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Sample records for 2004-2013 prospectives chapter

  1. Educational Technology Research Journals: "Interactive Learning Environments," 2004-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Steven S.; Andrews, Carolyn; Harris, Scott P.; Lloyd, Adam; Turley, Chad; West, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the journal "Interactive Learning Environments" to discover trends from 2004-2013. The authors looked at trends in article topics, research methods, authorship, citations, keyword frequencies, phrase counts of article abstracts, and article citations according to Google Scholar. Evidence is provided of the journal's…

  2. [Multidrug-resistant germs in neurological early rehabilitation (2004-2013)].

    PubMed

    Rollnik, J D; Samady, A-M; Grüter, L

    2014-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant germs are an increasing problem in neurological and neurosurgical early rehabilitation but reliable data is missing. The present study examined the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and multidrug-resistant gram negative germs (MRGN) in a German neurological early rehabilitation facility (BDH Clinic Hessisch Oldendorf). Observation period was 2004-2013 (10 years). MRSA prevalence on admission was 11.4%, MRGN prevalence during rehabilitation 11.8%. A combination of different multidrug-resistant germs (MRSA plus MRGN) was observed in 3.8% of all cases. VRE were first detected in 2009, prevalence was as low as 0.1%. High prevalence of MRSA and MRGN raises major financial, medical, and ethical problems in early rehabilitation facilities. The authors encourage further multi-center studies and suggest a better recompense for this group of patients in the German DRG-system (Diagnosis Related Groups).

  3. Deformation Analysis of 2004-2013 Dome Extrusions at Volcan de Colima, Mexico Using Tilt Meter Surveys Registered on Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Ruiz, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Volcán de Colima, Mexico is located on the Central Western part of this country and it is considered one of the most active volcano in Mexico. During the period of 2004-2013 three extrusions have occurred with the presence of inflation- deflation. Measurements of deformation tilt changes during the period 2004-2013 at Volcán de Colima (Mexico) was carried out to determine the origin of the activity during this period that is characterized by a sequence of effusive-explosive episodes. These sequences occurred on October 2004 and February 2007 was registered by sequences of inflation-deflation principally on two tilt sensors deployed around the volcano edifice. The tiltmeter net used in this study is composed of 5 sensors deployed around the volcano edifice at altitudes of 3060 masl (COIA), 3200 masl (PCJ1), 2590 masl (PC02), 2200 masl (EHJ1) and 2070 masl (PC01). The activity of Volcán de Colima during this period 2004-2013 can be summarized by the occurrence of three lava extrusions in October 2004, February 2007, and 2012. An explosive activity sequences in year 2005 and 2012. After the extrusion on February 2007 a deflation phase is registered with the tilt sensors until 2010 which explain the low activity that characterize the behavior of the volcano during the periods of time. Here we show the analysis of the activity during the 2004-2013 period using the tiltmeter surveys of the Volcan de Colima net.

  4. Epidemiology and Genetic Characterization of Measles Strains in Senegal, 2004-2013

    PubMed Central

    Dia, Ndongo; Fall, Ameth; Ka, Rouguiyatou; Fall, Amary; Kiori, David E.; Goudiaby, Deborah G.; Fall, Aichatou D.; Faye, El Hadj Abdourahmane; Dosseh, Annick; Ndiaye, Kader; Diop, Ousmane M.; Niang, Mbayame Nd.

    2015-01-01

    Background In Senegal, with the variable routine vaccination coverage, the risk for illness and death from measles still exists as evidenced by the measles epidemic episode in 2009. Since 2002 a laboratory-based surveillance system of measles was established by the Ministry of Health and the Institut Pasteur de Dakar. The present study analysed the data collected over the 10 years inclusive between 2004-2013 in order to define a measles epidemiological profile in Senegal, and we carried out a phylogenetic analysis of measles virus circulating in Senegal over the period 2009-2012. Methodology and Results A total number of 4580 samples were collected from suspected cases, with the most cases between 2008 and 2010 (2219/4580; 48.4%). The majority of suspected cases are found in children from 4-6 years old (29%). 981 (21.4%) were measles laboratory-confirmed by IgM ELISA. The measles confirmation rate per year is very high during 2009-2010 periods (48.5% for each year). Regarding age groups, the highest measles IgM-positivity rate occurred among persons aged over 15 years with 39.4% (115/292) followed by 2-3 years old age group with 30.4% (323/1062) and 30% (148/494) in children under one year old group. The majority of suspected cases were collected between February and June and paradoxically confirmed cases rates increased from July (77/270; 28.6%) and reached a peak in November with 60% (93/155). Phylogenetic analysis showed that all the 29 sequences from strains that circulated in Senegal between 2009 and 2012 belong to the B3 genotype and they are clustered in B3.1 (2011-2012) and B3.3 (2009-2011) sub-genotypes according to a temporal parameter. Conclusion Improvements in the measles surveillance in Senegal are required and the introduction of oral fluid and FTA cards as an alternative to transportation of sera should be investigated to improve surveillance. The introduction of a national vaccine database including number of doses of measles-containing vaccine

  5. Molecular analysis of hepatitis A virus strains obtained from patients with acute hepatitis A in Mongolia, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Tsatsralt-Od, Bira; Baasanjav, Nachin; Nyamkhuu, Dulmaa; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Tominari; Nagashima, Shigeo; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    Despite the high endemicity of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in Mongolia, the genetic information on those HAV strains is limited. Serum samples obtained from 935 patients with acute hepatitis in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia during 2004-2013 were tested for the presence of HAV RNA using reverse transcription-PCR with primers targeting the VP1-2B region (481 nucleotides, primer sequences at both ends excluded). Overall, 180 patients (19.3%) had detectable HAV RNA. These 180 isolates shared 94.6-100% identity and formed four phylogenetic clusters within subgenotype IA. One or three representative HAV isolates from each cluster exhibited 2.6-3.9% difference between clusters over the entire genome. Cluster 1 accounted for 65.0% of the total, followed by Cluster 2 (30.6%), Cluster 3 (3.3%), and Cluster 4 (1.1%). Clusters 1 and 2 were predominant throughout the observation period, whereas Cluster 3 was undetectable in 2009 and 2013 and Cluster 4 became undetectable after 2009. The Mongolian HAV isolates were closest to those of Chinese or Japanese origin (97.7-98.5% identities over the entire genome), suggesting the evolution from a common ancestor with those circulating in China and Japan. Further molecular epidemiological analyses of HAV infection are necessary to investigate the factors underlying the spread of HAV and to implement appropriate prevention measures in Mongolia.

  6. The Prevalence of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Infection among Blood Donors in Southeast China, 2004-2013

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jinzhen; Ge, Shengxiang; Zhang, Yali; Lin, Yongcai; Ni, Hongying; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Changrong

    2015-01-01

    Background The human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) which is associated with the diseases of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, HTLV-1 associated myelopathy / tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and HTLV-associated uveitis, can cause transfusion-transmitted infections. Although HTLV screening of blood donors was already routinely performed in developed countries, little is know about the HTLV prevalence among blood donors in developing countries which do not perform HTLV screening, such as China. Objectives &Aims To systematically characterize the prevalence of HTLV infection among bloods in southeast China. Methods A 10-year survey for HTLV prevalence in blood donors was performed in Xiamen, southeast China, during 2004-2013. The HTLV-1/2 of blood donations were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, following with confirmation by western blot assay and 9nucleic acid testing. The HTLV-1 prevalences in donors from different cities were calculated. Viral sequences derived from identified HTLV-positive cases were sequenced and analyzed. Results Among 253,855 blood donors, 43 were confirmed to be seropositive for HTLV-1 (16.9 per 100,000 95% CI: 12.3-22.8) and none HTLV-2 infection was found. The HTLV-1 prevalence varied significantly in donors from different cities. Donors from cities in Fujian province (24.3 per 100,000, 95%CI: 17.4-33.1) had a significantly higher (p=0.001) HTLV-1 seroprevalence than those who were born in non-Fujian cities (3.4 per 100,000, 95%CI: 0.7-9.8). Among nine cities in Fujian province, the highest prevalence was found in blood donors from Ningde (171.3 per 100,000, 95%CI: 91.3-292.8) which is a coastal city in the northeast of Fujian. Molecular characterization of viral sequences from 27 HTLV-1 carriers revealed 25 were Transcontinental subtype of genotype A and 2 were Japanese subtype of genotype A. Interestingly, 12 of 25 Transcontinental subtype sequences harbored a characteristic L55P mutation in viral gp46 protein

  7. Variability of Antarctic ozone loss in the last decade (2004-2013): high resolution simulations compared to Aura MLS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttippurath, J.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Lefèvre, F.; Santee, M. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Hauchecorne, A.

    2014-11-01

    A detailed analysis of the polar ozone loss processes during ten recent Antarctic winters is presented with high resolution Mimosa-Chim model simulations and high frequency polar vortex observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument. Our model results for the Antarctic winters 2004-2013 show that chemical ozone loss starts in the edge region of the vortex at equivalent latitudes (EqLs) of 65-69° S in mid-June/July. The loss progresses with time at higher EqLs and intensifies during August-September over the range 400-600 K. The loss peaks in late September/early October, where all EqLs (65-83°) show similar loss and the maximum loss (>2 ppmv [parts per million by volume]) is found over a broad vertical range of 475-550 K. In the lower stratosphere, most winters show similar ozone loss and production rates. In general, at 500 K, the loss rates are about 2-3 ppbv sh-1 (parts per billion by volume/sunlit hour) in July and 4-5 ppbv sh-1 in August/mid-September, while they drop rapidly to zero by late September. In the middle stratosphere, the loss rates are about 3-5 ppbv sh-1 in July-August and October at 675 K. It is found that the Antarctic ozone hole (June-September) is controlled by the halogen cycles at about 90-95% (ClO-ClO, BrO-ClO, and ClO-O) and the loss above 700 K is dominated by the NOx cycle at about 70-75%. On average, the Mimosa-Chim simulations show that the very cold winters of 2005 and 2006 exhibit a maximum loss of ~3.5 ppmv around 550 K or about 149-173 DU over 350-850 K and the warmer winters of 2004, 2010, and 2012 show a loss of ~2.6 ppmv around 475-500 K or 131-154 DU over 350-850 K. The winters of 2007, 2008, and 2011 were moderately cold and thus both ozone loss and peak loss altitudes are between these two ranges (3 ppmv around 500 K or 150 ± 10 DU). The modeled ozone loss values are in reasonably good agreement with those estimated from Aura MLS measurements, but the model underestimates the observed ClO, largely due

  8. On the Sizes of the North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones Based on 34- and 64-kt Wind Radii Data, 2004-2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    At end of the 2012 hurricane season the National Hurricane Center retired the original HURDAT dataset and replaced it with the newer version HURDAT2, which reformatted the original data and included additional information, in particular, estimates of the 34-, 50, and 64-kt wind radii for the interval 2004-2013. During the brief 10-year interval, some 164 tropical cyclones are noted to have formed in the North Atlantic basin, with 77 becoming hurricanes. Hurricane Sandy (2012) stands out as being the largest individual storm that occurred in the North Atlantic basin during the 2004 -2013 timeframe, both in terms of its 34- and 64-kt wind radii and wind areas, having maximum 34- and 64-kt wind radii, maximum wind areas, and average wind areas each more than 2 standard deviations larger than the corresponding means. In terms of the largest yearly total 34-kt wind area (i.e., the sum of all individual storm 34-kt wind areas during the year), the year 2010 stands out as being the largest (about 423 × 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)), compared to the mean of about 174 × 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)), surpassing the year 2005 (353 x 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)) that had the largest number of individual storms (28). However, in terms of the largest yearly total 64-kt wind area, the year 2005 was the largest (about 9 × 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)), compared to the mean of about 3 × 106 nmi(exp 2)). Interesting is that the ratio of total 64-kt wind area to total 34-kt wind area has decreased over time, from 0.034 in 2004 to 0.008 in 2013.

  9. Intercomparison and assessment of long-term (2004-2013) multiple satellite aerosol products over two contrasting sites in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesina, A. Joseph; Kumar, K. Raghavendra; Sivakumar, V.; Piketh, Stuart J.

    2016-10-01

    To build a long-term database and improve the accuracy of the satellite products used for aerosol studies, there is a need to carry out intercomparison and validation of these satellite observations with ground-based measurements. With this objective, we estimated the long-term inter-annual variations and percentage change in trends of aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) sensors for a 10-year period during 2004-2013 over two distinct sites namely, Skukuza (SKZ; 24.99°S, 31.58°E) and Richards Bay (RBAY; 28.8°S, 21.1°E) in South Africa. The validation performed over SKZ site shows that MISR was better correlated with AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) when compared to Terra and Aqua satellites of MODIS. Later both the MODIS products (Terra and Aqua) were compared on the annual and seasonal basis to derive the relationship between them through scattering plot. The long-term regression analysis performed at these sites shows that the annual trends were decreasing, with the MODIS products underestimating MISR. This is due to difficulties of the MODIS algorithm when dealing with highly complex surface reflectance conditions and aerosol model assumptions. Also, the temporal variations of AOD derived from the two sensors noticed maximum in spring (September/October) and minimum in winter (June). Further, the Ultra-Violet Aerosol Index (UVAI) retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) at the two locations for 9 years (2005-2013) showed a significant increasing trend with a high value of +0.009 yr-1 at SKZ than +0.006 yr-1 at RBAY during the study period, which is due to the transport of dust and smoke particles.

  10. Chapter 2: Sedimentary successions of the Arctic Region (58–64° to 90°N) that may be prospective for hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grantz, Arthur; Scott, Robert A.; Drachev, Sergey S.; Moore, Thomas E.; Valin, Zenon C.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 143 sedimentary successions that contain, or may be prospective for, hydrocarbons were identified in the Arctic Region north of 58–64°N and mapped in four quadrants at a scale of 1:11 000 000. Eighteen of these successions (12.6%) occur in the Arctic Ocean Basin, 25 (17.5%) in the passive and sheared continental margins of the Arctic Basin and 100 (70.0%) on the Circum-Arctic continents of which one (<1%) lies in the active margin of the Pacific Rim. Each succession was assigned to one of 13 tectono-stratigraphic and morphologic classes and coloured accordingly on the map. The thickness of each succession and that of any underlying sedimentary section down to economic basement, where known, are shown on the map by isopachs. Major structural or tectonic features associated with the creation of the successions, or with the enhancement or degradation of their hydrocarbon potential, are also shown. Forty-four (30.8%) of the successions are known to contain hydrocarbon accumulations, 64 (44.8%) are sufficiently thick to have generated hydrocarbons and 35 (24.5%) may be too thin to be prospective.

  11. MO-E-17A-09: Has Cancer Risk for Pediatric CT Increased Or Decreased? An Analysis of Cohort Data From 2004-2013

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S; Kaufman, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze CT radiation dosimetry trends in a pediatric population imaged with modern (2004-2013) CT technology Methods: The institutional review board approved this retrospective review. Two cohorts of pediatric patients that received CT scans for treatment or surveillance for Wilms tumor (n=73) or Neuroblastoma (n=74) from 2004–2013 were included in this study. Patients were scanned during this time period on a GE Ultra (8 slice; 2004–2007), a GE VCT (2008–2011), or a GE VCT-XTe (2011–2013). Each patient's individual or combined chest, abdomen, and pelvic CT exams (n=4138) were loaded onto a PACS workstation (Intelerad, Canada) and measured to calculate their effective diameter and SSDE. Patient SSDE was used to estimate patient organ dosimetry based on previously published data. Patient's organ dosimetry were sorted by gender, weight, age, scan protocol (i.e., chest, abdomen, or pelvis), and CT scanner technology and averaged accordingly to calculate population averaged absolute and effective dose values. Results: Patient radiation dose burden calculated for all genders, weights, and ages decreased at a rate of 0.2 mSv/year (4.2 mGy/year; average organ dose) from 2004–2013; overall levels decreased by 50% from 3.0 mSv (60.0 mGy) to 1.5 mSv (25.9 mGy). Patient dose decreased at equal rates for both male and female, and for individual scan protocols. The greatest dose savings was found for patients between 0–4 years old (65%) followed by 5-9 years old (45%), 10–14 years old (30%), and > 14 years old (21%). Conclusion: Assuming a linear-nothreshold model, there always will be potential risk of cancer induction from CT. However, as demonstrated among these patient populations, effective and organ dose has decreased over the last decade; thus, potential risk of long-term side effects from pediatric CT examinations has also been reduced.

  12. Long-Term RST Analysis of Anomalous TIR Sequences in Relation with Earthquakes Occurred in Greece in the Period 2004-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriou, Alexander; Filizzola, Carolina; Genzano, Nicola; Lacava, Teodosio; Lisi, Mariano; Paciello, Rossana; Pergola, Nicola; Vallianatos, Filippos; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Real-time integration of multi-parametric observations is expected to accelerate the process toward improved, and operationally more effective, systems for time-Dependent Assessment of Seismic Hazard (t-DASH) and earthquake short-term (from days to weeks) forecast. However, a very preliminary step in this direction is the identification of those parameters (chemical, physical, biological, etc.) whose anomalous variations can be, to some extent, associated with the complex process of preparation for major earthquakes. In this paper one of these parameters (the Earth's emitted radiation in the Thermal InfraRed spectral region) is considered for its possible correlation with M ≥ 4 earthquakes occurred in Greece in between 2004 and 2013. The Robust Satellite Technique (RST) data analysis approach and Robust Estimator of TIR Anomalies (RETIRA) index were used to preliminarily define, and then to identify, significant sequences of TIR anomalies (SSTAs) in 10 years (2004-2013) of daily TIR images acquired by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager on board the Meteosat Second Generation satellite. Taking into account the physical models proposed for justifying the existence of a correlation among TIR anomalies and earthquake occurrences, specific validation rules (in line with the ones used by the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability—CSEP—Project) have been defined to drive a retrospective correlation analysis process. The analysis shows that more than 93 % of all identified SSTAs occur in the prefixed space-time window around ( M ≥ 4) earthquake's time and location of occurrence with a false positive rate smaller than 7 %. Molchan error diagram analysis shows that such a correlation is far to be achievable by chance notwithstanding the huge amount of missed events due to frequent space/time data gaps produced by the presence of clouds over the scene. Achieved results, and particularly the very low rate of false positives registered

  13. Columbia: The Economic Foundation of Peace. Chapters 21-28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giugale, Marcelo M., Ed.; Lafourcade, Olivier, Ed.; Luff, Connie, Ed.

    This document contains 8 chapters of a 35-chapter book that presents a comprehensive diagnosis of current economic, social, and educational conditions in Colombia and their importance to development prospects and the quest for peace. The eight chapters covered here are part of a section titled "Sharing the Fruits of Growth with All Colombians."…

  14. Chapter Four: Discursive Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, the focus of attention moves from the contexts described in chapter 3 to the verbal, nonverbal, and interactional resources that participants employ in discursive practices. These resources are discussed within the frame of participation status and participation framework proposed by Goffman. Verbal resources employed by…

  15. Chapter 9: Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris A.

    2006-12-19

    Sophisticated front-end electronics are a key part of practically all modern radiation detector systems. This chapter introduces the basic principles and their implementation. Topics include signal acquisition, electronic noise, pulse shaping (analog and digital), and data readout techniques.

  16. Chapter 3: Energy Security

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, Thomas D.; Arent, Doug; de Carvalho Macedo, Isaias; Goldemberg, Jose; Hoysala, Chanakya; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Nigro, Francisco E. B.; Richard, Tom L.; Saddler, Jack; Samseth, Jon; Somerville, Chris R.

    2015-04-01

    This chapter considers the energy security implications and impacts of bioenergy. We provide an assessment to answer the following questions: What are the implications for bioenergy and energy security within the broader policy environment that includes food and water security, development, economic productivity, and multiple foreign policy aspects? What are the conditions under which bioenergy contributes positively to energy security?

  17. Diagnostic and vaccine chapter.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, J H; Kokanov, S K; Verkhovsky, O A

    2010-10-01

    The first report in this chapter describes the development of a killed composite vaccine. This killed vaccine is non-infectious to humans, other animals, and the environment. The vaccine has low reactivity, is non-abortive, and does not induce pathomorphological alterations to the organs of vaccinated animals. The second report of this chapter describes the diagnostic value of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting Brucella-specific antibodies and its ability to discriminate vaccinated cattle from infected cattle. The results indicated that the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is more sensitive than traditional tests for detecting antibodies to Brucella abortus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle. PMID:20850688

  18. Nutrient dynamics: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Likens, Gene E.; LaBaugh, James W.; Buso, Donald C.; Bade, Darren; Winter, Thomas C.; Likens, Gene E.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the variability and trends in chemical concentrations and fluxes at Mirror Lake during the period 1981–2000. It examines the water and chemical budgets of Mirror Lake to identify and understand better long-term trends in the chemical characteristics of the lake. It also identifies the causes of changes in nutrient concentrations and examines the contribution of hydrologic pathways to the contamination of Mirror Lake by road salt. The role of groundwater and precipitation on water and chemical budgets of the lake are also examined.

  19. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  20. Chapter 4: Solar Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, P.; Gosain, Sanjay

    2008-10-01

    This chapter is basically divided into 2 parts. In the first part, the important properties of the solar magnetic field are summarized. The discussion begins with a simple introduction to solar magneto hydrodynamics. This introduction will be sufficient to understand the current status of the solar dynamo theory that follows. Some very curious and interesting results on force free fields are then presented in very basic terms. Finally, the application of this theoretical framework to the problems of coronal heating, solar flares and coronal mass ejections are developed in a simple unified scheme, based on a hierarchy of physical conditions. The second part consists of a tutorial on magnetographs. It begins with a description of polarization of light from very fundamental notions of coherence of light. This is followed by simple but comprehensive explanations of the Zeeman and Hanle effects along with the necessary basic ideas of quantum physics of scattering of light. Then the working of a few important magnetographs is outlined, with special emphasis on a solar vector magnetograph developed for USO, to provide a ''hands on" perspective. The article concludes with a few brief remarks on the possible future directions for research in the domain of solar magnetism...

  1. Chapter 20: Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Graphite is truly a unique material. Its structure, from the nano- to the millimeter scale give it remarkable properties that lead to numerous and diverse applications. Graphite bond anisotropy, with strong in-plane covalent bonds and weak van der Waals type bonding between the planes, gives graphite its unique combination of properties. Easy shear of the crystal, facilitated by weak interplaner bonds allows graphite to be used as a dry lubricant, and is responsible for the substances name! The word graphite is derived from the Greek to write because of graphites ability to mark writing surfaces. Moreover, synthetic graphite contains within its structure, porosity spanning many orders of magnitude in size. The thermal closure of these pores profoundly affects the properties for example, graphite strength increases with temperature to temperatures in excess of 2200 C. Consequently, graphite is utilized in many high temperature applications. The basic physical properties of graphite are reviewed here. Graphite applications include metallurgical; (aluminum and steel production), single crystal silicon production, and metal casting; electrical (motor brushes and commutators); mechanical (seals, bearings and bushings); and nuclear applications, (see Chapter 91, Nuclear Graphite). Here we discuss the structure, manufacture, properties, and applications of Graphite.

  2. Synthesis: Chapter 19

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pardo, L.H.; Geiser, L.H.; Fenn, M.E.; Driscoll, C.T.; Goodale, C.L.; Allen, E.B.; Baron, J. S.; Bobbink, R.; Bowman, W.D.; Clark, C.M.; Emmett, B.; Gilliam, F.S.; Greaver, T.; Hall, S.J.; Lilleskov, E.A.; Liu, L.; Lynch, J.A.; Nadelhoffer, K.; Perakis, S.S.; Robin-Abbott, M. J.; Stoddard, J.L.; Weathers, K. C.

    2011-01-01

    Human activity in the last century has led to a substantial increase in nitrogen (N) emissions and deposition (Galloway et al. 2003). Because of past, and, in some regions, continuing increases in emissions (Lehmann et al. 2005, Nilles and Conley 2001), this N deposition has reached a level that has caused or is likely to cause alterations and damage in many ecosystems across the United States. In some ecoregions, the impact of N deposition has been severe and has changed the biotic community structure and composition of ecosystems. In the Mediterranean California ecoregion, for example (see Chapter 13), replacement of native by exotic invasive vegetation is accelerated because exotic species are often more productive under elevated N deposition than native species in some California grasslands, coastal sage scrub, and desert scrub (Fenn et al. 2010, Rao and Allen 2010, Rao et al. 2010, Weiss 1999, Yoshida and Allen 2004). Such shifts in plant community composition and species richness can have consequences beyond changes in ecosystem structure: shifts may lead to overall losses in biodiversity and further impair particular threatened or endangered species (Stevens et al. 2004). Th e extirpation of the endangered checkerspot butterfl y (Euphydryas editha bayensis), because the host plant for the larval stage disappears in N-enriched ecosystems (Fenn et al. 2010, Weiss 1999), is just one example of the detrimental impacts of elevated N deposition.

  3. Career development through local chapter involvement: perspectives from chapter members.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melissa; Inniss-Richter, Zipporah; Mata, Holly; Cottrell, Randall R

    2013-07-01

    The importance of career development in professional organizations has been noted in the literature. Personal and professional benefits of membership regardless of discipline can be found across the career spectrum from student to executive. The benefits of professional membership with respect to career development in local chapter organizations have seldom been studied. Local chapter participation may offer significant career development opportunities for the practitioner, faculty member, and student. The purpose of this study was to explore the importance of local chapter involvement to the career development of health education practitioners. An 18-item questionnaire was disseminated to the membership of three local SOPHE (Society for Public Health Education) chapters that explored the level of local chapter involvement and the impact of how specific professional development activities impacted career development. The results of the survey highlighted the importance of continuing education programs, networking, and leadership experience in developing one's career that are offered by local SOPHE chapter involvement. Making a positive impact in the community and earning the respect of one's peers were most often reported as indicators of career success. These factors can directly impact local chapter participation. Career development can certainly be enhanced by active participation in the local chapter of a professional association.

  4. Career development through local chapter involvement: perspectives from chapter members.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melissa; Inniss-Richter, Zipporah; Mata, Holly; Cottrell, Randall R

    2013-07-01

    The importance of career development in professional organizations has been noted in the literature. Personal and professional benefits of membership regardless of discipline can be found across the career spectrum from student to executive. The benefits of professional membership with respect to career development in local chapter organizations have seldom been studied. Local chapter participation may offer significant career development opportunities for the practitioner, faculty member, and student. The purpose of this study was to explore the importance of local chapter involvement to the career development of health education practitioners. An 18-item questionnaire was disseminated to the membership of three local SOPHE (Society for Public Health Education) chapters that explored the level of local chapter involvement and the impact of how specific professional development activities impacted career development. The results of the survey highlighted the importance of continuing education programs, networking, and leadership experience in developing one's career that are offered by local SOPHE chapter involvement. Making a positive impact in the community and earning the respect of one's peers were most often reported as indicators of career success. These factors can directly impact local chapter participation. Career development can certainly be enhanced by active participation in the local chapter of a professional association. PMID:23539263

  5. Collective Intelligence. Chapter 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Many systems of self-interested agents have an associated performance criterion that rates the dynamic behavior of the overall system. This chapter presents an introduction to the science of such systems. Formally, collectives are defined as any system having the following two characteristics: First, the system must contain one or more agents each of which we view as trying to maximize an associated private utility; second, the system must have an associated world utility function that rates the possible behaviors of that overall system. In practice, collectives are often very large, distributed, and support little, if any, centralized communication and control, although those characteristics are not part of their formal definition. A naturally occurring example of a collective is a human economy. One can identify the agents and their private utilities as the human individuals in the economy and the associated personal rewards they are each trying to maximize. One could then identify the world utility as the time average of the gross domestic product. ("World utility" per se is not a construction internal to a human economy, but rather something defined from the outside.) To achieve high world utility it is necessary to avoid having the agents work at cross-purposes lest phenomena like liquidity traps or the Tragedy of the Commons (TOC) occur, in which agents' individually pursuing their private utilities lowers world utility. The obvious way to avoid such phenomena is by modifying the agents utility functions to be "aligned" with the world utility. This can be done via punitive legislation. A real-world example of an attempt to do this was the creation of antitrust regulations designed to prevent monopolistic practices.

  6. Explanatory chapter: PCR primer design.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Fernández, Rubén

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is intended as a guide on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer design (for information on PCR, see General PCR and Explanatory Chapter: Troubleshooting PCR). In the next section, general guidelines will be provided, followed by a discussion on primer design for specific applications. A list of recommended software tools is shown at the end.

  7. Chapter 59: Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, M. J.

    Web services are a cornerstone of the distributed computing infrastructure that the VO is built upon yet to the newcomer, they can appear to be a black art. This perception is not helped by the miasma of technobabble that pervades the subject and the seemingly impenetrable high priesthood of actual users. In truth, however, there is nothing conceptually difficult about web services (unsurprisingly any complexities will lie in the implementation details) nor indeed anything particularly new. A web service is a piece of software available over a network with a formal description of how it is called and what it returns that a computer can understand. Note that entities such as web servers, ftp servers and database servers do not generally qualify as they lack the standardized description of their inputs and outputs. There are prior technologies, such as RMI, CORBA, and DCOM, that have employed a similar approach but the success of web services lies predominantly in its use of standardized XML to provide a language-neutral way for representing data. In fact, the standardization goes further as web services are traditionally (or as traditionally as five years will allow) tied to a specific set of technologies (WSDL and SOAP conveyed using HTTP with an XML serialization). Alternative implementations are becoming increasingly common and we will cover some of these here. One important thing to remember in all of this, though, is that web services are meant for use by computers and not humans (unlike web pages) and this is why so much of it seems incomprehensible gobbledegook. In this chapter, we will start with an overview of the web services current in the VO and present a short guide on how to use and deploy a web service. We will then review the different approaches to web services, particularly REST and SOAP, and alternatives to XML as a data format. We will consider how web services can be formally described and discuss how advanced features such as security, state

  8. Advanced Concepts. Chapter 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Mulqueen, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Before there is a funded space mission, there must be a present need for the mission. Space science and exploration are expensive, and without a well-defined and justifiable need, no one is going to commit significant funding for any space endeavor. However, as discussed in Chapter 1, applications of space technology and many and broad, hence there are many ways to determine and establish a mission need. Robotic science missions are justified by their science return. To be selected for flight, questions like these must be addressed: What is the science question that needs answering, and will the proposed mission be the most cost-effective way to answer it? Why does answering the question require an expensive space flight, instead of some ground-based alternative? If the question can only be answered by flying in space, then why is this approach better than other potential approaches? How much will it cost? And is the technology required to answer the question in hand and ready to use? If not, then how much will it cost and how long will it take to mature the technology to a usable level? There are also many ways to justify human exploration missions, including science return, technology advancement, as well as intangible reasons, such as national pride. Nonetheless, many of the questions that need answering, are similar to those for robotic science missions: Where are the people going, why, and will the proposed mission be the most cost-effective way to get there? What is the safest method to achieve the goal? How much will it cost? And is the technology required to get there and keep the crew alive in hand and ready to use? If not, then how much will it cost and how long will it take to mature the technology to a usable level? Another reason for some groups sending spacecraft into space is for profit. Telecommunications, geospatial imaging, and tourism are examples of proven, market-driven space missions and applications. For this specific set of users, the

  9. Promoting certification: the chapter's role.

    PubMed

    Staul, Luann

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses focuses on providing nurses with expert knowledge to promote delivery of excellent, safe, quality care to acutely and critically ill patients and their families. Chapters consist of professional leaders in a community who carry on the mission work of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses at the local level. Chapters can emphasize the value of certification and continuing education, because they offer a wide spectrum of opportunities to meet the learning and developmental needs of nurses as they advance in their professional careers. This article will highlight strategies that can be implemented by local chapters to facilitate and promote certification.

  10. Chapter 1: Estimating prospective benefits of EERE's portfolio

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs.

  11. Chapter A7. Biological Indicators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Donna N.; Wilde, Franceska D.

    2003-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter of the manual includes procedures for the (1) determination of biochemical oxygen demand using a 5-day bioassay test; (2) collection, identification, and enumeration of fecal indicator bacteria; (3) collection of samples and information on two laboratory methods for fecal indicator viruses (coliphages); and (4) collection of samples for protozoan pathogens. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed November 25, 2003).

  12. Prospects: Student Outcomes. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael J.; Karweit, Nancy; Price, Cristofer; Ricciuti, Anne; Thompson, William; Vaden-Kiernan, Michael

    This report is one of a series presenting findings from "Prospects: The Congressionally Mandated Study of Educational Growth and Opportunity." This study, conducted in response to the 1988 Hawkins-Stafford Amendments, was a major effort to examine the effects of Chapter 1 on student achievement and other school-related educational outcomes. Data…

  13. "Unusually Successful": Pittsfield Chapter 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiminski, James A.

    The United States Education Department recognizes projects that effectively meet the special needs of educationally deprived students. In 1992, the Pittsfield, Massachusetts, Chapter 1 preschool program earned national validation as an "unusually successful" compensatory education program. The program has served as a statewide model, and has…

  14. Venus 3 Book: Chapter 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, F.; Svedhem, H.; Head, J.

    2014-04-01

    This will be the first chapter in the planned 'Venus 3' book, which will present the latest knowledge about all aspects of the planet Venus. Chapter 1 will include: 1. Brief history of Venus observations, from telescopic studies up to and including early space missions (Venera, Mariner) 2. Overview of key results from more recent groundbased observations and space missions, including Pioneer Venus, the later Veneras, Vega, Magellan, Akatsuki and Venus Express 3. Summary of current knowledge, in three main sections: a. Surface and interior b. Atmosphere and climate c. Thermosphere, exosphere and magnetosphere 4. Outstanding scientific questions remaining, and future mission concepts providing background, introduction and an overview to the rest of the book.

  15. Objectives and Overview. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Hummel, Dietrich

    2009-01-01

    The RTO Task Group AVT-113 "Understanding and Modeling Vortical Flows to Improve the Technology Readiness Level for Military Aircraft" was established in April 2003. Two facets of the group, "Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamic Project International (CAWAPI)" and "Vortex Flow Experiment-2 (VFE-2)", worked closely together. However, because of the different requirements of each part, the CAWAPI facet concluded its work earlier (December 2006) than the VFE-2 facet (December 2007). In this first chapter of the Final Report of the Task Group an overview on its work is given, and the objectives for the Task Group are described.

  16. Chapter 3. Public health resources

    PubMed Central

    1973-01-01

    The resource requirements of the public health services are discussed in terms of their three main components: manpower, physical resources, and finances in relation to population. The observational data from the Republic of Korea provide an illustration of the problems of resource availability and utilization, with special reference to tuberculosis control. A calculation of resource and population constraints and estimates of the basic inputs required by tuberculosis control technology are presented. Data on the 1965 level of Korean health resources are given in the Annex to this chapter. PMID:20604424

  17. Earthquake ground motion: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luco, Nicolas; Valley, Michael; Crouse, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the effort in seismic design of buildings and other structures is focused on structural design. This chapter addresses another key aspect of the design process—characterization of earthquake ground motion. Section 3.1 describes the basis of the earthquake ground motion maps in the Provisions and in ASCE 7. Section 3.2 has examples for the determination of ground motion parameters and spectra for use in design. Section 3.3 discusses and provides an example for the selection and scaling of ground motion records for use in response history analysis.

  18. 31 CFR Appendixes to Chapter V - Note

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Note Appendixes to Chapter V Money... CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Ch. V, Nt. Appendixes to Chapter V—Note Notes: The alphabetical lists... blocked vessel in the underlying transaction. See § 501.604(b)(1) of this chapter. Financial...

  19. Monograph on prospective developments in oceanology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monin, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    Excerpts from a chapter of a monograph, Oceanology in the Year 2000, which has been prepared for publication at the USSR Academy of Sciences' Institute of Oceanology, is presented. The author of this chapter is A. S. Morin, corresponding member of the USSR Academy of Sciences and director of the oceanology institute. The monograph is said to be the collective work of a group of specialists. Monin views prospective developments of oceanology and oceanology related research and development, technology and expedition research.

  20. Chapter 1 and Chapter 1 Migrant. Evaluation Findings, 1990-91. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christner, Catherine; And Others

    This report describes an evaluation of the Austin (Texas) Independent School District's (AISD) Chapter 1 and Chapter 1 Migrant programs. Chapter 1 is a federally funded compensatory educational program that provided funding in 1990-91 to 25 AISD elementary schools with high concentrations of low-income students. Chapter 1 Migrant is also a…

  1. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 21, Rigid Motions and Vectors, Chapter 22, Computer and Programs. Teacher's Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    The teacher's guide for the eleventh unit in this SMSG series covers the chapter on rigid motions and vectors and the chapter on computers and programs. The overall purpose for each of the chapters is described, the prerequisite knowledge needed by students is specified, the mathematical development of each chapter is detailed, behavioral…

  2. Groundwater levels in the Kabul Basin, Afghanistan, 2004-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taher, Mohammad R.; Chornack, Michael P.; Mack, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The Afghanistan Geological Survey, with technical assistance from the U.S. Geological Survey, established a network of wells to measure and monitor groundwater levels to assess seasonal, areal, and potentially climatic variations in groundwater characteristics in the Kabul Basin, Afghanistan, the most populous region in the country. Groundwater levels were monitored in 71 wells in the Kabul Basin, Afghanistan, starting as early as July 2004 and continuing to the present (2013). The monitoring network is made up exclusively of existing production wells; therefore, both static and dynamic water levels were recorded. Seventy wells are in unconsolidated sediments, and one well is in bedrock. Water levels were measured periodically, generally monthly, using electric tape water-level meters. Water levels in well 64 on the grounds of the Afghanistan Geological Survey building were measured more frequently. This report provides a 10-year compilation of groundwater levels in the Kabul Basin prepared in cooperation with the Afghanistan Geological Survey. Depths to water below land surface range from a minimum of 1.47 meters (m) in the Shomali subbasin to a maximum of 73.34 m in the Central Kabul subbasin. The Logar subbasin had the smallest range in depth to water below land surface (1.5 to 12.4 m), whereas the Central Kabul subbasin had the largest range (2.64 to 73.34 m). Seasonal water-level fluctuations can be estimated from the hydrographs in this report for wells that have depth-to-water measurements collected under static conditions. The seasonal water-level fluctuations range from less than 1 m to a little more than 7 m during the monitoring period. In general, the hydrographs for the Deh Sabz, Logar, Paghman and Upper Kabul, and Shomali subbasins show relatively little change in the water-level trend during the period of record, whereas hydrographs for the Central Kabul subbasin show water level decreases of several meters to about 25 m.

  3. PHENIX EXPERIMENT AT RHIC: DECADAL PLAN 2004-2013

    SciTech Connect

    ZAJC,W.ET. AL.

    2003-11-30

    The PHENIX Collaboration has developed a plan for the detailed investigation of quantum chromodynamics in the next decade. The demonstrated capabilities of the PHENIX experiment to measure rare processes in hadronic, leptonic and photonic channels, in combination with RHIC's unparalleled flexibility as a hadronic collider, provides a physics program of extraordinary breadth and depth. A superlative set of measurements to elucidate the states of both hot and cold nuclear matter, and to measure the spin structure of the proton has been identified. The components of this plan include: (1) Definitive measurements that will establish the nature of the matter created in nucleus+nucleus collisions, that will determine if the description of such matter as a quark-gluon plasma is appropriate, and that will quantify both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium features of the produced medium. (2) Precision measurements of the gluon structure of the proton, and of the spin structure of the gluon and sea-quark distributions of the proton via polarized proton+proton collisions. (3) Determination of the gluon distribution in cold nuclear matter using proton+nucleus collisions. Each of these fundamental fields of investigation will be addressed through a program of correlated measurements in some or all of the following channels: (1) Particle production at high transverse momentum, studied via single particle inclusive measurements of identified charged and neutral hadrons, multi-particle correlations and jet production. (2) Direct photon, photon+jet and virtual photon production. (3) Light and heavy vector mesons. (4) Heavy flavor production. These measurements, together with the established PHENIX abilities to identify hadrons at low transverse momentum, to perform detailed centrality selections, and to monitor polarization and luminosity with high precision create a superb opportunity for performing world-class science with PHENIX for the next decade. A portion of this program is achievable using the present capabilities of PHENIX experimental apparatus, but the physics reach is considerably extended and the program made even more compelling by a proposed set of upgrades which include: (1) An aerogel and time-of-flight system to provide complete {pi}/K/p separation for momenta up to 10 GeV/c. (2) A vertex detector to detect displaced vertices from the decay of mesons containing charm or bottom quarks. (3) A hadron-blind detector to detect and track electrons near the vertex. (4) A micro-TPC to extend the range of PHENIX tracking in azimuth and pseudo-rapidity. (5) A forward detector upgrade for an improved muon trigger to preserve sensitivity at the highest projected RHIC luminosities. (6) A forward calorimeter to provide photon+jet studies over a wide kinematic range. The success of the proposed program is contingent upon several factors external to PHENIX. Implementation of the upgrades is predicated on the availability of R&D funds to develop the required detector technologies on a timely, and in some cases urgent, basis. The necessity for such funding, and the physics merit of the proposed PHENIX program, has been endorsed in the first meeting of BNL's Detector Advisory Committee in December, 2002. Progress towards the physics goals depends in an essential way on the development of the design values for RHIC luminosity, polarization and availability. An analysis based on the guidance from the Collider Accelerator Department indicates that moderate increases in the yearly running time lead to very considerable increases in progress toward the enunciated goals. Efficient access to the rarest probes in the proposed program is achieved via the order-of-magnitude increase in luminosity provided by RHIC-II.

  4. Dependents' Educational Assistance Program (DEA), Chapter 25 of Title 38, U.S. Code

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Veterans Affairs, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This pamphlet provides a general description of the Dependents' Educational Assistance program, or DEA (chapter 35 of title 38, U. S. Code). The DEA program provides education and training opportunities to eligible dependents and survivors of certain veterans. It covers the main questions prospective participants may have about DEA benefits,…

  5. Beyond Chapter 4.7.

    PubMed

    Bandler, Lilon Gretl

    2015-12-01

    Chapter 4.7 of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research refers specifically to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. It lays out the points at which researchers working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders must consider their approach, and the engagement with individuals, communities or groups who are involved in or affected by their research. History, of Australia and of research involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, has informed this approach. The response to that history has been a rational, institutionalised, systematic demand for a different perception of what should direct research and research processes to ensure engagement with and service to the community with whom the researchers wish to do the work. This paper considers whether these principles could inform the approach to other research work. PMID:27135116

  6. Chapter 14: Cancer Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Miguel; de la Torre, Victor; Valencia, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Although there is great promise in the benefits to be obtained by analyzing cancer genomes, numerous challenges hinder different stages of the process, from the problem of sample preparation and the validation of the experimental techniques, to the interpretation of the results. This chapter specifically focuses on the technical issues associated with the bioinformatics analysis of cancer genome data. The main issues addressed are the use of database and software resources, the use of analysis workflows and the presentation of clinically relevant action items. We attempt to aid new developers in the field by describing the different stages of analysis and discussing current approaches, as well as by providing practical advice on how to access and use resources, and how to implement recommendations. Real cases from cancer genome projects are used as examples. PMID:23300415

  7. Defining groundwater age: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torgersen, T.; Purtschert, R.; Phillips, F.M.; Plummer, L.N.; Sanford, W.E.; Suckow, A.

    2013-01-01

    This book investigates applications of selected chemical and isotopic substances that can be used to recognize and interpret age information pertaining to ‘old’ groundwater (defined as water that was recharged on a timescale from approximately 1000 to more than 1 000 000 a). However, as discussed below, only estimates of the ‘age’ of water extracted from wells can be inferred. These groundwater age estimates are interpreted from measured concentrations of chemical and isotopic substances in the groundwater. Even then, there are many complicating factors, as discussed in this book. In spite of these limitations, much can be learned about the physics of groundwater flow and about the temporal aspects of groundwater systems from age interpretations of measured concentrations of environmental tracers in groundwater systems. This chapter puts the concept of ‘age’ into context, including its meaning and interpretation, and attempts to provide a unifying usage for the rest of the book.

  8. Beyond Chapter 4.7.

    PubMed

    Bandler, Lilon Gretl

    2015-12-01

    Chapter 4.7 of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research refers specifically to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. It lays out the points at which researchers working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders must consider their approach, and the engagement with individuals, communities or groups who are involved in or affected by their research. History, of Australia and of research involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, has informed this approach. The response to that history has been a rational, institutionalised, systematic demand for a different perception of what should direct research and research processes to ensure engagement with and service to the community with whom the researchers wish to do the work. This paper considers whether these principles could inform the approach to other research work.

  9. Conclusions and Recommendations. Chapter 37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Hummel, Dietrich

    2009-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief wrap-up of the task group report and focuses on the overall conclusions and recommendations for future work for the CAWAPI and VFE-2 facets beyond the task group. The overall conclusion is that the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of CFD solvers has been improved in predicting the flow-physics of vortex-dominated flows during the work of the task group, by having flight and wind-tunnel data available for comparison. Moreover, like all good scientific studies, this task group has identified flight conditions on the F-16XL airplane or wind-tunnel test conditions for a specific leading-edge radius on the 65 delta-wing model where the TRL still needs to be increased.

  10. Collaborative Software Engineering: Challenges and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistrík, Ivan; Grundy, John; van der Hoek, André; Whitehead, Jim

    Much work is presently ongoing in collaborative software engineering research. This work is beginning to make serious inroads into our ability to more effectively practice collaborative software engineering, with best practices, processes, tools, metrics, and other techniques becoming available for day-to-day use. However, we have not yet reached the point where the practice of collaborative software engineering is routine, without surprises, and generally as optimal as possible. This chapter summarizes the main findings of this book, draws some conclusions on these findings and looks at the prospects for software engineers in dealing with the challenges of collaborative software development. The chapter ends with prospects for collaborative software engineering.

  11. Chapter 4: Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, J; Herzog, H

    2006-06-14

    Carbon sequestration is the long term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. The largest potential reservoirs for storing carbon are the deep oceans and geological reservoirs in the earth's upper crust. This chapter focuses on geological sequestration because it appears to be the most promising large-scale approach for the 2050 timeframe. It does not discuss ocean or terrestrial sequestration. In order to achieve substantial GHG reductions, geological storage needs to be deployed at a large scale. For example, 1 Gt C/yr (3.6 Gt CO{sub 2}/yr) abatement, requires carbon capture and storage (CCS) from 600 large pulverized coal plants ({approx}1000 MW each) or 3600 injection projects at the scale of Statoil's Sleipner project. At present, global carbon emissions from coal approximate 2.5 Gt C. However, given reasonable economic and demand growth projections in a business-as-usual context, global coal emissions could account for 9 Gt C. These volumes highlight the need to develop rapidly an understanding of typical crustal response to such large projects, and the magnitude of the effort prompts certain concerns regarding implementation, efficiency, and risk of the enterprise. The key questions of subsurface engineering and surface safety associated with carbon sequestration are: (1) Subsurface issues: (a) Is there enough capacity to store CO{sub 2} where needed? (b) Do we understand storage mechanisms well enough? (c) Could we establish a process to certify injection sites with our current level of understanding? (d) Once injected, can we monitor and verify the movement of subsurface CO{sub 2}? (2) Near surface issues: (a) How might the siting of new coal plants be influenced by the distribution of storage sites? (b) What is the probability of CO{sub 2} escaping from injection sites? What are the attendant risks? Can we detect leakage if it occurs? (3) Will surface leakage negate or reduce the

  12. Sediment transport measurements: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diplas, P.; Kuhnle, R.; Gray, J.; Glysson, D.; Edwards, T.; García, Marcelo H.

    2008-01-01

    Sediment erosion, transport, and deposition in fluvial systems are complex processes that are treated in detail in other sections of this book. Development of methods suitable for the collection of data that contribute to understanding these processes is a still-evolving science. Sediment and ancillary data are fundamental requirements for the proper management of river systems, including the design of structures, the determination of aspects of stream behavior, ascertaining the probable effect of removing an existing structure, estimation of bulk erosion, transport, and sediment delivery to the oceans, ascertaining the long-term usefulness of reservoirs and other public works, tracking movement of solid-phase contaminants, restoration of degraded or otherwise modified streams, and assistance in the calibration and validation of numerical models. This chapter presents techniques for measuring bed-material properties and suspended and bed-load discharges. Well-established and relatively recent, yet adequately tested, sampling equipment and methodologies, with designs that are guided by sound physical and statistical principles, are described. Where appropriate, the theory behind the development of the equipment and guidelines for its use are presented.

  13. Actively Controlled Components. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, W.; Hiller, S.-J.; Pfoertner, H.; Schadow, K.; Rosenfeld, T.; Garg, S.

    2009-01-01

    Active Control can help to meet future engine requirements by an active improvement of the component characteristics. The concept is based on an intelligent control logic, which senses actual operating conditions and reacts with adequate actuator action. This approach can directly improve engine characteristics as performance, operability, durability and emissions on the one hand. On the other hand active control addresses the design constrains imposed by unsteady phenomena like inlet distortion, compressor surge, combustion instability, flow separations, vibration and noise, which only occur during exceptional operating conditions. The feasibility and effectiveness of active control technologies have been demonstrated in lab-scale tests. This chapter describes a broad range of promising applications for each engine component. Significant efforts in research and development remain to implement these technologies in engine rig and finally production engines and to demonstrate today s engine generation airworthiness, safety, reliability, and durability requirements. Active control applications are in particular limited by the gap between available and advanced sensors and actuators, which allow an operation in the harsh environment in an aero engine. The operating and performance requirements for actuators and sensors are outlined for each of the gas turbine sections from inlet to nozzle.

  14. Chapter 12: Human microbiome analysis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Xochitl C; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    Humans are essentially sterile during gestation, but during and after birth, every body surface, including the skin, mouth, and gut, becomes host to an enormous variety of microbes, bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and viral. Under normal circumstances, these microbes help us to digest our food and to maintain our immune systems, but dysfunction of the human microbiota has been linked to conditions ranging from inflammatory bowel disease to antibiotic-resistant infections. Modern high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic tools provide a powerful means of understanding the contribution of the human microbiome to health and its potential as a target for therapeutic interventions. This chapter will first discuss the historical origins of microbiome studies and methods for determining the ecological diversity of a microbial community. Next, it will introduce shotgun sequencing technologies such as metagenomics and metatranscriptomics, the computational challenges and methods associated with these data, and how they enable microbiome analysis. Finally, it will conclude with examples of the functional genomics of the human microbiome and its influences upon health and disease.

  15. VUV thin films, chapter 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    The application of thin film technology to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region from 120 nm to 230 nm has not been fully exploited in the past because of absorption effects which complicate the accurate determination of the optical functions of dielectric materials. The problem therefore reduces to that of determining the real and imaginary parts of a complex optical function, namely the frequency dependent refractive index n and extinction coefficient k. We discuss techniques for the inverse retrieval of n and k for dielectric materials at VUV wavelengths from measurements of their reflectance and transmittance. Suitable substrate and film materials are identified for application in the VUV. Such applications include coatings for the fabrication of narrow and broadband filters and beamsplitters. The availability of such devices open the VUV regime to high resolution photometry, interferometry and polarimetry both for space based and laboratory applications. This chapter deals with the optics of absorbing multilayers, the determination of the optical functions for several useful materials, and the design of VUV multilayer stacks as applied to the design of narrow and broadband reflection and transmission filters and beamsplitters. Experimental techniques are discussed briefly, and several examples of the optical functions derived for selected materials are presented.

  16. Chapter 12: Human Microbiome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Xochitl C.; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    Humans are essentially sterile during gestation, but during and after birth, every body surface, including the skin, mouth, and gut, becomes host to an enormous variety of microbes, bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and viral. Under normal circumstances, these microbes help us to digest our food and to maintain our immune systems, but dysfunction of the human microbiota has been linked to conditions ranging from inflammatory bowel disease to antibiotic-resistant infections. Modern high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic tools provide a powerful means of understanding the contribution of the human microbiome to health and its potential as a target for therapeutic interventions. This chapter will first discuss the historical origins of microbiome studies and methods for determining the ecological diversity of a microbial community. Next, it will introduce shotgun sequencing technologies such as metagenomics and metatranscriptomics, the computational challenges and methods associated with these data, and how they enable microbiome analysis. Finally, it will conclude with examples of the functional genomics of the human microbiome and its influences upon health and disease. PMID:23300406

  17. Chapter 1: Biomedical knowledge integration.

    PubMed

    Payne, Philip R O

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  18. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  19. Chapter 1: Biomedical knowledge integration.

    PubMed

    Payne, Philip R O

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  20. Chapter 1: Biomedical Knowledge Integration

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Philip R. O.

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  1. National ESEA Chapter 1 Schoolwide Projects Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland Public Schools, OH.

    This document is a collection of schoolwide compensatory education project plans for 22 elementary schools in the Cleveland (Ohio) Public Schools system, with funding provided by Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. Chapter 1 project plans are included for the following schools: (1) Alfred A. Benesch; (2) Andrew J.…

  2. Chapter 6: Selenium Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter addresses the characteristics and nature of organic selenium (Se) toxicity to aquatic organisms, based on the most current state of scientific knowledge. As such, the information contained in this chapter relates to the 'toxicity assessment' phase of aquatic ecologi...

  3. Chapter 17: Estimating Net Savings: Common Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Violette, D. M.; Rathbun, P.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter focuses on the methods used to estimate net energy savings in evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) studies for energy efficiency (EE) programs. The chapter provides a definition of net savings, which remains an unsettled topic both within the EE evaluation community and across the broader public policy evaluation community, particularly in the context of attribution of savings to particular program. The chapter differs from the measure-specific Uniform Methods Project (UMP) chapters in both its approach and work product. Unlike other UMP resources that provide recommended protocols for determining gross energy savings, this chapter describes and compares the current industry practices for determining net energy savings, but does not prescribe particular methods.

  4. 26 CFR 31.3503-1 - Tax under chapter 21 or 22 paid under wrong chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax under chapter 21 or 22 paid under wrong chapter. 31.3503-1 Section 31.3503-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... TAX AT SOURCE General Provisions Relating to Employment Taxes (Chapter 25, Internal Revenue Code...

  5. Chapter 1.12: Solar Radiation Resource Assessment for Renewable Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter addresses measurements, modeling, and databases of solar energy potential that may serve as fuel for solar energy conversion systems. Developing innovative designs for capturing and converting solar radiation is only one part of the equation for solar system deployment. Identifying, locating, and prospecting for the appropriate quantity and quality of solar resources to fuel these systems is critical to system designers, investors, financial backers, utilities, governments, and owner/operators. This chapter addresses the fundamentals and state of the art for measuring, modeling, and applying solar radiation resource data to meet decision-making needs.

  6. Misinterpretations of United States pharmacopeia chapter <797>.

    PubMed

    McElhiney, Linda F

    2012-01-01

    By now, all compounding pharmacists should be aware that United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> has been revised. However, the revisions are tedious to read and may be misinterpreted. This article discusses some of the misinterpreted revisions of United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> and clarifies the revisions on the topics of Terminology, The Compounder, Facilities and Environment, Personnel Cleansing and Garbing, Assigning Beyond-use Dates, and Testing. Compounders need to take a firm stand with these misinterpretations of United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> and educate those who are not thoroughly familiar with the document. Compounders need to be diligent in following these standards to prevent harm to the patients.

  7. Chapter 42. Waterborne and Foodborne Parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter identifies the most prominent parasites in North America that are acquired through contaminated food and water including protozoa (Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, Entamoeba, Giardia, Cryptosporidium, Cystoisospora, Cyclospora, Toxoplasma, and Balantidium), nematodes (Trichinella, Angiostrongyl...

  8. How to write a medical book chapter?

    PubMed

    Kendirci, Muammer

    2013-09-01

    Invited medical book chapters are usually requested by editors from experienced authors who have made significant contributions to the literature in certain fields requested by an editor from an experienced. Before the start of the writing process a consensus should be established between the editor and the author with regard to the title, deadline, specific instructions and content of the manuscript. Certain issues concerning a chapter can be negotiated by the parties beforehand, but some issues cannot. As writing a medical book chapter is seen as an honor in its own right, the assignment needs to be treated with sincerity by elucidating the topic in detail, and maximal effort should be made to keep in mind that the chapter will reach a large target audience. The purpose of this review article is to provide guidance to residents and junior specialists in the field of urology to improve their writing skills.

  9. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES (CHAPTER 65)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses the use of technologies for reducing air pollution emissions from stationary sources, with emphasis on the control of combustion gen-erated air pollution. Major stationary sources include utility power boilers, industrial boilers and heaters, metal smelting ...

  10. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES - Book Chapter

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter contains the following headings and subheadings: Introduction; Experimental Approach - Precautions, Template, Primers, Reaction Conditions, Enhancers, Post Amplification; Procedures - Template DNA, Basic PCR, Thermal Cycle Parameters, Enzyme Addition, Agarose Ge...

  11. Where Social and Professional Networking Meet: The Virtual Association Chapter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noxon, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Online Capella University wanted to sponsor an International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI) chapter. Using social networking platforms, a new type of chapter was designed. The virtual chapter breaks new ground on more than the chapter's platform; it is also the first university-sponsored chapter and has a unique approach to…

  12. 48 CFR 9900.000 - Scope of chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope of chapter. 9900.000... PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET SCOPE OF CHAPTER 9900.000 Scope of chapter. This chapter... and subcontracts. This chapter does not apply to sealed bid contracts or to any contract with a...

  13. 1 CFR 21.8 - Chapters and subchapters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chapters and subchapters. 21.8 Section 21.8... Chapters and subchapters. (a) The normal divisions of a title are chapters, assigned to the various...) Subchapters may be used to group related parts within a chapter. (c) Chapter and subchapter assignments...

  14. Chapter IV - Safety During Payload Ground Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, Paul; Dollberg, John; Trinchero, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes the typical hazards that can be expected to be encountered when processing payloads on the ground. Also described are some of the more common controls for these hazards. Many of these controls are based on hard requirements but they are also based on specific lessons learned. This chapter uses the term Flight Hardware (F/H) for all payloads regardless of size.

  15. Geological Survey Research 1966, Chapter A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1966-01-01

    'Geological Survey Research 1966' is the seventh annual review of the econamic and scientific work of the U.S. Geological Survey. As in previous years the purpose of the volume is to make available promptly to the public the highlights of Survey investigations. This year the volume consists of 4 chapters (A through D) of Professional Paper 550. Chapter A contains a summary of significant results, and the remaining chapters are made up of collections of short technical papers. Many of the results summarized in chapter A are discussed in greater detail in the short papers or in reports listed in 'Publications in Fiscal Year 1966,' beginning on page A265. The tables of contents for chapters B through D are listed on pages A259-A264. Numerous Federal, State, county, and municipal agencies listed on pages A211-A215 cooperated financially with the Geological Survey during fiscal 1966 and have contributed significantly to the results reported here. They are identified where appropriate in the short technical papers that have appeared in Geological Survey Research and in papers published cooperatively, but generally are not identified in the brief statements in chapter A. Many individuals on the staff of the Geological Survey have contributed to 'Geological Survey Research 1966.' Reference is made to only a few. Frank W. Trainer, Water Resources Division, was responsible for organizing and assembling chapter A and for critical review of papers in chapters B-D, assisted by Louis Pavlides, Geologic Division. Marston S. Chase, Publications Division, was in charge of production aspects of the series, assisted by Jesse R. Upperco in technical editing, and William H. Elliott and James R. Hamilton in planning and preparing illustrations. The volume for next year, 'Geological Survey Research 1967,' will be published as chapters af Professional Paper 5715. Previous volumes are listed below, with their series designations. Gealagical Survey Research 1960-Prof. Paper 400 Gealagical

  16. Biodiversity Prospecting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittenfeld, Ana; Lovejoy, Annie

    1994-01-01

    Examines the use of biodiversity prospecting as a method for tropical countries to value biodiversity and contribute to conservation upkeep costs. Discusses the first agreement between a public interest organization and pharmaceutical company for the extraction of plant and animal materials in Costa Rica. (LZ)

  17. Chapter A5. Processing of Water Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter addresses methods to be used in processing water samples to be analyzed for inorganic and organic chemical substances, including the bottling of composite, pumped, and bailed samples and subsamples; sample filtration; solid-phase extraction for pesticide analyses; sample preservation; and sample handling and shipping. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be announced on the USGS Home Page on the World Wide Web under 'New Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey.' The URL for this page is http:/ /water.usgs.gov/lookup/get?newpubs.

  18. Marine West Coast Forests, Chapter 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Geiser, Linda H.; Lilleskov, Erik A.; Pardo, Linda H.; Robin-Abbott, Molly J.; Driscoll, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities have greatly increased nitrogen emissions and deposition across large areas of Earth. Although nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plant growth, too much nitrogen in excess of critical loads leads to losses of biodiversity, soil and stream acidification, nutrient imbalances, and other deleterious effects. In a new report quantifying critical loads of nitrogen deposition across the United States, USGS scientist Steve Perakis and co-authors provided a chapter about responses of marine west coast forests. Much of this region is understudied with respect to nitrogen deposition, and in this chapter the authors identify known adverse effects and estimate critical loads of nitrogen deposition for western Oregon and Washington and southeast Alaska forests. Perakis also contributed to the synthesis chapter, which includes background, objectives, advantages and uncertainties of critical loads, an overview of critical loads across U.S. ecoregions, and other topics.

  19. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 21, Rigid Motions and Vectors, Chapter 22, Computers and Programs. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    Transformation geometry topics are covered in one chapter of Unit 11 of this SMSG series. Work with translations, reflections, rotations, and composition of motions is included; vectors are briefly discussed. The chapter on computers and programming deals with recent history and uses of of the computer, organization of a digital computer, an…

  20. [Biennial Survey of Education, 1926-1928. Bulletin, 1930, No. 16. Chapter I - Chapter XX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education, United States Department of the Interior, 1930

    1930-01-01

    This document contains the first twenty chapters of the Biennial Survey of Education document, covering the years 1926-1928. The following chapters are included in this document: (1) Higher education (Arthur J. Klein); (2) Medical education (N. P. Colwell); (3) Legal education (Alfred Z. Reed); (4) Significant movements in city school systems (W.…

  1. Report of the Chapter 1 Sustained Effects Study. Elementary and Secondary Education Act--Chapter 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, William S.

    School districts receiving Chapter 1 funds are to conduct a study of sustained effects once every 3 years and to use the results for planning future Chapter 1 programs. As part of this effort, the Columbus (Ohio) public schools conducted pretest-to-posttest, posttest-to-sustained effect, and pretest-to-sustained effect studies of 4,031 students in…

  2. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 13, Perpendiculars and Parallels (I), Chapter 14, Similarity. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    The first chapter of the seventh unit in this SMSG series discusses perpendiculars and parallels; topics covered include the relationship between parallelism and perpendicularity, rectangles, transversals, parallelograms, general triangles, and measurement of the circumference of the earth. The second chapter, on similarity, discusses scale…

  3. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 27, Logic, Chapter 28, Applications of Probability and Statistics. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    One chapter in the fourteenth unit of this SMSG series deals with logic; simple and compound statements, truth tables, logical equivalence, rules of a logical argument, proof, quantifiers, and negations are the topics covered. The second chapter of the unit discusses applications of probability and statistics, including random sampling,…

  4. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 17, Perpendiculars and Parallels (II), Chapter 18, Coordinate Geometry. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    The first chapter, Perpendiculars and Parallels (II), of the ninth unit in this SMSG series includes a discussion of the properties of triangles, circles and perpendiculars, parallels in space, perpendicular lines and planes, and parallel planes. The next chapter, on coordinate geometry, covers distance; midpoints; algebraic descriptions of…

  5. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MODELING (CHAPTER 58)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discussses indoor air quality (IAQ) modeling. Such modeling provides a way to investigate many IAQ problems without the expense of large field experiments. Where experiments are planned, IAQ models can be used to help design experiments by providing information on exp...

  6. Chapter 4. Students' Attitudes toward Computer Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors attempt not only to discern aspects that relate to age, place, and the amount of time devoted to playing computer games in adolescence, but also to study content characteristics of their attitudes such as: the developmental dynamic in the change of their genre preferences in computer games, changes in factors that…

  7. Chapter 8: Youth, Technology, and Media Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sefton-Green, Julian

    2006-01-01

    This chapter begins with a scenario contrasting two seemingly different images of child and media from before and after the "digital revolution." The author argues that there is much greater continuity in how this relationship has been conceptualized over the period than is commonly imagined. While not offering a comprehensive study of recent…

  8. Chapter 12: spatial or area repellents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial repellents a three-dimensional zone of protection around a host from attacks by biting arthropods. This chapter reviews current knowledge and outlines future directions for utilization of spatial repellents. Current knowledge includes the kinds of products, both active and passive devices,...

  9. The Chapter I Challenge: Colorado's Contribution 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petro, Janice Rose

    Chapter I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) is the largest federally-funded program designed to provide services to elementary and secondary students to meet the special needs of educationally deprived students who reside in areas with high concentrations of low-income families. The 1994-95 school year is the last year of…

  10. Recommended Research on Artificial Gravity. Chapter 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, Joan; Paloski, William; Fuller, Charles; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    Based on the summaries presented in the above sections of what is still to be learned on the effects of artificial gravity on human functions, this chapter will discuss the short- and long-term steps of research required to understand fundamentals and to validate operational aspects of using artificial gravity as an effective countermeasure for long-duration space travel.

  11. Chapter Five: Language Learning and Discursive Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter is framed by the three questions related to learning in Practice Theory posed by Johannes Wagner (2008): (1) What is learned?; (2) Who is learning?; and (3) Who is participating in the learning? These questions are addressed in two learning theories: Language Socialization and Situated Learning theory. In Language Socialization, the…

  12. Chapter 7: Principles of Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Mary; Deglau, Dena

    2006-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the 4-year-long PEP professional development (PD) initiative in terms of current perspectives on teacher learning and PD, shares lessons learned about the design and delivery of high-quality PD, and presents some principles to guide the development of future PD efforts. The first section reviews the definition and…

  13. Metrology of Large Parts. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2012-01-01

    As discussed in the first chapter of this book, there are many different methods to measure a part using optical technology. Chapter 2 discussed the use of machine vision to measure macroscopic features such as length and position, which was extended to the use of interferometry as a linear measurement tool in chapter 3, and laser or other trackers to find the relation of key points on large parts in chapter 4. This chapter looks at measuring large parts to optical tolerances in the sub-micron range using interferometry, ranging, and optical tools discussed in the previous chapters. The purpose of this chapter is not to discuss specific metrology tools (such as interferometers or gauges), but to describe a systems engineering approach to testing large parts. Issues such as material warpage and temperature drifts that may be insignificant when measuring a part to micron levels under a microscope, as will be discussed in later chapters, can prove to be very important when making the same measurement over a larger part. In this chapter, we will define a set of guiding principles for successfully overcoming these challenges and illustrate the application of these principles with real world examples. While these examples are drawn from specific large optical testing applications, they inform the problems associated with testing any large part to optical tolerances. Manufacturing today relies on micrometer level part performance. Fields such as energy and transportation are demanding higher tolerances to provide increased efficiencies and fuel savings. By looking at how the optics industry approaches sub-micrometer metrology, one can gain a better understanding of the metrology challenges for any larger part specified to micrometer tolerances. Testing large parts, whether optical components or precision structures, to optical tolerances is just like testing small parts, only harder. Identical with what one does for small parts, a metrologist tests large parts and optics

  14. Vaccination against bacterial kidney disease: Chapter 22

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Wiens, Gregory D.; Hammell, K. Larry; Rhodes, Linda D.; Edited by Gudding, Roar; Lillehaug, Atle; Evensen, Øystein

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has been recognized as a serious disease in salmonid fishes since the 1930s. This chapter discusses the occurrence and significance, etiology, and pathogenesis of BKD. It then describes the different vaccination procedures and the effects and side-effects of vaccination. Despite years of research, however, only a single vaccine has been licensed for prevention of BKD, and has demonstrated variable efficacy. Therefore, in addition to a presentation of the current status of BKD vaccination, a discussion of potential future directions for BKD vaccine development is included in the chapter. This discussion is focused on the unique characteristics of R. salmoninarum and its biology, as well as aspects of the salmonid immune system that might be explored specifically to develop more effective vaccines for BKD prevention.

  15. Dust and human health: Chapter 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morman, Suzette A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Knippertz, Peter; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that exposure to fine particulate matter may increase risk for human morbidity and mortality. Until recently, population health related studies examining the effects of particulate matter on human health generally examined anthropogenic (industry and combustion by-products) sources with few studies considering contributions from natural sources. This chapter provides an overview of naturally occurring inorganic mineral dust research and associated human health ailments and some of the challenges in elucidating the etiological mechanisms responsible.

  16. Managing atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: chapter 2.

    PubMed

    Nester, Carla M

    2015-05-01

    Licht et al. present the 2-year follow-up data of the landmark trials studying the efficacy of eculizumab in the treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). They report sustained improvements in hematologic parameters, continued safety, and additional improvements in kidney function with extended treatment. This report adds a layer of comfort to our care of patients with this rare disease; however, it is unlikely to be the final chapter in the treatment of aHUS.

  17. Chapter A9. Safety in Field Activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, Susan L.; Ray, Ronald G.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols (requirements and recommendations) and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter of the manual addresses topics related to personal safety to be used in the collection of water-quality data, including: policies and general regulations on field safety; transportation of people and equipment; implementation of surface-water and ground-water activities; procedures for handling chemicals; and information on potentially hazardous environmental conditions, animals, and plants. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be announced on the USGS Home Page on the World Wide Web under 'New Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.usgs.gov/publications/ index.html.

  18. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2000-01-01

    This chapter focuses attention on the friction and wear properties of selected solid lubricating films to aid users in choosing the best lubricant, deposition conditions, and operational variables. For simplicity, discussion of the tribological properties of concern is separated into two parts. The first part of the chapter discusses the different solid lubricating films selected for study including commercially developed solid film lubricants: (1) bonded molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), (2) magnetron-sputtered MoS2, (3) ion-plated silver, (4) ion-plated lead, (5) magnetron-sputtered diamondlike carbon (MS DLC), and (6) plasma-assisted, chemical-vapor-deposited diamondlike carbon (PACVD DEC) films. Marked differences in the friction and wear properties of the different films resulted from the different environmental conditions (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, and dry nitrogen) and the solid film lubricant materials. The second part of the chapter discusses the physical and chemical characteristics, friction behavior, and endurance life of the magnetron-sputtered MoS2 films. The role of interface species and the effects of applied load, film thickness, oxygen pressure, environment, and temperature on the friction and wear properties are considered.

  19. A Survey of Geologic Resources. Chapter 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonson, Jennifer; Rickman, Doug

    2012-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the resources available from the Moon itself: regolith, geologically concentrated materials, and lunar physical features that will enable habitation and generation of power on the surface. This chapter briefly covers the formation of the Moon and thus the formation of the crust of the Moon, as well as the evolution of the regolith. The characteristics of the regolith are provided in some detail, including its mineralogy and lithology. The location of high concentrations of specific minerals or rocks is noted. Other ideal locations for in situ resource utilization technology and lunar habitation are presented. This chapter is intended to be a brief review of current knowledge, and to serve as a foundational source for further study. Each concept presented here has a wealth of literature associated with it; the reader is therefore directed to that literature with each discussion. With great interest in possible manned lunar landings and continued study of the Moon by multiple satellites, the available information changes regularly.

  20. Prospective Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Poizner, Howard; Lynch, Gary; Gepshtein, Sergei; Greenspan, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    Human performance approaches that of an ideal observer and optimal actor in some perceptual and motor tasks. These optimal abilities depend on the capacity of the cerebral cortex to store an immense amount of information and to flexibly make rapid decisions. However, behavior only approaches these limits after a long period of learning while the cerebral cortex interacts with the basal ganglia, an ancient part of the vertebrate brain that is responsible for learning sequences of actions directed toward achieving goals. Progress has been made in understanding the algorithms used by the brain during reinforcement learning, which is an online approximation of dynamic programming. Humans also make plans that depend on past experience by simulating different scenarios, which is called prospective optimization. The same brain structures in the cortex and basal ganglia that are active online during optimal behavior are also active offline during prospective optimization. The emergence of general principles and algorithms for goal-directed behavior has consequences for the development of autonomous devices in engineering applications. PMID:25328167

  1. Prospects: The Congressionally Mandated Study of Educational Growth and Opportunity. The Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael J.; And Others

    This publication is the first interim report from the Congressionally Mandated Study of Educational Growth and Opportunity (Prospects), and describes students' characteristics and the schools they attend. Prospects is designed to evaluate the short- and long-term consequences of Chapter 1 program participation by following for 5 years large…

  2. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  3. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  4. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  5. 48 CFR Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false A Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7...

  6. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  7. 48 CFR Appendix G to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false G Appendix G to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendix G to Chapter 2...

  8. 48 CFR Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false G Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7...

  9. 48 CFR Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false A Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7...

  10. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  11. 48 CFR Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false G Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7...

  12. Space Applications of Mass Spectrometry. Chapter 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Limero, Thomas; Arkin, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometers have been involved in essentially all aspects of space exploration. This chapter outlines some of these many uses. Mass spectrometers have not only helped to expand our knowledge and understanding of the world and solar system around us, they have helped to put man safely in space and expand our frontier. Mass spectrometry continues to prove to be a very reliable, robust, and flexible analytical instrument, ensuring that its use will continue to help aid our investigation of the universe and this small planet that we call home.

  13. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    This chapter describes powerful analytical techniques capable of sampling tribological surfaces and solid-film lubricants. Some of these techniques may also be used to determine the locus of failure in a bonded structure or coated substrate; such information is important when seeking improved adhesion between a solid-film lubricant and a substrate and when seeking improved performance and long life expectancy of solid lubricants. Many examples are given here and through-out the book on the nature and character of solid surfaces and their significance in lubrication, friction, and wear. The analytical techniques used include the late spectroscopic methods.

  14. 38 CFR 21.6380 - Additional applicable Chapter 31 regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Chapter 31 regulations. 21.6380 Section 21.6380 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... applicable Chapter 31 regulations. The following regulations are applicable to veterans pursuing the vocational training under this program in the same manner as they apply to 38 U.S.C. chapter 31: §...

  15. 24 CFR 300.1 - Scope of chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scope of chapter. 300.1 Section 300.1 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... of chapter. This chapter consists of general information and does not purport to set forth all of...

  16. Using Kolb's Experiential Learning Cycle in Chapter Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes-Eley, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    Student-led chapter presentations provide an excellent opportunity for instructors to evaluate a student's comprehension of the assigned chapter, as well as the student's ability to present and convey information in a public forum. Although several instructors realize the benefits of requiring students to complete chapter presentations either as…

  17. 42 CFR 412.125 - Effect of change of ownership on payments under the prospective payment systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL... described in § 489.18 of this chapter, the following rules apply: (a) Payment for the operating and...

  18. Methods of assessing responses of trees, stands, and ecosystems to air pollution (Chapter 7). Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Stolte, K.W.; Duriscoe, D.M.; Cook, E.R.; Cline, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    The chapter focuses on three main types of assessments of pollution effects used in the case studies chronicled in Chapter 8 through 12 (Regional Studies of conifer forests in the west). These are measures of crown condition of individual trees; impacts on populations and communities; and temporal patterns in radial growth. The concepts behind the development of each approach are introduced with references to previous work, leading to a discussion of the state of science. The importance of quality assurance techniques to the success of any assessment of air pollution effects is also discussed.

  19. Universal Sensor and Actuator Requirements. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Taylor; Webster, John; Garg, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    The previous chapters have focused on the requirements for sensors and actuators for "More Intelligent Gas Turbine Engines" from the perspective of performance and operating environment. Even if a technology is available, which meets these performance requirements, there are still various hurdles to be overcome for the technology to transition into a real engine. Such requirements relate to TRL (Technology Readiness Level), durability, reliability, volume, weight, cost, etc. This chapter provides an overview of such universal requirements which any sensor or actuator technology will have to meet before it can be implemented on a product. The objective here is to help educate the researchers or technology developers on the extensive process that the technology has to go through beyond just meeting performance requirements. The hope is that such knowledge will help the technology developers as well as decision makers to prevent wasteful investment in developing solutions to performance requirements, which have no potential to meet the "universal" requirements. These "universal" requirements can be divided into 2 broad areas: 1) Technology value proposition; and 2) Technology maturation. These requirements are briefly discussed in the following.

  20. Volatile hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates: Chapter 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates are among the most commonly occurring and widely distributed contaminants in the environment. This chapter presents a summary of the sources, transport, fate, and remediation of volatile fuel hydrocarbons and fuel additives in the environment. Much research has focused on the transport and transformation processes of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes and methyl tert‐butyl ether, in groundwater following release from underground storage tanks. Natural attenuation from biodegradation limits the movement of these contaminants and has received considerable attention as an environmental restoration option. This chapter summarizes approaches to environmental restoration, including those that rely on natural attenuation, and also engineered or enhanced remediation. Researchers are increasingly combining several microbial and molecular-based methods to give a complete picture of biodegradation potential and occurrence at contaminated field sites. New insights into the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel additives have been gained by recent advances in analytical tools and approaches, including stable isotope fractionation, analysis of metabolic intermediates, and direct microbial evidence. However, development of long-term detailed monitoring programs is required to further develop conceptual models of natural attenuation and increase our understanding of the behavior of contaminant mixtures in the subsurface.

  1. Prospects: The Congressionally Mandated Study of Educational Growth and Opportunity. Final Report on Limited English Proficient Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buron, Lawrence; Beecroft, Erik; Bell, Stephen; Price, Cristofer; Gemmen, Eric

    As a reflection of the importance attached to successfully educating children whose native language is not English, the U.S. Department of Education's longitudinal study of Chapter 1 assistance, "Prospects," includes a component devoted to the analysis of limited-English-proficient (LEP) students. Chapter 1, renamed Title 1 in 1994, is the primary…

  2. Chapter 2: Stand-alone Applications - TOPCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.

    Tool for OPerations on Catalogues And Tables or TOPCAT is a graphical viewer for table data. It offers a variety of ways to work with data tables, including a browser for the cell data, viewers for information about table and column metadata, dataset visualization, and even analysis. We discuss a small subset of TOPCAT's functionalities in this chapter. TOPCAT was originally developed as part of the Starlink program in the United Kingdom. It is now maintained by AstroGrid. The program is written in pure Java and available under the GNU General Public License. It is available for download and a version is included in the software distribution accompanying this book. TOPCAT is a GUI interface on top of the STIL library. A command line interface to this library, STILTS, described in Chapter 21 provides scriptable access to many of the capabilities described here. The purpose of this tutorial is to provide an overview of TOPCAT to the novice user. The best place to look for and learn about TOPCAT is the web page maintained by Mark B. Taylor. There, TOPCAT documentation is provided in HTML, PDF, via screen shots, etc. In this chapter we take the user through a few examples that give the general idea of how TOPCAT works. The majority of the functionality of TOPCAT is not included in this short tutorial. Our goal in this tutorial is to lead the reader through an exercise that would result in a publication quality figure (e.g. for a journal article). Specifically, we will use TOPCAT to show how the color-magnitude relation of a galaxy cluster compares to that of all galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (York et al. 2000). This diagnostic is used not only in cluster finding, but its linear fit can provide insight into the age and/or metallicity of the oldest galaxies in galaxy clusters (which are some of the oldest galaxies in the Universe). The data we need for this exercise are: 1) the entire spectroscopic galaxy catalog from the SDSS, with galaxy positions, galaxy

  3. Prospect redux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquemoud, S.; Ustin, S. L.; Verdebout, J.; Schmuck, G.; Andreoli, G.; Hosgood, B.

    1995-01-01

    The remote estimation of leaf biochemical content from spaceborne platforms has been the subject of many studies aimed at better understanding of terrestrial ecosystem functioning. The major ecological processes involved in exchange of matter and energy, like photosynthesis, primary production, evaportranspiration, respiration, and decomposition can be related to plant properties e.g., chlorophyll, water, protein, cellulose and lignin contents. As leaves represent the most important plant surfaces interacting with solar energy, a top priority has been to relate optical properties to biochemical constituents. Two different approaches have been considered: first, statistical correlations between the leaf reflectance (or transmittance) and biochemical content, and second, physically based models of leaf scattering and absorption developed using the laws of optics. Recently reviewed by Verdebout et al., the development of models of leaf optical properties has resulted in better understanding of the interaction of light with plant leaves. Present radiative transfer models mainly use chlorophyll and/or water contents as input parameters to calculate leaf reflectance. Inversion of these models allows to retrieve these constituents from spectrophotometric measurements. Conel et al. recently proposed a two-stream Kubelka-Munk model to analyze the influence of protein, cellulose, lignin, and starch on leaf reflectance, but in fact, the estimation of leaf biochemistry from remote sensing is still an open question. In order to clarify it, a laboratory experiment associating visible/infrared spectra of plan leaves both with physical measurements and biochemical analyses was conducted at the Joint Research Center during the summer of 1993. This unique data set has been used to upgrade the PROSPECT model, by including leaf biochemistry.

  4. History of Artificial Gravity. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Gilles; Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William

    2006-01-01

    This chapter reviews the past and current projects on artificial gravity during space missions. The idea of a rotating wheel-like space station providing artificial gravity goes back in the writings of Tsiolkovsky, Noordung, and Wernher von Braun. Its most famous fictional representation is in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey, which also depicts spin-generated artificial gravity aboard a space station and a spaceship bound for Jupiter. The O Neill-type space colony provides another classic illustration of this technique. A more realistic approach to rotating the space station is to provide astronauts with a smaller centrifuge contained within a spacecraft. The astronauts would go into it for a workout, and get their gravity therapeutic dose for a certain period of time, daily or a few times a week. This simpler concept is current being tested during ground-based studies in several laboratories around the world.

  5. New training building heralds new chapter.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2014-09-01

    Established in 1969 by the Department of Health as the National Centre for Hospital Engineering, Eastwood Park is today acknowledged as one of the UK's leading providers of specialist technical, engineering, estates, and facilities management training to the healthcare sector. Having celebrated 40 years in business in 2009, and with the breadth of its portfolio growing year-on-year, the training provider has recently entered a particularly exciting new chapter, as plans for a new 3,000 m2 training centre, due to open late next year, and equipped with facilities which Eastwood Park's management say will be 'unrivalled anywhere else in the world', come to fruition. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie reports.

  6. Coldwater fish in wadeable streams: chapter 8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunham, Jason B.; Rosenberger, Amanda E.; Thurow, Russell F.; Dolloff, C. Andrew; Howell, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    Standardizing sampling methods for fish populations across large regions is important for consistent measurement of large-scale effects of climate or geography. In addition, pooling samples creates larger sample sizes and can facilitate data sharing among scientists and land managers. Sampling freshwater fish has largely not been standardized due to the diversity of fish and habitats. USGS aquatic ecologist Jason Dunham and co-authors contributed a chapter about sampling coldwater fish in wadeable streams to a new book that details common methods, protocols, and guidelines for sampling fish across North America. Topics include three common sampling methods: electrofishing, snorkeling, and nest counts. Each method provides complementary information about different species and life stages. The information will be useful for initiating new or fine-tuning ongoing sampling programs.

  7. Mercury and halogens in coal: Chapter 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolker, Allan; Quick, Jeffrey C.; Granite, Evan J.; Pennline, Henry W.; Senior, Constance L.

    2014-01-01

    Apart from mercury itself, coal rank and halogen content are among the most important factors inherent in coal that determine the proportion of mercury captured by conventional controls during coal combustion. This chapter reviews how mercury in coal occurs, gives available concentration data for mercury in U.S. and international commercial coals, and provides an overview of the natural variation in halogens that influence mercury capture. Three databases, the U.S. Geological Survey coal quality (USGS COALQUAL) database for in-ground coals, and the 1999 and 2010 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Information Collection Request (ICR) databases for coals delivered to power stations, provide extensive results for mercury and other parameters that are compared in this chapter. In addition to the United States, detailed characterization of mercury is available on a nationwide basis for China, whose mean values in recent compilations are very similar to the United States in-ground mean of 0.17 ppm mercury. Available data for the next five largest producers (India, Australia, South Africa, the Russian Federation, and Indonesia) are more limited and with the possible exceptions of Australia and the Russian Federation, do not allow nationwide means for mercury in coal to be calculated. Chlorine in coal varies as a function of rank and correspondingly, depth of burial. As discussed elsewhere in this volume, on a proportional basis, bromine is more effective than chlorine in promoting mercury oxidation in flue gas and capture by conventional controls. The ratio of bromine to chlorine in coal is indicative of the proportion of halogens present in formation waters within a coal basin. This ratio is relatively constant except in coals that have interacted with deep-basin brines that have reached halite saturation, enriching residual fluids in bromine. Results presented here help optimize mercury capture by conventional controls and provide a starting point for

  8. Chapter 24: Programmatic Interfaces - IDL VOlib

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.

    In this chapter, we describe a library for working with the VO using IDL (the Interactive Data Language). IDL is a software environment for data analysis, visualization, and cross-platform application development. It has wide-usage in astronomy, including NASA (e.g. http://seadas.gsfc.nasa.gov/), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (http://www.sdss.org), and the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph Instrument (http://ssc.spitzer.caltech.edu/archanaly/contributed/smart/). David Stern, the founder of Research Systems, Inc. (RSI), began the development of IDL while working with NASA's Mars Mariner 7 and 9 data at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado. In 1981, IDL was rewritten in assembly language and FORTRAN for VAX/VMS. IDL's usage has expanded over the last decade into the fields of medical imaging and engineering, among many others. IDL's programming style carries over much of this FORTRAN-legacy, and has a familiar feel to many astronomers who learned their trade using FORTRAN. The spread of IDL-usage amongst astronomers can in part be attributed to the wealth of publicly astronomical libraries. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) maintains a list of astronomy-related IDL libraries, including the well known Astronomy User's Library (hereafter ASTROLIB2). We will use some of these GSFC IDL libraries. We note that while IDL is a licensed-software product, the source code of user-written procedures are typically freely available to the community. To make the most out of this section as a reader, it is important that many of the data discovery, access, and analysis protocols are understood before reading this chapter. In the next section, we provide an overview of some of the NVO terminology with which the reader should be familiar. The IDL library discussed here is specifically for use with the Virtual Observatory and is named VOlib. IDL's VOlib is available at http://nvo.noao.edu and is included with the software distrubution for this

  9. Numerical Prediction of Dust. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, J. M.; Basart, S.; Benincasa, F.; Boucher, O.; Brooks, M.; Chen, J. P.; Colarco, P. R.; Gong, S.; Huneeus, N.; Jones, L; Lu, S.; Menut, L.; Mulcahy, J.; Nickovic, S.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Perez, C.; Reid, J. S.; Sekiyama, T. T.; Tanaka, T.; Terradellas, E.; Westphal, D. L.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Zhou, C.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Covers the whole breadth of mineral dust research, from a scientific perspective Presents interdisciplinary work including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies Explores the role of dust as a player and recorder of environmental change This volume presents state-of-the-art research about mineral dust, including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies. Dust research is a new, dynamic and fast-growing area of science and due to its multiple roles in the Earth system, dust has become a fascinating topic for many scientific disciplines. Aspects of dust research covered in this book reach from timescales of minutes (as with dust devils, cloud processes, and radiation) to millennia (as with loess formation and oceanic sediments), making dust both a player and recorder of environmental change. The book is structured in four main parts that explore characteristics of dust, the global dust cycle, impacts of dust on the Earth system, and dust as a climate indicator. The chapters in these parts provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of this highly interdisciplinary subject. The contributions presented here cover dust from source to sink and describe all the processes dust particles undergo while travelling through the atmosphere. Chapters explore how dust is lifted and transported, how it affects radiation, clouds, regional circulations, precipitation and chemical processes in the atmosphere, and how it deteriorates air quality. The book explores how dust is removed from the atmosphere by gravitational settling, turbulence or precipitation, how iron contained in dust fertilizes terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and about the role that dust plays in human health. We learn how dust is observed, simulated using computer models and forecast. The book also details the role of dust deposits for climate reconstructions

  10. Dealing with Processing Chapter 10 Files from Multiple Vendors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudtson, Kevin Mark

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses the experiences of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's (DFRC) Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) in dealing with the problems encountered while performing post flight data processing using the WATR's data collection/processing system on Chapter 10 files from different Chapter 10 recorders. The transition to Chapter 10 recorders has brought Vvith it an assortment of issues that must be addressed: the ambiguities of language in the Chapter 10 standard, the unrealistic near-term expectations of the Chapter 10 standard, the incompatibility of data products generated from Chapter 10 recorders, and the unavailability of mature Chapter 10 applications. Some of these issues properly belong to the users of Chapter 10 recorders, some to the manufacturers, and some to the flight test community at large. The goal of this presentation is to share the WATR's lesson learned in processing data products from various Chapter 10 recorder vendors. The WATR could benefit greatly in the open forum Vvith lessons learned discussions with other members of the flight test community.

  11. Carbon cycling in terrestrial environments: Chapter 17

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Yang; Huntington, Thomas G.; Osher, Laurie J.; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Trumbore, Susan E.; Amundson, Ronald; Harden, Jennifer W.; McKnight, Diane M.; Schiff, Sherry L.; Aiken, George R.; Lyons, W. Berry; Aravena, Ramon O.; Baron, Jill S.

    1998-01-01

    This chapter reviews a number of applications of isotopic techniques for the investigation of carbon cycling processes. Carbon dioxide (C02) is an important greenhouse gas. Its concentration in the atmosphere has increased from an estimated 270 ppm at the beginning of the industrial revolution to ∼ 360 ppm at present. Climatic conditions and atmospheric C02 concentration also influence isotopic discrimination during photosynthesis. Natural and anthropogenically induced variations in the carbon isotopic abundance can be exploited to investigate carbon transformations between pools on various time scales. It also discusses one of the isotopes of carbon, the 14C, that is produced in the atmosphere by interactions of cosmic-ray produced neutrons with stable isotopes of nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), and carbon (C), and has a natural abundance in the atmosphere of ∼1 atom 14 C per 1012 atoms 12C. The most important factor affecting the measured 14C ages of soil organic matter is the rate of organic carbon cycling in soils. Differences in the dynamics of soil carbon among different soils or soil horizons will result in different soil organic 14C signatures. As a result, the deviation of the measured 14C age from the true age could differ significantly among different soils or soil horizons.

  12. Chapter 19: visual images and neurological illustration.

    PubMed

    Ione, Amy

    2010-01-01

    This chapter examines the importance of visual materials for studying the brain in health and in disease. Surveying historical representations, this research confirms that images of the brain's form and function have long served as teaching tools and as historical reference points for neurological events. The research is divided into five sections: the first section, Early History to Printing Technology considers prehistoric and ancient imagery, pre-Renaissance thinking about the brain, and the impact of printing and printmaking on neurological research. The second section, Renaissance Illustration, focuses on Leonardo da Vinci, Andreas Vesalius, and other contributors who produced images of the brain as dissection restrictions eased. The third section, which turns to Early Modern and Modern Illustration, highlights the work of Thomas Willis, Charles Bell, and other scientists (throughout the 19th century) who demonstrated the value of a visual component within brain studies. The fourth section presents examples of Neurologically-Descriptive Illustrations, with the final section considering Historical Illustration and Contemporary Research. PMID:19892122

  13. Fire as an ecosystem process: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, Jon E.; Safford, Hugh D.

    2016-01-01

    This long-anticipated reference and sourcebook for California’s remarkable ecological abundance provides an integrated assessment of each major ecosystem type—its distribution, structure, function, and management. A comprehensive synthesis of our knowledge about this biologically diverse state, Ecosystems of California covers the state from oceans to mountaintops using multiple lenses: past and present, flora and fauna, aquatic and terrestrial, natural and managed. Each chapter evaluates natural processes for a specific ecosystem, describes drivers of change, and discusses how that ecosystem may be altered in the future. This book also explores the drivers of California’s ecological patterns and the history of the state’s various ecosystems, outlining how the challenges of climate change and invasive species and opportunities for regulation and stewardship could potentially affect the state’s ecosystems. The text explicitly incorporates both human impacts and conservation and restoration efforts and shows how ecosystems support human well-being. Edited by two esteemed ecosystem ecologists and with overviews by leading experts on each ecosystem, this definitive work will be indispensable for natural resource management and conservation professionals as well as for undergraduate or graduate students of California’s environment and curious naturalists.

  14. Chapter 1: Epidemiology of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Maahs, David M; West, Nancy A; Lawrence, Jean M.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis This chapter describes the epidemiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) around the world and across the lifespan. Epidemiologic patterns of T1D by demographic, geographic, biologic, cultural and other factors in populations are presented to gain insight about the etiology, natural history, risks, and complications of T1D. Data from large epidemiologic studies worldwide indicate that the incidence of T1D has been increasing by 2–5% worldwide and that the prevalence of T1D is approximately 1 in 300 in the US by 18 years of age. Research on risk factors for T1D is an active area of research to identify genetic and environmental triggers that could potentially be targeted for intervention. While significant advances have been made in the clinical care of T1D with resultant improvements in quality of life and clinical outcomes, much more needs to be done to improve care of, and ultimately find a cure for T1D. Epidemiologic studies have an important on-going role to investigate the complex causes, clinical care, prevention, and cure of T1D. PMID:20723815

  15. Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkraus, J. M.; Wright, M. W.; Rheingans, B. E.; Steinkraus, D. E.; George, W. P.; Aljabri, A.; Hall, J. L.; Scott, D. C.

    2012-06-01

    One novel approach towards addressing the need for innovative instrumentation and investigation approaches is the integration of a suite of four spectrometer systems to form the Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometers (MAPS) for prospecting on Mars.

  16. Ecological consequences of manipulative parasites: chapter 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    phrases such as “may ultimately infl uence community structure” (Kiesecker and Blaustein 1999), yet few demonstrate ecological effects. Here, we consider the conditions under which manipulative parasites might have a substantial ecological effect in nature and highlight those for which evidence exists (see also Chapter 10).

  17. Introduction to MODIS Cloud Products. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, Bryan A.; Platnick, Steven

    2006-01-01

    derived from heritage instruments. This chapter provides an overview of the MODIS Level-2 and -3 operational cloud products.

  18. 48 CFR Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false B Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2...

  19. 48 CFR Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false B Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2...

  20. 48 CFR Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false B Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2...

  1. Report of Evaluation, Chapter I Mathematics Program, 1982-83.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, John F.

    The Des Moines Chapter I math program served 1110 students in grades 1-8 during school year 1982-83. The total population of Chapter I students attained the established criteria for achievement gains but the gains for grades 7 and 8, taken alone, were lower than the goals. The same was true for mastery of math objectives. All parent contact…

  2. Chapter I Mathematics Program, 1982-83. Report of Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, John F.

    The Des Moines (Iowa) Independent Community School District Chapter I Mathematics Program served 1,110 students in grades 2-8. Chapter I Math students in grades two through six achieved gains on the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills from pre to posttesting. Scores on these tests are reported using a metric known as the Normal Curve Equivalent (NCE). The…

  3. Chapter 2: Optical Properties of the Water Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, D. A.; Collins, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    In this chapter, and in chapter 29, the basic inter-relationship between the flux of radiant energy through the water column and the fixation of carbon by the phytoplankton in the ocean through processes of photosynthesis or primary production will be discussed.

  4. 48 CFR Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false B Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2...

  5. Technology and Chapter 1: Solutions for Catholic School Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Catholic Educational Association, Washington, DC.

    This booklet is designed to provide pertinent information about Chapter 1 (Elementary and Secondary Education Act), explaining what it is, who can participate, how funds are spent, and how technology can be used in a non-public school to meet the needs of students. Chapter 1 channels federal funds to school districts with high concentrations of…

  6. Chapter 2 Formula: Evaluation Report 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bliss, Kristen M.

    Chapter 2 Formula provides federal funds to the states through the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) as amended by P.L. 100-297 in 1988. Chapter 2 funds can support one or more programs that do the following: meet the educational needs of students with special needs (at-risk and high-cost students); acquire curricular…

  7. Chapter 1 Support for Instructional Development, 1986-87.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaemper, Jack; Morse, Kathy

    Six of the 39 Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public Schools' Chapter 1 participating schools, as part of the school-based budgeting process, allocated a portion of their Chapter 1 resource allocation for on-site intensive staff development activities. Three schools--Alamosa, Chaparral, and Duranes--agreed to utilize the time of a Support for…

  8. Biological effects: Marine mammals and sea turtles (chapter 14). Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Haebler, R.

    1994-01-01

    All spills are different, varying in type and amount of oil spilled, species exposed, and geographic and atmospheric conditions. It is important to understand as much as possible about both the natural history and characteristics of various species and the specific effects oil has on wildlife. Doing so improves the ability to extrapolate from one spill to another and improves prediction of types and severity of effects to wildlife. This chapter presents an overview of the biological effects of oil on marine mammals and sea turtles.

  9. Chapter A3. Cleaning of Equipment for Water Sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. Chapter A3 describes procedures for cleaning the equipment used to collect and process samples of surface water and ground water and procedures for assessing the efficacy of the equipment-cleaning process. This chapter is designed for use with the other chapters of this field manual. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be posted on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed September 20, 2004).

  10. Nanoporous Materials in Atmosphere Revitalization. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, J.; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Luna, Bernadette; Junaedi, Christian; Mulloth, Lila; Perry, Jay L.; Raptis, Raphael G.; Roychoudhury, Subir

    2012-01-01

    lowering cabin levels of CO2 and NH3 as well as reducing power requirements and increasing reliability. This chapter summarizes the challenges faced by ECLS system engineers in pursuing these goals, and the promising materials developments that may be part of the technical solution for challenges of crewed space exploration beyond LEO.

  11. Chapter 9: Analyses Using Disease Ontologies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nigam H.; Cole, Tyler; Musen, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced statistical methods used to analyze high-throughput data such as gene-expression assays result in long lists of “significant genes.” One way to gain insight into the significance of altered expression levels is to determine whether Gene Ontology (GO) terms associated with a particular biological process, molecular function, or cellular component are over- or under-represented in the set of genes deemed significant. This process, referred to as enrichment analysis, profiles a gene-set, and is widely used to makes sense of the results of high-throughput experiments. The canonical example of enrichment analysis is when the output dataset is a list of genes differentially expressed in some condition. To determine the biological relevance of a lengthy gene list, the usual solution is to perform enrichment analysis with the GO. We can aggregate the annotating GO concepts for each gene in this list, and arrive at a profile of the biological processes or mechanisms affected by the condition under study. While GO has been the principal target for enrichment analysis, the methods of enrichment analysis are generalizable. We can conduct the same sort of profiling along other ontologies of interest. Just as scientists can ask “Which biological process is over-represented in my set of interesting genes or proteins?” we can also ask “Which disease (or class of diseases) is over-represented in my set of interesting genes or proteins?“. For example, by annotating known protein mutations with disease terms from the ontologies in BioPortal, Mort et al. recently identified a class of diseases—blood coagulation disorders—that were associated with a 14-fold depletion in substitutions at O-linked glycosylation sites. With the availability of tools for automatic annotation of datasets with terms from disease ontologies, there is no reason to restrict enrichment analyses to the GO. In this chapter, we will discuss methods to perform enrichment analysis using any

  12. Getting the Most from Pi Sigma Alpha Chapters: Exploring the Chapter Activity Grant Program and Its Multiplier Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The political science honor society, Pi Sigma Alpha, has chapters in nearly 700 institutions across the United States. The organization sponsors many programs that can contribute a great deal to students of political science; however, many students are unaware of these opportunities. This article encourages chapter advisors to make use of these…

  13. Chapter 8: Plasma operation and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ITER Physics Expert Group on Disruptions, Control, Plasma, and MHD; ITER Physics Expert Group on Energetic Particles, Heating, Current and Drive; ITER Physics Expert Group on Diagnostics; ITER Physics Basis Editors

    1999-12-01

    well as in plasma periphery and divertor. The planned diagnostics (Chapter 7) serve as sensors for kinetic control, while gas and pellet fuelling, auxiliary power and angular momentum input, impurity injection, and non-inductive current drive constitute the control actuators. For example, in an ignited plasma, core density controls fusion power output. Kinetic control algorithms vary according to the plasma state, e.g. H- or L-mode. Generally, present facilities have demonstrated the kinetic control methods required for a reactor scale device. Plasma initiation - breakdown, burnthrough and initial current ramp - in reactor scale tokamaks will not involve physics differing from that found in present day devices. For ITER, the induced electric field in the chamber will be ~0.3V· m-1 - comparable to that required by breakdown theory but somewhat smaller than in present devices. Thus, a start-up 3MW electron cyclotron heating system will be employed to assure burnthrough. Simulations show that plasma current ramp up and termination in a reactor scale device can follow procedures developed to avoid disruption in present devices. In particular, simulations remain in the stable area of the li-q plane. For design purposes, the resistive V·s consumed during initiation is found, by experiments, to follow the Ejima expression, 0.45μ0 RIp. Advanced tokamak control has two distinct goals. First, control of density, auxiliary power, and inductive current ramping to attain reverse shear q profiles and internal transport barriers, which persist until dissipated by magnetic flux diffusion. Such internal transport barriers can lead to transient ignition. Second, combined use poloidal field shape control with non-inductive current drive and NBI angular momentum injection to create and control steady state, high bootstrap fraction, reverse shear discharges. Active n = 1 magnetic feedback and/or driven rotation will be required to suppress resistive wall modes for steady state plasmas

  14. Psychophysiology of prospective memory.

    PubMed

    Rothen, Nicolas; Meier, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Prospective memory involves the self-initiated retrieval of an intention upon an appropriate retrieval cue. Cue identification can be considered as an orienting reaction and may thus trigger a psychophysiological response. Here we present two experiments in which skin conductance responses (SCRs) elicited by prospective memory cues were compared to SCRs elicited by aversive stimuli to test whether a single prospective memory cue triggers a similar SCR as an aversive stimulus. In Experiment 2 we also assessed whether cue specificity had a differential influence on prospective memory performance and on SCRs. We found that detecting a single prospective memory cue is as likely to elicit a SCR as an aversive stimulus. Missed prospective memory cues also elicited SCRs. On a behavioural level, specific intentions led to better prospective memory performance. However, on a psychophysiological level specificity had no influence. More generally, the results indicate reliable SCRs for prospective memory cues and point to psychophysiological measures as valuable approach, which offers a new way to study one-off prospective memory tasks. Moreover, the findings are consistent with a theory that posits multiple prospective memory retrieval stages.

  15. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 1; Introduction and Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1996-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction and historical background to the field of tribology, especially solid lubrication and lubricants and sets them in the perspective of techniques and materials in lubrication. Also, solid and liquid lubrication films are defined and described.

  16. Transverse section through the Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter rooms ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Transverse section through the Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter rooms of James H. Windrim and George Summers’s neoclassical competition design for the New Masonic Temple, Philadelphia, 1867 - Masonic Temple, 1 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. Row erupts over axed chapter from Newt Gingrich book

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2012-02-01

    A chapter written by a respected climate scientist for a book co-edited by Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich has been canned because its author asserts that humans are responsible for climate change.

  18. Standardizing electrofishing power for boat electrofishing: chapter 14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, L.E. (Steve); Bonar, Scott A.; Hubert, Wayne A.; Willis, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Standardizing boat electrofishing entails achieving an accepted level of collection consistency by managing various brand factors, including (1) the temporal and spatial distribution of sampling effort, (2) boat operation, (3) equipment configuration, (4) characteristics of the waveform and energized field, and (5) power transferred to fish. This chapter focuses exclusively on factor 5:L factors 1-4 have been addressed in earlier chapters. Additionally, while the concepts covered in this chapter address boat electrofishing in general, the power settings discussed were developed from tests with primarily warmwater fish communities. Others (see Chapter 9) recommend lower power settings for communities consisting of primarily coldwater fishes. For reviews of basic concepts of electricity, electrofishing theory and systems, fish behavior relative to diverse waveforms, and injury matter, the reader is referred to Novotny (1990), Reynold (1996), and Snyder (2003).

  19. United States Parmacopeia Chapter <797> timeline: 1989 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Newton, David W

    2013-01-01

    This article features a tabular chronology of events deemed relevant to the creation and revision of United States Pharmacopeia General Chapter <797> Pharmaceutical Compounding--Sterile Preparations, which premiered in 2004.

  20. Modeling and Advanced Control for Sustainable Process Systems (chapter 5)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter introduces a novel process systems engineering framework that integrates process control with sustainability assessment tools for the simultaneous evaluation and optimization of process operations. The implemented control strategy consists of a biologically-insp...

  1. Implications of climate and land use change: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Jefferson S.; Murgueitio, Enrique; Calle, Zoraida; Raudsepp-Hearne, Ciara; Stallard, Robert F.; Balvanera, Patricia; Hall, Jefferson S.; Kirn, Vanessa; Yanguas-Fernandez, Estrella

    2015-01-01

    This chapter relates ecosystem services to climate change and land use. The bulk of the chapter focuses on ecosystem services and steepland land use in the humid Neotropics – what is lost with land-cover changed, and what is gained with various types of restoration that are sustainable given private ownership. Many case studies are presented later in the white paper. The USGS contribution relates to climate change and the role of extreme weather events in land-use planning.

  2. Air cleaners for indoor-air-pollution control (Chapter 10). Book chapter, Feb 89-Jul 90

    SciTech Connect

    Viner, A.S.; Ramanathan, K.; Hanley, J.T.; Smith, D.D.; Ensor, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    The chapter describes an experimental study to evaluate performance characteristics of currently available controls for indoor air pollutants, including both particles and gases. The study evaluated the particle-size-dependent collection efficiency of seven commercially available devices for particulate control: a common furnace filter, four industrial filters, and two electronic air cleaners (EACs). The furnance filter had negligible effect on particles with diameters between 0.1 and 1 micrometer. The industrial filters, with ASHRAE ratings of 95, 85, 65, and 40% showed minimum efficiency at about 0.1 micrometer, which was substantially less than the ASHRAE efficiency. One EAC, essentially a furnance filter with a high-voltage electrode, reached a maximum efficiency of 30% at low flowrates (7 cu m/min); however, it had a negligible effect at higher flowrates. The other EAC, similar to an industrial ESP, showed efficiencies of 80-90% over the entire size range at low to moderate flowrates. At the highest flowrate, a minimum efficiency was detected at 0.35 micrometer. The study also evaluated the suitability of commerically available carbon-based sorbents (wood, coal, and coconut) for removing low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (benzene, acetaldehyde, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane).

  3. Satellite-Based Spatiotemporal Trends in PM2.5 Concentrations: China 2004-2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Zongwei; Hu, Xuefei; Sayer, Andrew M.; Levy, Robert; Zhang, Qiang; Xue, Yingang; Tong, Shilu; Bi, Jun; Huang, Lei; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Three decades of rapid economic development is causing severe and widespread PM2.5(particulate matter (is) less than 2.5 ) pollution in China. However, research on the health impacts of PM2.5 exposure has been hindered by limited historical PM2.5 concentration data. We estimated ambient PM2.5 concentrations from 2004 to 2013 in China at 0.1 deg resolution using the most recent satellite data and evaluated model performance with available ground observations. We developed a two-stage spatial statistical model using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 6 aerosol optical depth (AOD) and assimilated meteorology, land use data, and PM2.5 concentrations from China's recently established ground monitoring network. An inverse variance weighting (IVW) approach was developed to combine MODIS Dark Target and Deep Blue AOD to optimize data coverage. We evaluated model predicted PM2.5 concentrations from 2004 to early 2014 using ground observations. The overall model cross-validation R(sup 2) and relative prediction error were 0.79 and 35.6%, respectively. Validation beyond the model year (2013) indicated that it accurately predicted PM(sub 2.5) concentrations with little bias at the monthly (R(sup 2) = 0.73), regression slope = 0.91) and seasonal (R(sup 2) = 0.79), regression slope = 0.92) levels. Seasonal variations revealed that winter was the most polluted season and that summer was the cleanest season. Analysis of predicted PM2.5 levels showed a mean annual increase of 1.97 micro-g/cu cm between 2004 and 2007 and a decrease of 0.46 micro-g/cu cm between 2008 and 2013. Our satellite-driven model can provide reliable historical PM2.5 estimates in China at a resolution comparable to those used in epidemiologic studies on the health effects of long-term PM2.5 exposure in North America. This data source can potentially advance research on PM2.5 health effects in China.

  4. Saturn’s Zonal Winds at Cloud Level between 2004-2013 from Cassini ISS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blalock, John J.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ewald, Shawn P.; Ingersoll , Andrew P.

    2014-11-01

    We examine images of Saturn returned by Cassini orbiter’s Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) camera between 2004 to 2013 to analyze the temporal evolution of the zonal mean wind speed as a function of latitude. Our study primarily examines the images captured in the 752-nm continuum band using the CB2 filter. Images captured using the CB2 filter sense the upper troposphere of Saturn between 350 mbar and 500 mbar (Pérez-Hoyos and Sánchez-Lavega, 2006; Sánchez-Lavega et al, 2006; García-Melendo et al, 2009). We measure the wind speed using a two-dimensional Correlation Imaging Velocimetry (CIV) technique. The wind vectors are computed using pairs of images separated in time by up to two planetary rotations, and binned in latitude to determine the zonal mean wind profile, which typically covers a limited range of latitude. To achieve pole-to-pole coverage, we systematically merge all the wind measurements during each of the calendar years in order to compile a yearly, near-global record of Saturn's zonal wind structure. Using our wind measurements, we analyze the temporal evolution of the zonal wind. We specifically focus on changes in the wind profile after the 2009 equinox; we predict that changes in the insolation pattern caused by the shifting ring shadows affect the horizontal temperature gradient, and change the zonal mean wind through the thermal wind relationship. Furthermore, we also extend the zonal wind analysis by Sayanagi et al (2013), who detected changes in the zonal wind related to the Great Storm of 2010-2011, to study the subsequent evolution of the region affected by the storm. We compare our results with previously published zonal wind profiles obtained from Voyager 1 and 2 (Sánchez-Lavega et al, 2000) and Cassini (García-Melendo et al, 2011). Out study is supported by the Cassini Project, and our investigation is funded by NASA Outer Planets Research Program grant NNX12AR38G and NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics grant 1212216 to KMS.

  5. Cryptococcosis due to Cryptococcus gattii in Germany from 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ilka McCormick; Stephan, Christoph; Hogardt, Michael; Klawe, Christoph; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Rickerts, Volker

    2015-10-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus gattii was considered to be restricted to tropic and sub- tropic regions. A recent outbreak in North America due to isolates belonging to molecular type VG II, affecting mostly non-immunocompromised hosts, documented the potential public health impact of this fungal pathogen also in temperate regions. Surveillance of these infections in Germany is challenging, as cryptococcosis is not notifiable and often C. gattii is diagnostically not distinguished from the more prevalent Cryptococcus neoformans. We used hospital discharge data and identified cryptococcal isolates received by the German cryptococcosis reference laboratory at the species level to gain insights into the epidemiology of C. gattii-infections in Germany between 2004 and 2013. Between 49 and 60 (Median 57) hospitalizations for cryptococcosis are documented per year. Between 5 and 28 (Median 14) isolates were received at the reference laboratory per year. Among 155 single patient isolates, four C. gattii (3%) of the molecular types VGI and VG III were identified from patients with meningoencephalitis, including one interspecies hybrid. Patient histories and molecular typing suggest that half of the infections were acquired abroad. Only one patient survived the infection. C. gattii remains rarely identified as agent of cryptococcosis in Germany but underestimation is likely. Definition of environmental niches occupied by C. gattii in Germany may help to assess the associated risk of infection and prevent this deadly fungal infection.

  6. Infodemiological data of Ironman Triathlon in the study period 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Mnadla, Sofiane; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Rouissi, Mehdi; Chaalali, Anis; Siri, Anna; Padulo, Johnny; Ardigò, Luca Paolo; Brigo, Francesco; Chamari, Karim; Knechtle, Beat

    2016-12-01

    This article reports data concerning the Internet-related activities and interest for Ironman Triathlon competition. Google Trends (GT) was used and mined from 2004 onwards. The interest for Ironman Triathlon was found to be cyclic over time. The Triathlon-related Internet activities negatively correlated with the number of finishers per year (Pearson׳s correlation r=-0.690, p-value<0.05), while an increasing participation of female athletes who were less likely to surf the Internet could be noticed (r=-0.811, p-value<0.05). Further, younger athletes, who were more likely to access the web, were underrepresented in the Ironman Triathlon event. Moreover, there was a correlation between the biking time and the Internet query volumes (r=0.590, p-value<0.05), and, in particular, for the male athletes (r=0.664, p-value<0.05). Finally, the countries which most contributed to the Internet query volumes were those with the highest number of medals. PMID:27642618

  7. Mars Exploration Rovers 2004-2013: Evolving Operational Tactics Driven by Aging Robotic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Julie; Seibert, Michael; Bellutta, Paolo; Ferguson, Eric; Forgette, Daniel; Herman, Jennifer; Justice, Heather; Keuneke, Matthew; Sosland, Rebekah; Stroupe, Ashley; Wright, John

    2014-01-01

    Over the course of more than 10 years of continuous operations on the Martian surface, the operations team for the Mars Exploration Rovers has encountered and overcome many challenges. The twin rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, designed for a Martian surface mission of three months in duration, far outlived their life expectancy. Spirit explored for six years and Opportunity still operates and, in January 2014, celebrated the 10th anniversary of her landing. As with any machine that far outlives its design life, each rover has experienced a series of failures and degradations attributable to age, use, and environmental exposure. This paper reviews the failures and degradations experienced by the two rovers and the measures taken by the operations team to correct, mitigate, or surmount them to enable continued exploration and discovery.

  8. The Australian Geography Competition: An Overview of Participation and Results 2004-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Iraphne R. W.; Berg, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The Australian Geography Competition (AGC) was established in 1995 by the Royal Geographical Society of Queensland (RGSQ) and the Australian Geography Teachers' Association to promote the study of geography in Australian secondary schools and to reward student excellence in geographical studies. Initially focusing on students at the lower…

  9. Time-series analysis on human brucellosis during 2004-2013 in Shandong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Bi, Z-W; Kou, Z-Q; Li, X-J; Zhang, M; Wang, M; Zhang, L-Y; Zhao, Z-T

    2015-05-01

    Human brucellosis is a re-emerging bacterial anthropozoonotic disease, which remains a public health concern in China with the growing number of cases and more widespread natural foci. The purpose of this study was to short-term forecast the incidence of human brucellosis with a prediction model. We collected the annual and monthly laboratory data of confirmed cases from January 2004 to December 2013 in Shandong Diseases Reporting Information System (SDRIS). Autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model was fitted based on the monthly human brucellosis incidence from 2004 to 2013. Finally, monthly brucellosis incidences in 2014 were short-term forecasted by the obtained model. The incidence of brucellosis was increasing from 2004 to 2013. For the ARIMA (0, 2, 1) model, the white noise diagnostic check (x(2) = 5.58 P = 0.35) for residuals obtained was revealed by the optimum goodness-of-fit test. The monthly incidences that fitted by ARIMA (0, 2, 1) model were closely consistent with the real incidence from 2004 to 2013. And forecasting incidences from January 2014 to December 2014 were, respectively, 0.101, 0.118, 0.143, 0.166, 0.160, 0.172, 0.169, 0.133, 0.122, 0.105, 0.103 and 0.079 per100 000 population, with standard error 0.011-0.019 and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) of 58.79%. PMID:25043064

  10. Place of Death in Patients with Lung Cancer: A Retrospective Cohort Study from 2004-2013

    PubMed Central

    O’Dowd, Emma L.; McKeever, Tricia M.; Baldwin, David R.; Hubbard, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many patients with cancer die in an acute hospital bed, which has been frequently identified as the least preferred location, with psychological and financial implications. This study looks at place and cause of death in patients with lung cancer and identifies which factors are associated with dying in an acute hospital bed versus at home. Methods and Findings We used the National Lung Cancer Audit linked to Hospital Episode Statistics and Office for National Statistics data to determine cause and place of death in those with lung cancer; both overall and by cancer Network. We used multivariate logistic regression to compare features of those who died in an acute hospital versus those who died at home. Results Of 143627 patients identified 40% (57678) died in an acute hospital, 29% (41957) died at home and 17% (24108) died in a hospice. Individual factors associated with death in an acute hospital bed compared to home were male sex, increasing age, poor performance status, social deprivation and diagnosis via an emergency route. There was marked variation between cancer Networks in place of death. The proportion of patients dying in an acute hospital ranged from 28% to 48%, with variation most notable in provision of hospice care (9% versus 33%). Cause of death in the majority was lung cancer (86%), with other malignancies, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and ischaemic heart disease (IHD) comprising 9% collectively. Conclusions A substantial proportion of patients with lung cancer die in acute hospital beds and this is more likely with increasing age, male sex, social deprivation and in those with poor performance status. There is marked variation between Networks, suggesting a need to improve end-of-life planning in those at greatest risk, and to review the allocation of resources to provide more hospice beds, enhanced community support and ensure equal access. PMID:27551922

  11. Land Use Specific Ammonia Deposition Velocities: a Review of Recent Studies (2004-2013).

    PubMed

    Schrader, Frederik; Brümmer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Land use specific deposition velocities of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols-particularly of reactive nitrogen compounds-are a fundamental input variable for a variety of deposition models. Although the concept is known to have shortcomings-especially with regard to bi-directional exchange-the often limited availability of concentration data and meteorological input variables make it a valuable simplification for regional modeling of deposition fluxes. In order to meet the demand for an up-to-date overview of recent publications on measurements and modeling studies, we compiled a database of ammonia (NH3) deposition velocities published from 2004 to 2013. Observations from a total of 42 individual studies were averaged using an objective weighing scheme and classified into seven land use categories. Weighted average and median deposition velocities are 2.2 and 2.1 cm s(-1) for coniferous forests, 1.5 and 1.2 cm s(-1) for mixed forests, 1.1 and 0.9 cm s(-1) for deciduous forests, 0.9 and 0.7 cm s(-1) for semi-natural sites, 0.7 and 0.8 cm s(-1) for urban sites, 0.7 and 0.6 cm s(-1) for water surfaces, and 1.0 and 0.4 cm s(-1) for agricultural sites, respectively. Thus, values presented in this compilation were considerably lower than those found in former studies (e.g., VDI 2006). Reasons for the mismatch were likely due to different land use classification, different averaging methods, choices of measurement locations, and improvements in measurement and in modeling techniques. Both data and code used for processing are made available as supplementary material to this article.

  12. Infodemiological data of Ironman Triathlon in the study period 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Mnadla, Sofiane; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Rouissi, Mehdi; Chaalali, Anis; Siri, Anna; Padulo, Johnny; Ardigò, Luca Paolo; Brigo, Francesco; Chamari, Karim; Knechtle, Beat

    2016-12-01

    This article reports data concerning the Internet-related activities and interest for Ironman Triathlon competition. Google Trends (GT) was used and mined from 2004 onwards. The interest for Ironman Triathlon was found to be cyclic over time. The Triathlon-related Internet activities negatively correlated with the number of finishers per year (Pearson׳s correlation r=-0.690, p-value<0.05), while an increasing participation of female athletes who were less likely to surf the Internet could be noticed (r=-0.811, p-value<0.05). Further, younger athletes, who were more likely to access the web, were underrepresented in the Ironman Triathlon event. Moreover, there was a correlation between the biking time and the Internet query volumes (r=0.590, p-value<0.05), and, in particular, for the male athletes (r=0.664, p-value<0.05). Finally, the countries which most contributed to the Internet query volumes were those with the highest number of medals.

  13. Mirror Lake: Past, present and future: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Likens, Gene E.; LaBaugh, James W.; Winter, Thomas C.; Likens, Gene E.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter discusses the hydrological and biogeochemical characteristics of Mirror Lake and the changes that resulted from air-land-water interactions and human activities. Since the formation of Mirror Lake, both the watershed and the lake have undergone many changes, such as vegetation development and basin filling. These changes are ongoing, and Mirror Lake is continuing along an aging pathway and ultimately, it will fill with sediment and no longer be a lake. The chapter also identifies major factors that affected the hydrology and biogeochemistry of Mirror Lake: acid rain, atmospheric deposition of lead and other heavy metals, increased human settlement around the lake, the construction of an interstate highway through the watershed of the Northeast Tributary, the construction of an access road through the West and Northeast watersheds to the lake, and climate change. The chapter also offers future recommendations for management and protection of Mirror Lake.

  14. The Western Aeronautical Test Range. Chapter 10 Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudtson, Kevin; Park, Alice; Downing, Robert; Sheldon, Jack; Harvey, Robert; Norcross, April

    2011-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) staff at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center is developing a translation software called Chapter 10 Tools in response to challenges posed by post-flight processing data files originating from various on-board digital recorders that follow the Range Commanders Council Inter-Range Instrumentation Group (IRIG) 106 Chapter 10 Digital Recording Standard but use differing interpretations of the Standard. The software will read the date files regardless of the vendor implementation of the source recorder, displaying data, identifying and correcting errors, and producing a data file that can be successfully processed post-flight

  15. Measurement and modeling of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity: Chapter 21

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    This chapter will discuss, by way of examples, various techniques used to measure and model hydraulic conductivity as a function of water content, K(). The parameters that describe the K() curve obtained by different methods are used directly in Richards’ equation-based numerical models, which have some degree of sensitivity to those parameters. This chapter will explore the complications of using laboratory measured or estimated properties for field scale investigations to shed light on how adequately the processes are represented. Additionally, some more recent concepts for representing unsaturated-zone flow processes will be discussed.

  16. CHAPTER 7. BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS BY NON-PLASMA BASED METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Ekechukwu, A

    2009-04-20

    The most common method of analysis for beryllium is inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). This method, along with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), is discussed in Chapter 6. However, other methods exist and have been used for different applications. These methods include spectroscopic, chromatographic, colorimetric, and electrochemical. This chapter provides an overview of beryllium analysis methods other than plasma spectrometry (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry or mass spectrometry). The basic methods, detection limits and interferences are described. Specific applications from the literature are also presented.

  17. Prospective ergonomics: origin, goal, and prospects.

    PubMed

    Robert, Jean-Marc; Brangier, Eric

    2012-01-01

    So far ergonomics has been concerned with two categories of activities: correction and design. We propose to add a third category: prospection, and by so doing, we introduce a new series of activities that opens up the future of ergonomics. Corrective ergonomics relates to the past and comes with a demand and a client. It is turned towards the correction of existing situations and aims to reduce or eliminate problems. Here, after delimiting and defining the problem, the challenge is to find the best solution. Ergonomics for design relates to the present and also comes with a demand and a client. It is turned towards the design of new artefacts that have already been identified by a client, and that will allow users to do some activity and attain their goals. Here, after defining the scope of the project and the functional requirements, the challenge is to do the best design. Finally, prospective ergonomics relates to the future and does not come with a demand and a client. It is turned towards the creation of future things that have not been identified yet. Here the challenge is to detect existing user needs or anticipate future ones, and imagine solutions. These three categories of activities overlap and are not exclusive of each other. In this paper we define prospective ergonomics and compare it with corrective ergonomics and ergonomics for design. We describe its origin, goal, and prospects, we analyze its impacts on education and practice, and we emphasize the need of new collaboration between ergonomics and other disciplines.

  18. ECR ion sources: present status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melin, G.

    1997-01-01

    Although now widely used for many applications, the electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS), an outgrowth of the fusion plasma research, still suffer from some mystification, or at least from a lack of understanding. This article is an attempt to give a broad overview of the today ECRIS activity devoted to the production of highly charged ions: it therefore describes both physics and theory efforts, technology, performances, plans and prospects as well. An important chapter gives the status of understanding the ECRIS behavior, both the current thinking on how they operate and the experimental evidences whenever it is possible. The various existing sources, their design and main features, are then surveyed. At last the present trends of development, the potential directions for future improvement are examined.

  19. Prospective cognition in rats

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Jonathon D.

    2012-01-01

    Efforts to develop animal models of memory are critical for understanding the neural substrate of memory. Memory is essential for daily life and enables information to be stored and retrieved after seconds to years. The ability to remember episodes from the past is thought to be related to the ability to plan for the future. Here we focus on a particular aspect of prospective cognition, namely the ability to remember to take action when a future scenario occurs. This review focuses on a recently developed method to evaluate prospective memory in the rat. Available evidence suggests that rats remember to take action in the future, but little is known about the temporal specificity of such memories or about the flexibility and limitations of prospective memories. Recent studies that suggest that rats remember a specific past episode are reviewed to underscore potential approaches that may be used to explore the range and limits of prospective cognition. The review highlights some directions to explore, including the temporal specificity of prospective cognition, the range of flexibility or creativity within prospective cognition, and the constraints imposed by multiple motivational systems. PMID:23180886

  20. 38 CFR 21.7044 - Persons with eligibility under 38 U.S.C. chapter 34.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... under 38 U.S.C. chapter 34. 21.7044 Section 21.7044 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... under 38 U.S.C. chapter 34. Certain individuals with 38 U.S.C. chapter 34 eligibility may establish eligibility for educational assistance under 38 U.S.C. chapter 30. This section requires an individual...

  1. 38 CFR 21.82 - Completing the plan under Chapter 31.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Chapter 31. 21.82 Section 21.82 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Individualized Written Rehabilitation Plan § 21.82 Completing the plan under Chapter 31. (a... completion of the program provided by the plan under Chapter 31. The provisions of § 21.70 and § 21.78(c)...

  2. 2 CFR 1.200 - Purpose of chapters I and II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose of chapters I and II. 1.200 Section... Introduction toSubtitle A § 1.200 Purpose of chapters I and II. (a) Chapters I and II of subtitle A provide OMB... procedures for management of the agencies' grants and agreements. (b) There are two chapters for...

  3. 24 CFR 1720.205 - Suspension notice under § 1710.45(a) of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...(a) of this chapter. 1720.205 Section 1720.205 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to....45(a) of this chapter. A suspension pursuant to § 1710.45(a) of this chapter shall be effected by... fee tender which constitute the grounds under § 1710.45(a) of this chapter, of the suspension, and...

  4. 41 CFR 304-2.1 - What definitions apply to this chapter?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to this chapter? 304-2.1 Section 304-2.1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... chapter? The following definitions apply to this chapter: Employee means an appointed officer or employee... defined in this chapter does not include a meeting or other event required to carry out an...

  5. 47 CFR 2.811 - Transmitters operated under part 73 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... chapter. 2.811 Section 2.811 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY....811 Transmitters operated under part 73 of this chapter. Section 2.803(a) through (d) shall not be... chapter, provided the conditions set out in part 73 of this chapter for the acceptability of...

  6. 38 CFR 21.79 - Determining entitlement usage under Chapter 31.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... usage under Chapter 31. 21.79 Section 21.79 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Duration of Rehabilitation Programs § 21.79 Determining entitlement usage under Chapter 31. (a) General. The determination of entitlement usage for chapter 31...

  7. Ethical & Legal Issues in School Counseling. Chapter 1: Ethical Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huey, Wayne C.; And Others

    This document contains chapter 1 (8 articles) from a collection of 35 articles primarily from American Association for Counseling and Development (AACD) publications on the most important legal and ethical topics about which all school counselors need to be informed. "Ethical Standards for School Counselors: Test Your Knowledge" (Wayne C. Huey)…

  8. Chapter 1 Early Literacy Summer School. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, John S.

    A study examined the effectiveness of the Chapter 1 Early Literacy Summer School program. The program provided additional reading instruction to underachieving first-grade pupils at five schools located throughout the Columbus, Ohio public school district. The program featured group instruction (with many of the activities modelled after the…

  9. Chapter 1 Early Literacy Summer School, 1993. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, John S.

    A study examined the effectiveness of the Chapter 1 Early Literacy Summer School program. The program provided additional reading instruction to underachieving first-grade pupils at six schools located throughout the Columbus, Ohio public school district. The program featured group instruction (with many of the activities modeled after the Reading…

  10. 48 CFR 9900.000 - Scope of chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope of chapter. 9900.000 Section 9900.000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL... describes policies and procedures for applying the Cost Accounting Standards (CAS) to negotiated...

  11. Elements of Mathematics, Book O: Intuitive Background. Chapter 5, Mappings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exner, Robert; And Others

    The sixteen chapters of this book provide the core material for the Elements of Mathematics Program, a secondary sequence developed for highly motivated students with strong verbal abilities. The sequence is based on a functional-relational approach to mathematics teaching, and emphasizes teaching by analysis of real-life situations. This text is…

  12. Chapter 1: Redefining Disciplinary Learning in Classroom Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Michael J.; Forman, Ellice A.

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors aim to review recent, sociocultural studies of classroom-based research in science education in light of a sample of practice-based research within the field of science studies. They provide a framework for examining the discipline of science that can also be useful for assessing its impact on students. The framework…

  13. Ethical & Legal Issues in School Counseling. Chapter 6: Special Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, James P., Jr.; And Others

    This document contains chapter 6 (5 articles) of a collection of 35 articles primarily from American Association for Counseling and Development (AACD) publications on the most important legal and ethical topics about which all school counselors need to be informed. "Ethical Issues Involved With the Use of Computer-Assisted Counseling, Testing, and…

  14. Chapter 2 Forumula. 1988-89 Final Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Research and Evaluation.

    Presented is the final technical report on the evaluation of the 1988-89 supplementary education programs of the Austin (Texas) Independent School District funded under Chapter 2 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. The following major findings are reported: (1) extracurricular transportation costs, which had been reduced by…

  15. Chapter 636, Voluntary Integration in Massachusetts. Successful Programs of Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spier, Adele W.; And Others

    A statewide study was conducted to identify and describe successful voluntary school desegregation programs funded under Chapter 636, a 1974 amendment to Massachussets' Racial Imbalance Law. Programs selected were of four types: (1) school-based (elementary, middle, and high); (2) school system- or district-wide; (3) part-time and full-time…

  16. 24 CFR 300.1 - Scope of chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scope of chapter. 300.1 Section 300.1 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) GOVERNMENT NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL § 300.1...

  17. Chapter 11. Quality evaluation of apple by computer vision

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple is one of the most consumed fruits in the world, and there is a critical need for enhanced computer vision technology for quality assessment of apples. This chapter gives a comprehensive review on recent advances in various computer vision techniques for detecting surface and internal defects ...

  18. Missing Chapters II: West Virginia Women in History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensley, Frances S., Ed.

    This collection of essays chronicles the contributions of 14 West Virginia women active in individual and group endeavors from 1824 to the present. Because the achievements of these women are absent from previous histories of West Virginia, their stories constitute missing chapters in the state's history. Some of these women made contributions in…

  19. Chapter Two: Foundations for the Study of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, the historical roots of contemporary Practice Theory are unearthed in the work of semioticians, philosophers, and anthropologists. Saussure's semiotic theory is contrasted with that of Peirce, and the importance of Peirce's work for understanding the context of signs is stressed. The philosophy of language in the writings of…

  20. Economic and Societal Benefits of Soil Carbon Management (Chapter 1).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many papers and books on soil carbon management have addressed specific ecosystems such as agricultural lands, rangelands, forestlands, etc. This paper introduces a book within which each chapter begins by addressing a particular concern and potential options to manage it, along with their real and...

  1. From Literacy Activities to Entrepreneurship in Siete Pilas. Chapter 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chacon, Antonio; Polo, Angel

    This chapter describes a community development project in Siete Pilas (Spain), a village whose economy is based primarily on small family farms and unskilled labor. The project grew out of the Sierra Education Program, which in 1980 sent adult-education teachers to five villages in the Sierra de Ronda region. The goal was to stimulate a socially…

  2. Evaluation of the 1985 Chapter 1 Citywide Summer School Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Detroit Public Schools, MI. Dept. of Evaluation and Testing.

    Described are aspects of the evaluation of the Detroit (Michigan) Public Schools' 1985 Chapter 1 Citywide Summer School program, a program implemented to improve the reading and mathematics skills of students from pre-kindergarten classes through grade 8. A random sample of 18 schools, including elementary and middle schools, was selected for…

  3. Chapter 13. Exploring Use of the Reserved Core

    SciTech Connect

    Holmen, John; Humphrey, Alan; Berzins, Martin

    2015-07-29

    In this chapter, we illustrate benefits of thinking in terms of thread management techniques when using a centralized scheduler model along with interoperability of MPI and PThread. This is facilitated through an exploration of thread placement strategies for an algorithm modeling radiative heat transfer with special attention to the 61st core. This algorithm plays a key role within the Uintah Computational Framework (UCF) and current efforts taking place at the University of Utah to model next-generation, large-scale clean coal boilers. In such simulations, this algorithm models the dominant form of heat transfer and consumes a large portion of compute time. Exemplified by a real-world example, this chapter presents our early efforts in porting a key portion of a scalability-centric codebase to the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor. Specifically, this chapter presents results from our experiments profiling the native execution of a reverse Monte-Carlo ray tracing-based radiation model on a single coprocessor. These results demonstrate that our fastest run configurations utilized the 61st core and that performance was not profoundly impacted when explicitly oversubscribing the coprocessor operating system thread. Additionally, this chapter presents a portion of radiation model source code, a MIC-centric UCF cross-compilation example, and less conventional thread management technique for developers utilizing the PThreads threading model.

  4. "Preescolar Na Casa": Teaching Parents To Teach Children. Chapter 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Ermitas

    This chapter describes a school readiness program that has been implemented in rural Galicia (Spain) since 1977. Data reveal that 70 percent of Galicia's population lives in rural areas, the economy remains primarily agricultural, Galicians earn less than the national average and have the largest number of public assistance recipients, and there…

  5. Television & Literacy Development in the Czech Republic. Chapter 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubik, Stanislav

    This chapter begins by explaining that cultural literacy is the ability of a community to create relationships, processes, and institutions aimed at multifaceted community development using indigenous resources (natural, human, social, and cultural). Literacy development in a rural community involves three equally important dimensions--social,…

  6. Chapter 688 Implementation Guidelines and Instructions for Local School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Executive Office of Human Services, Boston.

    The booklet presents guidelines for implementing Massachusetts Chapter 688, which provides for a 2-year transitional process to plan for habilitative services for severely disabled young adults who will lose their entitlement to special education upon graduation or reaching the age of 22. The law is intended to serve individuals who traditionally…

  7. Reading Recovery and ESEA Chapter 1: Issues and Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajano, Nancy C.

    The simultaneous implementation of Reading Recovery (an early intervention program designed to help children "at risk" of failure in their first year of reading instruction) and Chapter 1 programs in schools raises a number of issues as educators attempt to provide effective reading instruction within the policies and guidelines of both programs.…

  8. Chapter 5: Long-term benefits analysis of EERE's Programs

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    This chapter provides an overview of the modeling approach used in MARKAL-GPRA05 to evaluate the benefits of EERE R&D programs and technologies. The program benefits reported in this section result from comparisons of each Program Case to the Baseline Case, as modeled in MARKAL-GPRA05.

  9. Chapter 5: Long-term benefits analysis of EERE's programs

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    This chapter provides an overview of the modeling approach used in MARKAL-GPRA06 to evaluate the benefits of EERE R&D programs and technologies. The program benefits reported in this section result from comparisons of each Program Case to the Baseline Case, as modeled in MARKAL-GPRA06.

  10. Chapter 2 Formula. 1992-93 Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marable, Paula; And Others

    The Chapter 2 Formula provides federal funds to states through the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA). These funds are used to help students at risk of academic failure or dropping out, support purchases and programs, and develop teachers' professional skills. In 1992-93, the Austin Independent School District (AISD) received…

  11. Chapter 2 Formula Final Report, 1993-94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Julia E.

    Chapter 2 Formula funds provide federal aid to states through the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965 as amended in 1988 by PL 100-297. Funds can support programs for students at risk of failure or dropping out, or students for whom providing an education entails higher than average costs. Funds can also support programs for…

  12. Chapter 2 Formula: 1991-92. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moede, Lauren Hall

    Education Consolidation and Improvement Act (ECIA) Chapter 2 Formula has provided funding to the Austin (Texas) Independent School District (AISD) in order to expand existing programs and implement new programs, including the addition of staff and the acquisition of materials and equipment that would not otherwise be available from state or local…

  13. Ethical & Legal Issues in School Counseling. Chapter 3: Legal Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remley, Theodore P., Jr.; And Others

    This document contains chapter 3 (7 articles) of a collection of 35 articles primarily from American Association for Counseling and Development (AACD) publications on the most important legal and ethical topics about which all school counselors need to be informed. "The Law and Ethical Practices in Elementary and Middle Schools" (Theodore P.…

  14. Endocrine and exocrine function of the bovine testis. Chapter 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter is devoted to the endocrine and exocrine function of the normal bovine male testes. The discussion begins with a historical review of the literature dating back to Aristotle’s (300 BC) initial description of the anatomy of the mammalian testes. The first microscopic examination of the t...

  15. Vision for Micro Technology Space Missions. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, Neil

    2005-01-01

    It is exciting to contemplate the various space mission applications that Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology could enable in the next 10-20 years. The primary objective of this chapter is to both stimulate ideas for MEMS technology infusion on future NASA space missions and to spur adoption of the MEMS technology in the minds of mission designers. This chapter is also intended to inform non-space oriented MEMS technologists, researchers and decision makers about the rich potential application set that future NASA Science and Exploration missions will provide. The motivation for this chapter is therefore to lead the reader down a path to identify and it is exciting to contemplate the various space mission applications that Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology could enable in the next 10-20 years. The primary objective of this chapter is to both stimulate ideas for MEMS technology infusion on future NASA space missions and to spur adoption of the MEMS technology in the minds of mission designers. This chapter is also intended to inform non-space oriented MEMS technologists, researchers and decision makers about the rich potential application set that future NASA Science and Exploration missions will provide. The motivation for this chapter is therefore to lead the reader down a path to identify and consider potential long-term, perhaps disruptive or revolutionary, impacts that MEMS technology may have for future civilian space applications. A general discussion of the potential for MEMS in space applications is followed by a brief showcasing of a few selected examples of recent MEMS technology developments for future space missions. Using these recent developments as a point of departure, a vision is then presented of several areas where MEMS technology might eventually be exploited in future Science and Exploration mission applications. Lastly, as a stimulus for future research and development, this chapter summarizes a set of barriers

  16. Implementing United States Pharmacopeia chapter <1163> quality assurance in pharmaceutical compounding, Part 1.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V

    2012-01-01

    Compounding pharmacists must be familiar with and participate in the appropriate standards set forth in each chapter of the United States Pharmacopeia. Pharmacists should also be aware of any revisions to these standards. This article discusses the revisions to United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <1163> Quality Assurance in Pharmaceutical Compounding, a chapter which has been compared with other chapters, discusses some of those other chapters, and discusses the components of a reasonable quality-assurance program.

  17. Chapter 1 Reading Program. Final Evaluation Report 1994-95. Elementary and Secondary Education Act--Chapter 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lore, Rosemary

    A study evaluated the Chapter 1 Reading Program that served 5,914 underachieving pupils in grades 1 through 8 in the Columbus, Ohio, public schools. The program provided service to 84 public elementary schools, 26 public middle schools, and 11 nonpublic schools. These students appeared unlikely to learn to read successfully without additional…

  18. Chapter I: Impacting Excellence in Basic Skills since 1965. Initiative to Improve the Quality of Chapter I Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Billie; And Others

    The overall goal of the sections of Mercer County's Chapter 1 project described in this profile was to provide a low-risk environment for the development of writing, reading, and related language arts skills in first, second, and third grade children. This goal was implemented within the broader sphere of the total school community. Communication,…

  19. Development of a Launch Vehicle Manufacturing Process. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One of the goals of this chapter is to provide sufficient information so that you can develop a manufacturing process for a potential launch vehicle. With the variety of manufacturing options available, you might ask how this can possibly be done in the span of a single chapter. Actually, it will be quite simple because a basic manufacturing process is nothing more than a set of logical steps that are iterated until they produce a desired product. Although these statements seem simple and logical, don't let this simplicity fool you. Manufacturing problems with launch vehicles and their subassemblies have been the primary cause of project failures because the vehicle concept delivered to the manufacturing floor could not be built as designed.

  20. Advanced light water reactor requirements document: Chapter 4, Reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this chapter of the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Plant Requirements Document is to establish utility requirements for the design of the Reactor Systems of Advanced LWR plants consistent with the objectives and principles of the ALWR program. The scope of this chapter covers the following for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR): reactor pressure vessel, nozzles and safe-ends, reactor internals, in-vessel portions of fluid systems (including reactor internal pumps (Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) piping and spargers), nuclear fuel, and the control rods and control rod drive system (including hydraulic supply and accumulators). Special tools required for reactor system maintenance, inspection and testing are also covered.

  1. Characterization of eastern US spruce-fir soils. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, I.J.

    1992-01-01

    The spruce-fir forest of the eastern United States encompasses a diverse range of edaphic conditions due to differences in surficial geology, mineralogy, elevation, and climate. This chapter describes the characteristics of soils supporting eastern spruce-fir ecosystems, including soil properties that are important in understanding forest function and the consequences of atmospheric deposition to forested ecosystems. Chapter 1 describes the silvical characteristics of the spruce-fir forest. The Spruce-Fir Research Cooperative included six intensive study sites; five were high-elevation research sites located from western North Carolina to New Hampshire, with one low-elevation site in Maine. Information gained from research at these sites, and other relevant research from these regions, provides the basis for this description of eastern U. S. spruce-fir soils.

  2. Planning and setting objectives in field studies: Chapter 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Robert N.; Dodd, C. Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This chapter enumerates the steps required in designing and planning field studies on the ecology and conservation of reptiles, as these involve a high level of uncertainty and risk. To this end, the chapter differentiates between goals (descriptions of what one intends to accomplish) and objectives (the measurable steps required to achieve the established goals). Thus, meeting a specific goal may require many objectives. It may not be possible to define some of them until certain experiments have been conducted; often evaluations of sampling protocols are needed to increase certainty in the biological results. And if sampling locations are fixed and sampling events are repeated over time, then both study-specific covariates and sampling-specific covariates should exist. Additionally, other critical design considerations for field study include obtaining permits, as well as researching ethics and biosecurity issues.

  3. Prospective memory: A comparative perspective

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Jonathon D.; Wilson, A. George

    2014-01-01

    Prospective memory consists of forming a representation of a future action, temporarily storing that representation in memory, and retrieving it at a future time point. Here we review the recent development of animal models of prospective memory. We review experiments using rats that focus on the development of time-based and event-based prospective memory. Next, we review a number of prospective-memory approaches that have been used with a variety of non-human primates. Finally, we review selected approaches from the human literature on prospective memory to identify targets for development of animal models of prospective memory. PMID:25101562

  4. Habitat characteristics of North American tortoises: chapter 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nussear, Kenneth E.; Tuberville, Tracey D.

    2014-01-01

    North American tortoises are distributed in semi-arid and temperate deserts and coastal regions of the southern United States and Mexico. The five species currently recognized each have specific habitat requirements, which they fulfill through their selection of, and interaction with unique habitat constituents. In this chapter we discuss the physiographic and geological associations, perennial and annual vegetation components, shelter sites, and climatic conditions associated with the species’ habitats, as well as the potential threats to their habitat.

  5. Hydrologic processes and the water budget: Chapter 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, Donald O.; Winter, Thomas C.; Winter, Thomas C.; Likens, Gene E.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the hydrological setting of Mirror Lake and its water budget. It first describes the glacial deposits and bedrock topography in the Mirror Lake area. It then provides an overview of the hydrologic processes associated with Mirror Lake and examines the field and analytical methods used to determine its water budget. It presents results from the hydrologic studies, which are based on monthly and annual water budgets for the calendar years 1981 through 2000.

  6. Introduction: Aims and Requirements of Future Aerospace Vehicles. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Pedro I.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; McConnaughey, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The goals and system-level requirements for the next generation aerospace vehicles emphasize safety, reliability, low-cost, and robustness rather than performance. Technologies, including new materials, design and analysis approaches, manufacturing and testing methods, operations and maintenance, and multidisciplinary systems-level vehicle development are key to increasing the safety and reducing the cost of aerospace launch systems. This chapter identifies the goals and needs of the next generation or advanced aerospace vehicle systems.

  7. Chapter Five - Ubiquitination of Ion Channels and Transporters.

    PubMed

    Lamothe, S M; Zhang, S

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels and transporters play essential roles in excitable cells including cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle cells, neurons, and endocrine cells. Their dysfunction underlies the pathology of various diseases. Thus, the tight regulation of these transmembrane proteins is essential for cell physiology. While the ubiquitin system is involved in many aspects of cellular processes, this chapter focuses on the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of ion channels and transporters. Ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters is multifaceted and occurs at various cellular compartments such as the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum. While various molecules are involved in the ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters, E3 ubiquitin ligases play a central role in selectively targeting substrates for ubiquitination and will be a major focus in this chapter. To date, the Nedd4 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases and their regulations of ion channels and transporters have been extensively studied. In this chapter, we will first review Nedd4/Nedd4-2 and their regulations. We will then discuss how E3 ubiquitin ligases, especially Nedd4-2, regulate various ion channels and transporters including epithelial Na(+) channels, voltage-gated Na(+) channels, KCNQ and hERG K(+) channels, Cl(-) channels such as CFTR, transporters such as Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, and gap junctions. Furthermore, diseases caused by improper ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters will be discussed to highlight the process of ubiquitination and its biological as well as clinical significance. PMID:27378758

  8. Chapter Five - Ubiquitination of Ion Channels and Transporters.

    PubMed

    Lamothe, S M; Zhang, S

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels and transporters play essential roles in excitable cells including cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle cells, neurons, and endocrine cells. Their dysfunction underlies the pathology of various diseases. Thus, the tight regulation of these transmembrane proteins is essential for cell physiology. While the ubiquitin system is involved in many aspects of cellular processes, this chapter focuses on the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of ion channels and transporters. Ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters is multifaceted and occurs at various cellular compartments such as the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum. While various molecules are involved in the ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters, E3 ubiquitin ligases play a central role in selectively targeting substrates for ubiquitination and will be a major focus in this chapter. To date, the Nedd4 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases and their regulations of ion channels and transporters have been extensively studied. In this chapter, we will first review Nedd4/Nedd4-2 and their regulations. We will then discuss how E3 ubiquitin ligases, especially Nedd4-2, regulate various ion channels and transporters including epithelial Na(+) channels, voltage-gated Na(+) channels, KCNQ and hERG K(+) channels, Cl(-) channels such as CFTR, transporters such as Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, and gap junctions. Furthermore, diseases caused by improper ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters will be discussed to highlight the process of ubiquitination and its biological as well as clinical significance.

  9. Inducible defenses in food webs: Chapter 3.4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vos, Matthijs; Kooi, Bob W.; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Mooij, Wolf M.; de Ruiter, Peter; Wolters, Volkmar; Moore, John C.; Melville-Smith, Kimberly

    2005-01-01

    This chapter reviews the predicted effects of induced defenses on trophic structure and two aspects of stability, “local” stability and persistence, as well as presenting novel results on a third, resilience. Food webs are structures of populations in a given location organized according to their predator–prey interactions. Interaction strengths and, therefore, prey defenses are generally recognized as important ecological factors affecting food webs. Despite this, surprisingly, little light has been shed on the food web-level consequences of inducible defenses. Inducible defenses occur in many taxa in both terrestrial and aquatic food webs. They include refuge use, reduced activity, adaptive life history changes, the production of toxins, synomones and extrafloral nectar, and the formation of colonies, helmets, thorns, or spines. In the chapter, theoretical results for the effects of inducible defenses on trophic structure and the three aspects of stability are reviewed. This is done, in part, using bifurcation analysis—a type of analysis that is applied to nonlinear dynamic systems described by a set of ordinary differential or difference equations. The work presented in the chapter suggests that heterogeneity, as caused by induced defenses in prey species, has major effects on the functioning of food webs. Inducible defenses occur in many species in both aquatic and terrestrial systems, and theoretical work indicates they have major effects on important food web properties such as trophic structure, local stability, persistence, and resilience.

  10. Fundamentals of Physics, Volume 1, (Chapters 1 - 21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Jearl

    2004-01-01

    Chapter 1. Measurement 1. How does the appearance of a new type of cloud signal changes in Earth's atmosphere? 1-1 What Is Physics? 1-2 Measuring Things. 1-3 The International System of Units. 1-4 Changing Units. 1-5 Length. 1-6 Time. 1-7 Mass. Review & Summary. Problems. Chapter 2. Motion Along a Straight Line. What causes whiplash injury in rear-end collisions of cars? 2-1 What Is Physics? 2-2 Motion. 2-3 Position and Displacement. 2-4 Average Velocity and Average Speed. 2-5 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed. 2-6 Acceleration. 2-7 Constant Acceleration: A Special Case. 2-8 Another Look at Constant Acceleration. 2-9 Free-Fall Acceleration. 2-10 Graphical Integration in Motion Analysis. 2 Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 3. Vectors. How does an ant know the way home with no guiding clues on the desert plains? 3-1 What Is Physics? 3-2 Vectors and Scalars. 3-3 Adding Vectors Geometrically. 3-4 Components of Vectors. 3-5 Unit Vectors. 3-6 Adding Vectors by Components. 3-7 Vectors and the Laws of Physics. 3-8 Multiplying Vectors. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 4. Motion in Two and Three Dimensions. In a motorcycle jump for record distance, where does the jumper put the second ramp? 4-1 What Is Physics? 4-2 Position and Displacement. 4-3 Average Velocity and Instantaneous Velocity. 4-4 Average Acceleration and Instantaneous Acceleration. 4-5 Projectile Motion. 4-6 Projectile Motion Analyzed. 4-7 Uniform Circular Motion. 4-8 Relative Motion in One Dimension. 4-9 Relative Motion in Two Dimensions. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 5. Force and Motion--I. When a pilot takes off from an aircraft carrier, what causes the compulsion to .y the plane into the ocean? 5-1 What Is Physics? 5-2 Newtonian Mechanics. 5-3 Newton's First Law. 5-4 Force. 5-5 Mass. 5-6 Newton's Second Law. 5-7 Some Particular Forces. 5-8 Newton's Third Law. 5-9 Applying Newton's Laws. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 6. Force and Motion--II. Can a

  11. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 1 (Chapters 1-11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2003-12-01

    Chapter 1.Measurement. How does the appearance of a new type of cloud signal changes in Earth's atmosphere? 1-1 What Is Physics? 1-2 Measuring Things. 1-3 The International System of Units. 1-4 Changing Units. 1-5 Length. 1-6 Time. 1-7 Mass. Review & Summary. Problems. Chapter 2.Motion Along a Straight Line. What causes whiplash injury in rear-end collisions of cars? 2-1 What Is Physics? 2-2 Motion. 2-3 Position and Displacement. 2-4 Average Velocity and Average Speed. 2-5 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed. 2-6 Acceleration. 2-7 Constant Acceleration: A Special Case. 2-8 Another Look at Constant Acceleration. 2-9 Free-Fall Acceleration. 2-10 Graphical Integration in Motion Analysis. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 3.Vectors. How does an ant know the way home with no guiding clues on the deser t plains? 3-2 Vectors and Scalars. 3-3 Adding Vectors Geometrically. 3-4 Components of Vectors. 3-5 Unit Vectors. 3-6 Adding Vectors by Components. 3-7 Vectors and the Laws of Physics. 3-8 Multiplying Vectors. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 4.Motion in Two and Three Dimensions. In a motorcycle jump for record distance, where does the jumper put the second ramp? 4-1 What Is Physics? 4-2 Position and Displacement. 4-3 Average Velocity and Instantaneous Velocity. 4-4 Average Acceleration and Instantaneous Acceleration. 4-5 Projectile Motion. 4-6 Projectile Motion Analyzed. 4-7 Uniform Circular Motion. 4-8 Relative Motion in One Dimension. 4-9 Relative Motion in Two Dimensions. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 5.Force and Motion-I. When a pilot takes off from an aircraft carrier, what causes the compulsion to fly the plane into the ocean? 5-1 What Is Physics? 5-2 Newtonian Mechanics. 5-3 Newton's First Law. 5-4 Force. 5-5 Mass. 5-6 Newton's Second Law. 5-7 Some Particular Forces. 5-8 Newton's Third Law. 5-9 Applying Newton's Laws. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 6.Force and Motion-II. Can a Grand Prix race car be driven

  12. Fundamentals of Physics, Volume 1, (Chapters 1 - 21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Jearl

    2004-01-01

    Chapter 1. Measurement 1. How does the appearance of a new type of cloud signal changes in Earth's atmosphere? 1-1 What Is Physics? 1-2 Measuring Things. 1-3 The International System of Units. 1-4 Changing Units. 1-5 Length. 1-6 Time. 1-7 Mass. Review & Summary. Problems. Chapter 2. Motion Along a Straight Line. What causes whiplash injury in rear-end collisions of cars? 2-1 What Is Physics? 2-2 Motion. 2-3 Position and Displacement. 2-4 Average Velocity and Average Speed. 2-5 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed. 2-6 Acceleration. 2-7 Constant Acceleration: A Special Case. 2-8 Another Look at Constant Acceleration. 2-9 Free-Fall Acceleration. 2-10 Graphical Integration in Motion Analysis. 2 Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 3. Vectors. How does an ant know the way home with no guiding clues on the desert plains? 3-1 What Is Physics? 3-2 Vectors and Scalars. 3-3 Adding Vectors Geometrically. 3-4 Components of Vectors. 3-5 Unit Vectors. 3-6 Adding Vectors by Components. 3-7 Vectors and the Laws of Physics. 3-8 Multiplying Vectors. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 4. Motion in Two and Three Dimensions. In a motorcycle jump for record distance, where does the jumper put the second ramp? 4-1 What Is Physics? 4-2 Position and Displacement. 4-3 Average Velocity and Instantaneous Velocity. 4-4 Average Acceleration and Instantaneous Acceleration. 4-5 Projectile Motion. 4-6 Projectile Motion Analyzed. 4-7 Uniform Circular Motion. 4-8 Relative Motion in One Dimension. 4-9 Relative Motion in Two Dimensions. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 5. Force and Motion--I. When a pilot takes off from an aircraft carrier, what causes the compulsion to .y the plane into the ocean? 5-1 What Is Physics? 5-2 Newtonian Mechanics. 5-3 Newton's First Law. 5-4 Force. 5-5 Mass. 5-6 Newton's Second Law. 5-7 Some Particular Forces. 5-8 Newton's Third Law. 5-9 Applying Newton's Laws. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 6. Force and Motion--II. Can a

  13. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 1 (Chapters 1-11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2003-12-01

    Chapter 1.Measurement. How does the appearance of a new type of cloud signal changes in Earth's atmosphere? 1-1 What Is Physics? 1-2 Measuring Things. 1-3 The International System of Units. 1-4 Changing Units. 1-5 Length. 1-6 Time. 1-7 Mass. Review & Summary. Problems. Chapter 2.Motion Along a Straight Line. What causes whiplash injury in rear-end collisions of cars? 2-1 What Is Physics? 2-2 Motion. 2-3 Position and Displacement. 2-4 Average Velocity and Average Speed. 2-5 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed. 2-6 Acceleration. 2-7 Constant Acceleration: A Special Case. 2-8 Another Look at Constant Acceleration. 2-9 Free-Fall Acceleration. 2-10 Graphical Integration in Motion Analysis. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 3.Vectors. How does an ant know the way home with no guiding clues on the deser t plains? 3-2 Vectors and Scalars. 3-3 Adding Vectors Geometrically. 3-4 Components of Vectors. 3-5 Unit Vectors. 3-6 Adding Vectors by Components. 3-7 Vectors and the Laws of Physics. 3-8 Multiplying Vectors. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 4.Motion in Two and Three Dimensions. In a motorcycle jump for record distance, where does the jumper put the second ramp? 4-1 What Is Physics? 4-2 Position and Displacement. 4-3 Average Velocity and Instantaneous Velocity. 4-4 Average Acceleration and Instantaneous Acceleration. 4-5 Projectile Motion. 4-6 Projectile Motion Analyzed. 4-7 Uniform Circular Motion. 4-8 Relative Motion in One Dimension. 4-9 Relative Motion in Two Dimensions. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 5.Force and Motion-I. When a pilot takes off from an aircraft carrier, what causes the compulsion to fly the plane into the ocean? 5-1 What Is Physics? 5-2 Newtonian Mechanics. 5-3 Newton's First Law. 5-4 Force. 5-5 Mass. 5-6 Newton's Second Law. 5-7 Some Particular Forces. 5-8 Newton's Third Law. 5-9 Applying Newton's Laws. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 6.Force and Motion-II. Can a Grand Prix race car be driven

  14. 76 FR 60133 - Proposed Information Collection (Request for Supplies (Chapter 31-Vocational Rehabilitation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Request for Supplies (Chapter 31--Vocational Rehabilitation... information technology. Title: Request for Supplies (Chapter 31--Vocational Rehabilitation), VA Form...

  15. 76 FR 77893 - Agency Information Collection (Request for Supplies (Chapter 31-Vocational Rehabilitation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Request for Supplies (Chapter 31- Vocational Rehabilitation.... 2900-0061.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Request for Supplies (Chapter...

  16. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 3 (Chapters 22-33)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-03-01

    Chapter 21. Electric Charge. Why do video monitors in surgical rooms increase the risk of bacterial contamination? 21-1 What Is Physics? 21-2 Electric Charge. 21-3 Conductors and Insulators. 21-4 Coulomb's Law. 21-5 Charge Is Quantized. 21-6 Charge Is Conserved. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 22. Electric Fields. What causes sprites, those brief .ashes of light high above lightning storms? 22-1 What Is Physics? 22-2 The Electric Field. 22-3 Electric Field Lines. 22-4 The Electric Field Due to a Point Charge. 22-5 The Electric Field Due to an Electric Dipole. 22-6 The Electric Field Due to a Line of Charge. 22-7 The Electric Field Due to a Charged Disk. 22-8 A Point Charge in an Electric Field. 22-9 A Dipole in an Electric Field. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 23. Gauss' Law. How can lightning harm you even if it do es not strike you? 23-1 What Is Physics? 23-2 Flux. 23-3 Flux of an Electric Field. 23-4 Gauss' Law. 23-5 Gauss' Law and Coulomb's Law. 23-6 A Charged Isolated Conductor. 23-7 Applying Gauss' Law: Cylindrical Symmetry. 23-8 Applying Gauss' Law: Planar Symmetry. 23-9 Applying Gauss' Law: Spherical Symmetry. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 24. Electric Potential. What danger does a sweater pose to a computer? 24-1 What Is Physics? 24-2 Electric Potential Energy. 24-3 Electric Potential. 24-4 Equipotential Surfaces. 24-5 Calculating the Potential from the Field. 24-6 Potential Due to a Point Charge. 24-7 Potential Due to a Group of Point Charges. 24-8 Potential Due to an Electric Dipole. 24-9 Potential Due to a Continuous Charge Distribution. 24-10 Calculating the Field from the Potential. 24-11 Electric Potential Energy of a System of Point Charges. 24-12 Potential of a Charged Isolated Conductor. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 25. Capacitance. How did a fire start in a stretcher being withdrawn from an oxygen chamber? 25-1 What Is Physics? 25-2 Capacitance. 25-3 Calculating the Capacitance. 25

  17. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 2 (Chapters 12-20)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2003-12-01

    Chapter 12 Equilibrium and Elasticity. What injury can occur to a rock climber hanging by a crimp hold? 12-1 What Is Physics? 12-2 Equilibrium. 12-3 The Requirements of Equilibrium. 12-4 The Center of Gravity. 12-5 Some Examples of Static Equilibrium. 12-6 Indeterminate Structures. 12-7 Elasticity. Review & Summary Questions Problems. Chapter 13 Gravitation. What lies at the center of our Milky Way galaxy? 13-1 What Is Physics? 13-2 Newton's Law of Gravitation. 13-3 Gravitation and the Principle of Superposition. 13-4 Gravitation Near Earth's Surface. 13-5 Gravitation Inside Earth. 13-6 Gravitational Potential Energy. 13-7 Planets and Satellites: Kepler's Laws. 13-8 Satellites: Orbits and Energy. 13-9 Einstein and Gravitation. Review & Summary Questions Problems. Chapter 14 Fluids. What causes ground effect in race car driving? 14-1 What Is Physics? 14-2 What Is a Fluid? 14-3 Density and Pressure. 14-4 Fluids at Rest. 14-5 Measuring Pressure. 14-6 Pascal's Principle. 14-7 Archimedes' Principle. 14-8 Ideal Fluids in Motion. 14-9 The Equation of Continuity. 14-10 Bernoulli's Equation. Review & SummaryQuestionsProblems. Chapter 15 Oscillations. What is the "secret" of a skilled diver's high catapult in springboard diving? 15-1 What Is Physics? 15-2 Simple Harmonic Motion. 15-3 The Force Law for Simple Harmonic Motion. 15-4 Energy in Simple Harmonic Motion. 15-5 An Angular Simple Harmonic Oscillator. 15-6 Pendulums. 15-7 Simple Harmonic Motion and Uniform Circular Motion. 15-8 Damped Simple Harmonic Motion. 15-9 Forced Oscillations and Resonance. Review & Summary Questions Problems. Chapter 16 Waves--I. How can a submarine wreck be located by distant seismic stations? 16-1 What Is Physics? 16-2 Types of Waves. 16-3 Transverse and Longitudinal Waves. 16-4 Wavelength and Frequency. 16-5 The Speed of a Traveling Wave. 16-6 Wave Speed on a Stretched String. 16-7 Energy and Power of a Wave Traveling Along a String. 16-8 The Wave Equation. 16-9 The Principle of Superposition

  18. Chapter 2: Simulations of the Structure of Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, J. F.; Himmel, M. E.; Brady, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose is the homopolymer of (1 {yields} 4)-{beta}-D-glucose. The chemical composition of this polymer is simple, but understanding the conformation and packing of cellulose molecules is challenging. This chapter describes the structure of cellulose from the perspective of molecular mechanics simulations, including conformational analysis of cellobiose and simulations of hydrated cellulose I{beta} with CSFF and GLYCAM06, two sets of force field parameters developed specifically for carbohydrates. Many important features observed in these simulations are sensitive to differences in force field parameters, giving rise to dramatically different structures. The structures and properties of non-naturally occurring cellulose allomorphs (II, III, and IV) are also discussed.

  19. Aerothermodynamics of Blunt Body Entry Vehicles. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Borrelli, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the aerothermodynamic phenomena of blunt body entry vehicles are discussed. Four topics will be considered that present challenges to current computational modeling techniques for blunt body environments: turbulent flow, non-equilibrium flow, rarefied flow, and radiation transport. Examples of comparisons between computational tools to ground and flight-test data will be presented in order to illustrate the challenges existing in the numerical modeling of each of these phenomena and to provide test cases for evaluation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code predictions.

  20. Collection and chemical analysis of lichens for biomonitoring. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, L.L.; Ford, J.; Schwartzman, D.

    1991-01-01

    The chapter discusses the interrelated aspects of biomonitoring using chemical analysis of lichens. Many unique aspects of study objectives, study design (including design tasks, considerations, and sampling schemes), sample collection, sample preparation, and sample analysis that are required for a successful biomonitoring program using chemical analysis are emphasized. The advantages and disadvantages of common analytical methods suitable for chemical analysis of lichens are briefly discussed. Aspects of a quality assurance program and final contract reports are highlighted. In addition, some examples of studies using chemical analysis of lichens are discussed.

  1. 48 CFR Appendix H to Chapter 2 - Debarment and Suspension Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... 421 and 48 CFR chapter 1. H-100Scope. This appendix provides uniform debarment and suspension... Procedures H Appendix H to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Ch. 2, App. H Appendix H to Chapter 2—Debarment and Suspension...

  2. 38 CFR 21.9645 - Refund of basic contribution to chapter 30.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... contribution to chapter 30. 21.9645 Section 21.9645 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Assistance § 21.9645 Refund of basic contribution to chapter 30. (a)(1) An individual who makes an irrevocable election to receive educational assistance under this chapter by relinquishing eligibility...

  3. 5 CFR 841.506 - Effect of part 772 of this chapter on FERS payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Effect of part 772 of this chapter on... Employee Deductions and Government Contributions § 841.506 Effect of part 772 of this chapter on FERS... the interim appointment under § 772.102 of this chapter. The notice must specify that the...

  4. 27 CFR 9.3 - Relation to parts 4 and 70 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of this chapter. 9.3 Section 9.3 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Relation to parts 4 and 70 of this chapter. (a) Procedure. In accordance with §§ 4.25a(e)(2) and 70.701(c) of this chapter, the Administrator shall receive petitions to establish American viticultural...

  5. 26 CFR 301.6501(n)-1 - Special rules for chapter 42 and similar taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special rules for chapter 42 and similar taxes... Assessment and Collection § 301.6501(n)-1 Special rules for chapter 42 and similar taxes. (a) Return filed by... by chapter 42 (other than a tax imposed by section 4940), or by section 4975 shall be considered,...

  6. 21 CFR 312.54 - Emergency research under § 50.24 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emergency research under § 50.24 of this chapter... and Investigators § 312.54 Emergency research under § 50.24 of this chapter. (a) The sponsor shall... this chapter. When the sponsor receives from the IRB information concerning the public...

  7. 27 CFR 53.172 - Credit or refund of manufacturers tax under chapter 32.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... manufacturers tax under chapter 32. 53.172 Section 53.172 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND... Taxes § 53.172 Credit or refund of manufacturers tax under chapter 32. (a) Overpayment not described in... refund of an overpayment of manufacturers tax imposed by Chapter 32. It does not apply, however, to...

  8. 31 CFR 500.203 - Effect of transfers violating the provisions of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provisions of this chapter. 500.203 Section 500.203 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... CONTROL REGULATIONS Prohibitions § 500.203 Effect of transfers violating the provisions of this chapter. (a) Any transfer after the “effective date” which is in violation of any provision of this chapter...

  9. 5 CFR 891.101 - Relationship to part 890 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relationship to part 890 of this chapter... Provisions § 891.101 Relationship to part 890 of this chapter. This part does not apply to the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program which is governed by part 890 of this chapter. Part 890 of this...

  10. 38 CFR 21.380 - Establishment of qualifications for personnel providing assistance under Chapter 31.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... qualifications for personnel providing assistance under Chapter 31. 21.380 Section 21.380 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Personnel Training and Development § 21.380 Establishment of qualifications for personnel providing assistance under Chapter 31. (a)...

  11. 10 CFR 52.0 - Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions. 52.0... NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.0 Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions. (a... CFR Chapter I apply to a holder of or applicant for an approval, certification, permit, or license....

  12. 26 CFR 301.6511(f)-1 - Special rules for chapter 42 taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special rules for chapter 42 taxes. 301.6511(f... and Collection § 301.6511(f)-1 Special rules for chapter 42 taxes. (a) In general. Claims for credit or refund of an overpayment of any tax imposed by chapter 42 shall be filed by the taxpayer within...

  13. 20 CFR 1.3 - What rules are contained in this chapter?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What rules are contained in this chapter? 1.3... AND PROCEDURES PERFORMANCE OF FUNCTIONS § 1.3 What rules are contained in this chapter? The rules in this chapter are those governing the OWCP functions under the Federal Employees' Compensation Act,...

  14. 26 CFR 48.6416(a)-3 - Credit or refund of manufacturers tax under chapter 32.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... chapter 32. 48.6416(a)-3 Section 48.6416(a)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... refund of manufacturers tax under chapter 32. (a) Overpayment not described in section 6416(b)(3)(C) or... to claims for credit or refund of an overpayment of manufacturers tax imposed by chapter 32. It...

  15. 49 CFR 1500.3 - Terms and abbreviations used in this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Terms and abbreviations used in this chapter. 1500... APPLICABILITY, TERMS, AND ABBREVIATIONS § 1500.3 Terms and abbreviations used in this chapter. As used in this chapter: Administrator means the Under Secretary of Transportation for Security identified in 49...

  16. 26 CFR 1.6662-5 - Substantial and gross valuation misstatements under chapter 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... under chapter 1. 1.6662-5 Section 1.6662-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Assessable Penalties § 1.6662-5 Substantial and gross valuation misstatements under chapter 1. (a) In general... imposed under chapter 1 of subtitle A of the Code that is required to be shown on a return is...

  17. 9 CFR 51.10 - Part 53 of this chapter not applicable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Part 53 of this chapter not applicable... DESTROYED BECAUSE OF BRUCELLOSIS Indemnity for Cattle, Bison, and Swine § 51.10 Part 53 of this chapter not... the regulations contained in part 53 of this chapter, but all such claims shall be presented and...

  18. 26 CFR 156.6091-1 - Place for filing chapter 54 (Greenmail) tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Place for filing chapter 54 (Greenmail) tax... Administration § 156.6091-1 Place for filing chapter 54 (Greenmail) tax returns. Except as provided in § 156.6091... under chapter 54 of the Code of individuals, estates, and trusts shall be filed with any person...

  19. 38 CFR 21.334 - Election of payment at the Chapter 30 rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the Chapter 30 rate. 21.334 Section 21.334 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Authorization of Subsistence Allowance and Training and Rehabilitation Services § 21.334 Election of payment at the Chapter 30 rate. (a) Election. When the veteran elects...

  20. 20 CFR 802.102 - Applicability of part 801 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability of part 801 of this chapter... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Provisions Introductory § 802.102 Applicability of part 801 of this chapter. Part 801 of this chapter VII sets forth rules of general applicability covering the...

  1. 14 CFR 91.1007 - Flights conducted under part 121 or part 135 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 135 of this chapter. 91.1007 Section 91.1007 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... chapter. (a) Except as provided in § 91.501(b), when a nonprogram aircraft is used to substitute for a program flight, the flight must be operated in compliance with part 121 or part 135 of this chapter,...

  2. 31 CFR 501.101 - Relation of this part to other parts in this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in this chapter. 501.101 Section 501.101 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money..., PROCEDURES AND PENALTIES REGULATIONS Relation of This Part to Other Parts in This Chapter § 501.101 Relation of this part to other parts in this chapter. This part sets forth standard reporting...

  3. 47 CFR 80.3 - Other applicable rule parts of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other applicable rule parts of this chapter. 80... rule parts of this chapter. Other FCC rule parts applicable to licensees in the maritime services... requirements for construction, marking and lighting of antenna towers. (f) Part 20 of this chapter...

  4. 78 FR 48696 - Draft Revisions to the Marine Safety Manual, Volume III, Chapters 20-26

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Draft Revisions to the Marine Safety Manual, Volume III, Chapters 20-26 AGENCY: Coast... discusses the substantive changes to chapters 20 through 26 of MSM Volume III. The Coast Guard seeks and... Notice and Draft of MSM Volume III, Chapters 20-26: To view this Commandant Change notice and Draft...

  5. 14 CFR 36.105 - Flight Manual Statement of Chapter 4 equivalency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight Manual Statement of Chapter 4... Airplanes and Jet Airplanes § 36.105 Flight Manual Statement of Chapter 4 equivalency. For each airplane... by the FAA to be equivalent to the Chapter 4 noise level required by the International Civil...

  6. 26 CFR 53.6091-1 - Place for filing chapter 42 tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Place for filing chapter 42 tax returns. 53... Administration § 53.6091-1 Place for filing chapter 42 tax returns. Except as provided in § 53.6091-2 (relating to exceptional cases): (a) Persons other than corporations. Chapter 42 tax returns of persons...

  7. 26 CFR 55.6091-1 - Place for filing Chapter 44 tax returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Place for filing Chapter 44 tax returns. 55... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Procedure and Administration § 55.6091-1 Place for filing Chapter 44 tax returns. Except as provided in § 55.6091-2 (relating to exceptional cases): (a) In general. Chapter 44 tax...

  8. 46 CFR 154.1800 - Special operating requirements under Part 35 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... chapter. 154.1800 Section 154.1800 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Operations § 154.1800 Special operating requirements under Part 35 of this chapter. Each vessel must meet the requirements of Part 35 of this chapter except § 35.30-20....

  9. 21 CFR 812.47 - Emergency research under § 50.24 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emergency research under § 50.24 of this chapter....47 Emergency research under § 50.24 of this chapter. (a) The sponsor shall monitor the progress of all investigations involving an exception from informed consent under § 50.24 of this chapter....

  10. 38 CFR 21.5001 - Administration of benefits: 38 U.S.C. Chapter 32.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... benefits: 38 U.S.C. Chapter 32. 21.5001 Section 21.5001 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT...' Educational Assistance Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 32 Administrative § 21.5001 Administration of benefits: 38 U.S.C. Chapter 32. (a) Delegation of authority. Except as otherwise provided, authority is delegated...

  11. 48 CFR Appendix A to Chapter 2 - Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Contract Appeals A Appendix A to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Ch. 2, App. A Appendix A to Chapter 2—Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals Pt. Part 1—Charter Part 2—Rules Authority: 41 U.S.C. 421 and 48 CFR chapter 1....

  12. Educating Today's Children for Tomorrow's World. 1991-92 Chapter 1 Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. General Education Div.

    This document first provides an overall explanation of the Education Consolidation Improvement Act Chapter 1 and then describes Arkansas' involvement in Chapter 1 services. The report reveals that there were 76,588 Arkansas students who received Chapter 1 services in fiscal year (FY) 92, which amounted to a 7 percent increase over the previous…

  13. 77 FR 39731 - Swinomish Indian Tribal Community-Title 15, Chapter 4: Liquor Legalization, Regulation and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Swinomish Indian Tribal Community--Title 15, Chapter 4: Liquor Legalization... publishes Title 15, Chapter 4: Liquor Legalization, Regulation and License Code for the Swinomish Indian... adopted Ordinance No. 296, Enacting Swinomish Tribal Code Title 15, Chapter 4: Liquor...

  14. 77 FR 21581 - Kootenai Tribe of Idaho: Chapter 11-Alcohol Control Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Kootenai Tribe of Idaho: Chapter 11--Alcohol Control Act AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice publishes Chapter 11--Alcohol Control Act... enact a new Chapter 11--Alcohol Control Act on August 9, 2011. This notice is published in...

  15. 48 CFR Appendix H to Chapter 2 - Debarment and Suspension Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... 421 and 48 CFR chapter 1. H-100Scope. This appendix provides uniform debarment and suspension... Procedures H Appendix H to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Ch. 2, App. H Appendix H to Chapter 2—Debarment and Suspension...

  16. Chapter 2 Formula, 1989-90: Major Points. Publication No. 89.32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baenen, Nancy R.

    Programs implemented in 1989-90 by the Austin (Texas) Independent School District (AISD) using Chapter 2 Formula federal funds are described. Chapter 2 Formula provides federal funds to the states through the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 as amended in 1988. Chapter 2 funds can support programs that meet the educational needs of…

  17. Chapter 12: the anatomical foundations of clinical neurology.

    PubMed

    Bentivoglio, Marina; Mazzarello, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The chapter provides an itinerary of knowledge on nervous system anatomy as one of the pillars of clinical neurology. The journey starts from the Renaissance explosion on the approach to the human body, its functions and its diseases, dealing with the seminal contributions of Leonardo da Vinci and Vesalius. The itinerary proceeds through the contributions of the 17th century, especially by Thomas Willis and the pioneering investigations of Marcello Malpighi and Antony van Leeuwenhoek, and onto the 18th century. The itinerary thus leads to the progress from gross anatomy to the microscopic investigation of the nervous system in the 19th century: the reticular theories, the revolution of the neural doctrine and their protagonists (Camillo Golgi and Santiago Ramón y Cajal), which initiated the modern era of the neurosciences. The chapter also includes sections on the contributions of developmental neuroanatomy to neurology, on the history of tract tracing, and on the cytoarchitecture of the cerebral cortex. The never-ending story of the anatomical foundations of clinical neurology continues to evolve at the dawn of the 21st century, including knowledge that guides deep brain stimulation, and novel approaches to the anatomy of the living brain based on rapidly developing neuroimaging technology.

  18. Overview of NATO Background on Scramjet Technology. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip; Bouchez, Marc; McClinton, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present overview is to summarize the current knowledge of the NATO contributors. All the topics will be addressed in this chapter, with references and some examples. This background enhances the level of knowledge of the NATO scramjet community, which will be used for writing the specific chapters of the Report. Some previous overviews have been published on scramjet technology worldwide. NASA, DOD, the U.S. industry and global community have studied scramjet-powered hypersonic vehicles for over 40 years. Within the U.S. alone, NASA, DOD (DARPA, U.S. Navy and USAF), and industry have participated in hypersonic technology development. Over this time NASA Langley Research Center continuously studied hypersonic system design, aerothermodynamics, scramjet propulsion, propulsion-airframe integration, high temperature materials and structural architectures, and associated facilities, instrumentation and test methods. These modestly funded programs were substantially augmented during the National Aero-Space Plane (X-30) Program, which spent more than $3B between 1984 and 1995, and brought the DOD and other NASA Centers, universities and industry back into hypersonics. In addition, significant progress was achieved in all technologies required for hypersonic flight, and much of that technology was transferred into other programs, such as X-33, DC-X, X-37, X-43, etc. In addition, technology transfer impacted numerous other industries, including automotive, medical, sports and aerospace.

  19. Chapter 9 prehospital tourniquets: review, recommendations, and future research.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    The tourniquet is a simple device that has been used since the Middle Ages. Although different variations have been designed throughout its history, the simplicity of design has remained. The history of tourniquets follows two distinct paths--the operating room and the prehospital setting. From the earliest recorded history, tourniquets have been used for surgical procedures which were originally to amputate war-ravaged limbs and then to create a bloodless field for routine limb surgery. This history has continued uninterrupted since the early 1900s with continued research to foster advances in knowledge. The history of tourniquets in the prehospital setting, however, has not progressed as smoothly. The debate regarding the use of a tourniquet to save a life from excessive limb hemorrhage began in the 1600s, and continues to this day. This chapter will explore the prehospital use of tourniquets, which may shed some light on where this debate originated. The current state of the knowledge regarding tourniquets will then be discussed with a focus on prehospital use, using the operating room literature when needed to fill knowledge gaps. The chapter will conclude with recommendations for prehospital tourniquet use and some areas for future research. Tourniquets are used for operative procedures within accepted clinical guidelines throughout the world as the standard of care. Current science supports a similar stance for the use of prehospital tourniquets within clinical guidelines.

  20. Chapter 9 prehospital tourniquets: review, recommendations, and future research.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    The tourniquet is a simple device that has been used since the Middle Ages. Although different variations have been designed throughout its history, the simplicity of design has remained. The history of tourniquets follows two distinct paths--the operating room and the prehospital setting. From the earliest recorded history, tourniquets have been used for surgical procedures which were originally to amputate war-ravaged limbs and then to create a bloodless field for routine limb surgery. This history has continued uninterrupted since the early 1900s with continued research to foster advances in knowledge. The history of tourniquets in the prehospital setting, however, has not progressed as smoothly. The debate regarding the use of a tourniquet to save a life from excessive limb hemorrhage began in the 1600s, and continues to this day. This chapter will explore the prehospital use of tourniquets, which may shed some light on where this debate originated. The current state of the knowledge regarding tourniquets will then be discussed with a focus on prehospital use, using the operating room literature when needed to fill knowledge gaps. The chapter will conclude with recommendations for prehospital tourniquet use and some areas for future research. Tourniquets are used for operative procedures within accepted clinical guidelines throughout the world as the standard of care. Current science supports a similar stance for the use of prehospital tourniquets within clinical guidelines. PMID:25222543

  1. Chapter 24: Computational modeling of self-organized spindle formation.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Stuart C; José, Jorge V

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, we provide a derivation and computational details of a biophysical model we introduced to describe the self-organized mitotic spindle formation properties in the chromosome dominated pathway studied in Xenopus meiotic extracts. The mitotic spindle is a biological structure composed of microtubules. This structure forms the scaffold on which mitosis and cytokinesis occurs. Despite the seeming mechanical simplicity of the spindle itself, its formation and the way in which it is used in mitosis and cytokinesis is complex and not fully understood. Biophysical modeling of a system as complex as mitosis requires contributions from biologists, biochemists, mathematicians, physicists, and software engineers. This chapter is written for biologists and biochemists who wish to understand how biophysical modeling can complement a program of biological experimentation. It is also written for a physicist, computer scientist, or mathematician unfamiliar with this class of biological physics model. We will describe how we built such a mathematical model and its numerical simulator to obtain results that agree with many of the results found experimentally. The components of this system are large enough to be described in terms of coarse-grained approximations. We will discuss how to properly model such systems and will suggest effective tradeoffs between reliability, simulation speed, and accuracy. At all times we have in mind the realistic biophysical properties of the system we are trying to model. PMID:19118693

  2. Prospecting for lunar resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G.; Martel, L.

    Large space settlements on the Moon (thousands of people) will require use of indigenous resources to build and maintain the infrastructure and generate products for export. Prospecting for these resources is a crucial step in human migration to space and needs to begin before settlement and the establishment of industrial complexes. We are devising a multi-faceted approach to prospect for resources. A central part of this work is developing the methodology for prospecting the Moon and other planetary bodies. This involves a number of investigations: (1) It is essential to analyze the economics of planetary ore deposits. Ore deposits are planetary materials that we can mine, process, and deliver to customers at a profit. The planetary context tosses in some interesting twists to this definition. (2) We are also making a comprehensive theoretical assessment of potential lunar ore deposits. Our understanding of the compositions, geological histories, and geological processes on the Moon will lead to significant differences in how we assess wh a t types of ores could be present. For example, the bone-dry nature of the Moon (except at the poles) eliminates all ore deposits associated with hydrothermal fluids. (3) We intend to search for resources using existing data for the Moon. Thus, prospecting can begin immediately. We have a wealth of remote sensing data for the Moon. We also have a good sampling of the Moon by the Apollo and Luna missions, and from lunar meteorites. We can target specific types of deposits already identified (e.g. lunar pyroclastic deposits) and look for other geological settings that might have produced ores and other materials of economic value. Another approach we will take is to examine all data available to look for anomalies. Examples are unusual spectral properties, large disagreements between independent techniques that measure the same property, unusual elemental ratios, or simply exceptional properties such as elemental abundances much

  3. Experiences gained by establishing the IAMG Student Chapter Freiberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Sebastian M.; Liesenberg, Veraldo; Shahzad, Faisal

    2013-04-01

    The International Association for Mathematical Geosciences (IAMG) Student Chapter Freiberg was founded in 2007 at the Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg (TUBAF) in Germany by national and international graduate and undergraduate students of various geoscientific as well as natural science disciplines. The major aim of the IAMG is to promote international cooperation in the application and use of Mathematics in Geosciences research and technology. The IAMG encourages all types of students and young scientists to found and maintain student chapters, which can even receive limited financial support by the IAMG. Following this encouragement, generations of students at TUBAF have build up and established a prosperous range of activities. These might be an example and an invitation for other young scientists and institutions worldwide to run similar activities. We, some of the current and former students behind the student chapter, have organised talks, membership drives, student seminars, guest lectures, several short courses and even international workshops. Some notable short courses were held by invited IAMG distinguished lecturers. The topics included "Statistical analysis in the Earth Sciences using R - a language and environment for statistical computing and graphics", "Geomathematical Natural Resource Modeling" and "Introduction to Geostatistics for Environmental Applications and Natural Resources Evaluation: Basic Concepts and Examples". Furthermore, we conducted short courses by ourselves. Here, the topics included basic introductions into MATLAB, object oriented programming concepts for geoscientists using MATLAB and an introduction to the Keyhole Markup Language (KML). Most of those short courses lasted several days and provided an excellent and unprecedented teaching experience for us. We were given credit by attending students for filling gaps in our university's curriculum by providing in-depth and hands-on tutorials on topics, which were merely

  4. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 4 (Chapters 34-38)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-04-01

    Chapter 33. Electromagnetic Waves. Why can one rainbow or two rainbows be seen in the sky but never three rainbows? 33-1 What Is Physics? 33-2 Maxwell's Rainbow. 33-3 The Traveling Electromagnetic Wave, Qualitatively. 33-4 The Traveling Electromagnetic Wave, Quantitatively. 33-5 Energy Transport and the Poynting Vector. 33-6 Radiation Pressure. 33-7 Polarization. 33-8 Reflection and Refraction. 33-9 Total Internal Reflection. 33-10 Polarization by Reflection. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 34. Images. What creates the illusion of hallways in a mirror maze? 34-1 What Is Physics? 34-2 Two Types of Images. 34-3 Plane Mirrors. 34-4 Spherical Mirrors. 34-5 Images from Spherical Mirrors. 34-6 Spherical Refracting Surfaces. 34-7 Thin Lenses. 34-8 Optical Instruments. 34-9 Three Proofs. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 35. Interference. How do color-shifting inks on paper currency shift colors? 35-1 What Is Physics? 35-2 Light as a Wave. 35-3 Diffraction. 35-4 Young's Interference Experiment. 35-5 Coherence. 35-6 Intensity in Double-Slit Interference. 35-7 Interference from Thin Films. 35-8 Michelson's Interferometer. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 36. Diffraction. How were variable displays on credit cards made bright and counterfeit-proof? 36-1 What Is Physics? 36-2 Diffraction and the Wave Theory of Light. 36-3 Diffraction by a Single Slit: Locating the Minima. 36-4 Intensity in Single-Slit Diffraction, Qualitatively. 36-5 Intensity in Single-Slit Diffraction, Quantitatively. 36-6 Diffraction by a Circular Aperture. 36-7 Diffraction by a Double Slit. 36-8 Diffraction Gratings. 36-9 Gratings: Dispersion and Resolving Power. 36-10 X-Ray Diffraction. Review & Summary Questions. Problems. Chapter 37. Relativity. How can we determine what lurks at the center of the galaxy M87, 50 million light-years away? 37-1 What Is Physics? 37-2 The Postulates. 37-3 Measuring an Event. 37-4 The Relativity of Simultaneity. 37-5 The Relativity

  5. Basics of compounding: implementing United States pharmacopeia chapter <795> pharmaceutical compounding--nonsterile preparations, part 4.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V

    2012-01-01

    Compounding pharmacists must participate in the standards set forth in the United States Pharmacopeia. Chapters <795> and <1075> within the United States Pharmacopeia have been combined and revised and new categories included. It is incumbent upon the compounder to maintain knowledge and skill in all categories of compounding that occurs in the facility. Therefore, pharmacists should acquire and study the newly revised chapter. This article concludes the four-part discussion on the newly revised United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <795>. Our purpose for these discussions was to bring to your attention that Chapter <795> and Chapter <1075> were combined and to highlight the most important changes and their effect on compounding pharmacy.

  6. Basics of compounding: considerations for implementing United States pharmacopeia chapter 797 pharmaceutical compounding sterile preparations, part 6: 2008 revisions to chapter 797.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V; Okeke, Claudia C

    2008-01-01

    United States Pharmacopeia Chapter 797 Pharmaceutical Compounding-Sterile Preparations pertains to all preadministration manipulations and procedures involved in the preparation of sterile compounds for application, implantation, infusion, inhalation, injection, insertion, instillation, or irrigation, including preparation, storage and transportation. The chapter does not pertain to actual clinical administration of compounded sterile preparations to patients. The intent of Chapter 797 is simply to prevent patient harm and fatalities that may result from nonsterility , excessive endotoxin load, large content errors in strength of correct ingredients, or the presence of incorrect ingredients. Because the achievement of sterility requires that facilities meet minimum cleanliness standards, that personnel be trained adequately and undergo periodic testing and training in sterilization techniques, and that appropriate principles and practices be appied to sustain solution stability, compliance with Chapter 797, and those that have already met the new standards seem to support them strongly. A number of significant changes have been made to Chapter 797, and this article discusses these changes.

  7. Suggestions for prospecting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1989-01-01

    Prospectors have contributed much to the development of this Nation's mineral resources. Since the time of the earliest settlement, the need for iron for tools and guns, lead for bullets, and copper for utensils has prompted a search for sources of these metals. The lure of gold and silver provided the impetus for much of the development in the West between 1850 and 1910. Later, prospectors carried out successful ventures to fulfill the country's expanding industrial demands for other metals such as zinc, molybdenum, tungsten, chromium, vanadium, and many others. Even America's uninhabited rugged mountains or barren deserts have been prospected although perhaps only at a reconnaissance scale.

  8. Applied Astronomy: Asteroid Prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, M.

    2013-09-01

    In the age of asteroid mining the ability to find promising ore-bearing bodies will be valuable. This will give rise to a new discipline- "Applied Astronomy". Just as most geologists work in industry, not in academia, the same will be true of astronomers. Just how rare or common ore-rich asteroids are likely to be, and the skills needed to assay their value, are discussed here, with an emphasis on remote - telescopic - methods. Also considered are the resources needed to conduct extensive surveys of asteroids for prospecting purposes, and the cost and timescale involved. The longer-term need for applied astronomers is also covered.

  9. Structural equation modeling: building and evaluating causal models: Chapter 8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grace, James B.; Scheiner, Samuel M.; Schoolmaster, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Scientists frequently wish to study hypotheses about causal relationships, rather than just statistical associations. This chapter addresses the question of how scientists might approach this ambitious task. Here we describe structural equation modeling (SEM), a general modeling framework for the study of causal hypotheses. Our goals are to (a) concisely describe the methodology, (b) illustrate its utility for investigating ecological systems, and (c) provide guidance for its application. Throughout our presentation, we rely on a study of the effects of human activities on wetland ecosystems to make our description of methodology more tangible. We begin by presenting the fundamental principles of SEM, including both its distinguishing characteristics and the requirements for modeling hypotheses about causal networks. We then illustrate SEM procedures and offer guidelines for conducting SEM analyses. Our focus in this presentation is on basic modeling objectives and core techniques. Pointers to additional modeling options are also given.

  10. Chapter 88-97 of 1988 Laws, 15 June 1988.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    This document contains amended sections of Sections 001 and 012 of Chapter 390 of Florida's statute relating to abortions. The amended sections state that the physician must obtain the written informed consent of the woman or her legal guardian if she is incompetent. If the woman is under age 18 and unmarried, the written informed consent of a parent, custodian, or legal guardian must be obtained, unless a court order allows the physician to bypass this additional consent requirement. Further amendments give the department the power to develop and enforce rules governing the operation of abortion clinics. These rules insure, among other things, that abortions may be performed only by licensed physicians. The rules also cover the proper treatment of patient records and the proper disposal of fetal remains. PMID:12289580

  11. NASA's MERBoard: An Interactive Collaborative Workspace Platform. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay; Wales, Roxana; Gossweiler, Rich

    2003-01-01

    This chapter describes the ongoing process by which a multidisciplinary group at NASA's Ames Research Center is designing and implementing a large interactive work surface called the MERBoard Collaborative Workspace. A MERBoard system involves several distributed, large, touch-enabled, plasma display systems with custom MERBoard software. A centralized server and database back the system. We are continually tuning MERBoard to support over two hundred scientists and engineers during the surface operations of the Mars Exploration Rover Missions. These scientists and engineers come from various disciplines and are working both in small and large groups over a span of space and time. We describe the multidisciplinary, human-centered process by which this h4ERBoard system is being designed, the usage patterns and social interactions that we have observed, and issues we are currently facing.

  12. The role of infectious disease in marine communities: chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Harvell, C. Drew

    2014-01-01

    Marine ecologists recognize that infectious diseases play and important role in ocean ecosystems. This role may have increased in some host taxa over time (Ward and Lafferty 2004). We begin this chapter by introducing infectious agents and their relationships with their hosts in marine systems. We then put infectious disease agents with their hosts in marine systems. We then put infectious disease agents in the perspective of marine biodiversity and discuss the various factors that affect parasites. Specifically, we introduce some basin epidemiological concepts, including the effects of stress and free-living diversity on parasites. Following this, we give brief consideration to communities of parasites within their hosts, particularly as these can lead to general insights into community ecology. We also give examples of how infectious diseases affect host populations, scaling up to marine communities. Finally, we present examples of marine infectious disease that impair conservation and fisheries.

  13. Anatomy and physiology of plant conductive systems. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, C.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical models considered in the book are representations of the physical features and chemical reactions that define interactions between plants and their environment. By centering attention on equations, it is easy to lose sight of the intricate and complex nature of the problem. The particular chapter describes the anatomy of important plant features and briefly discuss some physiological principles that will help to visualize and perceive the conditions which are represented in the models. Because of the many competing interactions, the fate of chemicals in the soil/plant/air environment is not obvious. Models were thus developed to intelligently integrate available knowledge, to increase understanding of the complex interactions, to aid in presentation of plant functions, and to help make predictions about chemical fate.

  14. Chapter 12: Trapped Electrons as Electrical (Quantum) Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdú, José

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we present a detailed model of the equivalent electric circuit of a single trapped particle in a coplanar-waveguide (CPW) Penning trap. The CPW-trap, which is essentially a section of coplanar-waveguide transmission-line, is designed to make it compatible with circuit-quantum electrodynamic architectures. This will enable a single trapped electron, or geonium atom, as a potential building block of microwave quantum circuits. The model of the trapped electron as an electric circuit was first introduced by Hans Dehmelt in the 1960s. It is essential for the description of the electronic detection using resonant tank circuits. It is also the basis for the description of the interaction of a geonium atom with other distant quantum systems through electrical (microwave) signals.

  15. Chapter 3. Recent advances in the biology of echinostomes.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Rafael; Esteban, José-Guillermo; Fried, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    This chapter examines the significant literature on the biology of echinostomes. The members of the family Echinostomatidae are medically and veterinary-important parasitic flatworms that invade humans, domestic animals and wildlife and also parasitize in their larval stages numerous invertebrate and cold-blooded vertebrate hosts. All echinostomes possess a complicated lifecycle expressed by: (i) alternation of seven generations known as the adult, egg, miracidium, sporocyst, redia, cercaria and metacercaria, and (ii) inclusion of three host categories known as the definitive host and first and second intermediate hosts. Moreover, echinostomes have served as experimental models in parasitology at all levels of organization. We discuss recent advances in several areas of the biological sciences that feature studies on echinostomes. Initially, we consider aspects of the lifecycle, development and systematics of selected members of the Echinostomatidae. We then highlight host-parasite interactions between echinostomes and their intermediate and definitive hosts with emphasis on the application of novel techniques to these topics. PMID:19622409

  16. Controlling the spread of invasive species while sampling: chapter 13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacks, Stewart; Sharon, Steve; Kinnunen, Ronald E.; Britton, David K.; Smith, Scott S.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter focuses on measures that should be taken to present, minimize, or control the spread of invasive species in the routine work we do as natural resource professionals. Inadvertently transporting potentially harmful organisms undermines our purposed as natural resource professionals. It is imperative that we understand that pathways that we create and strive to eliminate (when possible) or minimize the potential damage that may result from our actions. A combination of technologies, education, codes of conduct, and government overshot, as recommended by the Ecological Society of America, can prevent invasive species introductions from pathways that already exist (Lodge et al. 2006). In the long run, a purposeful prevention strategy for stopping unintentional species introductions will promote responsible natural resource management and will help us to acheive agency goals.

  17. Chapter 9: The rock coast of the USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Adams, Peter N.; Allan, Jonathan; Ashton, Andrew; Griggs, Gary B.; Hampton, Monty A.; Kelly, Joseph; Young, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    The coastline of the USA is vast and comprises a variety of landform types including barrier islands, mainland beaches, soft bluffed coastlines and hard rocky coasts. The majority of the bluffed and rocky coasts are found in the northeastern part of the country (New England) and along the Pacific coast. Rocky and bluffed landform types are commonly interspersed along the coastline and occur as a result of relative lowering of sea level from tectonic or isostatic forcing, which can occur on timescales ranging from instantaneous to millenia. Recent research on sea cliffs in the contiguous USA has focused on a broad range of topics from documenting erosion rates to identifying processes and controls on morphology to prediction modelling. This chapter provides a detailed synthesis of recent and seminal research on rocky coast geomorphology along open-ocean coasts of the continental United States (USA).

  18. Introduction to physical properties and elasticity models: Chapter 20

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorkin, Jack; Helgerud, Michael B.; Waite, William F.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Nur, Amos

    2003-01-01

    Estimating the in situ methane hydrate volume from seismic surveys requires knowledge of the rock physics relations between wave speeds and elastic moduli in hydrate/sediment mixtures. The elastic moduli of hydrate/sediment mixtures depend on the elastic properties of the individual sedimentary particles and the manner in which they are arranged. In this chapter, we present some rock physics data currently available from literature. The unreferenced values in Table I were not measured directly, but were derived from other values in Tables I and II using standard relationships between elastic properties for homogeneous, isotropic material. These derivations allow us to extend the list of physical property estimates, but at the expense of introducing uncertainties due to combining property values measured under different physical conditions. This is most apparent in the case of structure II (sII) hydrate for which very few physical properties have been measured under identical conditions.

  19. Chapter 4. Analyzing the regulation of antibiotic production in streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Bibb, Mervyn; Hesketh, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This chapter outlines the approaches and techniques that can be used to analyze the regulation of antibiotic production in streptomycetes. It describes how to isolate antibiotic nonproducing and overproducing mutants by UV, nitrosoguanidine (NTG), transposon, and insertion mutagenesis, and then how to use those mutants to identify regulatory genes. Other approaches to identify both pathway-specific and pleiotropic regulatory genes include overexpression and genome scanning. A variety of methods used to characterize pathway-specific regulatory genes for antibiotic biosynthesis are then covered, including transcriptional analysis and techniques that can be used to distinguish between direct and indirect regulation. Finally, genome-wide approaches that can be taken to characterize pleiotropic regulatory genes, including microarray and ChIP-on-Chip technologies, are described.

  20. Methane Clathrate Hydrate Prospecting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N.; Romanovsky, V.

    2003-01-01

    A method of prospecting for methane has been devised. The impetus for this method lies in the abundance of CH4 and the growing shortages of other fuels. The method is intended especially to enable identification of subpermafrost locations where significant amounts of methane are trapped in the form of methane gas hydrate (CH4(raised dot)6H2O). It has been estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey that the total CH4 resource in CH4(raised dot) 6H2O exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuels (oil, coal, and natural gas from non-hydrate sources). Also, CH4(raised dot)6H2O is among the cleanest-burning fuels, and CH4 is the most efficient fuel because the carbon in CH4 is in its most reduced state. The method involves looking for a proxy for methane gas hydrate, by means of the combination of a thermal-analysis submethod and a field submethod that does not involve drilling. The absence of drilling makes this method easier and less expensive, in comparison with prior methods of prospecting for oil and natural gas. The proposed method would include thermoprospecting in combination with one more of the other non-drilling measurement techniques, which could include magneto-telluric sounding and/or a subsurface-electrical-resistivity technique. The method would exploit the fact that the electrical conductivity in the underlying thawed region is greater than that in the overlying permafrost.

  1. New Geoelectrical Prospecting Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilatov, V.

    Some advantages and problems of a new geoelectrical prospecting method, vertical electric current soundings (VECS) are discussed. This method is based on using a new source, circular electric dipole (CED). It is unique source for the electrical prospecting, which excite only TM field. The behavior of an inductive source (loop) and a TE process are well known. Note that because of the more rapidly attenuating TM process (the exponential attenuation in a medium with the insulating base), another conventional source of a type of horizontal grounded line (combined source) behaves mostly as inductive, particulary in the late stage. The most remarkable properties of the field in TM transient process include the absence of the normal (quasi-static) magnetic field at the outer surface of a layered medium, as well as the dependence of the process on the vertical geoelectrical struc- ture (rather than on the overall longitudinal conductivity only, which is typical of the processes excited by inductive means). The source (CED-array) is installed in the following way. One of the transmitter poles is grounded in the central point. The other pole is uniformly grounded around with a radius determined by the depth of investigation desired. The author consider results of the initial field tests in the Tartar republic (oil target).

  2. Prospect Theory and Coercive Bargaining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Christopher K.

    2007-01-01

    Despite many applications of prospect theory's concepts to explain political and strategic phenomena, formal analyses of strategic problems using prospect theory are rare. Using Fearon's model of bargaining, Tversky and Kahneman's value function, and an existing probability weighting function, I construct a model that demonstrates the differences…

  3. Prospective Memory Performance across Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lijuan; Kliegel, Matthias; Yang, Zhiliang; Liu, Wei

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, the authors explored age differences in event-based prospective memory (PM) across adolescence. The tasks consisted of an ongoing task (OT; i.e., personality questionnaire items, math problems) and an embedded prospective task that required participants to remember to make a special response whenever they encountered a PM cue…

  4. The Prospects Study and Desegregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    Argues that greater caution is required when drawing conclusions from statistical results than the Armor study has done, and describes the "Prospects" study (begun in 1989), the largest longitudinal study of educational outcomes conducted in the United States. "Prospects" provides much data useful in evaluating the school desegregation situation…

  5. Prospects at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1988-11-01

    I discuss some possibilities for neutrino experiments in the fixed-target environment of the SPS, Tevatron, and UNK, with their primary proton beams of 0.4, 0.9, and 3.0 TeV. The emphasis is on unfinished business: issues that have been recognized for some time, but not yet resolved. Then I turn to prospects for proton-proton colliders to explore the 1-TeV scale. I review the motivation for new physics in the neighborhood of 1 TeV and mention some discovery possibilities for high-energy, high-luminosity hadron colliders and the implications they would have for neutrino physics. I raise the possibility of the direct study of neutrino interactions in hadron colliders. I close with a report on the status of the SSC project. 38 refs., 17 figs.

  6. Prospecting with neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    One of the latest attempts to explore the interface between physics and geophysics is the extravagant scheme of Alvaro De Rújula, Sheldon Glashow, Robert Wilson, and Georges Charpak, to be published in Physics Reports. In what these theoretical and experimental physicists described recently as “our mad project” (Physics Today, August 1983), a high-energy neutrino beam is to be used as a geophysical prospecting tool.The beam would be able to look for oil, natural gas, and high-atomic-number metal ores, and it would be able to profile the vertical density distribution of the earth. De Rújula et al. come to this project from the world of big physics machines, so it is natural to expect that the “Geotron,” the field instrument to supply and focus the neutrino beam, is to be big also.

  7. Chapter A10. Lakes and reservoirs: Guidelines for study design and sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, William R.; Robertson, Dale M.; Wilde, Franceska D.

    2015-09-29

    Within this chapter are references to other chapters of the NFM that provide more detailed guidelines related to specific topics and more detailed protocols for the quality assurance and assessment of the lake and reservoir data. Protocols and procedures to address and document the quality of lake and reservoir investigations are adapted from, or referenced to, the protocols and standard operating procedures contained in related chapters of this National Field Manual.

  8. Prospects: The Congressionally Mandated Study of Educational Growth and Opportunity. First Year Report on Language Minority and Limited English Proficient Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Marc; Puma, Michael

    This report presents descriptive findings from the Language Minority/Limited English Proficiency Student Supplement of "Prospects," a six-year longitudinal evaluation concerning the impact of federal Chapter 1 programs. These programs provide supplemental instruction to low-achieving elementary and secondary school students in low-income schools.…

  9. 22 CFR Appendix B to Chapter Xiv - Memorandum Describing the Authority and Assigned Responsibilities of the General Counsel of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-Management Relations Statute B Appendix B to Chapter XIV Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS... THE FOREIGN SERVICE IMPASSE DISPUTES PANEL Ch. XIV, App. B Appendix B to Chapter XIV—Memorandum... under this chapter, (B) file and prosecute complaints under this chapter, and (C) exercise such...

  10. 22 CFR Appendix B to Chapter Xiv - Memorandum Describing the Authority and Assigned Responsibilities of the General Counsel of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-Management Relations Statute B Appendix B to Chapter XIV Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS... THE FOREIGN SERVICE IMPASSE DISPUTES PANEL Ch. XIV, App. B Appendix B to Chapter XIV—Memorandum... under this chapter, (B) file and prosecute complaints under this chapter, and (C) exercise such...

  11. 12 CFR 900.3 - Terms relating to other entities and concepts used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to other entities and concepts used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX. As used throughout this chapter, the following terms relating to other entities and concepts used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX have the... used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX. 900.3 Section 900.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE...

  12. 12 CFR 900.3 - Terms relating to other entities and concepts used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX. 900.3 Section 900.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD... to other entities and concepts used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX. As used throughout this chapter, the following terms relating to other entities and concepts used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX have...

  13. 12 CFR 900.3 - Terms relating to other entities and concepts used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX. 900.3 Section 900.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD... to other entities and concepts used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX. As used throughout this chapter, the following terms relating to other entities and concepts used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX have...

  14. 12 CFR 900.3 - Terms relating to other entities and concepts used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX. 900.3 Section 900.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD... to other entities and concepts used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX. As used throughout this chapter, the following terms relating to other entities and concepts used throughout 12 CFR chapter IX have...

  15. Introduction to the 2006 UK Renal Registry report (chapter 2).

    PubMed

    Ansell, David; Will, Es; Tomson, Charlie

    2007-08-01

    The UK Renal Registry is part of the UK Renal Association and provides independent audit and analysis of renal replacement therapy in the UK. The Registry is funded directly by participating renal units through an annual fee per patient registered. The Registry is now collecting data on incidence and prevalence from 100% of UK renal units, with the five remaining non-linked sites in England providing summary data. Maintaining and enhancing Registry functionality will be an important touchstone for the Connecting for Health initiative. Collaboration with other formal agencies also promises an exciting prospect for future development. After a long proving period, the means, methods and roles have come together to complete an effective adjunct to clinical activity, planning, research and the performance of the renal community.

  16. Satellite communications systems and technology. Volume 1: Analytical chapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, Burton I. (Editor); Pelton, Joseph N. (Editor); Bostian, Charles W.; Brandon, William T.; Chan, Vincent W. S.; Hager, E. Paul; Helm, Neil R.; Jennings, Raymond D.; Kwan, Robert K.; Mahle, Christoph E.

    1993-01-01

    This is Volume 1 (Analytical Chapters) of the final report of the NASA/NSF Panel Satellite Communications Systems and Technology. The panel surveyed advanced technology being developed for commercial use in the satellite communications field in Europe, Japan, and Russia. All aspects of satellite communications were considered, including fixed, broadcast, mobile, personal communications, navigation, low earth orbit, and small satellites. The focus was on experimental and advanced technology being developed in R&D and demonstration programs rather than on today's production capabilities. Focus was on commercial satellite technology, and does not review defense-related or other confidential satellite communications capabilities. The NASA/NSF panel concluded that the United States has lost its leading position in many critical satellite communications technologies. Although U.S. industry retains a leading position in today's marketplace for satellite communications systems and services, this position is largely founded on technologies and capabilities developed in the 1960's and 1970's. Because the United States is losing ground with respect to a wide range of technologies and systems that will be key to future communications markets, the market share of the U.S. satellite communications industry is at risk.

  17. Satellite communications systems and technology. Volume 1; Analytic Chapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Raymond D.; Mahle, Christoph E.; Miller, Edward F.; Riley, Lance; Pelton, Joseph N.; Bostian, Charles W.; Brandon, William T.; Chan, Vincent W. S.; Hager, E. Paul; Edelson, Burton I.; Kwan, Robert K.; Helm, Neil R.

    1993-01-01

    Volume 1 (Analytical Chapters) of the final report of the NASA/NSF Panel Satellite Communications Systems and Technology is presented. The panel surveyed advanced technology being developed for commercial use in the satellite communications field in Europe, Japan, and Russia. All aspects of satellite communications were considered, including fixed, broadcast, mobile, personal communications, navigation, low earth orbit, and small satellites. The focus of the study was on experimental and advanced technology being developed in R&D and demonstration programs rather than on today's production capabilities. The report focuses on commercial satellite technology, and does not review defense-related or other confidential satellite communications capabilities. The NASA/NSF panel concluded that the United States has lost its leading position in many critical satellite communications technologies. Although U.S. industry retains a leading position in today's marketplace for satellite communications systems and services, this position is largely founded on technologies and capabilities developed in the 1960s and 1970s. Because the United States is losing ground with respect to a wide range of technologies and systems that will be key to future communications markets, the market share of the U.S. satellite communications industry is at risk.

  18. Chapter 23: history of neuroendocrinology "the spring of primitive existence".

    PubMed

    Kreier, Felix; Swaab, Dick F

    2010-01-01

    The history of neuroendocrinology is intimately related to one of the key questions, i.e. how does the brain manage to keep us alive and let our species survive? Neuroendocrinology, part of the answer to this question, is the discipline that studies hormone production by neurons, the sensitivity of neurons to hormones, and the dynamic, bidirectional interactions between neurons and endocrine glands. These interactions do not only occur through hormones, but are partly executed by the autonomic system that is regulated by the hypothalamus and that innervates not only the endocrine glands, but all our organs. The hypothalamus acts as a central integrator for endocrine, autonomic, and higher brain functions. The history of neuroendocrinology begins in 200 AD, with Galenus, who postulated that the brain excreted a residue from animal spirits (pituita), and continues into the last century, when researchers from different disciplines tried to understand how the brain regulates the vital functions of the body. Thanks to massive recent electronic publications of English and German scientific journals from the early 20th century we were able to rediscover fascinating articles, written in Europe before World War II, which showed that some of our most recent "innovative" concepts had in fact already been thought up some 50-100 years earlier. Apparently, World War II and the migration and exile of many researchers interrupted the development of concepts in this field and made rediscovery necessary. Our chapter gives an overview of the developments, both new and newly discovered. PMID:19892126

  19. Metal stable isotopes in weathering and hydrology: Chapter 10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, Thomas D.; Holland, Heinrich; Turekian, K.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter highlights some of the major developments in the understanding of the causes of metal stable isotope compositional variability in and isotope fractionation between natural materials and provides numerous examples of how that understanding is providing new insights into weathering and hydrology. At this stage, our knowledge of causes of stable isotope compositional variability among natural materials is greatest for the metals lithium, magnesium, calcium, and iron, the isotopes of which have already provided important information on weathering and hydrological processes. Stable isotope compositional variability for other metals such as strontium, copper, zinc, chromium, barium, molybdenum, mercury, cadmium, and nickel has been demonstrated but is only beginning to be applied to questions related to weathering and hydrology, and several research groups are currently exploring the potential. And then there are other metals such as titanium, vanadium, rhenium, and tungsten that have yet to be explored for variability of stable isotope composition in natural materials, but which may hold untold surprises in their utility. This impressive list of metals having either demonstrated or potential stable isotope signals that could be used to address important unsolved questions related to weathering and hydrology, constitutes a powerful toolbox that will be increasingly utilized in the coming decades.

  20. The impact of climate change on coastal ecosystems: chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkett, Virginia; Woodroffe, Colin D.; Nicholls, Robert J.; Forbes, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we stress two important features of coasts and coastal ecosystems. First, these are dynamic systems which continually undergo adjustments, especially through erosion and re-deposition, in response to a range of processes. Many coastal ecosystems adjust naturally at a range of time scales and their potential for response is examined partly by reconstructing how such systems have coped with natural changes of climate and sea level in the geological past. Second, coasts have changed profoundly through the 20th Century due to the impacts of human development (such as urbanisation, port and industrial expansion, shore protection, and the draining and conversion of coastal wetlands), with these development-related drivers closely linked to a growing global population and economy. It remains a challenge to isolate the impacts of climate change and sea-level rise from either the natural trajectory of shoreline change, or the accelerated pathway resulting from other human-related stressors. There exists a danger of overstating the importance of climate change, or overlooking significant interactions of climate change with other drivers.

  1. Chapter 19: HVAC Controls (DDC/EMS/BAS) Evaluation Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Romberger, J.

    2014-11-01

    The HVAC Controls Evaluation Protocol is designed to address evaluation issues for direct digital controls/energy management systems/building automation systems (DDC/EMS/BAS) that are installed to control heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in commercial and institutional buildings. (This chapter refers to the DDC/EMS/BAS measure as HVAC controls.) This protocol may also be applicable to industrial facilities such as clean rooms and labs, which have either significant HVAC equipment or spaces requiring special environmental conditions. This protocol addresses only HVAC-related equipment and the energy savings estimation methods associated with installing such control systems as an energy efficiency measure. The affected equipment includes: Air-side equipment (air handlers, direct expansion systems, furnaces, other heating- and cooling-related devices, terminal air distribution equipment, and fans); Central plant equipment (chillers, cooling towers, boilers, and pumps). These controls may also operate or affect other end uses, such as lighting, domestic hot water, irrigation systems, and life safety systems such as fire alarms and other security systems. Considerable nonenergy benefits, such as maintenance scheduling, system component troubleshooting, equipment failure alarms, and increased equipment lifetime, may also be associated with these systems. When connected to building utility meters, these systems can also be valuable demand-limiting control tools. However, this protocol does not evaluate any of these additional capabilities and benefits.

  2. Chapter 23: history of neuroendocrinology "the spring of primitive existence".

    PubMed

    Kreier, Felix; Swaab, Dick F

    2010-01-01

    The history of neuroendocrinology is intimately related to one of the key questions, i.e. how does the brain manage to keep us alive and let our species survive? Neuroendocrinology, part of the answer to this question, is the discipline that studies hormone production by neurons, the sensitivity of neurons to hormones, and the dynamic, bidirectional interactions between neurons and endocrine glands. These interactions do not only occur through hormones, but are partly executed by the autonomic system that is regulated by the hypothalamus and that innervates not only the endocrine glands, but all our organs. The hypothalamus acts as a central integrator for endocrine, autonomic, and higher brain functions. The history of neuroendocrinology begins in 200 AD, with Galenus, who postulated that the brain excreted a residue from animal spirits (pituita), and continues into the last century, when researchers from different disciplines tried to understand how the brain regulates the vital functions of the body. Thanks to massive recent electronic publications of English and German scientific journals from the early 20th century we were able to rediscover fascinating articles, written in Europe before World War II, which showed that some of our most recent "innovative" concepts had in fact already been thought up some 50-100 years earlier. Apparently, World War II and the migration and exile of many researchers interrupted the development of concepts in this field and made rediscovery necessary. Our chapter gives an overview of the developments, both new and newly discovered.

  3. California spotted owls: Chapter 5 in Managing Sierra Nevada forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Suzanne C.; Brooks, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    California spotted owls (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) are habitat specialists that are strongly associated with late-successional forests. For nesting and roosting, they require large trees and snags embedded in a stand with a complex forest structure (Blakesley et al. 2005, Gutiérrez et al. 1992, Verner et al. 1992b). In mixedconifer forests of the Sierra Nevada, California spotted owls typically nest and roost in stands with high canopy closure (≥75 percent) [Note: when citing studies, we use terminology consistent with Jennings et al. (1999), however, not all studies properly distinguish between canopy cover and closure and often use the terms interchangeably (see chapter 14 for clarification)] and an abundance of large trees (>24 in (60 cm) diameter at breast height [d.b.h.]) (Bias and Gutiérrez 1992, Gutiérrez et al. 1992, LaHaye et al. 1997, Moen and Gutiérrez 1997, Verner et al. 1992a). The California spotted owl guidelines (Verner et al. 1992b) effectively summarized much of the information about nesting and roosting habitat. Since that report, research on the California spotted owl has continued with much of the new information concentrated in five areas: population trends, barred owl (Strix varia) invasion, climate effects, foraging habitat, and owl response to fire.

  4. Chapter 6: Energy Storage in Cellulase Linker Peptides?

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, C.; Zhao, X.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the use of molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculations to investigate the possible role the linker polypeptide, common to many cellulase enzymes, plays in the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. In particular, we focus on the linker polypeptide from cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) from Trichoderma reesei, which is one of the most active cellulase enzymes. CBH I is a multi-domain enzyme, consisting of a large catalytic domain containing an active site tunnel and a small cellulose binding module, which are joined together by a 27-amino-acid residue linker peptide. CBH I is believed to hydrolyze cellulose in a 'processive' manner; however, the exact mechanism of the depolymerization of cellulose by CBH I is not fully understood. It has been hypothesized that the flexible interdomain linker mediates a caterpillar-like motion that enables the enzyme to move along the cellodextrin strand. Although the linker polypeptide sequence is known, the spatial conformation adopted by the linker domain and its role in the hydrolysis process, if any, has yet to be determined. The simulation results obtained to date indicate that the CBH I linker's free energy is critically dependent on the existence of the cellulose substrate and the stretching/compression pathway adopted. In the presence of a cellulose surface, simulations suggest that the linker exhibits two stable states, which would support the hypothesis that the linker peptide has the capacity to store energy in a manner similar to a spring and facilitate a caterpillar-like motion.

  5. Applied Space Systems Engineering. Chapter 17; Manage Technical Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Effective space systems engineering (SSE) is conducted in a fully electronic manner. Competitive hardware, software, and system designs are created in a totally digital environment that enables rapid product design and manufacturing cycles, as well as a multitude of techniques such as modeling, simulation, and lean manufacturing that significantly reduce the lifecycle cost of systems. Because the SSE lifecycle depends on the digital environment, managing the enormous volumes of technical data needed to describe, build, deploy, and operate systems is a critical factor in the success of a project. This chapter presents the key aspects of Technical Data Management (TDM) within the SSE process. It is written from the perspective of the System Engineer tasked with establishing the TDM process and infrastructure for a major project. Additional perspectives are reflected from the point of view of the engineers on the project who work within the digital engineering environment established by the TDM toolset and infrastructure, and from the point of view of the contactors who interface via the TDM infrastructure. Table 17.1 lists the TDM process as it relates to SSE.

  6. Building Blocks for Reliable Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations. Examples relevant to turbulent flow computations are included.

  7. Chapter 4: neurology in the Bible and the Talmud.

    PubMed

    Feinsod, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    The Bible, a major pillar of Western Civilization consists of Hebrew Scriptures, assembled over a millennium and accepted as of divine origin. The Talmud is a compendium of Jewish laws, covering every possible aspect of life, analyzed in depth from 200 BCE to 600 CE, becoming the foundation of Jewish existence. The all-encompassing character of the books provides numerous medical problems and observations that appear in various connotations. When in need to clarify various legal dilemmas, the Talmudic sages displayed astoundingly accurate anatomical knowledge and were pioneers in clinical-pathological correlations. The descriptions of "neurological" events in the Bible are very precise but show no evidence of neurological knowledge. Those reported in the various tractates of the Talmud are evidence of a substantial medical knowledge, marked by Hellenistic influence. Subjects such as head and spinal injuries, epilepsy, handedness neuralgias aphasia tinnitus and tremor were discussed in depth. This chapter is an updated collection of the studies, extracting observations and discussions of neurological manifestations from the ancient texts.

  8. Chapter 20: neurological illustration from photography to cinematography.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Geneviève

    2010-01-01

    This chapter explores iconography in neurology from the birth of photography up to the early medical applications of cinematography before 1914. The important visual part of neurological diagnosis explains why these techniques were adopted very early by neurologists. Duchenne published the first medical book illustrated with photographs of patients. The first and most famous photographic laboratory was created in Charcot's department, at the Salpêtrière in Paris, under the direction of Albert Londe. Londe published the first book dedicated to medical photography. The physiologist Marey and the photographer Muybridge, in association with neurologists, played key roles in the development of chronophotography and cinematography. Germany was the first country to welcome cinematography in a neurology department. Independently, neurologists began to film patients in other countries in Europe and in America. In 1905, Arthur Van Gehuchten (1861-1914), Belgian anatomist and neurologist, began systematically to film neurologic patients, with the intention of building up a complete neurological iconographic collection. This collection has survived and has been restored in the laboratory of the Royal Belgian Film Archive where the films are now safely stored in their vaults.

  9. Valley plugs, land use, and phytogeomorphic response: Chapter 14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, A.R.; King, Sammy L.; Shroder, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic alteration of fluvial systems can disrupt functional processes that provide valuable ecosystem services. Channelization alters fluvial parameters and the connectivity of river channels to their floodplains which is critical for productivity, nutrient cycling, flood control, and biodiversity. The effects of channelization can be exacerbated by local geology and land-use activities, resulting in dramatic geomorphic readjustments including the formation of valley plugs. Considerable variation in the response of abiotic processes, including surface hydrology, subsurface hydrology, and sedimentation dynamics, to channelization and the formation of valley plugs. Altered abiotic processes associated with these geomorphic features and readjustments influence biotic processes including species composition, abundance, and successional processes. Considerable interest exists for restoring altered fluvial systems and their floodplains because of their social and ecological importance. Understanding abiotic and biotic responses of channelization and valley-plug formation within the context of the watershed is essential to successful restoration. This chapter focuses on the primary causes of valley-plug formation, resulting fluvial-geomorphic responses, vegetation responses, and restoration and research needs for these systems.

  10. Characterization and conceptualization of groundwater flow systems: Chapter 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L.N.; Sanford, W.E.; Glynn, P.D.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses some of the fundamental concepts, data needs and approaches that aid in developing a general understanding of a groundwater system. Principles of the hydrological cycle are reviewed; the processes of recharge and discharge in aquifer systems; types of geological, hydrological and hydraulic data needed to describe the hydrogeological framework of an aquifer system; factors affecting the distribution of recharge to aquifers; and uses of groundwater chemistry, geochemical modelling, environmental tracers and age interpretations in groundwater studies. Together, these concepts and observations aid in developing a conceptualization of groundwater flow systems and provide input to the development of numerical models of a flow system. Conceptualization of the geology, hydrology, geochemistry, and hydrogeological and hydrochemical framework can be quite useful in planning, study design, guiding sampling campaigns, acquisition of new data and, ultimately, developing numerical models capable of assessing a wide variety of societal issues — for example, sustainability of groundwater resources in response to real or planned withdrawals from the system, CO2 sequestration or other waste isolation issues (such as nuclear waste disposal).

  11. Chapter 20: neurological illustration from photography to cinematography.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Geneviève

    2010-01-01

    This chapter explores iconography in neurology from the birth of photography up to the early medical applications of cinematography before 1914. The important visual part of neurological diagnosis explains why these techniques were adopted very early by neurologists. Duchenne published the first medical book illustrated with photographs of patients. The first and most famous photographic laboratory was created in Charcot's department, at the Salpêtrière in Paris, under the direction of Albert Londe. Londe published the first book dedicated to medical photography. The physiologist Marey and the photographer Muybridge, in association with neurologists, played key roles in the development of chronophotography and cinematography. Germany was the first country to welcome cinematography in a neurology department. Independently, neurologists began to film patients in other countries in Europe and in America. In 1905, Arthur Van Gehuchten (1861-1914), Belgian anatomist and neurologist, began systematically to film neurologic patients, with the intention of building up a complete neurological iconographic collection. This collection has survived and has been restored in the laboratory of the Royal Belgian Film Archive where the films are now safely stored in their vaults. PMID:19892123

  12. Introduction, Chapter 1 in Metallogenesis and tectonics of northeast Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parfenov, Leonid M.; Badarch, Gombosuren; Berzin, Nikolai A.; Hwang, Duk-Hwan; Khanchuk, Alexander I.; Kuzmin, Mikhail I.; Nokleberg, Warren J.; Obolenskiy, Alexander A.; Ogasawara, Masatsugu; Prokopiev, Andrei V.; Rodionov, Sergey M.; Smelov, Alexander P.; Yan, Hongquan

    2010-01-01

    The major purposes of this chapter are to provide (1) an overview of the regional geology, tectonics, and metallogenesis of Northeast Asia for readers who are unfamiliar with the region, (2) a general scientific introduction to the succeeding chapters of this volume, and (3) an overview of the methodology of metallogenic and tectonic analysis used in this study. We also describe how a high-quality metallogenic and tectonic analysis, including construction of an associated metallogenic-tectonic model will greatly benefit other mineral resource studies, including synthesis of mineral-deposit models; improve prediction of undiscovered mineral deposit as part of a quantitative mineral-resource-assessment studies; assist land-use and mineral-exploration planning; improve interpretations of the origins of host rocks, mineral deposits, and metallogenic belts, and suggest new research. Research on the metallogenesis and tectonics of such major regions as Northeast Asia (eastern Russia, Mongolia, northern China, South Korea, and Japan) and the Circum-North Pacific (the Russian Far East, Alaska, and the Canadian Cordillera) requires a complex methodology including (1) definitions of key terms, (2) compilation of a regional geologic base map that can be interpreted according to modern tectonic concepts and definitions, (3) compilation of a mineral-deposit database that enables a determination of mineral-deposit models and clarification of the relations of deposits to host rocks and tectonic origins, (4) synthesis of a series of mineral-deposit models that characterize the known mineral deposits and inferred undiscovered deposits in the region, (5) compilation of a series of metallogenic-belt belts constructed on the regional geologic base map, and (6) construction of a unified metallogenic and tectonic model. The summary of regional geology and metallogenesis presented here is based on publications of the major international collaborative studies of the metallogenesis and

  13. Chapter 1. Impacts of the oceans on climate change.

    PubMed

    Reid, Philip C; Fischer, Astrid C; Lewis-Brown, Emily; Meredith, Michael P; Sparrow, Mike; Andersson, Andreas J; Antia, Avan; Bates, Nicholas R; Bathmann, Ulrich; Beaugrand, Gregory; Brix, Holger; Dye, Stephen; Edwards, Martin; Furevik, Tore; Gangstø, Reidun; Hátún, Hjálmar; Hopcroft, Russell R; Kendall, Mike; Kasten, Sabine; Keeling, Ralph; Le Quéré, Corinne; Mackenzie, Fred T; Malin, Gill; Mauritzen, Cecilie; Olafsson, Jón; Paull, Charlie; Rignot, Eric; Shimada, Koji; Vogt, Meike; Wallace, Craig; Wang, Zhaomin; Washington, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The oceans play a key role in climate regulation especially in part buffering (neutralising) the effects of increasing levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and rising global temperatures. This chapter examines how the regulatory processes performed by the oceans alter as a response to climate change and assesses the extent to which positive feedbacks from the ocean may exacerbate climate change. There is clear evidence for rapid change in the oceans. As the main heat store for the world there has been an accelerating change in sea temperatures over the last few decades, which has contributed to rising sea-level. The oceans are also the main store of carbon dioxide (CO2), and are estimated to have taken up approximately 40% of anthropogenic-sourced CO2 from the atmosphere since the beginning of the industrial revolution. A proportion of the carbon uptake is exported via the four ocean 'carbon pumps' (Solubility, Biological, Continental Shelf and Carbonate Counter) to the deep ocean reservoir. Increases in sea temperature and changing planktonic systems and ocean currents may lead to a reduction in the uptake of CO2 by the ocean; some evidence suggests a suppression of parts of the marine carbon sink is already underway. While the oceans have buffered climate change through the uptake of CO2 produced by fossil fuel burning this has already had an impact on ocean chemistry through ocean acidification and will continue to do so. Feedbacks to climate change from acidification may result from expected impacts on marine organisms (especially corals and calcareous plankton), ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles. The polar regions of the world are showing the most rapid responses to climate change. As a result of a strong ice-ocean influence, small changes in temperature, salinity and ice cover may trigger large and sudden changes in regional climate with potential downstream feedbacks to the climate of the rest of the world. A warming Arctic Ocean may lead to

  14. Volcanism on the Red Planet: Mars. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Bridges, Nathan T.; Crown, David A.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Fagents, Sarah A.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Zimbelman, James R.

    2000-01-01

    Of all the planets in the Solar System, Mars is the most Earthlike in its geological characteristics. Like Earth, it has been subjected to exogenic processes, such as impact cratesing and erosion by wind and water, as well as endogenic processes, including tectonic deformation of the crust and volcanism. The effects of these processes are amply demonstrated by the great variety of surface features, including impact craters, landslides, former river channels, sand dunes, and the largest volcanoes in the Solar System. Some of these features suggest substantial changes in Mars' environment during its history. For example, as reviewed by Carr, today Mars is a cold, dry desert with an average atmospheric pressure of only 5.6 mbar which does not allow liquid water to exist on the surface. To some planetary scientists, the presence of the channels bespeaks a time when Mars was warmer and wetter. However, others have argued that these features might have formed under current conditions and that there might not have been a shift in climate. Could the morphology of volcanoes and related features provide clues to past Martian environments? What role is played by atmospheric density in the styles of eruptions on Mars and resulting landforms? If these and related questions can be answered, then we may have a means for assessing the conditions on Mars' surface in the past and comparing the results with models of Martian evolution. In this chapter, we outline the sources of information available for volcanism on Mars, explore the influence of the Martian environment on volcanic processes, and describe the principal volcanic features and their implications for understanding the general evolution of the Martian surface.

  15. Large-Scale Hybrid Motor Testing. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, George

    2006-01-01

    Hybrid rocket motors can be successfully demonstrated at a small scale virtually anywhere. There have been many suitcase sized portable test stands assembled for demonstration of hybrids. They show the safety of hybrid rockets to the audiences. These small show motors and small laboratory scale motors can give comparative burn rate data for development of different fuel/oxidizer combinations, however questions that are always asked when hybrids are mentioned for large scale applications are - how do they scale and has it been shown in a large motor? To answer those questions, large scale motor testing is required to verify the hybrid motor at its true size. The necessity to conduct large-scale hybrid rocket motor tests to validate the burn rate from the small motors to application size has been documented in several place^'^^.^. Comparison of small scale hybrid data to that of larger scale data indicates that the fuel burn rate goes down with increasing port size, even with the same oxidizer flux. This trend holds for conventional hybrid motors with forward oxidizer injection and HTPB based fuels. While the reason this is occurring would make a great paper or study or thesis, it is not thoroughly understood at this time. Potential causes include the fact that since hybrid combustion is boundary layer driven, the larger port sizes reduce the interaction (radiation, mixing and heat transfer) from the core region of the port. This chapter focuses on some of the large, prototype sized testing of hybrid motors. The largest motors tested have been AMROC s 250K-lbf thrust motor at Edwards Air Force Base and the Hybrid Propulsion Demonstration Program s 250K-lbf thrust motor at Stennis Space Center. Numerous smaller tests were performed to support the burn rate, stability and scaling concepts that went into the development of those large motors.

  16. Chapter 13: Mining Electronic Health Records in the Genomics Era

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Joshua C.

    2012-01-01

    individuals. This chapter reviews several examples of phenotype extraction and their application to genetic research, demonstrating a viable future for genomic discovery using EHR-linked data. PMID:23300414

  17. German energy technology prospects.

    PubMed

    Popp, M

    1982-12-24

    After more than 25 years of development of nuclear power and almost 10 years of research and development in numerous areas of nonnuclear energy, there is now a good basis for judging the future prospects of energy technologies in the Federal Republic of Germany. The development of nuclear power has provided an important and economically advantageous new source of energy. Further efforts are needed to establish the nuclear fuel cycle in all stages and to exploit the potential of advanced reactors. In all other areas of energy technology, including energy conservation, new energy sources, and coal, economics has turned out to be the key problem, even at today's energy prices. Opportunities to overcome these economic problems through additional R & D are limited. There is some potential for special applications, and there are many technologies that could contribute to the energy supply of developing countries. In general, however, progress in energy conservation and the use of renewable energy sources will depend on the degree to which energy policy measures can improve their economic basis. For some technologies, such as solar thermal power stations and coal liquefaction, large-scale economic deployment cannot be foreseen today. Instead of establishing costly demonstration projects, emphasis will be put on improving key components of these technologies with the aim of having the most advanced technology available when the economic parameters are more favorable. PMID:17770150

  18. German energy technology prospects.

    PubMed

    Popp, M

    1982-12-24

    After more than 25 years of development of nuclear power and almost 10 years of research and development in numerous areas of nonnuclear energy, there is now a good basis for judging the future prospects of energy technologies in the Federal Republic of Germany. The development of nuclear power has provided an important and economically advantageous new source of energy. Further efforts are needed to establish the nuclear fuel cycle in all stages and to exploit the potential of advanced reactors. In all other areas of energy technology, including energy conservation, new energy sources, and coal, economics has turned out to be the key problem, even at today's energy prices. Opportunities to overcome these economic problems through additional R & D are limited. There is some potential for special applications, and there are many technologies that could contribute to the energy supply of developing countries. In general, however, progress in energy conservation and the use of renewable energy sources will depend on the degree to which energy policy measures can improve their economic basis. For some technologies, such as solar thermal power stations and coal liquefaction, large-scale economic deployment cannot be foreseen today. Instead of establishing costly demonstration projects, emphasis will be put on improving key components of these technologies with the aim of having the most advanced technology available when the economic parameters are more favorable.

  19. ANAIS: Status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaré, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cuesta, C.; García, E.; Ginestra, C.; Martínez, M.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Villar, P.

    2016-07-01

    ANAIS experiment will look for dark matter annual modulation with large mass of ultra-pure NaI(Tl) scintillators at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC), aiming to confirm the DAMA/LIBRA positive signal in a model-independent way. Two 12.5 kg each NaI(Tl) crystals provided by Alpha Spectra are currently taking data at the LSC. Present status of ANAIS detectors background and general performance is summarized; in particular, thanks to the high light collection efficiency prospects of lowering the threshold down to 1 keVee are reachable. Crystal radiopurity goals are fulfilled for 232Th and 238U chains and 40K activity, although higher than original goal, could be accepted; however, high 210Pb contamination out-of-equilibrium has been identified. More radiopure detectors are being built by Alpha Spectra. The ongoing high quantum efficiency PMT tests and muon veto characterization are also presented. Finally, the sensitivity of the experiment for the annual modulation in the WIMP signal, assuming the already achieved threshold and background in ANAIS-25 is shown. Further improvement should be achieved by reducing both threshold and background, as expected.

  20. 14 CFR 36.105 - Flight Manual Statement of Chapter 4 equivalency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight Manual Statement of Chapter 4... Airplanes and Jet Airplanes § 36.105 Flight Manual Statement of Chapter 4 equivalency. For each airplane that meets the requirements for Stage 4 certification, the Airplane Flight Manual or operations...

  1. 41 CFR Appendix A to Chapter 301 - Prescribed Maximum Per Diem Rates for CONUS

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Prescribed Maximum Per Diem Rates for CONUS A Appendix A to Chapter 301 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES Ch. 301, App. A Appendix A to Chapter...

  2. 9 CFR 51.10 - Part 53 of this chapter not applicable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Part 53 of this chapter not applicable. 51.10 Section 51.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... DESTROYED BECAUSE OF BRUCELLOSIS Indemnity for Cattle, Bison, and Swine § 51.10 Part 53 of this chapter...

  3. Math Notes. The Clipboard Connection. Chapter I Resource Center Curriculum and Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advanced Technology, Inc., Indianapolis, IN.

    The "Clipboard Connection" is a methodology to facilitate the rapid circulation of relevant pre-existing materials from Chapter 1 Technical Assistance Centers of relevant materials from Chapter 1 Technical Assistance Centers (TACs) to their clients, teachers of educationally disadvantaged children in resource centers. Each "Clipboard Connection"…

  4. A Two-Year Report on the Experimental Freshman Year Program. Chapter I, Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibler, Robert J., Ed.

    This chapter is published as the introduction to a six-chapter interim report on an experimental program at Southern Illinois University. 275 graduating high school seniors in the bottom one-third of their class were identified as high potential low achievers and admitted into the University to participate as experimental and control subjects in a…

  5. 41 CFR Appendix C to Chapter 301 - Standard Data Elements for Federal Travel [Traveler Identification

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... under 5 CFR 410.404, which states that “agencies may sponsor an employee's attendance at a conference as... for Federal Travel C Appendix C to Chapter 301 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES Ch. 301, App. C Appendix C to Chapter...

  6. Strategies & Ideas for Young Readers in Chapter 1 Instructional Activities. Bulletin No. 1826.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge.

    Focusing on remedial reading instruction for primary level students (grades K-3), this handbook presents training materials for teachers and coordinators of Chapter 1 reading programs. After a discussion on the nature and purpose of the program, the handbook describes a model of Chapter 1 programming, presenting three combined approaches that are…

  7. New Hampshire State Laws and Regulations, Chapters I and II, and Pest Fact Sheets l-48.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, James S.; Turmel, Jon P.

    This guide provides basic information needed to meet standards for pesticide applicator certification. Chapter one outlines the legislative history of pesticide regulation in New Hampshire especially requirements for certification and pesticide classification. The second chapter provides clarification of terms as they are used in this series of…

  8. The Function of the Passive Voice in the Japanese Constitution: Chapter 1 "The Emperor."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chino, Noriko

    1999-01-01

    When Japan surrendered in 1945, General MacArthur demanded that the Japanese adopt his draft of a new Americanized Constitution. This article focuses on one of the 11 chapters of the Japanese Constitution, Chapter 1 "The Emperor." Discourse analysis is used to examine portions of MacArthur's draft compared with its Japanese translation.…

  9. The Federal Administration of Evaluation Program Improvement and Technical Assistance under ECIA Chapter 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisner, Elizabeth R.; Marks, Ellen L.

    This document examines the following aspects of the federal administration of evaluation, program improvement, and technical assistance under Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act: (1) changes in each of the three areas since 1981 when Chapter 1 replaced Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act; (2) activities…

  10. Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Pi Chapter: African American Male Identity and Fraternity Culture, 1923-2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Edwin T.

    2009-01-01

    Pi Chapter of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. at Morgan State University made a significant contribution to the identity construction of college-educated African American men in the state of Maryland. The initiates of Pi Chapter constructed identities that allowed the members to see themselves as participants in mainstream American society as…

  11. 15 CFR Appendix A to Chapter Xx - Administration of the Trade Agreements Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Administration of the Trade Agreements Program A Appendix A to Chapter XX Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Ch. XX, App. A Appendix A to Chapter...

  12. 15 CFR Appendix A to Chapter Xx - Administration of the Trade Agreements Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administration of the Trade Agreements Program A Appendix A to Chapter XX Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Ch. XX, App. A Appendix A to Chapter...

  13. 15 CFR Appendix A to Chapter Xx - Administration of the Trade Agreements Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administration of the Trade Agreements Program A Appendix A to Chapter XX Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Ch. XX, App. A Appendix A to Chapter...

  14. 15 CFR Appendix A to Chapter Xx - Administration of the Trade Agreements Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Administration of the Trade Agreements Program A Appendix A to Chapter XX Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Ch. XX, App. A Appendix A to Chapter...

  15. 77 FR 60170 - Americans With Disabilities Act: Proposed Circular Chapter, Vehicle Acquisition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... published in the Federal Register on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477). Docket: For access to the docket to read... Federal Transit Administration Americans With Disabilities Act: Proposed Circular Chapter, Vehicle... circular chapter and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) has placed...

  16. 38 CFR 21.4232 - Specialized vocational training-38 U.S.C. Chapter 35.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specialized vocational training-38 U.S.C. Chapter 35. 21.4232 Section 21.4232 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Assistance Programs Programs of Education § 21.4232 Specialized vocational training—38 U.S.C. Chapter 35....

  17. 15 CFR Appendix A to Chapter Xx - Administration of the Trade Agreements Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administration of the Trade Agreements Program A Appendix A to Chapter XX Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Ch. XX, App. A Appendix A to Chapter...

  18. 77 FR 19408 - Reinstate Index to Chapter III in 20 CFR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ...://www.socialsecurity.gov . Correction In the Federal Register of March 27, 2012, in FR Doc. 2012-7182... ADMINISTRATION Reinstate Index to Chapter III in 20 CFR AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Notice... 27, 2012, about reinstating an Index to Chapter III in Title 20 of the Code of Federal...

  19. 48 CFR Appendix I to Chapter 7 - USAID's Academic Publication Policy

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... 2381) as amended; E.O. 12163, Sept. 29, 1979, 44 FR 56673; 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 435) ... Publication Policy I Appendix I to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Ch. 7, App. I Appendix I to Chapter 7—USAID's Academic Publication Policy 1. Statement of...

  20. 77 FR 21807 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 21E

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 21E Notice is hereby given that..., filed a complaint pursuant to Chapter 21E of the Massachusetts General Laws (``Mass. Gen. L. ch....

  1. 20 CFR 61.2 - Administration of the Act and this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administration of the Act and this chapter. 61.2 Section 61.2 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR....2 Administration of the Act and this chapter. (a) Pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 1706, Secretary of...

  2. 5 CFR Appendix A to 5 Cfr Chapter... - Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions A Appendix A to 5 CFR Chapter XIV Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY.... A Appendix A to 5 CFR Chapter XIV—Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions (a) The...

  3. 24 CFR 1710.5 - Statutory exemptions from the provisions of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Statutory exemptions from the provisions of this chapter. 1710.5 Section 1710.5 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... REGISTRATION General Requirements § 1710.5 Statutory exemptions from the provisions of this chapter. A...

  4. 38 CFR 21.6320 - Authorization of services under Chapter 31 rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of services under Chapter 31 rules. 21.6320 Section 21.6320 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... under Chapter 31 rules. (a) General. Sections 21.320 through 21.334 of this part are not applicable to...

  5. 41 CFR Appendix A to Chapter 301 - Prescribed Maximum Per Diem Rates for CONUS

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prescribed Maximum Per Diem Rates for CONUS A Appendix A to Chapter 301 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES Ch. 301, App. A Appendix A to Chapter...

  6. 48 CFR 1201.301-70 - Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...., Washington, DC 20590: (1) Problem: Succinctly state the problems created by current (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR... Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12. (a) Changes to the regulation may be the result of...

  7. 48 CFR 1201.301-70 - Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...., Washington, DC 20590: (1) Problem: Succinctly state the problems created by current (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR... Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12. (a) Changes to the regulation may be the result of...

  8. 41 CFR Appendix C to Chapter 301 - Standard Data Elements for Federal Travel [Traveler Identification

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... under 5 CFR 410.404, which states that “agencies may sponsor an employee's attendance at a conference as... for Federal Travel C Appendix C to Chapter 301 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES Ch. 301, App. C Appendix C to Chapter...

  9. 26 CFR 301.6501(n)-1 - Special rules for chapter 42 and similar taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Special rules for chapter 42 and similar taxes. 301.6501(n)-1 Section 301.6501(n)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Assessment and Collection § 301.6501(n)-1 Special rules for chapter 42 and similar taxes. (a) Return filed...

  10. Cost-Effectiveness Predictors in Chapter 1 Programs: The Minnesota Example.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Nicholas B.; Hunt, Rodney K.

    Reductions in the funding of compensatory education along with observed discrepancies in per-pupil cost among equally effective schools created a compelling case for the study of the determinants of cost-effective Chapter 1 programs in the state of Minnesota. Cost-effectiveness (CE) indexes for Chapter 1 reading and math services reflected a ratio…

  11. Where Chapter 1 Has Used the New Technology: Some Bright Patches Against a Dark Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, George D.; Deck, Dennis

    An increased proportion of Chapter 1 budgets across the country have been directed to the purchase of microcomputer hardware and software. A major reason for this expenditure has been the promise of better instruction, or at least more instruction for Chapter 1 students, without additional staff resources. Although evidence for instructional…

  12. 20 CFR 1.3 - What rules are contained in this chapter?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What rules are contained in this chapter? 1.3 Section 1.3 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES PERFORMANCE OF FUNCTIONS § 1.3 What rules are contained in this chapter? The rules...

  13. We Use Chapter 2 Funds as Seed Money for Teachers' Good Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lofthouse, Russ

    1988-01-01

    Explains how Cherry Creek (Colorado) schools effectively used Chapter 2 funds provided thorugh the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. Because these monies must be spent to supplement, not supplant, a school system's activities, the district devised two kinds of grants (minigrants and "skunk-works" grants) that fulfill Chapter 2…

  14. 10 CFR 52.0 - Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.0 Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions. (a..., standard design approvals, and manufacturing licenses for nuclear power facilities licensed under Section... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions....

  15. 10 CFR 52.0 - Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.0 Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions. (a..., standard design approvals, and manufacturing licenses for nuclear power facilities licensed under Section... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions....

  16. 10 CFR 52.0 - Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.0 Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions. (a..., standard design approvals, and manufacturing licenses for nuclear power facilities licensed under Section... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions....

  17. 10 CFR 52.0 - Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.0 Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions. (a..., standard design approvals, and manufacturing licenses for nuclear power facilities licensed under Section... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Scope; applicability of 10 CFR Chapter I provisions....

  18. Chapter 2 Formula: 1994-95 Final Report. Publication No. 94.11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Julia

    Chapter 2 Formula provides federal funds to states through the Elementary and Secondary Education Act as amended in 1988. Chapter 2 Formula funds can be used in a variety of ways to meet the educational needs of students at risk of failure or dropping out. In 1994-95, the Austin Independent School District (AISD) (Texas) received a total of…

  19. Secondary School Mathematics Special Edition, Teacher's Commentary, Chapters 1-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVenney, William S.; And Others

    This teacher's guide is written to be used in conjunction with the new materials for low achieving students in grades 7 and 8 by SMSG. It includes helpful hints about working with low achievers and suggestions regarding the implementation of this particular program. Most chapter discussions include behavioral objectives for the chapter, background…

  20. 5 CFR Appendix A to 5 Cfr Chapter... - Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Jurisdictions A Appendix A to 5 CFR Chapter XIV Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY.... A Appendix A to 5 CFR Chapter XIV—Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions (a) The Office... land and water areas west of the continents of North and South America (except coastal islands) to...

  1. 5 CFR Appendix A to 5 Cfr Chapter... - Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Jurisdictions A Appendix A to 5 CFR Chapter XIV Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY.... A Appendix A to 5 CFR Chapter XIV—Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions (a) The Office... land and water areas west of the continents of North and South America (except coastal islands) to...

  2. 5 CFR Appendix A to 5 Cfr Chapter... - Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Jurisdictions A Appendix A to 5 CFR Chapter XIV Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY.... A Appendix A to 5 CFR Chapter XIV—Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions (a) The Office... land and water areas west of the continents of North and South America (except coastal islands) to...

  3. 5 CFR Appendix A to 5 Cfr Chapter... - Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Jurisdictions A Appendix A to 5 CFR Chapter XIV Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY.... A Appendix A to 5 CFR Chapter XIV—Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions (a) The Office... land and water areas west of the continents of North and South America (except coastal islands) to...

  4. Geochemical and mineralogical methods of prospecting for mineral deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fersman, A. Ye; Borovik, S. A.; Gorshkov, G.V.; Popov, S.D.; Sosedko, A.F.; Hartsock, Lydia; Pierce, A.P.

    1952-01-01

    Fersman's book "Geochemical and mineralogical methods of prospecting for mineral deposits" (Geokhimicheskiye i mineralogicheskiye metody poiskov poleznykh iskopayemykh) covers all petrographic, mineralogical, and geochemical techniques that are used either directly or indirectly in mineral exploration. Chapter IV is of particular interest because it describes certain geochemical methods and principles that have not been widely applied outside of the Soviet Union. The original contained a number of photographs that have been omitted; the titles of the photographs are given in the body of the text. Wherever possible, bibliographic references have been checked, and the full titles given. References given in footnotes in the original have been collected and added at the end of each section as a bibliography.

  5. Prospective memory in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A. George; Crystal, Jonathon D.

    2011-01-01

    The content of prospective memory is comprised of representations of an action to perform in the future. When people form prospective memories, they temporarily put the memory representation in an inactive state while engaging in other activities, and then activate the representation in the future. Ultimately, successful activation of the memory representation yields an action at an appropriate, but temporally distant, time. A hallmark of prospective memory is that activation of the memory representation has a deleterious effect on current ongoing activity. Recent evidence suggests that scrub jays and non-human primates, but not other species, are capable of future planning. We hypothesized that prospective memory produces a selective deficit in performance at the time when rats access a memory representation but not when the memory representation is inactive. Rats were trained in a temporal bisection task (90 min/day). Immediately after the bisection task, half of the rats received an 8-g meal (meal group) and the other rats received no additional food (no-meal group). Sensitivity to time in the bisection task was reduced as the 90-min interval elapsed for the meal group but not for the no-meal group. This time-based prospective-memory effect was not based on response competition, an attentional limit, anticipatory contrast, or fatigue. Our results suggest that rats form prospective memories, which produces a negative side effect on ongoing activity. PMID:21922257

  6. Chapter 9: MEMS Applications in Spacecraft Thermal Control and Chapter 13: Handling and Contamination Control Considerations for Critical Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osiander, Robert; Darin, Ann; Chen, Philip

    2004-01-01

    Thermal control systems (TCS) are an integral part of all spacecraft and instruments. To operate properly all spacecraft components must be maintained within a specified temperature band, which in some instances can be quite tight (less than 1 degree C). Traditionally this is accomplished by "passive" designs, but with modem spacecraft and instruments it is increasingly necessary to use active thermal control technologies. Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) can be useful in developing an active TCS, and may be especially useful for small spacecraft. As the MEMS knowledge matures, the applications of MEMS in spacecraft thermal control emerges as a viable technology for thermal engineers. Potential applications include specialized thermal control coatings, thermal switches, and specialized filters for instruments. Although MEMS technology demonstrates benefits, it also poses challenges for thermal en,oineers due to the lack of in-flight MEMS data. As a consequence, in order to design a MEMS thermal control device and receive the full advantage, it is important to understand the potential impact of the space environment on MEMS devices and the design/operational constraints imposed in their use. An entire chapter is devoted to handling and contamination controls for Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) in space applications due to the importance of the topic area to final mission success. Handling and contamination control is discussed relative to the full life cycle from the very basic wafer level processing up through on orbit deployment. MEMS packaging will drive the need to tailor the Handling and Contamination Control Plan in order to assure adequacy of the overall program on a program by program basis. Plan elements are discussed at length to assist the user in preparing and implementing effective plans for both handling and contamination control to prevent deleterious effects.

  7. Jet Engine Noise Generation, Prediction and Control. Chapter 86

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.; Envia, Edmane

    2004-01-01

    . An example of this type of engine is shown in Figure IC, which is a schematic of the Honeywell T55 engine that powers the CH-47 Chinook helicopter. Since the noise from the propellers or helicopter rotors is usually dominant for turbo-shaft engines, less attention has been paid to these engines in so far as community noise considerations are concerned. This chapter will concentrate mostly on turbofan engine noise and will highlight common methods for their noise prediction and reduction.

  8. Chapter 3: MHD stability, operational limits and disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hender, T. C.; Wesley, J. C.; Bialek, J.; Bondeson, A.; Boozer, A. H.; Buttery, R. J.; Garofalo, A.; Goodman, T. P.; Granetz, R. S.; Gribov, Y.; Gruber, O.; Gryaznevich, M.; Giruzzi, G.; Günter, S.; Hayashi, N.; Helander, P.; Hegna, C. C.; Howell, D. F.; Humphreys, D. A.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Hyatt, A. W.; Isayama, A.; Jardin, S. C.; Kawano, Y.; Kellman, A.; Kessel, C.; Koslowski, H. R.; La Haye, R. J.; Lazzaro, E.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lukash, V.; Manickam, J.; Medvedev, S.; Mertens, V.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nakamura, Y.; Navratil, G.; Okabayashi, M.; Ozeki, T.; Paccagnella, R.; Pautasso, G.; Porcelli, F.; Pustovitov, V. D.; Riccardo, V.; Sato, M.; Sauter, O.; Schaffer, M. J.; Shimada, M.; Sonato, P.; Strait, E. J.; Sugihara, M.; Takechi, M.; Turnbull, A. D.; Westerhof, E.; Whyte, D. G.; Yoshino, R.; Zohm, H.; ITPA MHD, the; Disruption; Magnetic Control Topical Group

    2007-06-01

    ameliorate the consequences of MHD instabilities, there has been significant progress in improving physics understanding and modelling. This progress has been in areas including the mechanisms governing NTM growth and seeding, in understanding the damping controlling RWM stability and in modelling RWM feedback schemes. For disruptions there has been continued progress on the instability mechanisms that underlie various classes of disruption, on the detailed modelling of halo currents and forces and in refining predictions of quench rates and disruption power loads. Overall the studies reviewed in this chapter demonstrate that MHD instabilities can be controlled, avoided or ameliorated to the extent that they should not compromise ITER operation, though they will necessarily impose a range of constraints.

  9. Medicinal foods from marine animals: current status and prospects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Pallela, Ramjee

    2012-01-01

    The lifestyle of human being is changing day by day toward the simplified and more convenient way of living. Human wellbeing is majorly dependent on the daily food habits that are in accordance with the habits of individual community and the surrounding environments. Although the food habits are simplified and fashioned according to the current lifestyle, many of the Asians are still showing much importance to the naturally derived and traditional foods. One such medicinally important natural source is the foods from marine organisms, which are an important growing notion for the development of marine nutraceuticals and functional foods. In this context, we have already brought the recent trends and applications of marine algal (macro and micro) foods in my previous volume. The current preliminary chapter of this book volume on marine animals and microbes describes about the prospects of various marine animals and their derived substances/materials as medicinal foods. In addition, this chapter encourages the new researchers as well as various health communities to implement the marine animal-based medicinal foods and their applications.

  10. Summary of preliminary step-trend analysis from the Interagency Whitebark Pine Long-termMonitoring Program—2004-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Legg, Kristin; Shanahan, Erin; Daley, Rob; Irvine, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    In mixed and dominant stands, whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) occurs in over two million acres within the six national forests and two national parks that comprise the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). Currently, whitebark pine, an ecologically important species, is impacted by multiple ecological disturbances; white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola), mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), wildfire, and climate change all pose significant threats to the persistence of whitebark pine populations. Substantial declines in whitebark pine populations have been documented throughout its range.Under the auspices of the Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee (GYCC), several agencies began a collaborative, long-term monitoring program to track and document the status of whitebark pine across the GYE. This alliance resulted in the formation of the Greater Yellowstone Whitebark Pine Monitoring Working Group (GYWPMWG), which consists of representatives from the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), National Park Service (NPS), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Montana State University (MSU). This groundbased monitoring program was initiated in 2004 and follows a peer-reviewed protocol (GYWPMWG 2011). The program is led by the Greater Yellowstone Inventory and Monitoring Network (GRYN) of the National Park Service in coordination with multiple agencies. More information about this monitoring effort is available at: http://science. nature.nps.gov/im/units/gryn/monitor/whitebark_pine.cfm. The purpose of this report is to provide a draft summary of the first step-trend analysis for the interagency, long-term monitoring of whitebark pine health to the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) as part of a synthesis of the state of whitebark pine in the GYE. Due to the various stages of the analyses and reporting, this is the most efficient way to provide these results to the IGBST.

  11. Seasonal influenza vaccine dose distribution in 195 countries (2004-2013): Little progress in estimated global vaccination coverage.

    PubMed

    Palache, Abraham; Oriol-Mathieu, Valerie; Fino, Mireli; Xydia-Charmanta, Margarita

    2015-10-13

    Seasonal influenza is an important disease which results in 250,000-500,000 annual deaths worldwide. Global targets for vaccination coverage rates (VCRs) in high-risk groups are at least 75% in adults ≥65 years and increased coverage in other risk groups. The International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations Influenza Vaccine Supply (IFPMA IVS) International Task Force developed a survey methodology in 2008, to assess the global distribution of influenza vaccine doses as a proxy for VCRs. This paper updates the previous survey results on absolute numbers of influenza vaccine doses distributed between 2004 and 2013 inclusive, and dose distribution rates per 1000 population, and provides a qualitative assessment of the principal enablers and barriers to seasonal influenza vaccination. The two main findings from the quantitative portion of the survey are the continued negative trend for dose distribution in the EURO region and the perpetuation of appreciable differences in scale of dose distribution between WHO regions, with no observed convergence in the rates of doses distributed per 1000 population over time. The main findings from the qualitative portion of the survey were that actively managing the vaccination program in real-time and ensuring political commitment to vaccination are important enablers of vaccination, whereas insufficient access to vaccination and lack of political commitment to seasonal influenza vaccination programs are likely contributing to vaccination target failures. In all regions of the world, seasonal influenza vaccination is underutilized as a public health tool. The survey provides evidence of lost opportunity to protect populations against potentially serious influenza-associated disease. We call on the national and international public health communities to re-evaluate their political commitment to the prevention of the annual influenza disease burden and to develop a systematic approach to improve vaccine distribution equitably.

  12. Association of land use and its change with beach closure in the United States, 2004-2013

    EPA Science Inventory

    Land use and its change have great influences on water quality. However, their impacts on microbial contamination of beach water have been rarely investigated and their relationship with beach closure is still unknown. Here, we analyzed beach closure data obtained from 2004 to 20...

  13. Pertactin-negative variants of Bordetella pertussis in New York State: a retrospective analysis, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Tammy; Musser, Kimberlee A; Currenti, Salvatore A; Zansky, Shelley M; Halse, Tanya A

    2014-08-01

    The first report of pertactin-negative variants of Bordetella pertussis in the United States has raised questions about the role of acellular pertussis vaccines in the recent increase of pertussis cases. Our laboratory utilized a sequence-based method to identify mutations in the pertactin gene responsible for these variants and assessed vaccination status from the associated cases.

  14. Temporal trends in ankyloglossia and frenotomy in British Columbia, Canada, 2004-2013: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, K.S.; Kinniburgh, Brooke; Metcalfe, Amy; Razaz, Neda; Sabr, Yasser; Lisonkova, Sarka

    2016-01-01

    Background: Routine surveillance of congenital anomalies has shown recent increases in ankyloglossia (tongue-tie) in British Columbia, Canada. We examined the temporal trends in ankyloglossia and its surgical treatment (frenotomy). Methods: We conducted a population-based cohort study involving all live births in British Columbia from Apr. 1, 2004, to Mar. 31, 2014, with data obtained from the province's Perinatal Data Registry. Spatiotemporal trends in ankyloglossia and frenotomy, and associations with maternal and infant characteristics, were quantified using logistic regression analysis. Results: There were 459 445 live births and 3022 cases of ankyloglossia between 2004 and 2013. The population incidence of ankyloglossia increased by 70% (rate ratio 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-2.01), from 5.0 per 1000 live births in 2004 to 8.4 per 1000 in 2013. During the same period, the population rate of frenotomy increased by 89% (95% CI 52%-134%), from 2.8 per 1000 live births in 2004 to 5.3 per 1000 in 2013. The 2 regional health authorities with the lowest population rates of frenotomy (1.5 and 1.8 per 1000 live births) had the lowest rates of ankyloglossia and the lowest rates of frenotomy among cases with ankyloglossia, whereas the 2 regional health authorities with the highest population rates of frenotomy (5.2 and 5.3 per 1000 live births) had high rates of ankyloglossia and the highest rates of frenotomy among cases of ankyloglossia. Nulliparity, multiple birth, male infant sex, birth weight and year were independently associated with ankyloglossia. Interpretation: Large temporal increases and substantial spatial variations in ankyloglossia and frenotomy rates were observed that may indicate a diagnostic suspicion bias and increasing use of a potentially unnecessary surgical procedure among infants. PMID:27280112

  15. Association of land use and its change with beach closure in the United States, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianyong; Jackson, Laura

    2016-11-15

    Land use and its change have great influences on water quality. However, their impacts on microbial contamination of beach water have rarely been investigated and their relationship with beach actions (e.g., advisories or closure) is still unknown. Here, we analyzed beach closure data obtained from 2004 to 2013 for >500 beaches in the United States, and examined their associations with land use around beaches in 2006 and 2011, as well as the land use change between 2006 and 2011. The results show that the number of beach closures due to elevated indicators of health risk is negatively associated with the percentages of forest, barren land, grassland and wetland, while positively associated with the percentages of urban area. The results from multi-level models also indicate the negative association with forest area but positive association with urban area and agriculture. The examination of the change of land use and the number of beach closures between 2006 and 2011 indicates that the increase in the number of beach closures is positively associated with the increase in urban (β=1.612, p<0.05) and agricultural area including pasture (β=0.098, p<0.05), but negatively associated with the increase in forest area (β=-1.789, p<0.05). The study suggests that urbanization and agriculture development near beaches have adverse effects on beach microbial water quality, while afforestation may protect beach water quality and reduce the number of beach closures. PMID:27459255

  16. Changes in prevalence of, and risk factors for, lameness in random samples of English sheep flocks: 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Winter, Joanne R; Kaler, Jasmeet; Ferguson, Eamonn; KilBride, Amy L; Green, Laura E

    2015-11-01

    The aims of this study were to update the prevalence of lameness in sheep in England and identify novel risk factors. A total of 1260 sheep farmers responded to a postal survey. The survey captured detailed information on the period prevalence of lameness from May 2012-April 2013 and the prevalence and farmer naming of lesions attributable to interdigital dermatitis (ID), severe footrot (SFR), contagious ovine digital dermatitis (CODD) and shelly hoof (SH), management and treatment of lameness, and farm and flock details. The global mean period prevalence of lameness fell between 2004 and 2013 from 10.6% to 4.9% and the geometric mean period prevalence of lameness fell from 5.4% (95% CL: 4.7%-6.0%) to 3.5% (95% CI: 3.3%-3.7%). In 2013, more farmers were using vaccination and antibiotic treatment for ID and SFR and fewer farmers were using foot trimming as a routine or therapeutic treatment than in 2004. Two over-dispersed Poisson regression models were developed with the outcome the period prevalence of lameness, one investigated associations with farmer estimates of prevalence of the four foot lesions and one investigated associations with management practices to control and treat lameness and footrot. A prevalence of ID>10%, SFR>2.5% and CODD>2.5% were associated with a higher prevalence of lameness compared with those lesions being absent, however, the prevalence of SH was not associated with a change in risk of lameness. A key novel management risk associated with higher prevalence of lameness was the rate of feet bleeding/100 ewes trimmed/year. In addition, vaccination of ewes once per year and selecting breeding replacements from never-lame ewes were associated with a decreased risk of lameness. Other factors associated with a lower risk of lameness for the first time in a random sample of farmers and a full risk model were: recognising lameness in sheep at locomotion score 1 compared with higher scores, treatment of the first lame sheep in a group compared with waiting until >5 were lame, treatment of lame sheep within 3 days, ease of catching lame sheep and quarantine for >21 days. A previously known factor associated with a lower risk of lameness was footbathing to prevent ID. We conclude that the prevalence of lameness in sheep in England has fallen and that this might be in part because of increased uptake of managements recently reported as beneficial to control lameness. Routine foot trimming should be avoided.

  17. Genotypes of rubella virus and the epidemiology of rubella infections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Pukuta, Elizabeth; Waku-Kouomou, Diane; Abernathy, Emily; Illunga, Benoit Kebela; Obama, Ricardo; Mondonge, Vital; Dahl, Benjamin A; Maresha, Balcha G; Icenogle, Joseph; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques

    2016-10-01

    Rubella is a viral infection that may cause fetal death or congenital defects, known as congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), during early pregnancy. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that countries assess the burden of rubella and CRS, including the determination of genotypes of circulating viruses. The goal of this study was to identify the genotypes of rubella viruses in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Serum or throat swab samples were collected through the measles surveillance system. Sera that tested negative for measles IgM antibody were tested for rubella IgM antibody. Serum collected within 4 days of rash onset and throat swabs were screened by real-time RT-PCR for rubella virus RNA. For positive samples, an amplicon of the E1 glycoprotein gene was amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. 11733 sera were tested for rubella IgM and 2816 (24%) were positive; 145 (5%) were tested for the presence of rubella RNA by real-time RT-PCR and 10 (7%) were positive. Seventeen throat swabs were analyzed by RT-PCR and three were positive. Sequences were obtained from eight of the positive samples. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the DRC rubella viruses belonged to genotypes 1B, 1E, 1G, and 2B. This report provides the first information on the genotypes of rubella virus circulating in the DRC. These data contribute to a better understanding of rubella burden and the dynamics of rubella virus circulation in Africa. Efforts to establish rubella surveillance in the DRC are needed to support rubella elimination in Africa. J. Med. Virol. 88:1677-1684, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Comparing Observed with Predicted Weekly Influenza-Like Illness Rates during the Winter Holiday Break, United States, 2004-2013

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hongjiang; Wong, Karen K.; Zheteyeva, Yenlik; Shi, Jianrong; Uzicanin, Amra; Rainey, Jeanette J.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, influenza season typically begins in October or November, peaks in February, and tapers off in April. During the winter holiday break, from the end of December to the beginning of January, changes in social mixing patterns, healthcare-seeking behaviors, and surveillance reporting could affect influenza-like illness (ILI) rates. We compared predicted with observed weekly ILI to examine trends around the winter break period. We examined weekly rates of ILI by region in the United States from influenza season 2003–2004 to 2012–2013. We compared observed and predicted ILI rates from week 44 to week 8 of each influenza season using the auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) method. Of 1,530 region, week, and year combinations, 64 observed ILI rates were significantly higher than predicted by the model. Of these, 21 occurred during the typical winter holiday break period (weeks 51–52); 12 occurred during influenza season 2012–2013. There were 46 observed ILI rates that were significantly lower than predicted. Of these, 16 occurred after the typical holiday break during week 1, eight of which occurred during season 2012–2013. Of 90 (10 HHS regions x 9 seasons) predictions during the peak week, 78 predicted ILI rates were lower than observed. Out of 73 predictions for the post-peak week, 62 ILI rates were higher than observed. There were 53 out of 73 models that had lower peak and higher post-peak predicted ILI rates than were actually observed. While most regions had ILI rates higher than predicted during winter holiday break and lower than predicted after the break during the 2012–2013 season, overall there was not a consistent relationship between observed and predicted ILI around the winter holiday break during the other influenza seasons. PMID:26649568

  19. Genotypes of rubella virus and the epidemiology of rubella infections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Pukuta, Elizabeth; Waku-Kouomou, Diane; Abernathy, Emily; Illunga, Benoit Kebela; Obama, Ricardo; Mondonge, Vital; Dahl, Benjamin A; Maresha, Balcha G; Icenogle, Joseph; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques

    2016-10-01

    Rubella is a viral infection that may cause fetal death or congenital defects, known as congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), during early pregnancy. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that countries assess the burden of rubella and CRS, including the determination of genotypes of circulating viruses. The goal of this study was to identify the genotypes of rubella viruses in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Serum or throat swab samples were collected through the measles surveillance system. Sera that tested negative for measles IgM antibody were tested for rubella IgM antibody. Serum collected within 4 days of rash onset and throat swabs were screened by real-time RT-PCR for rubella virus RNA. For positive samples, an amplicon of the E1 glycoprotein gene was amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. 11733 sera were tested for rubella IgM and 2816 (24%) were positive; 145 (5%) were tested for the presence of rubella RNA by real-time RT-PCR and 10 (7%) were positive. Seventeen throat swabs were analyzed by RT-PCR and three were positive. Sequences were obtained from eight of the positive samples. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the DRC rubella viruses belonged to genotypes 1B, 1E, 1G, and 2B. This report provides the first information on the genotypes of rubella virus circulating in the DRC. These data contribute to a better understanding of rubella burden and the dynamics of rubella virus circulation in Africa. Efforts to establish rubella surveillance in the DRC are needed to support rubella elimination in Africa. J. Med. Virol. 88:1677-1684, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27479298

  20. Association of land use and its change with beach closure in the United States, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianyong; Jackson, Laura

    2016-11-15

    Land use and its change have great influences on water quality. However, their impacts on microbial contamination of beach water have rarely been investigated and their relationship with beach actions (e.g., advisories or closure) is still unknown. Here, we analyzed beach closure data obtained from 2004 to 2013 for >500 beaches in the United States, and examined their associations with land use around beaches in 2006 and 2011, as well as the land use change between 2006 and 2011. The results show that the number of beach closures due to elevated indicators of health risk is negatively associated with the percentages of forest, barren land, grassland and wetland, while positively associated with the percentages of urban area. The results from multi-level models also indicate the negative association with forest area but positive association with urban area and agriculture. The examination of the change of land use and the number of beach closures between 2006 and 2011 indicates that the increase in the number of beach closures is positively associated with the increase in urban (β=1.612, p<0.05) and agricultural area including pasture (β=0.098, p<0.05), but negatively associated with the increase in forest area (β=-1.789, p<0.05). The study suggests that urbanization and agriculture development near beaches have adverse effects on beach microbial water quality, while afforestation may protect beach water quality and reduce the number of beach closures.

  1. Student chapters: effective dissemination networks for informal optics and photonics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, Dirk; Vermeulen, Nathalie; Van Overmeire, Sara

    2009-06-01

    Professional societies sponsor student chapters in order to foster scholarship and training in photonics at the college and graduate level, but they are also an excellent resource for disseminating photonics knowledge to pre-college students and teachers. Starting in 2006, we tracked the involvement of SPIE student chapter volunteers in informal pre-college education settings. Chapter students reached 2800, 4900 and 11800 pre-college students respectively from 2006-2008 with some form of informal instruction in optics and photonics. As a case study, the EduKit, a self-contained instruction module featuring refractive and diffractive micro-optics developed by the European Network of Excellence on Micro-Optics (NEMO), was disseminated through student chapters in Argentina, Belgium, Canada, China, Colombia, India, Latvia, Mexico, Peru, Russia, Singapore, South Africa, and the United States. We tracked the movement of this material through the network, up to the student-teacher feedback stage. The student chapter network provided rapid dissemination of the material, translation of the material into the local language, and leveraged existing chapter contacts in schools to provide an audience. We describe the student chapter network and its impact on the development of the EduKit teaching module.

  2. Descriptive models, grade-tonnage relations, and databases for the assessment of sediment-hosted copper deposits: with emphasis on deposits in the Central Africa Copperbelt, Democratic Republic of the Congo and Zambia: Chapter J in Global mineral resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Causey, J. Douglas; Denning, Paul D.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Hayes, Timothy S.; Horton, John D.; Kirschbaum, Michael J.; Parks, Heather L.; Wilson, Anna B.; Wintzer, Niki E.; Zientek, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Chapter 1 of this report summarizes a descriptive model of sediment-hosted stratabound copper deposits. General characteristics and subtypes of sediment-hosted stratabound copper deposits are described based upon worldwide examples. Chapter 2 provides a global database of 170 sediment-hosted copper deposits, along with a statistical evaluation of grade and tonnage data for stratabound deposits, a comparison of stratabound deposits in the CACB with those found elsewhere, a discussion of the distinctive characteristics of the subtypes of sediment-hosted copper deposits that occur within the CACB, and guidelines for using grade and tonnage distributions for assessment of undiscovered resources in sediment-hosted stratabound deposits in the CACB. Chapter 3 presents a new descriptive model of sediment-hosted structurally controlled replacement and vein (SCRV) copper deposits with descriptions of individual deposits of this type in the CACB and elsewhere. Appendix A describes a relational database of tonnage, grade, and other information for more than 100 sediment-hosted copper deposits in the CACB. These data are used to calculate the pre-mining mineral endowment for individual deposits in the CACB and serve as the basis for the grade and tonnage models presented in chapter 2. Appendix B describes three spatial databases (Esri shapefiles) for (1) point locations of more than 500 sediment-hosted copper deposits and prospects, (2) projected surface extent of 86 selected copper ore bodies, and (3) areal extent of 77 open pits, all within the CACB.

  3. Waterfowl communities in the northern plains: Chapter 13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Douglas H.; Cody, M.L.; Smallwood, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    ecologists than have many other groups of birds despite the importance attributed to waterfowl by biologists more generally, as well as by the public. Exceptions include work by Nudds and colleagues in Canada and by P?ysS and colleagues in Finland (see Nudds 1992 and references contained therein). Further, waterfowl are important ecologically; in much of the prairie of the North American midcontinent, waterfowl are numerically among the most common bird species and are certainly dominant in terms of biomass. This chapter addresses some influences on waterfowl communities in mixed-grass prairie pothole habitat. It takes a temporal perspective, based on annual censuses of breeding ducks for 25 years on a specific study area at Woodworth, North Dakota. Any changes in the structural features of the habitat that may have occurred during this period at the census site were at most gradual. I examine how the waterfowl communities varied in response to influences that did change annually, such as climate, conditions of the wetlands on the study area, the regional populations of birds from which the communities were constituted, and the population at Woodworth during the previous year. The results of the analyses are interpreted relative to individual characteristics of 11 waterfowl species: Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), Gadwall (Anas strepera), Green-winged Teal (Anas crecca), Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors), Northern Pintail (Anas acuta), Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata), American Wigeon (Anas americana), Canvasback (Aythya valisineria), Redhead (Aythya americana), Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis), and Ruddy Duck (Oxyura jamaicensis).

  4. Chapter 18: Web-based Tools - NED VO Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarella, J. M.; NED Team

    The NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) is a thematic, web-based research facility in widespread use by scientists, educators, space missions, and observatory operations for observation planning, data analysis, discovery, and publication of research about objects beyond our Milky Way galaxy. NED is a portal into a systematic fusion of data from hundreds of sky surveys and tens of thousands of research publications. The contents and services span the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays through radio frequencies, and are continuously updated to reflect the current literature and releases of large-scale sky survey catalogs. NED has been on the Internet since 1990, growing in content, automation and services with the evolution of information technology. NED is the world's largest database of crossidentified extragalactic objects. As of December 2006, the system contains approximately 10 million objects and 15 million multi-wavelength cross-IDs. Over 4 thousand catalogs and published lists covering the entire electromagnetic spectrum have had their objects cross-identified or associated, with fundamental data parameters federated for convenient queries and retrieval. This chapter describes the interoperability of NED services with other components of the Virtual Observatory (VO). Section 1 is a brief overview of the primary NED web services. Section 2 provides a tutorial for using NED services currently available through the NVO Registry. The "name resolver" provides VO portals and related internet services with celestial coordinates for objects specified by catalog identifier (name); any alias can be queried because this service is based on the source cross-IDs established by NED. All major services have been updated to provide output in VOTable (XML) format that can be accessed directly from the NED web interface or using the NVO registry. These include access to images via SIAP, Cone- Search queries, and services providing fundamental, multi

  5. Bacterial Exopolysaccharides: Functionality and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Nwodo, Uchechukwu U.; Green, Ezekiel; Okoh, Anthony I.

    2012-01-01

    Diverse structural, functional and valuable polysaccharides are synthesized by bacteria of all taxa and secreted into the external environment. These polysaccharides are referred to as exopolysaccharides and they may either be homopolymeric or heteropolymeric in composition and of diverse high molecular weights (10 to 1000 kDa). The material properties of exopolysaccharides have revolutionized the industrial and medical sectors due to their retinue of functional applications and prospects. These applications have been extensive in areas such as pharmacological, nutraceutical, functional food, cosmeceutical, herbicides and insecticides among others, while prospects includes uses as anticoagulant, antithrombotic, immunomodulation, anticancer and as bioflocculants. Due to the extensive applications of bacterial exopolysaccharides, this overview provides basic information on their physiologic and morphologic functions as well as their applications and prospects in the medical and industrial sectors. PMID:23203046

  6. 9 CFR 51.10 - Part 53 of this chapter not applicable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DESTROYED BECAUSE OF BRUCELLOSIS Indemnity for Cattle, Bison, and Swine § 51.10 Part 53 of this chapter not applicable. No claim for indemnity for animals destroyed because of brucellosis shall hereafter be paid...

  7. Honor Societies: A Simple Role Concept and Some Suggestions for Chapters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Harry V.

    1975-01-01

    Article described three basic types of honor socities, with a few examples of each, and presented some general notions and practical suggestions for chapters based on the concept of intelligent partnership. (Author/RK)

  8. 75 FR 11503 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Texas; Revisions to Chapter 116 Which Relate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Texas; Revisions to Chapter 116 Which Relate to the Permit Renewal Application and Permit Renewal Submittal AGENCY:...

  9. Compliance by hospitals and healthcare facilities with the revised United States pharmacopeia chapter 797.

    PubMed

    McElhiney, Linda F

    2009-01-01

    All hospitals and healthcare facilities, JCAHO-accredited and non accredited, must comply with the revised United States Pharmacopeia Chapter 797 standards. For those facilites that met the January 2008 JCAHP deadline, compliance with the revised standards should be relatively simple to accomplish. The revised chapter should be read and a new gap analysis performed to determine the facility's compliance. Investments should be made in good training programs to make sure that everyone, compounding personnel and other hospital staff, is properly trained. The revised American Society of Health-System Pharmacists' guidelines for sterile compounding that will be published and available by 2010 should be obtained and read. This document will be a compliment to United States Pharmacopeia Chapter 797. Finally, the assessment tools and detailed information from United States Pharmacopeia Chapter 797 should be utilized to develop a good quality-assurance program for your hospital or healthcare facility.

  10. 24 CFR 1710.5 - Statutory exemptions from the provisions of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (INTERSTATE LAND SALES REGISTRATION PROGRAM) LAND REGISTRATION General Requirements § 1710.5 Statutory exemptions from the provisions of this chapter. A...

  11. Language Development Component Chapter 1 Reading Program 1993-94. Final Evaluation Report. Elementary and Secondary Education Act--Chapter 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lore, Rosemary; Chamberlain, Edward

    A study evaluated the Chapter 1 Reading Program that served 5,946 underachieving pupils in grades 1 through 8 in the Columbus, Ohio, public schools. These children appeared unlikely to learn to read successfully without additional reading instruction. The program featured small group instruction each day for 40-45 minutes on reading and writing…

  12. 31 CFR Appendix A to Chapter V - Information Pertaining to the Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or appendix B to 31 CFR chapter V. OFAC hereby notifies persons who have been issued specific licenses by OFAC that any reference to appendix A to 31 CFR chapter V or Appendix B to 31 CFR chapter V in....S. persons are advised to review 31 CFR part 560 prior to engaging in transactions involving...

  13. 31 CFR Appendix A to Chapter V - Information Pertaining to the Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or appendix B to 31 CFR chapter V. OFAC hereby notifies persons who have been issued specific licenses by OFAC that any reference to appendix A to 31 CFR chapter V or Appendix B to 31 CFR chapter V in....S. persons are advised to review 31 CFR part 560 prior to engaging in transactions involving...

  14. 31 CFR Appendix A to Chapter V - Information Pertaining to the Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or appendix B to 31 CFR chapter V. OFAC hereby notifies persons who have been issued specific licenses by OFAC that any reference to appendix A to 31 CFR chapter V or Appendix B to 31 CFR chapter V in... § 560.211 of the Iranian Transactions and Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 560 (the “ITSR”). The...

  15. 31 CFR Appendix A to Chapter V - Information Pertaining to the Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or appendix B to 31 CFR chapter V. OFAC hereby notifies persons who have been issued specific licenses by OFAC that any reference to appendix A to 31 CFR chapter V or Appendix B to 31 CFR chapter V in... § 560.211 of the Iranian Transactions and Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 560 (the “ITSR”). The...

  16. 5 CFR 842.310 - Service not creditable because of an election under part 847 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... election under part 847 of this chapter. 842.310 Section 842.310 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF... of this chapter. Any FERS service which becomes creditable under a retirement system established for nonappropriated fund employees due to an election made under part 847 of this chapter is not creditable for...

  17. 24 CFR 1720.225 - Suspension order under § 1710.45(b)(2) of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension order under § 1710.45(b)(2) of this chapter. 1720.225 Section 1720.225 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to....45(b)(2) of this chapter. A suspension pursuant to § 1710.45(b)(2) of this chapter shall be...

  18. 38 CFR 21.3131 - Rates-educational assistance allowance-38 U.S.C. chapter 35.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... assistance allowance-38 U.S.C. chapter 35. 21.3131 Section 21.3131 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...' Educational Assistance Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 35 Payments § 21.3131 Rates—educational assistance allowance—38 U.S.C. chapter 35. (a) Rates. Except as provided in § 21.3132, educational assistance...

  19. 38 CFR 21.6021 - Nonduplication-38 U.S.C., chapters 30, 31, 32, 34 and 35.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...., chapters 30, 31, 32, 34 and 35. 21.6021 Section 21.6021 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Vocational Training for Certain New Pension Recipients General § 21.6021 Nonduplication—38 U.S.C., chapters 30, 31, 32, 34 and 35. (a) Election between this temporary program and chapter 31 required. A...

  20. 38 CFR 21.5900 - Administration of benefits program-chapter 107, title 10 U.S.C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... benefits program-chapter 107, title 10 U.S.C. 21.5900 Section 21.5900 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... Assistance Test Program Administrative § 21.5900 Administration of benefits program—chapter 107, title 10 U.S.C. In administering benefits payable under Chapter 107, Title 10 U.S.C, VA will be bound by...

  1. 26 CFR 40.6302(c)-3 - Special rules for use of Government depositaries under chapter 33.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... under chapter 33. 40.6302(c)-3 Section 40.6302(c)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE...(c)-3 Special rules for use of Government depositaries under chapter 33. (a) Overview. This section sets forth an alternative method for computing the amount of deposits of taxes imposed by chapter...

  2. 38 CFR 21.264 - Election of payment at the 38 U.S.C. chapter 30 educational assistance rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the 38 U.S.C. chapter 30 educational assistance rate. 21.264 Section 21.264 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Monetary Assistance Services § 21.264 Election of payment at the 38 U.S.C. chapter 30 educational assistance rate. (a) Eligibility. A veteran...

  3. 78 FR 69518 - North American Free Trade Agreement; Invitation for Applications for Inclusion on the Chapter 19...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... American Free Trade Agreement; Invitation for Applications for Inclusion on the Chapter 19 Roster AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative. ACTION: Invitation for applications. SUMMARY: Chapter.... The United States annually renews its selections for the Chapter 19 roster. Applications are...

  4. 77 FR 64578 - North American Free Trade Agreement; Invitation for Applications for Inclusion on the Chapter 19...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... the Chapter 19 Roster AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative. ACTION: Invitation for applications. SUMMARY: Chapter 19 of the North American Free Trade Agreement (``NAFTA'') provides for the... NAFTA Party. The United States annually renews its selections for the Chapter 19 roster....

  5. 76 FR 18552 - Seeking Public Comment on Two Draft Chapters of the National Health Security Strategy Biennial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Seeking Public Comment on Two Draft Chapters of the National..., communities including all sectors and governments, states and the Federal Government). Two chapters (and....phe.gov/nhss . These chapters are the final two to be provided for public consideration and...

  6. 76 FR 65559 - North American Free Trade Agreement; Invitation for Applications for Inclusion on the Chapter 19...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... the Chapter 19 Roster AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative. ACTION: Invitation for applications. SUMMARY: Chapter 19 of the North American Free Trade Agreement (``NAFTA'') provides for the... NAFTA Party. The United States annually renews its selections for the Chapter 19 roster....

  7. 77 FR 76300 - Recommendations To Modify Chapters 29, 30, 37, and 85 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-27

    ... COMMISSION Recommendations To Modify Chapters 29, 30, 37, and 85 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the... recommendations to the President with respect to modifying provisions of chapters 29, 30, 37, and 85 of the... two categories. The first category concerns modifications to two HTS chapters inadvertently...

  8. 26 CFR 55.6081-1 - Automatic extension of time for filing a return due under Chapter 44.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... due under Chapter 44. 55.6081-1 Section 55.6081-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... extension of time for filing a return due under Chapter 44. (a) In general. A Real Estate Investment Trust... chapter. (e) Penalties. See section 6651 for failure to file or failure to pay the amount shown as tax...

  9. 38 CFR 36.4409 - Guaranteed or insured loans under 38 U.S.C. chapter 37.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... loans under 38 U.S.C. chapter 37. 36.4409 Section 36.4409 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... Specially Adapted Housing § 36.4409 Guaranteed or insured loans under 38 U.S.C. chapter 37. In any case where, in addition to the benefits of chapter 21, the veteran will utilize the veteran's entitlement...

  10. 26 CFR 156.6081-1 - Automatic extension of time for filing a return due under chapter 54.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... due under chapter 54. 156.6081-1 Section 156.6081-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Procedure and Administration § 156.6081-1 Automatic extension of time for filing a return due under chapter... § 301.6212-2 of this chapter. (e) Penalties. See section 6651 for failure to file or failure to pay...

  11. 26 CFR 157.6081-1 - Automatic extension of time for filing a return due under chapter 55.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... due under chapter 55. 157.6081-1 Section 157.6081-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... filing a return due under chapter 55. (a) In general. A taxpayer required to file a return on Form 8876... further guidance regarding the definition of last known address, see § 301.6212-2 of this chapter....

  12. 75 FR 64390 - North American Free Trade Agreement; Invitation for Applications for Inclusion on the Chapter 19...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... the Chapter 19 Roster AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative. ACTION: Invitation for applications. SUMMARY: Chapter 19 of the North American Free Trade Agreement (``NAFTA'') provides for the... NAFTA Party. The United States annually renews its selections for the Chapter 19 roster....

  13. 38 CFR 21.6010 - Applicability of rules and administrative procedures under 38 U.S.C., Chapter 31.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and administrative procedures under 38 U.S.C., Chapter 31. 21.6010 Section 21.6010 Pensions, Bonuses... Applicability of rules and administrative procedures under 38 U.S.C., Chapter 31. (a) General. Title 38 U.S.C... oriented services and assistance of the kind provided service-disabled veterans under chapter 31, Title...

  14. 77 FR 5265 - Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians-Cherokee Code Chapter 18B, Regulation of Alcoholic Beverages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians--Cherokee Code Chapter 18B, Regulation of... publishes the Amendment to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians--Cherokee Code Chapter 18B, Regulation of... Ordinance No. 768 (2011) which amended Cherokee Code Chapter 18B. This notice is published in...

  15. Compensatory Education: Chapter 1's Comparability of Services Provision. United States General Accounting Office Report to the Secretary of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    Chapter 1 was created from its predecessor, Title 1, in order to give more flexibility to states and local school districts. Many of the requirements and criteria of Title 1 were relaxed in 1981 when Chapter 1 began. Districts are now required to submit written plans of their new Chapter 1 organization assuring the comparability of services…

  16. Advances in methodology and current prospects for primary drug therapies for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Knopman, D S

    2000-01-01

    There has been gratifying progress in the development of drugs for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Even though the current generation of medications, the cholinesterase inhibitors (CEIs), has produced only modest benefits, our concept of an "effective" therapy has matured considerably over this time. A less visible but equally important advance has been a quantum leap in expertise in clinical trial methodology. This chapter reviews the methodological underpinnings of clinical trials in AD: patient selection issues, key design issues, and an overview of currently available agents and the prospects for drugs of the future.

  17. [Business prospects in eastern Indonesia].

    PubMed

    Hatmadji, S H; Kiting, A S; Anwar, E N

    1993-06-01

    "This paper shows the demographic prospect of population in the Eastern part of Indonesia, especially in four provinces: Bali, East Kalimantan, South Sulawesi and South East Sulawesi." The focus is on the sociodemographic characteristics of consumers in the region, and the implications for commerce. (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  18. Scientific knowledge and modern prospecting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuerburg, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Modern prospecting is the systematic search for specified and generally ill-exposed components of the Earth's crust known as ore. This prospecting depends entirely on reliable, or scientific knowledge for guidance and for recognition of the search objects. Improvement in prospecting results from additions and refinements to scientific knowledge. Scientific knowledge is an ordered distillation of observations too numerous and too complex in themselves for easy understanding and for effective management. The ordering of these observations is accomplished by an evolutionary hierarchy of abstractions. These abstractions employ simplified descriptions consisting of characterization by selected properties, sampling to represent much larger parts of a phenomenon, generalized mappings of patterns of geometrical and numerical relations among properties, and explanation (theory) of these patterns as functional relations among the selected properties. Each abstraction is predicated on the mode of abstraction anticipated for the next higher level, so that research is a deductive process in which the highest level, theory, is indispensible for the growth and refinement of scientific knowledge, and therefore of prospecting methodology. ?? 1985 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Job Prospects for Marine Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1986-01-01

    Marine engineering is one of the smaller disciplines that have grown during recent decades. Job prospects in this field, salaries, types of employers (particularly Navy shipbuilding and infrastructure work), and marine/ocean engineers involvement with environmental issues are discussed. (JN)

  20. Job Prospects for Civil Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    Government programs and renewed industrial activity have combined with stable enrollments to create bright job prospects for civil engineers. Areas with good opportunities include highway reconstruction and rehabilitation, water-resource management, and new factory construction. The subspecialty of structural engineering has a growing need in…

  1. Job Prospects for Metallurgical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    Job prospects in mining, metal-extraction, steel, and refining industries are depressed, but technological discoveries are opening up new fields for metallurgical engineers. Enrollment/employment opportunities and salaries in these areas are discussed a well as the roles of foreign competition, plastics applications, and ceramics research and…

  2. Job Prospects for Aerospace Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the recent trends in job opportunities for aerospace engineers. Mentions some of the political, technological, and economic factors affecting the overall employment picture. Includes a description of the job prospects created by the general upswing of the large commercial aircraft market. (TW)

  3. UV and Optical Detectors: Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, Bruce; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    UV and visible detectors - status and prospects. The status and prospects for UV and visible detectors for space astrophysics missions will be described, based on the findings of the NASA working group roadmap report, hopefully updated.

  4. Surface water quality in streams and rivers: introduction, scaling, and climate change: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loperfido, John

    2013-01-01

    A variety of competing and complementary needs such as ecological health, human consumption, transportation, recreation, and economic value make management and protection of water resources in riverine environments essential. Thus, an understanding of the complex and interacting factors that dictate riverine water quality is essential in empowering stake-holders to make informed management decisions (see Chapter 1.15 for additional information on water resource management). Driven by natural and anthropogenic forcing factors, a variety of chemical, physical, and biological processes dictate riverine water quality, resulting in temporal and spatial patterns and cycling (see Chapter 1.2 for information describing how global change interacts with water resources). Furthermore, changes in climatic forcing factors may lead to long-term deviations in water quality outside the envelope of historical data. The goal of this chapter is to present fundamental concepts dictating the conditions of basic water quality parameters in rivers and streams (herein generally referred to as rivers unless discussing a specific system) in the context of temporal (diel (24 h) to decadal) longitudinal scaling. Understanding water quality scaling in rivers is imperative as water is continually reused and recycled (see also Chapters 3.1 and 3.15); upstream discharges from anthropogenic sources are incorporated into bulk riverine water quality that is used by downstream consumers. Water quality parameters reviewed here include temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), and suspended sediment and were selected given the abundance of data available for these parameters due to recent advances in water quality sensor technology (see Chapter 4.13 for use of hydrologic data in watershed management). General equations describing reactions affecting water temperature, pH, DO, and suspended sediment are included to convey the complexity of how simultaneously occurring reactions can affect water quality

  5. Porphyry copper assessment of northeast Asia: Far East Russia and northeasternmost China: Chapter W in Global mineral resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mihalasky, Mark J.; Ludington, Stephen; Alexeiev, Dmitriy V.; Frost, Thomas P.; Light, Thomas D.; Briggs, Deborah A.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Wallis, John C.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Panteleyev, Andre

    2015-01-01

    The database of known deposits, significant prospects, and prospects includes an inventory of mineral resources in two known porphyry copper deposits, as well as key characteristics derived from available exploration reports for 70 significant porphyry copper prospects and 86 other prospects. Resource and exploration and development activity are updated with information current through February 2013.

  6. Prospective errors determine motor learning

    PubMed Central

    Takiyama, Ken; Hirashima, Masaya; Nozaki, Daichi

    2015-01-01

    Diverse features of motor learning have been reported by numerous studies, but no single theoretical framework concurrently accounts for these features. Here, we propose a model for motor learning to explain these features in a unified way by extending a motor primitive framework. The model assumes that the recruitment pattern of motor primitives is determined by the predicted movement error of an upcoming movement (prospective error). To validate this idea, we perform a behavioural experiment to examine the model’s novel prediction: after experiencing an environment in which the movement error is more easily predictable, subsequent motor learning should become faster. The experimental results support our prediction, suggesting that the prospective error might be encoded in the motor primitives. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this model has a strong explanatory power to reproduce a wide variety of motor-learning-related phenomena that have been separately explained by different computational models. PMID:25635628

  7. Prospects for nuclear safety research

    SciTech Connect

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-04-01

    This document is the text of a paper presented by Eric S. Beckjord (Director, Nuclear Regulatory Research/NRC) at the 22nd Water Reactor Safety Meeting in Bethesda, MD in October 1994. The following topics are briefly reviewed: (1) Reactor vessel research, (2) Probabilistic risk assessment, (3) Direct containment heating, (4) Advanced LWR research, (5) Nuclear energy prospects in the US, and (6) Future nuclear safety research. Subtopics within the last category include economics, waste disposal, and health and safety.

  8. Prospects for de-automatization.

    PubMed

    Kihlstrom, John F

    2011-06-01

    Research by Raz and his associates has repeatedly found that suggestions for hypnotic agnosia, administered to highly hypnotizable subjects, reduce or even eliminate Stroop interference. The present paper sought unsuccessfully to extend these findings to negative priming in the Stroop task. Nevertheless, the reduction of Stroop interference has broad theoretical implications, both for our understanding of automaticity and for the prospect of de-automatizing cognition in meditation and other altered states of consciousness.

  9. Packaging and transportation manual. Chapter on the packaging and transportation of hazardous and radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to outline the requirements that Los Alamos National Laboratory employees and contractors must follow when they package and ship hazardous and radioactive waste. This chapter is applied to on-site, intra-Laboratory, and off-site transportation of hazardous and radioactive waste. The chapter contains sections on definitions, responsibilities, written procedures, authorized packaging, quality assurance, documentation for waste shipments, loading and tiedown of waste shipments, on-site routing, packaging and transportation assessment and oversight program, nonconformance reporting, training of personnel, emergency response information, and incident and occurrence reporting. Appendices provide additional detail, references, and guidance on packaging for hazardous and radioactive waste, and guidance for the on-site transport of these wastes.

  10. Prospective memory across the lifespan: investigating the contribution of retrospective and prospective processes.

    PubMed

    Mattli, Florentina; Schnitzspahn, Katharina M; Studerus-Germann, Aline; Brehmer, Yvonne; Zöllig, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Prospective memory performance follows an inverted U-shaped function across the lifespan. Findings on the relative contribution of purely prospective memory and retrospective memory processes within prospective memory to this trajectory are scarce and inconclusive. We analyzed age-related differences in prospective memory performance across the lifespan in a cross-sectional design including six age groups (N = 99, 7-83 years) and investigated possible mechanisms by experimentally disentangling the relative contributions of retrospective memory and purely prospective memory processes. Results confirmed the inverted U-shaped function of prospective memory performance across the lifespan. A significant interaction between process type and age group was observed indicating differential relative contributions of retrospective memory and purely prospective memory processes on the development of prospective memory performance. Our results showed that mainly the pure prospective memory processes within prospective memory lead to lower prospective memory performance in young children and old adults. Moreover, the relative contributions of the retrospective memory and purely prospective memory processes are not uniform at both ends of the lifespan, i.e., in later adulthood the purely prospective memory processes seem to determine performance to an even greater extent than in childhood. Nevertheless, age effects were also observed in the retrospective component which thus contributed to the prospective memory performance differences between the age groups.

  11. Microbial air-sampling equipment, part 1: meeting United States pharmacopeia chapter 797 standards.

    PubMed

    Kastango, Eric S

    2008-01-01

    The most recent changes to Chapter 797 of the United States Pharmcopeia-National Formulary initiated an intense controversy about the frequency of cleanroom air sampling that is required to prevent the contamination of sterile preparations. For compounders who must purchase an air sampler to use in the cleanroom, choices abound. Included in this article are a review of United States Pharmacopeia-National Formulary requirements that pertain to air sampling, a discussion of how recent revision to Chapter 797 affect air sampling and patient safety, and, for easy reference, a table that features specifications for various models of microbial air samplers.

  12. Environmental implementation plan: Chapter 5, Chemical management, pollution prevention and other compliance programs. Draft revision

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, G.L.

    1993-11-18

    Compliance with environmental regulations and US Department of Energy Orders (DOE) relating to environmental protection is an important part of SRS`s program. Over the past few years, the number of environmental regulations has increased. The strategy to comply with new and existing environmental regulations and DOE orders is described in chapter two. In this chapter, the following environmental programs are described: Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA); Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA); and SPCC/BMP/Pollution Prevention Plans;The implementation section identifies issues and those responsible to achieve defined objectives.

  13. Building global partnerships in infection prevention: a report from APIC Badger and the Nairobi Infection Control Nurses Chapter.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Linda; Auel, Candace; Bahr, Melody; Hutchings, Anna; Leary, Maria; Moskal, Nancy; Ngugi, Rose; Reppen, Melanie; Rosemeyer, Sally

    2013-03-01

    An international partnership between Wisconsin and Kenya was established after a serendipitous meeting with a newly formed infection control organization in Nairobi, Kenya, the Nairobi Infection Control Nurses Chapter (NICNC). Establishment of a sister chapter partnership between a Wisconsin Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology chapter (APIC Badger) and the NICNC provided an opportunity to share resources. Although there are many barriers to developing infection prevention and control programs in Kenya, some needs can be met through such partnerships.

  14. Coal competition: prospects for the 1980s

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    This report consists of 10 chapters which present an historical overview of coal and the part it has played as an energy source in the economic growth of the United States from prior to World War II through 1978. Chapter titles are: definition of coals, coal mining; types of coal mines; mining methods; mining work force; development of coal; mine ownership; production; consumption; prices; exports; and imports. (DMC)

  15. Prospective Memory in Parkinson Disease During a Virtual Week: Effects of Both Prospective and Retrospective Demands

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Erin R.; Rose, Nathan S.; McDaniel, Mark A.; Rendell, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the effect of Parkinson disease (PD) on event-based prospective memory tasks with varying demand on (1) the amount of strategic attentional monitoring required for intention retrieval (prospective component) and (2) the retrospective memory processes required to remember the contents of the intention or the entire constellation of prospective memory tasks. Method Twenty-four older adults with PD and 28 healthy older adults performed the computerized Virtual Week task, a multi-intention prospective memory paradigm that simulates everyday prospective memory tasks. The Virtual Week included regular (low retrospective memory demand) and irregular (high retrospective memory demand) prospective memory tasks with cues that were focal (low strategic monitoring demand) or less focal (high strategic monitoring demand) to the ongoing activity. Results For the regular prospective memory tasks, PD participants were impaired when the prospective memory cues were less focal. For the irregular prospective memory tasks, PD participants were impaired regardless of prospective memory cue type. PD participants also had impaired retrospective memory for irregular tasks, which was associated with worse prospective memory for these tasks during the Virtual Week. Conclusions When retrospective memory demands are minimized, prospective memory in PD can be supported by cues that reduce the executive control demands of intention retrieval. However, PD-related deficits in self-initiated encoding or planning processes have strong negative effects on the performance of prospective memory tasks with increased retrospective memory demand. PMID:23527645

  16. Prospective memory in thalamic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Carlesimo, G A; Costa, A; Serra, L; Bozzali, M; Fadda, L; Caltagirone, C

    2011-07-01

    The contribution of the thalamus to the functioning of prospective memory (PM) is currently unknown. Here we report an experimental investigation of the performance of two patients with bilateral infarcts in the anterior-mesial regions of the thalami on an event-based PM paradigm. One patient, G.P., had a pervasive declarative memory impairment but no significant executive deficit. The other patient, R.F., had a memory deficit limited to verbal material with associated behavioral abnormalities (inertia and apathy); she performed poorly on tests of executive functions. Although both patients performed poorly on the PM task, a qualitative analysis of performance revealed different mechanisms at the base of their impaired PM. G.P. had reduced declarative memory for target words compared with normal controls; but, unforgotten words were normally able to elicit his recall of the prospective intention. Conversely, R.F.'s declarative memory for target words was as accurate as that of normal controls, but she presented a dramatically reduced ratio between the number of target words she recalled and the number of times she activated the prospective intention on the PM task, suggesting that her deficit consisted of difficulty in activating the intention despite normal declarative memory for the target events. In conclusion, results of the present study demonstrate that thalamic structures have an important role in PM processes. They also document that damage to the anterior-mesial regions of the thalami affects PM abilities by two different mechanisms, respectively based on the relative disruption of declarative memory or executive processes functioning, which, in turn, is related to the specific intrathalamic structures involved by the lesions. Indeed, while G.P.'s pervasive declarative memory deficit was underlain by bilateral involvement of the mammillo-thalamic tract, R.F.'s executive and behavioral abnormalities were likely related to bilateral damage of the midline

  17. Trichomoniasis and Lactoferrin: Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Rakesh; Goyal, Kapil; Sehgal, Alka

    2012-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a parasitic protozoan which infects the urogenital tract and requires iron as an essential nutrient. Iron is known to upregulate various adhesins required for cytoadherance and other factors involved in pathogenesis. At mucosal surfaces, iron is chelated by lactoferrin resulting in low levels of free iron. However, pathogens have evolved mechanisms for an increased uptake of iron. The present review highlights the role of iron in survival of Trichomonas during fluctuating concentrations of iron at mucosal surfaces during the menstrual cycle. Future prospects in terms of new drug and vaccine targets related to iron and its receptors have also been described. PMID:22988421

  18. Atmospheric neutrinos: Status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Sandhya

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of the current status of neutrino oscillation studies at atmospheric neutrino experiments. While the current data gives some tantalising hints regarding the neutrino mass hierarchy, octant of θ23 and δCP, the hints are not statistically significant. We summarise the sensitivity to these sub-dominant three-generation effects from the next-generation proposed atmospheric neutrino experiments. We next present the prospects of new physics searches such as non-standard interactions, sterile neutrinos and CPT violation studies at these experiments.

  19. Contextual Effects of Prekindergarten Classrooms for Disadvantaged Children on Cognitive Development: The Case of Chapter 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Valerie E.; Loeb, Susanna; Lubeck, Sally

    1998-01-01

    Used hierarchical linear modeling to explore the effects of the social context of Chapter 1 prekindergarten classrooms on 4-year-olds' learning. Found that children made smaller gains on the Preschool Inventory over the preschool year in classrooms with higher concentrations of minorities, children with special needs, recent immigrants, and…

  20. Chapter 2. General theoretical perspectives of narrative analysis of substance use-related dependency.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Sam; Lilja, John; von Braun, Therese; Sjöblom, Yvonne

    2013-11-01

    This chapter provides a short introduction to, and an overview for, using narrative analysis in the understanding of the use and misuse of alcohol and drugs. Important theoretical and methodological dimensions are discussed. Some tentative conclusions, limitations, and unresolved critical issues concerning the use of narrative research methods in the analysis of substance use-related dependency problems are also presented.

  1. Parents and Instruction. The Clipboard Connection. Chapter I Resource Center Curriculum and Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advanced Technology, Inc., Indianapolis, IN.

    The "Clipboard Connection" is a methodology to facilitate the rapid circulation of relevant pre-existing materials from Chapter 1 Technical Assistance Centers (TACs) to their clients, teachers of educationally disadvantaged children in resource centers. Each "Clipboard Connection" consists of a lead sheet summarizing the contents of the materials…

  2. Adult Education--Adequacy of Provision. Chapter 7. The Part-Time Tutor Sample Examined

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Educ (London), 1970

    1970-01-01

    Part of the report of the survey by the National Institute of Adult Education (England and Wales), this chapter provides information gathered from questionnaires distributed to the tutors of classes in the areas from which the student sample was drawn. (NL)

  3. Adult Education--Adequacy of Provision. Chapter 6. Views from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Educ (London), 1970

    1970-01-01

    Part of the report of the survey conducted by the National Institute of Adult Education (England and Wales), this chapter gives information gathered from personal discussions with administrative officers, organizers, and principals working full- or part-time in adult education. (NL)

  4. 48 CFR Appendix A to Chapter 2 - Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Contract Appeals Pt. Part 1—Charter Part 2—Rules Authority: 41 U.S.C. 421 and 48 CFR chapter 1. Armed... (Research, Development & Acquisition). (signed) Sue C. Peyton, Assistant Secretary of the Air Force..., Admission of Facts, and Production and Inspection of Documents Rule 16Service of Papers Other than...

  5. 48 CFR Appendix A to Chapter 2 - Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Contract Appeals Pt. Part 1—Charter Part 2—Rules Authority: 41 U.S.C. 421 and 48 CFR chapter 1. Armed... Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development & Acquisition). (signed) Sue C. Peyton, Assistant Secretary of..., Admission of Facts, and Production and Inspection of Documents Rule 16Service of Papers Other than...

  6. 14 CFR 36.105 - Flight Manual Statement of Chapter 4 equivalency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... equivalency. 36.105 Section 36.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Transport Category Large Airplanes and Jet Airplanes § 36.105 Flight Manual Statement of Chapter 4 equivalency. For each...

  7. Chapter 24: the coming of molecular biology and its impact on clinical neurology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher U M

    2010-01-01

    Although the chemical study of the nervous system dates back well into the 19th century, molecular biology and especially molecular neurobiology only began to be established in the second half of the 20th century. This chapter reviews their impact on clinical neuroscience during the 50 years since Watson and Crick published their seminal paper. After a short review of the part played by F.O. Schmitt in establishing molecular neuroscience the chapter outlines work that led to a detailed understanding of the biochemical structure and function of nerve cell membranes and their embedded channel proteins, receptors, and other molecules. The chapter then turns to the numerous pathologies that result from disorders of these elements: the various channel and gap-junction pathologies. The chapter continues with a discussion of some of the diseases caused by defective DNA, especially the trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases (TREDs) and ends with a short account of the development of molecular approaches to prion diseases, myasthenia gravis, and the neurodegenerative diseases of old age. Francis Bacon said long ago that "knowledge is power." The hope is that increasing molecular knowledge will help cure some of the human suffering seen in the neurological ward and clinic. PMID:19892127

  8. Chapter 6: Ecotoxicology, Environmental Risk Assessment & Potential Impact on Human Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter examines potential risks posed by pharmaceuticals present in the aquatic environment to humans and aquatic life. We begin by describing the mechanisms by which pharmaceuticals enter the vertebrate body, produce effects and leave the body. Then we describe theoretical...

  9. Family and Consumer Sciences: A Chapter of the "Curriculum Handbook." A Resource for Curriculum Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, John, Ed.

    This chapter, of the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development's Curriculum Handbook, contains nine papers covering curriculum guidelines for family and consumer science education (FCSE). The following are included: "Executive Summary" (Sharon S. Redick); "Status of Family and Consumer Sciences Curriculum" (Ann Vail); "Initiatives,…

  10. Products Available. The Clipboard Connection. Chapter I Resource Center Curriculum and Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advanced Technology, Inc., Indianapolis, IN.

    The "Clipboard Connection" is a methodology to facilitate the rapid circulation of relevant pre-existing materials from Chapter 1 Technical Assistance Centers (TACs) to their clients, teachers of educationally disadvantaged children in resource centers. Each "Clipboard Connection" consists of a lead sheet summarizing the contents of the materials…

  11. Mathematics Problem Solving: A More Advanced Skill for Chapter 1. Workshop Leader's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advanced Technology, Inc., Indianapolis, IN.

    This guide is designed to assist inservice providers in conducting successful workshops for teachers, administrators, and others associated with Chapter 1 mathematics programs. It contains step-by-step procedures for preparing, organizing, and presenting the workshop. Included in this guide are: (1) an advanced planner, which includes a detailed…

  12. The Reading Writing Connection. The Clipboard Connection. Chapter I Resource Center Curriculum and Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advanced Technology, Inc., Indianapolis, IN.

    The "Clipboard Connection" is a methodology to facilitate the rapid circulation of relevant pre-existing materials from Chapter 1 Technical Assistance Centers (TACs) to their clients, teachers of educationally disadvantaged children in resource centers. Each "Clipboard Connection" consists of a lead sheet summarizing the contents of the materials…

  13. 38 CFR 21.9645 - Refund of basic contribution to chapter 30.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Refund of basic contribution to chapter 30. 21.9645 Section 21.9645 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill...

  14. 38 CFR 21.9645 - Refund of basic contribution to chapter 30.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Refund of basic contribution to chapter 30. 21.9645 Section 21.9645 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill...

  15. 38 CFR 21.9645 - Refund of basic contribution to chapter 30.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Refund of basic contribution to chapter 30. 21.9645 Section 21.9645 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill...

  16. 38 CFR 21.9645 - Refund of basic contribution to chapter 30.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Refund of basic contribution to chapter 30. 21.9645 Section 21.9645 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill...

  17. Shaking It up: How to Run the Best Club and Chapter Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Alumni clubs and chapters are powerful tools for keeping alumni connected to each other and the institution, gathering insight into what alumni want from their alma mater, and even raising money for the institution. And while alumni leaders do not need to devote a large amount of their budget to create successful groups, they do need to ensure…

  18. Rid-A-Him or: Why Are So Many Boys Given Drugs in School? Chapter 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercogliano, Chris

    1998-01-01

    A chapter of a serialized book refutes the contention that attention-deficit disorder (ADD) is a genetically caused neurological disorder. It argues that ADD arises from the accumulation of risk factors in a child's life, such as poverty, father absence, environmental degradation, demise of extended families, and dysfunctional childrearing, which…

  19. 48 CFR Appendix A to Chapter 2 - Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Contract Appeals Pt. Part 1—Charter Part 2—Rules Authority: 41 U.S.C. 421 and 48 CFR chapter 1. Armed...-7109, or its Charter, 48 CFR Chap. 2, App. A, Pt. 1, relative to a contract made by the Department of... deciding motions for summary judgment, the Board looks to Rule 56 of the Federal Rules of Civil...

  20. Federal, State, and Local Collaboration for Effective Schools: Chapter 2 "20%" Innovative Projects of Statewide Significance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plato, Kathleen C.

    Chapter 2 of the Elementary and Secondary School Improvement Amendments directs that at least 80% of funds targeted under the law be delivered to school districts, while up to 20% may be reserved for statewide use. In 1989, the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction in Olympia (Washington) redirected this 20% to support a competitive…

  1. A Two-Year Report on the Experimental Freshman Year Program. Chapter IV, Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibler, Robert J., Ed.

    Chapter IV describes the interim findings of an experimental program for underachieving high school graduates during their freshman year at Southern Illinois University. The statistically analyzed data are presented and discussed under four headings--(1) Subjects' occupation or whereabouts in the year following their participation in the program,…

  2. A Two-Year Report on the Experimental Freshman Year Program. Chapter III, Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibler, Robert J., Ed.

    This chapter outlines the procedures followed in an experimental program for low-achievers during their freshman year at Southern Illinois University. Specifically described are the experimental design, selection of subjects, and the treatment according to the experimental, control, and norm groups. In addition, the sample group is described in…

  3. Synthesis Gas Demonstration Plant, Baskett, Kentucky: environmental report. [Contains chapter 4 and appendix 4A

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    This volume contains chapter 4 and Appendix 4A which include descriptions of use of adjacent land and water (within miles of the proposed site), baseline ecology, air quality, meteorology, noise, hydrology, water quality, geology, soils and socio-economic factors. Appendix 4A includes detailed ecological surveys made in the area including the methods used. (LTN)

  4. Schooling for the Future in Asia-Pacific Societies: Six Cases, Chapter 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogan, John J.; Kennedy, Kerry J.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter overviews the schooling for the future (SFF) study in its entirety including both the survey, Phase 1, and the interviews, Phase 2. It develops the historical background of how this SFF study grew out of and interfaces with the larger OECD/CERI schooling for tomorrow (SFT) project directed from Paris. Further, it details how the six…

  5. Teaching Ideas. The Clipboard Connection. Chapter I Resource Center Curriculum and Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advanced Technology, Inc., Indianapolis, IN.

    The "Clipboard Connection" is a methodology to facilitate the rapid circulation of relevant pre-existing materials from Chapter 1 Technical Assistance Centers (TACs) to their clients, teachers of educationally disadvantaged children in resource centers. Each "Clipboard Connection" consists of a lead sheet summarizing the contents of the materials…

  6. Ethical & Legal Issues in School Counseling. Chapter 4: The School Counselor and Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camblin, Lanthan D., Jr.; And Others

    This document contains chapter 4 (7 articles) of a collection of 35 articles primarily from American Association for Counseling and Development (AACD) publications on the most important legal and ethical topics about which all school counselors need to be informed. "School Counselors and the Reporting of Child Abuse: A Survey of State Laws and…

  7. 169. 1932 MT. VERNON CHAPTER, N.S.D.A.R. MEMORIAL PLAQUE FOR VIRGINIA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    169. 1932 MT. VERNON CHAPTER, N.S.D.A.R. MEMORIAL PLAQUE FOR VIRGINIA PRESIDENTS AT BELLE HAVEN PICNIC AREA. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  8. Evaluation of the 1985-86 ECIA, Chapter II Teaching Geographic Skills Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Donald R.

    This Education Consolidation and Improvement Act (ECIA), Chapter II project combined acquisition of instructional equipment with teacher training to improve the geographic skills of students in grades six through eight in the Dade County Public Schools, Florida. Map and globe materials from three different publishers (the George F. Cram Company,…

  9. E.C.I.A. Chapter 1 Reading and Math with Athletics. Summer 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ronald C.; And Others

    During Summer 1986, the Division of Special Education of the New York City Board of Education operated a Chapter 1 Summer Program, Reading and Math with Athletics, which served a total of 1,625 students at 13 sites for six weeks. Students received morning instruction: one period per day each in reading, mathematics, and in athletic and…

  10. Chapter One in Ohio: Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. 23rd Annual Evaluation Report, Fiscal 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

    This annual report summarizes recent activities provided in Ohio through Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. Information presented includes statistics for fiscal 1988, including the 1987-88 school year and the following summer, participation trends, instructional impact, expenditure and staffing patterns, parent…

  11. Chapter One in Ohio: Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. 21st Annual Evaluation Report, Fiscal 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Eileen, Ed.

    Recent activities provided in Ohio through Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act and its predecessor, Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act are summarized in this annual report. Specific information contained in the report includes statistics for fiscal 1986 (the 1985-86 school year and the summer that…

  12. The Distributive and Educational Consequences of Chapter 2 Block Grants in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuriloff, Peter J.

    1985-01-01

    Explores the association of district enrollment, minority enrollment, wealth, poverty level, fiscal capacity, and tax effort with changes in the distribution of Pennsylvania's federal aid due to implementation of Chapter 2 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. Examines the law's effect on paperwork, local control, and encouragement…

  13. Evaluation of the Fiscal 1989 Education Consolidation and Improvement Act (ECIA) Chapter 1 Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrough, Ted D.

    This report evaluates the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act (ECIA) Chapter 1 program in the Chicago (Illinois) Public Schools for 1988-89. The purpose of the program was to serve the most educationally needy students residing in eligible school attendance areas through supplementary and categorical activities. Services were scheduled in…

  14. Chapter One in Ohio: Education Consolidation and Improvement Act, 19th Annual Evaluation Report, Fiscal 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

    The nineteenth annual summary of activities provided through Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act and its Title I predecessor, this report includes statistics for fiscal 1984, participation trends, instructional impact, expenditure and staffing patterns, parent involvement, and five-year trends. After a brief discussion of…

  15. State Guidelines for Implementation of Chapter 1, Public Law 97-35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    The purpose of these guidelines is to provide Florida's school districts with some procedures for developing projects and programs that will meet the letter and intent of Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act of 1981. This document addresses: (1) allowable costs; (2) personnel; (3) fiscal requirements that apply to all…

  16. Chapter 1 Reading and Mathematics Achievement: 1987-1988. Report No. 8902.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidoff, Stephen H.

    The major purpose of this inquiry was to examine the impact of Chapter 1 services upon student achievement in reading and mathematics in the Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) School District during the 1987-88 school year. The program affects 162 schools and more than 50,000 children by providing services to those having the lowest academic achievement…

  17. 48 CFR Appendix F to Chapter 2 - Material Inspection and Receiving Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... 1303 and 48 CFR chapter 1. Part 1—Introduction F-101General. (a) This appendix contains procedures and... the drop-down box. (B) In the description field, if required by the contract for control purposes... Government representative must:— (1) Place an “X” in the appropriate CQA and/or acceptance box(es) to...

  18. Chapter I Evaluation Report for the Language Enrichment Communicative Skills Project 1983-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaughter, Helen B.; Haussler, Myna

    The Chapter 1 Language Enrichment Communicative Skills Project served students in eleven Tucson Arizona elementary schools in the primary grades during the 1983-84 school year. The project provided supplementary instruction in oral language interaction and developmental reading and writing in small groups. Students were selected on the basis of…

  19. Future Farmers of America--A Profile of Chapters and Advisors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Howard R. D.

    A study was conducted to collect information related to Future Farmers of America (FFA) advisors, chapters, and school characteristics. Specific objectives were to determine FFA activities influenced by the advisor's experience, and to identify factors perceived as contributing to the preparation of teachers for the role of advisor and to the…

  20. Cognitive Socialization and Competence: The Academic Development of Chicanos. Chapter 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laosa, Luis M.; Henderson, Ronald W.

    This chapter focuses on the innermost level of Bronfenbrenner's four-level conception of the human environmental ecology, namely the microsystem, and more specifically, the child's socialization in the family. Following discussion of concepts related to socialization, competence, and environmental ecology, selected research studies are reviewed to…