in the proceedings of the series of International Symposia that, in recent years, have occurred every second year. The latest of these conferences was hosted by Gesellshaft fuer Schwerionenforshung (GSI) in Darmstadt, West Germany, June 28-30, 1988. For this report, a few highlights from the conference are selected, stressing experimental progress and prospects for future advances. A little extra time is devoted to report on the developments at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is the center for most of the HIFAR program. The Director of the HIFAR program at LBL is Denis Keefe, who presented the HIF report at the last two of the meetings in this series, and in whose place the author is appearing now. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Cultural Neuroscience: Progress and Promise

    PubMed Central

    Chiao, Joan Y.; Cheon, Bobby K.; Pornpattanangkul, Narun; Mrazek, Alissa J.; Blizinsky, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    The nature and origin of human diversity has been a source of intellectual curiosity since the beginning of human history. Contemporary advances in cultural and biological sciences provide unique opportunities for the emerging field of cultural neuroscience. Research in cultural neuroscience examines how cultural and genetic diversity shape the human mind, brain and behavior across multiple time scales: situation, ontogeny and phylogeny. Recent progress in cultural neuroscience provides novel theoretical frameworks for understanding the complex interaction of environmental, cultural and genetic factors in the production of adaptive human behavior. Here, we provide a brief history of cultural neuroscience, theoretical and methodological advances, as well as empirical evidence of the promise of and progress in the field. Implications of this research for population health disparities and public policy are discussed. PMID:23914126

  6. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Piercey, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the nuclear physics group at Mississippi State University which were performed during 1993. Significant progress has been made in the focus areas: chairing the Gammasphere Software Working Group (SWG); assisting with the porting and enhancement of the ORNL UPAK histogramming software package; and developing standard formats for Gammasphere data products. In addition, they have established a new public ftp archive to distribute software and software development tools and information.

  7. Recent progress of quantum annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Sei

    2015-03-10

    We review the recent progress of quantum annealing. Quantum annealing was proposed as a method to solve generic optimization problems. Recently a Canadian company has drawn a great deal of attention, as it has commercialized a quantum computer based on quantum annealing. Although the performance of quantum annealing is not sufficiently understood, it is likely that quantum annealing will be a practical method both on a conventional computer and on a quantum computer.

  8. Revolution and progress in medicine.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, William

    2015-02-01

    This paper adapts Kuhn's conceptual framework to developmental episodes in the theory and practice of medicine. Previous attempts to understand the reception of Ignaz Semmelweis's work on puerperal fever in Kuhnian terms are used as a starting point. The author identifies some limitations of these attempts and proposes a new way of understanding the core Kuhnian notions of "paradigm," "progress," and "revolution" in the context of a socially embedded technoscience such as medicine.

  9. Ongoing Progress in Spacecraft Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Dave (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This publication is a collection of papers presented at the Mars Mission Research Center workshop on Ongoing Progress in Spacecraft Controls. The technical program addressed additional Mars mission control problems that currently exist in robotic missions in addition to human missions. Topics include control systems design in the presence of large time delays, fuel-optimal propulsive control, and adaptive control to handle a variety of unknown conditions.

  10. PROGRESS IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Kadia, Tapan M.; Ravandi, Farhad; O’Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Steady gains in clinical research and a renaissance of genomics in leukemia have led to improved outcomes. The recognition of tremendous heterogeneity in AML has allowed individualized treatments of specific disease entities within the context of patient age, cytogenetics, and mutational analysis. The following is a comprehensive review of the current state of AML therapy and a roadmap of our approach to these distinct disease entities. PMID:25441110

  11. Progress in breast cancer: overview.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-12-01

    This edition of CCR Focus titled Research in Breast Cancer: Frontiers in Genomics, Biology, and Clinical Investigation reviews six topics that cover areas of translational research of high impact in breast cancer. These topics represent areas of breast cancer research where significant progress has occurred but also where very important challenges remain. The papers in this CCR Focus section are contributed by experts in the respective areas of investigation. Herein, key aspects of these contributions and the research directions they propose are reviewed.

  12. Progress in NTHMP Hazard Assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonzalez, F.I.; Titov, V.V.; Mofjeld, H.O.; Venturato, A.J.; Simmons, R.S.; Hansen, R.; Combellick, R.; Eisner, R.K.; Hoirup, D.F.; Yanagi, B.S.; Yong, S.; Darienzo, M.; Priest, G.R.; Crawford, G.L.; Walsh, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    The Hazard Assessment component of the U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program has completed 22 modeling efforts covering 113 coastal communities with an estimated population of 1.2 million residents that are at risk. Twenty-three evacuation maps have also been completed. Important improvements in organizational structure have been made with the addition of two State geotechnical agency representatives to Steering Group membership, and progress has been made on other improvements suggested by program reviewers. ?? Springer 2005.

  13. Visual Analytics Technology Transition Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtz, Jean; Cook, Kristin A.; Whiting, Mark A.; Lemon, Douglas K.; Greenblatt, Howard

    2009-09-23

    The authors provide a description of the transition process for visual analytic tools and contrast this with the transition process for more traditional software tools. This paper takes this into account and describes a user-oriented approach to technology transition including a discussion of key factors that should be considered and adapted to each situation. The progress made in transitioning visual analytic tools in the past five years is described and the challenges that remain are enumerated.

  14. Information Loss from Technological Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Progress in electronics and optics offers faster computers, and rapid communication via the internet that is matched by ever larger and evolving storage systems. Instinctively one assumes that this must be totally beneficial. However advances in software and storage media are progressing in ways which are frequently incompatible with earlier systems and the economics and commercial pressures rarely guarantee total compatibility with earlier systems. Instead, the industries actively choose to force the users to purchase new systems and software. Thus we are moving forward with new technological variants that may have access to only the most recent systems and we will have lost earlier alternatives. The reality is that increased processing speed and storage capacity are matched by an equally rapid decline in the access and survival lifetime of older information. This pattern is not limited to modern electronic systems but is evident throughout history from writing on stone and clay tablets to papyrus and paper. It is equally evident in image systems from painting, through film, to magnetic tapes and digital cameras. In sound recording we have variously progressed from wax discs to vinyl, magnetic tape and CD formats. In each case the need for better definition and greater capacity has forced the earlier systems into oblivion. Indeed proposed interactive music systems could similarly relegate music CDs to specialist collections. The article will track some of the examples and discuss the consequences as well as noting that this information loss is further compounded by developments in language and changes in cultural views of different societies.

  15. Mathematical models of diabetes progression.

    PubMed

    De Gaetano, Andrea; Hardy, Thomas; Beck, Benoit; Abu-Raddad, Eyas; Palumbo, Pasquale; Bue-Valleskey, Juliana; Pørksen, Niels

    2008-12-01

    Few attempts have been made to model mathematically the progression of type 2 diabetes. A realistic representation of the long-term physiological adaptation to developing insulin resistance is necessary for effectively designing clinical trials and evaluating diabetes prevention or disease modification therapies. Writing a good model for diabetes progression is difficult because the long time span of the disease makes experimental verification of modeling hypotheses extremely awkward. In this context, it is of primary importance that the assumptions underlying the model equations properly reflect established physiology and that the mathematical formulation of the model give rise only to physically plausible behavior of the solutions. In the present work, a model of the pancreatic islet compensation is formulated, its physiological assumptions are presented, some fundamental qualitative characteristics of its solutions are established, the numerical values assigned to its parameters are extensively discussed (also with reference to available cross-sectional epidemiologic data), and its performance over the span of a lifetime is simulated under various conditions, including worsening insulin resistance and primary replication defects. The differences with respect to two previously proposed models of diabetes progression are highlighted, and therefore, the model is proposed as a realistic, robust description of the evolution of the compensation of the glucose-insulin system in healthy and diabetic individuals. Model simulations can be run from the authors' web page.

  16. Fluor Hanford Project Focused Progress at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    HANSON, R.D.

    2000-02-01

    Fluor Hanford is making significant progress in accelerating cleanup at the Hanford site. This progress consistently aligns with a new strategic vision established by the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (RL).

  17. Satisfactory Academic Progress: Who Cares and Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakey, William A.

    1985-01-01

    The author states that postsecondary institutions must implement their own minimum academic progress requirements to avoid a potentially punitive legislative requirement. Various General Accounting Office reports concerned with student progress statistics are quoted. (CT)

  18. Genetics Home Reference: progressive osseous heteroplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and muscle tissue. Bone that forms outside the skeleton is called heterotopic or ectopic bone. In progressive ... preventing bony tissue from being produced outside the skeleton. The GNAS gene mutations that cause progressive osseous ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: progressive familial heart block

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease Lev syndrome Lev's disease PCCD progressive cardiac conduction defect Related Information How are genetic conditions and ... Diseases Information Center (1 link) Familial progressive cardiac conduction defect Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Heart, ...

  20. 2016 Nebraska Higher Education Progress Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska's Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 Nebraska Higher Education Progress Report is the 12th annual progress report designed to provide the Nebraska Legislature with comparative statistics to monitor and evaluate progress toward achieving three key priorities for Nebraska's postsecondary education system. These priorities were developed by the 2003 LR 174 Higher Education Task…

  1. Towards a Learning Progression of Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Knut; Viering, Tobias; Boone, William J.; Fischer, Hans E.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an empirical study on an initial learning progression of energy, a concept of central importance to the understanding of science. Learning progressions have been suggested as one vehicle to support the systematic and successful teaching of core science concepts. Ideally, a learning progression will provide teachers with a…

  2. Progressive Education and the "Indian New Deal".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyhner, Jon

    This paper examines the progressive education movement and its effect on American Indian education. Progressive education became popular during the late 19th century during the period when American Indian children were being enrolled in Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) schools. John Dewey, who is considered the father of progressive education,…

  3. Recent progress in tidal modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vial, F.; Forbes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Recent contributions to tidal theory during the last five years are reviewed. Specific areas where recent progress has occurred include: the action of mean wind and dissipation on tides, interactions of other waves with tides, the use of TGCM in tidal studies. Furthermore, attention is put on the nonlinear interaction between semidiurnal and diurnal tides. Finally, more realistic thermal excitation and background wind and temperature models have been developed in the past few years. This has led to new month-to-month numerical simulations of the semidiurnal tide. Some results using these models are presented and compared with ATMAP tidal climatologies.

  4. [Research Progress on Forensic Entomotoxicology].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-jiang; Zhai, Xian-dun; Guan, Ling; Mo, Yao-nan

    2015-06-01

    Forensic entomotoxicology is a branch of forensic medicine, which applies entomology, toxicology and other related studies to solve the poisoning cases. It has an obvious advantage in the investigation on poisoning death. Based on the expounding definition and research of entomotoxicology, this paper reviews research progress and application value in some aspects of forensic medicine, such as the effects of drugs/toxins on the growth and development of sarcosaphagous insects and the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the drugs/toxins in the poisoned body tissue.

  5. Recent Progress in SERS Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Bantz, Kyle C.; Meyer, Audrey F.; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Im, Hyungsoon; Kurtuluş, Özge; Lee, Si Hoon; Lindquist, Nathan C.

    2011-01-01

    This perspective gives an overview of recent developments in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for biosensing. We focus this review on SERS papers published in the last 10 years and to specific applications of detecting biological analytes. Both intrinsic and extrinsic SERS biosensing schemes have been employed to detect and identify small molecules, nucleic acids, lipids, peptides, and proteins, as well as for in vivo and cellular sensing. Current SERS substrate technologies along with a series of advancements in surface chemistry, sample preparation, intrinsic/extrinsic signal transduction schemes, and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy are discussed. The progress covered herein shows great promise for widespread adoption of SERS biosensing. PMID:21509385

  6. Progress Report NORSAR Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-11

    PHASE 3 1 July - 30 September 1974 1 AUTHOR’«; Prepared by K.A. Berteussen 9 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS NTNF...30 June 1975 F08606-74-C-0049 Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR) Phase 3 $900 000.— II October 1974 1 July - 30 September 197 4 Nils Maräs, (02)71...Hi.»,«—, Hl .1 ii.li in im. UM;!..». .1.1 „IM I,„LWII ■Mtffll^ A D/A-00 2 25 2 PROGRESS REPORT NORSAR PHASE

  7. [Research progress on wetland ecotourism].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Long; Lu, Lin

    2009-06-01

    Wetland is rich in biodiversity and cultural diversity, possessing higher tourism value and environmental education and community participation functions. Wetland ecotourism reflects the sustainable development of tourism economy and wetland protection, having received great concern from governments and scholars at home and abroad. This paper summarized the related theories and practices, discussed the research advances in wetland ecotourism from the aspects of significance, progress, contents, methods and results, and pointed out the important research fields in the future, aimed to accelerate the development of wetland ecotourism research and to provide reference about the resources exploitation, environment protection, and scientific administration of wetland and related scenic areas.

  8. Interventions in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Koros, Christos; Stamelou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) an atypical parkinsonian with a common phenotype comprising early falls, the characteristic slowing of vertical saccades and a frontal syndrome with marked apathy (Richardson's syndrome). Currently, no effective symptomatic or neuroprotective treatment is available for PSP. Current medical have a limited role in PSP. Novel experimental treatments include davunetide or tideglusib, both inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) that failed to improve the clinical outcome of PSP patients in two recent studies. Future interventions aiming at tau dysfunction and passive or active immunization are ongoing or underway.

  9. Progress of the LASSO experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serene, B. E. H.

    1981-01-01

    The LASSO (Later Synchronisation from Stationary Orbit) experiment, designed to demonstrate the feasibility of achieving time synchronization between remote atomic clocks with an accuracy of one nanosecond or better by using laser techniques for the first time is described. The experiment uses groundbased laser stations and the SIRIO-2 geostationary satellite to be launched towards the end of 1981. The qualification of the LASSO on-board equipment is discussed with a brief description of the electrical and optical test equipment used. The progress of the operational organization is included.

  10. Genetic progression of malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Tímár, J; Vizkeleti, L; Doma, V; Barbai, T; Rásó, E

    2016-03-01

    Malignant melanoma of the skin is the most aggressive human cancer given that a primary tumor a few millimeters in diameter frequently has full metastatic competence. In view of that, revealing the genetic background of this potential may also help to better understand tumor dissemination in general. Genomic analyses have established the molecular classification of melanoma based on the most frequent driver oncogenic mutations (BRAF, NRAS, KIT) and have also revealed a long list of rare events, including mutations and amplifications as well as genetic microheterogeneity. At the moment, it is unclear whether any of these rare events have role in the metastasis initiation process since the major drivers do not have such a role. During lymphatic and hematogenous dissemination, the clonal selection process is evidently reflected by differences in oncogenic drivers in the metastases versus the primary tumor. Clonal selection is also evident during lymphatic progression, though the genetic background of this immunoselection is less clear. Genomic analyses of metastases identified further genetic alterations, some of which may correspond to metastasis maintenance genes. The natural genetic progression of melanoma can be modified by targeted (BRAF or MEK inhibitor) or immunotherapies. Some of the rare events in primary tumors may result in primary resistance, while further new genetic lesions develop during the acquired resistance to both targeted and immunotherapies. Only a few genetic lesions of the primary tumor are constant during natural or therapy-modulated progression. EGFR4 and NMDAR2 mutations, MITF and MET amplifications and PTEN loss can be considered as metastasis drivers. Furthermore, BRAF and MITF amplifications as well as PTEN loss are also responsible for resistance to targeted therapies, whereas NRAS mutation is the only founder genetic lesion showing any association with sensitivity to immunotherapies. Unfortunately, there are hardly any data on the

  11. Progress toward hydrogen peroxide micropulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J C; Dittman, M D; Ledebuhr, A G

    1999-07-08

    A new self-pressurizing propulsion system has liquid thrusters and gas jet attitude control without heavy gas storage vessels. A pump boosts the pressure of a small fraction of the hydrogen peroxide, so that reacted propellant can controllably pressurize its own source tank. The warm decomposition gas also powers the pump and is supplied to the attitude control jets. The system has been incorporated into a prototype microsatellite for terrestrial maneuvering tests. Additional progress includes preliminary testing of a bipropellant thruster, and storage of unstabilized hydrogen peroxide in small sealed tanks.

  12. Slug Expression during Melanoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Stephanie H.; Greene, Victoria R.; Duncan, Lyn M.; Torres Cabala, Carlos A.; Grimm, Elizabeth A.; Kusewitt, Donna F.

    2012-01-01

    Slug (Snai2), a member of the Snail family of zinc finger transcription factors, plays a role in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) that occurs during melanocyte emigration from the neural crest. A role for Slug in the EMT-like loss of cell adhesion and increased cell motility exhibited during melanoma progression has also been proposed. Our immunohistochemical studies of melanoma arrays, however, revealed that Slug expression was actually higher in nevi than in primary or metastatic melanomas. Moreover, Slug expression in melanomas was not associated with decreased expression of E-cadherin, the canonical Slug target in EMT. Comparisons of endogenous Slug and E-cadherin expression in cultured normal human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines supported our immunohistochemical findings. Expression of exogenous Slug in melanocytes and melanoma cells in vitro, however, suppressed E-cadherin expression, enhanced N-cadherin expression, and stimulated cell migration and invasion. Interestingly, both in tumors and cultured cell lines, there was a clear relationship between expression of Slug and MITF, a transcription factor known to regulate Slug expression during development. Taken together, our findings suggest that Slug expression during melanomagenesis is highest early in the process and that persistent Slug expression is not required for melanoma progression. The precise role of Slug in melanomagenesis remains to be elucidated and may be related to its interactions with other drivers of EMT, such as Snail. PMID:22503751

  13. Progress towards understanding baryon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Crede, Volker; Roberts, Winston

    2013-07-01

    The composite nature of baryons manifests itself in the existence of a rich spectrum of excited states, in particular in the important mass region 1?2 GeV for the light-flavoured baryons. The properties of these resonances can be identified by systematic investigations using electromagnetic and strong probes, primarily with beams of electrons, photons, and pions. After decades of research, the fundamental degrees of freedom underlying the baryon excitation spectrum are still poorly understood. The search for hitherto undiscovered but predicted resonances continues at many laboratories around the world. Recent results from photo- and electroproduction experiments provide intriguing indications for new states and shed light on the structure of some of the known nucleon excitations. The continuing study of available data sets with consideration of new observables and improved analysis tools have also called into question some of the earlier findings in baryon spectroscopy. Other breakthrough measurements have been performed in the heavy-baryon sector, which has seen a fruitful period in recent years, in particular at the B factories and the Tevatron. First results from the large hadron collider indicate rapid progress in the field of bottom baryons. In this review, we discuss the recent experimental progress and give an overview of theoretical approaches.

  14. Progressive Pseudorheumatoid Dysplasia or JIA?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD) or spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda with progressive arthropathy (SEDT-PA) is a rare arthropathy of childhood involving the axial skeleton as well as small peripheral joints. A 10-year-old boy was referred by a general practitioner with pain and deformity in the fingers of hands and limping gait. There was no joint synovitis although the finger joints were bulky on examination with mild flexion deformity. Patient had exaggerated kyphosis and lumbar lordosis with pigeon chest and restricted hip joint movements. Anteroposterior X-rays of the hip joints revealed widened and flattened epiphyses of the femoral heads with narrow and irregular joint spaces. Hand X-rays revealed periarticular osteopenia, significant narrowing of the joint spaces of proximal interphalangeal, and distal interphalangeal joints, together with osseous enlargement of the basis of metacarpal bones and phalanges. Spinal X-rays revealed generalized platyspondyly and anterior beaking of vertebral bodies. There was a clear mega os trigonum in his feet images. All blood investigations were normal with no evidence of inflammation and thyroid hormone levels were normal. The diagnosis of PPD was favored by imaging studies and normal inflammatory markers and the patient was treated with physiotherapy, family counseling, and anti-inflammatory medications. PMID:28316857

  15. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2001-01-01

    This report includes the results of a research in which the COmposite Durability STRuctural ANalysis (CODSTRAN) computational simulation capabilities were augmented and applied to various structures for demonstration of the new features and verification. The first chapter of this report provides an introduction to the computational simulation or virtual laboratory approach for the assessment of damage and fracture progression characteristics in composite structures. The second chapter outlines the details of the overall methodology used, including the failure criteria and the incremental/iterative loading procedure with the definitions of damage, fracture, and equilibrium states. The subsequent chapters each contain an augmented feature of the code and/or demonstration examples. All but one of the presented examples contains laminated composite structures with various fiber/matrix constituents. For each structure simulated, damage initiation and progression mechanisms are identified and the structural damage tolerance is quantified at various degradation stages. Many chapters contain the simulation of defective and defect free structures to evaluate the effects of existing defects on structural durability.

  16. Statistical variation in progressive scrambling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Robert D.; Fox, Peter C.

    2004-07-01

    The two methods most often used to evaluate the robustness and predictivity of partial least squares (PLS) models are cross-validation and response randomization. Both methods may be overly optimistic for data sets that contain redundant observations, however. The kinds of perturbation analysis widely used for evaluating model stability in the context of ordinary least squares regression are only applicable when the descriptors are independent of each other and errors are independent and normally distributed; neither assumption holds for QSAR in general and for PLS in particular. Progressive scrambling is a novel, non-parametric approach to perturbing models in the response space in a way that does not disturb the underlying covariance structure of the data. Here, we introduce adjustments for two of the characteristic values produced by a progressive scrambling analysis - the deprecated predictivity (Q_s^{ast^2}) and standard error of prediction (SDEP s * ) - that correct for the effect of introduced perturbation. We also explore the statistical behavior of the adjusted values (Q_0^{ast^2} and SDEP 0 * ) and the sensitivity to perturbation (d q 2/d r yy ' 2). It is shown that the three statistics are all robust for stable PLS models, in terms of the stochastic component of their determination and of their variation due to sampling effects involved in training set selection.

  17. Recent progress in planetary balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerzhanovich, Viktor V.; Cutts, James A.

    2001-08-01

    In the last 15 years several balloon mission cencepts have been proposed for Mars and Venus, one of them - Russian-French Mars Aerostat - was extensively developed in 1988-1995 but was terminated before completion. It became clear that a number of critical technologies still needed to be developed prior to committing a costly space mission. In recent years significant progress has been made in two critical fields: aerial deployment and inflation of thin-film balloons for specific planetary applications, and in the development of envelope design for stratospheric applications. This paper describes requirements, proposed concepts, critical elements and trade-offs in planetary balloon missions as well as current results of some of JPL balloon programs.

  18. CERN ELENA project progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmann, Wolfgang; Belochitskii, Pavel; Breuker, Horst; Butin, François; Carli, C.; Eriksson, Tommy; Oelert, Walter; Maury, Stephan; Pasinelli, Sergio; Tranquille, Gerard

    2015-05-01

    The Extra Low Energy Antiproton ring (ELENA) is a CERN project aiming at constructing a 30 m circumference synchrotron to further decelerate antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) from 5.3 MeV to 100 keV. The additional deceleration complemented by an electron cooler to reduce emittances will allow the existing AD experiments to increase substantially their antiproton capture efficiencies and render new experiments possible. The ELENA design is now well advanced and the project has entered the construction stage, in particular for what concerns the infrastructure. Installation of the machine components is foreseen during the second half of 2015 and beginning of 2016 followed by ring commissioning until the end of 2016. New electrostatic transfer lines to the experiments will be installed and commissioned during the first half of 2017 followed by the first physics operation with AD/ELENA end of 2017. Main ELENA related infrastructure progresses as well as the status of the project are reported.

  19. Progress toward single cell metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Lanni, Eric J.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-01-01

    The metabolome refers to the entire set of small molecules, or metabolites, within a biological sample. These molecules are involved in many fundamental intracellular functions and reflect the cell’s physiological condition. The ability to detect and identify metabolites and determine and monitor their amounts at the single cell level enables an exciting range of studies of biological variation and functional heterogeneity between cells, even within a presumably homogenous cell population. Significant progress has been made in the development and application of bioanalytical tools for single cell metabolomics based on mass spectrometry, microfluidics, and capillary separations. Remarkable improvements in the sensitivity, specificity, and throughput of these approaches enable investigation of multiple metabolites simultaneously in a range of individual cell samples. PMID:23246232

  20. Progress towards a dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Webster, Daniel P; Farrar, Jeremy; Rowland-Jones, Sarah

    2009-11-01

    The spread of dengue virus throughout the tropics represents a major, rapidly growing public health problem with an estimated 2.5 billion people at risk of dengue fever and the life-threatening disease, severe dengue. A safe and effective vaccine for dengue is urgently needed. The pathogenesis of severe dengue results from a complex interaction between the virus, the host, and, at least in part, immune-mediated mechanisms. Vaccine development has been slowed by fears that immunisation might predispose individuals to the severe form of dengue infection. A pipeline of candidate vaccines now exists, including live attenuated, inactivated, chimeric, DNA, and viral-vector vaccines, some of which are at the stage of clinical testing. In this Review, we present what is understood about dengue pathogenesis and its implications for vaccine design, the progress that is being made in the development of a vaccine, and the future challenges.

  1. EUV progress toward HVM readiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkot, Britt; Carson, Steven L.; Lio, Anna; Liang, Ted; Phillips, Mark; McCool, Brian; Stenehjem, Eric; Crimmins, Tim; Zhang, Guojing; Sivakumar, Sam

    2016-03-01

    This past year has witnessed a sharp increase in EUV lithography progress spanning production tools, source and infrastructure to better position the technology for HVM readiness. While the exposure source remains the largest contributor to downtime and availability, significant strides in demonstrated source power have bolstered confidence in the viability of EUVL for insertion into HVM production. The ongoing development of an EUV pellicle solution alleviates industry concern about one significant source of line-yield risk. In addition to continued expected improvements in EUV source power and availability, the ability to deliver predictable yield remains an ultimate gate to HVM insertion. Ensuring predictable yield requires significant emphasis on reticles. This includes continued pellicle development to enable the readiness and supply of a robust pellicle solution in advance of 250W source power, as well as improvements in mask blank defectivity and techniques to detect and mitigate reticle blank and pattern defects.

  2. Progress on the Cluster Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kivelson, Margaret; Khurana, Krishan; Acuna, Mario (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Prof M. G. Kivelson and Dr. K. K. Khurana (UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles)) are co-investigators on the Cluster Magnetometer Consortium (CMC) that provided the fluxgate magnetometers and associated mission support for the Cluster Mission. The CMC designated UCLA as the site with primary responsibility for the inter-calibration of data from the four spacecraft and the production of fully corrected data critical to achieving the mission objectives. UCLA will also participate in the analysis and interpretation of the data. The UCLA group here reports its excellent progress in developing fully intra-calibrated data for large portions of the mission and an excellent start in developing inter-calibrated data for selected time intervals, especially extended intervals in August, 2001 on which a workshop held at ESTEC in March, 2002 focused. In addition, some scientific investigations were initiated and results were reported at meetings.

  3. Research Progress on Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yong-Jie; Xu, Kan; Luo, Qi; Yu, Jin-Lu

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is a rare disease characterized by significant expansion, elongation, and tortuosity of the vertebrobasilar arteries. Current data regarding VBD are very limited. Here we systematically review VBD incidence, etiology, characteristics, clinical manifestations, treatment strategies, and prognosis. The exact incidence rate of VBD remains unclear, but is estimated to be 1.3% of the population. The occurrence of VBD is thought to be due to the cooperation of multiple factors, including congenital factors, infections and immune status, and degenerative diseases. The VBD clinical manifestations are complex with ischemic stroke as the most common, followed by progressive compression of cranial nerves and the brain stem, cerebral hemorrhage, and hydrocephalus. Treatment of VBD remains difficult. Currently, there are no precise and effective treatments, and available treatments mainly target the complications of VBD. With the development of stent technology, however, it may become an effective treatment for VBD. PMID:25136259

  4. European Archaeomagnetism: Progress and Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. E.; Hoye, G.

    2009-05-01

    Much progress has been made since the seminal work of Giuseppe Folgheraiter (1856-1913) in the late 19th century. So much so that recent advances now make it possible to draw up complete isogonic and isoclinic maps for Europe and adjacent areas spanning the last three millennia (Pavon-Carrasco et al., 2009). Results based on multiple independent studies, with high precision and good age control are crucial and should be recognized as "anchor points" (e.g. Pompeii). On the other hand, the nagging problem of outliers persists. Among the possible causes are magnetic refraction, physical distortion, and inadequate chronological control. Some examples, drawn from our own investigations over the last 30 years, will be discussed in detail. These include previously unpublished data from a detailed study (more than 100 samples) of a kiln in southern Italy, and an apparently good (but aberrant) archaeodirection from a kiln in southern Spain.

  5. Recent progress in henipavirus research.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Kim; Mungall, Bruce A

    2007-09-01

    Following the discovery of two new paramyxoviruses in the 1990s, much effort has been placed on rapidly finding the reservoir hosts, characterising the genomes, identifying the viral receptors and formulating potential vaccines and therapeutic options for these viruses, Hendra and Nipah viruses caused zoonotic disease on a scale not seen before with other paramyxoviruses. Nipah virus particularly caused high morbidity and mortality in humans and high morbidity in pig populations in the first outbreak in Malaysia. Both viruses continue to pose a threat with sporadic outbreaks continuing into the 21st century. Experimental and surveillance studies identified that pteropus bats are the reservoir hosts. Research continues in an attempt to understand events that precipitated spillover of these viruses. Discovered on the cusp of the molecular technology revolution, much progress has been made in understanding these new viruses. This review endeavours to capture the depth and breadth of these recent advances.

  6. Treatment of Primary Progressive Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Tippett, Donna C.; Hillis, Argye E.; Tsapkini, Kyrana

    2015-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily affects language functions and often begins in the fifth or sixth decade of life. The devastating effects on work and home life call for the investigation of treatment alternatives. In this paper, we present a review of the literature on treatment approaches for this neurodegenerative disease. We also present new data from two intervention studies we have conducted, a behavioral one and a neuromodulatory one using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) combined with written production intervention. We show that speech-language intervention improves language outcomes in individuals with PPA; and especially in the short term, tDCS augments generalization and maintenance of positive language outcomes. We also outline current issues and challenges in intervention approaches in PPA. PMID:26062526

  7. Progress in optical parametric oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Y. X.; Byer, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that tunable coherent sources are very useful for many applications, including spectroscopy, chemistry, combustion diagnostics, and remote sensing. Compared with other tunable sources, optical parametric oscillators (OPO) offer the potential advantage of a wide wavelength operating range, which extends from 0.2 micron to 25 microns. The current status of OPO is examined, taking into account mainly advances made during the last decade. Attention is given to early LiNbO3 parametric oscillators, problems which have prevented wide use of parametric oscillators, the demonstration of OPO's using urea and AgGaS2, progress related to picosecond OPO's, a breakthrough in nanosecond parametric oscillators, the first demonstration of a waveguide and fiber parametric amplification and generation, the importance of chalcopyrite crystals, and theoretical work performed with the aim to understand the factors affecting the parametric oscillator performance.

  8. [Progress in dedifferentiated fat cells].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feifei; Yang, Zhi; Qian, Cheng

    2014-10-01

    When mature adipocytes are subjected to an in vitro dedifferentiation strategy referred to as ceiling culture, these mature adipocytes can revert to dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. DFAT cells have many advantages compared with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). For example, DFAT cells are homogeneous and could be obtained from donors regardless of their age. Furthermore, DFAT cells also have the same multi-lineage potentials and low immunogenicity as ASCs. As an excellent source of seed cells for tissue engineering and stem cell transplantation, DFAT cells have better prospects in the treatment of many clinical diseases, such as bone defects, neurological diseases, ischemic heart disease and kidney disease. It is necessary to make more intensive studies of DFAT cells. This article summarizes progresses in the immunological characteristics, differentiation ability and potential clinical applications of DFAT cells.

  9. Green Chemistry: Progress and Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Sarah A.

    2016-10-01

    Green chemistry can advance both the health of the environment and the primary objectives of the chemical enterprise: to understand the behavior of chemical substances and to use that knowledge to make useful substances. We expect chemical research and manufacturing to be done in a manner that preserves the health and safety of workers; green chemistry extends that expectation to encompass the health and safety of the planet. While green chemistry may currently be treated as an independent branch of research, it should, like safety, eventually become integral to all chemistry activities. While enormous progress has been made in shifting from "brown" to green chemistry, much more effort is needed to effect a sustainable economy. Implementation of new, greener paradigms in chemistry is slow because of lack of knowledge, ends-justify-the-means thinking, systems inertia, and lack of financial or policy incentives.

  10. Hidden progress: broadband plasmonic invisibility.

    PubMed

    Renger, Jan; Kadic, Muamer; Dupont, Guillaume; Aćimović, Srdjan S; Guenneau, Sébastien; Quidant, Romain; Enoch, Stefan

    2010-07-19

    One of the key challenges in current research into electromagnetic cloaking is to achieve invisibility at optical frequencies and over an extended bandwidth. There has been significant progress towards this using the idea of cloaking by sweeping under the carpet of Li and Pendry. Here, we show that we can harness surface plasmon polaritons at a metal surface structured with a dielectric material to obtain a unique control of their propagation. We exploit this control to demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally cloaking over an unprecedented bandwidth (650-900 nm). Our non-resonant plasmonic metamaterial is designed using transformational optics extended to plasmonics and allows a curved reflector to mimic a flat mirror. Our theoretical predictions are validated by experiments mapping the surface light intensity at a wavelength of 800 nm.

  11. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2008-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells and the built-up composite structure global fracture are enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads.

  12. PROGRESSIVE OSSIFYING FIBRODYSPLASIA: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Fabiana; de Menezes Karam, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Progressive ossifying fibrodysplasia is a rare genetic disease that affects one individual in every two million births. Its main consequence is heterotopic ossification, i.e. formation of additional bone in abnormal locations. It is an autosomal dominant disease, usually caused by a new mutation in the ACVR1 receptor gene, which is in the signaling pathway for bone morphogenic protein. This abnormality is not related to gender, ethnicity or consanguinity. The present study reports the case of A.C., a 17-year-old girl. Her clinical investigation began at the age of four years, but she was only diagnosed with FOP at the age of 15 years, after being evaluated by several specialists in different centers. The patient has two siblings, but her family history did not reveal any similar cases. PMID:27047836

  13. Probabilistic progressive buckling of trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    A three-bay, space, cantilever truss is probabilistically evaluated to describe progressive buckling and truss collapse in view of the numerous uncertainties associated with the structural, material, and load variables (primitive variables) that describe the truss. Initially, the truss is deterministically analyzed for member forces, and member(s) in which the axial force exceeds the Euler buckling load are identified. These member(s) are then discretized with several intermediate nodes and a probabilistic buckling analysis is performed on the truss to obtain its probabilistic buckling loads and respective mode shapes. Furthermore, sensitivities associated with the uncertainties in the primitive variables are investigated, margin of safety values for the truss are determined, and truss end node displacements are noted. These steps are repeated by sequentially removing the buckled member(s) until onset of truss collapse is reached. Results show that this procedure yields an optimum truss configuration for a given loading and for a specified reliability.

  14. Probabilistic progressive buckling of trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1994-01-01

    A three-bay, space, cantilever truss is probabilistically evaluated to describe progressive buckling and truss collapse in view of the numerous uncertainties associated with the structural, material, and load variables that describe the truss. Initially, the truss is deterministically analyzed for member forces, and members in which the axial force exceeds the Euler buckling load are identified. These members are then discretized with several intermediate nodes, and a probabilistic buckling analysis is performed on the truss to obtain its probabilistic buckling loads and the respective mode shapes. Furthermore, sensitivities associated with the uncertainties in the primitive variables are investigated, margin of safety values for the truss are determined, and truss end node displacements are noted. These steps are repeated by sequentially removing buckled members until onset of truss collapse is reached. Results show that this procedure yields an optimum truss configuration for a given loading and for a specified reliability.

  15. World progress toward fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, J. F.

    1989-09-01

    This paper will describe the progress in fusion science and technology from a world perspective. The paper will cover the current technical status, including the understanding of fusion's economic, environmental, and safety characteristics. Fusion experiments are approaching the energy breakeven condition. An energy gain (Q) of 30 percent has been achieved in magnetic confinement experiments. In addition, temperatures required for an ignited plasma (Ti = 32 KeV) and energy confinements (about 75 percent of that required for ignition) have been achieved in separate experiments. Two major facilities have started the experimental campaign to extend these results and achieve or exceed Q = 1 plasma conditions by 1990. Inertial confinement fusion experiments are also approaching thermonuclear conditions and have achieved a compression factor 100-200 times liquid D-T. Because of this progress, the emphasis in fusion research is turning toward questions of engineering feasibility. Leaders of the major fusion R and D programs in the European Community (EC), Japan, the United States, and the U.S.S.R. have agreed on the major steps that are needed to reach the point at which a practical fusion system can be designed. The United States is preparing for an experiment to address the last unexplored scientific issue, the physics of an ignited plasma, during the late 1990's. The EC, Japan, U.S.S.R., and the United States have joined together under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to jointly design and prepare the validating R&D for an international facility, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), to address all the remaining scientific issues and to explore the engineering technology of fusion around the turn of the century.

  16. Genetics of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.

    PubMed

    Im, Sun Young; Kim, Young Eun; Kim, Yun Joong

    2015-09-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is clinically characterized by progressive postural instability, supranuclear gaze palsy, parkinsonism and cognitive decline. Pathologically, diagnosis of PSP is based on characteristic features, such as neurofibrillary tangles, neutrophil threads, tau-positive astrocytes and their processes in basal ganglia and brainstem, and the accumulation of 4 repeat tau protein. PSP is generally recognized as a sporadic disorder; however, understanding of genetic background of PSP has been expanding rapidly. Here we review relevant publications to outline the genetics of PSP. Although only small number of familial PSP cases have been reported, the recognition of familial PSP has been increasing. In some familial cases of clinically probable PSP, PSP pathologies were confirmed based on NINDS neuropathological diagnostic criteria. Several mutations in MAPT, the gene that causes a form of familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration with tauopathy, have been identified in both sporadic and familial PSP cases. The H1 haplotype of MAPT is a risk haplotype for PSP, and within H1, a sub-haplotype (H1c) is associated with PSP. A recent genome-wide association study on autopsyproven PSP revealed additional PSP risk alleles in STX6 and EIF2AK3. Several heredodegenerative parkinsonian disorders are referred to as PSP-look-alikes because their clinical phenotype, but not their pathology, mimics PSP. Due to the fast development of genomics and bioinformatics, more genetic factors related to PSP are expected to be discovered. Undoubtedly, these studies will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of PSP and clues for developing therapeutic strategies.

  17. [Progressive supranuclear palsy: what's new?].

    PubMed

    Levy, Richard

    2011-06-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) has been described as a clinical syndrome characterized by an impairment of voluntary control of gaze (supranuclear palsy), postural and gait instability, and behavioral and cognitive deficits including a frontal syndrome and psychic retardation. However, in the recent years, at least four other clinical forms of PSP have been recognized: PSP-Parkinsonism, "pure akinesia with gait freezing", PSP with cortico-basal syndrome, and PSP with speech apraxia. PSP-Parkinsonism mimics the signs and symptoms of idiopathic Parkinson's disease, including a significant reactivity to levodopa. "Pure akinesia with gait freezing" is characterized by a difficulty of self-initiation of motor programs, usually walking program. PSP with cortico-basal syndrome mimics cortico-basal degeneration (CBD) in that unilateral or asymmetric limb dystonia and apraxia are prominent signs. PSP with speech apraxia is an isolated syndrome of progressive anarthria. All these clinical syndromes are due to brain accumulation of phosphorylated tau protein. The differences in clinical expression within the framework of PSP can be explained by the differences in the topographical distribution of the lesions. PSP is considered as a primary tau disease ("tauopathy") such as CBD and some forms of fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. At the level of neuropathology, the pattern of tau abnormal inclusions differentiates PSP from other tau diseases, but some overlaps are reported. Moreover, several of the clinical forms of PSP partially or fully overlap with the other tauopathies. As a whole, the emergence of new clinical forms of PSP challenges the nosology of tauopathies and our understanding of these diseases.

  18. Genetics of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sun Young; Kim, Young Eun; Kim, Yun Joong

    2015-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is clinically characterized by progressive postural instability, supranuclear gaze palsy, parkinsonism and cognitive decline. Pathologically, diagnosis of PSP is based on characteristic features, such as neurofibrillary tangles, neutrophil threads, tau-positive astrocytes and their processes in basal ganglia and brainstem, and the accumulation of 4 repeat tau protein. PSP is generally recognized as a sporadic disorder; however, understanding of genetic background of PSP has been expanding rapidly. Here we review relevant publications to outline the genetics of PSP. Although only small number of familial PSP cases have been reported, the recognition of familial PSP has been increasing. In some familial cases of clinically probable PSP, PSP pathologies were confirmed based on NINDS neuropathological diagnostic criteria. Several mutations in MAPT, the gene that causes a form of familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration with tauopathy, have been identified in both sporadic and familial PSP cases. The H1 haplotype of MAPT is a risk haplotype for PSP, and within H1, a sub-haplotype (H1c) is associated with PSP. A recent genome-wide association study on autopsyproven PSP revealed additional PSP risk alleles in STX6 and EIF2AK3. Several heredodegenerative parkinsonian disorders are referred to as PSP-look-alikes because their clinical phenotype, but not their pathology, mimics PSP. Due to the fast development of genomics and bioinformatics, more genetic factors related to PSP are expected to be discovered. Undoubtedly, these studies will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of PSP and clues for developing therapeutic strategies. PMID:26413239

  19. Water-level altitudes 2001, water-level changes 1977-2001 and 2000-2001, and compaction 1973-2000 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplin, L.S.; Houston, Natalie A.; Brown, Dexter W.

    2001-01-01

    This report is one in an annual series of reports that depicts water-level altitudes and water-level changes since 1977 and compaction since 1973 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas. The report, prepared in cooperation with the City of Houston and the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District, presents maps for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers showing the approximate water-level altitudes in wells in 2001 (figs 1,4) and approximate water-level changes in wells from 1977 to 2001 and from 2000 to 2001 (figs 2,3,5,6), a map showing extensometer site locations (fig. 7), and graphs showing measured compaction of subserface material at selected sites from 1973 to 2000 (fig. 8). The most recent previously published water-level-altitude maps and water-level-change maps for the two aquifers in the region are by Coplin and Santos. (2000). The Houston-Galveston region comprises Harris and Galveston Counties and adjacent parts of Brazoria, Fort Bend, Waller, Montgomery, Liberty, and Chambers Counties.

  20. Salaries and Wages for Professional and Support Personnel in Public Schools, 2000-2001: A Reference Tool for Education Leaders. National Survey of Salaries and Wages in Public Schools. 28th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Alicia D.; Protheroe, Nancy; Parks, Michael C.

    This is the 28th edition of salary and wage studies conducted annually by the Educational Research Service. It collects salary data from a national panel sample of school systems for 22 professional and 10 support positions. Consistency in study design and procedures through the years has also made this the definitive study of salary changes in…

  1. Critical Pedagogy in Deaf Education: Teachers' Reflections on Implementing ASL/English Bilingual Methodology and Language Assessment for Deaf Learners. Year 4 Report (2000-2001). USDLC Star Schools Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nover, Stephen M.; Andrews, Jean F.; Everhart, Vicki S.

    The Star School staff of the Engaged Learners project at the New Mexico School for the Deaf in Santa Fe has completed its fourth year of a 5-year federally-funded program. This project aims to improve language-teaching practices of teachers who work with learners who are deaf by providing training in current bilingual theories and pedagogical…

  2. Progress in the spectacle correction of presbyopia. Part 2: Modern progressive lens technologies.

    PubMed

    Meister, Darryl J; Fisher, Scott W

    2008-05-01

    The first installment of this two-part series reviewed the fundamental optical principles and early development work associated with progressive lenses. Recent progress made in advancing the state of the art in progressive lenses will now be presented, with particular emphasis on 'free-form' progressive lenses and the application of 'wavefront' technology in progressive lens design. Because several fundamental concepts were developed in the first paper that will serve as the basis for discussions presented in this paper, including the basic optics and mathematics of progressive lens surfaces, the reader is strongly encouraged to review the companion paper.

  3. Progressive cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Warabi, Yoko; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Isozaki, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    We report two cases of neuromyelitis optica patients with progressive cerebral atrophy. The patients exhibited characteristic clinical features, including elderly onset, secondary progressive tetraparesis and cognitive impairment, abnormally elevated CSF protein and myelin basic protein levels, and extremely highly elevated serum anti-AQP-4 antibody titer. Because neuromyelitis optica pathology cannot switch from an inflammatory phase to the degenerative phase until the terminal phase, neuromyelitis optica rarely appears as a secondary progressive clinical course caused by axonal degeneration. However, severe intrathecal inflammation and massive destruction of neuroglia could cause a secondary progressive clinical course associated with cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica patients.

  4. Cognitive impairments in progression of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Stepkina, D A; Zakharov, V V; Yakhno, N N

    2010-01-01

    A total of 88 patients with progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) were studied. Cognitive impairments (CI) in PD were in most cases progressive in nature, predominantly because of increases in the severity of dysregulatory and neurodynamic disorders, impairments to visuospatial functions, and, in some cases, deficits in nominative speech function. A high frequency of transformation of moderate cognitive impairments to dementia was demonstrated over periods of 2-5 years. Predictors of the progression of CI in PD were identified: elderly age, later onset of disease, and the severity of PD. The greatest rate of progression of CI was seen in patients with initially more severe impairments of regulatory and visuospatial functions.

  5. SIAST Annual Report, 2000/01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saskatchewan Inst. of Applied Science and Technology, Saskatoon.

    This is the annual report for 2000-2001 from the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST). The SIAST Review Committee's report identified four priorities: (1) an appropriate and progressive mandate; (2) a commitment to accessibility; (3) responsiveness to the labor market; and (4) organizational effectiveness. This report…

  6. Let s make progress together!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriana, Mazare; Liliana, Gheorghian

    2015-04-01

    Let's make progress together! The "Theodor Balan" Secondary School in the urban area of Suceava County in northeastern Romania is involved in several different projects. In order to extend previous successful projects with the students, parents, teachers, businesses and local government representatives in science symposiums for civic projects within the concept of sustainable development, the school is continuing to develop various successful programs. "The battle" continues both in nature and in the classrooms, in order to preserve the environment and to discover new resources. To raise awareness about the importance of existing resources even at the level of individuals there is a constant concern for keeping up to date on what already exists and is well known, but at the same time to remove "barriers" and discover new horizons and resources. Scientific activities held in our school are an effective way to educate students and the community to which they belong. In our community, we discovered sources of drinking water polluted by nitrites from fertilizers used in agriculture. In order to inform and educate people in the area, our teachers have organized several educational activities. Its purpose was: -Knowledge of the importance of water for the environment and human health. -Reducing water pollution. Students have informed their families' about sustainable development acquired at school. In this way, the school manages to educate and change people's ideas. The ways and methods of adults' learning were practiced within a Grundtvig training course "It's never too late learning to learn" in February 2014, in Florence, Italy. The GIFT 2014 was a great occasion for the teachers and students, the county's educational department and the participants at the National Colloquia of Physics to discover new materials provided at the Conference and the latest news and topics in the world of science. The theme trips at the physics laboratories of "Alexandru Ioan Cuza

  7. Foot Progression Angle Walking Test

    PubMed Central

    Ranawat, Anil S.; Gaudiani, Michael A.; Slullitel, Pablo A.; Satalich, James; Rebolledo, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Determining an accurate clinical diagnosis for nonarthritic hip pain may be challenging, as symptoms related to femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) or hip instability can be difficult to elucidate with current testing methods. In addition, commonly utilized physical examination maneuvers are static and do not include a dynamic or weightbearing assessment to reproduce activity-related symptoms. Therefore, implementing a dynamic assessment for FAI and hip instability could help to improve diagnostic accuracy for routine clinical examinations of patients with nonarthritic hip pain. Purpose: To assess the efficacy of a novel diagnostic foot progression angle walking (FPAW) test for identifying hip pathology related to FAI or hip instability. Study Design: Prospective cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This prospective study included 199 consecutive patients who were evaluated for unilateral hip pain and who underwent FPAW testing along with standard physical examination testing. Demographic data, including age, sex and hip laterality, were collected from each patient. FPAW testing was performed with directed internal and external foot progression angles from their baseline measurements, with a positive test reproducing pain and/or discomfort. Comparisons were then made with flexion adduction internal rotation (FADIR) and flexion abduction external rotation (FABER) tests as the designated diagnostic standard examinations for FAI and hip instability, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity, along with the McNemar chi-square test for group comparison, were used to generate summary statistics. In addition, areas under the combined receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) of test performance were calculated for both FPAW and the designated standard examination tests (FADIR, FABER). Radiographic imaging was used subsequently to confirm the diagnosis. Results: The average age of the study cohort was 35.4 ± 11.8 years, with 114 patients being

  8. Recent Progress in Electronic Skin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiandi; Dong, Lin; Zhang, Hanlu; Yu, Ruomeng; Pan, Caofeng; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-10-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the human body and can sense pressure, temperature, and other complex environmental stimuli or conditions. The mimicry of human skin's sensory ability via electronics is a topic of innovative research that could find broad applications in robotics, artificial intelligence, and human-machine interfaces, all of which promote the development of electronic skin (e-skin). To imitate tactile sensing via e-skins, flexible and stretchable pressure sensor arrays are constructed based on different transduction mechanisms and structural designs. These arrays can map pressure with high resolution and rapid response beyond that of human perception. Multi-modal force sensing, temperature, and humidity detection, as well as self-healing abilities are also exploited for multi-functional e-skins. Other recent progress in this field includes the integration with high-density flexible circuits for signal processing, the combination with wireless technology for convenient sensing and energy/data transfer, and the development of self-powered e-skins. Future opportunities lie in the fabrication of highly intelligent e-skins that can sense and respond to variations in the external environment. The rapidly increasing innovations in this area will be important to the scientific community and to the future of human life.

  9. Progress on Variable Cycle Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westmoreland, J. S.; Howlett, R. A.; Lohmann, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    Progress in the development and future requirements of the Variable Stream Control Engine (VSCE) are presented. The two most critical components of this advanced system for future supersonic transports, the high performance duct burner for thrust augmentation, and the low jet coannular nozzle were studied. Nozzle model tests substantiated the jet noise benefit associated with the unique velocity profile possible with a coannular nozzle system on a VSCE. Additional nozzle model performance tests have established high thrust efficiency levels only at takeoff and supersonic cruise for this nozzle system. An experimental program involving both isolated component and complete engine tests has been conducted for the high performance, low emissions duct burner with good results and large scale testing of these two components is being conducted using a F100 engine as the testbed for simulating the VSCE. Future work includes application of computer programs for supersonic flow fields to coannular nozzle geometries, further experimental testing with the duct burner segment rig, and the use of the Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) Testbed Program for evaluating the VSCE duct burner and coannular nozzle technologies.

  10. Recent progress in VSTOL technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L.; Deckert, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in vertical and short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft technology, in particular, during the 1970 to 1980 period at Ames Research Center is discussed. Although only two kinds of V/STOL aircraft (the helicopter and the British direct lift Harrier) have achieved operational maturity, understanding of the technology has vastly improved during this 10 year period. To pursue an aggressive R and D program at a reasonable cost, it was decided to conduct extensive large scale testing in wind tunnel and flight simulation facilities, to develop low cost research aircraft using modified airframes or engines, and to involve other agencies and industry contractors in joint technical and funding arrangements. The STOL investigations include exploring STOL performance using the rotating cylinder flap concept, the augmentor wing, upon initiation of the Quiet Short Haul Research Aircraft program, the upper surface blown flap concept. The VTOL investigations were conducted using a tilt rotor aircraft, resulting in the XV-15 tilt rotor research aircraft. Direct jet lift is now being considered for application to future supersonic fighter aircraft.

  11. Progress in carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.; Roche, M.F.

    1995-08-01

    Our objective is to increase both the life and power of the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) by developing improved components and designs. Current activities are as follows: (1) Development of lithium ferrate (LiFeO{sub 2}) and lithium cobaltate (LiCoO{sub 2}) cathodes for extended MCFC life, particularly in pressurized operation, where the present cathode, NiO, provides insufficient life; (2) Development of distributed-manifold MCFC designs for increased volumetric power density and decreased temperature gradients (and, therefore, increased life); (3) Development of components and designs appropriate for high-power-density operation (>2 kW/m{sup 2} and >100 kW/m{sup 3} in an integrated MCFC system); and (4) Studies of pitting corrosion of the stainless-steel interconnects and aluminized seals now being employed in the MCFC (alternative components will also be studied). Each of these activities has the potential to reduce the MCFC system cost significantly. Progress in each activity will be presented during the poster session.

  12. Computational Aeroelasticity: Success, Progress, Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Liu, Danny D.; Huttsell, Lawrence J.

    2003-01-01

    The formal term Computational Aeroelasticity (CAE) has only been recently adopted to describe aeroelastic analysis methods coupling high-level computational fluid dynamics codes with structural dynamics techniques. However, the general field of aeroelastic computations has enjoyed a rich history of development and application since the first hand-calculations performed in the mid 1930 s. This paper portrays a much broader definition of Computational Aeroelasticity; one that encompasses all levels of aeroelastic computation from the simplest linear aerodynamic modeling to the highest levels of viscous unsteady aerodynamics, from the most basic linear beam structural models to state-of-the-art Finite Element Model (FEM) structural analysis. This paper is not written as a comprehensive history of CAE, but rather serves to review the development and application of aeroelastic analysis methods. It describes techniques and example applications that are viewed as relatively mature and accepted, the "successes" of CAE. Cases where CAE has been successfully applied to unique or emerging problems, but the resulting techniques have proven to be one-of-a-kind analyses or areas where the techniques have yet to evolve into a routinely applied methodology are covered as "progress" in CAE. Finally the true value of this paper is rooted in the description of problems where CAE falls short in its ability to provide relevant tools for industry, the so-called "challenges" to CAE.

  13. Silicon spintronics: Progress and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2015-07-01

    Electron spin attracts much attention as an alternative to the electron charge degree of freedom for low-power reprogrammable logic and non-volatile memory applications. Silicon appears to be the perfect material for spin-driven applications. Recent progress and challenges regarding spin-based devices are reviewed. An order of magnitude enhancement of the electron spin lifetime in silicon thin films by shear strain is predicted and its impact on spin transport in SpinFETs is discussed. A relatively weak coupling between spin and effective electric field in silicon allows magnetoresistance modulation at room temperature, however, for long channel lengths. Due to tunneling magnetoresistance and spin transfer torque effects, a much stronger coupling between the spin (magnetization) orientation and charge current is achieved in magnetic tunnel junctions. Magnetic random access memory (MRAM) built on magnetic tunnel junctions is CMOS compatible and possesses all properties needed for future universal memory. Designs of spin-based non-volatile MRAM cells are presented. By means of micromagnetic simulations it is demonstrated that a substantial reduction of the switching time can be achieved. Finally, it is shown that any two arbitrary memory cells from an MRAM array can be used to perform a logic operation. Thus, an intrinsic non-volatile logic-in-memory architecture can be realized.

  14. Progress on ITER Diagnostic Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David; Feder, Russ; Klabacha, Jonathan; Loesser, Doug; Messineo, Mike; Stratton, Brentley; Wood, Rick; Zhai, Yuhu; Andrew, Phillip; Barnsley, Robin; Bertschinger, Guenter; Debock, Maarten; Reichle, Roger; Udintsev, Victor; Vayakis, George; Watts, Christopher; Walsh, Michael

    2013-10-01

    On ITER, front-end components must operate reliably in a hostile environment. Many will be housed in massive port plugs, which also shield the machine from radiation. Multiple diagnostics reside in a single plug, presenting new challenges for developers. Front-end components must tolerate thermally-induced stresses, disruption-induced mechanical loads, stray ECH radiation, displacement damage, and degradation due to plasma-induced coatings. The impact of failures is amplified due to the difficulty in performing robotic maintenance on these large structures. Motivated by needs to minimize disruption loads on the plugs, standardize the handling of shield modules, and decouple the parallel efforts of the many parties, the packaging strategy for diagnostics has recently focused on the use of 3 vertical shield modules inserted from the plasma side into each equatorial plug structure. At the front of each is a detachable first wall element with customized apertures. Progress on US equatorial and upper plugs will be used as examples, including the layout of components in the interspace and port cell regions. Supported by PPPL under contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 and UT-Battelle, LLC under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. DOE.

  15. MICE Spectrometer Magnet System Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2007-08-27

    The first magnets for the muon ionization cooling experimentwill be the tracker solenoids that form the ends of the MICE coolingchannel. The primary purpose of the tracker solenoids is to provide auniform 4 T field (to better than +-0.3 percent over a volume that is 1meter long and 0.3 meters in diameter) spectrometer magnet field for thescintillating fiber detectors that are used to analyze the muons in thechannel before and after ionization cooling. A secondary purpose for thetracker magnet is the matching of the muon beam between the rest of theMICE cooling channel and the uniform field spectrometer magnet. Thetracker solenoid is powered by three 300 amp power supplies. Additionaltuning of the spectrometer is provided by a pair of 50 amp power suppliesacross the spectrometer magnet end coils. The tracker magnet will becooled using a pair of 4 K pulse tube coolers that each provide 1.5 W ofcooling at 4.2 K. Final design and construction of the tracker solenoidsbegan during the summer of 2006. This report describes the progress madeon the construction of the tracker solenoids.

  16. Recent progress in anisotropic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The quark-gluon plasma created in a relativistic heavy-ion collisions possesses a sizable pressure anisotropy in the local rest frame at very early times after the initial nuclear impact and this anisotropy only slowly relaxes as the system evolves. In a kinetic theory picture, this translates into the existence of sizable momentum-space anisotropies in the underlying partonic distribution functions, < pL2> ≪ < pT2>. In such cases, it is better to reorganize the hydrodynamical expansion by taking into account momentum-space anisotropies at leading-order in the expansion instead of as a perturbative correction to an isotropic distribution. The resulting anisotropic hydrodynamics framework has been shown to more accurately describe the dynamics of rapidly expanding systems such as the quark-gluon plasma. In this proceedings contribution, I review the basic ideas of anisotropic hydrodynamics, recent progress, and present a few preliminary phenomenological predictions for identified particle spectra and elliptic flow.

  17. Progress Toward Future Runway Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohr, Gary W.; Brown, Sherilyn A.; Atkins, Stephen; Eisenhawer, Stephen W.; Bott, Terrance F.; Long, Dou; Hasan, Shahab

    2011-01-01

    The runway is universally acknowledged as a constraining factor to capacity in the National Airspace System (NAS). It follows that investigation of the effective use of runways, both in terms of selection and assignment, is paramount to the efficiency of future NAS operations. The need to address runway management is not a new idea; however, as the complexities of factors affecting runway selection and usage increase, the need for effective research in this area correspondingly increases. Under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Airspace Systems Program, runway management is a key research area. To address a future NAS which promises to be a complex landscape of factors and competing interests among users and operators, effective runway management strategies and capabilities are required. This effort has evolved from an assessment of current practices, an understanding of research activities addressing surface and airspace operations, traffic flow management enhancements, among others. This work has yielded significant progress. Systems analysis work indicates that the value of System Oriented Runway Management tools is significantly increased in the metroplex environment over that of the single airport case. Algorithms have been developed to provide runway configuration recommendations for a single airport with multiple runways. A benefits analysis has been conducted that indicates the SORM benefits include supporting traffic growth, cost reduction as a result of system efficiency, NAS optimization from metroplex operations, fairness in aircraft operations, and rational decision making.

  18. Hepatitis C: progress and problems.

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, J A

    1994-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV), a single-stranded RNA virus, is the major cause of posttransfusion hepatitis. HCV isolates differ in nucleotide and amino acid sequences. Nucleotide changes are concentrated in hypervariable regions and may be related to immune selection. In most immunocompetent persons, HCV infection is diagnosed serologically, using antigens from conserved regions. Amplification of RNA may be necessary to detect infection in immunosuppressed patients. Transmission by known parenteral routes is frequent; other means of spread are less common and may represent inapparent, percutaneous dissemination. Infection can lead to classical acute hepatitis, but most infected persons have no history of acute disease. Once infected, most individuals apparently remain carriers of the virus, with varying degrees of hepatocyte damage and fibrosis ensuing. Chronic hepatitis may lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, disease progression varies widely, from less than 2 years to cirrhosis in some patients to more than 30 years with only chronic hepatitis in others. Determinants important in deciding outcome are unknown. Alpha interferon, which results in sustained remission in selected patients, is the only available therapy. Long-term benefits from such therapy have not been demonstrated. Prevention of HCV infection by vaccination is likely to be challenging if ongoing viral mutation results in escape from neutralization and clearance. PMID:7834603

  19. [Progress in proteogenomics of prokaryotes].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengpu; Xu, Ping; Zhu, Yunping

    2014-07-01

    With the rapid development of genome sequencing technologies, a large amount of prokaryote genomes have been sequenced in recent years. To further investigate the models and functions of genomes, the algorithms for genome annotations based on the sequence and homology features have been widely implemented to newly sequenced genomes. However, gene annotations only using the genomic information are prone to errors, such as the incorrect N-terminals and pseudogenes. It is even harder to provide reasonable annotating results in the case of the poor genome sequencing results. The transcriptomics based on the technologies such as microarray and RNA-seq and the proteomics based on the MS/MS have been used widely to identify the gene products with high throughput and high sensitivity, providing the powerful tools for the verification and correction of annotated genome. Compared with transcriptomics, proteomics can generate the protein list for the expressed genes in the samples or cells without any confusion of the non-coding RNA, leading the proteogenomics an important basis for the genome annotations in prokaryotes. In this paper, we first described the traditional genome annotation algorithms and pointed out the shortcomings. Then we summarized the advantages of proteomics in the genome annotations and reviewed the progress of proteogenomics in prokaryotes. Finally we discussed the challenges and strategies in the data analyses and potential solutions for the developments of proteogenomics.

  20. Progress on the DPASS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, Sergei A.; Bogatu, I. N.; Svidzinski, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    A novel project to develop Disruption Prediction And Simulation Suite (DPASS) of comprehensive computational tools to predict, model, and analyze disruption events in tokamaks has been recently started at FAR-TECH Inc. DPASS will eventually address the following aspects of the disruption problem: MHD, plasma edge dynamics, plasma-wall interaction, generation and losses of runaway electrons. DPASS uses the 3-D Disruption Simulation Code (DSC-3D) as a core tool and will have a modular structure. DSC is a one fluid non-linear, time-dependent 3D MHD code to simulate dynamics of tokamak plasma surrounded by pure vacuum B-field in the real geometry of a conducting tokamak vessel. DSC utilizes the adaptive meshless technique with adaptation to the moving plasma boundary, with accurate magnetic flux conservation and resolution of the plasma surface current. DSC has also an option to neglect the plasma inertia to eliminate fast magnetosonic scale. This option can be turned on/off as needed. During Phase I of the project, two modules will be developed: the computational module for modeling the massive gas injection and main plasma respond; and the module for nanoparticle plasma jet injection as an innovative disruption mitigation scheme. We will report on this development progress. Work is supported by the US DOE SBIR grant # DE-SC0013727.

  1. Measles elimination: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Cutts, F T; Henao-Restrepo, A; Olivé, J M

    1999-10-29

    The accelerating progress in reducing measles incidence and mortality in many parts of the world has led to calls for its global eradication during the next 10-15 years. Three regions have established goals of elimination of indigenous transmission of measles. The strategy used in the Americas of a mass 'catchup' campaign of children 9 months to 15 years of age, high coverage through routine vaccination of infants, intensive surveillance and follow-up campaigns to prevent excessive build-up of susceptibles has had great success in reducing measles transmission close to zero. However, while these developments are impressive, much remains to be done to reduce measles-associated mortality in western and central Africa, where less than half of children are currently receiving measles vaccine and half a million children die from measles each year. The obstacles to global measles eradication are perceived to be predominantly political and financial. There are also technical questions, however. These include the refinement of measles elimination strategies in the light of recent outbreaks in the Americas; the implications of the HIV epidemic for measles elimination, issues around injection safety, and concerns about the possibility that secondary vaccine failures will contribute in sustaining transmission in highly vaccinated populations. The global priorities are to improve measles control in low income countries, increase awareness among industrialized countries of the importance of measles, and conduct studies to answer the technical questions about measles elimination strategies.

  2. Stillbirths: progress and unfinished business.

    PubMed

    Frøen, J Frederik; Friberg, Ingrid K; Lawn, Joy E; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Pattinson, Robert C; Allanson, Emma R; Flenady, Vicki; McClure, Elizabeth M; Franco, Lynne; Goldenberg, Robert L; Kinney, Mary V; Leisher, Susannah Hopkins; Pitt, Catherine; Islam, Monir; Khera, Ajay; Dhaliwal, Lakhbir; Aggarwal, Neelam; Raina, Neena; Temmerman, Marleen

    2016-02-06

    This first paper of the Lancet Series on ending preventable stillbirths reviews progress in essential areas, identified in the 2011 call to action for stillbirth prevention, to inform the integrated post-2015 agenda for maternal and newborn health. Worldwide attention to babies who die in stillbirth is rapidly increasing, from integration within the new Global Strategy for Women's, Children's and Adolescents' Health, to country policies inspired by the Every Newborn Action Plan. Supportive new guidance and metrics including stillbirth as a core health indicator and measure of quality of care are emerging. Prenatal health is a crucial biological foundation to life-long health. A key priority is to integrate action for prenatal health within the continuum of care for maternal and newborn health. Still, specific actions for stillbirths are needed for advocacy, policy formulation, monitoring, and research, including improvement in the dearth of data for effective coverage of proven interventions for prenatal survival. Strong leadership is needed worldwide and in countries. Institutions with a mandate to lead global efforts for mothers and their babies must assert their leadership to reduce stillbirths by promoting healthy and safe pregnancies.

  3. CXCR3 in carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bo; Khazali, Ahmad; Wells, Alan

    2015-07-01

    CXCR3 is a G-protein coupled receptor which binds to ELR-negative CXC chemokines that have been found to impact immune responses, vascular develop, and wound repair. More recently, CXCR3 has been examined in the context of cancer and increased expression in many human tumors has been correlated with poor prognosis in breast, melanoma, colon and renal cancer patients. Three variants of CXCR3 are identified so far (CXCR3-A, CXCR3-B and CXCR3-alt) with the two primary ones, CXCR3-A and CXCR3-B, considered to induce opposite physiological functions. Generally, CXCR3-A, the predominant form in hematopoietic cells, appears to mediate tumor "go" signaling via promoting cell proliferation, survival, chemotaxis, invasion and metastasis; while CXCR3-B, the main form on formed elements including epithelial cells, appears to mediate tumor "stop" signaling via promoting growth suppression, apoptosis and vascular involution. Thus, aberrant expression of the isoforms CXCR3-A and CXCR3-B could affect tumor progression. In this review, we have discussed the profiles of CXCR3 variants and related signaling, as well as the role of CXCR3 variants in cancer.

  4. [Progresses and perspectives in cybersurgery].

    PubMed

    Falcone, Fulvio

    2006-01-01

    Aim of this paper is to describe the last progress of surgical robotics owing to the more precise and more reliable instrumentations The surgical robotic applications supported by these technological developments and by the new applications allowed by the outstanding contribution of Electronic Bioengineering Had the possibility to utilise more powerful Telecommunications Networks, essential tool for the data transmission, having an impact in several areas like Telemedicine, Diagnosis and Medical and Surgical Therapy of the patient. The data transmission in real time, that of course is not influenced by the distance, allows a new virtual contact (Map-Volume) and a Clinical three-dimensional Anatomical Space (3D) operative between the surgeon and the complex robotical system. Formed by the Monitor/Controller/Robot Surgeon/patients and distant neighbours. The use of Robotic Surgery, more and more involved in Telemedicine and in the complex system of teleassistance inside the Emergency Centres for all type of catastrophe, will be essential and decisive in the nearer future. In conclusion, many new scenarios with various applications have be opened us for Telerobotic Surgery. Innovations, applications, developments of new systems will involve a greater and greater number of technicians, Doctors, Bioengineers, Clinical Engineers, Informatic Staff in all Telemedicine sectors..

  5. Recent Progress in Electronic Skin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiandi; Dong, Lin; Zhang, Hanlu; Yu, Ruomeng; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the human body and can sense pressure, temperature, and other complex environmental stimuli or conditions. The mimicry of human skin's sensory ability via electronics is a topic of innovative research that could find broad applications in robotics, artificial intelligence, and human–machine interfaces, all of which promote the development of electronic skin (e‐skin). To imitate tactile sensing via e‐skins, flexible and stretchable pressure sensor arrays are constructed based on different transduction mechanisms and structural designs. These arrays can map pressure with high resolution and rapid response beyond that of human perception. Multi‐modal force sensing, temperature, and humidity detection, as well as self‐healing abilities are also exploited for multi‐functional e‐skins. Other recent progress in this field includes the integration with high‐density flexible circuits for signal processing, the combination with wireless technology for convenient sensing and energy/data transfer, and the development of self‐powered e‐skins. Future opportunities lie in the fabrication of highly intelligent e‐skins that can sense and respond to variations in the external environment. The rapidly increasing innovations in this area will be important to the scientific community and to the future of human life. PMID:27980911

  6. Peptide Vaccine: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidang; Joshi, Medha D.; Singhania, Smita; Ramsey, Kyle H.; Murthy, Ashlesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional vaccine strategies have been highly efficacious for several decades in reducing mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases. The bane of conventional vaccines, such as those that include whole organisms or large proteins, appear to be the inclusion of unnecessary antigenic load that, not only contributes little to the protective immune response, but complicates the situation by inducing allergenic and/or reactogenic responses. Peptide vaccines are an attractive alternative strategy that relies on usage of short peptide fragments to engineer the induction of highly targeted immune responses, consequently avoiding allergenic and/or reactogenic sequences. Conversely, peptide vaccines used in isolation are often weakly immunogenic and require particulate carriers for delivery and adjuvanting. In this article, we discuss the specific advantages and considerations in targeted induction of immune responses by peptide vaccines and progresses in the development of such vaccines against various diseases. Additionally, we also discuss the development of particulate carrier strategies and the inherent challenges with regard to safety when combining such technologies with peptide vaccines. PMID:26344743

  7. Purpose and Progress of CUAHSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. L.; Potter, K. W.

    2002-05-01

    The Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science Incorporated (CUASHI) is a fifty plus member institution dedicated to the design, construction and operation of infrastructure in the support of hydrologic science. Formed last year, the Consortium is presently writing a Science Plan, part of which will be described in companion talks at this special session. To address today's water resources problems the plan proposes that there must be fundamental changes in the conduct of hydrologic science. Research must consider complete hydrologic systems, including all important coupled processes, atmosphere--biosphere--land surface--human infrastructure--soil--subsurface. Research should also integrate relevant disciplines to simultaneously consider physical, chemical, biological, and social phenomena, and it should address the enormous spatial and temporal heterogeneity that characterizes hydrologic systems over a range of scales. The plan proposes shared infrastructure needed by the hydrologic science community to grapple with these issues, along with related education and outreach activities, and a program of science application. This talk introduces CUAHSI, describes our progress over the first nine months of operation including membership, staffing and the founding of corporate offices in Washington, DC., and proposes anticipated actions for the next six to twelve months.

  8. Tragedy, utopia and medical progress

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksen, S

    2006-01-01

    In this article, tragedy and utopia are juxtaposed, and it is proposed that the problem of “medicalisation” is better understood in a framework of tragedy than in a utopian one. In utopia, it is presupposed that there is an error behind every setback and every side effect, whereas tragedy brings to light how side effects can be the result of irreconcilable conflicts. Medicalisation is to some extent the result of such a tragic conflict. We are given power by medical progress, but are also confronted with our fallibility, thus provoking insecurity. This situation is illustrated by the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Recent epidemiological investigations have shown that infants sleeping in a prone position have a 15–20 times higher risk of dying from SIDS than infants sleeping in a supine position. A simple means of preventing infant death is suggested by this discovery, but insecurity is also created. What else has been overlooked? Perhaps a draught, or wet diapers, or clothes of wool are just as dangerous as sleeping prone? Further investigations and precautions will be needed, but medicalisation prevails. PMID:16877623

  9. Progress in coherent laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable progress with coherent laser radar has been made over the last few years, most notably perhaps in the available range of high performance devices and components and the confidence with which systems may now be taken into the field for prolonged periods of operation. Some of this increasing maturity was evident at the 3rd Topical Meeting on Coherent Laser Radar: Technology and Applications. Topics included in discussions were: mesoscale wind fields, nocturnal valley drainage and clear air down bursts; airborne Doppler lidar studies and comparison of ground and airborne wind measurement; wind measurement over the sea for comparison with satellite borne microwave sensors; transport of wake vortices at airfield; coherent DIAL methods; a newly assembled Nd-YAG coherent lidar system; backscatter profiles in the atmosphere and wavelength dependence over the 9 to 11 micrometer region; beam propagation; rock and soil classification with an airborne 4-laser system; technology of a global wind profiling system; target calibration; ranging and imaging with coherent pulsed and CW system; signal fluctuations and speckle. Some of these activities are briefly reviewed.

  10. Bioenergetic Progress and Heat Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotin, A. A.; Lamprecht, I.; Zotin, A. I.

    2001-07-01

    Progressing biological evolution is discussed in the framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. It is connected with an increase of the mass specific standard metabolism given by coefficient a in the allometric relation (1) between oxygen consumption rate and body mass of an animal. Three “heat barriers” are found in the course of such a bioenergetic evolution. The first heat barrier concerns an animal's overheating during active movement and is overcome by the development of thermoregulation and the appearance of homeothermic animals. A second barrier arises when the coefficient a reaches values connected with lethal body temperatures. The transition across this second heat barrier occurs as result of reasonable activities and the appearance of civilization. The third heat barrier will arise during the further development of human civilization, connected with a highly increased energy production and a fatal warming of the Earth atmosphere. The manner to overcome this barrier will probably depend on the assimilation of space and the establishment of energy consuming industries outside the Earth. The bioenergetic evolution discussed in this paper does not exclude other trends of evolution, e.g. increase of size, and does not mean to be the only aspect of biological evolution.

  11. Progress at LAMPF: Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report, January-June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, J.C.

    1981-09-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions.

  12. Progress at LAMPF: Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report, July-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, J.C.

    1981-03-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report also includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions.

  13. Students' Progression in Understanding the Matter Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadenfeldt, Jan Christoph; Neumann, Knut; Bernholt, Sascha; Liu, Xiufeng; Parchmann, Ilka

    2016-01-01

    This study presents our attempt to elicit students' progression in understanding the matter concept. Past work has identified the big ideas about matter students need to understand, the many everyday understandings students hold about these ideas, and levels of understanding through which students progress in developing understanding of the big…

  14. Measuring Organizational Learning: A Preliminary Progress Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Contractor Report 2010-01 Measuring Organizational Learning : A Preliminary Progress Report Chris Winkler and Charles T...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Measuring Organizational Learning : A Preliminary Progress Report 5a. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER W91WAW-07-C-0074 5b...Technical Publications Specialist (703) 602-8049 ii iii MEASURING ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING : A PRELIMINARY

  15. TAFE Projects in Progress. No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skott, Diana, Comp.

    1982-01-01

    This publication contains a listing of educational research and development projects currently in progress in Australia, which is the first of a planned twice-yearly listing of projects in progress. Projects are listed by territories and are indexed by author and by subject. Information supplied for each project includes a reference number,…

  16. Yemeni Student Characteristics and Language Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Ian C.

    A study was undertaken to identify useful methods for measuring progress in English language proficiency among students at the Yemen-America Language Institute (YALI) in Sana'a, Yemen. The study examined factors critical to such progress as well as the profiles of student attitudes and demographic characteristics. A questionnaire was administered…

  17. National Disability Policy: A Progress Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the National Council on Disability (NCD) Progress Report has been a retrospective review and analysis of Federal programs for people with disabilities. For this Progress Report, NCD members have chosen to depart from a retrospective approach, and, instead, will focus on the current status of the quality of life of people with…

  18. Progressive Associative Phonagnosia: A Neuropsychological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailstone, Julia C.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Vestergaard, Martin D.; Patterson, Roy D.; Warren, Jason D.

    2010-01-01

    There are few detailed studies of impaired voice recognition, or phonagnosia. Here we describe two patients with progressive phonagnosia in the context of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Patient QR presented with behavioural decline and increasing difficulty recognising familiar voices, while patient KL presented with progressive prosopagnosia.…

  19. Paraneoplastic syndrome mimicking progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Dash, Deepa; Choudhary, Rima; Ramanujam, Bhargavi; Vasantha, Padma M; Tripathi, Manjari

    2016-10-01

    Paraneoplastic syndrome presenting with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) phenotype is extremely rare. We report a patient who presented with features of rapidly progressive parkinsonism similar to PSP and was found to have small cell carcinoma of the lung along with seropositivity for onconeural antigen. The patient was treated with immunomodulation and was given chemotherapy for the malignancy and subsequently improved.

  20. SuperB Progress Report: Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Grauges, E.; Donvito, G.; Spinoso, V.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Eigen, G.; Fehlker, D.; Helleve, L.; Carbone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Gabrielli, A.; Galli, D.; Giorgi, F.; Marconi, U.; Perazzini, S.; Sbarra, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valentinetti, S.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.; /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Caltech /Carleton U. /Cincinnati U. /INFN, CNAF /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /UC, Irvine /Taras Shevchenko U. /Orsay, LAL /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Frascati /INFN, Legnaro /Orsay, IPN /Maryland U. /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Pavia /Pavia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Caltech /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /PNL, Richland /Queen Mary, U. of London /Rutherford /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome2 /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /INFN, Rome3 /Rome III U. /SLAC /Tel Aviv U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Padua /Trento U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /TRIUMF /British Columbia U. /Montreal U. /Victoria U.

    2012-02-14

    This report describes the present status of the detector design for SuperB. It is one of four separate progress reports that, taken collectively, describe progress made on the SuperB Project since the publication of the SuperB Conceptual Design Report in 2007 and the Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI in Valencia in 2008.

  1. Motivational Aspects of Moral Learning and Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curren, Randall

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses a puzzle about moral learning concerning its social context and the potential for moral progress: Won't the social context of moral learning shape moral perceptions, beliefs, and motivation in ways that will inevitably "limit" moral cognition, motivation, and progress? It addresses the relationships between…

  2. A Re-Visioning of Progressive Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doll, William E., Jr.

    Progressive education presents a valid model on which to build educational change, but the model should be altered to take into account developments in social needs and in ideational theories. In the past 90 years, only the "child-centered" strand of progressive education has had a major impact on classroom practice. Growing out of the needs of an…

  3. Gaining Momentum, Losing Ground. Progress Report, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business Roundtable, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report presents an update of the progress of Tapping America's Potential (TAP), a coalition of 15 of the nation's leading business organizations, and assesses three years' progress since 2005 in working towards the goal of doubling the number of students earning bachelor's degrees in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) by 2015.…

  4. Progress in advanced high temperature materials technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ault, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    Significant progress has recently been made in many high temperature material categories pertinent to such applications by the industrial community. These include metal matrix composites, superalloys, directionally solidified eutectics, coatings, and ceramics. Each of these material categories is reviewed and the current state-of-the-art identified, including some assessment, when appropriate, of progress, problems, and future directions.

  5. [Progressive anarthria: one case without lingual apraxia].

    PubMed

    Infante, J; Sánchez Guerra, M; Polo, J M; Carril, J M; Berciano, J; Oterino, A

    2000-05-01

    Progressive anarthria is a focal cortical degenerative disorder characterized by a profound, progressive alteration in speech without impairment in other cognitive domains. The first symptoms consist of an alteration in the articulation of speech producing telegraphic speech. The disorder invariably progress towards anarthria by deprogramming of the phonation and orolingual movements (bucophonetic apraxia). This type of apraxia is usually associated with orolinguofacial apraxia and it has been anatomofunctionally correlated with frontal opercular involvement of left predominance. The patient presented as progressive anarthria in the absence of manifest orolingual apraxia associated with a predominance of cortical atrophy in the right frontal operculum. This semiological dissociation emphasizes the importance of bucophonatory apraxia in the pathophysiology of progressive anarthria.

  6. Secondary progression is not the only explanation.

    PubMed

    Palavra, Filipe; Tur, Carmen; Tintoré, Mar; Rovira, Àlex; Montalban, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system. Its presentation is variable and its course and prognosis are unpredictable. Approximately 85% of individuals present a relapsing-remitting form of the disease, but some patients may evolve into a progressive course, accumulating irreversible neurological disability, defining its secondary progressive phase. Despite all the advances that had been reached in terms of diagnosis, many decisions are still taken based only on pure clinical skills. We present the case of a patient that, after being diagnosed with a clinically isolated syndrome many years ago, seemed to be entering in a secondary progressive course, developing a clinical picture dominated by a progressive gait disturbance. Nevertheless, multiple sclerosis heterogeneity asks for some clinical expertise, in order to exclude all other possible causes for patients' complaints. Here we present an important red flag in the differential diagnosis of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

  7. Progress in geophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Allan R.

    Geophysical fluid dynamics deals with the motions and physics of the atmosphere, oceans and interior of the earth and other planets: the winds, the swirls, the currents that occur on myriads of scales from millimeter to climatological. Explanations of natural phenomena, basic processes and abstractions are sought. The rotation of the earth, the buoyancy of its fluids and the tendency towards large-scale turbulence characterize these flows. But geophysical fluid dynamics is importantly a part of modern fluid dynamics which is contributing to the development of nonlinear mechanics generally. Some general insights are emerging for nonlinear systems which must be regarded as partly deterministic and partly random or which are complex and aperiodic. Contributions from geophysical fluid dynamics come from its methodology, from the experience of examples, and from the perspective provided by its unique scale. Contributions have been made to turbulent, chaotic and coherently structured nonlinear process research. Turbulent vortices larger than man himself naturally invite detailed investigation and deterministic physical studies. Examples are storms in the atmosphere and large ring vortices spun off by the Gulf Stream current in mid-ocean. The statistics of these events determine critical aspects of the general circulations. Fluid dynamicists generally now know that it is often relevant or necessary to study local dynamical processes of typical eddies even though only the average properties of the flow are of interest; progress in understanding the turbulent boundary layer in pipes involves the study of millimeter-scale vortices. Weather-related studies were seminal to the construction of the new scientific field of chaos. Coherent vortices abound of which the Great Red Spot of Jupiter is a spectacular example. Geophysical fluid dynamicists have been among forefront researchers in exploiting the steadily increasing speed and capacity of modern computers. Supercomputers

  8. Artificial lung: progress and prototypes.

    PubMed

    Zwischenberger, Brittany A; Clemson, Lindsey A; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2006-07-01

    Lung disease is the fourth leading cause of death (one in seven deaths) in the USA. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) affects approximately 150,000 patients a year in the USA, and an estimated 16 million Americans are afflicted with chronic lung disease, accounting for 100,000 deaths per year. Medical management is the standard of care for initial therapy, but is limited by the progression of disease. Chronic mechanical ventilation is readily available, but is cumbersome, expensive and often requires tracheotomy with loss of upper airway defense mechanisms and normal speech. Lung transplantation is an option for less than 1100 patients per year since demand has steadily outgrown supply. For the last 15 years, the authors' group has studied ARDS in order to develop viable alternative treatments. Both extracorporeal gas exchange techniques, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, extracorporeal and arteriovenous CO(2) removal, and intravenous oxygenation, aim to allow for a less injurious ventilatory strategy during lung recovery while maintaining near-normal arterial blood gases, but precludes ambulation. The paracorporeal artificial lung (PAL), however, redefines the treatment of both acute and chronic respiratory failure with the goal of ambulatory total respiratory support. PAL prototypes tested on both normal sheep and the absolute lethal dose smoke/burn-induced ARDS sheep model have demonstrated initial success in achieving total gas exchange. Still, clinical trials cannot begin until bio- and hemodynamic compatibility challenges are reconciled. The PAL initial design goals are for a short-term (weeks) bridge to recovery or transplant, but eventually, for long-term support (months).

  9. Progress in the spectacle correction of presbyopia. Part 1: Design and development of progressive lenses.

    PubMed

    Meister, Darryl J; Fisher, Scott W

    2008-05-01

    Most of the commercial advances in the spectacle correction of presbyopia continue to occur in progressive lens design, which has been the focus of intense research and development over the past 60 years by major spectacle lens manufacturers. While progressive lens design and manufacturing techniques have advanced at a steady pace, recent progress in 'free-form' lens surfacing has opened up many exciting possibilities that will in all likelihood bring about a paradigm shift in the current model of progressive lens fabrication and distribution. The first installment of this two-part series will review the fundamental optical principles and early development work associated with progressive lenses.

  10. On Disciplinary Fragmentation and Scientific Progress

    PubMed Central

    Balietti, Stefano; Mäs, Michael; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Why are some scientific disciplines, such as sociology and psychology, more fragmented into conflicting schools of thought than other fields, such as physics and biology? Furthermore, why does high fragmentation tend to coincide with limited scientific progress? We analyzed a formal model where scientists seek to identify the correct answer to a research question. Each scientist is influenced by three forces: (i) signals received from the correct answer to the question; (ii) peer influence; and (iii) noise. We observed the emergence of different macroscopic patterns of collective exploration, and studied how the three forces affect the degree to which disciplines fall apart into divergent fragments, or so-called “schools of thought”. We conducted two simulation experiments where we tested (A) whether the three forces foster or hamper progress, and (B) whether disciplinary fragmentation causally affects scientific progress and vice versa. We found that fragmentation critically limits scientific progress. Strikingly, there is no effect in the opposite causal direction. What is more, our results shows that at the heart of the mechanisms driving scientific progress we find (i) social interactions, and (ii) peer disagreement. In fact, fragmentation is increased and progress limited if the simulated scientists are open to influence only by peers with very similar views, or when within-school diversity is lost. Finally, disciplines where the scientists received strong signals from the correct answer were less fragmented and experienced faster progress. We discuss model’s implications for the design of social institutions fostering interdisciplinarity and participation in science. PMID:25790025

  11. Site Characterization Progress Report Number 21

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-30

    This is the 21 st progress report issued by the U.S. Department of Energy. This report provides a summary-level discussion of Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project progress. Accomplishments this period are presented in a format that identifies important progress achieved and conveys how that progress supports the near-term objectives in the U.S. Department of Energy's schedule. Greater detail is documented in the cited references and in deliverables listed in Appendix A to this report. This document provides a discussion of recently completed and ongoing activities conducted by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project during the six-month reporting period from April 1, 1999, through September 30, 1999. Some information presented herein is by necessity preliminary, because some deliverables and reports that support the discussions have not been finalized. Projected future deliverables and reports are listed in Appendix B and are noted in the text as works in progress. Appendix C lists the status of milestone reports referenced in previous progress reports commencing with Progress Report 17. A glossary of Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project-specific terms used in this report is given in Appendix D.

  12. On disciplinary fragmentation and scientific progress.

    PubMed

    Balietti, Stefano; Mäs, Michael; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Why are some scientific disciplines, such as sociology and psychology, more fragmented into conflicting schools of thought than other fields, such as physics and biology? Furthermore, why does high fragmentation tend to coincide with limited scientific progress? We analyzed a formal model where scientists seek to identify the correct answer to a research question. Each scientist is influenced by three forces: (i) signals received from the correct answer to the question; (ii) peer influence; and (iii) noise. We observed the emergence of different macroscopic patterns of collective exploration, and studied how the three forces affect the degree to which disciplines fall apart into divergent fragments, or so-called "schools of thought". We conducted two simulation experiments where we tested (A) whether the three forces foster or hamper progress, and (B) whether disciplinary fragmentation causally affects scientific progress and vice versa. We found that fragmentation critically limits scientific progress. Strikingly, there is no effect in the opposite causal direction. What is more, our results shows that at the heart of the mechanisms driving scientific progress we find (i) social interactions, and (ii) peer disagreement. In fact, fragmentation is increased and progress limited if the simulated scientists are open to influence only by peers with very similar views, or when within-school diversity is lost. Finally, disciplines where the scientists received strong signals from the correct answer were less fragmented and experienced faster progress. We discuss model's implications for the design of social institutions fostering interdisciplinarity and participation in science.

  13. Progressive hemifacial atrophy. A natural history study.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M T; Spencer, M A

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe two very different natural history courses in 2 patients with hemifacial atrophy. Progressive hemifacial atrophy (Parry-Romberg syndrome, Romberg syndrome, PHA) is characterized by slowly progressive atrophy, frequently involving only one side of the face, primarily affecting the subcutaneous tissue and fat. The onset usually occurs during the first 2 decades of life. The cause and pathophysiology are unknown. Ophthalmic involvement is common, with progressive enophthalmos a frequent finding. Pupillary disturbances, heterochromia, uveitis, pigmentary disturbances of the ocular fundus, and restrictive strabismus have also been reported. Neurologic findings may be present, but the natural history and progression of ocular findings are often not described in the literature. METHODS: We studied the records and present findings of 2 patients with progressive hemifacial atrophy who were observed in our institution over a 10-year period. RESULTS: Both patients showed progression of ophthalmic findings, primarily on the affected side. One patient has had chronic uveitis with secondary cataract and glaucoma, in addition to retinal pigmentary changes. She also had a third-nerve paresis of the contralateral eye and mild seizure activity. The other patient had mild uveitis, some progression of unilateral retinal pigmentary changes, and a significant increase in hyperopia in the affected eye, in addition to hypotony at age 19 without a clear cause, but with secondary retinal and refractive changes. CONCLUSION: Ocular manifestations of progressive hemifacial atrophy are varied, but can progress from mild visual impairment to blindness. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8719679

  14. Surrogate Markers of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Wanhainen, Anders; Mani, Kevin; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    The natural course of many abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is to gradually expand and eventually rupture and monitoring the disease progression is essential to their management. In this publication, we review surrogate markers of AAA progression. AAA diameter remains the most widely used and important marker of AAA growth. Standardized reporting of reproducible methods of measuring AAA diameter is essential. Newer imaging assessments, such as volume measurements, biomechanical analyses, and functional and molecular imaging, as well as circulating biomarkers, have potential to add important information about AAA progression. Currently, however, there is insufficient evidence to recommend their routine use in clinical practice.

  15. [Progress in microbial production of succinic acid].

    PubMed

    Liu, Rongming; Liang, Liya; Wu, Mingke; Jiang, Min

    2013-10-01

    Succinic acid is one of the key intermediates in the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA)and has huge potentials in biopolymer, food, medicine applications. This article reviews recent research progress in the production of succinic acid by microbial fermentation, including discovery and screening of the succinic-acid-producing microbes, the progress of genetic engineering strategy and metabolic engineering technology for construction of succinic acid-producing strains, and fermentation process control and optimization. Finally, we discussed the limitation of current progress and proposed the future research needs for microbial production of succinic acid.

  16. Theoretical problems in accelerator physics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This is the second progress report submitted under the author`s current grant and covers progress made since the submission of the first progress report in August 1993. During this period the author has continued to spend approximately one half of his time at SLAC and most of the projects reported here were carried out in collaboration with individuals and groups at SLAC. Except where otherwise noted, reference numbers in the text refer to the attached list of current contract publications. Copies of the publications, numbered in agreement with the publication list, are included with this report.

  17. Quantifying disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Turner, Martin R; Vucic, Steve; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shefner, Jeremy; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2014-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) exhibits characteristic variability of onset and rate of disease progression, with inherent clinical heterogeneity making disease quantitation difficult. Recent advances in understanding pathogenic mechanisms linked to the development of ALS impose an increasing need to develop strategies to predict and more objectively measure disease progression. This review explores phenotypic and genetic determinants of disease progression in ALS, and examines established and evolving biomarkers that may contribute to robust measurement in longitudinal clinical studies. With targeted neuroprotective strategies on the horizon, developing efficiencies in clinical trial design may facilitate timely entry of novel treatments into the clinic.

  18. Progress In Electromagnetics Research Symposium (PIERS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The third Progress In Electromagnetics Research Symposium (PIERS) was held 12-16 Jul. 1993, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California. More than 800 presentations were made, and those abstracts are included in this publication.

  19. Progress of the RERTR program in 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    Travelli, A.

    1999-09-29

    This paper describes the progress achieved by the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program in collaboration with its many international partners during 1999 and discusses planned activities for the coming year.

  20. Progress Evaluation of the National Estuary Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A guidance to help the U.S. EPA determine whether the 28 programs included in NEP are making adequate progress implementing their CCMP and therefore merit continued funding under §320 of the Clean Water Act.

  1. Regulation of terpene metabolism. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following research areas: function of monoterpene catabolism; pathways and enzymes of monoterpene catabolism; ultrastructure of oil glands; pathways and enzymes of monoterpene biosynthesis; and regulation of metabolism in peppermints. (ACR)

  2. Progress Made in Lupus Diagnosis and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Lupus Progress Made in Lupus Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table ... W. Clark NIAMS For our readers who have lupus or are the loved ones of someone with ...

  3. Hurricane Prediction: Progress and Problem Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Describes progress made in recent decades in predicting the track and landfall of hurricanes. Examines the problems of detecting, tracking, and describing tropical cyclones, and the difficulties which continue to complicate the matter of warning and evacuating coastal residents. (JR)

  4. Progress Resupply Craft Docks to Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    The 39th ISS Progress resupply vehicle automatically docked to the aft port of the Zvezda service module of the International Space Station at 7:58 a.m. EDT on September 12 using the Kurs automated...

  5. Secondhand Smoke Exposure | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  6. Basic Research and Progress against Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An infographic about the importance of basic research for making progress against cancer. The graphic shows the research milestones that led to the development and approval of crizotinib (Xalkori®) to treat certain non-small cell lung cancers.

  7. Basic Research and Progress against Pediatric Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An infographic about the importance of basic research for making progress against childhood cancers. Shows the milestones that led to development and approval of dinutuximab (Unituxin®) to treat neuroblastoma, a cancer seen mainly in children.

  8. Connected Health and Progress against Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog post about a new report from President’s Cancer Panel outlining how connective technologies can promote cancer prevention, enhance patients’ treatment experience, and accelerate progress in cancer research.

  9. Life After Cancer | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  10. End of Life | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  11. Early Detection | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  12. Adult Tobacco Use | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  13. Data Sources | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  14. Director's Message | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  15. Indoor Tanning | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  16. Data Resources | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  17. Treatment Summary Tables | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  18. Frequently Asked Questions | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  19. Alcohol Consumption | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  20. Prostate Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.